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Sample records for plasma coating formation

  1. Nanoscale Plasma Coating Inhibits Formation of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuanxi; Jones, John E.; Yu, Haiqing; Yu, Qingsong; Christensen, Gordon D.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus commonly infects medical implants or devices, with devastating consequences for the patient. The infection begins with bacterial attachment to the device, followed by bacterial multiplication over the surface of the device, generating an adherent sheet of bacteria known as a biofilm. Biofilms resist antimicrobial therapy and promote persistent infection, making management difficult to futile. Infections might be prevented by engineering the surface of the device to discourage bacterial attachment and multiplication; however, progress in this area has been limited. We have developed a novel nanoscale plasma coating technology to inhibit the formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. We used monomeric trimethylsilane (TMS) and oxygen to coat the surfaces of silicone rubber, a material often used in the fabrication of implantable medical devices. By quantitative and qualitative analysis, the TMS/O2 coating significantly decreased the in vitro formation of S. aureus biofilms; it also significantly decreased in vivo biofilm formation in a mouse model of foreign-body infection. Further analysis demonstrated TMS/O2 coating significantly changed the protein adsorption, which could lead to reduced bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. These results suggest that TMS/O2 coating can be used to effectively prevent medical implant-related infections. PMID:26369955

  2. Characterizing Suspension Plasma Spray Coating Formation Dynamics through Curvature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidambaram Seshadri, Ramachandran; Dwivedi, Gopal; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-12-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) enables the production of variety of microstructures with unique mechanical and thermal properties. In SPS, a liquid carrier (ethanol/water) is used to transport the sub-micrometric feedstock into the plasma jet. Considering complex deposition dynamics of SPS technique, there is a need to better understand the relationships among spray conditions, ensuing particle behavior, deposition stress evolution and resultant properties. In this study, submicron yttria-stabilized zirconia particles suspended in ethanol were sprayed using a cascaded arc plasma torch. The stresses generated during the deposition of the layers (termed evolving stress) were monitored via the change in curvature of the substrate measured using an in situ measurement apparatus. Depending on the deposition conditions, coating microstructures ranged from feathery porous to dense/cracked deposits. The evolving stresses and modulus were correlated with the observed microstructures and visualized via process maps. Post-deposition bi-layer curvature measurement via low temperature thermal cycling was carried out to quantify the thermo-elastic response of different coatings. Lastly, preliminary data on furnace cycle durability of different coating microstructures were evaluated. This integrated study involving in situ diagnostics and ex situ characterization along with process maps provides a framework to describe coating formation mechanisms, process parametrics and microstructure description.

  3. Peculiarities of the structure formation of nanoscale coatings from the vacuum arc discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrin, D. K.; Pikus, M. I.; Smirnov, E. A.; Lisenkov, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper features of the structure formation of nanoscale coatings (TiN)–(AlN)– (Ti–Al–N) in the vacuum arc discharge plasma are considered. The composition and structure of the formed nanoscale coatings are studied. The main factors influencing the quality of the formed coatings are shown.

  4. Column formation in suspension plasma-sprayed coatings and resultant thermal properties.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Every, K.; Krane, M. J. M.; Trice, R. W.; Wang, H.; Porter, W.; Besser, M.; Sordelet, D.; Ilavsky, J.; Almer, J.

    2011-06-01

    The suspension plasma spray (SPS) process was used to produce coatings from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders with median diameters of 15 {micro}m and 80 nm. The powder-ethanol suspensions made with 15-{micro}m diameter YSZ particles formed coatings with microstructures typical of the air plasma spray (APS) process, while suspensions made with 80-nm diameter YSZ powder yielded a coarse columnar microstructure not observed in APS coatings. To explain the formation mechanisms of these different microstructures, a hypothesis is presented which relates the dependence of YSZ droplet flight paths on droplet diameter to variations in deposition behavior. The thermal conductivity (k th) of columnar SPS coatings was measured as a function of temperature in the as-sprayed condition and after a 50 h, 1200 C heat treatment. Coatings produced from suspensions containing 80 nm YSZ particles at powder concentrations of 2, 8, and 11 wt.% exhibited significantly different k th values. These differences are connected to microstructural variations between the SPS coatings produced by the three suspension formulations. Heat treatment increased the k th of the coatings generated from suspensions containing 2 and 11 wt.% of 80 nm YSZ powder, but this k th increase was less than has been observed in APS coatings.

  5. Column Formation in Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Coatings and Resultant Thermal Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Van Every, Kent; Krane, Matthew; Trice, Rodney; Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Besser, Matthew; Sordelet, Daniel; Ilavsky, Dr. Jan; Almer, Jon

    2011-01-01

    The suspension plasma spray (SPS) process was used to produce coatings from yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders with median diameters of 15 {micro}m and 80 nm. The powder-ethanol suspensions made with 15-{micro}m diameter YSZ particles formed coatings with microstructures typical of the air plasma spray (APS) process, while suspensions made with 80-nm diameter YSZ powder yielded a coarse columnar microstructure not observed in APS coatings. To explain the formation mechanisms of these different microstructures, a hypothesis is presented which relates the dependence of YSZ droplet flight paths on droplet diameter to variations in deposition behavior. The thermal conductivity (k th) of columnar SPS coatings was measured as a function of temperature in the as-sprayed condition and after a 50 h, 1200 C heat treatment. Coatings produced from suspensions containing 80 nm YSZ particles at powder concentrations of 2, 8, and 11 wt.% exhibited significantly different k th values. These differences are connected to microstructural variations between the SPS coatings produced by the three suspension formulations. Heat treatment increased the k th of the coatings generated from suspensions containing 2 and 11 wt.% of 80 nm YSZ powder, but this k th increase was less than has been observed in APS coatings.

  6. Formation of a Spinel Coating on AZ31 Magnesium Alloy by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieber, Maximilian; Simchen, Frank; Scharf, Ingolf; Lampke, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is a common means for the surface modification of light metals. However, PEO of magnesium substrates in dilute electrolytes generally leads to the formation of coatings consisting of unfavorable MgO magnesium oxide. By incorporation of electrolyte components, the phase constitution of the oxide coatings can be modified. Coatings consisting exclusively of MgAl2O4 magnesium-aluminum spinel are produced by PEO in an electrolyte containing hydroxide, aluminate, and phosphate anions. The hardness of the coatings is 3.5 GPa on Martens scale on average. Compared to the bare substrate, the coatings reduce the corrosion current density in dilute sodium chloride solution by approx. one order of magnitude and slightly shift the corrosion potential toward more noble values.

  7. Latest Researches Advances of Plasma Spraying: From Splat to Coating Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchais, P.; Vardelle, M.; Goutier, S.

    2016-12-01

    The plasma spray process with solid feedstock, mainly ceramics powders, studied since the sixties is now a mature technology. The plasma jet and particle in-flight characterizations are now well established. The use of computer-aided robot trajectory allows spraying on industrial parts with complex geometries. Works about splat formation have shown the importance of: the substrate preheating over the transition temperature to get rid of adsorbates and condensates, substrate chemistry, crystal structure and substrate temperature during the whole coating process. These studies showed that coating properties strongly depend on the splat formation and layering. The first part of this work deals with a summary of conventional plasma spraying key points. The second part presents the current knowledge in plasma spraying with liquid feedstock, technology developed for about two decades with suspensions of particles below micrometers or solutions of precursors that form particles a few micrometers sized through precipitation. Coatings are finely structured and even nanostructured with properties arousing the interest of researchers. However, the technology is by far more complex than the conventional ones. The main conclusions are that models should be developed further, plasma torches and injection setups adapted, and new measuring techniques to reliably characterize these small particles must be designed.

  8. Formation of high heat resistant coatings by using gas tunnel type plasma spraying.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, A; Ando, Y; Kurokawa, K

    2012-06-01

    Zirconia sprayed coatings are widely used as thermal barrier coatings (TBC) for high temperature protection of metallic structures. However, their use in diesel engine combustion chamber components has the long run durability problems, such as the spallation at the interface between the coating and substrate due to the interface oxidation. Although zirconia coatings have been used in many applications, the interface spallation problem is still waiting to be solved under the critical conditions such as high temperature and high corrosion environment. The gas tunnel type plasma spraying developed by the author can make high quality ceramic coatings such as Al2O3 and ZrO2 coating compared to other plasma spraying method. A high hardness ceramic coating such as Al2O3 coating by the gas tunnel type plasma spraying, were investigated in the previous study. The Vickers hardness of the zirconia (ZrO2) coating increased with decreasing spraying distance, and a higher Vickers hardness of about Hv = 1200 could be obtained at a shorter spraying distance of L = 30 mm. ZrO2 coating formed has a high hardness layer at the surface side, which shows the graded functionality of hardness. In this study, ZrO2 composite coatings (TBCs) with Al2O3 were deposited on SS304 substrates by gas tunnel type plasma spraying. The performance such as the mechanical properties, thermal behavior and high temperature oxidation resistance of the functionally graded TBCs was investigated and discussed. The resultant coating samples with different spraying powders and thickness are compared in their corrosion resistance with coating thickness as variables. Corrosion potential was measured and analyzed corresponding to the microstructure of the coatings. High Heat Resistant Coatings, Gas Tunnel Type Plasma Spraying, Hardness,

  9. In situ formation of low friction ceramic coatings on carbon steel by plasma electrolytic oxidation in two types of electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunlong; Jiang, Zhaohua

    2009-04-01

    In situ formation of ceramic coatings on Q235 carbon steel was achieved by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in carbonate electrolyte and silicate electrolyte, respectively. The surface and cross-section morphology, phase and elemental composition of PEO coatings were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The bond strength of the coating was determined using a direct pull-off test. The hardness as well as tribological properties of the ceramic coating was primarily studied. The results indicated that the coating obtained in carbonate electrolyte was Fe 3O 4, while the coating achieved from silicate electrolyte was proved to be amorphous. Both kinds of coatings showed coarse and porous surface. The Fe 3O 4 coatings obtained in carbonate electrolyte showed a high bonding strength to the substrate up to 20 ± 2 MPa and the value was 15 ± 2 MPa for the amorphous coatings obtained in carbonate electrolyte. The micro hardness of the amorphous coating and the Fe 3O 4 coating was 1001 Hv and 1413 Hv, respectively, which was more than two and three times as that of the Q235 alloy substrate (415 Hv). The friction coefficient exhibited by amorphous coating and Fe 3O 4 coating was 0.13 and 0.11, respectively, both lower than the uncoated Q235 substrate which ranged from 0.17 to 0.35.

  10. The influence of repetitively pulsed plasma immersion low energy ion implantation on TiN coating formation and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivin, D. O.; Ananin, P. S.; Dektyarev, S. V.; Ryabchikov, A. I.; Shevelev, A. E.

    2017-05-01

    Application of high frequency short pulse plasma immersion low energy ion implantation for titanium nitride coating deposition using vacuum arc metal plasma and hot-cathode gas-discharge plasma on R6M5 alloy was investigated. Implementation of negative repetitively pulsed bias with bias amplitude 2 kV, pulse duration 5 μs and pulse frequency 105 Hz leads to 6.2-fold decrease of vacuum arc macroparticle surface density for macroparticles with diameter less than 0.5 μm. Ion sputtering due coating deposition reduces the production rate approximately by 30%. It was found that with bias amplitude range from 1.1 to 1.4 kV and pulse duration 5 μs yields to formation of coatings with local hardness up to 40 GPa. This paper presents the results of experimental studies of adhesion strength, tribological properties and surface morphology of deposited TiN coatings.

  11. Vacuum plasma spray coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Richard R.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.

    1989-01-01

    Currently, protective plasma spray coatings are applied to space shuttle main engine turbine blades of high-performance nickel alloys by an air plasma spray process. Originally, a ceramic coating of yttria-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2.12Y2O3) was applied for thermal protection, but was removed because of severe spalling. In vacuum plasma spray coating, plasma coatings of nickel-chromium-aluminum-yttrium (NiCrAlY) are applied in a reduced atmosphere of argon/helium. These enhanced coatings showed no spalling after 40 MSFC burner rig thermal shock cycles between 927 C (1700 F) and -253 C (-423 F), while current coatings spalled during 5 to 25 test cycles. Subsequently, a process was developed for applying a durable thermal barrier coating of ZrO2.8Y2O3 to the turbine blades of first-stage high-pressure fuel turbopumps utilizing the enhanced NiCrAlY bond-coating process. NiCrAlY bond coating is applied first, with ZrO2.8Y2O3 added sequentially in increasing amounts until a thermal barrier coating is obtained. The enchanced thermal barrier coating has successfully passed 40 burner rig thermal shock cycles.

  12. Characteristic Features of the Formation of a Combined Magnetron-Laser Plasma in the Processes of Deposition of Film Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmakov, A. P.; Kuleshov, V. N.; Prokopchik, K. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    A block diagram of a facility for combined magnetron-laser deposition of coatings and of the systems of controlling and managing this process is considered. The results of analysis of the influence of the gas medium and of laser radiation parameters on the emission-optical properties of laser plasma are considered. The influence of the laser plasma on the electric characteristics of a magnetron discharge is analyzed. The formation of the laser plasma-initiated pulse arc discharge has been established and the influence of the laser radiation parameters on the electric characteristics of this discharge has been determined. The emission optical spectra of the magnetron discharge plasma and of erosion laser plasma are compared separately and in combination.

  13. Formation process of in situ oxide coatings with high porosity using one-step plasma electrolytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiwen; Chen, Li; Qin, Honglei; Wu, Mingyue; Yan, Zongcheng

    2016-03-01

    Porous oxide films prepared via plasma electrolytic oxidation are ideal in situ catalysts. However, such films have low porosity. To overcome this limitation, we proposed a promising approach that controls discharge events. The treatments were performed in two kinds of alkaline-silicate solutions namely KOH-enriched solution and Na2SiO3-enriched solution. The coatings prepared in the former electrolyte exhibited superior growth behaviors and catalytic structures. Due to the strong corrosive of KOH-enriched electrolyte, the growth of the film was suppressed, and the sparks were maintained small and evenly distributed throughout the process. Such layers showed high porosity and were evenly covered by nanoparticles. The coating porosity increased with increasing time, and the film treated for 60 min exhibited a high porosity of 33.3 ± 1.7%. Moreover, an oxide film with an outer dendritic and inner porous structure was formed within 120 min. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterizations indicated that the coatings were mainly composed of aluminum oxide and that the doped iron oxide was enriched on the top surface of the coating. Finally, the formation mechanisms of the coating and nanoparticles were discussed with consideration of the dynamic equilibrium theory.

  14. Basic features of low-temperature plasma formation in the course of composite coating synthesis at the active faces of complex contoured hard tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzhozovsky, B. M.; Zimnyakov, D. A.; Zinina, E. P.; Martynov, V. V.; Pleshakova, E. S.; Yuvchenko, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Basic features of combined-discharge low-temperature plasma formation around the surfaces of complex-contoured metal units are considered. It is shown that it makes the possibilities for synthesis of hardened high-durable coatings of hard tools appropriate for material processing in extreme load-temperature conditions. Experimental study of the coating formation was carried out in combination with the analysis of emission spectra of a low-temperature plasma cloud. Some practical examples of the coating applications are presented.

  15. Ammonia formation and W coatings interaction with deuterium/nitrogen plasmas in the linear device GyM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguardia, L.; Caniello, R.; Cremona, A.; Dellasega, D.; Dell'Era, F.; Ghezzi, F.; Gittini, G.; Granucci, G.; Mellera, V.; Minelli, D.; Pallotta, F.; Passoni, M.; Ricci, D.; Vassallo, E.

    2015-08-01

    In this work results of the first D2/N2 experiments in GyM, a linear device able to produce plasmas of interest for the ITER divertor (ne 5 ṡ 1010 cm-3, Te 5 eV, ion flux 3-5 ṡ 1020 m-2s-1) are presented. Plasmas simulating a N-seeding scenario have been performed to evaluate ammonia formation and its effect on exposed W coatings. The presence of ND emission lines in the plasma can be correlated with the formation of ammonia, further directly detected and quantified by chromatography analysis of the exhaust. Four different W specimens were exposed in GyM to a plasma fluence of 8.78 ṡ 1023 m-2. XPS analysis evidenced the formation of WxNy layers with nitrogen concentration in the range of 1-10% depending on the initial morphology and structure of the W samples. In all analyzed cases, nitrogen was bound and retained within the first 6 nm below the surface and no further diffusion of N into the bulk was observed.

  16. Plasma-sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, H.

    1988-09-01

    Plasma spraying is one way to apply protective coatings. The hot, high-speed flame of a plasma gun can melt a powder of almost any ceramic or metal and spray it to form a coating for protection against corrosion, wear or high temperature. The technique carries much less risk of degrading the coating and substrate than many other high-temperature processes do, because the gas in the plasma flame is chemically inert and the target can be kept fairly cool. And yet a plasma gun can be only a little more cumbersome than a paint sprayer. Investigators are applying this technique to new materials. The General Electric Company is using vacuum plasma spraying to make freestanding components: intricate aircraft engine parts formed by plasma-spraying a superalloy on a removable substrate. Other workers spray ceramic particles or fibers and metal powder simulatious wrong, stiff composite materials: the ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix of metal. The author and colleagues at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have fabricated a thick film of high-temperature superconductor by plasma-spraying the compound in the form of a powder. 7 figs.

  17. Process Sprays Uniforms Plasma Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.; Jacobson, T. P.; Walther, G. C.; Nakamura, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    Composite-powder processing procedure developed along with plasma-spray parameters to achieve homogeneous, well-bonded, low-porosity, self-lubricating coatings. Multicomponent plasma coatings are applied without segretation of components.

  18. Effects of the nozzle design on the properties of plasma jet and formation of YSZ coatings under low pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chengqi; Gao, Yang; Yang, Deming; Fu, Yingqing

    2016-09-01

    How to control the quality of the coatings has become a major problem during the plasma spraying. Because nozzle contour has a great influence on the characteristic of the plasma jet, two kinds of plasma torches equipped with a standard cylindrical nozzle and a converging-diverging nozzle are designed for low pressure plasma spraying(LPPS) and very low pressure plasma spraying(VLPPS). Yttria stabilized zirconia(YSZ) coatings are obtained in the reducing pressure environment. The properties of the plasma jet without or with powder injection are analyzed by optical emission spectroscopy, and the electron temperature is calculated based on the ratio of the relative intensity of two Ar I spectral lines. The results show that some of the YSZ powder can be vaporized in the low pressure enlarged plasma jet, and the long anode nozzle may improve the characteristics of the plasma jet. The coatings deposited by LPPS are mainly composed of the equiaxed grains and while the unmelted powder particles and large scalar pores appear in the coatings made by VLPPS. The long anode nozzle could improve the melting of the powders and deposition efficiency, and enhance the coatings' hardness. At the same time, the long anode nozzle could lead to a decrease in the overspray phenomenon. Through the comparison of the two different size's nozzle, the long anode is much more suitable for making the YSZ coatings.

  19. Formation of Expanded Austenite on a Cold-Sprayed AISI 316L Coating by Low-Temperature Plasma Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Shinichiro; Ueda, Nobuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Low-temperature plasma nitriding at temperatures below 450 °C is commonly applied to austenitic stainless steels to enhance wear resistance, while maintaining corrosion resistance, by forming expanded austenite (known as the S-phase). In this work, low-temperature plasma nitriding of cold-sprayed AISI 316L coatings was examined. A cold-spray technique was developed to produce metal coatings with less oxidation. However, the cold-sprayed AISI 316L coating obtained by use of nitrogen gas as propellant contained many interconnected pores and cracks, and was, consequently, unsuitable as an anticorrosive coating. Therefore, laser post-treatment was used to modify the coating and increase its density to similar to that of bulk steel. The anticorrosive performance of this coating on a carbon steel substrate in NaCl solution was substantially improved. Subsequent low-temperature plasma nitriding enhanced the wear resistance by two orders of magnitude. It is concluded that cold-sprayed AISI 316L coatings treated by laser post-treatment and subsequent low-temperature plasma nitriding could be used as protective coatings under severe wear and corrosion conditions.

  20. Formation of Apatite Coatings on an Artificial Ligament Using a Plasma- and Precursor-Assisted Biomimetic Process

    PubMed Central

    Mutsuzaki, Hirotaka; Yokoyama, Yoshiro; Ito, Atsuo; Oyane, Ayako

    2013-01-01

    A plasma- and precursor-assisted biomimetic process utilizing plasma and alternate dipping treatments was applied to a Leed-Keio artificial ligament to produce a thin coating of apatite in a supersaturated calcium phosphate solution. Following plasma surface modification, the specimen was alternately dipped in calcium and phosphate ion solutions three times (alternate dipping treatment) to create a precoating containing amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) which is an apatite precursor. To grow an apatite layer on the ACP precoating, the ACP-precoated specimen was immersed for 24 h in a simulated body fluid with ion concentrations approximately equal to those in human blood plasma. The plasma surface modification was necessary to create an adequate apatite coating and to improve the coating adhesion depending on the plasma power density. The apatite coating prepared using the optimized conditions formed a thin-film that covered the entire surface of the artificial ligament. The resulting apatite-coated artificial ligament should exhibit improved osseointegration within the bone tunnel and possesses great potential for use in ligament reconstructions. PMID:24048251

  1. Coating of plasma polymerized film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morita, S.; Ishibashi, S.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma polymerized thin film coating and the use of other coatings is suggested for passivation film, thin film used for conducting light, and solid body lubrication film of dielectrics of ultra insulators for electrical conduction, electron accessories, etc. The special features of flow discharge development and the polymerized film growth mechanism are discussed.

  2. Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Metallic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, S.; Koenig, D. E.; Dardi, L. E.

    1981-10-01

    Recognizing the fundamental cost advantage, technical capabilities, and compositional flexibility of reduced pressure (vacuum) plasma spraying compared to other overlay coating methods, an advanced, second generation, closed chamber deposition process called VPX (a Howmet trademark) was developed. An automated experimental facility for coating gas turbine engine components was also constructed. This paper describes several important features of the process and equipment. It shows that the use of optimized spray parameters combined with an appropriate schedule of relative orientations between the gun and work-piece can be used to produce dense and highly reproducible coatings of either uniform or controlled thickness distributions. The chemical composition, microstructure, and interfacial characteristics of typical MCrAlY coatings are reported. Some effects of operating procedures and MCrAlY chemical composition on coating density are noted. The results of mechanical property and burner rig tests of coated material are also described.

  3. Biofilm formation on coated silicone tympanostomy tubes.

    PubMed

    Ojano-Dirain, Carolyn P; Silva, Rodrigo C; Antonelli, Patrick J

    2013-02-01

    Tympanostomy tube (TT) surface modifications have been promoted as a means of reducing biofilm formation, otorrhea, and occlusion. The goal of this study was to determine if biofilm formation on silicone TTs could be prevented by commercially available surface coatings. Silicone TTs with and without polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or/and silver oxide were exposed to human plasma and cultured with Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus (22 TTs per group). After 4 days, antibiotics were added to kill planktonic bacteria. Biofilm formation was assessed by quantitative bacterial counts and scanning electron microscopy. PVP, silver, and PVP-silver coatings reduced P. aeruginosa biofilm formation relative to silicone by over 1 log (p<0.0001). PVP was superior to silver (p=0.04) and PVP-silver (p<0.0001). PVP and PVP-silver coatings increased S. aureus biofilm formation nominally (p=0.01 & 0.003). PVP and silver coatings reduce P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on silicone TTs. Combining PVP and silver coatings does not further improve biofilm resistance. TT surface coatings warrant further study through clinical trials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Formation of C-N-Si Film for Interlayer of Hard Material Coating by Pulsed Discharge Plasma CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Mikio

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nitride (C-N) and Si added C-N (C-N-Si) films were deposited on SKD61 steel plate by pulsed discharge (PD) plasma chemical vapour deposition (CVD). When the films were deposited with N2 and H2 diluted CH4 source gases, the deposition rate increased and the hardness decreased with increasing CH4 concentration. By means of adding mono-methyl-silane (MMS) gas to the source gases, the C-N-Si film having high hardness of 10 GPa and low Yung's modulus of 80 GPa could be deposited. The FT-IR spectrum of the films showed a peak of graphitic ring and peaks of terminating with H and N were observed. Raman spectra showed D and G peaks at around 1350 and 1590 cm-1, respectively. The intensity of D peak compared to G peak decreased when MMS was added. Ball on disk test of the C-N-Si film against SUJ2 ball showed the friction coefficient was about 0.2. These results shows that the C-N-Si film having high hardness and low Young's modulus, which is suitable for interlayer of hard film coating, can deposit by the PD plasma CVD, and suggest that the film is composed of fullerene-like structure which forms resilient and fracture tough materials.

  5. Preparation and characterization of beryllium doped organic plasma polymer coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Brusasco, R.; Letts, S.; Miller, P.; Saculla, M.; Cook, R.

    1995-10-04

    We report the formation of beryllium doped plasma polymerized coatings derived from a helical resonator deposition apparatus, using diethylberyllium as the organometaric source. These coatings had an appearance not unlike plain plasma polymer and were relatively stable to ambient exposure. The coatings were characterized by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Coating rates approaching 0.7 {mu}m hr{sup {minus}1} were obtained with a beryllium-to-carbon ratio of 1:1.3. There is also a significant oxygen presence in the coating as well which is attributed to oxidation upon exposure of the coating to air. The XPS data show only one peak for beryllium with the preponderance of the XPS data suggesting that the beryllium exists as BeO. Diethylberyllium was found to be inadequate as a source for beryllium doped plasma polymer, due to thermal decomposition and low vapor recovery rates.

  6. Solid coatings deposited from liquid methyl methacrylate via Plasma Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurlitzer, Lisa; Maus-Friedrichs, Wolfgang; Dahle, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    The polymerization of methyl methacrylate via plasma discharges is well known today. Usually, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is used to deposit polymer coatings. Solid coatings are formed out of the liquid phase from methyl methacrylate via dielectric barrier discharge. The formation of the coating proceeds in the gas and the liquid phase. To learn more about the reactions in the two phases, the coatings from MMA monomer will be compared to those from MMA resin. Finally, attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are employed to characterize the solid coatings. In conclusion, the plasma enhanced chemical solution deposition is compared to the classical thermal polymerization of MMA.

  7. The formation of tungsten doped Al2O3/ZnO coatings on aluminum by plasma electrolytic oxidation and their application in photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojadinović, Stevan; Vasilić, Rastko; Radić, Nenad; Tadić, Nenad; Stefanov, Plamen; Grbić, Boško

    2016-07-01

    Tungsten doped Al2O3/ZnO coatings are formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation of aluminum substrate in supporting electrolyte (0.1 M boric acid + 0.05 M borax + 2 g/L ZnO) with addition of different concentrations of Na2WO4·2H2O. The morphology, crystal structure, chemical composition, and light absorption characteristics of formed surface coatings are investigated. The X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicate that formed surface coatings consist of alpha and gamma phase of Al2O3, ZnO, metallic tungsten and WO3. Obtained results showed that incorporated tungsten does not have any influence on the absorption spectra of Al2O3/ZnO coatings, which showed invariable band edge at about 385 nm. The photocatalytic activity of undoped and tungsten doped Al2O3/ZnO coatings is estimated by the photodegradation of methyl orange. The photocatalytic activity of tungsten doped Al2O3/ZnO coatings is higher thanof undoped Al2O3/ZnO coatings; the best photocatalytic activity is ascribed to coatings formed in supporting electrolyte with addition of 0.3 g/L Na2WO4·2H2O. Tungsten in Al2O3/ZnO coatings acts as a charge trap, thus reducing the recombination rate of photogenerated electron-hole pairs. The results of PL measurements are in agreement with photocatalytic activity. Declining PL intensity corresponds to increasing photocatalytic activity of the coatings, indicating slower recombination of electron-hole pairs.

  8. Plasma-Spray Metal Coating On Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, J.

    1994-01-01

    Molds, forms, and other substrates made of foams coated with metals by plasma spraying. Foam might be ceramic, carbon, metallic, organic, or inorganic. After coat applied by plasma spraying, foam left intact or removed by acid leaching, conventional machining, water-jet cutting, or another suitable technique. Cores or vessels made of various foam materials plasma-coated with metals according to method useful as thermally insulating containers for foods, liquids, or gases, or as mandrels for making composite-material (matrix/fiber) parts, or making thermally insulating firewalls in automobiles.

  9. Plasma-Spray Metal Coating On Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, J.

    1994-01-01

    Molds, forms, and other substrates made of foams coated with metals by plasma spraying. Foam might be ceramic, carbon, metallic, organic, or inorganic. After coat applied by plasma spraying, foam left intact or removed by acid leaching, conventional machining, water-jet cutting, or another suitable technique. Cores or vessels made of various foam materials plasma-coated with metals according to method useful as thermally insulating containers for foods, liquids, or gases, or as mandrels for making composite-material (matrix/fiber) parts, or making thermally insulating firewalls in automobiles.

  10. Vacuum application of thermal barrier plasma coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. R.; Mckechnie, T. N.

    1988-01-01

    Coatings are presently applied to Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbine blades for protection against the harsh environment realized in the engine during lift off-to-orbit. High performance nickel, chromium, aluminum, and yttrium (NiCrAlY) alloy coatings, which are applied by atmospheric plasma spraying, crack and spall off because of the severe thermal shock experienced during start-up and shut-down of the engine. Ceramic coatings of yttria stabilized zirconia (ZrO2-Y2O3) were applied initially as a thermal barrier over coating to the NiCrAlY but were removed because of even greater spalling. Utilizing a vacuum plasma spraying process, bond coatings of NiCrAlY were applied in a low pressure atmosphere of argon/helium, producing significantly improved coating-to-blade bonding. The improved coatings showed no spalling after 40 MSFC burner rig thermal shock cycles, cycling between 1700 and -423 F. The current atmospheric plasma NiCrAlY coatings spalled during 25 test cycles. Subsequently, a process was developed for applying a durable thermal barrier coating of ZrO2-Y2O3 to the turbine blades of first stage high-pressure fuel turbopumps utilizing the vacuum plasma process. The improved thermal barrier coating has successfully passed 40 burner rig thermal shock cycles without spalling. Hot firing in an SSME turbine engine is scheduled for the blades. Tooling was installed in preparation for vacuum plasma spray coating other SSME hardware, e.g., the titanium main fuel valve housing (MFVH) and the fuel turbopump nozzle/stator.

  11. Vacuum plasma coatings for turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Turbine blades, vacuum plasma spray coated with NiCrAlY, CoCrAlY or NiCrAlY/Cr2O3, were evaluated and rated superior to standard space shuttle main engine (SSME) coated blades. Ratings were based primarily on 25 thermal cycles in the MSFC Burner Rig Tester, cycling between 1700 F (gaseous H2) and -423 F (liquid H2). These tests showed no spalling on blades with improved vacuum plasma coatings, while standard blades spalled. Thermal barrier coatings of ZrO2, while superior to standard coatings, lacked the overall performance desired. Fatigue and tensile specimens, machined from MAR-M-246(Hf) test bars identical to the blades were vacuum plasma spray coated, diffusion bond treated, and tested to qualify the vacuum plasma spray process for flight hardware testing and application. While NiCrAlY/Cr2O3 offers significant improvement over standard coatings in durability and thermal protection, studies continue with an objective to develop coatings offering even greater improvements.

  12. Removing of Mixed Coatings by Plasma Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassallo, E.; Caniello, R.; Deambrosis, S.; Dellasega, D.; Ghezzi, F.; Laguardia, L.; Miorin, E.; Passoni, M.

    2013-08-01

    Next generation tokamaks offer the possibility of highly efficient energy generation from the fusion reaction of hydrogen isotopes. In tokamak operation, the core plasma interaction with the wall materials could produce tiles erosion. Redeposition of the eroded materials (C-W-Be) leads to an increase in the allowable tritium load if the coatings are not periodically removed. Amongst removal methods, plasma based techniques employing Ar, H2 gas have been investigated. Plasma cleaning has been carried out on hydrogenated carbon and carbon-tungsten coatings. It has been shown that at a RF power density of 1.3 W/cm2 (pressure of 1 Pa), the plasma cleaning was effective in removing the coatings. Details of further work in this research activity will be presented.

  13. Plasma-Sprayed Photocatalytic Zinc Oxide Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navidpour, A. H.; Kalantari, Y.; Salehi, M.; Salimijazi, H. R.; Amirnasr, M.; Rismanchian, M.; Azarpour Siahkali, M.

    2017-03-01

    Fabrication of semiconductor coatings with photocatalytic action for photodegradation of organic pollutants is highly desirable. In this research, pure zinc oxide, which is well known for its promising photocatalytic activity, was deposited on stainless-steel plates by plasma spraying. The phase composition and microstructure of the deposited films were studied by x-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Despite the low-energy conditions of the plasma spraying process, the zinc oxide coatings showed good mechanical integrity on the substrate. Their photocatalytic activity was evaluated using aqueous solution of methylene blue at concentration of 5 mg L-1. The results showed the potential of the plasma spraying technique to deposit zinc oxide coatings with photocatalytic action under ultraviolet illumination. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy confirmed that the plasma spraying method could deposit zinc oxide films with higher photoabsorption ability relative to the initial powder.

  14. Ion-plasma processes of the production of diffusion aluminide coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muboyadzhyan, S. A.

    2010-03-01

    A novel ion-plasma process for ecologically safe formation of diffusion aluminide coatings on a substrate made of a superalloy, which has advantages as compared to the well-known thermodiffusion processes of their production, is described. The ion-plasma process is shown to provide the formation of diffusion aluminide coatings on the surface of a superalloy substrate according to various technologies. Owing to alloying with one or several elements from the series Y, Si, Cr, Hf, B, Co, etc., ion-plasma diffusion coatings have higher protective properties than analogous coatings produced by the traditional methods of powder, slip, and gas-circulating aluminizing.

  15. Plasma process control for improved PEO coatings on magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Riyad Omran

    Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) is a high voltage plasma-assisted oxidation process uses an environmentally-friendly aqueous electrolyte to oxidize the metal surfaces to form ceramic oxide coatings which impart a high corrosion and wear resistance. One of the main advantages of PEO process is that it can be applied to treat samples with complex shapes, and surfaces with different composition and microstructure. The PEO process of Mg alloys is strongly influenced by such parameters as electrolyte composition and concentration, current or voltage applied and substrate alloy. Generally, these parameters have a direct influence on the discharging behavior. The discharges play an essential role in the formation and resulting composition of the 3-layer oxide structure. A detailed knowledge of the coating mechanisms is extremely important in order to produce a desired coating quality to reach the best performance of the PEO coatings in terms of corrosion resistance and tribological properties (wear rate, COF). During PEO processing of magnesium, some of the metal cations are transferred outwards from the substrate and react with anions to form ceramic coatings. Also, due to the high electric field in the discharge channels, oxygen anions transfer towards the magnesium substrate and react with Mg2+ cations to form a ceramic coating. Although, in general, PEO coating of Mg alloys produces the three-layered structure, the relative proportions of the three-layers are strongly influenced by the PEO processing parameters. In PEO process, the ceramic coating grows inwards to the alloy substrate and outwards to the coating surface simultaneously. For the coating growth, there are three simultaneous processes taking place, namely the electrochemical, the plasma chemical reactions and thermal diffusion. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was employed for the discharge characterization by following the substrate and electrolyte element present in the plasma discharge during the

  16. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm by Trimethylsilane Plasma Coating

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yibao; Jones, John E.; Ritts, Andrew C.; Yu, Qingsong

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation on implantable medical devices is a major impediment to the treatment of nosocomial infections and promotes local progressive tissue destruction. Staphylococcus epidermidis infections are the leading cause of biofilm formation on indwelling devices. Bacteria in biofilms are highly resistant to antibiotic treatment, which in combination with the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance among human pathogens further complicates treatment of biofilm-related device infections. We have developed a novel plasma coating technology. Trimethylsilane (TMS) was used as a monomer to coat the surfaces of 316L stainless steel and grade 5 titanium alloy, which are widely used in implantable medical devices. The results of biofilm assays demonstrated that this TMS coating markedly decreased S. epidermidis biofilm formation by inhibiting the attachment of bacterial cells to the TMS-coated surfaces during the early phase of biofilm development. We also discovered that bacterial cells on the TMS-coated surfaces were more susceptible to antibiotic treatment than their counterparts in biofilms on uncoated surfaces. These findings suggested that TMS coating could result in a surface that is resistant to biofilm development and also in a bacterial community that is more sensitive to antibiotic therapy than typical biofilms. PMID:22964248

  17. Plasma sprayed coatings on crankshaft used steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahu, G.; Munteanu, C.; Istrate, B.; Benchea, M.

    2017-08-01

    Plasma spray coatings may be an alternative to conventional heat treatment of main journals and crankpins of the crankshaft. The applications of plasma coatings are various and present multiple advantages compared to electric arc wire spraying or flame spraying. The study examines the layers sprayed with the following powders: Cr3C2- 25(Ni 20Cr), Al2O3- 13TiO2, Cr2O3-SiO2- TiO2 on the surface of steels used in the construction of a crankshaft (C45). The plasma spray coatings were made with the Spray wizard 9MCE facility at atmospheric pressure. The samples were analyzed in terms of micro and morphological using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Wear tests on samples that have undergone simulates extreme working conditions of the crankshafts. In order to emphasize adherence to the base material sprayed layer, were carried out tests of microscratches and micro-indentation. Results have showed a relatively compact morphological aspect given by the successive coatings with splat-like specific structures. Following the microscratch analysis it can be concluded that Al2O3-13TiO2 coating has a higher purpose in terms of hardness compared to Cr3C2-(Ni 20Cr) and Cr2O3-SiO2- TiO2 powders. Thermal coatings of the deposited powders have increased the mechanical properties of the material. The results stand to confirm that plasma sprayed Al2O3-13TiO2 powder is in fact a efficient solution for preventing mechanical wear, even with a faulty lubrication system.

  18. Mixed alumina and cobalt containing plasma electrolytic oxide coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yar-Mukhamedova, G. Sh; Ved', M. V.; Karakurkchi, A. V.; Sakhnenko, N. D.

    2017-06-01

    Principles of plasma electrolytic oxidation of the AL25 aluminum alloy in diphosphate alkali solutions containing cobalt(2+) cations are discussed. It has been established that a variation in the concentration of the electrolyte components provides the formation of mixed-oxide coatings consisting of the basic matrix materials and the cobalt oxides of different content. An increase in the cobalt oxide content in the coating is achieved by the variation in electrolysis current density as well as the treatment time due to both the electrochemical and thermo-chemical reactions at substrate surface and in spark region. Current density intervals that provide micro-globular surface formation and uniform cobalt distribution in the coating are determined. The composition and morphology of the surface causes high catalytic properties of synthesized materials, which confirmed the results of testing in model reaction CO and benzene oxidation as well as fuel combustion for various modes of engine operation.

  19. Plasma Chemical Aspects Of Dust Formation In Hydrocarbon Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, J.; Kovacevic, E.; Stepanovic, O.; Stefanovic, I.; Winter, J.

    2008-09-07

    This contribution deals with some plasma chemical aspects of dust formation in hydrocarbon plasmas. The interplay between dust formation and plasma chemistry will be discussed by means of different experimental results. One specific example concerns the formation of benzene and the role of atomic hydrogen for plasma chemical processes and dust formation in hydrocarbon discharges.

  20. Strength of plasma coating and effect of a plasma coating on hydrogen entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiguchi, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Tamiko; Kawasaki, Hiroharu; Fukuda, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    The strength of a plasma coating and the effect of the plasma coating on hydrogen entry were investigated to establish a method that provides a base material with highly resistant to hydrogen entry and embrittlement. Aluminum alloy A6061, which is highly resistant to hydrogen gas atmosphere, was employed as the coating material (300 W, 17 h, ∼40 µm thickness). Two types of specimen prepared by the hydrogen-charging method were adopted: the coated and uncoated specimens were (1) immersed in 20 mass % ammonium thiocyanate aqueous solution at 313 K for 48 h, or (2) exposed to hydrogen gas atmosphere at 100 MPa and 270 °C for 200 h. Hydrogen content measurements revealed that the A6061 plasma coating is highly resistant to hydrogen entry in corrosive environments. The coating reduced hydrogen entry by ∼50% during exposure to hydrogen gas atmosphere at 100 MPa and 270 °C. Moreover, the plasma coating method was found to be applicable in the elastic deformation region of the base material.

  1. Sonochemical formation of intermetallic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, J.D.; Casadonte, D.J. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    An energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) study of the agglomerates produced during the sonication of a series of mixed-metal powders in decane indicates that metal particles are both fused by the action of ultrasound and develop coatings which are intermetallic in nature. The principal mechanism of these effects is believed to be interparticle collision caused by the rapid movement of particles of less than 50 {mu}m diameter which are propelled by shockwaves generated at cavitation sites. By examination of mixed-metal systems including Ni/Co, Al/Ni, Al/Co, Ni/Mg, and Cu/Mo with substantially different tribological characteristics, it has been determined that the coatings are generated by both adhesive wear and direct impact. The fusion of Cu and Mo is particularly intriguing, as these two metals are immiscible below 1000{degrees}C. This indicates the enormous impact temperatures produced in sonically induced collisions. The mechanisms of intermetallic coatings produced via ultrasound are discussed. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Scattering from isotropic plasma coated nihility sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussan, M. M.; Ghaffar, A.; Alkanhal, Majeed A. S.; Naz, M. Y.; Ur Rehman, Sajjad; Khan, Y.

    2017-06-01

    In this study, it is observed that when an isotropic collisional plasma coating layer is produced on a nihility sphere, its back scattering efficiency becomes non-zero. Field equations, at each interface, are expanded in terms of spherical wave vector functions (SWVFs) by enforcing the extended classical wave scattering theory. Electromagnetic boundary conditions are applied at both interfaces, i.e., free space-plasma and plasma layer-nihility sphere core to obtain the scattering coefficients. The obtained scattering coefficients are used to calculate the forward scattering, back scattering, and extinction efficiencies. The obtained computational results show that an increase in collisional frequency causes a decrease in both forward and backscattered efficiencies and an increase in extinction efficiency. Furthermore, the numerical results indicate that an increase in plasma density causes an increase in both forward and backscattered efficiencies and a decrease in extinction efficiency.

  3. Characterisation of the TiO2 coatings deposited by plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benea, M. L.; Benea, L. P.

    2016-02-01

    Plasma spraying of materials such as ceramics and non-metals, which have high melting points, has become a well-established commercial process. Such coatings are increasingly used in aerospace, automobile, textile, medical, printing and electrical industries to impart proprieties such as corrosion resistance, thermal resistance, wear resistance, etc. One of the most important characteristics of thermal barrier coatings is the ability to undergo fast temperature changes without failing, the so called thermal shock resistance. The formation of residual stresses in plasma sprayed ceramic and metallic coatings is a very complex process. Several factors, such as substrate material, substrate thickness, physical properties of both the substrate and the coating material, deposition rate, relative velocity of the plasma torch, etc. determine the final residual stress state of the coating at room temperature. Our objective is to characterize the titanium oxide and aluminium oxide coatings deposited by plasma spraying in structural terms, the resistance to thermal shock and residual stresses.

  4. Application of Plasma Spraying as a Precursor in the Synthesis of Oxidation-Resistant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritt, P.; Lu-Steffes, O.; Sakidja, R.; Perepezko, J. H.; Lenling, W.; Crawmer, D.; Beske, J.

    2013-08-01

    Thermal spray methods offer a versatile and flexible approach to the manufacture of coatings as a final product. A novel application of thermal spray coating is demonstrated by incorporating a plasma-sprayed Mo layer coating as a precursor step within an integrated costing design. The effectiveness of the two-step design is illustrated for aluminoborosilica coatings on SiC/C composites and W substrates based on the plasma-sprayed Mo precursor and subsequent codeposition of Si and B by a pack cementation method. Even with incomplete precursor coverage, an aluminoborosilica coating is developed because of the high initial fluidity of the as-pack coating. An effective oxidation resistance is observed following exposure at elevated temperatures (1373-1673 K) in ambient air and during torch testing at 1773 K, providing clear evidence that the plasma spraying of Mo is a viable precursor step in the formation of the oxidation-resistant Mo-Si-B-based coating.

  5. Characterization of plasma coated tungsten heavy alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, A.; Kapoor, D.; Lankford, J. Jr.; Nicholls, A.E.

    1996-06-01

    The detrimental environmental impact of Depleted Uranium-based penetrators have led to tremendous development efforts in the area of tungsten heavy alloy based penetrators. One line of investigation involves the coating of tungsten heavy alloys with materials that are prone to shear localization. Plasma spraying of Inconel 718 and 4340 steel have been used to deposit dense coatings on tungsten heavy alloy substrates. The aim of the investigation was to characterize the coating primarily in terms of its microstructure and a special push-out test. The paper describes the results of the push-out tests and analyzes some of the possible failure mechanisms by carrying out microstructural characterization of the failed rings obtained from the push out tests.

  6. Electrospinning Yarn Formation and Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahbaee Bagherzadeh, Arash

    Electrospinning is a process by which nano polymer fibers can be produced using an electrostatically driven jet of polymer solution. Electrospinning seems to be a relatively simple process for producing nanofibers since it utilizes a few readily available components. On closer examination it is however clearly evident that successful electrospinning involves an understanding of the complex interaction of electrostatic fields, properties of polymer solutions and component design and system geometry. Using grounded plate as a collector causes the uniform electric field in all directions, so the electrostatic forces acting on the fiber have no preferential direction in the plane of the collector, results in a random deposition of the electrospun fibers leading to an isotropic web. For achieving their unique abilities to be useful in devices needs to deposit them in specific location and orientation. In this project a unique needle electrospinning process is described in which nanofibers are continuously fabricated, uniaxially oriented, and twisted to form of a yarn. It is shown that perfectly aligned nanofiber assemblies can be generated by manipulating the electric field. Twist insertion is accomplished by using two stepper motors and associated software. ANSYS/Emag.3-D is used to model the path of the electric field between the needle and the collector and the electrostatic forces acting on a charged nanofiber. The apparatus described, appears to offer advantages over other techniques. Nanofibers need not only be used as webs or yarn in order to attain the performance enhancement of high tech applications, but it is possible to introduce the benefit of nanofiber to regular yarn and other materials, by coating with nanofibers An addition advantage of the present setup is that it is possible to produce continuous fiber hybrid yarn coated with aligned nanofibers along the core yarn axis. With this method it is not only possible to coat regular yarn with aligned

  7. Fullerene monolayer formation by spray coating.

    PubMed

    Cervenka, J; Flipse, C F J

    2010-02-10

    Many large molecular complexes are limited in thin film applications by their insufficient thermal stability, which excludes deposition via commonly used vapour phase deposition methods. Here we demonstrate an alternative way of monolayer formation of large molecules by a simple spray coating method under ambient conditions. This technique has been successfully applied on C(60) dissolved in toluene and carbon disulfide. Monolayer thick C(60) films have been formed on graphite and gold surfaces at particular deposition parameters, as confirmed by atomic force and scanning tunnelling microscopies. Structural and electronic properties of spray coated C(60) films on Au(111) have been found comparable to thermally evaporated C(60). We attribute the monolayer formation in spray coating to a crystallization process mediated by an ultrathin solution film on a sample surface.

  8. Thermal Expansion of Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S V.; Palczer, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    Metallic Cu-8%Cr, Cu-26%Cr, Cu-8%Cr-1%Al, NiAl and NiCrAlY monolithic coatings were fabricated by vacuum plasma spray deposition processes for thermal expansion property measurements between 293 and 1223 K. The corrected thermal expansion, (DL/L(sub 0) varies with the absolute temperature, T, as (DL/L(sub 0) = A(T - 293)(sup 3) + BIT - 293)(sup 2) + C(T - 293) + D, where, A, B, C and D are thermal, regression constants. Excellent reproducibility was observed for all of the coatings except for data obtained on the Cu-8%Cr and Cu-26%Cr coatings in the first heat-up cycle, which deviated from those determined in the subsequent cycles. This deviation is attributed to the presence of residual stresses developed during the spraying of the coatings, which are relieved after the first heat-up cycle. In the cases of Cu-8%Cr and NiAl, the thermal expansion data were observed to be reproducible for three specimens. The linear expansion data for Cu-8% Cr and Cu-26%Cr agree extremely well with rule of mixture (ROM) predictions. Comparison of the data for the Cu-8%Cr coating with literature data for Cr and Cu revealed that the thermal expansion behavior of this alloy is determined by the Cu-rich matrix. The data for NiAl and NiCrAlY are in excellent agreement with published results irrespective of composition and the methods used for processing the materials. The implications of these results on coating GRCop-84 copper alloy combustor liners for reusable launch vehicles are discussed.

  9. Sintering of Fine Particles in Suspension Plasma Sprayed Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Latka, Leszek; Goryachev, Sergey B.; Kozerski, Stefan; Pawlowski, Lech

    2010-01-01

    Suspension plasma spraying is a process that enables the production of finely grained nanometric or submicrometric coatings. The suspensions are formulated with the use of fine powder particles in water or alcohol with some additives. Subsequently, the suspension is injected into plasma jet and the liquid additives evaporate. The remaining fine solids are molten and subsequently agglomerate or remain solid, depending on their trajectory in the plasma jet. The coating’s microstructure results from these two groups of particles arriving on a substrate or previously deposited coating. Previous experimental studies carried out for plasma sprayed titanium oxide and hydroxyapatite coatings enabled us to observe either a finely grained microstructure or, when a different suspension injection mode was used, to distinguish two zones in the microstructure. These two zones correspond to the dense zone formed from well molten particles, and the agglomerated zone formed from fine solid particles that arrive on the substrate in a solid state. The present paper focuses on the experimental and theoretical analysis of the formation process of the agglomerated zone. The experimental section establishes the heat flux supplied to the coating during deposition. In order to achieve this, calorimetric measurements were made by applying experimental conditions simulating the real coatings’ growth. The heat flux was measured to be in the range from 0.08 to 0.5 MW/m2, depending on the experimental conditions. The theoretical section analyzes the sintering during the coating’s growth, which concerns the fine particles arriving on the substrate in the solid state. The models of volume, grain boundary and surface diffusion were analyzed and adapted to the size and chemistry of the grains, temperature and time scales corresponding to the suspension plasma spraying conditions. The model of surface diffusion was found to best describe the sintering during suspension plasma spraying. The

  10. Performance of coated columbium and tantalum alloys in plasma arc reentry simulation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Merutka, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The evaluation of coated refractory metals screened in stagnation model plasma arc tests is reported. Columbium alloys FS-85, C-129Y, and Cb-752 coated with Si-20Cr-20Fe (R512E) were tested at 1390 C. Three silicide coatings on Ta-10W were tested at 1470 C. Half-hour cycles and a 6500 N/sqm stagnation pressure were used. The best R512E coated columbium alloy was FS-85 with first local coating breakdowns occurring in 12 to 50 cycles. At coating defects, low metal recession rates (0.005 mm/min) were generally observed on coated columbium alloys while high rates (0.15 mm/min) were observed on coated Ta-10W. Coated columbium suffered large emittance losses (to below 0.7) due to surface refractory metal pentoxide formation.

  11. Crack-free surface sealing of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings using an excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Yttria stabilized zirconia coatings are typically used in the aerospace industry as high-temperature thermal barriers. These coatings are normally applied by plasma thermal spray, which has an inherent problem of producing coatings containing a substantial amount of open or closed porosity. Surface sealing of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings with CO 2 and Nd:YAG lasers is always associated with the problem of cracking on melted layers. Although some attempts such as pre-heating have been used to overcome the problem, formation of cracking is still not prevented, especially in zirconia-based ceramic coatings. The present work investigates an alternative method of surface sealing of plasma sprayed 8 wt.% Y 2O 3-ZrO 2 coatings using an excimer laser. The results show that smooth, crack-free and crater-free sealing can be obtained. Effects of laser operating parameters on the sealing quality and involved mechanism are also discussed.

  12. Plasma sprayed and electrospark deposited zirconium metal diffusion barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hollis, Kendall J; Pena, Maria I

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium metal coatings applied by plasma spraying and electrospark deposition (ESD) have been investigated for use as diffusion barrier coatings on low enrichment uranium fuel for research nuclear reactors. The coatings have been applied to both stainless steel as a surrogate and to simulated nuclear fuel uranium-molybdenum alloy substrates. Deposition parameter development accompanied by coating characterization has been performed. The structure of the plasma sprayed coating was shown to vary with transferred arc current during deposition. The structure of ESD coatings was shown to vary with the capacitance of the deposition equipment.

  13. Plasma sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coating for NiAl-based intermetallic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A. (Inventor); Doychak, Joseph (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating system consists of two layers of a zirconia-yttria ceramic. The first layer is applied by low pressure plasma spraying. The second layer is applied by conventional atmospheric pressure plasma spraying. This facilitates the attachment of a durable thermally insulating ceramic coating directly to the surface of a highly oxidation resistant NiAl-based intermetallic alloy after the alloy has been preoxidized to promote the formation of a desirable Al2O3 scale.

  14. Plasma Formation Around Single Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duselis, Peter U.; Kusse, Bruce R.

    2002-12-01

    At Cornell's Laboratory of Plasma Studies, single wires of various metals were exploded using a ˜250 ns pulser with a rise time of ˜20 A/ns. It was found that the wires first experience a resistive heating phase that lasts 50-80 ns before a rapid collapse of voltage. From that point on, the voltage across the wire was negligible while the current through the wire continued to increase. We attribute this voltage collapse to the formation of plasma about the wire. Further confirmation of this explanation will be presented along with new experimental data describing preliminary spectroscopy results, the expansion rate of the plasma, and current flow along the wire as a function of radius. The resistance of the wire-electrode connection will be shown to significantly affect the energy deposition. Various diagnostics were used to obtain these experiments. Ultraviolet sensitive vacuum photodiodes and a framing camera with an 8 ns shutter were used to detect and measure the width of the visible light emitted by the plasma. A special wire holder was constructed that allowed the transfer of current from the wire to the surrounding plasma to be observed.

  15. Cell adhesion to plasma-coated PVC.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Elidiane C; de Souza, Eduardo S; de Moraes, Francine S; Duek, Eliana A R; Lucchesi, Carolina; Schreiner, Wido H; Durrant, Steven F; Cruz, Nilson C

    2014-01-01

    To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, P(Ar), was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with P(Ar) between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing P(Ar), except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices.

  16. Cell Adhesion to Plasma-Coated PVC

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Elidiane C.; de Souza, Eduardo S.; de Moraes, Francine S.; Duek, Eliana A. R.; Lucchesi, Carolina; Schreiner, Wido H.; Durrant, Steven F.; Cruz, Nilson C.

    2014-01-01

    To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, PAr, was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with PAr between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing PAr, except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices. PMID:25247202

  17. Tantalum oxide-based plasma-sprayed environmental barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weyant, Christopher M.

    Energy efficiency in gas turbine engines is linked to the high temperature capabilities of materials used in the hot section of the engine. To facilitate a significant increase in engine efficiency, tough structural ceramics have been developed that can handle the thermo-mechanical stresses that gas turbine components experience. Unfortunately, the high-temperature, high-pressure, and high-velocity combustion gases in a gas turbine contain water vapor and/or hydrogen which have been shown to volatilize the protective silica layer on silicon-based ceramics. This degradation leads to significant surface recession in ceramic gas turbine components. In order to maintain their structural integrity, an environmental barrier coating (EBC) could be used to protect ceramics from the harsh gas turbine environment. Due to its coefficient of thermal expansion and phase stability at elevated temperatures, tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) was examined as the base material for an air plasma-sprayed EBC on Si3N 4 ceramics. As-sprayed pure Ta2O5 was comprised of both low-temperature beta-Ta2O5 and high-temperature alpha-Ta 2O5 that was quenched into the structure. Residual stress measurements via X-ray diffraction determined the as-sprayed coating to be in tension and extensive vertical macrocracks were observed in the coating. Heat treatments of the pure coating led to conversion of alpha-Ta2 O5 to beta-Ta2O5, conversion of tensile stresses to compressive, localized buckling of the coating, and significant grain growth which caused microcracking in the coating. The pure coating was found to be an inadequate EBC. Al2O3 was investigated as a solid solution alloying addition designed to enhance the stability of beta-Ta2O 5, and reduce grain growth by slowing grain boundary diffusion. La 2O3 was investigated as an alloying addition designed to form second phase particles which would reduce grain growth through pinning. Al2O3 was successful at both stabilizing beta-Ta 2O5 and reducing grain

  18. Superhydrophobic Ceramic Coatings by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuxuan; Coyle, Thomas W; Azimi, Gisele; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2016-04-19

    This work presents a novel coating technique to manufacture ceramic superhydrophobic coatings rapidly and economically. A rare earth oxide (REO) was selected as the coating material due to its hydrophobic nature, chemical inertness, high temperature stability, and good mechanical properties, and deposited on stainless steel substrates by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS). The effects of various spraying conditions including standoff distance, torch power, number of torch passes, types of solvent and plasma velocity were investigated. The as-sprayed coating demonstrated a hierarchically structured surface topography, which closely resembles superhydrophobic surfaces found in nature. The water contact angle on the SPPS superhydrophobic coating was up to 65% higher than on smooth REO surfaces.

  19. Superhydrophobic Ceramic Coatings by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yuxuan; Coyle, Thomas W.; Azimi, Gisele; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a novel coating technique to manufacture ceramic superhydrophobic coatings rapidly and economically. A rare earth oxide (REO) was selected as the coating material due to its hydrophobic nature, chemical inertness, high temperature stability, and good mechanical properties, and deposited on stainless steel substrates by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS). The effects of various spraying conditions including standoff distance, torch power, number of torch passes, types of solvent and plasma velocity were investigated. The as-sprayed coating demonstrated a hierarchically structured surface topography, which closely resembles superhydrophobic surfaces found in nature. The water contact angle on the SPPS superhydrophobic coating was up to 65% higher than on smooth REO surfaces.

  20. Surface coating for prevention of crust formation

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A flexible surface coating which promotes the removal of deposits as they reach the surface by preventing adhesion and crust formation. Flexible layers are attached to each side of a flexible mesh substrate comprising of a plurality of zones composed of one or more neighboring cells, each zone having a different compressibility than its adjacent zones. The substrate is composed of a mesh made of strands and open cells. The cells may be filled with foam. Studs or bearings may also be positioned in the cells to increase the variation in compressibility and thus the degree of flexing of the coating. Surface loading produces varying amounts of compression from point to point causing the coating to flex as deposits reach it, breaking up any hardening deposits before a continuous crust forms. Preferably one or more additional layers are also used, such as an outer layer of a non-stick material such as TEFLON, which may be pigmented, and an inner, adhesive layer to facilitate applying the coating to a surface.

  1. Plasma tests of sprayed coatings for rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curren, A. N.; Love, W. K.

    1974-01-01

    Several plasma-sprayed coating systems were evaluated for structural stability in hydrogen plasma and in oxygen plasma mixed with hydrogen plasma. The principal test heat flux was 15 Btu per inch squared seconds. The system consisted of a number of thin 0.002 to 0.020 in. layers of metal oxides and/or metals. The principal materials included are molybdenum nichrome, alumina, and zirconia. The study identifies important factors in coating system fabrication and describes the durability of the coating systems in the test environments. Values of effective thermal conductivity for some of the systems are indicated.

  2. Stable low-fouling plasma polymer coatings on polydimethylsiloxane

    PubMed Central

    Forster, S.; McArthur, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (DMS) is a popular material for microfluidics, but it is hydrophobic and is prone to non-specific protein adsorption. In this study, we explore methods for producing stable, protein resistant, tetraglyme plasma polymer coatings on PDMS by combining extended baking processes with multiple plasma polymer coating steps. We demonstrate that by using this approach, it is possible to produce a plasma polymer coatings that resist protein adsorption (<10 ng/cm2) and are stable to storage over at least 100 days. This methodology can translate to any plasma polymer system, enabling the introduction of a wide range of surface functionalities on PDMS surfaces. PMID:24062864

  3. Phase stability and biological property evaluation of plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings for orthopedic and dental applications.

    PubMed

    Vahabzadeh, Sahar; Roy, Mangal; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2015-04-01

    In this work we have investigated the effects of strontium (Sr) dopant on in vitro protein release kinetics and in vivo osteogenic properties of plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings, along with their dissolution behavior. Plasma sprayed HA coatings are widely used in load-bearing implants. Apart from osseointegration, the new generation of HA coating is expected to deliver biomolecules and/or drugs that can induce osteoinduction. This paper reports the preparation of crystalline and amorphous HA coatings on commercially pure titanium (Cp-Ti) using inductively coupled radio frequency (RF) plasma spray, and their stability at different solution pH. Coatings prepared at 110 mm working distance from the nozzle showed an average Ca ion release of 18 and 90 ppm in neutral and acidic environments, respectively. Decreasing the working distance to 90 mm resulted in the formation of a coating with less crystalline HA and phases with higher solubility products, and consequently higher dissolution over 32 days. A 92% release of a model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) in phosphate buffer with pH of 7.4 was measured for Sr-doped HA (Sr-HA) coating, while only a 72% release could be measured for pure HA coating. Distortion of BSA during adsorption on coatings revealed a strong interaction between the protein and the coating, with an increase in α-helix content. Osteoid formation was found on Sr-HA implants as early as 7 weeks post implantation compared to HA coated and uncoated Ti implants. After 12 weeks post implantation, osteoid new bone was formed on HA implants; whereas, bone mineralization started on Sr-HA samples. While no osteoid was formed on bare Ti surfaces, bone was completely mineralized on HA and Sr-HA coatings after 16 weeks post implantation. Our results show that both phase stability and chemistry can have a significant influence toward in vitro and in vivo response of HA coatings on Ti implants.

  4. Structure and Properties of Modified Plasma-Sprayed Composite Coatings on a Titanium Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal'tseva, S. V.; Mel'nikova, I. P.; Lyasnikova, A. V.; Zaharevich, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    The structure and properties of hydroxyapatite (HA) plasma-sprayed coatings modified by Al2O3 and AlOOH nanoparticles have been investigated using different methods. It is found that the impregnation of HA particles before forming the coating ensures their most uniform distribution in the coating and increases its adhesion to 17.6 MPa. Agglomeration and milling of the powder mixture before spraying contribute to the formation of a uniform porous structure of the coating and a developed surface morphology with an increased adhesion from 10.4 to 17.8 MPa.

