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Sample records for plasma coating formation

  1. Nanoscale Plasma Coating Inhibits Formation of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuanxi; Jones, John E.; Yu, Haiqing; Yu, Qingsong; Christensen, Gordon D.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus commonly infects medical implants or devices, with devastating consequences for the patient. The infection begins with bacterial attachment to the device, followed by bacterial multiplication over the surface of the device, generating an adherent sheet of bacteria known as a biofilm. Biofilms resist antimicrobial therapy and promote persistent infection, making management difficult to futile. Infections might be prevented by engineering the surface of the device to discourage bacterial attachment and multiplication; however, progress in this area has been limited. We have developed a novel nanoscale plasma coating technology to inhibit the formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. We used monomeric trimethylsilane (TMS) and oxygen to coat the surfaces of silicone rubber, a material often used in the fabrication of implantable medical devices. By quantitative and qualitative analysis, the TMS/O2 coating significantly decreased the in vitro formation of S. aureus biofilms; it also significantly decreased in vivo biofilm formation in a mouse model of foreign-body infection. Further analysis demonstrated TMS/O2 coating significantly changed the protein adsorption, which could lead to reduced bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. These results suggest that TMS/O2 coating can be used to effectively prevent medical implant-related infections. PMID:26369955

  2. Nanoscale Plasma Coating Inhibits Formation of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanxi; Jones, John E; Yu, Haiqing; Yu, Qingsong; Christensen, Gordon D; Chen, Meng; Sun, Hongmin

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus commonly infects medical implants or devices, with devastating consequences for the patient. The infection begins with bacterial attachment to the device, followed by bacterial multiplication over the surface of the device, generating an adherent sheet of bacteria known as a biofilm. Biofilms resist antimicrobial therapy and promote persistent infection, making management difficult to futile. Infections might be prevented by engineering the surface of the device to discourage bacterial attachment and multiplication; however, progress in this area has been limited. We have developed a novel nanoscale plasma coating technology to inhibit the formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. We used monomeric trimethylsilane (TMS) and oxygen to coat the surfaces of silicone rubber, a material often used in the fabrication of implantable medical devices. By quantitative and qualitative analysis, the TMS/O2 coating significantly decreased the in vitro formation of S. aureus biofilms; it also significantly decreased in vivo biofilm formation in a mouse model of foreign-body infection. Further analysis demonstrated TMS/O2 coating significantly changed the protein adsorption, which could lead to reduced bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. These results suggest that TMS/O2 coating can be used to effectively prevent medical implant-related infections. PMID:26369955

  3. Nanoscale Plasma Coating Inhibits Formation of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanxi; Jones, John E; Yu, Haiqing; Yu, Qingsong; Christensen, Gordon D; Chen, Meng; Sun, Hongmin

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus commonly infects medical implants or devices, with devastating consequences for the patient. The infection begins with bacterial attachment to the device, followed by bacterial multiplication over the surface of the device, generating an adherent sheet of bacteria known as a biofilm. Biofilms resist antimicrobial therapy and promote persistent infection, making management difficult to futile. Infections might be prevented by engineering the surface of the device to discourage bacterial attachment and multiplication; however, progress in this area has been limited. We have developed a novel nanoscale plasma coating technology to inhibit the formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. We used monomeric trimethylsilane (TMS) and oxygen to coat the surfaces of silicone rubber, a material often used in the fabrication of implantable medical devices. By quantitative and qualitative analysis, the TMS/O2 coating significantly decreased the in vitro formation of S. aureus biofilms; it also significantly decreased in vivo biofilm formation in a mouse model of foreign-body infection. Further analysis demonstrated TMS/O2 coating significantly changed the protein adsorption, which could lead to reduced bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. These results suggest that TMS/O2 coating can be used to effectively prevent medical implant-related infections.

  4. Characterizing Suspension Plasma Spray Coating Formation Dynamics through Curvature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidambaram Seshadri, Ramachandran; Dwivedi, Gopal; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-10-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) enables the production of variety of microstructures with unique mechanical and thermal properties. In SPS, a liquid carrier (ethanol/water) is used to transport the sub-micrometric feedstock into the plasma jet. Considering complex deposition dynamics of SPS technique, there is a need to better understand the relationships among spray conditions, ensuing particle behavior, deposition stress evolution and resultant properties. In this study, submicron yttria-stabilized zirconia particles suspended in ethanol were sprayed using a cascaded arc plasma torch. The stresses generated during the deposition of the layers (termed evolving stress) were monitored via the change in curvature of the substrate measured using an in situ measurement apparatus. Depending on the deposition conditions, coating microstructures ranged from feathery porous to dense/cracked deposits. The evolving stresses and modulus were correlated with the observed microstructures and visualized via process maps. Post-deposition bi-layer curvature measurement via low temperature thermal cycling was carried out to quantify the thermo-elastic response of different coatings. Lastly, preliminary data on furnace cycle durability of different coating microstructures were evaluated. This integrated study involving in situ diagnostics and ex situ characterization along with process maps provides a framework to describe coating formation mechanisms, process parametrics and microstructure description.

  5. Formation Of Antifriction And Wear-Proof Coatings By Heterogeneous Arc Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyaglikov, I. P.; Chubrik, N. I.; Kuznechik, O. O.; Minko, D. V.

    2010-07-01

    Formation of coatings of the various functionality on electrode-detail while injecting of metal particles in plasma flow of short argon arc is considered. The possibility of formation both antifriction and wear-proof dense coatings, which have a metallurgical bond with a base, is shown.

  6. Formation of a Spinel Coating on AZ31 Magnesium Alloy by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieber, Maximilian; Simchen, Frank; Scharf, Ingolf; Lampke, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is a common means for the surface modification of light metals. However, PEO of magnesium substrates in dilute electrolytes generally leads to the formation of coatings consisting of unfavorable MgO magnesium oxide. By incorporation of electrolyte components, the phase constitution of the oxide coatings can be modified. Coatings consisting exclusively of MgAl2O4 magnesium-aluminum spinel are produced by PEO in an electrolyte containing hydroxide, aluminate, and phosphate anions. The hardness of the coatings is 3.5 GPa on Martens scale on average. Compared to the bare substrate, the coatings reduce the corrosion current density in dilute sodium chloride solution by approx. one order of magnitude and slightly shift the corrosion potential toward more noble values.

  7. Latest Researches Advances of Plasma Spraying: From Splat to Coating Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchais, P.; Vardelle, M.; Goutier, S.

    2016-08-01

    The plasma spray process with solid feedstock, mainly ceramics powders, studied since the sixties is now a mature technology. The plasma jet and particle in-flight characterizations are now well established. The use of computer-aided robot trajectory allows spraying on industrial parts with complex geometries. Works about splat formation have shown the importance of: the substrate preheating over the transition temperature to get rid of adsorbates and condensates, substrate chemistry, crystal structure and substrate temperature during the whole coating process. These studies showed that coating properties strongly depend on the splat formation and layering. The first part of this work deals with a summary of conventional plasma spraying key points. The second part presents the current knowledge in plasma spraying with liquid feedstock, technology developed for about two decades with suspensions of particles below micrometers or solutions of precursors that form particles a few micrometers sized through precipitation. Coatings are finely structured and even nanostructured with properties arousing the interest of researchers. However, the technology is by far more complex than the conventional ones. The main conclusions are that models should be developed further, plasma torches and injection setups adapted, and new measuring techniques to reliably characterize these small particles must be designed.

  8. In Situ Visualization of Impacting Phenomena of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconia: From Single Splat to Coating Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Kentaro; Murakami, Hideyuki; Kuroda, Seiji; Takehara, Kohsei; Oki, Sachio

    2008-12-01

    The authors have developed an in situ monitoring system for particle impacts under atmospheric dc plasma spraying conditions. This system utilized a high-speed video camera coupled with a long-distance microscope, and was capable of capturing the particle-impinging phenomena at one million frames per second. To understand the coating formation mechanism, two approaches were attempted, i.e., observation of the single splat formation and the subsequent coating formation. In the former case, the deformation and cooling processes of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) droplets impinging on substrates were successfully captured. In the latter case, multiple-droplet-impacting phenomena were observed as an ensemble treatment. Representing the coating process, the tower formation (0-dimensional) and bead formation (1-dimensional) were observed under typical plasma spray conditions for thermal barrier coatings using a triggering system coupled with the motion of a robot. The obtained images clearly showed the coating formation resulting from the integration of single splats.

  9. In-situ formation of multiphase air plasma sprayed barrier coatings for turbine components

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2001-01-01

    A turbine component (10), such as a turbine blade, is provided which is made of a metal alloy (22) and a base, planar-grained thermal barrier layer (28) applied by air plasma spraying on the alloy surface, where a heat resistant ceramic oxide overlay material (32') covers the bottom thermal barrier coating (28), and the overlay material is the reaction product of the precursor ceramic oxide overlay material (32) and the base thermal barrier coating material (28).

  10. Ammonia formation and W coatings interaction with deuterium/nitrogen plasmas in the linear device GyM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguardia, L.; Caniello, R.; Cremona, A.; Dellasega, D.; Dell'Era, F.; Ghezzi, F.; Gittini, G.; Granucci, G.; Mellera, V.; Minelli, D.; Pallotta, F.; Passoni, M.; Ricci, D.; Vassallo, E.

    2015-08-01

    In this work results of the first D2/N2 experiments in GyM, a linear device able to produce plasmas of interest for the ITER divertor (ne 5 ṡ 1010 cm-3, Te 5 eV, ion flux 3-5 ṡ 1020 m-2s-1) are presented. Plasmas simulating a N-seeding scenario have been performed to evaluate ammonia formation and its effect on exposed W coatings. The presence of ND emission lines in the plasma can be correlated with the formation of ammonia, further directly detected and quantified by chromatography analysis of the exhaust. Four different W specimens were exposed in GyM to a plasma fluence of 8.78 ṡ 1023 m-2. XPS analysis evidenced the formation of WxNy layers with nitrogen concentration in the range of 1-10% depending on the initial morphology and structure of the W samples. In all analyzed cases, nitrogen was bound and retained within the first 6 nm below the surface and no further diffusion of N into the bulk was observed.

  11. Basic features of low-temperature plasma formation in the course of composite coating synthesis at the active faces of complex contoured hard tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzhozovsky, B. M.; Zimnyakov, D. A.; Zinina, E. P.; Martynov, V. V.; Pleshakova, E. S.; Yuvchenko, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Basic features of combined-discharge low-temperature plasma formation around the surfaces of complex-contoured metal units are considered. It is shown that it makes the possibilities for synthesis of hardened high-durable coatings of hard tools appropriate for material processing in extreme load-temperature conditions. Experimental study of the coating formation was carried out in combination with the analysis of emission spectra of a low-temperature plasma cloud. Some practical examples of the coating applications are presented.

  12. Osteoblastic cell response and bone formation of phosphate ion coated on plasma polymerized Ti surface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seong-Won; Lee, Kang; Kim, Byung-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the bone formation ability and cell response on a phosphate (PO3(4-)) ion exchanged amine plasma polymerized titanium (Ti) surface. The enhanced bone-like apatite (hydroxyapatite, HAp)-forming ability was attributed to the PO3(4-) ion exchanged amine plasma polymerized Ti (P/NH2/Ti) surface, which was formed by the reduction of PO3(4-) ions. PO3(4-) ions promote HAp nucleation and growth on Ti in SBF, and PO3(4-) ions improve the crystallinity of the HAp deposited layer. The cell viability tests revealed significantly greater cell viability on the P/NH2/Ti surfaces than on the other surfaces.

  13. Effects of the nozzle design on the properties of plasma jet and formation of YSZ coatings under low pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chengqi; Gao, Yang; Yang, Deming; Fu, Yingqing

    2016-06-01

    How to control the quality of the coatings has become a major problem during the plasma spraying. Because nozzle contour has a great influence on the characteristic of the plasma jet, two kinds of plasma torches equipped with a standard cylindrical nozzle and a converging-diverging nozzle are designed for low pressure plasma spraying(LPPS) and very low pressure plasma spraying(VLPPS). Yttria stabilized zirconia(YSZ) coatings are obtained in the reducing pressure environment. The properties of the plasma jet without or with powder injection are analyzed by optical emission spectroscopy, and the electron temperature is calculated based on the ratio of the relative intensity of two Ar I spectral lines. The results show that some of the YSZ powder can be vaporized in the low pressure enlarged plasma jet, and the long anode nozzle may improve the characteristics of the plasma jet. The coatings deposited by LPPS are mainly composed of the equiaxed grains and while the unmelted powder particles and large scalar pores appear in the coatings made by VLPPS. The long anode nozzle could improve the melting of the powders and deposition efficiency, and enhance the coatings' hardness. At the same time, the long anode nozzle could lead to a decrease in the overspray phenomenon. Through the comparison of the two different size's nozzle, the long anode is much more suitable for making the YSZ coatings.

  14. Apatite formation on alkaline-treated dense TiO2 coatings deposited using the solution precursor plasma spray process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dianying; Jordan, Eric H; Gell, Maurice; Wei, Mei

    2008-05-01

    A dense titania (TiO2) coating was deposited from an ethanol-based solution containing titanium isopropoxide using the solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process. XRD and Raman spectrum analyses confirmed that the coating is exclusively composed of rutile TiO2. SEM micrographs show the as-sprayed coating is dense with a uniform thickness and there are no coarse splat boundaries. The as-sprayed coating was chemically treated in 5M NaOH solution at 80 degrees C for 48 h. The bioactivity of as-sprayed and alkaline-treated coatings was investigated by immersing the coatings in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 14-28 days, respectively. After 28 days immersion, there is a complete layer of carbonate-containing apatite formed on the alkaline-treated TiO2 coating surface, but none formed on the as-sprayed coating.

  15. Formation of Expanded Austenite on a Cold-Sprayed AISI 316L Coating by Low-Temperature Plasma Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Shinichiro; Ueda, Nobuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Low-temperature plasma nitriding at temperatures below 450 °C is commonly applied to austenitic stainless steels to enhance wear resistance, while maintaining corrosion resistance, by forming expanded austenite (known as the S-phase). In this work, low-temperature plasma nitriding of cold-sprayed AISI 316L coatings was examined. A cold-spray technique was developed to produce metal coatings with less oxidation. However, the cold-sprayed AISI 316L coating obtained by use of nitrogen gas as propellant contained many interconnected pores and cracks, and was, consequently, unsuitable as an anticorrosive coating. Therefore, laser post-treatment was used to modify the coating and increase its density to similar to that of bulk steel. The anticorrosive performance of this coating on a carbon steel substrate in NaCl solution was substantially improved. Subsequent low-temperature plasma nitriding enhanced the wear resistance by two orders of magnitude. It is concluded that cold-sprayed AISI 316L coatings treated by laser post-treatment and subsequent low-temperature plasma nitriding could be used as protective coatings under severe wear and corrosion conditions.

  16. Formation of Apatite Coatings on an Artificial Ligament Using a Plasma- and Precursor-Assisted Biomimetic Process

    PubMed Central

    Mutsuzaki, Hirotaka; Yokoyama, Yoshiro; Ito, Atsuo; Oyane, Ayako

    2013-01-01

    A plasma- and precursor-assisted biomimetic process utilizing plasma and alternate dipping treatments was applied to a Leed-Keio artificial ligament to produce a thin coating of apatite in a supersaturated calcium phosphate solution. Following plasma surface modification, the specimen was alternately dipped in calcium and phosphate ion solutions three times (alternate dipping treatment) to create a precoating containing amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) which is an apatite precursor. To grow an apatite layer on the ACP precoating, the ACP-precoated specimen was immersed for 24 h in a simulated body fluid with ion concentrations approximately equal to those in human blood plasma. The plasma surface modification was necessary to create an adequate apatite coating and to improve the coating adhesion depending on the plasma power density. The apatite coating prepared using the optimized conditions formed a thin-film that covered the entire surface of the artificial ligament. The resulting apatite-coated artificial ligament should exhibit improved osseointegration within the bone tunnel and possesses great potential for use in ligament reconstructions. PMID:24048251

  17. Coating formation by plasma electrolytic oxidation on ZC71/SiC/12p-T6 magnesium metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrabal, R.; Matykina, E.; Skeldon, P.; Thompson, G. E.

    2009-02-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) of a ZC71/SiC/12p-T6 magnesium metal matrix composite (MMC) is investigated in relation to coating growth and corrosion behaviour. PEO treatment was undertaken at 350 mA cm -2 (rms) and 50 Hz with a square waveform in stirred 0.05 M Na 2SiO 3.5H 2O/0.1 M KOH electrolyte. The findings revealed thick, dense oxide coatings, with an average hardness of 3.4 GPa, formed at an average rate of ˜1 μm min -1 for treatment times up to 100 min and ˜0.2 μm min -1 for later times. The coatings are composed mainly of MgO and Mg 2SiO 4, with an increased silicon content in the outer regions, constituting <10% of the coating thickness. SiC particles are incorporated into the coating, with formation of a silicon-rich layer at the particle/coating interface due to exposure to high temperatures during coating formation. The distribution of the particles in the coating indicated growth of new oxide at the metal/coating interface. The corrosion rate of the MMC in 3.5% NaCl is reduced by approximately two orders of magnitude by the PEO treatment.

  18. Coating of plasma polymerized film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morita, S.; Ishibashi, S.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma polymerized thin film coating and the use of other coatings is suggested for passivation film, thin film used for conducting light, and solid body lubrication film of dielectrics of ultra insulators for electrical conduction, electron accessories, etc. The special features of flow discharge development and the polymerized film growth mechanism are discussed.

  19. Behavior of plasma-sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Christopher C.

    1984-01-01

    The microstructural development of plasma sprayed oxide coatings is described with particualr reference to aluminum oxide coatings and thermal barrier coatings of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ). The microstructural features of these coatings, observed by optical and electron microscopy, are related to their mechanical behavior. The adhesion of the coatings is also investigated using fracture toughness and tensile tests. It is noted that acoustic emission is valuable in formulating possible fracture mechanisms for YSZ coatings.

  20. Smart Coating Technology by Gas Tunnel Type Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, A.

    2008-07-01

    Nano-science & technology is one of the most important scientific fields, and the material processing using the nano-technology is now advanced towards more precise and controllable smart stage. Regarding thermal processing, an important key should be the the performance of the applied heat source. A plasma is fundamentally the most superior heat source, because of high temperature, high energy density, easy controllable, etc. Therefore more precious plasma system has been expected for smart thermal processing. The gas tunnel type plasma system developed by the author has high energy density and also high efficiency. The concept and the feature of this plasma system are explained and the applications to the various thermal processing are described in this report. One practical application is plasma spraying of ceramics such as Al_2O_3 and ZrO_2. The characteristics of these ceramic coatings were superior to the conventional ones. The ZrO_2 composite coating has the possibility of the development of high functionally graded TBC (thermal barrier coating). Another application of gas tunnel type plasma is surface modification of metals. For example the TiN films were formed in a very short time of 5 s. Now, advanced plasma application of spraying methods as a smart coating technology is expected to obtain the desired characteristics of ceramics such as corrosion resistance, thermal resistance, and wear resistance by reducing the porosity and increasing the coating density. One application of the smart coating technology is a formation of the metallic glass coating with high function, and another is Hydroxiapatite coating for bio-medical application. The formation process of those coatings and the coating characteristics were investigated in this study.

  1. The formation of tungsten doped Al2O3/ZnO coatings on aluminum by plasma electrolytic oxidation and their application in photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojadinović, Stevan; Vasilić, Rastko; Radić, Nenad; Tadić, Nenad; Stefanov, Plamen; Grbić, Boško

    2016-07-01

    Tungsten doped Al2O3/ZnO coatings are formed by plasma electrolytic oxidation of aluminum substrate in supporting electrolyte (0.1 M boric acid + 0.05 M borax + 2 g/L ZnO) with addition of different concentrations of Na2WO4·2H2O. The morphology, crystal structure, chemical composition, and light absorption characteristics of formed surface coatings are investigated. The X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicate that formed surface coatings consist of alpha and gamma phase of Al2O3, ZnO, metallic tungsten and WO3. Obtained results showed that incorporated tungsten does not have any influence on the absorption spectra of Al2O3/ZnO coatings, which showed invariable band edge at about 385 nm. The photocatalytic activity of undoped and tungsten doped Al2O3/ZnO coatings is estimated by the photodegradation of methyl orange. The photocatalytic activity of tungsten doped Al2O3/ZnO coatings is higher thanof undoped Al2O3/ZnO coatings; the best photocatalytic activity is ascribed to coatings formed in supporting electrolyte with addition of 0.3 g/L Na2WO4·2H2O. Tungsten in Al2O3/ZnO coatings acts as a charge trap, thus reducing the recombination rate of photogenerated electron-hole pairs. The results of PL measurements are in agreement with photocatalytic activity. Declining PL intensity corresponds to increasing photocatalytic activity of the coatings, indicating slower recombination of electron-hole pairs.

  2. Plasma-Spray Metal Coating On Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, J.

    1994-01-01

    Molds, forms, and other substrates made of foams coated with metals by plasma spraying. Foam might be ceramic, carbon, metallic, organic, or inorganic. After coat applied by plasma spraying, foam left intact or removed by acid leaching, conventional machining, water-jet cutting, or another suitable technique. Cores or vessels made of various foam materials plasma-coated with metals according to method useful as thermally insulating containers for foods, liquids, or gases, or as mandrels for making composite-material (matrix/fiber) parts, or making thermally insulating firewalls in automobiles.

  3. Coating of titanium with hydroxyapatite leads to decreased bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Bøe, B. G.; Støen, R. Ø.; Solberg, L. B.; Reinholt, F. P.; Ellingsen, J. E.; Nordsletten, L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives An experimental rabbit model was used to test the null hypothesis, that there is no difference in new bone formation around uncoated titanium discs compared with coated titanium discs when implanted into the muscles of rabbits. Methods A total of three titanium discs with different surface and coating (1, porous coating; 2, porous coating + Bonemaster (Biomet); and 3, porous coating + plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite) were implanted in 12 female rabbits. Six animals were killed after six weeks and the remaining six were killed after 12 weeks. The implants with surrounding tissues were embedded in methyl methacrylate and grinded sections were stained with Masson-Goldners trichrome and examined by light microscopy of coded sections. Results Small amounts of bone were observed scattered along the surface of five of the 12 implants coated with porous titanium, and around one out of 12 porous coated surfaces with Bonemaster. No bone formation could be detected around porous coated implants with plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite. Conclusion Porous titanium coating is to some degree osteoinductive in muscles. PMID:23610682

  4. Vacuum plasma coatings for turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Turbine blades, vacuum plasma spray coated with NiCrAlY, CoCrAlY or NiCrAlY/Cr2O3, were evaluated and rated superior to standard space shuttle main engine (SSME) coated blades. Ratings were based primarily on 25 thermal cycles in the MSFC Burner Rig Tester, cycling between 1700 F (gaseous H2) and -423 F (liquid H2). These tests showed no spalling on blades with improved vacuum plasma coatings, while standard blades spalled. Thermal barrier coatings of ZrO2, while superior to standard coatings, lacked the overall performance desired. Fatigue and tensile specimens, machined from MAR-M-246(Hf) test bars identical to the blades were vacuum plasma spray coated, diffusion bond treated, and tested to qualify the vacuum plasma spray process for flight hardware testing and application. While NiCrAlY/Cr2O3 offers significant improvement over standard coatings in durability and thermal protection, studies continue with an objective to develop coatings offering even greater improvements.

  5. Physical Bases of Formation of Nanostructured Biocompatible Coatings on Medical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mel'nikova, I. P.; Lyasnikova, A. V.; Lyasnikov, V. N.

    2014-02-01

    Methods of obtaining nanostructured biocompatible coatings on medical implants are considered. The primary focus is on physical bases of formation of nanostructured coatings by different methods of plasma spraying of ceramic powders consisting of agglomerates of large and small particles after agglomeration of the powder and subsequent milling. The possibility is demonstrated of nanostructuring plasma-sprayed coatings by introducing nanoparticles into their porous structure by direct impregnation of the coatings or of the particles themselves before spraying.

  6. Oxide Coated Cathode Plasma Source of Linear Magnetized Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guanghai; Jin, Xiaoli; Yuan, Lin; Zhang, Qiaofeng; Xie, Jinlin; Li, Hong; Liu, Wandong

    2016-09-01

    Plasma source is the most important part of the laboratory plasma platform for fundamental plasma experimental research. Barium oxide coated cathode plasma source is well recognized as an effective technique due to its high electron emission current. An indirectly heated oxide coated cathode plasma source has been constructed on a linear magnetized plasma device. The electron emission current density can reach 2 A/cm2 to 6 A/cm2 in pulsed mode within pulse length 5-20 ms. A 10 cm diameter, 2 m long plasma column with density 1018 m-3 to 1019 m3 and electron temperature Te ≃ 3-7 eV is produced. The spatial uniformity of the emission ability is less than 4% and the discharge reproducibility is better than 97%. With a wide range of the plasma parameters, this kind of plasma source provides great flexibility for many basic plasma investigations. The detail of construction and initial characterization of oxide coated cathode are described in this paper. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11275200)

  7. Oxide Coated Cathode Plasma Source of Linear Magnetized Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guanghai; Jin, Xiaoli; Yuan, Lin; Zhang, Qiaofeng; Xie, Jinlin; Li, Hong; Liu, Wandong

    2016-09-01

    Plasma source is the most important part of the laboratory plasma platform for fundamental plasma experimental research. Barium oxide coated cathode plasma source is well recognized as an effective technique due to its high electron emission current. An indirectly heated oxide coated cathode plasma source has been constructed on a linear magnetized plasma device. The electron emission current density can reach 2 A/cm2 to 6 A/cm2 in pulsed mode within pulse length 5–20 ms. A 10 cm diameter, 2 m long plasma column with density 1018 m‑3 to 1019 m3 and electron temperature Te ≃ 3–7 eV is produced. The spatial uniformity of the emission ability is less than 4% and the discharge reproducibility is better than 97%. With a wide range of the plasma parameters, this kind of plasma source provides great flexibility for many basic plasma investigations. The detail of construction and initial characterization of oxide coated cathode are described in this paper. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11275200)

  8. Ion-plasma processes of the production of diffusion aluminide coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muboyadzhyan, S. A.

    2010-03-01

    A novel ion-plasma process for ecologically safe formation of diffusion aluminide coatings on a substrate made of a superalloy, which has advantages as compared to the well-known thermodiffusion processes of their production, is described. The ion-plasma process is shown to provide the formation of diffusion aluminide coatings on the surface of a superalloy substrate according to various technologies. Owing to alloying with one or several elements from the series Y, Si, Cr, Hf, B, Co, etc., ion-plasma diffusion coatings have higher protective properties than analogous coatings produced by the traditional methods of powder, slip, and gas-circulating aluminizing.

  9. Compositionally graded hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate coating on Ti by laser and induction plasma.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mangal; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2011-02-01

    In this study we report the fabrication of compositionally graded hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on Ti by combining laser engineering net shaping (LENS) and radio frequency induction plasma spraying processes. Initially, HA powder was embedded in the Ti substrates using LENS, forming a Ti-HA composite layer. Later, RF induction plasma spraying was used to deposit HA on these Ti substrates with a Ti-HA composite layer on top. Phase analysis by X-ray diffraction indicated phase transformation of HA to β-tricalcium phosphate in the laser processed coating. Laser processed coatings showed the formation of a metallurgically sound and diffused substrate-coating interface, which significantly increased the coating hardness to 922 ± 183 Hv from that of the base metal hardness of 189 ± 22 Hv. In the laser processed multilayer coating a compositionally graded nature was successfully achieved, however, with severe cracking and a consequent decrease in the flexural strength of the coating. To obtain a structurally stable coating with a composition gradient across the coating thickness a phase pure HA layer was sprayed on top of the laser processed single layer coatings using induction plasma spray. The plasma sprayed HA coatings were strongly adherent to the LENS-TCP coatings, with adhesive bond strength of 21 MPa. In vitro biocompatibility of these coatings, using human fetal osteoblast cells, showed a clear improvement in cellular activity from uncoated Ti compared with LENS-TCP-coated Ti and reached a maximum in the plasma sprayed HA coating.

  10. Plasma process control for improved PEO coatings on magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, Riyad Omran

    Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) is a high voltage plasma-assisted oxidation process uses an environmentally-friendly aqueous electrolyte to oxidize the metal surfaces to form ceramic oxide coatings which impart a high corrosion and wear resistance. One of the main advantages of PEO process is that it can be applied to treat samples with complex shapes, and surfaces with different composition and microstructure. The PEO process of Mg alloys is strongly influenced by such parameters as electrolyte composition and concentration, current or voltage applied and substrate alloy. Generally, these parameters have a direct influence on the discharging behavior. The discharges play an essential role in the formation and resulting composition of the 3-layer oxide structure. A detailed knowledge of the coating mechanisms is extremely important in order to produce a desired coating quality to reach the best performance of the PEO coatings in terms of corrosion resistance and tribological properties (wear rate, COF). During PEO processing of magnesium, some of the metal cations are transferred outwards from the substrate and react with anions to form ceramic coatings. Also, due to the high electric field in the discharge channels, oxygen anions transfer towards the magnesium substrate and react with Mg2+ cations to form a ceramic coating. Although, in general, PEO coating of Mg alloys produces the three-layered structure, the relative proportions of the three-layers are strongly influenced by the PEO processing parameters. In PEO process, the ceramic coating grows inwards to the alloy substrate and outwards to the coating surface simultaneously. For the coating growth, there are three simultaneous processes taking place, namely the electrochemical, the plasma chemical reactions and thermal diffusion. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was employed for the discharge characterization by following the substrate and electrolyte element present in the plasma discharge during the

  11. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm by Trimethylsilane Plasma Coating

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yibao; Jones, John E.; Ritts, Andrew C.; Yu, Qingsong

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation on implantable medical devices is a major impediment to the treatment of nosocomial infections and promotes local progressive tissue destruction. Staphylococcus epidermidis infections are the leading cause of biofilm formation on indwelling devices. Bacteria in biofilms are highly resistant to antibiotic treatment, which in combination with the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance among human pathogens further complicates treatment of biofilm-related device infections. We have developed a novel plasma coating technology. Trimethylsilane (TMS) was used as a monomer to coat the surfaces of 316L stainless steel and grade 5 titanium alloy, which are widely used in implantable medical devices. The results of biofilm assays demonstrated that this TMS coating markedly decreased S. epidermidis biofilm formation by inhibiting the attachment of bacterial cells to the TMS-coated surfaces during the early phase of biofilm development. We also discovered that bacterial cells on the TMS-coated surfaces were more susceptible to antibiotic treatment than their counterparts in biofilms on uncoated surfaces. These findings suggested that TMS coating could result in a surface that is resistant to biofilm development and also in a bacterial community that is more sensitive to antibiotic therapy than typical biofilms. PMID:22964248

  12. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm by trimethylsilane plasma coating.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yibao; Chen, Meng; Jones, John E; Ritts, Andrew C; Yu, Qingsong; Sun, Hongmin

    2012-11-01

    Biofilm formation on implantable medical devices is a major impediment to the treatment of nosocomial infections and promotes local progressive tissue destruction. Staphylococcus epidermidis infections are the leading cause of biofilm formation on indwelling devices. Bacteria in biofilms are highly resistant to antibiotic treatment, which in combination with the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance among human pathogens further complicates treatment of biofilm-related device infections. We have developed a novel plasma coating technology. Trimethylsilane (TMS) was used as a monomer to coat the surfaces of 316L stainless steel and grade 5 titanium alloy, which are widely used in implantable medical devices. The results of biofilm assays demonstrated that this TMS coating markedly decreased S. epidermidis biofilm formation by inhibiting the attachment of bacterial cells to the TMS-coated surfaces during the early phase of biofilm development. We also discovered that bacterial cells on the TMS-coated surfaces were more susceptible to antibiotic treatment than their counterparts in biofilms on uncoated surfaces. These findings suggested that TMS coating could result in a surface that is resistant to biofilm development and also in a bacterial community that is more sensitive to antibiotic therapy than typical biofilms.

  13. Plasma Chemical Aspects Of Dust Formation In Hydrocarbon Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, J.; Kovacevic, E.; Stepanovic, O.; Stefanovic, I.; Winter, J.

    2008-09-07

    This contribution deals with some plasma chemical aspects of dust formation in hydrocarbon plasmas. The interplay between dust formation and plasma chemistry will be discussed by means of different experimental results. One specific example concerns the formation of benzene and the role of atomic hydrogen for plasma chemical processes and dust formation in hydrocarbon discharges.

  14. Bioactive Glass-Ceramic Coatings Synthesized by the Liquid Precursor Plasma Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yanfeng; Song, Lei; Liu, Xiaoguang; Huang, Yi; Huang, Tao; Chen, Jiyong; Wu, Yao; Wu, Fang

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the liquid precursor plasma spraying process was used to manufacture P2O5-Na2O-CaO-SiO2 bioactive glass-ceramic coatings (BGCCs), where sol and suspension were used as feedstocks for plasma spraying. The effect of precursor and spray parameters on the formation and crystallinity of BGCCs was systematically studied. The results indicated that coatings with higher crystallinity were obtained using the sol precursor, while nanostructured coatings predominantly consisting of amorphous phase were synthesized using the suspension precursor. For coatings manufactured from suspension, the fraction of the amorphous phase increased with the increase in plasma power and the decrease in liquid precursor feed rate. The coatings synthesized from the suspension plasma spray process also showed a good in vitro bioactivity, as suggested by the fast apatite formation when soaking into SBF.

  15. Characterisation of the TiO2 coatings deposited by plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benea, M. L.; Benea, L. P.

    2016-02-01

    Plasma spraying of materials such as ceramics and non-metals, which have high melting points, has become a well-established commercial process. Such coatings are increasingly used in aerospace, automobile, textile, medical, printing and electrical industries to impart proprieties such as corrosion resistance, thermal resistance, wear resistance, etc. One of the most important characteristics of thermal barrier coatings is the ability to undergo fast temperature changes without failing, the so called thermal shock resistance. The formation of residual stresses in plasma sprayed ceramic and metallic coatings is a very complex process. Several factors, such as substrate material, substrate thickness, physical properties of both the substrate and the coating material, deposition rate, relative velocity of the plasma torch, etc. determine the final residual stress state of the coating at room temperature. Our objective is to characterize the titanium oxide and aluminium oxide coatings deposited by plasma spraying in structural terms, the resistance to thermal shock and residual stresses.

  16. Electrospinning Yarn Formation and Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahbaee Bagherzadeh, Arash

    Electrospinning is a process by which nano polymer fibers can be produced using an electrostatically driven jet of polymer solution. Electrospinning seems to be a relatively simple process for producing nanofibers since it utilizes a few readily available components. On closer examination it is however clearly evident that successful electrospinning involves an understanding of the complex interaction of electrostatic fields, properties of polymer solutions and component design and system geometry. Using grounded plate as a collector causes the uniform electric field in all directions, so the electrostatic forces acting on the fiber have no preferential direction in the plane of the collector, results in a random deposition of the electrospun fibers leading to an isotropic web. For achieving their unique abilities to be useful in devices needs to deposit them in specific location and orientation. In this project a unique needle electrospinning process is described in which nanofibers are continuously fabricated, uniaxially oriented, and twisted to form of a yarn. It is shown that perfectly aligned nanofiber assemblies can be generated by manipulating the electric field. Twist insertion is accomplished by using two stepper motors and associated software. ANSYS/Emag.3-D is used to model the path of the electric field between the needle and the collector and the electrostatic forces acting on a charged nanofiber. The apparatus described, appears to offer advantages over other techniques. Nanofibers need not only be used as webs or yarn in order to attain the performance enhancement of high tech applications, but it is possible to introduce the benefit of nanofiber to regular yarn and other materials, by coating with nanofibers An addition advantage of the present setup is that it is possible to produce continuous fiber hybrid yarn coated with aligned nanofibers along the core yarn axis. With this method it is not only possible to coat regular yarn with aligned

  17. Nanostructured photocatalytic titania coatings formed by suspension plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Filofteia-Laura; Bertrand, Ghislaine; Klein, Didier; Coddet, Christian; Meunier, Cathy

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes formation of titanium dioxide coatings designed for photocatalytic applications, obtained by suspension plasma spraying (SPS), an alternative of the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) technique in which the material feedstock is a suspension of the material to be sprayed. Two different TiO2 powders were dispersed in distilled water and ethanol and injected in Ar-H2 or Ar-H2-He plasma under atmospheric conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed to study the microstructure of the titania coatings. Photocatalytic efficiency of the elaborated samples was evaluated from the conversion ratio of different air pollutants: nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The morphology and crystalline structure of the deposits depended mainly on the nature of the solvent (water or alcohol) used in the preparation of the slurries. Dense coatings were obtained starting from aqueous suspensions and porous deposits were elaborated by plasma spraying of a PC105 alcoholic suspension. A significant phase transformation from anatase to rutile occurred when ethanol was used as a solvent. Different photocatalytic performances were observed as a function of the nature of the liquid material feed-stock, the spraying parameters, and the nature of the pollutant.

  18. In vitro bioactivity and phase stability of plasma-sprayed nanostructured 3Y-TZP coatings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guocheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Gao, Jianhua; Ding, Chuanxian

    2009-07-01

    In this work, plasma-sprayed nanostructured zirconia coatings stabilized with 3mol.% yttria (3Y-TZP) were deposited on Ti substrates. The microstructure and phase composition of coatings were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The in vitro bioactivity of coatings was evaluated by examining the formation of bone-like apatite on its surface in simulated body fluid. MG63 cell lines were cultured on the coating to investigate its cytocompatibility. The crystalline phase of the as-sprayed coating was tetragonal zirconia, and no monoclinic zirconia was detected. The size of the grains on the as-sprayed coating surface was less than 100nm. The apatite could precipitate on the surface of the coating immersed in simulated body fluid for 28days while no apatite was formed on the surface of 3Y-TZP ceramic control, indicating that the bioactivity of the coating is superior to the ceramic with the same composition. It also revealed that the polished coating whose nanostructural outmost layer was removed was bioinert, implying the significance of the nanosized grains for its bioactivity. MG63 cells could adhere, grow and proliferate well on the coating surface, indicating that the coating had good cytocompatibility. Phase stability of plasma-sprayed 3Y-TZP coating was evaluated under hydrothermal conditions at 134 degrees C. It revealed that the plasma-sprayed nanostructured zirconia coating was more sensitive to aging than that of zirconia ceramics.

  19. Thermal Expansion of Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S V.; Palczer, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    Metallic Cu-8%Cr, Cu-26%Cr, Cu-8%Cr-1%Al, NiAl and NiCrAlY monolithic coatings were fabricated by vacuum plasma spray deposition processes for thermal expansion property measurements between 293 and 1223 K. The corrected thermal expansion, (DL/L(sub 0) varies with the absolute temperature, T, as (DL/L(sub 0) = A(T - 293)(sup 3) + BIT - 293)(sup 2) + C(T - 293) + D, where, A, B, C and D are thermal, regression constants. Excellent reproducibility was observed for all of the coatings except for data obtained on the Cu-8%Cr and Cu-26%Cr coatings in the first heat-up cycle, which deviated from those determined in the subsequent cycles. This deviation is attributed to the presence of residual stresses developed during the spraying of the coatings, which are relieved after the first heat-up cycle. In the cases of Cu-8%Cr and NiAl, the thermal expansion data were observed to be reproducible for three specimens. The linear expansion data for Cu-8% Cr and Cu-26%Cr agree extremely well with rule of mixture (ROM) predictions. Comparison of the data for the Cu-8%Cr coating with literature data for Cr and Cu revealed that the thermal expansion behavior of this alloy is determined by the Cu-rich matrix. The data for NiAl and NiCrAlY are in excellent agreement with published results irrespective of composition and the methods used for processing the materials. The implications of these results on coating GRCop-84 copper alloy combustor liners for reusable launch vehicles are discussed.

  20. Performance of coated columbium and tantalum alloys in plasma arc reentry simulation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Merutka, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The evaluation of coated refractory metals screened in stagnation model plasma arc tests is reported. Columbium alloys FS-85, C-129Y, and Cb-752 coated with Si-20Cr-20Fe (R512E) were tested at 1390 C. Three silicide coatings on Ta-10W were tested at 1470 C. Half-hour cycles and a 6500 N/sqm stagnation pressure were used. The best R512E coated columbium alloy was FS-85 with first local coating breakdowns occurring in 12 to 50 cycles. At coating defects, low metal recession rates (0.005 mm/min) were generally observed on coated columbium alloys while high rates (0.15 mm/min) were observed on coated Ta-10W. Coated columbium suffered large emittance losses (to below 0.7) due to surface refractory metal pentoxide formation.

  1. Plasma sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coating for NiAl-based intermetallic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Robert A. (Inventor); Doychak, Joseph (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating system consists of two layers of a zirconia-yttria ceramic. The first layer is applied by low pressure plasma spraying. The second layer is applied by conventional atmospheric pressure plasma spraying. This facilitates the attachment of a durable thermally insulating ceramic coating directly to the surface of a highly oxidation resistant NiAl-based intermetallic alloy after the alloy has been preoxidized to promote the formation of a desirable Al2O3 scale.

  2. Plasma sprayed and electrospark deposited zirconium metal diffusion barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hollis, Kendall J; Pena, Maria I

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium metal coatings applied by plasma spraying and electrospark deposition (ESD) have been investigated for use as diffusion barrier coatings on low enrichment uranium fuel for research nuclear reactors. The coatings have been applied to both stainless steel as a surrogate and to simulated nuclear fuel uranium-molybdenum alloy substrates. Deposition parameter development accompanied by coating characterization has been performed. The structure of the plasma sprayed coating was shown to vary with transferred arc current during deposition. The structure of ESD coatings was shown to vary with the capacitance of the deposition equipment.

  3. Cell Adhesion to Plasma-Coated PVC

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Elidiane C.; de Souza, Eduardo S.; de Moraes, Francine S.; Duek, Eliana A. R.; Lucchesi, Carolina; Schreiner, Wido H.; Durrant, Steven F.; Cruz, Nilson C.

    2014-01-01

    To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, PAr, was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with PAr between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing PAr, except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices. PMID:25247202

  4. Deposition of wear-resistant steel surfaces by the plasma rotating electrode coating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Michael Robert

    A high-deposition rate thermal spray method was investigated for the purpose of coating aluminum cylinder bores with a wear resistant surface. This method, the plasma rotating electrode coating system (PROTEC) utilized transferred-arc melting of a rapidly rotating consumable electrode to create a droplet stream via centrifugal atomization. A cylindrical substrate was placed around the rotating rod, in the flight path of the droplets, to deposit a coating onto the internal surface of the cylinder. Selected coatings of 1045 steel deposited by the PROTEC coating method exhibited lower wear loss in lubricated sliding than wire-arc sprayed carbon steel coatings and gray cast iron. Splat cohesion was shown to be a significant factor in the wear resistance of PROTEC coatings. The relationship between deposition enthalpy and cooling rate of the coating was found to have the greatest effect on coating microstructure, and the coating cohesion. The most rapidly solidified coatings showed inferior splat cohesion in comparison to coatings that cooled more slowly. The increase in splat cohesion with decreased cooling rate was accompanied by the formation of a directionally oriented coating microstructure, likely formed during cellular solidification of the coating. A model describing the thermal state of the deposition process was used to predict the deposition conditions that would result in a cellular structure, and the level of splat cohesion required to produce a wear resistant coating.

  5. Surface coating for prevention of crust formation

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A flexible surface coating which promotes the removal of deposits as they reach the surface by preventing adhesion and crust formation. Flexible layers are attached to each side of a flexible mesh substrate comprising of a plurality of zones composed of one or more neighboring cells, each zone having a different compressibility than its adjacent zones. The substrate is composed of a mesh made of strands and open cells. The cells may be filled with foam. Studs or bearings may also be positioned in the cells to increase the variation in compressibility and thus the degree of flexing of the coating. Surface loading produces varying amounts of compression from point to point causing the coating to flex as deposits reach it, breaking up any hardening deposits before a continuous crust forms. Preferably one or more additional layers are also used, such as an outer layer of a non-stick material such as TEFLON, which may be pigmented, and an inner, adhesive layer to facilitate applying the coating to a surface.

  6. Superhydrophobic Ceramic Coatings by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yuxuan; Coyle, Thomas W.; Azimi, Gisele; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a novel coating technique to manufacture ceramic superhydrophobic coatings rapidly and economically. A rare earth oxide (REO) was selected as the coating material due to its hydrophobic nature, chemical inertness, high temperature stability, and good mechanical properties, and deposited on stainless steel substrates by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS). The effects of various spraying conditions including standoff distance, torch power, number of torch passes, types of solvent and plasma velocity were investigated. The as-sprayed coating demonstrated a hierarchically structured surface topography, which closely resembles superhydrophobic surfaces found in nature. The water contact angle on the SPPS superhydrophobic coating was up to 65% higher than on smooth REO surfaces.

  7. Mechanical, In Vitro Antimicrobial and Biological Properties of Plasma Sprayed Silver-Doped Hydroxyapatite Coating

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Mangal; Fielding, Gary A.; Beyenal, Haluk; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2012-01-01

    Implant related infection is one of the key concerns in total joint hip arthroplasties. In order to reduce bacterial adhesion, silver (Ag) / silver oxide (Ag2O) doping was used in plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on titanium substrate. HA powder was doped with 2.0, 4.0 and 6.0 wt% Ag, heat treated at 800 °C and used for plasma spray coating using a 30 kW plasma spray system, equipped with supersonic nozzle. Application of supersonic plasma nozzle significantly reduced phase decomposition and amorphous phase formation in the HA coatings as evident by X-ray diffraction (XRD) study and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) analysis. Adhesive bond strength of more than 15 MPa ensured the mechanical integrity of the coatings. Resistance against bacterial adhesion of the coatings was determined by challenging them against Pseudomonas Aeruginosa (PAO1). Live/Dead staining of the adherent bacteria on the coating surfaces indicated a significant reduction in bacterial adhesion due to the presence of Ag. In vitro cell-material interactions and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) protein expressions were evaluated by culturing human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB). Present results suggest that the plasma sprayed HA coatings doped with an optimum amount of Ag can have excellent antimicrobial property without altering mechanical property of the Ag doped HA coatings. PMID:22313742

  8. Mechanical, in vitro antimicrobial, and biological properties of plasma-sprayed silver-doped hydroxyapatite coating.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mangal; Fielding, Gary A; Beyenal, Haluk; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2012-03-01

    Implant-related infection is one of the key concerns in total joint hip arthroplasties. To reduce bacterial adhesion, we used silver (Ag)/silver oxide (Ag(2)O) doping in plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on titanium substrate. HA powder was doped with 2.0, 4.0, and 6.0 wt % Ag, heat-treated at 800 °C and used for plasma spray coating using a 30 kW plasma spray system, equipped with supersonic nozzle. Application of supersonic plasma nozzle significantly reduced phase decomposition and amorphous phase formation in the HA coatings as evident by X-ray diffraction (XRD) study and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) analysis. Adhesive bond strength of more than 15 MPa ensured the mechanical integrity of the coatings. Resistance against bacterial adhesion of the coatings was determined by challenging them against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1). Live/dead staining of the adherent bacteria on the coating surfaces indicated a significant reduction in bacterial adhesion due to the presence of Ag. In vitro cell-material interactions and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) protein expressions were evaluated by culturing human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB). Our results suggest that the plasma-sprayed HA coatings doped with an optimum amount of Ag can have excellent antimicrobial property without altering mechanical property of the Ag-doped HA coatings.

  9. Plasma tests of sprayed coatings for rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curren, A. N.; Love, W. K.

    1974-01-01

    Several plasma-sprayed coating systems were evaluated for structural stability in hydrogen plasma and in oxygen plasma mixed with hydrogen plasma. The principal test heat flux was 15 Btu per inch squared seconds. The system consisted of a number of thin 0.002 to 0.020 in. layers of metal oxides and/or metals. The principal materials included are molybdenum nichrome, alumina, and zirconia. The study identifies important factors in coating system fabrication and describes the durability of the coating systems in the test environments. Values of effective thermal conductivity for some of the systems are indicated.

  10. Superior Thermal Barrier Coatings Using Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, E. H.; Xie, L.; Gell, M.; Padture, N. P.; Cetegen, B.; Ozturk, A.; Ma, X.; Roth, J.; Xiao, T. D.; Bryant, P. E. C.

    2004-03-01

    A novel process, solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS), is presented for depositing thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), in which aqueous chemical precursors are injected into a standard direct current plasma spray system. The resulting coatings microstructure has three unique features: (1) ultra fine splats (1 µm), (2) nanometer and micron-sized interconnected porosity, and (3) closely spaced, through-thickness cracks. Coatings over 3 mm thick can be readily deposited using the SPPS process. Coating durability is excellent, with SPPS coatings showing, in furnace cycling tests, 2.5 times the spallation life of air plasma coatings (APS) and 1.5 times the life of electron beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) coatings. The conductivity of SPPS coatings is lower than EB-PVD coatings and higher than the best APS coatings. Manufacturing cost is expected to be similar to APS coatings and much lower than EB-PVD coatings. The SPPS deposition process includes droplet break-up and material arriving at the deposition surface in various physical states ranging from aqueous solution, gel phase, to fully-molten ceramic. The relation between the arrival state of the material and the microstructure is described.

  11. Microstructure and Tribological Property of TiC-Mo Composite Coating Prepared by Vacuum Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoqian; Niu, Yaran; Huang, Liping; Ji, Heng; Zheng, Xuebin

    2012-09-01

    TiC-based composite coating using Mo as an additive has been fabricated by vacuum plasma-spraying, and then the phase composition and microstructure of TiC-Mo composite coating were investigated. Wear resistance of the TiC-Mo composite coating was comparatively studied with pure TiC coating. The experimental results showed that the microstructure of the TiC-Mo composite coating was relatively homogeneous and compact, exhibiting typical lamellar structure of plasma-sprayed coating. Orientated columnar grains of TiC can be found in the composite coating, and a (Ti, Mo)C transition phase was also observed. Due to the formation of (Ti, Mo)C transition phase, strong interface between TiC and Mo splats was obtained, which positively influenced the wear performance of the composite coating. As compared with pure TiC coating, the TiC-Mo composite coating exhibited improved wear resistance both at low and high loads. Wear mechanisms for the TiC coatings have been changed by adding Mo element.

  12. Superhydrophobic Ceramic Coatings by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yuxuan

    Superhydrophobic surfaces exhibit superior water repellent properties, and they have remarkable potential to improve current energy infrastructure. Substantial research has been performed on the production of superhydrophobic coatings. However, superhydrophobic coatings have not yet been adopted in many industries where potential applications exist due to the limited durability of the coating materials and the complex and costly fabrication processes. Here presented a novel coating technique to manufacture ceramic superhydrophobic coatings rapidly and economically. A rare earth oxide (REO) was selected as the coating material due to its hydrophobic nature and strong mechanical properties, and deposited on stainless steel substrates by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS). The as-sprayed coating demonstrated a hierarchically structured coating topography, which closely resembles superhydrophobic surfaces in nature. Compared to smooth REO surfaces, the SPPS superhydrophobic coating improved the water contact angle by as much as 65° after vacuum treatment at 1 Pa for 48 hours.

  13. Physical, mechanical, and tribological properties of quasicrystalline Al-Cu-Fe coatings prepared by plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepeshev, A. A.; Rozhkova, E. A.; Karpov, I. V.; Ushakov, A. V.; Fedorov, L. Yu.

    2013-12-01

    The physical, mechanical, and tribological properties of quasicrystalline coatings based on the Al65Cu23Fe12 alloy prepared by plasma spraying have been investigated. The specific features of the phase formation due to the competitive interactions of the icosahedral ψ and cubic β phases have been elucidated. A correlation between the microhardness and the content of the icosahedral phase in the coating has been determined. The decisive role of the quasicrystalline phase in the formation of high tribological characteristics of the coatings has been revealed and tested.

  14. Microbubble formation from plasma polymers.

    PubMed

    Shahravan, Anaram; Yelamarty, Srinath; Matsoukas, Themis

    2012-09-27

    We document the formation of liquid-like particles in a toluene glow discharge that subsequently solidify via a process that releases hydrogen to form a solid microbubble with micrometer-size diameter, nanometer-size shell thickness, and high volume fraction, in excess of 90%. Liquid-like particles are produced in a toluene plasma under conditions that promote low degree of cross-linking (low power, high pressure). When these are transferred for observation in TEM, they are seen to transform under irradiation by the electron beam into solid bubbles with diameter of about 3 μm. This transformation also takes place under laser irradiation of sufficient power and under heating. We present evidence that the formation of these microbubbles is due to solidification of the liquid-like precursor that is accompanied by release of hydrogen. This mechanism is supported by a geometric model that provides a quantitative description of the particle size before and after solidification. These unique stimuli-responsive particles exhibit the potential of using temperature, electron beam, or laser as a source to change their size and structure which may find application in thermal insulators, lightweight materials, and light scattering agents.

  15. Thermal Spray Formation of Polymer Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coquill, Scott; Galbraith, Stephen L.; Tuss. Darren L.; Ivosevic, Milan

    2008-01-01

    This innovation forms a sprayable polymer film using powdered precursor materials and an in-process heating method. This device directly applies a powdered polymer onto a substrate to form an adherent, mechanically-sound, and thickness-regulated film. The process can be used to lay down both fully dense and porous, e.g., foam, coatings. This system is field-deployable and includes power distribution, heater controls, polymer constituent material bins, flow controls, material transportation functions, and a thermal spray apparatus. The only thing required for operation in the field is a power source. Because this method does not require solvents, it does not release the toxic, volatile organic compounds of previous methods. Also, the sprayed polymer material is not degraded because this method does not use hot combustion gas or hot plasma gas. This keeps the polymer from becoming rough, porous, or poorly bonded.

  16. Phase analysis of plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, N. R.; Berndt, C. C.; Herman, H.

    1983-01-01

    Phase analysis of plasma-sprayed 8 wt pct-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings and powders was carried out by X-ray diffraction. Step scanning was used for increased peak resolution. Plasma spraying of the YSZ powder into water or onto a steel substrate to form a coating reduced the cubic and monoclinic phases with a simultaneous increase in the tetragonal phase. Heat treatment of the coating at 1150 C for 10 h in an Ar atmosphere increased the amount of cubic and monoclinic phases. The implications of these transformations on coating performance and integrity are discussed.

  17. Thin film coating process using an inductively coupled plasma

    DOEpatents

    Kniseley, Richard N.; Schmidt, Frederick A.; Merkle, Brian D.

    1990-01-30

    Thin coatings of normally solid materials are applied to target substrates using an inductively coupled plasma. Particles of the coating material are vaporized by plasma heating, and pass through an orifice to a first vacuum zone in which the particles are accelerated to a velocity greater than Mach 1. The shock wave generated in the first vacuum zone is intercepted by the tip of a skimmer cone that provides a second orifice. The particles pass through the second orifice into a second zone maintained at a higher vacuum and impinge on the target to form the coating. Ultrapure coatings can be formed.

  18. Suspension plasma sprayed composite coating using amorphous powder feedstock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dianying; Jordan, Eric H.; Gell, Maurice

    2009-03-01

    Al 2O 3-ZrO 2 composite coatings were deposited by the suspension plasma spray process using molecularly mixed amorphous powders. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that the as-sprayed coating is composed of α-Al 2O 3 and tetragonal ZrO 2 phases with grain sizes of 26 nm and 18 nm, respectively. The as-sprayed coating has 93% density with a hardness of 9.9 GPa. Heat treatment of the as-sprayed coating reveals that the Al 2O 3 and ZrO 2 phases are homogeneously distributed in the composite coating.

  19. Plasma-sprayed coating of hydroxyapatite on metal implants--a review.

    PubMed

    Talib, R J; Toff, M R M

    2004-05-01

    Metal implants such as titanium, stainless steel and Co-Cr-Mo are used for load bearing purposes such as hip joint prostheses, fixing plates and dental root implants. For practical application, plasma-sprayed coatings of hydroxyapatite (HA) on metal implants are applied to promote early formation of strong bonds between metal implant and living bone. Plasma spray coating involves heating of HA material to a semi-molten or molten state and then propels its to a metal substrate. The plasma flame temperature is in the range of 6,000 degrees C to 16,000 degrees C but the surface temperature of the substrate rarely exceeds 150 degrees C. The HA materials are feed into the spray gun in the form of powders. Furthermore, this paper will discuss the processes of plasma-sprayed coating of HA on various types of metal implants.

  20. A plasma-sprayed valve coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, A.; Olmore, A. B.

    1980-01-01

    Need to reduce wear on nickel alloy seats and poppets for Space Shuttle main engine led to fused cobalt/tungsten carbide coating. Coating, which is dense, wear-resistant, and nonporous, can be applied in controlled amounts to various substrate configurations. Ease of application to parts with intricate shapes and contours should make coating useful in automotive and aircraft manufacturing.

  1. Study of fracture and erosive wear of plasma sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, D.Z.; Wang, L.J. )

    1993-09-01

    It is experimentally established that both the double-cantilever and short-bar methods are able to ascertain the G(Ic) of plasma-sprayed coatings. WC-Co- and ZrO2-base coatings are examined by these means; the G(Ic) of the former is found to be higher than that of the latter, and WC-Co coatings are also found to be the more erosion-resistant of the two. 15 refs.

  2. Fabrication and Characterization of Amorphous Alumina-Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Coatings by Air Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xuemei; Suhonen, Tomi; Varis, Tommi; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin; Zeng, Yi

    2014-12-01

    Almost fully amorphous coatings of near-eutectic alumina-yttria-stabilized zirconia (Al2O3-YSZ) were prepared by air plasma spraying using Al2O3 and 8 mol.% YSZ crystalline-mixed powders. The coatings consist of mostly an amorphous phase with a small amount of nanocrystals. Various characterization techniques were used to understand coating formation and the origins of the different phases within the coatings. The formation of the mostly amorphous structure is attributed to the high glass-forming ability of Al2O3-YSZ and the appropriate plasma spraying conditions. A small number of nanocrystals are produced during crystallization of the incoming molten droplets or by recrystallization of the solidified splats by accumulated heat. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the coatings have a dense, layered structure with low porosity, and bright-field transmission electron microscopy images indicate sharp interface rather than grit-blasted wavy surface between splats and substrates in the coatings. The as-sprayed amorphous coatings crystallized at around 920 °C and micro-hardness of the as-sprayed amorphous coatings was 8.12 GPa.

  3. Specific Measurements of In-Flight Droplet and Particle Behavior and Coating Microstructure in Suspension and Solution Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauchais, P.; Vardelle, M.; Goutier, S.; Vardelle, A.

    2015-12-01

    The plasma spraying of suspensions of sub-micro- or nano-sized particles and of solutions of chemicals precursors produces finely structured coatings that have generally enhanced properties compared to conventional plasma-sprayed coatings. However, most techniques used in conventional plasma spraying are no more adapted to experimentally observe the behavior of the liquid feedstock in the plasma jet and investigate the effect of the operating conditions on liquid fragmentation in droplets, solid particles released by solvent evaporation or formed from the chemical precursors. Also, specific techniques have to be used to study the coating formation and characterize its microstructure. This paper aims to present the main techniques developed or adapted, up to now, to study the plasma-liquid feedstock interactions and characterize the coatings achieved by suspension and solution plasma spraying.

  4. Bond-coating in plasma-sprayed calcium-phosphate coatings.

    PubMed

    Oktar, F N; Yetmez, M; Agathopoulos, S; Lopez Goerne, T M; Goller, G; Peker, I; Ipeker, I; Ferreira, J M F

    2006-11-01

    The influence of bond-coating on the mechanical properties of plasma-spray coatings of hydroxyatite on Ti was investigated. Plasma-spray powder was produced from human teeth enamel and dentine. Before processing the main apatite coating, a very thin layer of Al2O3/TiO2 was applied on super clean and roughened, by Al2O3 blasting, Ti surface as bond-coating. The experimental results showed that bond-coating caused significant increase of the mechanical properties of the coating layer: In the case of the enamel powder from 6.66 MPa of the simple coating to 9.71 MPa for the bond-coating and in the case of the dentine powder from 6.27 MPa to 7.84 MPa, respectively. Both tooth derived powders feature high thermal stability likely due to their relatively high content of fluorine. Therefore, F-rich apatites, such those investigated in this study, emerge themselves as superior candidate materials for calcium phosphate coatings of producing medical devices. The methods of apatite powder production and shaping optimization of powder particles are both key factors of a successful coating. The methods used in this study can be adopted as handy, inexpensive and reliable ways to produce high quality of powders for plasma spray purposes.

  5. Corrosion behavior of magnetic ferrite coating prepared by plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Wei, Shicheng Tong, Hui; Tian, Haoliang; Liu, Ming; Xu, Binshi

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g while the M{sub s} value of the ferrite powder is 71.916 emu/g. It can be seen that plasma spray process causes deterioration of the room temperature soft magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Spinel ferrite coatings have been prepared by plasma spraying. • The coating consists of nanocrystalline grains. • The saturation magnetization of the ferrite coating is 34.417 emu/g. • Corrosion behavior of the ferrite coating was examined in NaCl solution. - Abstract: In this study, spray dried spinel ferrite powders were deposited on the surface of mild steel substrate through plasma spraying. The structure and morphological studies on the ferrite coatings were carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy. It was showed that spray dried process was an effective method to prepare thermal spraying powders. The coating showed spinel structure with a second phase of LaFeO{sub 3}. The magnetic property of the ferrite samples were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) of the ferrite coating was 34.417 emu/g. The corrosion behavior of coating samples was examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. EIS diagrams showed three corrosion processes as the coating immersed in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The results suggested that plasma spraying was a promising technology for the production of magnetic ferrite coatings.

  6. Formation and Plasma Circulation of Solar Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2016-05-01

    Solar prominences are long-lived cool and dense plasma curtains in the hot and rarefied outer solar atmosphere or corona. The physical mechanism responsible for their formation and especially for their internal plasma circulation has been uncertain for decades. The observed ubiquitous downflows in quiescent prominences are difficult to interpret because plasma with high conductivity seems to move across horizontal magnetic field lines. Here we present three-dimensional numerical simulations of prominence formation and evolution in an elongated magnetic flux rope as a result of in situ plasma condensations fueled by continuous plasma evaporation from the solar chromosphere. The prominence is born and maintained in a fragmented, highly dynamic state with continuous reappearance of multiple blobs and thread structures that move mainly downward, dragging along mass-loaded field lines. The circulation of prominence plasma is characterized by the dynamic balance between the drainage of prominence plasma back to the chromosphere and the formation of prominence plasma via continuous condensation. Plasma evaporates from the chromosphere, condenses into the prominence in the corona, and drains back to the chromosphere, establishing a stable chromosphere-corona plasma cycle. Synthetic images of the modeled prominence with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly closely resemble actual observations, with many dynamical threads underlying an elliptical coronal cavity.

  7. Plasma variables and tribological properties of coatings in low pressure (0.1 - 10.0 torr) plasma systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avni, R.; Spalvins, T.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed treatment is presented of the dialog known as plasma surface interactions (PSI) with respect to the coating process and its tribological behavior. Adsorption, morphological changes, defect formation, sputtering, chemical etching, and secondary electron emission are all discussed as promoting and enhancing the surface chemistry, thus influencing the tribological properties of the deposited flux. Phenomenological correlations of rate of deposition, flux composition, microhardness, and wear with the plasma layer variables give an insight to the formation of chemical bonding between the deposited flux and the substrate surface.

  8. Superhydrophobic Ceramic Coatings by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yuxuan; Coyle, Thomas W; Azimi, Gisele; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a novel coating technique to manufacture ceramic superhydrophobic coatings rapidly and economically. A rare earth oxide (REO) was selected as the coating material due to its hydrophobic nature, chemical inertness, high temperature stability, and good mechanical properties, and deposited on stainless steel substrates by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS). The effects of various spraying conditions including standoff distance, torch power, number of torch passes, types of solvent and plasma velocity were investigated. The as-sprayed coating demonstrated a hierarchically structured surface topography, which closely resembles superhydrophobic surfaces found in nature. The water contact angle on the SPPS superhydrophobic coating was up to 65% higher than on smooth REO surfaces. PMID:27091306

  9. Superhydrophobic Ceramic Coatings by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yuxuan; Coyle, Thomas W.; Azimi, Gisele; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a novel coating technique to manufacture ceramic superhydrophobic coatings rapidly and economically. A rare earth oxide (REO) was selected as the coating material due to its hydrophobic nature, chemical inertness, high temperature stability, and good mechanical properties, and deposited on stainless steel substrates by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS). The effects of various spraying conditions including standoff distance, torch power, number of torch passes, types of solvent and plasma velocity were investigated. The as-sprayed coating demonstrated a hierarchically structured surface topography, which closely resembles superhydrophobic surfaces found in nature. The water contact angle on the SPPS superhydrophobic coating was up to 65% higher than on smooth REO surfaces. PMID:27091306

  10. Formation Of Voids In Dusty Lorentzian Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bahamida, S.; Annou, K.; Annou, R.

