Science.gov

Sample records for plasma electron temperature

  1. Electron Temperature Modification in Gas Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godyak, Valery

    2011-10-01

    In gas discharge plasma with a Maxwellian electron energy distribution function (EEDF), the ionization balance results in the electron temperature Te being solely a function of the product of gas pressure p and plasma characteristic size d, Te = Te(pd), independently on plasma density and electron heating mechanism. This common feature of gas discharge plasma takes place in self-sustained discharges where ionization is locally coupled with electron heating, usually in a uniform heating electric field. At such condition, there is no room for electron temperature change at fixed pd. Variety of non-equilibrium phenomena observed in self-organized dc and rf discharge structures, and in relaxation process therein suggests the way to EEDF and Te modification. At such conditions, the electron heating can be separated (in space or/and in time) from the ionization. Few examples of such discharge structures in well know stationary dc and rf discharges and in plasma transient processes, leading to considerable mean electron energy reduction, will be considered in the presentation together with abbreviated review of existing methods and experimental results on EEDF control in laboratory plasmas. This work was supported in part by the DOE OFES (Contract No DE-SC0001939).

  2. New Electron Temperature Diagnostic for Low Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Robert; Loch, Stuart

    2004-11-01

    A new line ratio diagnostic design to measure electron temperature in plasma is presented. Unlike previous diagnostics, this new technique features emission lines originating from levels with different principal quantum numbers. A significant advantage of this approach is that the line ratio varies considerably with temperature in the 1 to 20 eV range. Another advantage is that both transitions are optically thin even for plasma density up to 1 E 14 cm-3. The drawbacks are: a large difference in the line intensities and the significant difference in wavelength. The event of high sensitivity CCD camera combine with precise calibration can to a large extent minimize these latest two issues. The diagnostic is tested on the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) helicon plasma source. ASTRAL is a 2.3 m long helicon source designed to investigate basic plasma and space plasma processes. The device produces plasmas with the following typical parameters ne = 1 E9 to 1 E13 cm-3, Te = 2 to 20 eV and Ti = 0.03 to 0.3 eV. A series of 8 large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.2 kGauss. Operating pressure varies from 0.1 to 100 mTorr. A water cooled fractional helix antenna is used to introduce RF power up to 2 kwatt through a standard matching circuit. The line ratio temperatures are measured by means of a 0.33 m McPherson Criss-Cross Scanning monochromator instrumented with a SPH5 Apogee CCD camera. The line ratio temperatures are compared to electron temperatures measured by a rf compensated Langmuir Probe. To validate the diagnostic, a new collisional radiative model that makes use of the latest excitation cross-section values is presented. The model is also used to predict the potential range of this new diagnostic both in terms of electron temperature and plasma density.

  3. Two-dimensional-spatial distribution measurement of electron temperature and plasma density in low temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Cheol; Jang, Sung-Ho; Oh, Se-Jin; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2013-05-15

    A real-time measurement method for two-dimensional (2D) spatial distribution of the electron temperature and plasma density was developed. The method is based on the floating harmonic method and the real time measurement is achieved with little plasma perturbation. 2D arrays of the sensors on a 300 mm diameter wafer-shaped printed circuit board with a high speed multiplexer circuit were used. Experiments were performed in an inductive discharge under various external conditions, such as powers, gas pressures, and different gas mixing ratios. The results are consistent with theoretical prediction. Our method can measure the 2D spatial distribution of plasma parameters on a wafer-level in real-time. This method can be applied to plasma diagnostics to improve the plasma uniformity of plasma reactors for plasma processing.

  4. Determining electron temperature and density in a hydrogen microwave plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Farhat, Samir; Gicquel, Alix; Hassouni, Khaled; Lefebvre, Michel

    1993-01-01

    A three-temperature thermo-chemical model is developed for analyzing the chemical composition and energy states of a hydrogen microwave plasma used for studying diamond deposition. The chemical and energy exchange rate coefficients are determined from cross section data, assuming Maxwellian velocity distributions for electrons. The model is reduced to a zero-dimensional problem to solve for the electron temperature and ion mole fraction, using measured vibrational and rotational temperatures. The calculations indicate that the electron temperature may be determined to within a few percent error even though the uncertainty in dissociation fraction is many times larger.

  5. Electron temperature and density measurements of laser induced germanium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Hira; Arshad, Saboohi; Haq, S. U.; Nadeem, Ali

    2016-05-01

    The germanium plasma produced by the fundamental harmonics (1064 nm) of Nd:YAG laser in single and double pulse configurations have been studied spectroscopically. The plasma is characterized by measuring the electron temperature using the Boltzmann plot method for neutral and ionized species and electron number density as a function of laser irradiance, ambient pressure, and distance from the target surface. It is observed that the plasma parameters have an increasing trend with laser irradiance (9-33 GW/cm2) and with ambient pressure (8-250 mbar). However, a decreasing trend is observed along the plume length up to 4.5 mm. The electron temperature and electron number density are also determined using a double pulse configuration, and their behavior at fixed energy ratio and different interpulse delays is discussed.

  6. Continuous gas discharge plasma with 200 K electron temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, Shannon; Robertson, Scott

    2010-03-15

    A very cold and collisional hot-filament discharge plasma is created in a vacuum chamber with an inner wall cooled by liquid nitrogen. The inner chamber (16.5 cm diameterx30 cm) has two negatively biased tungsten filaments for plasma generation and a Langmuir probe on axis for diagnostic measurements. With the wall at 140 K, 0.5-16 mA filament emission, and 1.6 mTorr carbon monoxide as the working gas, probe data give electron temperatures of 17-28 meV (197-325 K) with corresponding densities of 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}. With He, Ar, H{sub 2}, and N{sub 2} at 140 K, the electron temperatures are >500 K. The lower electron temperature with CO is attributed to the asymmetric CO molecule having a larger cross section for electron excitation of rotational modes as a consequence of its dipole moment.

  7. Equatorial plasma bubbles with enhanced ion and electron temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeheung; Min, Kyoung Wook; Kim, Vitaly P.; Kil, Hyosub; Su, Shin-Yi; Chao, Chi Kuang; Lee, Jae-Jin

    2008-09-01

    While the ion and electron temperatures inside equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) are normally lower than those in an ambient plasma, bubbles with enhanced temperatures (BETs) are found occasionally in the topside ionosphere. Here we report the characteristics of BETs identified from observations of the first Republic of China Satellite (ROCSAT-1), the first Korea Multi-purpose Satellite (KOMPSAT-1), and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F15 during the solar maximum period between 2000 and 2001. The oxygen ion fraction inside the BETs, which was no lower than that of the ambient ionosphere, was similar to the case of ordinary low-temperature EPBs. These observations indicate that the BETs and low-temperature EPBs detected on the topside were produced by the upward drift of low-density plasma from lower altitudes. The feature that distinguishes BETs from normal EPBs is the occurrence of an unusually fast poleward field-aligned plasma flow relative to the ambient plasma. The BETs occurred preferentially around geomagnetic latitudes of 10° in the summer hemisphere, where the ambient ion and electron temperatures are lower than those in the conjugate winter hemisphere. The occurrence of BETs did not show any notable dependence on geomagnetic activities. The characteristics of the BETs suggest that the BETs were produced by adiabatic plasma heating associated with a fast poleward oxygen ion transport along magnetic flux tubes.

  8. Diagnosis of gas temperature, electron temperature, and electron density in helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Zhengshi; Zhang Guanjun; Shao Xianjun; Zhang Zenghui

    2012-07-15

    The optical emission spectra of helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) are captured with a three grating spectrometer. The grating primary spectrum covers the whole wavelength range from 200 nm to 900 nm, with the overlapped grating secondary spectrum appearing from 500 nm to 900 nm, which has a higher resolution than that of the grating primary spectrum. So the grating secondary spectrum of OH (A{sup 2}{Sigma} {sup +}({upsilon} Prime = 0) {yields} X{sup 2}{Pi}({upsilon} Double-Prime = 0)) is employed to calculate the gas temperature (T{sub g}) of helium APPJ. Moreover, the electron temperature (T{sub e}) is deduced from the Maxwellian electron energy distribution combining with T{sub g}, and the electron density (n{sub e}) is extracted from the plasma absorbed power. The results are helpful for understanding the physical property of APPJs.

  9. Atomic precision etch using a low-electron temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, L.; Wang, J.-C.; Rauf, S.; Zhang, Y.; Agarwal, A.; Kenney, J.; Ramaswamy, K.; Collins, K.

    2016-03-01

    Sub-nm precision is increasingly being required of many critical plasma etching processes in the semiconductor industry. Accurate control over ion energy and ion/radical composition is needed during plasma processing to meet these stringent requirements. Described in this work is a new plasma etch system which has been designed with the requirements of atomic precision plasma processing in mind. In this system, an electron sheet beam parallel to the substrate surface produces a plasma with an order of magnitude lower electron temperature Te (~ 0.3 eV) and ion energy Ei (< 3 eV without applied bias) compared to conventional radio-frequency (RF) plasma technologies. Electron beam plasmas are characterized by higher ion-to-radical fraction compared to RF plasmas, so a separate radical source is used to provide accurate control over relative ion and radical concentrations. Another important element in this plasma system is low frequency RF bias capability which allows control of ion energy in the 2-50 eV range. Presented in this work are the results of etching of a variety of materials and structures performed in this system. In addition to high selectivity and low controllable etch rate, an important requirement of atomic precision etch processes is no (or minimal) damage to the remaining material surface. It has traditionally not been possible to avoid damage in RF plasma processing systems, even during atomic layer etch. The experiments for Si etch in Cl2 based plasmas in the aforementioned etch system show that damage can be minimized if the ion energy is kept below 10 eV. Layer-by-layer etch of Si is also demonstrated in this etch system using electrical and gas pulsing.

  10. Plasma electron temperature and the entropy effect on hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakartnarodom, Parinya

    that atomic hydrogen is produced in the plasma, and the results from flue-gas analyzer show that H 2 is a product from the reaction in the plasma. From the experimental results, the yield of H2 is increased with the increasing of the electron temperature in gas/gas plasma reactions having positive entropy. For solid/gas plasma reactions which DeltaSo is either positive or negative, there is no correlation between H2 yield and electron temperature. However, H2 yield from all plasma reactions is lower than the prediction from the van't Hoff equation. Based on an analysis of the Saha equation, the effective temperature of the chemical species in the plasma may be lower than the electron temperature, thus rationalizing our observation of reduced H2 yield. An alternative hypothesis is that the quenching rates of the products from the plasma are not fast enough to avoid recombination of the reaction products at low temperature, where the enthalpy term dominates.

  11. Temperature evolution of strongly coupled electron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Sanat Kumar; Shaffer, Nathaniel; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2015-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of electron-ion plasmas have been carried out, focusing on the classical strongly coupled regime relevant to ultracold neutral plasmas. The interaction of oppositely charged species is modeled using a pseudopotential with a repulsive core at a specified distance ɛ in units of average interparticle spacing. This parameter distinguishes classical from quantum statistical regimes. Simulations are initiated with an equilibration phase in which ions and electrons are held to fixed independent temperatures using a thermostat. Subsequently, the thermostats are removed and the system is allowed to evolve. Two effects are observed: (1) For sufficiently small values of ɛ, the plasma rapidly heats, (2) electrons and ions equilibrate on a longer time scale. The critical ɛ value for the onset of heating and the temperature equilibration rate are compared with existing theory. Excess pressure is calculated in each case based on the equilibrium radial distribution functions obtained during the equilibration phase. The Γ - ɛ phase space is explored, revealing qualitative differences in the temperature evolution due to electron-ion interactions in the classical and quantum regimes. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from NSF grant PHY-1453736.

  12. Temperature diagnostics of ECR plasma by measurement of electron bremsstrahlung

    SciTech Connect

    Kasthurirangan, S.; Agnihotri, A. N.; Desai, C. A.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2012-07-15

    The x-ray bremsstrahlung spectrum emitted by the electron population in a 14.5 GHz ECR plasma source has been measured using a NaI(Tl) detector, and hence the electron temperature of the higher energy electron population in the plasma has been determined. The x-ray spectra for Ne and Ar gases have been systematically studied as a function of inlet gas pressure from 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} mbar to 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} mbar and for input microwave power {approx}1 W to {approx}300 W. At the highest input power and optimum pressure conditions, the end point bremsstrahlung energies are seen to reach {approx}700 keV. The estimated electron temperatures (T{sub e}) were found to be in the range 20 keV-80 keV. The T{sub e} is found to be peaking at a pressure of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} mbar for both gases. The T{sub e} is seen to increase with increasing input power in the intermediate power region, i.e., between 100 and 200 W, but shows different behaviour for different gases in the low and high power regions. Both gases show very weak dependence of electron temperature on inlet gas pressure, but the trends in each gas are different.

  13. To the problem of electron temperature control in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Galechyan, G.A.; Anna, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    One of the main problems in low temperature plasma is control plasma parameters at fixed values of current and gas pressure in the discharge. It is known that an increase in the intensity of sound wave directed along the positive column to values in excess of a definite threshold leads to essential rise of the temperature of electrons. However, no less important is the reduction of electron temperature in the discharge down to the value less than that in plasma in the absence external influence. It is known that to reduce the electron temperature in the plasma of CO{sub 2} laser, easily ionizable admixture are usually introduced in the discharge area with the view of increasing the overpopulation. In the present work we shall show that the value of electron temperature can be reduced by varying of sound wave intensity at its lower values. The experiment was performed on an experimental setup consisted of the tube with length 52 cm and diameter 9.8 cm, two electrodes placed at the distance of 27 cm from each other. An electrodynamical radiator of sound wave was fastened to one of tube ends. Fastened to the flange at the opposite end was a microphone for the control of sound wave parameters. The studies were performed in range of pressures from 40 to 180 Torr and discharge currents from 40 to 110 mA. The intensity of sound wave was varied from 74 to 92 dB. The measurement made at the first resonance frequency f = 150 Hz of sound in the discharge tube, at which a quarter of wave length keep within the length of the tube. The measurement of longitudinal electric field voltage in plasma of positive column was conducted with the help of two probes according to the compensation method. Besides, the measurement of gas temperature in the discharge were taken. Two thermocouple sensors were arranged at the distance of 8 cm from the anode, one of them being installed on the discharge tube axis, the second-fixed the tube wall.

  14. Electron Temperature and Potential Measurements in a Helicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, J.; Hayes, T. R.; Gilmore, M.

    2013-10-01

    Measurements of plasma potential, floating potential, and electron temperature, Te, are notoriously difficult in RF-produced plasmas such as helicons. This work presents comparisons of potential and Te measurements made via swept and stepped compensated and uncompensated single and double Langmuir probes, emissive probes, and static triple probes. These measurements have been made in the HelCat (Helicon-Cathode) linear plasma device at the University of New Mexico using HelCat's helicon source. HelCat is a 4 m long, 0.5 m diameter device with magnetic field, B0 <2.2 kG, and typical densities n ~ 1018 - 1020 m-3. Comparisons between the measurements and expected theoretical differences will be presented. Supported by US National Science Foundation Award 1201995.

  15. Control of electron temperature and space potential gradients by superposition of thermionic electrons on electron cyclotron resonance plasmas.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chanho; Kaneko, Toshiro; Tamura, Shuichi; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2010-05-01

    An electron temperature gradient (ETG) is formed perpendicular to the magnetic field lines by superimposing low-temperature thermionic electrons emitted from a tungsten hot plate upon high-temperature electrons of an electron cyclotron resonance plasma, which pass through two different-shaped mesh grids. The radial profile of the plasma space potential can be controlled independent of the ETG by changing the bias voltages of the hot plate.

  16. Electron temperature gradient driven instability in the tokamak boundary plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.Q.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Diamond, P.H.

    1992-12-15

    A general method is developed for calculating boundary plasma fluctuations across a magnetic separatrix in a tokamak with a divertor or a limiter. The slab model, which assumes a periodic plasma in the edge reaching the divertor or limiter plate in the scrape-off layer(SOL), should provide a good estimate, if the radial extent of the fluctuation quantities across the separatrix to the edge is small compared to that given by finite particle banana orbit. The Laplace transform is used for solving the initial value problem. The electron temperature gradient(ETG) driven instability is found to grow like t{sup {minus}1/2}e{sup {gamma}mt}.

  17. Sustenance of inhomogeneous electron temperature in a magnetized plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Karkari, S. K. Mishra, S. K.; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-09-15

    This paper presents the equilibrium properties of a magnetized plasma column sustained by direct-current (dc) operated hollow cathode discharge in conjunction with a conducting end-plate, acting as the anode. The survey of radial plasma characteristics, performed in argon plasma, shows hotter plasma in the periphery as compared to the central plasma region; whereas the plasma density peaks at the center. The off-centered peak in radial temperature is attributed due to inhomogeneous power deposition in the discharge volume in conjunction with short-circuiting effect by the conducting end plate. A theoretical model based on particle flux and energy balance is given to explain the observed characteristics of the plasma column.

  18. 2-D Imaging of Electron Temperature in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    T. Munsat; E. Mazzucato; H. Park; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-07-08

    By taking advantage of recent developments in millimeter wave imaging technology, an Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) instrument, capable of simultaneously measuring 128 channels of localized electron temperature over a 2-D map in the poloidal plane, has been developed for the TEXTOR tokamak. Data from the new instrument, detailing the MHD activity associated with a sawtooth crash, is presented.

  19. Two dimensional electron cyclotron emission imaging study of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations in Tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Bihe

    An innovative plasma diagnostic technique, electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI), was successfully developed and implemented on the TEXT-U and RTP tokamaks for the study of plasma electron temperature profiles and fluctuations. Due to the high spatial and temporal resolution of this new diagnostic, plasma filamentation was observed during high power electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in TEXT-U, and was identified as multiple rotating magnetic islands. In RTP, under special plasma conditions, evidence for magnetic bubbling was first observed, which is characterized by the flattening of the electron temperature and pressure profiles over a small annular region of about 1-2 cm extent near the q = 2 surface. More important results arose from the detailed study of the broadband plasma turbulence in TEXT-U and RTP. With the first measurements of poloidal wavenumbers and dispersion relations, turbulent Te fluctuations in the confinement region of TEXT-U plasmas were identified as electron drift wave turbulence. The fluctuation amplitude is found to follow the mixing length scaling, and the fluctuation-induced conducted- heat flux can account for the observed anomalous energy transport in TEXT-U. In RTP, detailed ECEI study of broadband Te fluctuations has shown that many characteristics of the observed fluctuations are consistent with the predictions of toroidal ηi mode theory. These include the global dependence of the fluctuation frequency and amplitude on the plasma density and current. The measured isotope and impurity scalings quantitatively match the predictions of toroidal ηi mode theory. The ECEI measurements in combination with ECRH modification of T e profiles argue against the Te gradients serving as the driving force of the turbulence. With the detailed 2- D measurements of the fluctuation distribution over the plasma minor cross-section, large scale, coherent structures similar to the eigenmode structures predicted by toroidal ηi mode theory

  20. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue

    2015-02-15

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (∼2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic “poly-tropic law” is more appropriate than the isothermal “barometric law” to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the “poly-tropic law” are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3.

  1. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin; Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue

    2015-02-01

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (˜2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic "poly-tropic law" is more appropriate than the isothermal "barometric law" to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the "poly-tropic law" are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3.

  2. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin; Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue

    2015-02-01

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (∼2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic "poly-tropic law" is more appropriate than the isothermal "barometric law" to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the "poly-tropic law" are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3. PMID:25725841

  3. Probing plasma turbulence by modulating the electron temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    DeBoo, J. C.; Petty, C. C.; Holland, C.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Doyle, E. J.; Hillesheim, J.; Peebles, W. A.; Zeng, L.; White, A. E.; Austin, M. E.; Yan, Z.

    2010-05-15

    The local value of a/L{sub Te}, a turbulence drive term, was modulated with electron cyclotron heating in L-mode discharges on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] and the density and electron temperature fluctuations in low, intermediate, and high-k regimes were measured and compared with nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. The local drive term at rhoapprox0.6 was reduced by up to 50%, which produced comparable reductions in electron temperature fluctuations at low-k. At intermediate k, k{sub t}hetaapprox4 cm{sup -1} and k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}approx0.8, a very interesting and unexpected result was observed where density fluctuations increased by up to 10% when the local drive term was decreased by 50%. Initial comparisons of simulations from GYRO with the thermal diffusivity from power balance analysis and measured turbulence response are reported. Simulations for the case with the lowest drive term are challenging as they are near the marginal value of a/L{sub Te} for trapped electron mode activity.

  4. Electron-temperature and energy-flow history in an imploding plasma.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, L; Kroupp, E; Davara, G; Starobinets, A; Fisher, V I; Bernshtam, V A; Ralchenko, Yu V; Maron, Y; Fisher, A; Hoffmann, D H H

    2005-05-01

    The time-dependent radial distribution of the electron temperature in a 0.6 micros, 220-kA gas-puff z-pinch plasma is studied using spatially-resolved observations of line emission from singly to fivefold ionized oxygen ions during the plasma implosion, up to 50 ns before maximum compression. The temperature obtained, together with the previously determined radial distributions of the electron density, plasma radial velocity, and magnetic field, allows for studying the history of the magnetic-field energy coupling to the plasma by comparing the energy deposition and dissipation rates in the plasma. It is found that at this phase of the implosion, approximately 65% of the energy deposited in the plasma is imparted to the plasma radial flow, with the rest of the energy being converted into internal energy and radiation. PMID:16089655

  5. Electron-temperature and energy-flow history in an imploding plasma.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, L; Kroupp, E; Davara, G; Starobinets, A; Fisher, V I; Bernshtam, V A; Ralchenko, Yu V; Maron, Y; Fisher, A; Hoffmann, D H H

    2005-05-01

    The time-dependent radial distribution of the electron temperature in a 0.6 micros, 220-kA gas-puff z-pinch plasma is studied using spatially-resolved observations of line emission from singly to fivefold ionized oxygen ions during the plasma implosion, up to 50 ns before maximum compression. The temperature obtained, together with the previously determined radial distributions of the electron density, plasma radial velocity, and magnetic field, allows for studying the history of the magnetic-field energy coupling to the plasma by comparing the energy deposition and dissipation rates in the plasma. It is found that at this phase of the implosion, approximately 65% of the energy deposited in the plasma is imparted to the plasma radial flow, with the rest of the energy being converted into internal energy and radiation.

  6. Local Measurement of Electron Density and Temperature in High Temperature Laser Plasma Using the Ion-Acoustic Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Davis, P; Ross, S; Meezan, N; Divol, L; Price, D; Glenzer, S H; Rousseaux, C

    2005-09-20

    The dispersion of ion-acoustic fluctuations has been measured using a novel technique that employs multiple color Thomson-scattering diagnostics to measure the frequency spectrum for two separate thermal ion-acoustic fluctuations with significantly different wave vectors. The plasma fluctuations are shown to become dispersive with increasing electron temperature. We demonstrate that this technique allows a time resolved local measurement of electron density and temperature in inertial confinement fusion plasmas.

  7. Evolution of the electron temperature profile of ohmically heated plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.C.; Arunasalam, V.; Goldston, R.J.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Johnson, D.W.; McGuire, K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stauffer, F.J.

    1985-08-01

    Blackbody electron cyclotron emission was used to ascertain and study the evolution and behavior of the electron temperature profile in ohmically heated plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The emission was measured with absolutely calibrated millimeter wavelength radiometers. The temperature profile normalized to the central temperature and minor radius is observed to broaden substantially with decreasing limiter safety factor q/sub a/, and is insensitive to the plasma minor radius. Sawtooth activity was seen in the core of most TFTR discharges and appeared to be associated with a flattening of the electron temperature profile within the plasma core where q less than or equal to 1. Two types of sawtooth behavior were identified in large TFTR plasmas (minor radius, a less than or equal to 0.8 m) : a typically 35 to 40 msec period ''normal'' sawtooth, and a ''compound'' sawtooth with 70 to 80 msec period.

  8. Experimental observation of electron-temperature-gradient turbulence in a laboratory plasma.

    PubMed

    Mattoo, S K; Singh, S K; Awasthi, L M; Singh, R; Kaw, P K

    2012-06-22

    We report the observation of electron-temperature-gradient (ETG) driven turbulence in the laboratory plasma of a large volume plasma device. The removal of unutilized primary ionizing and nonthermal electrons from uniform density plasma and the imposition and control of the gradient in the electron temperature (T[Symbol: see text] T(e)) are all achieved by placing a large (2 m diameter) magnetic electron energy filter in the middle of the device. In the dressed plasma, the observed ETG turbulence in the lower hybrid range of frequencies ν = (1-80 kHz) is characterized by a broadband with a power law. The mean wave number k perpendicular ρ(e) = (0.1-0.2) satisfies the condition k perpendicular ρ(e) ≤ 1, where ρ(e) is the electron Larmor radius.

  9. Arbitrary amplitude kinetic Alfven solitary waves in two temperature electron superthermal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manpreet; Singh Saini, Nareshpal; Ghai, Yashika

    2016-07-01

    Through various satellite missions it is observed that superthermal velocity distribution for particles is more appropriate for describing space and astrophysical plasmas. So it is appropriate to use superthermal distribution, which in the limiting case when spectral index κ is very large ( i.e. κ→∞), shifts to Maxwellian distribution. Two temperature electron plasmas have been observed in auroral regions by FAST satellite mission, and also by GEOTAIL and POLAR satellite in the magnetosphere. Kinetic Alfven waves arise when finite Larmor radius effect modifies the dispersion relation or characteristic perpendicular wavelength is comparable to electron inertial length. We have studied the kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) in a plasma comprising of positively charged ions, superthermal hot electrons and Maxwellian distributed cold electrons. Sagdeev pseudo-potential has been employed to derive an energy balance equation. The critical Mach number has been determined from the expression of Sagdeev pseudo-potential to see the existence of solitary structures. It is observed that sub-Alfvenic compressive solitons and super-Alfvenic rarefactive solitons exist in this plasma model. It is also observed that various parameters such as superthermality of hot electrons, relative concentration of cold and hot electron species, Mach number, plasma beta, ion to cold electron temperature ratio and ion to hot electron temperature ratio have significant effect on the amplitude and width of the KAWs. Findings of this investigation may be useful to understand the dynamics of coherent non-linear structures (i.e. KAWs) in space and astrophysical plasmas.

  10. Measurement of Electron Temperature and Plasma Density via Thomson Scattering and Electric Probe in Low Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Hyun-Jong; Chung, Kyu-Sun; Lho, Taihyeop

    2011-10-01

    Laser Thomson scattering system has been developed for the measurements of electron temperature and plasma density in low temperature plasma by means of the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with 2nd Harmonics (250 mJ at 532 nm, repetition rate of 20 Hz), triple grating spectrometer and ICCD camera. The triple grating spectrometer is composed of 3 grating (1800 gr/mm and 100 x 100 mm dimensions), 6 achromatic doublet lens (f=400 mm and 100 mm diameter) for reducing the abbreviation effect, two slits (entrance and exitance), opto- mechanical instruments, etc. The alignment and calibration of TGS system were performed by a diode laser and diffraction optics, Ne lamp (wavelength) and metal halide lamp (intensity), respectively. The LTS measurements were done wide ranges of 1 Plasma Simulator-II (DiPS-II) and it compared with the single probe measurements.

  11. Threefold Increase of the Bulk Electron Temperature of Plasma Discharges in a Magnetic Mirror Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagryansky, P. A.; Shalashov, A. G.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Lizunov, A. A.; Maximov, V. V.; Prikhodko, V. V.; Soldatkina, E. I.; Solomakhin, A. L.; Yakovlev, D. V.

    2015-05-01

    This Letter describes plasma discharges with a high temperature of bulk electrons in the axially symmetric high-mirror-ratio (R =35 ) open magnetic system gas dynamic trap (GDT) in the Budker Institute (Novosibirsk). According to Thomson scattering measurements, the on-axis electron temperature averaged over a number of sequential shots is 660 ±50 eV with the plasma density being 0.7 ×1 019 m-3 ; in few shots, electron temperature exceeds 900 eV. This corresponds to at least a threefold increase with respect to previous experiments both at GDT and at other comparable machines, thus, demonstrating the highest quasistationary (about 1 ms) electron temperature achieved in open traps. The breakthrough is made possible by application of a new 0.7 MW /54.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating system in addition to standard 5 MW heating by neutral beams, and application of a radial electric field to mitigate the flute instability.

  12. Effect of two-temperature electrons distribution on an electrostatic plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Jing; Xiang, Nong; Gan, Chunyun; Yang, Jinhong

    2013-06-15

    A magnetized collisionless plasma sheath containing two-temperature electrons is studied using a one-dimensional model in which the low-temperature electrons are described by Maxwellian distribution (MD) and high-temperature electrons are described by truncated Maxwellian distribution (TMD). Based on the ion wave approach, a modified sheath criterion including effect of TMD caused by high-temperature electrons energy above the sheath potential energy is established theoretically. The model is also used to investigate numerically the sheath structure and energy flux to the wall for plasmas parameters of an open divertor tokamak-like. Our results show that the profiles of the sheath potential, two-temperature electrons and ions densities, high-temperature electrons and ions velocities as well as the energy flux to the wall depend on the high-temperature electrons concentration, temperature, and velocity distribution function associated with sheath potential. In addition, the results obtained in the high-temperature electrons with TMD as well as with MD sheaths are compared for the different sheath potential.

  13. Effect of two-temperature electrons distribution on an electrostatic plasma sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jing; Xiang, Nong; Gan, Chunyun; Yang, Jinhong

    2013-06-01

    A magnetized collisionless plasma sheath containing two-temperature electrons is studied using a one-dimensional model in which the low-temperature electrons are described by Maxwellian distribution (MD) and high-temperature electrons are described by truncated Maxwellian distribution (TMD). Based on the ion wave approach, a modified sheath criterion including effect of TMD caused by high-temperature electrons energy above the sheath potential energy is established theoretically. The model is also used to investigate numerically the sheath structure and energy flux to the wall for plasmas parameters of an open divertor tokamak-like. Our results show that the profiles of the sheath potential, two-temperature electrons and ions densities, high-temperature electrons and ions velocities as well as the energy flux to the wall depend on the high-temperature electrons concentration, temperature, and velocity distribution function associated with sheath potential. In addition, the results obtained in the high-temperature electrons with TMD as well as with MD sheaths are compared for the different sheath potential.

  14. Weakly nonlinear ion-sound waves in inhomogeneous electron temperature, magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecseli, H. L.; Guio, P.

    2009-12-01

    Low frequency electrostatic waves are studied in magnetized plasmas for the case where the electron temperature varies with position in a direction perpendicular to the magnetic field. We analyze guided waves with characteristic frequencies below the ion cyclotron and ion plasma frequencies. A Korteweg-deVries equation is derived for the weakly nonlinear waves, and the results compared to numerical simulations. We study two different models for the electron distribution: one where the electrons are assumed to be in local Boltzmann equilibrium at all times, while the other model assumes a nonthermal-distribution for the electrons. The nonlinear space-time evolution of the electrostatic potential differs for the two cases.

  15. Reduced electron temperature in a magnetized inductively-coupled plasma with internal coil

    SciTech Connect

    Arancibia Monreal, J.; Chabert, P.; Godyak, V.

    2013-10-15

    The effect of magnetic filtering on the electron energy distribution function is studied in an inductive discharge with internal coil coupling. The coil is placed inside the plasma and driven by a low-frequency power supply (5.8 MHz) which leads to a very high power transfer efficiency. A permanent dipole magnet may be placed inside the internal coil to produce a static magnetic field around 100 Gauss. The coil and the matching system are designed to minimize the capacitive coupling to the plasma. Capacitive coupling is quantified by measuring the radiofrequency (rf) plasma potential with a capacitive probe. Without the permanent magnet, the rf plasma potential is significantly smaller than the electron temperature. When the magnet is present, the rf plasma potential increases. The electron energy distribution function is measured as a function of space with and without the permanent magnet. When the magnet is present, electrons are cooled down to low temperature in the downstream region. This region of low electron temperature may be useful for plasma processing applications, as well as for efficient negative ion production.

  16. Reduced electron temperature in a magnetized inductively-coupled plasma with internal coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arancibia Monreal, J.; Chabert, P.; Godyak, V.

    2013-10-01

    The effect of magnetic filtering on the electron energy distribution function is studied in an inductive discharge with internal coil coupling. The coil is placed inside the plasma and driven by a low-frequency power supply (5.8 MHz) which leads to a very high power transfer efficiency. A permanent dipole magnet may be placed inside the internal coil to produce a static magnetic field around 100 Gauss. The coil and the matching system are designed to minimize the capacitive coupling to the plasma. Capacitive coupling is quantified by measuring the radiofrequency (rf) plasma potential with a capacitive probe. Without the permanent magnet, the rf plasma potential is significantly smaller than the electron temperature. When the magnet is present, the rf plasma potential increases. The electron energy distribution function is measured as a function of space with and without the permanent magnet. When the magnet is present, electrons are cooled down to low temperature in the downstream region. This region of low electron temperature may be useful for plasma processing applications, as well as for efficient negative ion production.

  17. Oblique shock waves in a two electron temperature superthermally magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bains, A. S.; Panwar, A.; Ryu, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    A study is presented for the oblique propagation of low-frequency ion acoustic ( IA) shock waves in a magnetized plasma consisting of cold ions and two temperature superthermally distributed electrons. A nonlinear Korteweg de-Vries-Burger ( KdV-Burger) equation is obtained by using the reductive perturbation method (RPM) which governs the dynamics of the IA shock wave. Using the solution of KdV-Burger equation, the characteristics of the IA shock wave have been studied for various plasma parameters. The combined effects of the cold to hot electron temperature ratio (σ), the density ratio of hot electrons to ions (f), the superthermality of cold and hot electrons (κc, κh), the strength of the magnetic field (ω_{ci}), and the obliqueness (θ), significantly influence the profile of the shock wave. The findings in the present study could be important for the electrostatic wave structures in the Saturn's magnetosphere, where two temperature electrons exist with a kappa distribution.

  18. Dust-acoustic solitary structures in a magnetized dusty plasma with two-temperature nonextensive electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Emamuddin, M.; Yasmin, S.; Asaduzzaman, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2013-08-15

    The nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic (DA) waves in an obliquely propagating magnetized dusty plasma, containing nonextensively distributed electrons of distinct temperatures (namely lower and higher temperature nonextensive electrons), negatively charged mobile dust grains, and Maxwellian ions, is rigorously studied and analyzed by deriving the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation. It is found that the characteristics of the DA solitary waves (DASWs) are significantly modified by the external magnetic field, obliqueness of the system, nonextensivity of the electrons, electron temperature-ratios, and the respective number densities of two species of electrons. The results obtained from this analysis can be employed in understanding and treating the structures and the characteristics of DASWs both in laboratory and astrophysical plasma system.

  19. Laboratory observations of electron temperature in the wake of a sphere in a streaming plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oran, W. A.; Stone, N. H.; Samir, U.; Fontheim, E. G.

    1975-01-01

    A parametric study was performed of electron-temperature variation in the wake of a conducting sphere in a streaming plasma. The flow conditions were varied as follows: the ambient electron temperatures in the range from 850 to 2450 K; the ambient electron densities in the range from 0.0005 to 0.00007 per cu cm; and body potentials relative to plasma potential in the range from +1.7 to -2.8 V for an ion-beam energy of approximately 4 eV. Electron-temperature enhancements were observed which ranged up to 200 per cent above ambient in the nearest proximity of the body surface. The magnitude of the enhancement depends upon the ambient density, temperature, and body potential.

  20. Quantum Cohesion Oscillation of Electron Ground State in Low Temperature Laser Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Qingxun; Zhang, Ping; Dong, Lifang; Zhang, Kaixi

    1996-01-01

    The development of radically new technological and economically efficient methods for obtaining chemical products and for producing new materials with specific properties requires the study of physical and chemical processes proceeding at temperature of 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 4) K, temperature range of low temperature plasma. In our paper, by means of Wigner matrix of quantum statistical theory, a formula is derived for the energy of quantum coherent oscillation of electron ground state in laser plasma at low temperature. The collective behavior would be important in ion and ion-molecule reactions.

  1. Comparative electron temperature measurements of Thomson scattering and electron cyclotron emission diagnostics in TCABR plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, M. P.; Figueiredo, A. C. A.; Berni, L. A.; Machida, M.

    2010-10-15

    We present the first simultaneous measurements of the Thomson scattering and electron cyclotron emission radiometer diagnostics performed at TCABR tokamak with Alfven wave heating. The Thomson scattering diagnostic is an upgraded version of the one previously installed at the ISTTOK tokamak, while the electron cyclotron emission radiometer employs a heterodyne sweeping radiometer. For purely Ohmic discharges, the electron temperature measurements from both diagnostics are in good agreement. Additional Alfven wave heating does not affect the capability of the Thomson scattering diagnostic to measure the instantaneous electron temperature, whereas measurements from the electron cyclotron emission radiometer become underestimates of the actual temperature values.

  2. Arbitrary amplitude slow electron-acoustic solitons in three-electron temperature space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mbuli, L. N.; Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2015-06-15

    We examine the characteristics of large amplitude slow electron-acoustic solitons supported in a four-component unmagnetised plasma composed of cool, warm, hot electrons, and cool ions. The inertia and pressure for all the species in this plasma system are retained by assuming that they are adiabatic fluids. Our findings reveal that both positive and negative potential slow electron-acoustic solitons are supported in the four-component plasma system. The polarity switch of the slow electron-acoustic solitons is determined by the number densities of the cool and warm electrons. Negative potential solitons, which are limited by the cool and warm electron number densities becoming unreal and the occurrence of negative potential double layers, are found for low values of the cool electron density, while the positive potential solitons occurring for large values of the cool electron density are only limited by positive potential double layers. Both the lower and upper Mach numbers for the slow electron-acoustic solitons are computed and discussed.

  3. Temporal evolution of electron density and temperature in capillary discharge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Seong Y.; Kang, Hoonsoo; Uhm, Han S.; Lee, In W.; Suk, Hyyong

    2010-05-15

    Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of a capillary discharge plasma of helium gas were carried out to obtain detailed information about dynamics of the discharge plasma column, where the fast plasma dynamics is determined by the electron density and temperature. Our measurements show that the electron density of the capillary plasma column increases sharply after gas breakdown and reaches its peak of the order of 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} within less than 100 ns, and then it decreases as time goes by. The result indicates that a peak electron density of 2.3x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} occurs about 65 ns after formation of the discharge current, which is ideal for laser wakefield acceleration experiments reported by Karsch et al. [New J. Phys. 9, 415 (2007)].

  4. Measurement of the Electron-Ion Temperature Relaxation Rate in a Dense Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taccetti, J. M.; Shurter, R. P.; Goodwin, P. M.; Benage, J. F., Jr.

    2008-11-01

    Current theoretical approaches to temperature relaxation, which can be categorized as binary-collision and many-body approaches, disagree. Existing experimental evidence infers a lower relaxation rate compared to the binary-collision approach, but is insufficient to determine which approach is correct. We present the most recent results from an experiment aimed at obtaining the temperature relaxation rate between ions and electrons in a dense, strongly coupled plasma by directly measuring the temperature of each component. The plasma is formed by heating a gas jet with a 10 ps laser pulse. The electrons are preferentially heated by the short pulse laser (Te 100 eV), while the ions, after undergoing very rapid (sub-ps time-scale) disorder-induced heating, should only reach a temperature of 10-15 eV. This results in a strongly coupled ion plasma with an ion-ion coupling parameter γii 3-5. We plan to measure the electron and ion temperatures of the resulting plasma independently during and after heating, using collective Thomson scattering for electrons and a high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for the ions (measuring Doppler-broadened absorption lines).

  5. ELECTRON TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY IN AN EXPANDING PLASMA: PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Camporeale, E.; Burgess, D.

    2010-02-20

    We perform fully kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of a hot plasma that expands radially in a cylindrical geometry. The aim of the paper is to study the consequent development of the electron temperature anisotropy in an expanding plasma flow as found in a collisionless stellar wind. Kinetic plasma theory and simulations have shown that the electron temperature anisotropy is controlled by fluctuations driven by electromagnetic kinetic instabilities. In this study, the temperature anisotropy is driven self-consistently by the expansion. While the expansion favors an increase of parallel anisotropy (T{sub ||} > T{sub perpendicular}), the onset of the fire-hose instability will tend to decrease it. We show the results for supersonic, subsonic, and static expansion flows and suggest possible applications of the results for the solar wind and other stellar winds.

  6. Optical emission spectroscopy for simultaneous measurement of plasma electron density and temperature in a low-pressure microwave induced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Konjevic, N.; Jovicevic, S.; Ivkovic, M.

    2009-10-15

    The simple optical emission spectroscopy technique for diagnostics of low pressure microwave induced plasma (MIP) in hydrogen or in MIP seeded with hydrogen is described and tested. This technique uses the Boltzmann plot of relative line intensities along Balmer spectral series in conjunction with the criterion for partial local thermodynamic equilibrium for low electron density (N{sub e}) plasma diagnostics. The proposed technique is tested in a low pressure MIP discharge for simultaneous determination of electron density N{sub e} (10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} m{sup -3}) and temperature T{sub e}.

  7. Floating probe for electron temperature and ion density measurement applicable to processing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Hyong; Jang, Sung-Ho; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2007-02-01

    A floating-type probe and its driving circuit using the nonlinear characteristics of the probe sheath was developed and the electron temperature and the plasma density which is found from the ion part of the probe characteristic (ion density) were measured in inductively coupled plasmas. The floating-type probe was compared with a single Langmuir probe and it turned out that the floating-type probe agrees closely with the single probe at various rf powers and pressures. The ion density and electron temperature by the floating-type probe were measured with a film on the probe tip coated in CF{sub 4} plasma. It is found that the ion density and electron temperature by the floating-type probe were almost the same regardless of the coating on the probe tip while a single Langmuir probe does not work. Because the floating-type probe is hardly affected by the deposition on the probe tip, it is expected to be applied to plasma diagnostics for plasma processing such as deposition or etching.

  8. Dusty plasma diagnostics methods for charge, electron temperature, and ion density

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Bin; Goree, J.; Fortov, V. E.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Petrov, O. F.; Morfill, G. E.; Thomas, H. M.; Ivlev, A. V.

    2010-05-15

    Diagnostic methods are developed to measure the microparticle charge Q and two plasma parameters, electron temperature T{sub e}, and ion density n{sub i}, in the main plasma region of a dusty plasma. Using video microscopy to track microparticles yields a resonance frequency, which along with a charging model allows an estimation of Q and T{sub e}. Only measurements of microparticle position and velocity are required, unlike other methods that use measurements of T{sub e} and plasma parameters as inputs. The resonance frequency measurement can also be used with an ion drag model to estimate n{sub i}. These methods are demonstrated using a single-layer dusty plasma suspension under microgravity conditions.

  9. Improved electron collisional line broadening for low-temperature ions and neutrals in plasma modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, H. M.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Judge, E. J.; Barefield II, J. E.; Wiens, R. C.; Clegg, S. M.

    2015-09-29

    In this study, electron collisional broadening of observed spectral lines depends on plasma electron temperature and density. Including this effect in models of measured spectra is necessary to determine plasma conditions; however, computational limits make accurate line broadening treatments difficult to implement in large-scale plasma modeling efforts. In this paper, we report on improvements to the treatment of electron collisional line broadening and illustrate this with calculations using the Los Alamos ATOMIC code. We implement the Dimitrijevic and Konjevic modified semi-empirical model Dimitrijevic and Konjevic (1986 Astron. and Astrophy. 163 297 and 1987 Astron. Astrophys. 172 345), which we amend by employing oscillator strengths from Hartree–Fock calculations. This line broadening model applies to near-neutral plasmas with electron temperatures of Te ~ 1 eV and electron densities of Ne ~1017 cm-3. We evaluate the D.K.-inspired model against the previous hydrogenic approach in ATOMIC through comparison to NIST-rated measurements for selected neutral and singly-ionized Ca, O, Fe, and Sn lines using both fine-structure and configuration-averaged oscillator strengths. The new D.K.-inspired model is significantly more accurate than the previous hydrogenic model and we find the use of configuration-averaged oscillator strengths a good approximation for applications such as LIBS (laser induced breakdown spectroscopy), for which we demonstrate the use of the D.K.-inspired model.

  10. Improved electron collisional line broadening for low-temperature ions and neutrals in plasma modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Johns, H. M.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Judge, E. J.; Barefield II, J. E.; Wiens, R. C.; Clegg, S. M.

    2015-09-29

    In this study, electron collisional broadening of observed spectral lines depends on plasma electron temperature and density. Including this effect in models of measured spectra is necessary to determine plasma conditions; however, computational limits make accurate line broadening treatments difficult to implement in large-scale plasma modeling efforts. In this paper, we report on improvements to the treatment of electron collisional line broadening and illustrate this with calculations using the Los Alamos ATOMIC code. We implement the Dimitrijevic and Konjevic modified semi-empirical model Dimitrijevic and Konjevic (1986 Astron. and Astrophy. 163 297 and 1987 Astron. Astrophys. 172 345), which we amendmore » by employing oscillator strengths from Hartree–Fock calculations. This line broadening model applies to near-neutral plasmas with electron temperatures of Te ~ 1 eV and electron densities of Ne ~1017 cm-3. We evaluate the D.K.-inspired model against the previous hydrogenic approach in ATOMIC through comparison to NIST-rated measurements for selected neutral and singly-ionized Ca, O, Fe, and Sn lines using both fine-structure and configuration-averaged oscillator strengths. The new D.K.-inspired model is significantly more accurate than the previous hydrogenic model and we find the use of configuration-averaged oscillator strengths a good approximation for applications such as LIBS (laser induced breakdown spectroscopy), for which we demonstrate the use of the D.K.-inspired model.« less

  11. Improved electron collisional line broadening for low-temperature ions and neutrals in plasma modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, H. M.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Judge, E. J.; Barefield, J. E., II; Wiens, R. C.; Clegg, S. M.

    2014-11-01

    Electron collisional broadening of observed spectral lines depends on plasma electron temperature and density. Including this effect in models of measured spectra is necessary to determine plasma conditions; however, computational limits make accurate line broadening treatments difficult to implement in large-scale plasma modeling efforts. In this paper, we report on improvements to the treatment of electron collisional line broadening and illustrate this with calculations using the Los Alamos ATOMIC code. We implement the Dimitrijevic and Konjevic modified semi-empirical model Dimitrijevic and Konjevic (1986 Astron. and Astrophy. 163 297 and 1987 Astron. Astrophys. 172 345), which we amend by employing oscillator strengths from Hartree-Fock calculations. This line broadening model applies to near-neutral plasmas with electron temperatures of Te ˜ 1 eV and electron densities of Ne ˜ 1017 cm-3. We evaluate the D K-inspired model against the previous hydrogenic approach in ATOMIC through comparison to NIST-rated measurements for selected neutral and singly-ionized Ca, O, Fe, and Sn lines using both fine-structure and configuration-averaged oscillator strengths. The new D K-inspired model is significantly more accurate than the previous hydrogenic model and we find the use of configuration-averaged oscillator strengths a good approximation for applications such as LIBS (laser induced breakdown spectroscopy), for which we demonstrate the use of the D K-inspired model.

  12. Electron density and temperature measurement by continuum radiation emitted from weakly ionized atmospheric pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Wonho; Youn Moon, Se; Park, Jaeyoung

    2014-02-24

    The electron-atom neutral bremsstrahlung continuum radiation emitted from weakly ionized plasmas is investigated for electron density and temperature diagnostics. The continuum spectrum in 450–1000 nm emitted from the argon atmospheric pressure plasma is found to be in excellent agreement with the neutral bremsstrahlung formula with the electron-atom momentum transfer cross-section given by Popović. In 280–450 nm, however, a large discrepancy between the measured and the neutral bremsstrahlung emissivities is observed. We find that without accounting for the radiative H{sub 2} dissociation continuum, the temperature, and density measurements would be largely wrong, so that it should be taken into account for accurate measurement.

  13. Generalized Lenard-Balescu calculations of electron-ion temperature relaxation in beryllium plasma.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhen-Guo; Wang, Zhigang; Li, Da-Fang; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping

    2015-09-01

    The problem of electron-ion temperature relaxation in beryllium plasma at various densities (0.185-18.5g/cm^{3}) and temperatures [(1.0-8)×10^{3} eV] is investigated by using the generalized Lenard-Balescu theory. We consider the correlation effects between electrons and ions via classical and quantum static local field corrections. The numerical results show that the electron-ion pair distribution function at the origin approaches the maximum when the electron-electron coupling parameter equals unity. The classical result of the Coulomb logarithm is in agreement with the quantum result in both the weak (Γ_{ee}<10^{-2}) and strong (Γ_{ee}>1) electron-electron coupling ranges, whereas it deviates from the quantum result at intermediate values of the coupling parameter (10^{-2}<Γ_{ee}<1). We find that with increasing density of Be, the Coulomb logarithm will decrease and the corresponding relaxation rate ν_{ie} will increase. In addition, a simple fitting law ν_{ie}/ν_{ie}^{(0)}=a(ρ_{Be}/ρ_{0})^{b} is determined, where ν_{ie}^{(0)} is the relaxation rate corresponding to the normal metal density of Be and ρ_{0}, a, and b are the fitting parameters related to the temperature and the degree of ionization 〈Z〉 of the system. Our results are expected to be useful for future inertial confinement fusion experiments involving Be plasma. PMID:26465571

  14. Kinetics of metastable atoms and non-Maxwellian electrons in two-temperature plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.; Soon, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical and analytical solutions of the electron Boltzmann equation in two-temperature steady-state helium plasma are studied in a broad range of conditions T(a) = 5,000-20,000 K, T(e) = 10,000-20,000 K; N(a) = 10 to the 10th - 10 to the 18th per cu cm. The WKB analytical solution is found to be satisfactory in most situations. The deviation of the electron distribution from Maxwellian and a possibility of raising of the tail of the distribution in presence of sources of fast electrons is also discussed.

  15. Surface electronic states of low-temperature H-plasma-exposed Ge(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jaewon; Nemanich, R. J.

    1992-11-01

    The surface of low-temperature H-plasma-cleaned Ge(100) was studied by angle-resolved UV-photoemission spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). The surface was prepared by an ex situ preclean followed by an in situ H-plasma exposure at a substrate temperature of 150-300 °C. Auger-electron spectroscopy indicated that the in situ H-plasma clean removed the surface contaminants (carbon and oxygen) from the Ge(100) surface. The LEED pattern varied from a 1×1 to a sharp 2×1, as the substrate temperature was increased. The H-induced surface state was identified at ~5.6 eV below EF, which was believed to be mainly due to the ordered or disordered monohydride phases. The annealing dependence of the spectra showed that the hydride started to dissociate at a temperature of 190 °C, and the dangling-bond surface state was identified. A spectral shift upon annealing indicated that the H-terminated surfaces were unpinned. After the H-plasma clean at 300 °C the dangling-bond surface state was also observed directly with no evidence of H-induced states.

  16. Reconnection and electron temperature anisotropy in sub-proton scale plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, C. T.; Burgess, D.; Camporeale, E.

    2014-03-01

    Knowledge of turbulent behavior at sub-proton scales in magnetized plasmas is important for a full understanding of the energetics of astrophysical flows such as the solar wind. We study the formation of electron temperature anisotropy due to reconnection in the turbulent decay of sub-proton scale fluctuations using two-dimensional, particle-in-cell plasma simulations with a realistic electron-proton mass ratio and a guide field perpendicular to the simulation plane. A power spectrum fluctuation with approximately power-law form is created down to scales of the order of the electron gyroradius. We identify the signatures of collisionless reconnection at sites of X-point field geometry in the dynamic magnetic field topology, which gradually relaxes in complexity. The reconnection sites are generally associated with regions of strong parallel electron temperature anisotropy. The evolving topology of magnetic field lines connected to a reconnection site allows for the spatial mixing of electrons accelerated at multiple, spatially separated reconnection regions. This leads to the formation of multi-peaked velocity distribution functions with strong parallel temperature anisotropy. In a three-dimensional system that can support the appropriate wave vectors, the multi-peaked distribution functions would be expected to be unstable to kinetic instabilities, contributing to dissipation. The proposed mechanism of anisotropy formation is also relevant to space and astrophysical systems where the evolution of the plasma is constrained by linear temperature anisotropy instability thresholds. The presence of reconnection sites leads to electron energy gain, nonlocal velocity space mixing, and the formation of strong temperature anisotropy; this is evidence of an important role for reconnection in the dissipation of turbulent fluctuations.

  17. Threefold Increase of the Bulk Electron Temperature of Plasma Discharges in a Magnetic Mirror Device.

    PubMed

    Bagryansky, P A; Shalashov, A G; Gospodchikov, E D; Lizunov, A A; Maximov, V V; Prikhodko, V V; Soldatkina, E I; Solomakhin, A L; Yakovlev, D V

    2015-05-22

    This Letter describes plasma discharges with a high temperature of bulk electrons in the axially symmetric high-mirror-ratio (R=35) open magnetic system gas dynamic trap (GDT) in the Budker Institute (Novosibirsk). According to Thomson scattering measurements, the on-axis electron temperature averaged over a number of sequential shots is 660±50  eV with the plasma density being 0.7×10^{19}  m^{-3}; in few shots, electron temperature exceeds 900 eV. This corresponds to at least a threefold increase with respect to previous experiments both at GDT and at other comparable machines, thus, demonstrating the highest quasistationary (about 1 ms) electron temperature achieved in open traps. The breakthrough is made possible by application of a new 0.7  MW/54.5  GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating system in addition to standard 5 MW heating by neutral beams, and application of a radial electric field to mitigate the flute instability. PMID:26047233

  18. Ion-acoustic supersolitons in plasmas with two-temperature electrons: Boltzmann and kappa distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Verheest, Frank; Hellberg, Manfred A.; Kourakis, Ioannis

    2013-08-15

    Acoustic supersolitons arise when a plasma model is able to support three consecutive local extrema of the Sagdeev pseudopotential between the undisturbed conditions and an accessible root. This leads to a characteristic electric field signature, where a simple bipolar shape is enriched by subsidiary maxima. Large-amplitude nonlinear acoustic modes are investigated, using a pseudopotential approach, for plasmas containing two-temperature electrons having Boltzmann or kappa distributions, in the presence of cold fluid ions. The existence domains for positive supersolitons are derived in a methodological way, both for structure velocities and amplitudes, in terms of plasma compositional parameters. In addition, typical pseudopotentials, soliton, and electric field profiles have been given to illustrate that positive supersolitons can be found in the whole range of electron distributions from Maxwellian to a very hard nonthermal spectrum in kappa. However, it is found that the parameter ranges that support supersolitons vary significantly over the wide range of kappa considered.

  19. Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation in a magnetized plasma with two temperature superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, N. S. Chahal, B. S.; Bains, A. S.; Bedi, C.

    2014-02-15

    A nonlinear Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation for ion-acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) in a magnetized plasmas containing kappa distributed cold and hot electrons is derived by using reductive perturbation method. From the solution of ZK equation, the characteristics of IASWs have been studied under the influence of various plasma parameters. Existence domain of physical parameters is determined. It has been observed that the present plasma system supports the existence of both positive as well as negative potential solitons. The combined effects of cold to hot electron temperature ratio (σ), density ratio of cold electrons to ions (f), superthermality of cold and hot electrons (κ{sub c},κ{sub h}), strength of magnetic field (via Ω{sub i}), and obliqueness (θ) significantly influence the profile of IASWs. The physical parameters play a great role to modify the width and amplitude of the solitary structures. The stability analysis is also presented in this investigation and parametric range is determined to check the presence of stable and unstable solitons. The findings of this study are important to the physics of electrostatic wave structures in the Saturn's magnetosphere where two temperature electrons with kappa distribution exist.

  20. High and low frequency instabilities driven by a single electron beam in two-electron temperature space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mbuli, L. N.; Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.

    2013-12-15

    In an attempt to understand the excitation mechanisms of broadband electrostatic noise, beam-generated electrostatic instabilities are investigated using kinetic theory in a four-component magnetised plasma model composed of beam electrons (magnetic field-aligned), background hot and cool electrons and ions. All species are fully magnetised and considered to be Maxwellian. The dependence of the instability growth rates and real frequencies on various plasma parameters such as beam speed, particle densities and temperatures, magnetic field strength, wave propagation angle, and temperature anisotropy of the beam are examined. In this study we have found that the electron-acoustic, electron beam-resonant and ion-acoustic instabilities are excited. Our studies have focused on three velocity regimes, namely, the low (v{sub dbz}2 C{sub h}) regimes, where v{sub dbz} (C{sub h}) is the electron beam drift speed (thermal speed of the hot electrons). Plasma parameters from satellite measurements are used where applicable to provide realistic predictions.

  1. Finite electron temperature effects on interferometric and polarimetric measurements in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirnov, V. V.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Carlstrom, T. N.

    2007-10-01

    Finite electron temperature effects on interferometry and polarimetry measurements for burning plasma are considered with particular focus on analytically understanding the role of weakly relativistic effects. Development of a new iterative technique, in the limit when the probing wave frequency is much higher than the electron cyclotron frequency, yields the dispersion relation to lowest (linear) order in Te/mec2≪1. Perturbative treatment of the wave phase and polarization is presented in a form suitable for interpretation of experimental data. Previous analysis of the problem included nonrelativistic calculations only. Herein, it is shown that relativistic effects are equally important. Theoretical results are in agreement with computations and can be used for benchmarking of ray tracing codes. The implication of finite temperature effects on future burning plasma interferometer diagnostics is discussed.

  2. Dust ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in a plasma with two temperature superthermal electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, N. S.; Sethi, Papihra

    2016-10-01

    An investigation of dust ion-acoustic (DIA) cnoidal waves in unmagnetized collisionless plasma consisting of two temperature superthermal electrons, inertial warm ions, and negatively charged dust grains is presented. Reductive perturbation technique has been used to derive the modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation for the study of nonlinear periodic waves. Further, applying the Sagdeev potential approach, energy balance equation is derived. Using the expression for Sagdeev potential in expanded form, the cnoidal wave solution is determined. Both positive and negative potential (compressive and rarefactive) nonlinear DIA cnoidal structures are observed. The effects of parameters like the number density of cold electrons, superthermality of hot and cold electrons, ions to hot electrons temperature ratio, and dust to ion density ratio on the characteristics of DIA cnoidal waves are analyzed.