  5. Superhydrophobic Ceramic Coatings by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yuxuan

    Superhydrophobic surfaces exhibit superior water repellent properties, and they have remarkable potential to improve current energy infrastructure. Substantial research has been performed on the production of superhydrophobic coatings. However, superhydrophobic coatings have not yet been adopted in many industries where potential applications exist due to the limited durability of the coating materials and the complex and costly fabrication processes. Here presented a novel coating technique to manufacture ceramic superhydrophobic coatings rapidly and economically. A rare earth oxide (REO) was selected as the coating material due to its hydrophobic nature and strong mechanical properties, and deposited on stainless steel substrates by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS). The as-sprayed coating demonstrated a hierarchically structured coating topography, which closely resembles superhydrophobic surfaces in nature. Compared to smooth REO surfaces, the SPPS superhydrophobic coating improved the water contact angle by as much as 65° after vacuum treatment at 1 Pa for 48 hours.

  6. Physical, mechanical, and tribological properties of quasicrystalline Al-Cu-Fe coatings prepared by plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepeshev, A. A.; Rozhkova, E. A.; Karpov, I. V.; Ushakov, A. V.; Fedorov, L. Yu.

    2013-12-01

    The physical, mechanical, and tribological properties of quasicrystalline coatings based on the Al65Cu23Fe12 alloy prepared by plasma spraying have been investigated. The specific features of the phase formation due to the competitive interactions of the icosahedral ψ and cubic β phases have been elucidated. A correlation between the microhardness and the content of the icosahedral phase in the coating has been determined. The decisive role of the quasicrystalline phase in the formation of high tribological characteristics of the coatings has been revealed and tested.

  7. Thin film coating process using an inductively coupled plasma

    DOEpatents

    Kniseley, Richard N.; Schmidt, Frederick A.; Merkle, Brian D.

    1990-01-30

    Thin coatings of normally solid materials are applied to target substrates using an inductively coupled plasma. Particles of the coating material are vaporized by plasma heating, and pass through an orifice to a first vacuum zone in which the particles are accelerated to a velocity greater than Mach 1. The shock wave generated in the first vacuum zone is intercepted by the tip of a skimmer cone that provides a second orifice. The particles pass through the second orifice into a second zone maintained at a higher vacuum and impinge on the target to form the coating. Ultrapure coatings can be formed.

  8. Phase analysis of plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, N. R.; Berndt, C. C.; Herman, H.

    1983-01-01

    Phase analysis of plasma-sprayed 8 wt pct-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings and powders was carried out by X-ray diffraction. Step scanning was used for increased peak resolution. Plasma spraying of the YSZ powder into water or onto a steel substrate to form a coating reduced the cubic and monoclinic phases with a simultaneous increase in the tetragonal phase. Heat treatment of the coating at 1150 C for 10 h in an Ar atmosphere increased the amount of cubic and monoclinic phases. The implications of these transformations on coating performance and integrity are discussed.

  9. Thermal Spray Formation of Polymer Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coquill, Scott; Galbraith, Stephen L.; Tuss. Darren L.; Ivosevic, Milan

    2008-01-01

    This innovation forms a sprayable polymer film using powdered precursor materials and an in-process heating method. This device directly applies a powdered polymer onto a substrate to form an adherent, mechanically-sound, and thickness-regulated film. The process can be used to lay down both fully dense and porous, e.g., foam, coatings. This system is field-deployable and includes power distribution, heater controls, polymer constituent material bins, flow controls, material transportation functions, and a thermal spray apparatus. The only thing required for operation in the field is a power source. Because this method does not require solvents, it does not release the toxic, volatile organic compounds of previous methods. Also, the sprayed polymer material is not degraded because this method does not use hot combustion gas or hot plasma gas. This keeps the polymer from becoming rough, porous, or poorly bonded.

  10. Plasma-Sprayed ZnO/TiO2 Coatings with Enhanced Biological Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaobing; Peng, Chao; You, Jing

    2017-08-01

    Surface chemical composition and topography are two key factors in the biological performance of implants. The aim of this work is to deposit ZnO/TiO2 composite coatings on the surface of titanium substrates by plasma spraying technique. The effects of the amount of ZnO doping on the microstructure, surface roughness, corrosion resistance, and biological performance of the TiO2 coatings were investigated. The results indicated that the phase composition of the as-sprayed TiO2 coating was mainly rutile. Addition of 10% ZnO into TiO2 coating led to a slight shift of the diffraction peaks to lower angle. Anatase phase and Zn2TiO4 were formed in 20%ZnO/TiO2 and 30%ZnO/TiO2 coatings, respectively. Doping with ZnO changed the topography of the TiO2 coatings, which may be beneficial to enhance their biological performance. All coatings exhibited microsized surface roughness, and the corrosion resistance of ZnO/TiO2 coatings was improved compared with pure TiO2 coating. The ZnO/TiO2 coatings could induce apatite formation on their surface and inhibit growth of Staphylococcus aureus, but these effects were dose dependent. The 20%ZnO/TiO2 coating showed better biological performance than the other coatings, suggesting potential application for bone implants.

  11. A plasma-sprayed valve coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, A.; Olmore, A. B.

    1980-01-01

    Need to reduce wear on nickel alloy seats and poppets for Space Shuttle main engine led to fused cobalt/tungsten carbide coating. Coating, which is dense, wear-resistant, and nonporous, can be applied in controlled amounts to various substrate configurations. Ease of application to parts with intricate shapes and contours should make coating useful in automotive and aircraft manufacturing.

  12. Effect of preliminary vacuum plasma treatment on coating adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slabodchikov, Vladimir A.; Borisov, Dmitry P.; Kuznetsov, Vladimir M.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents research results on the adhesion properties of Si coatings synthesized by different methods and under different conditions of preliminary vacuum ion plasma treatment of substrates with subsequent magnetron sputtering. The substrate surface was pretreated with low-energy ion beams, high-energy ion beams, gas discharge plasma, and plasma produced by a magnetron sputtering system. The vacuum conditions (pump type, pressure, etc.), the ion current density, and the bias parameters (pulse repetition frequency and duration) were varied. The research results demonstrate a considerable effect of plasma immersion ion implantation on the adhesion of Si coatings to NiTi substrates.

  13. Room-temperature aqueous plasma electrolyzing Al2O3 nano-coating on carbon fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuping; Meng, Yang; Shen, Yonghua; Chen, Weiwei; Cheng, Huanwu; Wang, Lu

    2017-10-01

    A novel room-temperature aqueous plasma electrolysis technique has been developed in order to prepared Al2O3 nano-coating on each fiber within a carbon fiber bundle. The microstructure and formation mechanism of the Al2O3 nano-coating were systematically investigated. The oxidation resistance and tensile strength of the Al2O3-coated carbon fiber was measured at elevated temperatures. It showed that the dense Al2O3 nano-coating was relatively uniformly deposited with 80-120 nm in thickness. The Al2O3 nano-coating effectively protected the carbon fiber, evidenced by the slower oxidation rate and significant increase of the burn-out temperature from 800 °C to 950 °C. Although the bare carbon fiber remained ∼25 wt.% after oxidation at 700 °C for 20 min, a full destruction was observed, evidenced by the ∼0 GPa of the tensile strength, compared to ∼1.3 GPa of the Al2O3-coated carbon fiber due to the effective protection from the Al2O3 nano-coating. The formation mechanism of the Al2O3 nano-coating on carbon fiber was schematically established mainly based on the physic-chemical effect in the cathodic plasma arc zone.

  14. Tensile adhesion test measurements on plasma-sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    Adhesion measurements on plasma-sprayed coatings are briefly studied, including a critical analysis of the experimental scatter for duplicate tests. The application of a simple method which presents adhesion strength data in a fracture mechanics perspective is demonstrated. Available data are analyzed in a way which suggests an approach to finding the overall defect contribution to reducing the apparent strength of coatings.

  15. X-ray Computed Tomographic Investigation of the Porosity and Morphology of Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation Coatings.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xun; Aliasghari, Sepideh; Němcová, Aneta; Burnett, Timothy L; Kuběna, Ivo; Šmíd, Miroslav; Thompson, George E; Skeldon, Peter; Withers, Philip J

    2016-04-06

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is of increasing interest for the formation of ceramic coatings on metals for applications that require diverse coating properties, such as wear and corrosion resistance, low thermal conductivity, and biocompatibility. Porosity in the coatings can have an important impact on the coating performance. However, the quantification of the porosity in coatings can be difficult due to the wide range of pore sizes and the complexity of the coating morphology. In this work, a PEO coating formed on titanium is examined using high resolution X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT). The observations are validated by comparisons of surface views and cross-sectional views of specific coating features obtained using X-ray CT and scanning electron microscopy. The X-ray CT technique is shown to be capable of resolving pores with volumes of at least 6 μm(3). Furthermore, the shapes of large pores are revealed and a correlation is demonstrated between the locations of the pores, nodules on the coating surface, and depressions in the titanium substrate. The locations and morphologies of the pores, which constitute 5.7% of the coating volume, indicate that they are generated by release of oxygen gas from the molten coating.

  16. Experimental investigation on erosive wear behaviour of plasma spray coated stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girisha, K. G.; Sreenivas Rao, K. V.; Anil, K. C.; Sanman, S.

    2017-04-01

    Slurry erosion is an implicit problem in many engineering industrial components such as ore carrying pipelines, slurry pumps and extruders. Even the water turbine blades are subjected to erosive wear when the water contains considerable amount of silt. In the present study, Al2O3-40%TiO2 powder particles of average particle size of 50 micrometer were deposited on EN56B martenistic stainless steel by atmospheric plasma spray technique. Ni/Cr was pre coated to work as bond coat for good adhesion between coating and the substrate material. A coating thickness of 200 micrometer was achieved. Coated and un-coated substrates were subjected to slurry erosion test as per ASTM G-119 standard. Slurry erosion test rig was used to evaluate the erosion properties at room temperature condition by varying the spindle speed. Scanning electron microphotographs were taken before and after the slurry erosion test. Microstructures reveal uniform distribution of coating materials. Eroded surface shows lip, groove, and crater formation and dense coating resulting in less porosity. Micro hardness test was evaluated and reported. EDX analysis confirms the presence of Al, Ti and O2 particles. It was observed that, Al2O3-40%TiO2 coated substrates exhibit superior erosion resistance as compared to un-coated substrates due to higher hardness and less coating porosity.

  17. Sea water corrosion behavior of plasma sprayed abradable coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parida, M.; Nanda, S. P.; Mishra, S. C.

    2017-02-01

    Aluminum based abradable coating is used for sealing purpose in compressor casing of aero engines to withstand up to a service temperature of 450°C. Al-BNSiO2 composite coating is deposited using thermal plasma spray technique. Coating thickness measured and porosity of the coating is evaluated.Coating morphology is observed and EDSanalysis is done with SEM (Jeol make). The effect of time on the sea water corrosion behavior of the coating is evaluated. It is observed that, there is a sharp increase in weight gain of the coating up to six weeks of immersion. This behavior is attributed to the adsorption/deposition of other elements/reactions taking place during interaction with sea water.

  18. Bond-coating in plasma-sprayed calcium-phosphate coatings.

    PubMed

    Oktar, F N; Yetmez, M; Agathopoulos, S; Lopez Goerne, T M; Goller, G; Peker, I; Ipeker, I; Ferreira, J M F

    2006-11-01

    The influence of bond-coating on the mechanical properties of plasma-spray coatings of hydroxyatite on Ti was investigated. Plasma-spray powder was produced from human teeth enamel and dentine. Before processing the main apatite coating, a very thin layer of Al2O3/TiO2 was applied on super clean and roughened, by Al2O3 blasting, Ti surface as bond-coating. The experimental results showed that bond-coating caused significant increase of the mechanical properties of the coating layer: In the case of the enamel powder from 6.66 MPa of the simple coating to 9.71 MPa for the bond-coating and in the case of the dentine powder from 6.27 MPa to 7.84 MPa, respectively. Both tooth derived powders feature high thermal stability likely due to their relatively high content of fluorine. Therefore, F-rich apatites, such those investigated in this study, emerge themselves as superior candidate materials for calcium phosphate coatings of producing medical devices. The methods of apatite powder production and shaping optimization of powder particles are both key factors of a successful coating. The methods used in this study can be adopted as handy, inexpensive and reliable ways to produce high quality of powders for plasma spray purposes.

  19. Corrosion behavior of magnetic ferrite coating prepared by plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Wei, Shicheng Tong, Hui; Tian, Haoliang; Liu, Ming; Xu, Binshi

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g while the M{sub s} value of the ferrite powder is 71.916 emu/g. It can be seen that plasma spray process causes deterioration of the room temperature soft magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Spinel ferrite coatings have been prepared by plasma spraying. • The coating consists of nanocrystalline grains. • The saturation magnetization of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g. • Corrosion behavior of the ferrite coating was examined in NaCl solution. - Abstract: In this study, spray dried spinel ferrite powders were deposited on the surface of mild steel substrate through plasma spraying. The structure and morphological studies on the ferrite coatings were carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy. It was showed that spray dried process was an effective method to prepare thermal spraying powders. The coating showed spinel structure with a second phase of LaFeO{sub 3}. The magnetic property of the ferrite samples were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating was 34.417 emu/g. The corrosion behavior of coating samples was examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. EIS diagrams showed three corrosion processes as the coating immersed in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results suggested that plasma spraying was a promising technology for the production of magnetic ferrite coatings.

  20. Superhydrophobic Ceramic Coatings by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yuxuan; Coyle, Thomas W.; Azimi, Gisele; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a novel coating technique to manufacture ceramic superhydrophobic coatings rapidly and economically. A rare earth oxide (REO) was selected as the coating material due to its hydrophobic nature, chemical inertness, high temperature stability, and good mechanical properties, and deposited on stainless steel substrates by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS). The effects of various spraying conditions including standoff distance, torch power, number of torch passes, types of solvent and plasma velocity were investigated. The as-sprayed coating demonstrated a hierarchically structured surface topography, which closely resembles superhydrophobic surfaces found in nature. The water contact angle on the SPPS superhydrophobic coating was up to 65% higher than on smooth REO surfaces. PMID:27091306

  1. Effect of hydroxyapatite/tricalcium-phosphate coating on osseointegration of plasma-sprayed titanium alloy implants.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Matthew; Welter, Jean F; Goldberg, Victor M

    2004-04-01

    This study determined the effects of a plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) coating on osseointegration of plasma-sprayed titanium alloy implants in a lapine, distal femoral intramedullary model. The effects of the HA/TCP coating were assessed at 1, 3, and 6 months after implant placement. The HA/TCP coating significantly increased new bone apposition onto the implant surfaces at all time points. The ceramic coating also stimulated intramedullary bone formation at the middle and distal levels of the implants. Fluorescent bone labeling indicated that new bone formation occurred primarily during the first 3 months after implantation, with comparatively little activity detected in the latter stages of the study. There was no associated increase in pullout strength at either 3 or 6 months; however, post-pullout evaluation of the implants indicated that the HA/TCP coating itself was not the primary site of construct failure. Rather, failure was most commonly observed through the periprosthetic osseous struts that bridged the medullary cavity. The demonstrated osteoconductive activity of HA/TCP coating on plasma-sprayed titanium alloy implant surfaces may have considerable clinical relevance to early host-implant interactions, by accelerating the establishment of a stable prosthesis-bone interface. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 69A: 1-10, 2004

  2. Plasma variables and tribological properties of coatings in low pressure (0.1 - 10.0 torr) plasma systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avni, R.; Spalvins, T.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed treatment is presented of the dialog known as plasma surface interactions (PSI) with respect to the coating process and its tribological behavior. Adsorption, morphological changes, defect formation, sputtering, chemical etching, and secondary electron emission are all discussed as promoting and enhancing the surface chemistry, thus influencing the tribological properties of the deposited flux. Phenomenological correlations of rate of deposition, flux composition, microhardness, and wear with the plasma layer variables give an insight to the formation of chemical bonding between the deposited flux and the substrate surface.

  3. Modified drug release using atmospheric pressure plasma deposited siloxane coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, D. P.; Maher, S.; Law, V. J.; Ardhaoui, M.; Stallard, C.; Keenan, A.

    2016-09-01

    This pilot study evaluates the potential of atmospheric plasma polymerised coatings to modify the rate of drug release from polymeric substrates. The antibiotic rifampicin was deposited in a prototype multi-layer drug delivery system, consisting of a nebulized layer of active drug between a base layer of TEOS deposited on a plastic substrate (polystyrene) and an overlying layer of plasma polymerised PDMS. The polymerised TEOS and PDMS layers were deposited using a helium atmospheric plasma jet system. Elution of rifampicin was measured using UV-VIS spectroscopy, in addition to a antimicrobial well diffusion assay with an established indicator organism. The multi-layered plasma deposited coatings significantly extended the duration of release of the rifampicin from 24 h for the uncoated polymer to 144 h for the coated polymer.

  4. Gas Permeability of Porous Plasma-Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann-Ténèze, K.; Caron, N.; Alexandre, S.

    2008-12-01

    For different applications, such as solid oxide fuel cells, there is an interest in understanding the relationship between the microstructure and the gas permeability of plasma-sprayed coatings. Nevertheless, plasma spraying processes allow to elaborate coatings with singular microstructures, depending strongly on the initial material and plasma operating conditions. And so, the evolution of permeability is not directly linked to the porosity. In this work, coatings were manufactured using different initial feedstock and spray parameters to obtain various microporous structures. Measurements of their permeation with the pressure drop method and their open porosity just as the observation of the morphology and the structure by optical microscopy were achieved. The different data show that the evolution of the gas permeability with the open porosity follows the Kozeny-Carman equation. This result correlated with the microstructural observation highlights the relationship between the permeability and the physical properties of porous plasma-sprayed layers.

  5. Lithium Surface Coatings and Improved Plasma Performance in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugel, H. W.

    2007-11-01

    NSTX research on lithium-coated plasma facing components is the latest step in a decade-long, multi-institutional research program to develop lithium as a plasma-facing system that can withstand the high heat and neutron fluxes in a DT reactor. The NSTX research is also aimed towards sustaining the current non- inductively in H-mode plasmas which requires control of both wall recycling and impurity influxes. Employing several techniques to coat the plasma facing components (PFCs) with lithium, NSTX experiments have shown, for the first time, significant benefits in high-power divertor plasmas. Lithium pellet injection (LPI) uses the plasma itself to distribute lithium on the divertor or limiter surfaces. The multi-barrel LPI on NSTX can introduce either lithium pellets with masses 1 - 5 mg or powder during a discharge. This significantly lowered recycling and reduced the density in a subsequent NBI-heated, divertor plasma. Lithium coatings have also been applied with a LIThium EvaporatoR (LITER) that was installed on an upper vacuum vessel port to direct a collimated stream of lithium vapor toward the graphite tiles of the lower center stack and divertor. The lithium was evaporated either before tokamak discharges, or continuously between and during them. By evaporating lithium into the helium glow discharge that typically precedes each tokamak discharge, a coating of the entire PFC area was achieved. Lithium depositions from a few mg to 1 g have been applied between discharges. Among the effects observed in subsequent neutral-beam heated plasmas were decreases in oxygen impurities, plasma density, and the inductive flux consumption, and increases in electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement and DD neutron rate. In addition, a reduction in the ELM frequency, including their complete suppression, was achieved in H-mode plasmas. Additional observations, such as, the duration of the lithium coatings, increases in core metal impurity radiation, and

  6. Formation and Plasma Circulation of Solar Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2016-05-01

    Solar prominences are long-lived cool and dense plasma curtains in the hot and rarefied outer solar atmosphere or corona. The physical mechanism responsible for their formation and especially for their internal plasma circulation has been uncertain for decades. The observed ubiquitous downflows in quiescent prominences are difficult to interpret because plasma with high conductivity seems to move across horizontal magnetic field lines. Here we present three-dimensional numerical simulations of prominence formation and evolution in an elongated magnetic flux rope as a result of in situ plasma condensations fueled by continuous plasma evaporation from the solar chromosphere. The prominence is born and maintained in a fragmented, highly dynamic state with continuous reappearance of multiple blobs and thread structures that move mainly downward, dragging along mass-loaded field lines. The circulation of prominence plasma is characterized by the dynamic balance between the drainage of prominence plasma back to the chromosphere and the formation of prominence plasma via continuous condensation. Plasma evaporates from the chromosphere, condenses into the prominence in the corona, and drains back to the chromosphere, establishing a stable chromosphere-corona plasma cycle. Synthetic images of the modeled prominence with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly closely resemble actual observations, with many dynamical threads underlying an elliptical coronal cavity.

  7. Nano Structured Plasma Spray Coating for Wear and High Temperature Corrosion Resistance Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, D.; Shukla, A. K.; Roy, H.

    2014-04-01

    The nano structured coating is a major challenge today to improve the different mechanical properties, wear and high temperature corrosion resistance behaviour of different industrial alloys. This paper is a review on synthesis of nano powder, plasma spraying methods, techniques of nano structured coating by plasma spray method, mechanical properties, tribological properties and high temperature corrosion behaviour of nano structured coating. Nano structured coatings of ceramic powders/composites are being developed for wide variety of applications like boiler, turbine and aerospace industries, which requires the resistance against wear, corrosion, erosion etc. The nano sized powders are subjected to agglomeration by spray drying, after which nano structured coating can be successfully applied over the substrate. Nano structured coating shows improved mechanical wear resistance and high temperature corrosion resistance. The significant improvement of wear and corrosion resistance is mainly attributed to formation of semi molten nano zones in case of nano structured coatings. The future scope of application of nano structured coating has also been highlighted in this paper.

  8. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  9. On coating adhesion during impulse plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowska-Langier, Katarzyna; Zdunek, Krzysztof; Chodun, Rafal; Okrasa, Sebastian; Kwiatkowski, Roch; Malinowski, Karol; Składnik-Sadowska, Elzbieta; Sadowski, Marek J.

    2014-05-01

    The impulse plasma deposition (IPD) technique is the only method of plasma surface engineering (among plasma-based technologies) that allows a synthesis of layers upon a cold unheated substrate and which ensures a good adhesion. This paper presents a study of plasma impacts upon a copper substrate surface during the IPD process. The substrate was exposed to pulsed N2/Al plasma streams during the synthesis of AlN layers. For plasma-material interaction diagnostics, the optical emission spectroscopy method was used. Our results show that interactions of plasma lead to sputtering of the substrate material. It seems that the obtained adhesion of the layers is the result of a complex surface mechanism combined with the effects of pulsed plasma energy impacts upon the unheated substrate. An example of such a result is the value of the critical load for the Al2O3 layer, which was measured by the scratch-test method to be above 40 N.

  10. Adherent diamond like carbon coatings on metals via plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.; Munson, C.P.

    1996-12-01

    Various techniques are currently used to produce diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on various materials. Many of these techniques use metallic interlayers, such as Ti or Si, to improve the adhesion of a DLC coating to a ferrous substrate. An alternative processing route would be to use plasma source ion implantation (PSII) to create a carbon composition gradient in the surface of the ferrous material to serve as the interface for a DLC coating. The need for interlayer deposition is eliminated by using a such a graded interfaces PSII approach has been used to form adherent DLC coatings on magnesium, aluminum, silicon, titanium, chromium, brass, nickel, and tungsten. A PSII process tailored to create a graded interface allows deposition of adherent DLC coatings even on metals that exhibit a positive heat of formation with carbon, such as magnesium, iron, brass and nickel.

  11. Deposition of Functional Coatings Based on Intermetallic Systems TiAl on the Steel Surface by Vacuum Arc Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budilov, V.; Vardanyan, E.; Ramazanov, K.

    2015-11-01

    Laws governing the formation of intermetallic phase by sequential deposition of nano-sized layers coatings from vacuum arc plasma were studied. Mathematical modeling process of deposition by vacuum arc plasma was performed. In order to identify the structural and phase composition of coatings and to explain their physical and chemical behaviour XRD studies were carried out. Production tests of the hardened punching tools were performed.

  12. Formation Of Voids In Dusty Lorentzian Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bahamida, S.; Annou, K.; Annou, R.

    2008-09-07

    We study the possibility of formation of voids in Lorentzian plasmas containing of dust particles obeying to vortex-like velocity distribution. The size of the void is found to be ion spectral index dependent.

  13. Tuning Surface Chemistry of Polyetheretherketone by Gold Coating and Plasma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Novotná, Zdeňka; Rimpelová, Silvie; Juřík, Petr; Veselý, Martin; Kolská, Zdeňka; Hubáček, Tomáš; Borovec, Jakub; Švorčík, Václav

    2017-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has good chemical and biomechanical properties that are excellent for biomedical applications. However, PEEK exhibits hydrophobic and other surface characteristics which cause limited cell adhesion. We have investigated the potential of Ar plasma treatment for the formation of a nanostructured PEEK surface in order to enhance cell adhesion. The specific aim of this study was to reveal the effect of the interface of plasma-treated and gold-coated PEEK matrices on adhesion and spreading of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The surface characteristics (polarity, surface chemistry, and structure) before and after treatment were evaluated by various experimental techniques (gravimetry, goniometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrokinetic analysis). Further, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to examine PEEK surface morphology and roughness. The biological response of cells towards nanostructured PEEK was evaluated in terms of cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation. Detailed cell morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Compared to plasma treatment, gold coating improved PEEK wettability. The XPS method showed a decrease in the carbon concentration with increasing time of plasma treatment. Cell adhesion determined on the interface between plasma-treated and gold-coated PEEK matrices was directly proportional to the thickness of a gold layer on a sample. Our results suggest that plasma treatment in a combination with gold coating could be used in biomedical applications requiring enhanced cell adhesion.

  14. Tuning Surface Chemistry of Polyetheretherketone by Gold Coating and Plasma Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotná, Zdeňka; Rimpelová, Silvie; Juřík, Petr; Veselý, Martin; Kolská, Zdeňka; Hubáček, Tomáš; Borovec, Jakub; Švorčík, Václav

    2017-06-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has good chemical and biomechanical properties that are excellent for biomedical applications. However, PEEK exhibits hydrophobic and other surface characteristics which cause limited cell adhesion. We have investigated the potential of Ar plasma treatment for the formation of a nanostructured PEEK surface in order to enhance cell adhesion. The specific aim of this study was to reveal the effect of the interface of plasma-treated and gold-coated PEEK matrices on adhesion and spreading of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The surface characteristics (polarity, surface chemistry, and structure) before and after treatment were evaluated by various experimental techniques (gravimetry, goniometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrokinetic analysis). Further, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to examine PEEK surface morphology and roughness. The biological response of cells towards nanostructured PEEK was evaluated in terms of cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation. Detailed cell morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Compared to plasma treatment, gold coating improved PEEK wettability. The XPS method showed a decrease in the carbon concentration with increasing time of plasma treatment. Cell adhesion determined on the interface between plasma-treated and gold-coated PEEK matrices was directly proportional to the thickness of a gold layer on a sample. Our results suggest that plasma treatment in a combination with gold coating could be used in biomedical applications requiring enhanced cell adhesion.

  15. Plasma-sprayed self-lubricating coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, H. H.; Logan, W. R.; Harada, Y.

    1982-01-01

    One of the most important criterion for acceptable commercial application of a multiple phase composition is uniformity and reproducibility. This means that the performance characteristics of the coat - e.g., its lubricating properties, bond strength to the substrate, and thermal properties - can be readily predicted to give a desired performance. The improvement of uniformity and reproducibility of the coats, the oxidation behavior at three temperature ranges, the effect of bond coat and the effect of preheat treatment as measured by adhesive strength tests, coating examination procedures, and physical property measurements were studied. The following modifications improved the uniformity and reproducibility: (1) changes and closer control in the particle size range of the raw materials used, (2) increasing the binder content from 3.2% to 4.1% (dried weight), and (3) analytical processing procedures using step by step checking to assure consistency.

  16. Plasma electrolytic oxidation coating of synthetic Al-Mg binary alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tarakci, Mehmet

    2011-12-15

    The binary Al-Mg synthetic alloys were prepared in a vacuum/atmosphere controlled furnace with the addition of 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 7, and 15 wt.% pure Mg into pure aluminum as substrate material. The surfaces of the Al-Mg alloys and pure aluminum were coated for 120 min by plasma electrolytic oxidation in the same electrolyte of 12 g/L sodium silicate and 2 g/L KOH in distilled water. The coating was characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, profilometry and Vickers microhardness measurements. There regions of loose outer layer, dense inner layer with precipitate like particles of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and a thin transition layer were identified for the coated samples. The coating thickness increases from 85 to 150 {mu}m with Mg contents in the alloys. The surface morphology becomes more porous and consequently surface roughness tends to increase with plasma electrolytic oxidation treatment and further with Mg content. The increase in magnesium content reduces the formation of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and crystalline mullite phases in the coating and decreases microhardness of coating. The Mg concentration is constant throughout the other loose and dense regions of coating though it gradually decreases in the thin inner region. - Research Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average thickness of PEO coating of Al-Mg alloys increases with Mg content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The addition of Mg reduces and prevents the formation of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and mullite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The surface roughness increases with Mg content in the Al-Mg alloys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hardness values of the coating decreases with the Mg amount in the substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Mg concentration is constant throughout the main regions of coating.

  17. Plasma technology for creation of protective and decorative coatings for building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokitin, Oleg; Volokitin, Gennady; Skripnikova, Nelli; Shekhovtsov, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    An experimental setup is developed to create a protective and decorative coating on the surface of building materials. Experimental study is conducted to create a protective coating using low-temperature plasma. The properties of the surface before and after the plasma treatment are investigated. At the increase of the plasma generator power (56-75 kW) the rate of the vitreous coating formation is significantly reduced, and the destruction of hydrous calcium silicates occurs at a lower depth (0.5-2.0 mm). In this case, the adhesive strength increases up to 2.34 MPa. At the increase of the exposure time at 56 kW (0.045 m/s melting rate) plasma generation power, the melt formation is observed not only at the surface but at depth of 0.7 mm and deeper. Also, a deep degradation of the material occurs and the adhesive strength decreases. The optimal heat flux density of plasma generator was established at 1.8-2.6 . 106 W/m2, which allows the achievement of the uniform layer formation on the wood surface that preserves its natural pattern visible.

  18. Comparison of Physical-chemical and Mechanical Properties of Chlorapatite and Hydroxyapatite Plasma Sprayed Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Demnati, Imane; Grossin, David; Marsan, Olivier; Bertrand, Ghislaine; Collonges, Gérard; Combes, Christèle; Parco, Maria; Braceras, Inigo; Alexis, Joel; Balcaen, Yannick; Rey, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Chlorapatite can be considered a potential biomaterial for orthopaedic applications. Its use as plasma-sprayed coating could be of interest considering its thermal properties and particularly its ability to melt without decomposition unlike hydroxyapatite. Chlorapatite (ClA) was synthesized by a high-temperature ion exchange reaction starting from commercial stoichiometric hydroxyapatites (HA). The ClA powder showed similar characteristics as the original industrial HA powder, and was obtained in the monoclinic form. The HA and ClA powders were plasma-sprayed using a low-energy plasma spraying system with identical processing parameters. The coatings were characterized by physical-chemical methods, i.e. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, including distribution mapping of the main phases detected such as amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), oxyapatite (OA), and HA or ClA. The unexpected formation of oxyapatite in ClA coatings was assigned to a side reaction with contaminating oxygenated species (O2, H2O). ClA coatings exhibited characteristics different from HA, showing a lower content of oxyapatite and amorphous phase. Although their adhesion strength was found to be lower than that of HA coatings, their application could be an interesting alternative, offering, in particular, a larger range of spraying conditions without formation of massive impurities. PMID:25893015

  19. Plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes - An emerging technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1987-01-01

    A broad understanding of the numerous ion or plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes is sought. An awareness of the principles of these processes is needed before discussing in detail the ion nitriding technology. On the basis of surface modifications arising from ion or plasma energizing and interactions, it can be broadly classified as deposition of distinct overlay coatings (sputtering-dc, radio frequency, magnetron, reactive; ion plating-diode, triode) and surface property modification without forming a discrete coating (ion implantation, ion beam mixing, laser beam irradiation, ion nitriding, ion carburizing, plasma oxidation. These techniques offer a great flexibility and are capable in tailoring desirable chemical and structural surface properties independent of the bulk properties.

  20. Plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes: An emerging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalvins, T.

    A broad understanding of the numerous ion or plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes is sought. An awareness of the principles of these processes is needed before discussing in detail the ion nitriding technology. On the basis of surface modifications arising from ion or plasma energizing and interactions, it can be broadly classified as deposition of distinct overlay coatings (sputtering-dc, radio frequency, magnetron, reactive; ion plating-diode, triode) and surface property modification without forming a discrete coating (ion implantation, ion beam mixing, laser beam irradiation, ion nitriding, ion carburizing, plasma oxidation). These techniques offer a great flexibility and are capable in tailoring desirable chemical and structural surface properties independent of the bulk properties.

  1. Plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes - An emerging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalvins, T.

    A broad understanding of the numerous ion or plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes is sought. An awareness of the principles of these processes is needed before discussing in detail the ion nitriding technology. On the basis of surface modifications arising from ion or plasma energizing and interactions, it can be broadly classified as deposition of distinct overlay coatings (sputtering-dc, radio frequency, magnetron, reactive; ion plating-diode, triode) and surface property modification without forming a discrete coating (ion implantation, ion beam mixing, laser beam irradiation, ion nitriding, ion carburizing, plasma oxidation. These techniques offer a great flexibility and are capable in tailoring desirable chemical and structural surface properties independent of the bulk properties.

  2. Plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes - An emerging technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1987-01-01

    A broad understanding of the numerous ion or plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes is sought. An awareness of the principles of these processes is needed before discussing in detail the ion nitriding technology. On the basis of surface modifications arising from ion or plasma energizing and interactions, it can be broadly classified as deposition of distinct overlay coatings (sputtering-dc, radio frequency, magnetron, reactive; ion plating-diode, triode) and surface property modification without forming a discrete coating (ion implantation, ion beam mixing, laser beam irradiation, ion nitriding, ion carburizing, plasma oxidation. These techniques offer a great flexibility and are capable in tailoring desirable chemical and structural surface properties independent of the bulk properties.

  3. Plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes: An emerging technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1986-01-01

    A broad understanding of the numerous ion or plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes is sought. An awareness of the principles of these processes is needed before discussing in detail the ion nitriding technology. On the basis of surface modifications arising from ion or plasma energizing and interactions, it can be broadly classified as deposition of distinct overlay coatings (sputtering-dc, radio frequency, magnetron, reactive; ion plating-diode, triode) and surface property modification without forming a discrete coating (ion implantation, ion beam mixing, laser beam irradiation, ion nitriding, ion carburizing, plasma oxidation). These techniques offer a great flexibility and are capable in tailoring desirable chemical and structural surface properties independent of the bulk properties.

  4. Reactive Plasma-Sprayed Aluminum Nitride-Based Coating Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro; Egota, Kazumi; Okamoto, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Recently, thick aluminum nitride/alumina (AlN/Al2O3) composite coatings were successfully fabricated through the reactive plasma spraying of fine Al2O3/AlN mixture in the N2/H2 atmospheric plasma. The coatings consist of AlN, Al5O6N, γ-Al2O3, and α-Al2O3 phases. This study will evaluate the thermal conductivity of these complicated plasma-sprayed coatings and optimize the controlling aspects. Furthermore, the influence of the process parameters on the coatings thermal conductivity will be investigated. The fabricated coatings showed very low thermal conductivity (2.43 W/m K) compared to the AlN sintered compacts. It is attributed to the phase composition of the fabricated coatings, oxide content, and porosity. The presence of Al2O3, Al5O6N and the high coating porosity decreased its thermal conductivity. The presence of oxygen in the AlN lattice creates Al vacancies which lead to phonon scattering and therefore suppressed the thermal conductivity. The formation of γ-Al2O3 phase in the coating leads to further decrease in its conductivity, due to its lower density compared to the α-phase. Moreover, the high porosity of the coating strongly suppressed the conductivity. This is due to the complicated microstructure of plasma spray coatings (splats, porosity, and interfaces, particularly in case of reactive spray process), which obviously lowered the conductivity. Furthermore, the measured coating density was lower than the AlN value and suppressed the coating conductivity. In addition, the spraying parameter showed a varied effect on the coating phase composition, porosity, density, and therefore on its conductivity. Although the N2 gas flow improved the nitride content, it suppressed the thermal conductivity gradually. It is attributed to the further increase in the porosity and further decrease in the density of the coatings with the N2 gas. Furthermore, increasing the arc did not show a significant change on the coating thermal conductivity. On the other hand

  5. Properties of plasma sprayed bond coats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, W. J.

    1995-01-01

    Increasing bond coat oxidation resistance has been clearly linked to increasing durability of the ceramic layer of TBC's. However, recent studies have shown that significant differences in TBC life can be achieved for different bond coats that have little or no difference in oxidation behavior. These results suggest bond coat properties other than oxidation resistance can also influence TBC life. A determination of which properties affect TBC life and an understanding of how these properties affect TBC life could be valuable in designing new, more durable TBC's. Unfortunately, there is little existing information on the physical and mechanical properties of bond coat materials and there are fewer comparative studies that can be used to determine which properties are important to TBC life. This paper compares the properties of three bond coat compositions that have similar oxidation behavior but different TBC lives. Analysis of the properties indicates that the coefficient of thermal expansion and stress relaxation (creep) behavior of the three alloys are strongly correlated to the observed differences in TBC life.

  6. Vapors and Droplets Mixture Deposition of Metallic Coatings by Very Low Pressure Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautherin, B.; Planche, M.-P.; Bolot, R.; Quet, A.; Bianchi, L.; Montavon, G.

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, the very low pressure plasma-spraying (VLPPS) process has been intensely developed and implemented to manufacture thin, dense and finely structured ceramic coatings for various applications, such as Y2O3 for diffusion barriers, among other examples. This paper aims at presenting developments carried out on metallic coatings. Aluminum was chosen as a demonstrative material due to its "moderate" vaporization enthalpy (i.e., 38.23 KJ cm-3) compared to the one of copper (i.e., 55.33 KJ cm-3), cobalt (i.e., 75.03 KJ cm-3), or even tantalum (i.e., 87.18 KJ cm-3). The objective of this work is primarily to better understand the behavior of a solid precursor injected into the plasma jet leading to the formation of vapors and to better control the factors affecting the coating structure. Nearly dense aluminum coatings were successfully deposited by VLPPS at 100 Pa with an intermediate power plasma torch (i.e., Sulzer Metco F4 type gun with maximum power of 45 kW). Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was implemented to study and analyze the vapor behavior into the plasma jet. Simplified CFD modeling allowed better understanding of some of the thermo-physical mechanisms. The effect of powder-size distribution, substrate temperature and spray distance were studied. The phase composition and microstructural features of the coatings were characterized by XRD and SEM. Moreover, Vickers microhardness measurements were implemented.

  7. Improving Erosion Resistance of Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings by Elevating the Deposition Temperature Based on the Critical Bonding Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shu-Wei; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2017-09-01

    Interlamellar bonding within plasma-sprayed coatings is one of the most important factors dominating the properties and performance of coatings. The interface bonding between lamellae significantly influences the erosion behavior of plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings. In this study, TiO2 and Al2O3 coatings with different microstructures were deposited at different deposition temperatures based on the critical bonding temperature concept. The erosion behavior of ceramic coatings was investigated. It was revealed that the coatings prepared at room temperature exhibit a typical lamellar structure with numerous unbonded interfaces, whereas the coatings deposited at the temperature above the critical bonding temperature present a dense structure with well-bonded interfaces. The erosion rate decreases sharply with the improvement of interlamellar bonding when the deposition temperature increases to the critical bonding temperature. In addition, the erosion mechanisms of ceramic coatings were examined. The unbonded interfaces in the conventional coatings act as pre-cracks accelerating the erosion of coatings. Thus, controlling interlamellar bonding formation based on the critical bonding temperature is an effective approach to improve the erosion resistance of plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings.

  8. Protective coatings of metal surfaces by cold plasma treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manory, R.; Grill, A.

    1985-01-01

    The cold plasma techniques for deposition of various types of protective coatings are reviewed. The main advantage of these techniques for deposition of ceramic films is the lower process temperature, which enables heat treating of the metal prior to deposition. In the field of surface hardening of steel, significant reduction of treatment time and energy consumption were obtained. A simple model for the plasma - surface reactions in a cold plasma system is presented, and the plasma deposition techniques are discussed in view of this model.

  9. Monoclinic zirconia distributions in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lance, M. J.; Haynes, J. A.; Ferber, M. K.; Cannon, W. R.

    2000-03-01

    Phase composition in an air plasma-sprayed Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) top coating of a thermal barrier coating (TBC) system was characterized. Both the bulk phase content and localized pockets of monoclinic zirconia were measured with Raman spectroscopy. The starting powder consisted of ˜15 vol.% monoclinic zirconia, which decreased to ˜2 vol.% in the as-sprayed coating. Monoclinic zirconia was concentrated in porous pockets that were evenly distributed throughout the TBC. The pockets resulted from the presence of unmelted granules in the starting powder. The potential effect of the distributed monoclinic pockets on TBC performance is discussed.

  10. TiC-based coatings deposition using electric discharged plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmatullin, I.; Sivkov, A.; Gerasimov, D.; Ivashutenko, A.; Shanenkova, J.

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this work was to research the possibility of using coaxial magneto plasma accelerator for TiC-coatings deposition on steel substrates. As a result, coatings with 0.01 m2 area was deposited. They were researched using XRD, SEM; also, the nanohardness on cross section of coating was measured. The influence of energy and carbon load on phase content, average hardness and microstructure is shown. It is established that the finest microstructure and average nanohardness is 15.3 GPa are achieved at energy W = 46.7 kJ and carbon load of 2.0 grams.

  11. Evaluation of hot corrosion of 8YSZ coatings elaborated by suspension plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Hernández, A. G.; Ageorges, H.; López-Gómez, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the evaluation microscopic of hot corrosion of 8mol% Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (8YSZ) coatings was studied in the presence of V2O5 and Na2SO4 as corrosive molten salt, for 40h at 1050°C. First, the substrates of Inconel 718 super-alloy were sprayed with a NiCrCoAl-Y2O3 bond coat by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). Then this bond coat was polished for elaborated the 8YSZ layer by suspension plasma spraying (SPS). The microstructure of the cross-section and surface of the coating was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After the hot corrosion test, the delamination of 8YSZ coatings was occurred in the ceramic layer due to the creation of stress resulting from the chemical reaction between the molten salts and the yttria (Y2O3) of 8YSZ coating at high temperature. According to EDS-SEM analysis, the evaluation of fractured sections of 8YSZ coating showed mainly the formation of crystals composed by Y, V, O and the surface was mainly composed by Zr and O. Those crystals can be related with the tetragonal phase of YVO4, which they were commonly found by other researchers in studies of hot corrosion of YSZ-based TBCs when its surface reacts with the corrosive salts.

  12. Early apatite deposition and osteoblast growth on plasma-sprayed dicalcium silicate coating.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuanyong; Xie, Youtao; Ding, Chuanxian; Chu, Paul K

    2005-09-01

    Dicalcium silicate coating was deposited onto a Ti-6Al-4V substrate using plasma-spraying technology. The coating was immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h to investigate early apatite formation on the coating. Osteoblasts were also seeded onto the surface of the dicalcium silicate coating to evaluate its biocompatibility. Cold field-emission scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry were used to evaluate the morphologies and determine the chemical composition of the coatings. The surface structural changes caused by immersion in SBF were analyzed using thin-film X-ray diffraction. After the dicalcium silicate coating was soaked in SBF solution 1-6 h, two types of particles containing calcium and phosphorus were formed on the surface. One type consisted of relatively larger particles (P1) precipitated on the surface of the coating from the precursor cluster formed in the SBF solution. The second type was composed of particles (P2) nucleated on the surface of the coating. With increasing immersion time, the particles coalesced to form a surface Ca-P layer. The Ca-P layer was composed of amorphous calcium phosphate that was not transformed to crystalline apatite until the immersion time in SBF exceeded 24 h. The formation mechanism of the Ca-P layer and apatite on the surface of the coating is believed to be involved in the formation of the Si 3-ring active surface site with negative charge. The cell-seeding test revealed that osteoblasts grew and proliferated very well on the surface of the dicalcium silicate coating.

  13. Development and evaluation of suspension plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia coatings as thermal barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Every, Kent J.

    The insulating effects from thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in gas turbine engines allow for increased operational efficiencies and longer service lifetimes. Consequently, improving TBCs can lead to enhanced gas turbine engine performance. This study was conducted to investigate if yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings, the standard industrial choice for TBCs, produced from nano-sized powder could provide better thermal insulation than current commericial YSZ coatings generated using micron-sized powders. The coatings for this research were made via the recently developed suspension plasma spraying (SPS) process. With SPS, powders are suspended in a solvent containing dispersing agents; the suspension is then injected directly into a plasma flow that evaporates the solvent and melts the powder while transporting it to the substrate. Although related to the industrial TBC production method of air plasma spraying (APS), SPS has two important differences---the ability to spray sub-micron diameter ceramic particles, and the ability to alloy the particles with chemicals dissolved in the solvent. These aspects of SPS were employed to generate a series of coatings from suspensions containing ˜100 nm diameter YSZ powder particles, some of which were alloyed with neodymium and ytterbium ions from the solvent. The SPS coatings contained columnar structures not observed in APS TBCs; thus, a theory was developed to explain the formation of these features. The thermal conductivity of the coatings was tested to evaluate the effects of these unique microstructures and the effects of the alloying process. The results for samples in the as-sprayed and heat-treated conditions were compared to conventional YSZ TBCs. This comparison showed that, relative to APS YSZ coatings, the unalloyed SPS samples typically exhibited higher as-sprayed and lower heat-treated thermal conductivities. All thermal conductivity values for the alloyed samples were lower than conventional YSZ TBCs

  14. NSTX Plasma Response to Lithium Coated Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    H.W. Kugel, M.G. Bell, J.P. Allain, R.E. Bell, S. Ding, S.P. Gerhardt, M.A. Jaworski, R. Kaita, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, R. Majeski, R. Maqueda, D.K. Mansfield, D. Mueller, R. Nygren, S.F. Paul, R. Raman, A.L. Roquemore, S.A. Sabbagh, H. Schneider, C.H. Skinner, V.A. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor, J.R. Timberlak, W.R. Wampler, L.E. Zakharov, S.J. Zweben, and the NSTX Research Team

    2011-01-21

    NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. Initial results are reported from operation with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

  15. Influence of Metal Properties on the Formation and Evolution of Metal Coatings During Mechanical Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liang; Lu, Yun; Sato, Hiromasa; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Guo, Jie

    2013-06-01

    Powders of Cu, Ti, Ni, Fe, and Zn metals were used to prepare coatings on the surfaces of Al2O3 balls by the mechanical coating technique. The coated Al2O3 balls were characterized with XRD and SEM. The results showed that all the metal powders except Ni formed continuous metal coatings. The evolution of metal coatings during mechanical coating was also investigated. The analysis indicates that as long as continuous metal coatings can be formed, the evolution can fall into the following stages: nucleation, formation and coalescence of discrete islands, formation and thickening of continuous coatings, and exfoliation of continuous coatings. Electronegativity of the metal was shown to have a major effect on the adhesion of the tiny metal particles on the surfaces of the Al2O3 balls during the initial stage of mechanical coating. The lower the electronegativity of the metal, the greater the coverage of the metal on the Al2O3 ball and the easier the adhesion of the tiny metal particles. Further, the better the plastic deformability of metal, the easier the cold welding among metal powder particles and the greater the thickness of the continuous metal coatings.

  16. Investigation of electrode distance impact on PEO coating formation assisted by simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xun; Blawert, Carsten; Höche, Daniel; Zheludkevich, Mikhail L.; Kainer, Karl U.

    2016-12-01

    The influence of electrode distance between anode and cathode during plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process on the coating formation was investigated by combining experiments and simulation. Firstly a model was built to simulate the effect of electrode distance on the anodic current distribution using finite element analyses. Complementary, PEO coatings were fabricated on AM50 magnesium alloy in an alkaline electrolyte with different electrode distances applying constant voltage. Phase composition, coating morphology and thickness were studied for both the front and back sides of the PEO coating depending on the electrode distance. For paralleled plate-like electrodes, based on coating uniformity, an optimum electrode distance of 60-80 mm was identified under the chosen experimental conditions. Via correlation of simulation and experimental results, the influence of electrode distance on coating formation is explored. It is demonstrated that under constant voltage mode, PEO coating formation is affected by electrode distance on both front and back sides of magnesium substrates. This effect is ascribed to the influence of electrode distance on the current distribution in the bath and to the related average current density on the surfaces.

  17. Plasma Sprayed Hydroxyapatite Coatings: Influence of Spraying Power on Microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd, S. M.; Abd, M. Z.; Abd, A. N.

    2010-03-11

    The plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings are used on metallic implants to enhance the bonding between the implant and bone in human body. The coating process was implemented at different spraying power for each spraying condition. The coatings formed from a rapid solidification of molten and partly molten particles that impact on the surface of substrate at high velocity and high temperature. The study was concentrated on different spraying power that is between 23 to 31 kW. The effect of different power on the coatings microstructure was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and phase composition was evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The coatings surface morphology showed distribution of molten, partially melted particles and some micro-cracks. The produced coatings were found to be porous as observed from the cross-sectional morphology. The coatings XRD results indicated the presence of crystalline phase of HA and each of the patterns was similar to the initial powder. Regardless of different spraying power, all the coatings were having similar XRD patterns.

  18. Plasma sprayed rutile titania-nanosilver antibacterial coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jinjin; Zhao, Chengjian; Zhou, Jingfang; Li, Chunxia; Shao, Yiran; Shi, Chao; Zhu, Yingchun

    2015-11-01

    Rutile titania (TiO2) coatings have superior mechanical properties and excellent stability that make them preferential candidates for various applications. In order to prevent infection arising from bacteria, significant efforts have been focused on antibacterial TiO2 coatings. In the study, titania-nanosilver (TiO2/Ag) coatings with five different kinds of weight percentages of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were prepared by plasma spray. The feedstock powders, which had a composition of rutile TiO2 powders containing 1-10,000 ppm AgNPs, were double sintered and deposited on stainless steel substrates with optimized spraying parameters. X-Ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to analysize the phase composition and surface morphology of TiO2/Ag powders and coatings. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) were employed to examine the antibacterial activity of the as-prepared coatings by bacterial counting method. The results showed that silver existed homogeneously in the TiO2/Ag coatings and no crystalline changed happened in the TiO2 structure. The reduction ratios on the TiO2/Ag coatings with 10 ppm AgNPs were as high as 94.8% and 95.6% for E. coli and S. aureus, respectively, and the TiO2/Ag coatings with 100-1000 ppm AgNPs exhibited 100% bactericidal activity against E. coli and S. aureus, which indicated the TiO2/Ag coatings with more than 10 ppm AgNPs had strong antibacterial activity. Moreover, the main factors influencing the antibacterial properties of TiO2/Ag coatings were discussed with grain size and the content of silver as well as the microstructure of the coatings.

  19. Ceramic Top Coats of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings: Materials, Processes, and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakan, Emine; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-08-01

    The ceramic top coat has a major influence on the performance of the thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs). Yttria-partially-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the top coat material frequently used, and the major deposition processes of the YSZ top coat are atmospheric plasma spraying and electron beam physical vapor deposition. Recently, also new thermal spray processes such as suspension plasma spraying or plasma spray-physical vapor deposition have been intensively investigated for TBC top coat deposition. These new processes and particularly the different coating microstructures that can be deposited with them will be reviewed in this article. Furthermore, the properties and the intrinsic-extrinsic degradation mechanisms of the YSZ will be discussed. Following the TBC deposition processes and standard YSZ material, alternative ceramic materials such as perovskites and hexaaluminates will be summarized, while properties of pyrochlores with regard to their crystal structure will be discussed more in detail. The merits of the pyrochlores such as good CMAS resistance as well as their weaknesses, e.g., low fracture toughness, processability issues, will be outlined.

  20. Cangrelor attenuates coated-platelet formation.

    PubMed

    Norgard, Nicholas B; Hann, Callie L; Dale, George L

    2009-01-01

    P2Y(12) inhibitors were introduced clinically as effective inhibitors of adenosine-5'-diphosphate (ADP) mediated platelet activation and aggregation. This class of pharmacological agents has enjoyed considerable success. Cangrelor is a recently developed P2Y(12) inhibitor that has the advantage of being an active drug not requiring metabolic conversion, although it is not orally available. Coated-platelets are a subclass of activated platelets generated on dual agonist activation with collagen plus thrombin; the primary hallmark of coated-platelets is their ability to support prothrombinase activity. Interestingly, we recently observed that the relatively weak agonist ADP potentiates the production of coated-platelets by the very strong agonists collagen plus thrombin, a previously unknown role for ADP. The authors sought in this study to determine if P2Y(12) inhibitors, such as cangrelor, were capable of attenuating this augmentation of coated-platelet generation. Cangrelor, at physiologically relevant concentrations, was able to eliminate the ADP-dependent increase in coated-platelet production with an IC(50) of 1.4 nM. Cangrelor, however, had no effect on thrombin-dependent platelet activation as measured by P-selectin expression. Although this in vitro study does not address the question of whether the effectiveness of cangrelor in vivo is partially due to an attenuation of coated-platelet production in addition to its documented antiaggregatory effects, it does reveal an unexpected action of cangrelor. Additional studies will be required to determine if all P2Y(12) inhibitors are equally effective in attenuating coated-platelet production.

  1. Plasma sprayed coatings for containment of Cu-Mg-Si metallic phase change material

    DOE PAGES

    Withey, Elizabeth Ann; Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Andraka, Charles E.; ...

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the performance of Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ), Y2O3, and Al2O3 plasma sprayed coatings are investigated for their ability to prevent attack of Haynes 230 by a near-eutectic Cu-Mg-Si metallic phase change material (PCM) in a closed environment at 820 °C. Areas where coatings failed were identified with optical and scanning electron microscopy, while chemical interactions were clarified through elemental mapping using electron microprobe analysis. Despite its susceptibility to reduction by Mg, the Al2O3 coating performed well while the YSZ and Y2O3 coating showed clear areas of attack. These results are attributed to the evolution of gaseous Mg atmore » 820 °C leading to the formation of MgO and MgAl2O4.« less

  2. Abrasive wear resistance of plasma-sprayed glass-composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawne, D. T.; Qiu, Z.; Bao, Y.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, K.

    2001-12-01

    A ball-milled mixture of glass and alumina powders has been plasma sprayed to produce alumina-glass composite coatings. The coatings have the unique advantage of a melted, ceramic secondary phase parallel to the surface in an aligned plateletlike-composite structure. The alumina raises the hardness from 300 HV for pure glass coatings to 900 HV for a 60 wt.% alumina-glass composite coating. The scratch resistance increases by a factor of 3, and the wear resistance increases by a factor of 5. The glass wears by the formation and intersection of cracks, while the alumina wears by fine abrasion and supports most of the sliding load. The wear resistance reaches a maximum at 40 to 50 vol.% alumina, above which there is little further improvement. This critical alumina content corresponds to the changeover from a glass to a ceramic matrix.

  3. CMAS Interactions with Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited via Plasma Spray- Physical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harder, B. J.; Wiesner, V. L.; Zhu, D.; Johnson, N. S.

    2017-01-01

    Materials for advanced turbine engines are expected to have temperature capabilities in the range of 1370-1500C. At these temperatures the ingestion of sand and dust particulate can result in the formation of corrosive glass deposits referred to as CMAS. The presence of this glass can both thermomechanically and thermochemically significantly degrade protective coatings on metallic and ceramic components. Plasma Spray- Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) was used to deposit advanced environmental barrier coating (EBC) systems for investigation on their interaction with CMAS compositions. Coatings were exposed to CMAS and furnace tested in air from 1 to 50 hours at temperatures ranging from 1200-1500C. Coating composition and crystal structure were tracked with X-ray diffraction and microstructure with electron microscopy.

  4. Failure analysis of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, C. C.; Miller, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Thermally induced failure processes of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings are examined. Cracking processes give rise to noise which was monitored by acoustic emission (AE) techniques. The sequential failure of coatings was examined from samples which were thermally cycled. Coatings of yttria-stabilized zirconia with and without a NiCrAlZr bond coat were plasma-sprayed onto U700 alloy rod. In some cases the substrate was intentionally overheated during deposition of the thermal protection system to check how this process variable influenced the AE response of the specimen. In this way a qualitative appraisal of how process variables affect coating integrity could be discerned in terms of cracking behavior. Results from up to seven consecutive thermal cycles are reported here. Coating failure was observed in all cases. Failure of the thermal protection system is progressive, since cracking and crack growth were observed prior to ultimate failure. Thus castastrophic failure occurs at some stage when there is a transformation from the microcrack to a macrocrack network.

  5. Formation of ZrO{sub 2} in coating on Mg–3 wt.%Al–1 wt.%Zn alloy via plasma electrolytic oxidation: Phase and structure of zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Min; Kim, Yeon Sung; Yang, Hae Woong; Park, Joo Hyun; Ko, Young Gun; Shin, Dong Hyuk

    2015-01-15

    An investigation of the coating structure formed on Mg–3 wt.%Al–1 wt.%Zn alloy sample subjected to plasma electrolytic oxidation was examined by field-emission transmission electron microscopy. The plasma electrolytic oxidation process was conducted in a phosphoric acid electrolyte containing K{sub 2}ZrF{sub 6} for 600 s. Microstructural observations showed that the coating consisting of MgO, MgF{sub 2}, and ZrO{sub 2} phases was divided into three distinctive parts, the barrier, intermediate, and outer layers. Nanocrystalline MgO and MgF{sub 2} compounds were observed mainly in the barrier layer of ~ 1 μm thick near to the substrate. From the intermediate to outer layers, various ZrO{sub 2} polymorphs appeared due to the effects of the plasma arcing temperature on the phase transition of ZrO{sub 2} compounds during the plasma electrolytic oxidation process. In the outer layer, MgO compound grew in the form of a dendrite-like structure surrounded by cubic ZrO{sub 2}. - Highlights: • The barrier layer containing MgO and MgF{sub 2} was observed near to the Mg substrate. • In the intermediate layer, m-, t-, and o-ZrO{sub 2} compounds were additionally detected. • The outer layer contained MgO with the dendrite-like structure surrounded by c-ZrO{sub 2}. • The grain sizes of compounds in oxide layer increased from barrier to outer layer.

  6. Plasma deposition of antimicrobial coating on organic polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rżanek-Boroch, Zenobia; Dziadczyk, Paulina; Czajkowska, Danuta; Krawczyk, Krzysztof; Fabianowski, Wojciech

    2013-02-01

    Organic materials used for packing food products prevent the access of microorganisms or gases, like oxygen or water vapor. To prolong the stability of products, preservatives such as sulfur dioxide, sulfites, benzoates, nitrites and many other chemical compounds are used. To eliminate or limit the amount of preservatives added to food, so-called active packaging is sought for, which would limit the development of microorganisms. Such packaging can be achieved, among others, by plasma modification of a material to deposit on its surface substances inhibiting the growth of bacteria. In this work plasma modification was carried out in barrier discharge under atmospheric pressure. Sulfur dioxide or/and sodium oxide were used as the coating precursors. As a result of bacteriological studies it was found that sulfur containing coatings show a 16% inhibition of Salmonella bacteria growth and 8% inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria growth. Sodium containing coatings show worse (by 10%) inhibiting properties. Moreover, films with plasma deposited coatings show good sealing properties against water vapor. Contribution to the Topical Issue "13th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (Hakone XIII)", Edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Henryca Danuta Stryczewska and Yvan Ségui.

  7. Use of molecular beams to support microspheres during plasma coating

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J.K.; Smith, R.D.; Johnson, W.L.; Jordan, C.W.; Letts, S.A.; Korbel, G.R.; Krenik, R.M.

    1980-08-26

    Spherical targets can be levitated on beams of Ar or other gas atoms. This is an especially useful technique for supporting microspheres during plasma coating and processing. Measurements of gas flow and pressure indicate that the levitation device operates in the regime of Knudsen's flow. This device is currently being used in the development of future generation laser targets.

  8. Plasma formation and expansion in an electrothermal plasma injector

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.D.; Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    The experimental device SIRENS has been used to conduct studies on plasma formation and expansion in electrothermal launchers. The 1-D, time-dependent fluid dynamics code, ODIN, models the energy transport, particle transport, plasma resistivity, plasma viscosity, and the equation-of-state of the source and barrel of the SIRENS experiment. Because electrothermal plasmas are highly collisional (high-density, low-temperature), the plasma is modeled as a viscous fluid, assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium for each cell. The viscous drag forces were varied according to the Reynolds number of each cell. As the Reynolds number increases the modeled drag forces change accordingly, going from laminar to smooth turbulent to rough turbulent. The measured mass loss of the ablating liner (Lexan) in the source section is in good agreement with that predicted by the code. Comparisons between the measured and predicted pressures inside the barrel are in good agreement. The pressure reaches its maximum inside the source at approximately 45 {mu}s, then decreases steadily due to the drop in temperature and density. The plasma flows into the barrel and the pressure profile begins to flatten out and drop as the plasma exits the barrel. The variation of the plasma parameters as a function of the energy input to the source have also been calculated and will be discussed.

  9. Characterization of the WC coatings deposited by plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benea, M. L.; Benea, L. P.

    2015-06-01

    Tungsten monocarbide (WC) is deposited using a plasma jet on the martensitic noncorrosive steel support (Z12CNDV12), in three different thicknesses.The characteristics of the coatings are determined by: its chemical composition, optical microscopy, RX analysis, tensile adhesion strength, Vickers hardness, the nature and the processing degree of the substrate and the deposition conditions.The method used for determining the behaviour in a corrosive environment of the WC coatings deposited by plasma spraying consists in measuring the electrochemical potential difference between the coating and the substrate, which are immersed in a solution containing NaCl as a corrosive agent. The experimental results are then mathematically processed in order to determine a law and the mechanisms involved.

  10. Microstructural characterization of small-particle plasma spray coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Arellano-Lopez, A.R. de; Faber, K.T.

    1999-08-01

    The microstructure of a small-particle plasma spray (SPPS) aluminum oxide coating sprayed onto a prepared mild steel substrate has been characterized using a variety of microscopic techniques as part of a process optimization study. The coating was highly conforming to the substrate as evidenced in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, although some voids were present at the interface. The layered splat microstructure, characteristic of conventional plasma-sprayed coatings but smaller in size, was discerned in partially thinned samples in a focused-ion-beam scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM). Microcracks and microporosity, generally less than 0.5 {micro}m in size, was also seen between splats using transmission electron microscopy. Cubic alumina of the crystallographic form {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was identified by electron diffraction.

