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Sample records for plasma endothelial vasoactive

  1. Plasma levels of vasoactive regulatory peptides in patients receiving regular hemodialysis treatment.

    PubMed

    Hegbrant, J; Thysell, H; Ekman, R

    1992-01-01

    The fasting plasma levels of 10 vasoactive regulatory peptides were measured by radioimmunoassay in 23 stable patients with chronic renal failure receiving regular hemodialysis treatment (RDT) and compared with those of healthy controls. The plasma concentrations of arginine vasopressin, atrial natriuretic peptide, beta-endorphin, methionine-enkephalin, motilin, neuropeptide Y, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide were increased. The plasma level of calcitonin gene-related peptide was not statistically different from that of the controls. The plasma concentration of gamma 2-melanocyte-stimulating hormone was lowered in the RDT-patients. The arterial blood pressure correlated with the plasma levels of motilin and neuropeptide Y. We conclude that patients with chronic renal failure receiving RDT have increased concentrations of 8 out of 10 measured vasoactive regulatory peptides. The elevated levels of vasoactive peptides may contribute to the adaptation of the cardiovascular system to impaired renal function.

  2. Changes in plasma levels of vasoactive peptides during sequential bicarbonate hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Hegbrant, J; Thysell, H; Mårtensson, L; Ekman, R; Boberg, U

    1993-01-01

    The hemodynamic response to isolated ultrafiltration (IUF) is characterized by a vasoconstriction, while there is no significant change in peripheral vascular resistance during isovolemic bicarbonate hemodialysis (IVHD). The present investigation was designed to study the plasma levels of vasoactive regulatory peptides together with noradrenaline (NA) and plasma renin activity (PRA) in 11 patients during sequential hemodialysis (SQHD) - IUF for 60 min, followed by IVHD for 210 min. During IUF, the vasoconstrictors arginine vasopressin (AVP), gamma 2-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (gamma 2-MSH), neuropeptide Y (NPY), NA and PRA increased. During IVHD, NPY and PRA remained unchanged on a higher level. A decrease in AVP below the baseline and in gamma 2-MSH and NA to the baseline levels occurred during IVHD. In the case of vasodilators, there were no changes in calcitonin gene-related peptide or motilin during SQHD. An increase in beta-endorphin (beta-END) occurred during IUF, followed by a decrease during IVHD. Substance P and vasoactive intestinal peptide were unchanged during IUF but decreased during IVHD. We conclude that SQHD is characterized by an increase in all the measured vasoconstrictors during IUF in response to loss of fluid, and by a decrease in some vasoconstrictors (AVP, gamma 2-MSH, NA) during IVHD. With the exception of beta-END, there were no changes or only minor ones in vasodilators during SQHD. There are changes in plasma levels of vasoactive substances during SQHD but the importance of these changes for the hemodynamic adaptation to ultrafiltration and dialysis needs to be studied further.

  3. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  4. Transient disruptions of aortic endothelial cell plasma membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Q. C.; McNeil, P. L.

    1992-01-01

    Cells of gut, skin, and muscle frequently suffer transient survivable plasma membrane disruptions ("wounds") under physiological conditions, but it is not known whether endothelial cells of the aorta, which are constantly exposed to hemodynamically generated mechanical forces, similarly are injured in vivo. We have used serum albumin as a molecular probe for identifying endothelial cells of the rat aorta that incurred and survived transient plasma membrane wounds in vivo. Such wounded endothelial cells were in fact observed in the aortas of all rats examined. However, the percentage of wounded cells in the total aortic endothelial population varied remarkably between individuals ranging from 1.4% to 17.9% with a mean of 6.5% (+/- 4.6% SD). Wounded endothelial cells were heterogeneously distributed, being found in distinct clusters often in the shape of streaks aligned with the long axis of the vessel, or in the shape of partial or complete rims surrounding bifurcation openings, such as the ostia of the intercostal arteries. Physical exercise (running) did not increase the frequency of aortic endothelial cell membrane wounding, nor did spontaneous hypertension. Surprisingly, 80% of mitotic endothelial cell figures were identified as wounded. This article identified a previously unrecognized form of endothelial cell injury, survivable disruptions of the plasma membrane, and shows that injury to the endothelial cells of the normal aorta is far more commonplace than previously suspected. Plasma membrane wounding of endothelial cells could be linked to the initiation of atherosclerosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 11 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:1466399

  5. Sepsis-induced elevation in plasma serotonin facilitates endothelial hyperpermeability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yicong; Hadden, Coedy; Cooper, Anthonya; Ahmed, Asli; Wu, Hong; Lupashin, Vladimir V.; Mayeux, Philip R.; Kilic, Fusun

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpermeability of the endothelial barrier and resulting microvascular leakage are a hallmark of sepsis. Our studies describe the mechanism by which serotonin (5-HT) regulates the microvascular permeability during sepsis. The plasma 5-HT levels are significantly elevated in mice made septic by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). 5-HT-induced permeability of endothelial cells was associated with the phosphorylation of p21 activating kinase (PAK1), PAK1-dependent phosphorylation of vimentin (P-vimentin) filaments, and a strong association between P-vimentin and ve-cadherin. These findings were in good agreement with the findings with the endothelial cells incubated in serum from CLP mice. In vivo, reducing the 5-HT uptake rates with the 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor, paroxetine blocked renal microvascular leakage and the decline in microvascular perfusion. Importantly, mice that lack SERT showed significantly less microvascular dysfunction after CLP. Based on these data, we propose that the increased endothelial 5-HT uptake together with 5-HT signaling disrupts the endothelial barrier function in sepsis. Therefore, regulating intracellular 5-HT levels in endothelial cells represents a novel approach in improving sepsis-associated microvascular dysfunction and leakage. These new findings advance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying cellular responses to intracellular/extracellular 5-HT ratio in sepsis and refine current views of these signaling processes during sepsis. PMID:26956613

  6. Sepsis-induced elevation in plasma serotonin facilitates endothelial hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Li, Yicong; Hadden, Coedy; Cooper, Anthonya; Ahmed, Asli; Wu, Hong; Lupashin, Vladimir V; Mayeux, Philip R; Kilic, Fusun

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpermeability of the endothelial barrier and resulting microvascular leakage are a hallmark of sepsis. Our studies describe the mechanism by which serotonin (5-HT) regulates the microvascular permeability during sepsis. The plasma 5-HT levels are significantly elevated in mice made septic by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). 5-HT-induced permeability of endothelial cells was associated with the phosphorylation of p21 activating kinase (PAK1), PAK1-dependent phosphorylation of vimentin (P-vimentin) filaments, and a strong association between P-vimentin and ve-cadherin. These findings were in good agreement with the findings with the endothelial cells incubated in serum from CLP mice. In vivo, reducing the 5-HT uptake rates with the 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor, paroxetine blocked renal microvascular leakage and the decline in microvascular perfusion. Importantly, mice that lack SERT showed significantly less microvascular dysfunction after CLP. Based on these data, we propose that the increased endothelial 5-HT uptake together with 5-HT signaling disrupts the endothelial barrier function in sepsis. Therefore, regulating intracellular 5-HT levels in endothelial cells represents a novel approach in improving sepsis-associated microvascular dysfunction and leakage. These new findings advance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying cellular responses to intracellular/extracellular 5-HT ratio in sepsis and refine current views of these signaling processes during sepsis.

  7. Effect of intraduodenal bile and taurodeoxycholate on exocrine pancreatic secretion and on plasma levels of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and somatostatin in man.

    PubMed

    Riepl, R L; Fiedler, F; Teufel, J; Lehnert, P

    1994-01-01

    Intraduodenal (i.d.) application of bile or Na-taurodeoxycholate (TDC) dose dependently enhances basal exocrine pancreatic secretion. The hydrokinetic effect is mediated at least in part by secretin. This study should show, whether vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), a partial agonist of secretin, may also be involved in the mediation of the hydrokinetic effect. Furthermore, plasma concentrations of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI) were measured in order to check whether this counterregulating hormone is also released by bile and TDC. Twenty investigations were carried out on 10 fasting healthy volunteers provided with a double-lumen Dreiling tube. Bile and TDC were intraduodenally applied in doses of 2-6 g and 200-600 mg, respectively, at 65-min intervals. Plasma samples were withdrawn at defined intervals for radioimmunological determination of VIP and SLI. Duodenal juice was collected in 10-min fractions and analyzed for volume, pH, bicarbonate, lipase, trypsin, and amylase. I.d. application of bile or TDC dose dependently stimulated hydrokinetic and ecbolic pancreatic secretion. Bile exerted a slightly stronger effect than TDC. Pancreatic response was simultaneously accompanied by a significant increase of plasma VIP and SLI concentrations. The effect of bile on integrated plasma VIP and SLI concentrations seems to be dose dependent; the effect of TDC on integrated SLI, too. For the increase of integrated plasma VIP concentrations after TDC no dose-response relation could be established. We conclude that VIP may be a further mediator of bile-induced volume and bicarbonate secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Effect of intraduodenal bile and taurodeoxycholate on exocrine pancreatic secretion and on plasma levels of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and somatostatin in man.

    PubMed

    Riepl, R L; Fiedler, F; Teufel, J; Lehnert, P

    1994-01-01

    Intraduodenal (i.d.) application of bile or Na-taurodeoxycholate (TDC) dose dependently enhances basal exocrine pancreatic secretion. The hydrokinetic effect is mediated at least in part by secretin. This study should show, whether vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), a partial agonist of secretin, may also be involved in the mediation of the hydrokinetic effect. Furthermore, plasma concentrations of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI) were measured in order to check whether this counterregulating hormone is also released by bile and TDC. Twenty investigations were carried out on 10 fasting healthy volunteers provided with a double-lumen Dreiling tube. Bile and TDC were intraduodenally applied in doses of 2-6 g and 200-600 mg, respectively, at 65-min intervals. Plasma samples were withdrawn at defined intervals for radioimmunological determination of VIP and SLI. Duodenal juice was collected in 10-min fractions and analyzed for volume, pH, bicarbonate, lipase, trypsin, and amylase. I.d. application of bile or TDC dose dependently stimulated hydrokinetic and ecbolic pancreatic secretion. Bile exerted a slightly stronger effect than TDC. Pancreatic response was simultaneously accompanied by a significant increase of plasma VIP and SLI concentrations. The effect of bile on integrated plasma VIP and SLI concentrations seems to be dose dependent; the effect of TDC on integrated SLI, too. For the increase of integrated plasma VIP concentrations after TDC no dose-response relation could be established. We conclude that VIP may be a further mediator of bile-induced volume and bicarbonate secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7509061

  9. Effect of nucleoprotein factor-kB (NF-κB) in endothelial cells during high blood flow-associated pulmonary vascular remodeling on vasoactive substances adrenomedullin and prostacyclin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Wang, Weina; Dong, Meng; Yu, Xiaoxiao; Luo, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of nucleoprotein factor-kB (NF-κB) on the production and secretion of vasoactive substances adrenomedullin (ADM) and prostacyclin (PGI2) by endothelial cells in a high blood flow, pulmonary hypertension in vivo model. Fifty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: 15 rats received shunt surgery (Tn group); 15 rats received shunt surgery + NF-κB inhibitor [pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC)] (Ti group); 10 rats received sham surgery (Co group); and 10 rats were negative controls (Cn group). A left to right shunt pulmonary hypertension model was established in groups Tn and Ti. Rats in the Ti group received an intraperitoneal injection of PDTC (120 mg/kg·d) one hour before the operation for 2 weeks, and rats in the Co group were processed in the same fashion as that of the experimental groups, except that they did not undergo surgery. After 12 weeks, pulmonary artery systolic pressure was measured by cardiac catheterization, pulmonary arterial endothelial cells were isolated, and NF-κB, ADM and PGI2 protein expressions were measured in the endothelium using immunohistochemistry. ADM and PGI2 expressions were significantly lower in the Tn group relative to those of the Cn group (P<0.01) but no difference in the Ti group (P>0.05). Expressions in the Co and Cn groups were not significantly different (P>0.05). Heightened NF-κB activity in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells during high blood flow can suppress the synthesis and secretion of ADM and PGI2, potentially leading to vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26550335

  10. Effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in plasma and small intestine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shu-Guang; Wu, Wan-Chun; Han, Zhen; Wang, Meng-Ya

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin (CCK) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in plasma and small intestine, and to explore the relationship between small intestinal motor disorders and gastrointestinal hormones under psychological stress. METHODS: Thirty-six mice were randomly divided into psychological stress group and control group. A mouse model with psychological stress was established by housing the mice with a hungry cat in separate layers of a two-layer cage. A semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink) was used for monitoring small intestinal transit. CCK and VIP levels in plasma and small intestine in mice were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). RESULTS: Small intestinal transit was inhibited (52.18±19.15% vs 70.19±17.79%, P<0.01) in mice after psychological stress, compared to the controls. Small intestinal CCK levels in psychological stress mice were significantly lower than those in the control group (0.75±0.53 μg/g vs 1.98±1.17 μg/g, P<0.01), whereas plasma CCK concentrations were not different between the groups. VIP levels in small intestine were significantly higher in psychological stress mice than those in the control group (8.45±1.09 μg/g vs 7.03±2.36 μg/g, P<0.01), while there was no significant difference in plasma VIP levels between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Psychological stress inhibits the small intestinal transit, probably by down-regulating CCK and up-regulating VIP expression in small intestine. PMID:15655834

  11. Systems analysis of endothelial cell plasma membrane proteome of rat lung microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Endothelial cells line all blood vessels to form the blood-tissue interface which is critical for maintaining organ homeostasis and facilitates molecular exchange. We recently used tissue subcellular fractionation combined with several multi-dimensional mass spectrometry-based techniques to enhance identification of lipid-embedded proteins for large-scale proteomic mapping of luminal endothelial cell plasma membranes isolated directly from rat lungs in vivo. The biological processes and functions of the proteins expressed at this important blood-tissue interface remain unexplored at a large scale. Results We performed an unbiased systems analysis of the endothelial cell surface proteome containing over 1800 proteins to unravel the major functions and pathways apparent at this interface. As expected, many key functions of plasma membranes in general (i.e., cell surface signaling pathways, cytoskeletal organization, adhesion, membrane trafficking, metabolism, mechanotransduction, membrane fusion, and vesicle-mediated transport) and endothelial cells in particular (i.e., blood vessel development and maturation, angiogenesis, regulation of endothelial cell proliferation, protease activity, and endocytosis) were significantly overrepresented in this proteome. We found that endothelial cells express multiple proteins that mediate processes previously reported to be restricted to neuronal cells, such as neuronal survival and plasticity, axon growth and regeneration, synaptic vesicle trafficking and neurotransmitter metabolic process. Surprisingly, molecular machinery for protein synthesis was also detected as overrepresented, suggesting that endothelial cells, like neurons, can synthesize proteins locally at the cell surface. Conclusion Our unbiased systems analysis has led to the potential discovery of unexpected functions in normal endothelium. The discovery of the existence of protein synthesis at the plasma membrane in endothelial cells provides new insight

  12. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S.; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-01-01

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters. PMID:26936382

  13. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-03-03

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters.

  14. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S.; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-03-01

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters.

  15. Fluctuating plasma phosphorus level by changes in dietary phosphorus intake induces endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Watari, Eriko; Taketani, Yutaka; Kitamura, Tomoyo; Tanaka, Terumi; Ohminami, Hirokazu; Abuduli, Maerjianghan; Harada, Nagakatsu; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Yamamoto, Hironori; Takeda, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    High serum phosphorus (P) impairs endothelial function by increasing oxidative stress and decreasing nitric oxide production. Serum P levels fluctuate due to circadian rhythms or dietary P intake in healthy people and due to dialysis in end-stage chronic kidney disease patients. Here we examined whether fluctuating plasma P caused by changes in dietary P intake may be involved in endothelial dysfunction, resulting in increased cardiovascular risk. Rats were fed a diet containing 0.6% P for 16 days (control group), or a diet alternating between 0.02% P and 1.2% P (LH group) or between 1.2% P and 0.02% P (HL group) every 2 days; the total amount of P intake among the groups during the feeding period was similar. In the LH and HL groups, endothelial-dependent vasodilation significantly decreased plasma 8-(OH)dG level significantly increased, and the expression of inflammatory factors such as MCP-1 increased in the endothelium as compared with the control group. These data indicate that repetitive fluctuations of plasma P caused by varying dietary P intake can impair endothelial function via increased oxidative stress and inflammatory response. Taken together, these results suggest that habitual fluctuation of dietary P intake might be a cause of cardiovascular disease through endothelial dysfunction, especially in chronic kidney disease patients.

  16. Fluctuating plasma phosphorus level by changes in dietary phosphorus intake induces endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Watari, Eriko; Taketani, Yutaka; Kitamura, Tomoyo; Tanaka, Terumi; Ohminami, Hirokazu; Abuduli, Maerjianghan; Harada, Nagakatsu; Yamanaka-Okumura, Hisami; Yamamoto, Hironori; Takeda, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    High serum phosphorus (P) impairs endothelial function by increasing oxidative stress and decreasing nitric oxide production. Serum P levels fluctuate due to circadian rhythms or dietary P intake in healthy people and due to dialysis in end-stage chronic kidney disease patients. Here we examined whether fluctuating plasma P caused by changes in dietary P intake may be involved in endothelial dysfunction, resulting in increased cardiovascular risk. Rats were fed a diet containing 0.6% P for 16 days (control group), or a diet alternating between 0.02% P and 1.2% P (LH group) or between 1.2% P and 0.02% P (HL group) every 2 days; the total amount of P intake among the groups during the feeding period was similar. In the LH and HL groups, endothelial-dependent vasodilation significantly decreased plasma 8-(OH)dG level significantly increased, and the expression of inflammatory factors such as MCP-1 increased in the endothelium as compared with the control group. These data indicate that repetitive fluctuations of plasma P caused by varying dietary P intake can impair endothelial function via increased oxidative stress and inflammatory response. Taken together, these results suggest that habitual fluctuation of dietary P intake might be a cause of cardiovascular disease through endothelial dysfunction, especially in chronic kidney disease patients. PMID:25678749

  17. Effect of plasma membrane fluidity on serotonin transport by endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Block, E.R.; Edwards, D. )

    1987-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of plasma membrane fluidity of lung endothelial cells on serotonin transport, porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cells were incubated for 3 h with either 0.1 mM cholesterol hemisuccinate, 0.1 mM cis-vaccenic acid, or vehicle (control), after which plasma membrane fluidity and serotinin transport were measured. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure fluidity in the plasma membrane. Serotonin uptake was calculated from the disappearance of ({sup 14}C)-serotonin from the culture medium. Cholesterol decreased fluidity in the subpolar head group and central and midacyl side-chain regions of the plasma membrane and decreased serotonin transport, whereas cis-vaccenic acid increased fluidity in the central and midacyl side-chain regions of the plasma membrane and also increased serotonin transport. Cis-vaccenic acid had no effect of fluidity in the subpolar head group region of the plasma membrane. These results provide evidence that the physical state of the central and midacyl chains within the pulmonary artery endothelial cell plasma membrane lipid bilayer modulates transmembrane transport of serotonin by these cells.

  18. Surface modification of coronary stents with SiCOH plasma nanocoatings for improving endothelialization and anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Shen, Yang; Tang, Chaojun; Wu, Xue; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Guixue

    2015-02-01

    The surface properties of intravascular stent play a crucial role in preventing in-stent restenosis (ISR). In this study, SiCOH plasma nanocoatings were used to modify the surfaces of intravascular stents to improve their endothelialization and anticoagulation properties. SiCOH plasma nanocoatings with thickness of 30-40 nm were deposited by low-temperature plasmas from a gas mixture of trimethysilane (TMS) and oxygen at different TMS:O2 ratios. Water contact angle measurements showed that the SiCOH plasma nanocoating surfaces prepared from TMS:O2  = 1:4 are hydrophilic with contact angle of 29.5 ± 1.9°. The SiCOH plasma nanocoated 316L stainless steel (316L SS) wafers were first characterized by in vitro adhesion tests for blood platelets and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The in vitro test results showed that the SiCOH plasma nanocoatings prepared from TMS:O2  = 1:4 had excellent hemo- and cytocompatibility. With uncoated 316L SS stents as the control, the SiCOH plasma nanocoated 316L SS stents were implanted into rabbit abdominal artery model for in vivo evaluation of re-endothelialization and ISR inhibition. After implantation for 12 weeks, the animals testing results showed that the SiCOH plasma nanocoatings accelerated re-endothelialization and inhibited ISR with lumen reduction of 26.3 ± 10.1%, which were considerably less than the 41.9 ± 11.6% lumen reduction from the uncoated control group.

  19. Release of endothelial cell lipoprotein lipase by plasma lipoproteins and free fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, U.; Witte, L.D.; Goldberg, I.J.

    1989-03-15

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) bound to the lumenal surface of vascular endothelial cells is responsible for the hydrolysis of triglycerides in plasma lipoproteins. Studies were performed to investigate whether human plasma lipoproteins and/or free fatty acids would release LPL which was bound to endothelial cells. Purified bovine milk LPL was incubated with cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells resulting in the association of enzyme activity with the cells. When the cells were then incubated with media containing chylomicrons or very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), a concentration-dependent decrease in the cell-associated LPL enzymatic activity was observed. In contrast, incubation with media containing low density lipoproteins or high density lipoproteins produced a much smaller decrease in the cell-associated enzymatic activity. The addition of increasing molar ratios of oleic acid:bovine serum albumin to the media also reduced enzyme activity associated with the endothelial cells. To determine whether the decrease in LPL activity was due to release of the enzyme from the cells or inactivation of the enzyme, studies were performed utilizing radioiodinated bovine LPL. Radiolabeled LPL protein was released from endothelial cells by chylomicrons, VLDL, and by free fatty acids (i.e. oleic acid bound to bovine serum albumin). The release of radiolabeled LPL by VLDL correlated with the generation of free fatty acids from the hydrolysis of VLDL triglyceride by LPL bound to the cells. Inhibition of LPL enzymatic activity by use of a specific monoclonal antibody, reduced the extent of release of /sup 125/I-LPL from the endothelial cells by the added VLDL. These results demonstrated that LPL enzymatic activity and protein were removed from endothelial cells by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (chylomicrons and VLDL) and oleic acid.