  3. Effects of Anomalous Electron Cross-Field Transport in a Low Temperature Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny

    2014-10-01

    The application of the magnetic field in a low pressure plasma can cause a spatial separation of low and high energy electrons. This so-called magnetic filter effect is used for many plasma applications, including ion and neutral beam sources, plasma processing of semiconductors and nanomaterials, and plasma thrusters. In spite of successful practical applications, the magnetic filter effect is not well understood. In this work, we explore this effect by characterizing the electron and ion energy distribution functions in a plasma column with crossed electric and magnetic fields. Experimental results revealed a strong dependence of spatial variations of plasma properties on the gas pressure. For xenon and argon gases, below ~ 1 mtorr, the increase of the magnetic field leads to a more uniform profile of the electron temperature. This surprising result is due to anomalously high electron cross-field transport that causes mixing of hot and cold electrons. High-speed imaging and probe measurements revealed a coherent structure rotating in E cross B direction with frequency of a few kHz. Theory and simulations describing this rotating structure has been developed and points to ionization and electrostatic instabilities as their possible cause. Similar to spoke oscillations reported for Hall thrusters, this rotating structure conducts the large fraction of the cross-field current. The use of segmented electrodes with an electrical feedback control is shown to mitigate these oscillations. Finally, a new feature of the spoke phenomenon that has been discovered, namely a sensitive dependence of the rotating oscillations on the gas pressure, can be important for many applications. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  4. Oblique ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in two temperature superthermal electrons magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Panwar, A. Ryu, C. M.; Bains, A. S.

    2014-12-15

    A study is presented for the oblique propagation of ion acoustic cnoidal waves in a magnetized plasma consisting of cold ions and two temperature superthermal electrons modelled by kappa-type distributions. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Korteweg de-Vries equation is derived, which further gives the solutions with a special type of cnoidal elliptical functions. Both compressive and rarefactive structures are found for these cnoidal waves. Nonlinear periodic cnoidal waves are explained in terms of plasma parameters depicting the Sagdeev potential and the phase curves. It is found that the density ratio of hot electrons to ions μ significantly modifies compressive/refractive wave structures. Furthermore, the combined effects of superthermality of cold and hot electrons κ{sub c},κ{sub h}, cold to hot electron temperature ratio σ, angle of propagation and ion cyclotron frequency ω{sub ci} have been studied in detail to analyze the height and width of compressive/refractive cnoidal waves. The findings in the present study could have important implications in understanding the physics of electrostatic wave structures in the Saturn's magnetosphere where two temperature superthermal electrons are present.

  5. Electrostatic wave structures in a magnetized superthermal plasma with two-temperature electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Shahmansouri, M.; Alinejad, H.

    2013-08-15

    The linear and nonlinear excitation of arbitrary amplitude ion-acoustic (IA) solitary waves in a magnetized plasma comprising two-temperature electrons and cold ions are studied. The oblique propagation properties of two possible modes (in the linear regime) are investigated. It is found that the electron superthermality reduces the phase velocities of both modes, whereas obliqueness leads to an increase in the separation between two modes. In the nonlinear regime, an energy-like equation describes the evolution of IA solitary waves in the present model. The combined effects of the electron superthermality, magnitude of magnetic field, obliqueness and electron population are incorporated in the study of the existence domain of solitary waves and the soliton characteristics. It is shown that the small values of the hot electron population shift the permitted interval of Mach number to the lower values. Both compressive and rarefactive solitary structures are found to exist in the presence of two temperature electrons. The present investigation contributes to the physics of electrostatic wave structures in Saturn's magnetosphere in which two temperature electrons with kappa distribution exist.

  6. Direct measurement of electron density and temperature distributions in a micro-discharge plasma for a plasma display panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Yasuyuki; Matsuoka, Akira; Uchino, Kiichiro; Muraoka, Katsunori

    2002-01-01

    Spatial distributions of electron density (ne) and electron temperature (Te) of a micro-discharge plasma for an alternating current plasma display panel cell were directly measured using the laser Thomson scattering method. The use of a triple-grating spectrometer was very successful in suppressing the strong stray laser light and allowed us to perform measurements at 0.1 mm above the surface of the electrode substrate. Values of ne and Te were (0.2-3)×1019m-3 and (1.6-3.4) eV, respectively, depending on the time from the beginning of the pulsed discharge and the observation position. The structure of the micro-discharge is discussed in terms of the obtained distributions of ne and Te.

  7. The Jupiter hot plasma torus - Observed electron temperature and energy flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The detection of the optical emission /O I/ 6300 A (8 + or - 4 R) and /S III/ 6312 A (48 + or - 5 R) is reported. It is noted that these emissions are indicators of the ion source morphology and the plasma physical state and that the S III emitters have a kinetic temperature of approximately 10 to the 6th K. When combined with observations of UV lines from the same species, the optical measurements separately imply effective electron temperatures for radiative processes that are mutually consistent (approximately 50,000 K).

  8. Ion acoustic kinetic Alfvén rogue waves in two temperature electrons superthermal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Nimardeep; Saini, N. S.

    2016-10-01

    The propagation properties of ion acoustic kinetic Alfvén (IAKA) solitary and rogue waves have been investigated in two temperature electrons magnetized superthermal plasma in the presence of dust impurity. A nonlinear analysis is carried out to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation using the reductive perturbation method (RPM) describing the evolution of solitary waves. The effect of various plasma parameters on the characteristics of the IAKA solitary waves is studied. The dynamics of ion acoustic kinetic Alfvén rogue waves (IAKARWs) are also studied by transforming the KdV equation into nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation. The characteristics of rogue wave profile under the influence of various plasma parameters (κc, μc, σ , θ) are examined numerically by using the data of Saturn's magnetosphere (Schippers et al. 2008; Sakai et al. 2013).

  9. Secondary Electron Emission Properties of Plasma Facing Ceramic Materials at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Dourbal, Paul; Spektor, Rostislav

    2015-11-01

    The plasma-wall interaction in the presence of strong secondary electron emission (SEE) has been studied theoretically and experimentally both as a basic phenomenon and in relation to numerous plasma applications such as, for example, fusion devices and Hall thrusters. Herein, we report on SEE measurements for boron nitride (BN) ceramics, which are commonly used as channel wall materials for Hall thrusters. Measurements were conducted for BN ceramics of three different grades with different fractions (0, 1% and 40%) and phases of different binder additions (calcium borate, silicon oxide) and as a function of the sample temperature relevant to the thruster operation (about 600K). For all three grades, the energy at which the yield equals to 1 at room temperature was measured to be near 40 V. This result is in agreement with previous measurements. At the elevated temperature, the yield was slightly different for these ceramics, but lower than at the room temperature. This temperature effect was not as strong as measured in. Analysis of these results and their implication on plasma-surface interactions in Hall thrusters and other related devices are presented. This work was partially supported by the Aerospace Corporation and by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of electron-ion temperature equilibration in an SF6 plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, Lorin X.; Glosli, James N.; Richards, David F.; Streitz, Frederick H.; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Graziani, Frank R.; Murillo, Michael S.; Benage, John F.

    2009-03-01

    We use classical MD to investigate electron-ion temperature equilibration in a two- temperature SF6 plasma. We choose a density of 1.0x10^19 (dissociated) SF6 molecules per cm^3 and initial temperatures of Te˜100 eV and TS˜TF˜15 eV in accordance with experiments currently underway at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Our computed relaxation time is significantly longer than that predicted by the classic theory of Landau and Spitzer. Similar discrepancies are found when comparing to predictions made be more recent theories of electron-ion equilibration. These differences should be large enough to be measured in the upcoming experiments.

  11. Measurement of Local Electron Temperature in an Overdense Plasma Based Upon Mode-Converted Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthimion, P. C.; Taylor, G.; Jones, B.; Spaleta, J.; Menard, J.; Munsat, T.; Hosea, J. C.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.

    1999-11-01

    Most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot use standard ECE diagnostics to measure electron temperature (T_e). They either operate at high density relative to their magnetic field (e.g. ω_p>>Ωc in spherical tokamaks) or they do not have sufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition, optical thickness, τ>2. The τ for EBW is extremely high because it is an electrostatic wave with a large wavenumber. For NSTX τ ~ 3000 and for CDX-U τ ~ 300. The τ>2 condition can be reached with a plasma density > 10^11/cm^3 and Te > 1 eV. We report local electron temperature measurements made from mode converted EBW emission on CDX-U, where Te ~ 10 - 200 eV. The emission was absolutely calibrated and the inferred temperatures compared to other independent Te measurements. Using this technique, standard Te profiles have been constructed and local MHD has been observed. Initial results suggest Te measurements from EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts on plasmas where ω_p>>Ω_c.

  12. Trace rare gases optical emission spectroscopy: nonintrusive method for measuring electron temperatures in low-pressure, low-temperature plasmas.

    PubMed

    Malyshev, M V; Donnelly, V M

    1999-11-01

    Trace rare gases optical emission spectroscopy (TRG-OES) is a new, nonintrusive method for determining electron temperatures (T(e)) and, under some conditions, estimating electron densities (n(e)) in low-temperature, low-pressure plasmas. The method is based on a comparison of atomic emission intensities from trace amounts of rare gases (an equimixture of He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) added to the plasma, with intensities calculated from a model. For Maxwellian electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs), T(e) is determined from the best fit of theory to the experimental measurements. For non-Maxwellian EEDFs, T(e) derived from the best fit describes the high-energy tail of the EEDF. This method was reported previously, and was further developed and successfully applied to several laboratory and commercial plasma reactors. It has also been used in investigations of correlations between high-T(e) and plasma-induced damage to thin gate oxide layers. In this paper, we provide a refined mechanism for the method and include a detailed description of the generation of emission from the Paschen 2p manifold of rare gases both from the ground state and through metastable states, a theoretical model to calculate the number density of metastables (n(m)) of the rare gases, a practical procedure to compute T(e) from the ratios of experimental-to-theoretical intensity ratios, a way to determine the electron density (n(e)), a discussion of the range of sensitivity of TRG-OES to the EEDF, and an estimate of the accuracy of T(e). The values of T(e) obtained by TRG-OES in a transformer-coupled plasma reactor are compared with those obtained with a Langmuir probe for a wide range of pressures and powers. The differences in T(e) from the two methods are explained in terms of the EEDF dependence on pressure.

  13. Parametric decays in relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas with relativistic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Rodrigo A.; Munoz, Victor; Asenjo, Felipe A.; Alejandro Valdivia, J.

    2012-08-15

    The nonlinear evolution of a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave in an electron-positron plasma propagating along a constant background magnetic field is considered, by studying its parametric decays. Relativistic effects, of the particle motion in the wave field and of the plasma temperature, are included to obtain the dispersion relation of the decays. The exact dispersion relation of the pump wave has been previously calculated within the context of a relativistic fluid theory and presents two branches: an electromagnetic and an Alfven one. We investigate the parametric decays for the pump wave in these two branches, including the anomalous dispersion zone of the Alfven branch where the group velocity is negative. We solve the nonlinear dispersion relation for different pump wave amplitudes and plasma temperatures, finding various resonant and nonresonant wave couplings. We are able to identify these couplings and study their behavior as we modify the plasma parameters. Some of these couplings are suppressed for larger amplitudes or temperatures. We also find two kinds of modulational instabilities, one involving two sideband daughter waves and another involving a forward-propagating electroacoustic mode and a sideband daughter wave.

  14. Small amplitude electron-acoustic double layers and solitons in fully relativistic plasmas of two-temperature electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nam C.

    2009-04-15

    A Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for fully relativistic one dimensional plasmas of arbitrarily large streaming speed and temperature is derived by using the reductive perturbation method. For plasmas with more than two species of particles, the coefficient representing quadratic nonlinearity in KdV can vanish at critical values of certain parameters. To describe the nonlinear evolution at this critical parameter, a modified KdV (mKdV) equation that contains a cubic nonlinear term is obtained. Furthermore, a mixed mKdV equation pertaining to parameters in the vicinity of the critical values is also derived, in which the quadratic and cubic nonlinearities are both present. As an illustration of the results, the mixed mKdV equation is applied to a plasma comprised of cold ions and electrons having cold (T=0) and finite temperature components. For warm temperature T<electron-acoustic nonlinear waves in the shape of double layer (kink) and solitary waves can exist, which have phase speed {radical}(3T/(4+{alpha})m{sub e}) in the rest frame of plasma, where {alpha} is the polytropic index of the equation of state of the warm electrons. The thickness of the transitional layer of the kink structure is of the order of Debye length {lambda}{sub D}. For extremely high temperature T>>m{sub e}c{sup 2}, it is also found that double layer and soliton-type solutions can exist with phase speed {radical}({alpha}-1)c, which is equal to the well known relativistic sound speed c/{radical}(3) for {alpha}=4/3. The thickness of the transition layer scales as {delta}{approx}T{sup -1/4}, which is different from the T<

  15. Thomson-scattering measurements of electron temperature and density in a plasma channel created by a relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G.R.; Parke Davis, H.; Brandenburg, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    The electron density (n/sub e/) and temperature (T/sub e/) of the plasma channel created by the propagation of a relativistic electron beam in air have been measured by a ruby laser Thomson scattering diagnostic. The measurements were made at the MIMI electron beam accelerator (1.6 MV, 21 kA, 70 ns) at various times during the plasma channel development, with 25 ns temporal resolution and 2 mm radial resolution. For example, in 5 Torr air, at the time of maximum electron beam current, the results are n/sub e/ = 1.86 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/ (+- 12%), T/sub e/ = 4.24 eV (+- 20%). These results, as well as those with other timing, are in good agreement with the theoretical results of the Air Propagation Code: n/sub e/ = 1.65 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/, T/sub e/ = 2.59 eV. Signal-to-noise is very good (10:1), limited by x-ray fluorescence of the fiber optics at the spectrometer. In fielding the diagnostic on higher energy accelerators, however, the dominant noise is expected to be the background light from the plasma and hot gas, or the fluorescence of the collecting optics. Improvements to the diagnostic and an ongoing experiment in 80 Torr of air, 4 MV, 50 kA to address these issues is presented.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Electron-Ion Temperature Equilibration in an SF6 Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, Lorin X.; Glosli, James N.; Richards, David F.; Streitz, Frederick H.; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; London, Richard A.; Graziani, Frank R.; Murillo, Michael S.; Benage, John F.

    2009-05-01

    We use classical molecular dynamics to investigate electron-ion temperature equilibration in a two-temperature SF6 plasma. We choose a density of 1.0×1019SF6 molecules per cm3 and initial temperatures of Te=100eV and TS=TF=15eV, in accordance with experiments currently underway at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Our computed relaxation time lies between two oft-used variants of the Landau-Spitzer relaxation formula which invoke static screening. Discrepancies are also found when comparing to the predictions made by more recent theoretical approaches. These differences should be large enough to be measured in the upcoming experiments.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of electron-ion temperature equilibration in an SF6 plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, Lorin X.; Glosli, James N.; Richards, David F.; Streitz, Frederick H.; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; London, Richard A.; Graziani, Frank R.; Murillo, Michael S.; Benage, John F.

    2009-11-01

    We describe classical non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations aimed at studying electron-ion temperature equilibration in a two-temperature SF6 plasma. We choose a density of 1.0 x10^6 (dissociated) SF6 molecules per cm^3 and initial temperatures of Te= 100 eV and TS= TF= 15 eV, in accordance with experiments currently underway at Los Alamos National Lab. Our computed relaxation time lies between two oft-used variants of the Landau-Spitzer relaxation formula. Discrepancies are also found when comparing to the predictions of more recent theoretical approaches. These differences should be large enough to be measured in the upcoming experiments. We highlight one particular source of discrepancy arising from the strong ion-ion coupling: the time-dependent specific heat of the screened ion subsystem.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of electron-ion temperature equilibration in an SF6 plasma.

    PubMed

    Benedict, Lorin X; Glosli, James N; Richards, David F; Streitz, Frederick H; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; London, Richard A; Graziani, Frank R; Murillo, Michael S; Benage, John F

    2009-05-22

    We use classical molecular dynamics to investigate electron-ion temperature equilibration in a two-temperature SF6 plasma. We choose a density of 1.0 x 10;{19}SF_{6} molecules per cm;{3} and initial temperatures of T_{e} = 100 eV and T_{S} = T_{F} = 15 eV, in accordance with experiments currently underway at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Our computed relaxation time lies between two oft-used variants of the Landau-Spitzer relaxation formula which invoke static screening. Discrepancies are also found when comparing to the predictions made by more recent theoretical approaches. These differences should be large enough to be measured in the upcoming experiments.

  19. Plasma Core Electron Density and Temperature Measurements Using CVI Line Emissions in TCABR Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    do Nascimento, F.; Machida, M.; Severo, J. H. F.; Sanada, E.; Ronchi, G.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we present results of electron temperature ( T e ) and density ( n e ) measurements obtained in Tokamak Chauffage Alfvén Brésilien (TCABR) tokamak using visible spectroscopy from CVI line emissions which occurs mainly near the center of the plasma column. The presented method is based on a well-known relationship between the particle flux ( Γ ion) and the photon flux ( ø ion) emitted by an ion species combined with ionizations per photon atomic data provided by the atomic data and analysis structure (ADAS) database. In the experiment, we measured the photon fluxes of three different CVI spectral line emissions, 4685.2, 5290.5, and 6200.6 Å (one line per shot). Using this method it was possible to find out the temporal evolution of T e and n e in the plasma. The results achieved are in good agreement with T e and n e measurements made using other diagnostic tools.

  20. Ion-acoustic Gardner Solitons in electron-positron-ion plasma with two-electron temperature distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Momin A.; Mishra, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    The ion-acoustic solitons in collisionless plasma consisting of warm adiabatic ions, isothermal positrons, and two temperature distribution of electrons have been studied. Using reductive perturbation method, Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV), the modified K-dV (m-KdV), and Gardner equations are derived for the system. The soliton solution of the Gardner equation is discussed in detail. It is found that for a given set of parameter values, there exists a critical value of β=Tc/Th, (ratio of cold to hot electron temperature) below which only rarefactive KdV solitons exist and above it compressive KdV solitons exist. At the critical value of β, both compressive and rarefactive m-KdV solitons co-exist. We have also investigated the soliton in the parametric regime where the KdV equation is not valid to study soliton solution. In this region, it is found that below the critical concentration the system supports rarefactive Gardner solitons and above it compressive Gardner solitons are found. The effects of temperature ratio of two-electron species, cold electron concentration, positron concentration on the characteristics of solitons are also discussed.

  1. Instability of field-aligned electron-cyclotron waves in a magnetic mirror plasma with anisotropic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishanov, N. I.; Azarenkov, N. A.

    2016-08-01

    > Dispersion characteristics have been analysed for field-aligned electron-cyclotron waves (also known as right-hand polarized waves, extraordinary waves or whistlers) in a cylindrical magnetic mirror plasma including electrons with anisotropic temperature. It is shown that the instability of these waves is possible only in the range below the minimal electron-cyclotron frequency, which is much lower than the gyrotron frequency used for electron-cyclotron resonance power input into the plasma, under the condition where the perpendicular temperature of the resonant electrons is larger than their parallel temperature. The growth rates of whistler instability in the two magnetized plasma models, where the stationary magnetic field is either uniform or has a non-uniform magnetic mirror configuration, are compared.

  2. Measurement of electron temperature and ion density using the self-bias effect in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Kwang-Tae; Oh, Se-Jin; Choi, Ik-Jin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-06-15

    For novel plasma diagnostics, the rf floating probe was revisited. For inducing the self-bias effect, ac bias voltage (approxkilohertz) was applied through a dc blocking capacitor between a probe and a signal generator. The dc self-bias potential was changed not only with ac bias voltages but also with electron temperatures, and therefore, the electron temperature was derived from the variations in the self-bias potential with and without ac bias voltage. The harmonic component of the probe contains information about the ion flux, and using a fast Fourier transform analysis of the probe current, the ion density was derived from the first harmonic current of the probe. The experimental results were compared with a single Langmuir probe. The electron temperature and the ion density were in good agreement with those from the Langmuir probe. Because the amplitude of the ac bias voltage is very low (<3 V), local ionizations affected by a high bias-voltage can be neglected.

  3. Theoretical and experimental study of the microwave cut-off probe for electron density measurements in low-temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bin; Li Hong; Wang Huihui; Xie Jinlin; Liu Wandong

    2011-10-01

    The microwave cut-off probe for the electron density measurement in low-temperature plasmas is described in this article. It is based on the wave cutoff in an unmagnetized plasma. The measurement principle is analyzed theoretically using a model of plasma slab. Because of the high-pass characteristic of plasma, the waves above the cut-off frequency can penetrate the plasma slab, whereas the lower frequency waves are reflected from the cut-off layer. Therefore, an obvious critical point can be observed in the wave transmission spectrum. The abscissa of the critical point indicates the cut-off frequency, which is directly related to the maximum electron density between transmitting/receiving antennas of the cut-off probe. The measured electron densities are in agreement with the data obtained by the Langmuir probe. Experimental results show that the microwave cut-off probe can be used to diagnose the plasmas with a wide range of parameters.

  4. Electron density and temperature measurements in a magnetized expanding hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyte-González, R.; Palomares, J. M.; Schram, D. C.; Engeln, R.

    2016-08-01

    We report measurements of electron densities, ne, and temperatures, Te, in a magnetized expanding hydrogen plasma performed using Thomson scattering. The effects of applying an axial magnetic field and changing the background pressure in the plasma vessel on ne and Te along the expansion axis are reported. Magnetic field strengths (B field) up to 170 mT were applied, which are one order of magnitude larger than previously reported. The main effect of the applied B field is the plasma confinement, which leads to higher ne. At B fields larger than 88 mT the electron density along the expansion axis does not depend strongly on the magnetic field strength. However, Te is susceptible to the B field and reaches at 170 mT a maximum of 2.5 eV at a distance of 1.5 cm from the exit of the cascaded arc. To determine also the effect of the arc current through the arc, measurements were performed with arc currents of 45, 60, and 75 A at background pressures of 9.7 and 88.3 Pa. At constant magnetic field ne decreases from the exit of the arc along the expansion axis when the arc current is decreased. At 88.3 Pa ne shows a higher value close to the exit of the arc, but a faster decay along the expansion axis with respect to the 9.7 Pa case. Te is overall higher at lower pressure reaching a maximum of 3.2 eV at the lower arc current of 45 A. The results of this study complement our understanding and the characterization of expanding hydrogen plasmas.

  5. Electron density and temperature measurements in a magnetized expanding hydrogen plasma.

    PubMed

    Leyte-González, R; Palomares, J M; Schram, D C; Engeln, R

    2016-08-01

    We report measurements of electron densities, n_{e}, and temperatures, T_{e}, in a magnetized expanding hydrogen plasma performed using Thomson scattering. The effects of applying an axial magnetic field and changing the background pressure in the plasma vessel on n_{e} and T_{e} along the expansion axis are reported. Magnetic field strengths (B field) up to 170 mT were applied, which are one order of magnitude larger than previously reported. The main effect of the applied B field is the plasma confinement, which leads to higher n_{e}. At B fields larger than 88 mT the electron density along the expansion axis does not depend strongly on the magnetic field strength. However, T_{e} is susceptible to the B field and reaches at 170 mT a maximum of 2.5 eV at a distance of 1.5 cm from the exit of the cascaded arc. To determine also the effect of the arc current through the arc, measurements were performed with arc currents of 45, 60, and 75 A at background pressures of 9.7 and 88.3 Pa. At constant magnetic field n_{e} decreases from the exit of the arc along the expansion axis when the arc current is decreased. At 88.3 Pa n_{e} shows a higher value close to the exit of the arc, but a faster decay along the expansion axis with respect to the 9.7 Pa case. T_{e} is overall higher at lower pressure reaching a maximum of 3.2 eV at the lower arc current of 45 A. The results of this study complement our understanding and the characterization of expanding hydrogen plasmas. PMID:27627401

  6. Research on soft x-rays in high-current plasma-focus discharges and estimation of plasma electron temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Zaloga, D.; Sadowski, M. J.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Malinowski, K.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Surala, W.; Zielinska, E.; Tomaszewski, K.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents results of experimental studies of dense and high-temperature plasmas, which were produced by pulsed high-current discharges within a modernised PF-1000U facility operated at different initial gas conditions, and supplied from a condenser bank which delivered energy of about 350 kJ. The investigated discharges were performed at the initial deuterium filling under pressure of 1.6-2.0 hPa, with or without an additional puffing of pure deuterium (1 cm3, under pressure 0.15 MPa, at instants 1.5-2 ms before the main discharge initiation). For a comparison discharges were also performed at the initial neon filling under pressure of 1.1-1.3 hPa, with or without the addition of deuterium puffing. The recorded discharge current waveforms, laser interferometric images, signals of hard x-rays and fusion neutrons, as well as time-integrated x-ray pinhole images and time-resolved x-ray signals were compared. From a ratio of the x-ray signals recorded behind beryllium filters of different thickness there were estimated values of a plasma electron temperature (T e) in a region at the electrode outlets. For pure deuterium discharges an averaged T e value amounted to 150-170 eV, while for neon discharges with the deuterium puffing it reached 330-880 eV (with accuracy of  ±20%).

  7. A method to measure the electron temperature and density of a laser-produced plasma by Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, H.; Hur, M. S.; Lee, J. M.; Suk, H.; Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W.

    2008-08-18

    A method is proposed to investigate the electron temperature and density of a laser-produced plasma simultaneously, using the temperature dependence difference of the Raman forward scattering (RFS) and backward scattering (RBS). Density and temperature dependence of spectra from the RBS and the RFS in a laser produced plasma were investigated by one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in the nonrelativistic regime. This technique has a great advantage as a simple diagnostic of plasma characteristics in the sense that it can be performed only with the pump laser, without any additional probe laser.

  8. A resolution to the low temperature electron recombination problem for astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loch, Stuart

    Recent and ongoing work on electron recombination of atomic systems has revealed a range of ions where rates are underestimated or overestimated, sometimes by an order of magnitude, due to the positioning of resonance(s) near to the ground state threshold. Consequently, these ion stages may have a significant effect on diagnostics of abundances, temperatures, and densities. We propose to (1) implement a new type of survey calculation to identify which ions exhibit sensitivity to near threshold resonances; (2) quantify the resulting uncertainties in the DR rates for these ion stages; (3) show that the recently proposed process of "below threshold DR" can provide accurate rate coefficients for ions with critical sensitivity to near threshold resonances, and (4) archive and release these rates for use in astrophysical spectral studies. To achieve these results we will use a range of methods to calculate electron recombination, including both semi- and fully-relativistic approaches. The new theory for the inclusion of below threshold recombination was recently derived in the literature and will be used in this proposal. The work would be of significance for a range of NASA objectives and missions. These would include the analysis of low temperature photo-ionized plasmas. It would determine the atomic systems for which the low temperature recombination rate coefficients can be used with confidence, and provides a means to remove the sensitivity of the remaining rate coefficients to their near threshold resonances. As such it would lead to an improved understanding of these plasmas and their role in the cosmos.

  9. Transitional properties of supersolitons in a two electron temperature warm multi-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Steffy S.; Ghosh, S. S.

    2016-08-01

    The existence domain of an ion acoustic supersoliton and its transition to a regular kind of solitary wave have been explored in detail using Sagdeev pseudopotential technique for a two electron temperature warm multi-ion plasma having two species of ions. It was found that both the cold to hot electron temperature ratio and their respective ambient densities play a deterministic role for the existence of a supersoliton, as well as its transitional processes to a regular solitary wave. Analogous to a double layer solution, which often marks the boundary of the existence domain of a regular solitary wave, a "curve of inflection" determines the boundary of the existence domain of a supersoliton. The characteristics of the "curve of inflection," in turn, depend on the respective concentrations of the two ion species. It is observed that the supersolitons are actually a subset of a more general kind of solutions which are characterized by a fluctuation in the corresponding charge separation which precedes their maximum amplitude. It is also observed that these novel kinds of solitary structures, including supersolitons, occur only for a very narrow range of parameters near constant amplitude beyond which the wave breaks.

  10. Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in a plasma with two-temperature kappa-distributed electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alinejad, H.; Mahdavi, M.; Shahmansouri, M.

    2014-08-01

    Existence and characteristics of ion-acoustic (IA) wave modulation are studied in a plasma with two-temperature electron satisfying kappa distribution. Based on the multiple time scales perturbation, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS) is derived. Similar to the case of double Maxwellian electrons, both polarities of envelope soliton can exist over restricted ranges of the fractional hot electron density ratio and two-temperature superthermal electrons. The transition from stable dark solitons to unstable bright ones shifts to the smaller wavelength regions in the presence of cool and hot superthermal electrons. It is shown that the small values of the hot electron populations leads to shrinking the modulation instability region. It is also found the instability growth rate reduces due to the presence of hot electrons. The result of present investigation contributes to the physics of wave modulation in Saturn's magnetosphere where two-temperature electrons with kappa distribution exist.

  11. Temperature of Mercury's plasma electron environment: limits from the first MESSENGER flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Raines, Jim M.; Gloeckler, George; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Anderson, Brian J.; Slavin, James A.; Koehn, Patrick L.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction The Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) component of the Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) [1] on the MESSENGER spacecraft has provided evidence of a multi-species magnetospheric plasma at Mercury [2]. In addition, relatively low values of mass-per-charge in the compositional spectrogram are indicative of multiple ionizations of some species, in turn, a feature diagnostic of relatively high electron temperatures. While there is no means of directly assessing how closely the conditions of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) apply, testing this assumption for consistency with the measured data can potentially help advance our understanding of both the composition and temperature of this plasma. Poor particle statistics (low counting rates) necessitated the summing of data over the entire magnetospheric pass to provide a statistically significant mass-per-charge spectrum. Hence, we make the ab initio assumption that time-aliasing is not an issue, i.e., the ionic composition of the magnetosphere is approximately constant along the spacecraft trajectory. Such multicomponent plasmas, with multiply charged but kinetically cold ions, are well known in Jupiter's magnetosphere, with their compositional origins at Io and their (multiple) charge states resulting from the electrons in the hot, Io plasma torus [3,4,5]. Observations FIPS provides both energy-per-charge and velocity measurements, allowing for the mass per charge of detected components to be determined. Within Mercury's magnetosphere, ions in the mass/charge range 1-56 amu/e were detected with a time resolution of 8 s and within an energy range 0.1-13.5 keV/e. An overview of the data and compositional inferences from the signals corresponding to singly ionized species have already been discussed [2]. The multiply charged ions (mass-per-charge ~12 amu/e and less) are likely the result of impact ionization by hot electrons in the magnetosphere, most likely from the plasma sheet

  12. Research on soft x-rays in high-current plasma-focus discharges and estimation of plasma electron temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Zaloga, D.; Sadowski, M. J.; Kwiatkowski, R.; Malinowski, K.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Surala, W.; Zielinska, E.; Tomaszewski, K.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents results of experimental studies of dense and high-temperature plasmas, which were produced by pulsed high-current discharges within a modernised PF-1000U facility operated at different initial gas conditions, and supplied from a condenser bank which delivered energy of about 350 kJ. The investigated discharges were performed at the initial deuterium filling under pressure of 1.6–2.0 hPa, with or without an additional puffing of pure deuterium (1 cm3, under pressure 0.15 MPa, at instants 1.5–2 ms before the main discharge initiation). For a comparison discharges were also performed at the initial neon filling under pressure of 1.1–1.3 hPa, with or without the addition of deuterium puffing. The recorded discharge current waveforms, laser interferometric images, signals of hard x-rays and fusion neutrons, as well as time-integrated x-ray pinhole images and time-resolved x-ray signals were compared. From a ratio of the x-ray signals recorded behind beryllium filters of different thickness there were estimated values of a plasma electron temperature (T e) in a region at the electrode outlets. For pure deuterium discharges an averaged T e value amounted to 150–170 eV, while for neon discharges with the deuterium puffing it reached 330–880 eV (with accuracy of  ±20%).

  13. Control of longitudinal electric field intensity and of the electron temperature in a weakly ionized decaying plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V.A.; Skoblo, Y.E.

    1981-07-01

    The possibility is considered of controlling the intensity of a longitudinal electric field and the electron temperature in a decaying gas-discharge plasma. It is proposed to feed the discharge from a simple circuit that makes possible the control of the electric field in wide dynamic and frequency ranges. The procedure for controlling the field intensity and the electron temperature is experimentally investigated in the afterglow of a discharge in neon at pressures 2--30 torr and currents 10--100 mA. The possibility of arbitrarily varying the electron temperature can be used to investigate the temperature dependences of the constants of the elementary processes that take place in a decaying plasma.

  14. Boundary conditions at the walls with thermionic electron emission in two temperature modeling of “thermal” plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pekker, Leonid; Hussary, Nakhleh

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, we propose new boundary conditions for the electric potential, the electron energy equation, and the energy equation for heavy particles (ions and neutrals) at the hot walls with thermionic electron emission for two-temperature thermal arc models. The derived boundary conditions assume that the walls are made from refractory metals and, consequently, the erosion of the wall is small and can be neglected. In these boundary conditions, the plasma sheath formed at the electrode is viewed as the interface between the plasma and the wall. The derived boundary conditions allow the calculation of the heat flux to the walls from the plasma. This allows the calculation of the thermionic electron current that makes the model of electrode-plasma interaction self-consistent.

  15. Spectroscopic and probe measurements of the electron temperature in the plasma of a pulse-periodic microwave discharge in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, V. V.; Vasileska, I.; Korneeva, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    A pulse-periodic 2.45-GHz electron-cyclotron resonance plasma source on the basis of a permanent- magnet mirror trap has been constructed and tested. Variations in the discharge parameters and the electron temperature of argon plasma have been investigated in the argon pressure range of 1 × 10-4 to 4 × 10-3 Torr at a net pulsed input microwave power of up to 600 W. The plasma electron temperature in the above ranges of gas pressures and input powers has been measured by a Langmuir probe and determined using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) from the intensity ratios of spectral lines. The OES results agree qualitatively and quantitatively with the data obtained using the double probe.

  16. Effects of rf power on electron density and temperature, neutral temperature, and T{sub e} fluctuations in an inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Camparo, James; Fathi, Gilda

    2009-05-15

    Atomic clocks that fly on global-navigation satellites such as global positioning system (GPS) and Galileo employ light from low-temperature, inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) for atomic signal generation and detection (i.e., alkali/noble-gas rf-discharge lamps). In this application, the performance of the atomic clock and the capabilities of the navigation system depend sensitively on the stability of the ICP's optical emission. In order to better understand the mechanisms that might lead to instability in these rf-discharge lamps, and hence the satellite atomic clocks, we studied the optical emission from a Rb/Xe ICP as a function of the rf power driving the plasma. Surprisingly, we found that the electron density in the plasma was essentially independent of increases in rf power above its nominal value (i.e., 'rf-power gain') and that the electron temperature was only a slowly varying function of rf-power gain. The primary effect of rf power was to increase the temperature of the neutrals in the plasma, which was manifested by an increase in Rb vapor density. Interestingly, we also found evidence for electron temperature fluctuations (i.e., fluctuations in the plasma's high-energy electron content). The variance of these fluctuations scaled inversely with the plasma's mean electron temperature and was consistent with a simple model that assumed that the total electron density in the discharge was independent of rf power. Taken as a whole, our results indicate that the electrons in alkali/noble-gas ICPs are little affected by slight changes in rf power and that the primary effect of such changes is to heat the plasma's neutral species.

  17. Weibel instability for a streaming electron, counterstreaming e-e, and e-p plasmas with intrinsic temperature anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorbanalilu, M.; Sadegzadeh, S.; Ghaderi, Z.; Niknam, A. R.

    2014-05-15

    The existence of Weibel instability for a streaming electron, counterstreaming electron-electron (e-e), and electron-positron (e-p) plasmas with intrinsic temperature anisotropy is investigated. The temperature anisotropy is included in the directions perpendicular and parallel to the streaming direction. It is shown that the beam mean speed changes the instability mode, for a streaming electron beam, from the classic Weibel to the Weibel-like mode. The analytical and numerical solutions approved that Weibel-like modes are excited for both counterstreaming e-e and e-p plasmas. The growth rates of the instabilities in e-e and e-p plasmas are compared. The growth rate is larger for e-p plasmas if the thermal anisotropy is small and the opposite is true for large thermal anisotropies. The analytical and numerical solutions are in good agreement only in the small parallel temperature and wave number limits, when the instability growth rate increases linearly with normalized wave number kc∕ω{sub p}.

  18. Finite orbital angular momentum states and Laguerre-Gaussian potential in two-temperature electron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, K.; Ali, S.

    2014-09-01

    Electron-acoustic waves are studied with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in an unmagnetized collisionless uniform plasma, whose constituents are the Boltzmann hot electrons, inertial cold electrons and stationary ions. For this purpose, we employ the fluid equations to obtain a paraxial equation in terms of cold electron density perturbations, which admits both the Gaussian and Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam solutions. Furthermore, an approximate solution for the electrostatic potential problem is found, which also allows us to express the components of the electric field in terms of LG potential perturbations. Calculating the energy flux of the electron-acoustic waves, an OAM density for these waves is obtained. Numerically, it is found that the parameters, such as, azimuthal angle, radial and angular mode numbers, and the beam waist strongly modify the LG potential profiles associated with electron-acoustic waves. The present results should be helpful to study the trapping and transportation of plasma particles and energy as well as to understand the electron-acoustic mode excitations produced by the Raman backscattering of laser beams in a uniform plasma.

  19. Electron Temperature and Density Variation Due To Temporal Evolution of Nano Particle Growth in RF Silane Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, K. B.; Seon, C. R.; Choe, W.; Park, S.; Chung, C. W.

    2008-09-07

    Nano particles, generated in various processing plasmas, have been extensively studied for applications in the fabrication of microelectronics devices. However, studies to find the relation between the particle parameters (particle size and density) and the plasma parameters (electron temperature and density) have been limited because of the availability of the appropriate diagnostic method. The utilization of Langmuir probes are limited in many cases due to the probe tip contamination and the presence of abundant negative ions and particles. In this work, measurements of electron temperature and ion density were performed in rf silane plasmas using a floating probe, which allows an accurate measurement even under harsh plasma environments. The size and density of nano particles were measured by the laser light scattering and the laser extinction method at various gas pressures. It was found that the temporal evolution of the particle growth played a significant role in changing the plasma parameters due to the electron and ion fluxes to the particles. The relation between the plasma parameters and the particle parameters was described by a power balance equation including the power loss to the particle surface.

  20. Electronic excitation and isentropic coefficients of high temperature planetary atmosphere plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Colonna, Gianpiero; Capitelli, Mario

    2012-07-15

    In this paper, we have discussed the effects of electronically excited states of atomic species in affecting the isentropic coefficients of plasmas, focusing on mixtures representing the atmospheres of Jupiter, Mars, and Earth. General behaviors have been rationalized on the basis of simplified approaches. The contribution of the electronically excited states has been evidenced by comparing results obtained considering only the ground state and those obtained using either Fermi or Griem cutoff criteria.

  1. Comparison of plasma temperature and electron density on nanosecond laser ablation of Cu and nano-Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Anmin; Jiang, Yuanfei; Wang, Tingfeng; Shao, Junfeng; Jin, Mingxing

    2015-03-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is performed through the collection of spectra by spectral detection equipment at different delay times and distances from targets composed of Cu and nano-Cu, which are ablated using a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 10 ns, 10 Hz) in our experiments. The measured wavelength range is from 475 nm to 525 nm. Using the local thermodynamic equilibrium model, we analyze the characteristics of the plasma temperature and the electron number density for different distances between the target surface and the lens. The results show that when compared with the nano-Cu plasma case, the temperature of the Cu plasma is higher, while its electron number density is lower.

  2. Determination of plasma temperature and electron density of iron in iron slag samples using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, T.; Gondal, M. A.; Shamraiz, M.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma temperature and electron density of iron in iron slag samples taken from a local plant is studied. Optimal experimental conditions were evaluated using Nd: YAG laser at 1064 nm. Some toxic elements were identified and quantitative measurements were also made. Plasma temperature and electron density were estimated using standard equations and well resolved iron spectral lines in the 229.06-358.11 nm region at 10, 20, 30 and 40 mJ laser pulse energy with 4.5 μs delay time. These parameters were found to increase with increase in laser pulse energy. The Boltzmann distribution and experimentally measured line intensities support the assumption that the laser-induced plasma was in local thermal equilibrium. It is worth mentioning that iron and steel sector generates tons of solid waste and residues annually containing variety of contaminants which can be harmful to the environment and therefore knowledge, proper analysis and investigation of such iron slag is important.

  3. METHES: A Monte Carlo collision code for the simulation of electron transport in low temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabie, M.; Franck, C. M.

    2016-06-01

    We present a freely available MATLAB code for the simulation of electron transport in arbitrary gas mixtures in the presence of uniform electric fields. For steady-state electron transport, the program provides the transport coefficients, reaction rates and the electron energy distribution function. The program uses established Monte Carlo techniques and is compatible with the electron scattering cross section files from the open-access Plasma Data Exchange Project LXCat. The code is written in object-oriented design, allowing the tracing and visualization of the spatiotemporal evolution of electron swarms and the temporal development of the mean energy and the electron number due to attachment and/or ionization processes. We benchmark our code with well-known model gases as well as the real gases argon, N2, O2, CF4, SF6 and mixtures of N2 and O2.

  4. Comparison of analytical methods to determine the electron density and temperature for a laser-based atmospheric plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwander, M.; Kwiatkowski, P.; Prieske, M.

    2016-09-01

    Highly dependent on plasma properties and the energy range, different approaches are used for plasma diagnostics. Measurements of the plasma potential, electron density, electron temperature are imperative for a full characterisation. However, when comparing published studies it seems that different measuring systems produce different results for the same plasma. In order to show that by using different measurement methods varied results are achieved, the following analytical methods are applied for a high-energy laser-based thermal plasma: Langmuir probe measurement, bottleneck equation, emission spectroscopy by Finkelnburg and emission spectroscopy by the Saha equation. The electron density and temperature are determined between 1017-1020 m-3 and 1.1-1.8 eV by the use of Langmuir probes and 1.3•1021 m-3 and 1.0-3.5 eV using emission spectroscopy. Comparison to other studies shows that our results are in the same range, according to the method of analysis. It is conspicuous that the choice of a measurement method predetermines the results in a certain range. This indicates that the chosen method has a huge impact on the resulting outcomes.

  5. Ion acoustic solitary waves and double layers in a plasma with two temperature electrons featuring Tsallis distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Shalini, Saini, N. S.

    2014-10-15

    The propagation properties of large amplitude ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) are studied in a plasma containing cold fluid ions and multi-temperature electrons (cool and hot electrons) with nonextensive distribution. Employing Sagdeev pseudopotential method, an energy balance equation has been derived and from the expression for Sagdeev potential function, ion acoustic solitary waves and double layers are investigated numerically. The Mach number (lower and upper limits) for the existence of solitary structures is determined. Positive as well as negative polarity solitary structures are observed. Further, conditions for the existence of ion acoustic double layers (IADLs) are also determined numerically in the form of the critical values of q{sub c}, f and the Mach number (M). It is observed that the nonextensivity of electrons (via q{sub c,h}), concentration of electrons (via f) and temperature ratio of cold to hot electrons (via β) significantly influence the characteristics of ion acoustic solitary waves as well as double layers.

  6. Consistent multi-internal-temperature models for vibrational and electronic nonequilibrium in hypersonic nitrogen plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, Aurélien Bourdon, Anne Perrin, Marie-Yvonne

    2015-04-15

    In this work, a state-to-state vibrational and electronic collisional model is developed to investigate nonequilibrium phenomena behind a shock wave in an ionized nitrogen flow. In the ionization dynamics behind the shock wave, the electron energy budget is of key importance and it is found that the main depletion term corresponds to the electronic excitation of N atoms, and conversely the major creation terms are the electron-vibration term at the beginning, then replaced by the electron ions elastic exchange term. Based on these results, a macroscopic multi-internal-temperature model for the vibration of N{sub 2} and the electronic levels of N atoms is derived with several groups of vibrational levels of N{sub 2} and electronic levels of N with their own internal temperatures to model the shape of the vibrational distribution of N{sub 2} and of the electronic excitation of N, respectively. In this model, energy and chemistry source terms are calculated self-consistently from the rate coefficients of the state-to-state database. For the shock wave condition studied, a good agreement is observed on the ionization dynamics as well as on the atomic bound-bound radiation between the state-to-state model and the macroscopic multi-internal temperature model with only one group of vibrational levels of N{sub 2} and two groups of electronic levels of N.

  7. Low frequency solitons and double layers in a magnetized plasma with two temperature electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rufai, O. R.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2012-12-15

    Finite amplitude non-linear ion-acoustic solitary waves and double layers are studied in a magnetized plasma with cold ions fluid and two distinct groups of Boltzmann electrons, using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential technique. The conditions under which the solitary waves and double layers can exist are found both analytically and numerically. We have shown the existence of negative potential solitary waves and double layers for subsonic Mach numbers, whereas in the unmagnetized plasma they can only in the supersonic Mach number regime. For the plasma parameters in the auroral region, the electric field amplitude of the solitary structures comes out to be 49 mV/m which is in agreement of the Viking observations in this region.

  8. Non-invasive probe diagnostic method for electron temperature and ion current density in atmospheric pressure plasma jet source

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Yu-Sin; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Moon, Jun-Hyeon; Chung, Chin-Wook; Kim, Yunjung; Cho, Guangsup

    2015-08-15

    The electrical probe diagnostics are very hard to be applied to atmospheric plasmas due to severe perturbation by the electrical probes. To overcome this, the probe for measuring electron temperature and ion current density is indirectly contacted with an atmospheric jet source. The plasma parameters are obtained by using floating harmonic analysis. The probe is mounted on the quartz tube that surrounds plasma. When a sinusoidal voltage is applied to a probe contacting on a quartz tube, the electrons near the sheath at dielectric tube are collected and the probe current has harmonic components due to probe sheath nonlinearity. From the relation of the harmonic currents and amplitude of the sheath voltage, the electron temperature near the wall can be obtained with collisional sheath model. The electron temperatures and ion current densities measured at the discharge region are in the ranges of 2.7–3.4 eV and 1.7–5.2 mA/cm{sup 2} at various flow rates and input powers.

  9. Electron temperature profile invariance on OH, L- and H-mode plasmas and consequences for the anomalous transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.

    1992-01-01

    The shapes of the electron temperature and electron density profiles in the OH, L- and H-mode confinement regimes of ASDEX are explored by statistical analysis. It is shown that the shape of Te(r) is conserved in the outer half of the plasma in these regimes and that it is invariant with respect to heating power, heating profile, density, density scale length, q value and ion mass. These results suggest that microturbulence constrains the shape of the temperature profile by adjusting the electron heat diffusivity χe(r). No such invariance is found for the temperature profile in the inner half of the plasma and for the density profile over the whole cross-section. Properties of the empirical electron heat diffusivity and the diffusion coefficient in different regimes can be described by Te profile invariance. The improved confinement with peaked density profiles, the reduction of χe in the bulk of H-mode plasmas and the power dependence of χe in the L-regime are discussed

  10. Effect of a novel nonlinearity, viz., electron temperature dependence of electron-ion recombination on electromagnetic wave. Plasma interaction: Nonlinear propagation in the E-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodha, Mahendra Singh; Mishra, Rashmi; Srivastava, Sweta

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we consider the nonlinearity in the propagation of electromagnetic (e.m.) waves in a plasma caused by the electron temperature dependence of the coefficient of recombination of electrons with ions; specifically, the ionospheric E layer has been investigated. The enhancement in electron temperature by an intense electromagnetic wave causes reduction of the electron-ion recombination coefficient and thereby enhancement of electron density, the electron collision frequency also gets enhanced. The equations for number and energy balance of electrons and the wave equation have been used to predict the dependence of electron density/collision frequency and the nonlinear refractive index and absorption coefficient on αE02 (proportional to wave irradiance). The dependence of the propagation parameters on αE02 has been used to investigate the nonlinear electromagnetic wave propagation in the ionosphere. The study concludes that the electron temperature dependence of the recombination coefficient should be considered in all analyses of nonlinear plasma-e.m. wave interaction.

  11. Kinetic Temperature and Electron Density Measurement in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch using Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, Julia; Lyons, Wendy; Tong, WIlliam G.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser wave mixing is presented as an effective technique for spatially resolved kinetic temperature measurements in an atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma. Measurements are performed in a 1 kW, 27 MHz RF plasma using a continuous-wave, tunable 811.5-nm diode laser to excite the 4s(sup 3)P2 approaches 4p(sup 3)D3 argon transition. Kinetic temperature measurements are made at five radial steps from the center of the torch and at four different torch heights. The kinetic temperature is determined by measuring simultaneously the line shape of the sub-Doppler backward phase-conjugate degenerate four-wave mixing and the Doppler-broadened forward-scattering degenerate four-wave mixing. The temperature measurements result in a range of 3,500 to 14,000 K+/-150 K. Electron densities measured range from 6.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm to 10.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm. The experimental spectra are analyzed using a perturbative treatment of the backward phase-conjugate and forward-geometry wave-mixing theory. Stark width is determined from the collisional broadening measured in the phase-conjugate geometry. Electron density measurements are made based on the Stark width. The kinetic temperature of the plasma was found to be more than halved by adding deionized water through the nebulizer.

  12. The effects of nonthermal electron distributions on ion-temperature-gradient driven drift-wave instabilities in electron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Batool, Nazia; Masood, W.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2012-08-15

    The effects of nonthermal electron distributions on electrostatic ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven drift-wave instabilities in the presence of equilibrium density, temperature, and magnetic field gradients are investigated here. By using Braginskii's transport equations for ions and Cairns as well as Kappa distribution for electrons, the coupled mode equations are derived. The modified ITG driven modes are derived, and it is found both analytically as well as numerically that the nonthermal distribution of electrons significantly modify the real frequencies as well as the growth rate of the ITG driven drift wave instability. The growth rate of ion-temperature-gradient driven instability is found to be maximum for Cairns, intermediate for Kappa, and minimum for the Maxwellian distributed electron case. The results of present investigation might be helpful to understand several wave phenomena in space and laboratory plasmas in the presence of nonthermal electrons.

  13. Measurements of hot-electron temperature in laser-irradiated plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Solodov, A. A.; Yaakobi, B.; Edgell, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Myatt, J. F.; Sorce, C.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-10-26

    In a recently published work1–3 we reported on measuring the total energy of hot electrons produced by the interaction of a nanosecond laser with planar CH-coated molybdenum targets, using the Mo Kα emission. The temperature of the hot electrons in that work was determined by the high-energy bremsstrahlung [hard x-ray (HXR)] spectrum measured by a three-channel fluorescence-photomultiplier detector (HXRD). In the present work, we replaced the HXRD with a nine-channel image-plate (IP)–based detector (HXIP). For the same conditions (irradiance of the order of 1014 W/cm2; 2-ns pulses) the measured temperatures are consistently lower than those measured by the HXRD (bymore » a factor ~1.5 to 1.7). In addition, we supplemented this measurement with three experiments that measure the hot-electron temperature using Kα line-intensity ratios from high-Z target layers, independent of the HXR emission. These experiments yielded temperatures that were consistent with those measured by the HXIP. We showed that the thermal x-ray radiation must be included in the derivation of total energy in hot electrons (Ehot), and that this makes Ehot only weakly dependent on hot-electron temperature. For a given x-ray emission in inertial confinement fusion compression experiments, this result would lead to a higher total energy in hot electrons, but the preheat of the compressed fuel may be lower because of the reduced hot-electron range.« less

  14. Cylindrical and spherical dust-ion-acoustic modified Gardner solitons in dusty plasmas with two-temperature superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M. S.; Masud, M. M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2013-12-15

    A rigorous theoretical investigation has been performed on the propagation of cylindrical and spherical Gardner solitons (GSs) associated with dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) waves in a dusty plasma consisting of inertial ions, negatively charged immobile dust, and two populations of kappa distributed electrons having two distinct temperatures. The well-known reductive perturbation method has been used to derive the modified Gardner (mG) equation. The basic features (amplitude, width, polarity, etc.) of nonplanar DIA modified Gardner solitons (mGSs) have been thoroughly examined by the numerical analysis of the mG equation. It has been found that the characteristics of the nonplanar DIA mGSs significantly differ from those of planar ones. It has been also observed that kappa distributed electrons with two distinct temperatures significantly modify the basic properties of the DIA solitary waves and that the plasma system under consideration supports both compressive and rarefactive DIA mGSs. The present investigation should play an important role for understanding localized electrostatic disturbances in space and laboratory dusty plasmas where stationary negatively charged dust, inertial ions, and superthermal electrons with two distinct temperatures are omnipresent ingredients.

  15. Temperature and density evolution during decay in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen electron cyclotron resonance plasma: Off-resonant and resonant cases

    SciTech Connect

    Cortázar, O. D.

    2013-09-15

    Time resolved electron temperature and density measurements during the decay stage in a hydrogen electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma are presented for a resonance and off-resonance magnetic field configurations. The measurements are conducted on a ECR plasma generator excited at 2.45 GHz denominated test-bench for ion-sources plasma studies at ESS Bilbao. The plasma parameters evolution is studied by Langmuir probe diagnostic with synchronized sample technique developed for repetitive pulsed plasmas with a temporal resolution of 200 ns in typical decay processes of about 40 μs. An afterglow transient is clearly observed in the reflected microwave power signal from the plasma. Simultaneously, the electron temperature evolution shows rebounding peaks that may be related to the interplay between density drop and microwave coupling with deep impact on the Electron Energy Distribution Function. The correlation of such structures with the plasma absorbed power and the coupling quality is also reported.

  16. Temperature and density evolution during decay in a 2.45 GHz hydrogen electron cyclotron resonance plasma: off-resonant and resonant cases.

    PubMed

    Cortázar, O D; Megía-Macías, A; Vizcaíno-de-Julián, A

    2013-09-01

    Time resolved electron temperature and density measurements during the decay stage in a hydrogen electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma are presented for a resonance and off-resonance magnetic field configurations. The measurements are conducted on a ECR plasma generator excited at 2.45 GHz denominated test-bench for ion-sources plasma studies at ESS Bilbao. The plasma parameters evolution is studied by Langmuir probe diagnostic with synchronized sample technique developed for repetitive pulsed plasmas with a temporal resolution of 200 ns in typical decay processes of about 40 μs. An afterglow transient is clearly observed in the reflected microwave power signal from the plasma. Simultaneously, the electron temperature evolution shows rebounding peaks that may be related to the interplay between density drop and microwave coupling with deep impact on the Electron Energy Distribution Function. The correlation of such structures with the plasma absorbed power and the coupling quality is also reported.

  17. Ion-acoustic solitons in negative ion plasma with two-electron temperature distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, M. K.; Tiwari, R. S.; Chawla, J. K.

    2012-06-15

    Ion-acoustic solitons in a warm positive and negative ion species with different masses, concentrations, and charge states with two electron temperature distributions are studied. Using reductive perturbation method, Korteweg de-Vries (KdV) and modified-KdV (m-KdV) equations are derived for the system. The soliton solution of the KdV and m-KdV equations is discussed in detail. It is found that if the ions have finite temperatures, then there exist two types of modes, namely slow and fast ion-acoustic modes. It is also investigated that the parameter determining the nature of soliton (i.e., whether the system will support compressive or rarefactive solitons) is different for slow and fast modes. For the slow mode, the parameter is the relative temperature of the two ion species; whereas for the fast mode, it is the relative concentration of the two ion species. At a critical concentration of negative ions, both compressive and rarefactive solitons coexist. The amplitude and width of the solitons are discussed in detail at critical concentration for m-KdV solitons. The effect of the relative temperature of the two-electron and cold-electron concentration on the characteristics of the solitons are also discussed.

  18. Estimation of electron temperature and density of the decay plasma in a laser-assisted discharge plasma extreme ultraviolet source by using a modified Stark broadening method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Qiushi; Muto, Takahiro; Yamada, Junzaburo; Kishi, Nozomu; Watanabe, Masato; Okino, Akitoshi; Horioka, Kazuhiko; Hotta, Eiki

    2011-12-15

    In order to investigate the plasma expansion behaviors and the electrical recovery process after the maximum implosion in our tin fueled laser-assisted discharge plasma (LDP) 13.5 nm EUV source, we developed and evaluated a cost-efficient spectroscopic method to determine the electron temperature T{sub e} and density n{sub e} simultaneously, by using Stark broadenings of two Sn II isolated lines (5s{sup 2}4f{sup 2}F{sup o}{sub 5/2} - 5s{sup 2}5d{sup 2}D{sub 3/2} 558.9 nm and 5s{sup 2}6d{sup 2}D{sub 5/2} - 5s{sup 2}6p{sup 2}P{sup o}{sub 3/2} 556.2 nm) spontaneously emitted from the plasma. The spatial-resolved evolutions of T{sub e} and n{sub e} of the expansion plasma over 50 to 900 ns after the maximum implosion were obtained using this modified Stark broadening method. According to the different n{sub e} decay characteristics along the Z-pinch axis, the expansion velocity of the electrons was estimated as {approx}1.2 x 10{sup 4} ms{sup -1} from the plasma shell between the electrodes towards the cathode and the anode. The decay time constant of n{sub e} was measured as 183 {+-} 24 ns. Based on the theories of plasma adiabatic expansion and electron-impact ionization, the minimum time-span that electrical recovery between the electrodes needs in order to guarantee the next succeeding regular EUV-emitting discharge was estimated to be 70.5 {mu}s. Therefore, the maximum repetition rate of our LDP EUV source is {approx}14 kHz, which enables the output to reach 125 W/(2{pi}sr).

  19. Computational Study of Electron-Molecule Collisions Related to Low-Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Partridge, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Computational study of electron-molecule collisions not only complements experimental measurements, but can also be used to investigate processes not readily accessible experimentally. A number of ab initio computational methods are available for these types of calculations. Here we describe a recently developed technique, the finite element Z-matrix method, Analogous to the R-matrix, method, it partitions the space into regions and employs real matrix elements. However, unlike the implementation of the R-matrix method commonly used in atomic and molecular physics, the Z-matrix method is fully variational. In the present implementation, a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians is used to represent the continuum electron, thus offering full flexibility without imposing fixed boundary conditions. Numerical examples include the electron-impact dissociation of N2 via the metastable A3Su+ state, a process which may be important in the lower thermosphere, and the dissociation of the CF radical, a process of interest to plasma etching. To understand the dissociation pathways, large scale quantum chemical calculations have been carried out for all target states which dissociate to the lowest five limits in the case of N2, and to the lowest two limits in the case of CF. For N2, the structural calculations clearly show the preference for predissociation if the initial state is the ground X1 Sg+ state, but direct dissociation appears to be preferable if the initial state is the A3Su+ state. Multi-configuration SCF target functions are used in the collisional calculation.

  20. Effect of ion temperature on arbitrary amplitude ion acoustic solitary waves in quantum electron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Prasanta; Roy, Kaushik; Muniandy, Sithi V.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.

    2009-04-01

    Using Sagdeev's pseudopotential technique, the effect of ion temperature on the arbitrary amplitude ion acoustic solitary waves in quantum electron-ion plasma is studied. In addition, the effect of ion temperature on the region of existence, as well as on the shape of the solitary waves, is also investigated extensively. It is shown that for large amplitude solitary wave, quantum parameter H does not play any role in determining the region of existence and on the amplitude of the solitary waves. However, H has a significant effect on the width of the solitary wave. It is worth noting that our results are in agreement with previous investigations when the effect of ion temperature is neglected.