  11. Mechanical and Tribological Behavior of Ni(Al)-Reinforced Nanocomposite Plasma Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahedi, B.

    2014-02-01

    The mechanical and tribological behavior and microstructural evolutions of the Ni(Al)-reinforced nanocomposite plasma spray coatings were studied. At first, the feedstock Ni(Al)-15 wt.% (Al2O3-13% TiO2) nanocomposite powders were prepared using low-energy mechanical milling of the pure Ni and Al powders as well as Al2O3-13% TiO2 nanoparticle mixtures. The characteristics of the powder particles and the prepared coatings depending on their microstructures were examined in detail. The results showed that the feedstock powders after milling contained only α-Ni solid solution with no trace of the intermetallic phase. However, under the air plasma spraying conditions, the NiAl intermetallic phase in the α-Ni solid solution matrix appeared. The lack of nickel aluminide formation during low-energy ball milling is beneficial hence, the exothermic reaction can occur between Ni and Al during plasma spraying, improving the adhesive strength of the nanocomposite coatings. The results also indicated that the microhardness of the α-Ni phase was 3.91 ± 0.23 GPa and the NiAl intermetallic phase had a mean microhardness of 5.69 ± 0.12 GPa. The high microhardness of the nanocomposite coatings must be due to the presence of the reinforcing nanoparticles. Due to the improvement in mechanical properties, the Ni(Al) nanocomposite coatings showed significant modifications in wear resistance with low frictional coefficient.

  12. Program for plasma-sprayed self-lubricating coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walther, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    A method for preparing composite powders of the three coating components was developed and a procedure that can be used in applying uniform coatings of the composite powders was demonstrated. Composite powders were prepared by adjusting particle sizes of the components and employing a small amount of monoaluminum phosphate as an inorganic binder. Quantitative microscopy (image analysis) was found to be a convenient method of characterizing the composition of the multiphase plasma-sprayed coatings. Area percentages and distribution of the components were readily obtained by this method. The adhesive strength of the coating to a nickel-chromium alloy substrate was increased by about 40 percent by a heat treatment of 20 hours at 650 C.

  13. In situ fabrication of blue ceramic coatings on wrought Al Alloy 2024 by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhijiang; Nie Xueyuan; Hu, Henry; Hussein, Riyad O.

    2012-03-15

    In situ formation of ceramic coatings on 2024 Al alloy with a blue color was successfully achieved using a plasma electrolytic oxidation process working at atmospheric pressure. This novel blue ceramic coating overcomes the shortcomings of surface treatments resulting from conventional dyeing processes by depositing organic dyes into the porous structure of anodic film, which has poor resistance to abrasion and rapid fading when exposed to sunlight. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy were employed to characterize the microstructure of the blue ceramic coating. The fabricated ceramic coating was composed of CoAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3.} By controlling the working parameters, the distribution of the CoAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase on the surface can be adjusted, and plays a key role in the appearance of the coating. Electrochemical testing, thermal cycling method, and pin-on-disk sliding wear testing were employed to evaluate corrosion, thermal cycling, and wear resistance of the ceramic coatings. The results indicate that the blue ceramic coating has a similar polarization resistance to that of conventional anodic film and can significantly enhance the corrosion resistance of aluminum alloy. There are no destructive horizontal cracks observed within the blue ceramic coating when subjected to 120 times of thermal cycling, which heats the samples up to 573 K and followed by submersion in water at room temperature for 10 min. Compared with the aluminum substrate as well as a conventional anodic film coated aluminum sample, the wear resistance of the blue ceramic coating coated sample was significantly increased while the coefficient of friction was decreased from 0.34 to 0.14.

  14. Plasma Spraying Of Dense, Rough Bond Coats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A.; Edmonds, Brian J.; Leissler, George W.

    1988-01-01

    Simple modification of plasma torch facilitates spraying of coarse powders. Shape of nozzle changed to obtain decrease in velocity of gas and consequent increase in time particles spend in flame before impact on substrate. Increased residence time allows melting of coarser powders, spraying of which results in rougher bond surfaces.

  15. Effect of vacuum conditions and plasma concentration on the chemical composition and adhesion of vacuum-plasma coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, D. P.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Slabodchikov, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper reports on the chemical composition of titanium nitride (TiN) and silicon (Si) coatings deposited with a new technological vacuum plasma setup which comprises magnetron sputtering systems, arc evaporators, and an efficient plasma generator. It is shown that due to highly clean vacuum conditions and highly clean surface treatment in the gas discharge plasma, both the coating-substrate interface and the coatings as such are almost free from oxygen and carbon. It is found that the coating-substrate interface represents a layer of thickness ≥ 60 nm formed through vacuum plasma mixing of the coating and substrate materials. The TiN coatings obtained on the new equipment display a higher adhesion compared to brass coatings deposited by industrial technologies via intermediate titanium oxide layers. It is concluded that the designed vacuum plasma equipment allows efficient surface modification of materials and articles by vacuum plasma immersion processes.

  16. Thermophysical properties of plasma sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, K. E.; Lagedrost, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Thermophysical properties of plasma sprayed materials were determined for the following plasma sprayed materials: CaO - stabilized ZrO2, Y2O3 - stabilized ZerO2, Al2O3, HfO2 Mo, nichrome, NiAl, Mo-ZrO2, and MoAl2O3 mixtures. In all cases the thermal conductivity of the as-sprayed materials was found to be considerably lower than that of the bulk material. The flash-laser thermal diffusivity technique was used both for diffusivity determination of single-layer materials and to determine the thermal contact resistance at the interface of two-layer specimens.

  17. Microwave plasma deposition of diamond like carbon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, D. S.; Ramachandran, K.; Venkataramani, N.; Pandey, M.; D'Cunha, R.

    2000-11-01

    he promising applications of the microwave plasmas have been appearing in the fields of chemical processes and semiconductor manufacturing. Applications include surface deposition of all types including diamond/diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings, etching of semiconductors, promotion of organic reactions, etching of polymers to improve bonding of the other materials etc. With a 2.45 GHz, 700 W, microwave induced plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system set up in our laboratory we have deposited diamond like carbon coatings. The microwave plasma generation was effected using a wave guide single mode applicator. We have deposited DLC coatings on the substrates like stainless steel, Cu--Be, Cu and Si. The deposited coatings have been characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and ellipsometric techniques. The results show that we have achieved depositing ~ 95% sp3 bonded carbon in the films. The films are uniform with golden yellow color. The films are found to be excellent insulators. The ellipsometric measurements of optical constant on silicon substrates indicate that the films are transparent above 900 nm.

  18. Studies on the Sliding Wear Performance of Plasma Spray Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Maninder; Singh, Harpreet; Singh, Balraj; Singh, Bhupinder

    2010-01-01

    Two metallic powders namely Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al were coated on AISI 309 SS steel by shrouded plasma spray process. The wear behavior of the bare, Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al-coated AISI 309 SS steel was investigated according to ASTM Standard G99-03 on a Pin-on-Disc Wear Test Rig. The wear tests were carried out at normal loads of 30 and 50 N with a sliding velocity of 1 m/s. Cumulative wear rate and coefficient of friction (μ) were calculated for all the cases. The worn-out surfaces were then examined by scanning electron microscopy analysis. Both the as-sprayed coatings exhibited typical splat morphology. The XRD analysis indicated the formation of Ni phase for the Ni-20Cr coating and Ni3Al phase for the Ni3Al coating. It has been concluded that the plasma-sprayed Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al coatings can be useful to reduce the wear rate of AISI 309 SS steel. The coatings were found to be adherent to the substrate steel during the wear tests. The plasma-sprayed Ni3Al coating has been recommended as a better choice to reduce the wear of AISI 309 SS steel, in comparison with the Ni-20Cr coating.

  19. Study on Ceramic Interconnect Manufactured by Slurry Dip Coating and Plasma Spray Coating Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gil-Yong; Kim, Jong-Hee; Ryoo, Sung-Nam; Peck, Dong-Hyun; Jung, Doo-Hwan; Shul, Yong-Gun; Shin, Dong-Ryul; Song, Rak-Hyun

    To get a stable and dense interconnect layer of anode-supported flat tubular solid oxide fuel cell stack, we have studied on the synthesis of precursors with a fine particle size and the ceramic interconnect coating technology. Coated interconnects by slurry dipping and air plasma spray processes were sintered by 2-step sintering method. Ca-doped LaCrO3 perovskites such as La0.75Ca0.27CrO3(LCC27), La0.6Ca0.41CrO3(LCC41), and La0.8Sr0.05Ca0.15CrO3(LSCC), were synthesized by Pechini process and their average particle sizes were about 1 μm. LSCC layer is a functional layer to prevent Ca migration and then LCC41 layer is coated onto it. The Ca migration in the LSCC layer did not occur. The LCC41 was coated on the air plasma spray-coated LCC27 layer by slurry dip coating process and sintered at 1200°C for 20hr. Its electrical conductivity indicated about 27 S/cm at 800°C and the bubble test showed that there is no gas permeation at pressure difference of 0.4 kgf/cm2 at room temperature.

  20. Study on electrolytic plasma discharging behavior and its influence on the plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Riyad Omran

    In this study, aluminum oxide was deposited on a pure aluminum substrate to produce hard ceramic coatings using a Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) process. The process utilized DC, unipolar pulsed DC in the frequency range (0.2 KHz -- 20 KHz) and bipolar pulsed DC current modes. The effects of process parameters (i.e., electrolyte concentration, current density and treatment time) on the plasma discharge behavior during the PEO treatment were investigated using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) in the visible and near ultraviolet (NUV) band (285 nm -- 900 nm). The emission spectra were recorded and plasma temperature profile versus processing time was constructed using the line intensity ratios method. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDS) was used to study the coating microstructure. It was found that the plasma discharge behavior significantly influenced the microstructure and the morphology of the oxide coatings. The main effect came from the strongest discharges which were initiated at the interface between the substrate and the coating. Through manipulation of process parameters to control or reduce the strongest discharge, the density and quality of the coating layers could be modified. This work demonstrated that by adjusting the ratio of the positive to negative pulse currents as well as their timing in order to eliminate the strongest discharges, the quality of the coatings was considerably improved.

  1. Investigation of mechanical properties of thermal coatings obtained during plasma spraying of powder zirconium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibragimov, A. R.; Ilinkova, T. A.; Shafigullin, L. N.; Saifutdinov, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal coatings of zirconia partially stabilized with yttrium, deposited by low-temperature plasma, are the basis for the thermal protection of aircraft engine. At the same time there is an actual problem of selection of coating systems “ceramic layer - underlayer” of great thickness, providing better thermal protection, but having low strength characteristics due to the accumulation of internal stresses. To determine the optimal thickness of the test method used in the 4-point bending to allow the surface coating to explore in the elastic-plastic behavior of the field of coatings and strength. Based on the experimental results established the role of underlayer in the formation of the complex mechanical properties of thermal barrier coatings. With a well formed underlayer (PVNH16U6) system becomes sensitive to a change in thickness of the coating, to optimize the response on the strength and deformation criteria. According to the results the optimum ratio of the thickness of the ceramic layer and the underlayer should be regarded as the ratio of 3-5 for which the highest strength values were obtained for all the test coating systems.

  2. Improved adhesion of dense silica coatings on polymers by atmospheric plasma pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linying; Ranade, Alpana N; Matos, Marvi A; Dubois, Geraud; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2013-09-11

    Oxygen atmospheric plasma was used to pretreat polycarbonate (PC) and stretched poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surfaces in order to enhance the adhesion of the dense silica coatings deposited by atmospheric plasma on the polymer substrates. The treatment time and chemical structure of the polymers were found to be important factors. For PC, a short treatment increased the adhesion energy, while longer treatment times decreased the adhesion. In contrast, plasma pretreatment monotonically decreased the adhesion of PMMA, and pristine PMMA exhibited much higher adhesion than the PC counterpart. We found that adhesion enhancement was achieved through improved chemical bonding, chain interdiffusion, and mechanical interlocking at the coating/substrate interface, after a short atmospheric plasma treatment. Decreased adhesion resulted from overoxidation and low-molecular-weight weak layer formation on the polymer surface by prolonged atmospheric plasma treatment. The dramatic differences in the behavior of PC and PMMA in relation to the plasma treatment time were due to their dissimilar resistance to atmospheric plasma exposure.

  3. Plasma-Spray Coating Thickness Monitoring System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    Boards Alignment Procedure B - Z-80 Edge Card Systems PLS-898 One Card System C - Schematics D - Calibration of Thickness Measuring Gauge iii -. f...Figures Page 1. Plasma Spray Thickness Monitoring System 1 2. Card Cage 2 3. Probe 4 4. EMI/RFI-Shielded Box 4 5. Calibration Setup 5 6. Laser 6 7. Front...located in a card cage inside the cabinet (see Figure 2). A Reticon RC100B board (Figure 2, Item 1 and Appendix A) in the card cage is used in

  4. Bioactivity and biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite-based bioceramic coatings on zirconium by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Aktuğ, Salim Levent; Durdu, Salih; Yalçın, Emine; Çavuşoğlu, Kültigin; Usta, Metin

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, hydroxyapatite (HAP)-based plasma electrolytic oxide (PEO) coatings were produced on zirconium at different current densities in a solution containing calcium acetate and β-calcium glycerophosphate by a single step. The phase structure, surface morphology, functional groups, thickness and roughness of the coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), eddy current method and surface profilometer, respectively. The phases of cubic-zirconia, calcium zirconate and HAP were detected by XRD. The amount of HAP and calcium zirconate increased with increasing current density. The surface of the coatings was very porous and rough. Moreover, bioactivity and biocompatibility of the coatings were analyzed in vitro immersion simulated body fluid (SBF) and MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay, hemolysis assay and bacterial formation. The apatite-forming ability of the coatings was evaluated after immersion in SBF up to 28days. After immersion, the bioactivity of HAP-based coatings on zirconium was greater than the ones of uncoated zirconium and zirconium oxide-based surface. The bioactivity of PEO surface on zirconium was significantly improved under SBF conditions. The bacterial adhesion of the coatings decreased with increasing current density. The bacterial adhesion of the coating produced at 0.370A/cm(2) was minimum compared to uncoated zirconium coated at 0.260 and 0.292A/cm(2). The hemocompatibility of HAP-based surfaces was improved by PEO. The cell attachment and proliferation of the PEO coatings were better than the one of uncoated zirconium according to MTT assay results.

  5. Comparison of nanowire pellicles for plasma membrane enrichment: coating nanowires on cell

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Kyoung; Rose, Rebecca; Choksawangkarn, Waeowalee; Graham, Lauren; Hu, Junkai; Fenselau, Catherine; Lee, Sang Bok

    2014-01-01

    A study is reported on the effect of nanowire density on the ease of pellicle formation and the enrichment of plasma membrane proteins for analysis by mass spectrometry. An optimized synthesis is reported for iron silicate nanowires with a narrow size range of 900 ±400 nm in length and 200 nm diameter. The nanowires were coated with Al2O3 and used to form pellicles around suspended multiple myeloma cells, which acted as a model for cells recovered from tissue samples. Lighter alumina-coated silica nanowires were also synthesized (Kim et al. 2013), which allowed a comparison of the construction of the two pellicles and of the effect of nanowire density on plasma membrane enrichment. Evidence is offered that the dense nanowire pellicle does not crush or distort these mammalian cells. Finally, the pellicles were incorporated into a mass-spectrometry-based proteomic workflow to analyze transmembrane proteins in the plasma membrane. In contrast to a prior comparison of the effect of density with nanoparticles pellicles (Choksawangkarn et al. 2013), nanowire density was not found to significantly affect the enrichment of the plasma membrane. However, nanowires with a favorable aspect for pellicle formation are more easily and reliably produced with iron silicate than with silica. Additionally, the method for pellicle formation was optimized through the use of iron silicate nanowires (ISNW), which is crucial to the improvement of PM protein enrichment and analysis. PMID:24465155

  6. Ultrasmooth plasma polymerized coatings for laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Letts, S.A.; Myers, D.W.; Witt, L.A.

    1980-08-26

    Coatings for laser fusion targets were deposited up to 135 ..mu..m thick by plasma polymerization onto 140 ..mu..m diameter DT filled glass microspheres. Ultrasmooth surfaces (no defect higher than 0.1 ..mu..m) were achieved by eliminating particulate contamination. Process generated particles were eliminated by determining the optimum operating conditions of power, gas flow, and pressure, and maintaining these conditions through feedback control. From a study of coating defects grown over known surface irregularities, a quantitative relationship between irregularity size, film thickness, and defect size was determined. This relationship was used to set standards for the maximum microshell surface irregularity tolerable in the production of hydrocarbon or fluorocarbon coated laser fusion targets.

  7. Plasma and Ion Sources in Large Area Coatings: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2005-02-28

    Efficient deposition of high-quality coatings often requires controlled application of excited or ionized particles. These particles are either condensing (film-forming) or assisting by providing energy and momentum to the film growth process, resulting in densification, sputtering/etching, modification of stress, roughness, texture, etc. In this review, the technical means are surveyed enabling large area application of ions and plasmas, with ion energies ranging from a few eV to a few keV. Both semiconductortype large area (single wafer or batch processing with {approx} 1000 cm{sup 2}) and in-line web and glass-coating-type large area (> 10{sup 7} m{sup 2} annually) are considered. Characteristics and differences between plasma and ion sources are explained. The latter include gridded and gridless sources. Many examples are given, including sources based on DC, RF, and microwave discharges, some with special geometries like hollow cathodes and E x B configurations.

  8. Use of molecular beams to support microspheres during plasma coating

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J.K.; Smith, R.D.; Johnson, W.L.; Letts, S.A.; Korbel, G.R.; Krenick, R.M.

    1980-08-26

    Spherical laser fusion targets can be levitated on beams of Ar or other gas atoms. This is an especially useful and reliable technique for supporting microspheres during plasma coating or plasma etching. The reliability of this technique is principally the result of two things: the success of a special centering device which provides a lateral, stabilizing force on the levitated microspheres; and a gas handling system which is capable of controlling levitation gas flow in the microtorr liter/sec range. We have determined that the operational regime of this device is that of Knudsen's flow. This knowledge of the flow characteristics has been important in developing this device.

  9. Surface modification of polyester fabric with plasma pretreatment and carbon nanotube coating for antistatic property improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. X.; Lv, J. C.; Ren, Y.; Zhi, T.; Chen, J. Y.; Zhou, Q. Q.; Lu, Z. Q.; Gao, D. W.; Jin, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    This study introduced a green method to prepare antistatic polyester (PET) fabrics by plasma pretreatment and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) coating. The influences of plasma conditions and SWCNT coating parameters on antistatic property of PET fabrics were investigated. PET fabrics were pretreated under various plasma conditions such as different treatment times, output powers and working gases, and then SWCNT coating on the plasma treated PET fabrics was carried out by coating-dry-cure using various coating parameters including different SWCNT concentrations, curing times and curing temperatures. PET fabrics were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and volume resistivity. SEM and XPS analysis of the plasma treated PET fabrics revealed the increase in surface roughness and oxygen/nitrogen containing groups on the PET fiber surface. SEM and XPS analysis of the plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics indicated the SWCNT coating on PET fiber surface. The plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics exhibited a good antistatic property, which increased and then decreased with the increasing plasma treatment time and output power. The antistatic property of the O2 plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabric was better and worse than that of N2 or Ar plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabric in the shorter treatment time and the longer treatment time, respectively. In addition, the antistatic property of the plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics also increased with the increasing SWCNT concentration, curing time and curing temperature in the range studied. Plasma conditions and SWCNT coating parameters had signally influence on the antistatic property of plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics. Therefore, adequate parameters should be carefully selected for the optimum antistatic property of the plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics.

  10. Preparation and Mechanism of Controllable Micropores on Bioceramic TiO2 Coatings by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-Yuan; Zhu, Rui-Fu; Lu, Yu-Peng; Xiao, Gui-Yong; Ma, Jie; Yuan, Y. F.

    2013-09-01

    Porous titania coatings with Ca and P elements were synthesized by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO). The treatment was carried out in an electrolyte containing calcium acetate monohydrate and disodium phosphate dodecahydrate (Ca/P = 5), and 4-20 μm micropores were prepared on the coatings by applied pulse frequencies of 200-1000 Hz. The surface structure, chemical composition of the TiO2 coatings, and time-dependent variation of electric currents were studied. The result revealed that the coating micropores, which could be controlled in size, increased with higher frequency, and the coatings mainly consisted of anatase and rutile phases with varying fractions. Based on our experiment, the formation mechanism of micropores and phases of the PEO coatings was further discussed in details.

  11. A conformal oxidation-resistant, plasma-polymerized coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Wydeven, Theodore; Lerner, Narcinda R.

    1991-01-01

    A comparative study was made of the surface recession (etching) of thin films of plasma polymerized tetrafluoro ethylene (PPTFE), polytetrafluoro ethylene (PTFE), and ion-beam sputter deposited polytetrafluoro ethylene (SPTFE) exposed to ground-state atomic oxygen downstream from a nonequilibrium radio-frequency O2 plasma. At 22 C, the etch rates for PTFE, SPTFE, and PPTFE were in the ratio of 8.7:1.8:1.0. A thin, conformal coating of PPTFE (etch rate of 0.3 nm/h at 22 C) was found to protect an underlying cast film of a reactive polymer, cis-1,4 polybutadiene, against ground-state atomic oxygen attack for the time required to fully etch away the PPTFE coating. From ESCA analysis, PTFE exhibited only minor surface oxidation (uptake of 0.5 atom percent O) upon etching, its F/C ratio decreasing slightly from 2.00 to 1.97; PPTFE exhibited considerable surface oxidation (uptake of 5.9 atom percent O) intermediate between those of PTFE and PPTFE, with a decrease in F/C ratio from 1.73 to 1.67. A plasma-polymerized fluorocarbon coating such as PPTFE might be useful for space applications to protect polymers that are vulnerable to oxidation or degradation by oxygen atoms.

  12. Preparation and properties of plasma electrolytic oxidation coating on sandblasted pure titanium by a combination treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Yuan; Zhu, Rui-Fu; Lu, Yu-Peng; Xiao, Gui-Yong; Zhao, Xing-Chuan; He, Kun; Yuan, Y F; Li, Ying; Ma, Xiao-Ni

    2014-09-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is one of the most applicable methods to produce bioceramic coating on a dental implant and sandblasting is a primary technique to modify metal surface properties. This study aims to deposit bioceramic Ca- and P-containing coatings on sandblasted commercially pure titanium by PEO technique to improve its bioactive performance. The time-dependent modified surfaces are characterized in terms of their microstructure, phase, chemical composition, mechanical properties and bioactivities. The results show that the combination-treated coating exhibits better properties than the PEO-treated one, especially in bioactivities, as evidenced by the HA formation after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 5 days and the cell viability after seeding for 1 or 3 days. The enhancement of the modified surface is attributed to a combination of the mechanical sandblasting and the microplasma oxidation.

  13. Highly Segmented Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by Suspension Plasma Spray: Effects of Spray Process on Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaolong; Honda, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Seiji; Araki, Hiroshi; Murakami, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Makoto; Sakka, Yoshio

    2016-12-01

    Effects of the ceramic powder size used for suspension as well as several processing parameters in suspension plasma spraying of YSZ were investigated experimentally, aiming to fabricate highly segmented microstructures for thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to observe the atomization process and the velocity distribution of atomized droplets and ceramic particles travelling toward the substrates. The tested parameters included the secondary plasma gas (He versus H2), suspension injection flow rate, and substrate surface roughness. Results indicated that a plasma jet with a relatively higher content of He or H2 as the secondary plasma gas was critical to produce highly segmented YSZ TBCs with a crack density up to 12 cracks/mm. The optimized suspension flow rate played an important role to realize coatings with a reduced porosity level and improved adhesion. An increased powder size and higher operation power level were beneficial for the formation of highly segmented coatings onto substrates with a wider range of surface roughness.

  14. Quasistatic formation of the spheromak plasma configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, M.; Furth, H.P.; Hsu, W.; Jardin, S.; Janos, A.; Okabayashi, M.; Sinnis, J.; Stix, T.H.; Yamazaki, K.

    1980-10-01

    A novel method for creating the spheromak configuration has been proposed and verified experimentally. The scheme is based on a transfer of poloidal and toroidal magnetic fluxes into a plasma from a flux core. In this paper we present the first experimental verification of this quasistatic (tau/sub Alf/ much less than tau/sub form/ < tau/sub diff/) formation scheme, which is suitable for future scale-up to fusion-reactor parameters.

  15. Vortex formation in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Osamu

    Complex plasma experiments in ground-based laboratories as well as in microgravity conditions have shown the formation of vortex structures in various conditions (e.g., 1,2,3,4). The vortex structures formed in a complex plasma are visible by naked eyes with the help of irradiating laser and the individual dust particles in the structure give us the opportunity to study detailed physics of the commonly observed natural phenomena known such as tornadoes, typhoons, hurricanes and dust devils. Based on the Navier-Stokes equation with proper complex plasma conditions we analyze as much as possible in a universal way the vortex structure and clarifies the role of the controlling parameters like flow velocity and external magnetic field. 1. G. E. Morfill,H. M. Thomas, U. Konopka,H. Rothermel, M. Zuzic, A. Ivlev, and J. Goree, Phys,. Rev. Lett. 83, 1598 (1999). 2. E. Nebbat and R. Annou, Phys. Plasmas 17, 093702 (2010). 3. Y. Saitou and O. Ishihara, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 185003 (2013). 4. V. N. Tsytovich and N. G. Gusein-zade, Plasma Phys. Rep. 39, 515 (2013).

  16. Hierarchical Formation of Intrasplat Cracks in Thermal Spray Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2016-06-01

    Intrasplat cracks, an essential feature of thermally sprayed ceramic coatings, play important roles in determining coating properties. However, final intrasplat crack patterns are always considered to be disordered and irregular, resulting from random cracking during splat cooling, since the detailed formation process of intrasplat cracks has scarcely been considered. In the present study, the primary formation mechanism for intrasplat cracking was explored based on both experimental observations and mechanical analysis. The results show that the intrasplat crack pattern in thermally sprayed ceramic splats presents a hierarchical structure with four sides and six neighbors, indicating that intrasplat crack patterns arise from successive domain divisions due to sequential cracking during splat cooling. The driving forces for intrasplat cracking are discussed, and the experimental data quantitatively agree well with theoretical results. This will provide insight for further coating structure designs and tailoring by tuning of intrasplat cracks.

  17. Effect of Plasma Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing on HVOF-Sprayed Stainless Steel Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gayoung; Bae, Gyuyeol; Moon, Kyungil; Lee, Changhee

    2013-12-01

    In this work, the effects of plasma nitriding (PN) and nitrocarburizing on HVOF-sprayed stainless steel nitride layers were investigated. 316 (austenitic), 17-4PH (precipitation hardening), and 410 (martensitic) stainless steels were plasma-nitrided and nitrocarburized using a N2 + H2 gas mixture and the gas mixture containing C2H2, respectively, at 550 °C. The results showed that the PN and nitrocarburizing produced a relatively thick nitrided layer consisting of a compound layer and an adjacent nitrogen diffusion layer depending on the crystal structures of the HVOF-sprayed stainless steel coatings. Also, the diffusion depth of nitrogen increased when a small amount of C2H2 (plasma nitrocarburizing process) was added. The PN and nitrocarburizing resulted in not only an increase of the surface hardness, but also improvement of the load bearing capacity of the HVOF-sprayed stainless steel coatings because of the formation of CrN, Fe3N, and Fe4N phases. Also, the plasma-nitrocarburized HVOF-sprayed 410 stainless steel had a superior surface microhardness and load bearing capacity due to the formation of Cr23C6 on the surface.

  18. Character of laser-glazed, plasma-sprayed zirconia coatings on stainless steel substrata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischman, G. S.; Chen, C. H.; Rigsbee, J. M.; Brown, S. D.

    1985-01-01

    Partially stabilized zirconia was applied as coatings to 316L stainless steel substrata using an 80-kw arc-plasma unit. Some of these coating-substrate systems were subsequently glazed using a 10 kw CO2 continuous-wavelength laser. SEM was used to characterize the microstructures of the coatings and coating-substrate interfaces. Results are reported and discussed.

  19. Character of laser-glazed, plasma-sprayed zirconia coatings on stainless steel substrata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischman, G. S.; Chen, C. H.; Rigsbee, J. M.; Brown, S. D.

    1985-01-01

    Partially stabilized zirconia was applied as coatings to 316L stainless steel substrata using an 80-kw arc-plasma unit. Some of these coating-substrate systems were subsequently glazed using a 10 kw CO2 continuous-wavelength laser. SEM was used to characterize the microstructures of the coatings and coating-substrate interfaces. Results are reported and discussed.

  20. Plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings on γTiAl alloy for potential biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Lara Rodriguez, L; Sundaram, P A; Rosim-Fachini, E; Padovani, A M; Diffoot-Carlo, N

    2014-07-01

    In an attempt to enhance the potential of gamma titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy as a biomaterial, its surface characteristics were successfully modified using a calcium and phosphorous rich electrolyte through the application of plasma electrolytic oxidation. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to characterize the morphology and topographical features of the resulting coating while X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to determine the surface oxide composition. The mechanical properties of the surface coating were characterized by nanoindentation studies. The results observed show the formation of a submicron scale porous structure and a concomitant increase in the surface roughness. The surface oxide was composed of rutile and anatase phases. Composition gradients of Ca and P were also present which can possibly enhance the biomaterial application potential of this treated surface. Nanoindentation measurements indicate the formation of a fairly compact oxide during the process.

  1. Investigation of the Electrolyte Effects on Formation of Vanadium Carbide via Plasma Electrolytic Saturation Method (pes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbanian, Babak; Khoie, Seyed Mohammad Mousavi; Rasouli, Mahmood; Doodran, Ramona Javadi

    2016-02-01

    One of the most important hardening methods of tool steel is the use of carbide coatings. During this process, vanadium atoms diffuse the specimen’s surface at high temperature and reacts with the available carbon in steel and create vanadium carbide with high hardness. During the plasma electrolytic saturation (PES) process, the vanadium element diffuses with the help of plasma and increases up to around 950∘ as a result of the temperature, providing conditions for the creation of vanadium carbide. The best combination of electrolyte is 4g vanadium oxide and 50mL hydrochloric acid and different concern of sodium hydroxide. The results indicate that the formed coating is about 30μm. As the conductivity increases, the condition for diffusion is provided; however, with increase in the temperature, the diffusion decreases. The coating formation is observed in the current at 9-11 A and hardness of this coating is about 1400vickers.

  2. Plasma Response to Lithium-Coated Plasma-Facing Components in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    M.G. Bell, H.W. Kugel, R. Kaita, L.E. Zakharov, H. Schneider, B.P. LeBlanc, D. Mansfield, R.E. Bell, R. Maingi, S. Ding, S.M. Kaye, S.F. Paul, S.P. Gerhardt, J.M. Canik, J.C. Hosea, G. Taylor and the NSTX Research Team

    2009-08-20

    Experiments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) have shown beneficial effects on the performance of divertor plasmas as a result of applying lithium coatings on the graphite and carbonfiber- composite plasma-facing components. These coatings have mostly been applied by a pair of lithium evaporators mounted at the top of the vacuum vessel which inject collimated streams of lithium vapor towards the lower divertor. In NBI-heated, deuterium H-mode plasmas run immediately after the application of lithium, performance modifications included decreases in the plasma density, particularly in the edge, and inductive flux consumption, and increases in the electron and ion temperatures and the energy confinement time. Reductions in the number and amplitude of ELMs were observed, including complete ELM suppression for periods up to 1.2 s, apparently as a result of altering the stability of the edge. However, in the plasmas where ELMs were suppressed, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities, although not of lithium itself which remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. The impurity buildup could be inhibited by repetitively triggering ELMs with the application of brief pulses of an n = 3 radial field perturbation. The reduction in the edge density by lithium also inhibited parasitic losses through the scrape-off layer of ICRF power coupled to the plasma, enabling the waves to heat electrons in the core of H-mode plasmas produced by NBI. Lithium has also been introduced by injecting a stream of chemically stabilized, fine lithium powder directly into the scrape-off layer of NBI-heated plasmas. The lithium was ionized in the SOL and appeared to flow along the magnetic field to the divertor plates. This method of coating produced similar effects to the evaporated lithium but at lower amounts.

  3. Influence of injected silver content on synthesis of silver coated nickel particles by DC thermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Si Taek; Kim, Tae-Hee; Park, Dong-Wha

    2016-06-01

    Silver nanoparticle-coated spherical nickel particles were prepared from a mixture of micro-sized silver and nickel as raw materials by DC thermal plasma treatment. The mixture of micro-sized silver and nickel powders was injected into the high-temperature region of an argon thermal plasma jet. Although the silver, with its very high thermal conductivity and relatively low boiling point, was thoroughly evaporated by this process, nickel was not evaporated perfectly because of its comparatively low thermal conductivity and high boiling point. The rough nickel powder was spheroidized as it melted. Finally, silver evaporated by the thermal plasma quickly condensed into nanoparticles on the surfaces of the micro-sized spherical nickel particles, aided by the sharp temperature gradient of the thermal plasma jet. With varying the ratios of silver to nickel feedstock from 1:10 to 5:1, the products synthesized in each condition were examined by XRD, XPS, FE-SEM, and FE-TEM. More silver nanoparticles were attached on the nickel by increasing the injected feedstock to 9.8 at% silver. Meanwhile, a decrease of silver in the products was observed when larger amounts of silver were introduced to the thermal plasma jet. The exposed silver components decreased with greater proportions of silver feedstock because of the metal's dendritic structure and the formation of silver-coated silver particles.

  4. The effect of plasma-sprayed coatings on the fatigue of titanium alloy implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Todd

    1994-02-01

    The application of titanium plasma-spray coatings to Ti-6Al-4V orthopedic implants results in a dramatic decrease in high-cycle fatigue performance. The better bonding of the plasma sprayed and heat-treated implants results in a lower high-cycle fatigue strength. Therefore, the use of plasma-spray textured coatings on implants must be considered with caution.

  5. Ceramic plasma-sprayed coating of melting crucibles for casting metal fuel slugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki Hwan; Lee, Chong Tak; Lee, Chan Bock; Fielding, R. S.; Kennedy, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    Thermal cycling and melt reaction studies of ceramic coatings plasma-sprayed on Nb substrates were carried out to evaluate the performance of barrier coatings for metallic fuel casting applications. Thermal cycling tests of the ceramic plasma-sprayed coatings to 1450 °C showed that HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating had good cycling characteristics with few interconnected cracks even after 20 cycles. Interaction studies by 1550 °C melt dipping tests of the plasma-sprayed coatings also indicated that HfN and Y2O3 do not form significant reaction layer between U-20 wt.% Zr melt and the coating layer. Plasma-sprayed Y2O3 coating exhibited the most promising characteristics among HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating.

  6. Ceramic plasma-sprayed coating of melting crucibles for casting metal fuel slugs

    SciTech Connect

    K.H. Kim; C.T. Lee; C.B. Lee; R.S. Fielding; J.R. Kennedy

    2013-10-01

    Thermal cycling and melt reaction studies of ceramic coatings plasma-sprayed on Nb substrates were carried out to evaluate the performance of barrier coatings for metallic fuel casting applications. Thermal cycling tests of the ceramic plasma-sprayed coatings to 1450 degrees C showed that HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating had good cycling characteristics with few interconnected cracks even after 20 cycles. Interaction studies by 1550 degrees C melt dipping tests of the plasma-sprayed coatings also indicated that HfN and Y2O3 do not form significant reaction layer between U–20 wt.% Zr melt and the coating layer. Plasma-sprayed Y2O3 coating exhibited the most promising characteristics among HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating.

  7. Plasma-sprayed metal-glass fluoride coatings for lubrication to 1170 K (1650 F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma spray of Nichrome matrix composite contains dispersed glass for oxidation protection and calcium fluoride for lubrication. Coatings can be applied to bearing journals and bearing bores. Coating was easily machinable and had excellent bond strength on substrate metal.

  8. Effect of substrate preheating temperature and coating thickness on residual stress in plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Dapei

    2015-07-01

    A thermal-mechanical coupling model was developed based on thermal-elastic- plastic theory according the special process of plasma spraying Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating upon Ti-6Al-4V substrate. On the one hand, the classical Fourier transient heat conduction equation was modified by introducing the effect item of deformation on temperature, on the other hand, the Johnson-Cook model, suitable for high temperature and high strain rate conditions, was used as constitutive equation after considering temperature softening effect, strain hardening effect and strain rate reinforcement effect. Based on the above coupling model, the residual stress field within the HA coating was simulated by using finite element method (FEM). Meanwhile, the substrate preheating temperature and coating thickness on the influence of residual stress components were calculated, respectively. The failure modes of coating were also preliminary analyzed. In addition, in order to verify the reliability of calculation, the material removal measurement technique was applied to determine the residual stress of HA coating near the interface. Some important conclusions are obtained.

  9. Biocompatibility of Cation Coated on Plasma-Polymerized Ti Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kang; Ko, Yeong-Mu; Kim, Byung-Hoon

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the bone formation properties and cell responses on Na-, Mg-, K-, and Ca-ion-exchanged carboxyl plasma polymerized titanium (Ti) surfaces. The phase and morphologies of deposits bonelike apatite were significantly influence by the cation species. Na and Mg ions promote bonelike apatite nucleation and growth on plasma-functionalized Ti surfaces in simulated body fluid (SBF) and improves the crystallinity of the bonelike apatite deposited layer. The cell viability tests revealed significantly enhanced viability on the Ca-ion-exchanged plasma-functionalized Ti surface than on any other surface.

  10. Chlorine-rich plasma polymer coating for the prevention of attachment of pathogenic fungal cells onto materials surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamont-Friedrich, Stephanie J.; Michl, Thomas D.; Giles, Carla; Griesser, Hans J.; Coad, Bryan R.

    2016-07-01

    The attachment of pathogenic fungal cells onto materials surfaces, which is often followed by biofilm formation, causes adverse consequences in a wide range of areas. Here we have investigated the ability of thin film coatings from chlorinated molecules to deter fungal colonization of solid materials by contact killing of fungal cells reaching the surface of the coating. Coatings were deposited onto various substrate materials via plasma polymerization, which is a substrate-independent process widely used for industrial coating applications, using 1,1,2-trichloroethane as the process vapour. XPS surface analysis showed that the coatings were characterized by a highly chlorinated hydrocarbon polymer nature, with only a very small amount of oxygen incorporated. The activity of these coatings against human fungal pathogens was quantified using a recently developed, modified yeast assay and excellent antifungal activity was observed against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. Plasma polymer surface coatings derived from chlorinated hydrocarbon molecules may therefore offer a promising solution to preventing yeast and mould biofilm formation on materials surfaces, for applications such as air conditioners, biomedical devices, food processing equipment, and others.

  11. Graphene as a Coating for Plasma Facing Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Marcos; Rojas, Richard; Kulcisnki, Gerald; Lagally, Max; Santarius, John

    2016-10-01

    Graphene has been a source of interest for multiple applications because of its unusual electronic and mechanical properties. A number of experimental studies have established that defect-free graphene is an excellent chemical-barrier material, but there have been no reports of graphene proposed as a protective coating against ion and/or neutral interactions with material surfaces. In the presence of such irradiation, plasma facing components (PFC's) tend to develop ``fuzz/grass'' structures that lead to the sputtering of wall material, diminishing the lifetime of the PFC's and plasma performance. We have shown that graphene can reduce or eliminate changes on surface morphology due to energetic helium. In the case of graphene-covered tungsten, our results show that, compared to the uncovered W, graphene suppresses these morphologies that form on the surface of hot W. Using Raman spectroscopy as a diagnostic, the graphene coating shows little sign of damage after being irradiated, indicating that there is little to no sputtering of carbon impurities from the surface. We have also determined that the mass losses in W have been reduced significantly. Both decreases in impurities can lead to an improved plasma performance and longer lifetimes for PFC's. This work has been supported by GERS and TEAM-Science at the UW-Madison.

  12. Improved uniformity of multiphase ceramic-metal plasma-sprayed coats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, H. H.; Logan, W. R.; Harada, Y.; Jacobson, T. P.; Sliney, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    Processing-technology development of a multiphase, self-lubricating, plasma-spray powder resulted in greater uniformity and reproducibility of plasma-sprayed coats. The effect of particle-size variation, binder concentration, and reproducible processing parameters are reported. Greater adhesive strengths of coats to substrates were achieved by particle-size variation, use of an intermediate bond coat such as Ni-Cr, or heat treatment. Quantitative analyses of polished, coated specimens are also given.

  13. Post-treatment of Plasma-Sprayed Amorphous Ceramic Coatings by Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chraska, T.; Pala, Z.; Mušálek, R.; Medřický, J.; Vilémová, M.

    2015-04-01

    Alumina-zirconia ceramic material has been plasma sprayed using a water-stabilized plasma torch to produce free standing coatings. The as-sprayed coatings have very low porosity and are mostly amorphous. The amorphous material crystallizes at temperatures above 900 °C. A spark plasma sintering apparatus has been used to heat the as-sprayed samples to temperatures above 900 °C to induce crystallization, while at the same time, a uniaxial pressure of 80 MPa has been applied to their surface. After such post-treatment, the ceramic samples are crystalline and have very low open porosity. The post-treated material exhibits high hardness and significantly increased flexural strength. The post-treated samples have a microstructure that is best described as nanocomposite with the very small crystallites embedded in an amorphous matrix.

  14. Low friction stainless steel coatings graphite doped elaborated by air plasma sprayed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harir, A.; Ageorges, H.; Grimaud, A.; Fauchais, P.; Platon, F.

    2004-10-01

    A new process has been developed to incorporate graphite particles into a stainless steel coating during its formation. Four means have been tested to inject the graphite particles outside the plasma jet and its plume: graphite suspension, a graphite rod rubbed on the rotating sample, powder injection close to the substrate with an injector, or a specially designed guide. The last process has been shown to be the most versatile and the most easily controllable. It allows the incorporation of between 2 and 12 vol.% of graphite particles (2 15 µm) within the plasma sprayed stainless steel coatings. A volume fraction of 2% seems to give the best results with a slight decrease (6%) of the coating hardness. This volume fraction also gave the best results in dry friction on the pin-on-disk apparatus. Depending on the sliding velocity (0.1 0.5 m/s) and loads (3.7 28 N), the dry friction coefficient against a 100C6 pin is reduced by between 1.5 and 4 compared with that obtained with plasma sprayed stainless steel.

  15. The ice repellency of plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughi Mobarakeh, L.; Jafari, R.; Farzaneh, M.

    2013-11-01

    A superhydrophobic thin film was deposited on an aluminium oxide substrate by low pressure plasma polymerization of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO). The coating was determined to be superhydrophobic due to its high water contact angle (∼158°) and low contact angle hysteresis. The aim of this work is to verify the icephobic properties of the HMDSO thin films obtained under simulated atmospheric conditions in a wind tunnel at sub-zero temperature and subsequent centrifugal adhesion test. The results obtained showed that the ice adhesion strength of the superhydrophobic HMDSO coating was 3.5 times lower than that on an aluminium substrate as reference tests. Although ice adhesion strength of the surface increased after 15 times icing/de-icing cycles, the surface kept its icephobic properties (ice adhesion strength 1.4 times lower than untreated aluminium).

  16. Microstructural study of as sprayed and heat treated Ni3Al coatings deposited by air plasma spraying technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, K.; Rafiq, M. A.; Nusair Khan, A.; Rauf, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    Air plasma spraying system was utilized to deposit Ni3Al coatings on AISI 321 steel samples. After plasma spraying the coatings were heat treated at different temperatures i.e. 500 °C to 800 °C for 10 to 100 hours. The characterization tools such as, X-Ray diffraction analysis, optical and scanning electron microscopy were used. By comparing the XRD scan data of as sprayed and heat treated coating, it was observed that the formation of NiO increases drastically with time and temperature. Due to the formation of NiO, hardness was also enhanced. The oxidation behavior was observed by using optical microscope and when it was studied that the oxidation was increasing with time and temperature. Further, the SEM tool was utilized to study the detail microstructural behavior such as shrinkage cavity and oxide particles. The other phases like alumina and spinel phases were determined by using Energy dispersive spectrometer method.

  17. Antifungal coatings by caspofungin immobilization onto biomaterials surfaces via a plasma polymer interlayer.

    PubMed

    Griesser, Stefani S; Jasieniak, Marek; Coad, Bryan R; Griesser, Hans J

    2015-12-14

    Not only bacteria but also fungal pathogens, particularly Candida species, can lead to biofilm infections on biomedical devices. By covalent grafting of the antifungal drug caspofungin, which targets the fungal cell wall, onto solid biomaterials, a surface layer can be created that might be able to provide long-term protection against fungal biofilm formation. Plasma polymerization of propionaldehyde (propanal) was used to deposit a thin (∼20 nm) interfacial bonding layer bearing aldehyde surface groups that can react with amine groups of caspofungin to form covalent interfacial bonds for immobilization. Surface analyses by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry confirmed the intended grafting and uniformity of the coatings, and durability upon extended washing. Testing for fungal cell attachment and ensuing biofilm formation showed that caspofungin retained activity when covalently bound onto surfaces, disrupting colonizing Candida cells. Mammalian cytotoxicity studies using human primary fibroblasts indicated that the caspofungin-grafted surfaces were selective in eliminating fungal cells while allowing attachment and spreading of mammalian cells. These in vitro data suggest promise for use as antifungal coatings, for example, on catheters, and the use of a plasma polymer interlayer enables facile transfer of the coating method onto a wide variety of biomaterials and biomedical devices.

  18. Very low pressure plasma sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coating using a low-energy plasma gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Nannan; Bolot, Rodolphe; Planche, Marie-Pierre; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, a more economical low-energy plasma source was used to perform a very low pressure plasma-spray (VLPPS) process. The plasma-jet properties were analyzed by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Moreover, yttria-stabilized zirconia coating (YSZ) was elaborated by a F100 low-power plasma gun under working pressure of 1 mbar, and the substrate specimens were partially shadowed by a baffle-plate during plasma spraying for obtaining different coating microstructures. Based on the SEM observation, a column-like grain coating was deposited by pure vapor deposition at the shadowed region, whereas, in the unshadowed region, the coating exhibited a binary microstructure which was formed by a mixed deposition of melted particles and evaporated particles. The mechanical properties of the coating were also well under investigation.

  19. Induction plasma calcining of pigment particles for thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    Induction plasma heating techniques were studied for calcining zinc orthotitanate particles for use in thermal control coatings. Previous studies indicated that the optimum calcining temperature is between 1400 and 1750 C. An intermediate temperature (1670 C) was chosen as a reference point for running a temperature series at the reference point and 220 C on both sides. The effect of varying chamber temperature on the reflectance spectra, before and after vacuum UV irradiation, is presented. The correlation between Zn2Ti04 paramagnetic resonance activity and its susceptibility to vacuum UV damage is discussed.

  20. Water vapor resistance of plasma-polymerized coatings on potassium bromide windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.; Johnson, C. C.

    1981-01-01

    Plasma-polymerized tetrafluoroethylene (PPTFE) coated potassium bromide IR window are shown to possess better resistance to moisture than either ethylene or chlorotrifluoroethylene. The PPTFE-coated windows tolerated an upper limit relative humidity of about 80% at 297 K, without visible damage to either window or coating, over a period of 24 hours. Elemental analysis of the bulk, and photoelectron spectroscopy of the coating surface, showed that PPTFE coatings deposited downstream of the internal plasma reactor electrodes contained less atmospheric oxygen than coatings deposited between the electrodes; perhaps accounting for the improved moisture resistance.

  1. Influence of ion bombardment of a substrate on the quality of vacuum-plasma Ti-TiN coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhtman, S. R.; Migranov, M. Sh

    2017-07-01

    The characteristics of the quality of multi-layer vacuum ion-plasma coatings Ti-TiN such as roughness and adhesion strength are investigated. It is shown that additional ion bombardment promotes the production of high-quality coatings. Ion bombardment has a significant effect on the state of the surface layer of the metal. In the process of ion bombardment, conditions are created for the formation of active adsorption centers and the formation of a fine-grained structure, nanoscale grains and layers.

  2. Microstructure and characterization of a novel cobalt coating prepared by cathode plasma electrolytic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Cheng; He, Yedong

    2015-10-01

    A novel cobalt coating was prepared by cathode plasma electrolytic deposition (CPED). The kinetics of the electrode process in cathode plasma electrolytic deposition was studied. The composition and microstructure of the deposited coatings were investigated by SEM, EDS, XRD and TEM. The novel cobalt coatings were dense and uniform, showing a typically molten morphology, and were deposited with a rather fast rate. Different from the coatings prepared by conventional electrodeposition or chemical plating, pure cobalt coatings with face center cubic (fcc) structure were obtained by CPED. The deposited coatings were nanocrystalline structure with an average grain size of 40-50 nm, exhibited high hardness, excellent adhesion with the stainless steels, and superior wear resistance. The properties of the novel cobalt coatings prepared by CPED have been improved significantly, as compared with that prepared by conventional methods. It reveals that cathode plasma electrolytic deposition is an effective way to prepare novel cobalt coatings with high quality.

  3. Controlled drug release through a plasma polymerized tetramethylcyclo-tetrasiloxane coating barrier.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Shigemasa; Chen, Meng; Zamora, Paul O

    2012-01-01

    A plasma polymerized tetramethylcyclo-tetrasiloxane (TMCTS) coating was deposited onto a metallic biomaterial, 316 stainless steel, to control the release rate of drugs, including daunomycin, rapamycin and NPC-15199 (N-(9-fluorenylmethoxy-carbonyl)-leucine), from the substrate surface. The plasma-state polymerized TMCTS thin film was deposited in a vacuum plasma reactor operated at a radio-frequency of 13.56 MHz, and was highly adhesive to the stainless steel, providing a smooth and hard coating layer for drugs coated on the substrate. To investigate the influence of plasma coating thickness on the drug diffusion profile, coatings were deposited at various time lengths from 20 s to 6 min, depending on the type of drug. Atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) was utilized to characterize coating thickness. Drug elution was measured using a spectrophotometer or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system. The experimental results indicate that plasma polymerized TMCTS can be used as an over-coating to control drug elution at the desired release rate. The drug-release rate was also found to be dependent on the molecular weight of the drug with plasma coating barrier on top of it. The in vitro cytotoxicity test result suggested that the TMCTS plasma coatings did not produce a cytotoxic response to mammalian cells. The non-cytotoxicity of TMCTS coating plus its high thrombo-resistance and biocompatibility are very beneficial to drug-eluting devices that contact blood.

  4. Plasma mediated collagen-I-coating of metal implant materials to improve biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Joerg; Koeller, Manfred; Bensch, Sebastian; Halfmann, Helmut; Awakowicz, Peter; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Esenwein, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    This study describes the collagen-I coating of titanium and steel implants via cold low-pressure gas plasma treatment. To analyze the coatings in terms of biocompatibility osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells and human leukocytes were cultivated on the metal surfaces. Two different implant materials were assessed (Ti6Al4V, X2CrNiMo18) and four different surface properties were evaluated: (a) plasma pretreated and collagen-I coated implant materials; (b) collagen-I dip-coated without plasma pretreatment; (c) plasma treated but not collagen-I coated; (d) standard implant materials served as control. The different coating characteristics were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For adhesion and viability tests calcein-AM staining of the cells and Alamar blue assays were performed. The quantitative analysis was conducted by computer assisted microfluorophotography and spectrometer measurements. SEM analysis revealed that stable collagen-I coatings could not be achieved on the dip-coated steel and titanium alloys. Only due to pretreatment with low-pressure gas plasma a robust deposition of collagen I on the surface could be achieved. The cell viability and cell attachment rate on the plasma pretreated, collagen coated surfaces was significantly (p < 0.017) increased compared to the non coated surfaces. Gas plasma treatment is a feasible method for the deposition of proteins on metal implant materials resulting in an improved biocompatibility in vitro. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2010.

  5. Atmospheric Plasma Deposition of Diamond-like Carbon Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Ladwig, Angela

    2008-01-23

    There is great demand for thin functional coatings in the semiconductor, optics, electronics, medical, automotive and aerospace industries [1-13]. As fabricated components become smaller and more complex, the properties of the materials’ surface take on greater importance. Thin coatings play a key role in tailoring surfaces to give them the desired hardness, wear resistance, chemical inertness, and electrical characteristics. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings possess an array of desirable properties, including outstanding abrasion and wear resistance, chemical inertness, hardness, a low coefficient of friction and exceptionally high dielectric strength [14-22]. Diamond-like carbon is considered to be an amorphous material, containing a mixture of sp2 and sp3 bonded carbon. Based on the percentage of sp3 carbon and the hydrogen content, four different types of DLC coatings have been identified: tetrahedral carbon (ta-C), hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) hard, a-C:H soft, and hydrogenated tetrahedral carbon (ta-C:H) [20,24,25]. Possessing the highest hardness of 80 GPa, ta-C possesses an sp3 carbon content of 80 to 88u%, and no appreciable hydrogen content whereas a-C:H soft possesses a hardness of less than 10 GPa, contains an sp3 carbon content of 60% and a hydrogen content between 30 to 50%. Methods used to deposit DLC coatings include ion beam deposition, cathodic arc spray, pulsed laser ablation, argon ion sputtering, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition [73-83]. Researchers contend that several advantages exist when depositing DLC coatings in a low-pressure environment. For example, ion beam processes are widely utilized since the ion bombardment is thought to promote denser sp3-bonded carbon networks. Other processes, such as sputtering, are better suited for coating large parts [29,30,44]. However, the deposition of DLC in a vacuum system has several disadvantages, including high equipment cost and restrictions on the size and shape of

  6. Thermodynamics and kinetics of pack aluminide coating formation on IN-100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Caves, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of pack variables on the formation of aluminide coatings on nickel-base superalloy IN-100 was conducted. Also, the thermodynamics and kinetics of coating formation were analyzed. Observed coating weights were in good agreement with predictions made from the analysis. Pack temperature rather than pack aluminum activity controls the principal coating phase formed. Solid-state nickel diffusion controlled coating formation from sodium fluoride and chloride and ammonium fluoride activated packs. In other ammonium and sodium halide activated 1 weight percent aluminum packs, gaseous diffusion controlled coating formation.

  7. Thermodynamics and kinetics of pack aluminide coating formation on IN-100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Caves, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of pack variables on the formation of aluminide coatings on nickel-base superalloy IN-100 was conducted. Also, the thermodynamics and kinetics of coating formation were analyzed. Observed coating weights were in good agreement with predictions made from the analysis. Pack temperature rather than pack aluminum activity controls the principal coating phase formed. Solid-state nickel diffusion controlled coating formation from sodium fluoride and chloride and ammonium fluoride activated packs. In other ammonium and sodium halide activated 1 weight percent aluminum packs, gaseous diffusion controlled coating formation.

  8. Thermodynamics and kinetics of pack aluminide coating formation on IN-100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Caves, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of pack variables on the formation of aluminide coatings on nickel-base superalloy IN-100 was conducted. Also, the thermodynamics and kinetics of coating formation were analyzed. Observed coating weights were in good agreement with predictions made from the analysis. Pack temperature rather than pack aluminum activity controls the principal coating phase formed. In 1 weight percent aluminum packs, aluminum weight gains were related to the halide pack activator. Solid-state nickel diffusion controlled coating formation from sodium fluoride and chloride and ammonium fluoride activated packs. In other ammonium and sodium halide activated 1 weight percent aluminum packs, gaseous diffusion controlled coating formation.

  9. Generation of low-temperature plasma by low-pressure arcs for synthesis of nitride coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krysina, O. V.; Koval, N. N.; Lopatin, I. V.; Shugurov, V. V.; Kovalsky, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study gas, metal, and mixed metal-gas plasmas. The plasmas were generated with the use of an arc evaporator and a gas-plasma source with a hot filament and hollow cathode that were operated independently or simultaneously. It has been revealed that the arc current of gas-plasma source affects the parameters of the metal-gas plasma and the element concentrations in the coatings. It has been demonstrated that the characteristics of the nitride coatings produced by plasma-assisted vacuum-arc deposition can be controlled by varying the parameters of the arc in the gas-plasma source.

  10. Microstructure and mechanical properties of plasma sprayed HA/YSZ/Ti-6Al-4V composite coatings.

    PubMed

    Khor, K A; Gu, Y W; Pan, D; Cheang, P

    2004-08-01

    Plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on titanium alloy substrate have been used extensively due to their excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. However, the erratic bond strength between HA and Ti alloy has raised concern over the long-term reliability of the implant. In this paper, HA/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/Ti-6Al-4V composite coatings that possess superior mechanical properties to conventional plasma sprayed HA coatings were developed. Ti-6Al-4V powders coated with fine YSZ and HA particles were prepared through a unique ceramic slurry mixing method. The so-formed composite powder was employed as feedstock for plasma spraying of the HA/YSZ/Ti-6Al-4V coatings. The influence of net plasma energy, plasma spray standoff distance, and post-spray heat treatment on microstructure, phase composition and mechanical properties were investigated. Results showed that coatings prepared with the optimum plasma sprayed condition showed a well-defined splat structure. HA/YSZ/Ti-6Al-4V solid solution was formed during plasma spraying which was beneficial for the improvement of mechanical properties. There was no evidence of Ti oxidation from the successful processing of YSZ and HA coated Ti-6Al-4V composite powders. Small amount of CaO apart from HA, ZrO(2) and Ti was present in the composite coatings. The microhardness, Young's modulus, fracture toughness, and bond strength increased significantly with the addition of YSZ. Post-spray heat treatment at 600 degrees C and 700 degrees C for up to 12h was found to further improve the mechanical properties of coatings. After the post-spray heat treatment, 17.6% increment in Young's modulus (E) and 16.3% increment in Vicker's hardness were achieved. The strengthening mechanisms of HA/YSZ/Ti-6Al-4V composite coatings were related to the dispersion strengthening by homogeneous distribution of YSZ particles in the matrix, the good mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V and the formation of solid solution among HA

  11. Chemical Stability and Biological Properties of Plasma-Sprayed CaO-SiO2-ZrO2 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying; Xie, Youtao; Ji, Heng; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin

    2010-12-01

    In this work, calcia-stabilized zirconia powders were coated by silica derived from tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) hydrolysis. After calcining at 1400 °C, decalcification of calcia-stabilized zirconia by silica occurred and powders composed of Ca2SiO4, ZrO2, and CaZrO3 were prepared. We produced three kinds of powders with different Ca2SiO4 contents [20 wt.% (denoted as CZS2), 40 wt.% (denoted as CZS4), and 60 wt.% (denoted as CZS6)]. The obtained powders were sprayed onto Ti-6Al-4V substrates using atmospheric plasma spraying. The microstructure of the powders and coatings were analyzed. The dissolution rates of the coatings were assessed by monitoring the ions release and mass losses after immersion in Tris-HCl buffer solution. Results showed that the chemical stability of the coatings were significantly improved compared with pure calcium silicate coatings, and increased with the increase of Zr contents. The CZS4 coating showed not only good apatite-formation ability in simulated body fluid, but also well attachment and proliferation capability for the canine bone marrow stem cells. Results presented here indicate that plasma-sprayed CZS4 coating has medium dissolution rate and good biological properties, suggesting its potential use as bone implants.

  12. Physical processes and modeling of plasma deposition and hardening of coatings-switched electrical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyrmetov, A. M.; Sharifullin, S. N.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the results of simulation of plasma deposition and hardening of coatings in modulating the electrical parameters. Mathematical models are based on physical models of gas-dynamic mechanisms more dynamic and thermal processes of the plasma jet. As an example the modeling of dynamic processes of heterogeneous plasma jet, modulated current pulses indirect arc plasma torch.

  13. Improving the laser-induced damage threshold of 532-nm antireflection coating using plasma ion cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Meiping; Xing, Huanbin; Chai, Yingjie; Yi, Kui; Sun, Jian; Wang, Jianguo; Shao, Jianda

    2017-01-01

    BK7 glass substrates were precleaned by different cleaning procedures before being loaded into a vacuum chamber, and then a series of plasma ion cleaning procedures were conducted at different bias voltages in the vacuum chamber, prior to the deposition of 532-nm antireflection (AR) coatings. The plasma ion cleaning process was implemented by the plasma ion bombardment from an advanced plasma source. The surface morphology of the plasma ion-cleaned substrate, as well as the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the 532-nm AR coating was investigated. The results indicated that the LIDT of 532-nm AR coating can be greatly influenced by the plasma ion cleaning energy. The plasma ion cleaning with lower energy is an attractive method to improve the LIDT of the 532-nm AR coating, due to the removal of the adsorbed contaminations on the substrate surface, as well as the removal of part of the chemical impurities hidden in the surface layer.

  14. Nonlinear current sheet formation in ideal plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voge, A.; Schindler, K.; Otto, A.

    1994-01-01

    We present a numerical study of the formation of current sheets in ideal plasmas. First we confirm the development of singular current sheets in a one-dimensional model. In a second step we extend the analysis to two-dimensional equilibria. Here it is found that the resulting structures are quiet insensitive to the boundary conditions. For the special case of a magnetotail like equilibrium it will be shown that the resulting current distribution provides a possibility to understand the onset of a localized anomalous resistivity from a macroscopic point of view. Furthermore, the resulting structures provide an explanation for the dramatic decrease of the thickness of the current sheet in the magnetotail prior to the onset of geomagnetic substorms.

  15. Oxygen post-treatment of plastic surface coated with plasma polymerized silicon-containing monomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T. J.; Hollanhan, J. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    The abrasion resistance of plastic surfaces coated with polymerized organosilanes can be significantly improved by post-treatment of the polymerized silane in an oxygen plasma. For optical purposes, the advantages of this post-treatment are developed with a transparent polycarbonate resin substrate coated with plasma polymerized vinyltrimethoxysilane.

  16. Direct morphological comparison of vacuum plasma sprayed and detonation gun sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Gledhill, H C; Turner, I G; Doyle, C

    1999-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium substrates were produced using two thermal spray techniques vacuum plasma spraying and detonation gun spraying. X-ray diffraction was used to compare crystallinity and residual stresses in the coatings. Porosity was measured using optical microscopy in conjunction with an image analysis system. Scanning electron microscopy and surface roughness measurements were used to characterise the surface morphologies of the coatings. The vacuum plasma sprayed coatings were found to have a lower residual stress, a higher crystallinity and a higher level of porosity than the detonation gun coatings. It is concluded that consideration needs to be given to the significance of such variations within the clinical context.