  20. Identification of DNA-binding proteins on human umbilical vein endothelial cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, T M; Frampton, G; Cameron, J S

    1993-01-01

    The binding of anti-DNA antibodies to the endothelial cell is mediated through DNA, which forms a bridge between the immunoglobulin and the plasma membrane. We have shown that 32P-labelled DNA bound to the plasma membrane of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) by a saturable process, which could be competitively inhibited by non-radiolabelled DNA. In addition, DNA-binding was enhanced in HUVEC that had been treated with IL-1 alpha or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). DNA-binding proteins of mol. wt 46,000, 92,000, and 84,000 were identified by the binding of 32P-labelled DNA to plasma membrane proteins separated on SDS-PAGE. DNA-binding proteins of mol. wt 46,000 and 84,000 were also present in the cytosol and nucleus. Murine anti-DNA MoAb410 bound to a single band, at mol. wt 46,000, of plasma membrane protein, in the presence of DNA. Our results showed that DNA-binding proteins are present in different cellular fractions of endothelial cells. DNA-binding proteins on the cell membrane could participate in the in situ formation of immune deposits; and their presence in the cell nucleus suggests a potential role in the modulation of cell function. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8419070

  1. Endothelial Inflammatory Transcriptional Responses Induced by Plasma Following Inhalation of Diesel Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Schisler, Jonathan C.; Ronnebaum, Sarah M.; Madden, Michael; Channell, Meghan M.; Campen, Matthew J.; Willis, Monte S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Air pollution, especially emissions derived from traffic sources, is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, it remains unclear how inhaled factors drive extrapulmonary pathology. Objectives Previously, we found that canonical inflammatory response transcripts were elevated in cultured endothelial cells treated with plasma obtained after exposure compared with pre-exposure samples or filtered air (sham) exposures. While the findings confirmed the presence of bioactive factor(s) in the plasma after diesel inhalation, we wanted to better examine the complete genomic response to investigate 1) major responsive transcripts and 2) collected response pathways and ontogeny that may help to refine this method and inform the pathogenesis. Methods We assayed endothelial RNA with gene expression microarrays, examining the responses of cultured endothelial cells to plasma obtained from 6 healthy human subjects exposed to 100 μg/m3 diesel exhaust or filtered air for 2 h on separate occasions. In addition to pre-exposure baseline samples, we investigated samples obtained immediately-post and 24h-post exposure. Results Microarray analysis of the coronary artery endothelial cells challenged with plasma identified 855 probes that changed over time following diesel exhaust exposure. Over-representation analysis identified inflammatory cytokine pathways were upregulated both at the 2 and 24 h condition. Novel pathways related to FOX transcription factors and secreted extracellular factors were also identified in the microarray analysis. Conclusions These outcomes are consistent with our recent findings that plasma contains bioactive and inflammatory factors following pollutant inhalation. The specific study design implicates a novel pathway related to inflammatory blood borne components that may drive the extrapulmonary toxicity of ambient air pollutants. PMID:25942053

  2. Synthetic phospholipids as specific substrates for plasma endothelial lipase.

    PubMed

    Papillon, Julien P N; Pan, Meihui; Brousseau, Margaret E; Gilchrist, Mark A; Lou, Changgang; Singh, Alok K; Stawicki, Todd; Thompson, James E

    2016-08-01

    We designed and prepared synthetic phospholipids that generate lyso-phosphatidylcholine products with a unique mass for convenient detection by LC-MS in complex biological matrices. We demonstrated that compound 4, formulated either as a Triton X-100 emulsion or incorporated in synthetic HDL particles can serve as a substrate for plasma EL with useful specificity. PMID:27344207

  3. Measurement of the phospholipase activity of endothelial lipase in mouse plasma.

    PubMed

    Basu, Debapriya; Lei, Xia; Josekutty, Joby; Hussain, M Mahmood; Jin, Weijun

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is a major negative regulator of plasma HDL levels in mice, rabbits, and most probably, humans. Although this regulatory function is critically dependent on EL's hydrolysis of HDL phospholipids, as yet there is no phospholipase assay specific for EL in plasma. We developed such an assay for the mouse enzyme using a commercially available phospholipid-like fluorescent substrate in combination with an EL neutralizing antibody. The specificity of the assay was established using EL knockout mice and its utility demonstrated by detection of an increase in plasma EL phospholipase activity following exposure of wild-type mice to lipopolysaccharide. The assay revealed that murine pre-heparin plasma does not contain measurable EL activity, indicating that the hydrolysis of HDL phospholipids by EL in vivo likely occurs on the cell surface. PMID:23103358

  4. Fresh frozen plasma lessens pulmonary endothelial inflammation and hyperpermeability after hemorrhagic shock and is associated with loss of syndecan 1.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhanglong; Pati, Shibani; Potter, Daniel; Brown, Ryan; Holcomb, John B; Grill, Raymond; Wataha, Kathryn; Park, Pyong Woo; Xue, Hasen; Kozar, Rosemary A

    2013-09-01

    We have recently demonstrated that injured patients in hemorrhagic shock shed syndecan 1 and that the early use of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in these patients is correlated with improved clinical outcomes. As the lungs are frequently injured after trauma, we hypothesized that hemorrhagic shock-induced shedding of syndecan 1 exposes the underlying pulmonary vascular endothelium to injury resulting in inflammation and hyperpermeability and that these effects would be mitigated by FFP. In vitro, pulmonary endothelial permeability, endothelial monolayer flux, transendothelial electrical resistance, and leukocyte-endothelial binding were measured in pulmonary endothelial cells after incubation with equal volumes of FFP or lactated Ringer's (LR). In vivo, using a coagulopathic mouse model of trauma and hemorrhagic shock, pulmonary hyperpermeability, neutrophil infiltration, and syndecan 1 expression and systemic shedding were assessed after 3 h of resuscitation with either 1× FFP or 3× LR and compared with shock alone and shams. In vitro, endothelial permeability and flux were decreased, transendothelial electrical resistance was increased, and leukocyte-endothelial binding was inhibited by FFP compared with LR-treated endothelial cells. In vivo, hemorrhagic shock was associated with systemic shedding of syndecan 1, which correlated with decreased pulmonary syndecan 1 and increased pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability and inflammation. Fresh frozen plasma resuscitation, compared with LR resuscitation, abrogated these injurious effects. After hemorrhagic shock, FFP resuscitation inhibits endothelial cell hyperpermeability and inflammation and restores pulmonary syndecan 1 expression. Modulation of pulmonary syndecan 1 expression may mechanistically contribute to the beneficial effects FFP.

  5. MALT1 Protease Activation Triggers Acute Disruption of Endothelial Barrier Integrity via CYLD Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Klei, Linda R; Hu, Dong; Panek, Robert; Alfano, Danielle N; Bridwell, Rachel E; Bailey, Kelly M; Oravecz-Wilson, Katherine I; Concel, Vincent J; Hess, Emily M; Van Beek, Matthew; Delekta, Phillip C; Gu, Shufang; Watkins, Simon C; Ting, Adrian T; Gough, Peter J; Foley, Kevin P; Bertin, John; McAllister-Lucas, Linda M; Lucas, Peter C

    2016-09-27

    Microvascular endothelial cells maintain a tight barrier to prevent passage of plasma and circulating immune cells into the extravascular tissue compartment, yet endothelial cells respond rapidly to vasoactive substances, including thrombin, allowing transient paracellular permeability. This response is a cornerstone of acute inflammation, but the mechanisms responsible are still incompletely understood. Here, we demonstrate that thrombin triggers MALT1 to proteolytically cleave cylindromatosis (CYLD). Fragmentation of CYLD results in microtubule disruption and a cascade of events leading to endothelial cell retraction and an acute permeability response. This finding reveals an unexpected role for the MALT1 protease, which previously has been viewed mostly as a driver of pro-inflammatory NF-κB signaling in lymphocytes. Thus, MALT1 not only promotes immune cell activation but also acutely regulates endothelial cell biology, actions that together facilitate tissue inflammation. Pharmacologic inhibition of MALT1 may therefore have synergistic impact by targeting multiple disparate steps in the overall inflammatory response.

  6. MALT1 Protease Activation Triggers Acute Disruption of Endothelial Barrier Integrity via CYLD Cleavage.

    PubMed

    Klei, Linda R; Hu, Dong; Panek, Robert; Alfano, Danielle N; Bridwell, Rachel E; Bailey, Kelly M; Oravecz-Wilson, Katherine I; Concel, Vincent J; Hess, Emily M; Van Beek, Matthew; Delekta, Phillip C; Gu, Shufang; Watkins, Simon C; Ting, Adrian T; Gough, Peter J; Foley, Kevin P; Bertin, John; McAllister-Lucas, Linda M; Lucas, Peter C

    2016-09-27

    Microvascular endothelial cells maintain a tight barrier to prevent passage of plasma and circulating immune cells into the extravascular tissue compartment, yet endothelial cells respond rapidly to vasoactive substances, including thrombin, allowing transient paracellular permeability. This response is a cornerstone of acute inflammation, but the mechanisms responsible are still incompletely understood. Here, we demonstrate that thrombin triggers MALT1 to proteolytically cleave cylindromatosis (CYLD). Fragmentation of CYLD results in microtubule disruption and a cascade of events leading to endothelial cell retraction and an acute permeability response. This finding reveals an unexpected role for the MALT1 protease, which previously has been viewed mostly as a driver of pro-inflammatory NF-κB signaling in lymphocytes. Thus, MALT1 not only promotes immune cell activation but also acutely regulates endothelial cell biology, actions that together facilitate tissue inflammation. Pharmacologic inhibition of MALT1 may therefore have synergistic impact by targeting multiple disparate steps in the overall inflammatory response. PMID:27681433

  7. Interaction of platelets, fibrinogen and endothelial cells with plasma deposited PEO-like films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhilu; Wang, Jin; Li, Xin; Tu, Qiufen; Sun, Hong; Huang, Nan

    2012-02-01

    For blood-contacting biomedical implants like retrievable vena cava filters, surface-based diagnostic devices or in vivo sensors, limiting thrombosis and cell adhesion is paramount, due to a decrease even failure in performance. Plasma deposited PEO-like films were investigated as surface modifications. In this work, mixed gas composed of tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (tetraglyme) vapor and oxygen was used as precursor. It was revealed that plasma polymerization under high ratio of oxygen/tetraglyme led to deposition of the films that had high content of ether groups. This kind of PEO-like films had good stability in phosphate buffer solution. In vitro hemocompatibility and endothelial cell (EC) adhesion revealed low platelet adhesion, platelet activation, fibrinogen adhesion, EC adhesion and proliferation on such plasma deposited PEO-like films. This made it a potential candidate for the applications in anti-fouling surfaces of blood-contacting biomedical devices.

  8. Albuminuria Is Associated with Endothelial Dysfunction and Elevated Plasma Endothelin-1 in Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Derebail, Vimal K.; Caughey, Melissa; Elsherif, Laila; Shen, Jessica H.; Jones, Susan K.; Maitra, Poulami; Pollock, David M.; Cai, Jianwen; Archer, David R.; Hinderliter, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of albuminuria in SCD remains incompletely understood. We evaluated the association of albuminuria with measures of endothelial function, and explored associations of both albuminuria and measures of endothelial function with selected biological variables (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], endothelin-1 [ET-1], soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 [sFLT-1], soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [soluble VCAM-1] and plasma hemoglobin). Methods Spot urine measurements for albumin-creatinine ratio (UACR) and 24-hour urine protein were obtained. Endothelial function was assessed using brachial artery ultrasound with measurements of flow-mediated dilation (FMD), nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NTMD) and hyperemic velocity. Results Twenty three subjects with varying degrees of albuminuria were evaluated. UACR was significantly correlated with FMD (ρ = -0.45, p = 0.031). In univariate analysis, UACR was correlated with VEGF (ρ = -0.49; 95% CI: -0.75 –-0.1, p = 0.015), plasma hemoglobin (ρ = 0.50; 95% CI: 0.11–0.75, p = 0.013) and ET-1 (ρ = 0.40; 95% CI: -0.03–0.69, p = 0.06). Multivariable analysis showed significant associations of ET-1 (estimate: 455.1 [SE: 198.3], p = 0.02), VEGF (estimate: -1.1 [SE: 0.53], p = 0.04) and sFLT-1 (estimate: -1.14 [SE: 0.49], p = 0.02) with UACR. Only ET-1 (estimate: -8.03 [SE: 3.87], p = 0.04) was significantly associated with FMD in multivariable analyses. Finally, UACR was correlated with both 24-hour urine protein (ρ = 0.90, p < 0.0001) and urine aliquots for albumin-creatinine ratio obtained from the 24-hour urine collection (ρ = 0.97, p < 0.0001). Conclusion This study provides more definitive evidence for the association of albuminuria with endothelial dysfunction in SCD. Elevated circulating levels of ET-1 may contribute to SCD-related glomerulopathy by mediating endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27669006

  9. Effect of cholesterol lowering treatment on plasma markers of endothelial dysfunction in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Zinellu, Angelo; Sotgia, Salvatore; Mangoni, Arduino A; Sotgiu, Elisabetta; Ena, Sara; Satta, Andrea E; Carru, Ciriaco

    2016-09-10

    The elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is linked with endothelial dysfunction secondary to the pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidative state typical of this pathology. In consideration of the well-known pleiotropic effect of statins, we investigated the effect of cholesterol lowering treatment on endothelial dysfunction markers (MED), asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), vascular cell (VCAM) and intercellular (ICAM) adhesion molecule. Plasma MED concentrations, inflammation and oxidative stress indices [Kynurenine/Tryptophan (Kyn/Trp) ratio, malondialdehyde (MDA) and allantoin/uric acid (All/UA) ratio] were measured in 30 CKD patients randomized to three cholesterol lowering regimens for 12 months (simvastatin 40mg/day, ezetimibe/simvastatin 10/20mg/day, or ezetimibe/simvastatin 10/40mg/day). Treatment significantly reduced ADMA concentrations in all patients [0.694μmol/L (0.606-0.761) at baseline vs. 0.622μmol/L (0.563-0.681) after treatment, p<0.001]. ADMA reduction was paralleled by a significant decrease of MDA, All/AU ratio and Kyn/Trp ratio, but not VCAM and ICAM plasma concentrations. Cholesterol lowering treatment was associated with a significant reduction in plasma ADMA concentrations in CKD patients. This might be mediated by reduced oxidative stress and inflammation.

  10. Differential gene expression in pulmonary artery endothelial cells exposed to sickle cell plasma.

    PubMed

    Klings, Elizabeth S; Safaya, Surinder; Adewoye, Adeboye H; Odhiambo, Adam; Frampton, Garrett; Lenburg, Marc; Gerry, Norman; Sebastiani, Paola; Steinberg, Martin H; Farber, Harrison W

    2005-05-11

    Clinical variability in sickle cell disease (SCD) suggests a role for extra-erythrocytic factors in the pathogenesis of vasoocclusion. We hypothesized that endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction, one possible modifier of disease variability, results from induction of phenotypic changes by circulating factors. Accordingly, we analyzed gene expression in cultured human pulmonary artery ECs (HPAEC) exposed to plasma from 1) sickle acute chest syndrome (ACS) patients, 2) SCD patients at steady state, 3) normal volunteers, and 4) serum-free media, using whole genome microarrays (U133A-B GeneChip, Affymetrix). Data were analyzed by Bayesian analysis of differential gene expression (BADGE). Differential expression was defined by the probability of >1.5 fold change in signal intensity greater than 0.999 and a predicted score of 70-100, measured by cross-validation. Compared with normal plasma, plasma from SCD patients (steady state) resulted in differential expression of 50 genes in HPAEC. Of these genes, molecules involved in cholesterol biosynthesis and lipid transport, the cellular stress response, and extracellular matrix proteins were most prominent. Another 58 genes were differentially expressed in HPAEC exposed to plasma from ACS patients. The pattern of altered gene expression suggests that plasma from SCD patients induces an EC phenotype which is anti-apoptotic and favors cholesterol biosynthesis. An altered EC phenotype elicited by SCD plasma may contribute to the pathogenesis of sickle vasoocclusion.

  11. Impact of nutrient excess and endothelial nitric oxide synthase on the plasma metabolite profile in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sansbury, Brian E.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Hill, Bradford G.

    2014-01-01

    An increase in calorie consumption is associated with the recent rise in obesity prevalence. However, our current understanding of the effects of nutrient excess on major metabolic pathways appears insufficient to develop safe and effective metabolic interventions to prevent obesity. Hence, we sought to identify systemic metabolic changes caused by nutrient excess and to determine how endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)—which has anti-obesogenic properties—affects systemic metabolism by measuring plasma metabolites. Wild-type (WT) and eNOS transgenic (eNOS-TG) mice were placed on low fat or high fat diets for 6 weeks, and plasma metabolites were measured using an unbiased metabolomic approach. High fat feeding in WT mice led to significant increases in fat mass, which was associated with significantly lower plasma levels of 1,5-anhydroglucitol, lysophospholipids, 3-dehydrocarnitine, and bile acids, as well as branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) and their metabolites. Plasma levels of several lipids including sphingomyelins, stearoylcarnitine, dihomo-linoleate and metabolites associated with oxidative stress were increased by high fat diet. In comparison with low fat-fed WT mice, eNOS-TG mice showed lower levels of several free fatty acids, but in contrast, the levels of bile acids, amino acids, and BCAA catabolites were increased. When placed on a high fat diet, eNOS overexpressing mice showed remarkably higher levels of plasma bile acids and elevated levels of plasma BCAAs and their catabolites compared with WT mice. Treatment with GW4064, an inhibitor of bile acid synthesis, decreased plasma bile acid levels but was not sufficient to reverse the anti-obesogenic effects of eNOS overexpression. These findings reveal unique metabolic changes in response to high fat diet and eNOS overexpression and suggest that the anti-obesity effects of eNOS are likely independent of changes in the bile acid pool. PMID:25505420

  12. Amelioration of Cardiac Function and Activation of Anti-Inflammatory Vasoactive Peptides Expression in the Rat Myocardium by Low Level Laser Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manchini, Martha Trindade; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Feliciano, Regiane dos Santos; Santana, Eduardo Tadeu; Antônio, Ednei Luis; de Tarso Camillo de Carvalho, Paulo; Montemor, Jairo; Crajoinas, Renato Oliveira; Girardi, Adriana Castello Costa; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Silva, José Antônio

    2014-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used as an anti-inflammatory treatment in several disease conditions, even when inflammation is a secondary consequence, such as in myocardial infarction (MI). However, the mechanism by which LLLT is able to protect the remaining myocardium remains unclear. The present study tested the hypothesis that LLLT reduces inflammation after acute MI in female rats and ameliorates cardiac function. The potential participation of the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) and Kallikrein-Kinin System (KKS) vasoactive peptides was also evaluated. LLLT treatment effectively reduced MI size, attenuated the systolic dysfunction after MI, and decreased the myocardial mRNA expression of interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-6 in comparison to the non-irradiated rat tissue. In addition, LLLT treatment increased protein and mRNA levels of the Mas receptor, the mRNA expression of kinin B2 receptors and the circulating levels of plasma kallikrein compared to non-treated post-MI rats. On the other hand, the kinin B1 receptor mRNA expression decreased after LLLT. No significant changes were found in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the myocardial remote area between laser-irradiated and non-irradiated post-MI rats. Capillaries density also remained similar between these two experimental groups. The mRNA expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was increased three days after MI, however, this effect was blunted by LLLT. Moreover, endothelial NOS mRNA content increased after LLLT. Plasma nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) concentration was increased three days after MI in non-treated rats and increased even further by LLLT treatment. Our data suggest that LLLT diminishes the acute inflammation in the myocardium, reduces infarct size and attenuates left ventricle dysfunction post-MI and increases vasoactive peptides expression and nitric oxide (NO) generation. PMID:24991808

  13. Amelioration of cardiac function and activation of anti-inflammatory vasoactive peptides expression in the rat myocardium by low level laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Manchini, Martha Trindade; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Feliciano, Regiane dos Santos; Santana, Eduardo Tadeu; Antônio, Ednei Luis; de Tarso Camillo de Carvalho, Paulo; Montemor, Jairo; Crajoinas, Renato Oliveira; Girardi, Adriana Castello Costa; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Silva, José Antônio

    2014-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used as an anti-inflammatory treatment in several disease conditions, even when inflammation is a secondary consequence, such as in myocardial infarction (MI). However, the mechanism by which LLLT is able to protect the remaining myocardium remains unclear. The present study tested the hypothesis that LLLT reduces inflammation after acute MI in female rats and ameliorates cardiac function. The potential participation of the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) and Kallikrein-Kinin System (KKS) vasoactive peptides was also evaluated. LLLT treatment effectively reduced MI size, attenuated the systolic dysfunction after MI, and decreased the myocardial mRNA expression of interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-6 in comparison to the non-irradiated rat tissue. In addition, LLLT treatment increased protein and mRNA levels of the Mas receptor, the mRNA expression of kinin B2 receptors and the circulating levels of plasma kallikrein compared to non-treated post-MI rats. On the other hand, the kinin B1 receptor mRNA expression decreased after LLLT. No significant changes were found in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the myocardial remote area between laser-irradiated and non-irradiated post-MI rats. Capillaries density also remained similar between these two experimental groups. The mRNA expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was increased three days after MI, however, this effect was blunted by LLLT. Moreover, endothelial NOS mRNA content increased after LLLT. Plasma nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) concentration was increased three days after MI in non-treated rats and increased even further by LLLT treatment. Our data suggest that LLLT diminishes the acute inflammation in the myocardium, reduces infarct size and attenuates left ventricle dysfunction post-MI and increases vasoactive peptides expression and nitric oxide (NO) generation. PMID:24991808

  14. Inhibitory Effect of the Punica granatum Fruit Extract on Angiotensin-II Type I Receptor and Thromboxane B2 in Endothelial Cells Induced by Plasma from Preeclamptic Patients.