  1. Determination of the time evolution of the electron-temperature profile of reactor-like plasmas from the measurement of blackbody electron-cyclotron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, P.C.; Arunasalam, V.; Bitzer, R.A.; Hosea, J.C.

    1982-04-01

    Plasma characteristics (i.e., n/sub e/ greater than or equal to 1 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/, T/sub e/ greater than or equal to 10/sup 7/ /sup 0/K, B/sub psi/ greater than or equal to 20 kG) in present and future magnetically confined plasma devices, e.g., Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), meet the conditions for blackbody emission near the electron cyclotron frequency and at few harmonics. These conditions, derived from the hot plasma dielectric tensor, have been verified by propagation experiments on PLT and the Princeton Model-C Stellarator. Blackbody emission near the fundamental electron cyclotron frequency and the second harmonic have been observed in PLT and is routinely measured to ascertain the time evolution of the electron temperature profile. These measurements are especially valuable in the study of auxiliary heating of tokamak plasma. Measurement and calibration techniques will also be discussed with special emphasis on our fast-scanning heterodyne receiver concept.

  2. Measurements of electron density and temperature profiles in plasma produced by Nike KrF laser for laser plasma instability research.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J L; Karasik, M; Chan, L Y

    2015-08-01

    A grid image refractometer (GIR) has been implemented at the Nike krypton fluoride laser facility of the Naval Research Laboratory. This instrument simultaneously measures propagation angles and transmissions of UV probe rays (λ = 263 nm, Δt = 10 ps) refracted through plasma. We report results of the first Nike-GIR measurement on a CH plasma produced by the Nike laser pulse (∼1 ns FWHM) with the intensity of 1.1 × 10(15) W/cm(2). The measured angles and transmissions were processed to construct spatial profiles of electron density (ne) and temperature (Te) in the underdense coronal region of the plasma. Using an inversion algorithm developed for the strongly refracted rays, the deployed GIR system probed electron densities up to 4 × 10(21) cm(-3) with the density scale length of 120 μm along the plasma symmetry axis. The resulting n(e) and T(e) profiles are verified to be self-consistent with the measured quantities of the refracted probe light. PMID:26329186

  3. Plasma heating power dissipation in low temperature hydrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Komppula, J. Tarvainen, O.

    2015-10-15

    A theoretical framework for power dissipation in low temperature plasmas in corona equilibrium is developed. The framework is based on fundamental conservation laws and reaction cross sections and is only weakly sensitive to plasma parameters, e.g., electron temperature and density. The theory is applied to low temperature atomic and molecular hydrogen laboratory plasmas for which the plasma heating power dissipation to photon emission, ionization, and chemical potential is calculated. The calculated photon emission is compared to recent experimental results.

  4. Reduced model prediction of electron temperature profiles in microtearing-dominated National Spherical Torus eXperiment plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S. M. Guttenfelder, W.; Bell, R. E.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Maingi, R.

    2014-08-15

    A representative H-mode discharge from the National Spherical Torus eXperiment is studied in detail to utilize it as a basis for a time-evolving prediction of the electron temperature profile using an appropriate reduced transport model. The time evolution of characteristic plasma variables such as β{sub e}, ν{sub e}{sup ∗}, the MHD α parameter, and the gradient scale lengths of T{sub e}, T{sub i}, and n{sub e} were examined as a prelude to performing linear gyrokinetic calculations to determine the fastest growing micro instability at various times and locations throughout the discharge. The inferences from the parameter evolutions and the linear stability calculations were consistent. Early in the discharge, when β{sub e} and ν{sub e}{sup ∗} were relatively low, ballooning parity modes were dominant. As time progressed and both β{sub e} and ν{sub e}{sup ∗} increased, microtearing became the dominant low-k{sub θ} mode, especially in the outer half of the plasma. There are instances in time and radius, however, where other modes, at higher-k{sub θ}, may, in addition to microtearing, be important for driving electron transport. Given these results, the Rebut-Lallia-Watkins (RLW) electron thermal diffusivity model, which is based on microtearing-induced transport, was used to predict the time-evolving electron temperature across most of the profile. The results indicate that RLW does a good job of predicting T{sub e} for times and locations where microtearing was determined to be important, but not as well when microtearing was predicted to be stable or subdominant.

  5. Reduced model prediction of electron temperature profiles in microtearing-dominated National Spherical Torus eXperiment plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S. M.; Guttenfelder, W.; Bell, R. E.; Gerhardt, S. P.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Maingi, R.

    2014-08-01

    A representative H-mode discharge from the National Spherical Torus eXperiment is studied in detail to utilize it as a basis for a time-evolving prediction of the electron temperature profile using an appropriate reduced transport model. The time evolution of characteristic plasma variables such as βe, ν*e, the MHD α parameter, and the gradient scale lengths of Te, Ti, and ne were examined as a prelude to performing linear gyrokinetic calculations to determine the fastest growing micro instability at various times and locations throughout the discharge. The inferences from the parameter evolutions and the linear stability calculations were consistent. Early in the discharge, when βe and ν*e were relatively low, ballooning parity modes were dominant. As time progressed and both βe and ν*e increased, microtearing became the dominant low-κθ mode, especially in the outer half of the plasma. There are instances in time and radius, however, where other modes, at higher-κθ, may, in addition to microtearing, be important for driving electron transport. Given these results, the Rebut-Lallia-Watkins (RLW) electron thermal diffusivity model, which is based on microtearing-induced transport, was used to predict the time-evolving electron temperature across most of the profile. The results indicate that RLW does a good job of predicting Te for times and locations where microtearing was determined to be important, but not as well when microtearing was predicted to be stable or subdominant.

  6. Electron Bernstein wave electron temperature profile diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    G. Taylor; P. Efthimion; B. Jones; T. Munsat; J. Spaleta; J. Hosea; R. Kaita; R. Majeski; J. Menard

    2000-07-20

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has been employed as a standard electron temperature profile diagnostic on many tokamaks and stellarators, but most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard ECE diagnostics to measure temperature. They are either overdense, operating at high density relative to the magnetic field (e.g. where the plasma frequency is much greater than the electron cyclotron frequency, as in a spherical torus) or they have insufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition. Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) are electrostatic waves that can propagate in overdense plasmas and have a high optical thickness at the electron cyclotron resonance layers, as a result of their large perpendicular wavenumber. This paper reports on measurements of EBW emission on the CDX-U spherical torus, where B{sub o} {approximately} 2 kG, {approximately}10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} and T{sub e} {approx} to 10 -- 200 eV. Results are presented for electromagnetic measurements of EBW emission, mode-converted near the plasma edge. The EBW emission was absolutely calibrated and compared to the electron temperature profile measured by a multi-point Thomson scattering diagnostic. Depending on the plasma conditions, the mode converted EBW radiation temperature was found to be less than or equal to T{sub e} and the emission source was determined to be radially localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. A Langmuir triple probe and a 140 GHz interferometer were employed to measure changes in edge density profile in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance, where the mode conversion of the EBWs is expected to occur. Initial results suggest EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts for overdense plasmas.

  7. Temperature and Electron Density Determination on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Plasmas: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Najarian, Maya L.; Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory is designed for physical chemistry students to gain experience using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in understanding plasma diagnostics. LIBS uses a high-powered laser that is focused on the sample causing a plasma to form. The emission of this plasma is then spectrally resolved and detected. Temperature and electron…

  8. Imaging spectroscopy diagnosis of internal electron temperature and density distributions of plasma cloud surrounding hydrogen pellet in the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Motojima, G.; Sakamoto, R.; Goto, M.; Matsuyama, A.; Yamada, H.; Mishra, J. S.

    2012-09-15

    To investigate the behavior of hydrogen pellet ablation, a novel method of high-speed imaging spectroscopy has been used in the Large Helical Device (LHD) for identifying the internal distribution of the electron density and temperature of the plasma cloud surrounding the pellet. This spectroscopic system consists of a five-branch fiberscope and a fast camera, with each objective lens having a different narrow-band optical filter for the hydrogen Balmer lines and the background continuum radiation. The electron density and temperature in the plasma cloud are obtained, with a spatial resolution of about 6 mm and a temporal resolution of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} s, from the intensity ratio measured through these filters. To verify the imaging, the average electron density and temperature also have been measured from the total emission by using a photodiode, showing that both density and temperature increase with time during the pellet ablation. The electron density distribution ranging from 10{sup 22} to 10{sup 24} m{sup -3} and the temperature distribution around 1 eV have been observed via imaging. The electron density and temperature of a 0.1 m plasma cloud are distributed along the magnetic field lines and a significant electron pressure forms in the plasma cloud for typical experimental conditions of the LHD.

  9. Pulsed Plasma Electron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasik, Yakov

    2008-11-01

    Pulsed (˜10-7 s) electron beams with high current density (>10^2 A/cm^2) are generated in diodes with electric field of E > 10^6 V/cm. The source of electrons in these diodes is explosive emission plasma, which limits pulse duration; in the case E < 10^5 V/cm this plasma is not uniform and there is a time delay in its formation. Thus, there is a continuous interest in research of electron sources which can be used for generation of uniform electron beams produced at E <= 10^5 V/cm. In the present report, several types of plasma electron source (PES) will be considered. The first type of PES is fiber-based cathodes, with and without CsI coating. The operation of these cathodes is governed by the formation of the flashover plasma which serves as a source of electrons. The second type of PES is the ferroelectric plasma source (FPS). The operation of FPS, characterized by the formation of dense surface flashover plasma is accompanied also by the generation of fast microparticles and energetic neutrals. The latter was explained by Coulomb micro-explosions of the ferroelectric surface due to an large time-varying electric field at the front of the expanding plasma. A short review of recent achievements in the operation of a multi-FPS-assisted hollow anode to generate a large area electron beam will be presented as well. Finally, parameters of the plasma produced by a multi-capillary cathode with FPS and velvet igniters will be discussed. Ya. E. Krasik, J. Z. Gleizer, D. Yarmolich, A. Krokhmal, V. Ts. Gurovich, S.Efimov, J. Felsteiner V. Bernshtam, and Yu. M. Saveliev, J. Appl. Phys. 98, 093308 (2005). Ya. E. Krasik, A. Dunaevsky, and J. Felsteiner, Phys. Plasmas 8, 2466 (2001). D. Yarmolich, V. Vekselman, V. Tz. Gurovich, and Ya. E. Krasik, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 075004 (2008). J. Z. Gleizer, Y. Hadas and Ya. E. Krasik, Europhysics Lett. 82, 55001 (2008).

  10. Coulomb collisions in the Boltzmann equation for electrons in low-temperature gas discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelaar, G. J. M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates the effects of electron-electron and electron-ion Coulomb collisions on the electron distribution function and transport coefficients obtained from the Boltzmann equation for simple dc gas discharge conditions. Expressions are provided for the full Coulomb collision terms acting on both the isotropic and anisotropic parts of the electron distribution function, which are then incorporated in the freeware Boltzmann equation solver BOLSIG+. Different Coulomb collision effects are demonstrated and discussed on the basis of BOLSIG+  results for argon gas. It is shown that the anisotropic part of the electron-electron collision term, neglected in previous work, can in certain cases have a large effect on the electron mobility and is essential when describing the transition towards the Coulomb-collision dominated regime characterized by Spitzer transport coefficients. Finally, a brief overview is presented of the discharge conditions for which different Coulomb collision effects occur in different gases.

  11. Effects of finite beam and plasma temperature on the growth rate of a two-stream free electron laser with background plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdizadeh, N.; Aghamir, F. M.

    2013-02-28

    A fluid theory is used to derive the dispersion relation of two-stream free electron laser (TSFEL) with a magnetic planar wiggler pump in the presence of background plasma (BP). The effect of finite beams and plasma temperature on the growth rate of a TSFEL has been verified. The twelve order dispersion equation has been solved numerically. Three instabilities, FEL along with the TS and TS-FEL instabilities occur simultaneously. The analysis in the case of cold BP shows that when the effect of the beam temperature is taken into account, both instable bands of wave-number and peak growth rate in the TS instability increase, but peak growth of the FEL and TS-FEL instabilities decreases. Thermal motion of the BP causes to diminish the TS instability and it causes to decrease the FEL and TS-FEL instabilities. By increasing the beam densities and lowering initial velocities (in the collective Raman regime), growth rate of instabilities increases; however, it has opposite behavior in the Campton regime.

  12. Electron temperature measurements inside the ablating plasma of gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, M. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Jones, O.; Brown, G. V.; Regan, S. P.; Fournier, K. B.; Moore, A. S.; Ross, J. S.; Landen, O.; Kauffman, R. L.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J.; Jaquez, J.; Huang, H.; Hansen, S. B.; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Bradley, D.; Moody, J. D.

    2016-05-01

    The first measurement of the electron temperature (Te) inside a National Ignition Facility hohlraum is obtained using temporally resolved K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of a mid-Z tracer dot. Both isoelectronic- and interstage-line ratios are used to calculate the local Te via the collisional-radiative atomic physics code SCRAM [Hansen et al., High Energy Density Phys 3, 109 (2007)]. The trajectory of the mid-Z dot as it is ablated from the capsule surface and moves toward the laser entrance hole (LEH) is measured using side-on x-ray imaging, characterizing the plasma flow of the ablating capsule. Data show that the measured dot location is farther away from the LEH in comparison to the radiation-hydrodynamics simulation prediction using HYDRA [Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2070 (1996)]. To account for this discrepancy, the predicted simulation Te is evaluated at the measured dot trajectory. The peak Te, measured to be 4.2 keV ± 0.2 keV, is ˜0.5 keV hotter than the simulation prediction.

  13. [Temperature measurement of DC argon plasma jet].

    PubMed

    Yan, Jian-Hua; Pan, Xin-Chao; Ma, Zeng-Yi; Tu, Xin; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2008-01-01

    The electron temperature of DC arc plasma jet is an important parameter, which determines the characteristics of plasma jet. The measurement of emission spectrum was performed to obtain the spectral intensities of some Ar lines and the method of diagrammatic view of Boltzmann was adopted to calculate the electron temperature. The results indicated that the electron temperature dropped at different speed along with the axes of the plasma jet and rose rapidly when the current was increased, and it also rose when the flowrate of argon was increased.

  14. Role of neutral gas in scrape-off layer of tokamak plasma in the presence of finite electron temperature and its gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisai, N.; Kaw, P. K.

    2016-09-01

    The role of neutral gas molecules in the Scrape-off Layer (SOL) region of tokamak plasma is important as it is expected to modify the plasma turbulence. Two-dimensional model has been used that consists of electron continuity, molecular ion continuity, quasi-neutrality, electron energy, and neutral molecular gas continuity equations in the presence of electron impact molecular ionizations and other non-ionizing collisions. The growth rate obtained from these equations has been presented using linear theory. It is observed that the growth rate increases with the neutral gas ionization coefficients. The nonlinear equations are solved numerically in the presence and absence of the neutral gas molecules. Radial profiles of plasma density, electron temperature, and electric field have been obtained. It is found that the neutral gas reduces electric fields. More significant reduction of the poloidal electric field has been found by the neutral gas. Time series obtained from the numerical data has been analyzed. A strong decrease in fluctuation of the plasma density, electron temperature, and potential has been found at the outer region the SOL plasma in the presence of the gas molecules.

  15. Time-fractional KdV equation for plasma of two different temperature electrons and stationary ion

    SciTech Connect

    El-Wakil, S. A.; Abulwafa, Essam M.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Mahmoud, Abeer A.

    2011-09-15

    Using the time-fractional KdV equation, the nonlinear properties of small but finite amplitude electron-acoustic solitary waves are studied in a homogeneous system of unmagnetized collisionless plasma. This plasma consists of cold electrons fluid, non-thermal hot electrons, and stationary ions. Employing the reductive perturbation technique and the Euler-Lagrange equation, the time-fractional KdV equation is derived and it is solved using variational method. It is found that the time-fractional parameter significantly changes the soliton amplitude of the electron-acoustic solitary waves. The results are compared with the structures of the broadband electrostatic noise observed in the dayside auroral zone.

  16. Cyclic evolution of the electron temperature and density in dusty low-pressure radio frequency plasmas with pulsed injection of hexamethyldisiloxane

    SciTech Connect

    Garofano, V.; Stafford, L. E-mail: kremena.makasheva@laplace.univ-tlse.fr; Despax, B.; Clergereaux, R.; Makasheva, K. E-mail: kremena.makasheva@laplace.univ-tlse.fr

    2015-11-02

    Optical emission spectroscopy was used to analyze the very-low-frequency cyclic evolution of the electron energy and density caused by repetitive formation and loss of dust nanoparticles in argon plasmas with pulsed injection of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO, [CH{sub 3}]{sub 6}Si{sub 2}O). After elaborating a Boltzmann diagram for Ar high-lying levels and a collisional-radiative model for Ar 2p (Paschen notation) states, temperatures characterizing the low- and high-energy parts of the electron population were calculated. Relative electron densities were also estimated from relative line emission intensities. Both temperatures increase when the dust occupation increases, and then decrease when dust is lost. The opposite trend was observed for the electron density. Such cyclic behaviors of the electron energy and electron density in the HMDSO-containing plasmas are in good agreement with the evolution processes in dusty plasmas, in which the formation of negative ions followed by an electron attachment on the surfaces of the nanoparticles is a critical phenomenon driving dust growth.

  17. Marshall N. Rosenbluth Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Award Talk: Simultaneous Measurement of Electron Temperature and Density Fluctuations in the Core of DIII-D Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. E.

    2009-11-01

    Multi-field fluctuation measurements provide opportunities for rigorous comparison between experiment and nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations. A unique set of diagnostics on DIII-D allows for simultaneous study of local, long-wavelength (0 < kθρs< 0.5) electron temperature and density fluctuations in the core plasma (0.4 < ρ< 0.8). Previous experiments in L-mode indicate that normalized electron temperature fluctuation levels (40 < f < 400,kHz) increase with radius from ˜0.4% at ρ= 0.5 to ˜2% at ρ=0.8, similar to simultaneously measured density fluctuations. Electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to increase Te, which increases electron temperature fluctuation levels and electron heat transport in the experiments. In contrast, long wavelength density fluctuation levels change very little. The different responses are consistent with increased TEM drive relative to ITG-mode drive. A new capability at DIII-D is the measurement of phase angle between electron temperature and density fluctuations using coupled correlation electron cyclotron emission radiometer and reflectometer diagnostics. Linear and nonlinear GYRO runs have been used to design validation experiments that focus on measurements of the phase angle. GYRO shows that if Te and ∇Te increase 50% in a beam-heated L-mode plasma (ρ=0.5), then the phase angle between electron temperature and density fluctuations decreases 30%-50% and electron temperature fluctuation levels increase a factor of two more than density fluctuations. Comparisons between these predictions and experimental results will be presented.

  18. Existence domains of arbitrary amplitude nonlinear structures in two-electron temperature space plasmas. II. High-frequency electron-acoustic solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2012-12-15

    A three-component plasma model composed of ions, cool electrons, and hot electrons is adopted to investigate the existence of large amplitude electron-acoustic solitons not only for the model for which inertia and pressure are retained for all plasma species which are assumed to be adiabatic but also neglecting inertial effects of the hot electrons. Using the Sagdeev potential formalism, the Mach number ranges supporting the existence of large amplitude electron-acoustic solitons are presented. The limitations on the attainable amplitudes of electron-acoustic solitons having negative potentials are attributed to a number of different physical reasons, such as the number density of either the cool electrons or hot electrons ceases to be real valued beyond the upper Mach number limit, or, alternatively, a negative potential double layer occurs. Electron-acoustic solitons having positive potentials are found to be supported only if inertial effects of the hot electrons are retained and these are found to be limited only by positive potential double layers.

  19. Rotation dependence of a phase delay between plasma edge electron density and temperature fields due to a fast rotating, resonant magnetic perturbation field

    SciTech Connect

    Stoschus, H.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Unterberg, B.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Clever, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Kruezi, U.; Schega, D.; Samm, U.; Jakubowski, M. W.

    2010-06-15

    Measurements of the plasma edge electron density n{sub e} and temperature T{sub e} fields during application of a fast rotating, resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field show a characteristic modulation of both, n{sub e} and T{sub e} coherent to the rotation frequency of the RMP field. A phase delay PHI between the n{sub e}(t) and T{sub e}(t) waveforms is observed and it is demonstrated that this phase delay PHI is a function of the radius with PHI(r) depending on the relative rotation of the RMP field and the toroidal plasma rotation. This provides for the first time direct experimental evidence for a rotation dependent damping of the external RMP field in the edge layer of a resistive high-temperature plasma which breaks down at low rotation and high resonant field amplitudes.

  20. Electron Diffraction Experiments using Laser Plasma Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Fill, E E; Trushin, S; Tommasini, R; Bruch, R

    2005-09-07

    We demonstrate that electrons emitted from a laser plasma can be used to generate diffraction patterns in reflection and transmission. The electrons are emitted in the direction of laser polarization with energies up to 100 keV. The broad electron energy spectrum makes possible the generation of a ''streaked'' diffraction pattern which allows recording fast processes in a single run.

  1. Electron temperature gradient mode instability and stationary vortices with elliptic and circular boundary conditions in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Q.; Zakir, U.; Qamar, A.

    2015-12-15

    Linear and nonlinear dynamics of electron temperature gradient mode along with parallel electron dynamics is investigated by considering hydrodynamic electrons and non-Maxwellian ions. It is noticed that the growth rate of η{sub e}-mode driven linear instability decreases by increasing the value of spectral index and increases by reducing the ion/electron temperature ratio along the magnetic field lines. The eigen mode dispersion relation is also found in the ballooning mode limit. Stationary solutions in the form of dipolar vortices are obtained for both circular and elliptic boundary conditions. It is shown that the dynamics of both circular and elliptic vortices changes with the inclusion of inhomogeneity and non-Maxwellian effects.

  2. Propagation of ion-acoustic solitons in an electron beam-superthermal plasma system with finite ion-temperature: Linear and fully nonlinear investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Saberian, E.; Esfandyari-Kalejahi, A.; Rastkar-Ebrahimzadeh, A.; Afsari-Ghazi, M.

    2013-03-15

    The propagation of ion-acoustic (IA) solitons is studied in a plasma system, comprised of warm ions and superthermal (Kappa distributed) electrons in the presence of an electron-beam by using a hydrodynamic model. In the linear analysis, it is seen that increasing the superthermality lowers the phase speed of the IA waves. On the other hand, in a fully nonlinear investigation, the Mach number range and characteristics of IA solitons are analyzed, parametrically and numerically. It is found that the accessible region for the existence of IA solitons reduces with increasing the superthermality. However, IA solitons with both negative and positive polarities can coexist in the system. Additionally, solitary waves with both subsonic and supersonic speeds are predicted in the plasma, depending on the value of ion-temperature and the superthermality of electrons in the system. It is examined that there are upper critical values for beam parameters (i.e., density and velocity) after which, IA solitary waves could not propagate in the plasma. Furthermore, a typical interaction between IA waves and the electron-beam in the plasma is confirmed.

  3. Changes in core electron temperature fluctuations across the ohmic energy confinement transition in Alcator C-Mod plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, C.; White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Oi, C. Y.; Rice, J. E.; Gao, C.; Ennever, P.; Porkolab, M.; Parra, F.; Mikkelsen, D.; Ernst, D.; Walk, J.; Hughes, J. W.; Irby, J.; Kasten, C.; Hubbard, A. E.; Greenwald, M. J.; the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-08-01

    The first measurements of long wavelength (kyρs < 0.3) electron temperature fluctuations in Alcator C-Mod made with a new correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic support a long-standing hypothesis regarding the confinement transition from linear ohmic confinement (LOC) to saturated ohmic confinement (SOC). Electron temperature fluctuations decrease significantly (∼40%) crossing from LOC to SOC, consistent with a change from trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence domination to ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence as the density is increased. Linear stability analysis performed with the GYRO code (Candy and Waltz 2003 J. Comput. Phys. 186 545) shows that TEMs are dominant for long wavelength turbulence in the LOC regime and ITG modes are dominant in the SOC regime at the radial location (ρ ∼ 0.8) where the changes in electron temperature fluctuations are measured. In contrast, deeper in the core (ρ < 0.8), linear stability analysis indicates that ITG modes remain dominant across the LOC/SOC transition. This radial variation suggests that the robust global changes in confinement of energy and momentum occurring across the LOC/SOC transition are correlated to local changes in the dominant turbulent mode near the edge.

  4. Measurement of the central ion and electron temperature of tokamak plasmas from the x-ray line radiation of high-Z impurity ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S.; Goldman, M.; Hill, K.W.; Horton, R.; Roney, W.; Sauthoff, N.; Stodiek, W.

    1982-04-01

    This paper describes measurements of the central ion and electron temperature of tokamak plasmas from the observation of the 1s - 2p resonance lines, and the associated dielectronic (1s/sup 2/nl - 1s2pnl, with n greater than or equal to 2) satellites, of helium-like iron (Fe XXV) and titanium (Ti XXI). The satellite to resonance line ratios are very sensitive to the electron temperature and are used as an electron temperature diagnostic. The ion temperature is deduced from the Doppler width of the 1s - 2p resonance lines. The measurements have been performed with high resolution Bragg crystal spectrometers on the PLT (Princeton Large Torus) and PDX (Poloidal Divertor Experiment) tokamaks. The details of the experimental arrangement and line evaluation are described, and the ion and electron temperature results are compared with those obtained from independent diagnostic techniques, such as the analysis of charge-exchange neutrals and measurements of the electron cyclotron radiation. The obtained experimental results permit a detailed comparison with theoretical predictions.

  5. Numerical studies of independent control of electron density and gas temperature via nonlinear coupling in dual-frequency atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. L.; Nie, Q. Y.; Wang, Z. B.; Gao, X. T.; Kong, F. R.; Sun, Y. F.; Jiang, B. H.

    2016-07-01

    Dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) provide a promising technology of generating non-equilibrium cold plasmas in atmospheric pressure gases. For both application-focused and fundamental studies, it is important to explore the strategy and the mechanism for enabling effective independent tuning of key plasma parameters in a DBD system. In this paper, we report numerical studies of effects of dual-frequency excitation on atmospheric DBDs, and modulation as well as separate tuning mechanism, with emphasis on dual-frequency coupling to the key plasma parameters and discharge evolution. With an appropriately applied low frequency to the original high frequency, the numerical calculation demonstrates that a strong nonlinear coupling between two frequencies governs the process of ionization and energy deposition into plasma, and thus raises the electron density significantly (e.g., three times in this case) in comparisons with a single frequency driven DBD system. Nevertheless, the gas temperature, which is mainly determined by the high frequency discharge, barely changes. This method then enables a possible approach of controlling both averaged electron density and gas temperature independently.

  6. Axial- and radial-resolved electron density and excitation temperature of aluminum plasma induced by nanosecond laser: Effect of the ambient gas composition and pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dawood, Mahmoud S.; Hamdan, Ahmad E-mail: Joelle.margot@umontreal.ca; Margot, Joëlle E-mail: Joelle.margot@umontreal.ca

    2015-11-15

    The spatial variation of the characteristics of an aluminum plasma induced by a pulsed nanosecond XeCl laser is studied in this paper. The electron density and the excitation temperature are deduced from time- and space- resolved Stark broadening of an ion line and from a Boltzmann diagram, respectively. The influence of the gas pressure (from vacuum up to atmospheric pressure) and compositions (argon, nitrogen and helium) on these characteristics is investigated. It is observed that the highest electron density occurs near the laser spot and decreases by moving away both from the target surface and from the plume center to its edge. The electron density increases with the gas pressure, the highest values being occurred at atmospheric pressure when the ambient gas has the highest mass, i.e. in argon. The excitation temperature is determined from the Boltzmann plot of line intensities of iron impurities present in the aluminum target. The highest temperature is observed close to the laser spot location for argon at atmospheric pressure. It decreases by moving away from the target surface in the axial direction. However, no significant variation of temperature occurs along the radial direction. The differences observed between the axial and radial direction are mainly due to the different plasma kinetics in both directions.

  7. Effects of the parallel electron dynamics and finite ion temperature on the plasma blob propagation in the scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect

    Jovanovic, D.; Shukla, P. K.; Pegoraro, F.

    2008-11-15

    A new three-dimensional model for the warm-ion turbulence at the tokamak edge plasma and in the scrape-off layer is proposed, and used to study the dynamics of plasma blobs in the scrape-off layer. The model is based on the nonlinear interchange mode, coupled with the nonlinear resistive drift mode, in the presence of the magnetic curvature drive, the density inhomogeneity, the electron dynamics along the open magnetic field lines, and the electron-ion and electron-neutral collisions. Within the present model, the effect of the sheath resistivity decreases with the distance from the wall, resulting in the bending and the break up of the plasma blob structure. Numerical solutions exhibit the coupling of interchange modes with nonlinear drift modes, causing the collapse of the blob in the lateral direction, followed by a clockwise rotation and radial propagation. The symmetry breaking, caused both by the parallel resistivity and the finite ion temperature, introduces a poloidal component in the plasma blob propagation, while the overall stability properties and the speed are not affected qualitatively.

  8. Electron Scattering in Hot/Warm Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rozsnyai, B F

    2008-01-18

    Electrical and thermal conductivities are presented for aluminum, iron and copper plasmas at various temperatures, and for gold between 15000 and 30000 Kelvin. The calculations are based on the continuum wave functions computed in the potential of the temperature and density dependent self-consistent 'average atom' (AA) model of the plasma. The cross sections are calculated by using the phase shifts of the continuum electron wave functions and also in the Born approximation. We show the combined effect of the thermal and radiative transport on the effective Rosseland mean opacities at temperatures from 1 to 1000 eV. Comparisons with low temperature experimental data are also presented.

  9. A novel method to determine the electron temperature and density from the absolute intensity of line and continuum emission: application to atmospheric microwave induced Ar plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordanova, E.; Palomares, J. M.; Gamero, A.; Sola, A.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.

    2009-08-01

    An absolute intensity measurement (AIM) technique is presented that combines the absolute measurements of the line and the continuum emitted by strongly ionizing argon plasmas. AIM is an iterative combination of the absolute line intensity-collisional radiative model (ALI-CRM) and the absolute continuum intensity (ACI) method. The basis of ALI-CRM is that the excitation temperature T13 determined by the method of ALI is transformed into the electron temperature Te using a CRM. This gives Te as a weak function of electron density ne. The ACI method is based on the absolute value of the continuum radiation and determines the electron density in a way that depends on Te. The iterative combination gives ne and Te. As a case study the AIM method is applied to plasmas created by torche à injection axiale (TIA) at atmospheric pressure and fixed frequency at 2.45 GHz. The standard operating settings are a gas flow of 1 slm and a power of 800 W; the measurements have been performed at a position of 1 mm above the nozzle. With AIM we found an electron temperature of 1.2 eV and electron density values around 1021 m-3. There is not much dependence of these values on the plasma control parameters (power and gas flow). From the error analysis we can conclude that the determination of Te is within 7% and thus rather accurate but comparison with other studies shows strong deviations. The ne determination comes with an error of 40% but is in reasonable agreement with other experimental results.

  10. Electron temperature differences and double layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C.; Hershkowitz, N.; Lonngren, K. E.

    1983-01-01

    Electron temperature differences across plasma double layers are studied experimentally. It is shown that the temperature differences across a double layer can be varied and are not a result of thermalization of the bump-on-tail distribution. The implications of these results for electron thermal energy transport in laser-pellet and tandem-mirror experiments are also discussed.

  11. Effect of dust charge fluctuations on dust acoustic structures in magnetized dusty plasma containing nonextensive electrons and two-temperature isothermal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araghi, F.; Dorranian, D.

    2016-02-01

    Effect of dust electrical charge fluctuations on the nature of dust acoustic solitary waves (DASWs) in a four-species magnetized dusty plasma containing nonextensive electrons and two-temperature isothermal ions has been investigated. In this model, the negative dust electric charge is considered to be proportional to the plasma space potential. The nonlinear Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) and modified Zakharov-Kuznetsov (mZK) equations are derived for DASWs by using the standard reductive perturbation method. The combined effects of electron nonextensivity and dust charge fluctuations on the DASW profile are analyzed. The different ranges of the nonextensive q-parameter are considered. The results show that solitary waves the amplitude and width of which depend sensitively on the nonextensive q-parameter can exist. Due to the electron nonextensivity and dust charge fluctuation rate, our dusty plasma model can admit both positive and negative potential solitons. The results show that the amplitude of the soliton increases with increasing electron nonextensivity, but its width decreases. Increasing the electrical charge fluctuations leads to a decrease in both the amplitude and width of DASWs.

  12. Electron cyclotron emission imaging in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Munsat, Tobin; Domier, Calvin W.; Kong, Xiangyu; Liang, Tianran; Luhmann, Jr.; Neville C.; Tobias, Benjamin J.; Lee, Woochang; Park, Hyeon K.; Yun, Gunsu; Classen, Ivo. G. J.; Donne, Anthony J. H.

    2010-07-01

    We discuss the recent history and latest developments of the electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic technique, wherein electron temperature is measured in magnetically confined plasmas with two-dimensional spatial resolution. The key enabling technologies for this technique are the large-aperture optical systems and the linear detector arrays sensitive to millimeter-wavelength radiation. We present the status and recent progress on existing instruments as well as new systems under development for future experiments. We also discuss data analysis techniques relevant to plasma imaging diagnostics and present recent temperature fluctuation results from the tokamak experiment for technology oriented research (TEXTOR).

  13. Higher order nonlinear equations for the dust-acoustic waves in a dusty plasma with two temperature-ions and nonextensive electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Emamuddin, M.; Yasmin, S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2013-04-15

    The nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a dusty plasma whose constituents are negatively charged dust, Maxwellian ions with two distinct temperatures, and electrons following q-nonextensive distribution, is investigated by deriving a number of nonlinear equations, namely, the Korteweg-de-Vries (K-dV), the modified Korteweg-de-Vries (mK-dV), and the Gardner equations. The basic characteristics of the hump (positive potential) and dip (negative potential) shaped dust-acoustic (DA) Gardner solitons are found to exist beyond the K-dV limit. The effects of two temperature ions and electron nonextensivity on the basic features of DA K-dV, mK-dV, and Gardner solitons are also examined. It has been observed that the DA Gardner solitons exhibit negative (positive) solitons for qq{sub c}) (where q{sub c} is the critical value of the nonextensive parameter q). The implications of our results in understanding the localized nonlinear electrostatic perturbations existing in stellar polytropes, quark-gluon plasma, protoneutron stars, etc. (where ions with different temperatures and nonextensive electrons exist) are also briefly addressed.

  14. Determination of the electron temperature by optical emission spectroscopy in a 13.56 MHz dusty methane plasma: Influence of the power

    SciTech Connect

    Massereau-Guilbaud, Veronique; Geraud-Grenier, Isabelle; Plain, Andre

    2009-12-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is applied to the study of a radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) discharge in methane used to obtain hydrogenated carbon films and particles. The methane dissociation allows the creation of species in the plasma bulk as H{sub 2}, H, and CH. The emission lines of these species are studied as a function of time and of incident rf power. The electron temperature is determined from the two line radiance ratio method and the corona balance model using the Balmer lines (H{sub alpha}, H{sub beta}, and H{sub gamma}). The incident rf power enhancement in the range 40-120 W leads to the increase in the emission line intensities as the electron temperature decreases. The temporal variations of CH and hydrogen emission lines, of the dc self-bias voltage, and of the electron temperature are correlated both with the particle behavior and growth in the plasma, and with the coating that grows onto the powered electrode.

  15. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Seng, Gary T.

    1990-01-01

    To meet the needs of the aerospace propulsion and space power communities, the high temperature electronics program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. This program supports a major element of the Center's mission - to perform basic and developmental research aimed at improving aerospace propulsion systems. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices.

  16. Implementation of a multichannel soft x-ray diagnostic for electron temperature measurements in TJ-II high-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baiao, D.; Varandas, C.; Molinero, A.; Chercoles, J.

    2012-10-15

    Based on the multi-foil technique, a multichannel soft x-ray diagnostic for electron temperature measurements has been recently implemented in the TJ-II stellarator. The diagnostic system is composed by four photodiodes arrays with beryllium filters of different thickness. An in-vacuum amplifier board is coupled to each array, aiming at preventing induced noise currents. The Thomson scattering and the vacuum ultraviolet survey diagnostics are used for assessing plasma profiles and composition, being the analysis carried out with the radiation code IONEQ. The electron temperature is determined through the different signal-pair ratios with temporal and spatial resolution. The design and preliminary results from the diagnostic are presented.

  17. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma photos

    SciTech Connect

    Racz, R.; Palinkas, J.; Biri, S.

    2010-02-15

    In order to observe and study systematically the plasma of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources (ECRIS) we made a high number of high-resolution visible light plasma photos and movies in the ATOMKI ECRIS Laboratory. This required building the ECR ion source into an open ECR plasma device, temporarily. An 8MP digital camera was used to record photos of plasmas made from Ne, Ar, and Kr gases and from their mixtures. We studied and recorded the effect of ion source setting parameters (gas pressure, gas composition, magnetic field, and microwave power) to the shape, color, and structure of the plasma. The analysis of the photo series gave us many qualitative and numerous valuable physical information on the nature of ECR plasmas.

  18. Temperature relaxation in dense plasma mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    We present a model to calculate temperature-relaxation rates in dense plasma mixtures. The electron-ion relaxation rates are calculated using an average-atom model and the ion-ion relaxation rates by the Landau-Spitzer approach. This method allows the study of the temperature relaxation in many-temperature electron-ion and ion-ion systems such as those encountered in inertial confinement fusion simulations. It is of interest for general nonequilibrium thermodynamics dealing with energy flows between various systems and should find broad use in present high energy density experiments.

  19. Conceptual Design of Electron-Beam Generated Plasma Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ankur; Rauf, Shahid; Dorf, Leonid; Collins, Ken; Boris, David; Walton, Scott

    2015-09-01

    Realization of the next generation of high-density nanostructured devices is predicated on etching features with atomic layer resolution, no damage and high selectivity. High energy electron beams generate plasmas with unique features that make them attractive for applications requiring monolayer precision. In these plasmas, high energy beam electrons ionize the background gas and the resultant daughter electrons cool to low temperatures via collisions with gas molecules and lack of any accelerating fields. For example, an electron temperature of <0.6 eV with densities comparable to conventional plasma sources can be obtained in molecular gases. The chemistry in such plasmas can significantly differ from RF plasmas as the ions/radicals are produced primarily by beam electrons rather than those in the tail of a low energy distribution. In this work, we will discuss the conceptual design of an electron beam based plasma processing system. Plasma properties will be discussed for Ar, Ar/N2, and O2 plasmas using a computational plasma model, and comparisons made to experiments. The fluid plasma model is coupled to a Monte Carlo kinetic model for beam electrons which considers gas phase collisions and the effect of electric and magnetic fields on electron motion. The impact of critical operating parameters such as magnetic field, beam energy, and gas pressure on plasma characteristics in electron-beam plasma processing systems will be discussed. Partially supported by the NRL base program.

  20. Electron transport in one-dimensional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wienke, B.R.

    1983-11-01

    A one-dimensional, multigroup, discrete ordinates technique for computing electron energy deposition in plasmas is detailed. The Fokker-Planck collision operator is employed in the continuous approximation and electric fields (considered external) are included in the equation. Bremsstrahlung processes are not treated. Comparisons with analytic and Monte Carlo results are given. Fits to deposition profiles and energy scaling are proposed and discussed for monoenergetic and Maxwellian sources in the range, 0 to 150 keV, with and without uniform fields. The techniques employed to track electrons are generally useful in situations where the background plasma temperature is an order of magnitude smaller than the electron energy and collective plasma effects are negligible. We have used the approach successfully in laser pellet implosion applications.

  1. Flute-interchange stability in a hot electron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    Several topics in the kinetic stability theory of flute-interchange modes in a hot electron plasma are discussed. The stability analysis of the hot-electron, curvature-driven flute-interchange mode, previously performed in a slab geometry, is extended to a cylindrical plasma. The cold electron concentration necessary for stability differs substantially from previous criteria. The inclusion of a finite temperature background plasma in the stability analysis results in an ion curvature-driven flute-interchange mode which may be stabilized by either hot-electron diamagnetic effects, hot-electron plasma density, or finite (ion) Larmor radius effects.

  2. Temperature Relaxation in Non-Ideal Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gericke, Dirk O.; Murillo, Michael S.

    2001-10-01

    The equilibration process of multi-temperature plasmas, i.e., the energy transfer between electrons and ions, is investigated for the case of hot electrons and cold ions. Such non-equilibrium plasmas occur in various experiments, including the creation and heating of plasmas with short-pulse lasers and intense ion beams. Temperature separation occurs since these drivers couple almost entirely to the electrons. The standard approach to the equilibration rates goes back to the early works of Landau and Spitzer. However, this approach is only valid for systems where the Coulomb logarithm is larger than three, which clearly fails for strongly coupled plasmas. We first generalize this approach by considering hyperbolic orbits for the particle trajectories. Then we calculate the energy transfer rates using a quantal kinetic equation of the Boltzmann type which allows an exact (T-matrix) treatment of close collisions. On this basis, we demonstrate the importance of hyperbolic orbits, quantum defraction effects on the scattering cross section, a correct treatment of the distribution, dynamic screening effects, and the influence of the plasma composition.

  3. On the use of the double floating probe method to infer the difference between the electron and the heavy particles temperatures in an atmospheric pressure, vortex-stabilized nitrogen plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L. Mancinelli, B. R.; Kelly, H.

    2014-05-15

    Sweeping double probe measurements in an atmospheric pressure direct current vortex-stabilized plasma jet are reported (plasma conditions: 100 A discharge current, N{sub 2} gas flow rate of 25 Nl/min, thoriated tungsten rod-type cathode, copper anode with 5 mm inner diameter). The interpretation of the double probe characteristic was based on a generalization of the standard double floating probe formulae for non-uniform plasmas coupled to a non-equilibrium plasma composition model. Perturbations caused by the current to the probe together with collisional and thermal processes inside the probe perturbed region were taken into account. Radial values of the average electron and heavy particle temperatures as well as the electron density were obtained. The calculation of the temperature values did not require any specific assumption about a temperature relationship between different particle species. An electron temperature of 10 900 ± 900 K, a heavy particle temperature of 9300 ± 900 K, and an electron density of about 3.5 × 10{sup 22} m{sup −3} were found at the jet centre at 3.5 mm downstream from the torch exit. Large deviations from kinetic equilibrium were found toward the outer border of the plasma jet. These results showed good agreement with those previously reported by the authors by using a single probe technique. The calculations have shown that this method is particularly useful for studying spraying-type plasma torches operated at power levels of about 15 kW.

  4. TG wave autoresonant control of plasma temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kabantsev, A. A. Driscoll, C. F.

    2015-06-29

    The thermal correction term in the Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) wave’s frequency has been used to accurately control the temperature of electron plasma, by applying a swept-frequency continuous drive autoresonantly locked in balance with the cyclotron cooling. The electron temperature can be either “pegged” at a desired value (by constant drive frequency); or varied cyclically (following the tailored frequency course), with rates limited by the cooling time (on the way down) and by chosen drive amplitude (on the way up)

  5. Existence domains of arbitrary amplitude nonlinear structures in two-electron temperature space plasmas. I. Low-frequency ion-acoustic solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2012-07-15

    Using the Sagdeev pseudopotential technique, the existence of large amplitude ion-acoustic solitons is investigated for a plasma composed of ions, and hot and cool electrons. Not only are all species treated as adiabatic fluids but the model for which inertial effects of the hot electrons is neglected whilst retaining inertia and pressure for the ions and cool electrons has also been considered. The focus of this investigation has been on identifying the admissible Mach number ranges for large amplitude nonlinear ion-acoustic soliton structures. The lower Mach number limit yields a minimum velocity for the existence of ion-acoustic solitons. The upper Mach number limit for positive potential solitons is found to coincide with the limiting value of the potential (positive) beyond which the ion number density ceases to be real valued, and ion-acoustic solitons can no longer exist. Small amplitude solitons having negative potentials are found to be supported when the temperature of the cool electrons is negligible.

  6. Electronic Structure of Dense Plasmas by X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Rogers, F J; Pollaine, S M; Froula, D H; Blancard, C; Faussurier, G; Renaudin, P; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R; Landen, O L

    2003-10-07

    We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

  7. Spectroscopic diagnostics of high temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Moos, W.

    1990-01-01

    A three-year research program for the development of novel XUV spectroscopic diagnostics for magnetically confined fusion plasmas is proposed. The new diagnostic system will use layered synthetic microstructures (LSM) coated, flat and curved surfaces as dispersive elements in spectrometers and narrow band XUV filter arrays. In the framework of the proposed program we will develop impurity monitors for poloidal and toroidal resolved measurements on PBX-M and Alcator C-Mod, imaging XUV spectrometers for electron density and temperature fluctuation measurements in the hot plasma core in TEXT or other similar tokamaks and plasma imaging devices in soft x-ray light for impurity behavior studies during RF heating on Phaedrus T and carbon pellet ablation in Alcator C-Mod. Recent results related to use of multilayer in XUV plasma spectroscopy are presented. We also discuss the latest results reviewed to q{sub o} and local poloidal field measurements using Zeeman polarimetry.

  8. Thermal bremsstrahlung from high-temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, R.J.

    1980-06-15

    Analytic expressions are derived for the total bremsstrahlung energy-loss rate per unit volume and the spectral emission rate per unit volume and the spectral emission rate of a very hot (approx.10/sup 7/-10/sup 9/ K) plasma. At these temperatures the principal contribution to emission can be computed from the nonrelativistic limit of electron-ion bremsstrahlung in the Born approximation. Modifications to this rate are evaluated from (1) relativistic corrections to the thermal-electron velocity distribution function, (2) relativistic and spin corrections to the nonrelativistic electron-ion bremsstrahlung cross section, (3) electron-electron bremsstrahlung, and (4) first-order Born approximation corrections to electron-ion bremsstrahlung. Modifications (1), (2), and (3) are of relative order kT/mc/sup 2/, and modification (4) is of relative order (Ry/kT)/sup 1/2/; at 10/sup 8/ K, each is of order 10%.

  9. Electron density measurements for plasma adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiswander, Brian W.

    Over the past 40 years, there has been growing interest in both laser communications and directed energy weapons that operate from moving aircraft. As a laser beam propagates from an aircraft in flight, it passes through boundary layers, turbulence, and shear layers in the near-region of the aircraft. These fluid instabilities cause strong density gradients which adversely affect the transmission of laser energy to a target. Adaptive optics provides corrective measures for this problem but current technology cannot respond quickly enough to be useful for high speed flight conditions. This research investigated the use of plasma as a medium for adaptive optics for aero-optics applications. When a laser beam passes through plasma, its phase is shifted proportionally to the electron density and gas heating within the plasma. As a result, plasma can be utilized as a dynamically controllable optical medium. Experiments were carried out using a cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma chamber which generated a sub-atmospheric pressure, low-temperature plasma. An electrostatic model of this design was developed and revealed an important design constraint relating to the geometry of the chamber. Optical diagnostic techniques were used to characterize the plasma discharge. Single-wavelength interferometric experiments were performed and demonstrated up to 1.5 microns of optical path difference (OPD) in a 633 nm laser beam. Dual-wavelength interferometry was used to obtain time-resolved profiles of the plasma electron density and gas heating inside the plasma chamber. Furthermore, a new multi-wavelength infrared diagnostic technique was developed and proof-of-concept simulations were conducted to demonstrate the system's capabilities.

  10. Confinement Studies in High Temperature Spheromak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D N; Mclean, H S; Wood, R D; Casper, T A; Cohen, B I; Hooper, E B; LoDestro, L L; Pearlstein, L D; Romero-Talamas, C

    2006-10-23

    Recent results from the SSPX spheromak experiment demonstrate the potential for obtaining good energy confinement (Te > 350eV and radial electron thermal diffusivity comparable to tokamak L-mode values) in a completely self-organized toroidal plasma. A strong decrease in thermal conductivity with temperature is observed and at the highest temperatures, transport is well below that expected from the Rechester-Rosenbluth model. Addition of a new capacitor bank has produced 60% higher magnetic fields and almost tripled the pulse length to 11ms. For plasmas with T{sub e} > 300eV, it becomes feasible to use modest (1.8MW) neutral beam injection (NBI) heating to significantly change the power balance in the core plasma, making it an effective tool for improving transport analysis. We are now developing detailed designs for adding NBI to SSPX and have developed a new module for the CORSICA transport code to compute the correct fast-ion orbits in SSPX so that we can simulate the effect of adding NBI; initial results predict that such heating can raise the electron temperature and total plasma pressure in the core by a factor of two.

  11. Implementation of a new atomic basis for the He I equilibrium line ratio technique for electron temperature and density diagnostic in the SOL for H-mode plasmas in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz Burgos, J. M.; Schmitz, O.; Unterberg, E. A.; Loch, S. D.; Ballance, C. P.

    2011-08-01

    Evaluating the ratio of selected helium lines allows for measurement of electron densities and temperatures. This technique is applied for L-mode plasmas at TEXTOR (O. Schmitz et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 (2008) 115004). We report our first efforts to extend it to H-mode plasma diagnostics in DIII-D. This technique depends on the accuracy of the atomic data used in the collisional radiative model (CRM). We present predictions for the electron temperatures and densities by using recently calculated R-Matrix With Pseudostates (RMPS) and Convergent Close-Coupling (CCC) electron-impact excitation and ionization data. We include contributions from higher Rydberg states by means of the projection matrix. These effects become significant for high electron density conditions, which are typical in H-mode. We apply a non-equilibrium model for the time propagation of the ionization balance to predict line emission profiles from experimental H-mode data from DIII-D.

  12. Electron Bernstein wave electron temperature profile diagnostic (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.; Jones, B.; Munsat, T.; Spaleta, J.; Hosea, J.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.

    2001-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission (ECE) has been employed as a standard electron temperature profile diagnostic on many tokamaks and stellarators, but most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard ECE diagnostics to measure temperature. They are either ''overdense,'' operating at high density relative to the magnetic field (e.g., {omega}{sub pe}>>{Omega}{sub ce} in a spherical torus) or they have insufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition ({tau}>2). Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) are electrostatic waves that can propagate in overdense plasmas and have a high optical thickness at the electron cyclotron resonance layers as a result of their large k{sub perp}. In this article we report on measurements of EBW emission on the CDX-U spherical torus, where B{sub 0}{approx}2kG, {approx}10{sup 13}cm{sup -3} and T{sub e}{approx}10--200eV. Results are presented for electromagnetic measurements of EBW emission, mode converted near the plasma edge. The EBW emission was absolutely calibrated and compared to the electron temperature profile measured by a multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic. Depending on the plasma conditions, the mode-converted EBW radiation temperature was found to be {<=}T{sub e} and the emission source was determined to be radially localized at the electron cyclotron resonance layer. A Langmuir triple probe and a 140 GHz interferometer were employed to measure changes in the edge density profile in the vicinity of the upper hybrid resonance where the mode conversion of the EBWs is expected to occur. Initial results suggest EBW emission and EBW heating are viable concepts for plasmas where {omega}{sub pe}>>{Omega}{sub ce}.

  13. Temperature dependent evolution of the local electronic structure of atmospheric plasma treated carbon nanotubes: Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure study

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S. S.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Okpalugo, T. I. T.; Murphy, H.

    2006-09-01

    Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy has been employed to obtain the temperature dependent evolution of the electronic structure of acid treated carbon nanotubes, which were further modified by dielectric barrier discharge plasma processing in an ammonia atmosphere. The NEXAFS studies were performed from room temperature up to 900 deg. C. The presence of oxygen and nitrogen containing functional groups was observed in C K edge, N K edge, and O K edge NEXAFS spectra of the multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The N K edge spectra revealed three types of {pi}* features, the source of which was decisively identified by their temperature dependent evolution. It was established that these features are attributed to pyridinelike, NO, and graphitelike structures, respectively. The O K edge indicated that both carbonyl (C=O), {pi}*(CO), and ether C-O-C, {sigma}*(CO), functionalities were present. Upon heating in a vacuum to 900 deg. C the {pi}*(CO) resonances disappeared while the {sigma}*(CO) resonances were still present confirming their higher thermal stability. Heating did not produce a significant change in the {pi}* feature of the C K edge spectrum indicating that the tabular structure of the nanotubes is essentially preserved following the thermal decomposition of the functional groups on the nanotube surface.

  14. Temperature equilibration in strongly coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L. E.; Chang, C. H.; Snell, C. M.; Daughton, W. S.; Csanak, G. Y.

    2002-01-01

    A laser-driven experiment investigating electron-ion equilibration in strongly coupled plasma was performed in 1995. At that time, standard estimates for the electron-ion equilibration time were two-to-three orders of magnitude faster than observed experimentally. As a result, the electron-ion equilibration time was taken as a fitting parameter to understand the experimental results. Based upon guidance from nonequilibrium molecular dynamics mixture calculations 121 and comparison with strongly coupled resistivity experiments, we have developed a consistent binary collision model to understand the electron-ion equilibration experiment. The model has been implemented in a newly developed multi-species, multi-temperature physics code, which was used for simulation of the experiment. The resulting electron-ion exchange rate is close to the experiment, which is about three orders-of-magnitude slower than given by standard estimates, most of which is the result of a modified coulomb logarithm.

  15. Dense simple plasmas as high-temperature liquid simple metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrot, F.

    1990-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of dense plasmas considered as high-temperature liquid metals are studied. An attempt is made to show that the neutral pseudoatom picture of liquid simple metals may be extended for describing plasmas in ranges of densities and temperatures where their electronic structure remains 'simple'. The primary features of the model when applied to plasmas include the temperature-dependent self-consistent calculation of the electron charge density and the determination of a density and temperature-dependent ionization state.

  16. Plasma response to electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K.

    2013-12-15

    An electron energy filter (EEF) is embedded in the Large Volume Plasma Device plasma for carrying out studies on excitation of plasma turbulence by a gradient in electron temperature (ETG) described in the paper of Mattoo et al. [S. K. Mattoo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255007 (2012)]. In this paper, we report results on the response of the plasma to the EEF. It is shown that inhomogeneity in the magnetic field of the EEF switches on several physical phenomena resulting in plasma regions with different characteristics, including a plasma region free from energetic electrons, suitable for the study of ETG turbulence. Specifically, we report that localized structures of plasma density, potential, electron temperature, and plasma turbulence are excited in the EEF plasma. It is shown that structures of electron temperature and potential are created due to energy dependence of the electron transport in the filter region. On the other hand, although structure of plasma density has origin in the particle transport but two distinct steps of the density structure emerge from dominance of collisionality in the source-EEF region and of the Bohm diffusion in the EEF-target region. It is argued and experimental evidence is provided for existence of drift like flute Rayleigh-Taylor in the EEF plasma.

  17. Optical plasma torch electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, G.; Karger, O.; Knetsch, A.; Xi, Y.; Deng, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Smith, J.; Manahan, G. G.; Sheng, Z.-M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Hidding, B.

    2015-08-01

    A novel, flexible method of witness electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators is described. A quasistationary plasma region is ignited by a focused laser pulse prior to the arrival of the plasma wave. This localized, shapeable optical plasma torch causes a strong distortion of the plasma blowout during passage of the electron driver bunch, leading to collective alteration of plasma electron trajectories and to controlled injection. This optically steered injection is more flexible and faster when compared to hydrodynamically controlled gas density transition injection methods.

  18. Electron energy distribution in a dusty plasma: analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Denysenko, I B; Kersten, H; Azarenkov, N A

    2015-09-01

    Analytical expressions describing the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a dusty plasma are obtained from the homogeneous Boltzmann equation for electrons. The expressions are derived neglecting electron-electron collisions, as well as transformation of high-energy electrons into low-energy electrons at inelastic electron-atom collisions. At large electron energies, the quasiclassical approach for calculation of the EEDF is applied. For the moderate energies, we account for inelastic electron-atom collisions in the dust-free case and both inelastic electron-atom and electron-dust collisions in the dusty plasma case. Using these analytical expressions and the balance equation for dust charging, the electron energy distribution function, the effective electron temperature, the dust charge, and the dust surface potential are obtained for different dust radii and densities, as well as for different electron densities and radio-frequency (rf) field amplitudes and frequencies. The dusty plasma parameters are compared with those calculated numerically by a finite-difference method taking into account electron-electron collisions and the transformation of high-energy electrons at inelastic electron-neutral collisions. It is shown that the analytical expressions can be used for calculation of the EEDF and dusty plasma parameters at typical experimental conditions, in particular, in the positive column of a direct-current glow discharge and in the case of an rf plasma maintained by an electric field with frequency f=13.56MHz.

  19. Whistler Solitons in Plasma with Anisotropic Hot Electron Admixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Krivorutsky, E. N.; Gallagher, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    The longitudinal and transverse modulation instability of whistler waves in plasma, with a small admixture of hot anisotropic electrons, is discussed. If the hot particles temperature anisotropy is positive, it is found that, in such plasma, longitudinal perturbations can lead to soliton formation for frequencies forbidden in cold plasma. The soliton is enriched by hot particles. The frequency region unstable to transverse modulation in cold plasma in the presence of hot electrons is divided by stable domains. For both cases the role of hot electrons is more significant for whistlers with smaller frequencies.

  20. Energy efficiency of electron plasma emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Zalesski, V. G.

    2011-12-15

    Electron emission influence from gas-discharge plasma on plasma emitter energy parameters is considered. It is shown, that electron emission from plasma is accompanied by energy contribution redistribution in the gas-discharge from plasma emitter supplies sources-the gas-discharge power supply and the accelerating voltage power supply. Some modes of electron emission as a result can be realized: 'a probe measurements mode,' 'a transitive mode,' and 'a full switching mode.'.

  1. Database in low temperature plasma modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Y.

    2002-05-01

    This article is composed of recommended sets of electron collision cross-sections and reaction cross-sections of excited species assessed by a swam method and of information on transport coefficients and reaction rates (cross-sections) of ions, which are needed in low temperature plasma modeling. These data have been piled up by the Investigation Committee on "Discharge Plasma Electron Collision Cross-sections", IEE Japan, and the author's laboratory. The gases taken for the assessment in this work are rare gases, Hg, N 2, O 2, CO 2, CF 4, CH 4, GeH 4, SiH 4, SF 6, C 2H 6, Si 2H 6, c-C 4F 8 and CCl 2F 2.

  2. Self-absorption Effects In Experimental Methods Used To Determine Electron Density And Gas Temperature In An Argon Microwave Plasma (SWP) Generated At Atmospheric Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Santiago, I.; Munoz, J.; Calzada, M. D.

    2008-10-22

    In this work a procedure was applied to verify that self-absorption does not affect the spectral lines used in the experimental determination of the electron density and the gas temperature in surface wave discharges at atmospheric pressure. Therefore, the values of electron density and gas temperature obtained are not perturbed by this phenomenon.