  17. Hydrogen plasma tests of some insulating coating systems for the nuclear rocket thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Current, A. N.; Grisaffe, S. J.; Wycoff, K. C.

    1972-01-01

    Several plasma-sprayed and slurry-coated insulating coating systems were evaluated for structural stability in a low-pressure hot hydrogen environment at a maximum heat flux of 19.6 million watts/sq meter. The heat was provided by an electric-arc plasma generator. The coating systems consisted of a number of thin layers of metal oxides and/or metals. The materials included molybdenum, nichrome, tungsten, alumina, zirconia, and chromia. The study indicates potential usefulness in this environment for some coatings, and points up the need for improved coating application techniques.

  18. Technical note - Plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings for smooth intermetallic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Doychak, J.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach for plasma spray deposition of ceramic thermal barrier coatings directly to smooth substrates is described. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings were directly applied to substrates that had been coated with low-pressure plasma sprayed NiCrAlY bond coats and then centerless ground to simulate a smooth oxidation-resistant substrate. As the high-temperature oxidation behavior of NiAl+Zr is superior to that of MCrALY alloy, the bond coat is not required for oxidation resistance.

  19. Oxidation and degradation of a plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, J.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Porter, W.D.

    1996-04-01

    The isothermal oxidation behavior of thermal barrier coating (TBC) specimens consisting of single-crystal superalloy substrates, vacuum plasma-sprayed Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y bond coatings and air plasma-sprayed 7.5 wt.% yttria stabilized zirconia top coatings was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis at 1150{degrees}C for up to 200 hours. Coating durability was assessed by furnace cycling at 1150{degrees}C. Coatings and reaction products were identified by x-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  20. Technical note - Plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings for smooth intermetallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. A.; Doychak, J.

    1992-09-01

    A new approach for plasma spray deposition of ceramic thermal barrier coatings directly to smooth substrates is described. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings were directly applied to substrates that had been coated with low-pressure plasma sprayed NiCrAlY bond coats and then centerless ground to simulate a smooth oxidation-resistant substrate. As the high-temperature oxidation behavior of NiAl+Zr is superior to that of MCrALY alloy, the bond coat is not required for oxidation resistance.

  1. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation of an air plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, J.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Porter, W.D.; Rigney, E.D.

    1996-08-01

    Thermogravimetric methods for evaluating bond coat oxidation in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems were assessed by high-temperature testing of TBC systems with air plasma-sprayed (APS) Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y bond coatings and yttria-stabilized zirconia top coatings. High-mass thermogravimetric analysis (at 1150{sup degrees}C) was used to measure bond coat oxidation kinetics. Furnace cycling was used to evaluate APS TBC durability. This paper describes the experimental methods and relative oxidation kinetics of the various specimen types. Characterization of the APS TBCs and their reaction products is discussed.

  2. Technical note - Plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings for smooth intermetallic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Doychak, J.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach for plasma spray deposition of ceramic thermal barrier coatings directly to smooth substrates is described. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings were directly applied to substrates that had been coated with low-pressure plasma sprayed NiCrAlY bond coats and then centerless ground to simulate a smooth oxidation-resistant substrate. As the high-temperature oxidation behavior of NiAl+Zr is superior to that of MCrALY alloy, the bond coat is not required for oxidation resistance.

  3. Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings for Barrier Applications Against Molten Uranium Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthapadmanabhan, P. V.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Thiyagarajan, T. K.; Pragatheeswaran, A.

    2015-07-01

    Ceramic coatings are applied on engineering components for protecting them from large thermal load and hot corrosion. Choices of coating material for protection against hot corrosion by uranium are few, because of its high reactivity. Yttrium oxide has a high melting temperature and is inert towards uranium. Therefore, yttrium oxide coatings are effective as a barrier against hot corrosion by uranium and its alloys. This paper gives a summary of the developmental work on plasma-sprayed yttria coatings for corrosion barrier applications against molten uranium. Results show that plasma-sprayed yttria coatings offer a long-term solution to hot corrosion problems.

  4. Plasma sprayed coatings for containment of Cu-Mg-Si metallic phase change material

    SciTech Connect

    Withey, Elizabeth Ann; Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Andraka, Charles E.; Gibbs, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the performance of Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ), Y2O3, and Al2O3 plasma sprayed coatings are investigated for their ability to prevent attack of Haynes 230 by a near-eutectic Cu-Mg-Si metallic phase change material (PCM) in a closed environment at 820 °C. Areas where coatings failed were identified with optical and scanning electron microscopy, while chemical interactions were clarified through elemental mapping using electron microprobe analysis. Despite its susceptibility to reduction by Mg, the Al2O3 coating performed well while the YSZ and Y2O3 coating showed clear areas of attack. These results are attributed to the evolution of gaseous Mg at 820 °C leading to the formation of MgO and MgAl2O4.

  5. Characteristics of yttrium fluoride and yttrium oxide coatings for plasma process equipment prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tzu-Ken; Wuu, Dong-Sing; Huang, Shih-Yung; Wang, Wei-Kai

    2016-12-01

    In this study, yttrium fluoride (YF3) and yttrium oxide (Y2O3) coatings were prepared by an atmospheric plasma spraying technique and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). YF3 powders were sprayed at various plasma spraying powers of 9, 15, and 21 kW. The XRD result indicates that the YF3 coating shows preferred orientations and was well crystallized. The XPS results revealed a strong Y-F bond on the YF3 coating surface. A porosity value analysis showed that the porosity of the YF3 coating was lower than that of the Y2O3 coating. Moreover, the dielectric strength of the YF3 coating (22.65 kV/mm) was higher than that of the Y2O3 coating (14.42 kV/mm). This confirms that the YF3 coating exhibits a breakdown voltage of 4.97 kV, which is more than 1.5 times higher than that observed for the Y2O3 coating (3.29 kV). These results indicate that the YF3 coating has better mechanical and dielectric properties than the Y2O3 coating, indicating that the YF3 coating is a very attractive novel antiplasma and corrosion-resistant material.

  6. Effect of spark plasma sintering on the microstructure and in vitro behavior of plasma sprayed HA coatings.

    PubMed

    Yu, L-G; Khor, K A; Li, H; Cheang, P

    2003-07-01

    The crystalline phases and degree of crystallinity in plasma sprayed calcium phosphate coatings on Ti substrates are crucial factors that influence the biological interactions of the materials in vivo. In this study, plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings underwent post-spray treatment by the spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique at 500 degrees C, 600 degrees C, and 700 degrees C for duration of 5 and 30 min. The activity of the HA coatings before and after SPS are evaluated in vitro in a simulated body fluid. The surface microstructure, crystallinity, and phase composition of each coating is characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry before, and after in vitro incubation. Results show that the plasma sprayed coatings treated for 5 min in SPS demonstrated increased proportion of beta-TCP phase with a preferred-orientation in the (214) plane, and the content of beta-TCP phase corresponded to SPS temperature, up to 700 degrees C. SPS treatment at 700 degrees C for 30 min enhanced the HA content in the plasma spray coating as well. The HA coatings treated in SPS for 5 min revealed rapid surface morphological changes during in vitro incubation (up to 12 days), indicating that the surface activity is enhanced by the SPS treatment. The thickest apatite layer was found in the coating treated by SPS at 700 degrees C for 5 min.

  7. Plasma membrane coat and a coated vesicle-associated reticulum of membranes: their structure and possible interrelationship in Chara corallina

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Primary fixation with buffered glutaraldehyde plus 2.0 mM CaCl2 and 0.1% tannic acid results in the preservation of certain portions of the plasma membrane coat of Chara when seen with the electron microscope. Such a coat is not observable after fixation with glutaraldehyde alone. The coat appears to be present on all the above ground, vegetative cells of the male plant. Within complex invaginations of the plasma membrane, which are known as charasomes, the coat has two structural components, a central core that is either tubular or solid and a fibrous or granular peripheral region that surrounds the core. The coat material appears to be at least partially derived, via exocytosis, from the contents of single membrane-bound organelles known as glycosomes. Glycosomes seem to originate from within an assemblage of membranes and coated vesicles that can be described, in purely structural terms, as a partially coated reticulum. Such a reticulum is distinguishable from Golgi stacks because the reticulum (a) is not composed of stacked membranes, (b) is extensively involved with large, clearly detailed coated vesicles and coated invaginations, (c) is closely associated with glycosomes, and (d) is only slightly stained by the zinc-iodide- osmium tetraoxide reagent. PMID:6425304

  8. Improvement in tribological properties of atmospheric plasma-sprayed WC-Co coating followed by Cu electrochemical impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jianhui; Zhu, Yingchun; Zheng, Xuebing; Ruan, Qichao; Ji, Heng

    2009-06-01

    The WC-Co coating obtained by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) was modified by Cu electrochemical impregnation. The copper has infiltrated into and filled up the pores in WC-Co coating. The tribological properties of the coating against the stainless steel ball as sliding pairs were investigated with a ball-on-disc (BOD) configuration in air at room temperature. The as-prepared samples were characterized by means of optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. It was found that the frictional behavior of the WC-Co coating followed by Cu electrochemical impregnation was superior to that of WC-Co coating. The wear mechanism of the WC-Co coating followed by Cu electrochemical impregnation was microcutting, whilst that of a WC-Co coating was the fatigue wear. The improvement in tribological properties of the WC-Co coating followed by Cu electrochemical impregnation was attributed to the formation of self-lubricating Cu film on the wear surface which induces the transformation of wear mechanism.

  9. Effect of Powder-Feeding Modes During Plasma Spray on the Properties of Tungsten Carbide Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yi-ming; Du, Xiao-dong; Wu, Gang

    2017-05-01

    A WC-reinforced composite coating was fabricated on the surface of 45 steel samples by plasma, cladding process with WC powder added to the molten pool synchronously or in the tail of the molten pool. The microstructure, phase composition, and element distribution in the coating were analyzed. The results show that the undissolved WC particles and crystallized carbide (WC, W2C) were distributed uniformly in the sub-eutectic matrix in both cases. Fewer of the WC particles are dissolved in the matrix when they are injected into the tail of the molten pool. There are fewer needle-like tungsten carbide formations seen in the composite coating fabricated by back-feeding process than in that formed by synchronous feeding. The former results in a finer microstructure and a higher concentration gradient of elements near the interface between the WC particles and the coating matrix.

  10. The effects of plasma inhomogeneity on the nanoparticle coating in a low pressure plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pourali, N.; Foroutan, G.

    2015-10-15

    A self-consistent model is used to study the surface coating of a collection of charged nanoparticles trapped in the sheath region of a low pressure plasma reactor. The model consists of multi-fluid plasma sheath module, including nanoparticle dynamics, as well as the surface deposition and particle heating modules. The simulation results show that the mean particle radius increases with time and the nanoparticle size distribution is broadened. The mean radius is a linear function of time, while the variance exhibits a quadratic dependence. The broadening in size distribution is attributed to the spatial inhomogeneity of the deposition rate which in turn depends on the plasma inhomogeneity. The spatial inhomogeneity of the ions has strong impact on the broadening of the size distribution, as the ions contribute both in the nanoparticle charging and in direct film deposition. The distribution width also increases with increasing of the pressure, gas temperature, and the ambient temperature gradient.

  11. The effects of plasma inhomogeneity on the nanoparticle coating in a low pressure plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourali, N.; Foroutan, G.

    2015-10-01

    A self-consistent model is used to study the surface coating of a collection of charged nanoparticles trapped in the sheath region of a low pressure plasma reactor. The model consists of multi-fluid plasma sheath module, including nanoparticle dynamics, as well as the surface deposition and particle heating modules. The simulation results show that the mean particle radius increases with time and the nanoparticle size distribution is broadened. The mean radius is a linear function of time, while the variance exhibits a quadratic dependence. The broadening in size distribution is attributed to the spatial inhomogeneity of the deposition rate which in turn depends on the plasma inhomogeneity. The spatial inhomogeneity of the ions has strong impact on the broadening of the size distribution, as the ions contribute both in the nanoparticle charging and in direct film deposition. The distribution width also increases with increasing of the pressure, gas temperature, and the ambient temperature gradient.

  12. Failure modes of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, Kevin Walter

    Conventional plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are known to fail by spallation of the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) topcoat exposing the underlying metal to high temperatures. Failure takes place by crack propagation in the YSZ just above the YSZ/thermally grown oxide (TGO) interface. Compressive stress in the TGO due to thermal expansion coefficient mismatch and oxidation is believed to play a key role in the failure. However, non-destructive measurement of the compressive stress in the TGO has been challenging due to the overlying ceramic top layer. In this study, TBC samples coated to current industrial specifications were thermally cycled to various fractions of their life to determine the failure mechanisms. The technique of Cr3+ piezospectroscopy was successfully applied to the plasma-sprayed samples for the first time in an effort to measure compressive stress in the TGO through the ceramic top layer. In addition, a new nano-grained plasma-sprayed TBC was studied in order to develop a next generation TBC with enhanced properties. Results from observations on cross-sections and spalled surfaces have identified two competing failure mechanisms for TBCs: (1) cracking along asperity tips at the TGO/bond coat interface, and (2) cracking in the ceramic between the asperity tips. TGO residual compressive stress was found to increase in the first 1 to 10 cycles and then decrease with increasing number of cycles. The standard deviation of the stress measurement, which is a measure of damage accumulation in the TGO layer, was found to increase at higher numbers of cycles. Measurement of compressive stress in the TGO using Cr3+ piezo-spectroscopy was limited to YSZ thicknesses of <50 mum due to an impurity present in the YSZ layer. When no impurity was present the limiting thickness was <170 mum due to scattering by microstructural defects such as solute, porosity, and most importantly splat boundaries. A new nano-grained TBC was fabricated with a

  13. Young's Moduli of Cold and Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Metallic Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Pawlik, R.; Loewenthal, W.

    2009-01-01

    Monolithic metallic copper alloy and NiCrAlY coatings were fabricated by either the cold spray (CS) or the vacuum plasma spray (VPS) deposition processes. Dynamic elastic modulus property measurements were conducted on these monolithic coating specimens between 300 K and 1273 K using the impulse excitation technique. The Young's moduli decreased almost linearly with increasing temperature at all temperatures except in the case of the CS Cu-23%Cr-5%Al and VPS NiCrAlY, where deviations from linearity were observed above a critical temperature. It was observed that the Young's moduli for VPS Cu-8%Cr were larger than literature data compiled for Cu. The addition of 1%Al to Cu- 8%Cr significantly increased its Young's modulus by 12 to 17% presumably due to a solid solution effect. Comparisons of the Young s moduli data between two different measurements on the same CS Cu- 23%Cr-5%Al specimen revealed that the values measured in the first run were about 10% higher than those in the second run. It is suggested that this observation is due to annealing of the initial cold work microstructure resulting form the cold spray deposition process.

  14. Characterization and Wear Behavior of Heat-treated Ni3Al Coatings Deposited by Air Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, K.; Rafiq, M. A.; Nusair Khan, A.; Ahmed, F.; Mudassar Rauf, M.

    2016-07-01

    Air plasma spraying was utilized to deposit Ni3Al coatings on AISI-321 steel substrate. The deposited coatings were isothermally heat-treated at various temperatures from 500 to 800 °C for 10, 30, 60, and 100 h. The x-ray diffraction analysis revealed NiO formation in Ni3Al at 500 °C after 100 h, and the percentage of NiO increased with increasing exposure time and temperature. The hardness of the coating increased with the formation of NiO. The DSC test showed the formation of minor phases, Al3Ni and Al3Ni2, within the coating along with the major phase Ni3Al. TGA revealed a slowing down of the oxidation rate upon surface oxide formation. The pin-on-disk wear test on the as-sprayed and heat-treated coatings showed that wear rate and coefficient of friction decreased with an increase in the NiO phase content.

  15. Electrochemical characterization of plasma polymer coatings in corrosion protection of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Yenfong; Yu, Qingsong

    2005-07-01

    Low-temperature plasma polymerization is a promising pretreatment technique to create environmentally friendly coating systems for corrosion protection of aluminum alloys. In this study, the pretreatment effects of plasma treatment and plasma polymerization on corrosion properties of alclad aluminum alloy 2024-T3 ([2A]) were investigated using electrochemical characterization techniques, including cyclic polarization (CP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The [2A] panels were coated with an ultrathin layer (~50 nm) of plasma polymers in a direct current (dc) glow discharge of trimethylsilane or its mixtures with one of two diatomic gases (O2 and N2). The CP measurement results showed that the plasma polymer coated [2A] panels exhibited more negative corrosion potentials (Ecorr), smaller corrosion currents (Icorr), and no surface passivation when compared with uncoated [2A] control panels. The lower values of Icorr imply a higher corrosion resistance on the plasma polymer coated [2A]. When investigated using EIS, these plasma polymer coated [2A] panels exhibited higher impedance (|Z|) at lower frequency when first immersed in electrolyte solution, yet degraded quickly to a similar level as uncoated controls within 1 day of immersion. These results illustrated that thin plasma polymer films provided a certain but very limited corrosion resistance to [2A] substrate; their dominant role in plasma interface engineered coating systems still relied mostly on their adhesion enhancement at metal/paint interface as observed in our previous studies.

  16. Oxidation Control of Atmospheric Plasma Sprayed FeAl Intermetallic Coatings Using Dry-Ice Blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bo; Dong, Shujuan; Coddet, Pierre; Hansz, Bernard; Grosdidier, Thierry; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2013-03-01

    The performance of atmospheric plasma sprayed FeAl coatings has been remarkably limited because of oxidation and phase transformation during the high-temperature process of preparation. In the present work, FeAl intermetallic coatings were prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying combined with dry-ice blasting. The microstructure, oxidation, porosity, and surface roughness of FeAl intermetallic coatings were investigated. The results show that a denser FeAl coating with a lower content of oxide and lower degree of phase transformation can be achieved because of the cryogenic, the cleaning, and the mechanical effects of dry-ice blasting. The surface roughness value decreased, and the adhesive strength of FeAl coating increased after the application of dry-ice blasting during the atmospheric plasma spraying process. Moreover, the microhardness of the FeAl coating increased by 72%, due to the lower porosity and higher dislocation density.

  17. Oxidation and interdiffusion behavior of Niobium substrate coated MoSi2 coating prepared by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, JianHui; Wang, Yi; Liu, LongFei; Wang, Yueming

    2014-11-01

    In order to protect Niobium material from oxidation, MoSi2 coating was prepared on the Niobium substrate by spark plasma sintering. Oxidation behavior of MoSi2 coating was investigated in air over the temperature range of 1200-1500 °C. The interfacial diffusion between MoSi2 coating and Niobium substrate was also examined. Dense MoSi2 coating was successfully prepared using spark plasma sintering. The porosities of top and side coatings are about 5.5% and 6.4%, respectively. No cracks were present in the MoSi2 coating. Cracking and spallation of the SiO2 scale did not occur at test temperatures. Two intermediate phases-(Nb,Mo)5Si3 and Nb5Si3 phases, were detected in the boundary of MoSi2 coating and Nb substrate. The growth of the reaction layer was dominated by the diffusion of Si toward the Nb substrate and obeyed a parabolic rate law. A multi-layered structural coating formed on Nb substrate, which consisted of MoSi2, (Mo,Nb)5Si3 and Nb5Si3 in turn.

  18. Vortex formation during rf heating of plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments on a test plasma show that the linear theory of waveguide coupling to slow plasma waves begins to break down if the rf power flux exceeds approx. 30 W/cm/sup 2/. Probe measurements reveal that within 30 ..mu..s an undulation appears in the surface plasma near the mouth of the twin waveguide. This surface readjustment is part of a vortex, or off-center convective cell, driven by asymmetric rf heating of the plasma column.

  19. Comparison of nanowire pellicles for plasma membrane enrichment: coating nanowires on cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Kyoung; Rose, Rebecca; Choksawangkarn, Waeowalee; Graham, Lauren M.; Hu, Junkai; Fenselau, Catherine; Lee, Sang Bok

    2013-12-01

    This study is reported on the effect of nanowire density on the ease of pellicle formation and the enrichment of plasma membrane (PM) proteins for analysis by mass spectrometry. An optimized synthesis is reported for iron silicate nanowires (ISNW) with a narrow size range of 900 ± 400 nm in length and 200 nm diameter. The nanowires were coated with Al2O3 and used to form pellicles around suspended multiple myeloma cells, which acted as a model for cells recovered from tissue samples. Lighter alumina-coated silica nanowires were also synthesized (Kim et al., doi: 10.2217/NNM.13.96, 2013), which allowed a comparison of the construction of the two pellicles and of the effect of nanowire density on PM enrichment. Evidence is offered that the dense nanowire pellicle does not crush or distort these mammalian cells. Finally, the pellicles were incorporated into a mass spectrometry-based proteomic workflow to analyze transmembrane proteins in the PM. In contrast to a prior comparison of the effect of density with nanoparticles pellicles (Choksawangkarn et al. J Proteome Res 455 12:1134-1141, 2013), nanowire density was not found to significantly affect the enrichment of the PM. However, nanowires with a favorable aspect for pellicle formation are more easily and reliably produced with iron silicate than with silica. In addition, the method for pellicle formation was optimized through the use of ISNW, which is crucial to the improvement of PM protein enrichment and analysis.

  20. Apparatus for coating a surface with a metal utilizing a plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Ian G.; MacGill, Robert A.; Galvin, James E.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method for coating or layering a surface with a metal utilizing a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source. The apparatus includes a trigger mechanism for actuating the metal vacuum vapor arc plasma source in a pulsed mode at a predetermined rate. The surface or substrate to be coated or layered is supported in position with the plasma source in a vacuum chamber. The surface is electrically biased for a selected period of time during the pulsed mode of operation of the plasma source. Both the pulsing of the metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source and the electrical biasing of the surface are synchronized for selected periods of time.

  1. Primary Results of Lithium Coating for the Improvement of Plasma Performance in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Guizhong; Hu, Jiansheng; Li, Jiangang; Luo, Nanchang; Hu, Liqun; Fu, Jia; Chen, Kaiyun; Ti, Ang; Zhang, Lili

    2010-12-01

    First lithium coating associated with ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) plasma was performed successfully in EAST. Results in reduction of both residual impurity and deuterium in the vacuum vessel were obtained. Particularly the partial pressure of deuterium after the lithium coating was reduced by about a factor of 5. Impurity radiation in the plasma was reduced and electron temperature increased by about 50%. Moreover, reproducible plasma discharges with high parameters, such as higher plasma current and density, could be easily obtained. These results showed that plasma performance was improved. Even though only 2 g of lithium were injected, the effective lifetime of the Li film was raised up to 40 shots.

  2. Effect of Porosity on Photocatalytic Activity of Plasma-Sprayed TiO2 Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Chaudhary, Ujwal; Das, Santanu; Godavarty, Anuradha; Agarwal, Arvind

    2013-10-01

    The effect of porosity on photocatalytic activity of plasma-sprayed TiO2 coating on steel substrate is studied by varying processing parameters viz. plasma power and powder feed rate. The relationship between porosity content and methylene blue (MB) dye decomposition rate was established to correlate coating microstructure and its photocatalytic activity. The coating with the highest porosity content exhibited best photocatalytic efficiency. The same processing parameters were used to deposit TiO2 coating on FTO glass. The photocatalytic activity of TiO2 coating on FTO was 2.5 times better than TiO2 coating on the steel substrate. TiO2 coating on FTO glass contains bimodal porosity distribution (micropores and submicron pores) which accelerated MB decomposition by accelerated diffusion of ionic species.

  3. Porous Tantalum Coatings Prepared by Vacuum Plasma Spraying Enhance BMSCs Osteogenic Differentiation and Bone Regeneration In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ze; Xie, Youtao; Yang, Fei; Huang, Yan; Wang, Chuandong; Dai, Kerong; Zheng, Xuebin; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    Tantalum, as a potential metallic implant biomaterial, is attracting more and more attention because of its excellent anticorrosion and biocompatibility. However, its significantly high elastic modulus and large mechanical incompatibility with bone tissue make it unsuitable for load-bearing implants. In this study, porous tantalum coatings were first successfully fabricated on titanium substrates by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS), which would exert the excellent biocompatibility of tantalum and alleviate the elastic modulus of tantalum for bone tissue. We evaluated cytocompatibility and osteogenesis activity of the porous tantalum coatings using human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) and its ability to repair rabbit femur bone defects. The morphology and actin cytoskeletons of hBMSCs were observed via electron microscopy and confocal, and the cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potential of hBMSCs were examined quantitatively by PrestoBlue assay, Ki67 immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR technology and ALP staining. For in vivo detection, the repaired femur were evaluated by histomorphology and double fluorescence labeling 3 months postoperation. Porous tantalum coating surfaces promoted hBMSCs adhesion, proliferation, osteogenesis activity and had better osseointegration and faster new bone formation rate than titanium coating control. Our observation suggested that the porous tantalum coatings had good biocompatibility and could enhance osseoinductivity in vitro and promote new bone formation in vivo. The porous tantalum coatings prepared by VPS is a promising strategy for bone regeneration. PMID:23776648

  4. Porous tantalum coatings prepared by vacuum plasma spraying enhance bmscs osteogenic differentiation and bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ze; Xie, Youtao; Yang, Fei; Huang, Yan; Wang, Chuandong; Dai, Kerong; Zheng, Xuebin; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    Tantalum, as a potential metallic implant biomaterial, is attracting more and more attention because of its excellent anticorrosion and biocompatibility. However, its significantly high elastic modulus and large mechanical incompatibility with bone tissue make it unsuitable for load-bearing implants. In this study, porous tantalum coatings were first successfully fabricated on titanium substrates by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS), which would exert the excellent biocompatibility of tantalum and alleviate the elastic modulus of tantalum for bone tissue. We evaluated cytocompatibility and osteogenesis activity of the porous tantalum coatings using human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) and its ability to repair rabbit femur bone defects. The morphology and actin cytoskeletons of hBMSCs were observed via electron microscopy and confocal, and the cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potential of hBMSCs were examined quantitatively by PrestoBlue assay, Ki67 immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR technology and ALP staining. For in vivo detection, the repaired femur were evaluated by histomorphology and double fluorescence labeling 3 months postoperation. Porous tantalum coating surfaces promoted hBMSCs adhesion, proliferation, osteogenesis activity and had better osseointegration and faster new bone formation rate than titanium coating control. Our observation suggested that the porous tantalum coatings had good biocompatibility and could enhance osseoinductivity in vitro and promote new bone formation in vivo. The porous tantalum coatings prepared by VPS is a promising strategy for bone regeneration.

  5. Preparation and Performance of Plasma/Polymer Composite Coatings on Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhsheshi-Rad, H. R.; Hamzah, E.; Bagheriyan, S.; Daroonparvar, M.; Kasiri-Asgarani, M.; Shah, A. M.; Medraj, M.

    2016-09-01

    A triplex plasma (NiCoCrAlHfYSi/Al2O3·13%TiO2)/polycaprolactone composite coating was successfully deposited on a Mg-1.2Ca alloy by a combination of atmospheric plasma spraying and dip-coating techniques. The NiCoCrAlHfYSi (MCrAlHYS) coating, as the first layer, contained a large number of voids, globular porosities, and micro-cracks with a thickness of 40-50 μm, while the Al2O3·13%TiO2 coating, as the second layer, presented a unique bimodal microstructure with a thickness of 70-80 μm. The top layer was a hydrophobic polymer, which effectively sealed the porosities of plasma layers. The results of micro-hardness and bonding strength tests showed that the plasma coating presented excellent hardness (870 HV) and good bonding strength (14.8 MPa). However, the plasma/polymer coatings interface exhibited low bonding strength (8.6 MPa). The polymer coating formed thick layer (100-110 μm) that homogeneously covered the surface of the plasma layers. Contact angle measurement showed that polymer coating over plasma layers significantly decreased surface wettability. The corrosion current density ( i corr) of an uncoated sample (262.7 µA/cm2) decreased to 76.9 µA/cm2 after plasma coatings were applied. However, it was found that the i corr decreased significantly to 0.002 µA/cm2 after polymer sealing of the porous plasma layers.

  6. Double Glow Plasma Surface Alloying Antibacterial Silver Coating on Pure Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Naiming; Guo, Junwen; Hang, Ruiqiang; Zou, Jiaojuan; Tang, Bin

    2014-03-01

    In order to endow the commercial pure titanium dental implant material with antibacterial property and aimed at avoiding the invalidation that is caused by bacterial adhesion on the surface, a silver coating was fabricated via double glow plasma surface alloying. The antibacterial property of the silver coating was assessed via in vitro estimation. The results showed that a continuous and compact coating was formed. The silver coating had absolute superiority in antibacterial property to raw commercial pure titanium. Double glow plasma surface alloying with silver on commercial pure titanium dental implant material could be considered as a potentially effective method for preventing bacterial adhesion.

  7. Double Glow Plasma Surface Alloying Antibacterial Silver Coating on Pure Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Naiming; Guo, Junwen; Hang, Ruiqiang; Zou, Jiaojuan; Tang, Bin

    2014-12-01

    In order to endow the commercial pure titanium dental implant material with antibacterial property and aimed at avoiding the invalidation that is caused by bacterial adhesion on the surface, a silver coating was fabricated via double glow plasma surface alloying. The antibacterial property of the silver coating was assessed via in vitro estimation. The results showed that a continuous and compact coating was formed. The silver coating had absolute superiority in antibacterial property to raw commercial pure titanium. Double glow plasma surface alloying with silver on commercial pure titanium dental implant material could be considered as a potentially effective method for preventing bacterial adhesion.

  8. Dynamics of polymer film formation during spin coating

    SciTech Connect

    Mouhamad, Y.; Clarke, N.; Jones, R. A. L.; Geoghegan, M.; Mokarian-Tabari, P.

    2014-09-28

    Standard models explaining the spin coating of polymer solutions generally fail to describe the early stages of film formation, when hydrodynamic forces control the solution behavior. Using in situ light scattering alongside theoretical and semi-empirical models, it is shown that inertial forces (which initially cause a vertical gradient in the radial solvent velocity within the film) play a significant role in the rate of thinning of the solution. The development of thickness as a function of time of a solute-free liquid (toluene) and a blend of polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) cast from toluene were fitted to different models as a function of toluene partial pressure. In the case of the formation of the polymer blend film, a concentration-dependent (Huggins) viscosity formula was used to account for changes in viscosity during spin coating. A semi-empirical model is introduced, which permits calculation of the solvent evaporation rate and the temporal evolution of the solute volume fraction and solution viscosity.

  9. Novel Prospects for Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition of Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Baopeng; Guo, Hongbo

    2017-09-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is an emerging coating technique that can produce columnar thermal barrier coatings from vapor phase. Feedstock treatment at the start of its trajectory in the plasma torch nozzle is important for such vapor-phase deposition. This study describes the effects of the plasma composition (Ar/He) on the plasma characteristics, plasma-particle interaction, and particle dynamics at different points spatially distributed inside the plasma torch nozzle. The results of calculations show that increasing the fraction of argon in the plasma gas mixture enhances the momentum and heat flow between the plasma and injected feedstock. For the plasma gas combination of 45Ar/45He, the total enthalpy transferred to a representative powder particle inside the plasma torch nozzle is highest ( 9828 kJ/kg). Moreover, due to the properties of the plasma, the contribution of the cylindrical throat, i.e., from the feed injection point (FIP) to the start of divergence (SOD), to the total transferred energy is 69%. The carrier gas flow for different plasma gas mixtures was also investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements of zirconium emissions. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating microstructures were produced when using selected plasma gas compositions and corresponding carrier gas flows; structural morphologies were found to be in good agreement with OES and theoretical predictions. Quasicolumnar microstructure was obtained with porosity of 15% when applying the plasma composition of 45Ar/45He.

  10. Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed MCrAlY-Cr2O3 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Huang, Chuanbing; Lan, Hao; Du, Lingzhong; Zhang, Weigang

    2016-08-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion behavior of two atmospheric plasma-sprayed NiCoCrAlY-Cr2O3 and CoNiCrAlY-Cr2O3 coatings, which are primarily designed for wear applications at high temperature, were investigated in this study. The two coatings were exposed to air and molten salt (75%Na2SO4-25%NaCl) environment at 800 °C under cyclic conditions. Oxidation and hot corrosion kinetic curves were obtained by thermogravimetric technique. X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry were employed to characterize the coatings' microstructure, surface oxides, and composition. The results showed that both coatings provided the necessary oxidation resistance with oxidation rates of about 1.03 × 10-2 and 1.36 × 10-2 mg/cm2 h, respectively. The excellent oxidation behavior of these two coatings is attributed to formation of protective (Ni,Co)Cr2O4 spinel on the surface, while as-deposited Cr2O3 in the coatings also acted as a barrier to diffusion of oxidative and corrosive substances. The greater presence of Co in the CoNiCrAlY-Cr2O3 coating restrained internal diffusion of sulfur and slowed down the coating's degradation. Thus, the CoNiCrAlY-Cr2O3 coating was found to be more protective than the NiCoCrAlY-Cr2O3 coating under hot corrosion condition.

  11. Deposition of Antimicrobial Copper-Rich Coatings on Polymers by Atmospheric Pressure Jet Plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Kredl, Jana; Kolb, Juergen F.; Schnabel, Uta; Polak, Martin; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Fricke, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Inanimate surfaces serve as a permanent reservoir for infectious microorganisms, which is a growing problem in areas in everyday life. Coating of surfaces with inorganic antimicrobials, such as copper, can contribute to reduce the adherence and growth of microorganisms. The use of a DC operated air plasma jet for the deposition of copper thin films on acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) substrates is reported. ABS is a widespread material used in consumer applications, including hospitals. The influence of gas flow rate and input current on thin film characteristics and its bactericidal effect have been studied. Results from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy confirmed the presence of thin copper layers on plasma-exposed ABS and the formation of copper particles with a size in the range from 20 to 100 nm, respectively. The bactericidal properties of the copper-coated surfaces were tested against Staphylococcus aureus. A reduction in growth by 93% compared with the attachment of bacteria on untreated samples was observed for coverage of the surface with 7 at. % copper. PMID:28773396

  12. Effect of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Columnar Microstructure and Bond Coat Surface Preparation on Thermal Barrier Coating Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Benjamin; Quet, Aurélie; Bianchi, Luc; Schick, Vincent; Joulia, Aurélien; Malié, André; Rémy, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is identified as promising for the enhancement of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems used in gas turbines. Particularly, the emerging columnar microstructure enabled by the SPS process is likely to bring about an interesting TBC lifetime. At the same time, the SPS process opens the way to a decrease in thermal conductivity, one of the main issues for the next generation of gas turbines, compared to the state-of-the-art deposition technique, so-called electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). In this paper, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings presenting columnar structures, performed using both SPS and EB-PVD processes, were studied. Depending on the columnar microstructure readily adaptable in the SPS process, low thermal conductivities can be obtained. At 1100 °C, a decrease from 1.3 W m-1 K-1 for EB-PVD YSZ coatings to about 0.7 W m-1 K-1 for SPS coatings was shown. The higher content of porosity in the case of SPS coatings increases the thermal resistance through the thickness and decreases thermal conductivity. The lifetime of SPS YSZ coatings was studied by isothermal cyclic tests, showing equivalent or even higher performances compared to EB-PVD ones. Tests were performed using classical bond coats used for EB-PVD TBC coatings. Thermal cyclic fatigue performance of the best SPS coating reached 1000 cycles to failure on AM1 substrates with a β-(Ni,Pt)Al bond coat. Tests were also performed on AM1 substrates with a Pt-diffused γ-Ni/γ'-Ni3Al bond coat for which more than 2000 cycles to failure were observed for columnar SPS YSZ coatings. The high thermal compliance offered by both the columnar structure and the porosity allowed the reaching of a high lifetime, promising for a TBC application.

  13. Effect of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Columnar Microstructure and Bond Coat Surface Preparation on Thermal Barrier Coating Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Benjamin; Quet, Aurélie; Bianchi, Luc; Schick, Vincent; Joulia, Aurélien; Malié, André; Rémy, Benjamin

    2017-06-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is identified as promising for the enhancement of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems used in gas turbines. Particularly, the emerging columnar microstructure enabled by the SPS process is likely to bring about an interesting TBC lifetime. At the same time, the SPS process opens the way to a decrease in thermal conductivity, one of the main issues for the next generation of gas turbines, compared to the state-of-the-art deposition technique, so-called electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). In this paper, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings presenting columnar structures, performed using both SPS and EB-PVD processes, were studied. Depending on the columnar microstructure readily adaptable in the SPS process, low thermal conductivities can be obtained. At 1100 °C, a decrease from 1.3 W m-1 K-1 for EB-PVD YSZ coatings to about 0.7 W m-1 K-1 for SPS coatings was shown. The higher content of porosity in the case of SPS coatings increases the thermal resistance through the thickness and decreases thermal conductivity. The lifetime of SPS YSZ coatings was studied by isothermal cyclic tests, showing equivalent or even higher performances compared to EB-PVD ones. Tests were performed using classical bond coats used for EB-PVD TBC coatings. Thermal cyclic fatigue performance of the best SPS coating reached 1000 cycles to failure on AM1 substrates with a β-(Ni,Pt)Al bond coat. Tests were also performed on AM1 substrates with a Pt-diffused γ-Ni/γ'-Ni3Al bond coat for which more than 2000 cycles to failure were observed for columnar SPS YSZ coatings. The high thermal compliance offered by both the columnar structure and the porosity allowed the reaching of a high lifetime, promising for a TBC application.

  14. Making NiTi intermetallic compound coating using laser plasma complex spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraga, Hitoshi; Inoue, Takashi; Matsunawa, Akira

    1996-12-31

    To improve the erosion resistance of the Ti-alloys, surface modification technique using complex spraying system coupled with a high power CO{sub 2} laser and a DC plasma gun was applied. The laser plasma complex spraying system (LPCS) was constructed with 5kW CO{sub 2} laser and low pressure DC plasma spraying unit. In this system, the plasma spray coated layer was remelted and rapidly solidified by the CO{sub 2} laser irradiation. So, it is possible to synthesize intermetallic compound coatings from the simply mixed powder. NiTi intermetallic compound is known as a high cavitation erosion resistant material. In a case of only plasma spraying process, Ti and Ni layer were separated mutually in the coatings, but by the laser plasma complex spraying, NiTi, NiTi{sub 2}, and Ni{sub 3}Ti intermetallic compounds were formed in the coatings. And the coatings were joined metallurgically with substrate and contained few defect. The ratio of phases such as NiTi, NiTi{sub 2}, and Ni{sub 3}Ti was varied with the laser irradiation conditions and powder mixed ratio. To evaluate the erosion resistance of the coatings, vibratory cavitation erosion tests were carried out. The cavitation erosion resistance of the coatings were about 20 times as much as Ti6Al4V substrate due to NiTi phase.

  15. Plasma-sprayed coatings for lubrication of a titanium alloy in air at 430 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.; Wisander, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Plasma sprayed coatings of pure silver and of composite materials containing silver were investigated as possible self lubricating coatings for titanium alloys in air at 430 C. Pure silver provided low friction but was prone to severe plastic deformation and excessive transfer except in coating thicknesses of 0.02 mm or less. Additions of nichrome, calcium fluoride, and glass to silver were all beneficial in reducing plastic deformation and otherwise improving the coatings. The longest coating wear life, low wear of Ti alloy pins in sliding contact with the coatings, and a steady friction coefficient of 0.19 were obtained with a four component coating of 0.17 mm thickness. The coating composition, in weight percent is 30 nichrome-30 Ag-25 CaF2-15 glass.

  16. Formation and plasma circulation of solar prominences and coronal rains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, C.

    2016-12-01

    Solar prominences are long-lived cool and dense plasma curtains in the hot and rarefied corona. The physical mechanism responsible for their formation and especially for their internal plasma circulation has been uncertain for decades. The observed ubiquitous down flows in quiescent prominences are difficult to interpret as plasma with high conductivity seems to move across horizontal magnetic field lines. Here we present three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations of prominence formation and evolution in an elongated magnetic flux rope as a result of in-situ plasma condensations fueled by continuous plasma evaporation from the solar chromosphere. The prominence is born and maintained in a fragmented, highly dynamic state with continuous reappearance of multiple blobs and thread structures that move mainly downward dragging along mass-loaded field lines. The prominence plasma circulation is characterized by the dynamic balance between the drainage of prominence plasma back to the chromosphere and the formation of prominence plasma via continuous condensation. Plasma evaporates from the chromosphere, condenses into the prominence in the corona, and drains back to the chromosphere, establishing a stable chromosphere-corona plasma cycle. Another form of cool and dense plasma in the corona is coronal rain, which forms in-situ and drain down arched pathways along loops near active regions. We present 3D simulations of coronal rain in a bipolar arcade and compare it with observational results.

  17. Morphological Evaluation of Plasma Sprayed Ceramic Coatings using Cavitation Erosion Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uematsu, Susumu; Tani, Kazumi; Sugasawa, Shinobu; Kawanami, Yasutaka; Namba, Yoshio; Takabatake, Tsuyoshi; Yoshioka, Masaru; Ishihara, Yasuaki

    The microstructure of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings is characterized by the existence of splats along with other morphological features such as interlamellar and globular pores, intrasplat microcracks and splat boundaries. These various process-dependant micro- defects extremely influence physical and mechanical properties such as thermal conductivity and elastic modulus and then influence coating behavior. In this approach, the process involved in the cavitation erosion of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings have been studied using the ultrasonic vibratory technique. The weight loss occurring during fifteen minute intervals of exposure to cavitational erosion was determined, the surface of specimens and the wear debris were examined by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results suggest that the improvement in coating performance could be achieved by controlling the effective contact between lamellae of which the coating is made up using the plasma spray conditions, such as sufficient preheat, short standoff distance and slow gun traversing movement.

  18. In Situ Synthesis of FeAl Dense Coatings by Very Low Pressure Reactive Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Nannan; Zhang, Baicheng; Bolot, Rodolphe; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2013-03-01

    With the purpose of elaborating high-quality FeAl coatings, a so-called very low pressure reactive plasma spray technique that combines very low pressure plasma spray and self-propagation high-temperature synthesis processes was used in the present study. A dense and homogeneous FeAl coating was thus successfully in situ synthesized by reactive plasma spraying of an Al/Fe2O3 composite powder under 1 mbar. The phase composition and microstructural features of the coating were characterized by XRD and SEM. Results indicated that the B2 ordered FeAl phase was synthesized, and the coating featured a dense and defect-free microstructure. The fracture mechanism of the coating remains mainly a brittle failure but the appearance of some dimples in local zones suggested some unexpected toughness.

  19. Formation and bioactivity of porous and nanostructured TiO2/beta-TCP coating on titanium.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongjie; Liu, Xuanyong; Meng, Fanhao; Ding, Chuanxian

    2011-12-01

    Titanium and its alloys have been widely used as hard tissue implants due to their excellent mechanical properties and biocompatibility. However, their near bio-inertness and metallic ion release are still the problems with clinical uses. In this paper, porous and nanostructured TiO2/beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) composite coatings were prepared on titanium substrates by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in a Ca and P-containing electrolyte. The influence of PEO electric current density on phase composition and bioactivity of the coatings were studied. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy were utilized to characterize the phase composition and microstructure of the coatings. Simulated body fluid immersion tests were employed on the coatings to evaluate their bioactivity. The results reveal that TiO2/beta-TCP composite coating with pores size less than 10 microm and grains of 50-100 nm in size was prepared. The electric current density of PEO is an important factor in the formation of the composite coating. The TiO2/beta-TCP composite coating shows good bioactivity, which are attributed to the incorporation of beta-TCP.

  20. Processing-microstructure-properties relationships in small-particle plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawdsley, Jennifer Renee

    The objective of this study was to determine processing-microstructure-properties relationships for small-particle plasma-sprayed (SPPS) ceramic coatings. Plasma-sprayed yttria partially-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings, which are used to protect superalloys from heat and the environment in turbine engines, and plasma-sprayed alumina coatings, which are being investigated as a potential replacement for chrome in corrosion protection applications, were fabricated using SPPS technology and their microstructure and pertinent properties were examined. The properties of plasma-sprayed YSZ and alumina coatings were investigated with designed experiments. The parameters varied include power, spray distance, total plasma gas flow, percent hydrogen in the plasma gas, injector angle, injector offset and carrier gas flow. The variations in thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity, elastic modulus, and hardness for the YSZ SPPS coatings were found to correlate to the variations in density, which were related to the processing variables. It was found that surface roughness was related to the amount of splashing and debris associated with the single splats. In four-point bending strain tolerance and fatigue tests, the SPPS YSZ coatings showed very little acoustic emission activity, except in the case of tensile fatigue of a coating without network cracks. Small angle X-ray scattering experiments revealed that SPPS YSZ coatings have significantly less submicron intersplat porosity than conventional plasma-sprayed coatings, and that the pore and microcrack scattering area decreases with heat treatment due to the sintering of microcracks and small pores. The SPPS alumina coatings were optimized to produce a coating with excellent corrosion protection capabilities. It was found that the hardest SPPS alumina coatings did not provide the best corrosion protection due to unique porosity defect structures associated with surface bumps in the coatings. The surface bumps were

  1. The nanoparticle formation in hydrocarbon plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacevic, E.; Stefanovic, I.; Berndt, J.; Godde, C.; Winter, J.; Boufendi, L.

    2008-07-01

    This work presents controllable plasma polymerization of nanoparticles. Controlled production of nanoparticles with variable characteristics is important for different application fields, from technology to astrophysics. We present changes in material characteristics of nanoparticles due to variations of the gas mixtures, plasma characteristics and especially the role of temperature. The phenomena related to dusty plasmas have an immense number of facets -- from plasma crystals to applications in astrophysics or technology. One of the special aspects of this field is certainly the plasma polymerization of dust particles, resulting from homogeneous or heterogeneous processes, (``Dusty Plasmas'', ed. Bouchoule 2003). We present here results obtained in low--pressure capacitively coupled radiofrequency discharges, with variable gas mixtures. The plasma polymerization process and experimental set up used in our work are in detail described in Kovacevic 2006, Berndt 2007. It is possible to claim that such polymerization process posses similarities to stellar outflow conditions (Chiar et al. 1998, Kovacevic et al. 2005) and provides a convenient way to produce candidate carbonaceous interstellar dust analogs under controlled conditions and to compare their characteristics to astronomical observations (Kovacevic et al. 2005, Stefanovic et al. 2005). Moreover low temperature rf plasmas provide an excellent trap for the charged dust particles, enabling different in-situ methods like in-situ extinction measurements on the dust particles (from VUV to IR spectroscopy), mass spectroscopy and optical emission spectroscopy of gas phase species etc. One of the important results concerns the role of the gas composition on the material characteristics of the nanoparticles. Even changes of the carrier gases (He, Ar, Xe) affect the plasma characteristics, and thus the material characteristics of plasma polymerized nanoparticles. One important direction in our work concerns the role of

  2. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Modification of material properties and coating deposition using plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnyak, Alexander D.; Tyurin, Yu N.

    2005-05-01

    The review is concerned with the current status of research on the use of plasma jets for the modification of surface properties of metalware, as well as of investigations of doping and mass transfer of elements. The effect of thermal plasma parameters on the efficiency of surface processing of metal materials is discussed. The structure and properties of protective coatings produced by exposure to pulsed plasmas are analyzed. A new direction for the production of combined coatings is considered. Their structure and properties were studied by the example of Fe, Cu, steels, and alloys, including titanium alloys; the modification process was shown to be controllable by the action of pulsed plasma jets. The physical factors that affect the modification process and the coating deposition, and their effect on the structure and properties of metallic, ceramic - metal, and ceramic coatings were analyzed.

  3. Improving adhesion of powder coating on PEEK composite: Influence of atmospheric plasma parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Aurélie; Ho, Thu Huong; Fahs, Ahmad; Lafabrier, Aurore; Louarn, Guy; Bacharouche, Jalal; Airoudj, Aissam; Aragon, Emmanuel; Chailan, Jean-François

    2015-12-01

    In aeronautic industries, powder coatings are increasingly used because of environmental considerations. During the deposition of such a coating on a substrate piece, the main objective is to obtain a good coating/substrate adhesion. In this study, the targeted substrate is a Poly-(Ether EtherKetone)-(PEEK) based composite material. Due to the poor surface energy of PEEK, a surface treatment is necessary in order to enhance its adhesion with the coating. In this purpose, atmospheric plasma treatment has been chosen and the influence of plasma parameters has been studied. Four scan speed nozzles and three gases (Air, N2 and Argon) plasma has been tested. The increase of adhesion with increasing wettability, polarity and nanoroughness has been evidenced. A particular study of the type of grafted polar functionalities according to gas nature allowed to better understand the plasma mechanism and the cross-impact of polarity and nanoroughness in adhesion enhancement.

  4. Deposition of Hard Chrome Coating onto Heat Susceptible Substrates by Low Power Microwave Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redza, Ahmad; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma spray requires relatively low power, which is lower than 1 kW in comparison to other plasma spraying method. Until now, we are able to deposit Cu and Hydroxyapatite coating onto heat susceptible substrate, CFRP which are difficult for conventional plasma spray due to the excessive heat input. In this paper, a hard chromium coating was deposited onto SUS304 and CFRP by a low power microwave plasma spray technique. By controlling the working gas flow rate and spraying distance, a hard chrome coating with thickness of approximately 30 μm was successfully deposited onto CFRP substrate with hardness of 1110 Hv0.05. Furthermore, the coating produced here is higher than that produced by hard chrome plating.

  5. Porcelain-coated antenna for radio-frequency driven plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Wells, R.P.; Craven, G.E.

    1996-12-24

    A new porcelain-enamel coated antenna creates a clean plasma for volume or surface-conversion ion sources. The porcelain-enamel coating is hard, electrically insulating, long lasting, non fragile, and resistant to puncture by high energy ions in the plasma. Plasma and ion production using the porcelain enamel coated antenna is uncontaminated with filament or extraneous metal ions because the porcelain does not evaporate and is not sputtered into the plasma during operation. Ion beams produced using the new porcelain-enamel coated antenna are useful in ion implantation, high energy accelerators, negative, positive, or neutral beam applications, fusion, and treatment of chemical or radioactive waste for disposal. For ion implantation, the appropriate species ion beam generated with the inventive antenna will penetrate large or small, irregularly shaped conducting objects with a narrow implantation profile. 8 figs.

  6. Porcelain-coated antenna for radio-frequency driven plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Wells, Russell P.; Craven, Glen E.

    1996-01-01

    A new porcelain-enamel coated antenna creates a clean plasma for volume or surface-conversion ion sources. The porcelain-enamel coating is hard, electrically insulating, long lasting, non fragile, and resistant to puncture by high energy ions in the plasma. Plasma and ion production using the porcelain enamel coated antenna is uncontaminated with filament or extraneous metal ion because the porcelain does not evaporate and is not sputtered into the plasma during operation. Ion beams produced using the new porcelain-enamel coated antenna are useful in ion implantation, high energy accelerators, negative, positive, or neutral beam applications, fusion, and treatment of chemical or radioactive waste for disposal. For ion implantation, the appropriate species ion beam generated with the inventive antenna will penetrate large or small, irregularly shaped conducting objects with a narrow implantation profile.

  7. Acoustic emission and fatigue damage induced in plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating layers.

    PubMed

    Laonapakul, Teerawat; Otsuka, Yuichi; Nimkerdphol, Achariya Rakngarm; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2012-04-01

    In order to improve the adhesive strength of hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings, grit blasting with Al(2)O(3) powder and then wet blasting with HAp/Ti mixed powders was carried out on a commercially pure Ti (cp-Ti) substrate. Subsequently, an HAp/Ti bond coat layer and HAp top coat layer were deposited by plasma spraying. Fatigue tests of the HAp-coated specimens were carried out under four-point bending. Acoustic emission (AE) signals during the entire fatigue test were monitored to investigate the fatigue cracking behavior of the HAp-coated specimens. The HAp-coated specimens could survive up to 10(7) cycles without spallation of the HAp coating layers at the stress amplitude of 120 MPa. The HAp-coated specimens without HAp/Ti bond coat layer showed shorter fatigue life and easy crack nucleation compared to the HAp-coated specimens with HAp/Ti bond coat layer. The delamination and spallation of the HAp top coat with HAp/Ti bond coat on cp-Ti was not observed until the crack propagated into the cp-Ti during the final fracture stage of the fatigue cycle. Therefore, the HAp/Ti bond coat layer was found to greatly improve the fatigue damage resistance of the HAp coating layer. Three stages of the fatigue failure behavior of the HAp top coat with HAp/Ti bond coat on a cp-Ti substrate can be clearly estimated by the AE monitoring technique. These stages are cracks nucleating and propagating in the coating layer, cracks propagating in the substrate, and cracks propagating unstably to final fracture.

  8. The magnetic field application for the gas discharge plasma control in processes of surface coating and modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadullin, T. Ya; Galeev, I. G.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the method of magnetic field application to control the gas discharge plasma effect on the various surfaces in processes of surface coating and modification is considered. The magnetic field directed perpendicular to the direction of electric current in the gas discharge plasma channel is capable to reject this plasma channel due to action of Lorentz force on the moving electrically charged particles [1,2]. The three-dimensional spatial structure of magnetic field is created by system of necessary quantity of the magnets located perpendicular to the direction of course of electric current in the gas-discharge plasma channel. The formation of necessary spatial distribution of magnetic field makes possible to obtain a required distribution of plasma parameters near the processed surfaces. This way of the plasma channel parameters spatial distribution management is the most suitable for application in processes of plasma impact on a surface of irregular shape and in cases when the selective impact of plasma on a part of a surface of a product is required. It is necessary to apply automated computer management of the process parameters [3] to the most effective plasma impact.

  9. Application of pulsed electron beam for modification of ion-plasma multi-element coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval, N. N.; Eremin, E. N.; Yurov, V. M.; Krysina, O. V.; Teresov, A. D.; Guchenko, S. A.; Laurynas, V. Ch.

    2017-08-01

    It is established that coating irradiation by electron beam leads to coating structure dispersion, to microhardness increase and to friction coefficient decrease. The surface energy is enlarged too. That leads to wear resistance growth. The obtained operational characteristics results for ion-plasma multi-element coatings show their usage expediency for the equipment hardening which is applied in the oil production and refining systems.

  10. Performance of Plasma Sprayed Al2O3 Coating in Bio-Simulated Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldız, F.; Yetim, A. F.; Alsaran, A.; Çelik, A.

    2014-01-01

    Alumina coatings deposited on the surface of stainless steel 316L by the method of plasma spraying are studied. Tests for wear and corrosion are preformed in Ringer's solution simulating a human body environment. The structure, microhardness, wear resistance and corrosion resistance of the steel are determined with and without a coating. Deposition of a coating onto the stainless steel is shown to be an effective means for protecting implants from corrosion and wear.

  11. Electrocatalytically Active Nickel-Based Electrode Coatings Formed by Atmospheric and Suspension Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghasibeig, M.; Mousavi, M.; Ben Ettouill, F.; Moreau, C.; Wuthrich, R.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Ni-based electrode coatings with enhanced surface areas, for hydrogen production, were developed using atmospheric plasma spray (APS) and suspension plasma spray (SPS) processes. The results revealed a larger electrochemical active surface area for the coatings produced by SPS compared to those produced by APS process. SEM micrographs showed that the surface microstructure of the sample with the largest surface area was composed of a large number of small cauliflower-like aggregates with an average diameter of 10 μm.

  12. BN coatings deposition by magnetron sputtering of B and BN targets in electron beam generated plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenetskikh, A. S.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Koryakova, O. V.; Cholakh, S. O.

    2017-05-01

    Boron nitride coatings were deposited by reactive pulsed magnetron sputtering of B and BN targets (50 kHz, 10 µs for B; 13.56 MHz for BN) at 2-20 mA/cm2 ion current density on the substrate. The effect of electron beam generated plasma on characteristics of magnetron discharge and phase composition of coatings was studied.

  13. Fatigue testing of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, T. A.; Nagy, A.; Popelar, C. F.

    1990-01-01

    A plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating for diesel engines were fatigue tested. Candidate thermal barrier coating materials were fatigue screened and a data base was generated for the selected candidate material. Specimen configurations are given for the bend fatigue tests, along with test setup, specimen preparation, test matrix and procedure, and data analysis.

  14. Broadband Plasma-Sprayed Anti-reflection Coating for Millimeter-Wave Astrophysics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, O.; Lee, A.; Raum, C.; Suzuki, A.

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a plasma-sprayed anti-reflection (AR) coating technology for millimeter-wave astrophysics experiments with cryogenic optics which achieves minimal dissipative loss and broad bandwidth and is easily and accurately applied. Plasma spraying is a coating process through which melted or heated materials are sprayed onto a substrate. The dielectric constants of the plasma-sprayed coatings were tuned between 2.7 and 7.9 by mixing hollow ceramic microspheres with alumina powder as the base material and varying the plasma energy of the spray. By spraying low loss ceramic materials with a tunable dielectric constant, we can apply multiple layers of AR coating for broadband millimeter-wave detection. At 300 K, we achieved a fractional bandwidth of 106 over 90% transmission using a three-layer AR coating. Applying ceramic coatings on ceramic lenses offers an additional benefit of preventing cryogenic delamination of the coatings. We report on methodology of coating application and measurement of uniformity, repeatability, transmission property, and cryogenic adhesion performance.

  15. Induction plasma sprayed Sr and Mg doped nano hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti for bone implant.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mangal; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we report fabrication of strontium (Sr) and magnesium (Mg) doped hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on commercially pure titanium (Cp-Ti) substrates using inductively coupled radio frequency (RF) plasma spray. HA powder was doped with 1 wt % Sr (Sr-HA) and 1 wt % Mg (Mg-HA), heat treated at 800°C for 6 h and then used for plasma spray coating. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) analysis indicated that the coatings were primarily composed of phase pure crystalline HA. When compared to undoped HA coating, physical properties such as microstructure, grain size, and adhesive bond strength of the doped HA coatings did not change significantly. Microstructure of the coatings showed coherency in the structure with an average grain size of 200-280 μm HA particles, where each of the HA grains consisted of 20-30 nm sized particles. An average adhesive bond strength of 17 MPa ensured sufficient mechanical strength of the coatings. A chemistry dependent improvement in bone cell-coating interaction was noticed for doped coatings although it had minimal effect on physical properties of the coatings. In vitro cell-materials interactions using human fetal osteoblasts (hFOB) showed better cell attachment and proliferation on Sr-HA coatings compared to HA or Mg-HA coatings. Presence of Sr in the coating also stimulated hFOB cell differentiation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression. Improvement in bioactivity of Sr doped HA coatings on Ti without compromising its mechanical properties makes it an excellent material of choice for coated implant.

  16. Tailored plasma sprayed MCrAlY coatings for aircraft gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennisi, F. J.; Gupta, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    Eighteen plasma sprayed coating systems, nine based on the NiCoCrAly chemistry and nine based on the CoCrAly composition, were evaluated to identify coating systems which provide equivalent or superior life to that shown by the electron beam physical vapor deposited NiCoCrAly and CoCrAly coatings respectively. NiCoCrAly type coatings were examined on a single crystal alloy and the CoCrAly based coatings were optimized on the B1900+ Hf alloy. Cyclic burner rig oxidation and hot corrosion and tensile ductility tests used to evaluate the various coating candidates. For the single crystal alloy, a low pressure chamber plasma sprayed NiCoCrAly + Si coating exhibited a 2x oxidation life improvement at 1394 K (2050 F) over the vapor deposited NiCoCrAly material while showing equivalent tensile ductility. A silicon modified low pressure chamber plasma sprayed CoCrAly coating was found to be more durable than the baseline vapor deposited CoCrAly coating on the B1900+ Hf alloy.

  17. A structural investigation of a plasma sprayed Ni--Cr based alloy coating

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, S.; Neiser, R.A.; Herman, H. ); Kirkland, J.P.; Elam, W.T. )

    1993-01-01

    A Ni--Cr based hardfacing alloy has been plasma sprayed in ambient and low pressure atmospheres onto mild steel substrates. These coatings exhibit excellent wear and corrosion resistance; however, the significance of microstructure on properties has not been reported. This study relates the structure of the sprayed coatings to the processing conditions. X-ray diffraction results indicate phase separation in air plasma sprayed deposits, while low pressure plasma sprayed deposits exhibit a single supersaturated solid solution. Annealing of the air plasma sprayed coating shows dissolution of the bcc chromium phase, confirming its metastable nature. These results were confirmed using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analysis, which further suggests a highly disordered structure, with partial oxidation of selected alloying elements, such as chromium. Transmission electron microscopy indicates a wide variety of microstructures in the air plasma sprayed deposit. In the case of low pressure sprayed deposit, the microstructures are homogeneous and uniform.

  18. Structural Analysis of Dusty Plasma Formations Based on Spatial Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Khakhaev, A. D.; Luizova, L. A.; Piskunov, A. A.; Podryadchikov, S. F.; Soloviev, A. V.

    2008-09-07

    Some advantages of studying the structure of dusty plasma formations using spatial spectra are illustrated by simulated experiments and by processing actual images of dusty structures in dc glow discharge in inert and molecular gases.

  19. Wide-temperature-spectrum self-lubricating coatings prepared by plasma spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    Self-lubricating, multicomponent coatings, which lubricate over a wide range of operating conditions, are described. The coatings were successfully applied by plasma-spraying mixed powders onto superalloy substrates. They were evaluated in friction and wear experiments, and in sliding contact bearing tests. These coatings are wear resistant by virtue of their self lubricating characteristics rather than because of extreme hardness; a further benefit is low friction. Experiments with simple pin on disk sliding specimens and oscillating plain cylindrical bearing tests were performed to evaluate the tribological properties of the coatings. It was shown that coatings of nichrome, glass and calcium fluoride are self-lubricating from about 500 to 900 C, but give high friction at the lower temperatures. The addition of silver to the coating composition improved the low temperature bearing properties and resulted in coatings which are self-lubricating from cryogenic temperatures to at least 870 C; they are therefore, wide temperature spectrum, self-lubricating compositions.

  20. Biofouling development on plasma treated samples versus layers coated samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnatiuc, B.; Exnar, P.; Sabau, A.; Spatenka, P.; Dumitrache, C. L.; Hnatiuc, M.; Ghita, S.