    2008-09-07

    We study the possibility of formation of voids in Lorentzian plasmas containing of dust particles obeying to vortex-like velocity distribution. The size of the void is found to be ion spectral index dependent.

  11. Emission current formation in plasma electron emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Gruzdev, V. A.; Zalesski, V. G.

    2010-12-15

    A model of the plasma electron emitter is considered, in which the current redistribution over electrodes of the emitter gas-discharge structure and weak electric field formation in plasma are taken into account as functions of the emission current. The calculated and experimental dependences of the switching parameters, extraction efficiency, and strength of the electric field in plasma on the accelerating voltage and geometrical sizes of the emission channel are presented.

  12. Modified drug release using atmospheric pressure plasma deposited siloxane coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, D. P.; Maher, S.; Law, V. J.; Ardhaoui, M.; Stallard, C.; Keenan, A.

    2016-09-01

    This pilot study evaluates the potential of atmospheric plasma polymerised coatings to modify the rate of drug release from polymeric substrates. The antibiotic rifampicin was deposited in a prototype multi-layer drug delivery system, consisting of a nebulized layer of active drug between a base layer of TEOS deposited on a plastic substrate (polystyrene) and an overlying layer of plasma polymerised PDMS. The polymerised TEOS and PDMS layers were deposited using a helium atmospheric plasma jet system. Elution of rifampicin was measured using UV-VIS spectroscopy, in addition to a antimicrobial well diffusion assay with an established indicator organism. The multi-layered plasma deposited coatings significantly extended the duration of release of the rifampicin from 24 h for the uncoated polymer to 144 h for the coated polymer.

  13. Modified drug release using atmospheric pressure plasma deposited siloxane coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, D. P.; Maher, S.; Law, V. J.; Ardhaoui, M.; Stallard, C.; Keenan, A.

    2016-09-01

    This pilot study evaluates the potential of atmospheric plasma polymerised coatings to modify the rate of drug release from polymeric substrates. The antibiotic rifampicin was deposited in a prototype multi-layer drug delivery system, consisting of a nebulized layer of active drug between a base layer of TEOS deposited on a plastic substrate (polystyrene) and an overlying layer of plasma polymerised PDMS. The polymerised TEOS and PDMS layers were deposited using a helium atmospheric plasma jet system. Elution of rifampicin was measured using UV–VIS spectroscopy, in addition to a antimicrobial well diffusion assay with an established indicator organism. The multi-layered plasma deposited coatings significantly extended the duration of release of the rifampicin from 24 h for the uncoated polymer to 144 h for the coated polymer.

  14. Compatibility study of plasma grown alumina coating with Pb-17Li under static conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamnapara, Nirav I.; Sarada Sree, A.; Rajendra Kumar, E.; Mukherjee, S.; Khanna, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    A novel plasma assisted tempering process has been developed to generate a stable α-Al2O3 + FeAl coating on P91 steels. Hot dip aluminized P91 samples had been subjected to normalizing treatment in muffle furnace at 980 °C for 20 min followed by a glow discharge oxygen plasma assisted tempering treatment at 750 °C for 1 h. The plasma processing led to the formation of a stable α-Al2O3 coating, while thermal tempering in muffle furnace led to formation of θ-Al2O3 coating. Both the thermal and plasma tempered samples with alumina coating along with bare P91 samples were subjected to compatibility tests with Pb-17Li under static conditions at 550 °C for 1000 h. The extent of degradation of the samples was measured by weight loss method, X-ray diffraction and a cross-sectional examination with elemental studies using energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Plasma processed samples did not reveal any weight loss while thermally treated samples with metastable θ-Al2O3 indicated 0.23 mg/cm2 weight loss and bare P91 steels indicated a weight loss of 7.3 mg/cm2.

  15. Plasma polymerization for cell adhesive/anti-adhesive implant coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meichsner, Juergen; Testrich, Holger; Rebl, Henrike; Nebe, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Plasma polymerization of ethylenediamine (C2H8N2, EDA) and perfluoropropane (C3F8, PFP) with admixture of argon and hydrogen, respectively, was studied using an asymmetric 13.56 MHz CCP. The analysis of the plasma chemical gas phase processes for stable molecules revealed consecutive reactions: C2H8N2 consumption, intermediate product NH3, and main final product HCN. In C3F8- H2 plasma the precursor molecule C3F8 and molecular hydrogen are consumed and HF as well as CF4 and C2F6 are found as main gaseous reaction products. The deposited plasma polymer films on the powered electrode are strongly cross-linked due to ion bombardment. The stable plasma polymerized films from EDA are characterized by high content of nitrogen with N/C ratio of about 0.35. The plasma polymerized fluorocarbon film exhibit a reduced F/C ratio of about 1.2. Adhesion tests with human osteoblast cell line MG-63 on coated Ti6Al4V samples (polished) compared with uncoated reference sample yielded both, the enhanced cell adhesion for plasma polymerized EDA and significantly reduced cell adhesion for fluorocarbon coating, respectively. Aging of the plasma polymerized EDA film, in particular due to the reactions with oxygen from air, showed no significant change in the cell adhesion. The fluorocarbon coating with low cell adhesion is of interest for temporary implants. Funded by the Campus PlasmaMed.

  16. Nano Structured Plasma Spray Coating for Wear and High Temperature Corrosion Resistance Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, D.; Shukla, A. K.; Roy, H.

    2014-04-01

    The nano structured coating is a major challenge today to improve the different mechanical properties, wear and high temperature corrosion resistance behaviour of different industrial alloys. This paper is a review on synthesis of nano powder, plasma spraying methods, techniques of nano structured coating by plasma spray method, mechanical properties, tribological properties and high temperature corrosion behaviour of nano structured coating. Nano structured coatings of ceramic powders/composites are being developed for wide variety of applications like boiler, turbine and aerospace industries, which requires the resistance against wear, corrosion, erosion etc. The nano sized powders are subjected to agglomeration by spray drying, after which nano structured coating can be successfully applied over the substrate. Nano structured coating shows improved mechanical wear resistance and high temperature corrosion resistance. The significant improvement of wear and corrosion resistance is mainly attributed to formation of semi molten nano zones in case of nano structured coatings. The future scope of application of nano structured coating has also been highlighted in this paper.

  17. On coating adhesion during impulse plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowska-Langier, Katarzyna; Zdunek, Krzysztof; Chodun, Rafal; Okrasa, Sebastian; Kwiatkowski, Roch; Malinowski, Karol; Składnik-Sadowska, Elzbieta; Sadowski, Marek J.

    2014-05-01

    The impulse plasma deposition (IPD) technique is the only method of plasma surface engineering (among plasma-based technologies) that allows a synthesis of layers upon a cold unheated substrate and which ensures a good adhesion. This paper presents a study of plasma impacts upon a copper substrate surface during the IPD process. The substrate was exposed to pulsed N2/Al plasma streams during the synthesis of AlN layers. For plasma-material interaction diagnostics, the optical emission spectroscopy method was used. Our results show that interactions of plasma lead to sputtering of the substrate material. It seems that the obtained adhesion of the layers is the result of a complex surface mechanism combined with the effects of pulsed plasma energy impacts upon the unheated substrate. An example of such a result is the value of the critical load for the Al2O3 layer, which was measured by the scratch-test method to be above 40 N.

  18. Adherent diamond like carbon coatings on metals via plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.; Munson, C.P.

    1996-12-01

    Various techniques are currently used to produce diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on various materials. Many of these techniques use metallic interlayers, such as Ti or Si, to improve the adhesion of a DLC coating to a ferrous substrate. An alternative processing route would be to use plasma source ion implantation (PSII) to create a carbon composition gradient in the surface of the ferrous material to serve as the interface for a DLC coating. The need for interlayer deposition is eliminated by using a such a graded interfaces PSII approach has been used to form adherent DLC coatings on magnesium, aluminum, silicon, titanium, chromium, brass, nickel, and tungsten. A PSII process tailored to create a graded interface allows deposition of adherent DLC coatings even on metals that exhibit a positive heat of formation with carbon, such as magnesium, iron, brass and nickel.

  19. Adhesion enhancement of Al coatings on carbon/epoxy composite surfaces by atmospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulon, J. F.; Tournerie, N.; Maillard, H.

    2013-10-01

    Adhesion strengths between aluminium thin film coatings and manufactured carbon/epoxy composite surfaces were measured by assessing fracture tensile strengths using pull-off tests. The effect of the substrate roughness (nm to μm) of these composite surfaces on adhesion was studied by examining the surface free energies and adhesion strengths. The adhesion strengths of the coatings varied significantly. To improve the coating adhesion, each composite surface was treated with atmospheric plasma prior to deposition, which resulted in an increase in the surface free energy from approximately 40 mJ/m2 to 70 mJ/m2 because the plasma pretreatment led to the formation of hydrophilic Csbnd O and Cdbnd O bonds on the composite surfaces, as demonstrated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. The adhesion strengths of the coatings were enhanced for all surface roughnesses studied. In our study, the effect of mechanical adhesion due to roughness was separated from the effect of modifying the chemical bonds with plasma activation. The adhesion ability of the pure resin was relatively weak. Increasing the surface roughness largely improved the adhesion of the resin surface. Plasma treatment of the pure resin also increased the surface adhesion. Our study shows that plasma activation effectively enhances the adhesion of manufactured composites, even when the surface roughness is on the order of microns. The ageing of the surface activation was also investigated, and the results demonstrate that atmospheric plasma has potential for use in the pretreatment of composite materials.

  20. Solution precursor plasma deposition of nanostructured ZnO coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tummala, Raghavender; Guduru, Ramesh K.; Mohanty, Pravansu S.

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} The solution precursor route employed is an inexpensive process with capability to produce large scale coatings at fast rates on mass scale production. {yields} It is highly capable of developing tailorable nanostructures. {yields} This technique can be employed to spray the coatings on any kind of substrates including polymers. {yields} The ZnO coatings developed via solution precursor plasma spray process have good electrical conductivity and reflectivity properties in spite of possessing large amount of particulate boundaries, porosity and nanostructured grains. -- Abstract: Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide band gap semiconducting material that has various applications including optical, electronic, biomedical and corrosion protection. It is usually synthesized via processing routes, such as vapor deposition techniques, sol-gel, spray pyrolysis and thermal spray of pre-synthesized ZnO powders. Cheaper and faster synthesis techniques are of technological importance due to increased demand in alternative energy applications. Here, we report synthesis of nanostructured ZnO coatings directly from a solution precursor in a single step using plasma spray technique. Nanostructured ZnO coatings were deposited from the solution precursor prepared using zinc acetate and water/isopropanol. An axial liquid atomizer was employed in a DC plasma spray torch to create fine droplets of precursor for faster thermal treatment in the plasma plume to form ZnO. Microstructures of coatings revealed ultrafine particulate agglomerates. X-ray diffraction confirmed polycrystalline nature and hexagonal Wurtzite crystal structure of the coatings. Transmission electron microscopy studies showed fine grains in the range of 10-40 nm. Observed optical transmittance ({approx}65-80%) and reflectivity ({approx}65-70%) in the visible spectrum, and electrical resistivity (48.5-50.1 m{Omega} cm) of ZnO coatings are attributed to ultrafine particulate morphology of the coatings.

  1. Nanostructured bioactive glass-ceramic coatings deposited by the liquid precursor plasma spraying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yanfeng; Song, Lei; Liu, Xiaoguang; Huang, Yi; Huang, Tao; Wu, Yao; Chen, Jiyong; Wu, Fang

    2011-01-01

    Bioactive glass-ceramic coatings have great potential in dental and orthopedic medical implant applications, due to its excellent bioactivity, biocompatibility and osteoinductivity. However, most of the coating preparation techniques either produce only thin thickness coatings or require tedious preparation steps. In this study, a new attempt was made to deposit bioactive glass-ceramic coatings on titanium substrates by the liquid precursor plasma spraying (LPPS) process. Tetraethyl orthosilicate, triethyl phosphate, calcium nitrate and sodium nitrate solutions were mixed together to form a suspension after hydrolysis, and the liquid suspension was used as the feedstock for plasma spraying of P 2O 5-Na 2O-CaO-SiO 2 bioactive glass-ceramic coatings. The in vitro bioactivities of the as-deposited coatings were evaluated by soaking the samples in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 4 h, 1, 2, 4, 7, 14, and 21 days, respectively. The as-deposited coating and its microstructure evolution behavior under SBF soaking were systematically analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results showed that P 2O 5-Na 2O-CaO-SiO 2 bioactive glass-ceramic coatings with nanostructure had been successfully synthesized by the LPPS technique and the synthesized coatings showed quick formation of a nanostructured HCA layer after being soaked in SBF. Overall, our results indicate that the LPPS process is an effective and simple method to synthesize nanostructured bioactive glass-ceramic coatings with good in vitro bioactivity.

  2. Plasma technology for creation of protective and decorative coatings for building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokitin, Oleg; Volokitin, Gennady; Skripnikova, Nelli; Shekhovtsov, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    An experimental setup is developed to create a protective and decorative coating on the surface of building materials. Experimental study is conducted to create a protective coating using low-temperature plasma. The properties of the surface before and after the plasma treatment are investigated. At the increase of the plasma generator power (56-75 kW) the rate of the vitreous coating formation is significantly reduced, and the destruction of hydrous calcium silicates occurs at a lower depth (0.5-2.0 mm). In this case, the adhesive strength increases up to 2.34 MPa. At the increase of the exposure time at 56 kW (0.045 m/s melting rate) plasma generation power, the melt formation is observed not only at the surface but at depth of 0.7 mm and deeper. Also, a deep degradation of the material occurs and the adhesive strength decreases. The optimal heat flux density of plasma generator was established at 1.8-2.6 . 106 W/m2, which allows the achievement of the uniform layer formation on the wood surface that preserves its natural pattern visible.

  3. Plasma electrolytic oxidation coating of synthetic Al-Mg binary alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tarakci, Mehmet

    2011-12-15

    The binary Al-Mg synthetic alloys were prepared in a vacuum/atmosphere controlled furnace with the addition of 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 7, and 15 wt.% pure Mg into pure aluminum as substrate material. The surfaces of the Al-Mg alloys and pure aluminum were coated for 120 min by plasma electrolytic oxidation in the same electrolyte of 12 g/L sodium silicate and 2 g/L KOH in distilled water. The coating was characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, profilometry and Vickers microhardness measurements. There regions of loose outer layer, dense inner layer with precipitate like particles of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and a thin transition layer were identified for the coated samples. The coating thickness increases from 85 to 150 {mu}m with Mg contents in the alloys. The surface morphology becomes more porous and consequently surface roughness tends to increase with plasma electrolytic oxidation treatment and further with Mg content. The increase in magnesium content reduces the formation of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and crystalline mullite phases in the coating and decreases microhardness of coating. The Mg concentration is constant throughout the other loose and dense regions of coating though it gradually decreases in the thin inner region. - Research Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average thickness of PEO coating of Al-Mg alloys increases with Mg content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The addition of Mg reduces and prevents the formation of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and mullite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The surface roughness increases with Mg content in the Al-Mg alloys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hardness values of the coating decreases with the Mg amount in the substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Mg concentration is constant throughout the main regions of coating.

  4. Composite wire plasma formation and evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Spielman, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the formation and evolution of plasma from rapidly heated metallic wires is a long-standing challenge in the field of plasma physics and in exploding wire engineering. This physical process is made even more complicated if the wire material is composed of a number of individual layers. The authors have successfully developed both optical and x-ray backlighting diagnostics. In particular, the x-ray backlighting technique has demonstrated the capability for quantitative determination of the plasma density over a wide range of densities. This diagnostic capability shows that the process of plasma formation is composed of two separate phases: first, current is passed through a cold wire and the wire is heated ohmically, and, second, the heated wire evolves gases that break down and forms a low-density plasma surrounding the wire.

  5. Improvement in Plasma Performance with Lithium Coatings in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R; Ahn, J -W; Allain, J P; Bell, M G; Bell, R; Boedo, J; Bush, C; Mansfield, D; Menard, J; Mueller, D; Ono, M; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Ross, P W; Sabbagh, S; Schneider, H; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Stotler, D; Timberlake, J; Wampler, W R; Wilgen, J B; Zakharov, L

    2008-09-12

    Lithium as a plasma-facing material has attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Dramatic effects on plasma performance with lithium-coated plasma-facing components (PFCOs) have been demonstrated on many fusion devices, including TFTR, [1] T-11M, [2] and FT-U. [3] Using a liquid-lithium-filled tray as a limiter, the CDX-U device achieved very significant enhancement in the confinement time of ohmically heated plasmas. [4] The recent NSTX experiments reported here have demonstrated, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium PFC coatings on divertor plasma performance in both L- and H- mode regimes heated by neutral beams.

  6. Improvement in Plasma Performance with Lithium Coatings in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R

    2009-02-17

    Lithium as a plasma-facing material has attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Dramatic effects on plasma performance with lithium-coated plasma-facing components (PFC's) have been demonstrated on many fusion devices, including TFTR, T-11M, and FT-U. Using a liquid-lithium-filled tray as a limiter, the CDX-U device achieved very significant enhancement in the confinement time of ohmically heated plasmas. The recent NSTX experiments reported here have demonstrated, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium PFC coatings on divertor plasma performance in both L- and H- mode regimes heated by neutral beams.

  7. Plasma-sprayed self-lubricating coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, H. H.; Logan, W. R.; Harada, Y.

    1982-01-01

    One of the most important criterion for acceptable commercial application of a multiple phase composition is uniformity and reproducibility. This means that the performance characteristics of the coat - e.g., its lubricating properties, bond strength to the substrate, and thermal properties - can be readily predicted to give a desired performance. The improvement of uniformity and reproducibility of the coats, the oxidation behavior at three temperature ranges, the effect of bond coat and the effect of preheat treatment as measured by adhesive strength tests, coating examination procedures, and physical property measurements were studied. The following modifications improved the uniformity and reproducibility: (1) changes and closer control in the particle size range of the raw materials used, (2) increasing the binder content from 3.2% to 4.1% (dried weight), and (3) analytical processing procedures using step by step checking to assure consistency.

  8. Antihydrogen Formation using Cold Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, N.; Bowe, P.D.; Hangst, J.S.; Amoretti, M.; Carraro, C.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Amsler, C.; Johnson, I.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Bonomi, G.; Bouchta, A.; Doser, M.; Kellerbauer, A.; Landua, R.; Cesar, C.L.; Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L.V.

    2004-10-20

    Antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart of the hydrogen atom, can be formed by mixing cold samples of antiprotons and positrons. In 2002 the ATHENA collaboration succeeded in the first production of cold antihydrogen. By observing and imaging the annihilation products of the neutral, non-confined, antihydrogen atoms annihilating on the walls of the trap we can observe the production in quasi-real-time and study the dynamics of the formation mechanism. The formation mechanism strongly influences the final state of the formed antihydrogen atoms, important for future spectroscopic comparison with hydrogen. This paper briefly summarizes the current understanding of the antihydrogen formation in ATHENA.

  9. Calcium phosphate coating on titanium using laser and plasma spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Mangal

    Though calcium phosphate (CaP) coated implants are commercially available, its acceptance is still not wide spread due to challenges related to weaker interfacial bonding between metal and ceramic, and low crystallinity of hydroxyapatite (HA). The objectives of this research are to improve interfacial strength, crystallinity, phase purity and bioactivity of CaP coated metallic implants for orthopaedic applications. The rationale is that forming a diffuse and gradient metal-ceramic interface will improve the interfacial strength. Moreover, reducing CaP particles exposure to high temperature during coating preparation, can lead to improvement in both crystallinity and phase purity of CaP. In this study, laser engineered net shaping (LENS(TM)) was used to coat Ti metal with CaP. LENS(TM) processing enabled generation of Ti+TCP (tricalcium phosphate) composite coating with diffused interface, that also increased the coating hardness to 1049+/-112 Hv compared to a substrate hardness of 200+/-15 Hv. In vitro bone cell-material interaction studies confirmed the bioactivity of TCP coatings. Antimicrobial properties of the TCP coatings were improved by silver (Ag) electrodeposition. Along with LENS(TM), radio frequency induction plasma spray, equipped with supersonic plasma nozzle, was used to prepare HA coatings on Ti with improved crystallinity and phase purity. The coating was made of multigrain HA particles of ˜200 nm in size, which consisted of 15--20 nm HA grains. In vitro bone cell-material interaction and in vivo rat model studies confirmed the HA coatings to be bioactive. Furthermore, incorporation of Sr2+ improved bone cell of HA coatings interaction. A combination of LENS(TM) and plasma spray was used to fabricate a compositionally graded HA coatings on Ti where the microstructure varied from pure HA at the surface to pure Ti substrate with a diffused Ti+TCP composite region in between. The plasma spray system was used to synthesize spherical HA nano powder from

  10. Comparison of Physical-chemical and Mechanical Properties of Chlorapatite and Hydroxyapatite Plasma Sprayed Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Demnati, Imane; Grossin, David; Marsan, Olivier; Bertrand, Ghislaine; Collonges, Gérard; Combes, Christèle; Parco, Maria; Braceras, Inigo; Alexis, Joel; Balcaen, Yannick; Rey, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Chlorapatite can be considered a potential biomaterial for orthopaedic applications. Its use as plasma-sprayed coating could be of interest considering its thermal properties and particularly its ability to melt without decomposition unlike hydroxyapatite. Chlorapatite (ClA) was synthesized by a high-temperature ion exchange reaction starting from commercial stoichiometric hydroxyapatites (HA). The ClA powder showed similar characteristics as the original industrial HA powder, and was obtained in the monoclinic form. The HA and ClA powders were plasma-sprayed using a low-energy plasma spraying system with identical processing parameters. The coatings were characterized by physical-chemical methods, i.e. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, including distribution mapping of the main phases detected such as amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), oxyapatite (OA), and HA or ClA. The unexpected formation of oxyapatite in ClA coatings was assigned to a side reaction with contaminating oxygenated species (O2, H2O). ClA coatings exhibited characteristics different from HA, showing a lower content of oxyapatite and amorphous phase. Although their adhesion strength was found to be lower than that of HA coatings, their application could be an interesting alternative, offering, in particular, a larger range of spraying conditions without formation of massive impurities. PMID:25893015

  11. Plasma formation in underwater gas bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommers, B. S.; Foster, J. E.

    2014-02-01

    The generation of plasma in underwater gas bubbles offers the potential to produce large volume plasma in water while minimizing electrode erosion. Such attributes are desirable for the design of plasma-based water purification systems. In this work, gas bubbles of diameter 0.4-0.7 mm were trapped in the node of a 26.4 kHz underwater acoustic standing wave and pulsed with voltages in the range 10-14 kV. Plasma formation in trapped, isolated bubbles was observed to occur through two separate pathways: (1) plasma generated in the bubble through impact by a liquid streamer and (2) plasma generated in the bubble due solely to the applied electric field. The former case demonstrates the mechanism of so-called streamer hopping in which the discharge transitions from a water streamer to a gaseous surface streamer. Perturbations of the bubble's fluid boundary due to the streamer are also discussed.

  12. Plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes: An emerging technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1986-01-01

    A broad understanding of the numerous ion or plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes is sought. An awareness of the principles of these processes is needed before discussing in detail the ion nitriding technology. On the basis of surface modifications arising from ion or plasma energizing and interactions, it can be broadly classified as deposition of distinct overlay coatings (sputtering-dc, radio frequency, magnetron, reactive; ion plating-diode, triode) and surface property modification without forming a discrete coating (ion implantation, ion beam mixing, laser beam irradiation, ion nitriding, ion carburizing, plasma oxidation). These techniques offer a great flexibility and are capable in tailoring desirable chemical and structural surface properties independent of the bulk properties.

  13. Reflectivity and laser irradiation of plasma sprayed Al coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lihong; Ma, Zhuang; Wang, Fuchi; Li, Wenzhi

    2015-05-01

    It's well known that Al has a very high reflectivity in the visible/near-infrared range, which makes it become a promising anti-laser material. But for a plasma sprayed coating, there are usually many defects, such as pores, cracks and interfaces among particles, which lead to properties difference with its bulk material. In this paper, the reflectivity of plasma sprayed Al coating and its laser irradiation effect were investigated. Its reflectivity, surface roughness, porosity, microstructure, and cross-section microstructure were characterized. The results show that a high reflectivity (98.1% at CO2 laser 10.6μm wavelength) of plasma sprayed Al coating, which is comparable with bulk material, could be obtained. Its optical laser damage threshold is 2×104W/cm2 that makes its reflectivity obviously decrease. Its damage mechanism is oxidation.

  14. Vapors and Droplets Mixture Deposition of Metallic Coatings by Very Low Pressure Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vautherin, B.; Planche, M.-P.; Bolot, R.; Quet, A.; Bianchi, L.; Montavon, G.

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, the very low pressure plasma-spraying (VLPPS) process has been intensely developed and implemented to manufacture thin, dense and finely structured ceramic coatings for various applications, such as Y2O3 for diffusion barriers, among other examples. This paper aims at presenting developments carried out on metallic coatings. Aluminum was chosen as a demonstrative material due to its "moderate" vaporization enthalpy (i.e., 38.23 KJ cm-3) compared to the one of copper (i.e., 55.33 KJ cm-3), cobalt (i.e., 75.03 KJ cm-3), or even tantalum (i.e., 87.18 KJ cm-3). The objective of this work is primarily to better understand the behavior of a solid precursor injected into the plasma jet leading to the formation of vapors and to better control the factors affecting the coating structure. Nearly dense aluminum coatings were successfully deposited by VLPPS at 100 Pa with an intermediate power plasma torch (i.e., Sulzer Metco F4 type gun with maximum power of 45 kW). Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was implemented to study and analyze the vapor behavior into the plasma jet. Simplified CFD modeling allowed better understanding of some of the thermo-physical mechanisms. The effect of powder-size distribution, substrate temperature and spray distance were studied. The phase composition and microstructural features of the coatings were characterized by XRD and SEM. Moreover, Vickers microhardness measurements were implemented.

  15. Reactive Plasma-Sprayed Aluminum Nitride-Based Coating Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro; Egota, Kazumi; Okamoto, Kenji

    2015-12-01

    Recently, thick aluminum nitride/alumina (AlN/Al2O3) composite coatings were successfully fabricated through the reactive plasma spraying of fine Al2O3/AlN mixture in the N2/H2 atmospheric plasma. The coatings consist of AlN, Al5O6N, γ-Al2O3, and α-Al2O3 phases. This study will evaluate the thermal conductivity of these complicated plasma-sprayed coatings and optimize the controlling aspects. Furthermore, the influence of the process parameters on the coatings thermal conductivity will be investigated. The fabricated coatings showed very low thermal conductivity (2.43 W/m K) compared to the AlN sintered compacts. It is attributed to the phase composition of the fabricated coatings, oxide content, and porosity. The presence of Al2O3, Al5O6N and the high coating porosity decreased its thermal conductivity. The presence of oxygen in the AlN lattice creates Al vacancies which lead to phonon scattering and therefore suppressed the thermal conductivity. The formation of γ-Al2O3 phase in the coating leads to further decrease in its conductivity, due to its lower density compared to the α-phase. Moreover, the high porosity of the coating strongly suppressed the conductivity. This is due to the complicated microstructure of plasma spray coatings (splats, porosity, and interfaces, particularly in case of reactive spray process), which obviously lowered the conductivity. Furthermore, the measured coating density was lower than the AlN value and suppressed the coating conductivity. In addition, the spraying parameter showed a varied effect on the coating phase composition, porosity, density, and therefore on its conductivity. Although the N2 gas flow improved the nitride content, it suppressed the thermal conductivity gradually. It is attributed to the further increase in the porosity and further decrease in the density of the coatings with the N2 gas. Furthermore, increasing the arc did not show a significant change on the coating thermal conductivity. On the other hand

  16. Protective coatings of metal surfaces by cold plasma treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manory, R.; Grill, A.

    1985-01-01

    The cold plasma techniques for deposition of various types of protective coatings are reviewed. The main advantage of these techniques for deposition of ceramic films is the lower process temperature, which enables heat treating of the metal prior to deposition. In the field of surface hardening of steel, significant reduction of treatment time and energy consumption were obtained. A simple model for the plasma - surface reactions in a cold plasma system is presented, and the plasma deposition techniques are discussed in view of this model.

  17. Synthesis and microstructure observation of titanium carbonitride nanostructured coatings using reactive plasma spraying in atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; He, Jining; Yan, Dianran; Xiao, Lisong; Dong, Yanchun; Zhang, Jianxin; Liao, Hanlin

    2011-08-01

    In the present study, nanostructured titanium carbonitride (TiCN) coatings were successfully deposited by reactive plasma spraying (RPS) technology using a self-designed gas tunnel mounted on a normal plasma spray torch. The phase composition and microstructure of the TiCN coatings were characterised by XRD, SEM and TEM. The results indicated that the main phase of the coatings was FCC TiC 0.2N 0.8 with a small amount of Ti 3O. The coating that was deposited using 35 kW displayed better microstructure and properties. The coating exhibited a typical nanostructure including 90 nm diamertrical equiaxed grains and 400 nm long columnar grains by TEM images. The SEM observation further revealed that the equiaxed grains in parallel direction to the substrate surface in TEM images were actually the columnar grains perpendicular to the substrate surface. The formation mechanism of the nanostructured coatings was also discussed. The measured microhardness value of the coating was approximately 1659 Hv 100 g , and the calculated crack extension force was about 34.9 J/m 2.

  18. Acoustic emission evaluation of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic emission techniques have recently been used in a number of studies to investigate the performance and failure behavior of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings. Failure of the coating is a complex phenomena, especially when the composite nature of the coating is considered in the light of possible failure mechanisms. Thus it can be expected that both the metal and ceramic components (i.e., the bond coat and ceramic overlay) of a composite thermal protection system influence the macroscopic behavior and performance of the coating. The aim of the present work is to summarize the 'state-of-the-art' in terms of this initial work and indicate where future progress may be made.

  19. Development and evaluation of suspension plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia coatings as thermal barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Every, Kent J.

    The insulating effects from thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in gas turbine engines allow for increased operational efficiencies and longer service lifetimes. Consequently, improving TBCs can lead to enhanced gas turbine engine performance. This study was conducted to investigate if yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings, the standard industrial choice for TBCs, produced from nano-sized powder could provide better thermal insulation than current commericial YSZ coatings generated using micron-sized powders. The coatings for this research were made via the recently developed suspension plasma spraying (SPS) process. With SPS, powders are suspended in a solvent containing dispersing agents; the suspension is then injected directly into a plasma flow that evaporates the solvent and melts the powder while transporting it to the substrate. Although related to the industrial TBC production method of air plasma spraying (APS), SPS has two important differences---the ability to spray sub-micron diameter ceramic particles, and the ability to alloy the particles with chemicals dissolved in the solvent. These aspects of SPS were employed to generate a series of coatings from suspensions containing ˜100 nm diameter YSZ powder particles, some of which were alloyed with neodymium and ytterbium ions from the solvent. The SPS coatings contained columnar structures not observed in APS TBCs; thus, a theory was developed to explain the formation of these features. The thermal conductivity of the coatings was tested to evaluate the effects of these unique microstructures and the effects of the alloying process. The results for samples in the as-sprayed and heat-treated conditions were compared to conventional YSZ TBCs. This comparison showed that, relative to APS YSZ coatings, the unalloyed SPS samples typically exhibited higher as-sprayed and lower heat-treated thermal conductivities. All thermal conductivity values for the alloyed samples were lower than conventional YSZ TBCs

  20. Early apatite deposition and osteoblast growth on plasma-sprayed dicalcium silicate coating.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuanyong; Xie, Youtao; Ding, Chuanxian; Chu, Paul K

    2005-09-01

    Dicalcium silicate coating was deposited onto a Ti-6Al-4V substrate using plasma-spraying technology. The coating was immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h to investigate early apatite formation on the coating. Osteoblasts were also seeded onto the surface of the dicalcium silicate coating to evaluate its biocompatibility. Cold field-emission scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry were used to evaluate the morphologies and determine the chemical composition of the coatings. The surface structural changes caused by immersion in SBF were analyzed using thin-film X-ray diffraction. After the dicalcium silicate coating was soaked in SBF solution 1-6 h, two types of particles containing calcium and phosphorus were formed on the surface. One type consisted of relatively larger particles (P1) precipitated on the surface of the coating from the precursor cluster formed in the SBF solution. The second type was composed of particles (P2) nucleated on the surface of the coating. With increasing immersion time, the particles coalesced to form a surface Ca-P layer. The Ca-P layer was composed of amorphous calcium phosphate that was not transformed to crystalline apatite until the immersion time in SBF exceeded 24 h. The formation mechanism of the Ca-P layer and apatite on the surface of the coating is believed to be involved in the formation of the Si 3-ring active surface site with negative charge. The cell-seeding test revealed that osteoblasts grew and proliferated very well on the surface of the dicalcium silicate coating.

  1. NSTX Plasma Response to Lithium Coated Divertor

    SciTech Connect

    H.W. Kugel, M.G. Bell, J.P. Allain, R.E. Bell, S. Ding, S.P. Gerhardt, M.A. Jaworski, R. Kaita, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, R. Majeski, R. Maqueda, D.K. Mansfield, D. Mueller, R. Nygren, S.F. Paul, R. Raman, A.L. Roquemore, S.A. Sabbagh, H. Schneider, C.H. Skinner, V.A. Soukhanovskii, C.N. Taylor, J.R. Timberlak, W.R. Wampler, L.E. Zakharov, S.J. Zweben, and the NSTX Research Team

    2011-01-21

    NSTX experiments have explored lithium evaporated on a graphite divertor and other plasma facing components in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. Improvements in plasma performance have followed these lithium depositions, including a reduction and eventual elimination of the HeGDC time between discharges, reduced edge neutral density, reduced plasma density, particularly in the edge and the SOL, increased pedestal electron and ion temperature, improved energy confinement and the suppression of ELMs in the H-mode. However, with improvements in confinement and suppression of ELMs, there was a significant secular increase in the effective ion charge Zeff and the radiated power in H-mode plasmas as a result of increases in the carbon and medium-Z metallic impurities. Lithium itself remained at a very low level in the plasma core, <0.1%. Initial results are reported from operation with a Liquid Lithium Divertor (LLD) recently installed.

  2. Pulsed laser treatment of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings.

    PubMed

    Cheang, P; Khor, K A; Teoh, L L; Tam, S C

    1996-10-01

    Plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings have complex microstructures. There are often variations in phase, structure and chemical composition among the starting material and coating. Some of these changes may not be acceptable for biomedical applications. Attaining all the requirements for a functional coating in a single spraying process is not easily achieved. Additional post-treatment may be necessary. This study examines the use of a pulsed laser to enhance the coating characteristics of plasma-sprayed HA coatings. Preliminary results show the laser-treated coatings having a modified microstructure with crack networks and pores in the size range 5-30 microns. The pores and cracks were quantified by an image analyser. The crack network is less significant in coatings that are treated at lower energy intensity and this could be interesting in that the laser can be used to alter the surface phase composition as well as the morphology. However, repetitive passes with the pulsed laser did not help to seal the cracks that formed.

  3. Influence of Metal Properties on the Formation and Evolution of Metal Coatings During Mechanical Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liang; Lu, Yun; Sato, Hiromasa; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Guo, Jie

    2013-06-01

    Powders of Cu, Ti, Ni, Fe, and Zn metals were used to prepare coatings on the surfaces of Al2O3 balls by the mechanical coating technique. The coated Al2O3 balls were characterized with XRD and SEM. The results showed that all the metal powders except Ni formed continuous metal coatings. The evolution of metal coatings during mechanical coating was also investigated. The analysis indicates that as long as continuous metal coatings can be formed, the evolution can fall into the following stages: nucleation, formation and coalescence of discrete islands, formation and thickening of continuous coatings, and exfoliation of continuous coatings. Electronegativity of the metal was shown to have a major effect on the adhesion of the tiny metal particles on the surfaces of the Al2O3 balls during the initial stage of mechanical coating. The lower the electronegativity of the metal, the greater the coverage of the metal on the Al2O3 ball and the easier the adhesion of the tiny metal particles. Further, the better the plastic deformability of metal, the easier the cold welding among metal powder particles and the greater the thickness of the continuous metal coatings.

  4. Plasma formation and expansion in an electrothermal plasma injector

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, J.D.; Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    The experimental device SIRENS has been used to conduct studies on plasma formation and expansion in electrothermal launchers. The 1-D, time-dependent fluid dynamics code, ODIN, models the energy transport, particle transport, plasma resistivity, plasma viscosity, and the equation-of-state of the source and barrel of the SIRENS experiment. Because electrothermal plasmas are highly collisional (high-density, low-temperature), the plasma is modeled as a viscous fluid, assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium for each cell. The viscous drag forces were varied according to the Reynolds number of each cell. As the Reynolds number increases the modeled drag forces change accordingly, going from laminar to smooth turbulent to rough turbulent. The measured mass loss of the ablating liner (Lexan) in the source section is in good agreement with that predicted by the code. Comparisons between the measured and predicted pressures inside the barrel are in good agreement. The pressure reaches its maximum inside the source at approximately 45 {mu}s, then decreases steadily due to the drop in temperature and density. The plasma flows into the barrel and the pressure profile begins to flatten out and drop as the plasma exits the barrel. The variation of the plasma parameters as a function of the energy input to the source have also been calculated and will be discussed.

  5. Influence of Oxidation Behavior of Feedstock on Microstructure and Ablation Resistance of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconium Carbide Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Cui; Ge, Xuelian; Niu, Yaran; Li, Hong; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin; Sun, Jinliang

    2015-10-01

    Plasma spray is one of the suitable technologies to deposit carbide coatings with high melting point, such as ZrC. However, in the spray processes performed under atmosphere, oxidation of the carbide powder is inevitable. To investigate the influence of the oxidation behavior of feedstock on microstructure and ablation resistance of the deposited coating, ZrC coatings were prepared by atmospheric and vacuum plasma spray (APS and VPS) technologies, respectively. SiC-coated graphite was applied as the substrate. The obtained results showed that the oxidation of ZrC powder in APS process resulted in the formation of ZrO and Zr2O phases. Pores and cracks were more likely to be formed in the as-sprayed APS-ZrC coating. The VPS-ZrC coating without oxides possessed denser microstructure, higher thermal diffusivity, and lower coefficients of thermal expansion as compared with the APS-ZrC coating. A dense ZrO2 layer would be formed on the surface of the VPS-ZrC-coated sample during the ablation process and the substrate can be protected sufficiently after being ablated in high temperature plasma jet. However, the ZrO2 layer, formed by oxidation of the APS-ZrC coating having loose structure, was easy to be washed away by the shearing action of the plasma jet.

  6. Formation of ZrO{sub 2} in coating on Mg–3 wt.%Al–1 wt.%Zn alloy via plasma electrolytic oxidation: Phase and structure of zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Min; Kim, Yeon Sung; Yang, Hae Woong; Park, Joo Hyun; Ko, Young Gun; Shin, Dong Hyuk

    2015-01-15

    An investigation of the coating structure formed on Mg–3 wt.%Al–1 wt.%Zn alloy sample subjected to plasma electrolytic oxidation was examined by field-emission transmission electron microscopy. The plasma electrolytic oxidation process was conducted in a phosphoric acid electrolyte containing K{sub 2}ZrF{sub 6} for 600 s. Microstructural observations showed that the coating consisting of MgO, MgF{sub 2}, and ZrO{sub 2} phases was divided into three distinctive parts, the barrier, intermediate, and outer layers. Nanocrystalline MgO and MgF{sub 2} compounds were observed mainly in the barrier layer of ~ 1 μm thick near to the substrate. From the intermediate to outer layers, various ZrO{sub 2} polymorphs appeared due to the effects of the plasma arcing temperature on the phase transition of ZrO{sub 2} compounds during the plasma electrolytic oxidation process. In the outer layer, MgO compound grew in the form of a dendrite-like structure surrounded by cubic ZrO{sub 2}. - Highlights: • The barrier layer containing MgO and MgF{sub 2} was observed near to the Mg substrate. • In the intermediate layer, m-, t-, and o-ZrO{sub 2} compounds were additionally detected. • The outer layer contained MgO with the dendrite-like structure surrounded by c-ZrO{sub 2}. • The grain sizes of compounds in oxide layer increased from barrier to outer layer.

  7. Plasma sprayed rutile titania-nanosilver antibacterial coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jinjin; Zhao, Chengjian; Zhou, Jingfang; Li, Chunxia; Shao, Yiran; Shi, Chao; Zhu, Yingchun

    2015-11-01

    Rutile titania (TiO2) coatings have superior mechanical properties and excellent stability that make them preferential candidates for various applications. In order to prevent infection arising from bacteria, significant efforts have been focused on antibacterial TiO2 coatings. In the study, titania-nanosilver (TiO2/Ag) coatings with five different kinds of weight percentages of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were prepared by plasma spray. The feedstock powders, which had a composition of rutile TiO2 powders containing 1-10,000 ppm AgNPs, were double sintered and deposited on stainless steel substrates with optimized spraying parameters. X-Ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to analysize the phase composition and surface morphology of TiO2/Ag powders and coatings. Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) were employed to examine the antibacterial activity of the as-prepared coatings by bacterial counting method. The results showed that silver existed homogeneously in the TiO2/Ag coatings and no crystalline changed happened in the TiO2 structure. The reduction ratios on the TiO2/Ag coatings with 10 ppm AgNPs were as high as 94.8% and 95.6% for E. coli and S. aureus, respectively, and the TiO2/Ag coatings with 100-1000 ppm AgNPs exhibited 100% bactericidal activity against E. coli and S. aureus, which indicated the TiO2/Ag coatings with more than 10 ppm AgNPs had strong antibacterial activity. Moreover, the main factors influencing the antibacterial properties of TiO2/Ag coatings were discussed with grain size and the content of silver as well as the microstructure of the coatings.

  8. Plasma sprayed coatings for containment of Cu-Mg-Si metallic phase change material

    DOE PAGES

    Withey, Elizabeth Ann; Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Andraka, Charles E.; Gibbs, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the performance of Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ), Y2O3, and Al2O3 plasma sprayed coatings are investigated for their ability to prevent attack of Haynes 230 by a near-eutectic Cu-Mg-Si metallic phase change material (PCM) in a closed environment at 820 °C. Areas where coatings failed were identified with optical and scanning electron microscopy, while chemical interactions were clarified through elemental mapping using electron microprobe analysis. Despite its susceptibility to reduction by Mg, the Al2O3 coating performed well while the YSZ and Y2O3 coating showed clear areas of attack. These results are attributed to the evolution of gaseous Mg atmore » 820 °C leading to the formation of MgO and MgAl2O4.« less

  9. Fabrication and Tribological Evaluation of Vacuum Plasma-Sprayed B4C Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huiying; Niu, Yaran; Lin, Chucheng; Huang, Liping; Ji, Heng; Zheng, Xuebin

    2012-12-01

    B4C coating was fabricated by vacuum plasma spraying and the tribological properties of the coating against WC-Co alloy were evaluated by sliding wear tests. Al2O3 coating, one of the most commonly used wear-resistant coatings, was employed as comparison in the tribological evaluation. The results obtained show that, the B4C coating is composed of a large amount of nanostructured particles along with some amorphous phases. Both of the friction coefficient and wear rate of the B4C coating are much lower than those of the Al2O3 coating, and the tribological evaluation reveals a decreasing trend for the B4C coating in friction coefficient as well as wear rate with increasing normal load, which is explained in terms of the formation of a protective transfer layer on its worn surface. Tribofilm wear is found to be the dominant wear mechanism involved in the B4C/WC-Co alloy friction pair.

  10. Plasma electrolytic oxidation coating on AZ91 magnesium alloy modified by neodymium and its corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y. L.; Liu, Y. H.; Yu, S. R.; Zhu, X. Y.; Wang, Q.

    2008-03-01

    Ceramic coatings on the surfaces of Mg-9Al-1Zn (AZ91) magnesium alloy and Mg-9Al-1Zn-1Nd magnesium alloy (AZ91 magnesium alloy modified by neodymium, named as AZ91Nd in this paper) are synthesized in aluminate electrolyte by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process, respectively. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses show the PEO coating on the Mg-9Al-1Zn-1Nd alloy comprises not only MgO and Al 2O 3, which are found in the coating on the AZ91 alloy, but also a trace amount of Nd 2O 3. Microstructure observations indicate the addition of Nd can decrease the sizes of β phases and form Al 2Nd intermetallics in the AZ91 alloy. The fine β phases can effectively restrain the formation of unclosed-holes and greatly decrease the sizes of pores in the coating during the PEO process. In addition, the Al 2Nd intermetallics can be completely covered due to the lateral growth of the PEO coatings formed on the α and β phases. As a result, the coating on the AZ91Nd alloy possesses a dense microstructure compared with that on the AZ91 alloy. The following corrosion tests indicate the corrosion resistance of the PEO coating on the AZ91Nd alloy is evidently higher than that of the PEO coating on the AZ91 alloy.

  11. Plasma deposition of antimicrobial coating on organic polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rżanek-Boroch, Zenobia; Dziadczyk, Paulina; Czajkowska, Danuta; Krawczyk, Krzysztof; Fabianowski, Wojciech

    2013-02-01

    Organic materials used for packing food products prevent the access of microorganisms or gases, like oxygen or water vapor. To prolong the stability of products, preservatives such as sulfur dioxide, sulfites, benzoates, nitrites and many other chemical compounds are used. To eliminate or limit the amount of preservatives added to food, so-called active packaging is sought for, which would limit the development of microorganisms. Such packaging can be achieved, among others, by plasma modification of a material to deposit on its surface substances inhibiting the growth of bacteria. In this work plasma modification was carried out in barrier discharge under atmospheric pressure. Sulfur dioxide or/and sodium oxide were used as the coating precursors. As a result of bacteriological studies it was found that sulfur containing coatings show a 16% inhibition of Salmonella bacteria growth and 8% inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria growth. Sodium containing coatings show worse (by 10%) inhibiting properties. Moreover, films with plasma deposited coatings show good sealing properties against water vapor. Contribution to the Topical Issue "13th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (Hakone XIII)", Edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Henryca Danuta Stryczewska and Yvan Ségui.

  12. Failure analysis of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, C. C.; Miller, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Thermally induced failure processes of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings are examined. Cracking processes give rise to noise which was monitored by acoustic emission (AE) techniques. The sequential failure of coatings was examined from samples which were thermally cycled. Coatings of yttria-stabilized zirconia with and without a NiCrAlZr bond coat were plasma-sprayed onto U700 alloy rod. In some cases the substrate was intentionally overheated during deposition of the thermal protection system to check how this process variable influenced the AE response of the specimen. In this way a qualitative appraisal of how process variables affect coating integrity could be discerned in terms of cracking behavior. Results from up to seven consecutive thermal cycles are reported here. Coating failure was observed in all cases. Failure of the thermal protection system is progressive, since cracking and crack growth were observed prior to ultimate failure. Thus castastrophic failure occurs at some stage when there is a transformation from the microcrack to a macrocrack network.

  13. Mechanical and Tribological Behavior of Ni(Al)-Reinforced Nanocomposite Plasma Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahedi, B.

    2014-02-01

    The mechanical and tribological behavior and microstructural evolutions of the Ni(Al)-reinforced nanocomposite plasma spray coatings were studied. At first, the feedstock Ni(Al)-15 wt.% (Al2O3-13% TiO2) nanocomposite powders were prepared using low-energy mechanical milling of the pure Ni and Al powders as well as Al2O3-13% TiO2 nanoparticle mixtures. The characteristics of the powder particles and the prepared coatings depending on their microstructures were examined in detail. The results showed that the feedstock powders after milling contained only α-Ni solid solution with no trace of the intermetallic phase. However, under the air plasma spraying conditions, the NiAl intermetallic phase in the α-Ni solid solution matrix appeared. The lack of nickel aluminide formation during low-energy ball milling is beneficial hence, the exothermic reaction can occur between Ni and Al during plasma spraying, improving the adhesive strength of the nanocomposite coatings. The results also indicated that the microhardness of the α-Ni phase was 3.91 ± 0.23 GPa and the NiAl intermetallic phase had a mean microhardness of 5.69 ± 0.12 GPa. The high microhardness of the nanocomposite coatings must be due to the presence of the reinforcing nanoparticles. Due to the improvement in mechanical properties, the Ni(Al) nanocomposite coatings showed significant modifications in wear resistance with low frictional coefficient.

  14. Improved plasma performance in TEXTOR with silicon coated surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, J.; Esser, H.G.; Jackson, G.L.; Koenen, L.; Messiaen, A.; Ongena, J.; Philipps, V.; Pospiesczcyk, A.; Samm, U.; Schweer, B.; Unterberg, B.; the TEXTOR Team Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas-Laboratorium voor Plasmafysica, Association EURATOM-Etat Belge, Associatie EURATOM-Belgische Staat, Ecole Royale Militaire, Koninklijke Militaire School, B-1040, Brussels General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-9784 )

    1993-09-06

    Coating of the walls of TEXTOR with silicon has led to improved tokamak plasma performance. Very low concentrations of C, B, and O are measured. Radiation from silicon is located at the plasma periphery at [ital r]/[ital a][ge]0.75 and decreases with increasing plasma density. Density limits are enhanced by 30% as compared to boronized conditions; large density gradients and low electron temperatures at the edge ([lt]10 eV) are obtained. The improved confinement regimes observed earlier at low densities [[tau][sub [ital E

  15. Plasma cleaning of beryllium coated mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, L.; Marot, L.; Steiner, R.; Newman, M.; Widdowson, A.; Ivanova, D.; Likonen, J.; Petersson, P.; Pintsuk, G.; Rubel, M.; Meyer, E.; Contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    Cleaning systems of metallic first mirrors are needed in more than 20 optical diagnostic systems from ITER to avoid reflectivity losses. Currently, plasma sputtering is considered as one of the most promising techniques to remove deposits coming from the main wall (mainly beryllium and tungsten). This work presents the results of plasma cleaning of rhodium and molybdenum mirrors exposed in JET-ILW and contaminated with typical tokamak elements (including beryllium and tungsten). Using radio frequency (13.56 MHz) argon or helium plasma, the removal of mixed layers was demonstrated and mirror reflectivity improved towards initial values. The cleaning was evaluated by performing reflectivity measurements, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ion beam analysis.

  16. An Evaluation of Atmospheric-pressure Plasma for the Cost-Effective Deposition of Antireflection Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rob Sailer; Guruvenket Srinivasan; Kyle W. Johnson; Douglas L. Schulz

    2010-04-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma deposition (APPD) has previously been used to deposit various functional materials including polymeric surface modification layers, transparent conducting oxides, and photo catalytic materials. For many plasma polymerized coatings, reaction occurs via free radical mechanism where the high energy electrons from the plasma activate the olefinic carbon-carbon double bonds - a typical functional group in such precursors. The precursors for such systems are typically inexpensive and readily available and have been used in vacuum PECVD previously. The objectives are to investigate: (1) the effect of plasma power, gas composition and substrate temperature on the Si-based film properties using triethylsilane(TES) as the precursor; and (2) the chemical, mechanical, and optical properties of several experimental matrices based on Design of Experiment (DOE) principals. A simple APPD route has been utilized to deposit Si based films from an inexpensive precursor - Triethylsilane (TES). Preliminary results indicates formation of Si-C & Si-O and Si-O, Si-C & Si-N bonds with oxygen and nitrogen plasmas respectively. N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} plasma showed mixed trend; however oxygen remains a significant portion of all films, despite attempts to minimize exposure to atmosphere. SiN, SiC, and SiO ratios can be modified by the reaction conditions resulting in differing film properties. SE studies revealed that films with SiN bond possess refractive index higher than coatings with Si-O/Si-C bonds. Variable angle reflectance studies showed that SiOCN coatings offer AR properties; however thickness and refractive index optimization of these coatings remains necessary for application as potential AR coatings.

  17. Plasma-sprayed ceramic coatings for protection against molten metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Hollis, K. J.; Peters, M. I.; Bartram, B. D.

    2002-01-01

    Molten metal environments pose a special demand on materials due to the high temperature corrosion effects and thermal expansion mismatch induced stress effects. A solution that has been successfully employed is the use of a base material for the mechanical strength and a coating material for the chemical compatibility with the molten metal. The work described here used such an approach coating tungsten rods with aluminum oxide, yttria-stabilized zirconia, yttrium oxide, and erbium oxide deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying. The ceramic materials were deposited under varying conditions to produce different structures. Measurement of particle characteristics was performed to correlate to material properties. The coatings were tested in a thermal cycling environment to simulate the metal melting cycle expected in service. Results of the testing indicate the effect of material composition and spray conditions on the thermal cycle crack resistance of the coatings.

  18. Research of functional properties of nitride ion-plasma coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaulina, O. Yu; Ovechkin, B. B.; Papchenko, A. V.; Shvagrukova, E. V.

    2016-02-01

    This paper considers the influence of ion-plasma coatings with the use of nitrogen (N), zirconium nitride (ZrN), titanium-aluminum nitride (Ti,Al)N and titanium nitride and zirconium nitride by-layer (TiN+ZrN - eight layers) on the properties of steel 65X13. The main functional properties of the coatings are determined: microhardness, nanohardness, Young's modulus and corrosion resistance. It is shown that all the types of coatings allow increasing the physical and mechanical characteristics of instrument steel 65X13. Hardness and wear-resistance, depending on the type of the deposited coating, increase from 1, 5 to 4 times, corrosion resistance increases by tens times.

  19. Wear and microstructural integrity of ceramic plasma sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Lynn C.

    1999-10-01

    In this work a series of ceramic plasma sprayed (PS) coatings, both alumina- and chromia-based, were sprayed according to a matrix of deposition parameters in order to produce a broad range of microstructures. To investigate the effect of splat size on the coating response, a series of mono-crystalline a -alumina powders with very narrow particle size ranges, nominally 5, 10 and 18 microns in diameter, was sprayed. The coatings were extensively characterized for a variety of microstructural features, including porosity, the angular distribution and density of microcracks as well as the lamellar, or splat, dimensions, using techniques of metallurgical analysis and electron microscopy. The coatings were then evaluated using a series of micromechanical techniques, including indentation, controlled scratch testing, abrasion and dry particle erosion, to investigate their response to different contact situations. It was found that the microstructural features with the most influence on the behaviour of ceramic PS coatings during contact, or wear, by hard particles include, in order of importance: (1) macro-porosity, (2) horizontal crack density, (3) degree of flattening of the splats and (4) volume of unmelted particles, which are all linked to the level and strength of interlamellar bonding in the coating. The major effect of the inter-lamellar bonding in ceramic PS coatings was seen in the wear mechanism transitions. As the level of inter-splat bonding in the coating decreases, the contact load at which the transition from plastic deformation to splat fracture and debonding occurs does as well. However, the load at which catastrophic brittle fracture and spalling occur is increased. All of the micromechanical and wear methods evaluated in the present work were sensitive to differences in the coating microstructures to varying degrees. The low load abrasion results showed the most sensitivity to the microstructural differences of the coatings, followed by controlled

  20. Challenges Upon Reactive Plasma Spray Nitriding: Al Powders and Fabrication of AlN Coatings as a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2016-06-01

    Reactive plasma spraying (RPS) is a promising technology for the in situ formation of several ceramic coatings. The focus of this paper is to summarize the state of our current knowledge about the RPS process and using the nitriding of Al particles and the fabrication of aluminum nitride coatings, as a case study. The aspects and challenges in this process such as the influence of the plasma power, in-flight time, particle size, nitriding mechanism, splat morphology, in-flight particle diagnostics, N2 plasma gas, and the feeding rate on the RPS process are analyzed and discussed.

  1. In situ fabrication of blue ceramic coatings on wrought Al Alloy 2024 by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhijiang; Nie Xueyuan; Hu, Henry; Hussein, Riyad O.

    2012-03-15

    In situ formation of ceramic coatings on 2024 Al alloy with a blue color was successfully achieved using a plasma electrolytic oxidation process working at atmospheric pressure. This novel blue ceramic coating overcomes the shortcomings of surface treatments resulting from conventional dyeing processes by depositing organic dyes into the porous structure of anodic film, which has poor resistance to abrasion and rapid fading when exposed to sunlight. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy were employed to characterize the microstructure of the blue ceramic coating. The fabricated ceramic coating was composed of CoAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3.} By controlling the working parameters, the distribution of the CoAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase on the surface can be adjusted, and plays a key role in the appearance of the coating. Electrochemical testing, thermal cycling method, and pin-on-disk sliding wear testing were employed to evaluate corrosion, thermal cycling, and wear resistance of the ceramic coatings. The results indicate that the blue ceramic coating has a similar polarization resistance to that of conventional anodic film and can significantly enhance the corrosion resistance of aluminum alloy. There are no destructive horizontal cracks observed within the blue ceramic coating when subjected to 120 times of thermal cycling, which heats the samples up to 573 K and followed by submersion in water at room temperature for 10 min. Compared with the aluminum substrate as well as a conventional anodic film coated aluminum sample, the wear resistance of the blue ceramic coating coated sample was significantly increased while the coefficient of friction was decreased from 0.34 to 0.14.

  2. Plasma deposited stability enhancement coating for amorphous ketoprofen.

    PubMed

    Bosselmann, Stephanie; Owens, Donald E; Kennedy, Rachel L; Herpin, Matthew J; Williams, Robert O

    2011-05-01

    A hydrophobic fluorocarbon coating deposited onto amorphous ketoprofen via pulsed plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PPECVD) significantly prolonged the onset of recrystallization compared to uncoated drug. Rapid freezing (RF) employed to produce amorphous ketoprofen was followed by PPECVD of perfluorohexane. The effect of coating thickness on the recrystallization and dissolution behavior of ketoprofen was investigated. Samples were stored in open containers at 40°C and 75% relative humidity, and the onset of recrystallization was monitored by DSC. An increase in coating thickness provided enhanced stability against recrystallization for up to 6 months at accelerated storage conditions (longest time of observation) when compared to three days for uncoated ketoprofen. Results from XPS analysis demonstrated that an increase in coating thickness was associated with improved surface coverage thus enabling superior protection. Dissolution testing showed that at least 80% of ketoprofen was released in buffer pH 6.8 from all coated samples. Overall, an increase in coating thickness resulted in a more complete drug release due to decreased adhesion of the coating to the substrate.

  3. Effect of vacuum conditions and plasma concentration on the chemical composition and adhesion of vacuum-plasma coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, D. P.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Slabodchikov, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper reports on the chemical composition of titanium nitride (TiN) and silicon (Si) coatings deposited with a new technological vacuum plasma setup which comprises magnetron sputtering systems, arc evaporators, and an efficient plasma generator. It is shown that due to highly clean vacuum conditions and highly clean surface treatment in the gas discharge plasma, both the coating-substrate interface and the coatings as such are almost free from oxygen and carbon. It is found that the coating-substrate interface represents a layer of thickness ≥ 60 nm formed through vacuum plasma mixing of the coating and substrate materials. The TiN coatings obtained on the new equipment display a higher adhesion compared to brass coatings deposited by industrial technologies via intermediate titanium oxide layers. It is concluded that the designed vacuum plasma equipment allows efficient surface modification of materials and articles by vacuum plasma immersion processes.

  4. Thermophysical properties of plasma sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, K. E.; Lagedrost, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Thermophysical properties of plasma sprayed materials were determined for the following plasma sprayed materials: CaO - stabilized ZrO2, Y2O3 - stabilized ZerO2, Al2O3, HfO2 Mo, nichrome, NiAl, Mo-ZrO2, and MoAl2O3 mixtures. In all cases the thermal conductivity of the as-sprayed materials was found to be considerably lower than that of the bulk material. The flash-laser thermal diffusivity technique was used both for diffusivity determination of single-layer materials and to determine the thermal contact resistance at the interface of two-layer specimens.

  5. Improved adhesion of dense silica coatings on polymers by atmospheric plasma pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Cui, Linying; Ranade, Alpana N; Matos, Marvi A; Dubois, Geraud; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2013-09-11

    Oxygen atmospheric plasma was used to pretreat polycarbonate (PC) and stretched poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surfaces in order to enhance the adhesion of the dense silica coatings deposited by atmospheric plasma on the polymer substrates. The treatment time and chemical structure of the polymers were found to be important factors. For PC, a short treatment increased the adhesion energy, while longer treatment times decreased the adhesion. In contrast, plasma pretreatment monotonically decreased the adhesion of PMMA, and pristine PMMA exhibited much higher adhesion than the PC counterpart. We found that adhesion enhancement was achieved through improved chemical bonding, chain interdiffusion, and mechanical interlocking at the coating/substrate interface, after a short atmospheric plasma treatment. Decreased adhesion resulted from overoxidation and low-molecular-weight weak layer formation on the polymer surface by prolonged atmospheric plasma treatment. The dramatic differences in the behavior of PC and PMMA in relation to the plasma treatment time were due to their dissimilar resistance to atmospheric plasma exposure.

  6. Studies on the Sliding Wear Performance of Plasma Spray Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Maninder; Singh, Harpreet; Singh, Balraj; Singh, Bhupinder

    2010-01-01

    Two metallic powders namely Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al were coated on AISI 309 SS steel by shrouded plasma spray process. The wear behavior of the bare, Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al-coated AISI 309 SS steel was investigated according to ASTM Standard G99-03 on a Pin-on-Disc Wear Test Rig. The wear tests were carried out at normal loads of 30 and 50 N with a sliding velocity of 1 m/s. Cumulative wear rate and coefficient of friction (μ) were calculated for all the cases. The worn-out surfaces were then examined by scanning electron microscopy analysis. Both the as-sprayed coatings exhibited typical splat morphology. The XRD analysis indicated the formation of Ni phase for the Ni-20Cr coating and Ni3Al phase for the Ni3Al coating. It has been concluded that the plasma-sprayed Ni-20Cr and Ni3Al coatings can be useful to reduce the wear rate of AISI 309 SS steel. The coatings were found to be adherent to the substrate steel during the wear tests. The plasma-sprayed Ni3Al coating has been recommended as a better choice to reduce the wear of AISI 309 SS steel, in comparison with the Ni-20Cr coating.

  7. Development of plasma spray coated cylinder liners

    SciTech Connect

    Tricard, M.; Hagan, J.; Redington, P.; Subramanian, K.; Haselkorn, M.

    1996-09-01

    Improved fuel economy and reduction of emissions can be achieved by insulation of the combustion chamber components to reduce heat rejection. However, such insulation will also increase the operating temperature of the piston ring/cylinder liner interface from approximately 150 C to over 300 C. Since existing ring/liner materials cannot withstand these higher operating temperatures alternatives are needed for this critical tribological interface. This paper describes the development of a cost effective ID grinding technique for machining the bores of plasma sprayed diesel engine cylinder liners.

  8. Porosity in plasma sprayed alumina coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Ilavsky, J.; Herman, H.; Berndt, C.C.; Goland, A.N.; Long, G.G.; Krueger, S.; Allen, A.J.

    1994-03-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the porosity of plasma sprayed deposits of alumina in as-sprayed and heat-treated conditions. SANS results were compared with mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and water immersion techniques. Multiple small-angle neutron scattering yields a volume-weighted effective pore radius (R{sub eff}), for pores with sizes between 0.08 and 10{mu}m, the pore volume in this size region, and from the Porod region, the surface area of pores of all sizes.