  3. Electron plasma orbits from competing diocotron drifts.

    PubMed

    Hurst, N C; Danielson, J R; Baker, C J; Surko, C M

    2014-07-11

    The perpendicular dynamics of a pure electron plasma column are investigated when the plasma spans two Penning-Malmberg traps with noncoinciding axes. The plasma executes noncircular orbits described by competing image-charge electric-field (diocotron) drifts from the two traps. A simple model is presented that predicts a set of nested orbits in agreement with observed plasma trajectories.

  4. Revisiting plasma hysteresis with an electronically compensated Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.

    2012-09-15

    The measurement of electron temperature in plasma by Langmuir probes, using ramped bias voltage, is seriously affected by the capacitive current of capacitance of the cable between the probe tip and data acquisition system. In earlier works a dummy cable was used to balance the capacitive currents. Under these conditions, the measured capacitive current was kept less than a few mA. Such probes are suitable for measurements in plasma where measured ion saturation current is of the order of hundreds of mA. This paper reports that controlled balancing of capacitive current can be minimized to less than 20 {mu}A, allowing plasma measurements to be done with ion saturation current of the order of hundreds of {mu}A. The electron temperature measurement made by using probe compensation technique becomes independent of sweep frequency. A correction of {<=}45% is observed in measured electron temperature values when compared with uncompensated probe. This also enhances accuracy in the measurement of fluctuation in electron temperature as {delta}T{sub pk-pk} changes by {approx}30%. The developed technique with swept rate {<=}100 kHz is found accurate enough to measure both the electron temperature and its fluctuating counterpart. This shows its usefulness in measuring accurately the temperature fluctuations because of electron temperature gradient in large volume plasma device plasma with frequency ordering {<=}50 kHz.

  5. Revisiting plasma hysteresis with an electronically compensated Langmuir probe.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, P K; Singh, S K; Awasthi, L M; Mattoo, S K

    2012-09-01

    The measurement of electron temperature in plasma by Langmuir probes, using ramped bias voltage, is seriously affected by the capacitive current of capacitance of the cable between the probe tip and data acquisition system. In earlier works a dummy cable was used to balance the capacitive currents. Under these conditions, the measured capacitive current was kept less than a few mA. Such probes are suitable for measurements in plasma where measured ion saturation current is of the order of hundreds of mA. This paper reports that controlled balancing of capacitive current can be minimized to less than 20 μA, allowing plasma measurements to be done with ion saturation current of the order of hundreds of μA. The electron temperature measurement made by using probe compensation technique becomes independent of sweep frequency. A correction of ≤45% is observed in measured electron temperature values when compared with uncompensated probe. This also enhances accuracy in the measurement of fluctuation in electron temperature as δT(pk-pk) changes by ~30%. The developed technique with swept rate ≤100 kHz is found accurate enough to measure both the electron temperature and its fluctuating counterpart. This shows its usefulness in measuring accurately the temperature fluctuations because of electron temperature gradient in large volume plasma device plasma with frequency ordering ≤50 kHz.

  6. Finite temperature static charge screening in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, B.; Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2016-07-01

    The shielding potential around a test charge is calculated, using the linearized quantum hydrodynamic formulation with the statistical pressure and Bohm potential derived from finite temperature kinetic theory, and the temperature effects on the force between ions is assessed. The derived screening potential covers the full range of electron degeneracy in the equation of state of the plasma electrons. An attractive force between shielded ions in an arbitrary degenerate plasma exists below a critical temperature and density. The effect of the temperature on the screening potential profile qualitatively describes the ion-ion bound interaction strength and length variations. This may be used to investigate physical properties of plasmas and in molecular-dynamics simulations of fermion plasma. It is further shown that the Bohm potential including the kinetic corrections has a profound effect on the Thomson scattering cross section in quantum plasmas with arbitrary degeneracy.

  7. Solitary and shock waves in magnetized electron-positron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ding; Li, Zi-Liang; Abdukerim, Nuriman; Xie, Bai-Song

    2014-02-15

    An Ohm's law for electron-positron (EP) plasma is obtained. In the framework of EP magnetohydrodynamics, we investigate nonrelativistic nonlinear waves' solutions in a magnetized EP plasma. In the collisionless limit, quasistationary propagating solitary wave structures for the magnetic field and the plasma density are obtained. It is found that the wave amplitude increases with the Mach number and the Alfvén speed. However, the dependence on the plasma temperature is just the opposite. Moreover, for a cold EP plasma, the existence range of the solitary waves depends only on the Alfvén speed. For a hot EP plasma, the existence range depends on the Alfvén speed as well as the plasma temperature. In the presence of collision, the electromagnetic fields and the plasma density can appear as oscillatory shock structures because of the dissipation caused by the collisions. As the collision frequency increases, the oscillatory shock structure becomes more and more monotonic.

  8. On temperature bifurcation of beryllium and lithium plasma facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu.

    2009-12-15

    The mechanism of temperature bifurcation of plasma contacting surfaces due to recycling of the ionized surface material vapor is considered. It is shown that this mechanism can lead to overheating of beryllium and lithium plasma facing components (in particular, in fusion devices) prior to the thermionic electron emission mechanism. The surface temperatures and the plasma parameters, at which the considered mechanism triggers the local overheating of beryllium and lithium components, are evaluated. The increase in the surface heat load due to secondary electron emission is also considered. It is shown that the combined effects of energy and impact angle distributions of the plasma electrons can increase the averaged secondary electron emission yield to values higher than unity and can lower the average electron energy, at which such yields are achieved.

  9. Radiation temperature of non-equilibrium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Arunasalam, V.

    1991-07-01

    In fusion devices measurements of the radiation temperature T{sub r} ({omega}, k) near the electron cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub C} and the second harmonic 2{omega}{sub C} in directions nearly perpendicular to the confining magnetic field B (i.e., k {approx} k {perpendicular}) serve to map out the electron temperature profiles T{sub e}(r,t). For optically thick plasma at thermodynamic equilibrium T{sub r} = T{sub e}. However, there is increasing experimental evidence for the presence of non-equilibrium electron distributions (such as a drifting Maxwellian with appreciable values of the streaming parameter {omicron} = v{sub d}/v{sub t}, a bi- Maxwellian, and anisotropic Maxwellian with T {perpendicular} {ne} T {parallel}, etc.,) in tokamak plasmas, especially in the presence of radio-frequency heating. Here, we examine (both non-relativistically and relativistically) the dependence of T{sub r} on {omicron}, T{perpendicular}/T{parallel}, T{sub h}/T{sub b}, n{sub h}/n{sub b}etc., where n{sub b}, n{sub h}, T{sub b}, T{sub h} are the densities and temperatures, respectively, of the bulk and the hot components of the bi-Maxwellian plasma. Our bi-Maxwellian results predict that the ratio T{sub r}/T{sub e} is a very sensitive function of the ratios n{sub h}/n{sub b} and T{sub h}/T{sub b}. Further, these relativistic and non-relativistic results satisfy the well-known limit c {yields} {infinity} correspondence principle'', showing that the intensity of the emission and absorption line is independent of the line broadening mechanism. 44 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Electron plasma wave propagation in external-electrode fluorescent lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Guangsup; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Jeong, Jong-Mun; Hong, Byoung-Hee; Koo, Je-Huan; Choi, Eun-Ha; Verboncoeur, John P.; Uhm, Han Sup

    2008-01-14

    The optical propagation observed along the positive column of external electrode fluorescent lamps is shown to be an electron plasma wave propagating with the electron thermal speed of (kT{sub e}/m){sup 1/2}. When the luminance of the lamp is 10 000-20 000 cd/m{sup 2}, the electron plasma temperature and the plasma density in the positive column are determined to be kT{sub e}{approx}1.26-2.12 eV and n{sub o}{approx}(1.28-1.69)x10{sup 17} m{sup -3}, respectively.

  11. Electron density and electron temperature measurement in a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution using a derivative method of Langmuir probes

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ikjin; Chung, ChinWook; Youn Moon, Se

    2013-08-15

    In plasma diagnostics with a single Langmuir probe, the electron temperature T{sub e} is usually obtained from the slope of the logarithm of the electron current or from the electron energy probability functions of current (I)-voltage (V) curve. Recently, Chen [F. F. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 8, 3029 (2001)] suggested a derivative analysis method to obtain T{sub e} by the ratio between the probe current and the derivative of the probe current at a plasma potential where the ion current becomes zero. Based on this method, electron temperatures and electron densities were measured and compared with those from the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measurement in Maxwellian and bi-Maxwellian electron distribution conditions. In a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution, we found the electron temperature T{sub e} obtained from the method is always lower than the effective temperatures T{sub eff} derived from EEDFs. The theoretical analysis for this is presented.

  12. Electron density and electron temperature measurement in a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution using a derivative method of Langmuir probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ikjin; Chung, ChinWook; Youn Moon, Se

    2013-08-01

    In plasma diagnostics with a single Langmuir probe, the electron temperature Te is usually obtained from the slope of the logarithm of the electron current or from the electron energy probability functions of current (I)-voltage (V) curve. Recently, Chen [F. F. Chen, Phys. Plasmas 8, 3029 (2001)] suggested a derivative analysis method to obtain Te by the ratio between the probe current and the derivative of the probe current at a plasma potential where the ion current becomes zero. Based on this method, electron temperatures and electron densities were measured and compared with those from the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) measurement in Maxwellian and bi-Maxwellian electron distribution conditions. In a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution, we found the electron temperature Te obtained from the method is always lower than the effective temperatures Teff derived from EEDFs. The theoretical analysis for this is presented.

  13. Collapse of nonlinear electron plasma waves in a plasma layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimalsky, V.; Koshevaya, S.; Rapoport, Yu; Kotsarenko, A.

    2016-10-01

    The excitation of nonlinear electron plasma waves in the plasma layer is investigated theoretically. This excitation is realized by means of initial oscillatory perturbations of the volume electron concentration or by initial oscillatory distributions of the longitudinal electron velocity. The amplitudes of the initial perturbations are small and the manifestation of the volume nonlinearity is absent. When the amplitudes of the initial perturbations exceed some thresholds, the values of the electron concentration near the plasma boundary increase catastrophically. The maxima of the electron concentration reach extremely high magnitudes, and sharp peaks in the electron concentration occur, which are localized both in the longitudinal and transverse directions. This effect is interpreted as wave collapse near the plasma boundary.

  14. Plasma lenses for focusing relativistic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Govil, R.; Wheeler, S.; Leemans, W.

    1997-04-01

    The next generation of colliders require tightly focused beams with high luminosity. To focus charged particle beams for such applications, a plasma focusing scheme has been proposed. Plasma lenses can be overdense (plasma density, n{sub p} much greater than electron beam density, n{sub b}) or underdense (n{sub p} less than 2 n{sub b}). In overdense lenses the space-charge force of the electron beam is canceled by the plasma and the remaining magnetic force causes the electron beam to self-pinch. The focusing gradient is nonlinear, resulting in spherical aberrations. In underdense lenses, the self-forces of the electron beam cancel, allowing the plasma ions to focus the beam. Although for a given beam density, a uniform underdense lens produces smaller focusing gradients than an overdense lens, it produces better beam quality since the focusing is done by plasma ions. The underdense lens can be improved by tapering the density of the plasma for optimal focusing. The underdense lens performance can be enhanced further by producing adiabatic plasma lenses to avoid the Oide limit on spot size due to synchrotron radiation by the electron beam. The plasma lens experiment at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) is designed to study the properties of plasma lenses in both overdense and underdense regimes. In particular, important issues such as electron beam matching, time response of the lens, lens aberrations and shot-to-shot reproducibility are being investigated.

  15. Nonlinear electron oscillations in a warm plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Anwesa; Maity, Chandan; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2013-12-15

    A class of nonstationary solutions for the nonlinear electron oscillations of a warm plasma are presented using a Lagrangian fluid description. The solution illustrates the nonlinear steepening of an initial Gaussian electron density disturbance and also shows collapse behavior in time. The obtained solution may indicate a class of nonlinear transient structures in an unmagnetized warm plasma.

  16. Estimation of Electron Temperature on Glass Spherical Tokamak (GLAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, S.; Sadiq, M.; Shah, S. I. W.; GLAST Team

    2015-03-01

    Glass Spherical Tokamak (GLAST) is a small spherical tokamak indigenously developed in Pakistan with an insulating vacuum vessel. A commercially available 2.45 GHz magnetron is used as pre-ionization source for plasma current startup. Different diagnostic systems like Rogowski coils, magnetic probes, flux loops, Langmuir probe, fast imaging and emission spectroscopy are installed on the device. The plasma temperature inside of GLAST, at the time of maxima of plasma current, is estimated by taking into account the Spitzer resistivity calculations with some experimentally determined plasma parameters. The plasma resistance is calculated by using Ohm's law with plasma current and loop voltage as experimentally determined inputs. The plasma resistivity is then determined by using length and area of the plasma column. Finally, the average plasma electron temperature is predicted to be 12.65eV for taking neon (Ne) as a working gas.

  17. Electron density and plasma dynamics of a colliding plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiechula, J.; Schönlein, A.; Iberler, M.; Hock, C.; Manegold, T.; Bohlender, B.; Jacoby, J.

    2016-07-01

    We present experimental results of two head-on colliding plasma sheaths accelerated by pulsed-power-driven coaxial plasma accelerators. The measurements have been performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill of ArH2 at gas pressures between 17 Pa and 400 Pa and load voltages between 4 kV and 9 kV. As the plasma sheaths collide, the electron density is significantly increased. The electron density reaches maximum values of ≈8 ṡ 1015 cm-3 for a single accelerated plasma and a maximum value of ≈2.6 ṡ 1016 cm-3 for the plasma collision. Overall a raise of the plasma density by a factor of 1.3 to 3.8 has been achieved. A scaling behavior has been derived from the values of the electron density which shows a disproportionately high increase of the electron density of the collisional case for higher applied voltages in comparison to a single accelerated plasma. Sequences of the plasma collision have been taken, using a fast framing camera to study the plasma dynamics. These sequences indicate a maximum collision velocity of 34 km/s.

  18. Electron heat transport down steep temperature gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Matte, J.P.; Virmont, J.

    1982-12-27

    Electron heat transport is studied by numerically solving the Fokker-Planck equation, with a spherical harmonic representation of the distribution function. The first two terms (f/sub 0/, f/sub 1/) suffice, even in steep temperature gradients. Deviations from the Spitzer-Haerm law appear for lambda/L/sub T/ ((mean free path)/(temperature gradient length))> or approx. =0.01, as a result of non-Maxwellian f/sub 0/. For lambda/L/sub T/> or approx. =1, the heat flux is (1/3) of the free-streaming value. In intermediate cases, a harmonic law describes well the hottest part of the plasma.

  19. Ion temperature evolution in an ultracold neutral plasma

    SciTech Connect

    McQuillen, P. Strickler, T.; Langin, T.; Killian, T. C.

    2015-03-15

    We study the long-time evolution of the ion temperature in an expanding ultracold neutral plasma using spatially resolved, laser-induced-fluorescence spectroscopy. Adiabatic cooling reduces the ion temperature by an order of magnitude during the plasma expansion, to temperatures as low as 0.2 K. Cooling is limited by heat exchange between ions and the much hotter electrons. We also present evidence for an additional heating mechanism and discuss possible sources. Data are described by a model of the plasma evolution, including the effects of ion-electron heat exchange. We show that for appropriate initial conditions, the degree of Coulomb coupling of ions in the plasma increases during expansion.

  20. Temperature Measurements of Dense Plasmas by Detailed Balance

    SciTech Connect

    Holl, A; Redmer, R; Ropke, G; Reinholz, H; Thiele, R; Fortmann, C; Forster, E; Cao, L; Tschentscher, T; Toleikis, S; Glenzer, S H

    2006-03-14

    Plasmas at high electron densities of n{sub e} = 10{sup 20} - 10{sup 26} cm{sup -3} and moderate temperatures T{sub e} = 1 - 20 eV are important for laboratory astrophysics, high energy density science and inertial confinement fusion. These plasmas are usually referred to as Warm Dense Matter (WDM) and are characterized by a coupling parameter of {Lambda} {approx}> 1 where correlations become important. The characterization of such plasmas is still a challenging task due to the lack of direct measurement techniques for temperatures and densities. They propose to measure the Thomson scattering spectrum of vacuum-UV radiation off density fluctuations in the plasma. Collective Thomson scattering provides accurate data for the electron temperature applying first principles. Further, this method takes advantage of the spectral asymmetry resulting from detailed balance and is independent of collisional effects in these dense systems.

  1. Implementation of a new atomic basis for the He I equilibrium line ratio technique for electron temperature and density diagnostic in the SOL for H-mode plasmas in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Burgos, JMM; Schmitz, O.; Unterberg, Ezekial A; Loch, S. D.; Ballance, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating the ratio of selected helium lines allows for measurement of electron densities and temperatures. This technique is applied for L-mode plasmas at TEXTOR (O. Schmitz et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 (2008) 115004). We report our first efforts to extend it to H-mode plasma diagnostics in DIII-D. This technique depends on the accuracy of the atomic data used in the collisional radiative model (CRM). We present predictions for the electron temperatures and densities by using recently calculated R-Matrix With Pseudostates (RMPS) and Convergent Close-Coupling (CCC) electron-impact excitation and ionization data. We include contributions from higher Rydberg states by means of the projection matrix. These effects become significant for high electron density conditions, which are typical in H-mode. We apply a non-equilibrium model for the time propagation of the ionization balance to predict line emission profiles from experimental H-mode data from DIII-D. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Electron-ion bremsstrahlung continuum emission in nonideal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valuev, A. A.; Kurilenkov, Iu. K.

    1980-09-01

    The effect of the Coulomb nonidealness of a plasma on bremsstrahlung emission (absorption) over a wide spectral range is analyzed using numerical data on electron dynamics in nonideal fully ionized plasmas with charged-particle densities of 10 to the 18th-20th/cu cm and a temperature of 10,000 K. The results are compared with calculations obtained through Kramers' formula and with values of the bremsstrahlung emission coefficient derived from experimental data on the radiation from dense plasmas. These results point to the fact that relative 'bleaching' of nonideal plasmas occur in the IR region of the spectrum.

  3. Electron-ion bremsstrahlung continuum emission in nonideal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valuev, A. A.; Kurilenkov, Iu. K.

    1981-03-01

    The effect of the Coulomb nonidealness of a plasma on bremsstrahlung emission (absorption) over a wide spectral range is analyzed using numerical data on electron dynamics in nonideal fully ionized plasmas with charged-particle densities of 10 to the 18th-20th/cu cm and a temperature of 10,000 K. The results are compared with calculations obtained through Kramers' formula and with values of the bremsstrahlung emission coefficient derived from experimental data on the radiation from dense plasmas. These results point to the fact that relative 'bleaching' of nonideal plasmas occur in the IR region of the spectrum.

  4. Secondary-electrons-induced cathode plasma in a relativistic magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Queller, T.; Gleizer, J. Z.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2012-11-19

    Results of time- and space-resolved spectroscopic studies of cathode plasma during a S-band relativistic magnetron operation and a magnetically insulated diode having an identical interelectrode gap are presented. It was shown that in the case of the magnetron operation, one obtains an earlier, more uniform plasma formation due to energetic electrons' interaction with the cathode surface and ionization of desorbed surface monolayers. No differences were detected in the cathode's plasma temperature between the magnetron and the magnetically insulated diode operation, and no anomalous fast cathode plasma expansion was observed in the magnetron at rf power up to 350 MW.

  5. Model of electron collecting plasma contactors

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, V.A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M.J.; Parks, D.E. )

    1991-06-01

    In laboratory experiments, plasma contactors are observed to collect ampere-level electron currents with low impedance. In order to extend the laboratory experience to the low-earth-orbit environment, a model of plasma contactors is being developed. Laboratory results are being used to support and validate the model development. The important physical processes observed in the laboratory are that the source plasma is separated from the background plasma by a double layer and that ionization of the expellant gas by the collected electrons creates the bulk of the ions that leave the source plasma. The model, which uses Poisson's equation with a physical charge density that includes the ion and electron components of both the source and the ambient plasmas, reproduces this phenomenon for typical experimental parameters. The calculations, in agreement with the laboratory results, show little convergence of the accelerated electrons. The angular momentum of the incoming electrons dramatically reduces the peak electron density. These electrons ionize enough gas to generate the source plasma. Calculations show that the increase in ionization rate with potential produces a steep rise in collected current with increasing potential as seen in the laboratory. 26 refs.

  6. Effect of fast drifting electrons on electron temperature measurement with a triple Langmuir probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Subir; Chowdhury, Satyajit; Palivela, Yaswanth; Pal, Rabindranath

    2015-08-01

    Triple Langmuir Probe (TLP) is a widely used diagnostics for instantaneous measurement of electron temperature and density in low temperature laboratory plasmas as well as in edge region of fusion plasma devices. Presence of a moderately energetic flowing electron component, constituting only a small fraction of the bulk electrons, is also a generally observed scenario in plasma devices, where plasmas are produced by electron impact ionization of neutrals. A theoretical analysis of its effect on interpretation of the TLP data for bulk electron temperature measurement is presented here assuming electron velocity distribution is not deviating substantially from a Maxwellian. The study predicts conventional expression from standard TLP theory to give overestimated value of bulk electron temperature. Correction factor is significant and largely depends on population density, temperature, and energy of the fast component. Experimental verification of theoretical results is obtained in the magnetized plasma linear experimental device of Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics where plasma is produced by an electron cyclotron resonance method and known to have a fast flowing electron component.

  7. Effect of fast drifting electrons on electron temperature measurement with a triple Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Subir Chowdhury, Satyajit; Pal, Rabindranath

    2015-08-14

    Triple Langmuir Probe (TLP) is a widely used diagnostics for instantaneous measurement of electron temperature and density in low temperature laboratory plasmas as well as in edge region of fusion plasma devices. Presence of a moderately energetic flowing electron component, constituting only a small fraction of the bulk electrons, is also a generally observed scenario in plasma devices, where plasmas are produced by electron impact ionization of neutrals. A theoretical analysis of its effect on interpretation of the TLP data for bulk electron temperature measurement is presented here assuming electron velocity distribution is not deviating substantially from a Maxwellian. The study predicts conventional expression from standard TLP theory to give overestimated value of bulk electron temperature. Correction factor is significant and largely depends on population density, temperature, and energy of the fast component. Experimental verification of theoretical results is obtained in the magnetized plasma linear experimental device of Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics where plasma is produced by an electron cyclotron resonance method and known to have a fast flowing electron component.

  8. Time and space resolved measurement of the electron temperature, mass density and ionization state in the ablation plasma between two exploding Al wires

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, P. F.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Hansen, S. B.

    2012-05-15

    We have determined the properties of plasma around and between two exploding wires using high-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plasma densities and temperatures ranging from Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 0.1g/cm{sup 3} and a few eV to less than 0.01 g/cm{sup 3} and 30 eV have been measured in experiments at Cornell University with two 40 {mu}m aluminum (Al) wires spaced 1 mm apart driven by {approx}150 kA peak current pulses with 100 ns rise time. The wire plasma was backlit by the 1.4-1.6 keV continuum radiation produced by a Mo wire X-pinch. The spectrometer employed two spherically bent quartz crystals to record the absorption and backlighter spectra simultaneously. The transition between the dense Al wire core and the coronal plasma is seen as a transition from cold K-edge absorption to Mg-, Na-, and finally Ne-like absorption at the boundary. In the plasma that accumulates between the wires, ionization states up to C-Like Al are observed. The spectrometer geometry and {approx}2{mu}m X-pinch source size provide 0.3 eV spectral resolution and 20 {mu}m spatial resolution enabling us to see 1s{yields} 2p satellite transitions as separate lines as well as O-, F-, and Ne-like 1s{yields} 3p transitions that have not been seen before. A step wedge was used to calibrate the transmission, enabling density to be measured within a factor of two and temperature to be measured within {+-}25%. A genetic algorithm was developed to fit synthetic spectra calculated using the collisional-radiative code SCRAM to the experimental spectra. In order to obtain agreement it was necessary to assume multiple plasma regions with variable thicknesses, thereby allowing the inferred plasma conditions to vary along the absorption path.

  9. dc-plasma-sprayed electronic-tube device

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.

    1982-01-29

    An electronic tube and associated circuitry which is produced by dc plasma arc spraying techniques is described. The process is carried out in a single step automated process whereby both active and passive devices are produced at very low cost. The circuitry is extremely reliable and is capable of functioning in both high radiation and high temperature environments. The size of the electronic tubes produced are more than an order of magnitude smaller than conventional electronic tubes.

  10. Pure electron plasmas confined for 90 ms in a stellarator without electron sources or internal objects

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, P. W.; Sunn Pedersen, T.

    2012-05-15

    We report on the creation and up to 90 ms sustainment of pure electron plasmas confined in a stellarator without internal objects. Injection of positrons into such plasmas is expected to lead to the creation of the first electron-positron plasma experiments. These newly created plasmas will also allow a study of pure electron plasmas without the perturbing presence of internal objects. The plasmas were created by thermionic emission of electrons from a heated, biased filament that was retracted in 20 ms. The confinement of these transient plasmas is different from that of steady state plasmas with internal objects and emissive filaments, and is generally shorter, limited by ion buildup. The decay time is increased by lowering the neutral pressure, lowering the electron plasma temperature, or operating with neutrals with high ionization energies (helium). These findings are all consistent with ion accumulation being the cause for the shorter than expected confinement times. The magnetic field strength also moderately increases the decay times. The deleterious effect of ions is not expected to imply a similar deleterious effect when introducing positrons, but it implies that ion accumulation must be avoided also in an electron-positron experiment.

  11. Laser Thomson Scattering Diagnostics in the Low-Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Hyun-Jong; Chung, Kyu-Sun

    2008-10-01

    Laser Thomson Scattering (LTS) is the non-invasive method for measuring the electron temperature and its density, which can be used for the calibrations of electric probes within collisional and magnetized plasmas. For LTS diagnostics in the low-temperature plasmas, one need to special optics for detection of the scattered light with restricting the Rayleigh and Stray lights. For this, one uses the Triple Grating Spectrometer (TGS), which is composed of Rayleigh block (notch filter for Rayleigh light) and double grating filter (DGF). All focusing lenses are used with achromatic doublet configuration for reducing the non-linear optical effects such as spherical aberration, coma, etc. The specifications of the grating and achromatic doublet lens are 1800 gr/mm with the dimensions of 84 mm x 84 mm and 400 mm of focal length with the diameter of 100 mm, respectively. In this configurations, the linear dispersion is given as 1.006 nm/mm. Considering the dimension of Charged Coupled Device (CCD) with the linear dispersion, the LTS system can be measure the electron temperatures of less than 10 eV (in most laboratory plasmas). The initial measurement of LTS measurement and comparative study with single probe are done in Divertor Plasma Simulator (DiPS) with the following plasma parameters; plasma density of 10^11-10^13 cm-3, electron temperature of 1-4 eV, and the magnetic field of 0.2-1 kG, respectively.

  12. Studies of cryogenic electron plasmas in magnetic mirror fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Ramesh

    This thesis considers the properties of pure electron plasmas in Penning traps which have an axially varying magnetic field. Our theory of the thermal equilibrium of such plasmas in magnetic mirror fields indicates that their behavior may be characterized by the ratio of their temperature to their central density T/n. For cold, dense plasmas the density along the plasma axis scales linearly with the magnetic field, while for hot, tenuous plasmas, at the opposite limit of the parameter range, the density is constant along the axis, similar to the behavior of a neutral plasma in a magnetic mirror. We are able to conclude from this that the electrostatic potential varies along the field lines, in equilibrium. As the plasma charge and potential distribution must be consistent with the grounded potential on the trap walls, the plasma profile does not follow the geometry of the magnetic field lines; the plasma radius in the high-field region is smaller than would be obtained by mapping the field lines from the radial edge of the low-field region. Another interesting feature of these mirror equilibria is that there are trapped populations of particles both in the low-field and high-field regions. Our experiments on the Cryogenic Electron Trap have confirmed many of these theoretical results over a wide parameter range. We have been able to sample the volume charge density at various points on the axis. We have also measured the line-charge distribution of the plasma. Both these experiments are in general agreement with our theory of the global thermal equilibrium in the mirror- field. A surprising observation has been the unexpectedly long- life of the m = 1 diocotron mode in these traps where the magnetic field varies by ~100% across its length. We report these observations, along with plausible explanations for them. The trap we have constructed is intended for the eventual study of very cold electron plasmas in strong magnetic fields, where the plasma electrons are

  13. Emission current formation in plasma electron emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Gruzdev, V. A.; Zalesski, V. G.

    2010-12-15

    A model of the plasma electron emitter is considered, in which the current redistribution over electrodes of the emitter gas-discharge structure and weak electric field formation in plasma are taken into account as functions of the emission current. The calculated and experimental dependences of the switching parameters, extraction efficiency, and strength of the electric field in plasma on the accelerating voltage and geometrical sizes of the emission channel are presented.

  14. Measurements of plasma bremsstrahlung and plasma energy density produced by electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noland, Jonathan David

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to gain an understanding on the relative importance of microwave power, neutral pressure, and magnetic field configuration on the behavior of the hot electrons within an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) plasma. This was carried out through measurement of plasma bremsstrahlung with both NaI(Tl) (hv > 30 keV) and CdTe (2 keV < hv < 70 keV) x-ray detectors, and through measurement of the plasma energy density with a diamagnetic loop placed around the plasma chamber. We also examined the anisotropy in x-ray power by simultaneously measuring the x-ray spectra in two orthogonal directions: radially and axially, using NaI(Tl) detectors. We have seen that for a 6.4 GHz ECRIS, both the x-ray power produced by confined electrons and the plasma energy density behave logarithmically with microwave power. The x-ray flux created by electrons lost from the plasma, however, does not saturate. Thus, the small increase in plasma density that occurred at high microwave powers (> 150 W on a 6.4 GHz ECRIS) was accompanied by a large increase in total x-ray power. We suggest that the saturation of x-ray power and plasma energy density was due to rf-induced pitch-angle scattering of the electrons. X-ray power and plasma energy density were also shown to saturate with neutral pressure, and to increase nearly linearly as the gradient of the magnetic field in the resonance zone was decreased. All of these findings were in agreement with the theoretical models describing ECRIS plasmas. We have discussed the use of a diamagnetic loop as a means of exploring various plasma time scales on a relative basis. Specifically, we focused much of our attention on studying how changing ion source parameters, such as microwave power and neutral pressure, would effect the rise and decay of the integrated diamagnetic signal, which can be related to plasma energy density. We showed that increasing microwave power lowers the e-fold times at both the leading

  15. Quantitative diagnostics of reactive, multicomponent low-temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz-Selinger, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    The special emphasis in this work is put on the quantitative determination of the plasma composition of an inductively coupled low temperature plasma (ICP). Several standard plasma diagnostic techniques were applied. As a test case for a multi-component low-temperature plasma argon-hydrogen as well as argon-hydrogen-nitrogen mixed plasmas were investigated. For steady-state plasma operation the ion density and electron temperature were determined with a single tip Langmuir probe. A multi-grid miniature retarding-field analyzer was used to measure the mass integrated ion flux. An energy-dispersive mass spectrometer - a so-called plasma monitor (PM) - was applied to sample ions from the plasma to derive the ion composition. The degree of dissociation of hydrogen and the gas temperature were derived from optical emission spectroscopy. The gas temperature was estimated by the rotational distribution of the Q-branch lines of the hydrogen Fulcher- α diagonal band for the argon-hydrogen mixed plasmas and from the second positive system of N2 in argon-hydrogen-nitrogen mixed plasmas. The degree of dissociation of hydrogen was measured by actinometry. The influence of the substrate material of the counter electrode (stainless steel, copper, tungsten, Macor, and aluminium) on the atomic hydrogen concentration was investigated by OES. In addition, ionization-threshold mass spectrometry (ITMS) was used to determine the densities of atomic nitrogen (N) and atomic hydrogen (H and D). Pulsed plasma operation was applied to directly measure the loss rate of H, D and N in the afterglow from the temporal decay of the ITMS signal. From these data the wall loss probability of atomic hydrogen was determined. Furthermore, a zero-dimensional rate equation model was devised to explain the ion composition in these mixed plasmas with different admixture ratios. In addition to the experimental data on electron density, gas temperature, total pressure, atomic hydrogen density, and Ar, H2

  16. Plasma production for electron acceleration by resonant plasma wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Croia, M.; Curcio, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G. P.; Filippi, F.; Ghigo, A.; Lollo, V.; Pella, S.; Pompili, R.; Romeo, S.; Ferrario, M.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique known nowadays, able to provide very high accelerating fields (10-100 GV/m), enabling acceleration of electrons to GeV energy in few centimeter. However, the quality of the electron bunches accelerated with this technique is still not comparable with that of conventional accelerators (large energy spread, low repetition rate, and large emittance); radiofrequency-based accelerators, in fact, are limited in accelerating field (10-100 MV/m) requiring therefore hundred of meters of distances to reach the GeV energies, but can provide very bright electron bunches. To combine high brightness electron bunches from conventional accelerators and high accelerating fields reachable with plasmas could be a good compromise allowing to further accelerate high brightness electron bunches coming from LINAC while preserving electron beam quality. Following the idea of plasma wave resonant excitation driven by a train of short bunches, we have started to study the requirements in terms of plasma for SPARC_LAB (Ferrario et al., 2013 [1]). In particular here we focus on hydrogen plasma discharge, and in particular on the theoretical and numerical estimates of the ionization process which are very useful to design the discharge circuit and to evaluate the current needed to be supplied to the gas in order to have full ionization. Eventually, the current supplied to the gas simulated will be compared to that measured experimentally.

  17. Ion Temperature Control of the Io Plasma Torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delamere, P. A.; Schneider, N. M.; Steffl, A. J.; Robbins, S. J.

    2005-01-01

    We report on observational and theoretical studies of ion temperature in the Io plasma torus. Ion temperature is a critical factor for two reasons. First, ions are a major supplier of energy to the torus electrons which power the intense EUV emissions. Second, ion temperature determines the vertical extent of plasma along field lines. Higher temperatures spread plasma out, lowers the density and slows reaction rates. The combined effects can play a controlling role in torus energetics and chemistry. An unexpected tool for the study of ion temperature is the longitudinal structure in the plasma torus which often manifests itself as periodic brightness variations. Opposite sides of the torus (especially magnetic longitudes 20 and 200 degrees) have been observed on numerous occasions to have dramatically different brightness, density, composition, ionization state, electron temperature and ion temperature. These asymmetries must ultimately be driven by different energy flows on the opposite sides, presenting an opportunity to observe key torus processes operating under different conditions. The most comprehensive dataset for the study of longitudinal variations was obtained by the Cassini UVIS instrument during its Jupiter flyby. Steffl (Ph.D. thesis, 2005) identified longitudinal variations in all the quantities listed above wit the exception of ion temperature. We extend his work by undertaking the first search for such variation in the UVIS dataset. We also report on a 'square centimeter' model of the torus which extend the traditional 'cubic centimeter' models by including the controlling effects of ion temperature more completely.

  18. Correlation between excitation temperature and electron temperature with two groups of electron energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hoyong; Choe, Wonho; You, S. J.

    2010-10-15

    The relationship between the electron excitation temperature (T{sub exc}) determined by optical emission spectroscopy and the electron temperature (T{sub e}) using a rf-compensated Langmuir probe was investigated in argon capacitively coupled plasmas. In the experiment performed at the gas pressure range of 30 mTorr to 1 Torr and the rf power range of 5-37 W, the electron energy probability function (EEPF) obtained from the probe current versus voltage characteristic curve showed two energy groups of electrons. The measured EEPF demonstrated that the electron energy distribution changed from Druyvesteyn to single Maxwellian as the discharge current was increased and from bi-Maxwellian to Druyvesteyn as the pressure was increased. As a result, T{sub exc} showed a tendency identical to that of T{sub e} of the high energy part of electrons as pressure and rf power were varied. This suggests that electron temperature can be determined from the measured T{sub exc} through a calibration experiment by which the ratio between electron and excitation temperatures is measured.

  19. Development of plasma cathode electron guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, Efim M.; Schanin, Peter M.

    1999-05-01

    The status of experimental research and ongoing development of plasma cathode electron guns in recent years is reviewed, including some novel upgrades and applications to various technological fields. The attractiveness of this kind of e-gun is due to its capability of creating high current, broad or focused beams, both in pulsed and steady-state modes of operation. An important characteristic of the plasma cathode electron gun is the absence of a thermionic cathode, a feature which leads to long lifetime and reliable operation even in the presence of aggressive background gas media and at fore-vacuum gas pressure ranges such as achieved by mechanical pumps. Depending on the required beam parameters, different kinds of plasma discharge systems can be used in plasma cathode electron guns, such as vacuum arcs, constricted gaseous arcs, hollow cathode glows, and two kinds of discharges in crossed E×B fields: Penning and magnetron. At the present time, plasma cathode electron guns provide beams with transverse dimension from fractional millimeter up to about one meter, beam current from microamperes to kiloamperes, beam current density up to about 100 A/cm2, pulse duration from nanoseconds to dc, and electron energy from several keV to hundreds of keV. Applications include electron beam melting and welding, surface treatment, plasma chemistry, radiation technologies, laser pumping, microwave generation, and more.

  20. Electron density measurements in highly electronegative plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, D.; Lafleur, T.; Aanesland, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we present experimental measurements of the electron density in very electronegative ‘ion–ion’ Ar–SF6 plasmas where previous investigations using Langmuir probes have observed electronegativities of up to 5000. The electron density is measured using a short matched dipole probe technique that provides a tolerance better than  ±2 · 1013 m‑3. The results demonstrate that the electron density in the low pressure plasma source (which contains a magnetic filter) can be reduced to around 2.7 · 1013 m‑3 with a corresponding plasma electronegativity of about 4000; close to that from fluid simulation predictions. The highest electronegativity, and lowest electron density, is achieved with a pure SF6 plasma, while adding only 6% SF6 to Ar allows the electronegativity to be increased from 0 to a few hundred with a corresponding decrease in the electron density by more than a thousand. The impedance probe based on a short matched dipole appears to be a practical diagnostic that can be used for independent measurements of the electron density in very electronegative plasmas, and opens up the possibility to further investigate and optimize electronegative plasma sources.

  1. Electron density measurements in highly electronegative plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, D.; Lafleur, T.; Aanesland, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we present experimental measurements of the electron density in very electronegative ‘ion-ion’ Ar-SF6 plasmas where previous investigations using Langmuir probes have observed electronegativities of up to 5000. The electron density is measured using a short matched dipole probe technique that provides a tolerance better than  ±2 · 1013 m-3. The results demonstrate that the electron density in the low pressure plasma source (which contains a magnetic filter) can be reduced to around 2.7 · 1013 m-3 with a corresponding plasma electronegativity of about 4000; close to that from fluid simulation predictions. The highest electronegativity, and lowest electron density, is achieved with a pure SF6 plasma, while adding only 6% SF6 to Ar allows the electronegativity to be increased from 0 to a few hundred with a corresponding decrease in the electron density by more than a thousand. The impedance probe based on a short matched dipole appears to be a practical diagnostic that can be used for independent measurements of the electron density in very electronegative plasmas, and opens up the possibility to further investigate and optimize electronegative plasma sources.

  2. [Low temperature plasma technology for biomass refinery].

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoguo; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-05-01

    Biorefinery that utilizes renewable biomass for production of fuels, chemicals and bio-materials has become more and more important in chemical industry. Recently, steam explosion technology, acid and alkali treatment are the main biorefinery treatment technologies. Meanwhile, low temperature plasma technology has attracted extensive attention in biomass refining process due to its unique chemical activity and high energy. We systemically summarize the research progress of low temperature plasma technology for pretreatment, sugar platflow, selective modification, liquefaction and gasification in biomass refinery. Moreover, the mechanism of low temperature plasma in biorefinery and its further development were also discussed.

  3. Electron heating in capacitively coupled plasmas revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.; Chabert, P.; Booth, J. P.

    2014-06-01

    We revisit the problem of electron heating in capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs), and propose a method for quantifying the level of collisionless and collisional heating in plasma simulations. The proposed procedure, based on the electron mechanical energy conservation equation, is demonstrated with particle-in-cell simulations of a number of single and multi-frequency CCPs operated in regimes of research and industrial interest. In almost all cases tested, the total electron heating is comprised of collisional (ohmic) and pressure heating parts. This latter collisionless component is in qualitative agreement with the mechanism of electron heating predicted from the recent re-evaluation of theoretical models. Finally, in very electrically asymmetric plasmas produced in multi-frequency discharges, we observe an additional collisionless heating mechanism associated with electron inertia.

  4. Electronic Broadening operator for relativistic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Meftah, M. T.; Naam, A.

    2008-10-22

    In this work we review some aspects of the semiclassical dipole impact approximation for isolated ion lines in relativistic plasma. Mainly we focuss our work on the collision operator for relativistic electrons. In this case, the electron trajectory around a positive charge in the plasma differs drastically from those known earlier as hyperbolic. The effect of this difference on the collision operator is discussed with respect the various plasma conditions. Some theoretical and practical aspects of lines -shape calculations are discussed. Detailed calculations are performed for the collision operator in the semiclassical (dipole) impact approximation.

  5. Etching with electron beam generated plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Leonhardt, D.; Walton, S.G.; Muratore, C.; Fernsler, R.F.; Meger, R.A.

    2004-11-01

    A modulated electron beam generated plasma has been used to dry etch standard photoresist materials and silicon. Oxygen-argon mixtures were used to etch organic resist material and sulfur hexafluoride mixed with argon or oxygen was used for the silicon etching. Etch rates and anisotropy were determined with respect to gas compositions, incident ion energy (from an applied rf bias) and plasma duty factor. For 1818 negative resist and i-line resists the removal rate increased nearly linearly with ion energy (up to 220 nm/min at 100 eV), with reasonable anisotropic pattern transfer above 50 eV. Little change in etch rate was seen as gas composition went from pure oxygen to 70% argon, implying the resist removal mechanism in this system required the additional energy supplied by the ions. With silicon substrates at room temperature, mixtures of argon and sulfur hexafluoride etched approximately seven times faster (1375 nm/min) than mixtures of oxygen and sulfur hexafluoride ({approx}200 nm/min) with 200 eV ions, the difference is attributed to the passivation of the silicon by involatile silicon oxyfluoride (SiO{sub x}F{sub y}) compounds. At low incident ion energies, the Ar-SF{sub 6} mixtures showed a strong chemical (lateral) etch component before an ion-assisted regime, which started at {approx}75 eV. Etch rates were independent of the 0.5%-50% duty factors studied in this work.

  6. Self-effect in expanding electron beam plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M

    1999-05-07

    An analytical model of plasma flow from a metal plate hit by an intense, pulsed, electron beam aims to bridge the gap between radiation-hydrodynamics simulations and experiments, and to quantify the self-effect of the electron beam penetrating the flow. Does the flow disrupt the tight focus of the initial electron bunch, or later pulses in a train? This work aims to model the spatial distribution of plasma speed, density, degree of ionization, and magnetization to inquire. The initial solid density, several eV plasma expands to 1 cm and 10{sup {minus}4} relative density by 2 {micro}s, beyond which numerical simulations are imprecise. Yet, a Faraday cup detector at the ETA-II facility is at 25 cm from the target and observes the flow after 50 {micro}s. The model helps bridge this gap. The expansion of the target plasma into vacuum is so rapid that the ionized portion of the flow departs from local thermodynamic equilibrium. When the temperature (in eV) in a parcel of fluid drops below V{sub i} x [(2{gamma} - 2)/(5{gamma} + 17)], where V{sub i} is the ionization potential of the target metal (7.8 eV for tantalum), and {gamma} is the ratio of specific heats (5/3 for atoms), then the fractional ionization and electron temperature in that parcel remain fixed during subsequent expansion. The freezing temperature as defined here is V{sub i}/19. The balance between the self-pinching force and the space charge repulsion of an electron beam changes on penetrating a flow: (i) the target plasma cancels the space-charge field, (ii) internal eddy currents arise to counter the magnetization of relativistic electrons, and (iii) electron beam heating alters the flow magnetization by changing the plasma density gradient and the magnitude of the conductivity.

  7. Industrial Applications of Low Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bardsley, J N

    2001-03-15

    The use of low temperature plasmas in industry is illustrated by the discussion of four applications, to lighting, displays, semiconductor manufacturing and pollution control. The type of plasma required for each application is described and typical materials are identified. The need to understand radical formation, ionization and metastable excitation within the discharge and the importance of surface reactions are stressed.

  8. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunov, O.; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Jäger, A.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.; Dejneka, A.

    2015-02-01

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin-stained rat skin sections from plasma-treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  9. Approximate equations of state in two-temperature plasma mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramshaw, John D.; Cook, Andrew W.

    2014-02-15

    Approximate thermodynamic state relations for multicomponent atomic and molecular gas mixtures are often constructed by artificially partitioning the mixture into its constituent materials and requiring the separated materials to be in temperature and pressure equilibrium. Iterative numerical algorithms have been employed to enforce this equilibration and compute the resulting approximate state relations in single-temperature mixtures. In partially ionized gas mixtures, there is both theoretical and empirical evidence that equilibrating the chemical potentials, number densities, or partial pressures of the free electrons is likely to produce more accurate results than equilibrating the total pressures. Moreover, in many situations of practical interest the free electrons and heavy particles have different temperatures. In this paper, we present a generalized algorithm for equilibrating the heavy-particle and electron temperatures and a third user-specified independent thermodynamic variable in a two-temperature plasma mixture. Test calculations based on the equilibration of total pressure vs. electron pressure are presented for three different mixtures.

  10. Effects of interhemisphere transport on plasma temperatures at low latitudes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, G. J.; Moffett, R. J.; Hanson, W. B.; Sanatani, S.

    1973-01-01

    The thermal balance of the equatorial plasma between 300 and 800 km is examined. Steady state nighttime calculations are made for O+, H+, and electrons. The following features are included: collisional heat transfer between ions, electrons, and neutrals; ion and electron thermal conduction along the field lines; curvature of the field lines; nonlinear advection due to field-aligned ion and electron motions; and convective compression or expansion due to field-aligned and E x B motions. The ion velocities necessary to calculate the effects of convection are obtained from the work of Moffett and Hanson, who include a meridional wind across the magnetic equator in their calculations. It is shown that field-aligned interhemisphere plasma flows appreciably affect the plasma temperatures.

  11. Effect of secondary electron emission on the plasma sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Langendorf, S. Walker, M.

    2015-03-15

    In this experiment, plasma sheath potential profiles are measured over boron nitride walls in argon plasma and the effect of secondary electron emission is observed. Results are compared to a kinetic model. Plasmas are generated with a number density of 3 × 10{sup 12} m{sup −3} at a pressure of 10{sup −4} Torr-Ar, with a 1%–16% fraction of energetic primary electrons. The sheath potential profile at the surface of each sample is measured with emissive probes. The electron number densities and temperatures are measured in the bulk plasma with a planar Langmuir probe. The plasma is non-Maxwellian, with isotropic and directed energetic electron populations from 50 to 200 eV and hot and cold Maxwellian populations from 3.6 to 6.4 eV and 0.3 to 1.3 eV, respectively. Plasma Debye lengths range from 4 to 7 mm and the ion-neutral mean free path is 0.8 m. Sheath thicknesses range from 20 to 50 mm, with the smaller thickness occurring near the critical secondary electron emission yield of the wall material. Measured floating potentials are within 16% of model predictions. Measured sheath potential profiles agree with model predictions within 5 V (∼1 T{sub e}), and in four out of six cases deviate less than the measurement uncertainty of 1 V.

  12. Influence of electron evaporative cooling on ultracold plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Truman; Chen, Wei-Ting; Roberts, Jacob

    2013-07-15

    The expansion of ultracold neutral plasmas (UCP) is driven primarily by the thermal pressure of the electron component and is therefore sensitive to the electron temperature. For typical UCP spatial extents, evaporative cooling has a significant influence on the UCP expansion rate at lower densities (less than 10{sup 8}/cm{sup 3}). We studied the effect of electron evaporation in this density range. Owing to the low density, the effects of three-body recombination were negligible. We modeled the expansion by taking into account the change in electron temperature owing to evaporation as well as adiabatic expansion and found good agreement with our data. We also developed a simple model for initial evaporation over a range of ultracold plasma densities, sizes, and electron temperatures to determine over what parameter range electron evaporation is expected to have a significant effect. We also report on a signal calibration technique, which relates the signal at our detector to the total number of ions and electrons in the ultracold plasma.

  13. Trapped electron effects on ηi-mode and trapped electron mode in RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. F.; Guo, S. C.; Kong, W.; Dong, J. Q.

    2014-04-01

    The drift instabilities in the toroidal reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas are numerically studied with gyrokinetic integral eigenmode equations, by taking into account the trapped electrons (TEs) and full ion kinetic effects. Both the collisionless and collisional plasmas are investigated. Two topics are addressed: the TE effects on the ion temperature gradient driven mode, and the instability of the trapped electron mode (TEM). A comparison with a circular tokamak configuration has been made. Although the TEs generally play a similar role in RFPs as they do in tokamaks, their effects become significant in RFPs only when very steep density/temperature profiles exist. Indeed, the instability of the TEM in RFP plasmas requires a much steeper density/temperature gradient and has a much narrower kθρs spectrum than in tokamak plasmas.

  14. Electron Beam Diagnostics in Plasmas Based on Electron Beam Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Darrin; Leal-Quiros, Edbertho; Blackwell, David; Walton, Scott; Murphy, Donald; Fernsler, Richard; Meger, Robert

    2001-10-01

    Over the last few years, electron beam ionization has been shown to be a viable generator of high density plasmas with numerous applications in materials modification. To better understand these plasmas, we have fielded electron beam diagnostics to more clearly understand the propagation of the beam as it travels through the background gas and creates the plasma. These diagnostics vary greatly in sophistication, ranging from differentially pumped systems with energy selective elements to metal 'hockey pucks' covered with thin layers of insulation to electrically isolate the detector from the plasma but pass high energy beam electrons. Most importantly, absolute measurements of spatially resolved beam current densities are measured in a variety of pulsed and continuous beam sources. The energy distribution of the beam current(s) will be further discussed, through experiments incorporating various energy resolving elements such as simple grids and more sophisticated cylindrical lens geometries. The results are compared with other experiments of high energy electron beams through gases and appropriate disparities and caveats will be discussed. Finally, plasma parameters are correlated to the measured beam parameters for a more global picture of electron beam produced plasmas.

  15. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics of electron-positron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P. K.; Dasgupta, B.; Sakanaka, P. H.

    2000-05-01

    A set of nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations for magnetized, nonrelativistic electron-positron plasmas is derived by employing a two fluid model that is supplemented by Ampère's and Faraday's laws. The nonlinear equations show how the baroclinic driver (the Biermann battery) generates the electron positron flows and how these flows give rise to plasma currents which act as a source for the magnetic fields. The newly derived nonlinear equations form a basis for investigating waves, instabilities, as well as coherent nonlinear structures, in addition to studying exact equilibria of electron-positron jets in a magnetoplasma.

  16. Nonextensive statistical mechanics approach to electron trapping in degenerate plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebrouk, Khireddine; Gougam, Leila Ait; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2016-06-01

    The electron trapping in a weakly nondegenerate plasma is reformulated and re-examined by incorporating the nonextensive entropy prescription. Using the q-deformed Fermi-Dirac distribution function including the quantum as well as the nonextensive statistical effects, we derive a new generalized electron density with a new contribution proportional to the electron temperature T, which may dominate the usual thermal correction (∼T2) at very low temperatures. To make the physics behind the effect of this new contribution more transparent, we analyze the modifications arising in the propagation of ion-acoustic solitary waves. Interestingly, we find that due to the nonextensive correction, our plasma model allows the possibility of existence of quantum ion-acoustic solitons with velocity higher than the Fermi ion-sound velocity. Moreover, as the nonextensive parameter q increases, the critical temperature Tc beyond which coexistence of compressive and rarefactive solitons sets in, is shifted towards higher values.

  17. Beltrami–Bernoulli equilibria in plasmas with degenerate electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhiani, V. I.; Shatashvili, N. L.; Mahajan, S. M.

    2015-02-15

    A new class of Double Beltrami–Bernoulli equilibria, sustained by electron degeneracy pressure, is investigated. It is shown that due to electron degeneracy, a nontrivial Beltrami–Bernoulli equilibrium state is possible even for a zero temperature plasma. These states are, conceptually, studied to show the existence of new energy transformation pathways converting, for instance, the degeneracy energy into fluid kinetic energy. Such states may be of relevance to compact astrophysical objects like white dwarfs, neutron stars, etc.

  18. Time-resolved aluminium laser-induced plasma temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmick, D. M.; Parigger, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    We seek to characterize the temperature decay of laser-induced plasma near the surface of an aluminium target from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of aluminium alloy sample. Laser-induced plasma are initiated by tightly focussing 1064 nm, nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser radiation. Temperatures are inferred from aluminium monoxide spectra viewed at systematically varied time delays by comparing experimental spectra to theoretical calculations with a Nelder Mead algorithm. The temperatures are found to decay from 5173 ± 270 to 3862 ± 46 Kelvin from 10 to 100 μs time delays following optical breakdown. The temperature profile along the plasma height is also inferred from spatially resolved spectral measurements and the electron number density is inferred from Stark broadened Hβ spectra.

  19. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lunov, O. Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A.; Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K.; Syková, E.; Kubinová, Š.

    2015-02-02

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  20. Electron acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized plasma with nonthermal electrons and an electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. V.; Devanandhan, S.; Lakhina, G. S.; Bharuthram, R.

    2016-08-01

    A theoretical investigation is carried out to study the obliquely propagating electron acoustic solitary waves having nonthermal hot electrons, cold and beam electrons, and ions in a magnetized plasma. We have employed reductive perturbation theory to derive the Korteweg-de-Vries-Zakharov-Kuznetsov (KdV-ZK) equation describing the nonlinear evolution of these waves. The two-dimensional plane wave solution of KdV-ZK equation is analyzed to study the effects of nonthermal and beam electrons on the characteristics of the solitons. Theoretical results predict negative potential solitary structures. We emphasize that the inclusion of finite temperature effects reduces the soliton amplitudes and the width of the solitons increases by an increase in the obliquity of the wave propagation. The numerical analysis is presented for the parameters corresponding to the observations of "burst a" event by Viking satellite on the auroral field lines.

  1. Principle of radial transport in low temperature annular plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yunchao Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2015-07-15

    Radial transport in low temperature annular plasmas is investigated theoretically in this paper. The electrons are assumed to be in quasi-equilibrium due to their high temperature and light inertial mass. The ions are not in equilibrium and their transport is analyzed in three different situations: a low electric field (LEF) model, an intermediate electric field (IEF) model, and a high electric field (HEF) model. The universal IEF model smoothly connects the LEF and HEF models at their respective electric field strength limits and gives more accurate results of the ion mobility coefficient and effective ion temperature over the entire electric field strength range. Annular modelling is applied to an argon plasma and numerical results of the density peak position, the annular boundary loss coefficient and the electron temperature are given as functions of the annular geometry ratio and Paschen number.

  2. Electron-temperature dependence of dissociative recombination of electrons with N2/+/.N2 dimer ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, M.; Biondi, M. A.; Johnsen, R.

    1981-01-01

    The variation with electron temperature of the dissociative recombination of electrons with N2(+).N2 dimer ions is investigated in light of the importance of such ions in the lower ionosphere and in laser plasmas. Dissociative recombination coefficients were determined by means of a microwave afterglow mass spectrometer technique for electron temperatures from 300-5600 K and an ion and neutral temperature of 300 K. The recombination coefficient is found to be proportional to the -0.41 power of the electron temperature in this range, similar to that observed for the CO(+).CO dimer ion and consistent with the expected energy dependence for a fast dissociative process.

  3. Plasma properties in electron-bombardment ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matossian, J. N.; Beattie, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes a technique for computing volume-averaged plasma properties within electron-bombardment ion thrusters, using spatially varying Langmuir-probe measurements. Average values of the electron densities are defined by integrating the spatially varying Maxwellian and primary electron densities over the ionization volume, and then dividing by the volume. Plasma properties obtained in the 30-cm-diameter J-series and ring-cusp thrusters are analyzed by the volume-averaging technique. The superior performance exhibited by the ring-cusp thruster is correlated with a higher average Maxwellian electron temperature. The ring-cusp thruster maintains the same fraction of primary electrons as does the J-series thruster, but at a much lower ion production cost. The volume-averaged predictions for both thrusters are compared with those of a detailed thruster performance model.

  4. The influence of magnetic field on electron beam generated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; Boris, D. R.; Lock, E. H.; Petrova, Tz B.; Fernsler, R. F.; Walton, S. G.

    2015-06-01

    Magnetically confined argon plasma in a long cylindrical tube driven by an electron beam is studied experimentally and theoretically. Langmuir probes are used to measure the electron energy distribution function, electron density and temperature in plasmas generated by 2 keV, 10 mA electron beams in a 25 mTorr argon background for magnetic field strengths of up to 200 Gauss. The experimental results agree with simulations done using a spatially averaged Boltzmann model adapted to treat an electron beam generated plasma immersed in a constant magnetic field. The confining effect of the magnetic field is studied theoretically using fluid and kinetic approaches. The fluid approach leads to two regimes of operation: weakly and strongly magnetized. The former is similar to the magnetic field-free case, while in the latter the ambipolar diffusion coefficient and electron density depend quadratically on the magnetic field strength. Finally, a more rigorous kinetic treatment, which accounts for the impact of the magnetic field over the whole distribution of electrons, is used for accurate description of the plasma.

  5. Runaway electron generation in a cooling plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.; Helander, P.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Fueloep, T.

    2005-12-15

    The usual calculation of Dreicer [Phys. Rev. 115, 238 (1959); 117, 329 (1960)] generation of runaway electrons assumes that the plasma is in a steady state. In a tokamak disruption this is not necessarily true since the plasma cools down quickly and the collision time for electrons at the runaway threshold energy can be comparable to the cooling time. The electron distribution function then acquires a high-energy tail which can easily be converted to a burst of runaways by the rising electric field. This process is investigated and simple criteria for its importance are derived. If no rapid losses of fast electrons occur, this can be a more important source of runaway electrons than ordinary Dreicer generation in tokamak disruptions.

  6. Characteristics of surface sterilization using electron cyclotron resonance plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonesu, Akira; Hara, Kazufumi; Nishikawa, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of surface sterilization using electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma were investigated. High-energy electrons and oxygen radicals were observed in the ECR zone using electric probe and optical emission spectroscopic methods. A biological indicator (BI), Geobacillus stearothermophilus, containing 1 × 106 spores was sterilized in 120 s by exposure to oxygen discharges while maintaining a temperature of approximately 55 °C at the BI installation position. Oxygen radicals and high-energy electrons were found to be the sterilizing species in the ECR region. It was demonstrated that the ECR plasma could be produced in narrow tubes with an inner diameter of 5 mm. Moreover, sterilization tests confirmed that the spores present inside the narrow tube were successfully inactivated by ECR plasma irradiation.