    PubMed

    Kusumawati, Widya; Keman, Kusnarman; Soeharto, Setyawati

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate whether the Punica granatum fruit extract modulates the Angiotensin-II Type I receptor (AT1-R) and thromboxane B2 level in endothelial cells induced by plasma from preeclamptic patients. Endothelial cells were obtained from human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. At confluence, endothelial cells were divided into five groups, which included endothelial cells exposed to 2% plasma from normal pregnancy (NP), endothelial cells exposed to 2% plasma from preeclamptic patients (PP), and endothelial cells exposed to PP in the presence of ethanolic extract of Punica granatum (PP + PG) at the following three doses: 14; 28; and 56 ppm. The expression of AT1-R was observed by immunohistochemistry technique, and thromboxane B2 level was done by immunoassay technique. Plasma from PP significantly increased AT1-R expression and thromboxane B2 levels compared to cells treated by normal pregnancy plasma. The increasing of AT1-R expression significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated by high dose treatments of Punica granatum extract. Moreover, the increasing of thromboxane B2 levels significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated by lowest dose treatments of Punica granatum extract. We further concluded that Punica granatum fruit protects and inhibits the sensitivity of endothelial cells to plasma from preeclamptic patients due to inhibition of AT1-R expression (56 ppm) and reduced thromboxane B2 levels (14 ppm).

  15. Inhibitory Effect of the Punica granatum Fruit Extract on Angiotensin-II Type I Receptor and Thromboxane B2 in Endothelial Cells Induced by Plasma from Preeclamptic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kusumawati, Widya; Keman, Kusnarman; Soeharto, Setyawati

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate whether the Punica granatum fruit extract modulates the Angiotensin-II Type I receptor (AT1-R) and thromboxane B2 level in endothelial cells induced by plasma from preeclamptic patients. Endothelial cells were obtained from human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. At confluence, endothelial cells were divided into five groups, which included endothelial cells exposed to 2% plasma from normal pregnancy (NP), endothelial cells exposed to 2% plasma from preeclamptic patients (PP), and endothelial cells exposed to PP in the presence of ethanolic extract of Punica granatum (PP + PG) at the following three doses: 14; 28; and 56 ppm. The expression of AT1-R was observed by immunohistochemistry technique, and thromboxane B2 level was done by immunoassay technique. Plasma from PP significantly increased AT1-R expression and thromboxane B2 levels compared to cells treated by normal pregnancy plasma. The increasing of AT1-R expression significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated by high dose treatments of Punica granatum extract. Moreover, the increasing of thromboxane B2 levels significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated by lowest dose treatments of Punica granatum extract. We further concluded that Punica granatum fruit protects and inhibits the sensitivity of endothelial cells to plasma from preeclamptic patients due to inhibition of AT1-R expression (56 ppm) and reduced thromboxane B2 levels (14 ppm). PMID:26989513

  16. Baroreflex buffering and susceptibility to vasoactive drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jens; Tank, Jens; Shannon, John R.; Diedrich, Andre; Lipp, Axel; Schroder, Christoph; Arnold, Guy; Sharma, Arya M.; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, David; Luft, Friedrich C.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The overall effect of vasoactive drugs on blood pressure is determined by a combination of the direct effect on vascular tone and an indirect baroreflex-mediated effect, a baroreflex buffering of blood pressure. Differences in baroreflex function affect the responsiveness to vasoactive medications, particularly baroreflex buffering of blood pressure; however, the magnitude is not known. METHODS AND RESULTS: We characterized baroreflex function and responses to vasoactive drugs in patients with idiopathic orthostatic intolerance, patients with essential hypertension, patients with monogenic hypertension and brachydactyly, patients with multiple system atrophy, and control subjects. We used phenylephrine sensitivity during ganglionic blockade as a measure of baroreflex buffering. Phenylephrine (25 microg) increased systolic blood pressure 6+/-1.6 mm Hg in control subjects, 6+/-1.1 mm Hg in orthostatic intolerance patients, 18+/-3.9 mm Hg in patients with essential hypertension, 31+/-3.4 mm Hg in patients with monogenic hypertension, and 25+/-3.4 mm Hg in patients with multiple system atrophy. Similar differences in sensitivities between groups were observed with nitroprusside. The sensitivity to vasoactive drugs was highly correlated with baroreflex buffering function and to a lesser degree with baroreflex control of heart rate. In control subjects, sensitivities to nitroprusside and phenylephrine infusions were correlated with baroreflex heart rate control and sympathetic nerve traffic. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings are consistent with an important effect of baroreflex blood pressure buffering on the sensitivity to vasoactive drugs. They suggest that even moderate changes in baroreflex function may have a substantial effect on the sensitivity to vasoactive medications.

  17. Aspirin Triggered-Lipoxin A4 Reduces the Adhesion of Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils to Endothelial Cells Initiated by Preeclamptic Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Villa, AM; Norling, LV; Serhan, CN; Cordero, D; Rojas, M; Cadavid, A

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Preeclampsia is a disorder of pregnancy, characterized by hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks of gestation. Here, we evaluated the role of aspirin triggered-lipoxin A4 (ATL, 15-epi-LXA4) on the modulation of the adhesion of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) to endothelial cells initiated by preeclamptic plasma. Materials and methods Plasma from preeclamptic, normotensive pregnant, and non-pregnant women were analysed for factors involved in regulating angiogenesis, inflammation and lipid peroxidation. Plasma from preeclamptic women was added to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and the adhesion of PMN (incubated with or without ATL) to cells was evaluated. Results Preeclampsia was associated with some augmented anti-angiogenic, oxidative and pro-inflammatory markers, as well as increasing human PMN-endothelial cell adhesion. This cell adhesion was reduced when human PMN were incubated with ATL prior to addition to endothelial monolayers. Discussions and Conclusions Our results are the starting point for further research on the efficacy and rational use of aspirin in preeclampsia. PMID:22974760

  18. Significance of plasma nitric oxide/endothelial-1 ratio for prediction of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Akira; Matsui, Takemi; Ishizuka, Toshiaki; Takase, Bonpei; Satomura, Kimio

    2005-01-01

    Vascular tone is regulated by vasodilators and vasoconstrictors. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is the predominant vasoconstrictor peptide that constricts vascular smooth muscle, whereas nitric oxide (NO) is the primary vasodilator peptide that relaxes vascular smooth muscle. In this study, the authors examined whether NO/ET-1 ratio is a useful marker for detecting coronary artery disease (CAD), by comparison with evaluation based on vascular endothelial (VE) function. They measured plasma NOX and ET-1 by using ENO-200 and radioimmunoassay, in 38 subjects with normal (NL) coronary arteries (NL group; mean age, 60 +/-12 years) and 25 subjects with CAD (CAD group; mean age, 69 +/- 6 years). VE function (randomized endothelium-dependent [D] and endothelium-independent [I] VE function) was assessed by measuring brachial artery (BA) diameter by using high-resolution ultrasound (7.5 MHz). Soon after these procedures, symptom-limited exercise testing was performed. There were no statistically significant differences in serum lipid concentrations or VED function between the groups. However, the CAD group had a significantly lower NO/ET-1 ratio (1.2 +/- 1.1 vs 2.7 +/- 2.2, p < 0.01) and BA diameter after sublingual nitroglycerin (VEID function: 6 +/- 7% vs 10 +/- 4%, p < 0.05). As expected, the ST segment and treadmill exercise duration were significantly lower in the CAD group. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting CAD by plasma NO/ET-1 ratio (> or =2 .0) were 90% and 85%, respectively; sensitivity and specificity for detecting CAD by ST depression (> or =1 mm) were 80% and 78%, respectively. The present results suggest that plasma NO/ET-1 ratio is a useful biological marker for predicting CAD. PMID:15889192

  19. Blood-nerve barrier: distribution of anionic sites on the endothelial plasma membrane and basal lamina of dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Bush, M S; Reid, A R; Allt, G

    1991-09-01

    Previous investigations of the blood-nerve barrier have correlated the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels, compared to those of nerve trunks, with the presence of fenestrations and open intercellular junctions. Recent studies have demonstrated reduced endothelial cell surface charge in blood vessels showing greater permeability. To determine the distribution of anionic sites on the plasma membranes and basal laminae of endothelial cells in dorsal root ganglia, cationic colloidal gold and cationic ferritin were used. Electron microscopy revealed the existence of endothelial microdomains with differing labelling densities. Labelling indicated that caveolar and fenestral diaphragms and basal laminae are highly anionic at physiological pH, luminal plasma membranes and endothelial processes are moderately charged and abluminal plasma membranes are weakly anionic. Tracers did not occur in caveolae or cytoplasmic vesicles. In vitro tracer experiments at pH values of 7.3, 5.0, 3.5 and 2.0 indicated that the anionic charge on the various endothelial domains was contributed by chemical groups with differing pKa values. In summary, the labelling of ganglionic and sciatic nerve vessels was similar except for the heavy labelling of diaphragms in a minority of endoneurial vessels in ganglia. This difference is likely to account in part for the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels. The results are discussed with regard to the blood-nerve and -brain barriers and vascular permeability in other tissues and a comparison made between the ultrastructure and anionic microdomains of epi-, peri- and endoneurial vessels of dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerves.

  20. Blood-nerve barrier: distribution of anionic sites on the endothelial plasma membrane and basal lamina of dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Bush, M S; Reid, A R; Allt, G

    1991-09-01

    Previous investigations of the blood-nerve barrier have correlated the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels, compared to those of nerve trunks, with the presence of fenestrations and open intercellular junctions. Recent studies have demonstrated reduced endothelial cell surface charge in blood vessels showing greater permeability. To determine the distribution of anionic sites on the plasma membranes and basal laminae of endothelial cells in dorsal root ganglia, cationic colloidal gold and cationic ferritin were used. Electron microscopy revealed the existence of endothelial microdomains with differing labelling densities. Labelling indicated that caveolar and fenestral diaphragms and basal laminae are highly anionic at physiological pH, luminal plasma membranes and endothelial processes are moderately charged and abluminal plasma membranes are weakly anionic. Tracers did not occur in caveolae or cytoplasmic vesicles. In vitro tracer experiments at pH values of 7.3, 5.0, 3.5 and 2.0 indicated that the anionic charge on the various endothelial domains was contributed by chemical groups with differing pKa values. In summary, the labelling of ganglionic and sciatic nerve vessels was similar except for the heavy labelling of diaphragms in a minority of endoneurial vessels in ganglia. This difference is likely to account in part for the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels. The results are discussed with regard to the blood-nerve and -brain barriers and vascular permeability in other tissues and a comparison made between the ultrastructure and anionic microdomains of epi-, peri- and endoneurial vessels of dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerves. PMID:1960538

  1. Plasma polymerized n-butyl methacrylate coating with potential for re-endothelialization of intravascular stent devices.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Changsheng; Yin, Min

    2008-05-01

    Rapid re-endothelialization at an atherosclerotic lesion after stent employment is essential for reducing or preventing local thrombus formation and restenosis. To prevent these complications via enhanced rapid re-endothelialization, poly n-butyl methacrylate (PPBMA) coating was deposited on the stent surface through a radio-frequency plasma polymerization process, with oxygen as the carrier gas. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization confirmed the occurrence of the plasma polymerization and the chemistry properties of the PPBMA. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a smooth and dense surface. The wettability of the polymeric films measured by the contact angle indicated that the surface was more hydrophilic (2.0 +/- 1 degrees ) than the original surface (24 +/- 1 degrees ) by the introduction of the PPBMA coating, with a slight decrease even after 4 days. The results of the culture of human umbilical cord veins endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro showed that compared with the control of 316L stainless steel, the attachment and growth of cells on the PPBMA-coated surface was significantly enhanced, and a confluent endothelial cells layer was formed after a 4-day culture. A platelet adhesion experiment revealed that the blood compatibility of the substrate surface after PPBMA deposition was also obviously improved. The PPBMA coating remained intact on the stent surface after expansion according to the clinic protocol, indicating that the adhesive strength of PPBMA coating was high enough to withstand the external force in the process of stent expansion. This in vitro pilot study prior to in vivo experiments suggested that this plasma PPBMA was promising for coating stent materials for rapid re-endothelialization.

  2. Stimulation of growth hormone by vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Chihara, K; Kaji, H; Minamitani, N; Kodama, H; Kita, T; Goto, B; Chiba, T; Coy, D H; Fujita, T

    1984-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) was administered as an iv bolus of 1 micrograms/kg BW to 8 acromegalic patients and in doses of 0.5 and 1 microgram/kg BW to 15 normal volunteers. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressures decreased, and pulse rate increased transiently after VIP injection. VIP stimulated PRL release from the anterior pituitary in normal subjects. Plasma PRL responses to VIP in women were dose dependent and larger than those in men. On the other hand, plasma GH levels rose markedly after VIP injection in all 6 patients with untreated acromegaly. In 2 patients studied after transsphenoidal microadenomectomy, there was no plasma GH response to VIP. In 2 other patients with inactive acromegaly as well as in normal subjects, VIP failed to affect plasma GH levels. In all 6 patients with active acromegaly, LRH (1-2 micrograms/kg BW, iv) did not increase plasma GH levels, but TRH (5-10 micrograms/kg BW, iv) caused significant increases in plasma GH, the magnitude of which was not similar to that of increases seen after VIP injection. Paradoxical GH responses to TRH were not observed in patients in the inactive phase after transsphenoidal surgery. These findings suggest that VIP stimulates GH release in vivo in acromegalic patients. A VIP test as well as a TRH test offer promise as simple and reliable techniques to evaluate the activity of acromegaly, particularly after transsphenoidal surgery.

  3. Discovery of XEN445: a potent and selective endothelial lipase inhibitor raises plasma HDL-cholesterol concentration in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaoyi; Dean, Richard; Jia, Qi; Zenova, Alla; Zhong, Jing; Grayson, Celene; Xie, Clark; Lindgren, Andrea; Samra, Pritpaul; Sojo, Luis; van Heek, Margaret; Lin, Linus; Percival, David; Fu, Jian-Min; Winther, Michael D; Zhang, Zaihui

    2013-12-15

    Endothelial lipase (EL) activity has been implicated in HDL metabolism and in atherosclerotic plaque development; inhibitors are proposed to be efficacious in the treatment of dyslipidemia related cardiovascular disease. We describe here the discovery of a novel class of anthranilic acids EL inhibitors. XEN445 (compound 13) was identified as a potent and selective EL inhibitor, that showed good ADME and PK properties, and demonstrated in vivo efficacy in raising plasma HDLc concentrations in mice. PMID:24211162

  4. Endothelial gaps and adherent leukocytes in allergen-induced early- and late-phase plasma leakage in rat airways.

    PubMed

    Baluk, P; Bolton, P; Hirata, A; Thurston, G; McDonald, D M

    1998-06-01

    Exposure of sensitized individuals to antigen can induce allergic responses in the respiratory tract, manifested by early and late phases of vasodilatation, plasma leakage, leukocyte influx, and bronchoconstriction. Similar responses can occur in the skin, eye, and gastrointestinal tract. The early-phase response involves mast cell mediators and the late-phase response is leukocyte dependent, but the mechanism of leakage is not understood. We sought to identify the leaky blood vessels, to determine whether these vessels contained endothelial gaps, and to analyze the relationship of the gaps to adherent leukocytes, using biotinylated lectins or silver nitrate to stain the cells in situ and Monastral blue as a tracer to quantify plasma leakage. Most of the leakage occurred in postcapillary venules (< 40-microns diameter), whereas most of the leukocyte migration (predominantly neutrophils) occurred in collecting venules. Capillaries and arterioles did not leak. Endothelial gaps were found in the leaky venules, both by silver nitrate staining and by scanning electron microscopy, and 94% of the gaps were distinct from sites of leukocyte adhesion or migration. We conclude that endothelial gaps contribute to both early and late phases of plasma leakage induced by antigen, but most leakage occurs upstream to sites of leukocyte adhesion. PMID:9626051

  5. Addition of in-vitro generated endothelial microparticles to von-Willebrand plasma improves primary and secondary hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Trummer, Arne; Werwitzke, Sonja; Wermes, Cornelia; Ganser, Arnold; Birschmann, Ingvild; Budde, Ulrich; Tiede, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Increased endothelial microparticles (EMP) as markers for endothelial activation have been associated with worse outcomes in clinical prothrombotic situations. The procoagulant properties of EMP can be attributed to the expression of phospholipids, tissue factor and von-Willebrand factor on their surface. We therefore investigated whether addition of in-vitro generated EMP modifies hemostasis in plasma from patients with severe von-Willebrand disease (VWD). A large EMP pool was obtained from stimulated endothelial cell lines and EMP concentration was quantified by flow cytometry. The influence of EMP on primary and secondary hemostasis in VWD plasma was assessed using ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) and thrombin generation in a calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT), respectively. After addition of EMP, there was a significant increase in the maximal aggregation level in RIPA as well as a significant shortening of lag time and time-to-peak in CAT in comparison to control buffer. In summary, in vitro-generated EMP have the potential to improve hemostasis in severe VWD plasma and these results warrant further clinical reseach regarding their contribution to the clinical bleeding phenotype as well as their potential to improve replacement therapy.

  6. Theobroma cacao increases cells viability and reduces IL-6 and sVCAM-1 level in endothelial cells induced by plasma from preeclamptic patients.

    PubMed

    Rahayu, Budi; Baktiyani, Siti Candra Windu; Nurdiana, Nurdiana

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate whether an ethanolic extract of Theobroma cacao bean is able to increase cell viability and decrease IL-6 and sVCAM-1 in endothelial cells induced by plasma from preeclamptic patients. Endothelial cells were obtained from human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. At confluency, endothelial cells were divided into six groups, which included control (untreated), endothelial cells exposed to plasma from normal pregnancy, endothelial cells exposed to 2% plasma from preeclamptic patients (PP), endothelial cells exposed to PP in the presence of ethanolic extract of T. cacao (PP+TC) at the following three doses: 25, 50, and 100 ppm. The analysis was performed in silico using the Hex 8.0, LigPlus and LigandScout 3.1 software. Analysis on IL-6 and sVCAM-1 levels were done by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that seven of them could bind to the protein NFκB (catechin, leucoanthocyanidin, niacin, phenylethylamine, theobromine, theophylline, and thiamin). This increase in IL-6 was significantly (P<0.05) attenuated by both the 50 and 100 ppm treatments of T. cacao extract. Plasma from PP significantly increased sVCAM-1 levels compared to untreated cells. This increase in sVCAM-1 was significantly attenuated by all doses of the extract. In conclusion, T. cacao extract prohibits the increase in IL-6 and sVCAM-1 in endothelial cells induced by plasma from preeclamptic patients. Therefore this may provide a herbal therapy for attenuating the endothelial dysfunction found in preeclampsia. PMID:26955771

  7. Plasma from human volunteers subjected to remote ischemic preconditioning protects human endothelial cells from hypoxia-induced cell damage.

    PubMed

    Weber, Nina C; Riedemann, Isabelle; Smit, Kirsten F; Zitta, Karina; van de Vondervoort, Djai; Zuurbier, Coert J; Hollmann, Markus W; Preckel, Benedikt; Albrecht, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Short repeated cycles of peripheral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) can protect distant organs from subsequent prolonged I/R injury; a phenomenon known as remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC). A RIPC-mediated release of humoral factors might play a key role in this protection and vascular endothelial cells are potential targets for these secreted factors. In the present study, RIPC-plasma obtained from healthy male volunteers was tested for its ability to protect human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC) from hypoxia-induced cell damage. 10 healthy male volunteers were subjected to a RIPC-protocol consisting of 4 × 5 min inflation/deflation of a blood pressure cuff located at the upper arm. Plasma was collected before (T0; control), directly after (T1) and 1 h after (T2) the RIPC procedure. HUVEC were subjected to 24 h hypoxia damage and simultaneously incubated with 5% of the respective RIPC-plasma. Cell damage was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-measurements. Western blot experiments of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1alpha), phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5), protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK-1/2) were performed. Furthermore, the concentrations of hVEGF were evaluated in the RIPC-plasma by sandwich ELISA. Hypoxia-induced cell damage was significantly reduced by plasma T1 (p = 0.02 vs T0). The protective effect of plasma T1 was accompanied by an augmentation of the intracellular HIF1alpha (p = 0.01 vs T0) and increased phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 (p = 0.03 vs T0). Phosphorylation of AKT and STAT5 remained unchanged. Analysis of the protective RIPC-plasma T1 showed significantly reduced levels of hVEGF (p = 0.01 vs T0). RIPC plasma protects endothelial cells from hypoxia-induced cell damage and humoral mediators as well as intracellular HIF1alpha may be involved.

  8. Binding of human coronary artery endothelial cells to plasma-treated titanium dioxide nanotubes of different diameters.

    PubMed

    Flašker, Ajda; Kulkarni, Mukta; Mrak-Poljšak, Katjuša; Junkar, Ita; Čučnik, Saša; Žigon, Polona; Mazare, Anca; Schmuki, Patrik; Iglič, Aleš; Sodin-Semrl, Snezna

    2016-05-01

    Nanoscale topography in improving vascular response in vitro was established previously on various titanium surfaces. In the present study different surface nanotopographies that is different diameters of titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) nanotubes (NTs) were fabricated by electrochemical anodization and conditioned with highly reactive gaseous oxygen plasma. The morphology of different diameter NTs was studied by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, while changes in chemical composition on the surface before and after plasma treatment were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Performance of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) on those conditioned surfaces was studied in regard to cell proliferation, released IL-6 protein and immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM). We show that HCAEC function is dependent on the diameter of the TiO2 NTs, functioning far less optimally when bound to 100 nm TiO2 NTs as compared to Ti foil, 15 nm NTs or 50 nm NTs. There were improved, morphological cell shape changes, observed with IFM, between HCAEC growing on oxygen-rich plasma-treated versus nontreated 100 nm NTs. These endothelialized conditioned Ti nanosurfaces could elucidate optimization conditions necessary for vascular implants in coronary arteries.