    2016-12-01

    Biofouling is the most important cause of naval corrosion. In order to reduce the Biofouling development on naval materials as steel or resin, different new methods have been tested. These methods could help to follow the new IMO environment reglementations and they could replace few classic operations before the painting of the small ships. The replacement of these operations means a reduction in maintenance costs. Their action must influence especially the first two steps of the Biofouling development, called Microfouling, that demand about 24 hours. This work presents the comparative results of the Biofouling development on two different classic naval materials, steel and resin, for three treated samples, immersed in sea water. Non-thermal plasma, produced by GlidArc technology, is applied to the first sample, called GD. The plasma treatment was set to 10 minutes. The last two samples, called AE9 and AE10 are covered by hydrophobic layers, prepared from a special organic-inorganic sol synthesized by sol-gel method. Theoretically, because of the hydrophobic properties, the Biofouling formation must be delayed for AE9 and AE10. The Biofouling development on each treated sample was compared with a witness non-treated sample. The microbiological analyses have been done for 24 hours by epifluorescence microscopy, available for one single layer.

  1. Formation of shock waves in a cold dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, G. C.; Choudhury, Balen; Bora, M. P.

    2012-04-01

    In this brief report, we present our calculations leading to formation of coherent structures through shock waves, which is studied with the help of the Burger wave equation, in certain space plasmas contaminated by the massive cold dust grains. Burger equation, in an ideal Maxwellian complex plasma, is derived and results are reported, which could be relevant in case of different space and astrophysical plasmas including Saturn's spokes, F-ring, planetary nebulae, etc.

  2. Anisotropic Thermal Diffusivities of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akoshima, Megumi; Takahashi, Satoru

    2017-09-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to shield the blades of gas turbines from heat and wear. There is a pressing need to evaluate the thermal conductivity of TBCs in the thermal design of advanced gas turbines with high energy efficiency. These TBCs consist of a ceramic-based top coat and a bond coat on a superalloy substrate. Usually, the focus is on the thermal conductivity in the thickness direction of the TBC because heat tends to diffuse from the surface of the top coat to the substrate. However, the in-plane thermal conductivity is also important in the thermal design of gas turbines because the temperature distribution within the turbine cannot be ignored. Accordingly, a method is developed in this study for measuring the in-plane thermal diffusivity of the top coat. Yttria-stabilized zirconia top coats are prepared by thermal spraying under different conditions. The in-plane and cross-plane thermal diffusivities of the top coats are measured by the flash method to investigate the anisotropy of thermal conduction in a TBC. It is found that the in-plane thermal diffusivity is higher than the cross-plane one for each top coat and that the top coats have significantly anisotropic thermal diffusivity. The cross-sectional and in-plane microstructures of the top coats are observed, from which their porosities are evaluated. The thermal diffusivity and its anisotropy are discussed in detail in relation to microstructure and porosity.

  3. Sintering and Interface Strain Tolerance of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Leissler, George W.; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot section SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. A coating system consisting of a zirconia-based oxide topcoat (thermal barrier) and a mullite/BSAS silicate inner coat (environmental barrier) is often considered a model system for the CMC applications. However, the coating sintering, and thermal expansion mismatch between the zirconia oxide layer and the silicate environmental barrier/CMC substrate will be of major concern at high temperature and under thermal cycling conditions. In this study, the sintering behavior of plasma-sprayed freestanding zirconia-yttria-based thermal barrier coatings and mullite (and/or barium-strontium-aluminosilicate, i.e., BSAS) environmental barrier coatings was determined using a dilatometer in the temperature range of 1200-1500 C. The effects of test temperature on the coating sintering kinetics were systematically investigated. The plasma-sprayed zirconia-8wt.%yttria and mullite (BSAS) two-layer composite coating systems were also prepared to quantitatively evaluate the interface strain tolerance of the coating system under thermal cycling conditions based on the dilatomentry. The cyclic response of the coating strain tolerance behavior and interface degradation as a function of cycle number will also be discussed.

  4. Tailoring the heat transfer on the injection moulding cavity by plasma sprayed ceramic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Hopmann, Ch; Öte, M.; Knoch, M. A.; Alkhasli, I.; Dornebusch, H.; Schmitz, M.

    2017-03-01

    Inhomogeneous material shrinkage in injection moulding can cause warpage in thermoplastic components. To minimise the deformations of the injection moulding parts, the heat transfer during the cooling phase can be adjusted according to the local cooling demand on the surface of the mould cavity by means of plasma sprayed coatings with locally variable thermal resistance over the surface of the mould. Thermal resistance is a function of thermal conductivity and thickness of the coatings, where thermal conductivity of thermal barrier coatings can be adjusted by altering the chemical composition and the microstructure, which is depending on the thickness. This work evaluates the application of plasma sprayed coatings with variable thickness as thermal barrier coatings in the mould cavity. The thermal resistance of the coating and thereby the heat transfer from the melt into the mould will be influenced locally by varying the coating thickness over the cavity area according to the local cooling demand. Using the laser flash method, the thermal conduction of coatings with different thicknesses will be determined. On the basis of the experimentally determined thermal conduction, the effect of the coatings on the temperature field of the mould cavity will be numerically calculated and the required thickness distribution of the coating for an optimal temperature gradient will be determined.

  5. Tribological behavior of C-N coated spur gear by plasma source ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Long; Lyu, Sungki; He, Huibo; Cho, Sunghyun; Lee, Sanghyun

    2005-12-01

    The C-N coating can provide outstanding performance on the surface of spur gear. SCM415 specimens and test gears with steel surface were treated with carbon nitrogen by the plasma source ion implantation (PSII) method. The composition and structure of the surface layer were analyzed and compared with that of PVD coated TiN layer. It was found that both of friction coefficients of C-N coating decreased with the increase of load, however, C-N coating showed relatively lower friction coefficient than that of TiN coating. The effect of C-N coating was investigated on hardness, friction and wear. The TiN coated gear showed a more serious friction phenomenon than that of C-N coated gear. It was considered that coating of TiN, which was conducted at a vacuum chamber at about 500°C, resulted in a tempering of base material that caused microstructure change, which in turn resulted in decreasing of hardness, the C-N coated gear and pinion had higher wear resistance than that of TiN coated gear and pinion. C-N coating significantly improved the friction and wear resistance of gears.

  6. The WEST project: validation program for WEST tungsten coated plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richou, M.; Missirlian, M.; Tsitrone, E.; Bucalossi, J.; Desgranges, C.; Firdaouss, M.; Guilhem, D.; Greuner, H.; Hernandez, C.; Lipa, M.; Pintsuk, G.; Samaille, F.

    2016-02-01

    The W—for tungsten—Environment in Steady-state Tokamak (WEST) project is based on an upgrade of the Tore Supra tokamak from a carbon limiter to an X-point divertor device. A new set of actively cooled tungsten coated plasma facing components will cover a part of the vessel to provide a fully metallic environment. This paper deals with the validation program performed for tungsten coatings (≥15 μm) on a CuCrZr substrate. The first step was dedicated to the qualification under high heat flux tests of the coating on small inertially cooled samples. To study the thermal behavior and the non-uniformity, the second step was dedicated to the validation of the coating on large inertially cooled samples with geometry and shape (540 × 120 mm) representative of the WEST coated components. The last step was dedicated to the optimization of the coating and to the high heat flux tests up to 10.5 MW m-2 on relevant coated actively cooled prototypes. Non-uniformity and thickness of the coating (15 and 30 μm) correspond to specifications. As no delamination was observed, coatings of 15 and 30 μm were qualified with regard to their application on WEST coated components. In order to decrease the risk of coating delamination under thermal loading, it was decided to cover the upper divertor and baffle targets with the thinnest coating option of 15 μm.

  7. Phase transformation and wear studies of plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia coatings containing various mol% of yttria

    SciTech Connect

    Aruna, S.T. Balaji, N.; Rajam, K.S.

    2011-07-15

    Plasma sprayable grade zirconia powders doped with various mol% of yttria (0, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 12 mol%) were synthesized by a chemical co-precipitation route. The coprecipitation conditions were adjusted such that the powders possessed good flowability in the as calcined condition and thus avoiding the agglomeration step like spray drying. Identical plasma spray parameters were used for plasma spraying all the powders on stainless steel plates. The powders and plasma sprayed coatings were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Zirconia powders are susceptible to phase transformations when subjected to very high temperatures during plasma spraying and XRD is insensitive to the presence of some non crystalline phases and hence Raman spectroscopy was used as an important tool. The microstructure of the plasma sprayed coatings showed a bimodal distribution containing fully melted and unmelted zones. The microhardness and wear resistance of the plasma sprayed coatings were determined. Among the plasma sprayed coatings, 3 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia coating containing pure tetragonal zirconia showed the highest wear resistance. - Research Highlights: {yields} Preparation plasma sprayable YSZ powders without any agglomeration process and plasma spraying {yields} Phase transformation studies of plasma sprayed YSZ coatings by XRD and Raman spectroscopy {yields} Microstructure of the plasma sprayed coatings exhibited bimodal distribution {yields} Plasma sprayed 3 mol% YSZ coating exhibited the highest wear resistance {yields} Higher wear resistance is due to the higher fracture toughness of tetragonal 3 mol% YSZ phase.

  8. Thermal barrier coating life and isothermal oxidation of low-pressure plasma-sprayed bond coat alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, W. J.; Miller, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    The paper investigates the isothermal oxidation kinetics of Ni-35Cr-6Al-0.95Y, Ni-18Cr-12Al-0.3Y, and Ni-16Cr-6Al-0.3Y low-pressure plasma-sprayed bond coat alloys and examines the effect of these alloys on the thermal barrier coating (TBC) cyclic life. TBC life was examined by cycling substrates coated with the different bond coats and a ZrO2-7 wt pct Y2O3 TBC in an air-rich burner rig flame between 1150 C and room temperature. The oxidation kinetics of the three bond coat alloys was examined by isothermal oxidation of monolithic NJiCrAlY coupons at 1083 C. The Ni-35Cr-6Al-0.95Y alloy exhibits comparatively high isothermal oxidation weight gains and provides the longest TBC life, whereas the Ni-16Cr-6Al-0.3Y alloy had the lowest weight gains and provided the shortest TBC life. The results show that, although bond coat oxidation is known to have a strong detrimental effect on TBC life, it is not the only bond coat factor that determines TBC life.

  9. Thermal barrier coating life and isothermal oxidation of low-pressure plasma-sprayed bond coat alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, W. J.; Miller, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    The paper investigates the isothermal oxidation kinetics of Ni-35Cr-6Al-0.95Y, Ni-18Cr-12Al-0.3Y, and Ni-16Cr-6Al-0.3Y low-pressure plasma-sprayed bond coat alloys and examines the effect of these alloys on the thermal barrier coating (TBC) cyclic life. TBC life was examined by cycling substrates coated with the different bond coats and a ZrO2-7 wt pct Y2O3 TBC in an air-rich burner rig flame between 1150 C and room temperature. The oxidation kinetics of the three bond coat alloys was examined by isothermal oxidation of monolithic NJiCrAlY coupons at 1083 C. The Ni-35Cr-6Al-0.95Y alloy exhibits comparatively high isothermal oxidation weight gains and provides the longest TBC life, whereas the Ni-16Cr-6Al-0.3Y alloy had the lowest weight gains and provided the shortest TBC life. The results show that, although bond coat oxidation is known to have a strong detrimental effect on TBC life, it is not the only bond coat factor that determines TBC life.

  10. New generation of plasma-sprayed mullite coatings on silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1995-01-01

    Mullite is promising as a protective coating for silicon-based ceramics in aggressive high-temperature environments. Conventionally plasma-sprayed mullite on SiC tends to crack and debond on thermal cycling. It is shown that this behavior is due to the presence of amorphous mullite in the conventionally sprayed mullite. Heating the SiC substrate during the plasma spraying eliminated the amorphous phase and produced coatings with dramatically improved properties. The new coating exhibits excellent adherence and crack resistance under thermal cycling between room temperature and 1000 to 1400 C. Preliminary tests showed good resistance to Na2CO3-induced hot corrosion.

  11. Hydrophobic coating of solid materials by plasma-polymerized thin film using tetrafluoroethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozumi, K.; Kitamura, K.; Kitade, T.

    1980-01-01

    Glass slides were coated with plasma-polymerized tetrafluoroethylene films of different thickness using the glow discharge technique in a tube-shaped chamber, and the plasma conditions, film growth rates, light permeability of the polymer films, and particle bond strength in the polymer films were studied. Ashed sections of mouse organs and ashed bacillus spores were also coated to give them hydrophobic treatment without damaging their shapes or appearance. The hydrophobic coating of the specimens was successful, and the fine ash patterns were strongly fixed onto the glass slides, making permanent preparations.

  12. Remaining Fatigue Life Assessment of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Philippe; Gitzhofer, François; Fauchais, Pierre; Boulos, Maher

    2010-09-01

    Ceramic functional coatings are frequently applied to structural materials, covering a wide range of thermomechanical and electrochemical applications. The main limiting feature is their reliability when subjected to cyclic transient thermal stresses. The study described in this article is a continuation of earlier research study focused on acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of the thermomechanical aging effects in ceramic coatings. Here, emphasis is placed on the usefulness of combining AE short-term monitoring with finite element modeling (FEM) to predict the performance of such coatings when subjected to cyclic thermal loads. The FEM study presented in this article is based on a three-dimensional, time-dependent approach, of the stress fields that developed within the coatings during the post-deposition cooling step and the thermal cycling. Experiments were conducted using yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Alumina (Al2O3) ceramic coatings combined with a NiCr-based intermetallic bond coat.

  13. In-situ formation of multiphase deposited thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2004-01-13

    A multiphase ceramic thermal barrier coating is provided. The coating is adapted for use in high temperature applications in excess of about 1200.degree. C., for coating superalloy components of a combustion turbine engine. The coating comprises a ceramic single or two oxide base layer disposed on the substrate surface; and a ceramic oxide reaction product material disposed on the base layer, the reaction product comprising the reaction product of the base layer with a ceramic single or two oxide overlay layer.

  14. Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) of Ceramics for Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harder, Bryan J.; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    In order to generate advanced multilayer thermal and environmental protection systems, a new deposition process is needed to bridge the gap between conventional plasma spray, which produces relatively thick coatings on the order of 125-250 microns, and conventional vapor phase processes such as electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) which are limited by relatively slow deposition rates, high investment costs, and coating material vapor pressure requirements. The use of Plasma Spray - Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) processing fills this gap and allows thin (< 10 microns) single layers to be deposited and multilayer coatings of less than 100 microns to be generated with the flexibility to tailor microstructures by changing processing conditions. Coatings of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were applied to NiCrAlY bond coated superalloy substrates using the PS-PVD coater at NASA Glenn Research Center. A design-of-experiments was used to examine the effects of process variables (Ar/He plasma gas ratio, the total plasma gas flow, and the torch current) on chamber pressure and torch power. Coating thickness, phase and microstructure were evaluated for each set of deposition conditions. Low chamber pressures and high power were shown to increase coating thickness and create columnar-like structures. Likewise, high chamber pressures and low power had lower growth rates, but resulted in flatter, more homogeneous layers

  15. Formation of Solution-derived Hydroxyapatite Coatings on Titanium Alloy in the Presence of Magnetron-sputtered Alumina Bond Coats.

    PubMed

    Zykova, Anna; Safonov, Vladimir; Yanovska, Anna; Sukhodub, Leonid; Rogovskaya, Renata; Smolik, Jerzy; Yakovin, Stas

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 (HAp) and calcium phosphate ceramic materials and coatings are widely used in medicine and dentistry because of their ability to enhance the tissue response to implant surfaces and promote bone ingrowth and osseoconduction processes. The deposition conditions have a great influence on the structure and biofunctionality of calcium phosphate coatings. Corrosion processes and poor adhesion to substrate material reduce the lifetime of implants with calcium phosphate coatings. The research has focused on the development of advanced methods to deposit double-layered ceramic oxide/calcium phosphate coatings by a hybrid technique of magnetron sputtering and thermal methods. The thermal method can promote the crystallization and the formation of HAp coatings on titanium alloy Ti6Al4V substrates at low temperature, based on the principle that the solubility of HAp in aqueous solutions decreases with increasing substrate temperature. By this method, hydroxyapatite directly coated the substrate without precipitation in the initial solution. Using a thermal substrate method, calcium phosphate coatings were prepared at substrate temperatures of 100-105 (o)C. The coated metallic implant surfaces with ceramic bond coats and calcium phosphate layers combine the excellent mechanical properties of metals with the chemical stability of ceramic materials. The corrosion test results show that the ceramic oxide (alumina) coatings and the double-layered alumina-calcium phosphate coatings improve the corrosion resistance compared with uncoated Ti6Al4V and single-layered Ti6Al4V/calcium phosphate substrates. In addition, the double-layered alumina/hydroxyapatite coatings demonstrate the best biocompatibility during in vitro tests.

  16. Formation of Solution-derived Hydroxyapatite Coatings on Titanium Alloy in the Presence of Magnetron-sputtered Alumina Bond Coats

    PubMed Central

    Zykova, Anna; Safonov, Vladimir; Yanovska, Anna; Sukhodub, Leonid; Rogovskaya, Renata; Smolik, Jerzy; Yakovin, Stas

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 (HAp) and calcium phosphate ceramic materials and coatings are widely used in medicine and dentistry because of their ability to enhance the tissue response to implant surfaces and promote bone ingrowth and osseoconduction processes. The deposition conditions have a great influence on the structure and biofunctionality of calcium phosphate coatings. Corrosion processes and poor adhesion to substrate material reduce the lifetime of implants with calcium phosphate coatings. The research has focused on the development of advanced methods to deposit double-layered ceramic oxide/calcium phosphate coatings by a hybrid technique of magnetron sputtering and thermal methods. The thermal method can promote the crystallization and the formation of HAp coatings on titanium alloy Ti6Al4V substrates at low temperature, based on the principle that the solubility of HAp in aqueous solutions decreases with increasing substrate temperature. By this method, hydroxyapatite directly coated the substrate without precipitation in the initial solution. Using a thermal substrate method, calcium phosphate coatings were prepared at substrate temperatures of 100-105 oC. The coated metallic implant surfaces with ceramic bond coats and calcium phosphate layers combine the excellent mechanical properties of metals with the chemical stability of ceramic materials. The corrosion test results show that the ceramic oxide (alumina) coatings and the double-layered alumina-calcium phosphate coatings improve the corrosion resistance compared with uncoated Ti6Al4V and single-layered Ti6Al4V/calcium phosphate substrates. In addition, the double-layered alumina/hydroxyapatite coatings demonstrate the best biocompatibility during in vitro tests. PMID:25893018

  17. Comparison of different hard, metal-like coatings sprayed by plasma and detonation gun processes

    SciTech Connect

    Vuoristo, P.; Niemi, K.; Maentylae, T.; Berger, L.M.; Nebelung, M.

    1995-12-31

    Structure and wear properties of atmospheric plasma sprayed and detonation gun sprayed coatings prepared from an experimental (Ti,Mo)C-28.4%NiCo powder were compared to coatings sprayed from commercially available WC-12%Co and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-25%NiCr powders. All powders had an agglomerated (spray dried) and sintered structure and nearly the same content of the metallic binder of approximately 20 vol.-%. The powders were characterized by SEM (morphology and cross-sections) and X-ray diffraction (phase composition). The coatings were studied by optical microscope, microhardness measurements, X-ray diffraction analysis and by abrasion and erosion wear tests. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the coatings show that the (Ti,Mo)C-28.4%NiCo powder is characterized by high phase stability in both spray processes, whereas the WC-12%Co powder is prone to significant phase transformations during spraying. The results clearly show the high potential of the experimental (Ti,Mo)C-28.4%NiCo coatings in substituting the conventional systems in wear applications. For instance, it was found that plasma spraying of the (Ti,Mo)C-28.4%NiCo powder with an Ar-H{sub 2} plasma gas resulted in coatings with wear resistance comparable to WC-12%Co coatings. However, detonation gun sprayed WC-12%Co coatings showed somewhat better abrasion wear resistance.

  18. In vitro biological response of plasma electrolytically oxidized and plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Wing Kiu; Reilly, Gwendolen C; Matthews, Allan; Yerokhin, Aleksey

    2013-08-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is a relatively new surface modification process that may be used as an alternative to plasma spraying methods to confer bioactivity to Ti alloy implants. The aim of this study was to compare physical, chemical and biological surface characteristics of two coatings applied by PEO processes, containing different calcium phosphate (CaP) and titanium dioxide phases, with a plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coating. Coating characteristics were examined by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, surface profilometry, and wettability tests. The biological properties were determined using the human osteoblastic cell line MG-63 to assess cell viability, calcium and collagen synthesis. The tests showed that PEO coatings are significantly more hydrophilic (6%) and have 78% lower surface roughness (Ra) than the plasma-sprayed coatings. Cell behavior was demonstrated to be strongly dependent on the phase composition and surface distribution of elements in the PEO coating. MG-63 viability for the TiO2 -based PEO coating containing amorphous CaPs was significantly lower than that for the PEO coating containing crystalline HA and the plasma-sprayed coating. However, collagen synthesis on both the CaP and the TiO2 PEO coatings was significantly higher (92% and 71%, respectively) than on the plasma-sprayed coating after 14 days. PEO has been demonstrated to be a promising method for coating of orthopedic implant surfaces.

  19. In vitro fatigue behaviour of vacuum plasma and detonation gun sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings.

    PubMed

    Gledhill, H C; Turner, I G; Doyle, C

    2001-06-01

    The fatigue behaviour of vacuum plasma sprayed (VPS) and detonation gun sprayed (DGUN) hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium substrates has been compared in air and in buffered Ringer's solution. There was an increase in the surface microcracking and bulk porosity of both types of coating tested in air. After 1 million cycles in Ringer's solution the VPS coatings had completely delaminated from their substrates. In contrast the DGUN coatings retained their integrity when tested up to 10 million cycles but were beginning to show signs of delamination at the interface.

  20. Use of plasma sprayed coatings as surface treatments for aluminum adherends

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.D.; Whisnant, P.L.; Groff, G.B.

    1996-12-31

    Surface treatments for metal adherends prior to adhesive bonding typically use chromates and/or strong acids and bases. Such materials are hazardous to personnel and harmful to the environment following disposal. To reduce release of these substances into the environment and lower disposal costs, plasma spray treatments are being developed as surface treatments for aluminum adherends. These treatments eliminate liquid and gaseous wastes and provide bond strength and durability comparable to that provided by the conventional chemical treatments. They have other potential advantages of being more suited for repair/refurbishment and less sensitive to metallurgical differences from alloy to alloy. Plasma sprayed coatings are used in a variety of applications where a coating tailored for specific properties is needed that may or may not be chemically or structurally similar to the base substrate. Plasma spraying has been shown to provide excellent high-temperature bond performance with titanium (unlike conventional oxidation treatments) and durability approaching that of phosphoric acid anodization for aluminum. Success has also been reported using other coatings on aluminum, titanium, and steel. Plasma spraying has the important advantage of versatility. A wide range of coatings (metals, ceramics, and polymers) can be deposited onto an equally wide range of substrates, and the coating properties can be optimized for a given application, independent of the substrate. Because of this versatility, plasma-sprayed coatings have been used for wear resistance, thermal barriers, EMI/RF shielding, corrosion resistance, slip/slide resistance, and biocompatibility in addition to adhesion.

  1. Development of a plasma coating system for induction melting zirconium in a graphite crucible

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, E.L.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1993-05-26

    A plasma coating system has been developed for induction melting zirconium at 1900 C using a graphite crucible. This laminated coating system consists of plasma spraying the following materials onto the graphite: (1) molybdenum or tungsten, (2) a 50% blend by weight of the metal powder and calcia-stabilized zirconium oxide, and (3) calcia-stabilized zirconia followed by painting a final coating of nonstabilized zirconia on top of the plasma-sprayed coating system. Zirconium was melted in argon using both laminating systems without any degradation of the graphite crucible and with only a minimal amount of carbon absorption. This novel approach that is being proposed as an alternative method of melting zirconium alloys offers substantial cost savings over the standard practice of electric arc melting using a consumable electrode.

  2. Influence of high power density plasma irradiation on the boron carbide coating on tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begrambekov, L. B.; Grunin, A. V.; Puntakov, N. A.; Sadovskiy, Ya A.; Utkov, N. S.

    2017-05-01

    The paper considers an influence of T-10 tokamak plasma disruption on boron carbide (B4C) coating on tungsten. The power density of coating irradiation reached 100 MW/m2. The relief and composition of the boron carbide coating sample areas heated up to different temperature due to influence of disruption is determined. Conclusion is made that B4C does not change integrity, when heated to temperatures of up to 2000 K. Local melting was observed in areas heated up to 2500 K. In the range of 2500-3600 K most of the coating was melted and collected into droplets. Composition rate is reduced to B:C = 1:1. In all temperature ranges the coating remained continuous and provided protection of tungsten from direct plasma irradiation.

  3. A design of experiment study of plasma sprayed alumina-titania coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Steeper, T.J.; Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Wilson, G.C.; Riggs, W.L. II; Rotolico, A.J.; Nerz, J.E.

    1992-08-01

    An experimental study of the plasma spraying of alumina-titania powder is presented in this paper. This powder system is being used to fabricate heater tubes that emulate nuclear fuel tubes for use in thermal-hydraulic testing. Coating experiments were conducted using a Taguchi fractional-factorial design parametric study. Operating parameters were varied around the typical spray parameters in a systematic design of experiments in order to display the range of plasma processing conditions and their effect on the resultant coating. The coatings were characterized by hardness and electrical tests, image analysis, and optical metallography. Coating qualities are discussed with respect to dielectric strength, hardness, porosity, surface roughness, deposition efficiency, and microstructure. The attributes of the coatings are correlated with the changes in operating parameters.

  4. Factors affecting the microstructural stability and durability of thermal barrier coatings fabricated by air plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Helminiak, M. A.; Yanar, N. M.; Pettit, F. S.; Taylor, T. A.; Meier, G. H.

    2012-10-01

    The high-temperature behavior of high-purity, low-density (HP-LD) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The high purity yttria-stabilized zirconia resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The thermal conductivity of the as-processed TBC is low but increases during high temperature exposure even before densification occurs. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in good spallation resistance during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, topcoat density, and the thermal cycle frequency. The failure mechanisms are described and the durability of the HP-LD coatings is compared with that of state-of-the-art electron beam physical vapor deposition TBCs.

  5. Status of Plasma Physics Techniques for the Deposition of Tribological Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1984-01-01

    The plasma physics deposition techniques of sputtering and ion-plating are reviewed. Their characteristics and potentials are discussed in terms of synthesis or deposition of tribological coatings. Since the glow discharge or plasma generated in the conventional sputtering and ion-plating techniques has a low ionization efficiency, rapid advances have been made in equipment design to further increase the ionization efficiency. The enhanced ionization favorably affects the nucleation and growth sequence of the coating. This leads to improved adherence and coherence, higher density, favorable morphological growth, and reduced internal stresses in the coatings. As a result, desirable coating characteristics can be precision tailored. Tribological coating characteristics of sputtered solid film lubricants such as MoS2, ion-plated soft gold and lead metallic films, and sputtered and ion-plated wear-resistant refractory compound films such as nitrides and carbides are discussed.

  6. Fabrication of Nanosized Lanthanum Zirconate Powder and Deposition of Thermal Barrier Coating by Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Jagdeesh, N.; Pathak, L. C.

    2016-07-01

    The present manuscript discusses our findings on fabrication of nanosized lanthanum zirconate powder for thermal barrier coating application and its coating by plasma spray on nickel-based superalloy substrate. Single-phase La2Zr2O7 coating of thickness of the order of 45 µm on the Ni-Cr-Al bond coat coated Ni-based superalloy substrate was deposited by plasma spray process. The layers at the interface did not show spallation and inter diffusion was very less. The microstructure, interface, porosity, and mechanical properties of different layers are investigated. The lanthanum zirconate hardness and modulus were 10.5 and 277 GPa, respectively. The load depth curve for lanthanum zirconate showed good elastic recovery around 74%.

  7. Development of improved-durability plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, I. E.; Ruckle, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation is reported of improving the durability of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for the vane platforms in the JT9d turbofan engine. The program aims for reduced fuel consumption of commercial aircraft engines; the use of improved strain tolerant microstructures and control of the substrate temperature during coating application are being evaluated. The initial burner rig tests at temperatures up to 1010 C indicated that improvements in cyclic life greater than 20:1 over previous ceramic coatings were achieved. Three plasma sprayed coating systems applied to first stage vane platforms in the high pressure turbine were subjected to a 1000-cycle JT9D engine endurance test with only minor damage occurring to the coatings.

  8. Development of improved-durability plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, I. E.; Ruckle, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    As part of a NASA program to reduce fuel consumption of current commercial aircraft engines, methods were investigated for improving the durability of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for use on vane platforms in the JT9D turbofan engine. Increased durability concepts under evaluation include use of improved strain tolerant microstructures and control of the substrate temperature during coating application. Initial burner rig tests conducted at temperatures of 1010 C (1850 F) indicate that improvements in cyclic life greater than 20:1 over previous ceramic coating systems were achieved. Three plasma sprayed coating systems applied to first stage vane platforms in the high pressure turbine were subjected to a 100-cycle JT9D engine endurance test with only minor damage occurring to the coatings.

  9. Status of Plasma Physics Techniques for the Deposition of Tribological Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1984-01-01

    The plasma physics deposition techniques of sputtering and ion-plating are reviewed. Their characteristics and potentials are discussed in terms of synthesis or deposition of tribological coatings. Since the glow discharge or plasma generated in the conventional sputtering and ion-plating techniques has a low ionization efficiency, rapid advances have been made in equipment design to further increase the ionization efficiency. The enhanced ionization favorably affects the nucleation and growth sequence of the coating. This leads to improved adherence and coherence, higher density, favorable morphological growth, and reduced internal stresses in the coatings. As a result, desirable coating characteristics can be precision tailored. Tribological coating characteristics of sputtered solid film lubricants such as MoS2, ion-plated soft gold and lead metallic films, and sputtered and ion-plated wear-resistant refractory compound films such as nitrides and carbides are discussed.

  10. Formation and Stability of Impurity "snakes" in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    L. Delgado-Aparicio, et. al.

    2013-01-28

    New observations of the formation and dynamics of long-lived impurity-induced helical "snake" modes in tokamak plasmas have recently been carried-out on Alcator C-Mod. The snakes form as an asymmetry in the impurity ion density that undergoes a seamless transition from a small helically displaced density to a large crescent-shaped helical structure inside q < 1, with a regularly sawtoothing core. The observations show that the conditions for the formation and persistence of a snake cannot be explained by plasma pressure alone. Instead, many features arise naturally from nonlinear interactions in a 3D MHD model that separately evolves the plasma density and temperature

  11. Controlled dust formation in pulsed rf plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, J.; Kovacevic, E.; Boufendi, L.; Stefanovic, I.

    2009-09-15

    This paper deals with the formation of nanoparticles in a pulsed discharge. Experiments are performed in a capacitively coupled discharge operated in a mixture of argon and acetylene. The paper focuses especially on the influence of the pulse frequency on the dust formation. The experiments reveal the existence of a rather narrow frequency band that separates a frequency region with no dust formation from a frequency region where dust formation occurs. The decisive point in the observations is that a small change in the pulse frequency (from 700 to 725 Hz) is enough to induce or, respectively, suppress the formation of dust particles. The experimental results are discussed by means of a simple model that allows one to calculate the density of negative ions (C{sub 2}H{sup -}, C{sub 4}H{sup -}, etc.) as a function of the pulse frequency.

  12. Molecule formation in plasma at surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schram, D. C.; van Helden, J. H.; Zijlmans, R. A. B.; Yagci, G.; Ropcke, J.; Welzel, S.; Gabriel, O.; Engeln, R.

    2006-10-01

    With diode laser spectroscopy and mass spectrometry the generation of new molecules is studied in two types of plasmas: an expanding thermal plasma at TU/e and a microwave discharge at INP. Molecules formed in argon plasmas with N, H, O and C containing molecules were measured in a two laboratory study. Flows, pressure and power were designed such that an appreciable portion of the admitted gases could be dissociated. The results are very similar: predominantly H2, N2, CO, H2O and/or O2 are formed and to a lesser extent, NO, HCN and NH3, CnHm and CO2. Also H2CO is observed. Surface generation is concluded for most of the observed molecules. The surface is passivated with radicals from the plasma and the abundances of specific precursor adsorbants as H, N, OH, NH2, NO, CH3 etc. is apparently important for the production of new molecules. Observation of excited species as H2(r,v), N2* and NO2 (shuttle glow) near to surfaces at high fluxes of radicals forms a further support for the surface production mechanism.

  13. Target Plasma Formation for Magnetic Compression/Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemuth, I. R.; Reinovsky, R. E.; Chrien, R. E.; Christian, J. M.; Ekdahl, C. A.; Goforth, J. H.; Haight, R. C.; Idzorek, G.; King, N. S.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Larson, R. E.; Morgan, G. L.; Olinger, B. W.; Oona, H.; Sheehey, P. T.; Shlachter, J. S.; Smith, R. C.; Veeser, L. R.; Warthen, B. J.; Younger, S. M.; Chernyshev, V. K.; Mokhov, V. N.; Demin, A. N.; Dolin, Y. N.; Garanin, S. F.; Ivanov, V. A.; Korchagin, V. P.; Mikhailov, O. D.; Morozov, I. V.; Pak, S. V.; Pavlovskii, E. S.; Seleznev, N. Y.; Skobelev, A. N.; Volkov, G. I.; Yakubov, V. A.

    1995-09-01

    Experimental observations of plasma behavior in a novel plasma formation chamber are reported. Experimental results are in reasonable agreement with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computations suggesting that the plasma could subsequently be adiabatically compressed by a magnetically driven pusher to yield 1 GJ of fusion energy. An explosively driven helical flux compression generator mated with a unique closing switch/opening switch combination delivered a 2.7 MA, 347 μs magnetization current and an additional 5 MA, 2.5 μs electrical pulse to the chamber. A hot plasma was produced and 1013 D-T fusion reactions were observed.

  14. Shock Formation in Electron-Ion Plasmas: Mechanism and Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bret, Antoine; Stockem Novo, Anne; Ricardo, Fonseca; Luis, Silva

    2016-10-01

    We analyze the formation of a collisionless shock in electron-ion plasmas in theory and simulations. In initially un-magnetized relativistic plasmas, such shocks are triggered by the Weibel instability. While in pair plasmas the shock starts forming right after the instability saturates, it is not so in electron-ion plasmas because the Weibel filaments at saturation are too small. An additional merging phase is therefore necessary for them to efficiently stop the flow. We derive a theoretical model for the shock formation time, taking into account filament merging in the nonlinear phase of the Weibel instability. This process is much slower than in electron-positron pair shocks, and so the shock formation is longer by a factor proportional to √{mi /me } ln(mi /me).

  15. Plasma Induced Modification on Spin-Coated ZnO Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Rishi; Gupta, Parul; Mathur, Shubhra; Sachdev, K.; Sharma, S. K.

    2011-07-01

    Sol-gel spin coated ZnO thin films were prepared using nanostructured ZnO powder synthesized by sol-gel route. The spin coated ZnO thin films were annealed at 300 °C & 400 °C for 2 hours in air to produce films with different grain size. These thin films were then given N2+H2 (1:3) DC plasma treatment for 30 min. These films were investigated with XRD and SEM. XRD investigation on the specimens revealed the reduction of grain size in plasma treated ZnO thin films. The SEM investigation indicated the smoothening of the surface on plasma treatment.

  16. Efficiency of surface cleaning by a glow discharge for plasma spraying coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyrmetov, A. M.; Kashapov, N. F.; Sharifullin, S. N.; Saifutdinov, A. I.; Fadeev, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies of the quality of cleaning steel surfaces by a glow discharge for plasma spraying. Shows the results of measurements of the angle of surface wetting and bond strength of the plasma coating to the surface treated. The dependence of the influence of the glow discharge power, chamber pressure, distance between the electrodes and the processing time of the surface on cleaning efficiency. Optimal fields of factors is found. It is shown increase joint strength coating and base by 30-80% as a result of cleaning the substrate surface by a glow discharge plasma spraying.

  17. Study of thermal and electrical parameters of workpieces during spray coating by electrolytic plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khafizov, A. A.; Shakirov, Yu I.; Valiev, R. A.; Valiev, R. I.; Khafizova, G. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the results are presented of thermal and electrical parameters of products in the system bottom layer - intermediate layer when applying protective coatings of ferromagnetic powder by plasma spray produced in an electric discharge with a liquid cathode, on steel samples. Temperature distribution and gradients in coating and intermediate coating were examined. Detailed descriptions of spray coating with ferromagnetic powder by plasma jet obtained in electrical discharge with liquid cathode and the apparatus for obtaining thereof is provided. Problem has been solved by using of Fourier analysis. Initial data for calculations is provided. Results of numerical analysis are provided as temporal functions of temperature in contiguity between coating and intermediate coating as well as temporal function of the value Q=q-φ where q is density of heat current directed to the free surface of intermediate coating, φ is density of heat current in contiguity between coating and intermediate coating. The analysis of data given shows that in the systems of contact heat exchange bottom layer-intermediate layer with close values of the thermophysical characteristics of constituting materials is observed a slow increase of the temperature of the contact as a function of time.

  18. Advancements in predictive plasma formation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purvis, Michael A.; Schafgans, Alexander; Brown, Daniel J. W.; Fomenkov, Igor; Rafac, Rob; Brown, Josh; Tao, Yezheng; Rokitski, Slava; Abraham, Mathew; Vargas, Mike; Rich, Spencer; Taylor, Ted; Brandt, David; Pirati, Alberto; Fisher, Aaron; Scott, Howard; Koniges, Alice; Eder, David; Wilks, Scott; Link, Anthony; Langer, Steven

    2016-03-01

    We present highlights from plasma simulations performed in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Labs. This modeling is performed to advance the rate of learning about optimal EUV generation for laser produced plasmas and to provide insights where experimental results are not currently available. The goal is to identify key physical processes necessary for an accurate and predictive model capable of simulating a wide range of conditions. This modeling will help to drive source performance scaling in support of the EUV Lithography roadmap. The model simulates pre-pulse laser interaction with the tin droplet and follows the droplet expansion into the main pulse target zone. Next, the interaction of the expanded droplet with the main laser pulse is simulated. We demonstrate the predictive nature of the code and provide comparison with experimental results.

  19. Molecular dynamical modelling of endohedral fullerenes formation in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. S.; Kovaleva, E. A.; Lubkova, T. A.; Popov, Z. I.; Kuzubov, A. A.; Visotin, M. A.; Irle, S.

    2016-02-01

    The initial stages of fullerene and endohedral metallofullerene (EMF) synthesis in carbon-helium plasma at 1500 K and 2500 K have been simulated with quantum chemical molecular dynamics (MD) based on density-functional tight-binding (DFTB). The cases of formation of large (>100 atoms) sp2-carbon clusters with scandium atoms inside were observed. These clusters are considered as precursors of fullerenes or EMFs, and thus it is shown that formation of EMFs can be explained within the framework of "shrinking hot giant" mechanism. Also, the dependence of formation rates on plasma parameters, including temperature, buffer gas and metal atoms concentrations, has been studied.

  20. Fluorocarbon nano-coating of polyester fabrics by atmospheric air plasma with aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, F.; Campagne, C.; Perwuelz, A.; Gengembre, L.

    2008-04-01

    A fluorocarbon coating was deposited on polyester (PET) woven fabric using pulse discharge plasma treatment by injecting a fluoropolymer directly into the plasma dielectric barrier discharge. The objective of the treatment was to improve the hydrophobic properties as well as the repellent behaviour of the polyester fabric. Plasma treatment conditions were optimised to obtain optimal hydrophobic properties which were evaluated using water contact angle measurement as well as spray-test method at the polyester fabric surface. The study showed that adhesion of the fluoropolymer to the woven PET was greatly enhanced by the air plasma treatment. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed chemical surface modifications occurring after the plasma treatments.

  1. Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) Coatings on an A356 Alloy for Improved Corrosion and Wear Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhijing

    Plasma electrolytic oxidizing (PEO) is an advanced technique that has been used to deposit thick and hard ceramic coatings on aluminium (Al) alloys. This work was however to use the PEO process to produce thin ceramic oxide coatings on an A356 Al alloy for improving corrosion and wear resistance of the alloy. Effects of current density and treatment time on surface morphologies and thickness of the PEO coatings were investigated. The improvement of galvanic corrosion properties of the coated A356 alloy vs. steel and carbon fibre were evaluated in E85 fuel or NaCl environments. Tribological properties of the coatings were studied with comparison to the uncoated A356 substrate and other commercially-used engine bore materials. The research results indicated that the PEO coatings could have excellent tribological and corrosion properties for aluminium engine applications.

  2. Moisture resistant and anti-reflection optical coatings produced by plasma polymerization of organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollahan, J. R.; Wydeven, T.

    1975-01-01

    The need for protective coatings on critical optical surfaces, such as halide crystal windows or lenses used in spectroscopy, has long been recognized. It has been demonstrated that thin, one micron, organic coatings produced by polymerization of flourinated monomers in low temperature gas discharge (plasma) exhibit very high degrees of moisture resistence, e.g., hundreds of hours protection for cesium iodide vs. minutes before degradation sets in for untreated surfaces. The index of refraction of these coatings is intermediate between that of the halide substrate and air, a condition for anti-reflection, another desirable property of optical coatings. Thus, the organic coatings not only offer protection, but improved transmittance as well. The polymer coating is non-absorbing over the range 0.4 to 40 microns with an exception at 8.0 microns, the expected absorption for C-F bonds.

  3. Microwave absorption property of plasma spray W-type hexagonal ferrite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shicheng; Liu, Yi; Tian, Haoliang; Tong, Hui; Liu, Yuxin; Xu, Binshi

    2015-03-01

    In order to enhance the adhesion strength of microwave absorbing materials, W-type hexagonal ferrite coating is fabricated by plasma spray. The feedstock of ferrite powders is synthesized by solid-state reaction and spray dried process. Microstructures of the coating are analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectra (EDS). Hexagonal ferrite coating is successfully deposited on the substrate with adhesion strength of 28 MPa. The magnetic property of ferrite samples is measured using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Saturation magnetization of the ferrite coating is lower than ferrite powder. Reflection loss of the hexagonal ferrite coating is measured in frequency of 2-18 GHz. The result shows that the coating is suitable for electromagnetic wave absorbers in Ku-band.

  4. Analysis of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings With Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Bond Coats Under Spatially Uniform Cyclic Thermal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Aboudi, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a numerical investigation into the spallation mechanism in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings observed under spatially-uniform cyclic thermal loading. The analysis focuses on the evolution of local stress and inelastic strain fields in the vicinity of the rough top/bond coat interface during thermal cycling, and how these fields are influenced by the presence of an oxide film and spatially uniform and graded distributions of alumina particles in the metallic bond coat aimed at reducing the top/bond coat thermal expansion mismatch. The impact of these factors on the potential growth of a local horizontal delamination at the rough interface's crest is included. The analysis is conducted using the Higher-Order Theory for Functionally Graded Materials with creep/relaxation constituent modeling capabilities. For two-phase bond coat microstructures, both the actual and homogenized properties are employed in the analysis. The results reveal the important contributions of both the normal and shear stress components to the delamination growth potential in the presence of an oxide film, and suggest mixed-mode crack propagation. The use of bond coats with uniform or graded microstructures is shown to increase the potential for delamination growth by increasing the magnitude of the crack-tip shear stress component.

  5. Permeation barrier coating and plasma sterilization of PET bottles and foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steves, Simon; Deilmann, Michael; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Modern packaging materials such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) offer various advantages over glass or metal containers. Beside this they only offer poor barrier properties against gas permeation. Therefore, the shelf-live of packaged food is reduced. Additionally, common sterilization methods like heat, hydrogen peroxide or peracetic acid may not be applicable due to reduced heat or chemical resistance of the plastic packaging material. For the plasma sterilization and permeation barrier coating of PET bottles and foils, a microwave driven low pressure plasma reactor is developed based on a modified Plasmaline antenna. The dependencies of important plasma parameters, such as gas mixture, process pressure, power and pulse conditions on oxygen permeation through packaging foil are investigated. A residual permeation as low as J = 1.0 ±0.3 cm^3m-2day-1bar-1 for 60 nm thick silicon oxide (SiOx) coated PET foils is achieved. To discuss this residual permeation, coating defects are visualized by capacitively coupled atomic oxygen plasma etching of coated substrate. A defect density of 3000 mm-2 is revealed responsible for permeation. For plasma sterilization, optimized plasma parameters based on fundamental research of plasma sterilization mechanisms permit short treatment times of a few seconds.

  6. PLASMA SPRAYED Ni-Al COATINGS FOR SAFE ENDING HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    ALLAN,M.L.; OTTERSON,D.; BERNDT,C.C.

    1998-11-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed thermally conductive composite liners for corrosion and scale protection in heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The liners cannot withstand roller expansion to connect the tubes to the tubesheet. It is not possible to line the ends of the tubes with the same material after roller expansion due to the nature of the current liner application process. It was requested that BNL evaluate plasma sprayed Ni-Al coatings for safe ending heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The tubes of interest had an internal diameter of 0.875 inches. It is not typical to thermal spray small diameter components or use such small standoff distances. In this project a nozzle extension was developed by Zatorski Coating Company to spray the tube ends as well as flat coupons for testing. Four different Ni-Al coatings were investigated. One of these was a ductilized Ni-AIB material developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The coatings were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and subjected to corrosion, tensile adhesion, microhardness and field tests in a volcanic pool in New Zealand. It was determined that the Ni-Al coatings could be applied to a depth of two inches on the tube ends. When sprayed on flat coupons the coatings exhibited relatively high adhesion strength and microhardness. Polarization curves showed that the coating performance was variable. Measured corrosion potentials indicated that the Ni-Al coatings are active towards steel coated with thermally conductive polymers, thereby suggesting preferential corrosion. Corrosion also occurred on the coated coupons tested in the volcanic pool. This may have been exacerbated by the difficulty in applying a uniform coating to the coupon edges. The Ni-Al coatings applied to the tubes had significant porosity and did not provide adequate corrosion protection. This is associated with

  7. Deposition of hybrid organic-inorganic composite coatings using an atmospheric plasma jet system.

    PubMed

    Dembele, Amidou; Rahman, Mahfujur; Reid, Ian; Twomey, Barry; MacElroy, J M Don; Dowling, Denis P

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of alcohol addition on the incorporation of metal oxide nanoparticles into nm thick siloxane coatings. Titanium oxide (TiO2) nanoparticles with diameters of 30-80 nm were incorporated into an atmospheric plasma deposited tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) siloxane coating. The TMOS/TiO2 coating was deposited using the atmospheric plasma jet system known as PlasmaStream. In this system the liquid precursor/nanoparticle mixture is nebulised into the plasma. It was observed that prior to being nebulised the TiO2 particles agglomerated and settled over time in the TMOS/TiO2 mixture. In order to obtain a more stable nanoparticle/TMOS suspension the addition of the alcohols methanol, octanol and pentanol to this mixture was investigated. The addition of each of these alcohols was found to stabilise the nanoparticle suspension. The effect of the alcohol was therefore assessed with respect to the properties of the deposited coatings. It was observed that coatings deposited from TMOS/TiO2, with and without the addition of methanol were broadly similar. In contrast the coatings deposited with octanol and pentanol addition to the TMOS/TiO2 mixture were significantly thicker, for a given set of deposition parameters and were also more homogeneous. This would indicate that the alcohol precursor was incorporated into the plasma polymerised siloxane. The incorporation of the organic functionality from the alcohols was confirmed from FTIR spectra of the coatings. The difference in behaviour with alcohol type is likely to be due to the lower boiling point of methanol (65 degrees C), which is lower than the maximum plasma temperature measured at the jet orifice (77 degrees C). This temperature is significantly lower than the 196 degrees C and 136 degrees C boiling points of octanol and pentanol respectively. The friction of the coatings was determined using the Pin-on-disc technique. The more organic coatings deposited with

  8. Electron Transport in Plasmas with Lithium-Coated Plasma-Facing Components

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, Craig

    2014-04-01

    The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) is a spherical tokamak designed to study the low-recycling regime through the use of lithium-coated shells conformal to the last closed flux surface (LCFS). A lowered recycling rate is expected to flatten core $T_\\mathrm{e}$ profiles, raise edge $T_\\mathrm{e}$, strongly affect $n_\\mathrm{e}$ profiles, and enhance confinement. To study these unique plasmas, a Thomson scattering diagnostic uses a $\\le 20$~J, 30~ns FWHM pulsed ruby laser to measure $T_\\mathrm{e}$ and $n_\\mathrm{e}$ at 11 radial points on the horizontal midplane, spaced from the magnetic axis to the outer edge at a single temporal point for each discharge. Scattered light is imaged through a spectrometer onto an intensified CCD. The diagnostic is absolutely calibrated using a precision light source and Raman scattering. Measurements of $n_\\mathrm{e}$ are compared with line integrated density measurements from a microwave interferometer. Adequate signal to noise is obtained with $n_\\mathrm{e} \\ge 2 \\times 10^{18}\\,\\mathrm{m^{-3}}$. Thomson profiles of plasmas following evaporation of lithium onto room-temperature plasma-facing components (PFCs) are used in conjunction with magnetic equilibria as input for TRANSP modeling runs. Neoclassical calculations are used to determine $T_\\mathrm{i}$ profiles, which have levels that agree with passive charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) measurements. TRANSP results for confinement times and stored energies agree with diamagnetic loop measurements. Results of $\\chi_\\mathrm{e}$ result in values as low as 7 m$^2$/s near the core, which rise to around 100 m$^2$/s near the edge. These are the first measurements of $\\chi_\\mathrm{e}$ in LTX, or its predecessor, the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U), with lithium PFCs.

  9. Plasma calcining of pigment particles for thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, E. P.

    1972-01-01

    Method utilizes an RF excited plasma to surface deactivate thermally stable powders at high temperatures. Utilization of this plasma heat treatment at high temperatures can be carried out without grain growth, calcination, or agglomeration.

  10. Effects of La2O3 on the microstructure and tribological properties of plasma-sprayed Cr2O3-TiO2 coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Qingjun; Zhang, Aihua; Zhao, Gai; Peng, Hanmin; Gao, Wei

    2017-07-01

    Cr2O3-TiO2 coatings with different proportions of La2O3 were deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying. The coatings were evaluated by hardness tester, surface roughness tester, SEM and wear tester. The experiment results showed that the addition of La2O3 could improve the microhardness and decrease porosity, wear rate and surface roughness of the coating. The coating containing 2 wt.% La2O3 had the best tribological properties. The dominant wear mechanism is a mixture of abrasive wear and adhesive wear. The microscopic analysis suggests that the addition of La2O3 could refine the microstructure and promote the formation of solid solution powder, and then affect the properties of coatings.

  11. Nanostructure protein repellant amphiphilic copolymer coatings with optimized surface energy by Inductively Excited Low Pressure Plasma.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Sudhir; Pulpytel, Jérome; Ceccone, Giacomo; Lisboa, Patricia; Rossi, François; Kumar, Virendra; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh

    2011-12-06

    Statistically designed amphiphilic copolymer coatings were deposited onto Thermanox, Si wafer, and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) substrates via Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate and diethylene glycol vinyl ether in an Inductively Excited Low Pressure Plasma reactor. Plasma deposited amphiphilic coatings were characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Water Contact Angle techniques. The surface energy of the coatings can be adjusted between 12 and 70 mJ/m(2). The roughness of the coatings can be tailored depending on the plasma mode used. A very smooth coating was deposited with a CW (continuous wave) power, whereas a rougher surface with R(a) in the range of 2 to 12 nm was deposited with the PW (pulsed wave) mode. The nanometer scale roughness of amphiphilic PFDA-co-DEGVE coatings was found to be in the range of the size of the two proteins namely BSA and lysozyme used to examine for the antifouling properties of the surfaces. The results show that the statistically designed surfaces, presenting a surface energy around 25 mJ/m(2), present no adhesion with respect to both proteins measured by QCM.

  12. Plasma-Sprayed Hydroxylapatite-Based Coatings: Chemical, Mechanical, Microstructural, and Biomedical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Robert B.

    2016-06-01

    This contribution discusses salient properties and functions of hydroxylapatite (HA)-based plasma-sprayed coatings, including the effect on biomedical efficacy of coating thickness, phase composition and distribution, amorphicity and crystallinity, porosity and surface roughness, cohesion and adhesion, micro- and nano-structured surface morphology, and residual coating stresses. In addition, it will provide details of the thermal alteration that HA particles undergo in the extremely hot plasma jet that leads to dehydroxylated phases such as oxyhydroxylapatite (OHA) and oxyapatite (OA) as well as thermal decomposition products such as tri-(TCP) and tetracalcium phosphates (TTCP), and quenched phases such as amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP). The contribution will further explain the role of ACP during the in vitro interaction of the as-deposited coatings with simulated body fluid resembling the composition of extracellular fluid (ECF) as well as the in vivo responses of coatings to the ECF and the host tissue, respectively. Finally, it will briefly describe performance profiles required to fulfill biological functions of osteoconductive bioceramic coatings designed to improve osseointegration of hip endoprostheses and dental root implants. In large parts, the content of this contribution is a targeted review of work done by the author and his students and coworkers over the last two decades. In addition, it is considered a stepping stone toward a standard operation procedure aimed at depositing plasma-sprayed bioceramic implant coatings with optimum properties.

  13. Method and Process Development of Advanced Atmospheric Plasma Spraying for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihm, Sebastian; Duda, Thomas; Gruner, Heiko; Thomas, Georg; Dzur, Birger

    2012-06-01

    Over the last few years, global economic growth has triggered a dramatic increase in the demand for resources, resulting in steady rise in prices for energy and raw materials. In the gas turbine manufacturing sector, process optimizations of cost-intensive production steps involve a heightened potential of savings and form the basis for securing future competitive advantages in the market. In this context, the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process for thermal barrier coatings (TBC) has been optimized. A constraint for the optimization of the APS coating process is the use of the existing coating equipment. Furthermore, the current coating quality and characteristics must not change so as to avoid new qualification and testing. Using experience in APS and empirically gained data, the process optimization plan included the variation of e.g. the plasma gas composition and flow-rate, the electrical power, the arrangement and angle of the powder injectors in relation to the plasma jet, the grain size distribution of the spray powder and the plasma torch movement procedures such as spray distance, offset and iteration. In particular, plasma properties (enthalpy, velocity and temperature), powder injection conditions (injection point, injection speed, grain size and distribution) and the coating lamination (coating pattern and spraying distance) are examined. The optimized process and resulting coating were compared to the current situation using several diagnostic methods. The improved process significantly reduces costs and achieves the requirement of comparable coating quality. Furthermore, a contribution was made towards better comprehension of the APS of ceramics and the definition of a better method for future process developments.

  14. Effect of Zr on microstructure of metallic glass coatings prepared by gas tunnel type plasma spraying.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, A; Kuroda, T; Kimura, H; Inoue, A

    2012-06-01

    Metallic glass is one of the most attractive advanced materials, and many researchers have conducted various developmental research works. Metallic glass is expected to be used as a functional material because of its excellent physical and chemical functions such as high strength and high corrosion resistance. However, the application for small size parts has been carried out only in some industrial fields. In order to widen the industrial application fields, a composite material is preferred for the cost performance. In the coating processes of metallic glass with the conventional deposition techniques, there is a difficulty to form thick coatings due to their low deposition rate. Thermal spraying method is one of the potential candidates to produce metallic glass composites. Metallic glass coatings can be applied to the longer parts and therefore the application field can be widened. The gas tunnel plasma spraying is one of the most important technologies for high quality ceramic coating and synthesizing functional materials. As the gas tunnel type plasma jet is superior to the properties of other conventional type plasma jets, this plasma has great possibilities for various applications in thermal processing. In this study, the gas tunnel type plasma spraying was used to form the metallic glass coatings on the stainless-steel substrate. The microstructure and surface morphology of the metallic glass coatings were examined using Fe-based metallic glass powder and Zr-based metallic glass powder as coating material. For the mechanical properties the Vickers hardness was measured on the cross section of both the coatings and the difference between the powders was compared.

  15. Preparation of chitosan-coated polyethylene packaging films by DBD plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Theapsak, Siriporn; Watthanaphanit, Anyarat; Rujiravanit, Ratana

    2012-05-01

    Polyethylene (PE) packaging films were coated with chitosan in order to introduce the antibacterial activity to the films. To augment the interaction between the two polymers, we modified the surfaces of the PE films by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma before chitosan coating. After that the plasma-treated PE films were immersed in chitosan acetate solutions with different concentrations of chitosan. The optimum plasma treatment time was 10 s as determined from contact angle measurement. Effect of the plasma treatment on the surface roughness of the PE films was investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM) while the occurrence of polar functional groups was observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscope (FTIR). It was found that the surface roughness as well as the occurrence of oxygen-containing functional groups (i.e., C═O, C-O, and -OH) of the plasma-treated PE films increased from those of the untreated one, indicating that the DBD plasma enhanced hydrophilicity of the PE films. The amounts of chitosan coated on the PE films were determined after washing the coated films in water for several number of washing cycles prior to detection of the chitosan content by the Kjaldahl method. The amounts of chitosan coated on the PE films were constant after washing for three times and the chitosan-coated PE films exhibited appreciable antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Hence, the obtained chitosan-coated PE films could be a promising candidate for antibacterial food packaging.

  16. Kinetic aspects of the formation of aluminium oxide by use of a microwave-induced plasma.

    PubMed

    Quade, A; Steffen, H; Hippler, R; Wulff, H

    2002-10-01

    The oxidation of thin aluminium layers in a microwave plasma has been investigated to determine the kinetics of oxide growth. Thin Al-coatings were oxidized by means of a variety of gas mixtures, characterized by different partial pressures of oxygen, in microwave-induced plasmas of different power. To study the whole kinetic process the Al-metal and the oxide formed were investigated by means of a combination of grazing incidence X-ray reflectometry (GIXR) and grazing incidence X-ray diffractometry (GIXRD). XPS and FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the formation of stoichiometric Al(2)O(3). The alumina formed is X-ray amorphous. Quantitative description of oxide formation was achieved indirectly by determination of the decrease in the integrated intensity of the Al(111)-peak and the total thickness of the whole coating. These values enabled calculation of kinetic data. It was found that oxide growth was a combination of two simultaneous processes - diffusion and sputter processes. The diffusion coefficient D (cm(2) s(-1)) and the sputter rate S (nm s(-1)) were determined. The effect of the composition of the gas mixture, microwave power, and concentration of activated oxygen species on the oxidation process will be discussed. For calculation of the activation energy, E(A), of this plasma-enhanced diffusion process the temperature-dependence of D was investigated.

  17. Low-Energy Plasma Spray (LEPS) Deposition of Hydroxyapatite/Poly-ɛ-Caprolactone Biocomposite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Alonso, Diana; Parco, Maria; Stokes, Joseph; Looney, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Thermal spraying is widely employed to deposit hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-based biocomposites on hip and dental implants. For thick HA coatings (>150 μm), problems are generally associated with the build-up of residual stresses and lack of control of coating crystallinity. HA/polymer composite coatings are especially interesting to improve the pure HA coatings' mechanical properties. For instance, the polymer may help in releasing the residual stresses in the thick HA coatings. In addition, the selection of a bioresorbable polymer may enhance the coatings' biological behavior. However, there are major challenges associated with spraying ceramic and polymeric materials together because of their very different thermal properties. In this study, pure HA and HA/poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) thick coatings were deposited without significant thermal degradation by low-energy plasma spraying (LEPS). PCL has never been processed by thermal spraying, and its processing is a major achievement of this study. The influence of selected process parameters on microstructure, composition, and mechanical properties of HA and HA/PCL coatings was studied using statistical design of experiments (DOE). The HA deposition rate was significantly increased by the addition of PCL. The average porosity of biocomposite coatings was slightly increased, while retaining or even improving in some cases their fracture toughness and microhardness. Surface roughness of biocomposites was enhanced compared with HA pure coatings. Cell culture experiments showed that murine osteoblast-like cells attach and proliferate well on HA/PCL biocomposite deposits.

  18. Molecular plasma deposition: biologically inspired nanohydroxyapatite coatings on anodized nanotubular titanium for improving osteoblast density.

    PubMed

    Balasundaram, Ganesan; Storey, Daniel M; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    In order to begin to prepare a novel orthopedic implant that mimics the natural bone environment, the objective of this in vitro study was to synthesize nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (NHA) and coat it on titanium (Ti) using molecular plasma deposition (MPD). NHA was synthesized through a wet chemical process followed by a hydrothermal treatment. NHA and micron sized hydroxyapatite (MHA) were prepared by processing NHA coatings at 500°C and 900°C, respectively. The coatings were characterized before and after sintering using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The results revealed that the post-MPD heat treatment of up to 500°C effectively restored the structural and topographical integrity of NHA. In order to determine the in vitro biological responses of the MPD-coated surfaces, the attachment and spreading of osteoblasts (bone-forming cells) on the uncoated, NHA-coated, and MHA-coated anodized Ti were investigated. Most importantly, the NHA-coated substrates supported a larger number of adherent cells than the MHA-coated and uncoated substrates. The morphology of these cells was assessed by scanning electron microscopy and the observed shapes were different for each substrate type. The present results are the first reports using MPD in the framework of hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti to enhance osteoblast responses and encourage further studies on MPD-based hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti for improved orthopedic applications.

  19. Characterization of High-Velocity Single Particle Impacts on Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiilakoski, Jarkko; Lindroos, Matti; Apostol, Marian; Koivuluoto, Heli; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani; Vuoristo, Petri

    2016-08-01

    High-velocity impact wear can have a significant effect on the lifetime of thermally sprayed coatings in multiple applications, e.g., in the process and paper industries. Plasma-sprayed oxide coatings, such as Cr2O3- and TiO2-based coatings, are often used in these industries in wear and corrosion applications. An experimental impact study was performed on thermally sprayed ceramic coatings using the High-Velocity Particle Impactor (HVPI) at oblique angles to investigate the damage, failure, and deformation of the coated structures. The impact site was characterized by profilometry, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the connection between the microstructural details and impact behavior was studied in order to reveal the damage and failure characteristics at a more comprehensive level. Differences in the fracture behavior were found between the thermally sprayed Cr2O3 and TiO2 coatings, and a concept of critical impact energy is presented here. The superior cohesion of the TiO2 coating inhibited interlamellar cracking while the Cr2O3 coating suffered greater damage at high impact energies. The HVPI experiment has proven to be able to produce valuable information about the deformation behavior of coatings under high strain rates and could be utilized further in the development of wear-resistant coatings.