  7. Magnetized relativistic electron-ion plasma expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkhelifa, El-Amine; Djebli, Mourad

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of relativistic laser-produced plasma expansion across a transverse magnetic field is investigated. Based on a one dimensional two-fluid model that includes pressure, enthalpy, and rest mass energy, the expansion is studied in the limit of λD (Debye length) ≤RL (Larmor radius) for magnetized electrons and ions. Numerical investigation conducted for a quasi-neutral plasma showed that the σ parameter describing the initial plasma magnetization, and the plasma β parameter, which is the ratio of kinetic to magnetic pressure are the key parameters governing the expansion dynamics. For σ ≪ 1, ion's front shows oscillations associated to the break-down of quasi-neutrality. This is due to the strong constraining effect and confinement of the magnetic field, which acts as a retarding medium slowing the plasma expansion.

  8. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, Christopher T. Burgess, David; Sundberg, Torbjorn; Camporeale, Enrico

    2015-01-15

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  9. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, Christopher T.; Burgess, David; Camporeale, Enrico; Sundberg, Torbjorn

    2015-01-01

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  10. Influence of electron injection into 27 cm audio plasma cell on the plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haleem, N. A.; El Fiki, S. A.; Nouh, S. A.; El Disoki, T. M.; Ragheb, M. S.; Zakhary, S. G.

    2013-08-01

    In this article, the plasma is created in a Pyrex tube (L = 27 cm, ϕ = 4 cm) as a single cell, by a capacitive audio frequency (AF) discharge (f = 10-100 kHz), at a definite pressure of ˜0.2 Torr. A couple of tube linear and deviating arrangements show plasma characteristic conformity. The applied AF plasma and the injection of electrons into two gas mediums Ar and N2 revealed the increase of electron density at distinct tube regions by one order to attain 1013/cm3. The electrons temperature and density strengths are in contrast to each other. While their distributions differ along the plasma tube length, they show a decaying sinusoidal shape where their peaks position varies by the gas type. The electrons injection moderates electron temperature and expands their density. The later highest peak holds for the N2 gas, at electrons injection it changes to hold for the Ar. The sinusoidal decaying density behavior generates electric fields depending on the gas used and independent of tube geometry. The effect of the injected electrons performs a responsive impact on electrons density not attributed to the gas discharge. Analytical tools investigate the interaction of the plasma, the discharge current, and the gas used on the electrodes. It points to the emigration of atoms from each one but for greater majority they behave to a preferred direction. Meanwhile, only in the linear regime, small percentage of atoms still moves in reverse direction. Traces of gas atoms revealed on both electrodes due to sheath regions denote lack of their participation in the discharge current. In addition, atoms travel from one electrode to the other by overcoming the sheaths regions occurring transportation of particles agglomeration from one electrode to the other. The electrons injection has contributed to increase the plasma electron density peaks. These electrons populations have raised the generated electrostatic fields assisting the elemental ions emigration to a preferred

  11. Influence of electron injection into 27 cm audio plasma cell on the plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Haleem, N. A.; Ragheb, M. S.; Zakhary, S. G.; El Fiki, S. A.; Nouh, S. A.; El Disoki, T. M.

    2013-08-15

    In this article, the plasma is created in a Pyrex tube (L = 27 cm, φ= 4 cm) as a single cell, by a capacitive audio frequency (AF) discharge (f = 10–100 kHz), at a definite pressure of ∼0.2 Torr. A couple of tube linear and deviating arrangements show plasma characteristic conformity. The applied AF plasma and the injection of electrons into two gas mediums Ar and N{sub 2} revealed the increase of electron density at distinct tube regions by one order to attain 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 3}. The electrons temperature and density strengths are in contrast to each other. While their distributions differ along the plasma tube length, they show a decaying sinusoidal shape where their peaks position varies by the gas type. The electrons injection moderates electron temperature and expands their density. The later highest peak holds for the N{sub 2} gas, at electrons injection it changes to hold for the Ar. The sinusoidal decaying density behavior generates electric fields depending on the gas used and independent of tube geometry. The effect of the injected electrons performs a responsive impact on electrons density not attributed to the gas discharge. Analytical tools investigate the interaction of the plasma, the discharge current, and the gas used on the electrodes. It points to the emigration of atoms from each one but for greater majority they behave to a preferred direction. Meanwhile, only in the linear regime, small percentage of atoms still moves in reverse direction. Traces of gas atoms revealed on both electrodes due to sheath regions denote lack of their participation in the discharge current. In addition, atoms travel from one electrode to the other by overcoming the sheaths regions occurring transportation of particles agglomeration from one electrode to the other. The electrons injection has contributed to increase the plasma electron density peaks. These electrons populations have raised the generated electrostatic fields assisting the elemental ions

  12. Relativistic thermal electron scale instabilities in sheared flow plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Evan D.; Rogers, Barrett N.

    2016-04-01

    > The linear dispersion relation obeyed by finite-temperature, non-magnetized, relativistic two-fluid plasmas is presented, in the special case of a discontinuous bulk velocity profile and parallel wave vectors. It is found that such flows become universally unstable at the collisionless electron skin-depth scale. Further analyses are performed in the limits of either free-streaming ions or ultra-hot plasmas. In these limits, the system is highly unstable in the parameter regimes associated with either the electron scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (ESKHI) or the relativistic electron scale sheared flow instability (RESI) recently highlighted by Gruzinov. Coupling between these modes provides further instability throughout the remaining parameter space, provided both shear flow and temperature are finite. An explicit parameter space bound on the highly unstable region is found.

  13. Measurements of Plasma Expansion due to Background Gas in the Electron Diffusion Gauge Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle A. Morrison; Stephen F. Paul; Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-08-11

    The expansion of pure electron plasmas due to collisions with background neutral gas atoms in the Electron Diffusion Gauge (EDG) experiment device is observed. Measurements of plasma expansion with the new, phosphor-screen density diagnostic suggest that the expansion rates measured previously were observed during the plasma's relaxation to quasi-thermal-equilibrium, making it even more remarkable that they scale classically with pressure. Measurements of the on-axis, parallel plasma temperature evolution support the conclusion.

  14. Numerical Simulation of the Self-Heating Effect Induced by Electron Beam Plasma in Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yongfeng; Tan, Chang; Han, Xianwei; Tan, Yonghua

    2012-02-01

    For exploiting advantages of electron beam air plasma in some unusual applications, a Monte Carlo (MC) model coupled with heat transfer model is established to simulate the characteristics of electron beam air plasma by considering the self-heating effect. Based on the model, the electron beam induced temperature field and the related plasma properties are investigated. The results indicate that a nonuniform temperature field is formed in the electron beam plasma region and the average temperature is of the order of 600 K. Moreover, much larger volume pear-shaped electron beam plasma is produced in hot state rather than in cold state. The beam ranges can, with beam energies of 75 keV and 80 keV, exceed 1.0 m and 1.2 m in air at pressure of 100 torr, respectively. Finally, a well verified formula is obtained for calculating the range of high energy electron beam in atmosphere.

  15. Stability of shock waves in high temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Madhusmita; Bhattacharya, Chandrani; Menon, S. V. G.

    2011-10-15

    The Dyakov-Kontorovich criteria for spontaneous emission of acoustic waves behind shock fronts are investigated for high temperature aluminum and beryllium plasmas. To this end, the Dyakov and critical stability parameters are calculated from Rankine-Hugoniot curves using a more realistic equation of state (EOS). The cold and ionic contributions to the EOS are obtained via scaled binding energy and mean field theory, respectively. A screened hydrogenic model, including l-splitting, is used to calculate the bound electron contribution to the electronic EOS. The free electron EOS is obtained from Fermi-Dirac statistics. Predictions of the model for ionization curves and shock Hugoniot are found to be in excellent agreement with available experimental and theoretical data. It is observed that the electronic EOS has significant effect on the stability of the planar shock front. While the shock is stable for low temperatures and pressures, instability sets in as temperature rises. The basic reason is ionization of electronic shells and consequent increase in electronic specific heat. The temperatures and densities of the unstable region correspond to those where electronic shells get ionized. With the correct modeling of bound electrons, we find that shock instability for Al occurs at a compression ratio {approx}5.4, contrary to the value {approx}3 reported in the literature. Free electrons generated in the ionization process carry energy from the shock front, thereby giving rise to spontaneously emitted waves, which decay the shock front.

  16. Plasma-Catalysis During Temperature Transient Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hoard, John

    2001-08-05

    A combination of catalysts is used together with nonthermal plasma in simulated diesel exhaust, while the gas temperature is varied. The catalysts both store and convert pollutants. As a result, pollutant concentrations during temperature ramps are different than those at steady state conditions. The data are presented for plasma followed by BaY, alumina, and Pt catalysts in simulated exhaust. When temperature ramps from high to low, apparent NOx conversion is quite high. However, when temperature is ramped from low to high, lower apparent conversions are seen. In a typical test cycle, average NOx conversion between 100 and 400 C is 60%. Peak conversion during the down ramp is over 90%, and minimum conversion during the up ramp is 30%. The composition of the effluent gas also varies during the temperature cycle. Intermediates such as methyl nitrate and hydrogen cyanide are not present following the combination of catalysts.

  17. Nonquasineutral electron vortices in nonuniform plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Angus, J. R.; Richardson, A. S.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Schumer, J. W.; Ottinger, P. F.

    2014-11-15

    Electron vortices are observed in the numerical simulation of current carrying plasmas on fast time scales where the ion motion can be ignored. In plasmas with nonuniform density n, vortices drift in the B × ∇n direction with a speed that is on the order of the Hall speed. This provides a mechanism for magnetic field penetration into a plasma. Here, we consider strong vortices with rotation speeds V{sub ϕ} close to the speed of light c where the vortex size δ is on the order of the magnetic Debye length λ{sub B}=|B|/4πen and the vortex is thus nonquasineutral. Drifting vortices are typically studied using the electron magnetohydrodynamic model (EMHD), which ignores the displacement current and assumes quasineutrality. However, these assumptions are not strictly valid for drifting vortices when δ ≈ λ{sub B}. In this paper, 2D electron vortices in nonuniform plasmas are studied for the first time using a fully electromagnetic, collisionless fluid code. Relatively large amplitude oscillations with periods that correspond to high frequency extraordinary modes are observed in the average drift speed. The drift speed W is calculated by averaging the electron velocity field over the vorticity. Interestingly, the time-averaged W from these simulations matches very well with W from the much simpler EMHD simulations even for strong vortices with order unity charge density separation.

  18. Twisted electron-acoustic waves in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aman-ur-Rehman, Ali, S.; Khan, S. A.; Shahzad, K.

    2016-08-01

    In the paraxial limit, a twisted electron-acoustic (EA) wave is studied in a collisionless unmagnetized plasma, whose constituents are the dynamical cold electrons and Boltzmannian hot electrons in the background of static positive ions. The analytical and numerical solutions of the plasma kinetic equation suggest that EA waves with finite amount of orbital angular momentum exhibit a twist in its behavior. The twisted wave particle resonance is also taken into consideration that has been appeared through the effective wave number qeff accounting for Laguerre-Gaussian mode profiles attributed to helical phase structures. Consequently, the dispersion relation and the damping rate of the EA waves are significantly modified with the twisted parameter η, and for η → ∞, the results coincide with the straight propagating plane EA waves. Numerically, new features of twisted EA waves are identified by considering various regimes of wavelength and the results might be useful for transport and trapping of plasma particles in a two-electron component plasma.

  19. 100 eV electron temperatures in the Maryland centrifugal experiment observed using electron Bernstein emission

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R. R.; Romero-Talamás, C. A.; Young, W. C.; Ellis, R. F.; Hassam, A. B.

    2014-06-15

    Thermal electron Bernstein emission has been observed at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency at the mid-plane of the Maryland Centrifugal eXperiment. The emission is received in the X-mode polarization and coupled to the Bernstein wave by the B-X mode conversion process. The average B-X coupling efficiency is approximately 20%. The observed emission indicates thermal electron temperatures an excess of 100 eV in the core of the rotating plasma. The measured electron temperature is consistent with recent ion temperature measurements and indicates that the total energy confinement time exceeds 500 μs.

  20. Propagation of electron and positron beams in long, dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggli, Patric; Blue, Brent; Clayton, Chris; Decker, Franz-Joseph; Hogan, Mark; Hunag, Chengkun; Joshi, Chan; Katsouleas, Tom; Lu, Wei; Mori, Warren; O'Connell, Caollionn; Siemann, Robert; Walz, Dieter; Zhou, Miaomiao

    2008-04-01

    Electron beams with density larger than the plasma density can propagate through plasmas without significant emittance growth. The electron beam expels the plasma electrons from the bunch volume and propagate in a pure, uniform ion column. In contrast, positron beams attract plasma electrons that flow through the positron bunch. As a result the plasma focusing force is nonlinear, a charge halo forms around the bunch, and the bunch emittance grows. After some distance into the plasma, the bunch emittance reaches an approximately constant value, and the beam and the plasma focusing force reach a steady state. Experimental results obtained with electron and positron bunches, as well as numerical simulation results will be presented.

  1. Turbulent electron transport in edge pedestal by electron temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, R.; Jhang, Hogun; Diamond, P. H.

    2013-11-15

    We present a model for turbulent electron thermal transport at the edge pedestal in high (H)-mode plasmas based on electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence. A quasi-linear analysis of electrostatic toroidal ETG modes shows that both turbulent electron thermal diffusivity and hyper-resistivity exhibits the Ohkawa scaling in which the radial correlation length of turbulence becomes the order of electron skin depth. Combination of the Ohkawa scales and the plasma current dependence results in a novel confinement scaling inside the pedestal region. It is also shown that ETG turbulence induces a thermoelectric pinch, which may accelerate the density pedestal formation.

  2. Electron series resonance plasma discharges: Unmagnetized and magnetized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Weiguang

    2001-08-01

    This thesis explores high frequency electron series resonance in unmagnetized and magnetized bounded plasmas. Special interest is focused on low temperature plasmas in planar systems as such are useful for material processing and fusion devices. Chapter 1, Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 describe simulation studies of unmagnetized electron series resonance (ESR) sustained discharges with comparisons to theory and experiment. These plasmas have many desirable characteristics. The input resistance is small and the drive voltage and current are in phase. The drive voltage is small (˜Te) and the time average plasma potential is low (˜10Te). A strong kinetic phase space bunching process is shown to provide electrons of sufficient energy for ionization, which allows discharge operation at low neutral pressure and low electron temperatures. At low pressure, the ion flux to the wall has a narrow angular spread about the normal and the ion bombarding energy distribution has a sharp peak at the plasma potential. Scaling laws at fixed pressure nr∝w3RF ,s¯∝w -1RF are shown to hold when RF frequency is varied smoothly ("chirping") demonstrating continuous density control. Research on magnetized electron series resonance (MESR) discharges is described in Chapter 4, Chapter 5 and Chapter 6. The resonant frequency is derived from cold plasma theory and shows two resonant modes. Simulations verify these modes to be the natural oscillatory frequencies of weakly magnetized plasmas in a planar plasma diode. A global model is established for magnetized resonant discharges. The interrelations among the plasma parameters and the drive terms are formulated for both resonant modes. The initiation of a MESR discharge and its steady state properties are discussed and compared to the unmagnetized case. Weak lock-on of MESR frequency to the drive frequency is observed in simulation. Similar V - I characteristics as those in ESR are found both in theory and in simulation. Different from the ESR

  3. Plasma electron hole kinematics. I. Momentum conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, I. H.; Zhou, C.

    2016-08-01

    We analyse the kinematic properties of a plasma electron hole: a non-linear self-sustained localized positive electric potential perturbation, trapping electrons, which behaves as a coherent entity. When a hole accelerates or grows in depth, ion and electron plasma momentum is changed both within the hole and outside, by an energization process we call jetting. We present a comprehensive analytic calculation of the momentum changes of an isolated general one-dimensional hole. The conservation of the total momentum gives the hole's kinematics, determining its velocity evolution. Our results explain many features of the behavior of hole speed observed in numerical simulations, including self-acceleration at formation, and hole pushing and trapping by ion streams.

  4. Three-temperature plasma shock solutions with gray radiation diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. M.; Klein, R. I.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of radiation on the structure of shocks in a fully ionized plasma are investigated by solving the steady-state fluid equations for ions, electrons, and radiation. The electrons and ions are assumed to have the same bulk velocity but separate temperatures, and the radiation is modeled with the gray diffusion approximation. Both electron and ion conduction are included, as well as ion viscosity. When the material is optically thin, three-temperature behavior occurs. When the diffusive flux of radiation is important but radiation pressure is not, two-temperature behavior occurs, with the electrons strongly coupled to the radiation. Since the radiation heats the electrons on length scales that are much longer than the electron-ion Coulomb coupling length scale, these solutions resemble radiative shock solutions rather than plasma shock solutions that neglect radiation. When radiation pressure is important, all three components are strongly coupled. Results with constant values for the transport and coupling coefficients are compared to a full numerical simulation with a good match between the two, demonstrating that steady shock solutions constitute a straightforward and comprehensive verification test methodology for multi-physics numerical algorithms.

  5. Electron properties and air mixing in radio frequency driven argon plasma jets at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Gessel, Bram van; Bruggeman, Peter; Brandenburg, Ronny

    2013-08-05

    A time modulated radio frequency (RF) plasma jet operated with an Ar mixture is investigated by measuring the electron density and electron temperature using Thomson scattering. The measurements have been performed spatially resolved for two different electrode configurations and as a function of the plasma dissipated power and air concentration admixed to the Ar. Time resolved measurements of electron densities and temperatures during the RF cycle and after plasma power switch-off are presented. Furthermore, the influence of the plasma on the air entrainment into the effluent is studied using Raman scattering.

  6. Spectroscopic diagnostics of high temperature plasmas. [Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Moos, W.

    1990-12-31

    A three-year research program for the development of novel XUV spectroscopic diagnostics for magnetically confined fusion plasmas is proposed. The new diagnostic system will use layered synthetic microstructures (LSM) coated, flat and curved surfaces as dispersive elements in spectrometers and narrow band XUV filter arrays. In the framework of the proposed program we will develop impurity monitors for poloidal and toroidal resolved measurements on PBX-M and Alcator C-Mod, imaging XUV spectrometers for electron density and temperature fluctuation measurements in the hot plasma core in TEXT or other similar tokamaks and plasma imaging devices in soft x-ray light for impurity behavior studies during RF heating on Phaedrus T and carbon pellet ablation in Alcator C-Mod. Recent results related to use of multilayer in XUV plasma spectroscopy are presented. We also discuss the latest results reviewed to q{sub o} and local poloidal field measurements using Zeeman polarimetry.

  7. Generation of uniform electron beam plasma in a dielectric flask at fore-vacuum pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotukhin, D. B.; Burdovitsin, V. A.; Oks, E. M.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a system for the generation of spatially uniform and homogeneous dense plasma in a dielectric flask using a forevacuum-pressure plasma-cathode electron beam source. At optimum beam energy and gas pressure, the non-uniformity in plasma density distribution along the length of the flask is less than 10%, and the plasma density and electron temperature in the flask are greater than for the plasma produced in the vacuum chamber with no flask. The measured parameters of the beam plasma in the flask are compared to the predictions of a model based on balance equations.

  8. Simultaneous measurement of core electron temperature and density fluctuations during electron cyclotron heating on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Schmitz, L.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Staebler, G. M.; Burrell, K. H.; DeBoo, J. C.; Prater, R.

    2010-02-15

    New measurements show that long-wavelength (k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}<0.5) electron temperature fluctuations can play an important role in determining electron thermal transport in low-confinement mode (L-mode) tokamak plasmas. In neutral beam-heated L-mode tokamak plasmas, electron thermal transport and the amplitude of long-wavelength electron temperature fluctuations both increase in cases where local electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to modify the plasma profiles. In contrast, the amplitude of simultaneously measured long-wavelength density fluctuations does not significantly increase. Linear stability analysis indicates that the ratio of the trapped electron mode (TEM) to ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode growth rates increases in the cases with ECH. The increased importance of the TEM drive relative to the ITG mode drive in the cases with ECH may be associated with the increases in electron thermal transport and electron temperature fluctuations.

  9. EUV induced low temperature SF6-based plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartnik, A.; Wachulak, P.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Skrzeczanowski, W.; Jarocki, R.; Fok, T.; Węgrzyński, Ł.

    2016-03-01

    In this work spectral investigations of low temperature F-rich photoionized plasmas were performed. The photoionized plasmas were created by irradiation of SF6 gas with intense EUV (extreme ultraviolet) radiation pulses. Two laser plasma EUV sources of different parameters used in the experiments were based on 0.8 J /4ns and 10 J/ 10 ns Nd:YAG lasers respectively. Both sources operated at 10 Hz repetition rate. The EUV radiation was focused using a dedicated reflective collector onto the gas stream, injected into a vacuum chamber synchronously with the EUV pulses. Irradiation of the SF6 gas resulted in dissociative ionization of the molecules, leading to creation of SFn+ ions and fluorine atoms. Further photo- or electron impact ionization and excitation processes allow for formation of photoionized plasmas emitting radiation in the wide spectral range. Emission spectra were measured in the EUV and optical ranges. The EUV spectra contained multiple spectral lines, originating from F II, F III and S II ions. The UV/VIS spectra were composed of spectral lines corresponding to radiative transitions in F II, F I and S II species. A computer simulation of the F II spectrum was performed using a collisional-radiative PrismSPECT code. Parameters of the photoionized plasmas were estimated by fitting the spectrum obtained from the simulations to the experimental one. Apart from that, the electron temperature was estimated employing Boltzmann plots based on the UV/VIS spectrum.

  10. Effect of trapped electrons on soliton propagation in a plasma having a density gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Farah; Stroth, Ulrich

    2009-03-01

    A Korteweg-deVries equation with an additional term due to the density gradient is obtained using reductive perturbation technique in an unmagnetized plasma having a density gradient, finite temperature ions, and two-temperature nonisothermal (trapped) electrons. This equation is solved to get the solitary wave solution using sine-cosine method. The phase velocity, soliton amplitude, and width are examined under the effect of electron and ion temperatures and their concentrations. The effect of ion (electron) temperature is found to be more significant in the presence of larger (smaller) number of trapped electrons in the plasma.

  11. Effect of trapped electrons on soliton propagation in a plasma having a density gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Farah; Stroth, Ulrich

    2009-03-15

    A Korteweg-deVries equation with an additional term due to the density gradient is obtained using reductive perturbation technique in an unmagnetized plasma having a density gradient, finite temperature ions, and two-temperature nonisothermal (trapped) electrons. This equation is solved to get the solitary wave solution using sine-cosine method. The phase velocity, soliton amplitude, and width are examined under the effect of electron and ion temperatures and their concentrations. The effect of ion (electron) temperature is found to be more significant in the presence of larger (smaller) number of trapped electrons in the plasma.

  12. Diagnostic techniques for measuring suprathermal electron dynamics in plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Coda, S.

    2008-10-15

    Plasmas, both in the laboratory and in space, are often not in thermodynamic equilibrium, and the plasma electron distribution function is accordingly non-Maxwellian. Suprathermal electron tails can be generated by external drives, such as rf waves and electric fields, or internal ones, such as instabilities and magnetic reconnection. The variety and importance of the phenomena in which suprathermal electrons play a significant role explains an enduring interest in diagnostic techniques to investigate their properties and dynamics. X-ray bremsstrahlung emission has been studied in hot magnetized plasmas for well over two decades, flanked progressively by electron-cyclotron emission in geometries favoring the high-energy end of the distribution function (high-field-side, vertical, oblique emission), by electron-cyclotron absorption, by spectroscopic techniques, and at lower temperatures, by Langmuir probes and electrostatic analyzers. Continuous progress in detector technology and in measurement and analysis techniques, increasingly sophisticated layouts (multichannel and tomographic systems, imaging geometries), and highly controlled suprathermal generation methods (e.g., perturbative rf modulation) have all been brought to bear in recent years on an increasingly detailed, although far from complete, understanding of suprathermal electron dynamics.

  13. Laser-driven electron acceleration in an inhomogeneous plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rong; Cheng, Li-Hong; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2015-12-15

    We study the laser-driven electron acceleration in a transversely inhomogeneous plasma channel. We find that, in inhomogeneous plasma channel, the developing of instability for electron acceleration and the electron energy gain can be controlled by adjusting the laser polarization angle and inhomogeneity of plasma channel. That is, we can short the accelerating length and enhance the energy gain in inhomogeneous plasma channel by adjusting the laser polarization angle and inhomogeneity of the plasma channel.

  14. Three-temperature plasma shock solutions with gray radiation diffusion

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Bryan M.; Klein, Richard I.

    2016-04-19

    Here we discuss the effects of radiation on the structure of shocks in a fully ionized plasma are investigated by solving the steady-state fluid equations for ions, electrons, and radiation. The electrons and ions are assumed to have the same bulk velocity but separate temperatures, and the radiation is modeled with the gray diffusion approximation. Both electron and ion conduction are included, as well as ion viscosity. When the material is optically thin, three-temperature behavior occurs. When the diffusive flux of radiation is important but radiation pressure is not, two-temperature behavior occurs, with the electrons strongly coupled to the radiation.more » Since the radiation heats the electrons on length scales that are much longer than the electron–ion Coulomb coupling length scale, these solutions resemble radiative shock solutions rather than plasma shock solutions that neglect radiation. When radiation pressure is important, all three components are strongly coupled. Results with constant values for the transport and coupling coefficients are compared to a full numerical simulation with a good match between the two, demonstrating that steady shock solutions constitute a straightforward and comprehensive verification test methodology for multi-physics numerical algorithms.« less

  15. Rotating structures and vortices in low temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeuf, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-01

    Rotating structures are present in a number of low temperature EXB devices such as Hall thrusters, magnetrons, Penning discharges etc...Some aspects of the physics of these rotating instabilities are specific to low temperature plasmas because of the relatively large collisionality, the role of ionization, and the fact that ions are often non-magnetized. On the basis of fully kinetic simulations (Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions) we describe the formation of a rotating instability associated with an ionization front (``rotating spoke'') and driven by a cross-field current in a self-sustained cylindrical magnetron discharge at gas pressure on the order of 1 Pa. The rotating spoke is a strong double layer (electrostatic sheath) moving towards the higher potential region at a velocity close to the critical ionization velocity, a concept proposed by Alfvén in the context of the formation of the solar system. The mechanisms of cross-field electron transport induced by this instability are analyzed. At lower pressure (<0.01 Pa) the plasma of a magnetron discharge is non-neutral and the simulations predict the formation of electron vortices rotating in the azimuthal direction and resulting from the diocotron instability. The properties of these vortices are specific since they form in a self-sustained discharge where ionization (and losses at the ends of the plasma column) play an essential role in contrast with the electron vortices in pure electron plasmas. We discuss and analyze the mechanisms leading to the generation, dynamics and merging of these self-sustained electron vortices, and to the periodic ejection of fast electrons at the column ends (consistent with previous experimental observations).

  16. Electron decoherence at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2001-03-01

    Electron decoherence is fundamental to condensed matter physics. Our understanding of metals and insulators in the Fermi-liquid framework relies entirely on a diverging decoherence rate 1/τ_φ at low temperatures, which is expected to vanish at T=0. However, recent experiments find that 1/τ_φ saturates at low temperatures [1-2]. We review these measurements on a variety of mesoscopic systems (in 0D, 1D, 2D and 3D) as well as the control experiments used to check for various artifacts [1-3]. We emphasize the connection between the temperature-independent decoherence rate and persistent current in normal metals [4]. We briefly discuss decoherence induced by dynamic defects or two-level systems [5,6], including its relevance--or lack thereof---to the experiments on metallic wires [2]. Saturation of decohrence rate is argued to be present in---and relevant to---the following phenomena: metal-insulator transition in 2D [7,8], superconductor-insulator transition in 2D [9], quantum-Hall-insulator transition [10], transport through superconductor/normal-metal hybrid junctions [11], normal-state resistivity of high Tc superconductors [12], persistent current in normal metals [4], and energy relaxation in normal metals [13]. [1] P. Mohanty, Physica B 280, 446 (2000). [2] P. Mohanty, E.M.Q. Jariwala, R. Webb, PRL 78, 3366 (1997); PRB 55, R13542 (1997). [3] P. Mohanty, R. Webb, PRL 84, 4481 (2000). [4] P. Mohanty, Ann. Phys. 8, 549 (1999). [5] P. Mohanty, M.L. Roukes (to be published). [6] K. Ahn, P. Mohanty, cond-mat/ 0011139. [7] S. Kravchenko et al. PRB 50, 8039 (1994). [8] G. Brunthaler, A. Prinz, G. Bauer, V. Pudalov, cond-mat/0007230. [9] A. Kapitulnik, N. Mason, S. Kivelson, S. Chakravarty, cond-mat/0008005. [10] D. Shahar, D. Tsui, M. Shayegan, J. Cunningham, E. Shimsoni, S. Sondhi, SSC. 102, 817 (1997). [11] A. Vaknin, A. Frydman, Z. Ovadyahu, PRB 61, 13037 (2000). [12] P. Fournier et al., PRB 62, R11993 (2000). [13] A. Gougam, F. Pierre, H. Pothier, D. Esteve, N

  17. Time-resolving electron temperature diagnostic for ALCATOR C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairfax, S. A.

    1984-05-01

    A diagnostic that provides time-resolved central electron temperatures was designed, built, and tested on the ALCATOR C Tokamak. The diagnostic uses an array of fixed-wavelength X-ray crystal monochromators to sample the X-ray continuum and determine the absolute electron temperature. The resolution and central energy of each channel were chosen to exclude any contributions from impurity line radiation. The need for such a diagnostic tool, the design methodology, and the results with typical ALCATOR C plasmas are described. Sawtooth (m = 1) temperature oscillations were observed after pellet fueling of the plasma. This is the first time that such oscillations were observed with an X-ray temperature diagnostic.

  18. Mixing of Proton and Electron Scales - Effects of Proton Temperature Anisotropy on the Electron Firehose Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneva, Y. G.; Lazar, M.; Vinas, A. F.; Poedts, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    We perform kinetic linear theory instability analysis in a non-drifting anisotropic electron-proton plasma to study the effects of proton temperature anisotropies on the electron firehose instability in the collisionless solar wind. We solve the Vlasov linear theory dispersion relation for hot highly anisotropic electron-proton plasma in high-beta regime to study the behavior of the solar wind plasma close to the instability thresholds as observed by different spacecraft at 1 AU. We consider temperature and anisotropy regimes for which the electrons and the protons can interact via the excited electromagnetic fluctuations. For the selected parameters simultaneous electron and proton firehose instabilities can be observed with the growth rate of the electron firehose instability extending towards the proton scales. The co-existance of the proton and the electron firehose and the mixing of scales for the electromagnetic fluctuations excited by the two instabilities depends on the initial temperatures, anisotropies and angle of propagation. In the case of parallel wave propagation both left and right-hand polarized waves are simultaneously excited. As we increase the angle of propagation the electron firehose starts to dominate with excitation of large-amplitude aperiodic fluctuations over a large range of wave-numbers, starting at the protons scales and extending up to the smaller electron scales. We calculate the maximum growth rate of the oblique electron firehose as a function of the proton temperature anisotropy and discuss the implications of the electron-proton scale mixing for the observed plasma properties and instability thresholds in the undisturbed solar wind.

  19. Extraction of electron plasma energy distribution function using distortion meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azooz, A. A.

    2006-06-01

    A new method for direct evaluation of the electron energy distribution function in plasmas is suggested, which involves the use of audio frequencies distortion factor meters. The amount of distortion suffered by a Langmuir probe AC current produced by superimposing a clean AC voltage on the DC probe voltage is measured. Although such distortions are proportional to the second derivative of the probe characteristic at any point when its neighborhood can be approximated by a second-degree polynomial, the instrument function is always sharper than that of harmonic differentiation. The method is analyzed theoretically, and tested experimentally. It is also shown that distortion additionally provides a direct measure of the electron temperature.

  20. Dressed solitons in quantum electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Prasanta; Roy, Kaushik; Mondal, Ganesh; Muniandy, S. V.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.

    2009-12-01

    Nonlinear propagation of quantum ion acoustic waves in a dense quantum plasma whose constituents are electrons, positrons, and positive ions is investigated using a quantum hydrodynamic model. The Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived using reductive perturbation technique. The higher order inhomogeneous differential equation is obtained for the dressed soliton. The dynamical equation for dressed soliton is solved using the renormalization method. The conditions for the validity of the higher order correction are described. The effects of quantum parameter, positron concentration, electron to positron Fermi temperature ratio, and soliton velocity on the amplitude and width of the dressed soliton are studied.

  1. A Polytropic Model for Space and Laboratory Plasmas Described by Bi-Maxwellian Electron Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunchao; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2016-09-01

    Non-local electron energy probability functions (EEPFs) are shown to have an important effect on the thermodynamic behavior of plasmas in the context of solar wind and laboratory plasmas. A conservation relation is held for electron enthalpy and plasma potential during the electron transport. For an adiabatic system governed by non-local electron dynamics, the correlation between electron temperature and density can be approximated by a polytropic relation, with different indexes demonstrated using three cases of bi-Maxwellian EEPFs. This scenario differs from a local thermodynamic equilibrium having a single polytropic index of 5/3 for adiabaticity.

  2. Positron plasma diagnostics and temperature control for antihydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Amoretti, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Bouchta, A; Bowe, P D; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Doser, M; Filippini, V; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Lagomarsino, V; Landua, R; Lindelöf, D; Rizzini, E Lodi; Macrí, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Montagna, P; Pruys, H; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Testera, G; Variola, A; van der Werf, D P

    2003-08-01

    Production of antihydrogen atoms by mixing antiprotons with a cold, confined, positron plasma depends critically on parameters such as the plasma density and temperature. We discuss nondestructive measurements, based on a novel, real-time analysis of excited, low-order plasma modes, that provide comprehensive characterization of the positron plasma in the ATHENA antihydrogen apparatus. The plasma length, radius, density, and total particle number are obtained. Measurement and control of plasma temperature variations, and the application to antihydrogen production experiments are discussed.

  3. Localized electron heating and density peaking in downstream helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Barada, K. K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Bora, D.

    2015-06-01

    Localized electron temperature and density peaking at different axial locations in the downstream helicon plasma have been observed in a linear helicon device with both geometrical and magnetic expansion. The discharge is produced with an m=+1 right helical antenna powered by a RF source operating at 13.56 MHz. Axial wave field measurement shows the presence of damped helicon waves with standing wave character folded into it even at low densities (˜ {{10}16} m-3 ). The measured helicon wavelength is just about twice the antenna length and the phase velocity ≤ft({{v}p}\\right) is almost the speed required for electron impact ionization. These experimental observations strongly advocate the Landau damping heating and density production by the helicon waves, particularly in low density plasma such as ours. The electron temperature maximizes at 35-45 cm away from the antenna center in our experiments indicating a local source of heating at those locations. Different mechanisms responsible for this additional heating at a particular spatial location have been discussed for their possible roles. Further downstream from the location of the maximum electron temperature, a density peak located 55-65 cm away from the antenna is observed. This downstream density peaking can be explained through pressure balance in the system.

  4. Thomson scattering from near-solid density plasmas using soft x-ray free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holl, A; Bornath, T; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gregori, G; Laarmann, T; Meiwes-Broer, K H; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Reinholz, H; Ropke, G; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Toleikis, S; Truong, N X; Tschentscher, T; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U

    2006-11-21

    We propose a collective Thomson scattering experiment at the VUV free electron laser facility at DESY (FLASH) which aims to diagnose warm dense matter at near-solid density. The plasma region of interest marks the transition from an ideal plasma to a correlated and degenerate many-particle system and is of current interest, e.g. in ICF experiments or laboratory astrophysics. Plasma diagnostic of such plasmas is a longstanding issue. The collective electron plasma mode (plasmon) is revealed in a pump-probe scattering experiment using the high-brilliant radiation to probe the plasma. The distinctive scattering features allow to infer basic plasma properties. For plasmas in thermal equilibrium the electron density and temperature is determined from scattering off the plasmon mode.

  5. Radial Profiles of the Plasma Electron Characteristics in a 30 kW Arc Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Codron, Douglas A.; Nawaz, Anuscheh

    2013-01-01

    The present effort aims to strengthen modeling work conducted at the NASA Ames Research Center by measuring the critical plasma electron characteristics within and slightly outside of an arc jet plasma column. These characteristics are intended to give physical insights while assisting in the formulation of boundary conditions to validate full scale simulations. Single and triple Langmuir probes have been used to achieve estimates of the electron temperature (T(sub e)), electron number density (n(sub e)) and plasma potential (outside of the plasma column) as probing location is varied radially from the flow centerline. Both the electron temperature and electron number density measurements show a large dependence on radial distance from the plasma column centerline with T(sub e) approx. = (3 - 12 eV and n(sub e) approx. = 10(exp 12) - 10(exp 14)/cu cm.

  6. Modeling of free electronic state density in hydrogenic plasmas based on nearest neighbor approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, Takeshi

    2014-07-15

    Most conventional atomic models in a plasma do not treat the effect of the plasma on the free-electron state density. Using a nearest neighbor approximation, the state densities in hydrogenic plasmas for both bound and free electrons were evaluated and the effect of the plasma on the atomic model (especially for the state density of the free electron) was studied. The model evaluates the electron-state densities using the potential distribution formed by the superposition of the Coulomb potentials of two ions. The potential from one ion perturbs the electronic state density on the other. Using this new model, one can evaluate the free-state density without making any ad-hoc assumptions. The resulting contours of the average ionization degree, given as a function of the plasma temperature and density, are shifted slightly to lower temperatures because of the effect of the increasing free-state density.

  7. Kinetic modelling of runaway electron avalanches in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, E.; Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.; Granetz, R. S.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Vlainic, M.

    2015-09-01

    relative importance of the avalanche mechanism is investigated as a function of the key parameters for runaway electron formation, namely the plasma temperature and the electric field strength. In agreement with theoretical predictions, the LUKE simulations show that in low temperature and electric field the knock-on collisions becomes the dominant source of runaway electrons and can play a significant role for runaway electron generation, including in non-disruptive tokamak scenarios.

  8. Plasma synthesis of high temperature ceramic films

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Monteiro, O.R.

    1998-11-01

    Thin films of alumina, chromia, mullite, yttria and zirconia have been synthesized using a plasma-based method called metal plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (Mepiiid)--a highly versatile plasma deposition technique with ion energy control. Monolithic films (a single ceramic component) and multilayer films (individual layers of different ceramic materials) were formed. The films were characterized for their composition and structure in a number of different ways, and the high temperature performance of the films was explored, particularly for their ability to maintain their integrity and adhesion when subjected to repetitive high temperature thermal cycling up 1100 C. We found that the films retain their adhesion and quality without any apparent degradation with time, even after a large number of cycles; (the tests were extended out to a total of 40 cycles each of 24 hours duration). After repetitive high temperature thermal cycling, the film-substrate adhesion was greater than {approx}70 Mpa, the instrumental limit of measurement, and the interface toughness was approximately 0.8 MPa m{sup 1/2}.

  9. Relativistic warm plasma theory of nonlinear laser-driven electron plasma waves.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, C B; Esarey, E

    2010-05-01

    A relativistic, warm fluid model of a nonequilibrium, collisionless plasma is developed and applied to examine nonlinear Langmuir waves excited by relativistically intense, short-pulse lasers. Closure of the covariant fluid theory is obtained via an asymptotic expansion assuming a nonrelativistic plasma temperature. The momentum spread is calculated in the presence of an intense laser field and shown to be intrinsically anisotropic. Coupling between the transverse and longitudinal momentum variances is enabled by the laser field. A generalized dispersion relation is derived for Langmuir waves in a thermal plasma in the presence of an intense laser field. Including thermal fluctuations in three-velocity-space dimensions, the properties of the nonlinear electron plasma wave, such as the plasma temperature evolution and nonlinear wavelength, are examined and the maximum amplitude of the nonlinear oscillation is derived. The presence of a relativistically intense laser pulse is shown to strongly influence the maximum plasma wave amplitude for nonrelativistic phase velocities owing to the coupling between the longitudinal and transverse momentum variances.

  10. Relativistic warm plasma theory of nonlinear laser-driven electron plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric

    2010-06-30

    A relativistic, warm fluid model of a nonequilibrium, collisionless plasma is developed and applied to examine nonlinear Langmuir waves excited by relativistically-intense, short-pulse lasers. Closure of the covariant fluid theory is obtained via an asymptotic expansion assuming a non-relativistic plasma temperature. The momentum spread is calculated in the presence of an intense laser field and shown to be intrinsically anisotropic. Coupling between the transverse and longitudinal momentum variances is enabled by the laser field. A generalized dispersion relation is derived for langmuir waves in a thermal plasma in the presence of an intense laser field. Including thermal fluctuations in three velocity-space dimensions, the properties of the nonlinear electron plasma wave, such as the plasma temperature evolution and nonlinear wavelength, are examined, and the maximum amplitude of the nonlinear oscillation is derived. The presence of a relativistically intense laser pulse is shown to strongly influence the maximum plasma wave amplitude for non-relativistic phase velocities owing to the coupling between the longitudinal and transverse momentum variances.

  11. Electron-beam generated plasmas for processing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meger, Robert; Leonhardt, Darrin; Murphy, Donald; Walton, Scott; Blackwell, David; Fernsler, Richard; Lampe, Martin; Manheimer, Wallace

    2001-10-01

    NRL's Large Area Plasma Processing System (LAPPS) utilizes a 5-10 mA/cm^2, 2-4 kV, 1 cm x 30-60 cm cross section beam of electrons guided by a magnetic field to ionize a low density (10-100 mTorr) gas.[1] Beam ionization allows large area, high density, low temperature plasmas to be generated in an arbitrary gas mixture at a well defined location. Energy and composition of particle fluxes to surfaces on both sides of the plasma can be controlled by gas mixture, location, rf bias, and other factors. Experiments have been performed using both pulsed and cw beams. Extensive diagnostics (Langmuir probes, mass and ion energy analyzers, optical emissions, microwave interferometry, etc.) have been fielded to measure the plasma properties and neutral particle fluxes (ions, neutrals, free radicals) with and without rf bias on nearby surfaces both with the beam on and off. Uniform, cold (Te < 1eV), dense (ne 10^13 cm-3) plasmas in molecular and atomic gases and mixtures thereof have been produced in agreement with theoretical expectations. Initial tests of LAPPS application such as ashing, etching, sputtering, and diamond growth have been performed. Program status will be presented. [1]R.A. Meger, et al, Phys. of Plasmas 8(5), p. 2558 (2001)

  12. Material for electrodes of low temperature plasma generators

    DOEpatents

    Caplan, Malcolm; Vinogradov, Sergel Evge'evich; Ribin, Valeri Vasil'evich; Shekalov, Valentin Ivanovich; Rutberg, Philip Grigor'evich; Safronov, Alexi Anatol'evich

    2008-12-09

    Material for electrodes of low temperature plasma generators. The material contains a porous metal matrix impregnated with a material emitting electrons. The material uses a mixture of copper and iron powders as a porous metal matrix and a Group IIIB metal component such as Y.sub.2O.sub.3 is used as a material emitting electrons at, for example, the proportion of the components, mass %: iron: 3-30; Y.sub.2O.sub.3:0.05-1; copper: the remainder. Copper provides a high level of heat conduction and electric conductance, iron decreases intensity of copper evaporation in the process of plasma creation providing increased strength and lifetime, Y.sub.2O.sub.3 provides decreasing of electronic work function and stability of arc burning. The material can be used for producing the electrodes of low temperature AC plasma generators used for destruction of liquid organic wastes, medical wastes, and municipal wastes as well as for decontamination of low level radioactive waste, the destruction of chemical weapons, warfare toxic agents, etc.

  13. Material for electrodes of low temperature plasma generators

    DOEpatents

    Caplan, Malcolm; Vinogradov, Sergel Evge'evich; Ribin, Valeri Vasil'evich; Shekalov, Valentin Ivanovich; Rutberg, Philip Grigor'evich; Safronov, Alexi Anatol'evich; Shiryaev, Vasili Nikolaevich

    2010-03-02

    Material for electrodes of low temperature plasma generators. The material contains a porous metal matrix impregnated with a material emitting electrons. The material uses a mixture of copper and iron powders as a porous metal matrix and a Group IIIB metal component such as Y.sub.2O.sub.3 is used as a material emitting electrons at, for example, the proportion of the components, mass %: iron:3-30; Y.sub.2O.sub.3:0.05-1; copper: the remainder. Copper provides a high level of heat conduction and electric conductance, iron decreases intensity of copper evaporation in the process of plasma creation providing increased strength and lifetime, Y.sub.2O.sub.3 provides decreasing of electronic work function and stability of arc burning. The material can be used for producing the electrodes of low temperature AC plasma generators used for destruction of liquid organic wastes, medical wastes, municipal wastes as well as for decontamination of low level radioactive waste, the destruction of chemical weapons, warfare toxic agents, etc.

  14. Positron-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma with nonthermal electrons and positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    Obliquely propagating positron-acoustic solitary waves (PASWs) in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma (containing nonthermal hot positrons and electrons, inertial cold positrons, and immobile positive ions) are precisely investigated by deriving the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation. It is found that the characteristics of the PASWs are significantly modified by the effects of external magnetic field, obliqueness, nonthermality of hot positrons and electrons, temperature ratio of hot positrons and electrons, and respective number densities of hot positrons and electrons. The findings of our results can be employed in understanding the localized electrostatic structures and the characteristics of PASWs in various space and laboratory plasmas.

  15. Plasma Jet Braking: Energy Dissipation and Nonadiabatic Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Cully, C. M.; Vaivads, A.; Andre, M.; Owen, C. J.

    2011-04-22

    We report in situ observations by the Cluster spacecraft of wave-particle interactions in a magnetic flux pileup region created by a magnetic reconnection outflow jet in Earth's magnetotail. Two distinct regions of wave activity are identified: lower-hybrid drift waves at the front edge and whistler-mode waves inside the pileup region. The whistler-mode waves are locally generated by the electron temperature anisotropy, and provide evidence for ongoing betatron energization caused by magnetic flux pileup. The whistler-mode waves cause fast pitch-angle scattering of electrons and isotropization of the electron distribution, thus making the flow braking process nonadiabatic. The waves strongly affect the electron dynamics and thus play an important role in the energy conversion chain during plasma jet braking.

  16. Electron-helium scattering in Debye plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zammit, Mark C.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor; Janev, R. K.

    2011-11-15

    Electron-helium scattering in weakly coupled hot-dense (Debye) plasma has been investigated using the convergent close-coupling method. The Yukawa-type Debye-Hueckel potential has been used to describe plasma Coulomb screening effects. Benchmark results are presented for momentum transfer cross sections, excitation, ionization, and total cross sections for scattering from the ground and metastable states of helium. Calculations cover the entire energy range up to 1000 eV for the no screening case and various Debye lengths (5-100 a{sub 0}). We find that as the screening interaction increases, the excitation and total cross sections decrease, while the total ionization cross sections increase.

  17. Plasma treatment for producing electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Coates, Don Mayo; Walter, Kevin Carl

    2001-01-01

    Plasma treatment for producing carbonaceous field emission electron emitters is disclosed. A plasma of ions is generated in a closed chamber and used to surround the exposed surface of a carbonaceous material. A voltage is applied to an electrode that is in contact with the carbonaceous material. This voltage has a negative potential relative to a second electrode in the chamber and serves to accelerate the ions toward the carbonaceous material and provide an ion energy sufficient to etch the exposed surface of the carbonaceous material but not sufficient to result in the implantation of the ions within the carbonaceous material. Preferably, the ions used are those of an inert gas or an inert gas with a small amount of added nitrogen.

  18. Excitation of Plasma Waves in Aurora by Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    daSilva, C. E.; Vinas, A. F.; deAssis, A. S.; deAzevedo, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we study numerically the excitation of plasma waves by electron beams, in the auroral region above 2000 km of altitude. We have solved the fully kinetic dispersion relation, using numerical method and found the real frequency and the growth rate of the plasma wave modes. We have examined the instability properties of low-frequency waves such as the Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) wave as well as Lower-Hybrid (LH) wave in the range of high-frequency. In all cases, the source of free energy are electron beams propagating parallel to the geomagnetic field. We present some features of the growth rate modes, when the cold plasma parameters are changed, such as background electrons and ions species (H(+) and O(+)) temperature, density or the electron beam density and/or drift velocity. These results can be used in a test-particle simulation code, to investigate the ion acceleration and their implication in the auroral acceleration processes, by wave-particle interaction.

  19. Measurements of low-energy electron reflection at a plasma boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. I.; Adams, S. F.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Koepke, M. E.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.

    2015-10-15

    It is demonstrated that low-energy (<3 eV) electron reflection from a solid surface in contact with a low-temperature plasma can have significant variation with time. An uncontaminated, i.e., “clean,” metallic surface (just after heating up to glow) in a plasma environment may have practically no reflection of low-energy incident electrons. However, a contaminated, i.e., “dirty,” surface (in some time after cleaning by heating) that has a few monolayers of absorbent can reflect low-energy incident electrons and therefore significantly affect the net electron current collected by the surface. This effect may significantly change plasma properties and should be taken into account in plasma experiments and models. A diagnostic method is demonstrated for measurements of low-energy electron absorption coefficient in plasmas with a mono-energetic electron group.

  20. Self-focusing and defocusing of Gaussian laser beams in plasmas with linear temperature ramp

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Zhongxiang; Wang Ying; Yuan Chengxun; Du Yanwei

    2011-07-15

    The propagation characteristics of the Gaussian laser beam in plasmas in the presence of a linear electron temperature ramp have been investigated by taking the electron temperature as an individual variable. The ponderomotive force and collision have been considered as the mechanisms of nonlinearity. The second order differential equation of the dimensionless beam-width parameter has been acquired and solved with several initial electron temperatures and plus-minus temperature ramp parameters. The propagation regimes of laser beam are found to be sensitive with the selection of electron temperature. The linear temperature ramp breaks the stationary propagating mode and enhances the self-focusing or defocusing propagation properties. Results indicate the feasibility of extended propagation of focused laser beam in plasmas by modifying the electron temperature.

  1. Low temperature plasma biomedicine: A tutorial reviewa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, David B.

    2014-08-01

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown to be potentially useful for surface and wound sterilization, antisepsis, bleeding cessation, wound healing, and cancer treatment, among other biomedical applications. This tutorial review summarizes the field, stressing the likely role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species created in these plasmas as the biologically and therapeutically active agents. Reactive species, including radicals and non-radical compounds, are generated naturally within the body and are now understood to be essential for normal biological functions. These species are known to be active agents in existing therapies for wound healing, infection control, and cancer treatment. But they are also observed at elevated levels in persons with many diseases and are associated with aging. The physical and chemical complexity of plasma medical devices and their associated biochemical effects makes the development of safe, effective plasma medical devices and procedures a challenge, but encouragingly rapid progress has been reported around the world in the last several years.

  2. Low temperature plasma biomedicine: A tutorial review

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, David B.

    2014-08-15

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown to be potentially useful for surface and wound sterilization, antisepsis, bleeding cessation, wound healing, and cancer treatment, among other biomedical applications. This tutorial review summarizes the field, stressing the likely role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species created in these plasmas as the biologically and therapeutically active agents. Reactive species, including radicals and non-radical compounds, are generated naturally within the body and are now understood to be essential for normal biological functions. These species are known to be active agents in existing therapies for wound healing, infection control, and cancer treatment. But they are also observed at elevated levels in persons with many diseases and are associated with aging. The physical and chemical complexity of plasma medical devices and their associated biochemical effects makes the development of safe, effective plasma medical devices and procedures a challenge, but encouragingly rapid progress has been reported around the world in the last several years.

  3. Thermalization of electrons in decaying extreme ultraviolet photons induced low pressure argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, J.; van der Horst, R. M.; Osorio, E. A.; Kroesen, G. M. W.; Banine, V. Y.

    2016-06-01

    We monitored—in the pressure range: 0.5–15 Pa—the electron temperature in decaying plasmas induced in argon gas by pulsed irradiation with extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons with wavelengths closely around 13.5 nm. For this purpose, temporal measurements of the space-averaged and electric field weighted electron density after pulsed EUV irradiation are combined with an ambipolar diffusion model of the plasma. Results demonstrate that electrons are thermalized to room temperature before the plasma has fully expanded to the chamber walls for pressures of 3 Pa and higher. At pressures below 3 Pa, the electron temperature was found to be up to 0.1 eV above room temperature which is explained by the fact that plasma expansion is too quick for the electrons to fully thermalize. The comparison between plasma expansion duration towards a surface, plasma decay at a surface and time needed for thermalization and cooling of electrons is essential for designers of EUV lithography tools and EUV sources since the temperature of electrons dictates many fundamental physical processes.

  4. Electron Recombination in a Dense Hydrogen Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, M.R.; Johnstone, C.; Kobilarcik, T.; Koizumi, G.M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Tollestrup, A.V.; Yonehara, K.; Leonova, M.A.; Schwarz, T.A.; Chung, M.; /Unlisted /IIT, Chicago /Fermilab /MUONS Inc., Batavia /Turin Polytechnic

    2012-05-01

    A high pressure hydrogen gas filled RF cavity was subjected to an intense proton beam to study the evolution of the beam induced plasma inside the cavity. Varying beam intensities, gas pressures and electric fields were tested. Beam induced ionized electrons load the cavity, thereby decreasing the accelerating gradient. The extent and duration of this degradation has been measured. A model of the recombination between ionized electrons and ions is presented, with the intent of producing a baseline for the physics inside such a cavity used in a muon accelerator. Analysis of the data taken during the summer of 2011 shows that self recombination takes place in pure hydrogen gas. The decay of the number of electrons in the cavity once the beam is turned off indicates self recombination rather than attachment to electronegative dopants or impurities. The cross section of electron recombination grows for larger clusters of hydrogen and so at the equilibrium of electron production and recombination in the cavity, processes involving H{sub 5}{sup +} or larger clusters must be taking place. The measured recombination rates during this time match or exceed the analytic predicted values. The accelerating gradient in the cavity recovers fully in time for the next beam pulse of a muon collider. Exactly what the recombination rate is and how much the gradient degrades during the 60 ns muon collider beam pulse will be extrapolated from data taken during the spring of 2012.

  5. Low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma sources for plasma medicine.

    PubMed

    Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2016-09-01

    In this review paper, fundamental overviews of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma generation are provided and various sources for plasma medicine are described in terms of operating conditions and plasma properties. PMID:27109191

  6. Low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma sources for plasma medicine.

    PubMed

    Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2016-09-01

    In this review paper, fundamental overviews of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma generation are provided and various sources for plasma medicine are described in terms of operating conditions and plasma properties.

  7. Status of Plasma Electron Hose Instability Studies in FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Adli, Erik; England, Robert Joel; Frederico, Joel; Hogan, Mark; Li, Selina Zhao; Litos, Michael Dennis; Nosochkov, Yuri; An, Weiming; Mori, Warren; /UCLA

    2011-12-13

    In the FACET plasma-wakefield acceleration experiment a dense 23 GeV electron beam will interact with lithium and cesium plasmas, leading to plasma ion-channel formation. The interaction between the electron beam and the plasma sheath-electrons may lead to a fast growing electron hose instability. By using optics dispersion knobs to induce a controlled z-x tilt along the beam entering the plasma, we investigate the transverse behavior of the beam in the plasma as function of the tilt. We seek to quantify limits on the instability in order to further explore potential limitations on future plasma wakefield accelerators due to the electron hose instability. The FACET plasma-wakefield experiment at SLAC will study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. A dense 23 GeV electron beam will interact with lithium or cesium plasma, leading to plasma ion-channel formation. The interaction between the electron beam and the plasma sheath-electrons drives the electron hose instability, as first studied by Whittum. While Ref. [2] indicates the possibility of a large instability growth rate for typical beam and plasma parameters, other studies including have shown that several physical effects may mitigate the hosing growth rate substantially. So far there has been no quantitative benchmarking of experimentally observed hosing in previous experiments. At FACET we aim to perform such benchmarking by for example inducing a controlled z-x tilt along the beamentering the plasma, and observing the transverse behavior of the beam in the plasma as function. The long-term objective of these studies is to quantify potential limitations on future plasma wakefield accelerators due to the electron hose instability.

  8. Survey of the plasma electron environment of Jupiter: A view from Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Bridge, H. S.

    1980-01-01

    The plasma environment within Jupiter's bow shock is considered in terms of the in situ, calibrated electron plasma measurements made between 10 eV and 5.95 keV by the Voyager plasma science experiment (PLS). Measurements were analyzed and corrected for spacecraft potential variations; the data were reduced to nearly model independent macroscopic parameters of the local electron density and temperature. It is tentatively concluded that the radial temperature profile within the plasma sheet is caused by the intermixing of two different electron populations that probably have different temporal histories and spatial paths to their local observation. The cool plasma source of the plasma sheet and spikes is probably the Io plasma torus and arrives in the plasma sheet as a result of flux tube interchange motions or other generalized transport which can be accomplished without diverting the plasma from the centrifugal equator. The hot suprathermal populations in the plasma sheet have most recently come from the sparse, hot mid-latitude "bath" of electrons which were directly observed juxtaposed to the plasma sheet.

  9. Study of plasma heating induced by fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morace, A.; Magunov, A.; Batani, D.; Redaelli, R.; Fourment, C.; Santos, J. J.; Malka, G.; Boscheron, A.; Casner, A.; Nazarov, W.; Vinci, T.; Okano, Y.; Inubushi, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Flacco, A.; Spindloe, C.; Tolley, M.

    2009-12-01

    We studied the induced plasma heating in three different kinds of targets: mass limited, foam targets, and large mass targets. The experiment was performed at Alisé Laser Facility of CEA/CESTA. The laser system emitted a ˜1 ps pulse with ˜10 J energy at a wavelength of ˜1 μm. Mass limited targets had three layers with thicknesses of 10 μm C8H8, 1 μm C8H7Cl, and 10 μm C8H8 with size of 100×100 μm2. Detailed spectroscopic analysis of x rays emitted from the Cl tracer showed that it was possible to heat up the plasma from mass limited targets to a temperature of ˜250 eV with density of ˜1021 cm-3. The plasma heating is only produced by fast electron transport in the target, being the 10 μm C8H8 overcoating thick enough to prevent any possible direct irradiation of the tracer layer even taking into account mass-ablation due to the prepulse. These results demonstrate that with mass limited targets, it is possible to generate a plasma heated up to several hundreds eV. It is also very important for research concerning high energy density phenomena and for fast ignition (in particular for the study of fast electrons transport and induced heating).