  9. Biological factors in plasma from diabetes mellitus patients enhance hyperglycaemia and pulsatile shear stress-induced endothelial cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, X F; Yu, J Q; Dalan, R; Liu, A Q; Luo, K Q

    2014-05-01

    People suffering from Diabetes Mellitus (DM) are prone to an array of vascular complications leading to end organ damage. The hallmark of these vascular complications is endothelium dysfunction, which is caused by endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis. Although the endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction induced by hyperglycaemia and fluid shear stress has been studied, the effects of biological factors in the blood of DM patients on EC integrity have not been reported in the in vitro models that mimic the physiological pulsatile nature of the vascular system. This study reports the development of a hemodynamic lab-on-a-chip system to investigate this issue. The pulsatile flow was applied to a monolayer of endothelial cells expressing a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor that changes colour from green to blue in response to caspase-3 activation during apoptosis. Plasma samples from healthy volunteers and DM patients were compared to identify biological factors that are critical to endothelial disruption. Three types of microchannels were designed to simulate the blood vessels under healthy and partially blocked pathological conditions. The results showed that EC apoptosis rates increased with increasing glucose concentration and levels of shear stress. The rates of apoptosis further increased by a factor of 1.4-2.3 for hyperglycaemic plasma under all dynamic conditions. Under static conditions, little difference was detected in the rate of EC apoptosis between experiments using plasma from DM patients and glucose medium, suggesting that the effects of hyperglycaemia and biological factors on the induction of EC apoptosis are all shear flow-dependent. A proteomics study was then conducted to identify biological factors, demonstrating that the levels of eight proteins, including haptoglobin and clusterin, were significantly down-regulated, while six proteins, including apolipoprotein C-III, were significantly up-regulated in the plasma of DM patients

  10. Mechanisms contributing to the vaso-active effects of prilocaine in human skin.

    PubMed

    Newton, D J; Sur, E L; Khan, F; McLeod, G A; Belch, J J F

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the roles of the endothelial nitric oxide and cyclo-oxygenase pathways in mediating the vasoactivity of prilocaine in the skin. We injected prilocaine 1% intradermally into forearm skin of 10 healthy, male subjects. Nitric oxide synthesis was inhibited at a second site by co-injecting prilocaine with l-NAME 1%. We then repeated the injections while blocking the cyclo-oxygenase pathway with aspirin (4 x 600 mg). We measured blood flow responses to the injections using laser Doppler imaging. We found that, after the traumatic effects of injection had subsided, l-NAME reduced the vascular response to prilocaine by a third (p = 0.012), indicating an influence specifically on the drug response. Aspirin had no effect on the response (p = 0.588). We conclude that the vasoactive effects of prilocaine in human skin are mediated partly through the release of endothelial nitric oxide and, although other mechanisms might also be involved, the cyclo-oxygenase pathway does not appear to play a role.

  11. Endothelial expression of human ABCA1 in mice increases plasma HDL cholesterol and reduces diet-induced atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Vaisman, Boris L.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Stonik, John A.; Ghias, Mona; Knapper, Cathy L.; Sampson, Maureen L.; Dai, Cuilian; Levine, Stewart J.; Remaley, Alan T.

    2012-01-01

    The role of endothelial ABCA1 expression in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) was examined in transgenic mice, using the endothelial-specific Tie2 promoter. Human ABCA1 (hABCA1) was significantly expressed in endothelial cells (EC) of most tissues except the liver. Increased expression of ABCA1 was not observed in resident peritoneal macrophages. ApoA-I-mediated cholesterol efflux from aortic EC was 2.6-fold higher (P < 0.0001) for cells from transgenic versus control mice. On normal chow diet, Tie2 hABCA1 transgenic mice had a 25% (P < 0.0001) increase in HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and more than a 2-fold increase of eNOS mRNA in the aorta (P < 0.04). After 6 months on a high-fat, high-cholesterol (HFHC) diet, transgenic mice compared with controls had a 40% increase in plasma HDL-C (P < 0.003) and close to 40% decrease in aortic lesions (P < 0.02). Aortas from HFHC-fed transgenic mice also showed gene expression changes consistent with decreased inflammation and apoptosis. Beneficial effects of the ABCA1 transgene on HDL-C levels or on atherosclerosis were absent when the transgene was transferred onto ApoE or Abca1 knockout mice. In summary, expression of hABCA1 in EC appears to play a role in decreasing diet-induced atherosclerosis in mice and is associated with increased plasma HDL-C levels and beneficial gene expression changes in EC. PMID:22039582

  12. Oxidative Stress-Dependent Coronary Endothelial Dysfunction in Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Gamez-Mendez, Ana María; Vargas-Robles, Hilda; Ríos, Amelia; Escalante, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is involved in several cardiovascular diseases including coronary artery disease and endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial Endothelium vasodilator and vasoconstrictor agonists play a key role in regulation of vascular tone. In this study, we evaluated coronary vascular response in an 8 weeks diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice model. Coronary perfusion pressure in response to acetylcholine in isolated hearts from obese mice showed increased vasoconstriction and reduced vasodilation responses compared with control mice. Vascular nitric oxide assessed in situ with DAF-2 DA showed diminished levels in coronary arteries from obese mice in both basal and acetylcholine-stimulated conditions. Also, released prostacyclin was decreased in heart perfusates from obese mice, along with plasma tetrahydrobiopterin level and endothelium nitric oxide synthase dimer/monomer ratio. Obesity increased thromboxane A2 synthesis and oxidative stress evaluated by superoxide and peroxynitrite levels, compared with control mice. Obese mice treated with apocynin, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, reversed all parameters to normal levels. These results suggest that after 8 weeks on a high-fat diet, the increase in oxidative stress lead to imbalance in vasoactive substances and consequently to endothelial dysfunction in coronary arteries.

  13. Vasoactive agents for the treatment of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun

    2016-01-01

    The article describes some commonly used vasoactive agents in patients with septic shock. Depending on their distinct pharmacological properties, their effects on vascular bed and cardiac function are different. For example, dopamine has equivalent effect on heart and vasculature, which can result in increases in cardiac output, mean arterial pressure and heart rate. Dobutamine is considered as inodilator because it has potent effect on cardiac systole and vasculature. Patients with sepsis and septic shock sometimes have coexisting cardiac dysfunction that justifies the use of dobutamine. Levosimendan is a relatively new agent exerting its inodilator effect by increasing sensitivity of myocardium to calcium. Some preliminary studies showed a promising result of levosimendan on reducing mortality. PMID:27713891

  14. Fenofibrate improves endothelial function and plasma myeloperoxidase in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: an open-label interventional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fenofibrate offers a number of benefits on the cardiovascular system and it is plausible that its anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-fibrotic effects and enhancement of cardiac metabolic performances may account for its direct cardioprotective effects. In this study we aimed to investigate the effect of fenofibrate on endothelial function assesed by vascular studies and levels of soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin) as well as the effect on plasma myeloperoxidase (MPO) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) without previous use of lipid-lowering medication. Methods 27 patients (14 men and 13 women) with T2DM and good glycemic control (HbA1c: min 5.9%, max: 7.1%) treated with metformin monotherapy, without previous use of lipid-lowering medication were enrolled in this study. Vascular studies included measures of brachial artery diameter before and after release of a suprasystolic ischemia. FMD was calculated as the percent (%) change in arterial diameter following reactive hyperemia. Student’s paired t test and Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test were used to compare values before and after fenofibrate therapy. Results Fenofibrate therapy significantly increased post ischemia mean brachial artery diameter at 60 s (from 4.7 [4.4; 5.0] mm to 4.9 [4.6; 5.2] mm, p = 0.01) and at 90 s (from 4.7 [4.4; 5.0] mm to 4.9 [4.6; 5.1], p = 0.02). FMD response to hyperaemia at 60 s increased with 4.5 ± 13.7% (median value pre- treatment: 22.2%, median value post- treatment 25.0%, z = −2.9, p = 0.004). After 8 weeks of fenofibrate therapy, plasma MPO levels decreased to 49.5 [30.3; 71.5] ng/ml (% change from baseline = 4.6%, z = −2.2, p = 0.03) and mean plasma sE-selectin levels decreased to 67.1 [54.4; 79.8] ng/ml, (% change from baseline = 2.6%, p = 0.03). Conclusion In patients with T2DM without previous treatment for dyslipidemia, short-term treatment with fenofibrate improved vascular endothelial function as demonstrated by increased post ischemia mean

  15. Lipidomic analyses of female mice lacking hepatic lipase and endothelial lipase indicate selective modulation of plasma lipid species.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanbo; Kuwano, Takashi; Lagor, William R; Albert, Carolyn J; Brenton, Siobhan; Rader, Daniel J; Ford, David A; Brown, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) and endothelial lipase (EL) share overlapping and complementary roles in lipoprotein metabolism. The deletion of HL and EL alleles in mice raises plasma total cholesterol and phospholipid concentrations. However, the influence of HL and EL in vivo on individual molecular species from each class of lipid is not known. We hypothesized that the loss of HL, EL, or both in vivo may affect select molecular species from each class of lipids. To test this hypothesis, we performed lipidomic analyses on plasma and livers from fasted female wild-type, HL-knockout, EL-knockout, and HL/EL-double knockout mice. Overall, the loss of HL, EL, or both resulted in minimal changes to hepatic lipids; however, select species of CE were surprisingly reduced in the livers of mice only lacking EL. The loss of HL, EL, or both reduced the plasma concentrations for select molecular species of triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, and free fatty acid. On the other hand, the loss of HL, EL, or both raised the plasma concentrations for select molecular species of phosphatidylcholine, cholesteryl ester, diacylglycerol, sphingomyelin, ceramide, plasmanylcholine, and plasmenylcholine. The increased plasma concentration of select ether phospholipids was evident in the absence of EL, thus suggesting that EL might exhibit a phospholipase A2 activity. Using recombinant EL, we showed that it could hydrolyse the artificial phospholipase A2 substrate 4-nitro-3-(octanoyloxy)benzoic acid. In summary, our study shows for the first time the influence of HL and EL on individual molecular species of several classes of lipids in vivo using lipidomic methods. PMID:24777581

  16. Endothelial Cell Sensitization by Death Receptor Fractions of an Anti-Dengue Nonstructural Protein 1 Antibody Induced Plasma Leakage, Coagulopathy, and Mortality in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Der-Shan; Chang, Ying-Chen; Lien, Te-Sheng; King, Chwan-Chuen; Shih, Yung-Luen; Huang, Hsuan-Shun; Wang, Teng-Yi; Li, Chen-Ru; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Hsu, Ping-Ning; Chang, Hsin-Hou

    2015-09-15

    The mechanisms leading to the life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) remain elusive. DHF preferentially occurs during secondary dengue infections, suggesting that aberrant immune responses are involved in its development. We previously demonstrated that the autoantibodies elicited by dengue virus (DENV) nonstructural protein 1 (NS1; anti-NS1 Igs) induce plasma leakage and mortality in mice with warfarinized anticoagulant suppression. However, the involved pathogenic Ig fractions of anti-NS1 Igs remain unclear. In this study, the autoreactive Igs in patients with DHF and in NS1-immunized rabbits crossreacted with TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor 1 (death receptor [DR]4). Challenges with the DENV in a subcytotoxic dose sensitized endothelial cells to apoptosis. Treatments with the autoantibodies induced proapoptotic activities and suppressed the surface expression of endothelial anticoagulant thrombomodulin. Combined treatments comprising the DENV and DR4 affinity-purified fractions of anti-NS1 IgGs (anti-NS1-DR4 Ig), but not preimmune control IgGs, in subcytotoxic doses led to apoptosis in endothelial cells. Treatments with the anti-NS1-DR4 Ig led to plasma leakage, coagulopathy, and morality in mice with warfarinized anticoagulant suppression. These results suggest that DR4-induced endothelial cell sensitization through NS1-elicited autoantibodies exacerbates anticoagulant suppression, vascular injury, and plasma leakage. Detecting and blocking anti-DR Igs in patients may be novel strategies for managing severe DENV infection. PMID:26259584

  17. Endothelial Cell Sensitization by Death Receptor Fractions of an Anti-Dengue Nonstructural Protein 1 Antibody Induced Plasma Leakage, Coagulopathy, and Mortality in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Der-Shan; Chang, Ying-Chen; Lien, Te-Sheng; King, Chwan-Chuen; Shih, Yung-Luen; Huang, Hsuan-Shun; Wang, Teng-Yi; Li, Chen-Ru; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Hsu, Ping-Ning; Chang, Hsin-Hou

    2015-09-15

    The mechanisms leading to the life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) remain elusive. DHF preferentially occurs during secondary dengue infections, suggesting that aberrant immune responses are involved in its development. We previously demonstrated that the autoantibodies elicited by dengue virus (DENV) nonstructural protein 1 (NS1; anti-NS1 Igs) induce plasma leakage and mortality in mice with warfarinized anticoagulant suppression. However, the involved pathogenic Ig fractions of anti-NS1 Igs remain unclear. In this study, the autoreactive Igs in patients with DHF and in NS1-immunized rabbits crossreacted with TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor 1 (death receptor [DR]4). Challenges with the DENV in a subcytotoxic dose sensitized endothelial cells to apoptosis. Treatments with the autoantibodies induced proapoptotic activities and suppressed the surface expression of endothelial anticoagulant thrombomodulin. Combined treatments comprising the DENV and DR4 affinity-purified fractions of anti-NS1 IgGs (anti-NS1-DR4 Ig), but not preimmune control IgGs, in subcytotoxic doses led to apoptosis in endothelial cells. Treatments with the anti-NS1-DR4 Ig led to plasma leakage, coagulopathy, and morality in mice with warfarinized anticoagulant suppression. These results suggest that DR4-induced endothelial cell sensitization through NS1-elicited autoantibodies exacerbates anticoagulant suppression, vascular injury, and plasma leakage. Detecting and blocking anti-DR Igs in patients may be novel strategies for managing severe DENV infection.

  18. Vasoactive modulators during and after craniotomy: relation to postoperative hypertension.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Karsten S; Pedersen, Carsten Boe; Madsen, Jørn Bo; Ravn, Lisbet I; Schifter, Søren

    2002-07-01

    Hypertension after craniotomy is frequent. To establish an association between vasoactive modulators and postoperative hypertension, we followed the arterial blood pressure and plasma concentrations of selected substances in patients undergoing craniotomy. Twelve consecutive patients scheduled for operation of a supratentorial brain tumor were anesthetized with thiopental, fentanyl, isoflurane, and pancuronium. None of the patients had a history of arterial hypertension or were hypertensive before the operation. Arterial blood pressure and heart rate measurements were obtained preoperatively, after incision, during closure, and four times in the 50-minute interval after stopping isoflurane. At the same time, plasma concentrations of norepinephrine, epinephrine, renin, aldosterone, atrial natriuretic peptide, endothelin, and cortisol were measured. Data are given as mean +/- SD (range). The postoperative concentrations of these substances were significantly higher than the baseline concentrations measured preoperatively. Six of the patients developed postoperative hypertension defined as a mean arterial pressure (MAP) > 20% more than the baseline MAP (group H), and six had normal blood pressure postoperatively (group N). The mean value of the maximal postoperative MAPs measured in groups H and N, respectively, was 118 +/- 16 mm Hg (range: 96-132) and 103 +/- 9 mm Hg (range: 92-115) (P =.01). Only renin levels were higher intraoperatively in group H when compared to group N. However, postoperative levels of catecholamines, aldosterone, renin, and endothelin levels were higher in group H patients. The results suggest that in addition to an increased discharge of the sympathetic system, activation of the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system may also play an important role in the development of postoperative hypertension after craniotomy. PMID:12172288

  19. Hypoxia directly increases serotonin transport by porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cell (PAEC) plasma membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, G.B.; Block, E.R. )

    1990-02-26

    Alterations in the physical state and composition of membrane lipids have been shown to interfere with a number of critical cellular and membrane functions including transmembrane transport. The authors have reported that hypoxia has profound effects upon the physical state and lipid composition of the PAEC plasma membrane bilayer and have suggested that this is responsible for increased serotonin uptake by these cells. In order to determine whether hypoxia has a direct effect on the plasma membrane transport of serotonin, they measured serotonin transport activity (1) in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from normoxic (20% O{sub 2}-5% CO{sub 2}) and hypoxic (0% O{sub 2}-5% CO{sub 2}) PAEC and (2) in PAEC plasma membrane vesicles that were exposed directly to normoxia or hypoxia. A 24-h exposure of PAEC to hypoxia resulted in a 40% increase in specific serotonin transport by plasma membrane vesicles derived from these cells. When plasma membrane vesicles were isolated and then directly exposed to normoxia or hypoxia for 1 h at 37C, a 31% increase in specific 5-HT transport was observed in hypoxic vesicles. Hypoxia did not alter the Km of serotonin transport (normoxia = 3.47 {mu}M versus hypoxia = 3.76 {mu}M) but markedly increased the maximal rate of transport (V{sup max}) (normoxia = 202.4 pmol/min/mg protein versus hypoxia = 317.9 pmol/min/mg protein). These results indicate that hypoxia increases serotonin transport in PAEC by a direct effect on the plasma membrane leading to an increase in the effective number of transporter molecules without alteration in transporter affinity for serotonin.

  20. Increased plasma levels of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (sFlt-1) in women by moderate exercise and increased plasma levels of vascular endothelial growth factor in overweight/obese women.

    PubMed

    Makey, Kristina L; Patterson, Sharla G; Robinson, James; Loftin, Mark; Waddell, Dwight E; Miele, Lucio; Chinchar, Edmund; Huang, Min; Smith, Andrew D; Weber, Mark; Gu, Jian-Wei

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer is increasing worldwide, and this seems to be related to an increase in lifestyle risk factors, including physical inactivity and overweight/obesity. We have reported previously that exercise induced a circulating angiostatic phenotype characterized by increased soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and endostatin and decreased unbound vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in men. However, there are no data on women. The present study determines the following: (a) whether moderate exercise increased sFlt-1 and endostatin and decreased unbound VEGF in the circulation of adult female volunteers and (b) whether overweight/obese women have a higher plasma level of unbound VEGF than lean women. A total of 72 African American and White adult women volunteers ranging in age from 18 to 44 years were enrolled in the exercise study. All the participants walked on a treadmill for 30 min at a moderate intensity (55-59% heart rate reserve), and oxygen consumption (VO(2)) was quantified utilizing a metabolic cart. We obtained blood samples before and immediately after exercise from 63 participants. ELISA assays showed that the plasma levels of sFlt-1 were 67.8±3.7 pg/ml immediately after exercise (30 min), significantly higher than the basal levels, 54.5±3.3 pg/ml, before exercise (P<0.01; n=63). There was no significant difference in the % increase in the sFlt-1 levels after exercise between African American and White (P=0.533) women or between lean and overweight/obese women (P=0.892). There was no significant difference in the plasma levels of unbound VEGF (35.28±5.47 vs. 35.23±4.96 pg/ml; P=0.99) or endostatin (111.12±5.48 vs. 115.45±7.15 ng/ml; P=0.63) before and after exercise. The basal plasma levels of unbound VEGF in overweight/obese women were 52.26±9.6 pg/ml, significantly higher than the basal levels of unbound VEGF in lean women, 27.34±4.99 pg/ml (P<0.05). The results support our hypothesis that exercise

  1. Alkylglycerols reduce serum complement and plasma vascular endothelial growth factor in obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Parri, A; Fitó, Montserrat; Torres, C F; Muñoz-Aguayo, D; Schröder, H; Cano, J F; Vázquez, L; Reglero, G; Covas, María-Isabel

    2016-06-01

    Alkylglycerols (AKGs), isolated or present in shark liver oil have anti-inflammatory properties. Complement 3 (C3) and 4 (C4) participate in lipid metabolism and in obesity, contributing to the metabolic syndrome and to the low-grade inflammation associated with obesity. In a randomized, controlled, crossover study, 26 non-diabetes obese individuals were assigned two preparations with low (LAC, 10 mg AKGs) and high (HAC, 20 mg AKGs) AKG content. Intervention periods were of 3 weeks preceded by 2-week washout periods in which shark liver oil was avoided. Cholesterol, C3, C4, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) decreased in a linear trend (P < 0.01) from baseline (control) to LAC and HAC. Values after HAC were significantly lower (P < 0.05) versus both baseline and after LAC. No adverse effects were observed or reported. Data from this pilot study open a promising field for the study of the beneficial effects of AKGs on cardiovascular risk factors in obese individuals. PMID:27188987

  2. Alkylglycerols reduce serum complement and plasma vascular endothelial growth factor in obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Parri, A; Fitó, Montserrat; Torres, C F; Muñoz-Aguayo, D; Schröder, H; Cano, J F; Vázquez, L; Reglero, G; Covas, María-Isabel

    2016-06-01

    Alkylglycerols (AKGs), isolated or present in shark liver oil have anti-inflammatory properties. Complement 3 (C3) and 4 (C4) participate in lipid metabolism and in obesity, contributing to the metabolic syndrome and to the low-grade inflammation associated with obesity. In a randomized, controlled, crossover study, 26 non-diabetes obese individuals were assigned two preparations with low (LAC, 10 mg AKGs) and high (HAC, 20 mg AKGs) AKG content. Intervention periods were of 3 weeks preceded by 2-week washout periods in which shark liver oil was avoided. Cholesterol, C3, C4, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) decreased in a linear trend (P < 0.01) from baseline (control) to LAC and HAC. Values after HAC were significantly lower (P < 0.05) versus both baseline and after LAC. No adverse effects were observed or reported. Data from this pilot study open a promising field for the study of the beneficial effects of AKGs on cardiovascular risk factors in obese individuals.

  3. Bioavailability of orally administered water-dispersible hesperetin and its effect on peripheral vasodilatation in human subjects: implication of endothelial functions of plasma conjugated metabolites.