  9. Comparison of nanowire pellicles for plasma membrane enrichment: coating nanowires on cell.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Kyoung; Rose, Rebecca; Choksawangkarn, Waeowalee; Graham, Lauren; Hu, Junkai; Fenselau, Catherine; Lee, Sang Bok

    2013-12-01

    A study is reported on the effect of nanowire density on the ease of pellicle formation and the enrichment of plasma membrane proteins for analysis by mass spectrometry. An optimized synthesis is reported for iron silicate nanowires with a narrow size range of 900 ±400 nm in length and 200 nm diameter. The nanowires were coated with Al2O3 and used to form pellicles around suspended multiple myeloma cells, which acted as a model for cells recovered from tissue samples. Lighter alumina-coated silica nanowires were also synthesized (Kim et al. 2013), which allowed a comparison of the construction of the two pellicles and of the effect of nanowire density on plasma membrane enrichment. Evidence is offered that the dense nanowire pellicle does not crush or distort these mammalian cells. Finally, the pellicles were incorporated into a mass-spectrometry-based proteomic workflow to analyze transmembrane proteins in the plasma membrane. In contrast to a prior comparison of the effect of density with nanoparticles pellicles (Choksawangkarn et al. 2013), nanowire density was not found to significantly affect the enrichment of the plasma membrane. However, nanowires with a favorable aspect for pellicle formation are more easily and reliably produced with iron silicate than with silica. Additionally, the method for pellicle formation was optimized through the use of iron silicate nanowires (ISNW), which is crucial to the improvement of PM protein enrichment and analysis.

  10. Thermal Barrier Coatings Made by the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gell, Maurice; Jordan, Eric H.; Teicholz, Matthew; Cetegen, Baki M.; Padture, Nitin P.; Xie, Liangde; Chen, Dianying; Ma, Xinqing; Roth, Jeffrey

    2008-03-01

    The solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process is a relatively new and flexible thermal spray process that can produce a wide variety of novel materials, including some with superior properties. The SPPS process involves injecting atomized droplets of a precursor solution into the plasma. The properties of resultant deposits depend on the time-temperature history of the droplets in the plasma, ranging from ultra-fine splats to unmelted crystalline particles to unpyrolized particles. By controlling the volume fraction of these three different constituents, a variety of coatings can be produced, all with a nanograin size. In this article, we will be reviewing research related to thermal barrier coatings, emphasizing the processing conditions necessary to obtain a range of microstructures and associated properties. The SPPS process produces a unique strain-tolerant, low-thermal conductivity microstructure consisting of (i) three-dimensional micrometer and nanometer pores, (ii) through-coating thickness (vertical) cracks, (iii) ultra-fine splats, and (iv) inter-pass boundaries. Both thin (0.12 mm) and thick (4 mm) coatings have been fabricated. The volume fraction of porosity can be varied from 10% to 40% while retaining the characteristic microstructure of vertical cracks and ultra-fine splats. The mechanism of vertical crack formation will be described.

  11. Use of molecular beams to support microspheres during plasma coating

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J.K.; Smith, R.D.; Johnson, W.L.; Letts, S.A.; Korbel, G.R.; Krenick, R.M.

    1980-08-26

    Spherical laser fusion targets can be levitated on beams of Ar or other gas atoms. This is an especially useful and reliable technique for supporting microspheres during plasma coating or plasma etching. The reliability of this technique is principally the result of two things: the success of a special centering device which provides a lateral, stabilizing force on the levitated microspheres; and a gas handling system which is capable of controlling levitation gas flow in the microtorr liter/sec range. We have determined that the operational regime of this device is that of Knudsen's flow. This knowledge of the flow characteristics has been important in developing this device.

  12. Surface modification of polyester fabric with plasma pretreatment and carbon nanotube coating for antistatic property improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. X.; Lv, J. C.; Ren, Y.; Zhi, T.; Chen, J. Y.; Zhou, Q. Q.; Lu, Z. Q.; Gao, D. W.; Jin, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    This study introduced a green method to prepare antistatic polyester (PET) fabrics by plasma pretreatment and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) coating. The influences of plasma conditions and SWCNT coating parameters on antistatic property of PET fabrics were investigated. PET fabrics were pretreated under various plasma conditions such as different treatment times, output powers and working gases, and then SWCNT coating on the plasma treated PET fabrics was carried out by coating-dry-cure using various coating parameters including different SWCNT concentrations, curing times and curing temperatures. PET fabrics were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and volume resistivity. SEM and XPS analysis of the plasma treated PET fabrics revealed the increase in surface roughness and oxygen/nitrogen containing groups on the PET fiber surface. SEM and XPS analysis of the plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics indicated the SWCNT coating on PET fiber surface. The plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics exhibited a good antistatic property, which increased and then decreased with the increasing plasma treatment time and output power. The antistatic property of the O2 plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabric was better and worse than that of N2 or Ar plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabric in the shorter treatment time and the longer treatment time, respectively. In addition, the antistatic property of the plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics also increased with the increasing SWCNT concentration, curing time and curing temperature in the range studied. Plasma conditions and SWCNT coating parameters had signally influence on the antistatic property of plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics. Therefore, adequate parameters should be carefully selected for the optimum antistatic property of the plasma treated and SWCNT coated PET fabrics.

  13. Plasma and Ion Sources in Large Area Coatings: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2005-02-28

    Efficient deposition of high-quality coatings often requires controlled application of excited or ionized particles. These particles are either condensing (film-forming) or assisting by providing energy and momentum to the film growth process, resulting in densification, sputtering/etching, modification of stress, roughness, texture, etc. In this review, the technical means are surveyed enabling large area application of ions and plasmas, with ion energies ranging from a few eV to a few keV. Both semiconductortype large area (single wafer or batch processing with {approx} 1000 cm{sup 2}) and in-line web and glass-coating-type large area (> 10{sup 7} m{sup 2} annually) are considered. Characteristics and differences between plasma and ion sources are explained. The latter include gridded and gridless sources. Many examples are given, including sources based on DC, RF, and microwave discharges, some with special geometries like hollow cathodes and E x B configurations.

  14. Ultrasmooth plasma polymerized coatings for laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Letts, S.A.; Myers, D.W.; Witt, L.A.

    1980-08-26

    Coatings for laser fusion targets were deposited up to 135 ..mu..m thick by plasma polymerization onto 140 ..mu..m diameter DT filled glass microspheres. Ultrasmooth surfaces (no defect higher than 0.1 ..mu..m) were achieved by eliminating particulate contamination. Process generated particles were eliminated by determining the optimum operating conditions of power, gas flow, and pressure, and maintaining these conditions through feedback control. From a study of coating defects grown over known surface irregularities, a quantitative relationship between irregularity size, film thickness, and defect size was determined. This relationship was used to set standards for the maximum microshell surface irregularity tolerable in the production of hydrocarbon or fluorocarbon coated laser fusion targets.

  15. Antifouling coatings for dental implants: Polyethylene glycol-like coatings on titanium by plasma polymerization.

    PubMed

    Buxadera-Palomero, Judit; Canal, Cristina; Torrent-Camarero, Sergi; Garrido, Beatriz; Javier Gil, Francisco; Rodríguez, Daniel

    2015-06-12

    Titanium dental implants are commonly used for the replacement of lost teeth, but they present a considerable number of failures due to the infection on surrounding tissues. The aim of this paper is the development of a polyethylene glycol-like (PEG-like) coating on the titanium surface by plasma polymerization to obtain a novel improved surface with suitable low bacterial adhesion and adequate cell response. Surface analysis data of these coatings are presented, in particular, water contact angle, surface roughness, and film chemistry, demonstrating the presence of a PEG-like coating. Streptococcus sanguinis and Lactobacillus salivarius bacterial adhesion assays showed a decreased adhesion on the plasma polymerized samples, while cell adhesion of fibroblasts and osteoblasts on the treated surfaces was similar to control surfaces. Thus, the PEG-like antifouling coating obtained by plasma polymerization on Ti confers this biomaterial's highly suitable properties for dental applications, as they reduce the possibility of infection while allowing the tissue integration around the implant.

  16. Vortex formation in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Osamu

    Complex plasma experiments in ground-based laboratories as well as in microgravity conditions have shown the formation of vortex structures in various conditions (e.g., 1,2,3,4). The vortex structures formed in a complex plasma are visible by naked eyes with the help of irradiating laser and the individual dust particles in the structure give us the opportunity to study detailed physics of the commonly observed natural phenomena known such as tornadoes, typhoons, hurricanes and dust devils. Based on the Navier-Stokes equation with proper complex plasma conditions we analyze as much as possible in a universal way the vortex structure and clarifies the role of the controlling parameters like flow velocity and external magnetic field. 1. G. E. Morfill,H. M. Thomas, U. Konopka,H. Rothermel, M. Zuzic, A. Ivlev, and J. Goree, Phys,. Rev. Lett. 83, 1598 (1999). 2. E. Nebbat and R. Annou, Phys. Plasmas 17, 093702 (2010). 3. Y. Saitou and O. Ishihara, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 185003 (2013). 4. V. N. Tsytovich and N. G. Gusein-zade, Plasma Phys. Rep. 39, 515 (2013).

  17. Effect of Microstructure on the Thermal Conductivity of Plasma-Sprayed Al2O3-YSZ Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xuemei; Liu, Ziwei; Kong, Mingguang; Wang, Yongzhe; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin; Zeng, Yi

    2016-04-01

    The microstructures of three atmospheric plasma-sprayed (APS) Al2O3-ZrO2 coatings were investigated using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The differences in the microstructures of the three Al2O3-ZrO2 coatings, including their phase compositions, cracks, pores, grain sizes, and solid solutions, were analyzed in detail. A close relationship was observed between the thermal conductivities of the coatings and the microstructures, and the Al2O3-YSZ coatings with more spherical pores, fewer vertical cracks, and finer grains exhibited the lowest thermal conductivity of 0.91 W/m·K. Compared with YSZ coatings, Al2O3-YSZ coatings can exhibit lower thermal conductivity, which may be attributed to the formation of an amorphous phase, smaller grains, and Al2O3-YSZ solid solution.

  18. A conformal oxidation-resistant, plasma-polymerized coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, Morton A.; Wydeven, Theodore; Lerner, Narcinda R.

    1991-01-01

    A comparative study was made of the surface recession (etching) of thin films of plasma polymerized tetrafluoro ethylene (PPTFE), polytetrafluoro ethylene (PTFE), and ion-beam sputter deposited polytetrafluoro ethylene (SPTFE) exposed to ground-state atomic oxygen downstream from a nonequilibrium radio-frequency O2 plasma. At 22 C, the etch rates for PTFE, SPTFE, and PPTFE were in the ratio of 8.7:1.8:1.0. A thin, conformal coating of PPTFE (etch rate of 0.3 nm/h at 22 C) was found to protect an underlying cast film of a reactive polymer, cis-1,4 polybutadiene, against ground-state atomic oxygen attack for the time required to fully etch away the PPTFE coating. From ESCA analysis, PTFE exhibited only minor surface oxidation (uptake of 0.5 atom percent O) upon etching, its F/C ratio decreasing slightly from 2.00 to 1.97; PPTFE exhibited considerable surface oxidation (uptake of 5.9 atom percent O) intermediate between those of PTFE and PPTFE, with a decrease in F/C ratio from 1.73 to 1.67. A plasma-polymerized fluorocarbon coating such as PPTFE might be useful for space applications to protect polymers that are vulnerable to oxidation or degradation by oxygen atoms.

  19. Preparation and properties of plasma electrolytic oxidation coating on sandblasted pure titanium by a combination treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Yuan; Zhu, Rui-Fu; Lu, Yu-Peng; Xiao, Gui-Yong; Zhao, Xing-Chuan; He, Kun; Yuan, Y F; Li, Ying; Ma, Xiao-Ni

    2014-09-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is one of the most applicable methods to produce bioceramic coating on a dental implant and sandblasting is a primary technique to modify metal surface properties. This study aims to deposit bioceramic Ca- and P-containing coatings on sandblasted commercially pure titanium by PEO technique to improve its bioactive performance. The time-dependent modified surfaces are characterized in terms of their microstructure, phase, chemical composition, mechanical properties and bioactivities. The results show that the combination-treated coating exhibits better properties than the PEO-treated one, especially in bioactivities, as evidenced by the HA formation after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 5 days and the cell viability after seeding for 1 or 3 days. The enhancement of the modified surface is attributed to a combination of the mechanical sandblasting and the microplasma oxidation.

  20. Plasma polymerized carvone as an antibacterial and biocompatible coating.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuen Wah; Siow, Kim Shyong; Ng, Pei Yuen; Gires, Usup; Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin

    2016-11-01

    Antibacterial coating is important to prevent the colonization of medical devices by biofilm forming bacteria that would cause infection and sepsis in patients. Current coating techniques such as immobilization of antimicrobial compounds, time-releasing antibiotic agents and silver nanoparticles, require multiple processing steps, and they have low efficacy and low stability. We proposed a single-step plasma polymerization of an essential oil known as carvone to produce a moderately hydrophobic antibacterial coating (ppCar) with an average roughness of <1nm. ppCar had a static water contact angle of 78°, even after 10days of air aging and it maintained its stability throughout 24h of LB broth immersion. ppCar showed promising results in the live-dead fluorescence assay and crystal violet assay. The biofilm assay showed an effective reduction of E. coli and S. aureus bacteria by 86% and 84% respectively. ppCar is also shown to rupture the bacteria membrane for its bactericidal effects. The cytotoxicity test indicated that the coating is not cytotoxic to the human cell line. This study would be of interest to researcher keen on producing a bacteria-resistance and biocompatible coating on different substrates in a cost-effective manner. PMID:27524089

  1. Plasma polymerized carvone as an antibacterial and biocompatible coating.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuen Wah; Siow, Kim Shyong; Ng, Pei Yuen; Gires, Usup; Yeop Majlis, Burhanuddin

    2016-11-01

    Antibacterial coating is important to prevent the colonization of medical devices by biofilm forming bacteria that would cause infection and sepsis in patients. Current coating techniques such as immobilization of antimicrobial compounds, time-releasing antibiotic agents and silver nanoparticles, require multiple processing steps, and they have low efficacy and low stability. We proposed a single-step plasma polymerization of an essential oil known as carvone to produce a moderately hydrophobic antibacterial coating (ppCar) with an average roughness of <1nm. ppCar had a static water contact angle of 78°, even after 10days of air aging and it maintained its stability throughout 24h of LB broth immersion. ppCar showed promising results in the live-dead fluorescence assay and crystal violet assay. The biofilm assay showed an effective reduction of E. coli and S. aureus bacteria by 86% and 84% respectively. ppCar is also shown to rupture the bacteria membrane for its bactericidal effects. The cytotoxicity test indicated that the coating is not cytotoxic to the human cell line. This study would be of interest to researcher keen on producing a bacteria-resistance and biocompatible coating on different substrates in a cost-effective manner.

  2. Microstructure and Wear Behavior of Conventional and Nanostructured Plasma-Sprayed WC-Co Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, E.; Bannier, E.; Salvador, M. D.; Bonache, V.; García, J. C.; Morgiel, J.; Grzonka, J.

    2010-09-01

    WC-12%Co coatings were deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying using conventional and nanostructured powders and two secondary plasmogenous gases (He and H2). Coating microstructure and phase composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and x-ray diffraction techniques (XRD) techniques. This study examined wear and friction properties of the coatings under dry friction conditions. SEM was used to analyze abraded surface microstructure. Coating microhardness and fracture toughness were also determined. All coatings displayed strong decarburization as a result of WC decomposition, which gave rise to the formation of secondary phases (W2C and W). A very fine undissolved WC crystalline dispersion coexisted with these new phases. TEM observation confirmed that the matrix was predominantly amorphous and filled with block-type, frequently dislocated crystallites. Wear was observed to follow a three-body abrasive mechanism, since debris between the ball and the coating surface was detected. The main wear mechanism was based on subsurface cracking, owing to the arising debris. WC grain decomposition and dissolution were concluded to be critical factors in wear resistance. The level of decomposition and dissolution could be modified by changing the plasmogenous gas or feed powder grain size. The influence of the plasmogenous gas on wear resistance was greater than the influence of feedstock particle size.

  3. Hierarchical Formation of Intrasplat Cracks in Thermal Spray Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2016-06-01

    Intrasplat cracks, an essential feature of thermally sprayed ceramic coatings, play important roles in determining coating properties. However, final intrasplat crack patterns are always considered to be disordered and irregular, resulting from random cracking during splat cooling, since the detailed formation process of intrasplat cracks has scarcely been considered. In the present study, the primary formation mechanism for intrasplat cracking was explored based on both experimental observations and mechanical analysis. The results show that the intrasplat crack pattern in thermally sprayed ceramic splats presents a hierarchical structure with four sides and six neighbors, indicating that intrasplat crack patterns arise from successive domain divisions due to sequential cracking during splat cooling. The driving forces for intrasplat cracking are discussed, and the experimental data quantitatively agree well with theoretical results. This will provide insight for further coating structure designs and tailoring by tuning of intrasplat cracks.

  4. Effect of Plasma Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing on HVOF-Sprayed Stainless Steel Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Gayoung; Bae, Gyuyeol; Moon, Kyungil; Lee, Changhee

    2013-12-01

    In this work, the effects of plasma nitriding (PN) and nitrocarburizing on HVOF-sprayed stainless steel nitride layers were investigated. 316 (austenitic), 17-4PH (precipitation hardening), and 410 (martensitic) stainless steels were plasma-nitrided and nitrocarburized using a N2 + H2 gas mixture and the gas mixture containing C2H2, respectively, at 550 °C. The results showed that the PN and nitrocarburizing produced a relatively thick nitrided layer consisting of a compound layer and an adjacent nitrogen diffusion layer depending on the crystal structures of the HVOF-sprayed stainless steel coatings. Also, the diffusion depth of nitrogen increased when a small amount of C2H2 (plasma nitrocarburizing process) was added. The PN and nitrocarburizing resulted in not only an increase of the surface hardness, but also improvement of the load bearing capacity of the HVOF-sprayed stainless steel coatings because of the formation of CrN, Fe3N, and Fe4N phases. Also, the plasma-nitrocarburized HVOF-sprayed 410 stainless steel had a superior surface microhardness and load bearing capacity due to the formation of Cr23C6 on the surface.

  5. Investigation of the Electrolyte Effects on Formation of Vanadium Carbide via Plasma Electrolytic Saturation Method (pes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbanian, Babak; Khoie, Seyed Mohammad Mousavi; Rasouli, Mahmood; Doodran, Ramona Javadi

    2016-02-01

    One of the most important hardening methods of tool steel is the use of carbide coatings. During this process, vanadium atoms diffuse the specimen’s surface at high temperature and reacts with the available carbon in steel and create vanadium carbide with high hardness. During the plasma electrolytic saturation (PES) process, the vanadium element diffuses with the help of plasma and increases up to around 950∘ as a result of the temperature, providing conditions for the creation of vanadium carbide. The best combination of electrolyte is 4g vanadium oxide and 50mL hydrochloric acid and different concern of sodium hydroxide. The results indicate that the formed coating is about 30μm. As the conductivity increases, the condition for diffusion is provided; however, with increase in the temperature, the diffusion decreases. The coating formation is observed in the current at 9-11 A and hardness of this coating is about 1400vickers.

  6. On the interest of carbon-coated plasma reactor for advanced gate stack etching processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, R.; Cunge, G.; Joubert, O.

    2007-03-15

    In integrated circuit fabrication the most wide spread strategy to achieve acceptable wafer-to-wafer reproducibility of the gate stack etching process is to dry-clean the plasma reactor walls between each wafer processed. However, inherent exposure of the reactor walls to fluorine-based plasma leads to formation and accumulation of nonvolatile fluoride residues (such as AlF{sub x}) on reactor wall surfaces, which in turn leads to process drifts and metallic contamination of wafers. To prevent this while keeping an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reactor wall material, a coating strategy must be used, in which the reactor is coated by a protective layer between wafers. It was shown recently that deposition of carbon-rich coating on the reactor walls allows improvements of process reproducibility and reactor wall protection. The authors show that this strategy results in a higher ion-to-neutral flux ratio to the wafer when compared to other strategies (clean or SiOCl{sub x}-coated reactors) because the carbon walls load reactive radical densities while keeping the same ion current. As a result, the etching rates are generally smaller in a carbon-coated reactor, but a highly anisotropic etching profile can be achieved in silicon and metal gates, whose etching is strongly ion assisted. Furthermore, thanks to the low density of Cl atoms in the carbon-coated reactor, silicon etching can be achieved almost without sidewall passivation layers, allowing fine critical dimension control to be achieved. In addition, it is shown that although the O atom density is also smaller in the carbon-coated reactor, the selectivity toward ultrathin gate oxides is not reduced dramatically. Furthermore, during metal gate etching over high-k dielectric, the low level of parasitic oxygen in the carbon-coated reactor also allows one to minimize bulk silicon reoxidation through HfO{sub 2} high-k gate dielectric. It is then shown that the BCl{sub 3} etching process of the HfO{sub 2} high-k material is highly

  7. Plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings on γTiAl alloy for potential biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Lara Rodriguez, L; Sundaram, P A; Rosim-Fachini, E; Padovani, A M; Diffoot-Carlo, N

    2014-07-01

    In an attempt to enhance the potential of gamma titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy as a biomaterial, its surface characteristics were successfully modified using a calcium and phosphorous rich electrolyte through the application of plasma electrolytic oxidation. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to characterize the morphology and topographical features of the resulting coating while X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to determine the surface oxide composition. The mechanical properties of the surface coating were characterized by nanoindentation studies. The results observed show the formation of a submicron scale porous structure and a concomitant increase in the surface roughness. The surface oxide was composed of rutile and anatase phases. Composition gradients of Ca and P were also present which can possibly enhance the biomaterial application potential of this treated surface. Nanoindentation measurements indicate the formation of a fairly compact oxide during the process. PMID:24259371

  8. Character of laser-glazed, plasma-sprayed zirconia coatings on stainless steel substrata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischman, G. S.; Chen, C. H.; Rigsbee, J. M.; Brown, S. D.

    1985-01-01

    Partially stabilized zirconia was applied as coatings to 316L stainless steel substrata using an 80-kw arc-plasma unit. Some of these coating-substrate systems were subsequently glazed using a 10 kw CO2 continuous-wavelength laser. SEM was used to characterize the microstructures of the coatings and coating-substrate interfaces. Results are reported and discussed.

  9. Influence of injected silver content on synthesis of silver coated nickel particles by DC thermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Si Taek; Kim, Tae-Hee; Park, Dong-Wha

    2016-06-01

    Silver nanoparticle-coated spherical nickel particles were prepared from a mixture of micro-sized silver and nickel as raw materials by DC thermal plasma treatment. The mixture of micro-sized silver and nickel powders was injected into the high-temperature region of an argon thermal plasma jet. Although the silver, with its very high thermal conductivity and relatively low boiling point, was thoroughly evaporated by this process, nickel was not evaporated perfectly because of its comparatively low thermal conductivity and high boiling point. The rough nickel powder was spheroidized as it melted. Finally, silver evaporated by the thermal plasma quickly condensed into nanoparticles on the surfaces of the micro-sized spherical nickel particles, aided by the sharp temperature gradient of the thermal plasma jet. With varying the ratios of silver to nickel feedstock from 1:10 to 5:1, the products synthesized in each condition were examined by XRD, XPS, FE-SEM, and FE-TEM. More silver nanoparticles were attached on the nickel by increasing the injected feedstock to 9.8 at% silver. Meanwhile, a decrease of silver in the products was observed when larger amounts of silver were introduced to the thermal plasma jet. The exposed silver components decreased with greater proportions of silver feedstock because of the metal's dendritic structure and the formation of silver-coated silver particles.

  10. Ceramic plasma-sprayed coating of melting crucibles for casting metal fuel slugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki Hwan; Lee, Chong Tak; Lee, Chan Bock; Fielding, R. S.; Kennedy, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    Thermal cycling and melt reaction studies of ceramic coatings plasma-sprayed on Nb substrates were carried out to evaluate the performance of barrier coatings for metallic fuel casting applications. Thermal cycling tests of the ceramic plasma-sprayed coatings to 1450 °C showed that HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating had good cycling characteristics with few interconnected cracks even after 20 cycles. Interaction studies by 1550 °C melt dipping tests of the plasma-sprayed coatings also indicated that HfN and Y2O3 do not form significant reaction layer between U-20 wt.% Zr melt and the coating layer. Plasma-sprayed Y2O3 coating exhibited the most promising characteristics among HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating.

  11. Plasma-sprayed metal-glass fluoride coatings for lubrication to 1170 K (1650 F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma spray of Nichrome matrix composite contains dispersed glass for oxidation protection and calcium fluoride for lubrication. Coatings can be applied to bearing journals and bearing bores. Coating was easily machinable and had excellent bond strength on substrate metal.

  12. Ceramic plasma-sprayed coating of melting crucibles for casting metal fuel slugs

    SciTech Connect

    K.H. Kim; C.T. Lee; C.B. Lee; R.S. Fielding; J.R. Kennedy

    2013-10-01

    Thermal cycling and melt reaction studies of ceramic coatings plasma-sprayed on Nb substrates were carried out to evaluate the performance of barrier coatings for metallic fuel casting applications. Thermal cycling tests of the ceramic plasma-sprayed coatings to 1450 degrees C showed that HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating had good cycling characteristics with few interconnected cracks even after 20 cycles. Interaction studies by 1550 degrees C melt dipping tests of the plasma-sprayed coatings also indicated that HfN and Y2O3 do not form significant reaction layer between U–20 wt.% Zr melt and the coating layer. Plasma-sprayed Y2O3 coating exhibited the most promising characteristics among HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating.

  13. Effect of substrate preheating temperature and coating thickness on residual stress in plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Dapei

    2015-07-01

    A thermal-mechanical coupling model was developed based on thermal-elastic- plastic theory according the special process of plasma spraying Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating upon Ti-6Al-4V substrate. On the one hand, the classical Fourier transient heat conduction equation was modified by introducing the effect item of deformation on temperature, on the other hand, the Johnson-Cook model, suitable for high temperature and high strain rate conditions, was used as constitutive equation after considering temperature softening effect, strain hardening effect and strain rate reinforcement effect. Based on the above coupling model, the residual stress field within the HA coating was simulated by using finite element method (FEM). Meanwhile, the substrate preheating temperature and coating thickness on the influence of residual stress components were calculated, respectively. The failure modes of coating were also preliminary analyzed. In addition, in order to verify the reliability of calculation, the material removal measurement technique was applied to determine the residual stress of HA coating near the interface. Some important conclusions are obtained.

  14. Chlorine-rich plasma polymer coating for the prevention of attachment of pathogenic fungal cells onto materials surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamont-Friedrich, Stephanie J.; Michl, Thomas D.; Giles, Carla; Griesser, Hans J.; Coad, Bryan R.

    2016-07-01

    The attachment of pathogenic fungal cells onto materials surfaces, which is often followed by biofilm formation, causes adverse consequences in a wide range of areas. Here we have investigated the ability of thin film coatings from chlorinated molecules to deter fungal colonization of solid materials by contact killing of fungal cells reaching the surface of the coating. Coatings were deposited onto various substrate materials via plasma polymerization, which is a substrate-independent process widely used for industrial coating applications, using 1,1,2-trichloroethane as the process vapour. XPS surface analysis showed that the coatings were characterized by a highly chlorinated hydrocarbon polymer nature, with only a very small amount of oxygen incorporated. The activity of these coatings against human fungal pathogens was quantified using a recently developed, modified yeast assay and excellent antifungal activity was observed against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. Plasma polymer surface coatings derived from chlorinated hydrocarbon molecules may therefore offer a promising solution to preventing yeast and mould biofilm formation on materials surfaces, for applications such as air conditioners, biomedical devices, food processing equipment, and others.

  15. Low friction stainless steel coatings graphite doped elaborated by air plasma sprayed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harir, A.; Ageorges, H.; Grimaud, A.; Fauchais, P.; Platon, F.

    2004-10-01

    A new process has been developed to incorporate graphite particles into a stainless steel coating during its formation. Four means have been tested to inject the graphite particles outside the plasma jet and its plume: graphite suspension, a graphite rod rubbed on the rotating sample, powder injection close to the substrate with an injector, or a specially designed guide. The last process has been shown to be the most versatile and the most easily controllable. It allows the incorporation of between 2 and 12 vol.% of graphite particles (2 15 µm) within the plasma sprayed stainless steel coatings. A volume fraction of 2% seems to give the best results with a slight decrease (6%) of the coating hardness. This volume fraction also gave the best results in dry friction on the pin-on-disk apparatus. Depending on the sliding velocity (0.1 0.5 m/s) and loads (3.7 28 N), the dry friction coefficient against a 100C6 pin is reduced by between 1.5 and 4 compared with that obtained with plasma sprayed stainless steel.

  16. Metallurgical characterization of plasma-sprayed tungsten carbide-cobalt coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rangaswamy, S.

    1987-01-01

    Four commercial WC-Co powders prepared from different manufacturing techniques and having variations in binder metal content (11-20% wt), and WC grain size (1-15 ..mu.. m). Using identical process parameters, these powders were plasma sprayed, and the resulting coatings were characterized for changes in chemistry, phase content, and microstructural parameters. Finally, the coatings were evaluated for resistance to abrasion, sliding wear, particle erosion, and cavitation erosion. It was found that, in all cases, the plasma-spray process resulted in substantial loss of carbon leading to a decrease in the monocarbide content and an increase in subcarbides such as W/sub 2/C, and WC/sub 1-x/. The combined effects of carbon loss and high temperatures in the plasma resulted in the formation of several Co/sub x/ W/sub y/C/sub z/ phases, among which Co/sub 3/W/sub 3/C was predominant. The extent to which such reactions occur was found to depend on several factors including starting chemistry, powder size, initial phase content, and carbide grain size. In general, finer size powders containing coarser WC grains tend to lose more carbon, whereas powders containing W/sub 2/C tend to lose somewhat less carbon. Wear properties of WC-Co coatings depend on porosity, carbon content, mean diameter of carbide grains and mean free path of the matrix phase in the microstructure.

  17. Microstructural study of as sprayed and heat treated Ni3Al coatings deposited by air plasma spraying technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, K.; Rafiq, M. A.; Nusair Khan, A.; Rauf, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    Air plasma spraying system was utilized to deposit Ni3Al coatings on AISI 321 steel samples. After plasma spraying the coatings were heat treated at different temperatures i.e. 500 °C to 800 °C for 10 to 100 hours. The characterization tools such as, X-Ray diffraction analysis, optical and scanning electron microscopy were used. By comparing the XRD scan data of as sprayed and heat treated coating, it was observed that the formation of NiO increases drastically with time and temperature. Due to the formation of NiO, hardness was also enhanced. The oxidation behavior was observed by using optical microscope and when it was studied that the oxidation was increasing with time and temperature. Further, the SEM tool was utilized to study the detail microstructural behavior such as shrinkage cavity and oxide particles. The other phases like alumina and spinel phases were determined by using Energy dispersive spectrometer method.

  18. Modulated plasma deposition of super hydrophobic fluorinated coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favia, Pietro

    2002-10-01

    Modulated (pulsed) RF glow discharges fed with unsaturated fluorocarbons originate often films with superior characteristics and remarkable monomer structure retention degree. Properties such as low dielectric constant, low friction coefficient, high flexibility and high hydrophobic character can be granted by such coatings, as well as applications in textiles, packaging, biomaterials, microelectronics and other fields [1-4]. Albeit the surface chemistry of fluorinated films has been extensively analysed, very few works deal with the investigation of the plasma phase and of the material morphology and crystalline. We present our last results on the plasma deposition of coatings from modulated glow discharges fed with tetrafluoroethylene. Period and Duty Cycle (DC) have been changed in the range 20-200 ms and 2-100%, respectively. Chemical composition and structure of the coatings were determined by means of XPS, SIMS, FT-IR and XRD measurements; SEM and AFM allowed morphological investigations. The diagnostics of the gas phase was carried out by time resolved (TR) OES [5] and by IR-AS diagnostics [6]. At low DC (< 10%) a unique morphology is observed at the surface of the films, in form of ribbon-like features many microns long and hundreds of nanometers wide, whose surface density increases at lower DC values. XPS has been used to determine the surface fluorine to carbon ratio of the coatings; best-fitting procedures of the C1s signals have been also carried out. XPS and SIMS results show a high F/C ratio and a chemical structure close to conventional PTFE for samples with ribbon-like features. Due to the combined presence of structures and high fluorination degree, structured surfaces revealed very high hydrophobic character (Water Contact Angle > 150^o). XRD patterns of the structured coatings exhibited a diffraction peak at 2Θ = 18^o, characteristic of crystalline PTFE [4, 6]; this finding, and the presence of the structures, open questions about the

  19. Engineering the Microstructure of Solution Precursor Plasma-Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolissi, G.; Chazelas, C.; Bolelli, G.; Lusvarghi, L.; Vardelle, M.; Vardelle, A.

    2012-12-01

    This study examines the fundamental reactions that occur in-flight during the solution precursor plasma spraying (SPPS) of solutions containing Zr- and Y-based salts in water or ethanol solvent. The effect of plasma jet composition (pure Ar, Ar-H2 and Ar-He-H2 mixtures) on the mechanical break-up and thermal treatment of the solution, mechanically injected in the form of a liquid stream, was investigated. Observation of the size evolution of the solution droplets in the plasma flow by means of a laser shadowgraphy technique, showed that droplet break-up was more effective and solvent evaporation was faster when the ethanol-based solution was injected into binary or ternary plasma gas mixtures. In contrast with water-based solutions, residual liquid droplets were always detected at the substrate location. The morphology and structure of the material deposited onto stainless steel substrates during single-scan experiments were characterised by SEM, XRD and micro-Raman spectroscopy and were shown to be closely related to in-flight droplet behaviour. In-flight pyrolysis and melting of the precursor led to well-flattened splats, whereas residual liquid droplets at the substrate location turned into non pyrolysed inclusions. The latter, although subsequently pyrolysed by the plasma heat during the deposition of entire coatings, resulted in porous "sponge-like" structures in the deposit.

  20. Negative plasma potential in a multidipole chamber with a dielectric coated plasma boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, J. P.; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2012-05-15

    Negative plasma potentials with respect to a grounded wall that was coated with a dielectric have been achieved in an electropositive plasma confined by a multidipole device. A Langmuir probe was used to measure the density and temperatures of the bi-Maxwellian distribution electrons and an emissive probe was used to measure the plasma potential profile near the plasma boundary. For many discharge parameters, the potential profile was that of a typical electropositive sheath, but it was shifted negative due to negative charge accumulated on the plasma-surface boundary. A virtual cathode was observed near the boundary when the neutral pressure, primary electron energy, and/or discharge current were low ({approx}2 x 10{sup -4} Torr, {approx}60 eV, and 80 mA, respectively). The behavior of the sheath potential was shown to be consistent with that predicted by particle balance and a qualitative mechanism for wall charging is presented.

  1. Very low pressure plasma sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coating using a low-energy plasma gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Nannan; Bolot, Rodolphe; Planche, Marie-Pierre; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, a more economical low-energy plasma source was used to perform a very low pressure plasma-spray (VLPPS) process. The plasma-jet properties were analyzed by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Moreover, yttria-stabilized zirconia coating (YSZ) was elaborated by a F100 low-power plasma gun under working pressure of 1 mbar, and the substrate specimens were partially shadowed by a baffle-plate during plasma spraying for obtaining different coating microstructures. Based on the SEM observation, a column-like grain coating was deposited by pure vapor deposition at the shadowed region, whereas, in the unshadowed region, the coating exhibited a binary microstructure which was formed by a mixed deposition of melted particles and evaporated particles. The mechanical properties of the coating were also well under investigation.

  2. Phase Composition, Microstructure, and Tribological Property of Plasma-Sprayed TiC-BASED Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shibin; Zou, Zengda; Liu, Xuemei; Shi, Hanchao

    TiC-based wear resistant coating was prepared by plasma spraying using reconstituted composite powders doped with ultra-fine carbide. Phase composition and microstructure of as-sprayed coating were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) utilizing backscattered imaging mode (BSE), and electron probe micro-analysis. Wear test was performed by using a ring-on-block tester under dry sliding condition. Results show that the coating adheres well to the substrate and no delamination appears. TiC content underwent pronounced reduction because of oxidation, reaction, and physical loss. Reactions between TiC and Mo and probably between dissociated C and Mo lead to the formation of Mo2C. Wear resistance of NiCrMo-TiC coating is about 4-8 times higher than that of substrate under different applied force. This work shed light on the reconstitution of spraying powder doped with ultra-fine reinforce phase particles, and the present results are important for the preparation of nano-doped TiC-based coatings.

  3. Induction plasma calcining of pigment particles for thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    Induction plasma heating techniques were studied for calcining zinc orthotitanate particles for use in thermal control coatings. Previous studies indicated that the optimum calcining temperature is between 1400 and 1750 C. An intermediate temperature (1670 C) was chosen as a reference point for running a temperature series at the reference point and 220 C on both sides. The effect of varying chamber temperature on the reflectance spectra, before and after vacuum UV irradiation, is presented. The correlation between Zn2Ti04 paramagnetic resonance activity and its susceptibility to vacuum UV damage is discussed.

  4. The Tribological Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Al-Si Composite Coatings Reinforced with Nanodiamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Mingdong; Zhang, Cheng; Lahiri, Debrupa; Agarwal, Arvind

    2012-06-01

    Al-Si composite coatings reinforced with 0 vol.%, 0.5 vol.%, and 2 vol.% nanodiamond were synthesized by plasma spraying. The effect of the addition of nanodiamond on the microstructure, hardness, and tribological performance of the composite coatings is investigated. The addition of 2 vol.% nanodiamond results in 45% improvement in the wear resistance of Al-Si coating. Al-Si coating with 0.5 vol.% nanodiamond exhibited lower coefficient of friction (0.45) with a 12% improvement in the wear resistance. Plasma-sprayed AlSi coatings with nanodiamond have excellent potential as wear-resistant coatings in automotive applications.

  5. Water vapor resistance of plasma-polymerized coatings on potassium bromide windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.; Johnson, C. C.

    1981-01-01

    Plasma-polymerized tetrafluoroethylene (PPTFE) coated potassium bromide IR window are shown to possess better resistance to moisture than either ethylene or chlorotrifluoroethylene. The PPTFE-coated windows tolerated an upper limit relative humidity of about 80% at 297 K, without visible damage to either window or coating, over a period of 24 hours. Elemental analysis of the bulk, and photoelectron spectroscopy of the coating surface, showed that PPTFE coatings deposited downstream of the internal plasma reactor electrodes contained less atmospheric oxygen than coatings deposited between the electrodes; perhaps accounting for the improved moisture resistance.

  6. Microstructures and Dielectric Properties of PZT Coatings Prepared by Supersonic Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guolu; Gu, Linsong; Wang, Haidou; Xing, Zhiguo; Zhu, Lina

    2014-02-01

    This paper studied the microstructures and dielectric properties of PZT coatings prepared by supersonic plasma spraying. Samples of the PZT coatings were evaluated by various techniques. The phases and microstructures of the coatings were investigated by XRD, SEM, and TEM, respectively. The results showed that the coatings deposited on steel substrate had a dense microstructure, and there was no phase transformation during spraying. Additionally, the Curie temperature of the PZT coatings was about 370 °C by the investigation of dielectric constant.

  7. Microstructures and bond strengths of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings on porous titanium substrates.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ik-Hyun; Nomura, N; Chiba, A; Murayama, Y; Masahashi, N; Lee, Byong-Taek; Hanada, S

    2005-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) coating was carried out by plasma spraying on bulk Ti substrates and porous Ti substrates having a Young's modulus similar to that of human bone. The microstructures and bond strengths of HA coatings were investigated in this study. The HA coatings with thickness of 200-250 microm were free from cracks at interfaces between the coating and Ti substrates. XRD analysis revealed that the HA powder used for plasma spraying had a highly crystallized apatite structure, while the HA coating contained several phases other than HA. The bond strength between the HA coating and the Ti substrates evaluated by standard bonding test (ASTM C633-01) were strongly affected by the failure behavior of the HA coating. A mechanism to explain the failure is discussed in terms of surface roughness of the plasma-sprayed HA coatings on the bulk and porous Ti substrates.

  8. Microstructure and characterization of a novel cobalt coating prepared by cathode plasma electrolytic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Cheng; He, Yedong

    2015-10-01

    A novel cobalt coating was prepared by cathode plasma electrolytic deposition (CPED). The kinetics of the electrode process in cathode plasma electrolytic deposition was studied. The composition and microstructure of the deposited coatings were investigated by SEM, EDS, XRD and TEM. The novel cobalt coatings were dense and uniform, showing a typically molten morphology, and were deposited with a rather fast rate. Different from the coatings prepared by conventional electrodeposition or chemical plating, pure cobalt coatings with face center cubic (fcc) structure were obtained by CPED. The deposited coatings were nanocrystalline structure with an average grain size of 40-50 nm, exhibited high hardness, excellent adhesion with the stainless steels, and superior wear resistance. The properties of the novel cobalt coatings prepared by CPED have been improved significantly, as compared with that prepared by conventional methods. It reveals that cathode plasma electrolytic deposition is an effective way to prepare novel cobalt coatings with high quality.

  9. Controlled drug release through a plasma polymerized tetramethylcyclo-tetrasiloxane coating barrier.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Shigemasa; Chen, Meng; Zamora, Paul O

    2012-01-01

    A plasma polymerized tetramethylcyclo-tetrasiloxane (TMCTS) coating was deposited onto a metallic biomaterial, 316 stainless steel, to control the release rate of drugs, including daunomycin, rapamycin and NPC-15199 (N-(9-fluorenylmethoxy-carbonyl)-leucine), from the substrate surface. The plasma-state polymerized TMCTS thin film was deposited in a vacuum plasma reactor operated at a radio-frequency of 13.56 MHz, and was highly adhesive to the stainless steel, providing a smooth and hard coating layer for drugs coated on the substrate. To investigate the influence of plasma coating thickness on the drug diffusion profile, coatings were deposited at various time lengths from 20 s to 6 min, depending on the type of drug. Atomic force spectroscopy (AFM) was utilized to characterize coating thickness. Drug elution was measured using a spectrophotometer or high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system. The experimental results indicate that plasma polymerized TMCTS can be used as an over-coating to control drug elution at the desired release rate. The drug-release rate was also found to be dependent on the molecular weight of the drug with plasma coating barrier on top of it. The in vitro cytotoxicity test result suggested that the TMCTS plasma coatings did not produce a cytotoxic response to mammalian cells. The non-cytotoxicity of TMCTS coating plus its high thrombo-resistance and biocompatibility are very beneficial to drug-eluting devices that contact blood.

  10. Plasma mediated collagen-I-coating of metal implant materials to improve biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Joerg; Koeller, Manfred; Bensch, Sebastian; Halfmann, Helmut; Awakowicz, Peter; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Esenwein, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    This study describes the collagen-I coating of titanium and steel implants via cold low-pressure gas plasma treatment. To analyze the coatings in terms of biocompatibility osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells and human leukocytes were cultivated on the metal surfaces. Two different implant materials were assessed (Ti6Al4V, X2CrNiMo18) and four different surface properties were evaluated: (a) plasma pretreated and collagen-I coated implant materials; (b) collagen-I dip-coated without plasma pretreatment; (c) plasma treated but not collagen-I coated; (d) standard implant materials served as control. The different coating characteristics were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For adhesion and viability tests calcein-AM staining of the cells and Alamar blue assays were performed. The quantitative analysis was conducted by computer assisted microfluorophotography and spectrometer measurements. SEM analysis revealed that stable collagen-I coatings could not be achieved on the dip-coated steel and titanium alloys. Only due to pretreatment with low-pressure gas plasma a robust deposition of collagen I on the surface could be achieved. The cell viability and cell attachment rate on the plasma pretreated, collagen coated surfaces was significantly (p < 0.017) increased compared to the non coated surfaces. Gas plasma treatment is a feasible method for the deposition of proteins on metal implant materials resulting in an improved biocompatibility in vitro. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2010.

  11. Effect of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating on the osteoconductivity of commercially pure titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Strnad, Z; Strnad, J; Povýsil, C; Urban, K

    2000-01-01

    Formation of a calcium phosphate layer was studied on the surfaces of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (PSHA) and sandblasted commercially pure (cp) titanium in simulated body fluid with ion concentrations similar to those of human blood plasma. The PSHA surface induced the formation of calcium phosphate surface layers, while the precipitation of calcium phosphate on sandblasted cp titanium was not detected. Histologic evaluation of in vivo tests demonstrated that implants with a PSHA coating enabled the growth of bone tissue into gaps with a depth of up to 1 mm without significant formation of intermediate fibrous tissue. In comparison to sandblasted cp titanium, implants with PSHA coating exhibited greater tolerance to unfavorable conditions during healing, such as gaps at the interface or primary instability of the implant. In the case of good primary stability of the implant, filling of the gap with fibrous tissue was observed for sandblasted cp titanium implants over the greater part of the surface of gaps with a depth of 0.3 mm. Direct contact of cp titanium implants with bone was achieved only when the press-fit implantation model was used. PMID:10960980

  12. Thermodynamics and kinetics of pack aluminide coating formation on IN-100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Caves, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of pack variables on the formation of aluminide coatings on nickel-base superalloy IN-100 was conducted. Also, the thermodynamics and kinetics of coating formation were analyzed. Observed coating weights were in good agreement with predictions made from the analysis. Pack temperature rather than pack aluminum activity controls the principal coating phase formed. In 1 weight percent aluminum packs, aluminum weight gains were related to the halide pack activator. Solid-state nickel diffusion controlled coating formation from sodium fluoride and chloride and ammonium fluoride activated packs. In other ammonium and sodium halide activated 1 weight percent aluminum packs, gaseous diffusion controlled coating formation.

  13. Thermodynamics and kinetics of pack aluminide coating formation on IN-100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.; Caves, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of pack variables on the formation of aluminide coatings on nickel-base superalloy IN-100 was conducted. Also, the thermodynamics and kinetics of coating formation were analyzed. Observed coating weights were in good agreement with predictions made from the analysis. Pack temperature rather than pack aluminum activity controls the principal coating phase formed. Solid-state nickel diffusion controlled coating formation from sodium fluoride and chloride and ammonium fluoride activated packs. In other ammonium and sodium halide activated 1 weight percent aluminum packs, gaseous diffusion controlled coating formation.

  14. The effect on bone growth enhancement of implant coatings with hydroxyapatite and collagen deposited electrochemically and by plasma spray.

    PubMed

    Daugaard, Henrik; Elmengaard, Brian; Bechtold, Joan E; Jensen, Thomas; Soballe, Kjeld

    2010-03-01

    Skeletal bone consists of hydroxyapatite (HA) [Ca(10)(PO(4))(6)(OH)(2)] and collagen type I, both of which are osseoconductive. The goal of osseointegration of orthopedic and dental implants is the rapid achievement of a mechanically stable long-lasting fixation between bone and an implant surface. In this study, we evaluated the mechanical fixation and tissue distribution surrounding implants coated with three surfaces: plasma-sprayed HA coating, thinner coating of electrochemical-assisted deposition of HA, and an identical thin coating with a top layer of mineralized collagen. Uncoated plasma-sprayed titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) served as negative control. The electrochemical-assisted deposition was performed near physiological conditions. We used a canine experimental joint replacement model with four cylindrical implants (one of each treatment group) inserted in the humeri cancellous metaphyseal bone in a 1 mm gap. Observation time was 4 weeks. The mechanical fixation was quantified by push-out test to failure, and the peri-implant tissue formation by histomorphometric evaluation. HA coatings deposited by plasma spray technique or electrochemically, increased the mechanical fixation and bone ongrowth, but there was no statistical difference between the individual HA applications. Addition of collagen to the mineralized phase of the coating to create a more bone natural surface did not improve the osseoconductive effect of HA.

  15. Atmospheric Plasma Deposition of Diamond-like Carbon Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Ladwig, Angela

    2008-01-23

    There is great demand for thin functional coatings in the semiconductor, optics, electronics, medical, automotive and aerospace industries [1-13]. As fabricated components become smaller and more complex, the properties of the materials’ surface take on greater importance. Thin coatings play a key role in tailoring surfaces to give them the desired hardness, wear resistance, chemical inertness, and electrical characteristics. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings possess an array of desirable properties, including outstanding abrasion and wear resistance, chemical inertness, hardness, a low coefficient of friction and exceptionally high dielectric strength [14-22]. Diamond-like carbon is considered to be an amorphous material, containing a mixture of sp2 and sp3 bonded carbon. Based on the percentage of sp3 carbon and the hydrogen content, four different types of DLC coatings have been identified: tetrahedral carbon (ta-C), hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) hard, a-C:H soft, and hydrogenated tetrahedral carbon (ta-C:H) [20,24,25]. Possessing the highest hardness of 80 GPa, ta-C possesses an sp3 carbon content of 80 to 88u%, and no appreciable hydrogen content whereas a-C:H soft possesses a hardness of less than 10 GPa, contains an sp3 carbon content of 60% and a hydrogen content between 30 to 50%. Methods used to deposit DLC coatings include ion beam deposition, cathodic arc spray, pulsed laser ablation, argon ion sputtering, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition [73-83]. Researchers contend that several advantages exist when depositing DLC coatings in a low-pressure environment. For example, ion beam processes are widely utilized since the ion bombardment is thought to promote denser sp3-bonded carbon networks. Other processes, such as sputtering, are better suited for coating large parts [29,30,44]. However, the deposition of DLC in a vacuum system has several disadvantages, including high equipment cost and restrictions on the size and shape of

  16. Microstructure and mechanical properties of plasma sprayed HA/YSZ/Ti-6Al-4V composite coatings.

    PubMed

    Khor, K A; Gu, Y W; Pan, D; Cheang, P

    2004-08-01

    Plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on titanium alloy substrate have been used extensively due to their excellent biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. However, the erratic bond strength between HA and Ti alloy has raised concern over the long-term reliability of the implant. In this paper, HA/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/Ti-6Al-4V composite coatings that possess superior mechanical properties to conventional plasma sprayed HA coatings were developed. Ti-6Al-4V powders coated with fine YSZ and HA particles were prepared through a unique ceramic slurry mixing method. The so-formed composite powder was employed as feedstock for plasma spraying of the HA/YSZ/Ti-6Al-4V coatings. The influence of net plasma energy, plasma spray standoff distance, and post-spray heat treatment on microstructure, phase composition and mechanical properties were investigated. Results showed that coatings prepared with the optimum plasma sprayed condition showed a well-defined splat structure. HA/YSZ/Ti-6Al-4V solid solution was formed during plasma spraying which was beneficial for the improvement of mechanical properties. There was no evidence of Ti oxidation from the successful processing of YSZ and HA coated Ti-6Al-4V composite powders. Small amount of CaO apart from HA, ZrO(2) and Ti was present in the composite coatings. The microhardness, Young's modulus, fracture toughness, and bond strength increased significantly with the addition of YSZ. Post-spray heat treatment at 600 degrees C and 700 degrees C for up to 12h was found to further improve the mechanical properties of coatings. After the post-spray heat treatment, 17.6% increment in Young's modulus (E) and 16.3% increment in Vicker's hardness were achieved. The strengthening mechanisms of HA/YSZ/Ti-6Al-4V composite coatings were related to the dispersion strengthening by homogeneous distribution of YSZ particles in the matrix, the good mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V and the formation of solid solution among HA

  17. Influence of low atomic number plasma component on the formation of laser-produced plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Badziak, J.; Borodziuk, S.; Chodukowski, T.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Demchenko, N. N.; Ullschmied, J.; Krousky, E.; Masek, K.; Pfeifer, M.; Rohlena, K.; Skala, J.; Pisarczyk, P.

    2010-11-15

    The results of investigations are presented that are connected with a very simple method of plasma jet formation, which consists in irradiating a massive planar target made of material with relatively high atomic number by a partly defocused laser beam. This brief communication is aimed at investigations of interaction of axially symmetrical light (plastic-CH) plasma with heavy (copper) plasma. It demonstrates that a relatively thin plastic plasma envelope can compress the Cu plasma and control the Cu-jet formation.

  18. Highly effective antibiofilm coating of silver-polymer nanocomposite on polymeric medical devices deposited by one step plasma process.

    PubMed

    Agarwala, Munin; Barman, Tapan; Gogoi, Dolly; Choudhury, Bula; Pal, Arup R; Yadav, R N S

    2014-08-01

    Foley's catheters were coated with Silver (Ag), plasma polymerized aniline (PPAni) and Ag-PPAni composite by plasma based deposition processes which were characterized by XRD, EDX, SEM, and FT-IR spectroscopy and bioassays were performed to validate their efficacies to kill planktonic cells as well as to remove biofilm. The analyses confirmed the formation of Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs), PPAni and Ag-PPAni composite and also corroborated their successful deposition over the catheters. Antibacterial assays showed that coated catheters were capable of killing planktonic cells of most commonly encountered uropathogens and equally capable of eradicating biofilm formation by the uropathogens as evident from the reduced cfu/ml. UV-vis spectroscopy results showed that the nanoparticle coated catheters were capable of gradual release of AgNPs, killing all planktonic cells in solution over the time. Foley's catheters coated with AgNPs and their composites by one step plasma process were non-toxic devices capable of killing planktonic cells and proficient in eradicating biofilm formation which could be used to cutback the likelihood of the catheter related complications.

  19. Chemical Stability and Biological Properties of Plasma-Sprayed CaO-SiO2-ZrO2 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying; Xie, Youtao; Ji, Heng; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin

    2010-12-01

    In this work, calcia-stabilized zirconia powders were coated by silica derived from tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) hydrolysis. After calcining at 1400 °C, decalcification of calcia-stabilized zirconia by silica occurred and powders composed of Ca2SiO4, ZrO2, and CaZrO3 were prepared. We produced three kinds of powders with different Ca2SiO4 contents [20 wt.% (denoted as CZS2), 40 wt.% (denoted as CZS4), and 60 wt.% (denoted as CZS6)]. The obtained powders were sprayed onto Ti-6Al-4V substrates using atmospheric plasma spraying. The microstructure of the powders and coatings were analyzed. The dissolution rates of the coatings were assessed by monitoring the ions release and mass losses after immersion in Tris-HCl buffer solution. Results showed that the chemical stability of the coatings were significantly improved compared with pure calcium silicate coatings, and increased with the increase of Zr contents. The CZS4 coating showed not only good apatite-formation ability in simulated body fluid, but also well attachment and proliferation capability for the canine bone marrow stem cells. Results presented here indicate that plasma-sprayed CZS4 coating has medium dissolution rate and good biological properties, suggesting its potential use as bone implants.

  20. Mathematical modeling of plasma deposition and hardening of coatings-switched electrical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyrmetov, A. M.; Sharifullin, S. N.; Pustovalov, AS

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of simulation of plasma deposition and hardening of coatings in modulating the electrical parameters. Mathematical models are based on physical models of gas-dynamic mechanisms more dynamic and thermal processes of the plasma jet. As an example the modeling of dynamic processes of heterogeneous plasma jet, modulated current pulses indirect arc plasma torch.

  1. Formation and antifouling properties of amphiphilic coatings on polypropylene fibers.

    PubMed

    Goli, Kiran K; Rojas, Orlando J; Genzer, Jan

    2012-11-12

    We describe the formation of amphiphilic polymeric assemblies via a three-step functionalization process applied to polypropylene (PP) nonwovens and to reference hydrophobic self-assembled n-octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODTS) monolayer surfaces. In the first step, denatured proteins (lysozyme or fibrinogen) are adsorbed onto the hydrophobic PP or the ODTS surfaces, followed by cross-linking with glutaraldehyde in the presence of sodium borohydride (NaBH(4)). The hydroxyl and amine functional groups of the proteins permit the attachment of initiator molecules, from which poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) polymer grafts are grown directly through "grafting from" atom transfer radical polymerization. The terminal hydroxyls of HEMA's pendent groups are modified with fluorinating moieties of different chain lengths, resulting in amphiphilic brushes. A palette of analytical tools, including ellipsometry, contact angle goniometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in the attenuated total reflection mode, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is employed to determine the changes in physicochemical properties of the functionalized surfaces after each modification step. Antifouling properties of the resultant amphiphilic coatings on PP are analyzed by following the adsorption of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bovine serum albumin as a model fouling protein. Our results suggest that amphiphilic coatings suppress significantly adsorption of proteins as compared with PP fibers or PP surfaces coated with PHEMA brushes. The type of fluorinated chain grafted to PHEMA allows modulation of the surface composition of the topmost layer of the amphiphilic coating and its antifouling capability.

  2. Oxygen post-treatment of plastic surface coated with plasma polymerized silicon-containing monomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T. J.; Hollanhan, J. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    The abrasion resistance of plastic surfaces coated with polymerized organosilanes can be significantly improved by post-treatment of the polymerized silane in an oxygen plasma. For optical purposes, the advantages of this post-treatment are developed with a transparent polycarbonate resin substrate coated with plasma polymerized vinyltrimethoxysilane.

  3. XUV spectroscopy of laser plasma from molecular coated metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanyan, Valeri O.; Nersisyan, Gagik T.; Tittel, Frank K.

    1999-12-01

    Metal targets covered by micrometer layers of metal- phthalocyanines or fullerenes are studied here. An increase in XUV yield due to the optimized absorption of the laser field is reported. Effects of high-temperature plasma rapid expansion (velocity about 106 cm/s) were observed. Moderate power nanosecond and picosecond neodymium lasers are used to produce an incident intensity of 1011 to 1013 W/cm2 on the targets. The plasma electron density was measured by fitting observed spectral profiles to the theoretical profiles. Collisional, Doppler, and Stark broadening mechanisms were considered in the calculations. Our measurement technique permits us to determine the electron density and temperature dependence on distances from the target surface from 1 mm (where Ne approximately equals 1018 cm-3 and Te approximately equals 14 eV are measured for aluminum plasma) up to approximately 5 mm (where Ne coated targets is greater by a factor of approximately 1.5 than measured from bulk solid metal targets.

  4. XUV spectroscopy of laser plasma from molecular coated metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanyan, Valeri O.; Nersisyan, Gagik T.; Tittel, Frank K.

    1999-10-01

    Metal targets covered by micrometer layers of metal- phthalocyanines are studied here. An increase in EUV yield due to optimized absorption of the laser field is reported. Effects of high-temperature plasma rapid expansion (velocity about 106 cm/s) were observed. Moderate power nanosecond and picosecond neodymium lasers are used to product an incident intensity of 1011 to 1013 W/cm2 on the targets. The plasma electron density was measured by fitting observed spectral profiles to theoretical profiles. Collisional, Doppler, and Stark broadening mechanisms were considered in the calculations. Our measurement technique makes it possible to determine the electron density and temperature dependence on distances from the target surface from 1 mm (where Ne equals 2.0 (+/- 0.5)1018 cm-3 and Te equals 14 eV are measured for aluminum plasma) up to approximately 5 mm (where Ne coated targets is greater by a factor of approximately 1.5 than measured from bulk solid metal targets.

  5. Biofilm formation on nanostructured hydroxyapatite-coated titanium.

    PubMed

    Westas, Emma; Gillstedt, Martin; Lönn-Stensrud, Jessica; Bruzell, Ellen; Andersson, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Biofilm formation on medical devices is a common cause of implant failure, especially regarding implants that breach the epithelial tissue, so-called transcutaneous implants. Nanotechnology and the development of new nanomaterials have given the opportunity to design nanotextured implant surfaces. Such surfaces have been studied using various in vitro methods showing that nanosized features strongly benefit bone cell growth. However, little is known on how nanostructured features affect biofilm formation. The aim of this study was therefore to examine the shape- and chemical-dependent effect of a nanostructured hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on the degree of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation. Three different types of nanosized HA particles having different shapes and calcium to phosphate ratios were compared to uncoated turned titanium using safranin stain in a biofilm assay and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for assessment of biofilm biomass and bacterial volume, respectively. No difference in biofilm biomass was detected for the various surfaces after 6 h incubation with S. epidermidis. Additionally, image analysis of CLSM Z-stacks confirmed the biofilm assay and showed similar results. In conclusion, the difference in nanomorphology and chemical composition of the surface coatings did not influence the adhesion and biofilm formation of S. epidermidis.

  6. Direct morphological comparison of vacuum plasma sprayed and detonation gun sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Gledhill, H C; Turner, I G; Doyle, C

    1999-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium substrates were produced using two thermal spray techniques vacuum plasma spraying and detonation gun spraying. X-ray diffraction was used to compare crystallinity and residual stresses in the coatings. Porosity was measured using optical microscopy in conjunction with an image analysis system. Scanning electron microscopy and surface roughness measurements were used to characterise the surface morphologies of the coatings. The vacuum plasma sprayed coatings were found to have a lower residual stress, a higher crystallinity and a higher level of porosity than the detonation gun coatings. It is concluded that consideration needs to be given to the significance of such variations within the clinical context.

  7. Oxidation and degradation of a plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating system

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, J.A.; Ferber, M.K.; Porter, W.D.

    1996-04-01

    The isothermal oxidation behavior of thermal barrier coating (TBC) specimens consisting of single-crystal superalloy substrates, vacuum plasma-sprayed Ni-22Cr-10Al-1Y bond coatings and air plasma-sprayed 7.5 wt.% yttria stabilized zirconia top coatings was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis at 1150{degrees}C for up to 200 hours. Coating durability was assessed by furnace cycling at 1150{degrees}C. Coatings and reaction products were identified by x-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  8. Hydrogen plasma tests of some insulating coating systems for the nuclear rocket thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Current, A. N.; Grisaffe, S. J.; Wycoff, K. C.

    1972-01-01

    Several plasma-sprayed and slurry-coated insulating coating systems were evaluated for structural stability in a low-pressure hot hydrogen environment at a maximum heat flux of 19.6 million watts/sq meter. The heat was provided by an electric-arc plasma generator. The coating systems consisted of a number of thin layers of metal oxides and/or metals. The materials included molybdenum, nichrome, tungsten, alumina, zirconia, and chromia. The study indicates potential usefulness in this environment for some coatings, and points up the need for improved coating application techniques.

  9. Plasma sprayed coatings for containment of Cu-Mg-Si metallic phase change material

    SciTech Connect

    Withey, Elizabeth Ann; Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Andraka, Charles E.; Gibbs, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the performance of Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ), Y2O3, and Al2O3 plasma sprayed coatings are investigated for their ability to prevent attack of Haynes 230 by a near-eutectic Cu-Mg-Si metallic phase change material (PCM) in a closed environment at 820 °C. Areas where coatings failed were identified with optical and scanning electron microscopy, while chemical interactions were clarified through elemental mapping using electron microprobe analysis. Despite its susceptibility to reduction by Mg, the Al2O3 coating performed well while the YSZ and Y2O3 coating showed clear areas of attack. These results are attributed to the evolution of gaseous Mg at 820 °C leading to the formation of MgO and MgAl2O4.

  10. Direct thrombin inhibitor-bivalirudin functionalized plasma polymerized allylamine coating for improved biocompatibility of vascular devices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhilu; Tu, Qiufen; Maitz, Manfred F; Zhou, Shuo; Wang, Jin; Huang, Nan

    2012-11-01

    The direct thrombin inhibitor of bivalirudin (BVLD), a short peptide derived from hirudin, has drawn an increasing attention in clinical application because it is safer and more effective than heparin for diabetic patients with moderate- or high-risk for acute coronary syndromes (ACS). In this study, BVLD was covalently conjugated on plasma polymerized allylamine (PPAam) coated 316L stainless steel (SS) to develop an anticoagulant surface. QCM-D real time monitoring result shows that 565±20 ng/cm2 of BVLD was bound to the PPAam surface. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the immobilization of BVLD. The conjugation of BVLD onto the PPAam coating led to enhanced binding of thrombin, and the activity of the thrombin adsorbed on its surface was effectively inhibited. As a result, the BVLD immobilized PPAam (BVLD-PPAam) substrate prolonged the clotting times, and exhibited inhibition in adhesion and activation of platelets and fibrinogen. We also found that the BVLD-PPAam coating significantly enhanced endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and release of nitric oxide (NO) and secretion of prostaglandin I2 (PGI2). In vivo results indicate that the BVLD-PPAam surface restrained thrombus formation by rapidly growing a homogeneous and intact endothelium on its surface. These data suggest the potential of this multifunctional BVLD-PPAam coating for the application not only in general vascular devices such as catheters, tubes, oxygenator, hemodialysis membranes but also vascular grafts and stents.