  10. Cathode Plasma Formation in High Intensity Electron Beam Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark; Kiefer, Mark; Oliver, Bryan; Bennett, Nichelle; Droemer, Darryl; Bernshtam, V.; Doron, R.; Maron, Yitzhak

    2013-10-01

    This talk will detail the experimental results and conclusions obtained for cathode plasma formation on the Self-Magnetic Pinch (SMP) diode fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (4-7.5 MeV) at Sandia National Laboratories. The SMP diode utilizes a hollowed metal cathode to produce high power (TW), focused electron beams (<3 mm diameter) which are used for flash x-ray radiography applications. Optical diagnostics include high speed (<10 ns) framing cameras, optical streak cameras, and spectroscopy. The cathode plasma in this high electric (MV/cm) and magnetic (>10 Tesla) field environment forms well-defined striations. These striations have been examined for a number of different cathode sizes, vacuum gap spacings, and diode voltages. Optical streak images have been taken to determine the time evolution of the plasma, and optical spectroscopy has been employed to determine its constituents as well as their densities and temperatures inferred from detailed time-dependent, collisional-radiative (CR) and radiation transport modelings. Comments will be made as to the overall effect of the cathode plasma in regards to the diode impedance and electron beam focusing. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. The Empowerment of Plasma Modeling by Fundamental Electron Scattering Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-09-01

    Modeling of low temperature plasmas addresses at least 3 goals - investigation of fundamental processes, analysis and optimization of current technologies, and prediction of performance of as yet unbuilt systems for new applications. The former modeling may be performed on somewhat idealized systems in simple gases, while the latter will likely address geometrically and electromagnetically intricate systems with complex gas mixtures, and now gases in contact with liquids. The variety of fundamental electron and ion scattering data (FSD) required for these activities increases from the former to the latter, while the accuracy required of that data probably decreases. In each case, the fidelity, depth and impact of the modeling depends on the availability of FSD. Modeling is, in fact, empowered by the availability and robustness of FSD. In this talk, examples of the impact of and requirements for FSD in plasma modeling will be discussed from each of these three perspectives using results from multidimensional and global models. The fundamental studies will focus on modeling of inductively coupled plasmas sustained in Ar/Cl2 where the electron scattering from feed gases and their fragments ultimately determine gas temperatures. Examples of the optimization of current technologies will focus on modeling of remote plasma etching of Si and Si3N4 in Ar/NF3/N2/O2 mixtures. Modeling of systems as yet unbuilt will address the interaction of atmospheric pressure plasmas with liquids Work was supported by the US Dept. of Energy (DE-SC0001939), National Science Foundation (CHE-124752), and the Semiconductor Research Corp.

  12. New electron cyclotron emission diagnostic for measurement of temperature based upon the electron Bernstein wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthimion, P. C.; Hosea, J. C.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Taylor, G.

    1999-01-01

    Most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics to measure temperature. They either operate at high density relative to their magnetic field (e.g., ωp≫Ωc in spherical tokamaks) or they do not have sufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition (τ>2). The standard ECE technique measures the electromagnetic waves emanating from the plasma. Here we propose to measure electron Bernstein waves (EBW) to ascertain the local electron temperature in these plasmas. The optical thickness of EBW is extremely high because it is an electrostatic wave with a large ki. For example, the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) will have an optical thickness τ≈3000 and CDX-U will have τ≈300. One can reach the blackbody condition with a plasma density ≈1011cm-3 and Te≈1 eV. This makes it attractive to most plasma devices. The serious issue with using EBW is the wave accessibility for the emission measurement. Simple accessibility arguments indicate the wave may be accessible by either direct coupling or mode conversion through an extremely narrow layer (≈1-2 mm). EBW experiments on the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) will test the accessibility properties of the spherical tokamak configuration.

  13. New electron cyclotron emission diagnostic for measurement of temperature based upon the electron Bernstein wave

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, P.C.; Hosea, J.C.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Taylor, G.

    1999-01-01

    Most magnetically confined plasma devices cannot take advantage of standard electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics to measure temperature. They either operate at high density relative to their magnetic field (e.g., {omega}{sub p}{gt}{Omega}{sub c} in spherical tokamaks) or they do not have sufficient density and temperature to reach the blackbody condition ({tau}{gt}2). The standard ECE technique measures the electromagnetic waves emanating from the plasma. Here we propose to measure electron Bernstein waves (EBW) to ascertain the local electron temperature in these plasmas. The optical thickness of EBW is extremely high because it is an electrostatic wave with a large k{sub i}. For example, the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) will have an optical thickness {tau}{approx}3000 and CDX-U will have {tau}{approx}300. One can reach the blackbody condition with a plasma density {approx}10{sup 11}thinspcm{sup {minus}3} and T{sub e}{approx}1thinspeV. This makes it attractive to most plasma devices. The serious issue with using EBW is the wave accessibility for the emission measurement. Simple accessibility arguments indicate the wave may be accessible by either direct coupling or mode conversion through an extremely narrow layer ({approx}1{endash}2 mm). EBW experiments on the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) will test the accessibility properties of the spherical tokamak configuration. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Ne+, Ne2+, Ar+, and Ar2+ fine-structure electron-impact excitation data for applications in ultra low temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, YE; Wang, Qianxia; Pearce, Jonathan; Pindzola, Michael; Loch, Stuart; Stancil, Phillip C.; Cumbee, Renata; Ballance, Connor

    2016-01-01

    Fine-structure electron-impact excitation of ions plays an important role in cooling most interstellar environments and is important for far infrared (IR) and submillimeter (submm) observations. New atomic structure and collisonal data are presented using both semi-relativistic and fully-relativistic R-matrix methods for Ne+, Ne2+, Ar+, and Ar2+. Some illustrative modeling results using the data are also given.

  15. Possible excitation of solitary electron holes in a laboratory plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, S.; Mukherjee, S.; Ravi, G.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2010-10-15

    Plasma response to a fast rising high positive voltage pulse is experimentally studied in a uniform and unmagnetized plasma. The pulse is applied to a metallic disk electrode immersed in a low pressure argon plasma (n{sub p{approx}}10{sup 9} cm{sup -3} and T{sub e{approx}}0.5-2 eV) with the pulse magnitude U{sub 0}>>kT{sub e}/e, where T{sub e} is the electron temperature. Experiments have been carried out for various applied pulse widths {tau}{sub p} ranging from less than 3f{sub i}{sup -1} to greater than 3f{sub i}{sup -1}, where f{sub i} is the ion plasma frequency. For pulse widths less than 3f{sub i}{sup -1}, potential disturbances are observed to propagate in two opposite directions from a location different from the actual exciter (metal disk electrode), indicating the presence of a virtual source. For pulse widths equal or greater than 3f{sub i}{sup -1}, there is no indication of such virtual source. These disturbances propagate with two phase speeds, i.e., v{sub p}/v{sub e}=1.36{+-}0.11 and 0.4{+-}0.15, where v{sub e} is the electron thermal speed. It is also observed that by increasing plasma density, the speed of these disturbances increases, whereas the speed is independent of pulse magnitude. Analysis of these disturbances indicates the excitation of solitary electron holes.

  16. Multichannel euv spectroscopy of high temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fonck, R.J.

    1983-11-01

    Spectroscopy of magnetically confined high temperature plasmas in the visible through x-ray spectral ranges deals primarily with the study of impurity line radiation or continuum radiation. Detailed knowledge of absolute intensities, temporal behavior, and spatial distributions of the emitted radiation is desired. As tokamak facilities become more complex, larger, and less accessible, there has been an increased emphasis on developing new instrumentation to provide such information in a minimum number of discharges. The availability of spatially-imaging detectors for use in the vacuum ultraviolet region (especially the intensified photodiode array) has generated the development of a variety of multichannel spectrometers for applications on tokamak facilities.

  17. Electron dynamics in a plasma focus. [electron acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohl, F.; Gary, S. P.; Winters, P. A.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented of a numerical integration of the three-dimensional relativistic equations of motion of electrons subject to given electric and magnetic fields deduced from experiments. Fields due to two different models are investigated. For the first model, the fields are those due to a circular distribution of axial current filaments. As the current filaments collapse toward the axis, large azimuthal magnetic and axial electric fields are induced. These fields effectively heat the electrons to a temperature of approximately 8 keV and accelerate electrons within the radius of the filaments to high axial velocities. Similar results are obtained for the current-reduction phase of focus formation. For the second model, the fields are those due to a uniform current distribution. Both the current-reduction and the compression phases were studied. These is little heating or acceleration of electrons during the compression phase because the electrons are tied to the magnetic field. However, during the current-reduction phase, electrons near the axis are accelerated toward the center electrode and reach energies of 100 keV. A criterion is obtained which limits the runaway electron current to about 400 A.

  18. The behavior of the electron plasma boundary in ultraintense laser–highly overdense plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Arriaga, G.; Sanz, J.; Debayle, A.; Lehmann, G.

    2014-12-15

    The structural stability of the laser/plasma interaction is discussed, for the case of a linearly polarized laser beam interacting with a solid at normal incidence. Using a semi-analytical cold fluid model, the dynamics of the electron plasma boundary (EPB), usually related to the high-order harmonic generation and laser absorption, are presented. While the well-known J × B plasma oscillations at two times the laser frequency are recovered by the model, several other periodic in time stable solutions exist for exactly the same value of the physical parameters. This novel behavior highlights the importance of the laser pulse history among other factors. Some important features, such as the synchronization between the incident laser and the EPB oscillation, depend on the solution under consideration. A description of the possible types of stable oscillations in a parametric plane involving plasma density and laser amplitude is presented. The semi-analytical model is compared with particle-in-cell and semi-Lagrangian Vlasov simulations. They show that, among all the stable solutions, the plasma preferentially evolves to a state with the EPB oscillating twice faster than the laser. The effect of the plasma temperature and the existence of a ramp in the ion density profile are also discussed.

  19. Deriving large electron temperatures and small electron densities with the Cassini Langmuir probe at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Philippe; Wahlund, Jan-Erik; Holmberg, Mika; Lewis, Geraint; Schippers, Patricia; Rochel Grimald, Sandrine; Gurnett, Donald; Coates, Andrew; Dandouras, Iannis; Waite, Hunter

    2014-05-01

    The Langmuir Probes (LPs) are commonly used to investigate the cold plasma characteristics in planetary ionospheres/magnetospheres. The LPs performances are limited to low temperatures (i.e. below 5-10 eV at Saturn) and large densities (above several particles/cm3). A strong sensitivity of the Cassini LP measurements to energetic electrons (hundreds eV) may however be observed at Saturn in the L Shell range L=6-10 RS. These electrons impact the surface of the probe and generate a detectable current of secondary electrons. We investigate the influence of such electrons on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics (for negative potentials), and manage to reproduce the observations with a reasonable precision through empirical and theoretical methods. Conversely, the modelling allows us to derive useful information about the energetic electrons from the LP observations : some information about their pitch angle anisotropy (if combined with the data from a single CAPS ELS anode), as well as an estimate of the electron temperature (in the range 100-300 eV) and of the electron density (above 0.1 particles/cm3). This enlarges the LP measurements capabilities when the influence of the energetic electrons is large (essentially near L=6-10 RS at Saturn). We finally show that a significant influence of the energetic electrons (larger than the contribution of thermal ions) is also expected in various plasma environments of the Solar System, such as at Jupiter (i.e near Ganymede, Europa, Callisto and Io), or even at Earth (in the plasmasheet, the magnetosheath or in plasma cavities). Large electron temperatures and small electron densities could potentially be derived in these environments, which may be of interest for Langmuir Probes in the Earth magnetosphere or onboard the future JUICE mission at Jupiter.

  20. Hydrodynamic theory of diffusion in two-temperature multicomponent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ramshaw, J.D.; Chang, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    Detailed numerical simulations of multicomponent plasmas require tractable expressions for species diffusion fluxes, which must be consistent with the given plasma current density J{sub q} to preserve local charge neutrality. The common situation in which J{sub q} = 0 is referred to as ambipolar diffusion. The use of formal kinetic theory in this context leads to results of formidable complexity. We derive simple tractable approximations for the diffusion fluxes in two-temperature multicomponent plasmas by means of a generalization of the hydrodynamical approach used by Maxwell, Stefan, Furry, and Williams. The resulting diffusion fluxes obey generalized Stefan-Maxwell equations that contain driving forces corresponding to ordinary, forced, pressure, and thermal diffusion. The ordinary diffusion fluxes are driven by gradients in pressure fractions rather than mole fractions. Simplifications due to the small electron mass are systematically exploited and lead to a general expression for the ambipolar electric field in the limit of infinite electrical conductivity. We present a self-consistent effective binary diffusion approximation for the diffusion fluxes. This approximation is well suited to numerical implementation and is currently in use in our LAVA computer code for simulating multicomponent thermal plasmas. Applications to date include a successful simulation of demixing effects in an argon-helium plasma jet, for which selected computational results are presented. Generalizations of the diffusion theory to finite electrical conductivity and nonzero magnetic field are currently in progress.

  1. Effects of nonextensivity on the electron-acoustic solitary structures in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafat, A.; Rahman, M. M.; Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    Obliquely propagating electron-acoustic solitary waves (EASWs) in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma (containing nonextensive hot electrons and positrons, inertial cold electrons, and immobile positive ions) are precisely investigated by deriving the Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation. It is found that the basic features (viz. polarity, amplitude, width, phase speed, etc.) of the EASWs are significantly modified by the effects of the external magnetic field, obliqueness of the system, nonextensivity of hot positrons and electrons, ratio of the hot electron temperature to the hot positron temperature, and ratio of the cold electron number density to the hot positron number density. The findings of our results can be employed in understanding the localized electrostatic structures and the characteristics of EASWs in various astrophysical plasmas.

  2. Cold pulse experiments in plasma with an electron internal transport barrier on LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, S.; Ida, K.; Tamura, N.; Shimozuma, T.; Kubo, S.; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Sudo, S.; Ohkubo, K.; LHD Experimental Group

    2004-05-01

    Transient transport experiments are performed in LHD plasma with electron internal transport barrier (e-ITB). Evidence for a reduction of electron heat diffusivity inside the ITB is observed from cold and heat pulse propagations. The observed enhancement of the cold pulse peak is explained by the temperature dependent electron heat diffusivity. The heat diffusivity inside the ITB decreases with an increase in the electron temperature in LHD. A preliminary version of this study was presented in the 29th EPS Conf. on Plasma Phys. and Control. Fusion (Montreux, Switzerland, 17 21 June 2002) [1].

  3. Generation of anomalously energetic suprathermal electrons by an electron beam interacting with a nonuniform plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sydorenko, D.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Chen, L.; Ventzek, P. L. G.

    2015-12-15

    Generation of anomalously energetic suprathermal electrons was observed in simulation of a high-voltage dc discharge with electron emission from the cathode. An electron beam produced by the emission interacts with the nonuniform plasma in the discharge via a two-stream instability. The energy transfer from the beam to the plasma electrons is ensured by the plasma nonuniformity. The electron beam excites plasma waves whose wavelength and phase speed gradually decrease towards anode. The waves with short wavelength near the anode accelerate plasma bulk electrons to suprathermal energies. The sheath near the anode reflects some of the accelerated electrons back into the plasma. These electrons travel through the plasma, reflect near the cathode, and enter the accelerating area again but with a higher energy than before. Such particles are accelerated to energies much higher than after the first acceleration. This mechanism plays a role in explaining earlier experimental observations of energetic suprathermal electrons in similar discharges.

  4. Measurements of Electron Temperature and Gas Temperature in a Pulsed Atmospheric Pressure Air Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leipold, Frank; Hufney Mohamed, Abdel-Aleam; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2001-10-01

    The application of electrical pulses with duration shorter than the time constant for glow-to-arc transition allows us to shift the electron energy distribution in high pressure glow discharges temporally to high energy values [1]. Application of these nonequilibrium plasmas are plasma ramparts, plasma reactors, and excimer light sources. In order to obtain information on the electron energy distribution , or electron energy, respectively, and the gas temperature with the required temporal resolution of 1 ns, we have explored two diagnostic methods. One is based on the evaluation of the bremsstrahlung. This method allows us to determine the electron temperature [2]. The gas temperature is obtained from the rotational spectrum of the second positive system of nitrogen. The results of measurement on a 10 ns pulsed atmospheric pressure air glow will be presented. References [1] Robert H. Stark and Karl H. Schoenbach, J. Appl. Phys. 89, 3568 (2001) [2] Jaeyoung Park, Ivars Henins, Hans W. Herrmann, and Gary S. Selwyn, Physics of Plasmas 7, 3141 (2000). [3] R. Block, O. Toedter, and K. H. Schoenbach, Bull. APS 43, 1478 (1998)

  5. Laser electron acceleration in the prepulse produced plasma corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, N. E.; Povarnitsyn, M. E.; Pugachev, L. P.; Levashov, P. R.

    2015-11-01

    The generation of hot electrons at grazing incidence of a subpicosecond relativistic-intense laser pulse onto the plane solid target is analyzed for the parameters of the petawatt class laser systems. We study the preplasma formation on the surface of solid Al target produced by the laser prepulses with different time structure. For modeling of the preplasma dynamics we use a wide-range two-temperature hydrodynamic model. As a result of simulations, the preplasma expansion under the action of the laser prepulse and the plasma density profiles for different contrast ratios of the nanosecond pedestal are found. These density profiles were used as the initial density distributions in 3-D PIC simulations of electron acceleration by the main P-polarized laser pulse. Results of modeling demonstrate the substantial increase of the characteristic energy and number of accelerated electrons for the grazing incidence of a subpicosecond intense laser pulse in comparison with the laser-target interaction at normal incidence.

  6. The ionization length in plasmas with finite temperature ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelić, N.; Kos, L.; Tskhakaya, D. D.; Duhovnik, J.

    2009-12-01

    The ionization length is an important quantity which up to now has been precisely determined only in plasmas which assume that the ions are born at rest, i.e., in discharges known as "cold ion-source" plasmas. Presented here are the results of our calculations of the ionization lengths in plasmas with an arbitrary ion source temperature. Harrison and Thompson (H&T) [Proc. Phys. Soc. 74, 145 (1959)] found the values of this quantity for the cases of several ion strength potential profiles in the well-known Tonks-Langmuir [Phys. Rev. 34, 876 (1929)] discharge, which is characterized by "cold" ion temperature. This scenario is also known as the "singular" ion-source discharge. The H&T analytic result covers cases of ion sources proportional to exp(βΦ) with Φ the normalized plasma potential and β =0,1,2 values, which correspond to particular physical scenarios. Many years following H&T's work, Bissell and Johnson (B&J) [Phys. Fluids 30, 779 (1987)] developed a model with the so-called "warm" ion-source temperature, i.e., "regular" ion source, under B&J's particular assumption that the ionization strength is proportional to the local electron density. However, it appears that B&J were not interested in determining the ionization length at all. The importance of this quantity to theoretical modeling was recognized by Riemann, who recently answered all the questions of the most advanced up-to-date plasma-sheath boundary theory with cold ions [K.-U. Riemann, Phys. Plasmas 13, 063508 (2006)] but still without the stiff warm ion-source case solution, which is highly resistant to solution via any available analytic method. The present article is an extension of H&T's results obtained for a single point only with ion source temperature Tn=0 to arbitrary finite ion source temperatures. The approach applied in this work is based on the method recently developed by Kos et al. [Phys. Plasmas 16, 093503 (2009)].

  7. Electron Beam Emission Characteristics from Plasma Focus Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Patran, A.; Wong, D.; Hassan, S. M.; Springham, S. V.; Tan, T. L.; Lee, P.; Lee, S.; Rawat, R. S.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we observed the characteristics of the electron beam emission from our plasma focus machine filling neon, argon, helium and hydrogen. Rogowski coil and CCD based magnetic spectrometer were used to obtain temporal and energy distribution of electron emission. And the preliminary results of deposited FeCo thin film using electron beam from our plasma focus device were presented.

  8. High temperature electronic gain device

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, J. Byron; Depp, Steven W.; Hamilton, Douglas J.; Kerwin, William J.

    1979-01-01

    An integrated thermionic device suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments. Cathode and control electrodes are deposited on a first substrate facing an anode on a second substrate. The substrates are sealed to a refractory wall and evacuated to form an integrated triode vacuum tube.

  9. Ion temperature in the ASTRAL helicon plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Robert

    2005-10-01

    Ion temperature is measured in the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) helicon plasma source by means of a diode laser based Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic. ASTRAL produces plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 10^10 to 10^13 cm-3, Te = 2 to 15 eV and Ti = 0.03 to 0.5 eV. A series of 7 large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.3 kGauss. A fractional helix antenna is used to introduce rf power up to 2 kWatt. The 1.5 MHz bandwidth diode laser has a Littrow external cavity with a mode-hop free tuning range up to 15 GHz and with a total power output of about 15 mW. The wavelength is measured by a wavemeter and frequent monitoring prevents wavelength drift. For Ar plasma, the laser tuned at 668.61 nm, is used to pump the 3d^4F7/2 Ar II metastable level to the 4p^4D5/2 level. The fluorescence radiation between the 4p^4D5/2 and the 4s^4P3/2 levels (442.6 nm) is monitored by a PMT. Other diagnostics are presently installed on the plasma device. They included a RF compensated Langmuir probe which is used to measure both electron temperature and plasma density. A spectrometer which features a 0.33 m Criss-Cross Scanning monochromator and a CCD camera is used for spectroscopy studies of the plasma.

  10. Experimental and Theoretical Determination of Temperature in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zmerli, Besma; Ben Nessib, Nebil; Dimitrijevic, Milan S.

    2007-09-28

    When plasma is in thermodynamic equilibrium, all species have the same kinetic temperature. In practice, plasmas are generally not in equilibrium, so different temperatures can be obtained. We investigated here temperature dependence of Stark widths for neutral atom spectral lines in order to find a more precise method for scaling with temperature.

  11. A generalized plasma dispersion function for electron damping in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Phillips, C. K.; Lau, C. H.; Bertelli, N.; Green, D. L.

    2016-10-01

    Radio frequency wave propagation in finite temperature, magnetized plasmas exhibits a wide range of physics phenomena. The plasma response is nonlocal in space and time, and numerous modes are possible with the potential for mode conversions and transformations. In addition, diffraction effects are important due to finite wavelength and finite-size wave launchers. Multidimensional simulations are required to describe these phenomena, but even with this complexity, the fundamental plasma response is assumed to be the uniform plasma response with the assumption that the local plasma current for a Fourier mode can be described by the "Stix" conductivity. However, for plasmas with non-uniform magnetic fields, the wave vector itself is nonlocal. When resolved into components perpendicular (k⊥) and parallel (k||) to the magnetic field, locality of the parallel component can easily be violated when the wavelength is large. The impact of this inconsistency is that estimates of the wave damping can be incorrect (typically low) due to unresolved resonances. For the case of ion cyclotron damping, this issue has already been addressed by including the effect of parallel magnetic field gradients. In this case, a modified plasma response (Z function) allows resonance broadening even when k|| = 0, and this improves the convergence and accuracy of wave simulations. In this paper, we extend this formalism to include electron damping and find improved convergence and accuracy for parameters where electron damping is dominant, such as high harmonic fast wave heating in the NSTX-U tokamak, and helicon wave launch for off-axis current drive in the DIII-D tokamak.

  12. Helical temperature perturbations associated with tearing modes in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R.

    1994-06-01

    An investigation is made into the electron temperature perturbations associated with tearing modes in tokamak plasmas, with a view to determining the mode structure using Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) data. It is found that there is a critical magnetic island width below which the conventional picture where the temperature is flattened inside the separatrix is invalid. This effect comes about because of the stagnation of magnetic field lines in the vicinity of the rational surface and the finite parallel thermal conductivity of the plasma. For islands whose widths lie below the critical value there is no flattening of the electron temperature inside the separatrix. Such islands have quite different ECE signatures to conventional magnetic islands. In fact the two island types could, in principle, be differentiated experimentally. It should also be possible to map out the outer ideal magnetohydrodynamical eigenfunctions using ECE data. Islands whose widths are much less than the critical value are not destabilized by the perturbed bootstrap current, unlike conventional magnetic islands. This effect is found to have a number of very interesting consequences and may, indeed, provide an explanation for some puzzling experimental results regarding error field induced magnetic reconnection. All islands whose widths are much greater than the critical width possess a boundary layer on the separatrix which enables heat to be transported from one side of the island to the other via the X-point region. The structure of this boundary layer is described in some detail. Finally, the critical island width is found to be fairly substantial in conventional tokamak plasmas, provided that the long mean free path nature of parallel heat transport and the anomalous nature of perpendicular heat transport are taken into account in the calculation.

  13. High temperature power electronics for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Baumann, Eric D.; Myers, Ira T.; Overton, Eric

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature electronics program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating materials research, development and testing of high temperature power components, and integration of the developed components and devices into a demonstrable 200 C power system, such as inverter. An overview of the program and a description of the in-house high temperature facilities along with experimental data obtained on high temperature materials are presented.

  14. Electron plasma dynamics during autoresonant excitation of the diocotron mode

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, C. J. Danielson, J. R. Hurst, N. C. Surko, C. M.

    2015-02-15

    Chirped-frequency autoresonant excitation of the diocotron mode is used to move electron plasmas confined in a Penning-Malmberg trap across the magnetic field for advanced plasma and antimatter applications. Plasmas of 10{sup 8} electrons, with radii small compared to that of the confining electrodes, can be moved from the magnetic axis to ≥90% of the electrode radius with near unit efficiency and reliable angular positioning. Translations of ≥70% of the wall radius are possible for a wider range of plasma parameters. Details of this process, including phase and displacement oscillations in the plasma response and plasma expansion, are discussed, as well as possible extensions of the technique.

  15. The effect of quantum correction on plasma electron heating in ultraviolet laser interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zare, S.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R. Anvari, A.; Yazdani, E.; Hora, H.

    2015-04-14

    The interaction of the sub-picosecond UV laser in sub-relativistic intensities with deuterium is investigated. At high plasma temperatures, based on the quantum correction in the collision frequency, the electron heating and the ion block generation in plasma are studied. It is found that due to the quantum correction, the electron heating increases considerably and the electron temperature uniformly reaches up to the maximum value of 4.91 × 10{sup 7 }K. Considering the quantum correction, the electron temperature at the laser initial coupling stage is improved more than 66.55% of the amount achieved in the classical model. As a consequence, by the modified collision frequency, the ion block is accelerated quicker with higher maximum velocity in comparison with the one by the classical collision frequency. This study proves the necessity of considering a quantum mechanical correction in the collision frequency at high plasma temperatures.

  16. Double electrostatic probe for measuring density, temperature, and velocity of a flowing plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    A method for obtaining plasma electron temperature and density, as well as the Mach number and flow velocity from the current-voltage characteristic of a flat-faced double probe, is presented. Calculated momentum fluxes of a flowing argon plasma obtained with this probe are compared with experimentally determined momentum fluxes. Reasonable agreement is obtained.

  17. ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Tokamak Core Plasma Diagnostics Based on the Synergy of Stimulated Raman and Brillouin Scatterings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2012-10-01

    A novel plasma diagnostic method is proposed based on the synergy of stimulated Raman and Brillouin scatterings. A nonlinear plasma mode is excited in a 4-wave coupling,footnotetextV. Alexander STEFAN, Nonlinear Electromagnetic Radiation Plasma Interactions, (S-U-Press, 2008). leading to the appearance of suprathermal electrons and accelerated ions at the plasma edgefootnotetextV. Alexander Stefan, Abstract: D1.00018 : ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Stimulated Raman Scattering off Gould-Trivelpiece Modes and Generation of Suprathermal Electrons and Energetic Ions; Bulletin of the American Physical Society APS April Meeting 2011 Volume 56, Number 4. with the parameters directly dependent on the plasma parameters in the core of tokamak. Accordingly, plasma diagnostic in the core region, (ion temperature), can be performed by the diagnostics of suprathermal electrons and accelerated ions at the edge plasma.

  18. Ion Flux Measurements in Electron Beam Produced Plasmas in Atomic and Molecular Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, S. G.; Leonhardt, D.; Blackwell, D. D.; Murphy, D. P.; Fernsler, R. F.; Meger, R. A.

    2001-10-01

    In this presentation, mass- and time-resolved measurements of ion fluxes sampled from pulsed, electron beam-generated plasmas will be discussed. Previous works have shown that energetic electron beams are efficient at producing high-density plasmas (10^10-10^12 cm-3) with low electron temperatures (Te < 1.0 eV) over the volume of the beam. Outside the beam, the plasma density and electron temperature vary due, in part, to ion-neutral and electron-ion interactions. In molecular gases, electron-ion recombination plays a significant role while in atomic gases, ion-neutral interactions are important. These interactions also determine the temporal variations in the electron temperature and plasma density when the electron beam is pulsed. Temporally resolved ion flux and energy distributions at a grounded electrode surface located adjacent to pulsed plasmas in pure Ar, N_2, O_2, and their mixtures are discussed. Measurements are presented as a function of operating pressure, mixture ratio, and electron beam-electrode separation. The differences in the results for atomic and molecular gases will also be discussed and related to their respective gas-phase kinetics.

  19. Nonlinear ion-acoustic solitons in a magnetized quantum plasma with arbitrary degeneracy of electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Fernando; Mahmood, Shahzad

    2016-09-01

    Nonlinear ion-acoustic waves are analyzed in a nonrelativistic magnetized quantum plasma with arbitrary degeneracy of electrons. Quantum statistics is taken into account by means of the equation of state for ideal fermions at arbitrary temperature. Quantum diffraction is described by a modified Bohm potential consistent with finite-temperature quantum kinetic theory in the long-wavelength limit. The dispersion relation of the obliquely propagating electrostatic waves in magnetized quantum plasma with arbitrary degeneracy of electrons is obtained. Using the reductive perturbation method, the corresponding Zakharov-Kuznetsov equation is derived, describing obliquely propagating two-dimensional ion-acoustic solitons in a magnetized quantum plasma with degenerate electrons having an arbitrary electron temperature. It is found that in the dilute plasma case only electrostatic potential hump structures are possible, while in dense quantum plasma, in principle, both hump and dip soliton structures are obtainable, depending on the electron plasma density and its temperature. The results are validated by comparison with the quantum hydrodynamic model including electron inertia and magnetization effects. Suitable physical parameters for observations are identified.

  20. Quasi-periodic behavior of ion acoustic solitary waves in electron-ion quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Biswajit; Poria, Swarup; Narayan Ghosh, Uday; Roychoudhury, Rajkumar

    2012-05-01

    The ion acoustic solitary waves are investigated in an unmagnetized electron-ion quantum plasmas. The one dimensional quantum hydrodynamic model is used to study small as well as arbitrary amplitude ion acoustic waves in quantum plasmas. It is shown that ion temperature plays a critical role in the dynamics of quantum electron ion plasma, especially for arbitrary amplitude nonlinear waves. In the small amplitude region Korteweg-de Vries equation describes the solitonic nature of the waves. However, for arbitrary amplitude waves, in the fully nonlinear regime, the system exhibits possible existence of quasi-periodic behavior for small values of ion temperature.

  1. Atlas and wavenumber tables for the visible part of the electronic-vibro-rotational D2 spectrum emitted by low-temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrov, Boris P.; Umrikhin, Ivan S.

    2016-10-01

    The visible part (≈ 419-696 nm) of the multiline electronic-vibro-rotational (rovibronic) emission spectrum of the D2 molecule was recorded with a moderate resolution mainly determined by Doppler broadening of spectral lines (the observed line widths are equal to 0.0122(4) nm throughout the wavelength range under study). After the numerical deconvolution of the recorded intensity distributions and proper spectrometer calibrations, the new set of wavenumber values for rovibronic spectral lines has been obtained. It is shown that these new data are significantly more precise than experimental wavenumber values currently published for the visible part of the D2 spectrum, except for the fragmentary results of our high-resolution experiments (Phys. Rev. A, 2012). The assignments of the triplet rovibronic lines are verified by means of the optimizational technique based on two general principles: Rydberg-Ritz and maximum likelihood (J. Phys. B, 2008). Final results (reported in the on-line supplement material) include an atlas and accompanying tables. The atlas is divided into 158 sections (each section covers about 1.5 nm) containing images of the focal plane of the spectrometer and intensity distributions in linear and logarithmic scales. The tables contain wavenumber and relative intensity values for 11 941 spectral lines together with the available and new line assignments for the D2 and HD molecules.

  2. Density and temperature scaling of disorder-induced heating in ultracold plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeson, S. D.; Denning, A.; Lyon, M.; Robicheaux, F.

    2011-02-15

    We report measurements and simulations of disorder-induced heating in ultracold neutral plasmas. Fluorescence from plasma ions is excited using a detuned probe laser beam while the plasma relaxes from its initially disordered nonequilibrium state. This method probes the wings of the ion velocity distribution. The simulations yield information on time-evolving plasma parameters that are difficult to measure directly and make it possible to connect the fluorescence signal to the rms velocity distribution. The disorder-induced heating signal can be used to estimate the electron and ion temperatures {approx}100 ns after the plasma is created. This is particularly interesting for plasmas in which the electron and ion temperatures are not known.

  3. Electron Cyclotron Current Drive at High Electron Temperature on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, C. C.; Austin, M. E.; Harvey, R. W.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T. C.; Makowski, M. A.; Prater, R.

    2007-09-01

    Experiments on DIII-D have measured the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency for co- and counter-injection in low density plasmas with radiation temperatures from electron cyclotron emission (ECE) above 20 keV. The radiation temperature is generally higher than the Thomson scattering temperature, indicating that there is a significant population of non-thermal electrons. The experimental ECCD profile measured with motional Stark effect (MSE) polarimetry is found to agree with quasi-linear theory except for the highest power density cases (QEC/ne2≫1). Radial transport of the energetic electrons with diffusion coefficients of ˜0.4 m2/s is needed to model the broadened ECCD profile at high power density.

  4. Electron-ion energy partition when a charged particle slows in a plasma: theory.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lowell S; Preston, Dean L; Singleton, Robert L

    2012-07-01

    The preceding paper [Brown, Preston, and Singleton Jr., Phys. Rev. E 86, 016406 (2012)] presented precise results for the partition of the initial energy E(0) of a fast particle into the ions and electrons--E(I)/E(0) and E(e)/E(0)--when the fast particle slows in a plasma whose ion and electron temperatures may differ. As emphasized in that paper, this is an important problem because nuclear fusion reactions, such as those that occur in an inertial confinement fusion capsule, involve ion temperatures that run away from the electron temperatures. As also noted in the preceding paper, a precise evaluation entails the use of a well-defined Fokker-Planck equation for the phase-space evolution of initially fast projectile particles. When the plasma has differing ion and electron temperatures, the projectiles must slow into a "schizophrenic" final ensemble of particles that has neither the electron nor the ion temperature. This is not a simple Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution since the electrons are not in thermal equilibrium with the ions. Thus, detailed calculations are required for the solution of the problem. These we provide here for a weakly to moderately coupled plasma. The Fokker-Planck equation holds to first subleading order in the dimensionless plasma coupling constant, which translates to computing to order n ln n (leading) and n (subleading) in the plasma density n. The energy partitions for a background plasma in thermal equilibrium have been previously computed, but the order n terms have not been calculated, only estimated. The "schizophrenic" final ensemble of slowed particles gives a new mechanism to bring the electron and ion temperatures together. The rate at which this new mechanism brings the electrons and ions in the plasma into thermal equilibrium will be computed. PMID:23005550

  5. The temperature and pressure in the plasma parallel plate accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koníček, P.; Maloch, J.

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents the results of plasma temperature and pressure calculations in the parallel plate accelerator during the accelerating process. The plasma pressure is calculated by means in Dalton's law.

  6. Inactivation of Microcystis aeruginosa using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Sichuan; Chen, Jierong; Wang, Gang; Li, Xiaoyong; Ma, Yun

    2013-05-13

    The efficiency of Microcystis aeruginosa plasma inactivation was investigated using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma. The inactivation efficiency was characterized in terms of optical density. The influence of electrical and physicochemical parameters on M. aeruginosa inactivation was studied to determine the optimal experimental conditions. The influence of active species was studied. The proliferation of the M. aeruginosa cells was significantly decreased under plasma exposure. The morphologic changes in M. aeruginosa were characterized under scanning electron microscopy. These results suggest that the low-temperature plasma technology is a promising method for water pollution control.

  7. Inactivation of Microcystis aeruginosa using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Sichuan; Chen, Jierong; Wang, Gang; Li, Xiaoyong; Ma, Yun

    2013-05-01

    The efficiency of Microcystis aeruginosa plasma inactivation was investigated using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma. The inactivation efficiency was characterized in terms of optical density. The influence of electrical and physicochemical parameters on M. aeruginosa inactivation was studied to determine the optimal experimental conditions. The influence of active species was studied. The proliferation of the M. aeruginosa cells was significantly decreased under plasma exposure. The morphologic changes in M. aeruginosa were characterized under scanning electron microscopy. These results suggest that the low-temperature plasma technology is a promising method for water pollution control.

  8. Electron density measurement of inductively coupled plasmas by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Ayumi; Kurose, Tomoko; Kitano, Katsuhisa; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Reymond, Vivien; Kitahara, Hideaki; Takano, Keisuke; Hangyo, Masanori; Tani, Masahiko

    2011-10-01

    The electron densities of argon inductively coupled plasmas were measured by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). At a low pressure, the electron densities were also measured with a Langmuir-type double probe and the validity of THz-TDS electron-density measurement in a plasma has been corroborated. As the input radio-frequency (RF) power increases, the plasma density and gas temperature increase, which makes the probe measurement less reliable or even impossible, due to the large heat load to the probe surface. On the contrary, the THz-TDS measurement is unaffected by the gas temperature and becomes more reliable due to the higher electron density at higher input power for plasma generation.

  9. Ion acoustic solitons in a plasma with finite temperature drifting ions: Limit on ion drift velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, H.K.; Singh, S.; Dahiya, R.P. )

    1994-05-01

    Propagation of ion acoustic solitons in a plasma consisting of finite temperature drifting ions and nondrifting electrons has been studied. It is shown that in addition to the electron inertia and weak relativistic effects, the ion temperature also modifies the soliton behavior. By including the finite ion temperature, limit for the ion drift velocity [ital u][sub 0] for which the ion acoustic solitons are possible, is obtained. The solitons can exist for [ital v][sub [ital Te

  10. Performance of large electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Sanyasi, A. K.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes an in-house designed large Electron Energy Filter (EEF) utilized in the Large Volume Plasma Device (LVPD) [S. K. Mattoo, V. P. Anita, L. M. Awasthi, and G. Ravi, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 3864 (2001)] to secure objectives of (a) removing the presence of remnant primary ionizing energetic electrons and the non-thermal electrons, (b) introducing a radial gradient in plasma electron temperature without greatly affecting the radial profile of plasma density, and (c) providing a control on the scale length of gradient in electron temperature. A set of 19 independent coils of EEF make a variable aspect ratio, rectangular solenoid producing a magnetic field (Bx) of 100 G along its axis and transverse to the ambient axial field (Bz ˜ 6.2 G) of LVPD, when all its coils are used. Outside the EEF, magnetic field reduces rapidly to 1 G at a distance of 20 cm from the center of the solenoid on either side of target and source plasma. The EEF divides LVPD plasma into three distinct regions of source, EEF and target plasma. We report that the target plasma (ne ˜ 2 × 1011 cm-3 and Te ˜ 2 eV) has no detectable energetic electrons and the radial gradients in its electron temperature can be established with scale length between 50 and 600 cm by controlling EEF magnetic field. Our observations reveal that the role of the EEF magnetic field is manifested by the energy dependence of transverse electron transport and enhanced transport caused by the plasma turbulence in the EEF plasma.

  11. Low Temperature Plasma Physics: Fundamental Aspects and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippler, Rainer; Pfau, Sigismund; Schmidt, Martin; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2001-06-01

    Low-temperature plasma physics is a very active area of research located on the boundaries between physics, chemistry and materials science. Recent technological developments, e.g. in plasma etching or plasma deposition, have led to a revived interest in plasma physics and technology. This volume describes in detail fundamentals and applications of low-temperature plasma physics including newest achievements. The authors of this volume are top scientists from the USA and Europe who present most recent successes in our understanding of how plasmas behave and put a strong focus on the links between theory and experiment or technological process.

  12. Integration issues of a plasma contactor power electronics unit

    SciTech Connect

    Pinero, L.R.; York, K.W.; Bowers, G.E.

    1995-12-31

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor is baselined on International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) for spacecraft charge control. The plasma contactor system consists of a hollow cathode assembly (HCA), a power electronics unit (PEU), and an expellant management unit (EMU). The plasma contactor has recently been required to operate in a cyclic mode to conserve xenon expellant and extend system life. Originally, a DC cathode heater converter was baselined for a continuous operation mode because only a few ignitions of the hollow cathode were expected. However, for cyclic operation, a DC heater supply can potentially result in hollow cathode heater component failure due to the DC electrostatic field. This can prevent the heater from attaining the proper cathode tip temperature for reliable ignition of the hollow cathode. To mitigate this problem, an AC cathode heater supply was therefore designed, fabricated, and installed into a modified PEU. The PEU was tested using resistive loads and then integrated with an engineering model hollow cathode to demonstrate stable steady-state operation. Integration issues such as the effect of line and load impedance on the output of the AC cathode heater supply and the characterization of the temperature profile of the heater under AC excitation were investigated.

  13. Integration issues of a plasma contactor Power Electronics Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, Luis R.; York, Kenneth W.; Bowers, Glen E.

    1995-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor is baselined on International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) for spacecraft charge control. The plasma contactor system consists of a hollow cathode assembly (HCA), a power electronics unit (PEU), and an expellant management unit (EMU). The plasma contactor has recently been required to operate in a cyclic mode to conserve xenon expellant and extend system life. Originally, a DC cathode heater converter was baselined for a continuous operation mode because only a few ignitions of the hollow cathode were expected. However, for cyclic operation, a DC heater supply can potentially result in hollow cathode heater component failure due to the DC electrostatic field. This can prevent the heater from attaining the proper cathode tip temperature for reliable ignition of the hollow cathode. To mitigate this problem, an AC cathode heater supply was therefore designed, fabricated, and installed into a modified PEU. The PEU was tested using resistive loads and then integrated with an engineering model hollow cathode to demonstrate stable steady-state operation. Integration issues such as the effect of line and load impedance on the output of the AC cathode heater supply and the characterization of the temperature profile of the heater under AC excitation were investigated.

  14. [Two-temperature diagnostic studies by emission spectra for nonequilibrium Ti-H plasma].

    PubMed

    Deng, Chun-feng; Lu, Biao; Wu, Chun-lei; Wang, Yi-fu; Wen, Zhong-wei

    2014-12-01

    Using the T-H solid solution made by titanium absorbed hydrogen as the cathode, the Ti-H plasma produced by the pulsed vacuum are ion source was nonequilibrium: it contained both the component of titanium and hydrogen; there existed gradient in the radiaL, the horizontal and the time. As a result, it could not be described by a single temperature. The present paper assumed that the subsystem consisting of electrons and the subsystem consisting of other heavy particles reached equilibrium respectively, meaning that the Ti-H plasma was described by the two temperatures as electron temperature and heavy ion temperature, it was non-equilibrium two-temperature plasma Using Culdberg-Waage dissociation equation to describe the molecular dissociation process in the system, using Saha ionization equation to describe the atomic ionization process, combining plasma's charge quasi-neutral condition and introducing atomic emission spectroscopy as a plasma diagnostic method which would not interfere the plasma at the same time; the temperature and the particle number density of the Ti-H plasma were diagnosed. Using MATLAB as a tool, both the titanium atoms and monovalent titanium ions' ionization were considered, and the calculated results showed that with the electtron density determined by the Stark broadening of spectral lines in advance, except the heavy particle temperature and the hydrogen number density, the Ti-H plasma's parameters could be diagnosed fairly accurately; the accuracy of the electron density values had a great effect on the calculation results; if the heavy particle temperature could be determined in advance, the temperature and the particle number density of the Ti-H plasma could be accurately analyzed quantitatively. PMID:25881442

  15. Time-resolved electron density and electron temperature measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roettgen, A.; Shkurenkov, I.; Simeni Simeni, M.; Petrishchev, V.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2016-10-01

    Thomson scattering is used to study temporal evolution of electron density and electron temperature in nanosecond pulse discharges in helium sustained in two different configurations, (i) diffuse filament discharge between two spherical electrodes, and (ii) surface discharge over plane quartz surface. In the diffuse filament discharge, the experimental results are compared with the predictions of a 2D plasma fluid model. Electron densities are put on an absolute scale using pure rotational Raman spectra in nitrogen, taken without the plasma, for calibration. In the diffuse filament discharge, electron density and electron temperature increase rapidly after breakdown, peaking at n e  ≈  3.5 · 1015 cm-3 and T e  ≈  4.0 eV. After the primary discharge pulse, both electron density and electron temperature decrease (to n e ~ 1014 cm-3 over ~1 µs and to T e ~ 0.5 eV over ~200 ns), with a brief transient rise produced by the secondary discharge pulse. At the present conditions, the dominant recombination mechanism is dissociative recombination of electrons with molecular ions, \\text{He}2+ . In the afterglow, the electron temperature does not relax to gas temperature, due to superelastic collisions. Electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) inferred from the Thomson scattering spectra are nearly Maxwellian, which is expected at high ionization fractions, when the shape of EEDF is controlled primarily by electron-electron collisions. The kinetic model predictions agree well with the temporal trends detected in the experiment, although peak electron temperature and electron density are overpredicted. Heavy species temperature predicted during the discharge and the early afterglow remains low and does not exceed T  =  400 K, due to relatively slow quenching of metastable He* atoms in two-body and three-body processes. In the surface discharge, peak electron density and electron temperature are n e  ≈  3 · 1014 cm3 and T e

  16. Emittance Measurements of Trapped Electrons from a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, N.; Berry, M.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2007-06-28

    Recent electron beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator experiments carried out at SLAC showed trapping of plasma electrons. These trapped electrons appeared on an energy spectrometer with smaller transverse size than the beam driving the wake. A connection is made between transverse size and emittance; due to the spectrometer's resolution, this connection allows for placing an upper limit on the trapped electron emittance. The upper limit for the lowest normalized emittance measured in the experiment is 1 mm {center_dot} mrad.

  17. Electron-acoustic solitary waves in a nonextensive plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Djebarni, Lyes

    2010-12-15

    The problem of arbitrary amplitude electron-acoustic solitary waves (EASWs) in a plasma having cold fluid electrons, hot nonextensive electrons, and stationary ions is addressed. It is found that the 'Maxwellianization' process of the hot nonextensive component does not favor the propagation of the EASWs. In contrast to superthermality, nonextensivity makes the electron-acoustic solitary structure less spiky. Our theoretical analysis brings a possibility to develop more refined theories of nonlinear solitary structures in astrophysical plasmas.

  18. Deep Trek High Temperature Electronics Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Ohme

    2007-07-31

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative research agreement between Honeywell and U.S. Department of Energy to develop high-temperature electronics. Objects of this development included Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) wafer process development for high temperature, supporting design tools and libraries, and high temperature integrated circuit component development including FPGA, EEPROM, high-resolution A-to-D converter, and a precision amplifier.

  19. Cavity Enhanced Thomson Scattering for Low Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalin, Azer; Friss, Adam; Lee, Brian; Franka, Isaiah

    2013-09-01

    This contribution describes the design, simulation, and initial experimental development of a novel laser Thomson scattering (LTS) system for measurement of weakly-ionized low temperature plasmas. The LTS approach uses a high power intra-cavity beam of power ~10-100 kW to provide increased scattered photon counts and sensitivity as compared to conventional LTS experiments that use light sources with orders of magnitude lower average power. The high power intra-cavity beam is generated by locking a narrow linewidth source laser to a high-finesse optical cavity via Pound-Drever-Hall locking. The plasma (to be studied) is housed with the high-finesse optical cavity. The high-power source is combined with a detection system comprised of a high-suppression triple monochromator and a low-noise photomultiplier tube used in photon counting mode. We present simulations of signal strengths and scattering spectra including elastic scatter background, detector dark counts, and random (counting) noise contributions. Expected experimental performance is assessed from fits to the simulated data. The number density and electron temperature of a 1010 cm-3 plasma should be accurately measurable with standard deviation of <5% in a measurement time of 5 minutes per wavelength channel. We also present experimental development including characterization of laser locking, and initial Rayleigh and Raman signals which will be used to calibrate the Thomson system.

  20. Vortices, Reconnection and Turbulence in High Electron-Beta Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.

    2004-08-31

    Plasmas in which the kinetic energy exceeds the magnetic energy by a significant factor are common in space and in the laboratory. Such plasmas can convect magnetic fields and create null points in whose vicinity first the ions become unmagnetized, then the electrons. This project focuses on the detailed study of the transition regime of these plasmas.

  1. The 3 DLE instrument on ATS-5. [plasma electron counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deforest, S. E.

    1973-01-01

    The performance and operation of the DLE plasma electron counter on board the ATS 5 are described. Two methods of data presentation, microfilm line plots and spectrograms, are discussed along with plasma dynamics, plasma flow velocity, electrostatic charging, and wave-particle interactions.

  2. Vortex stabilized electron beam compressed fusion grade plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2014-03-19

    Most inertial confinement fusion schemes are comprised of highly compressed dense plasmas. Those schemes involve short, extremely high power, short pulses of beams (lasers, particles) applied to lower density plasmas or solid pellets. An alternative approach could be to shoot an intense electron beam through very dense, atmospheric pressure, vortex stabilized plasma.

  3. Effects of nonthermal electrons on plasma expansion into vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Bennaceur-Doumaz, D. Bara, D.; Benkhelifa, E.; Djebli, M.

    2015-01-28

    The expansion of semi-infinite plasma into vacuum is analyzed with a hydrodynamic model for cold ions assuming electrons modelled by a kappa-type distribution. Similarly to Mora study of a plasma expansion into vacuum [P. Mora, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 185002 (2003)], we formulated empirical expressions for the electric field strength, velocity, and position of the ion front in one-dimensional nonrelativistic, collisionless isothermally expanding plasma. Analytic expressions for the maximum ion energy and the spectrum of the accelerated ions in the plasma were derived and discussed to highlight the electron nonthermal effects on enhancing the ion acceleration in plasma expansion into vacuum.

  4. Generating electron cyclotron resonance plasma using distributed scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C. C.; Chang, T. H.; Chen, N. C.; Chao, H. W.; Chen, C. C.; Chou, S. F.

    2012-08-06

    This study employs a distributed microwave input system and permanent magnets to generate large-area electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma. ECR plasmas were generated with nitrogen gas, and the plasma density was measured by Langmuir probe. A uniform ECR plasma with the electron density fluctuation of {+-}9.8% over 500 mm Multiplication-Sign 500 mm was reported. The proposed idea of generating uniform ECR plasma can be scaled to a much larger area by using n Multiplication-Sign n microwave input array system together with well-designed permanent magnets.

  5. Electron inertia effect on small amplitude solitons in a weakly relativistic two-fluid plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Khushvant; Kumar, Vinod; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2005-05-15

    One-dimensional evolution of solitons in a two-fluid plasma having weakly relativistic streaming ions and electrons is studied through usual Korteweg-de Vries equation under the effect of electron inertia. Although fast and slow ion acoustic modes are possible in such a plasma, only the fast mode corresponds to the soliton propagation for a particular range of velocity difference of ions and electrons. This range depends upon the ratios of mass and temperature of the ions and electrons. The effect of electron inertia on the propagation characteristics of the soliton is studied for typical values of the speed and temperature of the ions and electrons and it is found that this effect is dominant over the relativistic effect and the effect of ion temperature.

  6. Thermodiffusion of high-density electron-hole plasmas in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, G.; Maier, G.; Forchel, A.; Laurich, B.; Sanwald, H.; Schmid, W.

    1981-12-21

    The spatial distributions of temperature and density in electron-hole plasmas in surface-excited semiconductors are investigated with use of linear irreversible thermodynamics and a microscopic plasma theory. Above a certain threshold the density distribution is dominated by a characteristic density, which increases with temperature. Experimental results for Ge, unstressed Si, and Si under high uniaxial stress are in agreement with the theory.

  7. Electron Energization During m=0 Magnetic Bursts in MST plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, W. C.; den Hartog, D. J.; Morton, L. A.; MST Team

    2015-11-01

    MST reversed-field pinch plasmas develop magnetic modes with both a core-resonant poloidal mode m=1 structure and edge-resonant m=0 structure on the reversal surface. The impact of the m=0 modes on electron energization has been observed with Thomson scattering under plasma conditions with suppressed m=1 modes. Under such conditions, the m=0 modes undergo brief (~100 μs) bursts of localized magnetic activity. These bursts show a localized 4% heating of electrons above a 600-900 eV background temperature, associated with a reduction of magnetic energy. An inward propagating cold pulse follows after the heating as a result of reduced confinement. Ensembles of hundreds of bursts are required to measure small relative heating, however single-shot results from MST's high repetition Thomson scattering diagnostic support the ensemble results. Analysis of Thomson scattering data also provides constraints on non-Maxwellian distributions and upcoming upgrades will improve the ability to resolve electron currents associated with the magnetic bursts. This work is supported by the US DOE and NSF.

  8. Microwave plasma burner and temperature measurements in its flames

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Cho, Soon Cheon; Bang, Chan Uk; Shin, Dong Hun; Kim, Jong Hun; Uhm, Han Sup; Yi, Won Ju

    2006-05-15

    An apparatus for generating flames and more particularly the microwave plasma burner for generating high-temperature large-volume plasma flame was presented. The plasma burner is operated by injecting liquid hydrocarbon fuels into a microwave plasma torch in air discharge and by mixing the resultant gaseous hydrogen and carbon compounds with air or oxygen gas. The microwave plasma torch can instantaneously vaporize and decompose the hydrogen and carbon containing fuels. It was observed that the flame volume of the burner was more than 50 times that of the torch plasma. While the temperature of the torch plasma flame was only 550 K at a measurement point, that of the plasma-burner flame with the addition of 0.025 lpm (liters per minute) kerosene and 20 lpm oxygen drastically increased to about 1850 K. A preliminary experiment was carried out, measuring the temperature profiles of flames along the radial and axial directions.

  9. Effect of re-heating on the hot electron temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrook, K.; Rosen, M.

    1980-06-17

    Resonant absorption is the direct conversion of the transverse laser light to longitudinal electron plasma waves (epw) at the critical density (10/sup 21/ (1.06 ..mu..m/lambda/sub 0/)/sup 2/ cm/sup -3/). The oscillating longitudinal electric field of the epw heats the electrons by accelerating them down the density gradient to a temperature of approximately 21T/sub e//sup 0/ /sup 25/ ((I(W/cm/sup 2/)/10/sup 16/)(lambda/sub 0//1.06 ..mu..m)/sup 2/)/sup 0/ /sup 4/. This section extends the previous work by studying the effects of magnetic fields and collisions (albedo) which return the heated electrons for further heating. A magnetic field increases their temperature and collisions do not.

  10. UV laser ionization and electron beam diagnostics for plasma lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Govil, R.; Volfbeyn, P.; Leemans, W.

    1995-04-01

    A comprehensive study of focusing of relativistic electron beams with overdense and underdense plasma lenses requires careful control of plasma density and scale lengths. Plasma lens experiments are planned at the Beam Test Facility of the LBL Center for Beam Physics, using the 50 MeV electron beam delivered by the linac injector from the Advanced Light Source. Here we present results from an interferometric study of plasmas produced in tri-propylamine vapor with a frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm. To study temporal dynamics of plasma lenses we have developed an electron beam diagnostic using optical transition radiation to time resolve beam size and divergence. Electron beam ionization of the plasma has also been investigated.

  11. Modulational instability of a Langmuir wave in plasmas with energetic tails of superthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, I. V.

    2013-01-15

    The impact of superthermal electrons on dispersion properties of isotropic plasmas and on the modulational instability of a monochromatic Langmuir wave is studied for the case when the power-law tail of the electron distribution function extends to relativistic velocities and contains most of the plasma kinetic energy. Such an energetic tail of electrons is shown to increase the thermal correction to the Langmuir wave frequency, which is equivalent to the increase of the effective electron temperature in the fluid approach, and has almost no impact on the dispersion of ion-acoustic waves, in which the role of temperature is played by the thermal spread of low-energy core electrons. It is also found that the spectrum of modulational instability in the non-maxwellian plasma narrows significantly, as compared to the equilibrium case, without change of the maximum growth rate and the corresponding wavenumber.

  12. Experimental investigation of ultraviolet laser induced plasma density and temperature evolution in air

    SciTech Connect

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Scharer, John

    2008-07-01

    We present measurements and analysis of laser induced plasma neutral densities and temperatures in dry air by focusing 200 mJ, 10 MW high power, 193 nm ultraviolet ArF (argon fluoride) laser radiation to a 30 {mu}m radius spot size. We examine these properties that result from multiphoton and collisional cascade processes for pressures ranging from 40 Torr to 5 atm. A laser shadowgraphy diagnostic technique is used to obtain the plasma electron temperature just after the shock front and this is compared with optical emission spectroscopic measurements of nitrogen rotational and vibrational temperatures. Two-color laser interferometry is employed to measure time resolved spatial electron and neutral density decay in initial local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE conditions. The radiating species and thermodynamic characteristics of the plasma are analyzed by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) supported by SPECAIR, a special OES program for air constituent plasmas. Core plasma rotational and vibrational temperatures are obtained from the emission spectra from the N{sub 2}C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the SPECAIR simulation results and the results are compared with the electron temperature just behind the shock wave. The plasma density decay measurements are compared with a simplified electron density decay model that illustrates the dominant three-and two-body recombination terms with good correlation.

  13. Experimental investigation of ultraviolet laser induced plasma density and temperature evolution in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Scharer, John

    2008-07-01

    We present measurements and analysis of laser induced plasma neutral densities and temperatures in dry air by focusing 200 mJ, 10 MW high power, 193 nm ultraviolet ArF (argon fluoride) laser radiation to a 30 μm radius spot size. We examine these properties that result from multiphoton and collisional cascade processes for pressures ranging from 40 Torr to 5 atm. A laser shadowgraphy diagnostic technique is used to obtain the plasma electron temperature just after the shock front and this is compared with optical emission spectroscopic measurements of nitrogen rotational and vibrational temperatures. Two-color laser interferometry is employed to measure time resolved spatial electron and neutral density decay in initial local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE conditions. The radiating species and thermodynamic characteristics of the plasma are analyzed by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) supported by SPECAIR, a special OES program for air constituent plasmas. Core plasma rotational and vibrational temperatures are obtained from the emission spectra from the N2C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the SPECAIR simulation results and the results are compared with the electron temperature just behind the shock wave. The plasma density decay measurements are compared with a simplified electron density decay model that illustrates the dominant three-and two-body recombination terms with good correlation.

  14. Differential turbulent heating of different ions in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Elizarov, L.I.; Ivanov, A.A.; Serebrennikov, K.S.; Vostrikova, E.A.

    2006-03-15

    The article considers the collisionless ion sound turbulent heating of different ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The ion sound arises due to parametric instability of pumping wave propagating along the magnetic field with the frequency close to that of electron cyclotron. Within the framework of turbulent heating model the different ions temperatures are calculated in gas-mixing ECRIS plasma.