    PubMed

    Takumi, Hiroko; Nakamura, Hiroyasu; Simizu, Terumi; Harada, Ryoko; Kometani, Takashi; Nadamoto, Tomonori; Mukai, Rie; Murota, Kaeko; Kawai, Yoshichika; Terao, Junji

    2012-04-01

    Hesperetin is an aglycone of citrus flavonoids and is expected to exert a vasodilatation effect in vivo. We developed water-dispersible hesperetin by the process of micronization to enhance the bioavailability of hesperetin. This study aimed to assess the effect of this process on the bioavailability of hesperetin and to estimate its efficiency on vasodilatation-related functions using endothelial cells in vitro and a human volunteer study at a single dose in vivo. We found that water-dispersible hesperetin was absorbed rapidly, with its maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) being 10.2 ± 1.2 μM, and that the time to reach C(max), which is within 1 h if 150 mg of this preparation was orally administered in humans. LC-MS analyses of the plasma at C(max) demonstrated that hesperetin accumulated in the plasma as hesperetin 7-O-β-D-glucuronide (Hp7GA), hesperetin 3'-O-β-D-glucuronide (Hp3'GA) and hesperetin sulfate exclusively. Similar to hesperetin, Hp7GA enhanced nitric oxide (NO) release by inhibiting nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (NADPH oxidase) activity in a human umbilical vein endothelial cell culture system, indicating that plasma hesperetin metabolites can improve vasodilatation in the vascular system. A volunteer study using women with cold sensitivity showed that a single dose of water-dispersible hesperetin was effective on peripheral vasodilatation.These results strongly suggest that rapid accumulation with higher plasma concentration enables hesperetin to exert a potential vasodilatation effect by the endothelial action of its plasma metabolites. Water-dispersible hesperetin may be useful to improve the health effect of dietary hesperetin.

  4. Proteolytic Enzymes Clustered in Specialized Plasma-Membrane Domains Drive Endothelial Cells’ Migration

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, Monica; Carfì Pavia, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In vitro cultured endothelial cells forming a continuous monolayer establish stable cell-cell contacts and acquire a “resting” phenotype; on the other hand, when growing in sparse conditions these cells acquire a migratory phenotype and invade the empty area of the culture. Culturing cells in different conditions, we compared expression and clustering of proteolytic enzymes in cells having migratory versus stationary behavior. In order to observe resting and migrating cells in the same microscopic field, a continuous cell monolayer was wounded. Increased expression of proteolytic enzymes was evident in cell membranes of migrating cells especially at sprouting sites and in shed membrane vesicles. Gelatin zymography and western blotting analyses confirmed that in migrating cells, expression of membrane-bound and of vesicle-associated proteolytic enzymes are increased. The enzymes concerned include MMP-2, MMP-9, MT1-MMP, seprase, DPP4 (DiPeptidyl Peptidase 4) and uPA. Shed membrane vesicles were shown to exert degradative activity on ECM components and produce substrates facilitating cell migration. Vesicles shed by migrating cells degraded ECM components at an increased rate; as a result their effect on cell migration was amplified. Inhibiting either Matrix Metallo Proteases (MMPs) or Serine Integral Membrane Peptidases (SIMPs) caused a decrease in the stimulatory effect of vesicles, inhibiting the spontaneous migratory activity of cells; a similar result was also obtained when a monoclonal antibody acting on DPP4 was tested. We conclude that proteolytic enzymes have a synergistic stimulatory effect on cell migration and that their clustering probably facilitates the proteolytic activation cascades needed to produce maximal degradative activity on cell substrates during the angiogenic process. PMID:27152413

  5. Watery diarrhoea with a vasoactive intestinal peptide-producing ganglioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Y; Nose, O; Kai, H; Okada, A; Mori, T; Lee, P K; Kakudo, K; Yanaihara, N

    1980-01-01

    An 8-month-old boy with persistent watery diarrhoea and failure to thrive developed abdominal distension, hypokalaemia, and flushing of the face and trunk. A high concentration of vasoactive intestinal peptide-like immunoreactivity was found in the serum. Soon after resection of a suprarenal mass, the serum level of vasoactive intestinal peptide became normal and the diarrhoea stopped. Histologically the tumour was a ganglioneuroblastoma: the cells showed fluorescence by the indirect immunofluorescence technique with anti-vasoactive intestinal peptide serum. Electron microscopical examination showed abundant secretory granules in the tumour cells. Reports of chronic watery diarrhoea in children due to neural crest tumours are reviewed, with particular respect to the clinical features of the syndrome. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4a Fig. 4b PMID:7006519

  6. Quantifying mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials in intact pulmonary arterial endothelial cells based on extracellular disposition of rhodamine dyes.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhuohui; Audi, Said H; Bongard, Robert D; Gauthier, Kathryn M; Merker, Marilyn P

    2011-05-01

    Our goal was to quantify mitochondrial and plasma potential (Δψ(m) and Δψ(p)) based on the disposition of rhodamine 123 (R123) or tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE) in the medium surrounding pulmonary endothelial cells. Dyes were added to the medium, and their concentrations in extracellular medium ([R(e)]) were measured over time. R123 [R(e)] fell from 10 nM to 6.6 ± 0.1 (SE) nM over 120 min. TMRE [R(e)] fell from 20 nM to a steady state of 4.9 ± 0.4 nM after ∼30 min. Protonophore or high K(+) concentration ([K(+)]), used to manipulate contributions of membrane potentials, attenuated decreases in [R(e)], and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) inhibition had the opposite effect, demonstrating the qualitative impact of these processes on [R(e)]. A kinetic model incorporating a modified Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz model was fit to [R(e)] vs. time data for R123 and TMRE, respectively, under various conditions to obtain (means ± 95% confidence intervals) Δψ(m) (-130 ± 7 and -133 ± 4 mV), Δψ(p) (-36 ± 4 and -49 ± 4 mV), and a Pgp activity parameter (K(Pgp), 25 ± 5 and 51 ± 11 μl/min). The higher membrane permeability of TMRE also allowed application of steady-state analysis to obtain Δψ(m) (-124 ± 6 mV). The consistency of kinetic parameter values obtained from R123 and TMRE data demonstrates the utility of this experimental and theoretical approach for quantifying intact cell Δψ(m) and Δψ(p.) Finally, steady-state analysis revealed that although room air- and hyperoxia-exposed (95% O(2) for 48 h) cells have equivalent resting Δψ(m), hyperoxic cell Δψ(m) was more sensitive to depolarization with protonophore, consistent with previous observations of pulmonary endothelial hyperoxia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction.

  7. Association of Urinary N-Domain Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme with Plasma Inflammatory Markers and Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Fernanda B; Plavnik, Frida L; Teixeira, Andressa MS; Christofalo, Dejaldo MJ; Ajzen, Sergio A; Higa, Elisa MS; Ronchi, Fernanda A; Sesso, Ricardo CC; Casarini, Dulce E

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between urinary 90 kDa N-domain Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) form with C-reactive protein (CRP) and homocysteine plasma levels (Hcy), urinary nitric oxide (NOu), and endothelial function (EF) in normotensive subjects. Forty healthy subjects were evaluated through brachial Doppler US to test the response to reactive hyperemia and a panel of blood tests to determine CRP and Hcy levels, NOu, and urinary ACE. They were divided into groups according to the presence (ACE90+) or absence (ACE90–) of the 90 kDa ACE, the presence (FH+) or absence (FH–) of family history of hypertension, and the presence or absence of these two variables FH+/ACE90+ and FH–/ACE90–. We found an impaired endothelial dilatation in subjects who presented the 90 kDa N-domain ACE as follows: 11.4% ± 5.3% in ACE90+ compared with 17.6% ± 7.1% in ACE90– group and 12.4% ± 5.6% in FH+/ACE90+ compared with 17.7% ± 6.2% in FH–/ACE90– group, P < 0.05. Hcy and CRP levels were statistically significantly lower in FH+/ACE90+ than in FH–/ACE90– group, as follows: 10.0 ± 2.3 μM compared with 12.7 ± 1.5 μM, and 1.3 ± 1.8 mg/L compared with 3.6 ± 2.0 mg/L, respectively. A correlation between flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and CRP, Hcy, and NOu levels was not found. Our study suggests a reduction in the basal NO production confirmed by NOu analysis in subjects with the 90 kDa N-domain ACE isoform alone or associated with a family history of hypertension. Our data suggest that the presence of the 90 kDa N-domain ACE itself may have a negative impact on flow-mediated dilatation stimulated by reactive hyperemia. PMID:18475311

  8. Association of urinary N-domain Angiotensin I-converting enzyme with plasma inflammatory markers and endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Fernanda B; Plavnik, Frida L; Teixeira, Andressa Ms; Christofalo, Dejaldo Mj; Ajzen, Sergio A; Higa, Elisa Ms; Ronchi, Fernanda A; Sesso, Ricardo Cc; Casarini, Dulce E

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between urinary 90 kDa N-domain Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) form with C-reactive protein (CRP) and homocysteine plasma levels (Hcy), urinary nitric oxide (NOu), and endothelial function (EF) in normotensive subjects. Forty healthy subjects were evaluated through brachial Doppler US to test the response to reactive hyperemia and a panel of blood tests to determine CRP and Hcy levels, NOu, and urinary ACE. They were divided into groups according to the presence (ACE90+) or absence (ACE90-) of the 90 kDa ACE, the presence (FH+) or absence (FH-) of family history of hypertension, and the presence or absence of these two variables FH+/ACE90+ and FH-/ACE90-. We found an impaired endothelial dilatation in subjects who presented the 90 kDa N-domain ACE as follows: 11.4% +/- 5.3% in ACE90+ compared with 17.6% +/- 7.1% in ACE90- group and 12.4% +/- 5.6% in FH+/ACE90+ compared with 17.7% +/- 6.2% in FH-/ACE90- group, P < 0.05. Hcy and CRP levels were statistically significantly lower in FH+/ACE90+ than in FH-/ACE90- group, as follows: 10.0 +/- 2.3 microM compared with 12.7 +/- 1.5 microM, and 1.3 +/- 1.8 mg/L compared with 3.6 +/- 2.0 mg/L, respectively. A correlation between flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and CRP, Hcy, and NOu levels was not found. Our study suggests a reduction in the basal NO production confirmed by NOu analysis in subjects with the 90 kDa N-domain ACE isoform alone or associated with a family history of hypertension. Our data suggest that the presence of the 90 kDa N-domain ACE itself may have a negative impact on flow-mediated dilatation stimulated by reactive hyperemia. PMID:18475311

  9. Inflammatory and Vasoactive Effects of Serum Following Inhalation of Varied Complex Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Aragon, Mario J; Chrobak, Izabela; Brower, Jeremy; Roldan, Luis; Fredenburgh, Laura E; McDonald, Jacob D; Campen, Matthew J

    2016-04-01

    Chronic cardiovascular disease is associated with air pollution exposure in epidemiology and toxicology studies. Inhaled toxicants can induce changes in serum bioactivity that impact endothelial inflammatory gene expression in vitro and impair vasorelaxation ex vivo, which are common precursors to atherosclerosis. Comparisons between single pollutants and common combustion mixtures, in terms of driving such serum inflammatory and vasoactive effects, have not been characterized. Healthy C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a single 6-h period of contrasting pollutant atmospheres: road dust, mixed vehicle emissions (MVE; a combination of gasoline and diesel engine emissions) particulate matter, mixed vehicle emissions gases, road dust plus ozone, road dust plus MVE, and hardwood smoke. Serum obtained from mice 24 h after these exposures was used as a stimulus to assess inflammatory potential in two assays: incubated with primary murine cerebrovascular endothelial cells for 4 h to measure inflammatory gene expression or applied to naïve aortic rings in an ex vivo myographic preparation. Road dust and wood smoke exposures were most potent at inducing inflammatory gene expression, while MVE atmospheres and wood smoke were most potent at impairing vasorelaxation to acetylcholine. Responses are consistent with recent reports on MVE toxicity, but reveal novel serum bioactivity related to wood smoke and road dust. These studies suggest that the compositional changes in serum and resultant bioactivity following inhalation exposure to pollutants may be highly dependent on the composition of mixtures. PMID:25900702

  10. Vasoactive intestinal peptide administration after stroke in rats enhances neurogenesis and improves neurological function.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Shi, Qing-Dong; Yang, Yuan-Bo; Qian, Yi-Hua; Feng, Gai-Feng; Chang, Ling; Zong, Chang-Hong

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on neurogenesis and neurological function after cerebral ischemia. Rats were intracerebroventricular administered with VIP after a 2h middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and sacrificed at 7, 14 and 28 days after MCAO. Functional outcome was studied with the modified neurological severity score. The infarct volume was evaluated via histology. Neurogenesis, angiogenesis and the protein expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting analysis, respectively. The treatment with VIP significantly reduced the neurological severity score and the infarc volume, and increased the numbers of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) immunoreactive cells and doublecortin immunoreactive area in the subventricular zone (SVZ) at 7, 14 and 28 days after ischemia. The cerebral protein levels of VEGF and VEGF expression in the SVZ were also enhanced in VIP-treated rats at 7 days after stroke. VIP treatment obviously increased the number of BrdU positive endothelial cells in the SVZ and density of cerebral microvessels in the ischemic boundary at 28 days after ischemia. Our study suggests that in the ischemic rat brain VIP reduces brain damage and promotes neurogenesis by increasing VEGF. VIP-enhanced neurogenesis is associated with angiogenesis. These changes may contribute to improvement in functional outcome.

  11. Niacin improves ischemia-induced neovascularization in diabetic mice by enhancement of endothelial progenitor cell functions independent of changes in plasma lipids.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Hsun; Lin, Chih-Pei; Wang, Chao-Hung; Chiang, Chia-Hung; Tsai, Hsiao-Ya; Chen, Jia-Shiong; Lin, Feng-Yen; Leu, Hsin-Bang; Wu, Tao-Cheng; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2012-09-01

    Niacin was shown to inhibit acute vascular inflammation and improves endothelial dysfunction independent of changes in plasma lipids. Here, we investigated whether niacin can increase blood flow recovery after tissue ischemia by enhancing endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) functions in diabetic mice. Starting at 4 weeks after the onset of diabetes, vehicle or niacin (40 mg/kg/day) was administered daily by gavage to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice and diabetic endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-deficient mice. Unilateral hindlimb ischemia surgery was conducted after 2 weeks of vehicle or niacin treatment. Compared to the control group, the niacin group had significantly increased ischemic/non-ischemic limb blood perfusion ratio and higher capillary density. These effects were markedly reduced in STZ-induced diabetic eNOS-deficient mice. Flow cytometry analysis showed impaired EPC-like cell (Sca-1(+)/Flk-1(+)) mobilization after ischemia surgery in diabetic mice but augmented mobilization in the mice treated with niacin. Diabetes was induced by administering STZ to FVB mice that received eGFP mouse bone marrow cells to evaluate effects of niacin on bone marrow-derived EPC homing and differentiation to endothelial cells. Differentiation of bone marrow-derived EPCs to endothelial cells in the ischemic tissue around vessels in diabetic mice that received niacin treatment, was significantly increased than that in control group. By in vitro studies, incubation with niacin in high-glucose medium reduced H(2)O(2) production, cell apoptosis, and improved high glucose-suppressed EPC functions by nitric oxide-related mechanisms. Our findings demonstrate that niacin increases blood flow recovery after tissue ischemia in diabetic mice through enhancing EPC mobilization and functions via nitric oxide-related pathways.

  12. Surface wettability of plasma SiOx:H nanocoating-induced endothelial cells' migration and the associated FAK-Rho GTPases signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yang; Wang, Guixue; Huang, Xianliang; Zhang, Qin; Wu, Jiang; Tang, Chaojun; Yu, Qingsong; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell (EC) adhesion and migration are essential processes in re-endothelialization of implanted biomaterials. There is no clear relationship and mechanism between EC adhesion and migration behaviour on surfaces with varying wettabilities. As model substrates, plasma SiOx:H nanocoatings with well-controlled surface wettability (with water contact angles in the range of 98.5 ± 2.3° to 26.3 ± 4.0°) were used in this study to investigate the effects of surface wettability on cell adhesion/migration and associated protein expressions in FAK-Rho GTPases signalling pathways. It was found that EC adhesion/migration showed opposite behaviour on the hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces (i.e. hydrophobic surfaces promoted EC migration but were anti-adhesions). The number of adherent ECs showed a maximum on hydrophilic surfaces, while cells adhered to hydrophobic surfaces exhibited a tendency for cell migration. The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor targeting the Y-397 site of FAK could significantly inhibit cell adhesion/migration, suggesting that EC adhesion and migration on surfaces with different wettabilities involve (p)FAK and its downstream signalling pathways. Western blot results suggested that the FAK-Rho GTPases signalling pathways were correlative to EC migration on hydrophobic plasma SiOx:H surfaces, but uncertain to hydrophilic surfaces. This work demonstrated that surface wettability could induce cellular behaviours that were associated with different cellular signalling events. PMID:21715399

  13. Neonatal androgenization increases vasoactive intestinal peptide levels in rat anterior pituitary: possible involvement of vasoactive intestinal peptide in the neonatal androgenization-induced hyperprolactinemia.

    PubMed

    Watanobe, H; Sasaki, S; Takebe, K

    1991-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) may be a physiological PRL-releasing factor. In the present study, we examined a possible involvement of VIP in the neonatal androgenization (NA)-induced hyperprolactinemia. Twenty-four hours after birth, newborn female rats were injected sc with 1,000 micrograms of testosterone (NA) or with oil vehicle only (control). Both groups were sacrificed at 8 weeks of age. Compared to controls, NA rats showed significantly higher plasma PRL levels (7.3 fold), anterior pituitary (AP) PRL content (2.1 fold) and plasma estradiol levels (2.1 fold). AP VIP content was extremely higher (61 fold) in NA rats than in controls. However, NA did not affect VIP content in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus or median eminence. These results suggest that the NA-induced hyperprolactinemia may be mediated, at least in part, by paracrine and/or autocrine effects of the increased AP VIP on PRL secretion. However, since the potentiation by NA of the AP VIP content was extremely marked compared to those of the other parameters, the possibility was also raised that the increased AP VIP may be involved in other endocrine and/or nonendocrine events occurring in the AP. PMID:1802925

  14. Do vasoactive neuropeptide autoimmune disorders explain pyridostigmine's association with Gulf War syndrome?

    PubMed

    Staines, Donald

    2005-01-01

    myasthenia gravis (MG). While evidence associating these conditions is thin, vasoactive neuropeptide neurotransmitters of the VIP/PACAP family have acetylcholine co-transmission functions via specific GPCRs. Autoimmune reactions to these receptors may have parallels with muscarinic (e.g., Sjogren's syndrome) and nicotinic (e.g., MG) acetylcholine neurotransmission. Hence theoretically, treatment options such as thymectomy, corticosteroids, plasma exchange, anti-idiotype antibodies and receptor genomic expression reactivation/suppression may be considered. Paradoxically pyridostigmine may prove to have a role in therapy although VN treatment/replacement may be associated with tachyphylaxis.

  15. A Novel Vasoactive Proline-Rich Oligopeptide from the Skin Secretion of the Frog Brachycephalus ephippium.

    PubMed

    Arcanjo, Daniel Dias Rufino; Vasconcelos, Andreanne Gomes; Comerma-Steffensen, Simón Gabriel; Jesus, Joilson Ramos; Silva, Luciano Paulino; Pires Júnior, Osmindo Rodrigues; Costa-Neto, Claudio Miguel; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Restini, Carolina Baraldi Araújo; Paulo, Michele; Bendhack, Lusiane Maria; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Oliveira, Aldeidia Pereira; Simonsen, Ulf; Leite, José Roberto de Souza de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Proline-rich oligopeptides (PROs) are a large family which comprises the bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs). They inhibit the activity of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and have a typical pyroglutamyl (Pyr)/proline-rich structure at the N- and C-terminus, respectively. Furthermore, PROs decrease blood pressure in animals. In the present study, the isolation and biological characterization of a novel vasoactive BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the frog Brachycephalus ephippium is described. This new PRO, termed BPP-Brachy, has the primary structure WPPPKVSP and the amidated form termed BPP-BrachyNH2 inhibits efficiently ACE in rat serum. In silico molecular modeling and docking studies suggest that BPP-BrachyNH2 is capable of forming a hydrogen bond network as well as multiple van der Waals interactions with the rat ACE, which blocks the access of the substrate to the C-domain active site. Moreover, in rat thoracic aorta BPP-BrachyNH2 induces potent endothelium-dependent vasodilatation with similar magnitude as captopril. In DAF-FM DA-loaded aortic cross sections examined by confocal microscopy, BPP-BrachyNH2 was found to increase the release of nitric oxide (NO). Moreover, BPP-BrachyNH2 was devoid of toxicity in endothelial and smooth muscle cell cultures. In conclusion, the peptide BPP-BrachyNH2 has a novel sequence being the first BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the Brachycephalidae family. This opens for exploring amphibians as a source of new biomolecules. The BPP-BrachyNH2 is devoid of cytotoxicity and elicits endothelium-dependent vasodilatation mediated by NO. These findings open for the possibility of potential application of these peptides in the treatment of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases.