  20. Molecular plasma deposition: biologically inspired nanohydroxyapatite coatings on anodized nanotubular titanium for improving osteoblast density

    PubMed Central

    Balasundaram, Ganesan; Storey, Daniel M; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    In order to begin to prepare a novel orthopedic implant that mimics the natural bone environment, the objective of this in vitro study was to synthesize nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (NHA) and coat it on titanium (Ti) using molecular plasma deposition (MPD). NHA was synthesized through a wet chemical process followed by a hydrothermal treatment. NHA and micron sized hydroxyapatite (MHA) were prepared by processing NHA coatings at 500°C and 900°C, respectively. The coatings were characterized before and after sintering using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The results revealed that the post-MPD heat treatment of up to 500°C effectively restored the structural and topographical integrity of NHA. In order to determine the in vitro biological responses of the MPD-coated surfaces, the attachment and spreading of osteoblasts (bone-forming cells) on the uncoated, NHA-coated, and MHA-coated anodized Ti were investigated. Most importantly, the NHA-coated substrates supported a larger number of adherent cells than the MHA-coated and uncoated substrates. The morphology of these cells was assessed by scanning electron microscopy and the observed shapes were different for each substrate type. The present results are the first reports using MPD in the framework of hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti to enhance osteoblast responses and encourage further studies on MPD-based hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti for improved orthopedic applications. PMID:25609958

  1. Microstructural design of functionally graded coatings composed of suspension plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite and bioactive glass.

    PubMed

    Cattini, Andrea; Bellucci, Devis; Sola, Antonella; Pawłowski, Lech; Cannillo, Valeria

    2014-04-01

    Various bioactive glass/hydroxyapatite (HA) functional coatings were designed by the suspension plasma spraying (SPS) technique. Their microstructure, scratch resistance, and apatite-forming ability in a simulated body fluid (SBF) were compared. The functional coatings design included: (i) composite coating, that is, randomly distributed constituent phases; (ii) duplex coating with glass top layer onto HA layer; and (iii) graded coating with a gradual changing composition starting from pure HA at the interface with the metal substrate up to pure glass on the surface. The SPS was a suitable coating technique to produce all the coating designs. The SBF tests revealed that the presence of a pure glass layer on the working surface significantly improved the reactivity of the duplex and graded coatings, but the duplex coating suffered a relatively low scratch resistance because of residual stresses. The graded coating therefore provided the best compromise between mechanical reliability and apatite-forming ability in SBF. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 102B: 551-560, 2014.

  2. B{sub 4}C protective coating under irradiation by QSPA-T intensive plasma fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Buzhinskij, O. I.; Barsuk, V. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Klimov, N. S.; Otroshchenko, V. G.; Putric, A. B.

    2016-12-15

    The effect of the QSPA-T pulsed plasma irradiation on the crystalline boron carbide B{sub 4}C coating was examined. The duration of the rectangular plasma pulses was 0.5 ms with an interval of 5–10 min between pulses. The maximum power density in the central part of plasma stream was 1 GW/m{sup 2}. The coating thickness varied from 20 to 40 μm on different surface areas. Modification of the surface layers and transformation of the coating at elevated temperature under plasma pulse irradiation during four successive series of impulses are described. It is shown that the boron carbide coating withstood the full cycle of tests under irradiation with 100 plasma pulses with peak power density of 1GW/m{sup 2}. Constitutive surface deterioration was not detected and the boron carbide coating kept crystal structure B{sub 4}C throughout the irradiation zone at the surface depth no less 2 μm.

  3. Plasma formation in diode pumped alkali lasers sustained in Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markosyan, Aram H.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-11-01

    In diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs), lasing action occurs on the resonant lines of alkali atoms following pumping by broadband semiconductor lasers. The goal is to convert the efficient but usually poor optical quality of inexpensive diode lasers into the high optical quality of atomic vapor lasers. Resonant excitation of alkali vapor leads to plasma formation through the excitation transfer from the 2P states to upper lying states, which then are photoionized by the pump and intracavity radiation. A first principles global model was developed to investigate the operation of the He/Cs DPAL system and the consequences of plasma formation on the efficiency of the laser. Over a range of pump powers, cell temperatures, excitation frequency, and mole fraction of the collision mixing agent (N2 or C2H6), we found that sufficient plasma formation can occur that the Cs vapor is depleted. Although N2 is not a favored collisional mixing agent due to large rates of quenching of the 2P states, we found a range of pump parameters where laser oscillation may occur. The poor performance of N2 buffered systems may be explained in part by plasma formation. We found that during the operation of the DPAL system with N2 as the collisional mixing agent, plasma formation is in excess of 1014-1015 cm-3, which can degrade laser output intensity by both depletion of the neutral vapor and electron collisional mixing of the laser levels.

  4. Fabrication and Wear Behavior of Nanostructured Plasma-Sprayed 6061Al-SiCp Composite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tailor, Satish; Mohanty, R. M.; Sharma, V. K.; Soni, P. R.

    2014-10-01

    6061Al powder with 15 wt.% SiC particulate (SiCp) reinforcement was mechanically alloyed (MA) in a high-energy attrition mill. The MA powder was then plasma sprayed onto weathering steel (Cor-Ten A242) substrate using an atmospheric plasma spray process. Results of particle size analysis and scanning electron microscopy show that the addition of SiC particles as the reinforcement influences on the matrix grain size and morphology. XRD studies revealed embedment of SiCp in the MA-processed composite powder, and nanocrystals in the MA powder and the coating. Microstructural studies showed a uniform distribution of reinforced SiC particles in the coating. The porosity level in the coating was as low as 2% while the coating hardness was increased to 232VHN. The adhesion strength of the coatings was high and this was attributed to higher degree of diffusion at the interface. The wear rate in the coatings was evaluated using a pin-on-disk type tribometer and found to decrease by 50% compared to the 6061Al matrix coating. The wear mechanism in the coating was delamination and oxidative type.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of plasma-sprayed HA/SiO(2) coatings for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Morks, M F

    2008-01-01

    Fused silica powder has been mixed with hydroxyapatite (HA) powder and plasma sprayed by using gas tunnel-type plasma jet. The influence of silica content (10 wt% and 20 wt%) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of HA-silica coatings was investigated. For investigating the microstructure and mechanical properties of HA-silica coatings, SUS 304 stainless steel was used as substrate material. The spraying was carried out on roughened substrate in an atmospheric chamber. Scanning electron microscope micrographs of cross-sectioned HA/SiO(2) coatings showed that the sprayed HA coatings with 10 and 20 wt% SiO(2) have dense structure with low porosity compared to the pure HA coatings. On the other hand, as the amount of silica was increased the coatings became denser, harder and exhibited high abrasive wear resistance. The presence of silica significantly improved the adhesive strength of HA/SiO(2) coatings mainly due to the increase in bonding strength of the coating at the interface.

  6. Plasma Enhanced PVD Protective Coatings for Wear and Erosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Fig. 2. The oxygen concentration depth profiles were taken using Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). Based on the AES analysis, thermal oxides are at...samples were then ion sputter cleaned in Ar at Id =10 Amp and Vb= 120 volts for 30, 60, 90 minutes; then sensitive Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS...groove adhesion testing was used to test mechanical adhesion strength of thick coatings using a tungsten carbide tool. All thick coatings in Table 1

  7. Excellent stability of plasma-sprayed bioactive Ca 3ZrSi 2O 9 ceramic coating on Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying; Xie, Youtao; Ji, Heng; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin

    2010-05-01

    In this work, novel zirconium incorporated Ca-Si based ceramic powder Ca 3ZrSi 2O 9 was synthesized. The aim of this study was to fabricate Ca 3ZrSi 2O 9 coating onto Ti-6Al-4V substrate using atmospheric plasma-spraying technology and to evaluate its potential applications in the fields of orthopedics and dentistry. The phase composition, surface morphologies of the coating were examined by XRD and SEM, which revealed that the Ca 3ZrSi 2O 9 coating was composed of grains around 100 nm and amorphous phases. The bonding strength between the coating and the substrate was 28 ± 4 MPa, which is higher than that of traditional HA coating. The dissolution rate of the coating was assessed by monitoring the ions release and mass loss after immersion in the Tris-HCl buffer solution. The in vitro bioactivity of the coating was determined by observing the formation of apatite on its surface in simulated body fluids. It was found that the Ca 3ZrSi 2O 9 coating possessed both excellent chemical stability and good apatite-formation ability, suggesting its potential use as bone implants.

  8. Apparatus for coating a surface with a metal utilizing a plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Brown, I.G.; MacGill, R.A.; Galvin, J.E.

    1991-05-07

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for coating or layering a surface with a metal utilizing a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source. The apparatus includes a trigger mechanism for actuating the metal vacuum vapor arc plasma source in a pulsed mode at a predetermined rate. The surface or substrate to be coated or layered is supported in position with the plasma source in a vacuum chamber. The surface is electrically biased for a selected period of time during the pulsed mode of operation of the plasma source. Both the pulsing of the metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source and the electrical biasing of the surface are synchronized for selected periods of time. 10 figures.

  9. Plasma-Etching of Spray-Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Biointerfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joon Hyub; Lee, Jun-Yong; Min, Nam Ki

    2012-08-01

    We present an effective method for the batch fabrication of miniaturized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) film electrodes using oxygen plasma etching. We adopted the approach of spray-coating for good adhesion of the SWCNT film onto a pre-patterned Pt support and used O2 plasma patterning of the coated films to realize efficient biointerfaces between SWCNT surfaces and biomolecules. By these approaches, the SWCNT film can be easily integrated into miniaturized electrode systems. To demonstrate the effectiveness of plasma-etched SWCNT film electrodes as biointerfaces, Legionella antibody was selected as analysis model owing to its considerable importance to electrochemical biosensors and was detected using plasma-etched SWCNT film electrodes and a 3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-benzidine dihydrochloride/horseradish peroxidase (TMB/HRP) catalytic system. The response currents increased with increasing concentration of Legionella antibody. This result indicates that antibodies were effectively immobilized on plasma-etched and activated SWCNT surfaces.

  10. The effects of plasma spray parameters and atmosphere on the properties and microstructure of WC-Co coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, D.; Lamy, D.; Sopkow, T.; Smuga-Otto, I.

    Wear- and corrosion-resistant coatings deposited by plasma spray process are increasingly used in severe environments in resource industries, such as oil and gas, oil sands, mining, pulp and paper, etc. While there is a large volume of literature in the area of plasma spray coatings, comparatively few papers deal with the co-relation between coating properties and microstructure as a function of plasma spray processing parameters. In this study, the effect of some plasma spray processing variables and atmosphere (air or inert gas) on the microstructure and the properties of WC-Co coatings were studied. The properties of the coatings measured include: microhardness, porosity by image analysis, wear resistance by dry sand/rubber wheel abrasion test (ASTM G 65-91) and corrosion properties by AC impedance technique. Phase analyses of the coatings were also performed by X-ray diffraction. From the above, optimized coatings were developed for oil and gas industry applications.

  11. Super-amphiphilic surface of nano silica/polyurethane hybrid coated PET film via a plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Bui, Van-Tien; Liu, Xuyan; Ko, Seung Hyeon; Choi, Ho-Suk

    2015-09-01

    This study first reports the fabrication of a super-amphiphilic surface using PET films with a silica-polyurethane hybrid top-coat layer through a non-thermal, one-atmospheric-pressure plasma treatment. This surface displays contact angle close to zero with both aqueous and oily liquids, which has attracted enormous attention for a wide-range of practical applications. We systematically investigated the influence of the plasma treatment time on the wetting behavior of the silica-polyurethane coated PET surface. The changes in morphology and chemical composition of PET surfaces before and after a plasma treatment were analyzed. In order to gain an insight into the formation of a super-amphiphilic PET surface and optimize the conditions under which super-amphiphilicity can be realized, we used a hemi-wicking action as a theoretical model and experimentally verified it through determining the critical angle. We also proposed a guide for designing a nano-sphere patterned PDMS surface which can generate super-wetting properties after a plasma treatment.

  12. Study on Formation of Plasma Nanobubbles in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takehiko; Nakatani, Tatsuyuki; Miyahara, Takashi; Ochiai, Shiroh; Oizumi, Masanobu; Fujita, Hidemasa; Miyazaki, Takamichi

    2015-12-01

    Nanobubbles of less than 400 nm in diameter were formed by plasma in pure water. Pre-breakdown plasma termed streamer discharges, generated gas channels shaped like fine dendritic coral leading to the formation of small bubbles. Nanobubbles were visualized by an optical microscope and measured by dynamic laser scattering. However, it is necessary to verify that these nanobubbles are gas bubbles, not solid, because contamination such as platinum particles and organic compounds from electrode and residue in ultrapure water were also observed.

  13. Water vapour-treated hydroxyapatite coatings after plasma spraying and their characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Weng, J; Chen, J; Feng, J; Yang, Z; Zhang, X

    1996-02-01

    A novel way to enhance the ability of hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings in resisting degradation was revealed. The as-received plasma sprayed HA coatings were kept in water vapour at 125 degrees C, with a pressure of 0.15 MPa for 6 h; most of the amorphous phase in the coating was converted into crystalline HA and enhanced the crystallinity significantly. Meanwhile, the alpha-tricalcium phosphate, tetracalcium phosphate and CaO which decomposed from HA during plasma spraying were also transformed into crystalline HA. The dissolution experiment in distilled water at room temperature showed that the post-water vapour-treated coatings were more stable than post-heat-treated ones. The average interfacial tensile bond strength between HA and substrate before and after water vapour treatment was 45.0 and 39.1 MPa, respectively.

  14. Nanocomposite Lanthanum Zirconate Thermal Barrier Coating Deposited by Suspension Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaohui; Wang, You; Wang, Liang; Hao, Guangzhao; Sun, Xiaoguang; Shan, Fan; Zou, Zhiwei

    2014-10-01

    This work seeks to develop an innovative nanocomposite thermal barrier coating (TBC) exhibiting low thermal conductivity and high durability compared with that of current TBCs. To achieve this objective, nanosized lanthanum zirconate particles were selected for the topcoat of the TBC system, and a new process—suspension plasma spray—was employed to produce desirable microstructural features: the nanocomposite lanthanum zirconate TBC contains ultrafine splats and high volume porosity, for lower thermal conductivity, and better durability. The parameters of plasma spray experiment included two main variables: (i) spray distance varying from 40 to 80 mm and (ii) the concentration of suspension 20, 25, and 30 wt.%, respectively. The microstructure of obtained coatings was characterized with scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction. The porosity of coatings is in the range of 6-10%, and the single phase in the as-sprayed coatings was pyrochlore lanthanum zirconate.

  15. Preparation of germanium doped plasma polymerized coatings as ICF target ablators

    SciTech Connect

    Brusasco, R M; Saculla, M D; Cook, R C

    1994-10-05

    Targets for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) utilize an organic (CH) ablator coating prepared by plasma polymerization. Some of these experiments require a mid-Z dopant in the ablator coating to modify the opacity of the shell. Bromine had been used in the past, but the surface finish of brominated CH degrades rapidly with time upon exposure to air. This paper describes the preparation and characterization of plasma polymer layers containing germanium as a dopant at concentrations of between 1.25 and 2.25 atom percent. The coatings are stable in air and have an rms surface roughness of 7--9 nm (modes 10--1,000) which is similar to that obtained with undoped coatings. High levels of dopant result in cracking of the inner mandrel during target assembly. Possible explanations for the observed cracking behavior will be discussed.

  16. Pulsed Plasma Synthesis of Iron and Nickel Nanoparticles Coated by Carbon for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaeva, Zhypargul; Omurzak, Emil; Iwamoto, Chihiro; Ihara, Hirotaka; Subban Ganapathy, Hullathy; Sulaimankulova, Saadat; Koinuma, Michio; Mashimo, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Fe and Ni magnetic nanoparticles coated by carbon were synthesized between the Fe-Fe and Ni-Ni metal electrodes, submerged in ethanol using pulsed plasma in a liquid method. Iron coated carbon (Fe@C) nanoparticles have an average size of 32 nm, and Ni@C nanoparticles are 40 nm. Obtained samples exhibit a well-defined crystalline structure of the inner Fe and Ni cores, encapsulated in the graphitic carbon coatings. Cytotoxicity studies performed on the MCF-7 (breast cancer) cell line showed small toxicity about 88-74% at 50 µg/mL of Fe@C and Ni@C nanoparticles, which can be significant criteria for use them in medical cancer treatment. In addition, appropriate sizes, good magnetic properties and well-organized graphitic carbon coatings are highlight merits of Fe@C and Ni@C nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed plasma.

  17. Sedimentary controls on modern sand grain coat formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowey, Patrick J.; Worden, Richard H.; Utley, James; Hodgson, David M.

    2017-05-01

    Coated sand grains can influence reservoir quality evolution during sandstone diagenesis. Porosity can be reduced and fluid flow restricted where grain coats encroach into pore space. Conversely pore-lining grain coats can restrict the growth of pore-filling quartz cement in deeply buried sandstones, and thus can result in unusually high porosity in deeply buried sandstones. Being able to predict the distribution of coated sand grains within petroleum reservoirs is thus important to help find good reservoir quality. Here we report a modern analogue study of 12 sediment cores from the Anllóns Estuary, Galicia, NW Spain, collected from a range of sub-environments, to help develop an understanding of the occurrence and distribution of coated grains. The cores were described for grain size, bioturbation and sedimentary structures, and then sub-sampled for electron and light microscopy, laser granulometry, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The Anllóns Estuary is sand-dominated with intertidal sand flats and saltmarsh environments at the margins; there is a shallowing/fining-upwards trend in the estuary-fill succession. Grain coats are present in nearly every sample analysed; they are between 1 μm and 100 μm thick and typically lack internal organisation. The extent of grain coat coverage can exceed 25% in some samples with coverage highest in the top 20 cm of cores. Samples from muddy intertidal flat and the muddy saltmarsh environments, close to the margins of the estuary, have the highest coat coverage (mean coat coverage of 20.2% and 21.3%, respectively). The lowest mean coat coverage occurs in the sandy saltmarsh (10.4%), beyond the upper tidal limit and sandy intertidal flat environments (8.4%), close to the main estuary channel. Mean coat coverage correlates with the concentration of clay fraction. The primary controls on the distribution of fine-grained sediment, and therefore grain coat distribution, are primary sediment transport and deposition processes that

  18. Nanoparticle formation and thin film deposition in aniline containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattyn, Cedric; Dias, Ana; Hussain, Shahzad; Strunskus, Thomas; Stefanovic, Ilija; Boulmer-Leborgne, Chantal; Lecas, Thomas; Kovacevic, Eva; Berndt, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    This contribution deals with plasma based polymerization processes in mixtures of argon and aniline. The investigations are performed in a capacitively coupled RF discharge (in pulsed and continuous mode) and concern both the observed formation of nanoparticles in the plasma volume and the deposition of films. The latter process was used for the deposition of ultra-thin layers on different kind of nanocarbon materials (nanotubes and free standing graphene). The analysis of the plasma and the plasma chemistry (by means of mass spectroscopy and in-situ FTIR spectroscopy) is accompanied by several ex-situ diagnostics of the obtained materials which include NEXAFS and XPS measurements as well as Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy. The decisive point of the investigations concern the preservation of the original monomer structure during the plasma polymerization processes and the stability of the thin films on the different substrates.

  19. Halo Formation And Emittance Growth of Positron Beams in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Muggli, P.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, Thomas C.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; O'Connell, C.L.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA

    2011-10-25

    An ultrarelativistic 28.5 GeV, 700-{micro}m-long positron bunch is focused near the entrance of a 1.4-m-long plasma with a density n{sub e} between {approx}10{sup 13} and {approx}5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}. Partial neutralization of the bunch space charge by the mobile plasma electrons results in a reduction in transverse size by a factor of {approx}3 in the high emittance plane of the beam {approx}1 m downstream from the plasma exit. As n{sub e} increases, the formation of a beam halo containing {approx}40% of the total charge is observed, indicating that the plasma focusing force is nonlinear. Numerical simulations confirm these observations. The bunch with an incoming transverse size ratio of {approx}3 and emittance ratio of {approx}5 suffers emittance growth and exits the plasma with approximately equal sizes and emittances.

  20. Plasma treatment of thin film coated with graphene flakes for the reduction of sheet resistance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hee; Oh, Jong Sik; Kim, Kyong Nam; Seo, Jin Seok; Jeon, Min Hwan; Yang, Kyung Chae; Yeom, Geun Young

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the effects of plasma treatment on the sheet resistance of thin films spray-coated with graphene flakes on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates. Thin films coated with graphene flakes show high sheet resistance due to defects within graphene edges, domains, and residual oxygen content. Cl2 plasma treatment led to decreased sheet resistance when treatment time was increased, but when thin films were treated for too long the sheet resistance increased again. Optimum treatment time was related to film thickness. The reduction of sheet resistance may be explained by the donation of holes due to forming pi-type covalent bonds of Cl with carbon atoms on graphene surfaces, or by C--Cl bonding at the sites of graphene defects. However, due to radiation damage caused by plasma treatment, sheet resistance increased with increased treatment time. We found that the sheet resistance of PET film coated with graphene flakes could be decreased by 50% under optimum conditions.

  1. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method to coat micropipettes with diamond-like carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kakuta, Naoto; Watanabe, Mayu; Yamada, Yukio; Okuyama, Naoki; Mabuchi, Kunihiko

    2005-07-15

    This article provides a simple method for coating glass micropipettes with diamond-like carbon (DLC) through plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The apparatus uses a cathode that is a thin-metal-coated micropipette itself and an anode that is a meshed cylinder with its cylinder axis along the micropipette length. To produce a uniform plasma and prevent a temperature increase at the tip due to ion collision concentration, we investigated the effect of the height and diameter of the meshed cylindrical anode on the plasma. Intermittent deposition is also effective for inhibiting the temperature rise and producing high quality DLC films. Measured Raman spectra and electric resistivity indicate that a DLC film suitable for use as an insulating film can be produced on the micropipette. This coating method should also be useful for other extremely small probes.

  2. Pressure-Based Liquid Feed System for Suspension Plasma Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotler, Elliot M.; Chen, Dianying; Molz, Ronald J.

    2011-06-01

    Thermal spraying with liquid-based feedstocks demonstrated a potential to produce coatings with new and enhanced characteristics. A liquid delivery system prototype was developed and tested in this study. The feeder is based on the 5MPE platform and uses a pressure setup to optimally inject and atomize liquid feedstock into a plasma plume. A novel self-cleaning apparatus is incorporated into the system to greatly reduce problems associated with clogging and agglomeration of liquid suspensions. This approach also allows the liquid feedstock line to the gun to remain charged for quick on-off operation. Experiments on aqueous and ethanol-based suspensions of titania, alumina, and YSZ were performed through this liquid delivery system using a 9MB plasma gun. Coatings with ultrafine splat microstructures were obtained by plasma spraying of those suspensions. Phase composition and microstructure of the as-sprayed coatings were investigated.

  3. "Thunderstruck": Plasma-Polymer-Coated Porous Silicon Microparticles As a Controlled Drug Delivery System.

    PubMed

    McInnes, Steven J P; Michl, Thomas D; Delalat, Bahman; Al-Bataineh, Sameer A; Coad, Bryan R; Vasilev, Krasimir; Griesser, Hans J; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2016-02-01

    Controlling the release kinetics from a drug carrier is crucial to maintain a drug's therapeutic window. We report the use of biodegradable porous silicon microparticles (pSi MPs) loaded with the anticancer drug camphothecin, followed by a plasma polymer overcoating using a loudspeaker plasma reactor. Homogenous "Teflon-like" coatings were achieved by tumbling the particles by playing AC/DC's song "Thunderstruck". The overcoating resulted in a markedly slower release of the cytotoxic drug, and this effect correlated positively with the plasma polymer coating times, ranging from 2-fold up to more than 100-fold. Ultimately, upon characterizing and verifying pSi MP production, loading, and coating with analytical methods such as time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, thermal gravimetry, water contact angle measurements, and fluorescence microscopy, human neuroblastoma cells were challenged with pSi MPs in an in vitro assay, revealing a significant time delay in cell death onset.

  4. Plasma-enhanced CVD silicon nitride antireflection coatings for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. C.; Wydeven, T.; Donohoe, K.

    1983-01-01

    Multilayer plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) silicon nitride antireflection coatings were deposited on space quality silicon solar cells. Preliminary experiments indicated that multilayer coatings decreased the total reflectance of polished silicon from 35 percent to less than 3 percent over the spectral range 0.4-1.0 micron. The solar cell energy conversion efficiency was increased from an average of 8.84 percent to an average of 12.63 percent.

  5. Electrical characteristics and formation mechanism of atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lijuan; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Weijing; Meng, Ying; Ouyang, Jiting

    2014-06-16

    The behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma jet produced by a coplanar dielectric barrier discharge in helium in external electrostatic and magnetic field is investigated. Net negative charges in the plasma jet outside the tube were detected. The deflection of the plume in the external field was observed. The plasma jet is suggested to be formed by the electron beam from the temporal cathode which is accelerated by a longitudinal field induced by the surface charges on the dielectric tube or interface between the helium and ambient air. The helium flow is necessary for the jet formation in the surrounding air.

  6. Formation of pre-sheath boundary layers in electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    In electronegative plasmas Coulomb scattering between positive and negative ions can lead to the formation of a pre-sheath boundary layer containing the bulk of the negative ions. The negative ion boundary layer forms when momentum transfer from positive to negative ions dominates the negative ion acceleration from the electric field. This condition is met in Inductively Coupled Plasma reactors that operate at low pressure and high plasma density. Simulations of the GEC reactor for Chlorine and Oxygen chemistries using the INDUCT95 2D model are presented showing the pre-sheath boundary layer structure as a function of applied power and neutral pressure.

  7. Comparison of Erosion Behavior and Particle Contamination in Mass-Production CF4/O2 Plasma Chambers Using Y2O3 and YF3 Protective Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-Ken; Wang, Wei-Kai; Huang, Shih-Yung; Tasi, Chi-Tsung

    2017-01-01

    Yttrium fluoride (YF3) and yttrium oxide (Y2O3) protective coatings prepared using an atmospheric plasma spraying technique were used to investigate the relationship between surface erosion behaviors and their nanoparticle generation under high-density plasma (1012–1013 cm−3) etching. As examined by transmission electron microscopy, the Y2O3 and YF3 coatings become oxyfluorinated after exposure to the plasma, wherein the yttrium oxyfluoride film formation was observed on the surface with a thickness of 5.2 and 6.8 nm, respectively. The difference in the oxyfluorination of Y2O3 and YF3 coatings could be attributed to Y–F and Y–O bonding energies. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses revealed that a strongly fluorinated bonding (Y–F bond) was obtained on the etched surface of the YF3 coating. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the nanoparticles on the 12-inch wafer are composed of etchant gases and Y2O3. These results indicate that the YF3 coating is a more erosion-resistant material, resulting in fewer contamination particles compared with the Y2O3 coating. PMID:28708079

  8. Comparison of Erosion Behavior and Particle Contamination in Mass-Production CF₄/O₂ Plasma Chambers Using Y₂O₃ and YF₃ Protective Coatings.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Ken; Wang, Wei-Kai; Huang, Shih-Yung; Tasi, Chi-Tsung; Wuu, Dong-Sing

    2017-07-14

    Yttrium fluoride (YF₃) and yttrium oxide (Y₂O₃) protective coatings prepared using an atmospheric plasma spraying technique were used to investigate the relationship between surface erosion behaviors and their nanoparticle generation under high-density plasma (10(12)-10(13) cm(-3)) etching. As examined by transmission electron microscopy, the Y₂O₃ and YF₃ coatings become oxyfluorinated after exposure to the plasma, wherein the yttrium oxyfluoride film formation was observed on the surface with a thickness of 5.2 and 6.8 nm, respectively. The difference in the oxyfluorination of Y₂O₃ and YF₃ coatings could be attributed to Y-F and Y-O bonding energies. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses revealed that a strongly fluorinated bonding (Y-F bond) was obtained on the etched surface of the YF₃ coating. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the nanoparticles on the 12-inch wafer are composed of etchant gases and Y₂O₃. These results indicate that the YF₃ coating is a more erosion-resistant material, resulting in fewer contamination particles compared with the Y₂O₃ coating.

  9. Effect of plasma spraying regimes on structure and properties of Ni3Al coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornienko, E. E.; Mul', D. O.; Rubtsova, O. A.; Vaschenko, S. P.; Kuzmin, V. I.; Gulyaev, I. P.; Sergachev, D. V.

    2016-11-01

    The structure and tribological properties of coatings made of PN85YU15 powder were studied. The coatings were deposited on the mild steel blanks by the technology of air-plasma spraying using a unit of annular input and gas-dynamic powder focusing. Efficiency of heating and acceleration of powder particles was studied preliminarily. Measurement results on temperature and velocity distributions of particles at a certain spraying distance by the method of spectral pyrometry and time-of-flight method are presented. The effect of plasmatorch arc current and amount of propane-butane in the plasma flow on the structure and properties of coatings is analyzed in this paper. It is determined that the phase composition of coatings and initial powder is the same: the main phase is Ni3Al compound; moreover, the structure contains Ni5Al3 phase. It is shown that an increase in the amount of propane-butane increases coatings porosity. The densest coatings (5.77%) were obtained at the plasmatorch arc current of 200 A with the reduced amount of propane-butane. The coatings obtained at the minimal arc current of 100 A with an increased amount of propane-butane are characterized by maximal porosity (20.38%). The results of tribological testing of the coatings under the conditions of sliding friction with a lubricant by the disc-plane scheme are presented. From the standpoint of obtaining the densest coatings with high performance, the optimal regimes of plasma spraying of PN85YU15 powder are the current from 140 A to 200 and using the air and propane-butane mixture only as the shielding gas (anode curtain).

  10. Fatigue test results of the rotating steel blades of steam turbine K-25-0.6 GEO with ion-plasma coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachalin, G. V.; Mednikov, A. F.; Tkhabisimov, A. B.; Arkad'ev, D. A.; Temkin, S. G.; Senina, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    Fatigue test results of the rotating steel blades of the fourth stage of the K-25-0.6 low pressure cylinder Geo steam turbine manufactured in the Kaluga Turbine Plant (hereinafter, KTP) with the ion-plasma coating were presented. Coating formation was carried out at the National Research University (MPEI) on the Gefest vacuum pilot plant by the magnetron sputtering method. Characteristics of the obtained coating were analyzed with the use of the scientific-research equipment of the National Research University (MPEI). Fatigue tests of the rotating blades and determination of the fatigue strength of the material with the ion-plasma coating were carried out on the electrodynamic vibration machines VEDS-400A in the KTP structural laboratory. The following characteristics were obtained after tests: Ti-TiN composition, 10-11 μm thickness, 1200 HV 0.05 microhardness. Fatigue tests showed that destruction, regardless of availability or nonavailability of the coating, took place by cross-section in the root zone both on the leading and trailing edges of the blade, i.e., in the most stressed zones. It was found out that the maximum stresses during tests were revealed in the root section along the trailing edge on the blade pressure side, and the less stresses were on the leading edge. Fatigue strength of the working blades after coating formation increased by 12% minimum. Results of the fatigue tests prove the previously obtained data concerning 10-12% increase of the fatigue strength of the blade steel with the ion-plasma coating and allow claiming that the process of their formation exerts the positive influence on the fatigue characteristics of the blade materials.

  11. Ablation Resistance of C/C Composites with Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed W Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhe; Wang, Yuan; Gong, Jieming; Ge, Yicheng; Peng, Ke; Ran, Liping; Yi, Maozhong

    2016-12-01

    To improve the ablation resistance of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites, tungsten (W) coating with thickness of 1.2 mm was applied by atmospheric plasma spraying. The antiablation property of the coated composites was evaluated by oxyacetylene flame ablation experiments. The phase composition of the coating was investigated by a combination of x-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis. The ablation resistance of the coated C/C substrates was compared with that of uncoated C/C composites and C/C-CuZr composites after ablation for 30 s. The properties of the coated C/C composites after ablation time of 10, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 180 s were further studied. The results indicated that the mass and linear ablation rates of the W-coated C/C composites were lower than those of uncoated C/C or C/C-CuZr composites after ablation for 30 s. The coating exhibited heat stability after 120 s of ablation, with mass loss and linear ablation rates of 7.39 × 10-3 g/s and 3.50 × 10-3 mm/s, respectively. However, the W coating became ineffective and failed after ablation for 180 s. Three ablation regions could be identified, in which the ablation mechanism of the coating changed from thermochemical to thermophysical erosion to mechanical scouring with increasing ablation time.

  12. Material fundamentals and clinical performance of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings: a review.

    PubMed

    Sun, L; Berndt, C C; Gross, K A; Kucuk, A

    2001-01-01

    The clinical use of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on metal implants has aroused as many controversies as interests over the last decade. Although faster and stronger fixation and more bone growth have been revealed, the performance of HA-coated implants has been doubted. This article will initially address the fundamentals of the material selection, design, and processing of the HA coating and show how the coating microstructure and properties can be a good predictor of the expected behavior in the body. Further discussion will clarify the major concerns with the clinical use of HA coatings and introduce a comprehensive review concerning the outcomes experienced with respect to clinical practice over the past 5 years. A reflection on the results indicates that HA coatings can promote earlier and stronger fixation but exhibit a durability that can be related to the coating quality. Specific relationships between coating quality and clinical performance are being established as characterization methods disclose more information about the coating.

  13. Characterization of gas tunnel type plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite-nanostructure titania composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yugeswaran, S.; Kobayashi, A.; Ucisik, A. Hikmet; Subramanian, B.

    2015-08-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) can be coated onto metal implants as a ceramic biocompatible coating to bridge the growth between implants and human tissue. Meanwhile many efforts have been made to improve the mechanical properties of the HA coatings without affecting its bioactivity. In the present study, nanostructure titania (TiO2) was mixed with HA powder and HA-nanostructure TiO2 composite coatings were produced by gas tunnel type plasma spraying torch under optimized spraying conditions. For this purpose, composition of 10 wt% TiO2 + 90 wt% HA, 20 wt% TiO2 + 80 wt% HA and 30 wt% TiO2 + 70 wt% HA were selected as the feedstock materials. The phase, microstructure and mechanical properties of the coatings were characterized. The obtained results validated that the increase in weight percentage of nanostructure TiO2 in HA coating significantly increased the microhardness, adhesive strength and wear resistance of the coatings. Analysis of the in vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility of the coatings were done using conventional simulated body fluid (c-SBF) solution and cultured green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow stromal cells (MSCs) respectively. The bioactivity results revealed that the composite coating has bio-active surface with good cytocompatibility.

  14. Oxidation Behavior of Titanium Carbonitride Coating Deposited by Atmospheric Plasma Spray Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; He, Jining; Yan, Dianran; Liao, Hanlin; Zhang, Nannan

    2017-08-01

    Abstract: As a high-hardness and anti-frictional material, titanium carbonitride (TiCN) thick coatings or thin films are increasingly being used in many industrial fields. In the present study, TiCN coatings were obtained by atmospheric plasma spray synthesis or reactive plasma spray. In order to promote the reaction between the Ti particles and reactive gases, a home-made gas tunnel was mounted on a conventional plasma gun to perform the spray process. The oxidation behavior of the TiCN coatings under different temperatures in static air was carefully investigated. As a result, when the temperature was over 700 °C, the coatings suffered from serious oxidation, and finally they were entirely oxidized to the TiO2 phase at 1100 °C. The principal oxidation mechanism was clarified, indicating that the oxygen can permeate into the defects and react with TiCN at high temperatures. In addition, concerning the use of a TiCN coating in high-temperature conditions, the microhardness of the oxidized coatings at different treatment temperatures was also evaluated.

  15. Oxidation Behavior of Titanium Carbonitride Coating Deposited by Atmospheric Plasma Spray Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; He, Jining; Yan, Dianran; Liao, Hanlin; Zhang, Nannan

    2017-10-01

    As a high-hardness and anti-frictional material, titanium carbonitride (TiCN) thick coatings or thin films are increasingly being used in many industrial fields. In the present study, TiCN coatings were obtained by atmospheric plasma spray synthesis or reactive plasma spray. In order to promote the reaction between the Ti particles and reactive gases, a home-made gas tunnel was mounted on a conventional plasma gun to perform the spray process. The oxidation behavior of the TiCN coatings under different temperatures in static air was carefully investigated. As a result, when the temperature was over 700 °C, the coatings suffered from serious oxidation, and finally they were entirely oxidized to the TiO2 phase at 1100 °C. The principal oxidation mechanism was clarified, indicating that the oxygen can permeate into the defects and react with TiCN at high temperatures. In addition, concerning the use of a TiCN coating in high-temperature conditions, the microhardness of the oxidized coatings at different treatment temperatures was also evaluated.

  16. Microstructure and thermal behaviour of plasma sprayed zirconia/alumina composite coating.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, A; Ando, Y; Kurokawa, K; Hejwowski, T

    2011-10-01

    In thermal barrier coatings (TBC), failure occurs near or at the interface between the metallic bondcoat and topcoat. On high temperature conditions, an oxide scale which is named thermally grown oxide (TGO) occurs along the bond/topcoat interface. For diminishing the creation of TGO, a dense coating with low residual stress and thermal stress buffer layer was preferable. High hardness ceramic coatings could be obtained by gas tunnel type plasma spraying, and the deposited coating had superior property in comparison with those deposited by conventional type plasma spray method. In this study, the gas tunnel type plasma spraying system was utilized to produce a zirconia/alumina functionally graded thermal barrier coating and discussed its physical and mechanical properties, thermal behavior and high temperature oxidation resistance of the coating are discussed. Consequently, the proposed system exhibited superior mechanical properties and oxidation resistance at the expenses of a slightly lower thermal insulating effect. This interlayer is preferred in order to minimize the detrimental effect of the phase transformation of gamma-Al2O3 to alpha-Al2O3.

  17. Structurization of submonolayer carbon coatings deposited in a low-pressure microwave plasma on single-crystal silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Shanygin, V. Ya.; Yafarov, R. K.

    2011-11-15

    Features of surface structurization of submonolayer carbon coatings deposited in highly ionized ultrahigh-frequency low-pressure plasma on silicon wafers with (111) and (100) crystallographic orientations are studied. It is shown that the size and surface density of nanostructured carbon formations are controlled by the atomic microstructure of the silicon free surface of these crystallographic orientations and its modifications depending on deposition and annealing conditions. We show the fundamental possibility of fabricating integrated columnar nanostructures with surface densities to (4-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2} and higher than 400 nm by highly anisotropic etching using the obtained carbon island nanostructures as a mask coating on singlecrystal (100) silicon.

  18. Use of a nitrogen-argon plasma to improve adherence of sputtered titanium carbide coatings on steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments on 440-C steel surfaces that had been RF-sputtered with titanium carbide when a small percentage of nitrogen was added to the plasma were conducted. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to analyze the resultant coatings. Results indicate that a small partial pressure of nitrogen (about 0.5%) markedly improves the adherence, friction, and wear properties when compared with coatings applied on sputter-etched oxidized surfaces or in the presence of a small oxygen partial pressure. The improvements are related to the formation of an interface containing a mixture of the nitrides of titanium and iron, which are harder than their corresponding oxides.

  19. Use of a nitrogen-argon plasma to improve adherence of sputtered titanium carbide coatings on steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments on 440-C steel surfaces that had been RF-sputtered with titanium carbide when a small percentage of nitrogen was added to the plasma were conducted. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to analyze the resultant coatings. Results indicate that a small partial pressure of nitrogen (about 0.5%) markedly improves the adherence, friction, and wear properties when compared with coatings applied on sputter-etched oxidized surfaces or in the presence of a small oxygen partial pressure. The improvements are related to the formation of an interface containing a mixture of the nitrides of titanium and iron, which are harder than their corresponding oxides.

  20. Effect of nitrogen-containing plasma on adherence, friction, and wear of radiofrequency-sputtered titanium carbide coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments on 440C steel surfaces that were rf sputtered with titanium carbide when a small percentage of nitrogen was added to the plasma were conducted. Both X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to analyze the resultant coatings. Results indicate that the small partial pressure of nitrogen (approximately 0.5 percent) markedly improves the adherence, friction, and wear properties when compared with coatings applied to sputter-etched surfaces, oxidized surfaces, or in the presence of a small oxygen partial pressure. The improvements are related to the formation of an interface containing a mixture of the nitrides of titanium and iron, which are harder than their corresponding oxides.

  1. Effect of plasma pretreatment on adhesion and mechanical properties of UV-curable coatings on plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gururaj, T.; Subasri, R.; Raju, K. R. C. Soma; Padmanabham, G.

    2011-02-01

    An attempt was made to study the effect of plasma surface activation on the adhesion of UV-curable sol-gel coatings on polycarbonate (PC) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates. The sol was synthesized by the hydrolysis and condensation of a UV-curable silane in combination with Zr-n-propoxide. Coatings deposited by dip coating were cured using UV-radiation followed by thermal curing between 80 °C and 130 °C. The effect of plasma surface treatment on the wettability of the polymer surface prior to coating deposition was followed up by measuring the water contact angle. The water contact angle on the surface of as-cleaned substrates was 80° ± 2° and that after plasma treatment was 43° ± 1° and 50° ± 2° for PC and PMMA respectively. Adhesion as well as mechanical properties like scratch resistance and taber abrasion resistance were evaluated for coatings deposited over plasma treated and untreated surfaces.

  2. Study of Coating Growth Behavior During the Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation of Magnesium Alloy ZK60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhaozhong; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Yushen; Qu, Yunfei; Wu, Xiaohong

    2015-04-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation technique was used to coat ZK60 magnesium alloy in a silicate-based electrolyte. Effects of oxidation time on the morphology, phase structure, and corrosion resistance of the resulting coatings were systematically investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization. The main components of the inner and the outer coating layers were MgO and Mg2SiO4, respectively. It was also found that the oxidation time has a significant impact on the corrosion resistance properties of the coatings. The coating obtained within the oxidation time of 360 s exhibited a corrosion current of 7.6 × 10-8 A/cm2 in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution, which decreased significantly when comparing with the pristine magnesium alloy.

  3. Low Pressure Plasma Sprayed Overlay Coatings for GRCop-84 Combustion Chamber Liners for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Barrett, C.; Ghosn, L. J.; Lerch, B.; Robinson,; Thorn, G.

    2005-01-01

    An advanced Cu-8(at.%)Cr-4%Nb alloy developed at NASA's Glenn Research Center, and designated as GRCop-84, is currently being considered for use as combustor chamber liners and nozzle ramps in NASA s future generations of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs). However, past experience has shown that unprotected copper alloys undergo an environmental attack called "blanching" in rocket engines using liquid hydrogen as fuel and liquid oxygen as the oxidizer. Potential for sulfidation attack of the liners in hydrocarbon-fueled engines is also of concern. Protective overlay coatings alloys are being developed for GRCop-84. The development of this coatings technology has involved a combination of modeling, coatings development and characterization, and process optimization. Coatings have been low pressure plasma sprayed on GRCop-84 substrates of various geometries and shapes. Microstructural, mechanical property data and thermophysical results on the coated substrates are presented and discussed.

  4. Adhesion Improvement of Zirconium Coating on Polyurethane Modified by Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Hao, Xiaofei; Liu, Jiwei

    2016-02-01

    In order to improve the adhesion of the middle frequency magnetic sputtered zirconium coating on a polyurethane film, an anode layer source was used to pretreat the polyurethane film with nitrogen and oxygen ions. SEMs and AFM roughness profiles of treated samples and the contrast groups were obtained. Besides, XPS survey spectrums and high resolution spectrums were also investigated. The adhesion test revealed that ion bombardment could improve the adhesion to the polyurethane coating substrate. A better etching result of oxygen ions versus nitrogen predicts a higher bonding strength of zirconium coating on polyurethane and, indeed, the highest bonding strengths are for oxygen ion bombardment upto 13.3 MPa. As demonstrated in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the oxygen ion also helps to introduce more active groups, and, therefore, it achieves a high value of adhesion strength.

  5. The effects of RF plasma ashing on zinc orthotitanate/potassium silicate thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Bruckner, Eric J.

    1992-01-01

    Samples of YB-71, a white thermal control coating composed of zinc orthotitanate pigment in a potassium silicate binder, were exposed in air plasma and in oxygen plasma to determine optical property and surface chemistry changes. Results show that YB-71 undergoes a significant reflectance decrease upon exposure to the simulated LEO atomic oxygen environment provided by an air plasma asher. YB-71 samples exposed to the same effective fluence in oxygen plasma, or in a UV screening Faraday cage in air or oxygen, do not undergo as severe reflectance decreases as the samples exposed in the air plasma asher environment. The UV and VUV radiation present in the plasma ashers affects the YB-71 degradation. It is noted that, when using plasma ashers to determine LEO degradation, it is necessary to take into account the sensitivity of the material to the synergistic effects of atomic oxygen and accelerated UV radiation.

  6. The effects of RF plasma ashing on zinc orthotitanate/potassium silicate thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Bruckner, Eric J.

    1992-01-01

    Samples of YB-71, a white thermal control coating composed of zinc orthotitanate pigment in a potassium silicate binder, were exposed in air plasma and in oxygen plasma to determine optical property and surface chemistry changes. Results show that YB-71 undergoes a significant reflectance decrease upon exposure to the simulated LEO atomic oxygen environment provided by an air plasma asher. YB-71 samples exposed to the same effective fluence in oxygen plasma, or in a UV screening Faraday cage in air or oxygen, do not undergo as severe reflectance decreases as the samples exposed in the air plasma asher environment. The UV and VUV radiation present in the plasma ashers affects the YB-71 degradation. It is noted that, when using plasma ashers to determine LEO degradation, it is necessary to take into account the sensitivity of the material to the synergistic effects of atomic oxygen and accelerated UV radiation.

  7. Process, properties, and environmental response of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results are shown which demonstrate that the properties of plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia are strongly influenced by the process parameters. Properties of the coatings in the as-sprayed condition are shown to be additionally influenced by environmental exposure. This behavior is dependent on raw material considerations and processing conditions as well as exposure time and temperature. Process control methodology is described which can take into consideration these complex interactions and help to produce thermal barrier coatings in a cost effective way while meeting coating technical requirements.

  8. Process, properties and environmental response of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results are shown which demonstrate that the properties of plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia are strongly influenced by the process parameters. Properties of the coatings in the as-sprayed condition are shown to be additionally influenced by environmental exposure. This behavior is dependent on raw material considerations and processing conditions as well as exposure time and temperature. Process control methodology is described which can take into consideration these complex interactions and help to produce thermal barrier coatings in a cost effective way while meeting coating technical requirements.

  9. Preparation of YBa2Cu3O7 High Tc Superconducting Coatings by Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danroc, J.; Lacombe, J.

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * THE COMPOUND YBa2Cu3O7-δ * Structure * Critical temperature * Critical current density * Phase equilibria in the YBaCuO system * PREPARATION OF YBa2Cu3O7 COATINGS * General organisation of the preparation process * The powder * Hot plasma spraying of YBa2Cu3O7 * The post-spraying thermal treatment * CHARACTERISTICS OF THE YBa2Cu3O7-δ COATINGS * Chemical composition * Crystalline structure * Morphology of the coatings * Electrical and magnetic characteristics * Conclusion * REFERENCES

  10. Process, properties, and environmental response of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results are shown which demonstrate that the properties of plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia are strongly influenced by the process parameters. Properties of the coatings in the as-sprayed condition are shown to be additionally influenced by environmental exposure. This behavior is dependent on raw material considerations and processing conditions as well as exposure time and temperature. Process control methodology is described which can take into consideration these complex interactions and help to produce thermal barrier coatings in a cost effective way while meeting coating technical requirements.

  11. Edge microstability of NSTX plasmas without and with lithium-coated plasma-facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canik, J. M.; Guttenfelder, W.; Maingi, R.; Osborne, T. H.; Kubota, S.; Ren, Y.; Bell, R. E.; Kugel, H. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Souhkanovskii, V. A.

    2013-11-01

    The pedestal structure in NSTX is strongly affected by lithium coatings applied to the PFCs. In discharges with lithium, the density pedestal widens, and the electron temperature (Te) gradient increases inside a radius of ψN ∼ 0.95, but is unchanged for ψN > 0.95. The inferred effective electron thermal (\\chi_{e}^{eff} ) and particle (D_{e}^{eff} ) profiles reflect the profile changes: \\chi_{e}^{eff} is slightly increased in the near-separatrix region, and is reduced in the region ψN < 0.95 in the with-lithium case. The D_{e}^{eff} profile shows a broadening of the region with low diffusivity with lithium, while the minimum value within the steep-gradient region is comparable in the two cases. The linear microstability properties of the edge plasma without and with lithium have been analysed. At the pedestal top microtearing modes are unstable without lithium. These are stabilized by the stronger density gradient with lithium, becoming TEM-like with growth rates reduced and comparable to E × B shearing rates. In the region ψN > 0.95, both the pre- and with-lithium cases are calculated to be unstable to ETG modes, with higher growth rates with lithium. Both cases are also found to lie near the onset for kinetic ballooning modes, but in the second-stable region where growth rates decrease with increasing pressure gradient.

  12. Erosion and re-deposition of lithium and boron coatings under high-flux plasma bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, Tyler Wayne

    Lithium and boron coatings are applied to the walls of many tokamaks to enhance performance and protect the underlying substrates. Li and B-coated high-Z substrates are planned for use in NSTX-U and are a candidate plasma-facing component (PFC) for DEMO. However, previous measurements of Li evaporation and thermal sputtering on low-flux devices indicate that the Li temperature permitted on such devices may be unacceptably low. Thus it is crucial to characterize gross and net Li erosion rates under high-flux plasma bombardment. Additionally, no quantitative measurements have been performed of the erosion rate of a boron-coated PFC during plasma bombardment. A realistic model for the compositional evolution of a Li layer under D bombardment was developed that incorporates adsorption, implantation, and diffusion. A model was developed for temperature-dependent mixed-material Li-D erosion that includes evaporation, physical sputtering, chemical sputtering, preferential sputtering, and thermal sputtering. The re-deposition fraction of a Li coating intersecting a linear plasma column was predicted using atomic physics information and by solving the Li continuity equation. These models were tested in the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device at ion fluxes of 1023-1024 m-2 s-1 and Li surface temperatures less than 800 degrees C. Li erosion was measured during bombardment with a neon plasma that will not chemically react with Li and the results agreed well with the erosion model. Next the ratio of the total D fluence to the areal density of the Li coating was varied to quantify differences in Li erosion under D plasma bombardment as a function of the D concentration. The ratio of D/Li atoms was calculated using the results of MD simulations and good agreement is observed between measurements and the predictions of the mixed-material erosion model. Li coatings are observed to disappear from graphite much faster than from TZM Mo, indicating that fast Li diffusion into the bulk

  13. Erosion and re-deposition of lithium and boron coatings under high-flux plasma bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, Tyler Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Lithium and boron coatings are applied to the walls of many tokamaks to enhance performance and protect the underlying substrates. Li and B-coated high-Z substrates are planned for use in NSTX-U and are a candidate plasma-facing component (PFC) for DEMO. However, previous measurements of Li evaporation and thermal sputtering on low-flux devices indicate that the Li temperature permitted on such devices may be unacceptably low. Thus it is crucial to characterize gross and net Li erosion rates under high-flux plasma bombardment. Additionally, no quantitative measurements have been performed of the erosion rate of a boron-coated PFC during plasma bombardment. A realistic model for the compositional evolution of a Li layer under D bombardment was developed that incorporates adsorption, implantation, and diffusion. A model was developed for temperature-dependent mixed-material Li-D erosion that includes evaporation, physical sputtering, chemical sputtering, preferential sputtering, and thermal sputtering. The re-deposition fraction of a Li coating intersecting a linear plasma column was predicted using atomic physics information and by solving the Li continuity equation. These models were tested in the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device at ion fluxes of 10^23-10^24 m^-2 s^-1 and Li surface temperatures less than 800 degrees C. Li erosion was measured during bombardment with a neon plasma that will not chemically react with Li and the results agreed well with the erosion model. Next the ratio of the total D fluence to the areal density of the Li coating was varied to quantify differences in Li erosion under D plasma bombardment as a function of the D concentration. The ratio of D/Li atoms was calculated using the results of MD simulations and good agreement is observed between measurements and the predictions of the mixed-material erosion model. Li coatings are observed to disappear from graphite much faster than from TZM Mo, indicating that fast Li diffusion into the bulk

  14. Contact potential induced enhancement of magnetization in polyaniline coated nanomagnetic iron oxides by plasma polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethulakshmi, N.; Sooraj, V.; Sajeev, U. S.; Nair, Swapna S.; Narayanan, T. N.; Joy, Lija K.; Joy, P. A.; Ajayan, P. M.; Anantharaman, M. R.

    2013-10-01

    The present work derives motivation from the so called surface/interfacial magnetism in core shell structures and commercial samples of Fe3O4 and γ Fe2O3 with sizes ranging from 20 to 30 nm were coated with polyaniline using plasma polymerization and studied. The High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy images indicate a core shell structure after polyaniline coating and exhibited an increase in saturation magnetization by 2 emu/g. For confirmation, plasma polymerization was performed on maghemite nanoparticles which also exhibited an increase in saturation magnetization. This enhanced magnetization is rather surprising and the reason is found to be an interfacial phenomenon resulting from a contact potential.

  15. Preparation of dielectric coating of variable dielectric constant by plasma polymerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudis, M.; Wydeven, T. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A plasma polymerization process for the deposition of a dielectric polymer coating on a substrate comprising disposing of the substrate in a closed reactor between two temperature controlled electrodes connected to a power supply is presented. A vacuum is maintained within the closed reactor, causing a monomer gas or gas mixture of a monomer and diluent to flow into the reactor, generating a plasma between the electrodes. The vacuum varies and controls the dielectric constant of the polymer coating being deposited by regulating the gas total and partial pressure, the electric field strength and frequency, and the current density.

  16. Tribological Characterization of Plasma-Sprayed CoNiCrAlY-BN Abradable Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irissou, E.; Dadouche, A.; Lima, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    The processing conditions, microstructural and tribological characterizations of plasma-sprayed CoNiCrAlY-BN high temperature abradable coatings are reported in this manuscript. Plasma spray torch parameters were varied to produce a set of abradable coatings exhibiting a broad range of porosity levels (34-62%) and superficial Rockwell hardness values (0-78 HR15Y). Abradability tests have been performed using an abradable-seal test rig, capable of simulating operational wear at different rotor speeds and seal incursion rates (SIRs). These tests allowed determining the rubbing forces and quantifying the blade and seal wear characteristics for slow and fast SIRs. Erosion wear performance and ASTM C633 coating adhesion strength test results are also reported. For optimal abradability performance, it is shown that coating hardness needs to be lower than 70 and 50 HR15Y for slow and fast blade incursion rate conditions, respectively. It is shown that the erosion wear performance, as well as, the coating cohesive strength is a function of the coating hardness. The current results allow defining the coating specifications in terms of hardness and porosity for targeted applications.

  17. Piezospectroscopic measurements capturing the evolution of plasma spray-coating stresses with substrate loads.

    PubMed

    Freihofer, Gregory; Fugon-Dessources, Daniela; Ergin, Emrecan; Van Newkirk, Amy; Gupta, Ankur; Seal, Sudipta; Schülzgen, Axel; Raghavan, Seetha

    2014-02-12

    Plasma-spray coatings have a unique microstructure composed of various types of microcracks and weakly bonded interfaces which dictate their nonlinear mechanical properties. The intrinsic photo-luminescence (PL) characteristics of alpha-alumina (α-Al2O3) within these coatings offer a diagnostic functionality, enabling these properties to be probed experimentally at the microscale, under substrate loading. The piezospectroscopic (PS) measurements from the coatings are capable of revealing microstructural stress at high spatial resolution. Here, for the first time, the evolution of stresses within air plasma spray (APS) coatings under increasing substrate loads were captured using piezospectroscopy. With mechanical cycling of the substrate, the PS properties revealed anelastic and inelastic behavior and a relaxation of residual tensile stress within the APS coatings. With decreasing substrate thickness, the coating was observed to sustain more stress, as the substrate's influence on the mechanical behavior decreased. The findings provide an insight into the microstructural response that can serve as the basis for model validation and subsequently drive the design process for these coatings.

  18. Sintering and Fracture Behavior of Plasma-sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Choi, Sung R.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. There is a need to characterize the fundamental sintering and fracture behavior of the current ZrO2-(7 to 8)wt%Y2O3 coating, in order to fully take advantage of the coating capability. In addition, a thorough evaluation of the coating behavior and temperature limits will be useful for more accurately assessing the benefit gained from future advanced coating systems. In this study, the sintering behavior of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 coatings was systematically investigated as a function of temperature and time using a dilatometer in the temperature range of 1200-1500 C. The coating sintering kinetics obtained by dilatometry were compared with the coating thermal conductivity increase kinetics, determined by a steady-state laser heat-flux testing approach, under high temperature and thermal gradient sintering conditions. The mode I, mode II, and mixed mode I-mode II fracture behavior of as-processed and sintering-annealed coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at ambient and elevated temperatures in order to evaluate the coating sintering effects on the fracture envelope of K(sub I) versus K(sub II). The coating thermal conductivity cyclic response associated with the interface delamination of the coating systems under simulated engine heat-flux conditions will be discussed in conjunction with the sintering and fracture testing results.

  19. Leaky enteric coating on ranitidine hydrochloride beads: dissolution and prediction of plasma data.

    PubMed

    Bendas, Ehab R; Ayres, James W

    2008-08-01

    The present research is based on the hypothesis that leaky enteric-coated pellets formulations are able to provide sustained input for drugs that have an absorption window, such as ranitidine hydrochloride, without jeopardizing their bioavailability. Leaky enteric-coated pellets formulations are defined as enteric-coated pellets that allow some of the drug to be released from the formulation in gastric fluid. Different approaches to making leaky enteric-coated pellets were investigated using extrusion-spheronization followed by spray coating. Leaky enteric coats were formulated using a commonly used enteric polymer, Eudragit L 30 D-55, combined with soluble compounds including lactose, PEG 8000 and surfactants (Span 60 (hydrophobic) or Tween 80 (hydrophilic)). The rate of drug release from the formulations in simulated gastric fluid can be tailored by varying the additive's amount or type. All leaky enteric-coated formulations studied completely released the drugs within 30 min after changing dissolution medium to phosphate buffer, pH 6. Predictions of plasma concentration-time profiles of the model drug ranitidine hydrochloride from leaky enteric-coated pellets in fasted conditions and from immediate-release formulations were performed using computer simulations. Simulation results are consistent with a hypothesis that leaky enteric-coated pellets formulations provide sustained input for drugs shown to have an absorption window without decreasing bioavailability. The sustained input results from the combined effects of the formulation and GI transit effects on pellets. The present research demonstrates a new application of knowledge about gastrointestinal transit effects on drug formulations. It also shows that enteric-coating polymers have new applications in areas other than the usual enteric-coated formulations. The hypothesis that a leaky enteric-coated pellets formulation may maintain or increase the bioavailability of drugs that have a window of absorption

  20. Space Plasma Testing of High-Voltage Thin-Film Solar Arrays with Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlomak, Pawel; Hausgen, Paul E.; Merrill, John; Senft, Donna; Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the space plasma test program for thin-film photovoltaics (TFPV) technologies developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). The main objective of this program is to simulate the effects of space plasma characteristic of LEO and MEO environments on TFPV. Two types of TFPV, amorphous silicon (a-Si) and copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS), coated with two types of thin-film, multifunctional coatings were used for these studies. This paper reports the results of the first phase of this program, namely the results of preliminary electrostatic charging, arcing, dielectric breakdown, and collection current measurements carried out with a series of TFPV exposed to simulated space plasma at the NASA Glenn Plasma Interaction Facility. The experimental data demonstrate that multifunctional coatings developed for this program provide effective protection against the plasma environment while minimizing impact on power generation performance. This effort is part of an ongoing program led by the Space Vehicles Directorate at the AFRL devoted to the development and space qualification of TFPV and their protective coatings.

  1. Stability of magnetite nanoparticles with different coatings in a simulated blood plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favela-Camacho, Sarai E.; Pérez-Robles, J. Francisco; García-Casillas, Perla E.; Godinez-Garcia, Andrés

    2016-07-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) have demonstrated to be a potential platform for simultaneous anticancer drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, magnetite is unstable at the blood plasma conditions. Therefore, to study their stability in a broad range of particle size, the MNPs were synthesized using two methods, the fast injection co-precipitation method (FIC) and the reflux co-precipitation method (RC). The MNPs obtained by the RC and the FIC methods have an average size of agglomerates of 200 and 45 nm respectively. They were dispersed using sodium citrate as surfactant and were coated with silica and chitosan. A total of four kind of coated MNPs were synthesized: magnetite/sodium citrate, magnetite/silica, magnetite/sodium citrate/silica and magnetite/sodium citrate/silica/chitosan. Different samples of the coated MNPs were immersed in a simulated blood plasma solution (Phosphate-Buffered Saline, PBS, Gibco®), for periods of 24, 48 and 72 h. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) technique was used to analyze the composition of the simulated plasma after those periods of time. The obtained results suggest that the uncoated samples showed an appreciable weight loss, and the iron composition in the simulated plasma increased. This last means that the used coatings avoid iron dissolution from the MNPs.

  2. Palladium-modified aluminide coatings: Mechanisms of formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lamesle, P.; Steinmetz, P.; Steinmetz, J.; Alperine, S.

    1995-02-01

    The need to increase the efficiency of turbo engines has led manufacturers to increase the temperature of gases at the exhaust of the combustion chamber. Another limiting factor for the lifetime of blades or vanes used in gas turbines is hot corrosion due to the condensation of alkaline sulfate produced by the oxidation of sulfur contained in kerosene or fuels. To overcome these problems, the use of protective coatings has come into general use. A systematic investigation of the influence of Pd-Ni predeposit alloys on the microstructure and composition of aluminum diffusion coatings has been conducted on Ni base superalloys (mainly IN738). Their metallurgical structure has been studied with a special emphasis on the nature of the phases and distribution of the various elements throughout the coating section. A two-layer structure similar to that formed on simple aluminide coatings is observed whatever the type of aluminizing treatment (low and high aluminum activity, pack of vapor-phase coating). The superficial layer is, however, very different from that observed in simple aluminide coatings, since it is constituted with a ternary PdNi aluminide. Palladium concentration profiles, which significantly differ when using low or high activity cements, and the results of a study of the ternary Ni-Pd-Al phase diagram, provide qualitative indications concerning the coatings` growth processes. Palladium, if present at a sufficient level, enhances Al diffusion in the beta phase. In the case of low activity processes, a consequence of this increase of Al diffusion flux is the location of an NiAl reaction zone inside the coating.