  15. Effects of electron temperature and electron flow on O-X conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Guo-Zhang; Gao, Zhe; Zhao, Ai-Hui

    2013-10-15

    Effects of electron temperature and electron flow on Ordinary-Extraordinary (O-X) conversion in the range of electron cyclotron frequency are investigated. The modified optimal parallel refraction index, N{sub zc}, and the conversion coefficient are obtained analytically from the kinetic dispersion relation. The presence of finite electron temperature shifts the O-X conversion layer towards a region of lower density and increases the value of N{sub zc}; while the effect of electron flow depends on its direction with respect to the parallel wave vector. When the electron flow is along the parallel wave vector, N{sub zc} will be increased and the effects of finite electron temperature and finite electron flow accumulate. As a result, a more oblique incidence angle is required for efficient O-X conversion. For typical Tokamak plasmas, the efficiency of O-X conversion will decrease without the consideration of the two effects. When the electron flow is in the direction opposite to the parallel wave vector, the two effects compete, even cancel each other.

  16. Effects of electron temperature and electron flow on O-X conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guo-Zhang; Gao, Zhe; Zhao, Ai-Hui

    2013-10-01

    Effects of electron temperature and electron flow on Ordinary-Extraordinary (O-X) conversion in the range of electron cyclotron frequency are investigated. The modified optimal parallel refraction index, Nzc, and the conversion coefficient are obtained analytically from the kinetic dispersion relation. The presence of finite electron temperature shifts the O-X conversion layer towards a region of lower density and increases the value of Nzc; while the effect of electron flow depends on its direction with respect to the parallel wave vector. When the electron flow is along the parallel wave vector, Nzc will be increased and the effects of finite electron temperature and finite electron flow accumulate. As a result, a more oblique incidence angle is required for efficient O-X conversion. For typical Tokamak plasmas, the efficiency of O-X conversion will decrease without the consideration of the two effects. When the electron flow is in the direction opposite to the parallel wave vector, the two effects compete, even cancel each other.

  17. Electron density estimations derived from spacecraft potential measurements on Cluster in tenuous plasma regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, A.; Lybekk, B.; André, M.; Eriksson, A.; Masson, A.; Mozer, F. S.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; DéCréAu, P. M. E.; Dandouras, I.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Fazakerley, A.; Taylor, M.; Paschmann, G.; Svenes, K. R.; Torkar, K.; Whipple, E.

    2008-07-01

    Spacecraft potential measurements by the EFW electric field experiment on the Cluster satellites can be used to obtain plasma density estimates in regions barely accessible to other type of plasma experiments. Direct calibrations of the plasma density as a function of the measured potential difference between the spacecraft and the probes can be carried out in the solar wind, the magnetosheath, and the plasmashere by the use of CIS ion density and WHISPER electron density measurements. The spacecraft photoelectron characteristic (photoelectrons escaping to the plasma in current balance with collected ambient electrons) can be calculated from knowledge of the electron current to the spacecraft based on plasma density and electron temperature data from the above mentioned experiments and can be extended to more positive spacecraft potentials by CIS ion and the PEACE electron experiments in the plasma sheet. This characteristic enables determination of the electron density as a function of spacecraft potential over the polar caps and in the lobes of the magnetosphere, regions where other experiments on Cluster have intrinsic limitations. Data from 2001 to 2006 reveal that the photoelectron characteristics of the Cluster spacecraft as well as the electric field probes vary with the solar cycle and solar activity. The consequences for plasma density measurements are addressed. Typical examples are presented to demonstrate the use of this technique in a polar cap/lobe plasma.

  18. Electron heat transport in a steep temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.H.; De Groot, J.S.; Abou-Assaleh, Z.; Matte, J.P.; Johnston, T.W.; Rosen, M.D.

    1989-04-01

    Temporal and spatial measurements of electron heat transport are made in the University of California Davis AURORA device (J. H. Rogers, Ph.D. dissertation, University of California, Davis, 1987). In AURORA, a microwave pulse heats a region of underdense, collisional, plasma (n/n/sub cr/ approx. <1, where n/sub cr/ = 1.8 x 10/sup 10/ cm/sup -3/ is the critical density, T/sub e//sub 0/ approx. =0.15 eV, and the electron scattering mean free path lambda/sub perpendicular/approx. >2 cm). In this region, strong thermal heating (T/sub c/ approx. <0.7 eV) as well as suprathermal heating (T/sub h/approx. =3 eV) is observed. The strong heating results in a steep temperature gradient that violates the approximations of classical heat diffusion theory (L/sub T//lambda/sub perpendicular/approx. >3 for thermal electrons, where L/sub T/ = T/sub c/(partialT/sub c//partialz)/sup -1/ is the cold electron temperature scale length. The time evolution of the electron temperature profile is measured using Langmuir probes. The measured relaxation of the temperature gradient after the microwave pulse is compared to calculations using the Fokker--Planck International code (Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1936 (1982)) and the multigroup, flux-limited, target design code LASNEX (Comm. Plasma Phys. 2, 51 (1975)). The electron distribution function at the end of the microwave pulse is used as initial conditions for both codes. The Fokker--Planck calculations are found to agree very well with the measurements.

  19. Integrated discharge scenario for high-temperature helical plasma in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, K.; Takahashi, H.; Murakami, S.; Nakano, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Tsuchiya, H.; Osakabe, M.; Ida, K.; Yokoyama, M.; Yoshinuma, M.; Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Oishi, T.; Pablant, N.; Fujii, K.; Tanaka, K.; Tamura, N.; Nakamura, Y.; Du, X.; Ido, T.; Shimizu, A.; Kubo, S.; Igami, H.; Seki, R.; Suzuki, C.; Suzuki, Y.; Tsumori, K.; Ikeda, K.; Kisaki, M.; Yoshimura, Y.; Shimozuma, T.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kasahara, H.; Kamio, S.; Mutoh, T.; Kaneko, O.; Yamada, H.; Komori, A.

    2015-09-01

    The discharge scenario of high temperature plasma with a helical configuration has significantly progressed. The increase of central ion temperature due to the reduction of wall recycling was clearly observed. The peaking of the ion heating profile and the reduction of charge exchange loss of energetic ions play an important role for further improvement of ion heat transport in the ion internal transport barrier (ITB) core. The ion ITB and electron ITB have been successfully integrated due to the superposition of centrally focused electron cyclotron heating to the ion ITB plasma, and the high temperature regime of the ion temperature comparable to the electron temperature (Ti ~ Te) has been significantly extended. The width of the ion ITB formed with electron ITB is wider than the width of electron ITB. The positive radial electric field was observed in the integrated ITB plasma by a heavy ion beam probe, while the negative radial electric field was observed in ion ITB plasmas. The ion temperature gradient decreases with the increase of the temperature ratio (Te /Ti).

  20. Physics of laser-driven plasma-based electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-07-15

    Laser-driven plasma-based accelerators, which are capable of supporting fields in excess of 100 GV/m, are reviewed. This includes the laser wakefield accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator, plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses, and highly nonlinear regimes. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse diffraction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, and beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Experiments demonstrating key physics, such as the production of high-quality electron bunches at energies of 0.1-1 GeV, are summarized.

  1. Plasma and ion barrier for electron beam spot stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1999-04-01

    The concept of a self-biased target to spatially confine the ions generated by the bombardment of intense electron beams on bremsstrahlung conversion targets has been predicted by computer simulation and further verified by experiments at the Integrated Test Stand for DARHT at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This technical article reports an alternative method of containing the plasmas and ions from the bremsstrahlung conversion target if the energy density of the electron beam is below a certain threshold. With the proposed changes of the electron beam parameters of the second axis of DARHT, the authors are able to show that a thin (0.5 mm) metallic barrier such as pure beryllium, or boron carbide with desirable thermal properties, is sufficiently transparent to the 20 MeV DARHT beam and at the same time able to confine the ions between the target and the barrier foil. The temperature rise in the foil due to energy deposited by the electron beam is expected to be below the melting point of the materials for the first three pulses. More important, they have shown in their time dependent particle-in-cell simulations that the deployment of a barrier situated 1 to 2 cm away from the converter target can achieve the ion confinement needed for the stability of the electron beam spot.

  2. Study of plasma heating induced by fast electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Morace, A.; Batani, D.; Redaelli, R.; Magunov, A.; Fourment, C.; Santos, J. J.; Malka, G.; Boscheron, A.; Nazarov, W.; Vinci, T.; Okano, Y.; Inubushi, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Flacco, A.; Spindloe, C.; Tolley, M.

    2009-12-15

    We studied the induced plasma heating in three different kinds of targets: mass limited, foam targets, and large mass targets. The experiment was performed at Alise Laser Facility of CEA/CESTA. The laser system emitted a approx1 ps pulse with approx10 J energy at a wavelength of approx1 {mu}m. Mass limited targets had three layers with thicknesses of 10 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 8}, 1 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 7}Cl, and 10 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 8} with size of 100x100 {mu}m{sup 2}. Detailed spectroscopic analysis of x rays emitted from the Cl tracer showed that it was possible to heat up the plasma from mass limited targets to a temperature of approx250 eV with density of approx10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. The plasma heating is only produced by fast electron transport in the target, being the 10 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 8} overcoating thick enough to prevent any possible direct irradiation of the tracer layer even taking into account mass-ablation due to the prepulse. These results demonstrate that with mass limited targets, it is possible to generate a plasma heated up to several hundreds eV. It is also very important for research concerning high energy density phenomena and for fast ignition (in particular for the study of fast electrons transport and induced heating).

  3. Effect of nonthermal electrons on oblique electrostatic excitations in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Alinejad, H.

    2012-05-15

    The linear and nonlinear propagation of ion-acoustic waves are investigated in a magnetized electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasma with nonthermal electrons. In the linear regime, the propagation of two possible modes and their evolution are studied via a dispersion relation. In the cases of parallel and perpendicular propagation, it is shown that these two possible modes are always stable. Then, the Korteweg-de Vries equation describing the dynamics of ion-acoustic solitary waves is derived from a weakly nonlinear analysis. The influence on the solitary wave characteristics of relevant physical parameters such as nonthermal electrons, magnetic field, obliqueness, positron concentration, and temperature ratio is examined. It is observed that the increasing nonthermal electrons parameter makes the solitary structures much taller and narrower. Also, it is revealed that the magnetic field strength makes the solitary waves more spiky. The present investigation contributes to the physics of the nonlinear electrostatic ion-acoustic waves in space and laboratory e-p-i plasmas in which wave damping produces an electron tail.

  4. Temperature measurement systems in wearable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walczak, S.; Gołebiowski, J.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the concept of temperature measurement system, adapted to wearable electronics applications. Temperature is one of the most commonly monitored factor in smart textiles, especially in sportswear, medical and rescue products. Depending on the application, measured temperature could be used as an initial value of alert, heating, lifesaving or analysis system. The concept of the temperature measurement multi-point system, which consists of flexible screen-printed resistive sensors, placed on the T-shirt connected with the central unit and the power supply is elaborated in the paper.

  5. X-ray emission from high temperature plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The physical processes occurring in plasma focus devices were investigated with particular emphasis on X-ray emission. Topics discussed include: trajectories of high energy electrons; detection of ion trajectories; spatial distribution of neutron emission; space and time resolved emission of hard X-rays from a plasma focus; the staged plasma focus as a variation of the hypocloidal pinch; formation of current sheets in a staged plasma focus; and X-ray and neutron emission from a staged plasma focus. The possibility of operating dense plasma-focus type devices in multiple arrays beyond the scaling law for a single gun is discussed.

  6. Impurity effects on trapped electron mode in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Huarong; Wang, Zheng-Xiong; Dong, J. Q.

    2016-07-01

    The effects of impurity ions on the trapped electron mode (TEM) in tokamak plasmas are numerically investigated with the gyrokinetic integral eigenmode equation. It is shown that in the case of large electron temperature gradient ( η e ), the impurity ions have stabilizing effects on the TEM, regardless of peaking directions of their density profiles for all normalized electron density gradient R / L n e . Here, R is the major radius and L n e is the electron density gradient scale length. In the case of intermediate and/or small η e , the light impurity ions with conventional inwardly (outwardly) peaked density profiles have stabilizing effects on the TEM for large (small) R / L n e , while the light impurity ions with steep inwardly (outwardly) peaked density profiles can destabilize the TEM for small (large) R / L n e . Besides, the TEM driven by density gradient is stabilized (destabilized) by the light carbon or oxygen ions with inwardly (outwardly) peaked density profiles. In particular, for flat and/or moderate R / L n e , two independent unstable modes, corresponding respectively to the TEM and impurity mode, are found to coexist in plasmas with impurity ions of outwardly peaked density profiles. The high Z tungsten impurity ions play a stronger stabilizing role in the TEM than the low Z impurity ions (such as carbon and oxygen) do. In addition, the effects of magnetic shear and collision on the TEM instability are analyzed. It is shown that the collisionality considered in this work weakens the trapped electron response, leading to a more stable TEM instability, and that the stabilizing effects of the negative magnetic shear on the TEM are more significant when the impurity ions with outwardly peaked density profile are taken into account.

  7. Influence of microwave driver coupling design on plasma density at Testbench for Ion sources Plasma Studies, a 2.45 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Megía-Macías, A.; Vizcaíno-de-Julián, A.; Cortázar, O. D.

    2014-03-15

    A comparative study of two microwave driver systems (preliminary and optimized) for a 2.45 GHz hydrogen Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasma generator has been conducted. The influence on plasma behavior and parameters of stationary electric field distribution in vacuum, i.e., just before breakdown, along all the microwave excitation system is analyzed. 3D simulations of resonant stationary electric field distributions, 2D simulations of external magnetic field mapping, experimental measurements of incoming and reflected power, and electron temperature and density along the plasma chamber axis have been carried out. By using these tools, an optimized set of plasma chamber and microwave coupler has been designed paying special attention to the optimization of stationary electric field value in the center of the plasma chamber. This system shows a strong stability on plasma behavior allowing a wider range of operational parameters and even sustaining low density plasma formation without external magnetic field. In addition, the optimized system shows the capability to produce values of plasma density four times higher than the preliminary as a consequence of a deeper penetration of the magnetic resonance surface in relative high electric field zone by keeping plasma stability. The increment of the amount of resonance surface embedded in the plasma under high electric field is suggested as a key factor.

  8. Measurements of electron energy distribution in tantalum laser-generated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Torrisi, L.; Giuffrida, L.; Mascali, D.; Miracoli, R.; Gammino, S.; Gambino, N.; Margarone, D.

    2010-06-15

    The time and space resolved characterization of laser-generated pulsed plasmas is useful not only for the comprehension of basic phenomena involved in the plasma generation and following supersonic expansion, but it also permits to control the nonequilibrium process that is useful for many applications (e.g., ion implantation). The ''on-line'' characterization can be performed by means of Langmuir probes, ion collectors, and ion energy analyzers, in order to measure the plasma temperatures and densities of atoms, ions, and electrons. The investigated plasmas were generated by means of laser pulses with intensity of the order of 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}. The contemporary characterization of the electron (through the Langmuir probe) and ion energy distribution functions, EEDF and IEDF, respectively, permits to correlate the ion properties, like charge states and temperatures, with the electron properties, like the shape of the EEDF at different times and distances from the ablated target surface.

  9. Electron Acoustic Waves in Pure Ion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderegg, F.; Affolter, M.; Driscoll, C. F.; O'Neil, T. M.; Valentini, F.

    2012-10-01

    Electron Acoustic Waves (EAWs) are the low-frequency branch of near-linear Langmuir (plasma) waves: the frequency is such that the complex dielectric function (Dr, Di) has Dr= 0; and ``flattening'' of f(v) near the wave phase velocity vph gives Di=0 and eliminates Landau damping. Here, we observe standing axisymmetric EAWs in a pure ion column.footnotetextF. Anderegg, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 095001 (2009). At low excitation amplitudes, the EAWs have vph˜1.4 v, in close agreement with near-linear theory. At moderate excitation strengths, EAW waves are observed over a range of frequencies, with 1.3 v < vph< 2.1 v. Here, the final wave frequency may differ from the excitation frequency since the excitation modifies f (v); and recent theory analyzes frequency shifts from ``corners'' of a plateau at vph.footnotetextF. Valentini et al., arXiv:1206.3500v1. Large amplitude EAWs have strong phase-locked harmonic content, and experiments will be compared to same-geometry simulations, and to simulations of KEENfootnotetextB. Afeyan et al., Proc. Inertial Fusion Sci. and Applications 2003, A.N.S. Monterey (2004), p. 213. waves in HEDLP geometries.

  10. Weakly nonlinear ion waves in striated electron temperatures.

    PubMed

    Guio, P; Pécseli, H L

    2016-04-01

    The existence of low-frequency waveguide modes of electrostatic ion acoustic waves is demonstrated in magnetized plasmas for cases where the electron temperature is striated along magnetic field lines. For low frequencies, the temperature striation acts as waveguide that supports a trapped mode. For conditions where the ion cyclotron frequency is below the ion plasma frequency we find a dispersion relation having also a radiative frequency band, where waves can escape from the striation. Arguments for the formation and propagation of an equivalent of electrostatic shocks are presented and demonstrated numerically for these conditions. The shock represents here a balance between an external energy input maintained by ion injection and a dissipation mechanism in the form of energy leakage of the harmonics generated by nonlinear wave steepening. This is a reversible form for energy loss that can replace the time-irreversible losses in a standard Burgers equation. PMID:27176415

  11. A survey of the plasma electron environment of Jupiter - A view from Voyager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Bridge, H. S.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of the plasma environment within Jupiter's bow shock is given in terms of the in situ calibrated electron plasma measurements made between 10 eV and 5.95 keV by the Voyager Plasma Science Experiment (PLS). The measurements are analyzed and corrected for spacecraft potential variations; the data are reduced to nearly model independent macroscopic parameters of the local electron density and temperature. The electron parameters are derived without reference to or internal calibration from the positive ion measurements made in the PLS experiment. Extensive statistical and direct comparisons with other determinations of the local plasma charge density indicate clearly that the analysis procedures have successfully and routinely discriminated between spacecraft sheath and ambient plasmas.

  12. Survey of low energy plasma electrons in Saturn's magnetosphere: Voyagers 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Scudder, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The low energy plasma electron environment within Saturn's magnetosphere was surveyed by the Plasma Science Experiment (PLS) during the Voyager encounters with Saturn. Over the full energy range of the PLS instrument (10 eV to 6 keV) the electron distribution functions are clearly non-Maxwellian in character; they are composed of a cold (thermal) component with Maxwellian shape and a hot (suprathermal) non-Maxwellian component. A large scale positive radial gradient in electron temperature is observed, increasing from less than 1 eV in the inner magnetosphere to as high as 800 eV in the outer magnetosphere. Three fundamentally different plasma regimes were identified from the measurements: (1) the hot outer magnetosphere, (2) the extended plasma sheet, and (3) the inner plasma torus.

  13. Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Dickman, John E.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott

    1997-01-01

    Many space and some terrestrial applications would benefit from the availability of low-temperature electronics. Exploration missions to the outer planets, Earth-orbiting and deep-space probes, and communications satellites are examples of space applications which operate in low-temperature environments. Space probes deployed near Pluto must operate in temperatures as low as -229 C. Figure 1 depicts the average temperature of a space probe warmed by the sun for various locations throughout the solar system. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low-temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation system, and arctic exploration. The development of electrical power systems capable of extremely low-temperature operation represents a key element of some advanced space power systems. The Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on the design, fabrication, and characterization of low-temperature power systems and the development of supporting technologies for low-temperature operations such as dielectric and insulating materials, power components, optoelectronic components, and packaging and integration of devices, components, and systems.

  14. Using rf impedance probe measurements to determine plasma potential and the electron energy distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D. N.; Fernsler, R. F.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2010-11-15

    Earlier work has demonstrated the usefulness of a network analyzer in plasma diagnostics using spherical probes in the thin sheath limit. The rf signal applied to the probe by the network analyzer is small in magnitude compared to probe bias voltages, and the instrument returns both real and imaginary parts of the complex plasma impedance as a function of frequency for given bias voltages. This information can be used to determine sheath resistance, sheath density profiles, and a technique for measuring electron temperature. The present work outlines a method for finding plasma potential and the electron energy distribution within a limited energy range. The results are compared to those using conventional Langmuir probe techniques. The rf method has general application to diverse areas of plasma investigations when the plasma is uniform and probe dimensions are much less than the size of the plasma. These applications include laboratory and space environments.

  15. Stochastic heating and acceleration of electrons in colliding laser fields in plasma.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Z-M; Mima, K; Sentoku, Y; Jovanović, M S; Taguchi, T; Zhang, J; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J

    2002-02-01

    We propose a mechanism that leads to efficient acceleration of electrons in plasma by two counterpropagating laser pulses. It is triggered by stochastic motion of electrons when the laser fields exceed some threshold amplitudes, as found in single-electron dynamics. It is further confirmed in particle-in-cell simulations. In vacuum or tenuous plasma, electron acceleration in the case with two colliding laser pulses can be much more efficient than with one laser pulse only. In plasma at moderate densities, such as a few percent of the critical density, the amplitude of the Raman-backscattered wave is high enough to serve as the second counterpropagating pulse to trigger the electron stochastic motion. As a result, even with one intense laser pulse only, electrons can be heated up to a temperature much higher than the corresponding laser ponderomotive potential.

  16. Electronics for Low Temperature Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2007-01-01

    Exploration missions to outer planets and deep space require spacecraft, probes, and on-board data and communication systems to operate reliably and efficiently under severe harsh conditions. On-board electronics, in particular those in direct exposures to the space environment without any shielding or protection, will encounter extreme low temperature and thermal cycling in their service cycle in most of NASA s upcoming exploration missions. For example, Venus atmosphere, Jupiter atmosphere, Moon surface, Pluto orbiter, Mars, comets, Titan, Europa, and James Webb Space Telescope all involve low-temperature surroundings. Therefore, electronics for space exploration missions need to be designed for operation under such environmental conditions. There are ongoing efforts at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to establish a database on the operation and reliability of electronic devices and circuits under extreme temperature operation for space applications. This work is being performed under the Extreme Temperature Electronics Program with collaboration and support of the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program. The results of these investigations will be used to establish safe operating areas and to identify degradation and failure modes, and the information will be disseminated to mission planners and system designers for use as tools for proper part selection and in risk mitigation. An overview of this program along with experimental data will be presented.

  17. Sheath structure in plasmas with nonextensively distributed electrons and thermal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Hatami, M. M.

    2015-02-15

    Sheath region of an electropositive plasma consisting of q-nonextensive electrons and singly charged positive ions with finite temperature is modeled. Using Sagdeev's pseudo potential technique to derive the modified sheath formation criterion, it is shown that the velocity of ions at the sheath edge is directly proportional to the ion temperatures and inversely proportional to the degree of nonextensivity of electrons (q-parameter). Using the modified Bohm criterion, effect of degree of nonextensivity of electrons and temperature of positive ions on the characteristics of the sheath region are investigated numerically. It is shown that an increase in the ion temperature gives rise to an increase in the electrostatic potential and the velocity of ions in the sheath regardless of the value of q. Furthermore, it is seen that the sheath width and the density distribution of the charged particles decrease by increasing the temperature of positive ions. In addition, it is found that the positive ion temperature is less effective on the sheath structure for higher values of the q-parameter. Finally, the results obtained for a thermal plasma with nonextensively distributed electrons are compared with the results of a cold plasma with nonextensive electrons and an extensive (Maxwellian) plasma with thermal ions.

  18. The Conference on High Temperature Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, D. J.; Mccormick, J. B.; Kerwin, W. J.; Narud, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The status of and directions for high temperature electronics research and development were evaluated. Major objectives were to (1) identify common user needs; (2) put into perspective the directions for future work; and (3) address the problem of bringing to practical fruition the results of these efforts. More than half of the presentations dealt with materials and devices, rather than circuits and systems. Conference session titles and an example of a paper presented in each session are (1) User requirements: High temperature electronics applications in space explorations; (2) Devices: Passive components for high temperature operation; (3) Circuits and systems: Process characteristics and design methods for a 300 degree QUAD or AMP; and (4) Packaging: Presently available energy supply for high temperature environment.

  19. Electron inertia contribution to soliton evolution in an inhomogeneous weakly relativistic two-fluid plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Khushvant; Kumar, Vinod; Malik, Hitendra K.

    2005-07-15

    The contribution of electron inertia to the evolution of solitons in weakly and strongly inhomogeneous plasmas having streaming ions and electrons with weak relativistic effect is studied on the basis of a relevant Korteweg-de Vries equation derived with the help of reductive perturbation technique. Three types of modes (fast, medium, and slow) are found to propagate in the plasma. In case of weak (strong) inhomogeneous plasma, only the fast (slow) mode corresponds to the soliton evolution. For the propagation of solitons in strongly inhomogeneous plasma, there is no restriction on the ion and electron velocities but in case of weak inhomogeneity the solitons are possible only for a particular range of velocity difference. This range shows the dependence on the temperature and mass ratios of the ions and electrons. In addition, it is realized that only the rarefactive solitons are possible in the present plasma model. The effect of electron inertia on the phase velocity, peak soliton amplitude, and soliton width is studied together with the effects of plasma density, ion temperature, and speeds (relativistic effects) of ions and electrons.

  20. Gyrokinetic stability theory of electron-positron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helander, P.; Connor, J. W.

    2016-06-01

    > The linear gyrokinetic stability properties of magnetically confined electron-positron plasmas are investigated in the parameter regime most likely to be relevant for the first laboratory experiments involving such plasmas, where the density is small enough that collisions can be ignored and the Debye length substantially exceeds the gyroradius. Although the plasma beta is very small, electromagnetic effects are retained, but magnetic compressibility can be neglected. The work of a previous publication (Helander, Phys. Rev. Lett., vol. 113, 2014a, 135003) is thus extended to include electromagnetic instabilities, which are of importance in closed-field-line configurations, where such instabilities can occur at arbitrarily low pressure. It is found that gyrokinetic instabilities are completely absent if the magnetic field is homogeneous: any instability must involve magnetic curvature or shear. Furthermore, in dipole magnetic fields, the stability threshold for interchange modes with wavelengths exceeding the Debye radius coincides with that in ideal magnetohydrodynamics. Above this threshold, the quasilinear particle flux is directed inward if the temperature gradient is sufficiently large, leading to spontaneous peaking of the density profile.

  1. Resistive collimation of electron beams in relativistic and degenerate plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, M.; Khodadadi Azadboni, F.

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this research is the study of the effects of plasma state and fiber on collimating relativistic electron beam in fast ignition. In this paper, for collimating relativistic electrons produced at the laser plasma interaction, a thin fiber of aluminum, lithium or CH either in the classical, degenerate or relativistic plasma states is considered. The fast electron beam could be collimated down to radii of 10 μm, in that case, the best results are achieved when there is a sharp transition in resistance. This ensures that the correct magnetic growth rate is used for hot electrons at different energy levels. Calculations show that the resistivity of the material surrounding the CH fiber in the degenerate plasma is smaller than that for classical and relativistic plasma.

  2. Electron acceleration in long scale laser - plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamperidis, Christos; Mangles, Stuart P. D.; Nagel, Sabrina R.; Bellei, Claudio; Krushelnick, Karl; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Bourgeois, Nicola; Marques, Jean Raphael; Kaluza, Malte C.

    2006-10-01

    Broad energy electron bunches are produced through the Self-Modulated Laser Wakefield Acceleration scheme at the 30J, 300 fsec laser, LULI, France, with long scale underdense plasmas, created in a He filled gas cell and in He gas jet nozzles of various lengths. With c.τlaser>>λplasma, electrons reached Emax ˜ 200MeV. By carefully controlling the dynamics of the interaction and by simultaneous observations of the electron energy spectra and the forward emitted optical spectrum, we found that a plasma density threshold (˜5.10^18 cm-3) exists for quasi-monoenergetic (˜30MeV) features to appear. The overall plasma channel size was inferred from the collected Thomson scattered light. 2D PIC simulations indicate that the main long laser pulse breaks up into small pulselets that eventually get compressed and tightly focused inside the first few plasma periods, leading to a bubble like acceleration of electron bunches.

  3. High Density And High Temperature Plasmas In Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komori, A.

    2010-07-01

    For the realization of the fusion reactor, it is necessary to confine high density and high temperature plasma for a time, which is well known as the Lawson criterion. To improve the plasma or confinement performance, vigorous experiments have been performed in the Large Helical Device (LHD) in National Institute for Fusion Science, which is the largest superconducting heliotron device with R = 3.9 m r = 0.6 m, Bt = 3 T. Recently a promising confinement regime called Super Dense Core (SDC) mode was discovered. An extremely high density core region with more than ~ 1 × 10^20 m-3 is obtained with the formation of an Internal Diffusion Barrier (IDB). The density gradient at the IDB (? = 0.6) is very high and the particle confinement in the core region is ~ 0.2 s. It is expected, for the future reactor, that the IDB-SDC mode has a possibility to achieve the self-ignition condition with lower temperature than expected before. The IDB-SDC mode is also favorable from the engineering point of view since one can moderate demands for heating devices and plasma facing components. In order to achieve the IDB-SDC mode, the central fuelling with the pellet injection and the low recycling condition are essential. A repetitive pellet injector was newly developed to continuously feed the particle source to the central region. For the recycling control, the effective divertor system should be employed to control the edge plasma. Conventional approaches to increase the temperature have also been tried in LHD. For the ion heating, the perpendicular neutral beam injection effectively increased the ion temperature more than 10 keV with the formation of the internal transport barrier (ITB). In the core region, the heat conductivity is improved to the neoclassical level, while no clear ITB for electron was seen. Another interesting phenomenon called "impurity hole" was observed inside the ITB. During the high ion temperature discharge, the im- purity density in the core region becomes

  4. Public Data Set: Impedance of an Intense Plasma-Cathode Electron Source for Tokamak Plasma Startup

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hinson, Edward T. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:000000019713140X); Barr, Jayson L. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000177685931); Bongard, Michael W. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000231609746); Burke, Marcus G. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000176193724); Fonck, Raymond J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000294386762); Perry, Justin M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000171228609)

    2016-05-31

    This data set contains openly-documented, machine readable digital research data corresponding to figures published in E.T. Hinson et al., 'Impedance of an Intense Plasma-Cathode Electron Source for Tokamak Plasma Startup,' Physics of Plasmas 23, 052515 (2016).

  5. Ion temperature profile simulation of JT-60 and TFTR plasmas with ion temperature gradient mode transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, H.; Hirayama, T.; Koide, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Naito, O.; Sato, M.; Fukuda, T.; Sugie, T.; Azumi, M.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Scott, S. D.; Grek, B.; Hill, K. W.; Johnson, D. W.; Mansfield, D. K.; Park, H. K.; Stratton, B. C.; Synakowski, E. J.; Taylor, G.; Towner, H. H.

    1994-05-01

    Ion temperature profiles of neutral beam heated plasmas in JT-60 and TFTR have been simulated using models of ion thermal diffusivity, χi, based on ion temperature gradient mode (ηi mode) turbulence and drift wave turbulence (trapped electron mode and circulating electron mode). The ion temperature profiles measured by charge exchange recombination spectroscopy are compared to predicted Ti profiles calculated from three theoretical models for ion heat transport by Dominguez and Waltz (1987), Lee and Diamond (1986), and Romanelli (1989). All three χi models can reproduce the measured Ti profile over a wide range of parameters in JT-60 L mode plasmas, except for two 1 MA limiter cases. With the use of transport models, which were adjusted to fit JT-60 plasmas, it was found that the Dominguez and Waltz and Romanelli models agree with measured Ti, profiles in TFTR L mode discharges in the region a/4 < r < a/2. The observed central peaking of Ti near the magnetic axis of TFTR L mode plasmas cannot be reproduced. It was found that the Lee and Diamond model does not fit me data as well. The χi models studied cannot consistently reproduce the measured Ti in the peripheral region of either JT-60 or TFTR plasmas. In the high ion temperature (high Ti) plasmas of JT-60 and supershot plasmas of TFTR, the predicted Ti profiles are much broader than the measured profile. In supershot plasmas, the measured central ion temperature greatly exceeds the predicted temperature, although there is reasonable agreement near the edge

  6. Progress toward positron-electron pair plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stenson, E. V.; Stanja, J.; Hergenhahn, U.; Saitoh, H.; Niemann, H.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Marx, G. H.; Schweikhard, L.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M.; Hugenschmidt, C.

    2015-06-29

    Electron-positron plasmas have been of theoretical interest for decades, due to the unique plasma physics that arises from all charged particles having precisely identical mass. It is only recently, though, that developments in non-neutral plasma physics (both in linear and toroidal geometries) and in the flux of sources for cold positrons have brought the goal of conducting electron-positron pair plasma experiments within reach. The APEX/PAX collaboration is working on a number of projects in parallel toward that goal; this paper provides an overview of recent, current, and upcoming activities.

  7. Wave breaking of nonlinear electron oscillations in a warm magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pramanik, Sourav; Maity, Chandan; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2014-02-15

    Wave breaking phenomena of nonlinear electron oscillations around a homogeneous background of massive ions have been studied in a warm magnetized plasma by using Lagrangian variables. An inhomogeneity in the background magnetic field is shown to induce phase mixing and thus breaking of the oscillations. A nonlinear analysis in Lagrangian variables predicts that wave breaking may disappear above a critical value of the electron temperature. An estimate for the critical temperature has been provided.

  8. Electron-ion plasma modification of Al-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yurii; Rygina, Mariya; Petrikova, Elizaveta; Krysina, Olga; Teresov, Anton; Ivanova, Olga; Ikonnikova, Irina

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports on the study where we analyzed the surface structure and strength properties of coated Al alloys modified by electron-ion plasma treatment. The Al alloys were deposited with a thin (≈0.5 μm) TiCu film coating (TiCu-Al system) and with a hard TiCuN coating (TiCuN-AlSi system) on a TRIO vacuum setup in the plasma of low-pressure arc discharges. The temperature fields and phase transformations in the film-substrate system were estimated by numerical simulation in a wide range of electron energy densities (5-30 J/cm2) and pulse durations (50-200 μs). The calculations allowed us to determine the threshold energy density and pulse duration at which the surface structure of the irradiated Al-based systems is transformed in a single-phase state (solid or liquid) and in a two-phase state (solid plus liquid). The elemental composition, defect structure, phase state, and lattice state in the modified surface layers were examined by optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy, and by X-ray diffraction analysis. The mechanical characteristics of the modified layers were studied by measuring the hardness and Young's modulus. The tribological properties of the modified layers were analyzed by measuring the wear resistance and friction coefficient. It is shown that melting and subsequent high-rate crystallization of the TiCu-Al system makes possible a multiphase Al-based surface structure with the following characteristics: crystallite size ranging within micrometer, microhardness of more than 3 times that in the specimen bulk, and wear resistance ≈1.8 times higher compared to the initial material. Electron beam irradiation of the TiCuN-AlSi system allows fusion of the coating into the substrate, thus increasing the wear resistance of the material ≈2.2 times at a surface hardness of ˜14 GPa.

  9. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Y; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann Jr, N C; Smith, D R

    2011-03-21

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k⊥ρs ≤10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  10. An Exact Calculation of Electron-Ion Energy Splitting in a Hot Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, Robert L

    2012-09-10

    In this brief report, I summarize the rather involved recent work of Brown, Preston, and Singleton (BPS). In Refs. [2] and [3], BPS calculate the energy partition into ions and electrons as a charged particle traverses a non-equilibrium two-temperature plasma. These results are exact to leading and next-to-leading order in the plasma coupling g, and are therefore extremely accurate in a weakly coupled plasma. The new BPS calculations are compared with the more standard work of Fraley et al. [12]. The results differ substantially at higher temperature when T{sub I} {ne} T{sub e}.

  11. Observation of warm, higher energy electrons transiting a double layer in a helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Yung-Ta; Li, Yan; Scharer, John

    2015-11-01

    Experimental observations in MadiHeX indicate that fast electrons with substantial density fractions can be created at low helicon operating pressure. Two-temperature electron distributions including a fast (>80 eV) tail are observed in an inductive RF helicon argon plasma double layer at 0.17 mTorr Ar pressure. The fast, untrapped electrons measured downstream of the double layer have a higher temperature of 13 eV than the trapped, upstream electrons with a temperature of 4 eV. The reduction of plasma potential and density observed in the double layer region would require an upstream temperature ten times the measured 4 eV if occurring via Boltzmann ambipolar expansion. Upstream fluctuations of +/- 30% are also observed in the emissive probe measured plasma potential. Sideband frequencies have been observed at +/- 2 kHz of the driven RF frequency of 13.56 MHz, implying a beam instability effect dominantly upstream of the double layer. This can affect ion acceleration and electron temperature distribution in the region. The mechanism behind this has been explored via several plasma diagnostics tools. An RF-compensated Langmuir probe has been used to measure the electron temperatures and densities, which are cross-checked with ADAS, OES and millimeter wave IF. The EEDF in the plasma has also been profiled to understand the acceleration mechanism. A four-grid RPA and an emissive probe have been used to measure the IEDF and plasma potential. The measured IEDF has also been checked with LIF techniques.

  12. Electron Gyro-scale Fluctuation Measurements in National Spherical Torus Experiment H-mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D R; Lee, W; Mazzucato, E; Park, H K; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Levinton, F M; Luhmann, N C; Menard, J E

    2009-08-10

    A collective scattering system has measured electron gyro-scale fluctuations in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) H-mode plasmas to investigate electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence. Observations and results pertaining to fluctuation measurements in ETGstable regimes, the toroidal field scaling of fluctuation amplitudes, the relation between between fluctuation amplitudes and transport quantities, and fluctuation magnitudes and k-spectra are presented. Collectively, the measurements provide insight and guidance for understanding ETG turbulence and anomalous electron thermal transport.

  13. Characterization of plasma parameters, first beam results, and status of electron cyclotron resonance source

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, S. K.; Jain, Akhilesh; Hannurkar, P. R.; Kotaiah, S.

    2007-05-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source at 50 keV, 30 mA proton current has been designed, fabricated, and assembled. Its plasma study has been done. Plasma chamber was excited with 350 W of microwave power at 2450 MHz, along with nitrogen and hydrogen gases. Microwave power was fed to the plasma chamber through waveguide. Plasma density and electron temperature were studied under various operating conditions, such as magnetic field, gas pressure, and transversal distance. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current-voltage variation. The nitrogen plasma density calculated was approximately 4.5x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}, and electron temperatures of 3-10 eV (cold) and 45-85 eV (hot) were obtained. The total ion beam current of 2.5 mA was extracted, with two-electrode extraction geometry, at 15 keV beam energy. The optimization of the source is under progress to extract 30 mA proton beam current at 50 keV beam energy, using three-electrode extraction geometry. This source will be used as an injector to continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 100 MeV proton linac. The required root-mean-square normalized beam emittance is less than 0.2{pi} mm mrad. This article presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and status of ECR proton source.

  14. Characterization of plasma parameters, first beam results, and status of electron cyclotron resonance source.

    PubMed

    Jain, S K; Jain, Akhilesh; Hannurkar, P R; Kotaiah, S

    2007-05-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source at 50 keV, 30 mA proton current has been designed, fabricated, and assembled. Its plasma study has been done. Plasma chamber was excited with 350 W of microwave power at 2450 MHz, along with nitrogen and hydrogen gases. Microwave power was fed to the plasma chamber through waveguide. Plasma density and electron temperature were studied under various operating conditions, such as magnetic field, gas pressure, and transversal distance. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current-voltage variation. The nitrogen plasma density calculated was approximately 4.5 x 10(11) cm(-3), and electron temperatures of 3-10 eV (cold) and 45-85 eV (hot) were obtained. The total ion beam current of 2.5 mA was extracted, with two-electrode extraction geometry, at 15 keV beam energy. The optimization of the source is under progress to extract 30 mA proton beam current at 50 keV beam energy, using three-electrode extraction geometry. This source will be used as an injector to continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 100 MeV proton linac. The required root-mean-square normalized beam emittance is less than 0.2pi mm mrad. This article presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and status of ECR proton source.

  15. Restructure of the plasma interior (presheath) caused by electron emission from surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanell, Michael

    2015-09-01

    In the conventionally theorized ``space-charge limited'' regime of strong electron emission, the sheath potential is negative and the presheath is governed by Bohm ion acceleration towards the sheath edge. However, recent works found that sheath potentials at emitting surfaces can be positive, repelling ions. In this ``inverse sheath regime,'' the entire plasma interior (presheath) is also restructured. Here we show at the presheath-sheath edge, due to their low velocities, the cold electrons entering the presheath have a higher spatial density than the hotter plasma electrons exiting the presheath. Therefore, assuming the emission collisionally thermalizes (reheats to the plasma temperature) in the presheath, it follows the quasineutral plasma density must increase towards the sheath edge, which is opposite from Bohm presheaths. The electron and ion force balance in the presheath becomes much different. A theoretical analysis with simulation and experimental evidence of ``inverted presheaths'' will be given. The results could be relevant to low temperature plasmas facing thermionically emitting surfaces and high temperature plasmas inducing strong secondary emission. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  16. Electron plasma oscillations associated with type 3 radio emissions and solar electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Frank, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    An extensive study of the IMP-6 and IMP-8 plasma and radio wave data was performed to try to find electron plasma oscillations associated with type III radio noise bursts and low-energy solar electrons. It is shown that electron plasma oscillations are seldom observed in association with solar electron events and type III radio bursts at 1.0 AU. For the one case in which electron plasma oscillations are definitely produced by the electrons ejected by the solar flare the electric field strength is relatively small. Electromagnetic radiation, believed to be similar to the type III radio emission, is observed coming from the region of the more intense electron plasma oscillations upstream. Quantitative calculations of the rate of conversion of the plasma oscillation energy to electromagnetic radiation are presented for plasma oscillations excited by both solar electrons and electrons from the bow shock. These calculations show that neither the type III radio emissions nor the radiation from upstream of the bow shock can be adequately explained by a current theory for the coupling of electron plasma oscillations to electromagnetic radiation.

  17. Thermal management of low temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Louis C.; Sehmbey, Maninder S.; Mahefkey, Tom

    1995-01-01

    Operation of electronics at liquid nitrogen temperature is a very attractive possibility. High temperature superconducting circuits operating at liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) have great potential in supercomputers and in the medical field. The limitations of superconducting switches in handling high power levels can be overcome by employing hybrid circuits where MOSFET switches are used in conjunction with superconducting elements. These hybrid circuits can be employed advantageously in many applications; for example, high-voltage power conversion, and superconducting-brushless-ac motors for locomotives. However, the thermal management of LNT electronics is an issue that has to be addressed. In this paper, two thermal management techniques, direct immersion cooling, and high-heat-flux spray cooling are discussed. Immersion cooling can handle relatively low heat flux levels (100 kW/m2) while spray cooling is capable of very high heat flux removal (over 1000 kW/m2).

  18. Energy exchange in strongly coupled plasmas with electron drift

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.; Ghorbanalilu, M.

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, the generalized viscoelastic collisional quantum hydrodynamic model is employed in order to investigate the linear dielectric response of a quantum plasma in the presence of strong electron-beam plasma interactions. The generalized Chandrasekhar's relativistic degeneracy pressure together with the electron-exchange and Coulomb interaction effects are taken into account in order to extend current research to a wide range of plasma number density relevant to big planetary cores and astrophysical compact objects. The previously calculated shear viscosity and the electron-ion collision frequencies are used for strongly coupled ion fluid. The effect of the electron-beam velocity on complex linear dielectric function is found to be profound. This effect is clearly interpreted in terms of the wave-particle interactions and their energy-exchange according to the sign of the imaginary dielectric function, which is closely related to the wave attenuation coefficient in plasmas. Such kinetic effect is also shown to be in close connection with the stopping power of a charged-particle beam in a quantum plasma. The effect of many independent plasma parameters, such as the ion charge-state, electron beam-velocity, and relativistic degeneracy, is shown to be significant on the growing/damping of plasma instability or energy loss/gain of the electron-beam.

  19. Energy exchange in strongly coupled plasmas with electron drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.; Ghorbanalilu, M.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the generalized viscoelastic collisional quantum hydrodynamic model is employed in order to investigate the linear dielectric response of a quantum plasma in the presence of strong electron-beam plasma interactions. The generalized Chandrasekhar's relativistic degeneracy pressure together with the electron-exchange and Coulomb interaction effects are taken into account in order to extend current research to a wide range of plasma number density relevant to big planetary cores and astrophysical compact objects. The previously calculated shear viscosity and the electron-ion collision frequencies are used for strongly coupled ion fluid. The effect of the electron-beam velocity on complex linear dielectric function is found to be profound. This effect is clearly interpreted in terms of the wave-particle interactions and their energy-exchange according to the sign of the imaginary dielectric function, which is closely related to the wave attenuation coefficient in plasmas. Such kinetic effect is also shown to be in close connection with the stopping power of a charged-particle beam in a quantum plasma. The effect of many independent plasma parameters, such as the ion charge-state, electron beam-velocity, and relativistic degeneracy, is shown to be significant on the growing/damping of plasma instability or energy loss/gain of the electron-beam.

  20. Laser scattering for temporal and spatial diagnostic of low temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomares Linares, Jose Maria

    2012-10-01

    Many recent industrial and technological applications like surface etching, inorganic films deposition, polymerization of surfaces or sterilization are developed within the field of low temperature plasmas. To study, monitor and model plasma processes is of great importance to have diagnostic tools that can provide reliable information on different plasma parameters. In general, laser scattering techniques provide a direct and accurate method for plasma diagnostic with spatial and temporal resolution. Laser Thomson scattering is used for the diagnostic of electron density and temperature, two of the most important parameters in low temperature discharges. With a similar setup Rayleigh and Raman scattering techniques are used for the diagnostic of gas density and temperature. In this contribution we deal with the different technical and theoretical aspects that are required for the application of these laser scattering techniques. Of special importance are the detection limit, laser stray light rejection and laser perturbations of the plasma. The present study is performed on different low temperature microwave discharges, both at low and atmospheric pressure. The laser scattering techniques provide information on the spatial distribution of the mentioned plasma parameters over different discharge conditions, including small micro-plasmas. Similarly, the temporal evolution of pulsed plasmas is studied, unraveling the features of the switching on and off phases of the discharges.

  1. Radio Emissions from Plasma with Electron Kappa-Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, G. D.; Kuznetsov, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Gregory Fleishman (New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, USA)Alexey Kuznetsov (Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Irkutsk, Russia), Currently there is a concern about the ability of the classical thermal (Maxwellian) distribution to describe quasisteady-state plasma in the solar atmosphere, including active regions. In particular, other distributions have been proposed to better fit observations, for example, kappa-distributions. If present, these distributions will generate radio emissions with different observable properties compared with the classical gyroresonance (GR) or free-free emission, which implies a way of remotely detecting these kappa distributions in the radio observations. Here we present analytically derived GR and free-free emissivities and absorption coefficients for the kappa-distribution, and discuss their properties, which are in fact remarkably different from the classical Maxwellian plasma. In particular, the radio brightness temperature from a gyrolayer increases with the optical depth τ for kappa-distribution. This property has a remarkable consequence allowing a straightforward observational test: the GR radio emission from the non-Maxwellian distributions is supposed to be noticeably polarized even in the optically thick case, where the emission would have strictly zero polarization in the case of Maxwellian plasma. This offers a way of remote probing the plasma distribution in astrophysical sources, including solar active regions as a vivid example. In this report, we present analytical formulae and computer codes to calculate the emission parameters. We simulate the gyroresonance emission under the conditions typical of the solar active regions and compare the results for different electron distributions. We discuss the implications of our findings for interpretation of radio observations. This work was supported in part by NSF grants AGS-1250374 and AGS-1262772, NASA grant NNX14AC87G to New Jersey Institute of Technology

  2. Nonplanar positron-acoustic Gardner solitary waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas with superthermal electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, M. J. Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-02-15

    Nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) positron-acoustic (PA) Gardner solitary waves (SWs) in an unmagnetized plasma system consisting of immobile positive ions, mobile cold positrons, and superthermal (kappa distributed) hot positrons and electrons are investigated. The modified Gardner equation is derived by using the reductive perturbation technique. The effects of cylindrical and spherical geometries, superthermal parameter of hot positrons and electrons, relative temperature ratios, and relative number density ratios on the PA Gardner SWs are studied by using the numerical simulations. The implications of our results in various space and laboratory plasma environments are briefly discussed.

  3. Plasma scale-length effects on electron energy spectra in high-irradiance laser plasmas.

    PubMed

    Culfa, O; Tallents, G J; Rossall, A K; Wagenaars, E; Ridgers, C P; Murphy, C D; Dance, R J; Gray, R J; McKenna, P; Brown, C D R; James, S F; Hoarty, D J; Booth, N; Robinson, A P L; Lancaster, K L; Pikuz, S A; Faenov, A Ya; Kampfer, T; Schulze, K S; Uschmann, I; Woolsey, N C

    2016-04-01

    An analysis of an electron spectrometer used to characterize fast electrons generated by ultraintense (10^{20}Wcm^{-2}) laser interaction with a preformed plasma of scale length measured by shadowgraphy is presented. The effects of fringing magnetic fields on the electron spectral measurements and the accuracy of density scale-length measurements are evaluated. 2D EPOCH PIC code simulations are found to be in agreement with measurements of the electron energy spectra showing that laser filamentation in plasma preformed by a prepulse is important with longer plasma scale lengths (>8 μm). PMID:27176413

  4. Transport and fluctuations in high temperature spheromak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Harry

    2005-10-01

    A systematic analysis is presented of thermal transport in a driven spheromak that extends well into the collisionless regime and spans a wide range of magnetic fluctuation levels. The relationship between internal fluctuations and energy/helicity transport is of fundamental interest to many self-organized configurations in laboratory and space plasmas and the subject of ongoing multi-institutional collaborations. With the recent achievement on the SSPX spheromak[1] of electron temperature Te˜350eV in the core, and good confinement (core electron thermal diffusivity χe<10m^2/ for Te>200eV), we are now comparing heat transport in the experiment with a variety of models including classical, Bohm, and stochastic[2]/diffusive[3]/open[4] field lines. Using Thomson scattering to measure Te, ne profiles and the CORSICA equilibrium code to calculate internal current profiles from magnetic probe fits, we find that χe decreases as Te increases, a scaling behavior more classical-like than Bohm or open field line models would indicate. Lower Te and higher χe is observed in the transition region between the core and the separatrix where NIMROD 3d resistive MHD calculations[5] show the possible existence of chaotic field lines. We will also discuss plans including multi-pulse Thomson scattering and neutral beam heating. [1] E.B. Hooper, et al., Nucl. Fusion 39, 863 (1999). [2] A.B. Rechester and M.N. Rosenbluth, Phys. Rev. Lett. 40, 38 (1978). [3] J.D. Callen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 055002 (2005). [4] R.W. Moses, et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 4839 (2001). [5] B.I. Cohen, et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056106 (2005). This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic spin waves in degenerate electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushtaq, A.; Maroof, R.; Ahmad, Zulfiaqr; Qamar, A.

    2012-05-01

    Low frequency magnetosonic waves are studied in magnetized degenerate electron-positron-ion plasmas with spin effects. Using the fluid equations of magnetoplasma with quantum corrections due to the Bohm potential, temperature degeneracy, and spin magnetization energy, a generalized dispersion relation for oblique magnetosonic waves is derived. Spin effects are incorporated via spin force and macroscopic spin magnetization current. For three different values of angle θ, the generalized dispersion relation is reduced to three different relations under the low frequency magnetohydrodynamic assumptions. It is found that the effect of quantum corrections in the presence of positron concentration significantly modifies the dispersive properties of these modes. The importance of the work relevant to compact astrophysical bodies is pointed out.

  6. Magnetohydrodynamic spin waves in degenerate electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mushtaq, A.; Maroof, R.; Ahmad, Zulfiaqr; Qamar, A.

    2012-05-15

    Low frequency magnetosonic waves are studied in magnetized degenerate electron-positron-ion plasmas with spin effects. Using the fluid equations of magnetoplasma with quantum corrections due to the Bohm potential, temperature degeneracy, and spin magnetization energy, a generalized dispersion relation for oblique magnetosonic waves is derived. Spin effects are incorporated via spin force and macroscopic spin magnetization current. For three different values of angle {theta}, the generalized dispersion relation is reduced to three different relations under the low frequency magnetohydrodynamic assumptions. It is found that the effect of quantum corrections in the presence of positron concentration significantly modifies the dispersive properties of these modes. The importance of the work relevant to compact astrophysical bodies is pointed out.

  7. Electron current extraction from a permanent magnet waveguide plasma cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherford, B. R.; Foster, J. E.; Kamhawi, H.

    2011-09-15

    An electron cyclotron resonance plasma produced in a cylindrical waveguide with external permanent magnets was investigated as a possible plasma cathode electron source. The configuration is desirable in that it eliminates the need for a physical antenna inserted into the plasma, the erosion of which limits operating lifetime. Plasma bulk density was found to be overdense in the source. Extraction currents over 4 A were achieved with the device. Measurements of extracted electron currents were similar to calculated currents, which were estimated using Langmuir probe measurements at the plasma cathode orifice and along the length of the external plume. The influence of facility effects and trace ionization in the anode-cathode gap are also discussed.

  8. Relativistic electromagnetic waves in an electron-ion plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chian, Abraham C.-L.; Kennel, Charles F.

    1987-01-01

    High power laser beams can drive plasma particles to relativistic energies. An accurate description of strong waves requires the inclusion of ion dynamics in the analysis. The equations governing the propagation of relativistic electromagnetic waves in a cold electron-ion plasma can be reduced to two equations expressing conservation of energy-momentum of the system. The two conservation constants are functions of the plasma stream velocity, the wave velocity, the wave amplitude, and the electron-ion mass ratio. The dynamic parameter, expressing electron-ion momentum conversation in the laboratory frame, can be regarded as an adjustable quantity, a suitable choice of which will yield self-consistent solutions when other plasma parameters were specified. Circularly polarized electromagnetic waves and electrostatic plasma waves are used as illustrations.

  9. Radial convection of finite ion temperature, high amplitude plasma blobs

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesenberger, M. Kendl, A.; Madsen, J.

    2014-09-15

    We present results from simulations of seeded blob convection in the scrape-off-layer of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We consistently incorporate high fluctuation amplitude levels and finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects using a fully nonlinear global gyrofluid model. This is in line with conditions found in tokamak scrape-off-layers (SOL) regions. Varying the ion temperature, the initial blob width, and the initial amplitude, we found an FLR dominated regime where the blob behavior is significantly different from what is predicted by cold-ion models. The transition to this regime is very well described by the ratio of the ion gyroradius to the characteristic gradient scale length of the blob. We compare the global gyrofluid model with a partly linearized local model. For low ion temperatures, we find that simulations of the global model show more coherent blobs with an increased cross-field transport compared to blobs simulated with the local model. The maximal blob amplitude is significantly higher in the global simulations than in the local ones. When the ion temperature is comparable to the electron temperature, global blob simulations show a reduced blob coherence and a decreased cross-field transport in comparison with local blob simulations.

  10. An experiment to measure the electron ion thermal equilibration rate in a strongly coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taccetti, J. M.; Shurter, R. P.; Roberts, J. P.; Benage, J. F.; Graden, B.; Haberle, B.; Murillo, M. S.; Vigil, B.; Wysocki, F. J.

    2006-04-01

    We present the most recent results from an experiment aimed at obtaining the temperature equilibration rate between ions and electrons in a strongly coupled plasma by directly measuring the temperature of each component. The plasma is formed by heating a sonic gas jet with a 10 ps laser pulse. The electrons are preferentially heated by the short pulse laser (we are aiming for Te ~ 100 eV), while the ions, after undergoing very rapid (sub-ps timescale) disorder-induced heating, should only reach a temperature of 10-15 eV. This results in a strongly coupled ion plasma with a Γii ~ 3-5. We plan to measure the electron and ion temperatures of the resulting plasma independently during and after heating, using collective Thomson scattering for electrons and a high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for the ions (measuring Doppler-broadened absorption lines). Theory indicates that the equilibration rate could be significantly lower than that given by the usual weakly coupled model (Landau-Spitzer) due to coupled collective modes present in the dense plasma.

  11. Large amplitude double layers in a positively charged dusty plasma with nonthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Djebli, M.; Marif, H.

    2009-06-15

    A pseudopotential approach is used to investigate large amplitude dust-acoustic solitary structures for a plasma composed of positively charged dust, cold electrons, and nonthermal hot electrons. Numerical investigation for an adiabatic situation is conducted to examine the existence region of the wave. The negative potential of the double layers is found to be dependent on nonthermal parameters, Mach number, and electrons temperature. A range of the nonthermal parameters values exists for which two possible double layers for the same plasma mix at different Mach numbers and with significant different amplitudes. The present model is used to investigate localized structures in the lower-altitude Earth's ionosphere.

  12. Electron acceleration by a nonlinear wakefield generated by ultrashort (23-fs) high-peak-power laser pulses in plasma.

    PubMed

    Kando, M; Masuda, S; Zhidkov, A; Yamazaki, A; Kotaki, H; Kondo, S; Homma, T; Kanazawa, S; Nakajima, K; Hayashi, Y; Mori, M; Kiriyama, H; Akahane, Y; Inoue, N; Ueda, H; Nakai, Y; Tsuji, K; Yamamoto, Y; Yamakawa, K; Koga, J; Hosokai, T; Uesaka, M; Tajima, T

    2005-01-01

    We study experimentally the interaction of the shortest at present (23-fs) , relativistically intense (20-TW), tightly focused laser pulses with underdense plasma. MeV electrons constitute a two-temperature distribution due to different plasma wave-breaking processes at a plasma density of 10(20) cm(-3). These two groups of electrons are shown numerically to constitute bunches with very distinctive time durations.

  13. Quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process in Lorentzian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Woo-Pyo; Jung, Young-Dae

    2014-08-15

    The quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process between a positive ion and a neutral atom collision is investigated in nonthermal generalized Lorentzian plasmas. The result shows that the nonthermal effect enhances the resonant electron transfer cross section in Lorentzian plasmas. It is found that the nonthermal effect on the classical resonant electron transfer cross section is more significant than that on the quantum tunneling resonant charge transfer cross section. It is shown that the nonthermal effect on the resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with an increase of the Debye length. In addition, the nonthermal effect on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer cross section decreases with increasing collision energy. The variation of nonthermal and plasma shielding effects on the quantum tunneling resonant electron transfer process is also discussed.

  14. Acceleration of electrons in strong beam-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.; Kellogg, P. J.; Whalen, B. A.

    1984-12-01

    The effects of strong beam-plasma interactions on the electron population of the upper atmosphere have been investigated in an electron acceleration experiment performed with a sounding rocket. The rocket carried the Several Complex Experiments (SCEX) payload which included an electron accelerator, three disposable 'throwaway' detectors (TADs), and a stepped electron energy analyzer. The payload was launched in an auroral arc over the rocket at altitudes of 157 and 178 km, respectively. The performance characteristics of the instruments are discussed in detail. The data are combined with the results of laboratory measurements and show that electrons with energies of at least two and probably four times the injection energy of 2 keV were observed during strong beam-plasma interaction events. The interaction events occurred at pitch angles of 54 and 126 degrees. On the basis of the data it is proposed that the superenergization of the electrons is correlated with the length of the beam-plasma interaction region.