  11. The effects of plasma inhomogeneity on the nanoparticle coating in a low pressure plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pourali, N.; Foroutan, G.

    2015-10-15

    A self-consistent model is used to study the surface coating of a collection of charged nanoparticles trapped in the sheath region of a low pressure plasma reactor. The model consists of multi-fluid plasma sheath module, including nanoparticle dynamics, as well as the surface deposition and particle heating modules. The simulation results show that the mean particle radius increases with time and the nanoparticle size distribution is broadened. The mean radius is a linear function of time, while the variance exhibits a quadratic dependence. The broadening in size distribution is attributed to the spatial inhomogeneity of the deposition rate which in turn depends on the plasma inhomogeneity. The spatial inhomogeneity of the ions has strong impact on the broadening of the size distribution, as the ions contribute both in the nanoparticle charging and in direct film deposition. The distribution width also increases with increasing of the pressure, gas temperature, and the ambient temperature gradient.

  12. Improvement in tribological properties of atmospheric plasma-sprayed WC-Co coating followed by Cu electrochemical impregnation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jianhui; Zhu, Yingchun; Zheng, Xuebing; Ruan, Qichao; Ji, Heng

    2009-06-01

    The WC-Co coating obtained by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) was modified by Cu electrochemical impregnation. The copper has infiltrated into and filled up the pores in WC-Co coating. The tribological properties of the coating against the stainless steel ball as sliding pairs were investigated with a ball-on-disc (BOD) configuration in air at room temperature. The as-prepared samples were characterized by means of optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. It was found that the frictional behavior of the WC-Co coating followed by Cu electrochemical impregnation was superior to that of WC-Co coating. The wear mechanism of the WC-Co coating followed by Cu electrochemical impregnation was microcutting, whilst that of a WC-Co coating was the fatigue wear. The improvement in tribological properties of the WC-Co coating followed by Cu electrochemical impregnation was attributed to the formation of self-lubricating Cu film on the wear surface which induces the transformation of wear mechanism.

  13. Failure modes of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichting, Kevin Walter

    Conventional plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are known to fail by spallation of the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) topcoat exposing the underlying metal to high temperatures. Failure takes place by crack propagation in the YSZ just above the YSZ/thermally grown oxide (TGO) interface. Compressive stress in the TGO due to thermal expansion coefficient mismatch and oxidation is believed to play a key role in the failure. However, non-destructive measurement of the compressive stress in the TGO has been challenging due to the overlying ceramic top layer. In this study, TBC samples coated to current industrial specifications were thermally cycled to various fractions of their life to determine the failure mechanisms. The technique of Cr3+ piezospectroscopy was successfully applied to the plasma-sprayed samples for the first time in an effort to measure compressive stress in the TGO through the ceramic top layer. In addition, a new nano-grained plasma-sprayed TBC was studied in order to develop a next generation TBC with enhanced properties. Results from observations on cross-sections and spalled surfaces have identified two competing failure mechanisms for TBCs: (1) cracking along asperity tips at the TGO/bond coat interface, and (2) cracking in the ceramic between the asperity tips. TGO residual compressive stress was found to increase in the first 1 to 10 cycles and then decrease with increasing number of cycles. The standard deviation of the stress measurement, which is a measure of damage accumulation in the TGO layer, was found to increase at higher numbers of cycles. Measurement of compressive stress in the TGO using Cr3+ piezo-spectroscopy was limited to YSZ thicknesses of <50 mum due to an impurity present in the YSZ layer. When no impurity was present the limiting thickness was <170 mum due to scattering by microstructural defects such as solute, porosity, and most importantly splat boundaries. A new nano-grained TBC was fabricated with a

  14. Mechanical properties, electrochemical corrosion and in-vitro bioactivity of yttria stabilized zirconia reinforced hydroxyapatite coatings prepared by gas tunnel type plasma spraying.

    PubMed

    Yugeswaran, S; Yoganand, C P; Kobayashi, A; Paraskevopoulos, K M; Subramanian, B

    2012-05-01

    Yttria stabilized zirconia reinforced hydroxyapatite coatings were deposited by a gas tunnel type plasma spray torch under optimum spraying conditions. For this purpose, 10, 20 and 30 wt% of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powders were premixed individually with hydroxyapatite (HA) powder and were used as the feedstocks for the coatings. The effect of YSZ reinforcement on the phase formation and mechanical properties of the coatings such as hardness, adhesive strength and sliding wear rates was examined. The results showed that the reinforcement of YSZ in HA could significantly enhance the hardness and adhesive strength of the coatings. The potentiodynamic polarization and impedance measurements showed that the reinforced coatings exhibited superior corrosion resistance compared to the HA coating in SBF solution. Further the results of the bioactivity test conducted by immersion of coatings in SBF showed that after 10 days of immersion of the obtained coatings with all the above compositions commonly exhibited the onset of bioactive apatite formation except for HA+10%YSZ coating. The cytocompatibility was investigated by culturing the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled marrow stromal cells (MSCs) on the coating surface. The cell culture results revealed that the reinforced coatings have superior cell growth than the pure HA coatings.

  15. Diffusion permeability of yttrium-based heat-resistant ion-plasma coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. S.; Goncharov, M. V.; Vasil'ev, E. V.

    2016-09-01

    The diffusion permeability of yttrium-containing ion-plasma coatings on substrates made of the low-alloy chromium-based Cr-0.7V-0.17La alloy has been studied. It has been found that protective coatings of this type have a strong barrier effect on diffusion fluxes in the substrate-coating-environment system and that YCr + YCrO3 coatings ensure the best protection of the substrates against gas saturation.

  16. Residual stresses determination in textured substrates for plasma sprayed coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capek, J.; Pala, Z.; Kovarik, O.

    2015-04-01

    In this contribution, we have striven to respond to the desire of obtaining the residual stress tensor in the both cold-rolled and hot-rolled substrates designated for deposition of thermal coatings by plasma spraying. Residual stresses play an important role in the coating adhesion to the substrate and, as such, it is a good practice to analyse them. Prior to spraying, the substrate is often being grit blasted. Residual stresses and texture were quantitatively assessed in both virgin and grit blasted sample employing three attitudes. Firstly without taking preferred orientation into account, secondly from measurements of interplanar lattice spacings of planes with high Miller indices using MoKα radiation. And eventually, by calculating anisotropic elastic constants as a weighted average between single-crystal and X-ray elastic constants with weighting being done according to the amount of textured and isotropic material in the irradiated volume. In the ensuing verification analyses, it was established that the latter approach is suitable for materials with either very strong or very weak presence of texture.

  17. Young's Moduli of Cold and Vacuum Plasma Sprayed Metallic Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Pawlik, R.; Loewenthal, W.

    2009-01-01

    Monolithic metallic copper alloy and NiCrAlY coatings were fabricated by either the cold spray (CS) or the vacuum plasma spray (VPS) deposition processes. Dynamic elastic modulus property measurements were conducted on these monolithic coating specimens between 300 K and 1273 K using the impulse excitation technique. The Young's moduli decreased almost linearly with increasing temperature at all temperatures except in the case of the CS Cu-23%Cr-5%Al and VPS NiCrAlY, where deviations from linearity were observed above a critical temperature. It was observed that the Young's moduli for VPS Cu-8%Cr were larger than literature data compiled for Cu. The addition of 1%Al to Cu- 8%Cr significantly increased its Young's modulus by 12 to 17% presumably due to a solid solution effect. Comparisons of the Young s moduli data between two different measurements on the same CS Cu- 23%Cr-5%Al specimen revealed that the values measured in the first run were about 10% higher than those in the second run. It is suggested that this observation is due to annealing of the initial cold work microstructure resulting form the cold spray deposition process.

  18. Tunable elastic stiffness of plasma-sprayed zirconia coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamberg, Joachim; Schwaminger, Christian

    1999-07-01

    Plasma-sprayed zirconia is widely used in aero-engines as thermal barrier coating material. The material has an open porosity and a network of very thin microcracks. The porosity and the microcracks give rise to the low elastic stiffness. When the plasm sprayed zirconia is immersed in a liquid the microcracks can be filled with the liquid by capillary forces. Although there is only a small amount of infiltrated material the zirconia shows a strong increase in elastic stiffness. We have measured the elastic behavior after infiltration and as function of temperature by ultrasonic pulse echo technique. It could be observed that the solidification of the infiltrated fluid at lower temperatures leads to a further increase of the elastic stiffness. The temperature controlled liquid-solid phase transition can therefore be used to change reversibly the elastic properties of this ceramic material. The desired switching temperature can be chosen by appropriate fluids. A possible application of this material is the vibration damping of coated structures by temperature controlled changing of resonance frequencies.

  19. Microstructure of Suspension Plasma Spray and Air Plasma Spray Al2O3-ZrO2 Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dianying; Jordan, Eric H.; Gell, Maurice

    2009-09-01

    Al2O3-ZrO2 coatings were deposited by the suspension plasma spray (SPS) molecularly mixed amorphous powder and the conventional air plasma spray (APS) Al2O3-ZrO2 crystalline powder. The amorphous powder was produced by heat treatment of molecularly mixed chemical solution precursors below their crystallization temperatures. Phase composition and microstructure of the as-synthesized and heat-treated SPS and APS coatings were characterized by XRD and SEM. XRD analysis shows that the as-sprayed SPS coating is composed of α-Al2O3 and tetragonal ZrO2 phases, while the as-sprayed APS coating consists of tetragonal ZrO2, α-Al2O3, and γ-Al2O3 phases. Microstructure characterization revealed that the Al2O3 and ZrO2 phase distribution in SPS coatings is much more homogeneous than that of APS coatings.

  20. Characterization and Wear Behavior of Heat-treated Ni3Al Coatings Deposited by Air Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, K.; Rafiq, M. A.; Nusair Khan, A.; Ahmed, F.; Mudassar Rauf, M.

    2016-07-01

    Air plasma spraying was utilized to deposit Ni3Al coatings on AISI-321 steel substrate. The deposited coatings were isothermally heat-treated at various temperatures from 500 to 800 °C for 10, 30, 60, and 100 h. The x-ray diffraction analysis revealed NiO formation in Ni3Al at 500 °C after 100 h, and the percentage of NiO increased with increasing exposure time and temperature. The hardness of the coating increased with the formation of NiO. The DSC test showed the formation of minor phases, Al3Ni and Al3Ni2, within the coating along with the major phase Ni3Al. TGA revealed a slowing down of the oxidation rate upon surface oxide formation. The pin-on-disk wear test on the as-sprayed and heat-treated coatings showed that wear rate and coefficient of friction decreased with an increase in the NiO phase content.

  1. Formation of three-dimensionally integrated nanocrystalline silicon particles by dip-coating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Shotaro; Nakamine, Yoshifumi; Zheng, Ran; Kouge, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Usami, Koichi; Kodera, Tetsuo; Kawano, Yukio; Oda, Shunri

    2015-10-01

    Printable technologies using silicon nanoink, in which nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) quantum dots are dispersed in solvents, are promising for novel electron and photonic device applications. The dip-coating method is applied for the first time to fabricate three-dimensionally integrated structures of nc-Si quantum dots with a uniform size of 10 nm prepared by the very high frequency plasma decomposition of silane gas. We have clarified the major problem of the dip-coating method, which is the formation of stripe structures. To circumvent this problem, we have proposed two methods: coating onto line-and-space-patterned substrates and utilization of electrophoresis force. We have successfully demonstrated the control of the position and number of layers of nc-Si by using a line-and-space-patterned substrate, however, with a limited shape. We have clarified the conditions of the formation of stripe-free regions by varying applied voltage and nc-Si concentration in the electrophoresis method.

  2. Electrochemical characterization of plasma polymer coatings in corrosion protection of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Yenfong; Yu, Qingsong

    2005-07-01

    Low-temperature plasma polymerization is a promising pretreatment technique to create environmentally friendly coating systems for corrosion protection of aluminum alloys. In this study, the pretreatment effects of plasma treatment and plasma polymerization on corrosion properties of alclad aluminum alloy 2024-T3 ([2A]) were investigated using electrochemical characterization techniques, including cyclic polarization (CP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The [2A] panels were coated with an ultrathin layer (~50 nm) of plasma polymers in a direct current (dc) glow discharge of trimethylsilane or its mixtures with one of two diatomic gases (O2 and N2). The CP measurement results showed that the plasma polymer coated [2A] panels exhibited more negative corrosion potentials (Ecorr), smaller corrosion currents (Icorr), and no surface passivation when compared with uncoated [2A] control panels. The lower values of Icorr imply a higher corrosion resistance on the plasma polymer coated [2A]. When investigated using EIS, these plasma polymer coated [2A] panels exhibited higher impedance (|Z|) at lower frequency when first immersed in electrolyte solution, yet degraded quickly to a similar level as uncoated controls within 1 day of immersion. These results illustrated that thin plasma polymer films provided a certain but very limited corrosion resistance to [2A] substrate; their dominant role in plasma interface engineered coating systems still relied mostly on their adhesion enhancement at metal/paint interface as observed in our previous studies.

  3. Oxidation Control of Atmospheric Plasma Sprayed FeAl Intermetallic Coatings Using Dry-Ice Blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bo; Dong, Shujuan; Coddet, Pierre; Hansz, Bernard; Grosdidier, Thierry; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2013-03-01

    The performance of atmospheric plasma sprayed FeAl coatings has been remarkably limited because of oxidation and phase transformation during the high-temperature process of preparation. In the present work, FeAl intermetallic coatings were prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying combined with dry-ice blasting. The microstructure, oxidation, porosity, and surface roughness of FeAl intermetallic coatings were investigated. The results show that a denser FeAl coating with a lower content of oxide and lower degree of phase transformation can be achieved because of the cryogenic, the cleaning, and the mechanical effects of dry-ice blasting. The surface roughness value decreased, and the adhesive strength of FeAl coating increased after the application of dry-ice blasting during the atmospheric plasma spraying process. Moreover, the microhardness of the FeAl coating increased by 72%, due to the lower porosity and higher dislocation density.

  4. Feasibility study of plasma sprayed Al2O3 coatings as diffusion barrier on CFC components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, Kirsten; Zhao, Lidong; Kopp, Nils; Warda, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    Carbon fibre reinforced carbon (CFC) materials are increasingly applied as sample carriers in modern furnaces. Only their tendency to react with different metals at high temperatures by C-diffusion is a disadvantage, which can be solved by application of diffusion barriers. Within this study the feasibility of plasma sprayed Al2O3 coatings as diffusion barrier was studied. Al2O3 coatings were prepared by air plasma spraying (APS). The coatings were investigated in terms of their microstructure, bonding to CFC substrates and thermal stability. The results showed that Al2O3 could be well deposited onto CFC substrates. The coatings had a good bonding and thermal shock behavior at 1060°C. At higher temperature of 1270°C, crack network formed within the coating, showing that the plasma sprayed Al2O3 coatings are limited regarding to their application temperatures as diffusion barrier on CFC components.

  5. Apparatus for coating a surface with a metal utilizing a plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Ian G.; MacGill, Robert A.; Galvin, James E.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method for coating or layering a surface with a metal utilizing a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source. The apparatus includes a trigger mechanism for actuating the metal vacuum vapor arc plasma source in a pulsed mode at a predetermined rate. The surface or substrate to be coated or layered is supported in position with the plasma source in a vacuum chamber. The surface is electrically biased for a selected period of time during the pulsed mode of operation of the plasma source. Both the pulsing of the metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source and the electrical biasing of the surface are synchronized for selected periods of time.

  6. Dynamics of polymer film formation during spin coating

    SciTech Connect

    Mouhamad, Y.; Clarke, N.; Jones, R. A. L.; Geoghegan, M.; Mokarian-Tabari, P.

    2014-09-28

    Standard models explaining the spin coating of polymer solutions generally fail to describe the early stages of film formation, when hydrodynamic forces control the solution behavior. Using in situ light scattering alongside theoretical and semi-empirical models, it is shown that inertial forces (which initially cause a vertical gradient in the radial solvent velocity within the film) play a significant role in the rate of thinning of the solution. The development of thickness as a function of time of a solute-free liquid (toluene) and a blend of polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) cast from toluene were fitted to different models as a function of toluene partial pressure. In the case of the formation of the polymer blend film, a concentration-dependent (Huggins) viscosity formula was used to account for changes in viscosity during spin coating. A semi-empirical model is introduced, which permits calculation of the solvent evaporation rate and the temporal evolution of the solute volume fraction and solution viscosity.

  7. Thermal barrier coatings on turbine blades by plasma spraying with improved cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosack, T.; Pawlowski, L.; Schneiderbanger, S.; Sturlese, S.

    1992-06-01

    Turbine blades were coated with a thermal barrier coating system consisting of an MCrAlY bond coat about 100 micron thick deposited by Low Pressure Plasma Spraying (LPPS) and a 300 micron thick ZrO2-7 wt pct Y2O3 top coat. The latter was manufactured by both Atmosphere and Temperature Controlled Spraying (ATCS) and Air Plasma Spraying using internal air cooling through the cooling holes of the turbine blades. Coated blades were submitted to thermal cycling tests in a burner rig with hot gas temperature of 1485 C. In the case of ATCS coated blades the number of cycles until the first spallation at the leading edge of the blade was between 350 and 2400. The number of cycles of the thermal barrier coatings sprayed with internal cooling was between 1200 and 1800.

  8. Porous tantalum coatings prepared by vacuum plasma spraying enhance bmscs osteogenic differentiation and bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ze; Xie, Youtao; Yang, Fei; Huang, Yan; Wang, Chuandong; Dai, Kerong; Zheng, Xuebin; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    Tantalum, as a potential metallic implant biomaterial, is attracting more and more attention because of its excellent anticorrosion and biocompatibility. However, its significantly high elastic modulus and large mechanical incompatibility with bone tissue make it unsuitable for load-bearing implants. In this study, porous tantalum coatings were first successfully fabricated on titanium substrates by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS), which would exert the excellent biocompatibility of tantalum and alleviate the elastic modulus of tantalum for bone tissue. We evaluated cytocompatibility and osteogenesis activity of the porous tantalum coatings using human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) and its ability to repair rabbit femur bone defects. The morphology and actin cytoskeletons of hBMSCs were observed via electron microscopy and confocal, and the cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potential of hBMSCs were examined quantitatively by PrestoBlue assay, Ki67 immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR technology and ALP staining. For in vivo detection, the repaired femur were evaluated by histomorphology and double fluorescence labeling 3 months postoperation. Porous tantalum coating surfaces promoted hBMSCs adhesion, proliferation, osteogenesis activity and had better osseointegration and faster new bone formation rate than titanium coating control. Our observation suggested that the porous tantalum coatings had good biocompatibility and could enhance osseoinductivity in vitro and promote new bone formation in vivo. The porous tantalum coatings prepared by VPS is a promising strategy for bone regeneration.

  9. Porous Tantalum Coatings Prepared by Vacuum Plasma Spraying Enhance BMSCs Osteogenic Differentiation and Bone Regeneration In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ze; Xie, Youtao; Yang, Fei; Huang, Yan; Wang, Chuandong; Dai, Kerong; Zheng, Xuebin; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    Tantalum, as a potential metallic implant biomaterial, is attracting more and more attention because of its excellent anticorrosion and biocompatibility. However, its significantly high elastic modulus and large mechanical incompatibility with bone tissue make it unsuitable for load-bearing implants. In this study, porous tantalum coatings were first successfully fabricated on titanium substrates by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS), which would exert the excellent biocompatibility of tantalum and alleviate the elastic modulus of tantalum for bone tissue. We evaluated cytocompatibility and osteogenesis activity of the porous tantalum coatings using human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) and its ability to repair rabbit femur bone defects. The morphology and actin cytoskeletons of hBMSCs were observed via electron microscopy and confocal, and the cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potential of hBMSCs were examined quantitatively by PrestoBlue assay, Ki67 immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR technology and ALP staining. For in vivo detection, the repaired femur were evaluated by histomorphology and double fluorescence labeling 3 months postoperation. Porous tantalum coating surfaces promoted hBMSCs adhesion, proliferation, osteogenesis activity and had better osseointegration and faster new bone formation rate than titanium coating control. Our observation suggested that the porous tantalum coatings had good biocompatibility and could enhance osseoinductivity in vitro and promote new bone formation in vivo. The porous tantalum coatings prepared by VPS is a promising strategy for bone regeneration. PMID:23776648

  10. Preparation and Performance of Plasma/Polymer Composite Coatings on Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhsheshi-Rad, H. R.; Hamzah, E.; Bagheriyan, S.; Daroonparvar, M.; Kasiri-Asgarani, M.; Shah, A. M.; Medraj, M.

    2016-07-01

    A triplex plasma (NiCoCrAlHfYSi/Al2O3·13%TiO2)/polycaprolactone composite coating was successfully deposited on a Mg-1.2Ca alloy by a combination of atmospheric plasma spraying and dip-coating techniques. The NiCoCrAlHfYSi (MCrAlHYS) coating, as the first layer, contained a large number of voids, globular porosities, and micro-cracks with a thickness of 40-50 μm, while the Al2O3·13%TiO2 coating, as the second layer, presented a unique bimodal microstructure with a thickness of 70-80 μm. The top layer was a hydrophobic polymer, which effectively sealed the porosities of plasma layers. The results of micro-hardness and bonding strength tests showed that the plasma coating presented excellent hardness (870 HV) and good bonding strength (14.8 MPa). However, the plasma/polymer coatings interface exhibited low bonding strength (8.6 MPa). The polymer coating formed thick layer (100-110 μm) that homogeneously covered the surface of the plasma layers. Contact angle measurement showed that polymer coating over plasma layers significantly decreased surface wettability. The corrosion current density (i corr) of an uncoated sample (262.7 µA/cm2) decreased to 76.9 µA/cm2 after plasma coatings were applied. However, it was found that the i corr decreased significantly to 0.002 µA/cm2 after polymer sealing of the porous plasma layers.

  11. Preparation and Performance of Plasma/Polymer Composite Coatings on Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhsheshi-Rad, H. R.; Hamzah, E.; Bagheriyan, S.; Daroonparvar, M.; Kasiri-Asgarani, M.; Shah, A. M.; Medraj, M.

    2016-09-01

    A triplex plasma (NiCoCrAlHfYSi/Al2O3·13%TiO2)/polycaprolactone composite coating was successfully deposited on a Mg-1.2Ca alloy by a combination of atmospheric plasma spraying and dip-coating techniques. The NiCoCrAlHfYSi (MCrAlHYS) coating, as the first layer, contained a large number of voids, globular porosities, and micro-cracks with a thickness of 40-50 μm, while the Al2O3·13%TiO2 coating, as the second layer, presented a unique bimodal microstructure with a thickness of 70-80 μm. The top layer was a hydrophobic polymer, which effectively sealed the porosities of plasma layers. The results of micro-hardness and bonding strength tests showed that the plasma coating presented excellent hardness (870 HV) and good bonding strength (14.8 MPa). However, the plasma/polymer coatings interface exhibited low bonding strength (8.6 MPa). The polymer coating formed thick layer (100-110 μm) that homogeneously covered the surface of the plasma layers. Contact angle measurement showed that polymer coating over plasma layers significantly decreased surface wettability. The corrosion current density ( i corr) of an uncoated sample (262.7 µA/cm2) decreased to 76.9 µA/cm2 after plasma coatings were applied. However, it was found that the i corr decreased significantly to 0.002 µA/cm2 after polymer sealing of the porous plasma layers.

  12. Microstructures of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite-coated Ti-6Al-4V dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tufekci, E; Brantley, W A; Mitchell, J C; McGlumphy, E A

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the microstructure of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings and the elemental composition near the coating-substrate interface for two commercial implants, using the scanning electron microscope. Both coating surfaces and cross-sectioned specimens were examined. The results indicated that while the surface microstructures of both implants were consistent with the plasma-spraying process, the scale of the constituents was much finer for one product. In cross-section, both coatings exhibited minimal porosity and intimate contact with the titanium alloy substrate. It was found that limited interdiffusion of titanium and calcium occurred near the interface.

  13. Plasma sprayed cerium oxide coating inhibits H2O2-induced oxidative stress and supports cell viability.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Xie, Youtao; You, Mingyu; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative stress is a risk factor in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, and plays a major role in bone regeneration of osteoporotic patients. Cerium oxide (CeO2) ceramics have the unique ability to protect various types of cells from oxidative damage, making them attractive for biomedical applications. In this study, we developed a plasma sprayed CeO2 coating with a hierarchical topography where ceria nanoparticles were superimposed in the micro-rough coating surface. The protective effects of the CeO2 coating on the response of osteoblasts to H2O2-induced oxidative stress have been demonstrated in terms of cell viability, apoptosis and differentiation. The CeO2 coating reversed the reduced superoxide dismutase activity, decreased reactive oxygen species production and suppressed malondialdehyde formation in H2O2-treated osteoblasts. It indicated that the CeO2 coating can preserve the intracellular antioxidant defense system. The cytocompatibility of the CeO2 coating was further assessed in vitro by cell viability assay and scanning electron microscopy analysis. Taken together, the CeO2 coating could provide an opportunity to be utilized as a potential candidate for bone regeneration under oxidative stress.

  14. Plasma Performance Improvement with Lithium-Coated Plasma-Facing Components in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R; Kugel, H; Bell, M G; Bell, R; Boedo, J; Bush, C; Ellis, R; Gates, D; Gerhardt, S; Gray, T; Kallman, J; Kaye, S; LeBlanc, B; Majeski, R; Maingi, R; Mansfield, D; Menard, J; Mueller, D; Ono, M; Paul, S; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Ross, P W; Sabbagh, S; Schneider, H; Skinner, S H; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T; Stotler, D; Timberlake, J; Zakharov, L; Ahn, J; Allain, J P; Wampler, W R

    2009-01-08

    Lithium as a plasma-facing material has many attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Recent NSTX experiments have shown, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium coatings on plasma-facing components (PFC's) to the performance of divertor plasmas in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. They included decreases in the plasma density and inductive flux consumption, and increases in the electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement time, and DD neutron rate. Extended periods of MHD quiescence were also achieved, and measurements of the visible emission from the lower divertor showed a reduction in the deuterium, carbon, and oxygen line emission. Other salient results with lithium evaporation included a broadening of the electron temperature profile, and changes in edge density gradients that benefited electron Bernstein wave coupling. There was also a reduction in ELM frequency and amplitude, followed by a period of complete ELM suppression. In general, it was observed that both the best and the average confinement occurred after lithium deposition and that the increase in WMHD occurs mostly through an increase in We. In addition, a liquid lithium divertor (LLD) is being installed on NSTX this year. As the first fully-toroidal liquid metal divertor target, experiments with the LLD can provide insight into the behavior of metallic ITER PFC's should they liquefy during high-power divertor tokamak operations. The NSTX lithium coating and LLD experiments are important near-term steps in demonstrating the potential of liquid lithium as a solution to the first-wall problem for both magnetic and inertial fusion reactors.

  15. Plasma Performance Improvement with Lithium-Coated Plasma-Facing Components in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R., et. al.

    2008-09-29

    Lithium as a plasma-facing material has many attractive features, including a reduction in the recycling of hydrogenic species and the potential for withstanding high heat and neutron fluxes in fusion reactors. Recent NSTX experiments have shown, for the first time, significant and recurring benefits of lithium coatings on plasma-facing components (PFC's) to the performance of divertor plasmas in both L- and H- mode confinement regimes heated by high-power neutral beams. They included decreases in the plasma density and inductive flux consumption, and increases in the electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement time, and DD neutron rate. Extended periods of MHD quiescence were also achieved, and measurements of the visible emission from the lower divertor showed a reduction in the deuterium, carbon, and oxygen line emission. Other salient results with lithium evaporation included a broadening of the electron temperature profile, and changes in edge density gradients that benefited electron Bernstein wave coupling. There was also a reduction in ELM frequency and amplitude, followed by a period of complete ELM suppression. In general, it was observed that both the best and the average confinement occurred after lithium deposition and that the increase in WMHD occurs mostly through an increase in We. In addition, a liquid lithium divertor (LLD) is being installed on NSTX this year. As the first fully-toroidal liquid metal divertor target, experiments with the LLD can provide insight into the behavior of metallic ITER PFC's should they liquefy during high-power divertor tokamak operations. The NSTX lithium coating and LLD experiments are important near-term steps in demonstrating the potential of liquid lithium as a solution to the first-wall problem for both magnetic and inertial fusion reactors.

  16. Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed MCrAlY-Cr2O3 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Huang, Chuanbing; Lan, Hao; Du, Lingzhong; Zhang, Weigang

    2016-08-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion behavior of two atmospheric plasma-sprayed NiCoCrAlY-Cr2O3 and CoNiCrAlY-Cr2O3 coatings, which are primarily designed for wear applications at high temperature, were investigated in this study. The two coatings were exposed to air and molten salt (75%Na2SO4-25%NaCl) environment at 800 °C under cyclic conditions. Oxidation and hot corrosion kinetic curves were obtained by thermogravimetric technique. X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry were employed to characterize the coatings' microstructure, surface oxides, and composition. The results showed that both coatings provided the necessary oxidation resistance with oxidation rates of about 1.03 × 10-2 and 1.36 × 10-2 mg/cm2 h, respectively. The excellent oxidation behavior of these two coatings is attributed to formation of protective (Ni,Co)Cr2O4 spinel on the surface, while as-deposited Cr2O3 in the coatings also acted as a barrier to diffusion of oxidative and corrosive substances. The greater presence of Co in the CoNiCrAlY-Cr2O3 coating restrained internal diffusion of sulfur and slowed down the coating's degradation. Thus, the CoNiCrAlY-Cr2O3 coating was found to be more protective than the NiCoCrAlY-Cr2O3 coating under hot corrosion condition.

  17. Reactive Atmospheric Plasma Spraying of AlN Coatings: Influence of Aluminum Feedstock Particle Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2011-03-01

    Feedstock powder characteristics (size distribution, morphology, shape, specific mass, and injection rate) are considered to be one of the key factors in controlling plasma-sprayed coatings microstructure and properties. The influence of feedstock powder characteristics to control the reaction and coatings microstructure in reactive plasma spraying process (RPS) is still unclear. This study, investigated the influence of feedstock particle size in RPS of aluminum nitride (AlN) coatings, through plasma nitriding of aluminum (Al) feedstock powders. It was possible to fabricate AlN-based coatings through plasma nitriding of all kinds of Al powders in atmospheric plasma spray (APS) process. The nitriding ratio was improved with decreasing the particle size of feedstock powder, due to improving the nitriding reaction during flight. However, decreasing the particle size of feedstock powder suppressed the coatings thickness. Due to the loss of the powder during the injection, the excessive vaporization of fine Al particles and the completing nitriding reaction of some fine Al particles during flight. The feedstock particle size directly affects on the nitriding, melting, flowability, and the vaporization behaviors of Al powders during spraying. It concluded that using smaller particle size powders is useful for improving the nitriding ratio and not suitable for fabrication thick AlN coatings in reactive plasma spray process. To fabricate thick AlN coatings through RPS, enhancing the nitriding reaction of Al powders with large particle size during spraying is required.

  18. Pre-plasma formation in experiments using petawatt lasers.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Florian; Bedacht, Stefan; Ortner, Alex; Roth, Markus; Tauschwitz, Anna; Zielbauer, Bernhard; Bagnoud, Vincent

    2014-12-01

    We used time-resolved shadowgraphy to characterize the pre-plasma formation in solid-target interaction experiments with micrometer-scale accuracy. We performed quantitative measurements of the plasma density for amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) levels ranging from 2 · 10(-7) to 10(-10) backed with 2-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. We find that ASE levels above 10(-9) are able to create a significant pre-plasma plume that features a plasma canal driving a self-focusing of the laser beam. For ASE levels of 10(-10), no ASE pre-plasma could be detected.

  19. Investigation on Antibacterial Property of Cu-COATING on Pure Titanium Fabricated via Plasma Surface Alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jiaojuan; Hang, Ruiqiang; Lin, Naiming; Huang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiangyu; Qin, Lin; Tang, Bin

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of a Cu-coating on pure titanium via plasma surface alloying technology. The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure and elemental distributions of the coating were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and glow discharge optical emission spectroscope (GDOES). The antibacterial property of the Cu-coating was assessed via in vitro bacterial adhesion test. The results showed that the Cu-coating was continuous and compact. The Cu-coating endowed pure titanium with a promising antibacterial property.

  20. Acoustoplasma synthesis of nanoparticles of metal oxides and formation of nanostructured coatings on material surfaces under ultrasonic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulychev, N. A.; Morozova, E. A.; Muravyev, E. N.; Chernov, A. A.; Kazaryan, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a new form of plasma discharge in a liquid under intensive ultrasonic treatment exceeding the cavitation threshold has been explored in view of initiation of various physical and chemical processes. Furthermore, in this plasma discharge, nanoparticles of oxides of various metals with controlled shape and size of particles and narrow particles size distribution have been synthesized. Further research proved that ultrasonic cavitation during synthesis significantly affects the physical and chemical characteristics of nanoparticles. These nanoparticles can be used for formation of nanostructured coatings on surfaces of various materials by an ultrasonic technique.

  1. Morphological Evaluation of Plasma Sprayed Ceramic Coatings using Cavitation Erosion Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uematsu, Susumu; Tani, Kazumi; Sugasawa, Shinobu; Kawanami, Yasutaka; Namba, Yoshio; Takabatake, Tsuyoshi; Yoshioka, Masaru; Ishihara, Yasuaki

    The microstructure of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings is characterized by the existence of splats along with other morphological features such as interlamellar and globular pores, intrasplat microcracks and splat boundaries. These various process-dependant micro- defects extremely influence physical and mechanical properties such as thermal conductivity and elastic modulus and then influence coating behavior. In this approach, the process involved in the cavitation erosion of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings have been studied using the ultrasonic vibratory technique. The weight loss occurring during fifteen minute intervals of exposure to cavitational erosion was determined, the surface of specimens and the wear debris were examined by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results suggest that the improvement in coating performance could be achieved by controlling the effective contact between lamellae of which the coating is made up using the plasma spray conditions, such as sufficient preheat, short standoff distance and slow gun traversing movement.

  2. Porcelain-coated antenna for radio-frequency driven plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Wells, R.P.; Craven, G.E.

    1996-12-24

    A new porcelain-enamel coated antenna creates a clean plasma for volume or surface-conversion ion sources. The porcelain-enamel coating is hard, electrically insulating, long lasting, non fragile, and resistant to puncture by high energy ions in the plasma. Plasma and ion production using the porcelain enamel coated antenna is uncontaminated with filament or extraneous metal ions because the porcelain does not evaporate and is not sputtered into the plasma during operation. Ion beams produced using the new porcelain-enamel coated antenna are useful in ion implantation, high energy accelerators, negative, positive, or neutral beam applications, fusion, and treatment of chemical or radioactive waste for disposal. For ion implantation, the appropriate species ion beam generated with the inventive antenna will penetrate large or small, irregularly shaped conducting objects with a narrow implantation profile. 8 figs.

  3. Improving adhesion of powder coating on PEEK composite: Influence of atmospheric plasma parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Aurélie; Ho, Thu Huong; Fahs, Ahmad; Lafabrier, Aurore; Louarn, Guy; Bacharouche, Jalal; Airoudj, Aissam; Aragon, Emmanuel; Chailan, Jean-François

    2015-12-01

    In aeronautic industries, powder coatings are increasingly used because of environmental considerations. During the deposition of such a coating on a substrate piece, the main objective is to obtain a good coating/substrate adhesion. In this study, the targeted substrate is a Poly-(Ether EtherKetone)-(PEEK) based composite material. Due to the poor surface energy of PEEK, a surface treatment is necessary in order to enhance its adhesion with the coating. In this purpose, atmospheric plasma treatment has been chosen and the influence of plasma parameters has been studied. Four scan speed nozzles and three gases (Air, N2 and Argon) plasma has been tested. The increase of adhesion with increasing wettability, polarity and nanoroughness has been evidenced. A particular study of the type of grafted polar functionalities according to gas nature allowed to better understand the plasma mechanism and the cross-impact of polarity and nanoroughness in adhesion enhancement.

  4. Deposition of Hard Chrome Coating onto Heat Susceptible Substrates by Low Power Microwave Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redza, Ahmad; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma spray requires relatively low power, which is lower than 1 kW in comparison to other plasma spraying method. Until now, we are able to deposit Cu and Hydroxyapatite coating onto heat susceptible substrate, CFRP which are difficult for conventional plasma spray due to the excessive heat input. In this paper, a hard chromium coating was deposited onto SUS304 and CFRP by a low power microwave plasma spray technique. By controlling the working gas flow rate and spraying distance, a hard chrome coating with thickness of approximately 30 μm was successfully deposited onto CFRP substrate with hardness of 1110 Hv0.05. Furthermore, the coating produced here is higher than that produced by hard chrome plating.

  5. Porcelain-coated antenna for radio-frequency driven plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Wells, Russell P.; Craven, Glen E.

    1996-01-01

    A new porcelain-enamel coated antenna creates a clean plasma for volume or surface-conversion ion sources. The porcelain-enamel coating is hard, electrically insulating, long lasting, non fragile, and resistant to puncture by high energy ions in the plasma. Plasma and ion production using the porcelain enamel coated antenna is uncontaminated with filament or extraneous metal ion because the porcelain does not evaporate and is not sputtered into the plasma during operation. Ion beams produced using the new porcelain-enamel coated antenna are useful in ion implantation, high energy accelerators, negative, positive, or neutral beam applications, fusion, and treatment of chemical or radioactive waste for disposal. For ion implantation, the appropriate species ion beam generated with the inventive antenna will penetrate large or small, irregularly shaped conducting objects with a narrow implantation profile.

  6. Nitric oxide releasing plasma polymer coating with bacteriostatic properties and no cytotoxic side effects.

    PubMed

    Michl, Thomas D; Coad, Bryan R; Doran, Michael; Osiecki, Michael; Kafshgari, Morteza Hasanzadeh; Voelcker, Nicolas H; Hüsler, Amanda; Vasilev, Krasimir; Griesser, Hans J

    2015-04-25

    We report a stable plasma polymer coating, using isopentyl nitrite as a volatile precursor, which releases nitric oxide at bacteriostatic concentrations when contacted with water, inhibiting bacterial growth without cytotoxic side effects to human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells.

  7. Structural Analysis of Dusty Plasma Formations Based on Spatial Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Khakhaev, A. D.; Luizova, L. A.; Piskunov, A. A.; Podryadchikov, S. F.; Soloviev, A. V.

    2008-09-07

    Some advantages of studying the structure of dusty plasma formations using spatial spectra are illustrated by simulated experiments and by processing actual images of dusty structures in dc glow discharge in inert and molecular gases.

  8. Microstructure and corrosion properties of thick WC composite coating formed by plasma cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guozhi, Xie; Xiaolong, Song; Dongjie, Zhang; Yuping, Wu; Pinghua, Lin

    2010-08-01

    The thick Ni-coated WC coatings, in a matrix of Nickel-based alloys, were prepared on AISI 1045 steel using plasma cladding equipment. A pre-placed layer of uniform mixture, with different weight fractions of Ni-coated WC powder and Nickel-based alloy powder, on the steel substrate was melted at the high temperature of the plasma jet. The coating composition, microstructure and microhardness were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and microhardness testing. The experimental results show that the metallurgical bond was formed between the coating and substrate. The XRD results show that the coatings contain γ-Ni, carbides (such as M 23C 6 and M 7C 3) and boride (such as Fe 2B, Fe 3B phases). SEM shows that all the coatings are crack-free with lower porosity (<1%). It is found that the microhardness and the electrochemical behavior of the coatings are depended on the content of Ni-coated WC powder. The corrosion mechanism for the coatings may be due to the microgalvance corrosion between the phases in the cladding coatings.

  9. Acoustic emission and fatigue damage induced in plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coating layers.

    PubMed

    Laonapakul, Teerawat; Otsuka, Yuichi; Nimkerdphol, Achariya Rakngarm; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2012-04-01

    In order to improve the adhesive strength of hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings, grit blasting with Al(2)O(3) powder and then wet blasting with HAp/Ti mixed powders was carried out on a commercially pure Ti (cp-Ti) substrate. Subsequently, an HAp/Ti bond coat layer and HAp top coat layer were deposited by plasma spraying. Fatigue tests of the HAp-coated specimens were carried out under four-point bending. Acoustic emission (AE) signals during the entire fatigue test were monitored to investigate the fatigue cracking behavior of the HAp-coated specimens. The HAp-coated specimens could survive up to 10(7) cycles without spallation of the HAp coating layers at the stress amplitude of 120 MPa. The HAp-coated specimens without HAp/Ti bond coat layer showed shorter fatigue life and easy crack nucleation compared to the HAp-coated specimens with HAp/Ti bond coat layer. The delamination and spallation of the HAp top coat with HAp/Ti bond coat on cp-Ti was not observed until the crack propagated into the cp-Ti during the final fracture stage of the fatigue cycle. Therefore, the HAp/Ti bond coat layer was found to greatly improve the fatigue damage resistance of the HAp coating layer. Three stages of the fatigue failure behavior of the HAp top coat with HAp/Ti bond coat on a cp-Ti substrate can be clearly estimated by the AE monitoring technique. These stages are cracks nucleating and propagating in the coating layer, cracks propagating in the substrate, and cracks propagating unstably to final fracture.

  10. Coatings and claddings for the reduction of plasma contamination and surface erosion in fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminsky, M.

    1980-01-01

    For the successful operation of plasma devices and future fusion reactors it is necessary to control plasma impurity release and surface erosion. Effective methods to obtain such controls include the application of protective coatings to, and the use of clad materials for, certain first wall components. Major features of the development programs for coatings and claddings for fusion applications will be described together with an outline of the testing program. A discussion of some pertinent test results will be included.

  11. Electrocatalytically Active Nickel-Based Electrode Coatings Formed by Atmospheric and Suspension Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghasibeig, M.; Mousavi, M.; Ben Ettouill, F.; Moreau, C.; Wuthrich, R.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Ni-based electrode coatings with enhanced surface areas, for hydrogen production, were developed using atmospheric plasma spray (APS) and suspension plasma spray (SPS) processes. The results revealed a larger electrochemical active surface area for the coatings produced by SPS compared to those produced by APS process. SEM micrographs showed that the surface microstructure of the sample with the largest surface area was composed of a large number of small cauliflower-like aggregates with an average diameter of 10 μm.

  12. Process for producing plasma sprayed carbide-based coatings with minimal decarburization and near theoretical density

    SciTech Connect

    Lenling, W.J. ); Smith, M.F.; Henfling, J.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Plasma spray deposition of carbide/metal hardcoatings is difficult because complex chemical transformations can occur while spraying, especially in the presence of oxygen. A commercial plasma spray torch has been modified to simultaneously inject carbide powder and a metal alloy powder at two different locations in the plasma stream. Composite hardcoatings of tungsten carbide/cobalt with a nickel-base alloy matrix have been produce with this dual-injection spray process and compared to coatings sprayed with a conventional plasma spray process. X-ray diffraction revealed very little change in the carbide phase composition of dual-injection coatings as compared to the original composition of the carbide spray powder. Conversely, the conventionally sprayed coatings showed significant transformation of the WC phase to the less desirable W{sub 2}C phase, and secondary oxy- carbide phases were also clearly evident. Porosity in the dual- injection coatings was consistently less than 2%, as measured by image analysis of polished metallographic samples. Microhardness results for the dual injection coatings also compared very favorably with values for the conventional coatings. Preliminary results from an ongoing abrasive wear study indicate that the dual-injection coatings are more wear resistant than the conventional coatings, but further research is needed. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Broadband Plasma-Sprayed Anti-reflection Coating for Millimeter-Wave Astrophysics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, O.; Lee, A.; Raum, C.; Suzuki, A.

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a plasma-sprayed anti-reflection (AR) coating technology for millimeter-wave astrophysics experiments with cryogenic optics which achieves minimal dissipative loss and broad bandwidth and is easily and accurately applied. Plasma spraying is a coating process through which melted or heated materials are sprayed onto a substrate. The dielectric constants of the plasma-sprayed coatings were tuned between 2.7 and 7.9 by mixing hollow ceramic microspheres with alumina powder as the base material and varying the plasma energy of the spray. By spraying low loss ceramic materials with a tunable dielectric constant, we can apply multiple layers of AR coating for broadband millimeter-wave detection. At 300 K, we achieved a fractional bandwidth of 106 over 90% transmission using a three-layer AR coating. Applying ceramic coatings on ceramic lenses offers an additional benefit of preventing cryogenic delamination of the coatings. We report on methodology of coating application and measurement of uniformity, repeatability, transmission property, and cryogenic adhesion performance.

  14. Fatigue testing of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, T. A.; Nagy, A.; Popelar, C. F.

    1990-01-01

    A plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating for diesel engines were fatigue tested. Candidate thermal barrier coating materials were fatigue screened and a data base was generated for the selected candidate material. Specimen configurations are given for the bend fatigue tests, along with test setup, specimen preparation, test matrix and procedure, and data analysis.

  15. Plasma polymerized n-butyl methacrylate coating with potential for re-endothelialization of intravascular stent devices.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Changsheng; Yin, Min

    2008-05-01

    Rapid re-endothelialization at an atherosclerotic lesion after stent employment is essential for reducing or preventing local thrombus formation and restenosis. To prevent these complications via enhanced rapid re-endothelialization, poly n-butyl methacrylate (PPBMA) coating was deposited on the stent surface through a radio-frequency plasma polymerization process, with oxygen as the carrier gas. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization confirmed the occurrence of the plasma polymerization and the chemistry properties of the PPBMA. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a smooth and dense surface. The wettability of the polymeric films measured by the contact angle indicated that the surface was more hydrophilic (2.0 +/- 1 degrees ) than the original surface (24 +/- 1 degrees ) by the introduction of the PPBMA coating, with a slight decrease even after 4 days. The results of the culture of human umbilical cord veins endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro showed that compared with the control of 316L stainless steel, the attachment and growth of cells on the PPBMA-coated surface was significantly enhanced, and a confluent endothelial cells layer was formed after a 4-day culture. A platelet adhesion experiment revealed that the blood compatibility of the substrate surface after PPBMA deposition was also obviously improved. The PPBMA coating remained intact on the stent surface after expansion according to the clinic protocol, indicating that the adhesive strength of PPBMA coating was high enough to withstand the external force in the process of stent expansion. This in vitro pilot study prior to in vivo experiments suggested that this plasma PPBMA was promising for coating stent materials for rapid re-endothelialization.

  16. [Coating with plasma-deposited functionalized diamond-like carbon to decrease encrustations on urological implants].

    PubMed

    Laube, N; Kleinen, L; Böde, U; Fisang, C; Meissner, A; Bradenahl, J; Syring, I; Busch, H; Pinkowski, W; Müller, S C

    2007-09-01

    The double-J stents used today for palliative artificial urinary diversion very often show extreme formation of encrustations, even a short time after implantation. Despite increased scientific material development, the complication rate has not really been strongly influenced. Grant-aided by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, we chose a new interdisciplinary and translational approach by coating standard stent materials with plasma-deposited amorphous diamond-like carbon. These stents show clearly reduced rates of encrustation in vitro. Ongoing clinical trials demonstrate a further enhancement of this effect in vivo. The underlying mechanisms are being investigated by extending the established in vitro model, thereby pushing research in this field to a new level.

  17. Improved plasma sprayed MCrAlY coatings for aircraft gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennisi, F. J.; Gupta, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    Eighteen plasma sprayed coating systems, nine based on the NiCoCrAlY chemistry and nine based on the CoCrAlY composition, were evaluated to identify coating systems which will provide equivalent or superior life to that shown by the electron beam physical vapor deposited NiCoCrAlY and CoCrAlY coatings respectively. NiCoCrAlY-type coatings were examined on a single crystal alloy and the CoCrAlY based coatings were optimized on the B1900 + Hf alloy. Cyclic burner rig oxidation and hot corrosion and tensile ductility tests were used to evaluate the various coating candidates. For the single crystal alloy, a low pressure chamber plasma sprayed NiCoCrAlY + Si coating exhibited a 2X oxidation life improvement at 1121 C (2050 F) over the vapor deposited NiCoCrAlY material while showing equivalent tensile ductility. A silicon modified low pressure chamber plasma sprayed CoCrAlY coating was found to be more durable than the baseline vapor deposited CoCrAlY coating on the B1900 + Hf alloy.

  18. Tailored plasma sprayed MCrAlY coatings for aircraft gas turbine applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennisi, F. J.; Gupta, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    Eighteen plasma sprayed coating systems, nine based on the NiCoCrAly chemistry and nine based on the CoCrAly composition, were evaluated to identify coating systems which provide equivalent or superior life to that shown by the electron beam physical vapor deposited NiCoCrAly and CoCrAly coatings respectively. NiCoCrAly type coatings were examined on a single crystal alloy and the CoCrAly based coatings were optimized on the B1900+ Hf alloy. Cyclic burner rig oxidation and hot corrosion and tensile ductility tests used to evaluate the various coating candidates. For the single crystal alloy, a low pressure chamber plasma sprayed NiCoCrAly + Si coating exhibited a 2x oxidation life improvement at 1394 K (2050 F) over the vapor deposited NiCoCrAly material while showing equivalent tensile ductility. A silicon modified low pressure chamber plasma sprayed CoCrAly coating was found to be more durable than the baseline vapor deposited CoCrAly coating on the B1900+ Hf alloy.

  19. A structural investigation of a plasma sprayed Ni--Cr based alloy coating

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, S.; Neiser, R.A.; Herman, H. ); Kirkland, J.P.; Elam, W.T. )

    1993-01-01

    A Ni--Cr based hardfacing alloy has been plasma sprayed in ambient and low pressure atmospheres onto mild steel substrates. These coatings exhibit excellent wear and corrosion resistance; however, the significance of microstructure on properties has not been reported. This study relates the structure of the sprayed coatings to the processing conditions. X-ray diffraction results indicate phase separation in air plasma sprayed deposits, while low pressure plasma sprayed deposits exhibit a single supersaturated solid solution. Annealing of the air plasma sprayed coating shows dissolution of the bcc chromium phase, confirming its metastable nature. These results were confirmed using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analysis, which further suggests a highly disordered structure, with partial oxidation of selected alloying elements, such as chromium. Transmission electron microscopy indicates a wide variety of microstructures in the air plasma sprayed deposit. In the case of low pressure sprayed deposit, the microstructures are homogeneous and uniform.

  20. Formation and Stability of Impurity "snakes" in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    L. Delgado-Aparicio, et. al.

    2013-01-28

    New observations of the formation and dynamics of long-lived impurity-induced helical "snake" modes in tokamak plasmas have recently been carried-out on Alcator C-Mod. The snakes form as an asymmetry in the impurity ion density that undergoes a seamless transition from a small helically displaced density to a large crescent-shaped helical structure inside q < 1, with a regularly sawtoothing core. The observations show that the conditions for the formation and persistence of a snake cannot be explained by plasma pressure alone. Instead, many features arise naturally from nonlinear interactions in a 3D MHD model that separately evolves the plasma density and temperature

  1. Phase transformation and wear studies of plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia coatings containing various mol% of yttria

    SciTech Connect

    Aruna, S.T. Balaji, N.; Rajam, K.S.

    2011-07-15

    Plasma sprayable grade zirconia powders doped with various mol% of yttria (0, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 12 mol%) were synthesized by a chemical co-precipitation route. The coprecipitation conditions were adjusted such that the powders possessed good flowability in the as calcined condition and thus avoiding the agglomeration step like spray drying. Identical plasma spray parameters were used for plasma spraying all the powders on stainless steel plates. The powders and plasma sprayed coatings were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Zirconia powders are susceptible to phase transformations when subjected to very high temperatures during plasma spraying and XRD is insensitive to the presence of some non crystalline phases and hence Raman spectroscopy was used as an important tool. The microstructure of the plasma sprayed coatings showed a bimodal distribution containing fully melted and unmelted zones. The microhardness and wear resistance of the plasma sprayed coatings were determined. Among the plasma sprayed coatings, 3 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia coating containing pure tetragonal zirconia showed the highest wear resistance. - Research Highlights: {yields} Preparation plasma sprayable YSZ powders without any agglomeration process and plasma spraying {yields} Phase transformation studies of plasma sprayed YSZ coatings by XRD and Raman spectroscopy {yields} Microstructure of the plasma sprayed coatings exhibited bimodal distribution {yields} Plasma sprayed 3 mol% YSZ coating exhibited the highest wear resistance {yields} Higher wear resistance is due to the higher fracture toughness of tetragonal 3 mol% YSZ phase.

  2. Analysis of scattering wave for a conducting cylinder coated with eccentric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Bo; Yang, Feng; Hao, Honggang; Li, Changyong

    2013-05-01

    Object coated with plasma has stimulated great interests of many people because of its stealth capability. The study on a conducting cylinder coated with coaxial plasma is very much, but there are little works on a conducting cylinder coated with eccentric plasma. In this article, a model for a conducting cylinder coated with eccentric unmagnetized plasma is set up, the scattering cross section of the object cylinder is studied by adopting the superposition of cylindrical wave functions and the coordinate transformation, where these wave functions are the solutions of Maxwell's equations with boundary conditions in cylindrical coordinates. The results show that the radar cross section for a conducting cylinder coated with eccentric plasma in every direction decrease obviously with an increase of the distance between two eccentric axes, but is almost not impacted by electron-neutral collision frequency of plasma, and the backscattering cross section of the target reduce with the increase of electron density. Comparing with the coaxial model, the backscattering cross section of the eccentric model has a smaller value in a wide frequency band. This is of significance for the target plasma stealth technology in practice.

  3. Wide-temperature-spectrum self-lubricating coatings prepared by plasma spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    Self-lubricating, multicomponent coatings, which lubricate over a wide range of operating conditions, are described. The coatings were successfully applied by plasma-spraying mixed powders onto superalloy substrates. They were evaluated in friction and wear experiments, and in sliding contact bearing tests. These coatings are wear resistant by virtue of their self lubricating characteristics rather than because of extreme hardness; a further benefit is low friction. Experiments with simple pin on disk sliding specimens and oscillating plain cylindrical bearing tests were performed to evaluate the tribological properties of the coatings. It was shown that coatings of nichrome, glass and calcium fluoride are self-lubricating from about 500 to 900 C, but give high friction at the lower temperatures. The addition of silver to the coating composition improved the low temperature bearing properties and resulted in coatings which are self-lubricating from cryogenic temperatures to at least 870 C; they are therefore, wide temperature spectrum, self-lubricating compositions.

  4. Sintering and Interface Strain Tolerance of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Leissler, George W.; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot section SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. A coating system consisting of a zirconia-based oxide topcoat (thermal barrier) and a mullite/BSAS silicate inner coat (environmental barrier) is often considered a model system for the CMC applications. However, the coating sintering, and thermal expansion mismatch between the zirconia oxide layer and the silicate environmental barrier/CMC substrate will be of major concern at high temperature and under thermal cycling conditions. In this study, the sintering behavior of plasma-sprayed freestanding zirconia-yttria-based thermal barrier coatings and mullite (and/or barium-strontium-aluminosilicate, i.e., BSAS) environmental barrier coatings was determined using a dilatometer in the temperature range of 1200-1500 C. The effects of test temperature on the coating sintering kinetics were systematically investigated. The plasma-sprayed zirconia-8wt.%yttria and mullite (BSAS) two-layer composite coating systems were also prepared to quantitatively evaluate the interface strain tolerance of the coating system under thermal cycling conditions based on the dilatomentry. The cyclic response of the coating strain tolerance behavior and interface degradation as a function of cycle number will also be discussed.

  5. Nano-structural bioactive gradient coating fabricated by computer controlled plasma-spraying technology.

    PubMed

    Ning, C Y; Wang, Y J; Lu, W W; Qiu, Q X; Lam, R W M; Chen, X F; Chiu, K Y; Ye, J D; Wu, G; Wu, Z H; Chow, S P

    2006-10-01

    The poor mechanical property of hydroxyapatite was the major problem for load bearing and implant coating in clinical applications. To overcome this weakness, a bioactive gradient coating with a special design composition of hydroxyapatite (HA), ZrO2, Ti, bioglass was developed. This 120 microm coating with an upper layer of 30-50 microm porous HA produced by computer controlled plasma spraying which maintained energy level of the plasma which ensure proper melting of powder. The crystal size of the coating was 18.6-26.2 nm. Transformation of t-ZrO2 to m-ZrO2 reduced the thermal stress that weakened the coating and lowered down interfacial strength of the coating and metal substrate. Thermal stress of sprayed coating was 16.4 MPa which was much smaller than the sample without thermal treatment of 67.1 MPa. Interfacial strength between the coating and metal substrate was 53 MPa which is much higher than conventional Hydroxyapatite coating. Based on XRD analysis crystallinity of HA approached 98%. Therefore, high temperature treatment improved long term stability of the coating through improved crystallinity of hydroxyapatite and reduced other impure calcium phosphate phase.

  6. Influence of NH4Cl Powder Addition for Fabrication of Aluminum Nitride Coating in Reactive Atmospheric Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahien, Mohammed; Yamada, Motohiro; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Reactive plasma spray is the key to fabricating aluminum nitride (AlN) thermally sprayed coatings. It was possible to fabricate AlN/Al composite coatings using atmospheric plasma spray process through plasma nitriding of Al powders (Al 30 μm). The nitriding reaction and the AlN content could be improved by controlling the spray distance and the feedstock powder particle size. Increasing the spray distance and/or using smaller particle size of Al powders improved the in-flight nitriding reaction. However, it was difficult to fabricate thick and dense AlN coatings with an increase in the spray distance and/or when using fine particles. Thus, the coatings thickness was suppressed because of the complete nitriding of some particles (formation of AlN particles) during flight, which prevents the particle deposition. Furthermore, the excessive vaporization of Al fine particles (due to increased particle temperature) decreased the deposition efficiency. To fabricate thick AlN coatings in the reactive plasma spray process, improving the nitriding reaction of the large Al particles at short spray distance is required to decrease the vaporization of Al particles during flight. This study investigated the influence of adding ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) powders on the nitriding process of large Al powders and on the microstructure of the fabricated coatings. It was possible to fabricate thick AlN coatings at 100 mm spray distance with small addition of NH4Cl powders to the Al feedstock powders (30 μm). Addition of NH4Cl to the starting Al powders promoted the formation of AlN through changing the reaction path to vapor-phase nitridation chlorination-nitridation sequences as confirmed by the thermodynamic analysis of possible intermediate reactions. This changes the nitriding reaction to a mild way, so it is more controlled with no explosive mode and with relatively low heating rates. Thus, NH4Cl acts as a catalyst, nitrogen source, and diluent agent. Furthermore, the evolved

  7. Hydrophobic coating of solid materials by plasma-polymerized thin film using tetrafluoroethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hozumi, K.; Kitamura, K.; Kitade, T.

    1980-01-01

    Glass slides were coated with plasma-polymerized tetrafluoroethylene films of different thickness using the glow discharge technique in a tube-shaped chamber, and the plasma conditions, film growth rates, light permeability of the polymer films, and particle bond strength in the polymer films were studied. Ashed sections of mouse organs and ashed bacillus spores were also coated to give them hydrophobic treatment without damaging their shapes or appearance. The hydrophobic coating of the specimens was successful, and the fine ash patterns were strongly fixed onto the glass slides, making permanent preparations.

  8. New generation of plasma-sprayed mullite coatings on silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1995-01-01

    Mullite is promising as a protective coating for silicon-based ceramics in aggressive high-temperature environments. Conventionally plasma-sprayed mullite on SiC tends to crack and debond on thermal cycling. It is shown that this behavior is due to the presence of amorphous mullite in the conventionally sprayed mullite. Heating the SiC substrate during the plasma spraying eliminated the amorphous phase and produced coatings with dramatically improved properties. The new coating exhibits excellent adherence and crack resistance under thermal cycling between room temperature and 1000 to 1400 C. Preliminary tests showed good resistance to Na2CO3-induced hot corrosion.

  9. Investigation on the suitability of plasma sprayed Fe Cr Al coatings as tritium permeation barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, C.; Stein-Fechner, K.; Serra, E.; Glasbrenner, H.; Benamati, G.

    1999-08-01

    Results on the fabrication of a tritium permeation barrier by spraying Fe-Cr-Al powders are described. The sprayed coatings were deposited at temperatures below the Ac1 temperature of the ferritic-martensitic steel substrate and no post-deposition heat treatment was applied. The aim of the investigation was the determination of the efficiency of the coatings to act as tritium permeation barrier. Metallurgical investigations as well as hydrogen isotope permeation measurements were carried out onto the produced coatings. The depositions were performed on ferritic-martensitic steels by means of three types of spray techniques: high velocity oxy fuel, air plasma spray and vacuum plasma spray.

  10. In-situ formation of multiphase deposited thermal barrier coatings

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2004-01-13

    A multiphase ceramic thermal barrier coating is provided. The coating is adapted for use in high temperature applications in excess of about 1200.degree. C., for coating superalloy components of a combustion turbine engine. The coating comprises a ceramic single or two oxide base layer disposed on the substrate surface; and a ceramic oxide reaction product material disposed on the base layer, the reaction product comprising the reaction product of the base layer with a ceramic single or two oxide overlay layer.

  11. Thermal barrier coating life and isothermal oxidation of low-pressure plasma-sprayed bond coat alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, W. J.; Miller, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    The paper investigates the isothermal oxidation kinetics of Ni-35Cr-6Al-0.95Y, Ni-18Cr-12Al-0.3Y, and Ni-16Cr-6Al-0.3Y low-pressure plasma-sprayed bond coat alloys and examines the effect of these alloys on the thermal barrier coating (TBC) cyclic life. TBC life was examined by cycling substrates coated with the different bond coats and a ZrO2-7 wt pct Y2O3 TBC in an air-rich burner rig flame between 1150 C and room temperature. The oxidation kinetics of the three bond coat alloys was examined by isothermal oxidation of monolithic NJiCrAlY coupons at 1083 C. The Ni-35Cr-6Al-0.95Y alloy exhibits comparatively high isothermal oxidation weight gains and provides the longest TBC life, whereas the Ni-16Cr-6Al-0.3Y alloy had the lowest weight gains and provided the shortest TBC life. The results show that, although bond coat oxidation is known to have a strong detrimental effect on TBC life, it is not the only bond coat factor that determines TBC life.

  12. Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) of Ceramics for Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harder, Bryan J.; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    In order to generate advanced multilayer thermal and environmental protection systems, a new deposition process is needed to bridge the gap between conventional plasma spray, which produces relatively thick coatings on the order of 125-250 microns, and conventional vapor phase processes such as electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) which are limited by relatively slow deposition rates, high investment costs, and coating material vapor pressure requirements. The use of Plasma Spray - Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) processing fills this gap and allows thin (< 10 microns) single layers to be deposited and multilayer coatings of less than 100 microns to be generated with the flexibility to tailor microstructures by changing processing conditions. Coatings of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were applied to NiCrAlY bond coated superalloy substrates using the PS-PVD coater at NASA Glenn Research Center. A design-of-experiments was used to examine the effects of process variables (Ar/He plasma gas ratio, the total plasma gas flow, and the torch current) on chamber pressure and torch power. Coating thickness, phase and microstructure were evaluated for each set of deposition conditions. Low chamber pressures and high power were shown to increase coating thickness and create columnar-like structures. Likewise, high chamber pressures and low power had lower growth rates, but resulted in flatter, more homogeneous layers

  13. Formation of Solution-derived Hydroxyapatite Coatings on Titanium Alloy in the Presence of Magnetron-sputtered Alumina Bond Coats

    PubMed Central

    Zykova, Anna; Safonov, Vladimir; Yanovska, Anna; Sukhodub, Leonid; Rogovskaya, Renata; Smolik, Jerzy; Yakovin, Stas

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 (HAp) and calcium phosphate ceramic materials and coatings are widely used in medicine and dentistry because of their ability to enhance the tissue response to implant surfaces and promote bone ingrowth and osseoconduction processes. The deposition conditions have a great influence on the structure and biofunctionality of calcium phosphate coatings. Corrosion processes and poor adhesion to substrate material reduce the lifetime of implants with calcium phosphate coatings. The research has focused on the development of advanced methods to deposit double-layered ceramic oxide/calcium phosphate coatings by a hybrid technique of magnetron sputtering and thermal methods. The thermal method can promote the crystallization and the formation of HAp coatings on titanium alloy Ti6Al4V substrates at low temperature, based on the principle that the solubility of HAp in aqueous solutions decreases with increasing substrate temperature. By this method, hydroxyapatite directly coated the substrate without precipitation in the initial solution. Using a thermal substrate method, calcium phosphate coatings were prepared at substrate temperatures of 100-105 oC. The coated metallic implant surfaces with ceramic bond coats and calcium phosphate layers combine the excellent mechanical properties of metals with the chemical stability of ceramic materials. The corrosion test results show that the ceramic oxide (alumina) coatings and the double-layered alumina-calcium phosphate coatings improve the corrosion resistance compared with uncoated Ti6Al4V and single-layered Ti6Al4V/calcium phosphate substrates. In addition, the double-layered alumina/hydroxyapatite coatings demonstrate the best biocompatibility during in vitro tests. PMID:25893018

  14. Formation of Solution-derived Hydroxyapatite Coatings on Titanium Alloy in the Presence of Magnetron-sputtered Alumina Bond Coats.