  16. A Novel Vasoactive Proline-Rich Oligopeptide from the Skin Secretion of the Frog Brachycephalus ephippium.

    PubMed

    Arcanjo, Daniel Dias Rufino; Vasconcelos, Andreanne Gomes; Comerma-Steffensen, Simón Gabriel; Jesus, Joilson Ramos; Silva, Luciano Paulino; Pires Júnior, Osmindo Rodrigues; Costa-Neto, Claudio Miguel; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Restini, Carolina Baraldi Araújo; Paulo, Michele; Bendhack, Lusiane Maria; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Oliveira, Aldeidia Pereira; Simonsen, Ulf; Leite, José Roberto de Souza de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Proline-rich oligopeptides (PROs) are a large family which comprises the bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs). They inhibit the activity of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and have a typical pyroglutamyl (Pyr)/proline-rich structure at the N- and C-terminus, respectively. Furthermore, PROs decrease blood pressure in animals. In the present study, the isolation and biological characterization of a novel vasoactive BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the frog Brachycephalus ephippium is described. This new PRO, termed BPP-Brachy, has the primary structure WPPPKVSP and the amidated form termed BPP-BrachyNH2 inhibits efficiently ACE in rat serum. In silico molecular modeling and docking studies suggest that BPP-BrachyNH2 is capable of forming a hydrogen bond network as well as multiple van der Waals interactions with the rat ACE, which blocks the access of the substrate to the C-domain active site. Moreover, in rat thoracic aorta BPP-BrachyNH2 induces potent endothelium-dependent vasodilatation with similar magnitude as captopril. In DAF-FM DA-loaded aortic cross sections examined by confocal microscopy, BPP-BrachyNH2 was found to increase the release of nitric oxide (NO). Moreover, BPP-BrachyNH2 was devoid of toxicity in endothelial and smooth muscle cell cultures. In conclusion, the peptide BPP-BrachyNH2 has a novel sequence being the first BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the Brachycephalidae family. This opens for exploring amphibians as a source of new biomolecules. The BPP-BrachyNH2 is devoid of cytotoxicity and elicits endothelium-dependent vasodilatation mediated by NO. These findings open for the possibility of potential application of these peptides in the treatment of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26661890

  17. A Novel Vasoactive Proline-Rich Oligopeptide from the Skin Secretion of the Frog Brachycephalus ephippium

    PubMed Central

    Arcanjo, Daniel Dias Rufino; Vasconcelos, Andreanne Gomes; Comerma-Steffensen, Simón Gabriel; Jesus, Joilson Ramos; Silva, Luciano Paulino; Pires, Osmindo Rodrigues; Costa-Neto, Claudio Miguel; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Restini, Carolina Baraldi Araújo; Paulo, Michele; Bendhack, Lusiane Maria; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Oliveira, Aldeidia Pereira; Simonsen, Ulf; Leite, José Roberto de Souza de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Proline-rich oligopeptides (PROs) are a large family which comprises the bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs). They inhibit the activity of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and have a typical pyroglutamyl (Pyr)/proline-rich structure at the N- and C-terminus, respectively. Furthermore, PROs decrease blood pressure in animals. In the present study, the isolation and biological characterization of a novel vasoactive BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the frog Brachycephalus ephippium is described. This new PRO, termed BPP-Brachy, has the primary structure WPPPKVSP and the amidated form termed BPP-BrachyNH2 inhibits efficiently ACE in rat serum. In silico molecular modeling and docking studies suggest that BPP-BrachyNH2 is capable of forming a hydrogen bond network as well as multiple van der Waals interactions with the rat ACE, which blocks the access of the substrate to the C-domain active site. Moreover, in rat thoracic aorta BPP-BrachyNH2 induces potent endothelium-dependent vasodilatation with similar magnitude as captopril. In DAF-FM DA-loaded aortic cross sections examined by confocal microscopy, BPP-BrachyNH2 was found to increase the release of nitric oxide (NO). Moreover, BPP-BrachyNH2 was devoid of toxicity in endothelial and smooth muscle cell cultures. In conclusion, the peptide BPP-BrachyNH2 has a novel sequence being the first BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the Brachycephalidae family. This opens for exploring amphibians as a source of new biomolecules. The BPP-BrachyNH2 is devoid of cytotoxicity and elicits endothelium-dependent vasodilatation mediated by NO. These findings open for the possibility of potential application of these peptides in the treatment of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26661890

  18. The Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Linagliptin Preserves Endothelial Function in Mesenteric Arteries from Type 1 Diabetic Rats without Decreasing Plasma Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Salheen, Salheen M.; Panchapakesan, Usha; Pollock, Carol A.; Woodman, Owen L.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin on the mechanism(s) of endothelium-dependent relaxation in mesenteric arteries from STZ-induced diabetic rats. Both normal and diabetic animals received linagliptin (2 mg/kg) daily by oral gavage for a period of 4 weeks. To measure superoxide generation in mesenteric arteries, lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence was used. ACh-induced relaxation of mesenteric arteries was assessed using organ bath techniques and Western blotting was used to investigate protein expression. Pharmacological tools (1μM TRAM-34, 1μM apamin, 100 nM Ibtx, 100 μM L-NNA, 10 μM ODQ) were used to distinguish between NO and EDH-mediated relaxation. Linagliptin did not affect plasma glucose, but did decrease vascular superoxide levels. Diabetes reduced responses to ACh but did not affect endothelium-independent responses to SNP. Linagliptin improved endothelial function indicated by a significant increase in responses to ACh. Diabetes impaired the contribution of both nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization (EDH) to endothelium-dependent relaxation and linagliptin treatment significantly enhanced the contribution of both relaxing factors. Western blotting demonstrated that diabetes also increased expression of Nox2 and decreased expression and dimerization of endothelial NO synthase, effects that were reversed by linagliptin. These findings demonstrate treatment of type 1 diabetic rats with linagliptin significantly reduced vascular superoxide levels and preserved both NO and EDH-mediated relaxation indicating that linagliptin can improve endothelial function in diabetes independently of any glucose lowering activity. PMID:26618855

  19. Metabolism of glycosylated human salivary amylase: in vivo plasma clearance by rat hepatic endothelial cells and in vitro receptor mediated pinocytosis by rat macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Niesen, T.E.; Alpers, D.H.; Stahl, P.D.; Rosenblum, J.L.

    1984-09-01

    Salivary-type amylase normally comprises about 60% of the amylase activity in human serum, but only a small fraction is a glycosylated isoenzyme (amylase A). In contrast, 1/3 of amylase in human saliva is glycosylated. Since glycosylation can affect circulatory clearance, we studied the clearance of amylase A in rats and its uptake by rat alveolar macrophages. Following intravenous injection, /sup 125/I-labeled amylase A disappeared rapidly from plasma (t 1/2 . 9 min) and accumulated in the liver. Simultaneous injection of mannose-albumin slowed its clearance to a rate comparable to that of /sup 125/I-labeled nonglycosylated salivary amylase (t 1/2 . 45 min). In contrast, galactose-albumin had no effect. Electron microscope autoradiography of the liver following injection of /sup 125/I-labeled amylase A revealed a localization of grains over the hepatic endothelial cells. In vitro studies indicated that amylase A is taken up by alveolar macrophages via receptor-mediated pinocytosis. Uptake was linear over time, saturable, and inhibited by mannan and mannose-albumin, but not by galactose-albumin. We conclude that amylase A, which is a naturally occurring human glycoprotein with at most three terminal L-fucose residues per molecule, is recognized in rats by a mannose receptor located on hepatic endothelial cells. We speculate that this receptor, by rapidly clearing circulating amylase A, may be responsible for the low level of amylase A in human serum.

  20. Exercise training improves endothelial function in young prehypertensives

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Darren T; Casey, Darren P; Martin, Jeffrey S; Emerson, Blaze D; Braith, Randy W

    2015-01-01

    Prehypertensives exhibit marked endothelial dysfunction, a risk factor for future cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the ability of exercise to ameliorate endothelial dysfunction in prehypertensives is grossly underinvestigated. This prospective randomized and controlled study examined the separate effects of resistance and endurance training on conduit artery endothelial function in young prehypertensives. Forty-three unmedicated prehypertensive (systolic blood pressure [SBP]=120–139 mmHg; diastolic blood pressure [DBP]=80–89 mmHg) but otherwise healthy men and women and 15 normotensive matched time-controls (NMTC); n = 15) between 18 and 35 y of age met screening requirements and participated in the study. Prehypertensive subjects were randomly assigned to either a resistance exercise training (PHRT; n = 15), endurance exercise training (PHET; n = 13) or time-control group (PHTC; n = 15). The treatment groups performed exercise training three days per week for eight weeks. The control groups did not initiate exercise programs throughout the study. Flow mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery, biomarkers of enodothelial function and peripheral blood pressure were evaluated before and after exercise intervention or time-matched control. PHRT and PHET reduced resting SBP (9.6 ± 3.6 and 11.9 ± 3.4 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05) and DBP (8.0 ± 5.1 and 7.2 ± 3.4 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05). Exercise training improved brachial artery FMD absolute diameter, percent dilation and normalized percent dilation by 30%, 34% and 19% for PHRT, P < 0.05; and by 54%, 63% and 75% for PHET, P < 0.05; respectively. PHRT and PHET increased plasma concentrations of 6-keto prostaglandin F1α (19% and 22%, respectively; P < 0.05), NOx (19% and 23%, respectively; P < 0.05), and reduced endothelin-1 by (16% and 24%, respectively; P < 0.01). This study provides novel evidence that resistance and endurance exercise separately have beneficial effects on resting

  1. Plasma Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Concentration and Alveolar Nitric Oxide as Potential Predictors of Disease Progression and Mortality in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, Jalpa; Shulgina, Ludmila; Sexton, Darren W.; Atkins, Christopher P.; Wilson, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Declining lung function signifies disease progression in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentration is associated with declining lung function in 6 and 12-month studies. Alveolar nitric oxide concentration (CANO) is increased in patients with IPF, however its significance is unclear. This study investigated whether baseline plasma VEGF concentration and CANO are associated with disease progression or mortality in IPF. Methods: 27 IPF patients were studied (maximum follow-up 65 months). Baseline plasma VEGF concentration, CANO and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) were measured. PFTs were performed the preceding year and subsequent PFTs and data regarding mortality were collected. Disease progression was defined as one of: death, relative decrease of ≥10% in baseline forced vital capacity (FVC) % predicted, or relative decrease of ≥15% in baseline single breath diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide (TLCO-SB) % predicted. Results: Plasma VEGF concentration was not associated with progression-free survival or mortality. There was a trend towards shorter time to disease progression and death with higher CANO. CANO was significantly higher in patients with previous declining versus stable lung function. Conclusion: The role of VEGF in IPF remains uncertain. It may be of value to further investigate CANO in IPF. PMID:27618114

  2. Vasoactive intestinal peptide signaling axis in human leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dorsam, Glenn Paul; Benton, Keith; Failing, Jarrett; Batra, Sandeep

    2011-01-01

    The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) signaling axis constitutes a master “communication coordinator” between cells of the nervous and immune systems. To date, VIP and its two main receptors expressed in T lymphocytes, vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor (VPAC)1 and VPAC2, mediate critical cellular functions regulating adaptive immunity, including arresting CD4 T cells in G1 of the cell cycle, protection from apoptosis and a potent chemotactic recruiter of T cells to the mucosa associated lymphoid compartment of the gastrointestinal tissues. Since the discovery of VIP in 1970, followed by the cloning of VPAC1 and VPAC2 in the early 1990s, this signaling axis has been associated with common human cancers, including leukemia. This review highlights the present day knowledge of the VIP ligand and its receptor expression profile in T cell leukemia and cell lines. Also, there will be a discussion describing how the anti-leukemic DNA binding transcription factor, Ikaros, regulates VIP receptor expression in primary human CD4 T lymphocytes and T cell lymphoblastic cell lines (e.g. Hut-78). Lastly, future goals will be mentioned that are expected to uncover the role of how the VIP signaling axis contributes to human leukemogenesis, and to establish whether the VIP receptor signature expressed by leukemic blasts can provide therapeutic and/or diagnostic information. PMID:21765981

  3. Effects of vasoactive stimuli on blood flow to choroid plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, F.M.; Mayhan, W.G.; Williams, J.K.; Heistad, D.D. )

    1988-02-01

    The goal of this study was to examine effects of vasoactive stimuli on blood flow to choroid plexus. The authors used microspheres to measure blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum in anesthetized dogs and rabbits. A critical assumption of the microsphere method is that microspheres do not pass through arteriovenous shunts. Blood flow values obtained with simultaneous injection of 15- and 50-{mu}m microspheres were similar, which suggest that shunting of 15-{mu}m microspheres was minimal. Blood flow to choroid plexus under control conditions was 287 {plus minus} 26 (means {plus minus} SE) ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 100 g{sup {minus}1} in dogs and 385 {plus minus} 73 ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} 100 g{sup {minus}1} in rabbits. Consecutive measurements under control conditions indicated that values for blood flow are reproducible. Adenosine did not alter blood flow to cerebrum but increased blood flow to choroid plexus two- to threefold in dogs and rabbits. Norepinephrine and phenylephrine did not affect blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum but decreased blood flow to choroid plexus by {approx} 50%. The authors suggest that (1) the microsphere method provides reproducible valid measurements of blood flow to the choroid plexus in dogs and rabbits and (2) vasoactive stimuli may have profoundly different effects on blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum.

  4. A high-throughput in vitro ring assay for vasoactivity using magnetic 3D bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hubert; Gage, Jacob A; Haisler, William L; Neeley, Shane K; Shen, Tsaiwei; Hebel, Chris; Barthlow, Herbert G; Wagoner, Matthew; Souza, Glauco R

    2016-01-01

    Vasoactive liabilities are typically assayed using wire myography, which is limited by its high cost and low throughput. To meet the demand for higher throughput in vitro alternatives, this study introduces a magnetic 3D bioprinting-based vasoactivity assay. The principle behind this assay is the magnetic printing of vascular smooth muscle cells into 3D rings that functionally represent blood vessel segments, whose contraction can be altered by vasodilators and vasoconstrictors. A cost-effective imaging modality employing a mobile device is used to capture contraction with high throughput. The goal of this study was to validate ring contraction as a measure of vasoactivity, using a small panel of known vasoactive drugs. In vitro responses of the rings matched outcomes predicted by in vivo pharmacology, and were supported by immunohistochemistry. Altogether, this ring assay robustly models vasoactivity, which could meet the need for higher throughput in vitro alternatives. PMID:27477945

  5. A high-throughput in vitro ring assay for vasoactivity using magnetic 3D bioprinting

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Hubert; Gage, Jacob A.; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Shen, Tsaiwei; Hebel, Chris; Barthlow, Herbert G.; Wagoner, Matthew; Souza, Glauco R.

    2016-01-01

    Vasoactive liabilities are typically assayed using wire myography, which is limited by its high cost and low throughput. To meet the demand for higher throughput in vitro alternatives, this study introduces a magnetic 3D bioprinting-based vasoactivity assay. The principle behind this assay is the magnetic printing of vascular smooth muscle cells into 3D rings that functionally represent blood vessel segments, whose contraction can be altered by vasodilators and vasoconstrictors. A cost-effective imaging modality employing a mobile device is used to capture contraction with high throughput. The goal of this study was to validate ring contraction as a measure of vasoactivity, using a small panel of known vasoactive drugs. In vitro responses of the rings matched outcomes predicted by in vivo pharmacology, and were supported by immunohistochemistry. Altogether, this ring assay robustly models vasoactivity, which could meet the need for higher throughput in vitro alternatives. PMID:27477945

  6. Vasoactive neuroendocrine responses associated with tolerance to lower body negative pressure in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Sather, T. M.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that peripheral vasoconstriction and orthostatic tolerance are associated with increased circulating plasma concentrations of noradrenaline, vasopressin and renin-angiotensin. Sixteen men were categorized as having high (HT, n=9) or low (LT, n=7) tolerance to lower body negative pressure (LBNP) based on whether the endpoint of their pre-syncopal-limited LBNP (peak LBNP) exposure exceeded -60 mmHg. The two groups were matched for age, height, weight, leg volume, blood volume and maximal oxygen uptake, as well as baseline blood volume and plasma concentrations of vasoactive hormones. Peak LBNP induced similar reductions in mean arterial pressure in both groups. The reduction in leg arterial pulse volume (measured by impedance rheography), an index of peripheral vascular constriction, from baseline to peak LBNP was greater (P<0.05) in the HT group (-0.041 +/- 0.005 ml 100 ml-1) compared to the reduction in the LT group (-0. 025 +/- 0.003 ml 100 ml-1). Greater peak LBNP in the HT group was associated with higher (P<0.05) average elevations in plasma concentrations of vasopressin (pVP, Delta=+7.2 +/- 2.0 pg ml-1) and plasma renin-angiotensin (PRA, Delta=+2.9 +/- 1.3 ng Ang II ml-1 h-1) compared to average elevations of pVP (+2.2 +/- 1.0 pg ml-1) and PRA (+0.1 +/- 0.1 ng Ang II ml-1 h-1) in the LT group. Plasma noradrenaline concentrations were increased (P<0.05) from baseline to peak LBNP in both HT and LT groups, with no statistically distinguishable difference between groups. These data suggest that the renin-angiotensin and vasopressin systems may contribute to sustaining arterial pressure and orthostatic tolerance by their vasoconstrictive actions.

  7. Selective biological response of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells on cold-plasma-modified polyester vascular prostheses.

    PubMed

    Blanchemain, N; Aguilar, M R; Chai, F; Jimenez, M; Jean-Baptiste, E; El-Achari, A; Martel, B; Hildebrand, H F; Roman, J San

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this work was to improve the hemocompatibility and the selectivity according to cells of non-woven poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) membranes. Non-woven PET membranes were modified by a combined plasma-chemical process. The surface of these materials was pre-activated by cold-plasma treatment and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was grafted by the in situ free radical polymerization of acrylic acid (AA). The extent of this reaction and the number of carboxylic groups incorporated were evaluated by colorimetric titration using toluidine blue O. All samples were characterized by SEM, AFM and thermogravimetric analysis, and the mechanical properties of the PAA grafted sample were determined. A selective cell response was observed when human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMC) or human pulmonary micro vascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) were seeded on the modified surfaces. HPASMC proliferation decreased about 60%, while HPMEC proliferation was just reduced about 10%. PAA grafted samples did not present hemolytic activity and the platelet adhesion decreased about 28% on PAA grafted surfaces. PMID:22002636

  8. [Medical significance of endothelial glycocalyx].

    PubMed

    Frati-Munari, Alberto C

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial glycocalyx is a layer composed by glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans and glycoproteins attached to the vascular endothelial luminal surface. It has several physiological roles: shear stress mechanotransduction to the endothelial cells, regulation of fluids and macromolecules vascular permeability, of coagulation cascade activation and fibrinolysis, and protects the endothelium from platelets and leukocytes adhesion. In general, glycocalyx protects vascular wall against pathogenic insults. The glycocalyx may be damaged by abnormal shear stress, reactive oxygen species, hypernatremia, hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia and inflammatory molecules, resulting in endothelial dysfunction, enhanced vascular permeability, lipoproteins leakage to subendothelial space, activation of plasma coagulation, and increased adherence of platelets and leukocytes to the endothelial cells. Shredding of glycocalyx appears as an important initial step in the pathophysiology of vascular diseases.

  9. Effect of glutamine on cellular adhesion molecule expression and leukocyte transmigration in endothelial cells stimulated by plasma or peritoneal drain fluid from a surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Chiu-Li; Hsu, Chun-Sen; Chen, Soul-Chin; Pai, Man-Hui; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2006-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of glutamine (GLN) concentration on surface molecule expression on endothelial cells (ECs) and leukocytes and the transendothelial migration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) through ECs stimulated by plasma or peritoneal drain fluid (PDF) from a surgical patient. Human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) and PMNs from normal subjects were treated with different concentrations (0, 300, 600, and 1000 micromol/L) of GLN for 24 h. After that, HUVECs were stimulated for 3 h with plasma or PDF from a patient who had undergone abdominal surgery, and PMNs were allowed to transmigrate through ECs for 2 h. HUVEC surface expression of cell adhesion molecules and integrin (CD11b) and interleukin (IL) 8 receptor expression on PMNs were measured by flow cytometry. PMNs transmigrating through ECs were also analyzed. The results showed that cell adhesion molecule and integrin expressions in PDF groups were higher than those in control groups. Among the PDF groups, cellular adhesion molecule expressions on ECs and CD11b expression on PMNs were lower with 600 and 1000 micromol/L than with 300 micromol/L GLN. IL-8 secretions from ECs and PMNs were higher with 300 and 600 micromol/L than with 1000 micromol/L GLN, and this was consistent with the expression of the IL-8 receptor on PMNs. PMN transmigration was significantly higher with 300 micromol/L GLN than with the other GLN concentrations. HUVECs stimulated by plasma from surgical patient had the similar effects on surface molecule expression as PDF; however, the influences were not so obvious as shown in PDF stimulation. The results of this in vitro study suggest that ECs and PMNs were activated after patient's plasma or PDF stimulation. A low GLN concentration comparable to catabolic conditions resulted in higher adhesion molecule expression and greater transendothelial migration of neutrophils. GLN administration at levels similar to or higher than physiological concentrations reduced IL-8 and

  10. Vascular endothelial growth factor polymorphisms and a synchronized examination of plasma and tissue expression in epithelial ovarian cancers.

    PubMed

    Bhaskari, J; Premalata, C S; Shilpa, V; Rahul, B; Pallavi, V R; Ramesh, G; Krishnamoorthy, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we have analyzed six genetic polymorphisms of the VEGF-A gene and correlated the genetic data with plasma and tissue expression of VEGF-A in epithelial ovarian carcinomas. A total of 130 cases including 95 malignant carcinomas, 17 low malignant potential and 18 benign tumours were studied. rs699947, rs833061, rs1570360, rs2010963, rs1413711 and rs3025039 were studied by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Plasma levels of VEGF-A were estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and tissue expression of VEGF-A by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Four polymorphisms of the above excluding rs699947 and rs3025039 showed significant association with malignancy, and we observed the presence of positive correlation between haplotype CCGGCC and increased expression of VEGF-A in both plasma and tissues which also correlated with poor prognosis and recurrence suggesting a probable increase in resistance to treatment in such carriers. Highly upregulated tissue expression of VEGF-A was seen in all epithelial ovarian carcinomas with intensity of expression increasing from benign to malignant cases. ELISA data from our study showed an increase in circulating levels of VEGF-A in malignancies. VEGF-A plasma levels can be employed as a biomarker for high-grade malignancy in epithelial ovarian cancers alongside tissue expression and CA-125 levels. This study is unique due to the fact that a simultaneous analysis of plasma and tissue expression has been demonstrated and is a first such study in epithelial ovarian cancers and representing the Indian population (South-east Asian) synchronized with genetic polymorphism data as well. PMID:26264619

  11. SNAP23 Regulates Endothelial Exocytosis of von Willebrand Factor

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qiuyu; Yamakuchi, Munekazu; Lowenstein, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial exocytosis regulates vascular thrombosis and inflammation. The trafficking and release of endothelial vesicles is mediated by SNARE (Soluble NSF Attachment protein REceptors) molecules, but the exact identity of endothelial SNAREs has been unclear. Three SNARE molecules form a ternary complex, including isoforms of the syntaxin (STX), vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP), and synaptosomal-associated protein (SNAP) families. We now identify SNAP23 as the predominant endothelial SNAP isoform that mediates endothelial exocytosis of von Willebrand Factor (VWF). SNAP23 was localized to the plasma membrane. Knockdown of SNAP23 decreased endothelial exocytosis, suggesting it is important for endothelial exocytosis. SNAP23 interacted with the endothelial exocytic machinery, and formed complexes with other known endothelial SNARE molecules. Taken together, these data suggest that SNAP23 is a key component of the endothelial SNARE machinery that mediates endothelial exocytosis. PMID:26266817

  12. Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide and Muscarinic Receptors: Supersensitivity Induced by Long-Term Atropine Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedlund, Britta; Abens, Janis; Bartfai, Tamas

    1983-04-01

    Long-term treatment of rats with atropine induced large increases in the numbers of muscarinic receptors and receptors for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in the salivary glands. Since receptors for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide coexist with muscarinic receptors on the same neurons in this preparation, the results suggest that a drug that alters the sensitivity of one receptor may also affect the sensitivity of the receptor for a costored transmitter and in this way contribute to the therapeutic or side effects of the drug.