  15. Acceleration of electrons in strong beam-plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Bernstein, W.; Kellogg, P. J.; Whalen, B. A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of strong beam-plasma interactions on the electron population of the upper atmosphere have been investigated in an electron acceleration experiment performed with a sounding rocket. The rocket carried the Several Complex Experiments (SCEX) payload which included an electron accelerator, three disposable 'throwaway' detectors (TADs), and a stepped electron energy analyzer. The payload was launched in an auroral arc over the rocket at altitudes of 157 and 178 km, respectively. The performance characteristics of the instruments are discussed in detail. The data are combined with the results of laboratory measurements and show that electrons with energies of at least two and probably four times the injection energy of 2 keV were observed during strong beam-plasma interaction events. The interaction events occurred at pitch angles of 54 and 126 degrees. On the basis of the data it is proposed that the superenergization of the electrons is correlated with the length of the beam-plasma interaction region.

  16. Oxidation Degradation of Aqueous Carbofuran Induced by Low Temperature Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Lumei; Gao, Jinzhang; Hu, Yusen; Liang, Huiguang; Xiao, Wen; Wang, Xingmin

    2008-06-01

    The oxidative degradation of aqueous carbofuran, a heavily used toxic carbamate insecticide by low temperature plasma, was investigated. The results show that the treatment efficiency increases with the increase in initial concentration. Raising the treatment temperature and changing the pH value can result in enhanced degradation of carbofuran in solution. The results also show that low temperature plasma treatment can effectively remove chemical oxygen demand (COD) of carbofuran in the solution.

  17. Annular vortex merging processes in non-neutral electron plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kaga, Chikato Ito, Kiyokazu; Higaki, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Hiromi

    2015-06-29

    Non-neutral electron plasmas in a uniform magnetic field are investigated experimentally as a two dimensional (2D) fluid. Previously, it was reported that 2D phase space volume increases during a vortex merging process with viscosity. However, the measurement was restricted to a plasma with a high density. Here, an alternative method is introduced to evaluate a similar process for a plasma with a low density.

  18. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce

    2014-07-01

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  19. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    SciTech Connect

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce

    2014-07-21

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  20. Observation of warm, higher energy electrons transiting a double layer in a helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Yung-Ta Li, Yan; Scharer, John E.

    2015-03-15

    Measurements of an inductive RF helicon argon plasma double layer with two temperature electron distributions including a fast (>80 eV) tail are observed at 0.17 mTorr Ar pressure. The fast, untrapped electrons observed downstream of the double layer have a higher temperature (13 eV) than the trapped (T{sub e} = 4 eV) electrons. The reduction of plasma potential and density observed in the double layer region would require an upstream temperature ten times the measured 4 eV if occurring via Boltzmann ambipolar expansion. The experimental observation in Madison helicon experiment indicates that fast electrons with substantial density fractions can be created at low helicon operating pressures.

  1. The effect of non-thermal electrons on obliquely propagating electron acoustic waves in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Satyavir; Bharuthram, Ramashwar

    2016-07-01

    Small amplitude electron acoustic solitary waves are studied in a magnetized plasma consisting of hot electrons following Cairn's type non-thermal distribution function and fluid cool electrons, cool ions and an electron beam. Using reductive perturbation technique, the Korteweg-de-Vries-Zakharov-Kuznetsov (KdV-ZK) equation is derived to describe the nonlinear evolution of electron acoustic waves. It is observed that the presence of non-thermal electrons plays an important role in determining the existence region of solitary wave structures. Theoretical results of this work is used to model the electrostatic solitary structures observed by Viking satellite. Detailed investigation of physical parameters such as non-thermality of hot electrons, beam electron velocity and temperature, obliquity on the existence regime of solitons will be discussed.

  2. Ponderomotive Acceleration of Hot Electrons in Tenuous Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    V. I. Geyko; Fraiman, G. M.; Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2009-02-01

    The oscillation-center Hamiltonian is derived for a relativistic electron injected with an arbitrary momentum in a linearly polarized laser pulse propagating in tenuous plasma, assuming that the pulse length is smaller than the plasma wavelength. For hot electrons generated at collisions with ions under intense laser drive, multiple regimes of ponderomotive acceleration are identified and the laser dispersion is shown to affect the process at plasma densities down to 1017 cm-3. Assuming a/Υg << 1, which prevents net acceleration of the cold plasma, it is also shown that the normalized energy Υ of hot electrons accelerated from the initial energy Υo < , Γ does not exceed Γ ~ aΥg, where a is the normalized laser field, and Υg is the group velocity Lorentz factor. Yet Υ ~ Γ is attained within a wide range of initial conditions; hence a cutoff in the hot electron distribution is predicted.

  3. Electromagnetic solitary pulses in a magnetized electron-positron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P. K.; Eliasson, B.; Stenflo, L.

    2011-03-15

    A theory for large amplitude compressional electromagnetic solitary pulses in a magnetized electron-positron (e-p) plasma is presented. The pulses, which propagate perpendicular to the external magnetic field, are associated with the compression of the plasma density and the wave magnetic field. Here the solitary wave magnetic field pressure provides the restoring force, while the inertia comes from the equal mass electrons and positrons. The solitary pulses are formed due to a balance between the compressional wave dispersion arising from the curl of the inertial forces in Faraday's law and the nonlinearities associated with the divergence of the electron and positron fluxes, the nonlinear Lorentz forces, the advection of the e-p fluids, and the nonlinear plasma current densities. The compressional solitary pulses can exist in a well-defined speed range above the Alfven speed. They can be associated with localized electromagnetic field excitations in magnetized laboratory and space plasmas composed of electrons and positrons.

  4. Accessibility of electron Bernstein modes in over-dense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M. D.; Bigelow, T. S.; Batchelor, D. B.

    1999-09-20

    Mode-conversion between the ordinary, extraordinary and electron Bernstein modes near the plasma edge may allow signals generated by electrons in an over-dense plasma to be detected. Alternatively, high frequency power may gain accessibility to the core plasma through this mode conversion process. Many of the tools used for ion cyclotron antenna design can also be applied near the electron cyclotron frequency. In this paper, we investigate the the possibilities for an antenna that may couple to electron Bernstein modes inside an over-dense plasma. The optimum values for wavelengths that undergo mode-conversion are found by scanning the poloidal and toroidal response of the plasma using a warm plasma slab approximation with a sheared magnetic field. Only a very narrow region of the edge can be examined in this manner; however, ray tracing may be used to follow the mode converted power in a more general geometry. It is eventually hoped that the methods can be extended to a hot plasma representation. Using antenna design codes, some basic antenna shapes will be considered to see what types of antennas might be used to detect or launch modes that penetrate the cutoff layer in the edge plasma. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Accessibillity of Electron Bernstein Modes in Over-Dense Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, D.B.; Bigelow, T.S.; Carter, M.D.

    1999-04-12

    Mode-conversion between the ordinary, extraordinary and electron Bernstein modes near the plasma edge may allow signals generated by electrons in an over-dense plasma to be detected. Alternatively, high frequency power may gain accessibility to the core plasma through this mode conversion process. Many of the tools used for ion cyclotron antenna de-sign can also be applied near the electron cyclotron frequency. In this paper, we investigate the possibilities for an antenna that may couple to electron Bernstein modes inside an over-dense plasma. The optimum values for wavelengths that undergo mode-conversion are found by scanning the poloidal and toroidal response of the plasma using a warm plasma slab approximation with a sheared magnetic field. Only a very narrow region of the edge can be examined in this manner; however, ray tracing may be used to follow the mode converted power in a more general geometry. It is eventually hoped that the methods can be extended to a hot plasma representation. Using antenna design codes, some basic antenna shapes will be considered to see what types of antennas might be used to detect or launch modes that penetrate the cutoff layer in the edge plasma.

  6. Gas temperature and electron temperature measurements by emission spectroscopy for an atmospheric microplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, Davide; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Sasaki, Takeshi; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2007-01-01

    A microplasma suitable for material processing at atmospheric pressure in argon and argon-oxygen mixtures is being studied here. The microplasma is ignited by a high voltage dc pulse and sustained by low power (1-5W) at 450MHz. the mechanisms responsible for sustaining the microplasma require a more detailed analysis, which will be the subject of further study. Here it is shown that the microplasma is in nonequilibrium and appears to be in glow mode. The effect of power and oxygen content is also analyzed in terms of gas temperature and electron temperature. Both the gas temperature and the electron temperature have been determined by spectral emission and for the latter a very simple method has been used based on a collisional-radiative model. It is observed that power coupling is affected by a combination of factors and that prediction and control of the energy flow are not always straightforward even for simple argon plasmas. Varying gas content concentration has shown that oxygen creates a preferential energy channel towards increasing the gas temperature. Overall the results have shown that combined multiple diagnostics are necessary to understand plasma characteristics and that spectral emission can represent a valuable tool for tailoring microplasma to specific processing requirements.

  7. Electron anions and the glass transition temperature.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Lewis E; Sushko, Peter V; Tomota, Yudai; Hosono, Hideo

    2016-09-01

    Properties of glasses are typically controlled by judicious selection of the glass-forming and glass-modifying constituents. Through an experimental and computational study of the crystalline, molten, and amorphous [Ca12Al14O32](2+) ⋅ (e(-))2, we demonstrate that electron anions in this system behave as glass modifiers that strongly affect solidification dynamics, the glass transition temperature, and spectroscopic properties of the resultant amorphous material. The concentration of such electron anions is a consequential control parameter: It invokes materials evolution pathways and properties not available in conventional glasses, which opens a unique avenue in rational materials design. PMID:27559083

  8. Electron beam manipulation, injection and acceleration in plasma wakefield accelerators by optically generated plasma density spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittig, Georg; Karger, Oliver S.; Knetsch, Alexander; Xi, Yunfeng; Deng, Aihua; Rosenzweig, James B.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Smith, Jonathan; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, Dino A.; Manahan, Grace G.; Hidding, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    We discuss considerations regarding a novel and robust scheme for optically triggered electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators [1]. In this technique, a transversely propagating focused laser pulse ignites a quasi-stationary plasma column before the arrival of the plasma wake. This localized plasma density enhancement or optical "plasma torch" distorts the blowout during the arrival of the electron drive bunch and modifies the electron trajectories, resulting in controlled injection. By changing the gas density, and the laser pulse parameters such as beam waist and intensity, and by moving the focal point of the laser pulse, the shape of the plasma torch, and therefore the generated trailing beam, can be tuned easily. The proposed method is much more flexible and faster in generating gas density transitions when compared to hydrodynamics-based methods, and it accommodates experimentalists needs as it is a purely optical process and straightforward to implement.

  9. Plasma characterization using ultraviolet Thomson scattering from ion-acoustic and electron plasma waves (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follett, R. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Henchen, R. J.; Katz, J.; Myatt, J. F.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    Collective Thomson scattering is a technique for measuring the plasma conditions in laser-plasma experiments. Simultaneous measurements of ion-acoustic and electron plasma-wave spectra were obtained using a 263.25-nm Thomson-scattering probe beam. A fully reflective collection system was used to record light scattered from electron plasma waves at electron densities greater than 1021 cm-3, which produced scattering peaks near 200 nm. An accurate analysis of the experimental Thomson-scattering spectra required accounting for plasma gradients, instrument sensitivity, optical effects, and background radiation. Practical techniques for including these effects when fitting Thomson-scattering spectra are presented and applied to the measured spectra to show the improvements in plasma characterization.

  10. Interaction of two solitary waves in quantum electron-positron-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan-Xia; Liu, Zong-Ming; Lin, Mai-Mai; Shi, Yu-Ren; Chen, Jian-Min; Duan, Wen-Shan

    2011-05-01

    The collision between two ion-acoustic solitary waves with arbitrary colliding angle θ in an unmagnetized, ultracold quantum three-component e-p-i plasma has been investigated. By using the extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) perturbation method, we obtain the KdV equations and the analytical phase shifts after the collision of two solitary waves in this three-component plasma. The effects of the quantum parameter H, the ratio of Fermi positron temperature to Fermi electron temperature σ, the ratio of Fermi positron number density to Fermi electron number density μ, and the ratio of Fermi ion temperature to Fermi electron temperature ρ on the phase shifts are studied. It is found that these parameters can significantly influence the phase shifts of the solitons.

  11. Interaction of two solitary waves in quantum electron-positron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yanxia; Lin Maimai; Shi Yuren; Duan Wenshan; Liu Zongming; Chen Jianmin

    2011-05-15

    The collision between two ion-acoustic solitary waves with arbitrary colliding angle {theta} in an unmagnetized, ultracold quantum three-component e-p-i plasma has been investigated. By using the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo (PLK) perturbation method, we obtain the KdV equations and the analytical phase shifts after the collision of two solitary waves in this three-component plasma. The effects of the quantum parameter H, the ratio of Fermi positron temperature to Fermi electron temperature {sigma}, the ratio of Fermi positron number density to Fermi electron number density {mu}, and the ratio of Fermi ion temperature to Fermi electron temperature {rho} on the phase shifts are studied. It is found that these parameters can significantly influence the phase shifts of the solitons.

  12. Electron acceleration during the decay of nonlinear Whistler waves in low-beta electron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Umeda, Takayuki; Saito, Shinji; Nariyuki, Yasuhiro E-mail: saito@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2014-10-10

    Relativistic electron acceleration through dissipation of a nonlinear, short-wavelength, and monochromatic electromagnetic whistler wave in low-beta plasma is investigated by utilizing a one-dimensional fully relativistic electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. The nonlinear (large-amplitude) parent whistler wave decays through the parametric instability which enhances electrostatic ion acoustic waves and electromagnetic whistler waves. These waves satisfy the condition of three-wave coupling. Through the decay instability, the energy of electron bulk velocity supporting the parent wave is converted to the thermal energy perpendicular to the background magnetic field. Increase of the perpendicular temperature triggers the electron temperature anisotropy instability which generates broadband whistler waves and heats electrons in the parallel direction. The broadband whistler waves are inverse-cascaded during the relaxation of the electron temperature anisotropy. In lower-beta conditions, electrons with a pitch angle of about 90° are successively accelerated by inverse-cascaded whistler waves, and selected electrons are accelerated to over a Lorentz factor of 10. The result implies that the nonlinear dissipation of a finite-amplitude and short-wavelength whistler wave plays an important role in producing relativistic nonthermal electrons over a few MeV especially at lower beta plasmas.

  13. Study on electron beam in a low energy plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair; Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow

    2014-03-05

    Electron beam emission was investigated in a low energy plasma focus device (2.2 kJ) using copper hollow anode. Faraday cup was used to estimate the energy of the electron beam. XR100CR X-ray spectrometer was used to explore the impact of the electron beam on the target observed from top-on and side-on position. Experiments were carried out at optimized pressure of argon gas. The impact of electron beam is exceptionally notable with two different approaches using lead target inside hollow anode in our plasma focus device.

  14. Properties of Trapped Electron Bunches in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Neil; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    Plasma-based accelerators use the propagation of a drive bunch through plasma to create large electric fields. Recent plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) experiments, carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), successfully doubled the energy for some of the 42 GeV drive bunch electrons in less than a meter; this feat would have required 3 km in the SLAC linac. This dissertation covers one phenomenon associated with the PWFA, electron trapping. Recently it was shown that PWFAs, operated in the nonlinear bubble regime, can trap electrons that are released by ionization inside the plasma wake and accelerate them to high energies. These trapped electrons occupy and can degrade the accelerating portion of the plasma wake, so it is important to understand their origins and how to remove them. Here, the onset of electron trapping is connected to the drive bunch properties. Additionally, the trapped electron bunches are observed with normalized transverse emittance divided by peak current, {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t}, below the level of 0.2 {micro}m/kA. A theoretical model of the trapped electron emittance, developed here, indicates that the emittance scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density in the non-linear 'bubble' regime of the PWFA. This model and simulations indicate that the observed values of {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t} result from multi-GeV trapped electron bunches with emittances of a few {micro}m and multi-kA peak currents. These properties make the trapped electrons a possible particle source for next generation light sources. This dissertation is organized as follows. The first chapter is an overview of the PWFA, which includes a review of the accelerating and focusing fields and a survey of the remaining issues for a plasma-based particle collider. Then, the second chapter examines the physics of electron trapping in the PWFA. The third chapter uses theory and simulations to analyze the properties of the trapped electron

  15. Adiabatic expansion of a strongly correlated pure electron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, D.H.E.; O'Neil, T.M.

    1986-02-17

    Adiabatic expansion is proposed as a method of increasing the degree of correlation of a magnetically confined pure electron plasma. Quantum mechanical effects and correlation effects make the physics of the expansion quite different from that for a classical ideal gas. The proposed expansion may be useful in a current experimental effort to cool a pure electron plasma to the liquid and solid (crystalline) states.

  16. Adiabatic expansion of a strongly correlated pure electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, D. H. E.; Oneil, T. M.

    1986-02-01

    Adiabatic expansion is proposed as a method of increasing the degree of correlation of a magnetically confined pure electron plasma. Quantum mechanical effects and correlation effects make the physics of the expansion quite different from that for a classical ideal gas. The proposed expansion may be useful in a current experimental effort to cool a pure electron plasma to the liquid and solid (crystalline) states.

  17. Spectroscopic measurement of plasma gas temperature of the atmospheric-pressure microwave induced nitrogen plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan-Jie; Li, Shou-Zhe

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric-pressure microwave induced N2 plasma is diagnosed by optical emission spectroscopy with respect to the plasma gas temperature. The spectroscopic measurement of plasma gas temperature is discussed with respect to the spectral line broadening of Ar I and the various emission rotational-vibrational band systems of N2(B-A), N2(C-B) and \\text{N}2+(\\text{B-X}). It is found that the Boltzmann plot of the selective spectral lines from \\text{N}2+(\\text{B-X}) at 391.4 nm is preferable to others with an accuracy better than 5% for an atmospheric-pressure plasma of high gas temperature. On the basis of the thermal balance equation, the dependences of the plasma gas temperature on the absorbed power, the gas flow rate, and the gas composition are investigated experimentally with photographs recording the plasma morphology.

  18. Microwave radiation measurements near the electron plasma frequency of the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallavarpu, R.; Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Microwave emission near the electron plasma frequency of the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus plasma has been observed, and its relation to the average electron density and the dc toroidal magnetic field was examined. The emission was detected using a spectrum analyzer and a 50-ohm miniature coaxial probe. The radiation appeared as a broad amplitude peak that shifted in frequency as the plasma parameters were varied. The observed radiation scanned an average plasma density ranging from 20 billion to 800 billion per cu cm. A linear relation was observed between the density calculated from the emission frequency and the average plasma density measured with a microwave interferometer. With the aid of a relative density profile measurement of the plasma, it was determined that the emissions occurred from the outer periphery of the plasma.

  19. Head-on collision of magnetoacoustic solitary waves in magnetized quantum electron-positron-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shi-Sen; Wu, Shan; Raissan, Majid; Cheng, Ze

    2013-08-01

    This article presents the first study of the head-on collision between two magnetoacoustic solitary waves (MASWs) in magnetized quantum plasma consisting of electrons, positrons, and ions, using the extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kou (PLK) method. The effects of the magnetic field intensity, the positron to ion number density ratio, the quantum parameter, the Fermi temperature ratio, and plasma number density on the solitary wave collisions are investigated. It is shown that these factors significantly modify the phase shift.

  20. Movement of electron when recombining in hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikhrev, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    An analytical model and the results of modeling are presented for movement of electrons in recombining hydrogen plasma. It is shown that in case of taking into account the magnetic moment and angular momentum as well as spin flip of electron in magnetic field the electron comes to the orbit with angular momentum ħ/2. If azimuthal and radial components of kinetic energy of electron are equal then the full energy of such the orbits is 13.6 eV.

  1. Computer Model for Electrode Plasma Generation by Electron and Ion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, Victor V.; Bespalov, Valeri I.; Kirikov, Alexander V.; Turchanovskii, Igor. Yu.; Tarakanov, Vladimir P.

    2002-12-01

    A model is proposed for computer simulation of the electrode plasma generation by electron and ion flows. The distribution of the absorbed energy of particles in the electrode material is calculated by the Monte-Carlo codes. This provides a possibility to control the electrode temperature by solving the heat conductivity equation for specified distributions of thermal sources and to calculate the rate of plasma generation. The behavior of the plasma in the gap can be modeled based on simple model where the velocity, the density, and the temperature of the plasma can be given by some dependence. Within the framework of the model proposed, numerical study is performed on the effect of the plasma flows in Rod Pinch Diodes and in the Insulator Stack of the Z-accelerator.

  2. Oscillating plasma bubbles. III. Internal electron sources and sinks

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2012-08-15

    An internal electron source has been used to neutralize ions injected from an ambient plasma into a spherical grid. The resultant plasma is termed a plasma 'bubble.' When the electron supply from the filament is reduced, the sheath inside the bubble becomes unstable. The plasma potential of the bubble oscillates near but below the ion plasma frequency. Different modes of oscillations have been observed as well as a subharmonic and multiple harmonics. The frequency increases with ion density and decreases with electron density. The peak amplitude occurs for an optimum current and the instability is quenched at large electron densities. The frequency also increases if Langmuir probes inside the bubble draw electrons. Allowing electrons from the ambient plasma to enter, the bubble changes the frequency dependence on grid voltage. It is concluded that the net space charge density in the sheath determines the oscillation frequency. It is suggested that the sheath instability is caused by ion inertia in an oscillating sheath electric field which is created by ion bunching.

  3. Electron Beam Transport in Advanced Plasma Wave Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Ronald L

    2013-01-31

    The primary goal of this grant was to develop a diagnostic for relativistic plasma wave accelerators based on injecting a low energy electron beam (5-50keV) perpendicular to the plasma wave and observing the distortion of the electron beam's cross section due to the plasma wave's electrostatic fields. The amount of distortion would be proportional to the plasma wave amplitude, and is the basis for the diagnostic. The beat-wave scheme for producing plasma waves, using two CO2 laser beam, was modeled using a leap-frog integration scheme to solve the equations of motion. Single electron trajectories and corresponding phase space diagrams were generated in order to study and understand the details of the interaction dynamics. The electron beam was simulated by combining thousands of single electrons, whose initial positions and momenta were selected by random number generators. The model was extended by including the interactions of the electrons with the CO2 laser fields of the beat wave, superimposed with the plasma wave fields. The results of the model were used to guide the design and construction of a small laboratory experiment that may be used to test the diagnostic idea.

  4. Measuring ionospheric electron density using the plasma frequency probe

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, M.D.; Baker, K.D. )

    1992-02-01

    During the past decade, the plasma frequency probe (PFP) has evolved into an accurate, proven method of measuring electron density in the ionosphere above about 90 km. The instrument uses an electrically short antenna mounted on a sounding rocket that is immersed in the plasma and notes the frequency where the antenna impedance is large and nonreactive. This frequency is closely related to the plasma frequency, which is a direct function of free electron concentration. The probe uses phase-locked loop technology to follow a changing electron density. Several sections of the plasma frequency probe circuitry are unique, especially the voltage-controlled oscillator that uses both an electronically tuned capacitor and inductor to give the wide tuning range needed for electron density measurements. The results from two recent sounding rocket flights (Thunderstorm II and CRIT II) under vastly different plasma conditions demonstrate the capabilities of the PFP and show the importance of in situ electron density measurements of understanding plasma processes. 9 refs.

  5. Electron temperatures and densities in the Venus ionosphere - Pioneer Venus orbiter electron temperature probe results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, L. H.; Theis, R. F.; Krehbiel, J. P.; Nagy, A. F.; Donahue, T. M.; Mcelroy, M. B.; Pedersen, A.

    1979-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus orbiter electron temperature probe was used to obtain altitude profiles of electron temperature and density in the ionosphere of Venus. Elevated temperatures at times of low solar wind flux might indicate support for a certain model. According to this model, less than 5% of the solar wind energy is deposited at the ionopause and is conducted downward through an unmagnetized ionosphere to the region below 200 km where electron cooling to the neutral atmosphere proceeds rapidly. The patterns of electron temperatures and densities at higher solar wind fluxes are considered, the variability of the ionopause height in the late afternoon is noted, and the role of an induced magnetic barrier in the neighborhood of the ionopause is discussed.

  6. Simulation of laser-plasma interactions and fast-electron transport in inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I. Kemp, A.J.; Divol, L.

    2010-06-20

    A new framework is introduced for kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions in an inhomogeneous plasma motivated by the goal of performing integrated kinetic simulations of fast-ignition laser fusion. The algorithm addresses the propagation and absorption of an intense electromagnetic wave in an ionized plasma leading to the generation and transport of an energetic electron component. The energetic electrons propagate farther into the plasma to much higher densities where Coulomb collisions become important. The high-density plasma supports an energetic electron current, return currents, self-consistent electric fields associated with maintaining quasi-neutrality, and self-consistent magnetic fields due to the currents. Collisions of the electrons and ions are calculated accurately to track the energetic electrons and model their interactions with the background plasma. Up to a density well above critical density, where the laser electromagnetic field is evanescent, Maxwell's equations are solved with a conventional particle-based, finite-difference scheme. In the higher-density plasma, Maxwell's equations are solved using an Ohm's law neglecting the inertia of the background electrons with the option of omitting the displacement current in Ampere's law. Particle equations of motion with binary collisions are solved for all electrons and ions throughout the system using weighted particles to resolve the density gradient efficiently. The algorithm is analyzed and demonstrated in simulation examples. The simulation scheme introduced here achieves significantly improved efficiencies.

  7. Hybrid Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Fast Electron Transport in Inhomogeneous Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B I; Kemp, A; Divol, L

    2009-05-27

    A new framework is introduced for kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions in an inhomogenous plasma motivated by the goal of performing integrated kinetic simulations of fast-ignition laser fusion. The algorithm addresses the propagation and absorption of an intense electromagnetic wave in an ionized plasma leading to the generation and transport of an energetic electron component. The energetic electrons propagate farther into the plasma to much higher densities where Coulomb collisions become important. The high-density plasma supports an energetic electron current, return currents, self-consistent electric fields associated with maintaining quasi-neutrality, and self-consistent magnetic fields due to the currents. Collisions of the electrons and ions are calculated accurately to track the energetic electrons and model their interactions with the background plasma. Up to a density well above critical density, where the laser electromagnetic field is evanescent, Maxwell's equations are solved with a conventional particle-based, finite-difference scheme. In the higher-density plasma, Maxwell's equations are solved using an Ohm's law neglecting the inertia of the background electrons with the option of omitting the displacement current in Ampere's law. Particle equations of motion with binary collisions are solved for all electrons and ions throughout the system using weighted particles to resolve the density gradient efficiently. The algorithm is analyzed and demonstrated in simulation examples. The simulation scheme introduced here achieves significantly improved efficiencies.

  8. Oblique firehose instability in hot collisionless plasmas - interplay between protons and electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneva, Yana; Lazar, Marian; Vinas, Adolfo; Poedts, Stefaan

    2016-04-01

    We solve the linearized kinetic Vlasov-Maxwell dispersion relation for oblique wave propagation in a homogeneous highly anisotropic hot electron-proton plasma. We assume bi-Maxwellian velocity distributions for both species, charge neutrality and current conservation, and consider no differential streaming between the ions and the electrons. We calculate the growth rate of the parallel and oblique proton firehose instabilities for various angles of wave propagation and varios electron plasma properties. We study the transition from stable to unstable scales with increasing electron temperature and temperature anisotropies. We find that for highly anisotropic hot plasma both the oscillatory parallel and the aperiodic oblique proton firehose branches may easily couple to the parallel and oblique electron firehose branches. In other words our work demonstrates the interplay between the proton and electron firehose instabilities, whose scales become fully mixed in hot collisionless plasma when the protons and the electrons are simultaneously anisotropic. In the case of parallel wave propagation both left and right-hand polarized waves are simultaneously excited. As we increase the angle of propagation the electron firehose starts to dominate with excitation of large-amplitude aperiodic fluctuations over a large range of wave-numbers, starting at the protons scales and extending up to the smaller electron scales. Whereas the maximum growth rate of the parallel proton firehose branch remains always at the proton scales, the maximum growth rate for the oblique proton firehose extends down to the electron scales. The observed electron-proton scale mixing can have significant implications for the observed plasma properties and instability thresholds in hot colissionless solar wind streams.

  9. Monitoring Temperature in High Enthalpy Arc-heated Plasma Flows using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Marcel Nations; Chang, Leyen S.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Nawaz, Anuscheh; Taunk, Jaswinder S.; Driver, David M.; Raiche, George

    2013-01-01

    A tunable diode laser sensor was designed for in situ monitoring of temperature in the arc heater of the NASA Ames IHF arcjet facility (60 MW). An external cavity diode laser was used to generate light at 777.2 nm and laser absorption used to monitor the population of electronically excited oxygen atoms in an air plasma flow. Under the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, time-resolved temperature measurements were obtained on four lines-of-sight, which enabled evaluation of the temperature uniformity in the plasma column for different arcjet operating conditions.

  10. Comparison of measured and simulated electron energy distribution functions in low-pressure helium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruenwald, J.; Tskhakaya, D.; Kovačič, J.; Čerček, M.; Gyergyek, T.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2013-02-01

    Knowledge of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) is of great interest in different branches of plasma physics ranging from laboratory to fusion plasmas. In the frame of this work systematic measurements of the EEDF in low temperature helium plasmas (Te ≈ 2 eV) at different working gas pressures and discharge currents (Idis between 1 and 2 A) will be presented and compared with numerical particle-in-cell (PIC) code simulations. The experiments were conducted in the Innsbruck double plasma machine and in the Ljubljana linear magnetic plasma device with helium as the working gas. The EEDF was obtained by the second derivative of the characteristic of a Langmuir probe. The PIC code was used to simulate the EEDF by taking into account most of the physical parameters in the plasma vessel.

  11. Measurement of electron temperature of imploded capsules at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Callahan, D.; Cerjan, C.; Edwards, J.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S.; Landen, O. L.; Springer, P.; Suter, L.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D. K.; Kilkenny, J.; Kline, J.; Kyrala, G.; and others

    2012-10-15

    The electron and ion temperatures of the imploded core plasma are two of the most important metrics of inertial confinement fusion experiments. We have developed a technique for inferring electron temperatures from the contrast of x-ray images observed through a group of x-ray filters. Generally, the plasma electron temperature exhibits spatial and temporal variations, so time-averaged and time-resolved measurements are expected to yield somewhat different results. By analyzing the intensity of images observed with both a time-integrated detector (imaging plates) and a time-resolved detector (gated micro-channel plate), we found the electron temperature observed from x-ray images to be systematically higher than the ion temperature inferred from fusion neutron spectroscopy.

  12. Gyrokinetic simulations of electrostatic microinstabilities with bounce-averaged kinetic electrons for shaped tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Lei; Kwon, Jaemin; Hahm, T. S.; Jo, Gahyung

    2016-06-01

    Nonlinear bounce-averaged kinetic theory [B. H. Fong and T. S. Hahm, Phys. Plasmas 6, 188 (1999)] is used for magnetically trapped electron dynamics for the purpose of achieving efficient gyrokinetic simulations of Trapped Electron Mode (TEM) and Ion Temperature Gradient mode with trapped electrons (ITG-TEM) in shaped tokamak plasmas. The bounce-averaged kinetic equations are explicitly extended to shaped plasma equilibria from the previous ones for concentric circular plasmas, and implemented to a global nonlinear gyrokinetic code, Gyro-Kinetic Plasma Simulation Program (gKPSP) [J. M. Kwon et al., Nucl. Fusion 52, 013004 (2012)]. Verification of gKPSP with the bounce-averaged kinetic trapped electrons in shaped plasmas is successfully carried out for linear properties of the ITG-TEM mode and Rosenbluth-Hinton residual zonal flow [M. N. Rosenbluth and F. L. Hinton, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 724 (1998)]. Physics responsible for stabilizing effects of elongation on both ITG mode and TEM is identified using global gKPSP simulations. These can be understood in terms of magnetic flux expansion, leading to the effective temperature gradient R / L T ( 1 - E ') [P. Angelino et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 195002 (2009)] and poloidal wave length contraction at low field side, resulting in the effective poloidal wave number kθρi/κ.

  13. Measuring the Electron Temperature in the Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, Joseph; SaintCyr, Orville C.; Reginald, Nelson

    2008-01-01

    We report on an experiment to demonstrate the feasibility of a new method to obtain the electron temperature and flow speed in the solar corona by observing the visible Kcoronal spectrum during the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Libya. Results show that this new method is indeed feasible, giving electron temperatures and speeds of 1.10 $\\pm$ 0.05 MK, 103.0 $\\pm$ 92.0 $kmsA{-l}$; 0.98 $\\pm$ 0.12 MK, 0.0 + 10.0 $kmsA{-1)s; 0.70 $\\pm$ 0.08 MK, 0.0 + 10.0 $kmsA{-l)$ at l.l{\\it R)$ {\\odot}$ in the solar north, east and west, respectively, and 0.93 $\\pm$ 0.12 MK, 0.0 + 10.0 $kmsA{-l}$ at 1.2{\\it R}$ {\\odot}$ in the solar east. This new technique could be easily used from a space-based platform in a coronagraph to produce two dimensional maps of the electron temperature and bulk flow speed at the base of the solar wind useful for the study of heliospheric structure and space weather.

  14. Ion and electron temperatures in the SUMMA mirror device by emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.; Voss, D. E.; Reinmann, J. J.; Snyder, A.

    1974-01-01

    Ion and electron temperatures, and ion drift were measured in a superconducting magnetic mirror apparatus by observing the Doppler-broadened charge-exchange component of the 667.8 and 587.6 nanometer He lines in He plasma, and the H sub alpha and H sub beta lines in H2 plasma. The second moment of the line profiles was used as the parameter for determining ion temperature. Corrections for magnetic splitting, fine structure, monochromator slit function, and variation in charge-exchange cross section with energy are included. Electron temperatures were measured by the line ratio method for the corona model, and correlations of ion and electron temperatures with plasma parameters are presented.

  15. High and low frequency instabilities driven by counter-streaming electron beams in space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mbuli, L. N.; Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.

    2014-05-15

    A four-component plasma composed of a drifting (parallel to ambient magnetic field) population of warm electrons, drifting (anti-parallel to ambient magnetic field) cool electrons, stationary hot electrons, and thermal ions is studied in an attempt to further our understanding of the excitation mechanisms of broadband electrostatic noise (BEN) in the Earth's magnetospheric regions such as the magnetosheath, plasmasphere, and plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL). Using kinetic theory, beam-driven electrostatic instabilities such as the ion-acoustic, electron-acoustic instabilities are found to be supported in our multi-component model. The dependence of the instability growth rates and real frequencies on various plasma parameters such as beam speed, number density, temperature, and temperature anisotropy of the counter-streaming (relative to ambient magnetic field) cool electron beam are investigated. It is found that the number density of the anti-field aligned cool electron beam and drift speed play a central role in determining which instability is excited. Using plasma parameters which are closely correlated with the measurements made by the Cluster satellites in the PSBL region, we find that the electron-acoustic and ion-acoustic instabilities could account for the generation of BEN in this region.

  16. Feasibility of measuring density and temperature of laser produced plasmas using spectroscopic techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Edens, Aaron D.

    2008-09-01

    A wide variety of experiments on the Z-Beamlet laser involve the creation of laser produced plasmas. Having a direct measurement of the density and temperature of these plasma would an extremely useful tool, as understanding how these quantities evolve in space and time gives insight into the causes of changes in other physical processes, such as x-ray generation and opacity. We propose to investigate the possibility of diagnosing the density and temperature of laser-produced plasma using temporally and spatially resolved spectroscopic techniques that are similar to ones that have been successfully fielded on other systems. Various researchers have measured the density and temperature of laboratory plasmas by looking at the width and intensity ratio of various characteristic lines in gases such as nitrogen and hydrogen, as well as in plasmas produced off of solid targets such as zinc. The plasma conditions produce two major measurable effects on the characteristic spectral lines of that plasma. The 1st is the Stark broadening of an individual line, which depends on the electron density of the plasma, with higher densities leading to broader lines. The second effect is a change in the ratio of various lines in the plasma corresponding to different ionization states. By looking at the ratio of these lines, we can gain some understanding of the plasma ionization state and consequently its temperature (and ion density when coupled with the broadening measurement). The hotter a plasma is, the higher greater the intensity of lines corresponding to higher ionization states. We would like to investigate fielding a system on the Z-Beamlet laser chamber to spectroscopically study laser produced plasmas from different material targets.

  17. Electron plasma oscillations upstream of the solar wind termination shock.

    PubMed

    Gurnett, D A; Kurth, W S

    2005-09-23

    Electron plasma oscillations have been detected upstream of the solar wind termination shock by the plasma wave instrument on the Voyager 1 spacecraft. These waves were first observed on 11 February 2004, at a heliocentric radial distance of 91.0 astronomical units, and continued sporadically with a gradually increasing occurrence rate for nearly a year. The last event occurred on 15 December 2004, at 94.1 astronomical units, just before the spacecraft crossed the termination shock. Since then, no further electron plasma oscillations have been observed, consistent with the spacecraft having crossed the termination shock into the heliosheath.

  18. Femtosecond laser-induced electronic plasma at metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhaoyang; Mao, Samuel S.

    2008-08-04

    We develop a theoretical analysis to model plasma initiation at the early stage of femtosecond laser irradiation of metal surfaces. The calculation reveals that there is a threshold intensity for the formation of a microscale electronic plasma at the laser-irradidated metal surface. As the full width at half maximum of a laser pulse increases from 15 to 200 fs, the plasma formation threshold decreases by merely about 20%. The dependence of the threshold intensity on laser pulse width can be attributed to laser-induced surface electron emission, in particular due to the effect of photoelectric effect.

  19. Electron-Hose Instability in an Annular Plasma Sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, David H.

    1999-07-08

    A relativistic electron beam propagating through an annular plasma sheath is subject to a transverse plasma-electron coupled electrostatic instability. From the linearized fluid equations, the beam-sheath interaction is resolved into three coupled equations. The corresponding wakefield is computed and the asymptotic linear evolution is noted. For illustration, numerical examples are given for a plasma accelerator employing such a sheath. While the coasting beam scalings are quite severe at low energy, single-bunch instability growth can in fact be reduced to nil, for a very high-gradient accelerator.

  20. Observations of Electron Vorticity in the Inner Plasma Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurgiolo, C.; Goldstein, M. L.; Vinas, A. F.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Fazakerley, A. N.

    2011-01-01

    From a limited number of observations it appears that vorticity is a common feature in the inner plasma sheet. With the four Cluster spacecraft and the four PEACE instruments positioned in a tetrahedral configuration, for the first time it is possible to directly estimate the electron fluid vorticity in a space plasma. We show examples of electron fluid vorticity from multiple plasma sheet crossings. These include three time periods when Cluster passed through a reconnection ion diffusion region. Enhancements in vorticity are seen in association with each crossing of the ion diffusion region.

  1. Helicon wave plasma chemical vapor deposition of nanocrystalline silicon carbide films at low substrate temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wei; Lu, Wanbing; Wang, Baozhu; Han, Li; Fu, Guangsheng

    2005-02-01

    Silicon carbide thin films have been deposited by helicon wave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (HW-PECVD) technique under the conditions of variant deposition temperatures from 300 to 600°C. Silane, methane and hydrogen are used as reactive gas. The structural properties of the deposited films are characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), scan electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ultraviolet-visible optical absorption techniques. Detailed analysis of the FTIR spectra indicates that the onset of growing nanocrystalline SiC films at low substrate temperature is closed related with the high plasma ionization rate of helicon wave plasma and the condition of low working gas pressure and strong hydrogen dilution in experiment. The SEM and TEM measurements confirm that the structure of the deposited films is nanocrystalline SiC grains embedded in amorphous matrix and the size of the crystalline gains increases with substrate temperature.

  2. Ideal laser-beam propagation through high-temperature ignition Hohlraum plasmas.

    PubMed

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; Meezan, N B; Dixit, S; Moody, J D; Neumayer, P; Pollock, B B; Ross, J S; Glenzer, S H

    2007-02-23

    We demonstrate that a blue (3omega, 351 nm) laser beam with an intensity of 2 x 10(15) W cm(-2) propagates nearly within the original beam cone through a millimeter scale, T(e)=3.5 keV high density (n(e)=5 x 10(20) cm(-3)) plasma. The beam produced less than 1% total backscatter at these high temperatures and densities; the resulting transmission is greater than 90%. Scaling of the electron temperature in the plasma shows that the plasma becomes transparent for uniform electron temperatures above 3 keV. These results are consistent with linear theory thresholds for both filamentation and backscatter instabilities inferred from detailed hydrodynamic simulations. This provides a strong justification for current inertial confinement fusion designs to remain below these thresholds.

  3. Alkylation of lignites and peat in low-temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    L.I. Shchukin; S.I. Zherebtsov; M.V. Kornievich; O.A. Skutina

    2007-02-15

    The alkylation of lignites and peat was carried out at 50-270{sup o}C in different plasmas. The degree of conversion determined as the yield of the alcohol-benzene extract increases on passing from methane to alcohol plasma. The dependence of the extract yield on the plasma temperature, treatment time, and sample grinding degree was studied. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Electron inertia effects on the planar plasma sheath problem

    SciTech Connect

    Duarte, V. N.; Clemente, R. A.

    2011-04-15

    The steady one-dimensional planar plasma sheath problem, originally considered by Tonks and Langmuir, is revisited. Assuming continuously generated free-falling ions and isothermal electrons and taking into account electron inertia, it is possible to describe the problem in terms of three coupled integro-differential equations that can be numerically integrated. The inclusion of electron inertia in the model allows us to obtain the value of the plasma floating potential as resulting from an electron density discontinuity at the walls, where the electrons attain sound velocity and the electric potential is continuous. Results from numerical computation are presented in terms of plots for densities, electric potential, and particles velocities. Comparison with results from literature, corresponding to electron Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution (neglecting electron inertia), is also shown.

  5. Measurements of beat wave accelerated electrons in a toroidal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.H. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Hwang, D.W. . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1992-06-01

    Electrons are accelerated by large amplitude electron plasma waves driven by counter-propagating microwaves with a difference frequency approximately equal to the electron plasma frequency. Energetic electrons are observed only when the phase velocity of the wave is in the range 3v{sub e} < v{sub ph} < 7v{sub e} (v{sub ph} was varied 2v{sub e} < v{sub ph} < 10v{sub e}), where v{sub e} is the electron thermal velocity, (kT{sub e}/m{sub e}){sup {1/2}}. As the phase velocity increases, fewer electrons are accelerated to higher velocities. The measured current contained in these accelerated electrons has the power dependence predicted by theory, but the magnitude is lower than predicted.

  6. Hydrated Electrons at the Plasma-Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, David; Gopalakrishnan, Ranga; Kawamura, Emi; Lieberman, Michael

    2015-09-01

    When atmospheric pressure plasma interacts with liquid water surfaces, complex processes involving both charged and neutral species generally occur but the details of the processes are not well understood. One plasma-generated specie of considerable interest that can enter an adjacent liquid water phase is the electron. Hydrated electrons are well known to be important in radiation chemistry as initiating precursors for a variety of other reactive compounds. Recent experimental evidence for hydrated electrons near the atmospheric pressure plasma-water interface was reported by Rumbach et al.. We present results from a model of a dc argon plasma coupled to an anodic adjacent water layer that aims to simulate this experiment. The coupled plasma-electrolyte model illustrates the nature of the plasma-water interface and reveals important information regarding the self-consistent electric fields on each side of the interface as well as time- and space-resolved rates of reaction of key reactive species. We suggest that the reducing chemistry that results from electron hydration may be useful therapeutically in countering local excess oxidative stress. Supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Science Plasma Science Center

  7. The Influence of Energetic Electrons on the Cassini Langmuir Probe at Saturn : Deriving Large Electron Temperatures and Small Electron Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, P.; Wahlund, J.; Holmberg, M.; Lewis, G.; Schippers, P.; Thomsen, M. F.; Rochel Grimald, S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Coates, A. J.; Dandouras, I. S.; Waite, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Langmuir probes (LPs) are commonly used to investigate the cold plasma characteristics in planetary ionospheres/magnetospheres. The LPs performances are limited to low temperatures (i.e. below 5-10 eV at Saturn) and large densities (above several particles/cm3). A strong sensitivity of the Cassini LP measurements to energetic electrons (hundreds eV) may however be observed at Saturn in the L Shell range L=6-10 RS. These electrons impact the surface of the probe and generate a detectable current of secondary electrons. We investigated the influence of such electrons on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics (for negative potentials), showing that both the DC level and slope of the I-V curve are modified. The influence of energetic electrons may be interpreted in terms of the critical and anticritical temperatures concept that is important for spacecraft charging studies. Estimations of the maximum secondary yield value for the LP surface are obtained without using laboratory measurements. Empirical and theoretical methods were developed to reproduce the influence of the energetic electrons with a reasonable precision. Conversely, this modelling allows us to derive useful information about the energetic electrons from the LP observations : some information about their pitch angle anisotropy (if combined with the data from a single CAPS ELS anode), as well as an estimate of the electron temperature (in the range 100-300 eV) and of the electron density (above 0.1 particles/cm3). This enlarges the LP measurements capabilities when the influence of the energetic electrons is large (essentially near L=6-10 RS at Saturn). The understanding of this influence may be used for other missions using Langmuir probes, such as the future missions JUICE at Jupiter, BepiColombo at Mercury, or even the probes in the Earth magnetosphere.

  8. Ground State and Excited State H-Atom Temperatures in a Microwave Plasma Diamond Deposition Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gicquel, A.; Chenevier, M.; Breton, Y.; Petiau, M.; Booth, J. P.; Hassouni, K.

    1996-09-01

    Ground electronic state and excited state H-atom temperatures are measured in a microwave plasma diamond deposition reactor as a function of a low percentage of methane introduced in the feed gas and the averaged input microwave power density. Ground state H-atom temperatures (T_H) and temperature of the H-atom in the n=3 excited state (T_{Hα}) are obtained from the measurements respectively of the excitation profile by Two-photon Allowed transition Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) and the Hα line broadening by Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES). They are compared to gas temperatures calculated with a 1D diffusive non equilibrium H{2} plasma flow model and to ground electronic state rotational temperatures of molecular hydrogen measured previously by Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy.

  9. Ion acoustic solitons in dense magnetized plasmas with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sadiq, Safeer; Mahmood, S.; Haque, Q.; Ali, Munazza Zulfiqar

    2014-09-20

    The propagation of electrostatic waves in a dense magnetized electron-positron-ion (EPI) plasma with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons is investigated. The linear dispersion relation is obtained for slow and fast electrostatic waves in the EPI plasma. The limiting cases for ion acoustic wave (slow) and ion cyclotron wave (fast) are also discussed. Using the reductive perturbation method, two-dimensional propagation of ion acoustic solitons is found for both the nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons. The effects of positron concentration, magnetic field, and mass of ions on ion acoustic solitons are shown in numerical plots. The proper form of Fermi temperature for nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons and positrons is employed, which has not been used in earlier published work. The present investigation is useful for the understanding of linear and nonlinear electrostatic wave propagation in the dense magnetized EPI plasma of compact stars. For illustration purposes, we have applied our results to a pulsar magnetosphere.

  10. Shock waves and double layers in a quantum electron-positron-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dip, P. R.; Hossen, M. A.; Salahuddin, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    The ion-acoustic (IA) shock waves and double layers (DLs) in an unmagnetized, dissipative, quantum electron-positron-ion (EPI) plasma (composed of a viscous heavy ion fluid, Fermi electrons and positrons) have been theoretically investigated. The higher-order Burgers and Gardner equations are derived by employing the reductive perturbation method. The basic features of the IA shock waves and the DLs are identified by analyzing the solutions of both the higher-order Burgers and Gardner equations. The ratio of the Fermi temperature of the positron to that of the electron, the Fermi pressure of electrons and positrons, the viscous force, the plasma particle number densities, etc. are found to change remarkably the basic features (viz. amplitude, width, phase speed, etc.) of the IA waves. The results of our investigation may be helpful in understanding the nonlinear features of localized IA waves propagating in quantum EPI plasmas which are ubiquitous in astrophysical, as well as laboratory, environments.

  11. Low Temperature Atmospheric Argon Plasma: Diagnostics and Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolaeva, Svetlana; Petrov, Oleg; Zigangirova, Nailya; Vasiliev, Mikhail; Sysolyatina, Elena; Antipov, Sergei; Alyapyshev, Maxim; Kolkova, Natalia; Mukhachev, Andrei; Naroditsky, Boris; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Grigoriev, Anatoly; Morfill, Gregor; Fortov, Vladimir; Gintsburg, Alexander

    This study was devoted to diagnostic of low temperature plasma produced by microwave generator and investigation of its bactericidal effect against bacteria in biofilms and within eukaryotic cells. The profile of gas temperature near the torch outlet was measured. The spectrum in a wide range of wavelengths was derived by the method of optical emission spec-troscopy. Probe measurements of the floating potential of plasma were car-ried out. The estimation and adaptation of parameters of plasma flow (tem-perature, velocity, ion number density) according to medico-technical requirements were produced. The model of immersed surface-associated biofilms formed by Gram-negative bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia, and Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, was used to assess bactericidal effects of plasma treatment. Reduction in the concentration of live bacteria in biofilms treated with plasma for 5 min was demonstrated by measuring Live/Dead fluorescent labeling and using direct plating. The intracellular infection model with the pathogenic bacterium, Chlamydia trachomatis, was used to study the efficacy of microwave argon plasma against intracellular parasites. A 2 min plasma treatment of mouse cells infected with C. trachomatis reduced infectious bacteria by a factor of 2×106. Plasma treatment diminished the number of viable host cells by about 20%. When the samples were covered with MgF2 glass to obstruct active particles and UV alone was applied, the bactericidal effect was re-duced by 5×104 fold compared to the whole plasma.

  12. Ionization-Induced Electron Trapping inUltrarelativistic Plasma Wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Oz, E.; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Barnes, C.D.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.J.; Emma, P.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Kirby, N.; Krejcik, P.; O'Connell, C.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.; Auerbach, D.; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; /UCLA

    2007-04-06

    The onset of trapping of electrons born inside a highly relativistic, 3D beam-driven plasma wake is investigated. Trapping occurs in the transition regions of a Li plasma confined by He gas. Li plasma electrons support the wake, and higher ionization potential He atoms are ionized as the beam is focused by Li ions and can be trapped. As the wake amplitude is increased, the onset of trapping is observed. Some electrons gain up to 7.6 GeV in a 30.5 cm plasma. The experimentally inferred trapping threshold is at a wake amplitude of 36 GV/m, in good agreement with an analytical model and PIC simulations.

  13. Three-wave coupling in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tinakiche, N.; Annou, R.; Tripathi, V. K.

    2012-07-15

    The three-wave coupling processes in electron-positron-ion plasmas are investigated. The non-linear dispersion relation is derived along with the non-linear growth rate in both resonant and non resonant processes. It is shown that the inclusion of positron affects the dielectric properties of the plasma as well as the nonlinear growth rates of parametric processes. As one increases the positron density to electron density ratio from 0 to 1, maintaining quasi neutrality of the plasma, the growth rates of stimulated Raman, Brillouin, and Compton scattering processes in an isothermal plasma tend to zero due to the ponderomotive forces acting on electrons and positrons due the pump and scattered waves being equal.

  14. Electron energy distributions in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Sang-Heon E-mail: Sang-Heon.Song@us.tel.com; Yang, Yang; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-09-15

    Optimizing and controlling electron energy distributions (EEDs) is a continuing goal in plasma materials processing as EEDs determine the rate coefficients for electron impact processes. There are many strategies to customize EEDs in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), for example, pulsing and choice of frequency, to produce the desired plasma properties. Recent experiments have shown that EEDs in low pressure ICPs can be manipulated through the use of static magnetic fields of sufficient magnitudes to magnetize the electrons and confine them to the electromagnetic skin depth. The EED is then a function of the local magnetic field as opposed to having non-local properties in the absence of the magnetic field. In this paper, EEDs in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma (mICP) sustained in Ar are discussed with results from a two-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics model. Results are compared with experimental measurements. We found that the character of the EED transitions from non-local to local with application of the static magnetic field. The reduction in cross-field mobility increases local electron heating in the skin depth and decreases the transport of these hot electrons to larger radii. The tail of the EED is therefore enhanced in the skin depth and depressed at large radii. Plasmas densities are non-monotonic with increasing pressure with the external magnetic field due to transitions between local and non-local kinetics.

  15. Temperature gradients due to adiabatic plasma expansion in a magnetic nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, J. P.; Longmier, B. W.; Bering, E. A.; Olsen, C. S.; Squire, J. P.; Ballenger, M. G.; Carter, M. D.; Cassady, L. D.; Díaz, F. R. Chang; Glover, T. W.; Ilin, A. V.

    2014-08-01

    A mechanism for ambipolar ion acceleration in a magnetic nozzle is proposed. The plasma is adiabatic (i.e., does not exchange energy with its surroundings) in the diverging section of a magnetic nozzle so any energy lost by the electrons must be transferred to the ions via the electric field. Fluid theory indicates that the change in plasma potential is proportional to the change in average electron energy. These predictions were compared to measurements in the VX-200 experiment which has conditions conducive to ambipolar ion acceleration. A planar Langmuir probe was used to measure the plasma potential, electron density, and electron temperature for a range of mass flow rates and power levels. Axial profiles of those parameters were also measured, showing consistency with the adiabatic ambipolar fluid theory.

  16. Effect of plasma parameters on growth and field emission of electrons from cylindrical metallic carbon nanotube surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Tewari, Aarti

    2011-08-15

    The effect of plasma parameters (e.g., electron density and temperature, ion density and temperature, neutral atom density, and temperature) on the growth (without a catalyst), structure, and field emission of electrons from a cylindrical metallic carbon nanotube (CNT) surfaces has been theoretically investigated. A theoretical model of charge neutrality, including the kinetics of electrons, positively charged ions, and neutral atoms, and the energy balance of the various species in plasma, has been developed. Numerical calculations of the radius of the cylindrical CNT for different CNT number densities and plasma parameters have been carried out for the typical glow discharge plasma parameters. It is found that, on increasing the CNT number density and plasma parameters, the radius of cylindrical CNT decreases and consequently, the field emission factor for the metallic cylindrical CNT surfaces increase.

  17. Arbitrary amplitude electrostatic wave propagation in a magnetized dense plasma containing helium ions and degenerate electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, S.; Sadiq, Safeer; Haque, Q.; Ali, Munazza Z.

    2016-06-01

    The obliquely propagating arbitrary amplitude electrostatic wave is studied in a dense magnetized plasma having singly and doubly charged helium ions with nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons pressures. The Fermi temperature for ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons described by N. M. Vernet [(Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2007), p. 57] is used to define ion acoustic speed in ultra-dense plasmas. The pseudo-potential approach is used to solve the fully nonlinear set of dynamic equations for obliquely propagating electrostatic waves in a dense magnetized plasma containing helium ions. The upper and lower Mach number ranges for the existence of electrostatic solitons are found which depends on the obliqueness of the wave propagation with respect to applied magnetic field and charge number of the helium ions. It is found that only compressive (hump) soliton structures are formed in all the cases and only subsonic solitons are formed for a singly charged helium ions plasma case with nonrelativistic degenerate electrons. Both subsonic and supersonic soliton hump structures are formed for doubly charged helium ions with nonrelativistic degenerate electrons and ultrarelativistic degenerate electrons plasma case containing singly as well as doubly charged helium ions. The effect of propagation direction on the soliton amplitude and width of the electrostatic waves is also presented. The numerical plots are also shown for illustration using dense plasma parameters of a compact star (white dwarf) from literature.

  18. Coupled electron and ion nonlinear oscillations in a collisionless plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Karimov, A. R.

    2013-05-15

    Dynamics of coupled electrostatic electron and ion nonlinear oscillations in a collisionless plasma is studied with reference to a kinetic description. Proceeding from the exact solution of Vlasov-Maxwell equations written as a function of linear functions in the electron and ion velocities, we arrive at the two coupled nonlinear equations which describe the evolution of the system.

  19. Numerical model of the plasma formation at electron beam welding

    SciTech Connect

    Trushnikov, D. N.; Mladenov, G. M.

    2015-01-07

    The model of plasma formation in the keyhole in liquid metal as well as above the electron beam welding zone is described. The model is based on solution of two equations for the density of electrons and the mean electron energy. The mass transfer of heavy plasma particles (neutral atoms, excited atoms, and ions) is taken into account in the analysis by the diffusion equation for a multicomponent mixture. The electrostatic field is calculated using the Poisson equation. Thermionic electron emission is calculated for the keyhole wall. The ionization intensity of the vapors due to beam electrons and high-energy secondary and backscattered electrons is calibrated using the plasma parameters when there is no polarized collector electrode above the welding zone. The calculated data are in good agreement with experimental data. Results for the plasma parameters for excitation of a non-independent discharge are given. It is shown that there is a need to take into account the effect of a strong electric field near the keyhole walls on electron emission (the Schottky effect) in the calculation of the current for a non-independent discharge (hot cathode gas discharge). The calculated electron drift velocities are much bigger than the velocity at which current instabilities arise. This confirms the hypothesis for ion-acoustic instabilities, observed experimentally in previous research.

  20. Ionization Fractions of Slow Ions in a Plasma with Kappa Distributions for the Electron Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wannawichian, S.; Ruffolo, D.; Kartavykh, Yu. Yu.

    2003-06-01

    The interpretation of a wide variety of astrophysical observations requires an understanding of how ionization fractions depend on plasma parameters. Observations have indicated that electron velocity distributions in space plasmas generally have enhanced high-energy tails. Instead of a Maxwellian distribution, they are better described by a kappa distribution, characterized by the kinetic temperature, T, and a parameter, κ, that quantifies the deviation from a Maxwellian. We calculate and tabulate the equilibrium ionization fractions of N, O, Ne, Mg, S, Si, Ar, Ca, Fe, and Ni, based on a balance of ionization and recombination processes, for 104K<=T<=108K (or up to 109 K for Fe and Ni) and for various Maxwellian and kappa distributions. For a Maxwellian distribution of electrons, the mean charge as a function of temperature is characterized by plateaux corresponding to closed-shell charge states, with transitions over narrow ranges of logT. However, for kappa distributions, which are more realistic models of the observed electron distributions in coronal or space plasmas, those transitions are substantially broader. We find that a lower κ value (more suprathermal electrons) frequently leads to a higher mean charge, especially for low temperatures, but can also lead to a lower mean charge in certain temperature ranges; these effects are associated with the sharp energy thresholds and resonances of ionization and dielectronic recombination cross sections, respectively. The results provide information for various applications in which observed ionization fractions are used as diagnostics of astrophysical plasmas.