    PubMed

    Zykova, Anna; Safonov, Vladimir; Yanovska, Anna; Sukhodub, Leonid; Rogovskaya, Renata; Smolik, Jerzy; Yakovin, Stas

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 (HAp) and calcium phosphate ceramic materials and coatings are widely used in medicine and dentistry because of their ability to enhance the tissue response to implant surfaces and promote bone ingrowth and osseoconduction processes. The deposition conditions have a great influence on the structure and biofunctionality of calcium phosphate coatings. Corrosion processes and poor adhesion to substrate material reduce the lifetime of implants with calcium phosphate coatings. The research has focused on the development of advanced methods to deposit double-layered ceramic oxide/calcium phosphate coatings by a hybrid technique of magnetron sputtering and thermal methods. The thermal method can promote the crystallization and the formation of HAp coatings on titanium alloy Ti6Al4V substrates at low temperature, based on the principle that the solubility of HAp in aqueous solutions decreases with increasing substrate temperature. By this method, hydroxyapatite directly coated the substrate without precipitation in the initial solution. Using a thermal substrate method, calcium phosphate coatings were prepared at substrate temperatures of 100-105 (o)C. The coated metallic implant surfaces with ceramic bond coats and calcium phosphate layers combine the excellent mechanical properties of metals with the chemical stability of ceramic materials. The corrosion test results show that the ceramic oxide (alumina) coatings and the double-layered alumina-calcium phosphate coatings improve the corrosion resistance compared with uncoated Ti6Al4V and single-layered Ti6Al4V/calcium phosphate substrates. In addition, the double-layered alumina/hydroxyapatite coatings demonstrate the best biocompatibility during in vitro tests. PMID:25893018

  15. Use of plasma sprayed coatings as surface treatments for aluminum adherends

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.D.; Whisnant, P.L.; Groff, G.B.

    1996-12-31

    Surface treatments for metal adherends prior to adhesive bonding typically use chromates and/or strong acids and bases. Such materials are hazardous to personnel and harmful to the environment following disposal. To reduce release of these substances into the environment and lower disposal costs, plasma spray treatments are being developed as surface treatments for aluminum adherends. These treatments eliminate liquid and gaseous wastes and provide bond strength and durability comparable to that provided by the conventional chemical treatments. They have other potential advantages of being more suited for repair/refurbishment and less sensitive to metallurgical differences from alloy to alloy. Plasma sprayed coatings are used in a variety of applications where a coating tailored for specific properties is needed that may or may not be chemically or structurally similar to the base substrate. Plasma spraying has been shown to provide excellent high-temperature bond performance with titanium (unlike conventional oxidation treatments) and durability approaching that of phosphoric acid anodization for aluminum. Success has also been reported using other coatings on aluminum, titanium, and steel. Plasma spraying has the important advantage of versatility. A wide range of coatings (metals, ceramics, and polymers) can be deposited onto an equally wide range of substrates, and the coating properties can be optimized for a given application, independent of the substrate. Because of this versatility, plasma-sprayed coatings have been used for wear resistance, thermal barriers, EMI/RF shielding, corrosion resistance, slip/slide resistance, and biocompatibility in addition to adhesion.

  16. Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of Plasma Sprayed Ni-Based Metallic Glass Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Akira; Kuroda, Toshio; Kimura, Hisamichi; Inoue, Akihisa

    2010-10-01

    Various developmental research works on the metallic glass have been conducted in order to broaden its application field. Thermal spraying method is one of the potential techniques to enhance the excellent properties such as high toughness and corrosion resistance of the metallic glass material. The gas tunnel type plasma spraying is useful to obtain high quality ceramic coatings such as Al2O3 and ZrO2 coatings. In this study, the Ni-based metallic glass coatings were produced by the gas tunnel type plasma spraying under various experimental conditions, and their microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated. At the plasma current of 200-300 A, the Ni-based metallic glass coatings of more than 200 μm in thickness were formed densely with Vickers hardness of about Hv = 600.

  17. A design of experiment study of plasma sprayed alumina-titania coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Steeper, T.J.; Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Wilson, G.C.; Riggs, W.L. II; Rotolico, A.J.; Nerz, J.E.

    1992-08-01

    An experimental study of the plasma spraying of alumina-titania powder is presented in this paper. This powder system is being used to fabricate heater tubes that emulate nuclear fuel tubes for use in thermal-hydraulic testing. Coating experiments were conducted using a Taguchi fractional-factorial design parametric study. Operating parameters were varied around the typical spray parameters in a systematic design of experiments in order to display the range of plasma processing conditions and their effect on the resultant coating. The coatings were characterized by hardness and electrical tests, image analysis, and optical metallography. Coating qualities are discussed with respect to dielectric strength, hardness, porosity, surface roughness, deposition efficiency, and microstructure. The attributes of the coatings are correlated with the changes in operating parameters.

  18. A design of experiment study of plasma sprayed alumina-titania coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Steeper, T.J. and Co., Aiken, SC . Savannah River Lab.); Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Wilson, G.C. ); Riggs, W.L. II ); Rotolico, A.J.; Nerz, J.E. )

    1992-01-01

    An experimental study of the plasma spraying of alumina-titania powder is presented in this paper. This powder system is being used to fabricate heater tubes that emulate nuclear fuel tubes for use in thermal-hydraulic testing. Coating experiments were conducted using a Taguchi fractional-factorial design parametric study. Operating parameters were varied around the typical spray parameters in a systematic design of experiments in order to display the range of plasma processing conditions and their effect on the resultant coating. The coatings were characterized by hardness and electrical tests, image analysis, and optical metallography. Coating qualities are discussed with respect to dielectric strength, hardness, porosity, surface roughness, deposition efficiency, and microstructure. The attributes of the coatings are correlated with the changes in operating parameters.

  19. Fabrication of Nanosized Lanthanum Zirconate Powder and Deposition of Thermal Barrier Coating by Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Jagdeesh, N.; Pathak, L. C.

    2016-07-01

    The present manuscript discusses our findings on fabrication of nanosized lanthanum zirconate powder for thermal barrier coating application and its coating by plasma spray on nickel-based superalloy substrate. Single-phase La2Zr2O7 coating of thickness of the order of 45 µm on the Ni-Cr-Al bond coat coated Ni-based superalloy substrate was deposited by plasma spray process. The layers at the interface did not show spallation and inter diffusion was very less. The microstructure, interface, porosity, and mechanical properties of different layers are investigated. The lanthanum zirconate hardness and modulus were 10.5 and 277 GPa, respectively. The load depth curve for lanthanum zirconate showed good elastic recovery around 74%.

  20. Status of Plasma Physics Techniques for the Deposition of Tribological Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1984-01-01

    The plasma physics deposition techniques of sputtering and ion-plating are reviewed. Their characteristics and potentials are discussed in terms of synthesis or deposition of tribological coatings. Since the glow discharge or plasma generated in the conventional sputtering and ion-plating techniques has a low ionization efficiency, rapid advances have been made in equipment design to further increase the ionization efficiency. The enhanced ionization favorably affects the nucleation and growth sequence of the coating. This leads to improved adherence and coherence, higher density, favorable morphological growth, and reduced internal stresses in the coatings. As a result, desirable coating characteristics can be precision tailored. Tribological coating characteristics of sputtered solid film lubricants such as MoS2, ion-plated soft gold and lead metallic films, and sputtered and ion-plated wear-resistant refractory compound films such as nitrides and carbides are discussed.

  1. Development of improved-durability plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, I. E.; Ruckle, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    As part of a NASA program to reduce fuel consumption of current commercial aircraft engines, methods were investigated for improving the durability of plasma sprayed ceramic coatings for use on vane platforms in the JT9D turbofan engine. Increased durability concepts under evaluation include use of improved strain tolerant microstructures and control of the substrate temperature during coating application. Initial burner rig tests conducted at temperatures of 1010 C (1850 F) indicate that improvements in cyclic life greater than 20:1 over previous ceramic coating systems were achieved. Three plasma sprayed coating systems applied to first stage vane platforms in the high pressure turbine were subjected to a 100-cycle JT9D engine endurance test with only minor damage occurring to the coatings.

  2. Factors affecting the microstructural stability and durability of thermal barrier coatings fabricated by air plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Helminiak, M A; Yanar, N M; Pettit, F S; Taylor, T A; Meier, G H

    2012-10-01

    The high-temperature behavior of high-purity, low-density (HP-LD) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The high purity yttria-stabilized zirconia resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The thermal conductivity of the as-processed TBC is low but increases during high temperature exposure even before densification occurs. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in good spallation resistance during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, topcoat density, and the thermal cycle frequency. The failure mechanisms are described and the durability of the HP-LD coatings is compared with that of state-of-the-art electron beam physical vapor deposition TBCs.

  3. In vitro fatigue behaviour of vacuum plasma and detonation gun sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings.

    PubMed

    Gledhill, H C; Turner, I G; Doyle, C

    2001-06-01

    The fatigue behaviour of vacuum plasma sprayed (VPS) and detonation gun sprayed (DGUN) hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium substrates has been compared in air and in buffered Ringer's solution. There was an increase in the surface microcracking and bulk porosity of both types of coating tested in air. After 1 million cycles in Ringer's solution the VPS coatings had completely delaminated from their substrates. In contrast the DGUN coatings retained their integrity when tested up to 10 million cycles but were beginning to show signs of delamination at the interface.

  4. Bow shock formation in a complex plasma.

    PubMed

    Saitou, Y; Nakamura, Y; Kamimura, T; Ishihara, O

    2012-02-10

    A bow shock is observed in a two-dimensional supersonic flow of charged microparticles in a complex plasma. A thin conducting needle is used to make a potential barrier as an obstacle for the particle flow in the complex plasma. The flow is generated and the flow velocity is controlled by changing a tilt angle of the device under the gravitational force. A void, microparticle-free region, is formed around the potential barrier surrounding the obstacle. The flow is bent around the leading edge of the void and forms an arcuate structure when the flow is supersonic. The structure is characterized by the bow shock as confirmed by a polytropic hydrodynamic theory as well as numerical simulation. PMID:22401079

  5. Cryopreservation increases coating of bull sperm by seminal plasma binder of sperm proteins BSP1, BSP3, and BSP5.

    PubMed

    Ardon, Florencia; Suarez, Susan S

    2013-08-01

    Artificial insemination with frozen semen allows affordable, worldwide dissemination of gametes with superior genetics. Nevertheless, sperm are damaged by the cryopreservation process. Elucidating the molecular effects of cryopreservation on sperm could suggest methods for improving fertility of frozen/thawed semen. This study was undertaken to examine the effect of cryopreservation on the coating of sperm by binder of sperm (BSP) proteins in seminal plasma. BSP proteins are secreted by the seminal vesicles and coat the surface of sperm by partially intercalating into the outer leaflet of the sperm plasma membrane. The BSP proteins are known to play roles in the formation of the oviductal sperm storage reservoir and in sperm capacitation. We investigated the effects of cryopreservation on the sperm BSP protein coat using Bovipure to separate live sperm from extended semen and then assaying the amounts of BSP proteins on sperm using quantitative western blotting with custom-made antibodies against unique sequences of each BSP protein. Greater amounts of all three BSP proteins (BSP1, BSP3, and BSP5) were detected on frozen/thawed sperm than on fresh sperm. Furthermore, the reduction of BSP3 from 15 to 13 kDa in mass, which occurs during incubation of sperm under mild capacitating conditions, was enhanced by cryopreservation. We concluded that freezing alters the BSP protein coating on sperm, which could account in part for reduced fertility of cryopreserved semen samples.

  6. Dynamics of Lane Formation in Driven Binary Complex Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Suetterlin, K. R.; Ivlev, A. V.; Raeth, C.; Thomas, H. M.; Rubin-Zuzic, M.; Morfill, G. E.; Wysocki, A.; Loewen, H.; Goedheer, W. J.; Fortov, V. E.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Petrov, O. F.

    2009-02-27

    The dynamical onset of lane formation is studied in experiments with binary complex plasmas under microgravity conditions. Small microparticles are driven and penetrate into a cloud of big particles, revealing a strong tendency towards lane formation. The observed time-resolved lane-formation process is in good agreement with computer simulations of a binary Yukawa model with Langevin dynamics. The laning is quantified in terms of the anisotropic scaling index, leading to a universal order parameter for driven systems.

  7. New ZrO2-Yb2O3 plasma-sprayed coatings for thermal barrier applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecura, Stephan

    1987-01-01

    New thermal barrier coatings, whose compositions were chosen on the basis of a limited study of the ZrO2-Yb2O3 system, were evaluated by cyclic testing in a furnace at 1120 C. On Ni-16.2Cr-5.9Al-0.15Y bond coating, ZrO2-12.4Yb2O3, ZrO2-14.7Yb2O3 and ZrO2-17.4Yb2O3 coatings have respectively 60, 30, and 15 percent longer lives than the near-optimum ZrO2-6.1Y2O3 coating. On Ni-18.3Cr-6.4Al-0.22Yb coating, ZrO2-12.4Yb2O3 has about 40 percent longer life than the ZrO2-6.1Y2O3 coating. The optimum Yb2O3 concentration in ZrO2 at which the maximum life is obtained is believed to be between 12.4 and 14.7 wt pct. The ZrO2-Yb2O3 thermal barrier systems failed through the formation of a crack or cracks in the thermal barrier coating near the bond coating interface. As-received ZrO2-Yb2O3 plasma spray powders had a nonhomogeneous distribution of Yb2O3. Monoclinic, cubic, and tetragonal phases in addition to Zr3Yb4O12 and an unknown phase were present.

  8. Study of thermal and electrical parameters of workpieces during spray coating by electrolytic plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khafizov, A. A.; Shakirov, Yu I.; Valiev, R. A.; Valiev, R. I.; Khafizova, G. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the results are presented of thermal and electrical parameters of products in the system bottom layer - intermediate layer when applying protective coatings of ferromagnetic powder by plasma spray produced in an electric discharge with a liquid cathode, on steel samples. Temperature distribution and gradients in coating and intermediate coating were examined. Detailed descriptions of spray coating with ferromagnetic powder by plasma jet obtained in electrical discharge with liquid cathode and the apparatus for obtaining thereof is provided. Problem has been solved by using of Fourier analysis. Initial data for calculations is provided. Results of numerical analysis are provided as temporal functions of temperature in contiguity between coating and intermediate coating as well as temporal function of the value Q=q-φ where q is density of heat current directed to the free surface of intermediate coating, φ is density of heat current in contiguity between coating and intermediate coating. The analysis of data given shows that in the systems of contact heat exchange bottom layer-intermediate layer with close values of the thermophysical characteristics of constituting materials is observed a slow increase of the temperature of the contact as a function of time.

  9. Permeation barrier coating and plasma sterilization of PET bottles and foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steves, Simon; Deilmann, Michael; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Modern packaging materials such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) offer various advantages over glass or metal containers. Beside this they only offer poor barrier properties against gas permeation. Therefore, the shelf-live of packaged food is reduced. Additionally, common sterilization methods like heat, hydrogen peroxide or peracetic acid may not be applicable due to reduced heat or chemical resistance of the plastic packaging material. For the plasma sterilization and permeation barrier coating of PET bottles and foils, a microwave driven low pressure plasma reactor is developed based on a modified Plasmaline antenna. The dependencies of important plasma parameters, such as gas mixture, process pressure, power and pulse conditions on oxygen permeation through packaging foil are investigated. A residual permeation as low as J = 1.0 ±0.3 cm^3m-2day-1bar-1 for 60 nm thick silicon oxide (SiOx) coated PET foils is achieved. To discuss this residual permeation, coating defects are visualized by capacitively coupled atomic oxygen plasma etching of coated substrate. A defect density of 3000 mm-2 is revealed responsible for permeation. For plasma sterilization, optimized plasma parameters based on fundamental research of plasma sterilization mechanisms permit short treatment times of a few seconds.

  10. Plasma calcining of pigment particles for thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, E. P.

    1972-01-01

    Method utilizes an RF excited plasma to surface deactivate thermally stable powders at high temperatures. Utilization of this plasma heat treatment at high temperatures can be carried out without grain growth, calcination, or agglomeration.

  11. Moisture resistant and anti-reflection optical coatings produced by plasma polymerization of organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollahan, J. R.; Wydeven, T.

    1975-01-01

    The need for protective coatings on critical optical surfaces, such as halide crystal windows or lenses used in spectroscopy, has long been recognized. It has been demonstrated that thin, one micron, organic coatings produced by polymerization of flourinated monomers in low temperature gas discharge (plasma) exhibit very high degrees of moisture resistence, e.g., hundreds of hours protection for cesium iodide vs. minutes before degradation sets in for untreated surfaces. The index of refraction of these coatings is intermediate between that of the halide substrate and air, a condition for anti-reflection, another desirable property of optical coatings. Thus, the organic coatings not only offer protection, but improved transmittance as well. The polymer coating is non-absorbing over the range 0.4 to 40 microns with an exception at 8.0 microns, the expected absorption for C-F bonds.

  12. Investigation of Microwave Surface-Wave Plasma Deposited SiOx Coatings on Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huan; Yang, Lizhen; Chen, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we reported nano-scale SiOx coatings deposited on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) webs by microwave surface-wave assisted plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition for the purpose of improving their barrier properties. Oxygen (O2) and hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) were employed as oxidant gas and Si monomer during SiOx deposition, respectively. Analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FTIR) for chemical structure and observation by atomic force microscopy (AFM) for surface morphology of SiOx coatings demonstrated that both chemical compounds and surface feature of coatings have a remarkable influence on the coating barrier properties. It is noted that the processing parameters play a critical role in the barrier properties of coatings. After optimization of the SiOx coatings deposition conditions, i.e. the discharge power of 1500 W, 2:1 of O2 : HMDSO ratio and working pressure of 20 Pa, a better barrier property was achieved in this work.

  13. Characterization of oxide coatings formed on tantalum by plasma electrolytic oxidation in 12-tungstosilicic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petković, M.; Stojadinović, S.; Vasilić, R.; Zeković, Lj.

    2011-10-01

    Oxide coatings were formed on tantalum by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process in 12-tungstosilicic acid. The PEO process can be divided into three stages with respect to change of the voltage-time response. The contribution of electron current density in total current density during anodization results in the transformation of the slope of voltage-time curve. The surface morphology, chemical and phase composition of oxide coatings were investigated by AFM, SEM-EDX, XRD and Raman spectroscopy. Oxide coating morphology is strongly dependent of PEO time. The elemental components of PEO coatings are Ta, O, Si and W. The oxide coatings are partly crystallized and mainly composed of WO 3, Ta 2O 5 and SiO 2. Raman spectroscopy showed that the outer layer of oxide coatings formed during the PEO process is silicate tungsten bronze.

  14. Analysis of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings With Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Bond Coats Under Spatially Uniform Cyclic Thermal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Aboudi, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a numerical investigation into the spallation mechanism in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings observed under spatially-uniform cyclic thermal loading. The analysis focuses on the evolution of local stress and inelastic strain fields in the vicinity of the rough top/bond coat interface during thermal cycling, and how these fields are influenced by the presence of an oxide film and spatially uniform and graded distributions of alumina particles in the metallic bond coat aimed at reducing the top/bond coat thermal expansion mismatch. The impact of these factors on the potential growth of a local horizontal delamination at the rough interface's crest is included. The analysis is conducted using the Higher-Order Theory for Functionally Graded Materials with creep/relaxation constituent modeling capabilities. For two-phase bond coat microstructures, both the actual and homogenized properties are employed in the analysis. The results reveal the important contributions of both the normal and shear stress components to the delamination growth potential in the presence of an oxide film, and suggest mixed-mode crack propagation. The use of bond coats with uniform or graded microstructures is shown to increase the potential for delamination growth by increasing the magnitude of the crack-tip shear stress component.

  15. Electrochemical Behavior of CoNiCrAlY/ZrO2-Y2O3 Coated Layers with Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Technology in Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Jong; Woo, Yong-Bin; Lee, Seung-Jun; Jeong, Jae-Yong

    2013-11-01

    Application of surface treatment has become common for protecting machine parts from oxidation, abrasion and corrosion induced by external environment. In particular, thermal spraying techniques are widely employed to improve wear, corrosion and thermal resistance. And compared to other methods they are simple and cost effective. However, the presence of porosity in the thermal spray coating can be highly detrimental because it provides access to penetration of corrosive matters, lowering corrosion resistance. Therefore, this research evaluate the electrochemical behavior under marine environment for aluminum-bronze alloy coated with MCrAlY and yttria-stabillized zirconia (YSZ) by atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) coating technology. Further application of carbon-based sealer removed voids and defects in the coating. The result reveled that, in case the voids and defects are completely removed, excellent corrosion resistance can be archived by application of good coating material along with formation of compact sealing layer.

  16. PLASMA SPRAYED Ni-Al COATINGS FOR SAFE ENDING HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    ALLAN,M.L.; OTTERSON,D.; BERNDT,C.C.

    1998-11-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed thermally conductive composite liners for corrosion and scale protection in heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The liners cannot withstand roller expansion to connect the tubes to the tubesheet. It is not possible to line the ends of the tubes with the same material after roller expansion due to the nature of the current liner application process. It was requested that BNL evaluate plasma sprayed Ni-Al coatings for safe ending heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The tubes of interest had an internal diameter of 0.875 inches. It is not typical to thermal spray small diameter components or use such small standoff distances. In this project a nozzle extension was developed by Zatorski Coating Company to spray the tube ends as well as flat coupons for testing. Four different Ni-Al coatings were investigated. One of these was a ductilized Ni-AIB material developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The coatings were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and subjected to corrosion, tensile adhesion, microhardness and field tests in a volcanic pool in New Zealand. It was determined that the Ni-Al coatings could be applied to a depth of two inches on the tube ends. When sprayed on flat coupons the coatings exhibited relatively high adhesion strength and microhardness. Polarization curves showed that the coating performance was variable. Measured corrosion potentials indicated that the Ni-Al coatings are active towards steel coated with thermally conductive polymers, thereby suggesting preferential corrosion. Corrosion also occurred on the coated coupons tested in the volcanic pool. This may have been exacerbated by the difficulty in applying a uniform coating to the coupon edges. The Ni-Al coatings applied to the tubes had significant porosity and did not provide adequate corrosion protection. This is associated with

  17. Effect of Zr on microstructure of metallic glass coatings prepared by gas tunnel type plasma spraying.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, A; Kuroda, T; Kimura, H; Inoue, A

    2012-06-01

    Metallic glass is one of the most attractive advanced materials, and many researchers have conducted various developmental research works. Metallic glass is expected to be used as a functional material because of its excellent physical and chemical functions such as high strength and high corrosion resistance. However, the application for small size parts has been carried out only in some industrial fields. In order to widen the industrial application fields, a composite material is preferred for the cost performance. In the coating processes of metallic glass with the conventional deposition techniques, there is a difficulty to form thick coatings due to their low deposition rate. Thermal spraying method is one of the potential candidates to produce metallic glass composites. Metallic glass coatings can be applied to the longer parts and therefore the application field can be widened. The gas tunnel plasma spraying is one of the most important technologies for high quality ceramic coating and synthesizing functional materials. As the gas tunnel type plasma jet is superior to the properties of other conventional type plasma jets, this plasma has great possibilities for various applications in thermal processing. In this study, the gas tunnel type plasma spraying was used to form the metallic glass coatings on the stainless-steel substrate. The microstructure and surface morphology of the metallic glass coatings were examined using Fe-based metallic glass powder and Zr-based metallic glass powder as coating material. For the mechanical properties the Vickers hardness was measured on the cross section of both the coatings and the difference between the powders was compared.

  18. Effect of Zr on microstructure of metallic glass coatings prepared by gas tunnel type plasma spraying.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, A; Kuroda, T; Kimura, H; Inoue, A

    2012-06-01

    Metallic glass is one of the most attractive advanced materials, and many researchers have conducted various developmental research works. Metallic glass is expected to be used as a functional material because of its excellent physical and chemical functions such as high strength and high corrosion resistance. However, the application for small size parts has been carried out only in some industrial fields. In order to widen the industrial application fields, a composite material is preferred for the cost performance. In the coating processes of metallic glass with the conventional deposition techniques, there is a difficulty to form thick coatings due to their low deposition rate. Thermal spraying method is one of the potential candidates to produce metallic glass composites. Metallic glass coatings can be applied to the longer parts and therefore the application field can be widened. The gas tunnel plasma spraying is one of the most important technologies for high quality ceramic coating and synthesizing functional materials. As the gas tunnel type plasma jet is superior to the properties of other conventional type plasma jets, this plasma has great possibilities for various applications in thermal processing. In this study, the gas tunnel type plasma spraying was used to form the metallic glass coatings on the stainless-steel substrate. The microstructure and surface morphology of the metallic glass coatings were examined using Fe-based metallic glass powder and Zr-based metallic glass powder as coating material. For the mechanical properties the Vickers hardness was measured on the cross section of both the coatings and the difference between the powders was compared. PMID:22905546

  19. Method and Process Development of Advanced Atmospheric Plasma Spraying for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihm, Sebastian; Duda, Thomas; Gruner, Heiko; Thomas, Georg; Dzur, Birger

    2012-06-01

    Over the last few years, global economic growth has triggered a dramatic increase in the demand for resources, resulting in steady rise in prices for energy and raw materials. In the gas turbine manufacturing sector, process optimizations of cost-intensive production steps involve a heightened potential of savings and form the basis for securing future competitive advantages in the market. In this context, the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process for thermal barrier coatings (TBC) has been optimized. A constraint for the optimization of the APS coating process is the use of the existing coating equipment. Furthermore, the current coating quality and characteristics must not change so as to avoid new qualification and testing. Using experience in APS and empirically gained data, the process optimization plan included the variation of e.g. the plasma gas composition and flow-rate, the electrical power, the arrangement and angle of the powder injectors in relation to the plasma jet, the grain size distribution of the spray powder and the plasma torch movement procedures such as spray distance, offset and iteration. In particular, plasma properties (enthalpy, velocity and temperature), powder injection conditions (injection point, injection speed, grain size and distribution) and the coating lamination (coating pattern and spraying distance) are examined. The optimized process and resulting coating were compared to the current situation using several diagnostic methods. The improved process significantly reduces costs and achieves the requirement of comparable coating quality. Furthermore, a contribution was made towards better comprehension of the APS of ceramics and the definition of a better method for future process developments.

  20. Plasma-Sprayed Hydroxylapatite-Based Coatings: Chemical, Mechanical, Microstructural, and Biomedical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Robert B.

    2016-06-01

    This contribution discusses salient properties and functions of hydroxylapatite (HA)-based plasma-sprayed coatings, including the effect on biomedical efficacy of coating thickness, phase composition and distribution, amorphicity and crystallinity, porosity and surface roughness, cohesion and adhesion, micro- and nano-structured surface morphology, and residual coating stresses. In addition, it will provide details of the thermal alteration that HA particles undergo in the extremely hot plasma jet that leads to dehydroxylated phases such as oxyhydroxylapatite (OHA) and oxyapatite (OA) as well as thermal decomposition products such as tri-(TCP) and tetracalcium phosphates (TTCP), and quenched phases such as amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP). The contribution will further explain the role of ACP during the in vitro interaction of the as-deposited coatings with simulated body fluid resembling the composition of extracellular fluid (ECF) as well as the in vivo responses of coatings to the ECF and the host tissue, respectively. Finally, it will briefly describe performance profiles required to fulfill biological functions of osteoconductive bioceramic coatings designed to improve osseointegration of hip endoprostheses and dental root implants. In large parts, the content of this contribution is a targeted review of work done by the author and his students and coworkers over the last two decades. In addition, it is considered a stepping stone toward a standard operation procedure aimed at depositing plasma-sprayed bioceramic implant coatings with optimum properties.

  1. Study on Formation of Plasma Nanobubbles in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takehiko; Nakatani, Tatsuyuki; Miyahara, Takashi; Ochiai, Shiroh; Oizumi, Masanobu; Fujita, Hidemasa; Miyazaki, Takamichi

    2015-12-01

    Nanobubbles of less than 400 nm in diameter were formed by plasma in pure water. Pre-breakdown plasma termed streamer discharges, generated gas channels shaped like fine dendritic coral leading to the formation of small bubbles. Nanobubbles were visualized by an optical microscope and measured by dynamic laser scattering. However, it is necessary to verify that these nanobubbles are gas bubbles, not solid, because contamination such as platinum particles and organic compounds from electrode and residue in ultrapure water were also observed.

  2. Halo Formation And Emittance Growth of Positron Beams in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Muggli, P.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, Thomas C.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; O'Connell, C.L.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA

    2011-10-25

    An ultrarelativistic 28.5 GeV, 700-{micro}m-long positron bunch is focused near the entrance of a 1.4-m-long plasma with a density n{sub e} between {approx}10{sup 13} and {approx}5 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}. Partial neutralization of the bunch space charge by the mobile plasma electrons results in a reduction in transverse size by a factor of {approx}3 in the high emittance plane of the beam {approx}1 m downstream from the plasma exit. As n{sub e} increases, the formation of a beam halo containing {approx}40% of the total charge is observed, indicating that the plasma focusing force is nonlinear. Numerical simulations confirm these observations. The bunch with an incoming transverse size ratio of {approx}3 and emittance ratio of {approx}5 suffers emittance growth and exits the plasma with approximately equal sizes and emittances.

  3. Formation of electrostatic solitons and hole structures in pair plasmas.

    PubMed

    Jao, C-S; Hau, L-N

    2012-11-01

    In an electron-proton plasma, electrostatic solitary waves and hole structures can easily be generated by streaming instability due to the asymmetric inertia between ions and electrons. It has been argued theoretically whether electrostatic solitons and/or hole structures can form in a pair plasma. This paper presents results on the formation of pair electrostatic hole structure in an electron-positron plasma based on one-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations. In particular, we show the feature of interlacing electron and positron holes in phase space generated by current-free electron and positron beams streaming in a stationary electron-positron background plasma. The coexistent electron and positron holes are associated with periodic interlacing of positive and negative potentials, respectively. Detailed comparisons between simulation results and linear theory of streaming instability in pair plasmas are made and the thermodynamic state is inferred. PMID:23214890

  4. Role of carbon nanotube dispersion in fracture toughening of plasma sprayed aluminum oxide-carbon nanotube nanocomposite coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balani, Kantesh

    Aluminum oxide (Al2O3, or alumina) is a conventional ceramic known for applications such as wear resistant coatings, thermal liners, heaters, crucibles, dielectric systems, etc. However applications of Al 2O3 are limited owing to its inherent brittleness. Due to its excellent mechanical properties and bending strength, carbon nanotubes (CNT) is an ideal reinforcement for Al2O3 matrix to improve its fracture toughness. The role of CNT dispersion in the fracture toughening of the plasma sprayed Al2O3-CNT nanocomposite coating is discussed in the current work. Pretreatment of powder feedstock is required for dispersing CNTs in the matrix. Four coatings namely spray dried Al2O 3 (A-SD), Al2O3 blended with 4wt.% CNT (A4C-B), composite spray dried Al2O3-4wt.% CNT (A4C-SD) and composite spray dried A1203-8wt.% CNT (A8C-SD), are synthesized by plasma spraying. Owing to extreme temperatures and velocities involved in the plasma spraying of ceramics, retention of CNTs in the resulting coatings necessitates optimizing plasma processing parameters using an inflight particle diagnostic sensor. A bimodal microstructure was obtained in the matrix that consists of fully melted and resolidified structure and solid state sintered structure. CNTs are retained both in the fully melted region and solid-state sintered regions of processed coatings. Fracture toughness of A-SD, A4C-B, A4C-SD and A8C-SD coatings was 3.22, 3.86, 4.60 and 5.04 MPa m1/2 respectively. This affirms the improvement of fracture toughness from 20% (in A4C-B coating) to 43% (in A4C-SD coating) when compared to the A-SD coating because of the CNT dispersion. Fracture toughness improvement from 43% (in A4C-SD) to 57% (in A8C-SD) coating is evinced because of the CNT content. Reinforcement by CNTs is described by its bridging, anchoring, hook formation, impact alignment, fusion with splat, and mesh formation. The Al2O3/CNT interface is critical in assisting the stress transfer and utilizing excellent mechanical

  5. Formation of pre-sheath boundary layers in electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    In electronegative plasmas Coulomb scattering between positive and negative ions can lead to the formation of a pre-sheath boundary layer containing the bulk of the negative ions. The negative ion boundary layer forms when momentum transfer from positive to negative ions dominates the negative ion acceleration from the electric field. This condition is met in Inductively Coupled Plasma reactors that operate at low pressure and high plasma density. Simulations of the GEC reactor for Chlorine and Oxygen chemistries using the INDUCT95 2D model are presented showing the pre-sheath boundary layer structure as a function of applied power and neutral pressure.

  6. Electrical characteristics and formation mechanism of atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lijuan; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Weijing; Meng, Ying; Ouyang, Jiting

    2014-06-16

    The behavior of atmospheric pressure plasma jet produced by a coplanar dielectric barrier discharge in helium in external electrostatic and magnetic field is investigated. Net negative charges in the plasma jet outside the tube were detected. The deflection of the plume in the external field was observed. The plasma jet is suggested to be formed by the electron beam from the temporal cathode which is accelerated by a longitudinal field induced by the surface charges on the dielectric tube or interface between the helium and ambient air. The helium flow is necessary for the jet formation in the surrounding air.

  7. Characterization of High-Velocity Single Particle Impacts on Plasma-Sprayed Ceramic Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiilakoski, Jarkko; Lindroos, Matti; Apostol, Marian; Koivuluoto, Heli; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani; Vuoristo, Petri

    2016-08-01

    High-velocity impact wear can have a significant effect on the lifetime of thermally sprayed coatings in multiple applications, e.g., in the process and paper industries. Plasma-sprayed oxide coatings, such as Cr2O3- and TiO2-based coatings, are often used in these industries in wear and corrosion applications. An experimental impact study was performed on thermally sprayed ceramic coatings using the High-Velocity Particle Impactor (HVPI) at oblique angles to investigate the damage, failure, and deformation of the coated structures. The impact site was characterized by profilometry, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the connection between the microstructural details and impact behavior was studied in order to reveal the damage and failure characteristics at a more comprehensive level. Differences in the fracture behavior were found between the thermally sprayed Cr2O3 and TiO2 coatings, and a concept of critical impact energy is presented here. The superior cohesion of the TiO2 coating inhibited interlamellar cracking while the Cr2O3 coating suffered greater damage at high impact energies. The HVPI experiment has proven to be able to produce valuable information about the deformation behavior of coatings under high strain rates and could be utilized further in the development of wear-resistant coatings.

  8. Low-Energy Plasma Spray (LEPS) Deposition of Hydroxyapatite/Poly-ɛ-Caprolactone Biocomposite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Alonso, Diana; Parco, Maria; Stokes, Joseph; Looney, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Thermal spraying is widely employed to deposit hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-based biocomposites on hip and dental implants. For thick HA coatings (>150 μm), problems are generally associated with the build-up of residual stresses and lack of control of coating crystallinity. HA/polymer composite coatings are especially interesting to improve the pure HA coatings' mechanical properties. For instance, the polymer may help in releasing the residual stresses in the thick HA coatings. In addition, the selection of a bioresorbable polymer may enhance the coatings' biological behavior. However, there are major challenges associated with spraying ceramic and polymeric materials together because of their very different thermal properties. In this study, pure HA and HA/poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) thick coatings were deposited without significant thermal degradation by low-energy plasma spraying (LEPS). PCL has never been processed by thermal spraying, and its processing is a major achievement of this study. The influence of selected process parameters on microstructure, composition, and mechanical properties of HA and HA/PCL coatings was studied using statistical design of experiments (DOE). The HA deposition rate was significantly increased by the addition of PCL. The average porosity of biocomposite coatings was slightly increased, while retaining or even improving in some cases their fracture toughness and microhardness. Surface roughness of biocomposites was enhanced compared with HA pure coatings. Cell culture experiments showed that murine osteoblast-like cells attach and proliferate well on HA/PCL biocomposite deposits.

  9. Molecular plasma deposition: biologically inspired nanohydroxyapatite coatings on anodized nanotubular titanium for improving osteoblast density

    PubMed Central

    Balasundaram, Ganesan; Storey, Daniel M; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    In order to begin to prepare a novel orthopedic implant that mimics the natural bone environment, the objective of this in vitro study was to synthesize nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (NHA) and coat it on titanium (Ti) using molecular plasma deposition (MPD). NHA was synthesized through a wet chemical process followed by a hydrothermal treatment. NHA and micron sized hydroxyapatite (MHA) were prepared by processing NHA coatings at 500°C and 900°C, respectively. The coatings were characterized before and after sintering using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The results revealed that the post-MPD heat treatment of up to 500°C effectively restored the structural and topographical integrity of NHA. In order to determine the in vitro biological responses of the MPD-coated surfaces, the attachment and spreading of osteoblasts (bone-forming cells) on the uncoated, NHA-coated, and MHA-coated anodized Ti were investigated. Most importantly, the NHA-coated substrates supported a larger number of adherent cells than the MHA-coated and uncoated substrates. The morphology of these cells was assessed by scanning electron microscopy and the observed shapes were different for each substrate type. The present results are the first reports using MPD in the framework of hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti to enhance osteoblast responses and encourage further studies on MPD-based hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti for improved orthopedic applications. PMID:25609958

  10. Molecular plasma deposition: biologically inspired nanohydroxyapatite coatings on anodized nanotubular titanium for improving osteoblast density.

    PubMed

    Balasundaram, Ganesan; Storey, Daniel M; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    In order to begin to prepare a novel orthopedic implant that mimics the natural bone environment, the objective of this in vitro study was to synthesize nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (NHA) and coat it on titanium (Ti) using molecular plasma deposition (MPD). NHA was synthesized through a wet chemical process followed by a hydrothermal treatment. NHA and micron sized hydroxyapatite (MHA) were prepared by processing NHA coatings at 500°C and 900°C, respectively. The coatings were characterized before and after sintering using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The results revealed that the post-MPD heat treatment of up to 500°C effectively restored the structural and topographical integrity of NHA. In order to determine the in vitro biological responses of the MPD-coated surfaces, the attachment and spreading of osteoblasts (bone-forming cells) on the uncoated, NHA-coated, and MHA-coated anodized Ti were investigated. Most importantly, the NHA-coated substrates supported a larger number of adherent cells than the MHA-coated and uncoated substrates. The morphology of these cells was assessed by scanning electron microscopy and the observed shapes were different for each substrate type. The present results are the first reports using MPD in the framework of hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti to enhance osteoblast responses and encourage further studies on MPD-based hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti for improved orthopedic applications. PMID:25609958

  11. Super-amphiphilic surface of nano silica/polyurethane hybrid coated PET film via a plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Bui, Van-Tien; Liu, Xuyan; Ko, Seung Hyeon; Choi, Ho-Suk

    2015-09-01

    This study first reports the fabrication of a super-amphiphilic surface using PET films with a silica-polyurethane hybrid top-coat layer through a non-thermal, one-atmospheric-pressure plasma treatment. This surface displays contact angle close to zero with both aqueous and oily liquids, which has attracted enormous attention for a wide-range of practical applications. We systematically investigated the influence of the plasma treatment time on the wetting behavior of the silica-polyurethane coated PET surface. The changes in morphology and chemical composition of PET surfaces before and after a plasma treatment were analyzed. In order to gain an insight into the formation of a super-amphiphilic PET surface and optimize the conditions under which super-amphiphilicity can be realized, we used a hemi-wicking action as a theoretical model and experimentally verified it through determining the critical angle. We also proposed a guide for designing a nano-sphere patterned PDMS surface which can generate super-wetting properties after a plasma treatment.

  12. Plasma-Etching of Spray-Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Biointerfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joon Hyub; Lee, Jun-Yong; Min, Nam Ki

    2012-08-01

    We present an effective method for the batch fabrication of miniaturized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) film electrodes using oxygen plasma etching. We adopted the approach of spray-coating for good adhesion of the SWCNT film onto a pre-patterned Pt support and used O2 plasma patterning of the coated films to realize efficient biointerfaces between SWCNT surfaces and biomolecules. By these approaches, the SWCNT film can be easily integrated into miniaturized electrode systems. To demonstrate the effectiveness of plasma-etched SWCNT film electrodes as biointerfaces, Legionella antibody was selected as analysis model owing to its considerable importance to electrochemical biosensors and was detected using plasma-etched SWCNT film electrodes and a 3,3',5,5'-tetramethyl-benzidine dihydrochloride/horseradish peroxidase (TMB/HRP) catalytic system. The response currents increased with increasing concentration of Legionella antibody. This result indicates that antibodies were effectively immobilized on plasma-etched and activated SWCNT surfaces.

  13. Apparatus for coating a surface with a metal utilizing a plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Brown, I.G.; MacGill, R.A.; Galvin, J.E.

    1991-05-07

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for coating or layering a surface with a metal utilizing a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source. The apparatus includes a trigger mechanism for actuating the metal vacuum vapor arc plasma source in a pulsed mode at a predetermined rate. The surface or substrate to be coated or layered is supported in position with the plasma source in a vacuum chamber. The surface is electrically biased for a selected period of time during the pulsed mode of operation of the plasma source. Both the pulsing of the metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source and the electrical biasing of the surface are synchronized for selected periods of time. 10 figures.

  14. Fabrication and Wear Behavior of Nanostructured Plasma-Sprayed 6061Al-SiCp Composite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tailor, Satish; Mohanty, R. M.; Sharma, V. K.; Soni, P. R.

    2014-10-01

    6061Al powder with 15 wt.% SiC particulate (SiCp) reinforcement was mechanically alloyed (MA) in a high-energy attrition mill. The MA powder was then plasma sprayed onto weathering steel (Cor-Ten A242) substrate using an atmospheric plasma spray process. Results of particle size analysis and scanning electron microscopy show that the addition of SiC particles as the reinforcement influences on the matrix grain size and morphology. XRD studies revealed embedment of SiCp in the MA-processed composite powder, and nanocrystals in the MA powder and the coating. Microstructural studies showed a uniform distribution of reinforced SiC particles in the coating. The porosity level in the coating was as low as 2% while the coating hardness was increased to 232VHN. The adhesion strength of the coatings was high and this was attributed to higher degree of diffusion at the interface. The wear rate in the coatings was evaluated using a pin-on-disk type tribometer and found to decrease by 50% compared to the 6061Al matrix coating. The wear mechanism in the coating was delamination and oxidative type.

  15. Characterization of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Coatings Deposited by Low-Pressure Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Peng-jiang; Yin, Shuo; Song, Chen; Lapostolle, Frédéric; Liao, Han-lin

    2016-02-01

    The research presented here aimed to apply plasma spraying at a low pressure of 100 Pa for fabricating the columnar structure or dense coatings. These coatings with different structures were elaborated from the vapor condensation and molten droplets, respectively, using the agglomerated YSZ powders and a relatively low power commercial F4-VB torch. It was shown that the crystallite size of coating deposited from the vapor condensation at a spraying distance of 200 mm was reduced to 17.1 nm from 43.7 nm of the feedstock. Observations indicated that a thin columnar structured coating was produced out of the line of sight of projection. In the line of sight of projection, the hybrid structured coating was obtained. The relatively dense coating was fabricated using a specifically designed extended nozzle. Investigations by means of optical emission spectroscopy were performed to analyze the nature of the plasma jet with YSZ powders. The Vickers microhardness was also conducted. It was found that the relatively dense coating showed a higher value in comparison to the hybrid structure coating, up to 1273 ± 56 Hv100g.

  16. Air Plasma Formation in MHD Slipstream Accelerator for Mercury Lightcraft

    SciTech Connect

    Myrabo, L.N.; Raizer, Y.P.; Surzhikov, S.

    2004-03-30

    This paper investigates the physics of air plasma formation at the entrance of the MHD slipstream accelerator for the 'tractor-beam' Mercury Lightcraft. Two scenarios are analyzed. The first addresses the needs of the minimum power airspike assuming that all the power required for air plasma formation must come from the remote laser beam. The second case considers the constant-focus airspike and assumes that the breakdown criteria is satisfied by an on-board auxiliary source (e.g., electric discharge, RF source, microwave source, or E-beam)

  17. Air Plasma Formation in MHD Slipstream Accelerator for Mercury Lightcraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrabo, L. N.; Raizer, Y. P.; Surzhikov, S.

    2004-03-01

    This paper investigates the physics of air plasma formation at the entrance of the MHD slipstream accelerator for the `tractor-beam' Mercury Lightcraft. Two scenarios are analyzed. The first addresses the needs of the minimum power airspike assuming that all the power required for air plasma formation must come from the remote laser beam. The second case considers the constant-focus airspike and assumes that the breakdown criteria is satisfied by an on-board auxiliary source (e.g., electric discharge, RF source, microwave source, or E-beam).

  18. Magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite formation on (Ti,Mg)N coatings produced by cathodic arc PVD technique.

    PubMed

    Onder, Sakip; Kok, Fatma Nese; Kazmanli, Kursat; Urgen, Mustafa

    2013-10-01

    In this study, formation of magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite (Ca10-xMgx(PO4)6(OH)2) on (Ti,Mg)N and TiN coating surfaces were investigated. The (Ti1-x,Mgx)N (x=0.064) coatings were deposited on titanium substrates by using cathodic arc physical vapor deposition technique. TiN coated grade 2 titanium substrates were used as reference to understand the role of magnesium on hydroxyapatite (HA) formation. The HA formation experiments was carried out in simulated body fluids (SBF) with three different concentrations (1X SBF, 5X SBF and 5X SBF without magnesium ions) at 37 °C. The coatings and hydroxyapatite films formed were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR Spectroscopy techniques. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses and XRD investigations of the coatings indicated that magnesium was incorporated in the TiN structure rather than forming a separate phase. The comparison between the TiN and (Ti, Mg)N coatings showed that the presence of magnesium in TiN structure facilitated magnesium substituted HA formation on the surface. The (Ti,Mg)N coatings can potentially be used to accelerate the HA formation in vivo conditions without any prior hydroxyapatite coating procedure.

  19. Excellent stability of plasma-sprayed bioactive Ca 3ZrSi 2O 9 ceramic coating on Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying; Xie, Youtao; Ji, Heng; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin

    2010-05-01

    In this work, novel zirconium incorporated Ca-Si based ceramic powder Ca 3ZrSi 2O 9 was synthesized. The aim of this study was to fabricate Ca 3ZrSi 2O 9 coating onto Ti-6Al-4V substrate using atmospheric plasma-spraying technology and to evaluate its potential applications in the fields of orthopedics and dentistry. The phase composition, surface morphologies of the coating were examined by XRD and SEM, which revealed that the Ca 3ZrSi 2O 9 coating was composed of grains around 100 nm and amorphous phases. The bonding strength between the coating and the substrate was 28 ± 4 MPa, which is higher than that of traditional HA coating. The dissolution rate of the coating was assessed by monitoring the ions release and mass loss after immersion in the Tris-HCl buffer solution. The in vitro bioactivity of the coating was determined by observing the formation of apatite on its surface in simulated body fluids. It was found that the Ca 3ZrSi 2O 9 coating possessed both excellent chemical stability and good apatite-formation ability, suggesting its potential use as bone implants.

  20. Improvement in mechanical properties of plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings by Al2O3 reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Manoj; Nath, S K; Prakash, Satya

    2013-07-01

    Thermal sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings suffer from poor mechanical properties like tensile strength, wear resistance, hardness, toughness and fatigue. The mechanical properties of hydroxyapatite coatings can be enhanced via incorporation of secondary bioinert reinforcement material. In this study an attempt has been made to improve the mechanical properties of plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite by reinforcing it with 10, 20 and 30% Al2O3. The plasma sprayed coatings have been characterized using FE-SEM/EDAX, XRD, AFM and FTIR spectroscopy. Corrosion studies have been done in simulated body fluid and abrasive wear studies have been performed on flat specimens on a disk wear tester. Microhardness, tensile strength and wear resistance are found to be increased with increasing Al2O3 content. All types of coatings show superior resistance against corrosion in simulated body fluid.

  1. Pulsed Plasma Synthesis of Iron and Nickel Nanoparticles Coated by Carbon for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaeva, Zhypargul; Omurzak, Emil; Iwamoto, Chihiro; Ihara, Hirotaka; Subban Ganapathy, Hullathy; Sulaimankulova, Saadat; Koinuma, Michio; Mashimo, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Fe and Ni magnetic nanoparticles coated by carbon were synthesized between the Fe-Fe and Ni-Ni metal electrodes, submerged in ethanol using pulsed plasma in a liquid method. Iron coated carbon (Fe@C) nanoparticles have an average size of 32 nm, and Ni@C nanoparticles are 40 nm. Obtained samples exhibit a well-defined crystalline structure of the inner Fe and Ni cores, encapsulated in the graphitic carbon coatings. Cytotoxicity studies performed on the MCF-7 (breast cancer) cell line showed small toxicity about 88-74% at 50 µg/mL of Fe@C and Ni@C nanoparticles, which can be significant criteria for use them in medical cancer treatment. In addition, appropriate sizes, good magnetic properties and well-organized graphitic carbon coatings are highlight merits of Fe@C and Ni@C nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed plasma.

  2. Hydroxyapatite coating for titanium fibre mesh scaffold enhances osteoblast activity and bone tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Makoto; Hayakawa, Tohru; Yoshinari, Masao; Ametani, Akihiro; Shima, Takaki; Monden, Yuka; Ozawa, Tomomichi; Sato, Mitsunobu; Koyama, Chika; Tamai, Naoto; Iwai, Toshinori; Tohnai, Iwai

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the bone regeneration properties of titanium fibre mesh as a tissue engineering material. A thin hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on the titanium fibre web was created using the developed molecular precursor method without losing the complex interior structure. HA-coated titanium fibre mesh showed apatite crystal formation in vitro in a human osteoblast culture. Titanium fibre mesh discs with or without a thin HA coating were implanted into rat cranial bone defects, and the animals were killed at 2 and 4 weeks. The in vivo experience revealed that the amount of newly formed bone was significantly higher in the HA-coated titanium fibre mesh than in the non-coated titanium fibre mesh 2 weeks after implantation. These results suggest that thin HA coating enhances osteoblast activity and bone regeneration in the titanium fibre mesh scaffold. Thin HA-coating improved the ability of titanium fibre mesh to act as a bone regeneration scaffold.

  3. Plasma treatment of thin film coated with graphene flakes for the reduction of sheet resistance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hee; Oh, Jong Sik; Kim, Kyong Nam; Seo, Jin Seok; Jeon, Min Hwan; Yang, Kyung Chae; Yeom, Geun Young

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the effects of plasma treatment on the sheet resistance of thin films spray-coated with graphene flakes on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates. Thin films coated with graphene flakes show high sheet resistance due to defects within graphene edges, domains, and residual oxygen content. Cl2 plasma treatment led to decreased sheet resistance when treatment time was increased, but when thin films were treated for too long the sheet resistance increased again. Optimum treatment time was related to film thickness. The reduction of sheet resistance may be explained by the donation of holes due to forming pi-type covalent bonds of Cl with carbon atoms on graphene surfaces, or by C--Cl bonding at the sites of graphene defects. However, due to radiation damage caused by plasma treatment, sheet resistance increased with increased treatment time. We found that the sheet resistance of PET film coated with graphene flakes could be decreased by 50% under optimum conditions. PMID:24266197

  4. A model for residual stress evolution in air-plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, B. G.; Singh, J. P.; Grimsditch, M.

    2000-02-28

    Ruby fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that residual stress in air-plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings is a function of the local interface geometry. The stress profile of a simulated rough interface characterized by ``peaks'' and ``valleys'' was modeled with a finite-element approach that accounted for thermal mismatch, oxide scale growth, and top coat sintering. Dependence of the stress profile on interface geometry and microstructure was investigated, and the results were compared with measured stresses.

  5. Transferrin Coated Nanoparticles: Study of the Bionano Interface in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Pitek, Andrzej S.; O’Connell, David; Mahon, Eugene; Monopoli, Marco P.; Baldelli Bombelli, Francesca; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    It is now well established that the surface of nanoparticles (NPs) in a biological environment is immediately modified by the adsorption of biomolecules with the formation of a protein corona and it is also accepted that the protein corona, rather than the original nanoparticle surface, defines a new biological identity. Consequently, a methodology to effectively study the interaction between nanomaterials and the biological corona encountered within an organism is a key objective in nanoscience for understanding the impact of the nanoparticle-protein interactions on the biological response in vitro and in vivo. Here, we outline an integrated methodology to address the different aspects governing the formation and the function of the protein corona of polystyrene nanoparticles coated with Transferrin by different strategies. Protein-NP complexes are studied both in situ (in human plasma, full corona FC) and after washing (hard corona, HC) in terms of structural properties, composition and second-order interactions with protein microarrays. Human protein microarrays are used to effectively study NP-corona/proteins interactions addressing the growing demand to advance investigations of the extrinsic function of corona complexes. Our data highlight the importance of this methodology as an analysis to be used in advance of the application of engineered NPs in biological environments. PMID:22829881

  6. Electron transport in plasmas with lithium-coated plasma-facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Craig Michael

    The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) is a spherical tokamak designed to study the lowrecycling regime through the use of lithium-coated shells conformal to the last closed flux surface (LCFS). A lowered recycling rate is expected to flatten core Te profiles, raise edge Te, strongly affect n e profiles, and enhance confinement. To study these unique plasmas, a Thomson scattering diagnostic uses a ≤ 20 J, 30 ns FWHM pulsed ruby laser to measure Te and ne at 11 radial points on the horizontal midplane, spaced from the magnetic axis to the outer edge at a single temporal point for each discharge. Scattered light is imaged through a spectrometer onto an intensified CCD. The diagnostic is absolutely calibrated using a precision light source and Raman scattering. Measurements of n e are compared with line integrated density measurements from a microwave interferometer. Adequate signal to noise is obtained with ne ≥ 2 x10 18 m--3. Thomson profiles of plasmas following evaporation of lithium onto room-temperature plasmafacing components (PFCs) are used in conjunction with magnetic equilibria as input for TRANSP modeling runs. Neoclassical calculations are used to determine Ti profiles, which have levels that agree with passive charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) measurements. TRANSP results for confinement times and stored energies agree with diamagnetic loop measurements. Results of chie result in values as low as 7 m2/s near the core, which rise to around 100 m2/s near the edge. These are the first measurements of chie in LTX, or its predecessor, the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U), with lithium PFCs.

  7. The effects of RF plasma ashing on zinc orthotitanate/potassium silicate thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Bruckner, Eric J.

    1992-01-01

    Samples of YB-71, a white thermal control coating composed of zinc orthotitanate pigment in a potassium silicate binder, were exposed in air plasma and in oxygen plasma to determine optical property and surface chemistry changes. Results show that YB-71 undergoes a significant reflectance decrease upon exposure to the simulated LEO atomic oxygen environment provided by an air plasma asher. YB-71 samples exposed to the same effective fluence in oxygen plasma, or in a UV screening Faraday cage in air or oxygen, do not undergo as severe reflectance decreases as the samples exposed in the air plasma asher environment. The UV and VUV radiation present in the plasma ashers affects the YB-71 degradation. It is noted that, when using plasma ashers to determine LEO degradation, it is necessary to take into account the sensitivity of the material to the synergistic effects of atomic oxygen and accelerated UV radiation.

  8. Use of a nitrogen-argon plasma to improve adherence of sputtered titanium carbide coatings on steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments on 440-C steel surfaces that had been RF-sputtered with titanium carbide when a small percentage of nitrogen was added to the plasma were conducted. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to analyze the resultant coatings. Results indicate that a small partial pressure of nitrogen (about 0.5%) markedly improves the adherence, friction, and wear properties when compared with coatings applied on sputter-etched oxidized surfaces or in the presence of a small oxygen partial pressure. The improvements are related to the formation of an interface containing a mixture of the nitrides of titanium and iron, which are harder than their corresponding oxides.

  9. Effect of nitrogen-containing plasma on adherence, friction, and wear of radiofrequency-sputtered titanium carbide coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments on 440C steel surfaces that were rf sputtered with titanium carbide when a small percentage of nitrogen was added to the plasma were conducted. Both X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to analyze the resultant coatings. Results indicate that the small partial pressure of nitrogen (approximately 0.5 percent) markedly improves the adherence, friction, and wear properties when compared with coatings applied to sputter-etched surfaces, oxidized surfaces, or in the presence of a small oxygen partial pressure. The improvements are related to the formation of an interface containing a mixture of the nitrides of titanium and iron, which are harder than their corresponding oxides.

  10. Manufacture of thick chromium coatings by R.F. plasma spraying for PVD sputter targets

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, M.; Heimann, R.B.; Gitzhofer, F.; Boulos, M.I.

    1995-12-31

    The production of plasma-sprayed thick chromium coatings on copper substrates for PVD sputter targets contains a number of technological challenges which were tried to be addressed using r.f. plasma spray technology. The efforts were focused on several objectives. The coatings should be as dense as possible. Their residual stresses should be low enough to avoid strong substrate bending and to prevent failure in adhesion or cohesion of the coating. The deposition efficiency during spraying should be as high as possible. Different spraying parameters were varied in order to find the optimum conditions for the spraying process. Two different powder grain sizes were used. First a spheroidization study was performed which gave evidence about the optimum chamber pressure, the optimum plasma power, and a manageable range of the powder feed rate. During spraying of the coatings the power feed was further optimized. Also the spraying distance, the substrate roughness and the substrate cooling were optimized. The substrates were respectively non-cooled, gas-cooled or directly water-cooled. The water-cooled samples showed no substrate bending. However, the thermal stresses were strong enough to cause failure in adhesion or cohesion of the coating. The non-cooled samples showed the best adhesion while the substrate bending could be kept in acceptable limits. Powder feed rates up to about 55 g/min yielded the densest coatings with optimum deposition efficiency.

  11. Neural network analysis for erosion wear of nickel-aluminide coatings on steel by plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. C.; Chaithanya, M.; Satapathy, Alok; Ananthapadmanabhan, P. V.; Sreekumar, K. P.

    2010-02-01

    In the present investigation plasma spray inter metallic coating of Nickel-aluminide was deposited on mild steel substrates. The response of plasma sprayed nickel-aluminide coatings to the impingement of such solid particles has been presented in this work. Nickel pre-mixed with alumina powder is deposited on mild steel substances by atmospheric plasma spraying at various operating power level. The coatings are subjected to erosion wear test. An erosion test setup developed in our laboratory is used to simulate real time erosive situations. Dry silica sand of average particle size 400 micron is used as the erodent. The erosion rate is calculated on the basis of 'coating mass losses. The erosion studies are made and different velocities and impingement angles. A computational technique (ANN analysis) is used to predict the rate of erosion wear under various operational conditions. This technique involves database training to predict property parameter evolutions in process having large number of interdependent variables. This paper presents the database construction, implementation protocol and also the set of predicted results related to the erosion wear rate of nickel-aluminide coating. It is shown that the erosion wear is strongly influenced by the angle of impact. The test is conducted at room temperature i.e.27°C and 60% RH. Ni3Al coatings deposited at different power levels (10, 12, 16, 20, 24 kW) are found to exhibit different wear rate under similar test conditions.

  12. Microstructure and thermal behaviour of plasma sprayed zirconia/alumina composite coating.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, A; Ando, Y; Kurokawa, K; Hejwowski, T

    2011-10-01

    In thermal barrier coatings (TBC), failure occurs near or at the interface between the metallic bondcoat and topcoat. On high temperature conditions, an oxide scale which is named thermally grown oxide (TGO) occurs along the bond/topcoat interface. For diminishing the creation of TGO, a dense coating with low residual stress and thermal stress buffer layer was preferable. High hardness ceramic coatings could be obtained by gas tunnel type plasma spraying, and the deposited coating had superior property in comparison with those deposited by conventional type plasma spray method. In this study, the gas tunnel type plasma spraying system was utilized to produce a zirconia/alumina functionally graded thermal barrier coating and discussed its physical and mechanical properties, thermal behavior and high temperature oxidation resistance of the coating are discussed. Consequently, the proposed system exhibited superior mechanical properties and oxidation resistance at the expenses of a slightly lower thermal insulating effect. This interlayer is preferred in order to minimize the detrimental effect of the phase transformation of gamma-Al2O3 to alpha-Al2O3.

  13. Effect of plasma pretreatment on adhesion and mechanical properties of UV-curable coatings on plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gururaj, T.; Subasri, R.; Raju, K. R. C. Soma; Padmanabham, G.

    2011-02-01

    An attempt was made to study the effect of plasma surface activation on the adhesion of UV-curable sol-gel coatings on polycarbonate (PC) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates. The sol was synthesized by the hydrolysis and condensation of a UV-curable silane in combination with Zr-n-propoxide. Coatings deposited by dip coating were cured using UV-radiation followed by thermal curing between 80 °C and 130 °C. The effect of plasma surface treatment on the wettability of the polymer surface prior to coating deposition was followed up by measuring the water contact angle. The water contact angle on the surface of as-cleaned substrates was 80° ± 2° and that after plasma treatment was 43° ± 1° and 50° ± 2° for PC and PMMA respectively. Adhesion as well as mechanical properties like scratch resistance and taber abrasion resistance were evaluated for coatings deposited over plasma treated and untreated surfaces.

  14. Characterization of gas tunnel type plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite-nanostructure titania composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yugeswaran, S.; Kobayashi, A.; Ucisik, A. Hikmet; Subramanian, B.

    2015-08-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) can be coated onto metal implants as a ceramic biocompatible coating to bridge the growth between implants and human tissue. Meanwhile many efforts have been made to improve the mechanical properties of the HA coatings without affecting its bioactivity. In the present study, nanostructure titania (TiO2) was mixed with HA powder and HA-nanostructure TiO2 composite coatings were produced by gas tunnel type plasma spraying torch under optimized spraying conditions. For this purpose, composition of 10 wt% TiO2 + 90 wt% HA, 20 wt% TiO2 + 80 wt% HA and 30 wt% TiO2 + 70 wt% HA were selected as the feedstock materials. The phase, microstructure and mechanical properties of the coatings were characterized. The obtained results validated that the increase in weight percentage of nanostructure TiO2 in HA coating significantly increased the microhardness, adhesive strength and wear resistance of the coatings. Analysis of the in vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility of the coatings were done using conventional simulated body fluid (c-SBF) solution and cultured green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow stromal cells (MSCs) respectively. The bioactivity results revealed that the composite coating has bio-active surface with good cytocompatibility.

  15. (Evaluation of plasma sprayed crucible coatings for melt processing copper-refractory metal alloys)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    A study was made to access the suitability of several plasma arc sprayed coatings applied to graphite for application as containment crucibles for melt processing copper-refractory metal alloys. Coatings of Ta, TaC, TaB{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}{center dot}8w/o Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were evaluated and compared to uncoated graphite. The ZrO{sub 2}{center dot}8w/o Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was sprayed over a tungsten bond coat. Prealloyed samples of Cu-15v/o Cr and Cu-15v/o Nb were placed within the crucibles and heated inductively to 1800{degrees}C and 2100{degrees}C, respectively. Compatibility of the coating-alloy system was evaluated by optical and scanning electron microscopy, EDS, XRD and combustion chromatography.

  16. Evaluation of plasma sprayed crucible coatings for melt processing copper-refractory metal alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sordelet, D.J.; Ellis, T.W.; Laabs, F.C.