  13. Effect of vasoactive agents on prostanoid synthesis in isolated rat glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Podjarny, E; Magen, H; Shapira, J; Rathaus, M; Bernheim, J

    1986-11-01

    We studied the influence of vasoactive substances (angiotensin II, epinephrine, norepinephrine and acetylcholine) on the synthesis of prostanoids in isolated rat glomeruli. A significant increase of prostaglandin E2, and of thromboxane B2, but not of prostaglandin F2 alpha synthesis was observed after the administration of angiotensin II at physiological doses. Neither catecholamines nor acetylcholine influenced prostaglandin synthesis. The stimulation of vasoactive prostaglandins by angiotensin II, may modify the hemodynamic status of the glomerulus.

  14. Endothelial Cell Proteomic Response to Rickettsia conorii Infection Reveals Activation of the Janus Kinase (JAK)-Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT)-Inferferon Stimulated Gene (ISG)15 Pathway and Reprogramming Plasma Membrane Integrin/Cadherin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingxin; Valbuena, Gustavo; Walker, David H; Gazi, Michal; Hidalgo, Marylin; DeSousa, Rita; Oteo, Jose Antonio; Goez, Yenny; Brasier, Allan R

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsia conorii is the etiologic agent of Mediterranean spotted fever, a re-emerging infectious disease with significant mortality. This Gram-negative, obligately intracellular pathogen is transmitted via tick bites, resulting in disseminated vascular endothelial cell infection with vascular leakage. In the infected human, Rickettsia conorii infects endothelial cells, stimulating expression of cytokines and pro-coagulant factors. However, the integrated proteomic response of human endothelial cells to R. conorii infection is not known. In this study, we performed quantitative proteomic profiling of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with established R conorii infection versus those stimulated with endotoxin (LPS) alone. We observed differential expression of 55 proteins in HUVEC whole cell lysates. Of these, we observed induction of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)1, MX dynamin-like GTPase (MX1), and ISG15 ubiquitin-like modifier, indicating activation of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway occurs in R. conorii-infected HUVECs. The down-regulated proteins included those involved in the pyrimidine and arginine biosynthetic pathways. A highly specific biotinylated cross-linking enrichment protocol was performed to identify dysregulation of 11 integral plasma membrane proteins that included up-regulated expression of a sodium/potassium transporter and down-regulation of α-actin 1. Analysis of Golgi and soluble Golgi fractions identified up-regulated proteins involved in platelet-endothelial adhesion, phospholipase activity, and IFN activity. Thirty four rickettsial proteins were identified with high confidence in the Golgi, plasma membrane, or secreted protein fractions. The host proteins associated with rickettsial infections indicate activation of interferon-STAT signaling pathways; the disruption of cellular adhesion and alteration of antigen presentation pathways in response to rickettsial infections are distinct from

  15. Endothelial Lessons.

    PubMed

    Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    This essay focuses on nine important lessons learned during more than thirty years of endothelial research. They include: the danger of hiding behind a word, the confusion generated by abbreviations, the need to define the physiological role of the response studied, the local role of endothelium- dependent responses, the strength of pharmacological analyses, endothelial dysfunction as consequence and cause of disease, the importance of rigorous protocols, the primacy of in vivo studies and the importance of serendipity. PMID:26638800

  16. [Endothelial function and the microcirculation in diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Arosio, E; Minuz, P; Prior, M

    1999-01-01

    The role of endothelial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of diabetic microangiopathy is reviewed. Reversible alterations in microcirculation, consisting of increased capillary pressure, blood flow and endothelial permeability, can be detected at an early stage in diabetes mellitus. Irreversible structural modifications of the vascular wall, such as thickening of the basal membrane due to the extracellular accumulation of proteins, take place at later stages. Atherosclerosis further affects microcirculation in diabetes mellitus by decreasing autoregulatory capacity and blood flow reserve. Endothelial dysfunction has been observed to precede the onset of microvascular lesions, as demonstrated by reduction in the vasodilatory response to vasoactive agents and by alterations in the antithrombotic properties of the endothelium. Experimental data available so far suggest that endothelial dysfunction may be directly related to hyperglycemia. Abnormalities in lipoprotein metabolism, generation of glycation end products, and increased oxidative stress may also be responsible for the endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. Insulin resistance appears to be related to endothelial dysfunction in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus through a reduction in the biological activity of endothelial-derived nitric oxide.

  17. Pharmacodynamics and toxicity of vasoactive intestinal peptide for intranasal administration.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xu; Cao, De-Ying; Wang, Zhi-Min; Zheng, Ai-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the nasal route for the delivery of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) to the brain and to evaluate the toxicity of VIP nasal spray. Mice were injected intracerebroventricularly with the aggregated Abeta25-35 to mimic Alzheimer's disease. Following administration, different groups of mice were treated over one week, and their spatial learning and memory capacities were evaluated by the Morris water maze test. The toxicity of VIP nasal spray was evaluated by examining the morphology of individual rat nasal mucosa cilia and the pathology of rat nasal mucosa. Rats receiving intranasal VIP (40 microg/ml) showed good spatial memory relative to the Abeta25-35 model group, but the escape latency did not show any statistically significant difference. Intranasal administration of VIP nasal spray (200 microg/ml) improved deficits in spatial memory to the point that test animals receiving intranasal VIP showed no statistically significant differences from the normal control group in escape latency. This indicated that the nasal spray method could increase the quantity of VIP entering the brain and protect the central nervous systems of mice. Toxicity evaluation showed that the preparation could cause minor irritation, which resolved spontaneously within a week at the end of treatment. In conclusion, VIP can be delivered successfully to the brain using the intranasal route. PMID:23444784

  18. Vasoactive intestinal peptide and electrical activity influence neuronal survival

    SciTech Connect

    Brenneman, D.E.; Eiden, L.E.

    1986-02-01

    Blockage of electrical activity in dissociated spinal cord cultures results in a significant loss of neurons during a critical period in development. Decreases in neuronal cell numbers and SVI-labeled tetanus toxin fixation produced by electrical blockage with tetrodotoxin (TTX) were prevented by addition of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) to the nutrient medium. The most effective concentration of VIP was 0.1 nM. At higher concentrations, the survival-enhancing effect of VIP on TTX-treated cultures was attenuated. Addition of the peptide alone had no significant effect on neuronal cell counts or tetanus toxin fixation. With the same experimental conditions, two closely related peptides, PHI-27 (peptide, histidyl-isoleucine amide) and secretin, were found not to increase the number of neurons in TTX-treated cultures. Interference with VIP action by VIP antiserum resulted in neuronal losses that were not significantly different from those observed after TTX treatment. These data indicate that under conditions of electrical blockade a neurotrophic action of VIP on neuronal survival can be demonstrated.

  19. Intake of cooked tomato sauce preserves coronary endothelial function and improves apolipoprotein A-I and apolipoprotein J protein profile in high-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Vilahur, Gemma; Cubedo, Judit; Padró, Teresa; Casaní, Laura; Mendieta, Guiomar; González, Alicia; Badimon, Lina

    2015-07-01

    Intake of tomatoes has been linked with healthy diets (eg, Mediterranean diet). However, it remains unknown whether tomato intake exerts protective effects on the vasculature. The aim of this study was to determine whether medium-term supplementation with cooked tomato sauce (CTS) Mediterranean style (sofrito) attenuates diet-induced coronary endothelial dysfunction in an animal model with clinical impact and explore the mechanisms behind the effects. Pigs (N = 18) were fed a 10-day hypercholesterolemic diet. Half of the animals were given a supplement of 100 g/d of CTS (21.5 mg lycopene per day). Coronary responses to escalating doses of vasoactive drugs (acetylcholine, calcium ionophore, and sodium nitroprusside) and L-NG-monomethylarginine (endothelial nitric oxide synthase [eNOS] inhibitor) were measured using flow Doppler. In the coronary arteries, we investigated eNOS gene expression and activation, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) expression, and oxidative DNA damage. In the circulation, we investigated lipoprotein resistance to oxidation and the differential proteomic protein profile. In dyslipidemic animals, CTS intake prevented diet-induced impairment of receptor-operated and nonreceptor-operated endothelial-dependent coronary vasodilation. These beneficial effects were associated with enhanced eNOS transcription and activation and diminished DNA damage in the coronary arteries. CTS-fed animals showed lower lipid peroxidation, higher high-density lipoprotein (HDL) antioxidant potential and plasma lycopene levels of 0.16 mg/L. Interestingly, improved HDL functionality was associated with protein profile changes in apolipoprotein A-I and apolipoprotein J. Lipids levels and MCP-1 expression were not affected by CTS. We report that CTS intake protects against low-density lipoprotein-induced coronary endothelial dysfunction by reducing oxidative damage, enhancing eNOS expression and activity, and improving HDL functionality.

  20. Isolation and culture of pulmonary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, U S

    1984-06-01

    Methods for isolation, identification and culture of pulmonary endothelial cells are now routine. In the past, methods of isolation have used proteolytic enzymes to detach cells; thereafter, traditional methods for cell passaging have used trypsin/EDTA mixtures. Cells isolated and passaged using proteolytic enzymes have been useful in establishing the field and in verifying certain endothelial properties. However, there is a growing awareness of the role of endothelial cells in processing vasoactive substances, in responding to hormones and other agonists and in cell-cell interactions with other cell types of the vascular wall, with blood cells and with cellular products. Consequently, a new requirement has arisen for cells in vitro that maintain the differentiated properties of their counterparts in vivo. The deleterious effects of trypsin and other proteolytic enzymes commonly used in cell culture on surface structures of endothelial cells such as enzymes, receptors and junctional proteins, as well as on extracellular layers such as the glycocalyx or "endothelial fuzz," have led to the development of methods that avoid use of proteolytic enzymes at both the isolation step and during subsequent subculture. This chapter describes traditional methods for isolating pulmonary endothelial cells but emphasizes newer approaches using mechanical harvest and scale-up using microcarriers. The new methods allow maintenance of long-term, large-scale cultures of cells that retain the full complement of surface properties and that maintain the cobblestone monolayer morphology and differentiated functional properties. Methods for identification of isolated cells are therefore also considered as methods for validation of cultures during their in vitro lifespan. PMID:6090112

  1. Induction of endothelial cell proliferation and von Willebrand factor expression and secretion by leukemic plasma of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia before and after inhibition of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Shahidi, Minoo; Mohsen Razavi, Seyed; Hayat, Parisa

    2016-09-01

    Although certain evidence has indicated a role for angiogenesis in the pathophysiology of hematopoietic malignancies, its role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) prognosis is yet to be defined. To our knowledge, the effects of CLL plasma on cell culture have not been addressed. Therefore, we investigated the effects of CLL plasma on cell cycle regulation and von Willebrand factor (vWF) secretion, and expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cell cultures (HUVECs). Since nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factor has been a therapeutic target for treatment of cancer, we inhibited NF-κB using small interfering RNA to clarify if there is a role for this factor in probable effects. The cells were treated with the plasma of patients with CLL. Subsequently, cell cycle phase distribution, vWF secretion, expression, and storage were detected using ELISA, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemical staining. In addition, NF-κB was inhibited using small interfering RNA. Plasma treatment promoted cell cycle progression by decreasing the cell number in G1 phase, while increasing the cell number in S phase and G2M phase. A significant increase of vWF expression, secretion, and storage was found, associated with the vWF levels of patients' plasma. We found that induction of cell cycle promotion, but not vWF expression and secretion, was partially suppressed by this inhibition. We found that endothelial cell cycle and vWF expression and secretion affected by CLL plasma and NF-κB play a role in the former. These findings would be useful for understanding the prognostic importance of plasma angiogenic factor levels in CLL. PMID:27472040

  2. How cholesterol regulates endothelial biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhongkui; Staiculescu, Marius C.; Hampel, Paul; Levitan, Irena; Forgacs, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    As endothelial cells form the barrier between blood flow and surrounding tissue, many of their functions depend on mechanical integrity, in particular those of the plasma membrane. As component and organizer of the plasma membrane, cholesterol is a regulator of cellular mechanical properties. Disruption of cholesterol balance leads to impairment of endothelial functions and eventually to disease. The mechanical properties of the membrane are strongly affected by the cytoskeleton. As Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is a key mediator between the membrane and cytoskeleton, it also affects cellular biomechanical properties. Typically, PIP2 is concentrated in cholesterol-rich microdomains, such as caveolae and lipid rafts, which are particularly abundant in the endothelial plasma membrane. We investigated the connection between cholesterol and PIP2 by extracting membrane tethers from bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) at different cholesterol levels and PIP2 conditions. Our results suggest that in BAEC the role of PIP2, as a mediator of membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion, is regulated by cholesterol. Our findings confirm the specific role of cholesterol in endothelial cells and may have implications for cholesterol-dependent vascular pathologies. PMID:23162471

  3. The role of vasoactive intestinal peptide in scavenging singlet oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, B.R.; Misra, H.P. )

    1990-02-26

    The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a highly basic 28 amino acid peptide, has a widespread distribution in the body. The functional specificity of this peptide not only includes its potent vasodilatory activity, but also its role in protecting lungs against acute injury, in preventing T-lymphocyte proliferation and in modulating immune function. The purpose of this study was to examine the possible antioxidant properties of VIP. The authors found that VIP up to 50 {mu}g/ml had no inhibitory effect on its reduction of cytochrome C by xanthine and xanthine oxidase, indicating that the peptide does not have significant O{sub 2} scavenging ability. However, VIP was found to inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, the {sup 1}O{sub 2} dependent 2, 2, 6, 6 tetramethyl piperidine oxide (TEMPO) formation. {sup 1}O{sub 2} was produced by rose benzal photosensitizing system and was detected as TEMP-{sup 1}O{sub 2} adduct (TEMPO) by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic technique. The formation of TEMPO signal was strongly inhibited by {beta}-carotene, histidine as well as azide, but not by superoxide dismutase (48 {mu}g/ml), catalase (20 {mu}g/ml) and mannitol (6mM), indicating that TEMPO signal was a TEMP-{sup 1}O{sub 2} adduct. These results indicate that VIP has potent antioxidant activity and may serve as a singlet O{sub 2} scavenger, thus it may modulate the oxidative tissue injury caused by this reactive oxygen species.

  4. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) inhibits human renal cell carcinoma proliferation.

    PubMed

    Vacas, Eva; Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Bajo, Ana M; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Schally, Andrew V; Prieto, Juan C; Carmena, María J

    2012-10-01

    Clear renal cell carcinoma (cRCC) is an aggressive and fatal neoplasm. The present work was undertaken to investigate the antiproliferative potential of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) exposure on non-tumoral (HK2) and tumoral (A498, cRCC) human proximal tubular epithelial cell lines. Reverse transcription and semiquantitative PCR was used at the VIP mRNA level whereas enzyme immunoanalysis was performed at the protein level. Both renal cell lines expressed VIP as well as VIP/pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (VPAC) receptors whereas only HK2 cells expressed formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL-1). Receptors were functional, as shown by VIP stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity. Treatment with 0.1μM VIP (24h) inhibited proliferation of A498 but not HK2 cells as based on a reduction in the incorporation of [(3)H]-thymidine and BrdU (5'-Br-2'-deoxyuridine), PCNA (proliferating-cell nuclear antigen) expression and STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) expression and activation. VPAC(1)-receptor participation was established using JV-1-53 antagonist and siRNA transfection. Growth-inhibitory response to VIP was related to the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC)/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K) signaling systems as shown by studies on adenylate cyclase stimulation, and using the EPAC-specific compound 8CPT-2Me-cAMP and specific kinase inhibitors such as H89, wortmannin and PD98059. The efficacy of VIP on the prevention of tumor progression was confirmed in vivo using xenografted athymic mouse. These actions support a potential role of this peptide and its agonists in new therapies for cRCC.

  5. The relationship between oxidised LDL, endothelial progenitor cells and coronary endothelial function in patients with CHD

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Jonathan; Kennedy, Simon; Ahmed, Nadeem; Hayhurst, James; McClure, John D; Berry, Colin; Wadsworth, Roger M; Oldroyd, Keith G

    2016-01-01

    Objective The balance between coronary endothelial dysfunction and repair is influenced by many protective and deleterious factors circulating in the blood. We studied the relationship between oxidised low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and coronary endothelial function in patients with stable coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods 33 patients with stable CHD were studied. Plasma oxLDL was measured using ELISA, coronary endothelial function was assessed using intracoronary acetylcholine infusion and EPCs were quantified using flow cytometry for CD34+/KDR+ cells. Results Plasma oxLDL correlated positively with the number of EPCs in the blood (r=0.46, p=0.02). There was a positive correlation between the number of circulating EPCs and coronary endothelial function (r=0.42, p=0.04). There was no significant correlation between oxLDL and coronary endothelial function. Conclusions Plasma levels of oxLDL are associated with increased circulating EPCs in the blood of patients with CHD, which may reflect a host-repair response to endothelial injury. Patients with stable CHD had a high prevalence of coronary endothelial dysfunction, which was associated with lower numbers of circulating EPCs, suggesting a mechanistic link between endothelial dysfunction and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. PMID:26848395

  6. Endothelial Caveolar Subcellular Domain Regulation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ramadoss, Jayanth; Pastore, Mayra B.; Magness, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Complex regulatory processes alter the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) leading to nitric oxide (NO) production by endothelial cells under various physiological states. These complex processes require specific sub-cellular eNOS partitioning between plasma membrane caveolar domains and non-caveolar compartments.eNOS translocation from the plasma membrane to intracellular compartments is important for eNOS activation and subsequent NO biosynthesis. We present data reviewing and interpreting information: 1) the coupling of endothelial plasma membrane receptor systems in the caveolar structure relative to eNOS trafficking; 2) how eNOS trafficking relates to specific protein-protein interaction for inactivation and activation of eNOS; and 3) how these complex mechanisms confer specific subcellular location relative to eNOS multi-site phosphorylation and signaling.Dysfunction in regulation of eNOS activation may contribute to several disease states; in particular gestational endothelial abnormalities (preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, etc) that have life-long deleterious health consequences that predispose the offspring to develop hypertensive disease, type II diabetes and adiposity.1 PMID:23745825

  7. Vasoactivity and antioxidant properties of Microdesmis keayana roots.

    PubMed

    Zamblé, Alexis; Yao, Datté; Martin-Nizard, Françoise; Sahpaz, Sevser; Offoumou, Michel; Bordet, Régis; Duriez, Patrick; Brunet, Claude; Bailleul, François

    2006-03-01

    Endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA expression increases in the corpora cavernosum, penile arteries and arterioles during erection. But eNOS expression and nitric oxide (NO), the product of its catalytic action, are inactivated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), especially by superoxide anion. ROS are involved in the impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation and are responsible for some of the pathologies linked to erectile dysfunction (i.e. hypertension, atherosclerosis, etc.). While investigating Microdesmis keayana J. Léonard (Pandaceae) (syn. Microdesmis puberula Hook.f. ex. Planch.), used in African traditional medicine for erectile dysfunction, the hypotensive and the vasorelaxing properties of the aqueous extract of Microdesmis keayana (AEMK) were, respectively, tested using normotensive rabbits and aorta strips of guinea pigs in an organ bath experience. Interaction of AEMK in endothelial production of eNOS was measured by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analysis. The scavenging activities versus ROS, such as superoxide anion (O(2)(.-)), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hydroxyl radical (HO.) were evaluated. Action of AEMK on cellular generation of superoxide anion was also tested in a physiopathology model of oxidative burst using human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate. The results showed that Microdesmis keayana roots had significant hypotensive and vasorelaxing properties. These properties are due to both antioxidant activities and stimulation of eNOS mRNA expression. Therefore, AEMK stimulated indirectly NO production in the vascular bed. PMID:16289601

  8. Platelet rich plasma enhances the immunohistochemical expression of platelet derived growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in the synovium of the meniscectomized rat models of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Almasry, Shaima M; Soliman, Hala M; El-Tarhouny, Shereen A; Algaidi, Sami A; Ragab, Ehab M

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out on a rat model of surgically-induced osteoarthritis (OA) to assess the histological and immunohistochemical changes in the synovial membrane and to evaluate the effects of intra-articular injection of platelet rich plasma (PRP) in such cases. Forty five male albino rats were divided into 3 equal groups; control, surgically-induced OA and surgically-induced OA followed by intra-articular injection of PRP. Knee joints were processed for histological and immunohistochemical staining with anti-platelet derived growth factor (PDGF-A) and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the area percentages of immunostaining were measured by digital image analysis. Serum levels of PDGF-A and VEGF were analyzed by ELISA. The osteoarthritis research society international (OARSI) score was significantly higher in OA (2433.8±254) than in control (230.4±37.8; p<0.001) and in PRP-treated tissues (759.7±45.8; p<0.001). The immunostained area percentages for PDGF-A was significantly higher in PRP-treated tissues (20.6±2.4) than in OA (11.06±1.3; p=0.007) and in control tissues (4.1±0.78; p<0.001). Likewise, the immunostained area percentage for VEGF was significantly higher in PRP-treated tissues (22.5±1.6) than in OA (14.9±1; p=0. 002) and in control tissues (6.5±0.7; p<0.001). ELISA analysis revealed a significant increase in serum levels of the PDGF-A and VEGF after intraarticular PRP injection when compared to the other groups (p<0.000). The present study concluded that intra-articular injection of PRP could produce optimizing effects in surgically induced OA in the form of; decreasing the OARSI score, improving the inflammatory events in synovium and modulating the PDGF-A and VEGF serum levels and synovial tissue immunoexpression. These effects could be reflected positively on the associated chondral defect. PMID:25466931

  9. Aspirate from human stented saphenous vein grafts induces epicardial coronary vasoconstriction and impairs perfusion and left ventricular function in rat bioassay hearts with pharmacologically induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lieder, Helmut R; Baars, Theodor; Kahlert, Philipp; Kleinbongard, Petra

    2016-08-01

    Stent implantation into aortocoronary saphenous vein grafts (SVG) releases particulate debris and soluble vasoactive mediators, for example, serotonin. We now analyzed effects of the soluble mediators released into the coronary arterial blood during stent implantation on vasomotion of isolated rat epicardial coronary artery segments and on coronary flow and left ventricular developed pressure in isolated perfused rat hearts. Coronary blood was retrieved during percutaneous SVG intervention using a distal occlusion/aspiration protection device in nine symptomatic patients with stable angina pectoris and a flow-limiting SVG stenosis. The blood was separated into particulate debris and plasma. Responses to coronary plasma were determined in isolated rat epicardial coronary arteries and in isolated, constant pressure-perfused rat hearts (±nitric oxide synthase [NOS] inhibition and ±serotonin receptor blockade, respectively). Coronary aspirate plasma taken after stent implantation induced a stronger vasoconstriction of rat epicardial coronary arteries (52 ± 8% of maximal potassium chloride induced vasoconstriction [% KClmax = 100%]) than plasma taken before stent implantation (12 ± 8% of KClmax); NOS inhibition augmented this vasoconstrictor response (to 110 ± 15% and 24 ± 9% of KClmax). Coronary aspirate plasma taken after stent implantation reduced in isolated perfused rat hearts only under NOS inhibition coronary flow by 17 ± 3% and left ventricular developed pressure by 25 ± 4%. Blockade of serotonin receptors abrogated these effects. Coronary aspirate plasma taken after stent implantation induces vasoconstriction in isolated rat epicardial coronary arteries and reduces coronary flow and left ventricular developed pressure in isolated perfused rat hearts with pharmacologically induced endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27482071

  10. High precision measurement of electrical resistance across endothelial cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Tschugguel, W; Zhegu, Z; Gajdzik, L; Maier, M; Binder, B R; Graf, J

    1995-05-01

    Effects of vasoactive agonists on endothelial permeability was assessed by measurement of transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) grown on porous polycarbonate supports. Because of the low values of TEER obtained in this preparation (< 5 omega cm2) a design of an Ussing type recording chamber was chosen that provided for a homogeneous electric field across the monolayer and for proper correction of series resistances. Precision current pulses and appropriate rates of sampling and averaging of the voltage signal allowed for measurement of < 0.1 omega resistance changes of the endothelium on top of a 21 omega series resistance of the support and bathing fluid layers. Histamine (10 microM) and thrombin (10 U/ml) induced an abrupt and substantial decrease of TEER, bradykinin (1 microM) was less effective, PAF (380 nM) and LTC4 (1 microM) had no effect. TEER was also reduced by the calcium ionophore A-23187 (10 microM). The technique allows for measurements of TEER in low resistance monolayer cultures with high precision and time resolution. The results obtained extend previous observations in providing quantitative data on the increase of permeability of HUVECs in response to vasoactive agonists.