  3. Plasma source ion implantation to increase the adhesion of subsequently deposited coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.P.; Walter, K.C.; Taylor, T.N.

    1997-10-01

    In Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) an object is placed in a plasma and pulse biased to a high negative potential, so as to implant the plasma ions into the surface of the object. Although ion implantation, by itself, can yield desirable surface modification, it is even more useful as a method of creating a functionally graded interface between the substrate material and a subsequently deposited coating, which may be produced by altering operating conditions on the same plasma source. Although this interfacial region is very thin - as little as 20 nm - it can greatly increase the adhesion of the deposited coatings. We present here a description of this process, and compare a simulation of the graded interface with an XPS depth profile of the interfacial region for erbium metal implanted into steel.

  4. Microwave plasma formation within a 2D photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Stephen; Gregório, José; Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2017-05-01

    Experiments demonstrate that an electromagnetic wave incident on a photonic crystal (PhC) containing a single point-defect causes gas breakdown. After breakdown we report the formation of a stable microwave plasma within this free-space vacancy. We show that gas breakdown is possible in low-pressure argon (10 Torr) using as little as 1.4 W of microwave power if the frequency of the incident wave is equal to the resonance of the vacancy (8.614 GHz). During formation, the plasma-filled defect decreases the transmission of energy through the photonic crystal by approximately two orders of magnitude. Plasma formation time is measured to be as fast as 100 ns at relatively high power (9 W). Using the transmission of energy through the PhC as a diagnostic tool, we report that the electron density of the microwave plasma is 1016-1017 m-3 for argon pressures between 10 and 50 Torr. Finally, we consider the application of the self-initiated plasma within the PhC as a simple power limiter.

  5. In vivo stimulation of bone formation by aluminum and oxygen plasma surface-modified magnesium implants.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hoi Man; Zhao, Ying; Tam, Vivian; Wu, Shuilin; Chu, Paul K; Zheng, Yufeng; To, Michael Kai Tsun; Leung, Frankie K L; Luk, Keith D K; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Yeung, Kelvin W K

    2013-12-01

    A newly developed magnesium implant is used to stimulate bone formation in vivo. The magnesium implant after undergoing dual aluminum and oxygen plasma implantation is able to suppress rapid corrosion, leaching of magnesium ions, as well as hydrogen gas release from the biodegradable alloy in simulated body fluid (SBF). No released aluminum is detected from the SBF extract and enhanced corrosion resistance properties are confirmed by electrochemical tests. In vitro studies reveal enhanced growth of GFP mouse osteoblasts on the aluminum oxide coated sample, but not on the untreated sample. In addition to that a small amount (50 ppm) of magnesium ions can enhance osteogenic differentiation as reported previously, our present data show a low concentration of hydrogen can give rise to the same effect. To compare the bone volume change between the plasma-treated magnesium implant and untreated control, micro-computed tomography is performed and the plasma-treated implant is found to induce significant new bone formation adjacent to the implant from day 1 until the end of the animal study. On the contrary, bone loss is observed during the first week post-operation from the untreated magnesium sample. Owing to the protection offered by the Al2O3 layer, the plasma-treated implant degrades more slowly and the small amount of released magnesium ions stimulate new bone formation locally as revealed by histological analyses. Scanning electron microscopy discloses that the Al2O3 layer at the bone-implant interface is still present two months after implantation. In addition, no inflammation or tissue necrosis is observed from both treated and untreated implants. These promising results suggest that the plasma-treated magnesium implant can stimulate bone formation in vivo in a minimal invasive way and without causing post-operative complications.

  6. Plasma formation in a double-gap vircator

    SciTech Connect

    Queller, T.; Shlapakovski, A.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2010-11-15

    Time-resolved light emission imaging was used to observe the plasma formation within the cavity of the double-gap vircator powered by a sub-microsecond generator ({approx}500 kV, {approx}10 kA, {approx}500 ns). The vircator generated well reproducible S-band microwave pulses of {approx}200 MW peak power and up to 200 ns full duration. The plasma light emission was observed {approx}30 ns prior to the ending of the generated microwave pulses at the surface of the aluminum foil separating the vircator cavity gaps, in the gap where the virtual cathode is formed. Estimations showed that the energy deposition into the foil by the high-current electron beam is sufficient for the surface plasma formation. The plasma ions accelerated toward the virtual cathode neutralize its electron space charge. The latter was confirmed by the increase in the electron current transmitted through the vircator cavity. In addition, the time of the plasma appearance was determined by comparing the measured transmitted current with that following from the one-dimensional model of a stationary un-neutralized two-stream electron flow. This time agrees with the maximum of the microwave power observed in the experiments, thus showing that the plasma ions cause the termination of the microwave generation.

  7. Refrigerated Wind Tunnel Tests on Surface Coatings for Preventing Ice Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Montgomery; Clay, William C

    1930-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to determine the effectiveness of various surface coatings as a means for preventing ice formations on aircraft in flight. The substances used as coatings for these tests are divided into two groups: compounds soluble in water, and those which are insoluble in water. It was found that certain soluble compounds were apparently effective in preventing the formation of ice on an airfoil model, while all insoluble compounds which were tested were found to be ineffective.

  8. Effect of electrolyte components on the magnetic and magnetoresistive characteristics of Fe-containing plasma electrolytic oxide coatings on titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnev, V. S.; Adigamova, M. V.; Tkachenko, I. A.; Sergienko, V. I.; Yanushkevich, K. I.; Aplesnin, S. S.; Lukiyanchuk, I. V.; Morozova, V. P.; Medkov, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    The effect replacing Na3PO4 with Na2HPO4 in aqueous phosphate-borate-tungstate electrolyte that additionally contains Fe2(C2O4)3 on the magnetic and magnetoresistive characteristics of oxide coating/ titanium composites formed by means of plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is investigated. It is established that PEO coatings with ferromagnetic characteristics form on titanium in an electrolyte containing Na3PO4 (pH 11) upon adding iron(III) oxalate, while replacing Na3PO4 with Na2HPO4 and the respective drop in the pH of the base electrolyte down to 9.8 results in the formation of coatings with different magnetic characteristics. The correlation between changes in the values of the charge carriers' activation energy and the magnetic susceptibility is demonstrated for the latter. An increase in the electric resistance of coatings in a magnetic field is observed, and the type of the magnetic resistance temperature dependence is established.

  9. Life modeling of atmospheric and low pressure plasma-sprayed thermal-barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Argarwal, P.; Duderstadt, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    The cycles-to-failure vs cycle duration data for three different thermal barrier coating systems, which consist of atmospheric pressure plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 percent Y2O3 over similarly deposited or low pressure plasma sprayed Ni-base alloys, are presently analyzed by means of the Miller (1980) oxidation-based life model. Specimens were tested at 1100 C for heating cycle lengths of 1, 6, and 20 h, yielding results supporting the model's value.

  10. Development of barrier coatings for cellulosic-based materials by cold plasma methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denes, Agnes Reka

    Cellulose-based materials are ideal candidates for future industries that need to be based on environmentally safe technologies and renewable resources. Wood represents an important raw material and its application as construction material is well established. Cellophane is one of the most important cellulosic material and it is widely used as packaging material in the food industry. Outdoor exposure of wood causes a combination of physical and chemical degradation processes due to the combined effects of sunlight, moisture, fungi, and bacteria. Cold-plasma-induced surface modifications are an attractive way for tailoring the characteristics of lignocellulosic substrates to prevent weathering degradation. Plasma-polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (PPHMDSO) was deposited onto wood surfaces to create water repellent characteristics. The presence of a crosslinked macromolecular structure was detected. The plasma coated samples exhibited very high water contact angle values indicating the existence of hydrophobic surfaces. Reflective and electromagnetic radiation-absorbent substances were incorporated with a high-molecular-weight polydimethylsiloxane polymer in liquid phase and deposited as thin layers on wood surfaces. The macromolecular films, containing the dispersed materials, were then converted into a three dimensional solid state network by exposure to a oxygen-plasma. It was demonstrated that both UV-absorbent and reflectant components incorporated into the plasma-generated PDMSO matrix protected the wood from weathering degradation. Reduced oxidation and less degradation was observed after simulated weathering. High water contact angle values indicated a strong hydrophobic character of the oxygen plasma-treated PDMSO-coated samples. Plasma-enhanced surface modifications and coatings were employed to create water-vapor barrier layers on cellophane substrate surfaces. HMDSO was selected as a plasma gas and oxygen was used to ablate amorphous regions. Oxygen plasma

  11. Transmission electron microscopy of coatings formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation of titanium.

    PubMed

    Matykina, E; Arrabal, R; Skeldon, P; Thompson, G E

    2009-05-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and supporting film analyses are used to investigate the changes in composition, morphology and structure of coatings formed on titanium during DC plasma electrolytic oxidation in a calcium- and phosphorus-containing electrolyte. The coatings are of potential interest as bioactive surfaces. The initial barrier film, of mixed amorphous and nanocrystalline structure, formed below the sparking voltage of 180 V, incorporates small amounts of phosphorus and calcium species, with phosphorus confined to the outer approximately 63% of the coating thickness. On commencement of sparking, calcium- and phosphorus-rich amorphous material forms at the coating surface, with local heating promoting crystallization in underlying and adjacent anodic titania. The amorphous material thickens with increased treatment time, comprising almost the whole of the approximately 5.7-microm-thick coating formed at 340 V. At this stage, the coating is approximately 4.4 times thicker than the oxidized titanium, with a near-surface composition of about 12 at.% Ti, 58 at.% O, 19 at.% P and 11 at.% Ca. Further, the amount of titanium consumed in forming the coating is similar to that calculated from the anodizing charge, although there may be non-Faradaic contributions to the coating growth.

  12. Microstructure and Thermal Properties of Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed Yb2Si2O7 Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xin; Niu, Yaran; Huang, Liping; Li, Hong; Zheng, Xuebin; Ding, Chuanxian; Sun, Jinliang

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, Yb2Si2O7 powder was synthesized by solid-state reaction using Yb2O3 and SiO2 powders as starting materials. Atmospheric plasma spray technique was applied to fabricate Yb2Si2O7 coating. The phase composition and microstructure of the coating were characterized. The density, open porosity and Vickers hardness of the coating were investigated. Its thermal stability was evaluated by thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA). The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the coating were measured. The results showed that the as-sprayed coating was mainly composed of crystalline Yb2Si2O7 with amorphous phase. The coating had a dense structure containing defects, such as pores, interfaces and microcracks. The TG-DTA results showed that there was almost no mass change from room temperature to 1200 °C, while a sharp exothermic peak appeared at around 1038 °C in DTA curve, which indicated that the amorphous phase crystallized. The thermal conductivity of the coating decreased with rise in temperature up to 600 °C and then followed by an increase at higher temperatures. The minimum value of the thermal conductivity of the Yb2Si2O7 coating was about 0.68 W/(m K).

  13. Bioactive plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings--the role of the composition, microstructure, and electrochemical stability.

    PubMed

    Mohedano, M; Guzman, R; Arrabal, R; López Lacomba, J-L; Matykina, E

    2013-11-01

    A Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process was used to produce bioactive coatings on Ti. PEO coatings with Ca/P atomic ratio of 1.7 and 4.0 were fabricated and characterized with respect to their morphology, composition, and microstructure. AC and DC electrochemical tests were used to evaluate the effect of (i) organic additives (amino acids, proteins, vitamins, and antibiotics) in alpha-minimum essential medium (α-MEM) on electrochemical stability of noncoated and PEO-coated Ti and (ii) coating composition, microstructure, and corrosion behavior on the cell response in α-MEM. PEO-coated Ti showed higher corrosion resistance than the noncoated Ti in MEM with and without organic additives by an order of magnitude. The corrosion resistance in α-MEM decreased with time for nonmodified Ti and increased for PEO-coated Ti; the latter was because of the adsorption of the proteins in the coating pores which increased the diffusion resistance. The presence of Ca and P in titanium oxide coating at the Ca/P ratio exceeding that of any stoichiometric Ca-P-O and Ca-P-O-H compounds facilitates faster osteoblast cell adhesion.

  14. Semianalytical models of sprite formation from plasma inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surkov, V. V.; Hayakawa, M.

    2016-11-01

    A spherical plasma inhomogeneity located at mesospheric altitudes in a thundercloud quasi-electrostatic field is considered as a possible cause of sprite formation. A simple semianalytical model of ionization instability in a quasi-electrostatic field, the value of which is larger than the air breakdown value, is developed on the assumption that plasma ball conductivity is controlled by impact ionization and electron attachment to neutrals. After several simplifications, the problem is reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations for the average conductivity and plasma ball radius. The analytical estimates and numerical simulation indicate that the predicted expansion rate and acceleration of the plasma inhomogeneity boundary are close in magnitude to the values observed during high-speed imaging of sprite development.

  15. Microstructural, mechanical and oxidation features of NiCoCrAlY coating produced by plasma activated EB-PVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jian; Guo, Hongbo; Peng, Hui; Gong, Shengkai

    2013-06-01

    NiCoCrAlY coatings produced by electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) have been extensively used as the oxidation resistance coatings or suitable bond coats in thermal barrier coating (TBC) system. However, the inherent imperfections caused by EB-PVD process degrade the oxidation resistance of the coatings. In the present work, NiCoCrAlY coatings were creatively produced by plasma activated electron beam-physical vapor deposition (PA EB-PVD). The novel coatings showed a terraced substructure on the surface of each grain due to the increased energy of metal ions and enhanced mobility of adatoms. Also a strong (1 1 1) crystallographic texture of γ/γ' grains was observed. The toughness of the coatings got remarkably improved compared with the coatings deposited by conventional EB-PVD and the oxidation behavior at 1373 K showed that the novel coatings had excellent oxidation resistance. The possible mechanism was finally discussed.

  16. A First-Principle Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimant, Yakov; Oppenheim, Meers

    2015-11-01

    Every second millions of tiny meteoroids hit the Earth from space, vast majority too small to observe visually. However, radars detect the plasma they generate and use the collected data to characterize the incoming meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. This diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of formation of the meteor plasma. Fast-descending meteoroids become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently and start ablating. The ablated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from this plasma produces a localized signal called a head echo. Using first principles, we have developed a consistent collisional kinetic theory of the near-meteoroid plasma. This theory shows that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. The spatial distribution of the plasma density shows significant deviations from a Gaussian law usually employed in head-echo modeling. This analytical model will serve as a basis for more accurate quantitative interpretation of the head echo radar measurements. Work supported by NSF Grant 1244842.

  17. Plasma formation in water vapour layers in high conductivity liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, C. P.; Schaper, L.; Stalder, K. R.; Graham, W. G.

    2011-10-01

    The vapour layer development stage of relatively low voltage plasmas in conducting solutions has already been well explored. The nature of the discharges formed within the vapour layer however is still largely unexplored. Here we examine the nature of such discharges through a combination of fast imaging and spatially, temporally resolved spectroscopy and electrical characterisation. The experimental setup used is a pin-to-plate discharge configuration with a -350V, 200 μs pulse applied at a repetition rate of 2Hz. A lens, followed by beam splitter allows beams to one Andor ICCD camera to capture images of the plasma emission with a second camera at the exit of a high resolution spectrometer. Through synchronization of the camera images at specified times after plasma ignition (as determined from current-voltage characteristics) they can be correlated with the spectra features. Initial measurements reveal two apparently different plasma formations. Stark broadening of the hydrogen Balmer beta line indicate electron densities of 3 to 5 ×1020 m-3 for plasmas produced early in the voltage pulse and an order of magnitude less for the later plasmas. The vapour layer development stage of relatively low voltage plasmas in conducting solutions has already been well explored. The nature of the discharges formed within the vapour layer however is still largely unexplored. Here we examine the nature of such discharges through a combination of fast imaging and spatially, temporally resolved spectroscopy and electrical characterisation. The experimental setup used is a pin-to-plate discharge configuration with a -350V, 200 μs pulse applied at a repetition rate of 2Hz. A lens, followed by beam splitter allows beams to one Andor ICCD camera to capture images of the plasma emission with a second camera at the exit of a high resolution spectrometer. Through synchronization of the camera images at specified times after plasma ignition (as determined from current

  18. Improvements in Microstructure and Wear Resistance of Plasma-Sprayed Fe-Based Amorphous Coating by Laser-Remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chaoping; Chen, Hong; Wang, Gui; Chen, Yongnan; Xing, Yazhe; Zhang, Chunhua; Dargusch, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Amorphous coating technology is an attractive way of taking advantage of the superior properties of amorphous alloys for structural applications. However, the limited bonds between splats within the plasma-sprayed coatings result in a typically lamellar and porous coating structure. To overcome these limitations, the as-sprayed coating was treated by a laser-remelting process. The microstructure and phase composition of two coatings were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The wear resistance of the plasma-sprayed coating and laser-remelted coating was studied comparatively using a pin-on-disc wear test under dry friction conditions. It was revealed that the laser-remelted coating exhibited better wear resistance because of its defect-free and amorphous-nanocrystalline composited structure.

  19. Improvements in Microstructure and Wear Resistance of Plasma-Sprayed Fe-Based Amorphous Coating by Laser-Remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chaoping; Chen, Hong; Wang, Gui; Chen, Yongnan; Xing, Yazhe; Zhang, Chunhua; Dargusch, Matthew

    2017-03-01

    Amorphous coating technology is an attractive way of taking advantage of the superior properties of amorphous alloys for structural applications. However, the limited bonds between splats within the plasma-sprayed coatings result in a typically lamellar and porous coating structure. To overcome these limitations, the as-sprayed coating was treated by a laser-remelting process. The microstructure and phase composition of two coatings were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The wear resistance of the plasma-sprayed coating and laser-remelted coating was studied comparatively using a pin-on-disc wear test under dry friction conditions. It was revealed that the laser-remelted coating exhibited better wear resistance because of its defect-free and amorphous-nanocrystalline composited structure.

  20. Adhesive and cohesive properties by indentation method of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Z.; Ziaei-Moayyed, A. A.; Mesgar, A. Sheikh-Mehdi

    2007-03-01

    Adhesive and cohesive properties of the plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings, deposited on Ti-6Al-4V substrates by varying the plasma power level and spray distance (SD), were evaluated by an indentation method. The crystallinity and the porosity decreased with increasing both of these two parameters. The microhardness value, Young's modulus ( E) and coating fracture toughness ( KC) were found to increase with a combinational increase in spray power and SD. The Knoop and Vickers indentation methods were used to estimate E and KC, respectively. The critical point at which no crack appears at the interface was determined by the interface indentation test. This was used to define the apparent interfacial toughness ( KCa) which is representative of the crack initiation resistance of the interface. It was found that KCa reaches to a maximum at a medium increase in both spray power and SD, while other mechanical properties of the coatings reaches to the highest value with further increase in these two plasma parameters. The tensile adhesion strength of the coatings, measure by the standard adhesion test, ISO 13779-4, was shown to alter in the same manner with KCa results. It was deduced that a combinational increase in spray power and SD which leads to a higher mechanical properties in the coatings, does not necessarily tends to a better mechanical properties at the interface.

  1. XPS and bioactivity study of the bisphosphonate pamidronate adsorbed onto plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Kate; Kumar, Sunil; Smart, Roger St. C.; Dutta, Naba; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Anderson, Gail I.; Sekel, Ron

    2006-12-01

    This paper reports the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to investigate bisphosphonate (BP) adsorption onto plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings commonly used for orthopaedic implants. BPs exhibit high binding affinity for the calcium present in HA and hence can be adsorbed onto HA-coated implants to exploit their beneficial properties for improved bone growth at the implant interface. A rigorous XPS analysis of pamidronate, a commonly used nitrogenous BP, adsorbed onto plasma sprayed HA-coated cobalt-chromium substrates has been carried out, aimed at: (a) confirming the adsorption of this BP onto HA; (b) studying the BP diffusion profile in the HA coating by employing the technique of XPS depth profiling; (c) confirming the bioactivity of the adsorbed BP. XPS spectra of plasma sprayed HA-coated discs exposed to a 10 mM aqueous BP solution (pamidronate) for periods of 1, 2 and 24 h showed nitrogen and phosphorous photoelectron signals corresponding to the BP, confirming its adsorption onto the HA substrate. XPS depth profiling of the 2 h BP-exposed HA discs showed penetration of the BP into the HA matrix to depths of at least 260 nm. The bioactivity of the adsorbed BP was confirmed by the observed inhibition of osteoclast (bone resorbing) cell activity. In comparison to the HA sample, the HA sample with adsorbed BP exhibited a 25-fold decrease in primary osteoclast cells.

  2. Atmospheric reactive plasma sprayed Fe-Al 2 O 3 -FeAl 2 O 4 composite coating and its property evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; He, Jining; Yan, Dianran; Dong, Yanchun; Zhang, Jianxin; Li, Xiangzhi; Liao, Hanlin

    2011-09-01

    In the present study, Fe-Al2O3-FeAl2O4 composite coatings were successfully deposited by reactive plasma sprayed Al/Fe2O3 agglomerated powder. Phase composition and microstructure of the coatings were determined by XRD and SEM. The results indicated that the composite coatings were principally composed of three different phases, i.e. FeAl2O4 phase as main framework, dispersed ball-like Fe-rich phase, and small splats of Al2O3 phase, and it was thought that the in situ synthesized metal phase was helpful to toughen the coating matrix. According to the results of the indentation and frictional wear tests, the composite coating exhibited excellent toughness and anti-friction properties in comparison with conventional Al2O3 monophase coating, though its microhardness value was a little lower than that of Al2O3 coating. The formation mechanism and the toughening mechanism of the composite coating were clarified in detail.

  3. Boron carbide-based coatings on graphite for plasma facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, P.G.; Trester, P.W.; Winter, J.; Linke, J.; Duwe, R.; Wallura, E.; Philipps, V.

    1994-01-01

    In the effort to evaluate boron-rich coatings as plasma facing surfaces in fusion devices, a new process for applying boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) coatings to graphite was developed. The process entails eutectic melting of the carbon (C) substrate surface with a precursor layer of B{sub 4}C particles. Adherent coatings were achieved which consisted of two layers: a surface layer and a graded penetration zone in the outer portion of the substrate. The surface-layer microstructure was multiphase and ranged from reaction-sintered structures of sintered B{sub 4}C particles in an eutectic-formed matrix to that of hypereutectic carbon particles in a B{sub 4}C-C eutectic matrix. Because of high surface energy, the coating generally developed a nonuniform thickness. Quantitative evaluations of the coating were performed with limiters in the TEXTOR fusion device and with coupons in electron beam tests. Test results revealed the following: good adherence of the coating even after remelting; and, during remelting, diagnostics detected a corresponding interaction of boron with the plasma.

  4. Ceramic coatings of LA141 alloy formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation for corrosion protection.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhijun; Yuan, Yi; Sun, Pengpeng; Jing, Xiaoyan

    2011-09-01

    Superlight Mg-Li alloy is a promising structural materials in aerospace, automobile, and electronics because of its excellent properties such as low density, high ductility, superior strength-to-weight ratio, and good damping ability. The fabrication of compact plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings with excellent corrosion resistance is valuable for the widespread application of Mg-Li alloy. Here we present a ceramic coating on the surface of Mg-14Li-1Al (LA141) alloy for corrosion protection via plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in an alkaline silicate electrolyte with tungstate as an additive. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thin film-X-ray diffraction analysis of coatings show that the surface coating is mainly comprised of Mg(2)SiO(4), MgO and WO(3). Scanning electron microscopy observations have revealed that the dense and compact coating formed in the presence of tungstate has less structural imperfections in comparison to the control one fabricated without use of tungstate. The effect of oxidation time on the morphology and phase composition of coatings is also examined in detail.

  5. Preparation of SrZrO3 Thermal Barrier Coating by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinhui; Ma, Wen; Wen, Jing; Bai, Yu; Sun, Li; Chen, Baodong; Dong, Hongying; Shuang, Yingchai

    2017-02-01

    The solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process is capable of depositing highly durable thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). In this study, an aqueous chemical precursor feedstock was injected into the plasma jet to deposit SrZrO3 thermal barrier coating on metal substrate. Taguchi design of experiments was employed to optimize the SPPS process. The thermal characteristics and phase evolution of the SrZrO3 precursor, as well as the influence of various spray parameters on the coating deposition rate, microhardness, microstructure, and phase stability, were investigated. The experimental results showed that, at given spray distance, feedstock flow rate, and atomization pressure, the optimized spray parameters were arc current of 600 A, argon flow rate of 40 L/min, and hydrogen flow rate of 10 L/min. The SrZrO3 coating prepared using the optimized spray parameters had single-pass thickness of 6.0 μm, porosity of 18%, and microhardness of 6.8 ± 0.1 GPa. Phase stability studies indicated that the as-sprayed SrZrO3 coating had good phase stability in the temperature range from room temperature to 1400 °C, gradually exhibiting a phase transition from t'-ZrO2 to m-ZrO2 in the SrZrO3 coating at 1450 °C with increasing time, while the SrZrO3 phase did not change.

  6. Characterization of Microstructure and Thermal Properties of YSZ Coatings Obtained by Axial Suspension Plasma Spraying (ASPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganvir, Ashish; Curry, Nicholas; Björklund, Stefan; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Nylén, Per

    2015-10-01

    The paper aims at demonstrating various microstructures which can be obtained using the suspension spraying technique and their respective significance in enhancing the thermal insulation property of a thermal barrier coating. Three different types of coating microstructures are discussed which were produced by the Axial Suspension Plasma Spraying. Detailed characterization of coatings was then performed. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were utilized for microstructure evaluations; x-ray diffraction for phase analysis; water impregnation, image analysis, and mercury intrusion porosimetry for porosity analysis, and laser flash analysis for thermal diffusivity measurements were used. The results showed that Axial Suspension Plasma Spraying can generate vertically cracked, porous, and feathery columnar-type microstructures. Pore size distribution was found in micron, submicron, and nanometer range. Higher overall porosity, the lower density of vertical cracks or inter-column spacing, and higher inter-pass porosity favored thermal insulation property of the coating. Significant increase in thermal diffusivity and conductivity was found at higher temperature, which is believed to be due to the pore rearrangement (sintering and pore coarsening). Thermal conductivity values for these coatings were also compared with electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) thermal barrier coatings from the literature and found to be much lower.

  7. Suspension Plasma Spraying of Sub-micron Silicon Carbide Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubarok, F.; Espallargas, N.

    2015-06-01

    Thermal spraying of silicon carbide (SiC) material is a challenging task since SiC tends to decompose during atmospheric spraying process. The addition of metal or ceramic binders is necessary to facilitate the bonding of SiC particles, allowing SiC composite coating to be deposited. In the conventional procedures, the binders are added through mechanical mixing of powder constituents, making it difficult to achieve homogeneous distribution. In the new procedure proposed in this work, the binder is delivered as a nano-film of the surface of the individual SiC particles through co-precipitation treatment. Suspension plasma spray (SPS) coating technique has been used with the aim at avoiding the decomposition of SiC typically expected with atmospheric techniques, such as atmospheric plasma spray. The deposited SiC coatings by SPS showed identical SiC phase peak as identified in the suspension feedstock, indicating that the nano-film binder was able to protect SiC particles from decomposition. Further analysis by XPS revealed that SiC particles underwent some minor oxidation. Unfortunately, all the SiC coatings exhibited poor mechanical performance due to low cohesive strength, high porosity, and powdery structure making the coatings vulnerable to grain pull-out. This was due to the absence of sintering process during the spraying process contributing to the low performance of SiC SPS coatings.

  8. Plasma electrolytic oxide coatings on valve metals and their activity in CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukiyanchuk, I. V.; Rudnev, V. S.; Tyrina, L. M.; Chernykh, I. V.

    2014-10-01

    Two approaches have been examined for obtaining titanium- or aluminum-supported catalysts with transition and noble metals using the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technique. Elemental compositions, distribution of active elements and catalytic activity in CO oxidation have been compared for composites formed by one-stage PEO technique and those obtained as a result of modification of PEO coatings by impregnation.

  9. Recent Trends in Newly Developed Plasma-Sprayed and Sintered Coatings for Implant Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bsat, Suzan; Speirs, Andrew; Huang, Xiao

    2016-08-01

    The current paper aims to review recent trends (2011 to 2015) in newly developed plasma-sprayed and sintered coatings for implant applications. Recent developments in plasma-sprayed and sintered coatings have focused on improving biological performance, bacterial growth resistance, and mechanical properties, predominantly of HA and glass ceramics. The majority of these improvements are attributed to the addition of dopants. To improve biological performance, trace elements, such as Zn and Mg, both of which are found in bone, were added to replicate the functions they provide for the skeletal system. Though bacterial growth resistance is traditionally improved by Ag dopant, the addition of new dopants such as CeO2 and Zn were explored as well. Great effort has also been made to improve coating adherence and reduce stresses by minimizing coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the coating and substrate through the addition of elements such as Zn and Mg or the inclusion of a buffer layer. For sintering process in particular, there was an emphasis on reducing sintering temperature through modification of 45S5 Bioglass. New plasma spray and sintering technologies aimed at reducing high-temperature exposure are briefly introduced as well. These include microplasma spray and spark plasma sintering.

  10. Effects of real viscosity on plasma liner formation and implosion from supersonic plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillo, Kevin; Cassibry, Jason; Hsu, Scott; PLX-Alpha Team

    2015-11-01

    The PLX- α project endeavors to study plasma liner formation and implosion by merging of a spherical array of plasma jets as a candidate standoff driver for magneto-inertial fusion (MIF). Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is being used to model the liner formation and implosion processes. SPH is a meshless Lagrangian method to simulate fluid flows by dividing a fluid into a set of particles and using a summation interpolant function to calculate the properties and gradients for each of these particles. The SPH code was used to simulate test cases in which the number of plasma guns and initial conditions for the plasma were varied. Linear stabilizations were observed, but the possibility exists that this stabilization was due to the implementation of artificial viscosity in the code. A real viscosity model was added to our SPHC model using the Braginskii ion viscosity. Preliminary results for test cases that incorporate real viscosity are presented.

  11. Relationship Between the Microstructure and Thermal Conductivity of Plasma-Sprayed ZrO2 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongzhe; Wu, Wei; Zheng, Xuebin; Zeng, Yi; Ding, Minju; Zhang, Chenggong

    2011-12-01

    Plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings have a complex microstructure consisting of a variety of pores and cracks. These microstructure features which are determined by the spray process are known to influence the thermal conductivity of coatings. In this article, the microstructure features such as total porosity, large pores, and small pores were quantified by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image analysis, and for each spray process, the particle velocity and particle temperature were measured prior to impact onto the substrate using the online monitoring system (Spray Watch 2i). Multiple linear regression was used to find the relationship between the particle state and the spray gun parameters. The linear regression models were also investigated between the particle state and the microstructure features, in addition, between the microstructure features and the thermal conductivity. The comprehensive correlation of spray process-microstructure-thermal conductivity was established for plasma-sprayed ZrO2 coatings.

  12. Effect of Gun Current on Electrical Properties of Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed Lanthanum Silicate Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Liao, Han-Lin; Coddet, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Apatite-type lanthanum silicate (ATLS) electrolyte coatings for use in intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells were deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). Plasma-sprayed coatings with typical composition La10(SiO4)6O3 exhibiting good densification and high oxide ionic conductivity were obtained by properly adjusting the spraying parameters, particularly the gun current. The highest obtained ionic conductivity value of 3.3 mS/cm at 1,173 K in air is comparable to other ATLS conductors. This work demonstrated empirically that utilization of the APS technique is feasible to synthesize dense La10(SiO4)6O3 electrolyte coatings using gun currents within an unusually broad range.

  13. Tungsten nitride coatings obtained by HiPIMS as plasma facing materials for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiron, Vasile; Velicu, Ioana-Laura; Porosnicu, Corneliu; Burducea, Ion; Dinca, Paul; Malinský, Petr

    2017-09-01

    In this work, tungsten nitride coatings with nitrogen content in the range of 19-50 at% were prepared by reactive multi-pulse high power impulse magnetron sputtering as a function of the argon and nitrogen mixture and further exposed to a deuterium plasma jet. The elemental composition, morphological properties and physical structure of the samples were investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Deuterium implantation was performed using a deuterium plasma jet and its retention in nitrogen containing tungsten films was investigated using thermal desorption spectrometry. Deuterium retention and release behaviour strongly depend on the nitrogen content in the coatings and the films microstructure. All nitride coatings have a polycrystalline structure and retain a lower deuterium level than the pure tungsten sample. Nitrogen content in the films acts as a diffusion barrier for deuterium and leads to a higher desorption temperature, therefore to a higher binding energy.

  14. Dry sliding wear behavior of ceramic-metal composite coatings prepared by plasma spraying of self-reacting powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yanchun; Yan, Dianran; He, Jining; Li, Xiangzhi; Zhang, Jianxin

    2006-09-01

    Ceramic-metal composite (CMC) coatings were deposited on the surface of Fe-0.14 0.22 wt.% C steel by plasma spraying of self-reacting Fe2O3-Al composite powders. The dry sliding friction and wear character of the CMC coatings are investigated in this paper. The wear resistance of the CMC coatings was significantly better than that of Al2O3 coatings under the same sliding wear conditions. The tough metal, which is dispersed in the ceramic matrix, obviously improved the toughness of the CMC coatings. Wear mechanisms of the CMC coatings were identified as a combination of abrasive and adhesive wear.

  15. Chemical reaction and dust formation studies in laboratory hydrocarbon plasmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippler, Rainer; Majumdar, Abhijit; Thejaswini, H. C.

    Plasma chemical reaction studies with relevance to, e.g., Titan's atmosphere have been per-formed in various laboratory plasmas [1,2]. Chemical reactions in a dielectric barrier discharge at medium pressure of 250-300 mbar have been studied in CH4 /N2 and CH4 /Ar gas mixtures by means of mass spectrometry. The main reaction scheme is production of H2 by fragmenta-tion of CH4 , but also production of larger hydrocarbons like Cn Hm with n up to 10 including formation of different functional CN groups is observed. [1] A. Majumdar and R. Hippler, Development of dielectric barrier discharge plasma processing apparatus for mass spectrometry and thin film deposition, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 075103 (2007) [2] H.T. Do, G. Thieme, M. Frühlich, H. Kersten, and R. Hippler, Ion Molecule and Dust Particle Formation in Ar/CH4 , Ar/C2 H2 and Ar/C3 H6 Radio-frequency Plasmas, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 45, No. 5-6, 378-384 (2005)

  16. Plasma formation inside deformed gas bubbles submerged in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommers, Bradley; Foster, John

    2012-10-01

    Plasma formation in liquids produces highly reactive products that may be desirable for a variety of applications, including water purification and waste processing. The direct ignition of plasma in these environments, however, is limited by the large breakdown strength of liquids, which imposes severe voltage and energy requirements on the design of practical devices. One way to address this issue is by first igniting plasma in gas bubbles injected into the water. These bubbles provide an environment with higher reduced electric field (E/N) that is more suitable for plasma formation. If the same bubbles can be excited into strong distortions of their shape and volume, then it is possible to further alter E/N, both by field enhancement at the bubble's highly distorted dielectric interface (via E) and by fluctuations in its internal gas pressure (via N). This principle is investigated by trapping a single bubble at the node of a 26.4 kHz underwater acoustic field and driving it into violent oscillations using an A.C electric field. A third high voltage needle is placed nearby and used to ignite plasma in the bubble at various points during its oscillation. The bubble response is captured using a high speed camera capable of up to 30,000 frames per second.

  17. Riboflavin Deficiency in Rats Decreases de novo Formate Production but Does Not Affect Plasma Formate Concentration.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Luke; Lamarre, Simon G; daSilva, Robin P; Jacobs, René L; Brosnan, Margaret E; Brosnan, John T

    2017-03-01

    Background: The one-carbon metabolism pathway is highly dependent on a number of B vitamins in order to provide one-carbon units for purine and thymidylate biosynthesis as well as homocysteine remethylation. Previous studies have examined folate and vitamin B-12 deficiency and their effects on formate metabolism; as of yet, to our knowledge, no studies on the effects of riboflavin deficiency on formate metabolism have been published.Objective: Our objective was to determine the effects of riboflavin deficiency on formate metabolism.Methods: Weanling male rats were randomly assigned either to control, riboflavin-replete (RR) or to experimental, riboflavin-deficient (RD) versions of the AIN-93G diet for 13 d, at which time a constant infusion of [(13)C]-formate was carried out to ascertain the effects of deficiency on formate production. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to measure plasma formate concentration and [(13)C]-formate enrichment. HPLC, LC-mass spectrometry (MS)/MS, and enzymatic assays were used for the measurement of one-carbon precursors and other metabolites.Results: RD rats had significantly lower rates of formate production (15%) as well as significantly reduced hepatic methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase activity (69%) and protein concentration (54%) compared with RR rats. There was no difference in plasma formate concentrations between the groups. Plasma serine, a potential one-carbon precursor, was significantly higher in RD rats (467 ± 73 μM) than in RR rats (368 ± 52 μM).Conclusions: Although deficiencies in folate and vitamin B-12 lead to major changes in plasma formate concentrations, riboflavin deficiency results in no significant difference; this disagrees with the prediction of a published mathematical model. Our observation of a lower rate of formate production is consistent with a role for flavoproteins in this process. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  18. Ion-substituted calcium phosphate coatings deposited by plasma-assisted techniques: A review.

    PubMed

    Graziani, Gabriela; Bianchi, Michele; Sassoni, Enrico; Russo, Alessandro; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2017-05-01

    One of the main critical aspects behind the failure or success of an implant resides in its ability to fast bond with the surrounding bone. To boost osseointegration, the ideal implant material should exhibit composition and structure similar to those of biological apatite. To this aim, the most common approach is to coat the implant surface with a coating of hydroxyapatite (HA), resembling the main component of mineralized tissues. However, bone apatite is a non-stoichiometric, multi-substituted poorly-crystalline apatite, containing significant amounts of foreign ions, with high biological relevance. Ion-substituted HAs can be deposited by so called "wet methods", which are however poorly reproducible and hardly industrially feasible; at the same time bioactive coatings realized by plasma assisted method, interesting for industrial applications, are generally made of stoichiometric (i.e. un-substituted) HA. In this work, the literature concerning plasma-assisted deposition methods used to deposit ion-substituted HA was reviewed and the last advances in this field discussed. The ions taken into exam are those present in mineralized tissues and possibly having biological relevance. Notably, literature about this topic is scarce, especially relating to in vivo animal and clinical trials; further on, available studies evaluate the performance of substituted coatings from different points of view (mechanical properties, bone growth, coating dissolution, etc.) which hinders a proper evaluation of the real efficacy of ion-doped HA in promoting bone regeneration, compared to stoichiometric HA. Moreover, results obtained for plasma sprayed coatings (which is the only method currently employed for deposition at the industrial scale) were collected and compared to those of novel plasma-assisted techniques, that are expected to overcome its limitations. Data so far available on the topic were discussed to highlight advantages, limitations and possible perspectives of these

  19. Plasma polymerized allylamine coated quartz particles for humic acid removal.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Karyn L; Majewski, Peter

    2012-08-15

    Allylamine plasma polymerization has been used to modify the surface of quartz particles for humic acid removal via an inductively coupled rotating barrel plasma reactor. Plasma polymerized allylamine (ppAA) films were deposited at a power of 25 W, allylamine flow rate of 4.4 sccm and polymerization times of 5-60 min. The influence of polymerization time on surface chemistry was investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and electrokinetic analysis. Acid orange 7 adsorption/desorption quantified the number of surface amine groups. Humic acid removal via ppAA quartz particles was examined by varying pH, removal time, humic acid concentration, and particle mass. Increasing the polymerization time increased the concentration of amine groups on the ppAA quartz surface, thus also increasing the isoelectric point. ToF-SIMS demonstrated uniform distribution of amine groups across the particle surface. Greatest humic acid removal was observed at pH 5 due to electrostatic attraction. At higher pH values, for longer polymerization times, humic acid removal was also observed due to hydrogen bonding. Increasing the initial humic acid concentration increased the mass of humic acid removed, with longer polymerization times exhibiting the greatest increases. Plasma polymerization using a rotating plasma reactor has shown to be a successful method for modifying quartz particles for the removal of humic acid. Further development of the plasma polymerization process and investigation of additional contaminants will aid in the development of a low cost water treatment system.

  20. Hydrophobic Coatings on Cotton Obtained by in Situ Plasma Polymerization of a Fluorinated Monomer in Ethanol Solutions.

    PubMed

    Molina, Ricardo; Teixidó, Josep Maria; Kan, Chi-Wai; Jovančić, Petar

    2017-02-15

    Plasma polymerization using hydrophobic monomers in the gas phase is a well-known technology to generate hydrophobic coatings. However, synthesis of functional hydrophobic coatings using plasma technology in liquids has not yet been accomplished. This work is consequently focused on polymerization of a liquid fluorinated monomer on cotton fabric initiated by atmospheric plasma in a dielectric barrier discharge configuration. Functional hydrophobic coatings on cotton were successfully achieved using in situ atmospheric plasma-initiated polymerization of fluorinated monomer dissolved in ethanol. Gravimetric measurements reveal that the amount of polymer deposited on cotton substrates can be modulated with the concentration of monomer in ethanol solution, and cross-linking reactions occur during plasma polymerization of a fluorinated monomer even without the presence of a cross-linking agent. FTIR and XPS analysis were used to study the chemical composition of hydrophobic coatings and to get insights into the physicochemical processes involved in plasma treatment. SEM analysis reveals that at high monomer concentration, coatings possess a three-dimensional pattern with a characteristic interconnected porous network structure. EDX analysis reveals that plasma polymerization of fluorinated monomers takes place preferentially at the surface of cotton fabric and negligible polymerization takes place inside the cotton fabric. Wetting time measurements confirm the hydrophobicity of cotton coatings obtained although equilibrium moisture content was slightly decreased. Additionally, the abrasion behavior and resistance to washing of plasma-coated cotton has been evaluated.

  1. The effect of thermal aging on the thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed and EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, R.B.; Beecher, S.C.; Porter, W.D.; Nagaraj, B.A.

    1996-05-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBCs is of primary importance. Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EV-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The density of the APS coatings was controlled by varying the spray parameters. The low density APS yttria-partially stabilized zirconia (yttria-PSZ) coatings yielded a thermal conductivity that is lower than both the high density APS coatings and the EB-PVD coatings. The thermal aging of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia are compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposure to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the EB-PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, results suggest that they typically have a higher thermal conductivity than APS coatings before thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for plasma sprayed partially stabilized zirconia have been found to be less than for plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia coatings.

  2. Corrosion evaluation of zirconium doped oxide coatings on aluminum formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bajat, Jelena; Mišković-Stanković, Vesna; Vasilić, Rastko; Stojadinović, Stevan

    2014-01-01

    The plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) of aluminum in sodium tungstate (Na(2)WO(4) · (2)H(2)O) and Na(2)WO(4) · (2)H(2)O doped with Zr was analyzed in order to obtain oxide coatings with improved corrosion resistance. The influence of current density in PEO process and anodization time was investigated, as well as the influence of Zr, with the aim to find out how they affect the chemical content, morphology, surface roughness, and corrosion stability of oxide coatings. It was shown that the presence of Zr increases the corrosion stability of oxide coatings for all investigated PEO times. Evolution of EIS spectra during the exposure to 3% NaCl, as a strong corrosive agent, indicated the highest corrosion stability for PEO coating formed on aluminum at 70 mA/cm(2) for 2 min in a zirconium containing electrolyte.

  3. Life Prediction of Atmospheric Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings Using Temperature-Dependent Model Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Chen, Kuiying; Baddour, N.; Patnaik, P. C.

    2017-06-01

    The failure analysis and life prediction of atmospheric plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (APS-TBCs) were carried out for a thermal cyclic process. A residual stress model for the top coat of APS-TBC was proposed and then applied to life prediction. This residual stress model shows an inversion characteristic versus thickness of thermally grown oxide. The capability of the life model was demonstrated using temperature-dependent model parameters. Using existing life data, a comparison of fitting approaches of life model parameters was performed. A larger discrepancy was found for the life predicted using linearized fitting parameters versus temperature compared to those using non-linear fitting parameters. A method for integrating the residual stress was proposed by using the critical time of stress inversion. The role of the residual stresses distributed at each individual coating layer was explored and their interplay on the coating's delamination was analyzed.

  4. Influence of Laser Glazing on the Characterization of Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Jiangwei; Liao, Hanlin; Darut, Geoffrey; Stella, Jorge; Poirier, Thierry; Planche, Marie-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    In this study, 8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia powder was deposited on the substrates by atmospheric plasma spray. The coatings were post-treated by laser glazing under different parameters in order to densify them. The characterization of the laser molten pools under different laser treatment conditions was studied. Preheating processes were also employed. Scanning electron microscopy observations of the surface and cross section of as-sprayed and laser-glazed coatings were carried out to investigate the influence of laser glazing on the microstructure on laser-glazed coatings. The results show that preheating processes improve the coating in terms of deepening the laser-glazed layer, reducing the number of vertical cracks and surface density of cracks and widening the molten pool. Finally, the influences of linear energy density on the characterization of the glazed layer are discussed.

  5. Hot Corrosion Resistance and Mechanical Behavior of Atmospheric Plasma Sprayed Conventional and Nanostructured Zirconia Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saremi, Mohsen; Keyvani, Ahmad; Heydarzadeh Sohi, Mahmoud

    Conventional and nanostructured zirconia coatings were deposited on In-738 Ni super alloy by atmospheric plasma spray technique. The hot corrosion resistance of the coatings was measured at 1050°C using an atmospheric electrical furnace and a fused mixture of vanadium pent oxide and sodium sulfate respectively. According to the experimental results nanostructured coatings showed a better hot corrosion resistance than conventional ones. The improved hot corrosion resistance could be explained by the change of structure to a dense and more packed structure in the nanocoating. The evaluation of mechanical properties by nano indentation method showed the hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E) of the YSZ coating increased substantially after hot corrosion.

  6. Wear Behavior of the Ceramic Coatings on the Al6061 Alloy Prepared by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Jin Long; Wang, Kai; Byeon, Sang Sik; Koo, Bon Heun; Wang, Yi Qi; Song, Jung Il

    2011-06-01

    The oxide coatings were prepared on T6-tempered A16061 alloys substrate under a hybrid voltage (AC 200V-60Hz & DC 260V value) in an aluminate electrolyte by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 min, respectively. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to investigate the coating microstructure. XRD analysis results show that the coatings consist of α- and γ-Al2O3. The abrasive behaviors of the oxide coatings in different PEO-treated times were tested assessed by conducting dry ball-on-disk wear tests. The abrasive weight loss increased when the PEO-treated time increased, and finally became equilibrium.

  7. Characterization of the adherence of plasma-sprayed ZrO/sub 2/ coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, P.F.; Rice, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of the microstructure and adherence of ZrO/sub 2/ coatings revealed that the adherence decreased with increasing coating thickness and could be increased by incorporating MgO as a second phase as well as by including noncubic ZrO/sub 2/ in the cubic ZrO/sub 2/ coating. Residual stresses from the plasma spraying process limit adherence (hence the coating thickness dependence) but these can be relieved by plastic flow in the MgO phase during post-spray cooling. Some degree of strength/toughening is also derived by the presence of microcracks and/or from transformation associated with the presence of tetragonal ZrO/sub 2/.

  8. Metal-containing plasma-polymerized coatings for laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Letts, S.A.; Jordan, C.W.

    1981-09-14

    Addition of metal to plastic layers in some direct drive laser fusion targets is needed to reduce electron induced fuel preheat. A plasma polymerization coating system was constructed to produce a metal seeded polymer by adding an organometallic gas to the usual trans-2-butene and hydrogen feedstocks. Since organometallic gases are highly reactive and toxic, safety is a major concern in the design of a coating system. Our coating apparatus was designed with three levels of containment to assure protection of the operator. The gas handling system has redundant valves and was designed to fail safe. Several sensor controlled interlocks assure safe operating conditions. Waste materials are collected on a specially designed cold trap. Waste disposal is accomplished by heating the traps and purging volatile products through a reactor vessel. The design, operating procedure, and safety interlocks of this novel coating system are described.

  9. Thorium-Free Versus Thoriated Plasma Gun Electrodes: Statistical Evaluation of Coating Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmenares-Angulo, Jose; Molz, Ronald; Hawley, David; Seshadri, Ramachandran Chidambaram

    2016-04-01

    Industries throughout the world today have an increased awareness of environmental, health, and safety issues. This, together with recent Nuclear Regulatory Commission changes concerning source material (e.g., thorium) has added complexity in the supply chain of thoriated tungsten commonly used in plasma spray gun spares. In the interest of a safer and more sustainable work environment, Oerlikon Metco has developed thorium-free material solutions proven to have longer service life than conventional thoriated spares. This work reports on the effect, if any, caused by tungsten compositional changes and extended service life in coating properties. Microstructure, coating efficiency parameters, hardness, particle state, in situ coating stress, and ex situ modulus are evaluated over the service life duration of the nozzle, comparing coatings with thoriated and non-thoriated nozzles and electrodes with the same spray parameters.

  10. Numerical study of plasma formation from current carrying conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, Milena A.

    The problem of plasma formation from thick conductors driven by intense currents have practical applications in a number of high energy density (HED) fields of interest where complex interaction between conductor surfaces and megagauss magnetic fields is involved. These include: wire-array Z-pinches, magnetically accelerated flier plates, liner acceleration by magnetic field, ultrahigh magnetic field generators, high current fuses, magneto-inertial fusion (MIF), magnetically insulated transmission lines, as well as some astrophysical applications. Recent aluminum rod experiments driven by 1-MA Zebra generator at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) have provided a benchmark for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modeling. The innovative 'hourglass' and 'barbell' load geometries used in the experiments made it possible to distinguish between plasma formation due to Ohmic heating, which can be studied numerically utilizing MHD codes, and plasma formation due to high electric fields, by introducing a large-diameter contact with the electrodes. This prevents nonthermal formation of plasma from being caused early in the current pulse by plasma at contacts, as occurs in simple straight-rod explosion experiments. The UNR megagauss rod experiments were modeled by employing the state-of-the-art radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic code MHRDR. Numerical simulations were performed for a wide range of rods, varying from 100 to 580 microns in radius. A "cold start" initiation was employed in order to create initial parameters close to the experimental conditions. Material properties of aluminum, crucial for such simulations, were modeled employing a set of well tested SESAME format equations-of-state (EOS), ionization, and thermal and electrical conductivity tables. The cold start initiation also allowed observation of the numerical phase transitions of the aluminum rod, from solid to liquid to vapor and finally to low density plasma as it is ohmically heated by the megaampere driving current

  11. Formation of Imploding Plasma Liners for HEDP and MIF Application

    SciTech Connect

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Case, Andrew; Brockington, Samuel; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Mike; Wu, Linchun; Elton, Ray

    2014-11-11

    /s for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Initial work used existing computational and analytical tools to develop and refine a specific plasma gun concept having a novel tapered coaxial electromagnetic accelerator contour with an array of symmetric ablative plasma injectors. The profile is designed to suppress the main barrier to success in coaxial guns, namely the blow-by instability in which the arc slips past and outruns the bulk of the plasma mass. Efforts to begin developing a set of annular non-ablative plasma injectors for the coaxial gun, in order to accelerate pure gases, resulted in development of linear parallel-plate MiniRailguns that turned out to work well as plasma guns in their own right and we subsequently chose them for an initial plasma liner experiment on the PLX facility at LANL. This choice was mainly driven by cost and schedule for that particular experiment, while longer term goals still projected use of coaxial guns for reactor-relevant applications for reasons of better symmetry, lower impurities, more compact plasma jet formation, and higher gun efficiency. Our efforts have focused mainly on 1) developing various plasma injection systems for both coax and linear railguns and ensuring they work reliably with the accelerator section, 2) developing a suite of plasma and gun diagnostics, 3) performing computational modeling to design and refine the plasma guns, 4) establishing a research facility dedicated to plasma gun development, and finally, 5) developing plasma guns and associated pulse power systems capable of achieving these goals and installing and testing the first two gun sets on the PLX facility at LANL. During the second funding cycle for this program, HyperV joined in a collaborative effort with LANL, the University of Alabama at Huntsville, and the University of New Mexico to perform a plasma liner experiment (PLX) to investigate the physics and technology of forming spherically imploding

  12. Fastest Formation Routes of Nanocarbons in Solution Plasma Processes.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Tetsunori; Ueno, Tomonaga; Panomsuwan, Gasidit; Hieda, Junko; Yoshida, Akihito; Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Saito, Nagahiro

    2016-11-14

    Although solution-plasma processing enables room-temperature synthesis of nanocarbons, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We investigated the routes of solution-plasma-induced nanocarbon formation from hexane, hexadecane, cyclohexane, and benzene. The synthesis rate from benzene was the highest. However, the nanocarbons from linear molecules were more crystalline than those from ring molecules. Linear molecules decomposed into shorter olefins, whereas ring molecules were reconstructed in the plasma. In the saturated ring molecules, C-H dissociation proceeded, followed by conversion into unsaturated ring molecules. However, unsaturated ring molecules were directly polymerized through cation radicals, such as benzene radical cation, and were converted into two- and three-ring molecules at the plasma-solution interface. The nanocarbons from linear molecules were synthesized in plasma from small molecules such as C2 under heat; the obtained products were the same as those obtained via pyrolysis synthesis. Conversely, the nanocarbons obtained from ring molecules were directly synthesized through an intermediate, such as benzene radical cation, at the interface between plasma and solution, resulting in the same products as those obtained via polymerization. These two different reaction fields provide a reasonable explanation for the fastest synthesis rate observed in the case of benzene.

  13. Wide-temperature-spectrum self-lubricating coatings prepared by plasma spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    Self-lubricating, multicomponent coatings, which lubricate over a wide range of operating conditions, are described. The coatings have been successfully applied by plasma-spraying mixed powders onto superalloy substrates. They have been evaluated in friction and wear experiments, and in sliding contact bearing tests. These coatings are wear resistant by virtue of their self-lubricating characteristics rather than because of extreme hardness; a further benefit is low friction. Experiments with simple pin on disk sliding specimens and oscillating plain cylindrical bearing tests were performed to evaluate the tribological properties of the coatings. It was shown that coatings of nichrome, glass and calcium fluoride are self-lubricating from about 500 to 900 C, but give high friction at the lower temperatures. The addition of silver to the coating composition improved the low temperature bearing properties and resulted in coatings which are self-lubricating from cryogenic temperatures to at least 870 C; they are therefore 'wide temperature spectrum,' self-lubricating compositions.

  14. Thermal conductivities of nanostructured magnesium oxide coatings deposited on magnesium alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinwei; Nie, Xueyuan; Hu, Henry

    2014-10-01

    The resistances of magnesium alloys to wear, friction and corrosion can be effectively improved by depositing coatings on their surfaces. However, the coatings can also reduce the heat transfer from the coated components to the surroundings (e.g., coated cylinder bores for internal combustion of engine blocks). In this paper, nanostructured magnesium oxides were produced by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process on the magnesium alloy AJ62 under different current densities. The guarded comparative heat flow method was adopted to measure the thermal conductivities of such coatings which possess gradient nanoscale grain sizes. The aim of the paper is to explore how the current density in the PEO process affects the thermal conductivity of the nanostructured magnesium coatings. The experimental results show that, as the current density rises from 4 to 20 A/mm2, the thermal conductivity has a slight increase from 0.94 to 1.21 W/m x K, which is significantly smaller than that of the corresponding bulk magnesium oxide materials (29.4 W/m x K). This mostly attributed to the variation of the nanoscale grain sizes of the PEO coatings.

  15. Wide-temperature-spectrum self-lubricating coatings prepared by plasma spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    Self-lubricating, multicomponent coatings, which lubricate over a wide range of operating conditions, are described. The coatings have been successfully applied by plasma-spraying mixed powders onto superalloy substrates. They have been evaluated in friction and wear experiments, and in sliding contact bearing tests. These coatings are wear resistant by virtue of their self-lubricating characteristics rather than because of extreme hardness; a further benefit is low friction. Experiments with simple pin on disk sliding specimens and oscillating plain cylindrical bearing tests were performed to evaluate the tribological properties of the coatings. It was shown that coatings of nichrome, glass and calcium fluoride are self-lubricating from about 500 to 900 C, but give high friction at the lower temperatures. The addition of silver to the coating composition improved the low temperature bearing properties and resulted in coatings which are self-lubricating from cryogenic temperatures to at least 870 C; they are therefore 'wide temperature spectrum,' self-lubricating compositions.

  16. Preparation of broadband absorption ceramic coatings by using plasma electrolytic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Caizhen; Li, Yuan; Li, Qin; Lu, Songtao; Wu, Xiaohong; Jiang, Yong; Gao, Wei; Yan, Hongwei; Wang, Haijun; Ye, Yayun

    2017-07-01

    Two types of black ceramic coatings with high spectrum absorptivity were prepared on Al alloy substrate by using plasma electrolytic deposition method. The spectrum absorption properties of coatings were tested by using 355 nm ultraviolet laser pulses. Particle counter device was employed to collect and analyze the particles formed during the irradiation process. Experimental results showed that the coatings have porous structures. The sample coatings 1 and 2 have thickness of 120 μm and 60 μm with holes’ diameter of about 70 μm and 15 μm, respectively. The coating 1 is mainly composed of Al2O3 and SiO2 while coating 2 consists of Al2O3. The reflectivity of both coatings is much lower than that of Al alloy substrate. The absorptivity of samples 1 and 2 is about 99.88% and 99.92% for wavelength from 300 nm to 800 nm. The mechanisms of spectrum absorption were also explored.

  17. Structure and mechanical properties of ceramic coatings fabricated by plasma electrolytic oxidation on aluminized steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhenqiang; Xia, Yuan; Li, Guang; Xu, Fangtao

    2007-08-01

    Ceramic coatings were formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) on aluminized steel. Characteristics of the average anodic voltages versus treatment time were observed during the PEO process. The micrographs, compositions and mechanical properties of ceramic coatings were investigated. The results show that the anodic voltage profile for processing of aluminized steel is similar to that for processing bulk Al alloy during early PEO stages and that the thickness of ceramic coating increases approximately linearly with the Al layer consumption. Once the Al layer is completely transformed, the FeAl intermetallic layer begins to participate in the PEO process. At this point, the anodic voltage of aluminized steel descends, and the thickness of ceramic coating grows more slowly. At the same time, some micro-cracks are observed at the Al 2O 3/FeAl interface. The final ceramic coating mainly consists of γ-Al 2O 3, mullite, and α-Al 2O 3 phases. PEO ceramic coatings have excellent elastic recovery and high load supporting performance. Nanohardness of ceramic coating reaches about 19.6 GPa.

  18. Failure of thick, low density air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helminiak, Michael Aaron

    This research was directed at developing fundamental understandings of the variables that influence the performance of air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Focus was placed on understanding how and why each variable influenced the performance of the TBC system along with how the individual variables interacted with one another. It includes research on the effect of surface roughness of NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying, the interdiffusion behavior of bond coats coupled to commercial superalloys, and the microstructural and compositional control of APS topcoats to maximize the coating thicknesses that can be applied without spallation. The specimens used for this research were prepared by Praxair Surface Technologies and have been evaluated using cyclic oxidation and thermal shock tests. TBC performance was sensitive to bond coat roughness with the rougher bond coats having improved cyclic performance than the smoother bond coats. The explanation being the rough bond coat surface hindered the propagation of the delamination cracks. The failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on a combination of the topcoat thickness, topcoat microstructure and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between the superalloy and topcoat. Thinner topcoats tended to fail at the topcoat/TGO interface due to bond coat oxidation whereas thicker topcoats failed within the topcoat due to the strain energy release rate of the thicker coating exceeding the fracture strength of the topcoat. Properties of free-standing high and conventional purity YSZ topcoats of both a lowdensity (LD) and dense-vertically fissure (DVF) microstructures were evaluated. The densification rate and phase evolution were sensitive to the YSZ purity and the starting microstructure. Increasing the impurity content resulted in enhanced sintering and phase decomposition rates, with the exception of the

  19. Influence of Silver-hydroxyapatite Nanocomposite Coating on Biofilm Formation of Joint Prosthesis and Its Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, L; Ashraf, MA

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The main reason for biomaterial related refractory infections is biofilm formation caused by bacterial adhesion on the surface of materials. Silver-hydroxyapatite (Ag/HA) nanocomposite coating can inhibit the formation of biofilm, but its mechanism is not clear. Material and Method: In order to clarify the mechanism, the amounts of biofilm on the Ag/HA composite coating and HA coating were determined, the release rates of silver nanoparticles in simulated body fluid (SBF) were detected by atomic absorption spectrometry, and the expression values of atlE, fbe, sap, iapB genes of Staphylococcus aureus were studied when they grew on Ag/HA composite coating and HA coating. Results: The amount of the biofilm on the Ag/HA composite coating was significantly less than that on the HA coating, and the bacterial adhesion was decreased. The silver nanoparticles were released continuously in SBF and the release rate decreased gradually with time. The expression values of atlE, fbe and sap were high in the initial stage of adhesion and the expression value of iapB was high in the colonies-gathering stage in the control group, but they were all significantly inhibited in the presence of Ag. Conclusion: These results indicated that the main antibacterial effect of Ag/HA composite coating was achieved by the release of silver nanoparticles. The addition of Ag inhibited the expression of genes related to biofilm formation, which in turn inhibited the formation of biofilms. This provided theoretical support for the clinical application of Ag/HA composite coating. PMID:27400164

  20. Influence of Silver-hydroxyapatite Nanocomposite Coating on Biofilm Formation of Joint Prosthesis and Its Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, L; Ashraf, M A

    2015-12-01

    The main reason for biomaterial related refractory infections is biofilm formation caused by bacterial adhesion on the surface of materials. Silver-hydroxyapatite (Ag/HA) nanocomposite coating can inhibit the formation of biofilm, but its mechanism is not clear. In order to clarify the mechanism, the amounts of biofilm on the Ag/HA composite coating and HA coating were determined, the release rates of silver nanoparticles in simulated body fluid (SBF) were detected by atomic absorption spectrometry, and the expression values of atlE, fbe, sap, iapB genes of Staphylococcus aureus were studied when they grew on Ag/HA composite coating and HA coating. The amount of the biofilm on the Ag/HA composite coating was significantly less than that on the HA coating, and the bacterial adhesion was decreased. The silver nanoparticles were released continuously in SBF and the release rate decreased gradually with time. The expression values of atlE, fbe and sap were high in the initial stage of adhesion and the expression value of iapB was high in the colonies-gathering stage in the control group, but they were all significantly inhibited in the presence of Ag. These results indicated that the main antibacterial effect of Ag/HA composite coating was achieved by the release of silver nanoparticles. The addition of Ag inhibited the expression of genes related to biofilm formation, which in turn inhibited the formation of biofilms. This provided theoretical support for the clinical application of Ag/HA composite coating.