    1992-04-01

    A study was made to access the suitability of several plasma arc sprayed coatings applied to graphite for application as containment crucibles for melt processing copper-refractory metal alloys. Coatings of Ta, TaC, TaB{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}{center_dot}8w/o Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were evaluated and compared to uncoated graphite. The ZrO{sub 2}{center_dot}8w/pY{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was sprayed over a tungsten bond coat. Prealloyed samples of Cu-15v/o Cr and Cu-15v/o Nb were placed within the crucibles and heated inductively to 1800{degree}C and 2100{degree}C, respectively. Compatibility of the coating-alloy system was evaluated by optical and scanning electron microscopy, EDS, XRD and combustion chromatography.

  17. [Evaluation of plasma sprayed crucible coatings for melt processing copper-refractory metal alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    A study was made to access the suitability of several plasma arc sprayed coatings applied to graphite for application as containment crucibles for melt processing copper-refractory metal alloys. Coatings of Ta, TaC, TaB{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}{center_dot}8w/o Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were evaluated and compared to uncoated graphite. The ZrO{sub 2}{center_dot}8w/o Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was sprayed over a tungsten bond coat. Prealloyed samples of Cu-15v/o Cr and Cu-15v/o Nb were placed within the crucibles and heated inductively to 1800{degrees}C and 2100{degrees}C, respectively. Compatibility of the coating-alloy system was evaluated by optical and scanning electron microscopy, EDS, XRD and combustion chromatography.

  18. Evaluation of plasma sprayed crucible coatings for melt processing copper-refractory metal alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sordelet, D.J.; Ellis, T.W.; Laabs, F.C.

    1992-01-01

    A study was made to access the suitability of several plasma arc sprayed coatings applied to graphite for application as containment crucibles for melt processing copper-refractory metal alloys. Coatings of Ta, TaC, TaB{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}{center dot}8w/o Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} were evaluated and compared to uncoated graphite. The ZrO{sub 2}{center dot}8w/pY{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was sprayed over a tungsten bond coat. Prealloyed samples of Cu-15v/o Cr and Cu-15v/o Nb were placed within the crucibles and heated inductively to 1800{degree}C and 2100{degree}C, respectively. Compatibility of the coating-alloy system was evaluated by optical and scanning electron microscopy, EDS, XRD and combustion chromatography.

  19. Low Pressure Plasma Sprayed Overlay Coatings for GRCop-84 Combustion Chamber Liners for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Barrett, C.; Ghosn, L. J.; Lerch, B.; Robinson,; Thorn, G.

    2005-01-01

    An advanced Cu-8(at.%)Cr-4%Nb alloy developed at NASA's Glenn Research Center, and designated as GRCop-84, is currently being considered for use as combustor chamber liners and nozzle ramps in NASA s future generations of reusable launch vehicles (RLVs). However, past experience has shown that unprotected copper alloys undergo an environmental attack called "blanching" in rocket engines using liquid hydrogen as fuel and liquid oxygen as the oxidizer. Potential for sulfidation attack of the liners in hydrocarbon-fueled engines is also of concern. Protective overlay coatings alloys are being developed for GRCop-84. The development of this coatings technology has involved a combination of modeling, coatings development and characterization, and process optimization. Coatings have been low pressure plasma sprayed on GRCop-84 substrates of various geometries and shapes. Microstructural, mechanical property data and thermophysical results on the coated substrates are presented and discussed.

  20. Study of hydroxyl carbonate apatite formation on bioactive glass coated dental ceramics by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanciu, G. A.; Savu, B.; Sandulescu, I.; Paraskevopoulos, K.; Koidis, P.

    2007-03-01

    Some dental ceramics were coated with a bioactive glass and resulted the formation of a stable and well bonded with the ceramic substrate thin layer. After immersion in a solution with ion concentrations similar to those of human blood plasma the development of hydroxy carbonate apatite layer on the surface of bioactive glass may be observed. The objective of this study was to investigate structural surface changes of bioactive glass, after exposure in a simulated body fluid for a different number of days. The roughness and topography of the hydroxyapatite surface were investigated by Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy. The chemical composition was analyzed by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy measurements.

  1. Process, properties, and environmental response of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results are shown which demonstrate that the properties of plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia are strongly influenced by the process parameters. Properties of the coatings in the as-sprayed condition are shown to be additionally influenced by environmental exposure. This behavior is dependent on raw material considerations and processing conditions as well as exposure time and temperature. Process control methodology is described which can take into consideration these complex interactions and help to produce thermal barrier coatings in a cost effective way while meeting coating technical requirements.

  2. Process, properties and environmental response of plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results are shown which demonstrate that the properties of plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia are strongly influenced by the process parameters. Properties of the coatings in the as-sprayed condition are shown to be additionally influenced by environmental exposure. This behavior is dependent on raw material considerations and processing conditions as well as exposure time and temperature. Process control methodology is described which can take into consideration these complex interactions and help to produce thermal barrier coatings in a cost effective way while meeting coating technical requirements.

  3. Studies on non-oxide coating on carbon fibers using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Sharma, S.; Prajapati, K. K.; Vyas, M. M.; Batra, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    A new way of improving the oxidative behavior of carbon fibers coated with SiC through Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition technique. The complete study includes coating of SiC on glass slab and Stainless steel specimen as a starting test subjects but the major focus was to increase the oxidation temperature of carbon fibers by PECVD technique. This method uses relatively lower substrate temperature and guarantees better stoichiometry than other coating methods and hence the substrate shows higher resistance towards mechanical and thermal stresses along with increase in oxidation temperature.

  4. Adhesion Improvement of Zirconium Coating on Polyurethane Modified by Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Hao, Xiaofei; Liu, Jiwei

    2016-02-01

    In order to improve the adhesion of the middle frequency magnetic sputtered zirconium coating on a polyurethane film, an anode layer source was used to pretreat the polyurethane film with nitrogen and oxygen ions. SEMs and AFM roughness profiles of treated samples and the contrast groups were obtained. Besides, XPS survey spectrums and high resolution spectrums were also investigated. The adhesion test revealed that ion bombardment could improve the adhesion to the polyurethane coating substrate. A better etching result of oxygen ions versus nitrogen predicts a higher bonding strength of zirconium coating on polyurethane and, indeed, the highest bonding strengths are for oxygen ion bombardment upto 13.3 MPa. As demonstrated in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the oxygen ion also helps to introduce more active groups, and, therefore, it achieves a high value of adhesion strength.

  5. Estimating positronium formation for plasma applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naginey, T. C.; Pollock, B. B.; Stacy, Eric W.; Walters, H. R. J.; Whelan, Colm T.

    2014-01-01

    The basic physics of e+,e- creation and annihilation is overviewed. It is shown that for atomic hydrogen targets electron capture by a free positron to form positronium is vastly more probable than in-flight annihilation. Cross sections are presented using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) approach for the charge-exchange process: e++Aq +→Ps+A(q+1)+,where Aq + is some target ion of charge q. Charge-exchange cross sections for hydrogenic ion targets are presented. It is found that while the CTMC gives adequate results for positronium formation for e+-hydrogen and e+-cesium collisions, its high-energy behavior for hydrogenic ions is not in agreement with quantum mechanical predictions. Since we are interested in situations where many multicharged ions will be present we have looked for an alternative approach. Scaling rules are proposed and used to estimate the charge-exchange cross sections for both neutral atoms and multicharged ions.

  6. Tribological behavior of plasma spray coatings for marine diesel engine piston ring and cylinder liner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jong-Hyun; Han, Myoung-Seoup; Kim, Dae-Young; Youn, Joong-Geun

    2006-06-01

    High-temperature wear characteristics between plasma spray coated piston rings and cylinder liners were investigated to find the optimum combination of coating materials using the disc-on-plate reciprocating wear test in dry conditions. The disc and plate represented the piston ring and the cylinder liner, respectively. Coating materials studied were Cr2O3-NiCr, Cr2O3-NiCr-Mo, and Cr3C2-NiCr-Mo. Plasma spray conditions for the coating materials were established adjusting stand-off distance to obtain a coating with a porosity content of ˜5%. It was found that a dissimilar coating combination of Cr2O3-NiCr-Mo and Cr3C2-NiCr-Mo provided the best antiwear performance. The addition of molybdenum was found to be beneficial to improve the wear resistance of the coating. Hardness differences between mating surfaces were also important factors in determining the wear characteristics, so that it should be controlled below 300 in Vickers hardness under dry conditions. Adhesive wear accompanying with metal transfer was a dominant wear mechanism for dry conditions.

  7. Forming strengthening nanoparticles in the metal matrix of plasma deposited powder alloys coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alontseva, D. L.; Prokhorenkova, N. V.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the generalized results of investigation of the structure-phase compositions of thick coatings on the base of Ni and Co deposited by plasma-jet on steel substrates. Research methodology included transmission and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis, X-ray structure phase analysis, mechanical testing. The phase structures and morphology of precipitation of strengthening nanoparticles from solid solution are defined; factor k is defined in the Hall-Petch equation for the coating materials; the coating structure model was developed. It was found that the exposure to plasma jet during the coating deposition leads to the evolution of the structural-phase state and to substantial improvement of microhardness of modified surfaces. The reason of doing this research is the necessity of the study of the structural and phase structure of these coatings and understanding what phase changes exactly are desirable in order to improve the structural behavior of the coatings at modifying treatment. Based on the experimental study, we plan to develop a scheme of the coating structure for the further use it in modeling processes taking place during additional irradiation treatment, and eventually to give evidence-based recommendations on the selection of modes of further processing.

  8. Piezospectroscopic measurements capturing the evolution of plasma spray-coating stresses with substrate loads.

    PubMed

    Freihofer, Gregory; Fugon-Dessources, Daniela; Ergin, Emrecan; Van Newkirk, Amy; Gupta, Ankur; Seal, Sudipta; Schülzgen, Axel; Raghavan, Seetha

    2014-02-12

    Plasma-spray coatings have a unique microstructure composed of various types of microcracks and weakly bonded interfaces which dictate their nonlinear mechanical properties. The intrinsic photo-luminescence (PL) characteristics of alpha-alumina (α-Al2O3) within these coatings offer a diagnostic functionality, enabling these properties to be probed experimentally at the microscale, under substrate loading. The piezospectroscopic (PS) measurements from the coatings are capable of revealing microstructural stress at high spatial resolution. Here, for the first time, the evolution of stresses within air plasma spray (APS) coatings under increasing substrate loads were captured using piezospectroscopy. With mechanical cycling of the substrate, the PS properties revealed anelastic and inelastic behavior and a relaxation of residual tensile stress within the APS coatings. With decreasing substrate thickness, the coating was observed to sustain more stress, as the substrate's influence on the mechanical behavior decreased. The findings provide an insight into the microstructural response that can serve as the basis for model validation and subsequently drive the design process for these coatings.

  9. Tribological Characterization of Plasma-Sprayed CoNiCrAlY-BN Abradable Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irissou, E.; Dadouche, A.; Lima, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    The processing conditions, microstructural and tribological characterizations of plasma-sprayed CoNiCrAlY-BN high temperature abradable coatings are reported in this manuscript. Plasma spray torch parameters were varied to produce a set of abradable coatings exhibiting a broad range of porosity levels (34-62%) and superficial Rockwell hardness values (0-78 HR15Y). Abradability tests have been performed using an abradable-seal test rig, capable of simulating operational wear at different rotor speeds and seal incursion rates (SIRs). These tests allowed determining the rubbing forces and quantifying the blade and seal wear characteristics for slow and fast SIRs. Erosion wear performance and ASTM C633 coating adhesion strength test results are also reported. For optimal abradability performance, it is shown that coating hardness needs to be lower than 70 and 50 HR15Y for slow and fast blade incursion rate conditions, respectively. It is shown that the erosion wear performance, as well as, the coating cohesive strength is a function of the coating hardness. The current results allow defining the coating specifications in terms of hardness and porosity for targeted applications.

  10. Effect of culture conditions and calcium phosphate coating on ectopic bone formation.

    PubMed

    Vaquette, Cédryck; Ivanovski, Saso; Hamlet, Stephen M; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of a calcium phosphate (CaP) coating onto a polycaprolactone melt electrospun scaffold and in vitro culture conditions on ectopic bone formation in a subcutaneous rat model. The CaP coating resulted in an increased alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) in ovine osteoblasts regardless of the culture conditions and this was also translated into higher levels of mineralisation. A subcutaneous implantation was performed and increasing ectopic bone formation was observed over time for the CaP-coated samples previously cultured in osteogenic media whereas the corresponding non-coated samples displayed a lag phase before bone formation occurred from 4 to 8 weeks post-implantation. Histology and immunohistochemistry revealed bone fill through the scaffolds 8 weeks post-implantation for coated and non-coated specimens and that ALP, osteocalcin and collagen 1 were present at the ossification front and in the bone tissues. Vascularisation in the vicinity of the bone tissues was also observed indicating that the newly formed bone was not deprived of oxygen and nutrients. We found that in vitro osteogenic induction was essential for achieving bone formation and CaP coating accelerated the osteogenic process. We conclude that high cell density and preservation of the collagenous and mineralised extracellular matrix secreted in vitro are factors of importance for ectopic bone formation.

  11. Space Plasma Testing of High-Voltage Thin-Film Solar Arrays with Protective Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlomak, Pawel; Hausgen, Paul E.; Merrill, John; Senft, Donna; Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the space plasma test program for thin-film photovoltaics (TFPV) technologies developed at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). The main objective of this program is to simulate the effects of space plasma characteristic of LEO and MEO environments on TFPV. Two types of TFPV, amorphous silicon (a-Si) and copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS), coated with two types of thin-film, multifunctional coatings were used for these studies. This paper reports the results of the first phase of this program, namely the results of preliminary electrostatic charging, arcing, dielectric breakdown, and collection current measurements carried out with a series of TFPV exposed to simulated space plasma at the NASA Glenn Plasma Interaction Facility. The experimental data demonstrate that multifunctional coatings developed for this program provide effective protection against the plasma environment while minimizing impact on power generation performance. This effort is part of an ongoing program led by the Space Vehicles Directorate at the AFRL devoted to the development and space qualification of TFPV and their protective coatings.

  12. Palladium-modified aluminide coatings: Mechanisms of formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lamesle, P.; Steinmetz, P.; Steinmetz, J.; Alperine, S.

    1995-02-01

    The need to increase the efficiency of turbo engines has led manufacturers to increase the temperature of gases at the exhaust of the combustion chamber. Another limiting factor for the lifetime of blades or vanes used in gas turbines is hot corrosion due to the condensation of alkaline sulfate produced by the oxidation of sulfur contained in kerosene or fuels. To overcome these problems, the use of protective coatings has come into general use. A systematic investigation of the influence of Pd-Ni predeposit alloys on the microstructure and composition of aluminum diffusion coatings has been conducted on Ni base superalloys (mainly IN738). Their metallurgical structure has been studied with a special emphasis on the nature of the phases and distribution of the various elements throughout the coating section. A two-layer structure similar to that formed on simple aluminide coatings is observed whatever the type of aluminizing treatment (low and high aluminum activity, pack of vapor-phase coating). The superficial layer is, however, very different from that observed in simple aluminide coatings, since it is constituted with a ternary PdNi aluminide. Palladium concentration profiles, which significantly differ when using low or high activity cements, and the results of a study of the ternary Ni-Pd-Al phase diagram, provide qualitative indications concerning the coatings` growth processes. Palladium, if present at a sufficient level, enhances Al diffusion in the beta phase. In the case of low activity processes, a consequence of this increase of Al diffusion flux is the location of an NiAl reaction zone inside the coating.

  13. Plasma formation in water vapour layers in high conductivity liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, C. P.; Schaper, L.; Stalder, K. R.; Graham, W. G.

    2011-10-01

    The vapour layer development stage of relatively low voltage plasmas in conducting solutions has already been well explored. The nature of the discharges formed within the vapour layer however is still largely unexplored. Here we examine the nature of such discharges through a combination of fast imaging and spatially, temporally resolved spectroscopy and electrical characterisation. The experimental setup used is a pin-to-plate discharge configuration with a -350V, 200 μs pulse applied at a repetition rate of 2Hz. A lens, followed by beam splitter allows beams to one Andor ICCD camera to capture images of the plasma emission with a second camera at the exit of a high resolution spectrometer. Through synchronization of the camera images at specified times after plasma ignition (as determined from current-voltage characteristics) they can be correlated with the spectra features. Initial measurements reveal two apparently different plasma formations. Stark broadening of the hydrogen Balmer beta line indicate electron densities of 3 to 5 ×1020 m-3 for plasmas produced early in the voltage pulse and an order of magnitude less for the later plasmas. The vapour layer development stage of relatively low voltage plasmas in conducting solutions has already been well explored. The nature of the discharges formed within the vapour layer however is still largely unexplored. Here we examine the nature of such discharges through a combination of fast imaging and spatially, temporally resolved spectroscopy and electrical characterisation. The experimental setup used is a pin-to-plate discharge configuration with a -350V, 200 μs pulse applied at a repetition rate of 2Hz. A lens, followed by beam splitter allows beams to one Andor ICCD camera to capture images of the plasma emission with a second camera at the exit of a high resolution spectrometer. Through synchronization of the camera images at specified times after plasma ignition (as determined from current

  14. Refrigerated Wind Tunnel Tests on Surface Coatings for Preventing Ice Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Montgomery; Clay, William C

    1930-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to determine the effectiveness of various surface coatings as a means for preventing ice formations on aircraft in flight. The substances used as coatings for these tests are divided into two groups: compounds soluble in water, and those which are insoluble in water. It was found that certain soluble compounds were apparently effective in preventing the formation of ice on an airfoil model, while all insoluble compounds which were tested were found to be ineffective.

  15. Plasma Spray and Pack Cementation Process Optimization and Oxidation Behaviour of Novel Multilayered Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng

    The hot section components in gas turbines are subjected to a harsh environment with the temperature being increased continuously. The higher temperature has directly resulted in severe oxidation of these components. Monolithic coatings such as MCrAIY and aluminide have been traditionally used to protect the components from oxidation; however, increased operating temperature quickly deteriorates the coatings due to accelerated diffusion of aluminum in the coatings. To improve the oxidation resistance a group of multilayered coatings are developed in this study. The multilayered coatings consist of a Cr-Si co-deposited layer as the diffusion barrier, a plasma sprayed NiCrA1Y coating as the middle layer and an aluminized top layer. The Cr-Si and aluminized layers are fabricated using pack cementation processes and the NiCrA1Y coatings are produced using the Mettech Axial III(TM) System. All of the coating processes are optimized using the methodology of Design of Experiments (DOE) and the results are analyzed using statistical method. The optimal processes are adopted to fabricate the multilayered coatings for oxidation tests. The coatings are exposed in air at 1050°C and 1150°C for 1000 hr. The results indicate that a Cr layer and a silicon-rich barrier layer have formed on the interface between the Cr-Si coating and the NiCrA1Y coating. This barrier layer not only prevents aluminum and chromium from diffusing into the substrate, but also impedes the diffusion of other elements from the substrate into the coating. The results also reveal that, for optimal oxidation resistance at 1050°C, the top layer in a multilayered coating should have at least Al/Ni ratio of one; whereas the multilayered coating with the All Ni ratio of two in the top layer exhibits the best oxidation resistance at 1150°C. The DOE methodology provides an excellent means for process optimization and the selection of oxidation test matrix, and also offers a more thorough understanding of the

  16. Numerical simulation of primary cluster formation in silane plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nandini; Stoffels, W. W.; Kroesen, G. M. W.

    2003-04-01

    The usage of low-cost silicon-based solar cells is limited by their tendency to degrade on prolonged exposure to sunlight. Current research has indicated that the inclusion of nano-particles in the plasma-deposited film enhances its efficiency considerably. It is therefore essential to identify the plasma operating conditions such that nano-particles are formed and deposited in the film. The early stages of cluster formation, nucleation and coagulation are still open to experimental and theoretical investigation. In this paper, a simulation of the first stage of particle formation in capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharges in SiH4 is attempted. A molecular dynamics based model has been set up to simulate one of the principal reaction pathways in cluster formation. This simulation model appears to produce valid and meaningful trends. Further studies are planned to explore the effect of other parameters and alternate pathways.

  17. Life modeling of atmospheric and low pressure plasma-sprayed thermal-barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.; Argarwal, P.; Duderstadt, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    The cycles-to-failure vs cycle duration data for three different thermal barrier coating systems, which consist of atmospheric pressure plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 percent Y2O3 over similarly deposited or low pressure plasma sprayed Ni-base alloys, are presently analyzed by means of the Miller (1980) oxidation-based life model. Specimens were tested at 1100 C for heating cycle lengths of 1, 6, and 20 h, yielding results supporting the model's value.

  18. Effects of real viscosity on plasma liner formation and implosion from supersonic plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillo, Kevin; Cassibry, Jason; Hsu, Scott; PLX-Alpha Team

    2015-11-01

    The PLX- α project endeavors to study plasma liner formation and implosion by merging of a spherical array of plasma jets as a candidate standoff driver for magneto-inertial fusion (MIF). Smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is being used to model the liner formation and implosion processes. SPH is a meshless Lagrangian method to simulate fluid flows by dividing a fluid into a set of particles and using a summation interpolant function to calculate the properties and gradients for each of these particles. The SPH code was used to simulate test cases in which the number of plasma guns and initial conditions for the plasma were varied. Linear stabilizations were observed, but the possibility exists that this stabilization was due to the implementation of artificial viscosity in the code. A real viscosity model was added to our SPHC model using the Braginskii ion viscosity. Preliminary results for test cases that incorporate real viscosity are presented.

  19. Cluster observes formation of high-beta plasma blobs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, G.; Georgescu, E.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Klecker, B.; Bogdanova, J.; Reme, H.; Frey, H. U.; Vaivads, A.

    2003-04-01

    Late in a sequence of four moderate substorms an 26 July 2001, Cluster observed periods of a few minutes durations of high-beta plasma events (B < 10nT, beta = 2 - 30), connected with dipolarizations of the magnetic field. Cluster was located near 02:45 MLT, at R = 19 Re and at about 5 degrees N GSM. These events began late in the recovery phase of the second and about 5 minutes before onset of the third substorm and lasted for three hours, way beyond the recovery phase of the fourth substorm. The most remarkable observation is that the onset coincided with the arrival of energetic (E ~ 7 keV) O+ ions from the ionosphere, which tended to dominate the plasma composition throughout the remaining time. The magnetic flux and the transverse plasma transport is continuously directed equator- and earthward with oscillatory east-west movements superposed. Periods of order 5 - 10 minutes and strong correlations between the magnetic elevation angle and log(beta) (correlation coefficient 0.78) are highly reminiscent of the high-beta plasma blobs discovered with Equator-S and Geotail between 9 and 11 Re in the late night/early morning sector [Haerendel et al. 1999]. Another feature in common with the Equator-S and Geotail observations is the plasma flow towards low latitudes during the magnetic field recovery. We conclude that Cluster observed the plasma blob formation in the tail plasma sheet, which seems to occur dominantly in the recovery and post-recovery phase of substorms. This is consistent with the finding of Equator-S and Geotail. The origin is a pulsed earthward plasma transport with velocity amplitudes of only several tens of km/s. It needs to be investigated whether the preceeding injection of ionospheric O+ ions into the plasma sheet plays a causal role in the process.

  20. Chemical reaction and dust formation studies in laboratory hydrocarbon plasmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippler, Rainer; Majumdar, Abhijit; Thejaswini, H. C.

    Plasma chemical reaction studies with relevance to, e.g., Titan's atmosphere have been per-formed in various laboratory plasmas [1,2]. Chemical reactions in a dielectric barrier discharge at medium pressure of 250-300 mbar have been studied in CH4 /N2 and CH4 /Ar gas mixtures by means of mass spectrometry. The main reaction scheme is production of H2 by fragmenta-tion of CH4 , but also production of larger hydrocarbons like Cn Hm with n up to 10 including formation of different functional CN groups is observed. [1] A. Majumdar and R. Hippler, Development of dielectric barrier discharge plasma processing apparatus for mass spectrometry and thin film deposition, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 075103 (2007) [2] H.T. Do, G. Thieme, M. Frühlich, H. Kersten, and R. Hippler, Ion Molecule and Dust Particle Formation in Ar/CH4 , Ar/C2 H2 and Ar/C3 H6 Radio-frequency Plasmas, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 45, No. 5-6, 378-384 (2005)

  1. Thin and Dense Ceramic Coatings by Plasma Spraying at Very Low Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauer, Georg; Vaßen, Robert; Stöver, Detlev

    2010-01-01

    The very low pressure plasma spray (VLPPS) process operates at a pressure range of approximately 100 Pa. At this pressure, the plasma jet interaction with the surrounding atmosphere is very weak. Thus, the plasma velocity is almost constant over a large distance from the nozzle exit. Furthermore, at these low pressures the collision frequency is distinctly reduced and the mean free path is strongly increased. As a consequence, at low pressure the specific enthalpy of the plasma is substantially higher, but at lower density. These particular plasma characteristics offer enhanced possibilities to spray thin and dense ceramics compared to conventional processes which operate in the pressure range between 5 and 20 kPa. This paper presents some examples of gas-tight and electrically insulating coatings with low thicknesses <50 μm for solid oxide fuel cell applications. Furthermore, plasma spraying of oxygen conducting membrane materials such as perovskites is discussed.

  2. Features of thermal processes of plasma deposition and hardening of coatings with external modulation parameters of the arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadyrmetov, A. M.; Sharifullin, S. N.; Maltsev, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    In the work on the basis of mathematical modeling analysis of processes of plasma deposition of coatings with modulation of the electrical parameters of the extension arc. The effect of modulation on the temperature field in the system "coating-basis" on a local scale, proportionate to the diameter of the spot attachment of the arc to the surface, and at the macrolevel of evaporation surface. It justifies the preconditions of the improvement of plasma deposition and hardening coatings.

  3. Characterization of calcium containing plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings on AM50 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, P. Bala; Liang, J.; Blawert, C.; Störmer, M.; Dietzel, W.

    2010-04-01

    An attempt was made to produce calcium containing plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coatings on AM50 magnesium alloy using an alkaline electrolyte. This study was performed in three alkaline electrolytes containing calcium hydroxide and sodium phosphate with three different mass ratios viz., 1:2.5, 1:5 and 1:7.5. All the three coatings produced were found to contain Ca and P in appreciable amounts. The concentration of P was found to be higher in the coatings obtained in the electrolytes with higher concentration of phosphate ions. Even though all the three coatings were found to be constituted with magnesium oxide and magnesium phosphate phases, X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that the phase composition was influenced by the phosphate ion concentration/conductivity of the electrolyte. Further, the PEO coating obtained in the 1:7.5 ratio electrolyte was found to contain di-calcium phosphate (monetite) and calcium peroxide phases, which were absent in the other two coatings. Potentiodynamic polarization studies performed in 0.1 M NaCl solution showed that the coatings obtained from the 1:5 ratio electrolyte possessed a superior corrosion resistance, which is attributed to the combined effect of thickness, compactness and phase/chemical composition of this coating.

  4. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Coating on Implant Surfaces Reduces Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Jacobsson, Gunnar; Peetermans, Marijke; Verhamme, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are a major medical challenge because of their high prevalence and antibiotic resistance. As fibrin plays an important role in S. aureus biofilm formation, we hypothesize that coating of the implant surface with fibrinolytic agents can be used as a new method of antibiofilm prophylaxis. The effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) coating on S. aureus biofilm formation was tested with in vitro microplate biofilm assays and an in vivo mouse model of biofilm infection. tPA coating efficiently inhibited biofilm formation by various S. aureus strains. The effect was dependent on plasminogen activation by tPA, leading to subsequent local fibrin cleavage. A tPA coating on implant surfaces prevented both early adhesion and later biomass accumulation. Furthermore, tPA coating increased the susceptibility of biofilm infections to antibiotics. In vivo, significantly fewer bacteria were detected on the surfaces of implants coated with tPA than on control implants from mice treated with cloxacillin. Fibrinolytic coatings (e.g., with tPA) reduce S. aureus biofilm formation both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a novel way to prevent bacterial biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices. PMID:26519394

  5. Effect of steam treatment during plasma spraying on the microstructure of hydroxyapatite splats and coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Khor, K. A.; Cheang, P.

    2006-12-01

    The major problems with plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings for hard tissue replacement are severe HA decomposition and insufficient mechanical properties of the coatings. Loss of crystalline HA after the high-temperature spraying is due mainly to the loss of OH- in terms of water. The current study used steam to treat HA droplets and coatings during both in-flight and flattening stages during plasma spraying. The microstructure of the HA coatings and splats was characterized using scanning electron microscope, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Results showed that a significant increase in crystallinity of the HA coating was achieved through the steam treatment (e.g., from 58 to 79%). In addition, the effects were dependent on particle sizes of the HA feedstock, more increase in crystallinity of the coatings made from smaller powders was revealed. The Raman spectroscopy analyses on the individual splats and coatings indicate that the mechanism involves entrapping of water molecules by the individual HA droplets upon their impingement. It further suggests that the HA decomposition has already taken place before the impingement of the droplets on precoating or substrate. The improvement in crystallinity and phases, for example, from tricalcium phosphate and amorphous calcium phosphate to HA, was achieved by reversing the HA decomposition through providing extra OH-. Furthermore, the steam treatment during the spraying also accounts for remarkably increased adhesion strength from 9.09 to 23.13 MPa. The in vitro testing through immersing the HA coatings in simulated body fluid gives further evidence that the economic and simple steam treatment is promising in improving HA coating structure.

  6. Antibacterial and biological characteristics of plasma sprayed silver and strontium doped hydroxyapatite coatings

    PubMed Central

    Fielding, Gary A.; Roy, Mangal; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2012-01-01

    Infection in primary total joint prostheses is estimated to occur in up to 3% of all surgeries. As a measure to improve the antimicrobial properties of implant materials, silver (Ag) was incorporated into plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings. To offset potential cytotoxic effects of Ag in the coatings, strontium (Sr) was also added as a binary dopant. HA powder were doped with 2.0 wt% Ag2O, 1.0 wt% SrO and the powder was then heat treated at 800° C. Titanium substrates were coated using a 30 kW plasma spray system equipped with a supersonic nozzle. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the phase purity and high crystallinity of the coatings. Samples were evaluated for mechanical stability by adhesive bond strength testing. Results show that the addition of dopants did not affect the overall bond strength of the coatings. The antibacterial efficacies of the coatings were tested against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Samples that contained the Ag2O dopant were found to be highly effective against the bacterial colonization. In vitro cell-material interactions using human fetal osteoblast (hFOB) cells were characterized by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay for cell viability, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) for cell morphology and confocal imaging for the important differentiation marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Our results showed evidence of cytotoxic effects in the Ag-HA coatings, characterized by poor cellular morphology and cell death and nearly complete impediment of functional ALP activity. The addition of SrO to Ag-HA coatings was able to effectively offset these negative effects and improve the performance when compared to pure HA coated samples. PMID:22487928

  7. Adhesive and cohesive properties by indentation method of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Z.; Ziaei-Moayyed, A. A.; Mesgar, A. Sheikh-Mehdi

    2007-03-01

    Adhesive and cohesive properties of the plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings, deposited on Ti-6Al-4V substrates by varying the plasma power level and spray distance (SD), were evaluated by an indentation method. The crystallinity and the porosity decreased with increasing both of these two parameters. The microhardness value, Young's modulus ( E) and coating fracture toughness ( KC) were found to increase with a combinational increase in spray power and SD. The Knoop and Vickers indentation methods were used to estimate E and KC, respectively. The critical point at which no crack appears at the interface was determined by the interface indentation test. This was used to define the apparent interfacial toughness ( KCa) which is representative of the crack initiation resistance of the interface. It was found that KCa reaches to a maximum at a medium increase in both spray power and SD, while other mechanical properties of the coatings reaches to the highest value with further increase in these two plasma parameters. The tensile adhesion strength of the coatings, measure by the standard adhesion test, ISO 13779-4, was shown to alter in the same manner with KCa results. It was deduced that a combinational increase in spray power and SD which leads to a higher mechanical properties in the coatings, does not necessarily tends to a better mechanical properties at the interface.

  8. XPS and bioactivity study of the bisphosphonate pamidronate adsorbed onto plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Kate; Kumar, Sunil; Smart, Roger St. C.; Dutta, Naba; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Anderson, Gail I.; Sekel, Ron

    2006-12-01

    This paper reports the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to investigate bisphosphonate (BP) adsorption onto plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings commonly used for orthopaedic implants. BPs exhibit high binding affinity for the calcium present in HA and hence can be adsorbed onto HA-coated implants to exploit their beneficial properties for improved bone growth at the implant interface. A rigorous XPS analysis of pamidronate, a commonly used nitrogenous BP, adsorbed onto plasma sprayed HA-coated cobalt-chromium substrates has been carried out, aimed at: (a) confirming the adsorption of this BP onto HA; (b) studying the BP diffusion profile in the HA coating by employing the technique of XPS depth profiling; (c) confirming the bioactivity of the adsorbed BP. XPS spectra of plasma sprayed HA-coated discs exposed to a 10 mM aqueous BP solution (pamidronate) for periods of 1, 2 and 24 h showed nitrogen and phosphorous photoelectron signals corresponding to the BP, confirming its adsorption onto the HA substrate. XPS depth profiling of the 2 h BP-exposed HA discs showed penetration of the BP into the HA matrix to depths of at least 260 nm. The bioactivity of the adsorbed BP was confirmed by the observed inhibition of osteoclast (bone resorbing) cell activity. In comparison to the HA sample, the HA sample with adsorbed BP exhibited a 25-fold decrease in primary osteoclast cells.

  9. Roughening and reflection performance of molybdenum coatings exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eren, B.; Marot, L.; Ryzhkov, I. V.; Lindig, S.; Houben, A.; Wisse, M.; Skoryk, O. O.; Oberkofler, M.; Voitsenya, V. S.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Meyer, E.

    2013-11-01

    Optical diagnostic systems of ITER are foreseen to include metallic, plasma-facing, electromagnetic radiation reflecting components called first mirrors (FMs). Molybdenum coatings are important candidates for these components. Depending on the local plasma parameters of the reactor, the mirrors may be under net erosion or deposition conditions. In this work, we exposed molybdenum coatings to a high-flux deuterium plasma in order to test their roughening limits under erosion conditions. The high energy of deuterium ions (500 eV on average) results in more vigorous roughening of the surface compared with lower energy ions (200 eV). Longer exposure (3 × 1020 ions cm-2) of the 200 eV ions results in only a slightly increased roughness compared with shorter exposure (6.8 × 1019 ions cm-2). Both phenomena match to the theory regarding roughening dynamics of physical sputtering. A comparison of results in this work with previous studies gives support to the hypothesis that roughening is flux and temperature dependent. Partial delamination of the coatings is observed upon exposure at room temperature, but not at an elevated temperature (200 °C). In summary, Mo coatings will remain functional in the ITER environment under the expected conditions. However, changes in the expected conditions such as 500 eV mean energy of impinging charge exchange neutrals or <100 °C surface temperature of the mirrors can lead to gradual or sudden failure of the coatings.

  10. Formation of Imploding Plasma Liners for HEDP and MIF Application

    SciTech Connect

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Case, Andrew; Brockington, Samuel; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Mike; Wu, Linchun; Elton, Ray

    2014-11-11

    /s for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Initial work used existing computational and analytical tools to develop and refine a specific plasma gun concept having a novel tapered coaxial electromagnetic accelerator contour with an array of symmetric ablative plasma injectors. The profile is designed to suppress the main barrier to success in coaxial guns, namely the blow-by instability in which the arc slips past and outruns the bulk of the plasma mass. Efforts to begin developing a set of annular non-ablative plasma injectors for the coaxial gun, in order to accelerate pure gases, resulted in development of linear parallel-plate MiniRailguns that turned out to work well as plasma guns in their own right and we subsequently chose them for an initial plasma liner experiment on the PLX facility at LANL. This choice was mainly driven by cost and schedule for that particular experiment, while longer term goals still projected use of coaxial guns for reactor-relevant applications for reasons of better symmetry, lower impurities, more compact plasma jet formation, and higher gun efficiency. Our efforts have focused mainly on 1) developing various plasma injection systems for both coax and linear railguns and ensuring they work reliably with the accelerator section, 2) developing a suite of plasma and gun diagnostics, 3) performing computational modeling to design and refine the plasma guns, 4) establishing a research facility dedicated to plasma gun development, and finally, 5) developing plasma guns and associated pulse power systems capable of achieving these goals and installing and testing the first two gun sets on the PLX facility at LANL. During the second funding cycle for this program, HyperV joined in a collaborative effort with LANL, the University of Alabama at Huntsville, and the University of New Mexico to perform a plasma liner experiment (PLX) to investigate the physics and technology of forming spherically imploding

  11. Atmospheric reactive plasma sprayed Fe-Al 2 O 3 -FeAl 2 O 4 composite coating and its property evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; He, Jining; Yan, Dianran; Dong, Yanchun; Zhang, Jianxin; Li, Xiangzhi; Liao, Hanlin

    2011-09-01

    In the present study, Fe-Al2O3-FeAl2O4 composite coatings were successfully deposited by reactive plasma sprayed Al/Fe2O3 agglomerated powder. Phase composition and microstructure of the coatings were determined by XRD and SEM. The results indicated that the composite coatings were principally composed of three different phases, i.e. FeAl2O4 phase as main framework, dispersed ball-like Fe-rich phase, and small splats of Al2O3 phase, and it was thought that the in situ synthesized metal phase was helpful to toughen the coating matrix. According to the results of the indentation and frictional wear tests, the composite coating exhibited excellent toughness and anti-friction properties in comparison with conventional Al2O3 monophase coating, though its microhardness value was a little lower than that of Al2O3 coating. The formation mechanism and the toughening mechanism of the composite coating were clarified in detail.

  12. Recent Trends in Newly Developed Plasma-Sprayed and Sintered Coatings for Implant Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bsat, Suzan; Speirs, Andrew; Huang, Xiao

    2016-08-01

    The current paper aims to review recent trends (2011 to 2015) in newly developed plasma-sprayed and sintered coatings for implant applications. Recent developments in plasma-sprayed and sintered coatings have focused on improving biological performance, bacterial growth resistance, and mechanical properties, predominantly of HA and glass ceramics. The majority of these improvements are attributed to the addition of dopants. To improve biological performance, trace elements, such as Zn and Mg, both of which are found in bone, were added to replicate the functions they provide for the skeletal system. Though bacterial growth resistance is traditionally improved by Ag dopant, the addition of new dopants such as CeO2 and Zn were explored as well. Great effort has also been made to improve coating adherence and reduce stresses by minimizing coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the coating and substrate through the addition of elements such as Zn and Mg or the inclusion of a buffer layer. For sintering process in particular, there was an emphasis on reducing sintering temperature through modification of 45S5 Bioglass. New plasma spray and sintering technologies aimed at reducing high-temperature exposure are briefly introduced as well. These include microplasma spray and spark plasma sintering.

  13. Characterization of Microstructure and Thermal Properties of YSZ Coatings Obtained by Axial Suspension Plasma Spraying (ASPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganvir, Ashish; Curry, Nicholas; Björklund, Stefan; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Nylén, Per

    2015-10-01

    The paper aims at demonstrating various microstructures which can be obtained using the suspension spraying technique and their respective significance in enhancing the thermal insulation property of a thermal barrier coating. Three different types of coating microstructures are discussed which were produced by the Axial Suspension Plasma Spraying. Detailed characterization of coatings was then performed. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were utilized for microstructure evaluations; x-ray diffraction for phase analysis; water impregnation, image analysis, and mercury intrusion porosimetry for porosity analysis, and laser flash analysis for thermal diffusivity measurements were used. The results showed that Axial Suspension Plasma Spraying can generate vertically cracked, porous, and feathery columnar-type microstructures. Pore size distribution was found in micron, submicron, and nanometer range. Higher overall porosity, the lower density of vertical cracks or inter-column spacing, and higher inter-pass porosity favored thermal insulation property of the coating. Significant increase in thermal diffusivity and conductivity was found at higher temperature, which is believed to be due to the pore rearrangement (sintering and pore coarsening). Thermal conductivity values for these coatings were also compared with electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) thermal barrier coatings from the literature and found to be much lower.

  14. Boron carbide-based coatings on graphite for plasma facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, P.G.; Trester, P.W.; Winter, J.; Linke, J.; Duwe, R.; Wallura, E.; Philipps, V.

    1994-01-01

    In the effort to evaluate boron-rich coatings as plasma facing surfaces in fusion devices, a new process for applying boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) coatings to graphite was developed. The process entails eutectic melting of the carbon (C) substrate surface with a precursor layer of B{sub 4}C particles. Adherent coatings were achieved which consisted of two layers: a surface layer and a graded penetration zone in the outer portion of the substrate. The surface-layer microstructure was multiphase and ranged from reaction-sintered structures of sintered B{sub 4}C particles in an eutectic-formed matrix to that of hypereutectic carbon particles in a B{sub 4}C-C eutectic matrix. Because of high surface energy, the coating generally developed a nonuniform thickness. Quantitative evaluations of the coating were performed with limiters in the TEXTOR fusion device and with coupons in electron beam tests. Test results revealed the following: good adherence of the coating even after remelting; and, during remelting, diagnostics detected a corresponding interaction of boron with the plasma.

  15. Suspension Plasma Spraying of Sub-micron Silicon Carbide Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubarok, F.; Espallargas, N.

    2015-06-01

    Thermal spraying of silicon carbide (SiC) material is a challenging task since SiC tends to decompose during atmospheric spraying process. The addition of metal or ceramic binders is necessary to facilitate the bonding of SiC particles, allowing SiC composite coating to be deposited. In the conventional procedures, the binders are added through mechanical mixing of powder constituents, making it difficult to achieve homogeneous distribution. In the new procedure proposed in this work, the binder is delivered as a nano-film of the surface of the individual SiC particles through co-precipitation treatment. Suspension plasma spray (SPS) coating technique has been used with the aim at avoiding the decomposition of SiC typically expected with atmospheric techniques, such as atmospheric plasma spray. The deposited SiC coatings by SPS showed identical SiC phase peak as identified in the suspension feedstock, indicating that the nano-film binder was able to protect SiC particles from decomposition. Further analysis by XPS revealed that SiC particles underwent some minor oxidation. Unfortunately, all the SiC coatings exhibited poor mechanical performance due to low cohesive strength, high porosity, and powdery structure making the coatings vulnerable to grain pull-out. This was due to the absence of sintering process during the spraying process contributing to the low performance of SiC SPS coatings.

  16. Diagnostics of Nano-Particle Formation in Process Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersten, Holger

    2015-09-01

    The main sources of particle generation during plasma surface processing and the formation of nano-composite materials are (i) the formation of large molecules, mesoscopic clusters and particles in the plasma bulk by chemically reactive gases, and (ii) the formation and incorporation of particles at surfaces (target, substrate) by means of plasma-wall interaction. The plasma process promotes the particle formation by excitation, dissociation and reaction of the involved species in the gas phase. The different stages of the particle growth in the gas phase can be observed by various plasma diagnostics as mass spectrometry, laser induced evaporation, photo-detachment, IR absorption, microwave cavity measurements, Mie scattering and self-excited electron resonance spectroscopy (SEERS). Common diagnostics of particle formation also use the observation and analysis of harmonics and other discharge characteristics. Especially the early stages of the particle growth are not well investigated since they are experimentally inaccessible by standard methods as mentioned above. A novel collection method based on neutral drag was tested in order to get a better insight into the early stages of particle growth. The experiments were performed in an asymmetric, capacitively coupled rf-discharge, where multiple growth cycles can be obtained. Making use of the correlation between the particle growth cycles and the bias voltage as well as the phase angle between discharge current and voltage it was possible to monitor each growth process in-situ. This allowed to collect particles at any desired stage of the growth cycle via the neutral drag method. Size distributions of the nanoparticles at the different stages of the growth cycle were determined ex-situ by transmission electron microscopy. The observed correlations of particle size and bias voltage, which can be used for prediction of the particle growth, are qualitatively explained. Furthermore, the change of the electron density

  17. Enhanced ingrowth of porous-coated CoCr implants plasma-sprayed with tricalcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Chae, J C; Collier, J P; Mayor, M B; Surprenant, V A; Dauphinais, L A

    1992-01-01

    Tricalcium phosphate (TCP) is an osteo-conductive bioceramic which, when applied to a porous-coated prosthesis, may enhance osseous ingrowth and mechanical stability. TCP plasma-sprayed and unsprayed porous-coated tibial intramedullary rods were bilaterally implanted in seven adult rabbits. All rabbits were killed at 12 weeks. Pull-out tests were performed on 4 rabbits while all were evaluated histologically for osseous response and adverse tissue reaction. TCP-sprayed implants showed significantly greater osseous ingrowth in comparison to unsprayed implants. Neither implant type exhibited adverse tissue reactions. Average pull-out strengths were 69 lb for treated rods and 72 lb for controls (p greater than 0.05); quality of fit for all pull-out specimens except one was deemed poor. We conclude that plasma-sprayed TCP enhances osseous ingrowth into porous-coated devices. However, our data further suggest that enhanced ingrowth may not always lead to enhanced fixation.

  18. Plasma polymerized allylamine coated quartz particles for humic acid removal.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Karyn L; Majewski, Peter

    2012-08-15

    Allylamine plasma polymerization has been used to modify the surface of quartz particles for humic acid removal via an inductively coupled rotating barrel plasma reactor. Plasma polymerized allylamine (ppAA) films were deposited at a power of 25 W, allylamine flow rate of 4.4 sccm and polymerization times of 5-60 min. The influence of polymerization time on surface chemistry was investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and electrokinetic analysis. Acid orange 7 adsorption/desorption quantified the number of surface amine groups. Humic acid removal via ppAA quartz particles was examined by varying pH, removal time, humic acid concentration, and particle mass. Increasing the polymerization time increased the concentration of amine groups on the ppAA quartz surface, thus also increasing the isoelectric point. ToF-SIMS demonstrated uniform distribution of amine groups across the particle surface. Greatest humic acid removal was observed at pH 5 due to electrostatic attraction. At higher pH values, for longer polymerization times, humic acid removal was also observed due to hydrogen bonding. Increasing the initial humic acid concentration increased the mass of humic acid removed, with longer polymerization times exhibiting the greatest increases. Plasma polymerization using a rotating plasma reactor has shown to be a successful method for modifying quartz particles for the removal of humic acid. Further development of the plasma polymerization process and investigation of additional contaminants will aid in the development of a low cost water treatment system.

  19. Study of the Splat Microstructure and the Effects of Substrate Heating on the Splat Formation for Ni-Cr Particles Plasma Sprayed onto Stainless Steel Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossard, S.; Munroe, P. R.; Tran, A. T.; Hyland, M. M.

    2010-09-01

    The plasma spraying process is still poorly understood in term of the processes by which the coating is built up, especially coating interactions with the substrate. This present study enhances this understanding by studying, through a range of electron microscopy techniques, single NiCr splats plasma sprayed onto stainless steel substrates, which were first exposed to different heat treatments. The microstructure of the splats, particularly the splat-substrate interface, was characterized, and the formation of the observed features is discussed. Evidence of localized substrate melting and inter-mixing with the splat material was found, showing metallurgical bonding. The structures observed were also correlated to the treatment of the substrate, demonstrating how such treatments can influence the properties of the fully deposited coating by modifying the splat formation process. Most notably, heating the substrate during spraying was found to significantly modify splat formation by reducing splashing and increasing the extent of substrate melting.

  20. The effect of thermal aging on the thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed and EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, R.B.; Beecher, S.C.; Porter, W.D.; Nagaraj, B.A.

    1996-05-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied to the hot gas components of turbine engines lead to enhanced fuel efficiency and component reliability. Understanding the mechanisms which control the thermal transport behavior of the TBCs is of primary importance. Electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EV-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS) are the two most commonly used coating techniques. These techniques produce coatings with unique microstructures which control their performance and stability. The density of the APS coatings was controlled by varying the spray parameters. The low density APS yttria-partially stabilized zirconia (yttria-PSZ) coatings yielded a thermal conductivity that is lower than both the high density APS coatings and the EB-PVD coatings. The thermal aging of both fully and partially stabilized zirconia are compared. The thermal conductivity of the coatings permanently increases upon exposure to high temperatures. These increases are attributed to microstructural changes within the coatings. This increase in thermal conductivity can be modeled using a relationship which depends on both the temperature and time of exposure. Although the EB-PVD coatings are less susceptible to thermal aging effects, results suggest that they typically have a higher thermal conductivity than APS coatings before thermal aging. The increases in thermal conductivity due to thermal aging for plasma sprayed partially stabilized zirconia have been found to be less than for plasma sprayed fully stabilized zirconia coatings.

  1. Modeling of plasma jet production from rail and coaxial guns for imploding plasma liner formation*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, R. J.; Faehl, R. J.; Kirikpatrick, R. C.; Witherspoon, D.; Cassibry, J.

    2010-11-01

    We study the generation of plasma jets for forming imploding plasma liners using an enhanced version of the ePLAS implicit/hybrid model.^1 Typically, the jets are partially ionized D or Ar gases, in initial 3-10 cm long slugs at 10^16-10^18 electron/cm^3, accelerated for microseconds along 15-30 cm rail or coaxial guns with a 1 cm inter-electrode gap and driven by magnetic fields of a few Tesla. We re-examine the B-field penetration mechanisms that can be active in such wall-connected plasmas,^2 including erosion and EMHD influences, which can subsequently impact plasma liner formation and implosion. For the background and emitted plasma components we discuss optimized PIC and fluid modeling techniques, and the use of implicit fields and hybridized electrons to speed simulation. The plasmas are relatively cold (˜3 eV), so results with fixed atomic Z are compared to those from a simple analytic EOS, and allowing radiative heat loss from the plasma. The use of PIC ions is explored to extract large mean-free-path kinetic effects. 1. R. J. Mason and C. Cranfill, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. PS-14, 45 (1986) 2. R. Mason, et al., Phys. Fluids B, 5, 1115 (1993). [4pt] *Research supported in part by USDOE Grant DE-SC0004207.

  2. Hot Corrosion Resistance and Mechanical Behavior of Atmospheric Plasma Sprayed Conventional and Nanostructured Zirconia Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saremi, Mohsen; Keyvani, Ahmad; Heydarzadeh Sohi, Mahmoud

    Conventional and nanostructured zirconia coatings were deposited on In-738 Ni super alloy by atmospheric plasma spray technique. The hot corrosion resistance of the coatings was measured at 1050°C using an atmospheric electrical furnace and a fused mixture of vanadium pent oxide and sodium sulfate respectively. According to the experimental results nanostructured coatings showed a better hot corrosion resistance than conventional ones. The improved hot corrosion resistance could be explained by the change of structure to a dense and more packed structure in the nanocoating. The evaluation of mechanical properties by nano indentation method showed the hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E) of the YSZ coating increased substantially after hot corrosion.

  3. Thorium-Free Versus Thoriated Plasma Gun Electrodes: Statistical Evaluation of Coating Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colmenares-Angulo, Jose; Molz, Ronald; Hawley, David; Seshadri, Ramachandran Chidambaram

    2016-04-01

    Industries throughout the world today have an increased awareness of environmental, health, and safety issues. This, together with recent Nuclear Regulatory Commission changes concerning source material (e.g., thorium) has added complexity in the supply chain of thoriated tungsten commonly used in plasma spray gun spares. In the interest of a safer and more sustainable work environment, Oerlikon Metco has developed thorium-free material solutions proven to have longer service life than conventional thoriated spares. This work reports on the effect, if any, caused by tungsten compositional changes and extended service life in coating properties. Microstructure, coating efficiency parameters, hardness, particle state, in situ coating stress, and ex situ modulus are evaluated over the service life duration of the nozzle, comparing coatings with thoriated and non-thoriated nozzles and electrodes with the same spray parameters.

  4. Metal-containing plasma-polymerized coatings for laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Letts, S.A.; Jordan, C.W.

    1981-09-14

    Addition of metal to plastic layers in some direct drive laser fusion targets is needed to reduce electron induced fuel preheat. A plasma polymerization coating system was constructed to produce a metal seeded polymer by adding an organometallic gas to the usual trans-2-butene and hydrogen feedstocks. Since organometallic gases are highly reactive and toxic, safety is a major concern in the design of a coating system. Our coating apparatus was designed with three levels of containment to assure protection of the operator. The gas handling system has redundant valves and was designed to fail safe. Several sensor controlled interlocks assure safe operating conditions. Waste materials are collected on a specially designed cold trap. Waste disposal is accomplished by heating the traps and purging volatile products through a reactor vessel. The design, operating procedure, and safety interlocks of this novel coating system are described.

  5. Carbon dust formation in a cold plasma from cathode sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnas, C.; Mouberi, A.; Hassouni, K.; Michau, A.; Lombardi, G.; Bonnin, X.; Bénédic, F.; Pégourié, B.

    2009-06-01

    Nanoparticles are produced in argon glow plasmas where carbon is introduced by sputtering of a graphite cathode. A scaling law of growth is reported on as a function of the discharge time. Two successive stages of growth of concomitant agglomeration and carbon deposition are observed, followed by a final stage of growth by carbon deposition. A model of formation of molecular precursors by coagulation of neutral clusters on the one hand and of neutral-negative clusters on the other hand is presented, based on formation enthalpy and cluster geometry.

  6. Formation of carbon deposits from coal in an arc plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.; Tian, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhu, S.; Lu, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Xie, K.

    2007-07-01

    The issue of deposited carbon (DC) on a reactor wall during the production of acetylene by the coal/arc plasma process is a potential obstacle for the industrialization process. The formation mechanism of DC is very difficult to reveal because the high complexity of coal and the volatile matter. Combining with quenching technique, the methane, liquid petroleum gas and benzene were employed as the model materials to roughly act as the light gas, chain and aromatic subcomponents of volatile matter, and then the reasonable formation mechanism of DC was subtly speculated accordingly.

  7. Plasma Sprayed Metal-Ceramic Coatings and Modification of Their Structure with Pulsed Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solonenko, O. P.; Ovcharenko, V. E.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Golovin, A. A.

    2011-06-01

    Composite powder obtained from mechanically crushed titanium carbide—metal binder cermet compacts deserves special mention for plasma spraying of wear-resistant coatings. However, cermet coatings sprayed using this powder have comparatively high porosity. The porosity causes the mechanical strength of the coating to largely deteriorate, and it also lowers the strength of the bond between the coating and the substrate. Computational and physical experiments were performed in this area to reveal the possibilities offered by pulsed electron beam irradiation for structural modification of 70 vol.%TiC-(Ni-Cr) powder coatings. The authors evaluated optimal values of process parameters for suitability in implementing a controlled thermal treatment of coatings under conditions of solid-liquid interaction of components in the cermet composition with each other and with the steel substrate. Evolution of the structure and physical properties of the cermet coatings under rapid heating and following cooling in a wide range of temperatures typical of pulsed irradiation conditions have been examined.

  8. Thermal conductivities of nanostructured magnesium oxide coatings deposited on magnesium alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinwei; Nie, Xueyuan; Hu, Henry

    2014-10-01

    The resistances of magnesium alloys to wear, friction and corrosion can be effectively improved by depositing coatings on their surfaces. However, the coatings can also reduce the heat transfer from the coated components to the surroundings (e.g., coated cylinder bores for internal combustion of engine blocks). In this paper, nanostructured magnesium oxides were produced by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process on the magnesium alloy AJ62 under different current densities. The guarded comparative heat flow method was adopted to measure the thermal conductivities of such coatings which possess gradient nanoscale grain sizes. The aim of the paper is to explore how the current density in the PEO process affects the thermal conductivity of the nanostructured magnesium coatings. The experimental results show that, as the current density rises from 4 to 20 A/mm2, the thermal conductivity has a slight increase from 0.94 to 1.21 W/m x K, which is significantly smaller than that of the corresponding bulk magnesium oxide materials (29.4 W/m x K). This mostly attributed to the variation of the nanoscale grain sizes of the PEO coatings. PMID:25942897

  9. Thermal conductivities of nanostructured magnesium oxide coatings deposited on magnesium alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinwei; Nie, Xueyuan; Hu, Henry

    2014-10-01

    The resistances of magnesium alloys to wear, friction and corrosion can be effectively improved by depositing coatings on their surfaces. However, the coatings can also reduce the heat transfer from the coated components to the surroundings (e.g., coated cylinder bores for internal combustion of engine blocks). In this paper, nanostructured magnesium oxides were produced by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process on the magnesium alloy AJ62 under different current densities. The guarded comparative heat flow method was adopted to measure the thermal conductivities of such coatings which possess gradient nanoscale grain sizes. The aim of the paper is to explore how the current density in the PEO process affects the thermal conductivity of the nanostructured magnesium coatings. The experimental results show that, as the current density rises from 4 to 20 A/mm2, the thermal conductivity has a slight increase from 0.94 to 1.21 W/m x K, which is significantly smaller than that of the corresponding bulk magnesium oxide materials (29.4 W/m x K). This mostly attributed to the variation of the nanoscale grain sizes of the PEO coatings.

  10. Failure of thick, low density air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helminiak, Michael Aaron

    This research was directed at developing fundamental understandings of the variables that influence the performance of air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Focus was placed on understanding how and why each variable influenced the performance of the TBC system along with how the individual variables interacted with one another. It includes research on the effect of surface roughness of NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying, the interdiffusion behavior of bond coats coupled to commercial superalloys, and the microstructural and compositional control of APS topcoats to maximize the coating thicknesses that can be applied without spallation. The specimens used for this research were prepared by Praxair Surface Technologies and have been evaluated using cyclic oxidation and thermal shock tests. TBC performance was sensitive to bond coat roughness with the rougher bond coats having improved cyclic performance than the smoother bond coats. The explanation being the rough bond coat surface hindered the propagation of the delamination cracks. The failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on a combination of the topcoat thickness, topcoat microstructure and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between the superalloy and topcoat. Thinner topcoats tended to fail at the topcoat/TGO interface due to bond coat oxidation whereas thicker topcoats failed within the topcoat due to the strain energy release rate of the thicker coating exceeding the fracture strength of the topcoat. Properties of free-standing high and conventional purity YSZ topcoats of both a lowdensity (LD) and dense-vertically fissure (DVF) microstructures were evaluated. The densification rate and phase evolution were sensitive to the YSZ purity and the starting microstructure. Increasing the impurity content resulted in enhanced sintering and phase decomposition rates, with the exception of the

  11. Formation of Aluminide Coatings on Fe-Based Alloys by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying; Pint, Bruce A; Cooley, Kevin M; Haynes, James A

    2008-01-01

    Aluminide and Al-containing coatings were synthesized on commercial ferritic (P91) and austenitic (304L) alloys via a laboratory chemical vapor deposition (CVD) procedure for rigorous control over coating composition, purity and microstructure. The effect of the CVD aluminizing parameters such as temperature, Al activity, and post-aluminizing anneal on coating growth was investigated. Two procedures involving different Al activities were employed with and without including Cr-Al pellets in the CVD reactor to produce coatings with suitable thickness and composition for coating performance evaluation. The phase constitution of the as-synthesized coatings was assessed with the aid of a combination of X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, and existing phase diagrams. The mechanisms of formation of these CVD coatings on the Fe-based alloys are discussed, and compared with nickel aluminide coatings on Ni-base superalloys. In addition, Cr-Al pellets were replaced with Fe-Al metals in some aluminizing process runs and similar coatings were achieved.

  12. A Quantitative Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimant, Yakov; Oppenheim, Meers

    2014-10-01

    Every second millions of small meteoroids hit the Earth from space, the vast majority too small to observe visually. Radars easily detect the plasma they generate and use the data they gather to characterize the meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. These diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of the formation of the meteor plasma and how it interacts with the Earth's atmosphere. Meteors become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently that they begin to sublimate. The sublimated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around and behind the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from the plasma around the descending meteoroid produces a localized signal called a head echo. This research applies kinetic theory to show that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. This analytical model will serve as a basis for quantitative interpretation of the head echo radar measurements, the ionization efficiency (called the Beta parameter), and should help us calculate meteoroid and atmosphere parameters from radar head-echo observations. Work supported by NSF Grant AGS-1244842.

  13. Room-temperature formation of low refractive index silicon oxide films using atmospheric-pressure plasma.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kei; Yamaguchi, Yoshihito; Yokoyama, Keiji; Higashida, Kosuke; Ohmi, Hiromasa; Kakiuchi, Hiroaki; Yasutake, Kiyoshi

    2011-04-01

    This study aims to apply atmospheric-pressure (AP) plasma to the fabrication of single-layer anti-reflection (AR) coatings with porous silicon oxide. 150 MHz very high-frequency (VHF) excitation of AP plasma permits to enhance the chemical reactions both in the gas phase and on the film-growing surface, increasing deposition rate significantly. Silicon oxide films were prepared from silane (SiH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) dual sources diluted with helium. The microstructure and refractive index of the films were studied using infrared absorption and ellipsometry as a function of VHF power density. It was shown that significant increase in deposition rate at room temperature prevented the formation of a dense SiO2 network, decreasing refractive index of the resulting film effectively. As a result, a porous silicon oxide film, which had the lowest refractive index of 1.24 at 632.8 nm, was obtained with a very high deposition rate of 235 nm/s. The reflectance and transmittance spectra showed that the low refractive index film functioned as a quarter-wave AR coating of a glass plate.

  14. The durability of adhesively bonded titanium: Performance of plasma-sprayed polymeric coating pretreatments

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, F.; Dillard, J.; Dillard, D.

    1996-12-31

    The role of a surface treatment of an adherend is to promote highly stable adhesive-adherend interactions; high stability is accomplished by making the chemistry of the adherend and adhesive compatible. The common surface preparations used to enhance durability include grit blasting, chromic acid or sodium hydroxide anodization, and other chemical treatments for titanium. As interest has grown in the development of environmentally benign surface treatments, other methods have been explored. In this study, plasma-sprayed polymeric materials have been evaluated as a surface coating pretreatment for adhesively bonding titanium alloy. Polyimide and polyether powders were plasm-sprayed onto grit-blasted titanium-6Al-4V. The alloy was adhesively bonded using a high performance polyimide adhesive. The coating was characterized using surface sensitive analytical measurements. The durability performance of the plasma-sprayed adherends was compared to the performance for chromic acid anodized titanium. Among the plasma-sprayed coatings, a LaRC-TPI polyimide-based coating exhibited performance comparable to that for chromic acid anodized specimens.

  15. Columnar-Structured Mg-Al-Spinel Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs) by Suspension Plasma Spraying (SPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, N.; Ebert, S.; Mauer, G.; Vaßen, R.

    2015-01-01

    The suspension plasma spraying (SPS) process has been developed to permit the feeding of sub-micrometer-sized powder into the plasma plume. In contrast to electron beam-physical vapor deposition and plasma spray-physical vapor deposition, SPS enables the cost-efficient deposition of columnar-structured coatings. Due to their strain tolerance, these coatings play an important role in the field of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). In addition to the cost-efficient process, attention was turned to the TBC material. Nowadays, yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is used as standard TBC material. However, its long-term application at temperatures higher than 1200 °C is problematic. At these high temperatures, phase transitions and sintering effects lead to the degradation of the TBC system. To overcome those deficits of YSZ, Mg-Al-spinel was chosen as TBC material. Even though it has a lower melting point (~2135 °C) and a higher thermal conductivity (~2.5 W/m/K) than YSZ, Mg-Al-spinel provides phase stability at high temperatures in contrast to YSZ. The Mg-Al-spinel deposition by SPS resulted in columnar-structured coatings, which have been tested for their thermal cycling lifetime. Furthermore, the influence of substrate cooling during the spraying process on thermal cycling behavior, phase composition, and stoichiometry of the Mg-Al-spinel has been investigated.

  16. The effect of enzymatically degradable IPN coatings on peri-implant bone formation and implant fixation.

    PubMed

    Ho, James E; Barber, Thomas A; Virdi, Amarjit S; Sumner, Dale R; Healy, Kevin E

    2007-06-01

    Short-term osseointegration of orthopedic implants is critical for the long-term stability of the implant-bone interface. To improve initial implant stability, one strategy under consideration involves the presentation of adhesion ligands on the implant surface to stimulate bone regeneration in the peri-implant region. To assess the relative effects of implant surface chemistry and topography on osseointegration within the rat femoral ablation implant model, a nonfouling, enzymatically degradable interpenetrating polymer network (edIPN) of poly(AAm-co-EG/AAc) amenable to presenting the cell signaling domain Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), was developed. Moderate enhancement of peri-implant bone formation was found after 28 days using the edIPN without peptide modification (p = 0.032). However, no data supported a benefit of peptide modification, as bone-implant contact, normalized bone volume and normalized fixation strength was equivalent or poorer than dual acid-etched (DAE) treated implants after 28 days. Surface topography was determined to be the dominant factor in modulating osseointegration, as DAE implants produced equivalent roughness-normalized fixation strength versus previously reported data on plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate-coated implants (Barber et al., J Biomed Mater Res A, forthcoming). An ideal osseointegrated implant will require optimization of all three aforementioned parameters, and may take the form of biomolecule delivery from thin degradable polymer networks. PMID:17212345

  17. Electrochemical Impedance Studies on Tribocorrosion Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Al2O3 Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhe; Chu, Zhenhua; Chen, Xueguang; Dong, Yanchun; Yang, Yong; Li, Yingzhen; Yan, Dianran

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the tribocorrosion of plasma-sprayed Al2O3 coatings in simulated seawater was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique, complemented by scanning electron microscopy to observe the morphology of the tribocorrosion attack. Base on EIS of plasma-sprayed Al2O3 coatings undergoing long-time immersion in simulated seawater, the corrosion process of Al2O3 coatings can be divided into the earlier stage of immersion (up to 20 h) and the later stage (beyond 20 h). Then, the wear tests were carried out on the surface of Al2O3 coating undergoing different times of immersion to investigate the influence of wear on corrosion at different stages. The coexistence of wear and corrosion condition had been created by a boron nitride grinding head rotating on the surface of coatings corroded in simulated seawater. The measured EIS and the values of the fitting circuit elements showed that wear accelerated corrosion at the later stage, meanwhile, corrosion accelerated wear with the immersion time increasing.

  18. Thermal stability studies of plasma sprayed yttrium oxide coatings deposited on pure tantalum substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, A.; Anupama, P.; Mukherjee, Jaya; Sreekumar, K. P.; Satpute, R. U.; Padmanabhan, P. V. A.; Gantayet, L. M.

    2010-02-01

    Plasma sprayed Yttrium oxide is used for coating of crucibles and moulds that are used at high temperature to handle highly reactive molten metals like uranium, titanium, chromium, and beryllium. The alloy bond layer is severely attacked by the molten metal. This commonly used layer contributes to the impurity addition to the pure liquid metal. Yttrium oxide was deposited on tantalum substrates (25 mm × 10mm × 1mm thk and 40 mm × 8mm × 1mm thk) by atmospheric plasma spray technique with out any bond coat using optimized coating parameters. Resistance to thermal shock was evaluated by subjecting the coated specimens, to controlled heating and cooling cycles between 300K to 1600K in an induction furnace in argon atmosphere having <= 0.1ppm of oxygen. The experiments were designed to examine the sample tokens by both destructive and non-destructive techniques, after a predetermined number of thermal cycles. The results upto 24 thermal cycles of 25 mm × 10mm × 1mm thk coupons and upto 6 cycles of 40 mm × 8mm × 1mm thk coupons are discussed. The coatings produced with the optimized parameters were found to exhibit excellent thermal shock resistance.

  19. The behavior of high-purity, low-density air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Helminiak, Yanar NM

    2009-12-01

    Research on the behavior of high-purity, low-density (85%) air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBC) with NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying is described. The microstructure of the APS topcoats is one variable in this study intended to maximize the coating thicknesses that can be applied without spallation and to minimize the thermal conduction through the YSZ layer. The specimens were evaluated using cyclic oxidation tests and important properties of the TBCs, such as resistance to sintering and phase transformation, were determined. The high purity resulted in top coats which are highly resistant to sintering and transformation from the metastable tetragonal phase to the equilibrium mixture of monoclinic and cubic phases. The porous topcoat microstructure also resulted in significant durability during thermal cycling. The actual failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on topcoat thickness, CTE of the superalloy substrate and the nature of the thermal exposure.

  20. Pulsed Plasma Polymerization of Perfluorooctyl Ethylene for Transparent Hydrophobic Thin Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaojun; Wang, Lei; Hao, Jie; Chu, Liqiang

    2015-12-01

    Herein we report on the deposition of transparent hydrophobic thin coatings by radio frequency plasma polymerization (PP) of perfluorooctyl ethylene (PFOE) in both pulsed and continuous wave (CW) modes. The chemical compositions of the resulting PP-PFOE coatings were confirmed by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The thicknesses and surface morphologies of the coatings were examined using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The surface wetting properties and optical transmittance were measured using a water contact angle goniometer and UV-vis spectroscopy. The FT-IR and XPS data showed that the PP-PFOE coatings deposited in the pulsed mode had a higher retention of CF2 groups compared to those from the CW mode. While the water contact angle of the freshly deposited PP-PFOE from the pulsed mode showed a decrease from 120 degrees to 111 degrees in the first two days, it then remained almost unchanged up to 45 days. The UV-vis data indicated that a PP-PFOE coating 30.6 nm thick had a light transmittance above 90% in the UV and visible ranges. The deposition rates under various plasma conditions are also discussed. supported by the Tianjin Research Program of Application Foundation and Advanced Technology, China (No. 12JCYBJC31700) and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University, China (No. NCET-12-1064)

  1. Formation of intermetallic compound coating on magnesium AZ91 cast alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Tianping; Gao, Wei

    2009-08-01

    This study describes an intermetallic compound coating formed on AZ91 Mg cast alloy. The Al sputtered on AZ91 cast alloy reacted with substrate during a short period of heat treatment at 435°C, resulting in the formation of a continuous intermetallic compound layer. The short period treatment has the advantage of minimizing the negative effect on the microstructure of substrate and the mechanical properties, comparing with the reported diffusion coatings. DSC measurement and examination on the cross-section of Al sputtered samples show that local melting occurred along the Al/substrate interface at the temperature range between 430~435°C. The formation mechanism of intermetallic compound coating is proposed in terms of the local melting at Al/substrate interface. The salt water immersion test showed significant improvement in corrosion resistance of the intermetallic compound coated AZ91 cast alloy compared with the as-cast alloys.

  2. Testing the role of silicic acid and bioorganic materials in the formation of rock coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Vera M.; Philip, Ajish I.; Perry, Randall S.

    2004-11-01

    Silica, amino acids, and DNA were recently discovered in desert varnish. In this work we experimentally test the proposed role of silicic acid and bio-chemicals in the formation of desert varnish and other rock coatings. We have developed a protocol in which the rocks were treated with a mixture of silicic acid, sugars, amino acids, metals and clays, under the influence of heat and UV light. This protocol reflects the proposed mechanism of the polymerization of silicic acid with the biooganic materials, and the laboratory model for the natural conditions under which the desert varnish is formed. Our experiments produced coatings with a hardness and morphology that resemble the natural ones. These results provide a support for the role of silicic acid in the formation of rock coatings. Since the hard silica-based coatings preserve organic compounds in them, they may serve as a biosignature for life, here or possibly on Mars.

  3. Testing the Role of Silicic Acid and Bioorganic Materials in the Formation of Rock Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, Vera; Philip, Ajish I.; Perry, Randall S.

    2004-12-01

    Silica, amino acids, and DNA were recently discovered in desert varnish. In this work we experimentally test the proposed role of silicic acid and bio-chemicals in the formation of desert varnish and other rock coatings. We have developed a protocol in which hte rocks were treated with a mixture of silicic acid, sugars, amino acids, metals and clays, under the influence of heat and UV light. This protocol reflects the proposed mechanism of hte polymerization of silicic acid with the bioorganic materials, and the laboratory model for the natural conditions under which the desert varnish is formed. Our experiments produced coatings with a hardness and morphology that resemble the nature ones. These results provide a support for the role of silicic acid in the formation of rock coatings. Since the hard silica-based coatings preserve organic compounds in them, they may serve as a biosignature for life, here or possibly Mars.

  4. Plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings with flame-spheroidized feedstock: microstructure and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Kweh, S W; Khor, K A; Cheang, P

    2000-06-01

    Flame-spheroidized feedstock, with excellent known heat transfer and consistent melting capabilities, were used to produce hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings via plasma spraying. The characteristics and inherent mechanical properties of the coatings have been investigated and were found to have direct and impacting relationship with the feedstock characteristics, processing parameters as well as microstructural deformities. Processing parameters such as particle sizes (SHA: 20-45, 45-75 and 75-125 microm) and spray distances (10, 12 and 14 cm) have been systematically varied in the present study. It was found that the increase of particle sizes and spray distances weakened the mechanical properties (microhardness, modulus, fracture toughness and bond strength) and structural stability of the coatings. The presence of inter- and intralamellar thermal microcracks, voids and porosities with limited true contact between lamellae were also found to degrade the mechanical characteristics of the coatings, especially in coatings produced from large-sized HA particles. An effort was made to correlate the effects of microstructural defects with the resultant mechanical properties and structural integrity of the plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings. The effects of different heat treatment temperatures (600, 800 and 900 degrees C) on the mechanical properties of the coatings were also studied. It was found that a heat treatment temperature of 800 degrees C does enhance the microhardness and elastic modulus of the coatings significantly (P < 0.05) whereas a further increment in heat treatment temperature to 900 degrees C did not show any discernable improvements (P > 0.1). The elastic response behaviour and fracture toughness of both the as-sprayed and heat-treated HA coatings using Knoop and Vickers indentations at different loadings have been investigated. Results have shown that the mechanical properties of the coatings have improved significantly despite increasing crack

  5. Lithium Iron Phosphate Powders and Coatings Obtained by Means of Inductively Coupled Thermal Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, K.; Veilleux, J.; Brisard, G.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries have high energy efficiency and good cycling life and are considered as one of the best energy storage device for hybrid and/or electrical vehicle. Still, several problems must be solved prior to a broad adoption by the automotive industry: energy density, safety, and costs. To enhance both energy density and safety, the current study aims at depositing binder-free cathode materials using inductively coupled thermal plasma. In a first step, lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) powders are synthesized in an inductively coupled thermal plasma reactor and dispersed in a conventional polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) binder. Then, binder-free LiFePO4 coatings are directly deposited onto nickel current collectors by solution precursor plasma spraying (SPPS). The morphology, microstructure, and composition of the synthesized LiFePO4 powders and coatings are fully characterized by electronic microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Quantifying Li with XPS requires the substitution of iron with manganese in the SPPS precursors (LiMPO4, where M = Fe or Mn). The plasma-derived cathodes (with and without PVDF binder) are assembled in button cells and tested. Under optimized plasma conditions, cyclic voltammetry shows that the electrochemical reversibility of plasma-derived cathodes is improved over that of conventional sol-gel-derived LiFePO4 cathodes.

  6. Mechanisms of degradation and failure in a plasma deposited thermal barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demasi-Marcin, Jeanine T.; Sheffler, Keith D.; Bose, Sudhangshu

    1989-01-01

    Failure of a two layer plasma deposited thermal barrier coating is caused by cyclic thermal exposure and occurs by spallation of the outer ceramic layer. Spallation life is quantitatively predictable, based on the severity of cyclic thermal exposure. This paper describes and attempts to explain unusual constitutive behavior observed in the insulative ceramic coating layer, and presents details of the ceramic cracking damage accumulation process which is responsible for spallation failure. Comments also are offered to rationalize the previously documented influence of interfacial oxidation on ceramic damage accumulation and spallation life.

  7. Thermal control coatings on magnesium alloys prepared by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lingqian; Zhou, Jiansong; Liang, Jun; Chen, Jianmin

    2013-09-01

    Four kinds of oxide coatings with different solar absorptance properties were prepared on AZ91D magnesium alloys by plasma electrolytic oxidation. They were of different colors due to the different additives in the electrolytes. The microstructure and composition were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The optical properties were investigated by the UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer, and the thermal control properties were measured by solar spectrum reflectometer as well as emissivity tester. Results showed that the solar absorptance of the coatings ranged from 0.439 to 0.918 while the emittance remained unchanged.

  8. Polymer coating on the surface of zirconia nanoparticles by inductively coupled plasma polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Guo, Zhigang; Pu, Yikang; Yan, Luting; Si, Wenjie

    2004-08-01

    Polymer coating on the surface of inorganic ceramic nanoparticles is beneficial to decrease agglomeration and improve dispersion in organic solvent in ceramic injection moulding technology. A layer of thin polymer film on zirconia nanoparticles is deposited by inductively coupled ethylene/nitrogen plasma. Transmission electron microscopy photographs indicate the presence of uniform polymer coatings and the thickness of the polymer layer is estimated as several nanometers. The chemical structure of the film is revealed as quasi-polyethylene long hydrocarbon chain by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy examination.

  9. Plasma-polymerized coating for polycarbonate: Single-layer, abrasion resistant, and antireflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, Theodore

    1991-01-01

    Plasma-polymerized vinyl trimethoxy silane films were deposited on transparent polycarbonate substrates. The adherent, clear films protected the substrates from abrasion and also served as antireflection coatings. Post-treatment of the vinyl trimethoxy silane films in an oxygen glow discharge further improved their abrasion resistance. The coatings were characterized by elemental analysis of the bulk, ESCA analysis of the surface, transmission, thickness, abrasion resistance, haze, and adhesion. This patented process is currently used by the world's largest manufacturers of non-prescription sunglasses to protect the plastic glasses from scratching and thereby to increase their useful lifetime.

  10. Improvement of Coating Properties in Three-Cathode Atmospheric Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Kopp, N.; Warda, T.; Petković, I.; Zimmermann, S.; Hartz-Behrend, K.; Landes, K.; Forster, G.; Kirner, S.; Marqués, J.-L.; Schein, J.; Prehm, J.; Möhwald, K.; Bach, Fr.-W.

    2013-04-01

    The main aim of this study is to improve the coating properties of three-cathode atmospheric plasma-sprayed coatings with respect to porosity and residual stresses. This was done by means of numerical simulation coupled with advanced diagnostic methods. A numerical model for the triple injection of alumina feedstock, as well as acceleration and heating of the powder particles in the characteristic threefold symmetrical plasma jet cross section produced by a three-cathode-plasma torch, was developed. The modeling results for the standard injector's position "0" were calculated and experimentally verified by laser Doppler anemometry. Based on the criteria defined for the concentrated feedstock transport and homogeneous thermal treatment of powder particles in the plasma jet, the optimal injection position was found. In the next step, a previously developed, coupled CFD-FEM-simulation model was used for simulations of the coating build-up, describing flattening, solidification, and deformation due to shrinkage for alumina particles on a rough substrate surface.

  11. Demixing-stimulated lane formation in binary complex plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Du, C.-R.; Jiang, K.; Suetterlin, K. R.; Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.

    2011-11-29

    Recently lane formation and phase separation have been reported for experiments with binary complex plasmas in the PK3-Plus laboratory onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Positive non-additivity of particle interactions is known to stimulate phase separation (demixing), but its effect on lane formation is unknown. In this work, we used Langevin dynamics (LD) simulation to probe the role of non-additivity interactions on lane formation. The competition between laning and demixing leads to thicker lanes. Analysis based on anisotropic scaling indices reveals a crossover from normal laning mode to a demixing-stimulated laning mode. Extensive numerical simulations enabled us to identify a critical value of the non-additivity parameter {Delta} for the crossover.

  12. Comprehensive process maps for synthesizing high density aluminum oxide-carbon nanotube coatings by plasma spraying for improved mechanical and wear properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshri, Anup Kumar

    Plasma sprayed aluminum oxide ceramic coating is widely used due to its outstanding wear, corrosion, and thermal shock resistance. But porosity is the integral feature in the plasma sprayed coating which exponentially degrades its properties. In this study, process maps were developed to obtain Al2O3-CNT composite coatings with the highest density (i.e. lowest porosity) and improved mechanical and wear properties. Process map is defined as a set of relationships that correlates large number of plasma processing parameters to the coating properties. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were added as reinforcement to Al2O 3 coating to improve the fracture toughness and wear resistance. Two novel powder processing approaches viz spray drying and chemical vapor growth were adopted to disperse CNTs in Al2O3 powder. The degree of CNT dispersion via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was superior to spray drying but CVD could not synthesize powder in large amount. Hence optimization of plasma processing parameters and process map development was limited to spray dried Al2O3 powder containing 0, 4 and 8 wt. % CNTs. An empirical model using Pareto diagram was developed to link plasma processing parameters with the porosity of coating. Splat morphology as a function of plasma processing parameter was also studied to understand its effect on mechanical properties. Addition of a mere 1.5 wt. % CNTs via CVD technique showed ˜27% and ˜24% increase in the elastic modulus and fracture toughness respectively. Improved toughness was attributed to combined effect of lower porosity and uniform dispersion of CNTs which promoted the toughening by CNT bridging, crack deflection and strong CNT/Al2O3 interface. Al2O 3-8 wt. % CNT coating synthesized using spray dried powder showed 73% improvement in the fracture toughness when porosity reduced from 4.7% to 3.0%. Wear resistance of all coatings at room and elevated temperatures (573 K, 873 K) showed improvement with CNT addition and decreased porosity

  13. Vacuum plasma sprayed coatings using ionic silver doped hydroxyapatite powder to prevent bacterial infection of bone implants.

    PubMed

    Guimond-Lischer, Stefanie; Ren, Qun; Braissant, Olivier; Gruner, Philipp; Wampfler, Bruno; Maniura-Weber, Katharina

    2016-03-10

    Fast and efficient osseointegration of implants into bone is of crucial importance for their clinical success; a process that can be enhanced by coating the implant surface with hydroxyapatite (HA) using the vacuum plasma spray technology (VPS). However, bacterial infections, especially the biofilm formation on implant surfaces after a surgery, represent a serious complication. With ever-increasing numbers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, there is great interest in silver (Ag) as an alternative to classical antibiotics due to its broad activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. In the present study, silver ions were introduced into HA spray powder by ion exchange and the HA-Ag powder was applied onto titanium samples by VPS. The Ag-containing surfaces were evaluated for the kinetics of the silver release, its antibacterial effect against Staphylococcus aureus as well as Escherichia coli, and possible cytotoxicity against human bone cells. The HA-Ag coatings with different concentrations of Ag displayed mechanical and compositional properties that fulfill the regulatory requirements. Evaluation of the Ag release kinetic showed a high release rate in the first 24 h followed by a decreasing release rate over the four subsequent days. The HA-Ag coatings showed no cytotoxicity to primary human bone cells while exhibiting antibacterial activity to E. coli and S. aureus.

  14. Nano powders, components and coatings by plasma technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKechnie, Timothy N. (Inventor); Antony, Leo V. M. (Inventor); O'Dell, Scott (Inventor); Power, Chris (Inventor); Tabor, Terry (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Ultra fine and nanometer powders and a method of producing same are provided, preferably refractory metal and ceramic nanopowders. When certain precursors are injected into the plasma flame in a reactor chamber, the materials are heated, melted and vaporized and the chemical reaction is induced in the vapor phase. The vapor phase is quenched rapidly to solid phase to yield the ultra pure, ultra fine and nano product. With this technique, powders have been made 20 nanometers in size in a system capable of a bulk production rate of more than 10 lbs/hr. The process is particularly applicable to tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten carbide, molybdenum carbide and other related materials.

  15. Nano powders, components and coatings by plasma technique

    DOEpatents

    McKechnie, Timothy N.; Antony, Leo V. M.; O'Dell, Scott; Power, Chris; Tabor, Terry

    2009-11-10

    Ultra fine and nanometer powders and a method of producing same are provided, preferably refractory metal and ceramic nanopowders. When certain precursors are injected into the plasma flame in a reactor chamber, the materials are heated, melted and vaporized and the chemical reaction is induced in the vapor phase. The vapor phase is quenched rapidly to solid phase to yield the ultra pure, ultra fine and nano product. With this technique, powders have been made 20 nanometers in size in a system capable of a bulk production rate of more than 10 lbs/hr. The process is particularly applicable to tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten carbide, molybdenum carbide and other related materials.

  16. Formation of plasma dust structures at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V. Babichev, V. N.; Dyatko, N. A.; Pal', A. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Taran, M. D.; Fortov, V. E.

    2006-02-15

    The formation of strongly coupled stable dust structures in the plasma produced by an electron beam at atmospheric pressure was detected experimentally. Analytical expressions were derived for the ionization rate of a gas by an electron beam in an axially symmetric geometry by comparing experimental data with Monte Carlo calculations. Self-consistent one-dimensional simulations of the beam plasma were performed in the diffusion drift approximation of charged plasma particle transport with electron diffusion to determine the dust particle levitation conditions. Since almost all of the applied voltage drops on the cathode layer in the Thomson glow regime of a non-self-sustained gas discharge, a distribution of the electric field that grows toward the cathode is produced in it; this field together with the gravity produces a potential well in which the dust particles levitate to form a stable disk-shaped structure. The nonideality parameters of the dust component in the formation region of a highly ordered quasi-crystalline structure calculated using computational data for the dust particle charging problem were found to be higher than the critical value after exceeding which an ensemble of particles with a Yukawa interaction should pass to the crystalline state.

  17. In vivo evaluation of plasma-sprayed titanium coating after alkali modification.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weichang; Liu, Xuanyong; Zheng, XueBin; Ding, Chuanxian

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, plasma-sprayed titanium coatings were modified by alkali treatment. The changes in chemical composition and structure of coatings were examined by SEM and AES. The results obtained indicated that a net-like microscopic texture feature, which was full of the interconnected fine porosity, appeared on the surface of alkali-modified titanium coatings. The surface chemical composition was also altered by alkali modification. A sodium titanate compound was formed on the surface of the titanium coating and replaced the native passivating oxide layer. Its thickness was measured as about 150 nm which was about 10 times of that of the as-sprayed coating. The bone bonding ability of titanium coatings were investigated using a canine model. The histological examination and SEM observation demonstrated that more new bone was formed on the surface of alkali-modified implants and grew more rapidly into the porosity. The alkali-modified implants were found to appose directly to the surrounding bone. In contrast, a gap was observed at the interface between the as-sprayed implants and bone. The push-out test showed that alkali-modified implants had a higher shear strength than as-sprayed implants after 1 month of implantation. An interfacial layer, containing Ti, Ca and P, was found to form at the interface between bone and the alkali-modified implant by EDS analysis.

  18. Low cycle fatigue behaviour of a plasma-sprayed coating material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Miner, R. V.

    1986-01-01

    Single crystal nickel-base superalloys employed in turbine blade applications are often used with a plasma spray coating for oxidation and hot corrosion resistance. These coatings may also affect fatigue life of the superalloy substrate. As part of a large program to understand the fatigue behavior of coated single crystals, fully reversed, total strain controlled fatigue tests were run on a free standing NiCoCrAlY coating alloy, PWA 276, at 0.1 Hz. Fatigue tests were conducted at 650 C, where the NiCoCrAlY alloy has modest ductility, and at 1050 C, where it is extremely ductile, showing tensile elongation in excess of 100 percent. At the lower test temperature, deformation induced disordering softened the NiCoCrAlY alloy, while at the higher test temperature cyclic hardening was observed which was linked to gradual coarsening of the two phase microstructure. Fatigue life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy was significantly longer at the higher temperature. Further, the life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy exceeds that of coated, /001/-oriented PWA 1480 single crystals at 1050 C but at 650 C the life of the coated crystal is greater than that of the NiCoCrAlY alloy on a total strain basis.

  19. The low cycle fatigue behavior of a plasma-sprayed coating material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Single crystal nickel-base superalloys employed in turbine blade applications are often used with a plasma spray coating for oxidation and hot corrosion resistance. These coatings may also affect fatigue life of the superalloy substrate. As part of a large program to understand the fatigue behavior of coated single crystals, fully reversed, total strain controlled fatigue tests were run on a free standing NiCoCrAlY coating alloy, PWA 276, at 0.1 Hz. Fatigue tests were conducted at 650 C, where the NiCoCrAlY alloy has modest ductility, and at 1050 C, where it is extremely ductile, showing tensile elongation in excess of 100 percent. At the lower test temperature, deformation induced disordering softened the NiCoCrAlY alloy, while at the higher test temperature cyclic hardening was observed which was linked to gradual coarsening of the two phase microstructure. Fatigue life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy was significantly longer at the higher temperature. Further, the life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy exceeds that of coated, /001/-oriented PWA 1480 single crystals at 1050 C, but at 650 C the life of the coated crystal is greater than that of the NiCoCrAlY alloy on a total strain basis.

  20. Plasma sprayed manganese-cobalt spinel coatings: Process sensitivity on phase, electrical and protective performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Su Jung; Pala, Zdenek; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-02-01

    Manganese cobalt spinel (Mn1.5Co1.5O4, MCO) coatings are prepared by the air plasma spray (APS) process to examine their efficacy in serving as protective coatings from Cr-poisoning of the cathode side in intermediate temperature-solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). These complex oxides are susceptible to process induced stoichiometric and phase changes which affect their functional performance. To critically examine these effects, MCO coatings are produced with deliberate modifications to the spray process parameters to explore relationship among process conditions, microstructure and functional properties. The resultant interplay among particle thermal and kinetic energies are captured through process maps, which serve to characterize the parametric effects on properties. The results show significant changes to the chemistry and phase composition of the deposited material resulting from preferential evaporation of oxygen. Post deposition annealing recovers oxygen in the coatings and allows partial recovery of the spinel phase, which is confirmed through thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA)/differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and magnetic hysteresis measurements. In addition, coatings with high density after sintering show excellent electrical conductivity of 40 S cm-1 at 800 °C while simultaneously providing requisite protection characteristics against Cr-poisoning. This study provides a framework for optimal evaluation of MCO coatings in intermediate temperature SOFCs.

  1. Advanced Microscopic Study of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Zirconia Coatings with Different Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokołowski, Paweł; Pawłowski, Lech; Dietrich, Dagmar; Lampke, Thomas; Jech, David

    2016-01-01

    The present paper is focused on the characterization of the differences between two microstructures that can be obtained using SPS technology, namely (i) columnar and (ii) two-zone microstructure including lamellas and fine unmelted particulates. The optimization of spray parameters was made, and the advanced microstructural studies of obtained coatings were performed. The work was focused on zirconia stabilized by yttria (YSZ, ZrO2 + 14 wt.% Y2O3) and both by yttria and ceria (YCSZ, ZrO2 + 24 wt.% CeO2 + 2.5 wt.% Y2O3) which are frequently used as thermal barrier coatings. Two types of microstructure were achieved using two different plasma torches, namely SG-100 of Praxair and Triplex of Oerlikon Metco. The microstructure of prepared coatings was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy with secondary electrons detector and backscattered electrons. Energy dispersive spectroscopy was performed to analyze the chemical composition of sprayed coatings. By electron backscatter diffraction grain shape, size, and crystal orientation were determined. The analysis enabled the discussion of the coatings growth mechanism. Finally, the Shape From Shading technique was applied to recreate and to analyze 3D views of coatings' topographies, and using laser confocal microscopy, the surface roughness was examined.

  2. Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings with Enhanced Splat Bonding for CMAS and Corrosion Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Yao, Shu-Wei; Wang, Li-Shuang; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2016-01-01

    The infiltration of molten CMAS in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) at high temperature is significantly affected by the microstructure of the ceramic coating. Enhancing the bonding ratio between splats can reduce the interconnected pores and suppress the infiltration of the molten CMAS into the coating. In this study, a dual-layered (DL) TBC with the dense 8YSZ on the top of the conventional porous 8YSZ was proposed to enhance CMAS corrosion of atmospheric plasma-sprayed YSZ. The dense YSZ coating with improved lamellar bonding was deposited at a higher deposition temperature. The microstructure of the coatings before and after CMAS attack test was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. It was clearly revealed that by adjusting the microstructure and applying a dense ceramic layer with the improved interface bonding on the top of porous TBC, the infiltration of CMAS into porous YSZ coating can be effectively suppressed. Moreover, by designing DL TBCs, the thermal conductivity of the TBC system exhibits a limited increase. Thus with the design of DL structure, the TBCs with high CMAS corrosion resistance and low thermal conductivity can be achieved.

  3. Sintering and Creep Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconia and Hafnia Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The sintering and creep of plasma-sprayed ceramic thermal barrier coatings under high temperature conditions are complex phenomena. Changes in thermomechanical and thermophysical properties and in the stress response of these coating systems as a result of the sintering and creep processes are detrimental to coating thermal fatigue resistance and performance. In this paper, the sintering characteristics of ZrO2-8wt%y2O3, ZrO2-25wt%CeO2-2.5wt%Y2O3, ZrO2-6w%NiO- 9wt%Y2O3, ZrO2-6wt%Sc2O3-2wt%y2O3 and HfO2-27wt%y2O3 coating materials were investigated using dilatometry. It was found that the HfO2-Y2O3 and baseline ZrO2-Y2O3 exhibited the best sintering resistance, while the NiO-doped ZrO2-Y2O3 showed the highest shrinkage strain rates during the tests. Higher shrinkage strain rates of the coating materials were also observed when the specimens were tested in Ar+5%H2 as compared to in air. This phenomenon was attributed to an enhanced metal cation interstitial diffusion mechanism under the reducing conditions. It is proposed that increased chemical stability of coating materials will improve the material sintering resistance.

  4. Cathode Plasma Formation in High Intensity Electron Beam Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark; Kiefer, Mark; Oliver, Bryan; Bennett, Nichelle; Droemer, Darryl; Bernshtam, V.; Doron, R.; Maron, Yitzhak

    2013-10-01

    This talk will detail the experimental results and conclusions obtained for cathode plasma formation on the Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (4-7.5 MeV) at Sandia National Laboratories. The SMP diode utilizes a hollowed metal cathode to produce high power (TW), focused electron beams (<3 mm diameter) which are used for flash x-ray radiography applications. Optical diagnostics include high speed (<10 ns) framing cameras, optical streak cameras, and spectroscopy. The cathode plasma in this high electric (MV/cm) and magnetic (>10 Tesla) field environment forms well-defined striations. These striations have been examined for a number of different cathode sizes, vacuum gap spacings, and diode voltages. Optical streak images have been taken to determine the time evolution of the plasma, and optical spectroscopy has been employed to determine its constituents as well as their densities and temperatures inferred from detailed time-dependent, collisional-radiative (CR) and radiation transport modelings. Comments will be made as to the overall effect of the cathode plasma in regards to the diode impedance and electron beam focusing. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Numerical model of the plasma formation at electron beam welding

    SciTech Connect

    Trushnikov, D. N.; Mladenov, G. M.

    2015-01-07

    The model of plasma formation in the keyhole in liquid metal as well as above the electron beam welding zone is described. The model is based on solution of two equations for the density of electrons and the mean electron energy. The mass transfer of heavy plasma particles (neutral atoms, excited atoms, and ions) is taken into account in the analysis by the diffusion equation for a multicomponent mixture. The electrostatic field is calculated using the Poisson equation. Thermionic electron emission is calculated for the keyhole wall. The ionization intensity of the vapors due to beam electrons and high-energy secondary and backscattered electrons is calibrated using the plasma parameters when there is no polarized collector electrode above the welding zone. The calculated data are in good agreement with experimental data. Results for the plasma parameters for excitation of a non-independent discharge are given. It is shown that there is a need to take into account the effect of a strong electric field near the keyhole walls on electron emission (the Schottky effect) in the calculation of the current for a non-independent discharge (hot cathode gas discharge). The calculated electron drift velocities are much bigger than the velocity at which current instabilities arise. This confirms the hypothesis for ion-acoustic instabilities, observed experimentally in previous research.

  6. Microstructural evolution of plasma sprayed submicron-/nano-zirconia-based thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Bai, Y.; Liu, K.; Wang, J. W.; Kang, Y. X.; Li, J. R.; Chen, H. Y.; Li, B. Q.

    2016-02-01

    Two types of agglomerates powder with grain sizes in the submicron- /nano-range were used as the feedstock to deposit yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YPSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). The dual-modal submicron-coating and multi-modal nano-coating were fabricated. The results from thermal shock test indicated that, due to the weak bond and higher densification rate of unmelted nano-particles in the nano-coating, the interface between recrystallization zone and unmelted nano-particles linked up, which resulted in the decrease of content of unmelted nano-particles from 13% to 7%. The weak bond and higher shrinking rate of nano-particles led to the formation of coarse cracks that ran along the recrystallization zone/unmelted nano-particles interfaces. These cracks caused the premature failure of nano-coating. The submicron-coating can overcome the inherent deficiencies of nano-coating at high temperatures and show a higher thermal shock resistance, it is expected to become a candidate for high-performance TBCs.

  7. On the Anelastic Behavior of Plasma Sprayed Ceramic Coatings: Observations, Characterizations and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Gopal

    Plasma sprayed ceramic materials contain an assortment of microstructural defects, including pores, cracks, and interfaces arising from the droplet based assemblage of the spray deposition technique. The defective architecture of the deposits introduces a novel "anelastic" response in the coatings comprising of their non-linear and hysteretic stress-strain relationship under mechanical loading. It has been established that this anelasticity can be attributed to the relative movement of the embedded defects under varying stresses; while the non-linear response of the coatings arises from the opening/closure of defects, hysteresis is produced by the frictional sliding among defect surfaces. Recent studies have indicated that anelastic behavior of coatings can be a unique descriptor of their mechanical behavior and related to the defect configuration. In this dissertation, a multi-variable study employing systematic processing strategies was conducted to augment the understanding on various aspects of the reported anelastic behavior. Enhancements to bi-layer curvature measurement technique allowed for reliable and repeatable quantification of the anelastic response, enabling extraction of three anelastic parameters; elastic modulus, non-linear degree and hysteresis degree. This allowed for further exploration of the process space enabling controlled introduction of anelasticity in thermal sprayed ceramic coatings. This dissertation reports on these findings by first describing the experimental advancements in bilayer curvature measurements via thermal cycling of a coated beam. This experimental development allowed assessment of sensitivity and repeatability of the obtained anelastic parameters to varying microstructures imposed by processing excursions. Subsequently, controlled modification of anelasticity was achieved through material and process parameters as well as through extrinsic modification of the defects within the microstructure. The results suggest that

  8. Assessment of plasma sprayed coatings to modify surface friction for railroad applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Heidi Lynn

    For the past hundred years, railroads have been an important means of transportation for passengers and freight. Over the years train traffic, speeds, and loads have increased steadily leading to a more severe wheel/rail environment that exceeds the design limits of the steels thus causing increased wear, decreased rail life, and higher maintenance costs. The cost of controlling friction and the resulting damage is an area of ever-increasing concern. One potential method of modifying friction is by changing the surface properties of the rail. The work reported herein was carried out as part of a larger effort to modify surface friction of rails. The original focus of this research was to use high velocity air plasma spraying to develop friction enhancing coatings for the rail surface. Using the methodology developed at the Oregon Graduate Institute, the plasma spray parameters were optimized and the coatings were tested on the Amsler machine under rolling/sliding wear conditions to determine viability prior to full scale testing. Stainless steel and composite 1080 steel were investigated as potential materials for increasing friction. Poor results with these coatings shifted the research focus to understanding the durability of the coatings and to failure analysis of initial 1080 steel full scale samples tested by the Facility for Accelerated Service Testing that had failed prematurely. After re-optimization of parameters and preparation methodologies further full scale samples (1080 steel/nylon) were tested and failure analysis was performed. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were used to evaluate the microstructure of coatings from the tested samples. The laboratory scale Amsler test did not appear to be a good indicator of the performance of the coating in full scale tests, because variations in microstructure were caused by differences in sample size, geometry and spraying methods when scaling up from a small Amsler roller to a large rail sample. The

  9. Long period gratings coated with hafnium oxide by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition for refractive index measurements.

    PubMed

    Melo, Luis; Burton, Geoff; Kubik, Philip; Wild, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Long period gratings (LPGs) are coated with hafnium oxide using plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) to increase the sensitivity of these devices to the refractive index of the surrounding medium. PEALD allows deposition at low temperatures which reduces thermal degradation of UV-written LPGs. Depositions targeting three different coating thicknesses are investigated: 30 nm, 50 nm and 70 nm. Coating thickness measurements taken by scanning electron microscopy of the optical fibers confirm deposition of uniform coatings. The performance of the coated LPGs shows that deposition of hafnium oxide on LPGs induces two-step transition behavior of the cladding modes.

  10. Influence of "Island-Like" Oxides in the Bond-Coat on the Stress and Failure Patterns of the Thermal-Barrier Coatings Fabricated by Atmospheric Plasma Spraying During Long-Term High Temperature Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Zhao, Y. X.; Zhong, X. H.; Tao, S. Y.; Zhang, W.; Wang, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs) are very important ceramic-coating materials due to their excellent performance at high temperature. The inner zone of the bond-coat is often easily endured oxidized (internal oxidation) in the process of thermal spraying and the long-time exposure to the high temperature, and the "island-like" oxides can be formed. Especially, when the bond-coat was fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), this trend is more evident. In this paper, the stress distribution around the thermally grown oxide (TGO) has been calculated by the finite element method when the "island-like" oxides have been considered. The simulation results indicate that the maximum tensile stress and compressive stress existed in the TGO, and the existence of the "island-like" oxides will further decrease the maximum tensile stress level in the TGO. While the "island-like" oxides in the bond-coat will decrease the effective thickness of the TGO at the metallic layer/ceramic layer interface due to the oxidation of the metallic elements in the bond-coat. The crack propagation equation has been established and the failure mechanism of the TBC due to the formation and growth of the TGO has also been discussed in detail. The lifetime of the TBCs which have experienced high temperature oxidation has been predicted and the theoretical results agreed well with the experimental data.

  11. Drop coating deposition Raman spectroscopy of blood plasma for the detection of colorectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengpeng; Chen, Changshui; Deng, Xiaoyuan; Mao, Hua; Jin, Shaoqin

    2015-03-01

    We have recently applied the technique of drop coating deposition Raman (DCDR) spectroscopy for colorectal cancer (CRC) detection using blood plasma. The aim of this study was to develop a more convenient and stable method based on blood plasma for noninvasive CRC detection. Significant differences are observed in DCDR spectra between healthy (n=105) and cancer (n=75) plasma from 15 CRC patients and 21 volunteers, particularly in the spectra that are related to proteins, nucleic acids, and β-carotene. The multivariate analysis principal components analysis and the linear discriminate analysis, together with leave-one-out, cross validation were used on DCDR spectra and yielded a sensitivity of 100% (75/75) and specificity of 98.1% (103/105) for detection of CRC. This study demonstrates that DCDR spectroscopy of blood plasma associated with multivariate statistical algorithms has the potential for the noninvasive detection of CRC.

  12. Drop coating deposition Raman spectroscopy of blood plasma for the detection of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengpeng; Chen, Changshui; Deng, Xiaoyuan; Mao, Hua; Jin, Shaoqin

    2015-03-01

    We have recently applied the technique of drop coating deposition Raman (DCDR) spectroscopy for colorectal cancer (CRC) detection using blood plasma. The aim of this study was to develop a more convenient and stable method based on blood plasma for noninvasive CRC detection. Significant differences are observed in DCDR spectra between healthy (n = 105) and cancer (n = 75) plasma from 15 CRC patients and 21 volunteers, particularly in the spectra that are related to proteins, nucleic acids, and β-carotene. The multivariate analysis principal components analysis and the linear discriminate analysis, together with leave-one-out, cross validation were used on DCDR spectra and yielded a sensitivity of 100% (75/75) and specificity of 98.1% (103/105) for detection of CRC. This study demonstrates that DCDR spectroscopy of blood plasma associated with multivariate statistical algorithms has the potential for the noninvasive detection of CRC.

  13. Cellular and transcriptomic analysis of human mesenchymal stem cell response to plasma-activated hydroxyapatite coating.

    PubMed

    Tan, Fei; O'Neill, Feidhlim; Naciri, Mariam; Dowling, Denis; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma has recently emerged as a technique with a promising future in the medical field. In this work we used the technique as a post-deposition modification process as a means to activate hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings. Contact angle goniometry, optical profilometry, scanning electron microscopy morphology imaging and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrate that surface wettability is improved after treatment, without inducing any concomitant damage to the coating. The protein adsorption pattern has been found to be preferable for MSC, and this may result in greater cell attachment and adhesion to plasma-activated HA than to untreated samples. Cell cycle distribution analysis using flow cytometry reveals a faster transition from G(1) to S phase, thus leading to a faster cell proliferation rate on plasma-activated HA. This indicates that the improvement in surface wettability independently enhances cell attachment and cell proliferation, which is possibly mediated by FAK phosphorylation. Pathway-specific polymerase chain reaction arrays revealed that wettability has a substantial influence on gene expression during osteogenic differentiation of human MSC. Plasma-activated HA tends to enhance this process by systemically deregulating multiple genes. In addition, the majority of these deregulated genes had been appropriately translated, as confirmed by ELISA protein quantification. Lastly, alizarin red staining showed that plasma-activated HA is capable of improving mineralization for up to 3 weeks of in vitro culture. It was concluded from this study that atmospheric pressure plasma is a potent tool for modifying the biological function of a material without causing thermal damage, such that adhesion molecules and drugs might be deposited on the original coating to improve performance.

  14. Friction and wear of plasma-sprayed coatings containing cobalt alloys from 25 deg to 650 deg in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.; Jacobson, T. P.

    1980-01-01

    Four different compositions of self-lubricating, plasma-sprayed, composite coatings with calcium fluoride dispersed throughout cobalt alloy-silver matrices were evaluated on a friction and wear apparatus. In addition, coatings of the cobalt alloys alone and of one coating with a nickel alloy-silver matrix were evaluated for comparison. The wear specimens consisted of two, diametrically opposed, flat rub shoes sliding on the coated, cylindrical surface of a rotating disk. Two of the cobalt composite coatings gave a friction coefficient of about 0.25 and low wear at room temperature, 400 and 650 C. Wear rates were lower than those of the cobalt alloys alone or the nickel alloy composite coating. However, oxidation limited the maximum useful temperature of the cobalt composite coating to about 650 C compared to about 900 C for the nickel composite coating.

  15. Friction and wear of plasma-sprayed coatings containing cobalt alloys from 25 deg to 650 deg in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.; Jacobson, T. P.

    1979-01-01

    Four different compositions of self-lubricating, plasma-sprayed, composite coatings with calcium fluoride dispersed throughout cobalt alloy-silver matrices were evaluated on a friction and wear apparatus. In addition, coatings of the cobalt alloys alone and one coating with a nickel alloy-silver matrix were evaluated for comparison. The wear specimens consisted of two, diametrically opposed, flat rub shoes sliding on the coated, cylindrical surface of a rotating disk. Two of the cobalt composite coatings gave a friction coefficient of about 0.25 and low wear at room temperature, 400 and 650 C. Wear rates were lower than those of the cobalt alloys alone or the nickel alloy composite coating. However, oxidation limited the maximum useful temperature of the cobalt composite coating to about 650 C compared to about 900 C for the nickel composite coating.

  16. Microstructure and Oxidation Resistance of NiCoCrAlYTa Coating by Low Pressure Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X.-H.; Zhou, K. S.; Liu, M.; Hong, R. J.; Deng, C. G.; Luo, S.; Chen, Z. K.

    The NiCoCrAlYTa coating was prepared on Ni-based single crystal super-alloys by low pressure plasma spraying (LPPS). The phases and microstructures for the coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, and the fracture toughness and micro-hardness for both coatings and substrate were also investigated. The relationship between coating properties and oxidation was analyzed. The result shows that elementary distribution of NiCoCrAlYTa coatings, which consists of γ-Ni, β-NiAl, γ'-Ni3Al, and CrCoTa phases, is much homogeneous. The composition changes with depth from the surface to substrate for the coatings. The micro-hardness of coatings is 350.8 HV0.3 and fracture toughness is 2.73 MPa m1/2. The oxidation resistance of coatings excelled than Ni-based single crystal super-alloys.

  17. Formation and control of plasma potentials in TMX upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T.C.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Porkolab, M.; Stallard, B.W.

    1981-05-06

    The methods to be employed to form and control plasma potentials in the TMX Upgrade tandem mirror with thermal barriers are described. ECRH-generated mirror -confined electron plasmas are used to establish a negative potential region to isolate the end-plug and central-cell celectrons. This thermal isolation will allow a higher end-plug electron temperature and an increased central-cell confining potential. Improved axial central-cell ion confinement results since higher temperature central-cell ions can be confined. This paper describes: (1) calculations of the sensitivity of barrier formation to vacuum conditions and to the presence of impurities in the neutral beams, (2) calculations of microwave penetration and absorption used to design the ECRH system, and (3) techniques to limit electron runaway to high energies by localized microwave beams and by relativistic detuning.

  18. Etching of ruthenium coatings in O{sub 2}- and Cl{sub 2}-containing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.C.; Coburn, J.W.; Graves, D.B.

    2006-01-15

    Ruthenium (Ru) film etching has been studied with O{sub 2}- and Cl{sub 2}-containing inductively coupled plasmas to understand the etching mechanism and the relationship between plasma characteristics and the competition between the wall deposition of etch by-products and the creation of volatile etch by-products that flow into the downstream. The ICP was characterized by multiple in situ diagnostic tools. Ru films were etched either from 6-in. wafers placed on a rf-biased substrate or from Ru-coated QCMs without a Ru-coated wafer present. Ru etches readily in O{sub 2}-containing plasma. Cl{sub 2} addition resulted in significant changes in etch rate, wall deposition behavior, and the downstream etch product composition. When Ru was etched by Ar/O{sub 2} plasmas, a positive wall deposition rate was observed and no RuO{sub 4} was observed in the foreline. The etching rate correlated well with the oxygen radical density. With Cl{sub 2} addition, our observations included the significantly increased etching rate, the detection of RuO{sub 4} downstream by FTIR, the detection of RuO{sub x}Cl{sub y} ions in the plasma, and virtually zero wall deposition. The increased etch rate with Cl{sub 2} addition was not solely due to an increase in O atom concentration, plasma density, plasma potential or the electron energy distribution. It is believed that both O- and Cl-containing species (ions and/or neutrals) are necessary to explain the different behavior in Ru etching by using Cl{sub 2} and O{sub 2}-containing plasmas.

  19. Controlled deposition of plasma activated coatings on zirconium substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, Behnam; Bilek, Marcela

    2015-12-01

    Zirconium-based alloys are promising materials for orthopedic prostheses due to their low toxicity, superb corrosion resistivity, and favorable mechanical properties. The integration of such bio-implantable devices with local host tissues can strongly be improved by the development of a plasma polymerized acetylene and nitrogen (PPAN) that immobilizes bio-active molecules. The surface chemistry of PPAN is critically important as it plays a key role in affecting the surface free energy that alters the functionality of bio-active molecules at the surface. The cross-linking degree of PPAN is another key property that directly influences the water-permeability and thus also the stability of films in aqueous media. In this study we demonstrate that by simply tuning the zirconium bias voltage, control over the surface chemistry and cross-linking degree of PANN is achieved.

  20. Effect of laser melting on plasma-sprayed aluminum oxide coatings reinforced with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Samant, Anoop; Balani, Kantesh; Dahotre, Narendra B.; Agarwal, Arvind

    2009-03-01

    The effect of laser melting on the microstructure and mechanical properties of plasma-sprayed aluminum oxide composite coating reinforced with 4 wt% multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is reported. Laser-melted layer consists of dense, coarse columnar microstructure which is significantly different from plasma-sprayed coating that consists of splats and porosity. CNTs retained their original cylindrical graphitic structure after undergoing laser irradiation. Three dimensional heat flow model has been developed to estimate temperature variation in the laser-melted composite layer. Laser-melted layers show an increase in the microhardness at the expanse of degradation of fracture toughness. Nanoindentation study indicates an increase in the elastic modulus and yield strength of the laser-melted layer which is attributed to dense microstructure with absence of weak-bonding splats and porosity.

  1. Microstructure of Nanostructured TIO2 Coating Prepared by Atmospheric Plasma Spraying and its Photocatalytic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qinghe; Huang, Hui; Zhou, Chungen

    The starting nano-TiO2 feedstock was agglomerated by spray-drying process. Nano-TiO2 coatings on transparent glasses were prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). The variation of the anatase content, porosity and grain size with the arc current is investigated extensively. Result shows that the nano-TiO2 phase is composed of anatase and rutile phase. The content of anatase in the sprayed coatings decreased and the grain size increased with the arc current increasing, and the porosity first increased and then decreased. As-sprayed nano-TiO2 coatings obtained at the spraying current of 400 A have the best photocatalytic property due to the synergistic effect of the fractions of anatase phase and the rate of porosity.

  2. Composite materials obtained by the ion-plasma sputtering of metal compound coatings on polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlebnikov, Nikolai; Polyakov, Evgenii; Borisov, Sergei; Barashev, Nikolai; Biramov, Emir; Maltceva, Anastasia; Vereshchagin, Artem; Khartov, Stas; Voronin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the principle and examples composite materials obtained by deposition of metal compound coatings on polymer film substrates by the ion-plasma sputtering method are presented. A synergistic effect is to obtain the materials with structural properties of the polymer substrate and the surface properties of the metal deposited coatings. The technology of sputtering of TiN coatings of various thicknesses on polyethylene terephthalate films is discussed. The obtained composites are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is shown. The examples of application of this method, such as receiving nanocomposite track membranes and flexible transparent electrodes, are considered.

  3. Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of VC and Columnar Structured Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by Suspension Plasma Spray Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaolong; Yang, Qi; Huang, Xiao; Tang, Zhaolin

    2015-08-01

    The effects of different thermal barrier coating (TBC) top coat structures and substrate alloys on the isothermal oxidation behaviors of TBC systems were investigated at 1080 °C in lab air. The tested TBC systems consisted of two nickel-based superalloy substrates (CMSX-4 and IN738LC), a platinum aluminide bond coat and two 8YSZ top coats (vertical cracked and columnar structured). Samples with IN738LC substrate demonstrated longer isothermal oxidation lives than the counterparts with CMSX-4 substrate. Outward refractory elemental diffusion in coating systems with CMSX-4 substrate and void formation at the interface between thermally grown oxide and bond coat was found to be responsible for the early failure of TBCs. Columnar structured YSZ top coat seemed to provide better protection of the bond coating and substrate, marginally delaying the failure of the both coating systems with IN738LC and CMSX-4.

  4. Collisionless expansion of pulsed radio frequency plasmas. I. Front formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, T.; Grulke, O.; Klinger, T.; Boswell, R. W.; Charles, C.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics during plasma expansion are studied with the use of a versatile particle-in-cell simulation with a variable neutral gas density profile. The simulation is tailored to a radio frequency plasma expansion experiment [Schröder et al., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 47(5), 055207 (2014)]. The experiment has shown the existence of a propagating ion front. The ion front features a strong electric field and features a sharp plasma potential drop similar to a double layer. However, the presented results of a first principle simulation show that, in general, the ion front does not have to be entangled with an electric field. The propagating electric field reflects the downstream ions, which stream with velocities up to twice as high as that of the ion front propagation. The observed ion density peak forms due to the accumulation of the reflected ions. The simulation shows that the ion front formation strongly depends on the initial ion density profile and is subject to a wave-breaking phenomenon. Virtual diagnostics in the code allow for a direct comparison with experimental results. Using this technique, the plateau forming in the wake of the plasma front could be indirectly verified in the expansion experiment. Although the simulation considers profiles only in one spatial dimensional, its results are qualitatively in a very good agreement with the laboratory experiment. It can successfully reproduce findings obtained by independent numerical models and simulations. This indicates that the effects of magnetic field structures and tangential inhomogeneities are not essential for the general expansion dynamic. The presented simulation will be used for a detailed parameter study dealt with in Paper II [Schröder et al., Phys. Plasma 23, 013512 (2016)] of this series.

  5. Plasma polymerized coating for polycarbonate: single layer, abrasion resistant, and antireflection.

    PubMed

    Wydeven, T

    1977-03-01

    Plasma polymerized vinyltrimethoxy silane films were deposited on transparent polycarbonate substrates. The adherent, clear films protected the substrates from abrasion and also served as antireflection coatings. Posttreatment of the vinyltrimethoxy silane films in an oxygen glow discharge further improved the abrasion resistance. ESCA (electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis) and ir transmission spectra of some films were recorded, and an elemental analysis of the films was obtained.

  6. Plasma polymerized coating for polycarbonate - Single layer, abrasion resistant, and antireflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.

    1977-01-01

    Plasma polymerized vinyltrimethoxy silane films were deposited on transparent polycarbonate substrates. The adherent, clear films protected the substrates from abrasion and also served as antireflection coatings. Posttreatment of the vinyltrimethoxy silane films in an oxygen glow discharge further improved the abrasion resistance. ESCA (electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis) and IR transmission spectra of some films were recorded, and an elemental analysis of the films was obtained.

  7. Effect of Processing Conditions on the Anelastic Behavior of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Vaishak

    2011-12-01

    Plasma sprayed ceramic materials contain an assortment of micro-structural defects, including pores, cracks, and interfaces arising from the droplet based assemblage of the spray deposition technique. The defective architecture of the deposits introduces a novel "anelastic" response in the coatings comprising of their non-linear and hysteretic stress-strain relationship under mechanical loading. It has been established that this anelasticity can be attributed to the relative movement of the embedded defects under varying stresses. While the non-linear response of the coatings arises from the opening/closure of defects, hysteresis is produced by the frictional sliding among defect surfaces. Recent studies have indicated that anelastic behavior of coatings can be a unique descriptor of their mechanical behavior and related to the defect configuration. In this dissertation, a multi-variable study employing systematic processing strategies was conducted to augment the understanding on various aspects of the reported anelastic behavior. A bi-layer curvature measurement technique was adapted to measure the anelastic properties of plasma sprayed ceramic. The quantification of anelastic parameters was done using a non-linear model proposed by Nakamura et.al. An error analysis was conducted on the technique to know the available margins for both experimental as well as computational errors. The error analysis was extended to evaluate its sensitivity towards different coating microstructure. For this purpose, three coatings with significantly different microstructures were fabricated via tuning of process parameters. Later the three coatings were also subjected to different strain ranges systematically, in order to understand the origin and evolution of anelasticity on different microstructures. The last segment of this thesis attempts to capture the intricacies on the processing front and tries to evaluate and establish a correlation between them and the anelastic

  8. Thermal Shock Properties of Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Coatings Deposited Using Low-Energy Very Low Pressure Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Nannan; Bolot, Rodolphe; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings have been frequently used as a thermal protective layer on the metal or alloy component surfaces. In the present study, ZrO2-7%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were successfully deposited by DC (direct current) plasma spray process under very low pressure conditions (less than 1 mbar) using low-energy plasma guns F4-VB and F100. The experiments were performed to evaluate the thermal shock resistance of different TBC specimens which were heated to 1373 K at a high-temperature cycling furnace and held for 0.5 h, followed by air cooling at room temperature for 0.2 h. For comparison, a corresponding atmospheric plasma spray (APS) counterpart was also elaborated to carry out the similar experiments. The results indicated that the very low pressure plasma spray (VLPPS) coatings displayed better thermal shock resistance. Moreover, the failure mechanism of the coatings was elucidated.

  9. Laser Cladding to Improve Oxidation Behavior of Air Plasma-Sprayed Ni-20Cr Coating on Stainless Steel Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, M. Mudassar; Shahid, Muhammad; Nusair Khan, A.; Mehmood, K.

    2015-09-01

    Air plasma-sprayed Ni-20Cr coating on stainless steel (AISI-304) substrate was re-melted using CO2 laser to remove the inherent defects, i.e., porosity, splat boundaries, and oxides of air plasma-sprayed coating. The (1) uncoated, (2) air plasma-sprayed, and (3) laser-re-melted specimens were exposed to cyclic oxidation at 900 °C for a hundred cycles run. The oxidation products were characterized using XRD and SEM. Weight changes were determined after every 4th cycle; Uncoated samples showed severe oxidation indicated by substantial weight loss, whereas air plasma-coated samples demonstrated noticeable weight gain. However, oxidation resistance of laser-cladded samples was found to be significantly improved as the samples showed negligible weight change; porosity within the coating was minimized with an improvement in interface quality causing reduction in delamination damage.

  10. A mechanism of raft formation on both plasma membrane layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornbundit, Kan; Modchang, Charin; Triampo, Wannapong; Triampo, Darapond; Nuttavut, Narin

    2013-10-01

    A double-layered membrane model is proposed to explain raft formation and induction on extracellular (outer) and cytoplasmic (inner) leaflets of plasma membranes in a situation where only the outer layer has a tendency to phase-separate. In the model, lipid exchange with the surrounding medium is allowed on both layers, but lipid exchange between layers is not allowed. Simulations display domain stabilization on both layers. The effect of the lipid recycling frequencies on stationary domain sizes is also investigated. It is found that stationary domain sizes decrease when lipid recycling frequencies are stronger. Linear stability analysis is used to verify the results.

  11. Formation of prominences by condensation modes in magnetized cylindrical plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, C.-H.

    1985-01-01

    Condensation modes in a magnetized cylindrical plasma are studied to shed light on the formation and stability of solar prominences. A rigorous mathematical derivation of the perturbation equation is developed, and the effect of field twist on the stability is studied for an equilibrium with uniform field twist, in which temperature increases, but density does not, as pressure increases. The results imply that prominences may form in globally magnetohydrodynamic-stable magnetic loops with very low field twist. Also, prominences are more likely to form in a region of weaker area-averaged magnetic field.

  12. Neutron and X-ray diffraction of plasma-sprayed zirconia-yttria thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankar, N. R.; Herman, H.; Singhal, S. P.; Berndt, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    ZrO2-7.8mol. pct. YO1.5, a fused powder, and ZrO2-8.7mol. pct. YO1.5, a prereacted powder, were plasma-sprayed onto steel substrates. Neutron diffraction and X-ray diffraction of the as-received powder, the powder plasma sprayed into water, as-sprayed coatings, and coatings heat-treated for 10 and 100 h were carried out to study phase transformations and ordering of the oxygen ions on the oxygen sublattice. The as-received fused powder has a much lower monoclinic percentage than does the pre-reacted powder, this resulting in a much lower monoclinic percentage in the coating. Heat treatment increases the percentages of the cubic and monoclinic phases, while decreasing the tetragonal content. An ordered tetragonal phase is detected by the presence of extra neutron diffraction peaks. These phase transformations and ordering will result in volume changes. The implications of these transformations on the performance of partially stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings is discussed.

  13. High Anatase Rate Titanium Dioxide Coating Deposition by Low Power Microwave Plasma Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redza, Ahmad; Kondo, Toshiki; Yasui, Toshiaki; Fukumoto, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    Titanium dioxide is a promising photocatalyst material because of the magnificent properties of this material where it is able to remove the air pollution substance and the deodorizing function. Generally, the deposition method of a titanium dioxide coating is carried out by an organic system binder but the powerful photocatalytic reaction will degrades the binder. Therefore, thermal spray is considered to be the alternative method but this method will induce crystallization transformation of titanium dioxide from anatase phase with high photocatalytic activity to rutile phase with low photocatalyst which caused by high heat input. Since our microwave plasma spraying device is operable at low power comparing with conventional high power plasma spray, the reduce effect of the heat input onto the particles at the time of spraying can be achieved and coating deposition with high rate of anatase phase is expected. Therefore, in this research, the coating deposition by controlling the heat input into the spray particle which can be resulted in high rate of anatase phase with high photocatalytic activity was conducted. By controlled condition, coating with optimum anatase rate of 83% is able to be fabricated by this method.

  14. Mechanical Properties of Yttria- and Ceria-Stabilized Zirconia Coatings Obtained by Suspension Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łatka, Leszek; Cattini, Andrea; Chicot, Didier; Pawłowski, Lech; Kozerski, Stefan; Petit, Fabrice; Denoirjean, Alain

    2013-03-01

    Plasma generated by the SG-100 torch was applied to spray suspension formulated with the use of ZrO2 + 8 wt.% Y2O3 (8YSZ) and ZrO2 + 24 wt.% CeO2 + 2.5 wt.% Y2O3 (24CeYSZ) as solid phases. The suspensions were formulated with the use of 20 wt.% solid phase, 40 wt.% water, and 40 wt.% ethanol. The plasma spray parameters were optimized by keeping constant: (a) the electric power of 40 kW and (b) the working gas compositions of 45 slpm for Ar and 5 slpm for H2. On the other hand, the spray distance was varied from 40 to 60 mm and the torch linear speed was varied from 300 to 500 mm/s. The coatings were sprayed onto stainless steel substrates, and their thicknesses were in the range from 70 to 110 μm. The coating microstructures were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope. Mechanical properties were tested with the different methods including the indentation and scratch tests. The indentation test, carried out with various loads ranging from 100 to 10,000 mN, enabled to determine elastic modulus and Martens microhardness. Young's modulus of the coatings was in the range of 71-107 GPa for 8YSZ and 68-130 GPa for 24CeYSZ coatings. The scratch test enabled the authors to find the scratch macrohardness.

  15. In vivo biocompatibility of a plasma-activated, coronary stent coating.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, Anna; Wise, Steven G; Yin, Yongbai; Wu, Buchu; James, Barbara; Zreiqat, Hala; McKenzie, David R; Bao, Shisan; Weiss, Anthony S; Ng, Martin K C; Bilek, Marcela M M

    2012-11-01

    Bare metal and drug-eluting coronary stents suffer an inherent lack of vascular cell and blood compatibility resulting in adverse patient responses. We have developed a plasma-activated coating (PAC) for metallic coronary stents that is durable, withstands crimping and expansion, has low thrombogenicity and can covalently bind proteins, linker-free. This has been shown to enhance endothelial cell interactions in vitro and has the potential to promote biointegration of stents. Using the rabbit denuded iliac artery model, we show for the first time that PAC is a feasible coating for coronary stents in vivo. The coating integrity of PAC was maintained following implantation and expansion. The rate of endothelialization, strut coverage, neointimal response and the initial immune response were equivalent to bare metal stents. Furthermore, the initial thrombogenicity caused by the PAC stents showed a reduced trend compared to bare metal stents. This work demonstrates a robust, durable, non-cytotoxic plasma-based coating technology that has the ability to covalently immobilize bioactive molecules for surface modification of coronary stents. Improvements in the clinical performance of implantable cardiovascular devices could be achieved by the immobilization of proteins or peptides that trigger desirable cellular responses.

  16. Study of Plasma Interaction with Titanium Coated Ferritic Steel in IR-T1 Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoranneviss, M.; Talebitaher, A.; Arvin, R.; Mohammadi, S.; Nikmohamadi, A.; Milani, M.; Salem, M. K.; Sari, A. H.; Yousefi, M. R.; Shokouhi, A.; Khorshid, P.; Saboohi, S.

    2008-04-07

    Studies of plasma interaction with titanium coated ferritic steel is performed on IR-T1 tokamak. Titanium coating is one of the candidates for the plasma facing materials in a tokomak. Titaniumization is carried out by a sputtering method. Some of the samples were baked (3 hours at 460 deg. C) before sputtering. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analyses before and after discharge in r/a = l .04 carried out. The samples (with distinctive titanium layers) were placed at different depths inside the vacuum vessel of the IR-T1 tokamak in the SOL region. A comparison of the titanium coated steel with bare ferritic steel exposed to plasma tokamak and glow discharges is made in this research. Depth of impurity penetration and retention, and the surface roughness are measured by using surface analysis methods. Rutherford backscattering method is used to measure the content of nitrogen, oxygen and titanium, before and after discharges. The result is shown a change in roughness with respect to position of samples.

  17. Study of Plasma Interaction with Titanium Coated Ferritic Steel in IR-T1 Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoranneviss, M.; Khorshid, P.; Saboohi, S.; Talebitaher, A.; Arvin, R.; Mohammadi, S.; Nikmohamadi, A.; Milani, M.; Salem, M. K.; Sari, A. H.; Yousefi, M. R.; Shokouhi, A.

    2008-04-01

    Studies of plasma interaction with titanium coated ferritic steel is performed on IR-T1 tokamak. Titanium coating is one of the candidates for the plasma facing materials in a tokomak. Titaniumization is carried out by a sputtering method. Some of the samples were baked (3 hours at 460 °C) before sputtering. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analyses before and after discharge in r/a = l .04 carried out. The samples (with distinctive titanium layers) were placed at different depths inside the vacuum vessel of the IR-T1 tokamak in the SOL region. A comparison of the titanium coated steel with bare ferritic steel exposed to plasma tokamak and glow discharges is made in this research. Depth of impurity penetration and retention, and the surface roughness are measured by using surface analysis methods. Rutherford backscattering method is used to measure the content of nitrogen, oxygen and titanium, before and after discharges. The result is shown a change in roughness with respect to position of samples.