  1. Deposition and properties of high-velocity-oxygen-fuel and plasma-sprayed Mo-Mo2C composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prchlik, L.; Gutleber, J.; Sampath, S.

    2001-12-01

    Molybdenum thermal-spray coatings, dispersion strengthened by molybdenum oxides and molybdenum carbides, play an important role in industrial tribological applications. Traditionally, they have been prepared by plasma and wire flame spraying. High porosity and lower cohesion strength limit their application in situations where both galling and abrasion wear is involved. In this study, high-velocity-oxygen-fuel (HVOF) deposition of molybdenum and molybdenum carbide coatings was attempted. Deposition was achieved for all powders used. Composition, microstructure, mechanical, and wear properties of the HVOF synthesized coatings were evaluated and compared with plasma-sprayed counterparts. The HVOF coatings possessed a very good abrasion resistance, whereas plasma deposits performed better in dry sliding tests. Measurements showed a close relationship between the coating surface hardness and its abrasion resistance. Results also suggested correlation between molybdenum carbide distribution in the molybdenum matrix and the sliding friction response of Mo-Mo2C coatings.

  2. Formation of Aluminide Coatings on Fe-Based Alloys by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying; Pint, Bruce A; Cooley, Kevin M; Haynes, James A

    2008-01-01

    Aluminide and Al-containing coatings were synthesized on commercial ferritic (P91) and austenitic (304L) alloys via a laboratory chemical vapor deposition (CVD) procedure for rigorous control over coating composition, purity and microstructure. The effect of the CVD aluminizing parameters such as temperature, Al activity, and post-aluminizing anneal on coating growth was investigated. Two procedures involving different Al activities were employed with and without including Cr-Al pellets in the CVD reactor to produce coatings with suitable thickness and composition for coating performance evaluation. The phase constitution of the as-synthesized coatings was assessed with the aid of a combination of X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, and existing phase diagrams. The mechanisms of formation of these CVD coatings on the Fe-based alloys are discussed, and compared with nickel aluminide coatings on Ni-base superalloys. In addition, Cr-Al pellets were replaced with Fe-Al metals in some aluminizing process runs and similar coatings were achieved.

  3. Modeling of plasma jet production from rail and coaxial guns for imploding plasma liner formation*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, R. J.; Faehl, R. J.; Kirikpatrick, R. C.; Witherspoon, D.; Cassibry, J.

    2010-11-01

    We study the generation of plasma jets for forming imploding plasma liners using an enhanced version of the ePLAS implicit/hybrid model.^1 Typically, the jets are partially ionized D or Ar gases, in initial 3-10 cm long slugs at 10^16-10^18 electron/cm^3, accelerated for microseconds along 15-30 cm rail or coaxial guns with a 1 cm inter-electrode gap and driven by magnetic fields of a few Tesla. We re-examine the B-field penetration mechanisms that can be active in such wall-connected plasmas,^2 including erosion and EMHD influences, which can subsequently impact plasma liner formation and implosion. For the background and emitted plasma components we discuss optimized PIC and fluid modeling techniques, and the use of implicit fields and hybridized electrons to speed simulation. The plasmas are relatively cold (˜3 eV), so results with fixed atomic Z are compared to those from a simple analytic EOS, and allowing radiative heat loss from the plasma. The use of PIC ions is explored to extract large mean-free-path kinetic effects. 1. R. J. Mason and C. Cranfill, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-14, 45 (1986) 2. R. Mason, et al., Phys. Fluids B, 5, 1115 (1993). [4pt] *Research supported in part by USDOE Grant DE-SC0004207.

  4. Diagnostic studies of ion beam formation in inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Jenee L.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation describes a variety of studies focused on the plasma and the ion beam in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The ability to use ICP-MS for measurements of trace elements in samples requires the analytes to be efficiently ionized. Updated ionization efficiency tables are discussed for ionization temperatures of 6500 K and 7000 K with an electron density of 1 x 1015 cm-3. These values are reflective of the current operating parameters of ICP-MS instruments. Calculations are also discussed for doubly charged (M2+) ion formation, neutral metal oxide (MO) ionization, and metal oxide (MO+) ion dissociation for similar plasma temperature values. Ionization efficiency results for neutral MO molecules in the ICP have not been reported previously.

  5. Formation of plasma around a small meteoroid: 1. Kinetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimant, Y. S.; Oppenheim, M. M.

    2017-04-01

    Every second, millions of submilligram meteoroids enter the Earth's atmosphere producing dense plasmas. Radars easily detect these plasmas, and researchers use this data to characterize both the meteoroids and the atmosphere. This paper develops a first-principle kinetic theory describing the behavior of particles ablated from a small fast-moving meteoroid and then colliding with atmospheric molecules. These collisions result in partial ionization of the ablated particles and formation of a dense plasma around the meteoroid. This theory produces analytic expressions describing the spatial structure and velocity distributions of ions and neutrals near the ablating meteoroid. The analytical model will serve as a basis for a more accurate quantitative interpretation of radar measurements and should help calculate meteoroid and atmosphere parameters from radar head-echo observations.

  6. Formation of Long-Lived Fireballs by Plasma Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, I.

    2001-10-01

    Results of the long-lived plasma structure and fireball formation (so called ``plasmoids") investigations in the atmosphere have been presented and discussed. Lifetimes of these objects considerably (by several orders of magnitude) exceed typical times of their generation by power sources and of plasma decay time. Experiments on the formation of these objects have been carried out by means of different types of pulse erosive plasma injectors in a wide range of energy (100 J - 100 kJ) putted into the plasmoid. Acrylic glass, fabric-based laminate, caprolon, and different organic materials (waxes, paraffines, resins with natural fillers, wood, lignin, etc.) have been used as plasma forming materials. Injection was made both into undisturbed air and into air saturated by organic vapors. It is shown that the formation of plasmoids of different forms (spherical, torus -type, cylindrical and others) with typical sizes 10-20 cm and their lifetime up to ~1 s takes place during pulse plasma injection into the air. In so doing the time of energy input ranged from 10 mcs to 10 ms. Typical temperature's value at the initial stage of the plasmoid existence is 7 - 10 kK. Initial value of the electron concentration reaches ten in (16-17) power per cubic cm. Obtained plasma radiation spectra and their temporary evolution is under the analysis. It is shown that at late stages of the existence of fireballs their radiation spectra correspond to the radiation of solid carbon and metallic oxide particles, and to spectra of burning of organic materials. It is shown that different structures have been formed at the application of the organic plasma forming materials and /or at the injection of plasma jet into the air saturated by organic vapors. One of them with typical sizes 10-20 cm and temperature ~2000 K has a lifetime up to 0.5 s. Undertaken experimental and theoretical investigations have shown a possibility of different ball lightning type realization in nature in the result of

  7. Formation of coated vesicles from coated pits in broken A431 cells

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Biochemical and morphological techniques were used to demonstrate the early steps in the endocytosis of transferrin in broken A431 cells. After binding 125I-transferrin, the cells were broken by scraping and then warmed. 125I-transferrin became inaccessible to exogenous anti- transferrin antibody providing a measure of the internalization process. Parallel morphological experiments using transferrin coupled to horseradish peroxidase confirmed internalization in broken cells. The process was characterized and compared with endocytosis in intact cells and showed many similar features. The system was used to show that both the appearance of new coated pits and the scission of coated pits to form coated vesicles were dependent on the addition of cytosol and ATP whereas invagination of pits was dependent on neither. PMID:2564003

  8. Modification of the composite multi-layer oxide ceramic coating on meteoroid shielding element by compression plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astashinski, V. M.; Khramtsov, P. P.; Hryshchanka, U. M.; Chernik, M. Yu; Vasetskij, V. A.; Shikh, I. A.; Doroshko, M. V.; Makhnach, A. I.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work is investigation of the influence of high-energy plasma impact on composite multi-layer coating (NiAl as a sublayer and Al2O3 as a top coat) on meteoroid shielding element. In order to reach this goal qausi-stationary plasma accelerator with impulse gas feeding was used. Experiments were conducted with use of helium and hydrogen gas mixture and nitrogen as plasma forming substance. Plasma accelerator generates plasma jet with electron temperature ≈ 150 kK and electron density (2.5-4) × 1016 cm-3. Visual examination, photography and spectral measurements were made through special vacuum chamber optical windows.

  9. The durability of adhesively bonded titanium: Performance of plasma-sprayed polymeric coating pretreatments

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, F.; Dillard, J.; Dillard, D.

    1996-12-31

    The role of a surface treatment of an adherend is to promote highly stable adhesive-adherend interactions; high stability is accomplished by making the chemistry of the adherend and adhesive compatible. The common surface preparations used to enhance durability include grit blasting, chromic acid or sodium hydroxide anodization, and other chemical treatments for titanium. As interest has grown in the development of environmentally benign surface treatments, other methods have been explored. In this study, plasma-sprayed polymeric materials have been evaluated as a surface coating pretreatment for adhesively bonding titanium alloy. Polyimide and polyether powders were plasm-sprayed onto grit-blasted titanium-6Al-4V. The alloy was adhesively bonded using a high performance polyimide adhesive. The coating was characterized using surface sensitive analytical measurements. The durability performance of the plasma-sprayed adherends was compared to the performance for chromic acid anodized titanium. Among the plasma-sprayed coatings, a LaRC-TPI polyimide-based coating exhibited performance comparable to that for chromic acid anodized specimens.

  10. Columnar-Structured Mg-Al-Spinel Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs) by Suspension Plasma Spraying (SPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, N.; Ebert, S.; Mauer, G.; Vaßen, R.

    2015-01-01

    The suspension plasma spraying (SPS) process has been developed to permit the feeding of sub-micrometer-sized powder into the plasma plume. In contrast to electron beam-physical vapor deposition and plasma spray-physical vapor deposition, SPS enables the cost-efficient deposition of columnar-structured coatings. Due to their strain tolerance, these coatings play an important role in the field of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). In addition to the cost-efficient process, attention was turned to the TBC material. Nowadays, yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is used as standard TBC material. However, its long-term application at temperatures higher than 1200 °C is problematic. At these high temperatures, phase transitions and sintering effects lead to the degradation of the TBC system. To overcome those deficits of YSZ, Mg-Al-spinel was chosen as TBC material. Even though it has a lower melting point (~2135 °C) and a higher thermal conductivity (~2.5 W/m/K) than YSZ, Mg-Al-spinel provides phase stability at high temperatures in contrast to YSZ. The Mg-Al-spinel deposition by SPS resulted in columnar-structured coatings, which have been tested for their thermal cycling lifetime. Furthermore, the influence of substrate cooling during the spraying process on thermal cycling behavior, phase composition, and stoichiometry of the Mg-Al-spinel has been investigated.

  11. Cell adhesion to plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) titania coatings, assessed using a centrifuging technique.

    PubMed

    Robinson, H J; Markaki, A E; Collier, C A; Clyne, T W

    2011-11-01

    The adhesion of bovine chondrocytes and human osteoblasts to three titania-based coatings, formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO), was compared to that on uncoated Ti-6Al-4V substrates, and some comparisons were also made with plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings. This was done using a centrifuge, with accelerations of up to 160,000 g, so as to induce buoyancy forces that created normal or shear stresses at the interface. It is shown that, on all surfaces, it was easier to remove cells under normal loading than under shear loading. Cell adhesion to the PEO coatings was stronger than that on Ti-6Al-4V and similar to that on HA. Cell proliferation rates were relatively high on one of the PEO coatings, which was virtually free of aluminium, but low on the other two, which contained significant levels of aluminium. It is concluded that the Al-free PEO coating offers promise for application to prosthetic implants.

  12. Electrochemical Impedance Studies on Tribocorrosion Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Al2O3 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhe; Chu, Zhenhua; Chen, Xueguang; Dong, Yanchun; Yang, Yong; Li, Yingzhen; Yan, Dianran

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the tribocorrosion of plasma-sprayed Al2O3 coatings in simulated seawater was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique, complemented by scanning electron microscopy to observe the morphology of the tribocorrosion attack. Base on EIS of plasma-sprayed Al2O3 coatings undergoing long-time immersion in simulated seawater, the corrosion process of Al2O3 coatings can be divided into the earlier stage of immersion (up to 20 h) and the later stage (beyond 20 h). Then, the wear tests were carried out on the surface of Al2O3 coating undergoing different times of immersion to investigate the influence of wear on corrosion at different stages. The coexistence of wear and corrosion condition had been created by a boron nitride grinding head rotating on the surface of coatings corroded in simulated seawater. The measured EIS and the values of the fitting circuit elements showed that wear accelerated corrosion at the later stage, meanwhile, corrosion accelerated wear with the immersion time increasing.

  13. The behavior of high-purity, low-density air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Helminiak, Yanar NM

    2009-12-01

    Research on the behavior of high-purity, low-density (85%) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBC) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The microstructure of the APS topcoats is one variable in this study intended to maximize the coating thicknesses that can be applied without spallation and to minimize the thermal conduction through the YSZ layer. The specimens were evaluated using cyclic oxidation tests and important properties of the TBCs, such as resistance to sintering and phase transformation, were determined. The high purity resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in significant durability during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, CTE of the superalloy substrate and the nature of the thermal exposure.

  14. Fabrication of functionally gradient nanocomposite coatings by plasma electrolytic oxidation based on variable duty cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliofkhazraei, M.; Rouhaghdam, A. Sabour

    2012-01-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) was applied on the surface of commercially pure titanium substrates in a mixed aluminate-phosphate electrolyte in the presence of silicon nitride nanoparticles as suspension in the electrolyte in order to fabricate nanocomposite coatings. Pulsed current was applied based on variable duty cycle in order to synthesize functionally gradient coatings (FGC). Different rates of variable duty cycle (3, 1.5 and 1%/min), applied current densities (0.06-0.14 A/cm2) and concentrations of nanoparticles in the electrolyte (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 g l-1) were investigated. The nanopowder and coated samples were analyzed by atomic force microscope, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope. The influence of different rates of variable duty cycle (or treatment times) on the growth rate of nanocomposite coatings and their microhardness values was investigated. The experimental results revealed that the content of Si3N4 nanoparticulates in the layer increases with the increase of its concentration in the plasma electrolysis bath. Nanocomposite coatings fabricated with lower rate of variable duty cycle have higher microhardness with smoother microhardness profile.

  15. Thermal stability studies of plasma sprayed yttrium oxide coatings deposited on pure tantalum substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, A.; Anupama, P.; Mukherjee, Jaya; Sreekumar, K. P.; Satpute, R. U.; Padmanabhan, P. V. A.; Gantayet, L. M.

    2010-02-01

    Plasma sprayed Yttrium oxide is used for coating of crucibles and moulds that are used at high temperature to handle highly reactive molten metals like uranium, titanium, chromium, and beryllium. The alloy bond layer is severely attacked by the molten metal. This commonly used layer contributes to the impurity addition to the pure liquid metal. Yttrium oxide was deposited on tantalum substrates (25 mm × 10mm × 1mm thk and 40 mm × 8mm × 1mm thk) by atmospheric plasma spray technique with out any bond coat using optimized coating parameters. Resistance to thermal shock was evaluated by subjecting the coated specimens, to controlled heating and cooling cycles between 300K to 1600K in an induction furnace in argon atmosphere having <= 0.1ppm of oxygen. The experiments were designed to examine the sample tokens by both destructive and non-destructive techniques, after a predetermined number of thermal cycles. The results upto 24 thermal cycles of 25 mm × 10mm × 1mm thk coupons and upto 6 cycles of 40 mm × 8mm × 1mm thk coupons are discussed. The coatings produced with the optimized parameters were found to exhibit excellent thermal shock resistance.

  16. Formation and Stability of Partially-Neutralized Plasma Clumps.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    propagation in the vacuum region, to the extent studied in the experiments. The goal of that related work is the generation of nearly charge-neutral...A179 444 FORMATION AND STABILITY OF PARTIALLY-NEUTRALIZED PLOSMA Y CLUNPS(U) MARYLAND UNIV COLLEGE PARK LAS FOR PLASMA AND FUSION ENERGY STUDIES J...Energy Studies / Bldg 410 Energy Research 3ldg, College Park Md 20742 Bolling AFB, D.C. 20332-6448 Ga. NAME OF FUNOING;SPONSORINGB. OFFICE SYMBOL 9

  17. Microstructure and Wear Resistance of Plasma Jet Clad Ti5Si3/NiTi Composite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan-Fu; Han, Jian-Min; Zhang, Gu-Ling; Wang, Jiu-Li; Li, Min; Yang, Wu-Bao; Liu, Chi-Zi; Li, Hui-Qi; Yang, Si-Ze

    2004-07-01

    A wear resistant Ti5Si3/NiTi composite coating was fabricated on a substrate of a titanium alloy by plasma jet cladding using Ni-Ti-Si elemental powder blends. The microstructure, microhardness and wear resistance of the coating were evaluated. The result shows that the plasma jet clad composite coating has a rapidly solidified microstructure consisting of blocky primary Ti5Si3 and the inter-blocky Ti5Si3/NiTi eutectics and is metallurgically bonded to the titanium substrate. The composite coating has high hardness and excellent wear resistance under the dry-sliding-wear test condition.

  18. Gradient multilayer tribilogical coatings based on Mo-S-Ti-C formed by hybrid ion-plasma methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savostikov, V. M.; Potekaev, A. I.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Shulepov, I. A.; Kuzmichenko, V. M.; Didenko, A. A.

    2012-04-01

    Mechanical, physical and tribological properties of layer-gradient multi-component coatings based on the Mo-S-Ti-C composition are investigated. The coatings are formed by combining the magnetron sputtering and the hybrid magnetron and vacuum arc deposition assisted by a gas plasma generator. A correlation is established between the physic mechanical and tribological properties of the resulting coatings, which allows identifying their potential applications. The physical principles of the combined technologies of lowtemperature ion-plasma deposition of tribological Mo-S-Ti-C coatings onto hardened steel machine parts are developed.

  19. Testing the Role of Silicic Acid and Bioorganic Materials in the Formation of Rock Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, Vera; Philip, Ajish I.; Perry, Randall S.

    2004-12-01

    Silica, amino acids, and DNA were recently discovered in desert varnish. In this work we experimentally test the proposed role of silicic acid and bio-chemicals in the formation of desert varnish and other rock coatings. We have developed a protocol in which hte rocks were treated with a mixture of silicic acid, sugars, amino acids, metals and clays, under the influence of heat and UV light. This protocol reflects the proposed mechanism of hte polymerization of silicic acid with the bioorganic materials, and the laboratory model for the natural conditions under which the desert varnish is formed. Our experiments produced coatings with a hardness and morphology that resemble the nature ones. These results provide a support for the role of silicic acid in the formation of rock coatings. Since the hard silica-based coatings preserve organic compounds in them, they may serve as a biosignature for life, here or possibly Mars.

  20. Formation of intermetallic compound coating on magnesium AZ91 cast alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tianping; Gao, Wei

    2009-08-01

    This study describes an intermetallic compound coating formed on AZ91 Mg cast alloy. The Al sputtered on AZ91 cast alloy reacted with substrate during a short period of heat treatment at 435°C, resulting in the formation of a continuous intermetallic compound layer. The short period treatment has the advantage of minimizing the negative effect on the microstructure of substrate and the mechanical properties, comparing with the reported diffusion coatings. DSC measurement and examination on the cross-section of Al sputtered samples show that local melting occurred along the Al/substrate interface at the temperature range between 430~435°C. The formation mechanism of intermetallic compound coating is proposed in terms of the local melting at Al/substrate interface. The salt water immersion test showed significant improvement in corrosion resistance of the intermetallic compound coated AZ91 cast alloy compared with the as-cast alloys.

  1. Product surface hardening in non-self-sustained glow discharge plasma before synthesis of superhard coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, P. S.; Metel, A. S.; Nay, H. A.

    2017-05-01

    Before the synthesis of superhard coating, the product surface is hardened by means of plasma nitriding, which prevents the surface deformations and the coating brittle rupture. The product heating by ions accelerated from plasma by applied to the product bias voltage leads to overheating and blunting of the product sharp edges. To prevent the blunting, it is proposed to heat the products with a broad beam of fast nitrogen molecules. The beam injection into a working vacuum chamber results in filling of the chamber with quite homogeneous plasma suitable for nitriding. Immersion in the plasma of the electrode and heightening of its potential up to 50-100 V initiate a non-self-sustained glow discharge between the electrode and the chamber. It enhances the plasma density by an order of magnitude and reduces its spatial nonuniformity down to 5-10%. When a cutting tool is isolated from the chamber, it is bombarded by plasma ions with an energy corresponding to its floating potential, which is lower than the sputtering threshold. Hence, the sharp edges are sputtered only by fast nitrogen molecules with the same rate as other parts of the tool surface. This leads to sharpening of the cutting tools instead of blunting.

  2. PREFACE: Low temperature Plasma in the Processes of Functional Coating Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gali Yunusovich, Dautov; Kashapov Faikovich, Nail; Larionov, Viktor; Gerfanovich Zaripov, Renat; Galyautdinov Tagirovich, Raphael; Ilnaz, Fayrushin; Ramil Nailevich, Kashapov

    2013-12-01

    In November 2013 the V Republican Scientific Technical Conference 'Low-temperature plasma during the deposition of functional coatings' was held in Kazan. The Conference took place from 4-7 November at the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tatarstan and Kazan Federal University chaired by a member of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tatarstan Nail Kashapov, Professor, Doctor of Technical Science, and a member of the Scientific and Technical Council of the Ministry of Economy of the Republic of Tatarstan. At the conference, the participants were offered a wide range of issues affecting the theoretical and computational aspects of the research problems in the physics and technology of low-temperature plasma. There was also a whole series of works devoted to the study of thin films, obtained by low-temperature plasma. For the second year at this conference, work dedicated to the related field of pulsation combustion and low- temperature plasma was considered. In addition much interest is devoted to reports on the exploration of gas discharges with liquid electrolytic electron trodes and the study of dusty plasmas. The VI All-Russian Conference 'Low-temperature plasma during the deposition of functional coatings', an extended version with international participation, is scheduled to take place in November 2014. Nail Kashapov Editor

  3. Investigation of Plasma Spray Coatings as an Alternative to Hard Chrome Plating on Internal Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-20

    Ni-988 Praxair WC-Co self fluxing 50%(WC 12Co) 50%(33Ni 9Cr 3.5Fe 2Si 2B 0.5C) SM 5803 Sulzer Metco (WC 12Co) 25(Ni-Based Superalloy ) SM 5810...10012402-1 SM 5803 (WC 12Co) 25(Ni-Based Superalloy ) Ar/He/H2 5.3 82.2 671 Micro cracks 10012502-1 D2002 (WC 12Co) 50(self fluxing alloy), (WC...resistance of EHC and plasma spray coatings. Ring Coated (block) disc Figure 4-29 Ring-on-block wear tester. Ring tilted to show design. 53 the

  4. Mechanisms of degradation and failure in a plasma deposited thermal barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demasi-Marcin, Jeanine T.; Sheffler, Keith D.; Bose, Sudhangshu

    1989-01-01

    Failure of a two layer plasma deposited thermal barrier coating is caused by cyclic thermal exposure and occurs by spallation of the outer ceramic layer. Spallation life is quantitatively predictable, based on the severity of cyclic thermal exposure. This paper describes and attempts to explain unusual constitutive behavior observed in the insulative ceramic coating layer, and presents details of the ceramic cracking damage accumulation process which is responsible for spallation failure. Comments also are offered to rationalize the previously documented influence of interfacial oxidation on ceramic damage accumulation and spallation life.

  5. Polymer coating on the surface of zirconia nanoparticles by inductively coupled plasma polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    He Wei; Guo Zhigang; Pu Yikang; Yan Luting; Si Wenjie

    2004-08-09

    Polymer coating on the surface of inorganic ceramic nanoparticles is beneficial to decrease agglomeration and improve dispersion in organic solvent in ceramic injection moulding technology. A layer of thin polymer film on zirconia nanoparticles is deposited by inductively coupled ethylene/nitrogen plasma. Transmission electron microscopy photographs indicate the presence of uniform polymer coatings and the thickness of the polymer layer is estimated as several nanometers. The chemical structure of the film is revealed as quasi-polyethylene long hydrocarbon chain by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy examination.

  6. Properties of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition Barrier Coatings and Encapsulated Polymer Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Lei; Zhang, Chunmei; Chen, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report silicon oxide coatings deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology (PECVD) on 125 μm polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) surfaces for the purpose of the shelf lifetime extension of sealed polymer solar cells. After optimization of the processing parameters, we achieved a water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of ca. 10-3 g/m2/day with the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) less than 0.05 cc/m2/day, and succeeded in extending the shelf lifetime to about 400 h in encapsulated solar cells. And then the chemical structure of coatings related to the properties of encapsulated cell was investigated in detail.

  7. Delayed-onset of procoagulant signalling revealed by kinetic analysis of COAT platelet formation.

    PubMed

    Alberio, Lorenzo; Ravanat, Catherine; Hechler, Béatrice; Mangin, Pierre H; Lanza, François; Gachet, Christian

    2017-06-02

    The combined action of collagen and thrombin induces the formation of COAT platelets, which are characterised by a coat of procoagulant and adhesive molecules on their surface. Although recent work has started to highlight their clinical relevance, the exact mechanisms regulating the formation of procoagulant COAT platelets remain unclear. Therefore, we employed flow cytometry in order to visualise in real time surface and intracellular events following simultaneous platelet activation with convulxin and thrombin. After a rapid initial response pattern characterised by the homogenous activation of the fibrinogen receptor glycoprotein IIb/IIIa in all platelets, starting with a delay of about 2 minutes an increasing fraction transforms to procoagulant COAT platelets. Their surface is characterised by progressive loss of PAC-1 binding, expression of negative phospholipids and retention of α-granule von Willebrand factor. Intracellular events in procoagulant COAT platelets are a marked increase of free calcium into the low micromolar range, concomitantly with early depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane and activation of caspase-3, while non-COAT platelets keep the intracellular free calcium in the nanomolar range and maintain an intact mitochondrial membrane. We show for the first time that the flow-cytometrically distinct fractions of COAT and non-COAT platelets differentially phosphorylate two signalling proteins, PKCα and p38MAPK, which may be involved in the regulation of the different calcium fluxes observed in COAT versus non-COAT platelets. This study demonstrates the utility of concomitant cellular and signalling evaluation using flow cytometry in order to further dissect the mechanisms underlying the dichotomous platelet response observed after collagen/thrombin stimulation.

  8. Analysis of mechanisms for anode plasma formation in ion diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, M.A.; Brandenburg, J.E.; Gerber, R.A.; Johnson, D.J.; Hoffman, J.M.; Miller, P.A.; Quintenz, J.P.; Slutz, S.A.; Bieg, K.W.

    1983-01-01

    Understanding how anode plasma is formed in intense pulsed-power ion diodes by insulator breakdown is important in assessing the effect on ion beam quality. Formation of a passive flashover anode plasma source may involve one or more of the following: polarization of the anode dielectric, direct leakage electron bombardment, UV-stimulated desorption of excited gas in the gap or on the anode surface, ionization of desorbed neutrals in a surface plasma by electron return currents associated with ion extraction, or bombardment by low energy electrons or negative ions. At Sandia National Laboratories experiments have been done on Nereus, PI 110A, Proto I, Proto II, HydraMITE, and PBFA I using anodes with dielectric-filled surfaces. The experiments represent a variety of anode turn-on delays (2 to 15 ns), magnetic field strengths (7 to 30 kG), voltages (300 keV to 2 MeV), and anode configurations. Data include ion beam current from Faraday cups, holographic observation of plasma motion, the spatial and temporal character of visible light emitted from the plasma, and optical metallographic examination of the dielectric.

  9. Fastest Formation Routes of Nanocarbons in Solution Plasma Processes

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Tetsunori; Ueno, Tomonaga; Panomsuwan, Gasidit; Hieda, Junko; Yoshida, Akihito; Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Saito, Nagahiro

    2016-01-01

    Although solution-plasma processing enables room-temperature synthesis of nanocarbons, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We investigated the routes of solution-plasma-induced nanocarbon formation from hexane, hexadecane, cyclohexane, and benzene. The synthesis rate from benzene was the highest. However, the nanocarbons from linear molecules were more crystalline than those from ring molecules. Linear molecules decomposed into shorter olefins, whereas ring molecules were reconstructed in the plasma. In the saturated ring molecules, C–H dissociation proceeded, followed by conversion into unsaturated ring molecules. However, unsaturated ring molecules were directly polymerized through cation radicals, such as benzene radical cation, and were converted into two- and three-ring molecules at the plasma–solution interface. The nanocarbons from linear molecules were synthesized in plasma from small molecules such as C2 under heat; the obtained products were the same as those obtained via pyrolysis synthesis. Conversely, the nanocarbons obtained from ring molecules were directly synthesized through an intermediate, such as benzene radical cation, at the interface between plasma and solution, resulting in the same products as those obtained via polymerization. These two different reaction fields provide a reasonable explanation for the fastest synthesis rate observed in the case of benzene. PMID:27841288

  10. Fastest Formation Routes of Nanocarbons in Solution Plasma Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Tetsunori; Ueno, Tomonaga; Panomsuwan, Gasidit; Hieda, Junko; Yoshida, Akihito; Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Saito, Nagahiro

    2016-11-01

    Although solution-plasma processing enables room-temperature synthesis of nanocarbons, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We investigated the routes of solution-plasma-induced nanocarbon formation from hexane, hexadecane, cyclohexane, and benzene. The synthesis rate from benzene was the highest. However, the nanocarbons from linear molecules were more crystalline than those from ring molecules. Linear molecules decomposed into shorter olefins, whereas ring molecules were reconstructed in the plasma. In the saturated ring molecules, C–H dissociation proceeded, followed by conversion into unsaturated ring molecules. However, unsaturated ring molecules were directly polymerized through cation radicals, such as benzene radical cation, and were converted into two- and three-ring molecules at the plasma–solution interface. The nanocarbons from linear molecules were synthesized in plasma from small molecules such as C2 under heat; the obtained products were the same as those obtained via pyrolysis synthesis. Conversely, the nanocarbons obtained from ring molecules were directly synthesized through an intermediate, such as benzene radical cation, at the interface between plasma and solution, resulting in the same products as those obtained via polymerization. These two different reaction fields provide a reasonable explanation for the fastest synthesis rate observed in the case of benzene.

  11. A Quantitative Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimant, Yakov; Oppenheim, Meers

    2014-10-01

    Every second millions of small meteoroids hit the Earth from space, the vast majority too small to observe visually. Radars easily detect the plasma they generate and use the data they gather to characterize the meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. These diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of the formation of the meteor plasma and how it interacts with the Earth's atmosphere. Meteors become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently that they begin to sublimate. The sublimated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around and behind the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from the plasma around the descending meteoroid produces a localized signal called a head echo. This research applies kinetic theory to show that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. This analytical model will serve as a basis for quantitative interpretation of the head echo radar measurements, the ionization efficiency (called the Beta parameter), and should help us calculate meteoroid and atmosphere parameters from radar head-echo observations. Work supported by NSF Grant AGS-1244842.

  12. Characterization of PEG-Like Macromolecular Coatings on Plasma Modified NiTi Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun; Gao, Jiacheng; Chang, Peng; Wang, Jianhua

    2008-04-01

    A poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG-like) coating was developed to improve the biocompatibility of Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) alloy implants. The PEG-like macromolecular coatings were deposited on NiTi substrates at a room temperature of 298 K through a ECR (electron-cyclotron resonance) cold-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method using tetraglyme (CH3-O-(CH2-CH2-O)4-CH3) as a precursor. A power supply with a frequency of 2.45 GHz was applied to ignite the plasma with Ar(argon) used as the carrier gas. Based on the atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies, a thin smooth coating on NiTi substrates with highly amorphous functional groups on the modified NiTi surfaces were mainly the same accumulated stoichiometric ratio of C and O with PEG. The vitro studies showed that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) adsorption on the modified NiTi alloy surface was significantly reduced. This study indicated that plasma surface modification changes the surface components of NiTi alloy and subsequently improves its biocompatibility.

  13. Improvement of Coating Properties in Three-Cathode Atmospheric Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Kopp, N.; Warda, T.; Petković, I.; Zimmermann, S.; Hartz-Behrend, K.; Landes, K.; Forster, G.; Kirner, S.; Marqués, J.-L.; Schein, J.; Prehm, J.; Möhwald, K.; Bach, Fr.-W.

    2013-04-01

    The main aim of this study is to improve the coating properties of three-cathode atmospheric plasma-sprayed coatings with respect to porosity and residual stresses. This was done by means of numerical simulation coupled with advanced diagnostic methods. A numerical model for the triple injection of alumina feedstock, as well as acceleration and heating of the powder particles in the characteristic threefold symmetrical plasma jet cross section produced by a three-cathode-plasma torch, was developed. The modeling results for the standard injector's position "0" were calculated and experimentally verified by laser Doppler anemometry. Based on the criteria defined for the concentrated feedstock transport and homogeneous thermal treatment of powder particles in the plasma jet, the optimal injection position was found. In the next step, a previously developed, coupled CFD-FEM-simulation model was used for simulations of the coating build-up, describing flattening, solidification, and deformation due to shrinkage for alumina particles on a rough substrate surface.

  14. Formation of High-Beta Plasma and Stable Confinement of Toroidal Electron Plasma in RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Haruhiko

    2010-11-01

    The Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device is a laboratory magnetosphere generated by a levitated superconducting magnet. The goals of RT-1 are to realize stable formation of ultra high-beta plasma suitable for burning advanced fusion fuels, and confinement of toroidal non-neutral plasmas including antimatter particles. RT- 1 has produced high-beta plasma in the magnetospheric configuration. The effects of coil levitation and geomagnetic field compensation [Y. Yano et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 4, 039] resulted drastic improvements of the plasma properties, and a maximum local beta value exceeded 70%. Because plasma is generated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) in the present experiment, the plasma pressure is mainly due to hot electrons, whose bremsstrahlung was observed with an x-ray CCD camera. The pressure profiles have rather steep gradient near the superconducting coil in the strong field region. The decay rates of magnetic probe and interferometer signals have different time constants, suggesting multiple temperature components. The energy confinement time estimated from the input RF power and stored magnetic energy is on the order of 1s, which is comparable to the decay time constant of the density of hot electron component. Pure electron plasma experiments are also conducted in RT-1. Radial profiles of electrostatic potential and electron density showed that the plasma rigidly rotates in the toroidal direction in the stable confinement phase. Long time confinement of toroidal non- neutral plasma for more than 300s and inward particle diffusion to strong field regions, caused by the activation of the diocotron (Kelvin-Helmholtz) instability, have been realized [Z. Yoshida et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235004].

  15. Nano powders, components and coatings by plasma technique

    DOEpatents

    McKechnie, Timothy N.; Antony, Leo V. M.; O'Dell, Scott; Power, Chris; Tabor, Terry

    2009-11-10

    Ultra fine and nanometer powders and a method of producing same are provided, preferably refractory metal and ceramic nanopowders. When certain precursors are injected into the plasma flame in a reactor chamber, the materials are heated, melted and vaporized and the chemical reaction is induced in the vapor phase. The vapor phase is quenched rapidly to solid phase to yield the ultra pure, ultra fine and nano product. With this technique, powders have been made 20 nanometers in size in a system capable of a bulk production rate of more than 10 lbs/hr. The process is particularly applicable to tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten carbide, molybdenum carbide and other related materials.

  16. Nano powders, components and coatings by plasma technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKechnie, Timothy N. (Inventor); Antony, Leo V. M. (Inventor); O'Dell, Scott (Inventor); Power, Chris (Inventor); Tabor, Terry (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Ultra fine and nanometer powders and a method of producing same are provided, preferably refractory metal and ceramic nanopowders. When certain precursors are injected into the plasma flame in a reactor chamber, the materials are heated, melted and vaporized and the chemical reaction is induced in the vapor phase. The vapor phase is quenched rapidly to solid phase to yield the ultra pure, ultra fine and nano product. With this technique, powders have been made 20 nanometers in size in a system capable of a bulk production rate of more than 10 lbs/hr. The process is particularly applicable to tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten carbide, molybdenum carbide and other related materials.

  17. Vacuum plasma sprayed coatings using ionic silver doped hydroxyapatite powder to prevent bacterial infection of bone implants.

    PubMed

    Guimond-Lischer, Stefanie; Ren, Qun; Braissant, Olivier; Gruner, Philipp; Wampfler, Bruno; Maniura-Weber, Katharina

    2016-03-10

    Fast and efficient osseointegration of implants into bone is of crucial importance for their clinical success; a process that can be enhanced by coating the implant surface with hydroxyapatite (HA) using the vacuum plasma spray technology (VPS). However, bacterial infections, especially the biofilm formation on implant surfaces after a surgery, represent a serious complication. With ever-increasing numbers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, there is great interest in silver (Ag) as an alternative to classical antibiotics due to its broad activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. In the present study, silver ions were introduced into HA spray powder by ion exchange and the HA-Ag powder was applied onto titanium samples by VPS. The Ag-containing surfaces were evaluated for the kinetics of the silver release, its antibacterial effect against Staphylococcus aureus as well as Escherichia coli, and possible cytotoxicity against human bone cells. The HA-Ag coatings with different concentrations of Ag displayed mechanical and compositional properties that fulfill the regulatory requirements. Evaluation of the Ag release kinetic showed a high release rate in the first 24 h followed by a decreasing release rate over the four subsequent days. The HA-Ag coatings showed no cytotoxicity to primary human bone cells while exhibiting antibacterial activity to E. coli and S. aureus.

  18. Sintering and Creep Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconia and Hafnia Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The sintering and creep of plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings under high temperature conditions are complex phenomena. Changes in thermomechanical and thermophysical properties and in the stress response of these coating systems as a result of the sintering and creep processes are detrimental to coating thermal fatigue resistance and performance. In this paper, the sintering characteristics of ZrO2-8wt%y2O3, ZrO2-25wt%CeO2-2.5wt%Y2O3, ZrO2-6w%NiO- 9wt%Y2O3, ZrO2-6wt%Sc2O3-2wt%y2O3 and HfO2-27wt%y2O3 coating materials were investigated using dilatometry. It was found that the HfO2-Y2O3 and baseline ZrO2-Y2O3 exhibited the best sintering resistance, while the NiO-doped ZrO2-Y2O3 showed the highest shrinkage strain rates during the tests. Higher shrinkage strain rates of the coating materials were also observed when the specimens were tested in Ar+5%H2 as compared to in air. This phenomenon was attributed to an enhanced metal cation interstitial diffusion mechanism under the reducing conditions. It is proposed that increased chemical stability of coating materials will improve the material sintering resistance.

  19. Plasma sprayed manganese-cobalt spinel coatings: Process sensitivity on phase, electrical and protective performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Su Jung; Pala, Zdenek; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-02-01

    Manganese cobalt spinel (Mn1.5Co1.5O4, MCO) coatings are prepared by the air plasma spray (APS) process to examine their efficacy in serving as protective coatings from Cr-poisoning of the cathode side in intermediate temperature-solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). These complex oxides are susceptible to process induced stoichiometric and phase changes which affect their functional performance. To critically examine these effects, MCO coatings are produced with deliberate modifications to the spray process parameters to explore relationship among process conditions, microstructure and functional properties. The resultant interplay among particle thermal and kinetic energies are captured through process maps, which serve to characterize the parametric effects on properties. The results show significant changes to the chemistry and phase composition of the deposited material resulting from preferential evaporation of oxygen. Post deposition annealing recovers oxygen in the coatings and allows partial recovery of the spinel phase, which is confirmed through thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA)/differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and magnetic hysteresis measurements. In addition, coatings with high density after sintering show excellent electrical conductivity of 40 S cm-1 at 800 °C while simultaneously providing requisite protection characteristics against Cr-poisoning. This study provides a framework for optimal evaluation of MCO coatings in intermediate temperature SOFCs.

  20. Microstructures and Tribological Properties of Fe-Based Amorphous Metallic Coatings Deposited via Supersonic Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yang-yang; Ma, Guo-zheng; Wang, Hai-dou; Li, Guo-lu; Chen, Shu-ying; Fu, Bin-guo

    2017-08-01

    The effects of the Ar flow rate and spraying power of a supersonic plasma spraying process on the microstructures and amorphous phase contents of Fe48Cr15Mo14C15B6Y2 amorphous coatings were systematically investigated. The tribological properties of the coatings were evaluated in pin-on-disk mode using a sliding tribometer. The results show that the amorphous phase content and microhardness initially increase with the Ar flow rate and then gradually decrease. However, the amorphous phase content and microhardness increase with the power. In particular, the amorphous phase content of the coating reaches 96.78% with a spraying power of 62 kW and a 110 L min-1 Ar flow rate. Tribological testing demonstrates that the coatings exhibit similar steady-state coefficients of friction (0.75-0.82) with a total test time of 20 min and an applied load of 20 N. However, the wear rates vary with the spraying parameters. In particular, the relative wear rate of the coating can be enhanced up to sixfold under optimal spraying conditions, resulting in excellent wear resistance. Detailed analysis of the coating wear surfaces indicates that the dominant wear mechanisms are abrasive and oxidative wear. Moreover, delamination may occur during the wear process.

  1. Low cycle fatigue behaviour of a plasma-sprayed coating material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Miner, R. V.

    1986-01-01

    Single crystal nickel-base superalloys employed in turbine blade applications are often used with a plasma spray coating for oxidation and hot corrosion resistance. These coatings may also affect fatigue life of the superalloy substrate. As part of a large program to understand the fatigue behavior of coated single crystals, fully reversed, total strain controlled fatigue tests were run on a free standing NiCoCrAlY coating alloy, PWA 276, at 0.1 Hz. Fatigue tests were conducted at 650 C, where the NiCoCrAlY alloy has modest ductility, and at 1050 C, where it is extremely ductile, showing tensile elongation in excess of 100 percent. At the lower test temperature, deformation induced disordering softened the NiCoCrAlY alloy, while at the higher test temperature cyclic hardening was observed which was linked to gradual coarsening of the two phase microstructure. Fatigue life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy was significantly longer at the higher temperature. Further, the life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy exceeds that of coated, /001/-oriented PWA 1480 single crystals at 1050 C but at 650 C the life of the coated crystal is greater than that of the NiCoCrAlY alloy on a total strain basis.

  2. The low cycle fatigue behavior of a plasma-sprayed coating material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Single crystal nickel-base superalloys employed in turbine blade applications are often used with a plasma spray coating for oxidation and hot corrosion resistance. These coatings may also affect fatigue life of the superalloy substrate. As part of a large program to understand the fatigue behavior of coated single crystals, fully reversed, total strain controlled fatigue tests were run on a free standing NiCoCrAlY coating alloy, PWA 276, at 0.1 Hz. Fatigue tests were conducted at 650 C, where the NiCoCrAlY alloy has modest ductility, and at 1050 C, where it is extremely ductile, showing tensile elongation in excess of 100 percent. At the lower test temperature, deformation induced disordering softened the NiCoCrAlY alloy, while at the higher test temperature cyclic hardening was observed which was linked to gradual coarsening of the two phase microstructure. Fatigue life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy was significantly longer at the higher temperature. Further, the life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy exceeds that of coated, /001/-oriented PWA 1480 single crystals at 1050 C, but at 650 C the life of the coated crystal is greater than that of the NiCoCrAlY alloy on a total strain basis.

  3. Low cycle fatigue behaviour of a plasma-sprayed coating material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Miner, R. V.

    1986-01-01

    Single crystal nickel-base superalloys employed in turbine blade applications are often used with a plasma spray coating for oxidation and hot corrosion resistance. These coatings may also affect fatigue life of the superalloy substrate. As part of a large program to understand the fatigue behavior of coated single crystals, fully reversed, total strain controlled fatigue tests were run on a free standing NiCoCrAlY coating alloy, PWA 276, at 0.1 Hz. Fatigue tests were conducted at 650 C, where the NiCoCrAlY alloy has modest ductility, and at 1050 C, where it is extremely ductile, showing tensile elongation in excess of 100 percent. At the lower test temperature, deformation induced disordering softened the NiCoCrAlY alloy, while at the higher test temperature cyclic hardening was observed which was linked to gradual coarsening of the two phase microstructure. Fatigue life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy was significantly longer at the higher temperature. Further, the life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy exceeds that of coated, /001/-oriented PWA 1480 single crystals at 1050 C but at 650 C the life of the coated crystal is greater than that of the NiCoCrAlY alloy on a total strain basis.

  4. Heat load behaviors of plasma sprayed tungsten coatings on copper alloys with different compliant layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, F. L.; Chen, J. L.; Li, J. G.; Hu, D. Y.; Zheng, X. B.

    2008-04-01

    Plasma sprayed tungsten (PS-W) coatings with the compliant layers of titanium (Ti), nickel-chromium-aluminum (NiCrAl) alloys and W/Cu mixtures were fabricated on copper alloys, and their properties of the porosity, oxygen content, thermal conductivity and bonding strength were measured. High heat flux tests of actively cooled W coatings were performed by means of an electron beam facility. The results indicated that APS-W coating showed a poorer heat transfer capability and thermo-mechanical properties than VPS-W coating, and the compliant layers improved W coating performance under the heat flux load. Among three compliant layers, W/Cu was the preferable because of its better effects on heat removal and stress alleviating. The optimization of W/Cu compliant layer found that 0.1 mm and 25 vol.%W was optimum compliant layer structure for 1 mm W coating, which induced a 23% reduction of the maximum stress compared to the sharp interface, and the plastic strain was reduced to 0.01% from 1.55%.

  5. Preventive effects of a phospholipid polymer coating on PMMA on biofilm formation by oral streptococci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Yukie; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Tsuru, Kanji; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2016-12-01

    The regulation of biofilm formation on dental materials such as denture bases is key to oral health. Recently, a biocompatible phospholipid polymer, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine-co-n-butyl methacrylate) (PMB) coating, was reported to inhibit sucrose-dependent biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans, a cariogenic bacterium, on the surface of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) denture bases. However, S. mutans is a minor component of the oral microbiome and does not play an important role in biofilm formation in the absence of sucrose. Other, more predominant oral streptococci must play an indispensable role in sucrose-independent biofilm formation. In the present study, the effect of PMB coating on PMMA was evaluated using various oral streptococci that are known to be initial colonizers during biofilm formation on tooth surfaces. PMB coating on PMMA drastically reduced sucrose-dependent tight biofilm formation by two cariogenic bacteria (S. mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus), among seven tested oral streptococci, as described previously [N. Takahashi, F. Iwasa, Y. Inoue, H. Morisaki, K. Ishihara, K. Baba, J. Prosthet. Dent. 112 (2014) 194-203]. Streptococci other than S. mutans and S. sobrinus did not exhibit tight biofilm formation even in the presence of sucrose. On the other hand, all seven species of oral streptococci exhibited distinctly reduced glucose-dependent soft biofilm retention on PMB-coated PMMA. We conclude that PMB coating on PMMA surfaces inhibits biofilm attachment by initial colonizer oral streptococci, even in the absence of sucrose, indicating that PMB coating may help maintain clean conditions on PMMA surfaces in the oral cavity.

  6. Evidence that phospholipase D mediates ADP ribosylation factor- dependent formation of Golgi coated vesicles

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Formation of coatomer-coated vesicles from Golgi-enriched membranes requires the activation of a small GTP-binding protein, ADP ribosylation factor (ARF). ARF is also an efficacious activator of phospholipase D (PLD), an activity that is relatively abundant on Golgi- enriched membranes. It has been proposed that ARF, which is recruited onto membranes from cytosolic pools, acts directly to promote coatomer binding and is in a 3:1 stoichiometry with coatomer on coated vesicles. We present evidence that cytosolic ARF is not necessary for initiating coat assembly on Golgi membranes from cell lines with high constitutive PLD activity. Conditions are also described under which ARF is at most a minor component relative to coatomer in coated vesicles from all cell lines tested, including Chinese hamster ovary cells. Formation of coated vesicles was sensitive to ethanol at concentrations that inhibit the production of phosphatidic acid (PA) by PLD. When PA was produced in Golgi membranes by an exogenous bacterial PLD, rather than with ARF and endogenous PLD, coatomer bound to Golgi membranes. Purified coatomer also bound selectively to artificial lipid vesicles that contained PA and phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2). We propose that activation of PLD and the subsequent production of PA are key early events for the formation of coatomer-coated vesicles. PMID:8707816

  7. Assessment of plasma sprayed coatings to modify surface friction for railroad applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Heidi Lynn

    For the past hundred years, railroads have been an important means of transportation for passengers and freight. Over the years train traffic, speeds, and loads have increased steadily leading to a more severe wheel/rail environment that exceeds the design limits of the steels thus causing increased wear, decreased rail life, and higher maintenance costs. The cost of controlling friction and the resulting damage is an area of ever-increasing concern. One potential method of modifying friction is by changing the surface properties of the rail. The work reported herein was carried out as part of a larger effort to modify surface friction of rails. The original focus of this research was to use high velocity air plasma spraying to develop friction enhancing coatings for the rail surface. Using the methodology developed at the Oregon Graduate Institute, the plasma spray parameters were optimized and the coatings were tested on the Amsler machine under rolling/sliding wear conditions to determine viability prior to full scale testing. Stainless steel and composite 1080 steel were investigated as potential materials for increasing friction. Poor results with these coatings shifted the research focus to understanding the durability of the coatings and to failure analysis of initial 1080 steel full scale samples tested by the Facility for Accelerated Service Testing that had failed prematurely. After re-optimization of parameters and preparation methodologies further full scale samples (1080 steel/nylon) were tested and failure analysis was performed. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to evaluate the microstructure of coatings from the tested samples. The laboratory scale Amsler test did not appear to be a good indicator of the performance of the coating in full scale tests, because variations in microstructure were caused by differences in sample size, geometry and spraying methods when scaling up from a small Amsler roller to a large rail sample. The

  8. Long period gratings coated with hafnium oxide by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition for refractive index measurements.

    PubMed

    Melo, Luis; Burton, Geoff; Kubik, Philip; Wild, Peter

    2016-04-04

    Long period gratings (LPGs) are coated with hafnium oxide using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) to increase the sensitivity of these devices to the refractive index of the surrounding medium. PEALD allows deposition at low temperatures which reduces thermal degradation of UV-written LPGs. Depositions targeting three different coating thicknesses are investigated: 30 nm, 50 nm and 70 nm. Coating thickness measurements taken by scanning electron microscopy of the optical fibers confirm deposition of uniform coatings. The performance of the coated LPGs shows that deposition of hafnium oxide on LPGs induces two-step transition behavior of the cladding modes.

  9. Friction and wear of plasma-sprayed coatings containing cobalt alloys from 25 deg to 650 deg in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.; Jacobson, T. P.

    1979-01-01

    Four different compositions of self-lubricating, plasma-sprayed, composite coatings with calcium fluoride dispersed throughout cobalt alloy-silver matrices were evaluated on a friction and wear apparatus. In addition, coatings of the cobalt alloys alone and one coating with a nickel alloy-silver matrix were evaluated for comparison. The wear specimens consisted of two, diametrically opposed, flat rub shoes sliding on the coated, cylindrical surface of a rotating disk. Two of the cobalt composite coatings gave a friction coefficient of about 0.25 and low wear at room temperature, 400 and 650 C. Wear rates were lower than those of the cobalt alloys alone or the nickel alloy composite coating. However, oxidation limited the maximum useful temperature of the cobalt composite coating to about 650 C compared to about 900 C for the nickel composite coating.

  10. Friction and wear of plasma-sprayed coatings containing cobalt alloys from 25 deg to 650 deg in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.; Jacobson, T. P.

    1980-01-01

    Four different compositions of self-lubricating, plasma-sprayed, composite coatings with calcium fluoride dispersed throughout cobalt alloy-silver matrices were evaluated on a friction and wear apparatus. In addition, coatings of the cobalt alloys alone and of one coating with a nickel alloy-silver matrix were evaluated for comparison. The wear specimens consisted of two, diametrically opposed, flat rub shoes sliding on the coated, cylindrical surface of a rotating disk. Two of the cobalt composite coatings gave a friction coefficient of about 0.25 and low wear at room temperature, 400 and 650 C. Wear rates were lower than those of the cobalt alloys alone or the nickel alloy composite coating. However, oxidation limited the maximum useful temperature of the cobalt composite coating to about 650 C compared to about 900 C for the nickel composite coating.

  11. Phospholipase D Is Involved in the Formation of Golgi Associated Clathrin Coated Vesicles in Human Parotid Duct Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brito de Souza, Lorena; Pinto da Silva, Luis Lamberti; Jamur, Maria Célia; Oliver, Constance

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) has been implicated in many cellular functions, such as vesicle trafficking, exocytosis, differentiation, and proliferation. The aim of this study was to characterize the role of PLD in HSY cells, a human cell line originating from the intercalated duct of the parotid gland. As the function and intracellular localization of PLD varies according to cell type, initially, the intracellular localization of PLD1 and PLD2 was determined. By immunofluorescence, PLD1 and PLD2 both showed a punctate cytoplasmic distribution with extensive co-localization with TGN-46. PLD1 was also found in the nucleus, while PLD2 was associated with the plasma membrane. Treatment of cells with the primary alcohol 1-butanol inhibits the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcoline by PLD thereby suppressing phosphatidic acid (PA) production. In untreated HSY cells, there was only a slight co-localization of PLD with the clathrin coated vesicles. When HSY cells were incubated with 1-butanol the total number of clathrin coated vesicles increased, especially in the juxtanuclear region and the co-localization of PLD with the clathrin coated vesicles was augmented. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the number of Golgi-associated coated vesicles was greater. Treatment with 1-butanol also affected the Golgi apparatus, increasing the volume of the Golgi saccules. The decrease in PA levels after treatment with 1-butanol likewise resulted in an accumulation of enlarged lysosomes in the perinuclear region. Therefore, in HSY cells PLD appears to be involved in the formation of Golgi associated clathrin coated vesicles as well as in the structural maintenance of the Golgi apparatus. PMID:24618697

  12. Demixing-stimulated lane formation in binary complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Du, C.-R.; Jiang, K.; Suetterlin, K. R.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.

    2011-11-29

    Recently lane formation and phase separation have been reported for experiments with binary complex plasmas in the PK3-Plus laboratory onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Positive non-additivity of particle interactions is known to stimulate phase separation (demixing), but its effect on lane formation is unknown. In this work, we used Langevin dynamics (LD) simulation to probe the role of non-additivity interactions on lane formation. The competition between laning and demixing leads to thicker lanes. Analysis based on anisotropic scaling indices reveals a crossover from normal laning mode to a demixing-stimulated laning mode. Extensive numerical simulations enabled us to identify a critical value of the non-additivity parameter {Delta} for the crossover.

  13. Reduced Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation in the presence of chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Si-feng; Jia, Jing-fu; Guo, Xiao-kui; Zhao, Ya-ping; Chen, De-sheng; Guo, Yong-yuan; Zhang, Xian-long

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can adhere to most foreign materials and form biofilm on the surface of medical devices. Biofilm infections are difficult to resolve. The goal of this in vitro study was to explore the use of chitosan-coated nanoparticles to prevent biofilm formation. For this purpose, S. aureus was seeded in 96-well plates to incubate with chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in order to study the efficiency of biofilm formation inhibition. The biofilm bacteria count was determined using the spread plate method; biomass formation was measured using the crystal violet staining method. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the biofilm formation. The results showed decreased viable bacteria numbers and biomass formation when incubated with chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles at all test concentrations. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed increased dead bacteria and thinner biofilm when incubated with nanoparticles at a concentration of 500 µg/mL. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles inhibited biofilm formation in polystyrene plates. Future studies should be performed to study these nanoparticles for anti-infective use. PMID:27994455

  14. Reduced Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation in the presence of chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Si-Feng; Jia, Jing-Fu; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Chen, De-Sheng; Guo, Yong-Yuan; Zhang, Xian-Long

    Staphylococcus aureus can adhere to most foreign materials and form biofilm on the surface of medical devices. Biofilm infections are difficult to resolve. The goal of this in vitro study was to explore the use of chitosan-coated nanoparticles to prevent biofilm formation. For this purpose, S. aureus was seeded in 96-well plates to incubate with chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in order to study the efficiency of biofilm formation inhibition. The biofilm bacteria count was determined using the spread plate method; biomass formation was measured using the crystal violet staining method. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the biofilm formation. The results showed decreased viable bacteria numbers and biomass formation when incubated with chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles at all test concentrations. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed increased dead bacteria and thinner biofilm when incubated with nanoparticles at a concentration of 500 µg/mL. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles inhibited biofilm formation in polystyrene plates. Future studies should be performed to study these nanoparticles for anti-infective use.

  15. Drop coating deposition Raman spectroscopy of blood plasma for the detection of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengpeng; Chen, Changshui; Deng, Xiaoyuan; Mao, Hua; Jin, Shaoqin

    2015-03-01

    We have recently applied the technique of drop coating deposition Raman (DCDR) spectroscopy for colorectal cancer (CRC) detection using blood plasma. The aim of this study was to develop a more convenient and stable method based on blood plasma for noninvasive CRC detection. Significant differences are observed in DCDR spectra between healthy (n = 105) and cancer (n = 75) plasma from 15 CRC patients and 21 volunteers, particularly in the spectra that are related to proteins, nucleic acids, and β-carotene. The multivariate analysis principal components analysis and the linear discriminate analysis, together with leave-one-out, cross validation were used on DCDR spectra and yielded a sensitivity of 100% (75/75) and specificity of 98.1% (103/105) for detection of CRC. This study demonstrates that DCDR spectroscopy of blood plasma associated with multivariate statistical algorithms has the potential for the noninvasive detection of CRC.

  16. Drop coating deposition Raman spectroscopy of blood plasma for the detection of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengpeng; Chen, Changshui; Deng, Xiaoyuan; Mao, Hua; Jin, Shaoqin

    2015-03-01

    We have recently applied the technique of drop coating deposition Raman (DCDR) spectroscopy for colorectal cancer (CRC) detection using blood plasma. The aim of this study was to develop a more convenient and stable method based on blood plasma for noninvasive CRC detection. Significant differences are observed in DCDR spectra between healthy (n=105) and cancer (n=75) plasma from 15 CRC patients and 21 volunteers, particularly in the spectra that are related to proteins, nucleic acids, and β-carotene. The multivariate analysis principal components analysis and the linear discriminate analysis, together with leave-one-out, cross validation were used on DCDR spectra and yielded a sensitivity of 100% (75/75) and specificity of 98.1% (103/105) for detection of CRC. This study demonstrates that DCDR spectroscopy of blood plasma associated with multivariate statistical algorithms has the potential for the noninvasive detection of CRC.

  17. Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of VC and Columnar Structured Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by Suspension Plasma Spray Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaolong; Yang, Qi; Huang, Xiao; Tang, Zhaolin

    2015-08-01

    The effects of different thermal barrier coating (TBC) top coat structures and substrate alloys on the isothermal oxidation behaviors of TBC systems were investigated at 1080 °C in lab air. The tested TBC systems consisted of two nickel-based superalloy substrates (CMSX-4 and IN738LC), a platinum aluminide bond coat and two 8YSZ top coats (vertical cracked and columnar structured). Samples with IN738LC substrate demonstrated longer isothermal oxidation lives than the counterparts with CMSX-4 substrate. Outward refractory elemental diffusion in coating systems with CMSX-4 substrate and void formation at the interface between thermally grown oxide and bond coat was found to be responsible for the early failure of TBCs. Columnar structured YSZ top coat seemed to provide better protection of the bond coating and substrate, marginally delaying the failure of the both coating systems with IN738LC and CMSX-4.

  18. Investigations of Local Corrosion Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed FeCr Nanocomposite Coating by SECM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xi; Shu, Mingyong; Zhong, Qingdong; Zhang, Junliang; Zhou, Qiongyu; Bui, Quoc Binh

    2016-02-01

    FeCr alloy coating can be sprayed on low-carbon steel to improve the corrosion resistance because of FeCr alloy's high anti-corrosion capacity. In this paper, Fe microparticles/Cr nanoparticles coating (NFC) and FeCr microparticles coating (MFC) were prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying and NFC was heat-treated under hydrogen atmosphere at 800 °C (HNFC). EDS mapping showed no penetration of Ni in MFC and NFC while penetration of Ni occurred in HNFC. X-ray diffraction results indicated the form of the NiCrFe (bcc) solid solution in HNFC. SECM testing in 3.5 (wt.%) NaCl revealed that the anti-corrosion capacity of NFC improved compared with MFC, while HNFC improved further.

  19. Composite materials obtained by the ion-plasma sputtering of metal compound coatings on polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlebnikov, Nikolai; Polyakov, Evgenii; Borisov, Sergei; Barashev, Nikolai; Biramov, Emir; Maltceva, Anastasia; Vereshchagin, Artem; Khartov, Stas; Voronin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the principle and examples composite materials obtained by deposition of metal compound coatings on polymer film substrates by the ion-plasma sputtering method are presented. A synergistic effect is to obtain the materials with structural properties of the polymer substrate and the surface properties of the metal deposited coatings. The technology of sputtering of TiN coatings of various thicknesses on polyethylene terephthalate films is discussed. The obtained composites are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is shown. The examples of application of this method, such as receiving nanocomposite track membranes and flexible transparent electrodes, are considered.

  20. Effect of laser melting on plasma-sprayed aluminum oxide coatings reinforced with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Samant, Anoop; Balani, Kantesh; Dahotre, Narendra B.; Agarwal, Arvind

    2009-03-01

    The effect of laser melting on the microstructure and mechanical properties of plasma-sprayed aluminum oxide composite coating reinforced with 4 wt% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is reported. Laser-melted layer consists of dense, coarse columnar microstructure which is significantly different from plasma-sprayed coating that consists of splats and porosity. CNTs retained their original cylindrical graphitic structure after undergoing laser irradiation. Three dimensional heat flow model has been developed to estimate temperature variation in the laser-melted composite layer. Laser-melted layers show an increase in the microhardness at the expanse of degradation of fracture toughness. Nanoindentation study indicates an increase in the elastic modulus and yield strength of the laser-melted layer which is attributed to dense microstructure with absence of weak-bonding splats and porosity.