  18. Friction and Wear Characteristics of Plasma-Sprayed Self-Lubrication Coating with Clad Powder at Elevated Temperatures up to 800 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chuanbing; Du, Lingzhong; Zhang, Weigang

    2014-02-01

    NiCr/(Cr3C2-BaF2·CaF2) coating was fabricated by atmospheric plasma spray technology using clad powder. The coating shows low porosity, high microhardness and bonding strength, and it also exhibits good friction reduction and wear resistance at elevated temperatures up to 800 °C which is due to the formation of a kind of continuous BaF2·CaF2 eutectic lubricating film. The excellent mechanical and tribological properties of the coating are partially attributed to the protection of NiCr layer of the composite powders which can decrease oxidation, decarburization of Cr3C2, and ablation of BaF2·CaF2 eutectic during spray and deposition process.

  19. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Temporal and thermodynamic characteristics of plasma formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatavichyus, M. V.; Kazakyavichyus, É.; Orshevski, G.; Danyunas, V.

    1991-11-01

    An investigation was made of plasma formation accompanying the interaction with aluminum, iron, and VK-6 alloy targets of nanosecond radiation from a YAG:Nd3+ laser (Emax = 50 mJ, τ = 3-8 ns). The duration of the plasma formation process depended weakly on the laser radiation parameters [the power density was varied in the range 1-3 GW/cm2, the pulse rise time in the range 2-8 ns, or the rate of rise of the power density in the range (1-8) × 108 W · cm - 2 · ns -1]. A study was made of the establishment of a local thermodynamic equilibrium in a plasma jet excited by radiation from nanosecond and picosecond (E = 30 mJ, τ = 40 ps) lasers. The maximum of the luminescence from an aluminum plasma excited by picosecond laser radiation was found to correspond to a local thermodynamic equilibrium. A local thermodynamic equilibrium could be absent in the case of excitation by nanosecond laser radiation.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Plasma-Sprayed ZrO2-8 wt% Y2O3 Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical behavior of free standing, plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8 wt% Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings, including strength, fracture toughness, fatigue, constitutive relation, elastic modulus, and directionality, has been determined under various loading-specimen configurations. This report presents and describes a summary of mechanical properties of the plasma-sprayed coating material to provide them as a design database.

  1. Formation of boron nitride coatings on silicon carbide fibers using trimethylborate vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Mengjiao; Zhou, Tong; He, Jing; Chen, Lifu

    2016-09-01

    High quality boron nitride (BN) coatings have been grown on silicon carbide (SiC) fibers by carbothermal nitridation and at atmospheric pressure. SiC fibers were first treated in chlorine gas to form CDC (carbide-derived carbon) film on the fiber surface. The CDC-coated SiC fibers were then reacted with trimethylborate vapor and ammonia vapor at high temperature, forming BN coatings by carbothermal reduction. The FT-IR, XPS, XRD, SEM, TEM and AES were used to investigate the formation of the obtained coatings. It has been found that the obtained coatings are composed of phase mixture of h-BN and amorphous carbon, very uniform in thickness, have smooth surface and adhere well with the SiC fiber substrates. The BN-coated SiC fibers retain ∼80% strength of the as-received SiC fibers and show an obvious interfacial debonding and fiber pullout in the SiCf/SiOC composites. This method may be useful for the large scale production of high quality BN coating on silicon carbide fiber.

  2. The properties and fracture behavior of ion plasma sprayed TiN coating on stainless steel substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, Dina V.; Goncharenko, Igor M.; Danilov, Vladimir I.; Lobach, Maxim I.; Danilova, Lidiya V.; Shlyakhova, Galina V.

    2015-10-01

    The wear resistance and fracture behavior of ion plasma sprayed TiN coating were studied; the results are presented. The coating was applied to the stainless steel substrate using a vacuum arc method. The samples were tested by active loading. With varying coating thickness, its characteristics were found to change. Multiple cracking would occur in the deformed sample, with fragment borders aligned normal to the extension axis.

  3. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of plasma-sprayed Mg(2)SiO(4) coating on titanium alloy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Youtao; Zhai, Wanyin; Chen, Lei; Chang, Jiang; Zheng, Xuebin; Ding, Chuanxian

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, chemically synthesized Mg(2)SiO(4) (MS) powder was plasma-sprayed onto a titanium alloy substrate to evaluate its application potentials in biomedicine. The phase composition and surface morphology of the MS coating were analyzed. Results showed that the MS coating was composed mainly of Mg(2)SiO(4) phase, with a small amount of MgO and glass phases. Mechanical testing showed that the coating exhibited good adhesion strength to the substrate due to the close thermal expansion coefficient between the MS ceramic and the titanium alloy substrate. The measured bonding strength was as high as 41.5+/-5.3MPa, which is much higher than the traditional HA coating. In vitro cytocompatibility evaluation of the MS coating was performed using canine bone marrow stem cells (MSCs). The MSCs exhibited good adhesion, proliferation and differentiation behavior on the MS coating surface, which can be explained by the high protein adsorption capability of the MS coating, as well as the stimulatory effects of Mg and Si ions released from the coating. The proliferation rate of the MSCs on MS coating was very close to that on the hydroxylapatite (HA) coating. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity analysis demonstrated that the ALP level of the MSCs on the MS coating remained high even after 21days, implying that the surface characteristics of the coating are beneficial for the differentiation of MSCs. In summary, our results suggest that MS coating might be a new approach to prepare bone implants.

  4. Ice Nucleation and Droplet Formation by Bare and Coated Black Carbon Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Beth J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-10-13

    We have studied the ice formation at heterogeneous and homogeneous temperatures, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied to span a relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation with a comparison to a well characterized mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, as well as particle hygroscopicity. At 253K and 243K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, droplet formation was observed. At 233K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles, but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude from our studies that both uncoated and coated soot particles are unlikely to contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233K and 253K.

  5. Ice Nucleation and Droplet Formation by Bare and Coated Soot Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Beth J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-09-13

    We have studied ice formation at temperatures relevant to homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity, of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied to span an atmospherically relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation, with a comparison to a mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, and particle hygroscopicity. At 253K and 243K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, only droplet formation was observed. At 233K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles, but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude that both uncoated and coated soot particles representative of those generated in our studies are unlikely to significantly contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233K and 253K.

  6. Organoselenium coating on cellulose inhibits the formation of biofilms by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phat L; Hammond, Adrienne A; Mosley, Thomas; Cortez, Janette; Gray, Tracy; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Shashtri, Mayank; Spallholz, Julian E; Hamood, Abdul N; Reid, Ted W

    2009-06-01

    Among the most difficult bacterial infections encountered in treating patients are wound infections, which may occur in burn victims, patients with traumatic wounds, necrotic lesions in people with diabetes, and patients with surgical wounds. Within a wound, infecting bacteria frequently develop biofilms. Many current wound dressings are impregnated with antimicrobial agents, such as silver or antibiotics. Diffusion of the agent(s) from the dressing may damage or destroy nearby healthy tissue as well as compromise the effectiveness of the dressing. In contrast, the antimicrobial agent selenium can be covalently attached to the surfaces of a dressing, prolonging its effectiveness. We examined the effectiveness of an organoselenium coating on cellulose discs in inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation. Colony biofilm assays revealed that cellulose discs coated with organoselenium completely inhibited P. aeruginosa and S. aureus biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy of the cellulose discs confirmed these results. Additionally, the coating on the cellulose discs was stable and effective after a week of incubation in phosphate-buffered saline. These results demonstrate that 0.2% selenium in a coating on cellulose discs effectively inhibits bacterial attachment and biofilm formation and that, unlike other antimicrobial agents, longer periods of exposure to an aqueous environment do not compromise the effectiveness of the coating.

  7. N-trimethylchitosan/Alginate Layer-by-Layer Self Assembly Coatings Act as “Fungal Repellents” to Prevent Biofilm Formation on Healthcare Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fuguang; Yeh, Chih-Ko; Wen, Jianchuan

    2015-01-01

    Fungal biofilm formation on healthcare materials is a significant clinical concern, often leading to medical device related infections, which are difficult to treat. A novel fungal repellent strategy is developed to control fungal biofilm formation. Methylacrylic acid (MAA) is grated onto poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA)-based biomaterials via plasma initiated grafting polymerization. A cationic polymer, trimethylchitosan (TMC), is synthesized by reacting chitosan with methyl iodide. Sodium alginate (SA) is used as an anionic polymer. TMC/SA multilayers are coated onto the MAA-grafted PMMA via layer-by-layer self-assembly. The TMC/SA multilayer coatings significantly reduce fungal initial adhesion, and effectively prevent fungal biofilm formation. It is concluded that the anti-adhesive property of the surface is due to its hydrophilicity, and that the biofilm-inhibiting action is attributed to the antifungal activity of TMC as well as the chelating function of TMC and SA, which may have acted as fungal repellents. Phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-immersion tests show that the biofilm-modulating effect of the multilayer coatings is stable for more than 4 weeks. Furthermore, the presence of TMC/SA multilayer coatings improve the biocompatibility of the original PMMA, offering a simple, yet effective, strategy for controlling fungal biofilm-formation. PMID:25295485

  8. Plasma-produced erbia coatings for waste reduction in plutonium casting operations

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.P.; Soderquist, D.; Gurevitch, A.; Steele, J.; Hampel, F.; Walter, K.C.; Perry, A.J.; Treglio, J.

    1997-12-31

    Disposal of molds used in plutonium casting operations creates a significant waste stream, since such molds are typically only used once or twice, due to the highly corrosive nature of molten plutonium. Erbia (erbium oxide) is inert to molten plutonium, but being a brittle ceramic material, is difficult to make adhere to mold surfaces under severe conditions of thermal expansion mismatch. The authors report on efforts to utilize an ion implantation process to improve the adhesion of erbia coatings deposited from a cathodic arc derived erbium plasma. Coatings were created using both dc and pulsed cathodic arc sources in a low pressure oxygen background. Ion implantation was achieved by pulse biasing the target to several 10`s of kilovolts during some steps in the process. This high energy ion bombardment was found to produce superior coating adhesion, and treated samples successfully resisted attack from molten plutonium in a casting test. The effect of variations in ion implantation parameters, coating parameters, and coating stoichiometry is discussed.

  9. Plasma Sprayed Bondable Stainless Surface (BOSS) Coatings for Corrosion Protection and Adhesion Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. D.; Groff, G. B.; Rooney, M.; Cooke, A. V.; Boothe, R.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed Bondable Stainless Surface (BOSS) coatings are being developed under the Solid Propulsion Integrity Program's (SPIP) Bondlines Package. These coatings are designed as a steel case preparation treatment prior to insulation lay-up. Other uses include the exterior of steel cases and bonding surfaces of nozzle components. They provide excellent bondability - rubber insulation and epoxy bonds fail cohesively within the polymer - for both fresh surfaces and surfaces having undergone natural and accelerated environmental aging. They have passed the MSFC requirements for protection of inland and sea coast environment. Because BOSS coatings are inherently corrosion resistant, they do not require preservation by greases or oils. The reduction/elimination of greases and oils, known bondline degraders, can increase SRM reliability, decrease costs by reducing the number of process steps, and decrease environmental pollution by reducing the amount of methyl chloroform used for degreasing and thus reduce release of the ozone-depleting chemical in accordance with the Clean Air Act and the Montreal Protocol. The coatings can potential extend the life of RSRM case segments and nozzle components by eliminating erosion due to multiple grit blasting during each use cycle and corrosion damage during marine recovery. Concurrent work for the Air Force show that other BOSS coatings give excellent bondline strength and durability for high-performance structures of aluminum and titanium.

  10. Plasma Sprayed Ni-Al Coatings for Safe Ending Heat Exchanger Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.L.; Berndt, C.C.; Otterson, D.

    1998-11-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed thermally conductive composite liners for corrosion and scale protection in heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The liners cannot withstand roller expansion to connect the tubes to the tubesheet. It is not possible to line the ends of the tubes with the same material after roller expansion due to the nature of the current liner application process. It was requested that BNL evaluate plasma sprayed Ni-Al coatings for safe ending heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The tubes of interest had an internal diameter of 0.875 inches. It is not typical to thermal spray small diameter components or use such small standoff distances. In this project a nozzle extension was developed by Zatorski Coating Company to spray the tube ends as well as flat coupons for testing. Four different Ni-Al coatings were investigated. One of these was a ductilized Ni-AlB material developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The coatings were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and subjected to corrosion, tensile adhesion, microhardness and field tests in a volcanic pool in New Zealand.

  11. Microstructure Characteristics and Oxidation Behavior of Molybdenum Disilicide Coatings Prepared by Vacuum Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yaran; Fei, Xiaoai; Wang, Hongyan; Zheng, Xuebin; Ding, Chuanxian

    2013-03-01

    In this study, molybdenum disilicide (MoSi2) coatings were fabricated by vacuum plasma spraying technology. Their morphology, composition, and microstructure characteristics were intensively investigated. The oxidation behavior of MoSi2 coatings was also explored. The results show that the MoSi2 coatings are compact with porosity less than 5%. Their microstructure exhibits typical lamellar character and is mainly composed of tetragonal and hexagonal MoSi2 phases. A small amount of tetragonal Mo5Si3 phase is randomly distributed in the MoSi2 matrix. A rapid weight gain is found between 300 and 800 °C. The MoSi2 coatings exhibit excellent oxidation-resistant properties at temperatures between 1300 and 1500 °C, which results from the continuous dense glassy SiO2 film formed on their surface. A thick layer composed of Mo5Si3 is found to be present under the SiO2 film for the MoSi2 coatings treated at 1700 °C, suggesting that the phenomenon of continuous oxidation took place.

  12. Plasma Suppression of Large Scale Structure Formation in the Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pisin; Lai, Kwang-Chang

    2007-12-10

    We point out that during the reionization epoch of the cosmic history, the plasma collective effect among the ordinary matter would suppress the large scale structure formation. The imperfect Debye shielding at finite temperature would induce a residual long-range electrostatic potential which, working together with the baryon thermal pressure, would counter the gravitational collapse. As a result the effective Jean's length, {tilde {lambda}}{sub J}, is increased by a factor, {tilde {lambda}}{sub J}/{lambda}{sub J} = {radical}8/5, relative to the conventional one. For scales smaller than the effective Jean's scale the plasma would oscillate at the ion-acoustic frequency. The modes that would be influenced by this effect depend on the starting time and the initial temperature of reionization, but roughly lie in the range 0.5hMpc{sup -1} < k, which corresponds to the region of the Lyman-{alpha} forest from the inter-galactic medium. We predict that in the linear regime of density-contrast growth, the plasma suppression of the matter power spectrum would approach 1 - ({Omega}{sub dm}/{Omega}{sub m}){sup 2} {approx} 1 -(5/6){sup 2} {approx} 30%.

  13. Plasma sputtering robotic device for in-situ thick coatings of long, small diameter vacuum tubesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Custer, A.; Dingus, A.; Erickson, M.; Fischer, W.; Jamshidi, N.; Laping, R.; Liaw, C.-J.; Meng, W.; Poole, H. J.; Todd, R.

    2015-05-01

    A novel robotic plasma magnetron mole with a 50 cm long cathode was designed, fabricated, and operated. The reason for this endeavor is to alleviate the problems of unacceptable resistive heating of stainless steel vacuum tubes in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The magnetron mole was successfully operated to copper coat an assembly containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, RHIC magnet tubing connected to two types of RHIC bellows, to which two additional pipes made of RHIC tubing were connected. To increase the cathode lifetime, a movable magnet package was developed, and the thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate (de facto anode) distance of less than 1.5 cm. Achieving reliable steady state magnetron discharges at such a short cathode to anode gap was rather challenging, when compared to commercial coating equipment, where the target to substrate distance is 10's cm; 6.3 cm is the lowest experimental target to substrate distance found in the literature. Additionally, the magnetron developed during this project provides unique omni-directional uniform coating. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system is driven by a motorized spool. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. Measurements indicated that well-scrubbed copper coating reduced secondary electron yield to 1, i.e., the problem of electron clouds can be eliminated. Room temperature RF resistivity measurement indicated that a 10 μm copper coated stainless steel RHIC tube has a conductivity close to that of pure copper tubing. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. The device details and experimental results are described.

  14. Plasma Sputtering Robotic Device for In-Situ Thick Coatings of Long, Small Diameter Vacuum Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2014-10-01

    A novel robotic plasma magnetron mole with a 50 cm long cathode was designed fabricated & operated. Reason for this endeavor is to alleviate the problems of unacceptable ohmic heating of stainless steel vacuum tubes and of electron clouds, due to high secondary electron yield (SEY), in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The magnetron mole was successfully operated to copper coat an assembly containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, RHIC magnet tubing connected to two types of RHIC bellows, to which two additional pipes made of RHIC tubing were connected. To increase cathode lifetime, movable magnet package was developed, and thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate (de facto anode) distance of less than 1.5 cm. Achieving reliable steady state magnetron discharges at such a short cathode to anode gap was rather challenging, when compared to commercial coating equipment, where the target to substrate distance is 10's cm; 6.3 cm is the lowest experimental target to substrate distance found in the literature. Additionally, the magnetron developed during this project provides unique omni-directional uniform coating. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system is driven by a motorized spool. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. Measurements indicated that well-scrubbed copper coating reduced SEY to 1, i.e., the problem of electron clouds can be eliminated. Room temperature RF resistivity measurement indicated that 10 μm Cu coated stainless steel RHIC tube has conductivity close to that of pure copper tubing. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. Device detail and experimental results will be presented. Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under

  15. Plasma sputtering robotic device for in-situ thick coatings of long, small diameter vacuum tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A. Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Fischer, W.; Liaw, C.-J.; Meng, W.; Todd, R.; Custer, A.; Dingus, A.; Erickson, M.; Jamshidi, N.; Laping, R.; Poole, H. J.

    2015-05-15

    A novel robotic plasma magnetron mole with a 50 cm long cathode was designed, fabricated, and operated. The reason for this endeavor is to alleviate the problems of unacceptable resistive heating of stainless steel vacuum tubes in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The magnetron mole was successfully operated to copper coat an assembly containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, RHIC magnet tubing connected to two types of RHIC bellows, to which two additional pipes made of RHIC tubing were connected. To increase the cathode lifetime, a movable magnet package was developed, and the thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate (de facto anode) distance of less than 1.5 cm. Achieving reliable steady state magnetron discharges at such a short cathode to anode gap was rather challenging, when compared to commercial coating equipment, where the target to substrate distance is 10's cm; 6.3 cm is the lowest experimental target to substrate distance found in the literature. Additionally, the magnetron developed during this project provides unique omni-directional uniform coating. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system is driven by a motorized spool. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. Measurements indicated that well-scrubbed copper coating reduced secondary electron yield to 1, i.e., the problem of electron clouds can be eliminated. Room temperature RF resistivity measurement indicated that a 10 μm copper coated stainless steel RHIC tube has a conductivity close to that of pure copper tubing. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. The device details and experimental results are described.

  16. Formation and Acceleration Physics on Plasma Injector 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    Plasma Injector 1 (PI-1) is a two stage coaxial Marshal gun with conical accelerator electrodes, similar in shape to the MARAUDER device, with power input of the same topology as the RACE device. The goal of PI-1 research is to produce a self-confined compact toroid with high-flux (200 mWb), high-density (3x10^16 cm-3) and moderate initial temperature (100 eV) to be used as the target plasma in a MTF reactor. PI-1 is 5 meters long and 1.9 m in diameter at the expansion region where a high aspect ratio (4.4) spheromak is formed with a minimum lambda of 9 m-1. The acceleration stage is 4 m long and tapers to an outer diameter of 40 cm. The capacitor banks store 0.5 MJ for formation and 1.13 MJ for acceleration. Power is delivered via 62 independently controlled switch modules. Several geometries for formation bias field, inner electrodes and target chamber have been tested, and trends in accelerator efficiency and target lifetime have been observed. Thomson scattering and ion Doppler spectroscopy show significant heating (>100 eV) as the CT is compressed in the conical accelerator. B-dot probes show magnetic field structure consistent with Grad-Shafranov models and MHD simulations, and CT axial length depends strongly on the lambda profile.

  17. Effect of Solid Shield on Coating Properties in Atmospheric Plasma Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting; Zheng, Lili; Zhang, Hui

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the impact of shrouded shield structure on plasma spray processes and the selection of optimal shield structure. Response of plasma flame characteristics to solid shield structures is studied first, and experimental investigations are then performed for both atmospheric (APS) and shrouded (SPS) plasma spray processes. It is found that the usage of conical shield (divergence angle 5.5°) with 90 mm in length is effective to form a low-oxygen (<2%) and high-temperature (>3000 K) region in the plasma flame and this region can cover the majority area for particles passing by. The average particle temperature is higher in SPS than in APS with the given conditions, and such behavior is intensified as solid shield length increases. Using the SPS process, more disk-shaped splats are obtained, and the oxygen concentration in coating is significantly reduced. The degree of the oxidation in the coatings is further reduced as the length of the solid shield increases from 50 to 90 mm. Applying solid shield will lead to high flame temperature and low oxidation; however, the substrate overheating and velocity reduction may occur. For the cases studied, the optimal shield length is around 90 mm.

  18. Preparation of biomedical Ag incorporated hydroxyapatite/titania coatings on Ti6Al4V alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lan; Lü, Guo-Hua; Mao, Fei-Fei; Yang, Si-Ze

    2014-03-01

    Nano-Ag incorporated hydroxyapatite/titania (HA/TiO2) coatings were deposited on Ti6Al4V substrates by the plasma electrolytic oxidation process. Compared with the substrate, the deposited coatings display attractive mechanical and biomedical properties. First, the coatings have stronger wear resistance and corrosion resistance. Second, they show a strong antibacterial ability. The mean vitality of the P. gingivalis on the coating surfaces is reduced to about 21%. Third, the coatings have good biocompatibility. The mean viability of the fibroblast cells on the coating surface is increased to about 130%. With these attractive properties, Ag incorporated HA/TiO2 coatings may be useful in the biomedical field.

  19. Effects of cathodic voltages on structure and wear resistance of plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings formed on aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingbiao; Liang, Jun; Liu, Baixing; Peng, Zhenjun; Wang, Qing

    2014-04-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coatings were prepared on aluminium alloy using pulsed bipolar power supply at constant anodic voltage and different cathodic voltages. The samples were prepared to attain the same coating thickness by adjusting the processing time. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and tribometer were employed to investigate the microstructure, element content, phase composition and wear resistance of the coatings respectively. It was found that the coating growth rate enhanced obviously and the coatings exhibited a more compact structure with thicker inner layer and lower surface roughness when the cathodic voltage increased. The coatings were mainly composed of crystalline γ-Al2O3 and amorphous silicate oxides and their relative content changed with the cathodic voltage. The wear resistance of the coatings improved significantly with the increase of cathodic voltage.

  20. Characterization of Ceramic Plasma-Sprayed Coatings, and Interaction Studies Between U-Zr Fuel and Ceramic Coated Interface at an Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ki Hwan Kim; Chong Tak Lee; R. S. Fielding; J. R. Kennedy

    2011-08-01

    Candidate coating materials for re-usable metallic nuclear fuel crucibles, HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3, were plasma-sprayed onto niobium substrates. The coating microstructure and the thermal cycling behavior were characterized, and U-Zr melt interaction studies carried out. The Y2O3 coating layer had a uniform thickness and was well consolidated with a few small pores scattered throughout. While the HfN coating was not well consolidated with a considerable amount of porosity, but showed somewhat uniform thickness. Thermal cycling tests on the HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coatings showed good cycling characteristics with no interconnected cracks forming even after 20 cycles. Interaction studies done on the coated samples by dipping into a U-20wt.%Zr melt indicated that HfN and Y2O3 did not form significant reaction layers between the melt and the coating while the TiC and the ZrC coatings were significantly degraded. Y2O3 exhibited the most promising performance among HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coatings.

  1. Origin of the plasma scalds in dielectric coatings induced by 1 ω laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Qi, Hongji; Zhao, Jiaoling; Wang, Bin; Chai, Yingjie; Yu, Zhen; Shao, Jianda

    2016-04-01

    The plasma scalds initiated by a 1053 nm ( 1 ω ) nanosecond laser are separated from the defect-induced damage pits, which is verified as a result of the ionization wavefront with the subnanosecond laser. Considering the beam reflection from solid-state absorption fronts during the damage process, a theoretical scalding threshold about 6.84 J / cm 2 ( 12 ns ) based on the energy required to start an air avalanche is evaluated and agrees well with the experimental scalding threshold. The occurrence order of the initial explosion and subsequent ionization wavefront is verified to explain most of the damage morphologies caused by the 1 ω laser. In addition to the significance in laser conditioning or cleaning for a high-power laser system, the results also indicate that through the occurrence of plasma scalds it is possible to mark the onset time of air plasma during laser-coating interaction.

  2. In Vitro Evaluation of Hydroxyapatite-Coated Titanium Implant with Atmospheric Plasma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo-Jin; Kwon, Tae-Yub; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kang, Seong Soo; Choi, Seok Hwa; Kwon, Soon-Taek; Cho, Dae-Hyun; Son, Jun Sik

    2015-08-01

    Plasma treatments are becoming a popular method for modifying the characteristics of a range of substrate surfaces. Atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) is cost-efficient, safe and simple compared to high-pressure plasma. This study examined the effects of a low-temperature APP treatment of a hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated Ti (HA-Ti) surface. The APP treatment made the HA-Ti surfaces more hydrophilic without changing surface morphologies. The APP-treated HA-Ti (APP-HA-Ti) surface showed enhanced cell spreading, cell proliferation, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels with more developed cellular networks, and the formed extracellular matrix (ECM) was fused perfectly with the HA substrate than that on the HA-Ti surface. In conclusion, an APP treatment is a potential surface-modifying method that can enhance the cell affinity at the early stages in vitro. PMID:26369123

  3. LIBS analysis of tungsten coatings exposed to Magnum PSI ELM-like plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piip, K.; De Temmerman, G.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Lissovski, A.; Karhunen, J.; Aints, M.; Hakola, A.; Paris, P.; Laan, M.; Likonen, J.; Jõgi, I.; Kozlova, J.; Mändar, H.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this work was to study the applicability of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as an in situ method for monitoring plasma facing materials in fusion reactors. Tungsten coated samples were exposed to Magnum PSI plasma using two different regimes: the steady-state (the sequence of approximately 11 s pulses) and the ELM-like. Right after the plasma exposure samples were tested with LIBS in the Magnum PSI analyses and target exchange chamber. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the surface morphology and crystallinity. These methods showed that changes at the sample surface caused by used ELM-like mode did not differ remarkably from those caused by steady-state mode. Surface temperature had significant effect on the surface structure. In addition post mortem LIBS measurements were performed that gave result similar to that of in situ LIBS.

  4. Mathematical analysis of thermoelastic characteristics in plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings.

    PubMed

    Go, Jaegwi; Jungo, Yeon-Gil; Kim, Seokchan; Ali, Md Afsar; Paik, Ungyu

    2012-02-01

    The thermoelastic characteristics of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been analyzed using mathematical modeling. Two types of TBC model, cylinder and circular disk which are commercial plasma-sprayed TBCs, subjecting to symmetric temperature distribution to the radial and longitudinal directions, respectively, were taken into consideration. Based on the thermoelastic theories, a second order ordinary differential equation was derived for the cylinder model and a pair of partial differential equations were set up for the circular disk model. The analytic solution was obtained from the ordinary differential equation, while a finite volume method was developed for numerical solutions to the pair of partial differential equations due to the complexity of governing equations. The thermoelastic characteristics of TBC models, such as temperature distributions, displacements, and stresses, were displayed according to the obtained solutions. The rate of heat conduction in the section of the top coat is relatively slow in comparison with the substrate, and no profound difference appears in the temperature distribution between two TBC models. The highest longitudinal tensile stress is expressed at the bond coat of both models, and the substrate is under the compressive stresses to the circumferential direction. While the cylinder expands to the positive longitudinal direction only, the expansion in the circular disk occurs to both the positive and negative longitudinal directions. Relatively large displacement and stresses exhibit in the cylinder as compared with the circular disk. In the circular disk, the stresses to the radial direction undulate at each section, and the displacement profile displays that the width of the circular disk is slightly narrowed. The results demonstrate that the mechanical and thermal properties of the top and bond coats are the crucial factors to be considered in controlling the thermoelastic characteristics of plasma

  5. Micronucleus formation induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma exposure in brain cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Uhm, Hansup; Ha Choi, Eun

    2012-02-01

    Induction of micronucleus formation (cytogenetic damage) in brain cancer cells upon exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma has been investigated. We have investigated the influence of exposure and incubation times on T98G brain cancer cells by using growth kinetic, clonogenic, and micronucleus formation assay. We found that micronucleus formation rate directly depends on the plasma exposure time. It is also shown that colony formation capacity of cells has been inhibited by the treatment of plasma at all doses. Cell death and micronucleus formation are shown to be significantly elevated by 120 and 240 s exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

  6. PREFACE: VII Conference on Low Temperature Plasma in the Processes of Functional Coating Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nail, Kashapov

    2016-01-01

    The VII All-Russian (with international participation) Scientific Technical Conference "Low-temperature plasma during the deposition of functional coatings" took place from 4-7 November 2015 at the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tatarstan and the Kazan Federal University. The conference was attended by over 150 people from Russia and abroad. The participants proposed a wide range of issues affecting the theoretical and experimental aspects of the problems of the physics of low-temperature plasma. We heard the reports of experts from leading universities and research organizations in the field of plasma physics: Moscow State University, St. Petersburg State University, MEPhI, Tomsk Polytechnic University, Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, etc. A series of works were devoted to the study of thin films obtained by low-temperature plasma. This year, work dedicated to the related field of heat mass transfer in multiphase media and low-temperature plasma was also presented. Of special interest were reports on the exploration of gas discharges with liquid electrolytic electrodes and the study of dusty plasmas. Kashapov Nail, D.Sc., professor (Kazan Federal University)

  7. Effect of Initial Powder Morphology and Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Stand-Alone Plasma-Sprayed 7 wt%Y2O3-ZrO2 Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Ercan, Batur; Bowman, Keith; Trice, Rodney; Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D

    2006-01-01

    The effects of starting powder morphology on the thermal and mechanical properties of stand-alone plasma-sprayed 7 wt.% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2}(YSZ) coatings were studied. Two powder morphologies were investigated: an agglomerated and sintered powder (referred to presently as 'AS') and a powder manufactured using plasma spheroidization to create hollow spheres (referred to presently as 'HS'). Coatings made from AS powders contained 0.21 wt.% SiO{sub 2} impurity, twice as much as observed in coatings made from HS powders. Properties of coatings made from each powder type were compared in the as-sprayed state and after 50 h heat treatments at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1400 C. SEM microstructural investigations revealed significant differences in the porosity and distribution of pores in the coatings. In coatings made with AS powders the majority of the high aspect ratio pores were located between lamella (interlamellar porosity). In addition to interlamellar pores, coatings made with HS powders demonstrated 1.5 times more spherical-shaped globular pores by number located within lamella. Globular pores were shown to still exist in coatings made with HS powders after 50 h heat treatments at 1400 C. Archimedes porosity measurements showed that coatings made with AS powders typically contained 4-5% less total porosity than coatings made with HS powders. Thermal conductivity experiments using laser flash showed that there was no difference in the thermal conductivity of coatings made from either powder type in the as-sprayed state despite higher porosity in the coatings made from HS powders. After a 50 h heat treatment at 1000 and 1200 C, coatings made from both powder types still demonstrated statistically similar thermal conductivities. However, after a 50 h heat treatment at 1400 C the thermal conductivity of coatings made from AS powders was found to be 0.3 W/m/K higher than coatings made from HS powders. Microstructural differences in the coatings made

  8. Improved microwave shielding behavior of carbon nanotube-coated PET fabric using plasma technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji, Aminoddin; Semnani Rahbar, Ruhollah; Mousavi Shoushtari, Ahmad

    2014-08-01

    Four different procedures were conducted to load amine functionalized multiwall carbon nanotube (NH2-MWCNT) onto poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabric surface to obtain a microwave shielding sample. Plasma treated fabric which was subsequently coated with NH2-MWCNT in the presence of acrylic acid was chosen as the best sample. Surface changes in the PET fabrics were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Wide-angle X-ray diffraction was used to study the crystalline structure of the PET fabric. The microwave shielding performance of the PET fabrics in term of reflection loss was determined using a network analyzer at X-band (8.2-12.4 GHz). The XPS results revealed that the carbon atomic percentage decreased while the oxygen atomic percentage increased when the fabric was plasma treated and coated with NH2-MWCNT. The SEM images showed that the NH2-MWCNTs were homogenously dispersed and individually separated in the surface of fabric. Moreover, the structural studies showed that the crystalline region of the fabrics was not affected by NH2-MWCNT and plasma treatment. The best microwave absorbing properties were obtained from the plasma treated fabric which was then coated with 10% NH2-MWCNT in the presence of acrylic acid. It showed a minimum reflection loss of ∼-18.2 dB about 11 GHz. Proper attachments of NH2-MWCNT on the PET fabric surface was explained in the suggested mechanism in which hydrogen bonding and amide linkage are responsible for the achievement of microwave shielding properties with high durability.

  9. MISSE Results Used for RF Plasma Ground Testing-To-Space-Exposure Correlation for Coated Kapton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon K. R.; Banks, Bruce A.; Tollis, Greg

    2008-01-01

    The ability to predict the durability of materials in the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment by exposing them in ground-based facilities is important because one can achieve test results sooner, expose more types of materials, and do it much more cost effectively than to test them in flight. However, flight experiments to determine the durability of groups or classes of materials that behave similarly are needed in order to provide correlations of how much time in ground-based facilities represents certain durations in LEO for the material type of interest. An experiment was designed and flown on the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) 2 (3.95 yr in LEO) and MISSE 4 (1.04 yr in LEO) in order to develop this type of correlation between ground-based RF plasma exposure and LEO exposure for coated Kapton. The experiment consisted of a sample of Kapton H (DuPont) polyimide coated with 1300 of silicon dioxide by Sheldahl, Inc. The samples were exposed to atomic oxygen in a radio frequency (RF) generated atomic oxygen plasma. Mass change was measured for the samples and then the same samples were exposed in flight on MISSE and the mass change was again recorded post-flight. After documentation, the samples were exposed again in the ground-based RF plasma in order to determine if the erosion would be the same as it had been in the same facility pre-flight which would indicate whether or not the sample had been damaged during flight and if the defects on the surface were those that were there preflight. The slopes of the mass change versus fluence plots were then used to develop a correlation factor that can be used to help predict the durability of coated Kapton in ground-based isotropic atomic oxygen plasma systems. This paper describes the experiment and presents the correlation factor results.

  10. Coatings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    This review covers analytical techniques applicable to the examination of coatings, raw materials, and substrates upon which coatings are placed. Techniques include chemical and electrochemical methods, chromatography, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, microscopy, and miscellaneous techniques. (MVL)

  11. Improvement in the properties of plasma-sprayed metallic, alloy and ceramic coatings using dry-ice blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shujuan; Song, Bo; Hansz, Bernard; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Dry-ice blasting, as an environmental-friendly method, was introduced into atmospheric plasma spraying for improving properties of metallic, alloy and ceramic coatings. The deposited coatings were then compared with coatings plasma-sprayed using conventional air cooling in terms of microstructure, temperature, oxidation, porosity, residual stress and adhesion. It was found that a denser steel or CoNiCrAlY alloy coating with a lower content of oxide can be achieved with the application of dry-ice blasting during the plasma spraying. In addition, the adhesive strength of Al 2O 3 coating deposited with dry-ice blasting exceeded 60 MPa, which was nearly increased by 30% compared with that of the coating deposited with conventional air cooling. The improvement in properties of plasma-sprayed metallic, alloy and ceramic coatings caused by dry-ice blasting was attributed to the decrease of annulus-ringed disk like splats, the better cooling efficiency of dry-ice pellets and even the mechanical effect of dry-ice impact.

  12. Thin Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Coatings Deposited by Low-Energy Plasma Spraying Under Very Low Pressure Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Nannan; Sun, Fu; Bolot, Rodolphe; Planche, Marie-Pierre; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2011-09-01

    In recent decades, very low pressure plasma spraying (VLPPS) technology (less than 10 mbar), as a next-generation coating process, has been extensively studied, because it can fully evaporate the materials to deposit dense, thin, and columnar grain coatings. This research aims at applying VLPPS with low-energy plasma source to melt or evaporate ceramic materials to develop high-quality thermal barrier coatings. Thin and homogeneous yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings were deposited successfully on a stainless steel substrate using low-power plasma spraying torch F100 (23 kW maximal) under very low pressure (1 mbar). The optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the properties of the plasma jet. The phase composition and the microstructure of the coatings were characterized by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the YSZ powder was fully melted and partially evaporated, and the coatings had a hybrid microstructure that was combined with the condensation of the YSZ vapor and the melted particles. In addition, the porosity and microhardness of the coatings were evaluated.

  13. Formation and Oxidation Performance of Low-Temperature Pack Aluminide Coatings on Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Brian; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, Ying; Pint, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    A pack cementation process was developed to coat commercial 9% Cr ferritic-martensitic steel T91 at temperatures below its normal tempering temperature to avoid any potential detrimental effect on the mechanical properties of the coated alloy. In order to prevent the formation of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} coatings, the Al activity in the pack cementation process was reduced by substituting the pure Al masteralloy with binary Cr-Al masteralloys containing either 15 or 25 wt.% Al. When the Cr-25Al masteralloy was used, a duplex coating was formed at 700 C, consisting of a thin Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} outer layer and an inner layer of FeAl. With the Cr-15Al masteralloy, an FeAl coating of {approx} 12 {micro}m thick was achieved at 700 C. The pack aluminide coatings fabricated at 700 C are being evaluated in air + 10 vol.% H{sub 2}O at 650 C and 700 C to determine their long-term oxidation performance.

  14. Simulation of surface roughness during the formation of thermal spray coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kanouff, M.P.

    1996-07-01

    The formation of a thermal spray coating was analyzed to identify methods to reduce the surface roughness of the coating. A new methodology was developed which uses a string of equally spaced node points to define the shape of the coating surface and to track the shape change as the thermal spray mass is deposited. This allows the calculation of arbitrary shapes for the coating surface which may be very complex. The model simulates the stochastic deposition of a large number of thermal spray droplets, where experimental data is used for the mass flux distribution on the target surface. This data shows that when the thermal spray mass impinges on the target surface, a large fraction of it (over-spray) splashes off the target and is re-deposited with a small spray angle, resulting in a large coating roughness. This analysis was used in a parameter study to identify methods for reducing the coating roughness. Effect of the shape of the profile for the pre-roughened substrate was found to be small. Decreasing the droplet size by a factor of 2 decreased the roughness by 13%. Increasing the spray angle for the over-spray by a factor of 2 decreased the roughness by 50%, and decreasing the amount of over- spray by a factor of 2 decreased the roughness by 51%.

  15. Structure Formation in Planetary Disk and Laboratory Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Koichi; Tajima, Toshiki; Horton, Wendell

    2000-10-01

    The shear flow instabilities under the presence of magnetic fields in the protoplanetary disk can greatly facilitate the formation of density structures that serve prior to the onset of the gravitational Jeans instability as a seed for the faster formation of planetesimals. Such a process may explain several puzzles in the planetary genesis. We evaluate the effects of the Parker, magnetorotational, and kinematic dynamo instabilities, and calculate the mass spectra of coagulated density structures by the above mechanism in the radial direction for two typical models. The mass spectrum of the magnetorotational instability may describe the origin of giant planets away from central star. Our local three-dimentional MHD simulation indicates that the coupling of those instabilities creates spiral arms and gas blobs in the accretion disk, reinforcing our theory. Such a mechanism for the early structure formation may be tested in a laboratory. The recent progress in experiments invloving shear flows in tokamak and laser plasmas may become a key in this regard. * The work is supported by NSF and DoE.

  16. Preparation of Aluminum Coatings by Atmospheric Plasma Spraying and Dry-Ice Blasting and Their Corrosion Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shu-Juan; Song, Bo; Zhou, Gen-Shu; Li, Chang-Jiu; Hansz, Bernard; Liao, Han-Lin; Coddet, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Aluminum coating, as an example of spray coating material with low hardness, was deposited by atmospheric plasma spraying while dry-ice blasting was applied during the deposition process. The deposited coatings were characterized in terms of microstructure, porosity, phase composition, and the valence states. The results show that the APS aluminum coatings with dry-ice blasting present a porosity of 0.35 ± 0.02%, which is comparable to the bulk material formed by the mechanical compaction. In addition, no evident oxide has been detected, except for the very thin and impervious oxide layer at the outermost layer. Compared to plasma-sprayed Al coatings without dry-ice blasting, the adhesion increased by 52% for Al substrate using dry-ice blasting, while 25% for steel substrate. Corrosion behavior of coated samples was evaluated in 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous using electrochemistry measurements. The electrochemical results indicated that APS Al coating with dry-ice blasting was more resistant to pitting corrosion than the conventional plasma-sprayed Al coating.

  17. An Assessment of the Residual Stresses in Low Pressure Plasma Sprayed Coatings on an Advanced Copper Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Ghosn, L. J.; Agarwal, A.; Lachtrupp, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Modeling studies were conducted on low pressure plasma sprayed (LPPS) NiAl top coat applied to an advanced Cu-8(at.%)Cr-4%Nb alloy (GRCop-84) substrate using Ni as a bond coat. A thermal analysis suggested that the NiAl and Ni top and bond coats, respectively, would provide adequate thermal protection to the GRCop-84 substrate in a rocket engine operating under high heat flux conditions. Residual stress measurements were conducted at different depths from the free surface on coated and uncoated GRCop-84 specimens by x-ray diffraction. These data are compared with theoretically estimated values assessed by a finite element analysis simulating the development of these stresses as the coated substrate cools down from the plasma spraying temperature to room temperature.

  18. Parametric study of Al and Al 2O 3 ceramic coatings deposited by air plasma spray onto polymer substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guanhong, Sun; Xiaodong, He; Jiuxing, Jiang; Yue, Sun

    2011-06-01

    Aluminum and ceramic (Al 2O 3) coatings were deposited onto the polymer substrate by air plasma spray (APS) to improve the mechanical properties of the polymer surface. The effect of spray parameters (current and spray distance in this paper) on the phase composition, microstructure and mechanical properties was investigated. Shear adhesion strength between the coatings and the substrates was also examined. The results indicate that the deposition parameters have a significant effect on the phase composition, microstructure and mechanical properties of as-spayed coatings. The maximum shear adhesion strength of the bond coats was 5.21 MPa with the current of 180 A and 190 mm spray distance.

  19. Better Quality Control: Stochastic Approaches to Optimize Properties and Performance of Plasma-Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Robert B.

    2010-06-01

    Statistical design of experiment (SDE) methodology applied to design and performance testing of plasma-sprayed coatings follows an evolutionary path, usually starting with classic multiparameter screening designs (Plackett-Burman), and progressing through factorial (Taguchi) to limited response surface designs (Box-Behnken). Modern designs of higher dimensionality, such as central composite and D-optimal designs, will provide results with higher predictive power. Complex theoretical models relying on evolutionary algorithms, and application of artificial neuronal networks (ANNs) and fuzzy logic control (FLC) allow estimating the behavior of the complex plasma spray environment through validation either by key experiments or first-principle calculations. In this review, paper general principles of SDE will be discussed and examples be given that underscore the different powers of prediction of individual statistical designs. Basic rules of ANN and FLC will be briefly touched on, and their potential for increased reliability of coating performance through stringent quality control measures assessed. Salient features will be reviewed of studies performed to optimize thermal coating properties and processes reported in the pertinent literature between 2000 and the present.

  20. Very low pressure plasma sprayed alumina and yttria-stabilized zirconia thin dense coatings using a modified transferred arc plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Nannan; Zhang, Baicheng; Sun, Fu; Bolot, Rodolphe; Planche, Marie-Pierre; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2011-12-01

    As a novel thermal spray process, very low pressure plasma spray (VLPPS) process has been significantly used to deposit thin, dense and homogenous ceramic coating materials for special application needs in recent years. In this study, in order to enhance low-energy plasma jet under very low pressure ambience, a home-made transferred arc nozzle was made and mounted on a low-power F100 plasma torch to fully melt or evaporate powder feedstock. As a result, thin and dense alumina (Al2O3) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) ceramic coatings with an average thickness of 30-40 μm were successfully elaborated by the VLPPS process below 1 mbar. An optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to analyze the plasma jet properties. The microstructures of the coatings were observed by means of a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the YSZ coatings displayed a bimodal microstructure which was composed of splats formed by melted particles and a little amount of vapor condensation from evaporated particles. However, vapor condensation could not be observed in the Al2O3 coatings, and only lamellar splats were found. The mechanical properties of both coatings were also evaluated.

  1. Formation of the Increased Wear-Resistant Properties of Hardox 450 Steel by Deposited Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, S. V.; Kormyshev, V. E.; Kapralov, E. V.; Ivanov, Y. F.; Zavatski, O. V.; Gromov, V. E.

    2016-09-01

    The structure-phase conditions formed during the deposition of surface coatings on Hardox 450 steel by the wire comprising C, V, Cr, Nb, W were examined by the methods of X- ray phase analysis and transmission electron diffraction microscopy. It was established that after the hardened layer was deposited, the wear-resistance increased 153 times and the coefficient of friction in the material decreased 2.5 times. It was concluded that the increased properties of the surface coating were due to the formation of martensitic structure and the occurrence of high volume fraction of carbide phase inclusions.

  2. Characterization and refinement of carbide coating formation rates and dissolution kinetics in the Ta-C system

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, P.J.

    1996-10-01

    The interaction between carbide coating formation rates and dissolution kinetics in the tantalum-carbon system was investigated. The research was driven by the need to characterize carbide coating formation rates. The characterization of the carbide coating formation rates was required to engineer an optimum processing scheme for the fabrication of the ultracorrosion-resistant composite, carbon-saturated tantalum. A packed-bed carburization process was successfully engineered and employed. The packed-bed carburization process produced consistent, predictable, and repeatable carbide coatings. A digital imaging analysis measurement process for accurate and consistent measurement of carbide coating thicknesses was developed. A process for removing the chemically stable and extremely hard tantalum-carbide coatings was also developed in this work.

  3. Synthesis of Tribologically Favorable Coatings for Hot Extrusion Tools by Suspension Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erne, M.; Kolar, D.; Hübsch, C.; Möhwald, M.; Bach, Fr.-W.

    2012-06-01

    Up to now, no coating systems have been marketed in the field of direct hot extrusion, which provide both surface protection of the parts in contact with the billet (i.e., container and die) as well as a significant reduction of the frictional losses induced by the billet passing over the container walls. To dispense with the use of lubricants and to enhance the usable forming capacity and therefore the efficiency of the process, different oxide ceramics were prepared in one suspension and plasma sprayed to produce coatings. The aim was to reach a sufficient level of feedstock mixing to obtain deterministic solid solutions of the oxide phases in coatings resulting in a reduction of their coefficient of friction under dry sliding conditions. To achieve this objective, the high specific surface area of nanosized feedstock with primary particle sizes below 100 nm was used. By means of x-ray diffraction it could be proven, that the desired phases could be synthesized to varying ratios regarding the different coating systems considered here. Besides the experimental work, the fundamentals of the mixing process of different oxides are discussed with regard to the crystallographic aspects.

  4. Multi-Scale-Structured Composite Coatings by Plasma-Transferred Arc for Nuclear Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werry, A.; Chazelas, C.; Denoirjean, A.; Valette, S.; Vardelle, A.; Meillot, E.

    2016-01-01

    In nuclear plants, the replacement of hardfacing Stellite, a cobalt-based alloy, on parts of the piping system in connection with the reactor has been investigated since the late 60's. Various Fe-based or Ni-based alloys, Co-free or with a low content of Co, have been developed but with mechanical properties generally lower than that of Stellites. The 4th generation nuclear plants impose additional or more stringent requirements for hardfacing materials. Plasma-transferred arc (PTA) coatings of cobalt-free nickel-based alloys with the addition of sub-micrometric or micrometric alumina particles are thought to be a potential solution for tribological applications in the primary system of sodium-cooled fast reactors. In this study, PTA coatings of nickel-based alloys reinforced with alumina particles were deposited on 316L stainless steel substrates. Under the conditions of this study, the addition of alumina particles resulted in a refinement of coating microstructure and the improvement of their resistance to abrasive wear. However, it does not bring about any change in coating micro-hardness.

  5. Preparation and Characterization of Ir Coating on WC Ceramic by Double Glow Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongwei; Xu, Zhenghui; Wang, Jinming; Wu, Wangping; Chen, Zhaofeng

    2012-10-01

    Dense and adherent Ir coating was deposited on porous WC ceramic by double glow plasma (DGP). There were two cathodes in the vacuum deposition chamber. The bias voltage of Ir target and WC substrate were -900 and -350 V, respectively. The Ir coating was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, nanoindentation instrument, and scratch tester to examine the microstructure and the mechanical properties. The results indicated that the deposition rate by DGP was up to 5-6 μm/h which was faster than that by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition and magnetron sputtering. The Ir coating had a preferential growth orientation of (220) crystal face. The hardness was 800 HV. The elastic modulus was 644 GPa. The excellent mechanical properties were attributed to the preferential growth, the large compressive stress, and the shrinkage of the lattice parameters. The adhesive force was up to 51 N. The strong adhesion was attributed to the mechanical locking and chemical reaction between the Ir coating and the porous WC substrate.

  6. Process-Property Relationship for Air Plasma-Sprayed Gadolinium Zirconate Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Gopal; Tan, Yang; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay

    2015-02-01

    The continuous need of elevating operating temperature of gas turbine engines has introduced several challenges with the current state-of-the-art yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), requiring examination of new TBC material with high temperature phase stability, lower thermal conductivity, and resistance to environmental ash particles. Gadolinium zirconate (Gd2Zr2O7) (GDZ) has been shown to meet many of these requirements, and has, in fact, been successfully implemented in to engine components. However, several fundamental issues related to the process-ability, toughness, and microstructural differences for GDZ when compared to equivalent YSZ coating. This study seeks to critically address the process-structure-property correlations for plasma-sprayed GDZ coating subjected to controlled parametric exploration. Use of in-flight diagnostics coupled with in situ and ex situ coating property monitoring allows examination and comparison of the process-property interplay and the resultant differences between the two TBC compositions. The results indicate that it is feasible to retain material chemistry and fabricate relevant microstructures of interest with GDZ with concomitant performance advantages such as low conductivity, mechanical compliance, sintering resistance, and suppression of environmentally induced damage from ash particles. This study provides a framework for optimal design and manufacturing of emergent multi-layer and multi-material TBCs.

  7. High Temperature Multilayer Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited Via Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harder, Bryan James; Zhu, Dongming; Schmitt, Michael P.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Si-based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) require environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments to avoid rapid material loss. Candidate EBC materials have use temperatures only marginally above current technology, but the addition of a columnar oxide topcoat can substantially increase the durability. Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) allows application of these multilayer EBCs in a single process. The PS-PVD technique is a unique method that combines conventional thermal spray and vapor phase methods, allowing for tailoring of thin, dense layers or columnar microstructures by varying deposition conditions. Multilayer coatings were deposited on CMC specimens and assessed for durability under high heat flux and load. Coated samples with surface temperatures ranging from 2400-2700F and 10 ksi loads using the high heat flux laser rigs at NASA Glenn. Coating morphology was characterized in the as-sprayed condition and after thermomechanical loading using electron microscopy and the phase structure was tracked using X-ray diffraction.

  8. Formation and dissociation of dust molecules in dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jia; Feng, Fan; Liu, Fucheng; Dong, Lifang; He, Yafeng

    2016-09-01

    Dust molecules are observed in a dusty plasma experiment. By using measurements with high spatial resolution, the formation and dissociation of the dust molecules are studied. The ion cloud in the wake of an upper dust grain attracts the lower dust grain nearby. When the interparticle distance between the upper dust grain and the lower one is less than a critical value, the two dust grains would form a dust molecule. The upper dust grain always leads the lower one as they travel. When the interparticle distance between them is larger than the critical value, the dust molecule would dissociate. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11205044 and 11405042), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant Nos. A2011201006 and A2012201015), the Research Foundation of Education Bureau of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. Y2012009), the Program for Young Principal Investigators of Hebei Province, China, and the Midwest Universities Comprehensive Strength Promotion Project, China.

  9. Formation of current singularity in a topologically constrained plasma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yao; Huang, Yi-Min; Qin, Hong; Bhattacharjee, A

    2016-02-01

    Recently a variational integrator for ideal magnetohydrodynamics in Lagrangian labeling has been developed. Its built-in frozen-in equation makes it optimal for studying current sheet formation. We use this scheme to study the Hahm-Kulsrud-Taylor problem, which considers the response of a 2D plasma magnetized by a sheared field under sinusoidal boundary forcing. We obtain an equilibrium solution that preserves the magnetic topology of the initial field exactly, with a fluid mapping that is non-differentiable. Unlike previous studies that examine the current density output, we identify a singular current sheet from the fluid mapping. These results are benchmarked with a constrained Grad-Shafranov solver. The same signature of current singularity can be found in other cases with more complex magnetic topologies. PMID:26986430

  10. Formation of current singularity in a topologically constrained plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yao; Huang, Yi-Min; Qin, Hong; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-02-01

    Recently a variational integrator for ideal magnetohydrodynamics in Lagrangian labeling has been developed. Its built-in frozen-in equation makes it optimal for studying current sheet formation. We use this scheme to study the Hahm-Kulsrud-Taylor problem, which considers the response of a 2D plasma magnetized by a sheared field under sinusoidal boundary forcing. We obtain an equilibrium solution that preserves the magnetic topology of the initial field exactly, with a fluid mapping that is non-differentiable. Unlike previous studies that examine the current density output, we identify a singular current sheet from the fluid mapping. These results are benchmarked with a constrained Grad-Shafranov solver. The same signature of current singularity can be found in other cases with more complex magnetic topologies.

  11. A comparative study of tribological behavior of plasma and D-gun sprayed coatings under different wear modes

    SciTech Connect

    Sundararajan, G.; Rao, D.S.; Prasad, K.U.M.; Joshi, S.V.

    1998-06-01

    In recent years, thermal sprayed protective coatings have gained widespread acceptance for a variety of industrial applications. A vast majority of these applications involve the use of thermal sprayed coatings to combat wear. While plasma spraying is the most versatile variant of all the thermal spray processes, the detonation gun (D-gun) coatings have been a novelty until recently because of their proprietary nature. The present study is aimed at comparing the tribological behavior of coatings deposited using the two above techniques by focusing on some popular coating materials that are widely adopted for wear resistant applications, namely, WC-12% Co, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr. To enable a comprehensive comparison of the above indicated thermal spray techniques as well as coating materials, the deposited coatings were extensively characterized employing microstructural evaluation, microhardness measurements, and XRD analysis for phase constitution. The behavior of these coatings under different wear modes was also evaluated by determining their tribological performance when subjected to solid particle erosion tests, rubber wheel sand abrasion tests, and pin-on-disk sliding wear tests. Among all the coating materials studied, D-gun sprayed WC-12% Co, in general, yields the best performance under different modes of wear, whereas plasma sprayed Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows least wear resistance to every wear mode.

  12. Microstructure and Wear Resistance of Plasma-Sprayed Molybdenum Coating Reinforced by MoSi2 Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jianhui; He, Zheyu; Wang, Yi; Qiu, Jingwen; Wang, Yueming

    2016-10-01

    Mo coatings with or without incorporated MoSi2 were fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying, and their microstructure, microhardness, bond strength, and wear resistance were compared. Two kinds of spray powder, i.e., pure Mo and a blend of Mo and MoSi2, were sprayed onto low-carbon steel. Microstructural analysis of the MoSi2-Mo coating showed MoSi2 homogeneously distributed in a Mo matrix. Addition of MoSi2 particles increased the microhardness of the as-sprayed Mo coating. The adhesion strength of the Mo coating was better than that of the MoSi2-Mo coating. Wear test results showed that the wear rate and friction coefficient of the two coatings increased with increasing load, and the friction coefficient of the MoSi2-Mo coating was lower than that of the Mo coating. The MoSi2-Mo composite coating exhibited better wear resistance than the Mo coating. The wear failure mechanisms of the two coatings were local plastic deformation, delamination, oxidation, and adhesion wear.

  13. Microstructure and Wear Resistance of Plasma-Sprayed Molybdenum Coating Reinforced by MoSi2 Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jianhui; He, Zheyu; Wang, Yi; Qiu, Jingwen; Wang, Yueming

    2016-08-01

    Mo coatings with or without incorporated MoSi2 were fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying, and their microstructure, microhardness, bond strength, and wear resistance were compared. Two kinds of spray powder, i.e., pure Mo and a blend of Mo and MoSi2, were sprayed onto low-carbon steel. Microstructural analysis of the MoSi2-Mo coating showed MoSi2 homogeneously distributed in a Mo matrix. Addition of MoSi2 particles increased the microhardness of the as-sprayed Mo coating. The adhesion strength of the Mo coating was better than that of the MoSi2-Mo coating. Wear test results showed that the wear rate and friction coefficient of the two coatings increased with increasing load, and the friction coefficient of the MoSi2-Mo coating was lower than that of the Mo coating. The MoSi2-Mo composite coating exhibited better wear resistance than the Mo coating. The wear failure mechanisms of the two coatings were local plastic deformation, delamination, oxidation, and adhesion wear.

  14. Heterogeneous nucleation as a potential sulphate-coating mechanism of atmospheric mineral dust particles and implications of coated dust on new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, H.; Napari, I.; Timmreck, C.; VehkamäKi, H.; Pirjola, L.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Lauri, A.; Kulmala, M.

    2003-09-01

    The plausibility of heterogeneous conucleation of water, sulphuric acid, and ammonia as a pathway leading to soluble coating of atmospheric mineral dust is investigated. In addition, the effect of such sulphate-coated dust on the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles is addressed. The simulated new particle formation mechanism is ternary nucleation of water, sulphuric acid, and ammonia vapors, while in the condensational growth process the effect of condensable organic vapor is also studied. The results indicate that soluble coating of dust by heterogeneous nucleation can occur at atmospheric sulphuric acid concentrations. In addition, the simulations show that homogeneous ternary nucleation and subsequent growth are decoupled. Although observed (or even higher) dust concentrations are unable to inhibit new particle formation, coated dust particles acting as condensation and coagulation sinks can prevent the growth of newly formed particles to detectable sizes. This is particularly true in desert areas, where organic vapor concentrations are low.

  15. Determination of the Mechanical Properties of Plasma-Sprayed Hydroxyapatite Coatings Using the Knoop Indentation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Fahad; Wang, James; Berndt, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    The microhardness and elastic modulus of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings were evaluated using Knoop indentation on the cross section and on the top surface. The effects of indentation angle, testing direction, measurement location and applied load on the microhardness and elastic modulus were investigated. The variability and distribution of the microhardness and elastic modulus data were statistically analysed using the Weibull modulus distribution. The results indicate that the dependence of microhardness and elastic modulus on the indentation angle exhibits a parabolic shape. Dependence of the microhardness values on the indentation angle follows Pythagoras's theorem. The microhardness, Weibull modulus of microhardness and Weibull modulus of elastic modulus reach their maximum at the central position (175 µm) on the cross section of the coatings. The Weibull modulus of microhardness revealed similar values throughout the thickness, and the Weibull modulus of elastic modulus shows higher values on the top surface compared to the cross section.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Air Plasma Sprayed Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Bradley; Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis; Wadley, Haydn

    2015-01-01

    Development work in Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs) for Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) has focused considerably on the identification of materials systems and coating architectures to meet application needs. The evolution of these systems has occurred so quickly that modeling efforts and requisite data for modeling lag considerably behind development. Materials property data exists for many systems in the bulk form, but the effects of deposition on the critical properties of strength and fracture behavior are not well studied. We have plasma sprayed bulk samples of baseline EBC materials (silicon, ytterbium disilicate) and tested the mechanical properties of these materials to elicit differences in strength and toughness. We have also endeavored to assess the mixed-mode fracture resistance, Gc, of silicon in a baseline EBC applied to SiCSiC CMC via four point bend test. These results are compared to previously determined properties of the comparable bulk material.

  17. Synthesis, characterization and physical properties of Al-Cu-Fe quasicrystalline plasma sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, S.

    1995-11-09

    Our lab has been working with plasma spraying of both high pressure gas atomized (HPGA) and cast and crushed quasicrystal powders. A major component of this research includes comparative studies of PAS coatings formed with starting powders prepared by both techniques. In addition, a thorough investigation of the effects of starting powder particle size on coating microstructure is included. During the course of the overall research, an interest developed in forming Al-Cu-Fe materials with finer grain sizes. Therefore, a brief study was performed to characterize the effect of adding boron to Al-Cu-Fe materials prepared by different techniques. In addition to characterizing the microstructural features of the above materials, oxidation and wear behavior was also examined.

  18. Microstructure and Pitting Corrosion Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Fe-Si Nanocomposite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xi; Meng, Xinjing; Zhong, Qingdong; Yang, Jian; Shu, Mingyong; Han, Hongbo; Bui, QuocBinh

    2016-06-01

    In this study, Fe-Si nanoparticle composite coating (FSN) and Fe-Si microparticle composite coating (FSM) were prepared via atmospheric plasma spraying, and FSN was thermally treated under hydrogen atmosphere at 1120 °C for holding time of 2.5 h (TFSN). Under transmission electron microscopy, many unmelted nanoscale particles were observed in FSN, while no substantial particles were found in TFSN. On scanning electron microscopy analysis, pores and cracks were observed in FSM and FSN, while no defects were found in TFSN. Scanning electrochemical microscopy testing in 3.5 wt.% NaCl for 5 h revealed that FSM underwent severe pitting corrosion, FSN showed relatively minor pitting corrosion, and TFSN had no pitting corrosion.

  19. Plasma surface oxidation of 316L stainless steel for improving adhesion strength of silicone rubber coating to metal substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifi, Afrooz; Imani, Mohammad; Khorasani, Mohammad Taghi; Daliri Joupari, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    Stainless steel 316L is one of the most widely used materials for fabricating of biomedical devices hence, improving its surface properties is still of great interest and challenging in biomaterial sciences. Plasma oxidation, in comparison to the conventional chemical or mechanical methods, is one of the most efficient methods recently used for surface treatment of biomaterials. Here, stainless steel specimens were surface oxidized by radio-frequency plasma irradiation operating at 34 MHz under pure oxygen atmosphere. Surface chemical composition of the samples was significantly changed after plasma oxidation by appearance of the chromium and iron oxides on the plasma-oxidized surface. A wettable surface, possessing high surface energy (83.19 mN m-1), was observed after plasma oxidation. Upon completion of the surface modification process, silicone rubber was spray coated on the plasma-treated stainless steel surface. Morphology of the silicone rubber coating was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A uniform coating was formed on the oxidized surface with no delamination at polymer-metal interface. Pull-off tests showed the lowest adhesion strength of coating to substrate (0.12 MPa) for untreated specimens and the highest (0.89 MPa) for plasma-oxidized ones.

  20. Formation Mechanism of Titanium Carbide Crystal in Laser Synthesized Metal-Ceramic Composite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Baoshuai; Zhang, Zhongwen; Wang, Xinhong; Zou, Zengda

    In situ titanium carbide reinforced iron-based composite coating was deposited on mild carbon steel using laser surface engineering (LSE) with ferrotitanium and graphite as precursor. The microstructure and phase constituents of the deposited coating were characterized. Formation mechanism of titanium carbide crystal in the composite coating was elucidated by correlating the morphology of titanium carbide and the thermal cycle experienced by the precursor during the laser treatment. It was demonstrated that titanium carbide was formed in situ as a result of the metallurgical reaction between ferrotitanium and graphite following a liquid-precipitation route. Different morphologies of titanium carbide crystal (dendrite and fishbone) correspond to the primary and eutectic titanium carbide respectively.