  11. Effect of grazing seedhead-suppressed tall fescue pasture on the vasoactivity of serotonin receptors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research has demonstrated that exposure to ergot alkaloids reduces vasoactivity of serotonin (5HT) receptors. Chemical suppression of tall fescue seedhead production is a tool to reduce the level of exposure to ergot alkaloids by a grazing animal. Therefore, the objective was to evaluate co...

  12. Effect of continuous regional vasoactive agent infusion on liver metastasis blood flow.

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, M. J.; Carnochan, P.; Allen-Mersh, T. G.

    1997-01-01

    Regionally administered vasopressors might increase tumour chemotherapy uptake by differentially constricting normal and tumour blood vessels, leading to a selective increase in blood flow to the tumour. In this study, we compared the effects of the vasopressors angiotensin II, vasopressin and endothelin I and the vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) by continuously measuring liver parenchymal and tumour blood flow during a 30-min regional vasoactive infusion in a rat HSN liver metastasis model. Vasopressin and angiotensin II produced a vasoconstriction that decreased despite continued infusion, while endothelin I infusion led to prolonged vasoconstriction with a more gradual onset. CGRP infusion resulted in increased vessel conductance but a reduction in blood flow due to systemic hypotension. The tumour to normal flow ratio (TNR) was transiently increased during infusion of all pressors, but only endothelin I produced sufficient change to result in a rise in average TNR throughout pressor infusion. Continuous liver and tumour blood flow measurement throughout vasoactive infusion demonstrated that the extent and the duration of blood flow change varied with the agents assessed. No vasoactive agent increased tumour blood flow, but endothelin I had the most suitable vasoactive properties for enhancing tumour uptake of continuously infused chemotherapy. PMID:9365170

  13. [Regional vasoactive and metabolic therapy of patients with severe cranio-cerebral traumas].

    PubMed

    Lapshin, V N; Shakh, B N; Teplov, V M; Smirnov, D B

    2012-01-01

    In patients with severe cranio-cerebral traumas an investigation was performed of the efficiency of using vasoactive therapy in complex treatment directed to earlier recovery of the microcirculatory blood flow and aerobic metabolism in ischemic parts of the brain. PMID:22880433

  14. Molecular mechanisms that control endothelial cell contacts.

    PubMed

    Vestweber, D

    2000-02-01

    Endothelial cell contacts control the permeability of the blood vessel wall. This allows the endothelium to form a barrier for solutes, macromolecules, and leukocytes between the vessel lumen and the interstitial space. Loss of this barrier function in pathophysiological situations can lead to extracellular oedema. The ability of leukocytes to enter tissue at sites of inflammation is dependent on molecular mechanisms that allow leukocytes to adhere to the endothelium and to migrate through the endothelial cell layer and the underlying basal lamina. It is a commonly accepted working hypothesis that inter-endothelial cell contacts are actively opened and closed during this process. Angiogenesis is another important process that requires well-controlled regulation of inter-endothelial cell contacts. The formation of new blood vessels by sprouting from pre-existing vessels depends on the loosening of established endothelial cell contacts and the migration of endothelial cells that form the outgrowing sprouts. This review focuses on the molecular composition of endothelial cell surface proteins and proteins of the cytoskeletal undercoat of the plasma membrane at sites of inter-endothelial cell contacts and discusses the current knowledge about the potential role of such molecules in the regulation of endothelial cell contacts. PMID:10685062

  15. Effect of vasoactive peptides on prostacyclin synthesis in man.

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, S. E.; Dollery, C. T.; Heavey, D. J.; Hickling, N. E.; Ritter, J. M.; Vial, J.

    1986-01-01

    Bradykinin, angiotensin II, arginine vasopressin (AVP) or des-amino-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP) were administered by intravenous infusion to 10 healthy men. The concentration of 6-oxo-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-oxo-PGF1 alpha), the stable hydrolysis product of prostacyclin (PGI2), was measured in plasma using gas chromatography/negative ion chemical ionisation mass spectrometry. Dose-related increases in plasma concentrations of 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha occurred during administration of bradykinin (100-3200 ng kg-1 min-1). The concentrations of 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha rose from baseline values in the range less than 1.0-4.9 pg ml-1 to 24.9-47.6 pg ml-1 at maximum tolerated infusion rates. There were no changes in the concentrations of 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha during administration of angiotensin II, AVP or DDAVP at infusion rates which caused haemodynamic changes. PMID:3513880

  16. [Blood oxygen transport, prooxidant -- antioxidant status, and vasoactive characteristics of vascular endothelium in rats treated with endotoxin and taurine].

    PubMed

    Milosh, T S; Maksimovich, N E

    2014-01-01

    Experiments on a group of 74 pregnant rats upon intramuscular introduction of E. coli lipopolysaccharides during pregnancy revealed the correction effect of taurine on the blood oxygen transport function, prooxidant - antioxidant status, and vasoactive characteristics of vascular endothelium.

  17. Altered vasoactive intestinal peptides expression in irritable bowel syndrome patients and rats with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    Del Valle-Pinero, Arseima Y; Sherwin, LeeAnne B; Anderson, Ethan M; Caudle, Robert M; Henderson, Wendy A

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the vasoactive intestinal peptides (VIP) expression in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis. METHODS: The VIP gene expression and protein plasma levels were measured in adult participants (45.8% male) who met Rome III criteria for IBS for longer than 6 mo and in a rat model of colitis as induced by TNBS. Plasma and colons were collected from naïve and inflamed rats. Markers assessing inflammation (i.e., weight changes and myeloperoxidase levels) were assessed on days 2, 7, 14 and 28 and compared to controls. Visceral hypersensitivity of the rats was assessed with colo-rectal distension and mechanical threshold testing on hind paws. IBS patients (n = 12) were age, gender, race, and BMI-matched with healthy controls (n = 12). Peripheral whole blood and plasma from fasting participants was collected and VIP plasma levels were assayed using a VIP peptide-enzyme immunoassay. Human gene expression of VIP was analyzed using a custom PCR array. RESULTS: TNBS induced colitis in the rats was confirmed with weight loss (13.7 ± 3.2 g) and increased myeloperoxidase activity. Visceral hypersensitivity to colo-rectal distension was increased in TNBS treated rats up to 21 d and resolved by day 28. Somatic hypersensitivity was also increased up to 14 d post TNBS induction of colitis. The expression of an inflammatory marker myeloperoxidase was significantly elevated in the intracellular granules of neutrophils in rat models following TNBS treatment compared to naïve rats. This confirmed the induction of inflammation in rats following TNBS treatment. VIP plasma concentration was significantly increased in rats following TNBS treatment as compared to naïve animals (P < 0.05). Likewise, the VIP gene expression from peripheral whole blood was significantly upregulated by 2.91-fold in IBS patients when compared to controls (P < 0.00001; 95%CI). VIP plasma protein was not significantly different when compared with

  18. Isolation and amino acid sequences of opossum vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and cholecystokinin octapeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Eng, J; Yu, J; Rattan, S; Yalow, R S

    1992-01-01

    Evolutionary history suggests that the marsupials entered South America from North America about 75 million years ago and subsequently dispersed into Australia before the separation between South America and Antarctica-Australia. A question of interest is whether marsupial peptides resemble the corresponding peptides of Old or New World mammals. Previous studies had shown that "little" gastrin of the North American marsupial, the opossum, is identical in length to that of the New World mammals, the guinea pig and chinchilla. In this report, we demonstrate that opossum cholecystokinin octapeptide, like that of the Australian marsupials, the Eastern quoll and the Tamar wallaby, is identical to the cholecystokinin octapeptide of Old World mammals and differs from that of the guinea pig and chinchilla. However, opossum vasoactive intestinal polypeptide differs from the usual Old World mammalian vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in five sites: [sequence; see text]. PMID:1542675

  19. Inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandins, but not endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors, reduces blood flow and aerobic energy turnover in the exercising human leg.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Stefan P; González-Alonso, José; Damsgaard, Rasmus; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva

    2007-06-01

    Prostaglandins, nitric oxide (NO) and endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs) are substances that have been proposed to be involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow during physical activity. We measured haemodynamics, plasma ATP at rest and during one-legged knee-extensor exercise (19 +/- 1 W) in nine healthy subjects with and without intra-arterial infusion of indomethacin (Indo; 621 +/- 17 microg min(-1)), Indo + N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA; 12.4 +/- 0.3 mg min(-1)) (double blockade) and Indo + L-NMMA + tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA; 12.4 +/- 0.3 mg min(-1)) (triple blockade). Double and triple blockade lowered leg blood flow (LBF) at rest (P<0.05), while it remained unchanged with Indo. During exercise, LBF and vascular conductance were 2.54 +/- 0.10 l min(-1) and 25 +/- 1 mmHg, respectively, in control and they were lower with double (33 +/- 3 and 36 +/- 4%, respectively) and triple (26 +/- 4 and 28 +/- 3%, respectively) blockade (P<0.05), while there was no difference with Indo. The lower LBF and vascular conductance with double and triple blockade occurred in parallel with a lower O(2) delivery, cardiac output, heart rate and plasma [noradrenaline] (P<0.05), while blood pressure remained unchanged and O(2) extraction and femoral venous plasma [ATP] increased. Despite the increased O(2) extraction, leg was 13 and 17% (triple and double blockade, respectively) lower than control in parallel to a lower femoral venous temperature and lactate release (P<0.05). These results suggest that NO and prostaglandins play important roles in skeletal muscle blood flow regulation during moderate intensity exercise and that EDHFs do not compensate for the impaired formation of NO and prostaglandins. Moreover, inhibition of NO and prostaglandin formation is associated with a lower aerobic energy turnover and increased concentration of vasoactive ATP in plasma. PMID:17347273

  20. Time-course gene expression data on the transcriptional effects of Aminaphtone on ECV304 endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Giulia; Bellocchi, Chiara; Todoerti, Katia; Saporiti, Federica; Piacentini, Luca; Scorza, Raffaella; Colombo, Gualtiero I

    2016-09-01

    We previously showed that Aminaphtone, a drug used in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency, modulates several vasoactive factors, such as endothelin-1 and adhesion molecules. Here, we provide data of time-course experiments about the effects of Aminaphtone on gene expression at the genome-wide level in human endothelial cells undergoing cytokine stimulation in vitro. ECV-304 endothelial cells were incubated with interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in the presence or absence of Aminaphtone for 1, 3, and 6 h. Gene expression profiles were analyzed by microarray. This article contains complete data on the genes significantly modulated by the drug over time. The data are supplemental to our original research article reporting detailed analysis of the actions of Aminaphtone on IL-1β stimulated endothelial cells at the molecular level, "Gene expression profiling reveals novel protective effects of Aminaphtone on ECV304 endothelial cells" (Salazar et al., 2016) [1].

  1. Time-course gene expression data on the transcriptional effects of Aminaphtone on ECV304 endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Giulia; Bellocchi, Chiara; Todoerti, Katia; Saporiti, Federica; Piacentini, Luca; Scorza, Raffaella; Colombo, Gualtiero I

    2016-09-01

    We previously showed that Aminaphtone, a drug used in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency, modulates several vasoactive factors, such as endothelin-1 and adhesion molecules. Here, we provide data of time-course experiments about the effects of Aminaphtone on gene expression at the genome-wide level in human endothelial cells undergoing cytokine stimulation in vitro. ECV-304 endothelial cells were incubated with interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in the presence or absence of Aminaphtone for 1, 3, and 6 h. Gene expression profiles were analyzed by microarray. This article contains complete data on the genes significantly modulated by the drug over time. The data are supplemental to our original research article reporting detailed analysis of the actions of Aminaphtone on IL-1β stimulated endothelial cells at the molecular level, "Gene expression profiling reveals novel protective effects of Aminaphtone on ECV304 endothelial cells" (Salazar et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27508230

  2. Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Karen Kristine; Simon-Santamaria, Jaione; McCuskey, Robert S; Smedsrød, Bård

    2015-10-01

    The liver sinusoidal endothelial cell (LSEC) forms the fenestrated wall of the hepatic sinusoid and functions as a control post regulating and surveying the trafficking of molecules and cells between the liver parenchyma and the blood. The cell acts as a scavenger cell responsible for removal of potential dangerous macromolecules from blood, and is increasingly acknowledged as an important player in liver immunity. This review provides an update of the major functions of the LSEC, including its role in plasma ultrafiltration and regulation of the hepatic microcirculation, scavenger functions, immune functions, and role in liver aging, as well as issues that are either undercommunicated or confusingly dealt with in the literature. These include metabolic functions, including energy metabolic interplay between the LSEC and the hepatocyte, and adequate ways of identifying and distinguishing the cells.

  3. Hyperglycaemia exerts deleterious effects on late endothelial progenitor cell secretion actions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Li, Hong; Cui, Xiaodong; Guan, Xiumei; Tang, Kexin; Jin, Chengwen; Cheng, Min

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a fundamental role in tissue regeneration and vascular repair both by differentiating into endothelial cells and by secretion of vasoactive substances that promote angiogenesis and maintain vascular homeostasis. It has previously been shown that hyperglycaemia impairs early and late EPC functions, such as differentiation, proliferation and adhesion. However, its role in the regulation of the production of vasoactive substances in EPCs, especially in late EPCs, is less well defined. We investigated the effects of hyperglycaemia on the production of vasodilator, fibrinolytic and angiogenic growth factors, and also on the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in late EPCs. For this purpose, late EPCs were incubated with different concentrations of D-glucose (5-40 mmol/L) for 24 hr. Levels of nitric oxide (NO), tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), prostaglandin I(2) (PGI(2)), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the activity of SOD were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Under high glucose stress conditions, late EPCs exhibited lower levels of NO, t-PA, PAI-1, PGI(2) and VEGF compared to control medium (5 mmol/L glucose). Moreover, high glucose was also observed to decrease the activity of SOD in late EPCs. These results suggest that hyperglycaemia-induced impairment of late EPC secretion functions could contribute to the development of vascular disease in diabetes.

  4. Transcriptional coactivator p300 regulates glucose-induced gene expression in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shali; Feng, Biao; George, Biju; Chakrabarti, Rana; Chen, Megan; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2010-01-01

    Sustained hyperglycemia in diabetes causes alteration of a large number of transcription factors and mRNA transcripts, leading to tissue damage. We investigated whether p300, a transcriptional coactivator with histone acetyl transferase activity, regulates glucose-induced activation of transcription factors and subsequent upregulation of vasoactive factors and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were incubated in varied glucose concentrations and were studied after p300 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection, p300 overexpression, or incubation with the p300 inhibitor curcumin. Histone H2AX phosphorylation and lysine acetylation were examined for oxidative DNA damage and p300 activation. Screening for transcription factors was performed with the Luminex system. Alterations of selected transcription factors were validated. mRNA expression of p300, endothelin-1 (ET-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and fibronectin (FN) and its splice variant EDB(+)FN and FN protein production were analyzed. HUVECs in 25 mmol/l glucose showed increased p300 production accompanied by increased binding of p300 to ET-1 and FN promoters, augmented histone acetylation, H2AX phosphorylation, activation of multiple transcription factors, and increased mRNA expression of vasoactive factors and ECM proteins. p300 overexpression showed a glucose-like effect on the mRNA expression of ET-1, VEGF, and FN. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated p300 blockade or chemical inhibitor of p300 prevented such glucose-induced changes. Similar mRNA upregulation was also seen in the organ culture of vascular tissues, which was prevented by p300 siRNA transfection. Data from these studies suggest that glucose-induced p300 upregulation is an important upstream epigenetic mechanism regulating gene expression of vasoactive factors and ECM proteins in endothelial cells and is a potential therapeutic target for diabetic complications.

  5. Sickle erythrocytes inhibit human endothelial cell DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.; Zhou, M.A.; Bartlett-Pandite, A.; Wenc, K. )

    1990-11-15

    Patients with sickle cell anemia experience severe vascular occlusive phenomena including acute pain crisis and cerebral infarction. Obstruction occurs at both the microvascular and the arterial level, and the clinical presentation of vascular events is heterogeneous, suggesting a complex etiology. Interaction between sickle erythrocytes and the endothelium may contribute to vascular occlusion due to alteration of endothelial function. To investigate this hypothesis, human vascular endothelial cells were overlaid with sickle or normal erythrocytes and stimulated to synthesize DNA. The erythrocytes were sedimented onto replicate monolayers by centrifugation for 10 minutes at 17 g to insure contact with the endothelial cells. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine into endothelial cell DNA was markedly inhibited during contact with sickle erythrocytes. This inhibitory effect was enhanced more than twofold when autologous sickle plasma was present during endothelial cell labeling. Normal erythrocytes, with or without autologous plasma, had a modest effect on endothelial cell DNA synthesis. When sickle erythrocytes in autologous sickle plasma were applied to endothelial monolayers for 1 minute, 10 minutes, or 1 hour and then removed, subsequent DNA synthesis by the endothelial cells was inhibited by 30% to 40%. Although adherence of sickle erythrocytes to the endothelial monolayers was observed under these experimental conditions, the effect of sickle erythrocytes on endothelial DNA synthesis occurred in the absence of significant adherence. Hence, human endothelial cell DNA synthesis is partially inhibited by contact with sickle erythrocytes. The inhibitory effect of sickle erythrocytes occurs during a brief (1 minute) contact with the endothelial monolayers, and persists for at least 6 hours of 3H-thymidine labeling.

  6. Acute effects of ingestion of a novel whey-derived extract on vascular endothelial function in overweight, middle-aged men and women.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Kevin D; Kupchak, Brian R; Volk, Brittanie M; Mah, Eunice; Shkreta, Aida; Liptak, Cary; Ptolemy, Adam S; Kellogg, Mark S; Bruno, Richard S; Seip, Richard L; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S

    2013-03-14

    Whey protein intake reduces CVD risk, but little is known whether whey-derived bioactive peptides regulate vascular endothelial function (VEF). We determined the impact of a whey-derived extract (NOP-47) on VEF in individuals with an increased cardiovascular risk profile. Men and women with impaired brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) (n 21, age 55 (sem 1·3) years, BMI 27·8 (sem 0·6) kg/m2, FMD 3·7 (sem 0·4) %) completed a randomised, cross-over study to examine whether ingestion of NOP-47 (5 g) improves postprandial VEF. Brachial artery FMD, plasma amino acids, insulin, and endothelium-derived vasodilators and vasoconstrictors were measured for 2 h after ingestion of NOP-47 or placebo. Acute NOP-47 ingestion increased FMD at 30 min (4·6 (sem 0·5) %) and 120 min (5·1 (sem 0·5) %) post-ingestion (P< 0·05, time × trial interaction), and FMD responses at 120 min were significantly greater in the NOP-47 trial compared with placebo (4·3 (sem 0·5) %). Plasma amino acids increased at 30 min following NOP-47 ingestion (P< 0·05). Serum insulin increased at 15, 30 and 60 min (P< 0·001) following NOP-47 ingestion. No changes were observed between the trials for plasma NO∙ and prostacyclin metabolites or endothelin-1. Ingestion of a rapidly absorbed extract derived from whey protein improved endothelium-dependent dilation in older adults by a mechanism independent of changes in circulating vasoactive compounds. Future investigation is warranted in individuals at an increased CVD risk to further elucidate potential health benefits and the underlying mechanisms of extracts derived from whey. PMID:22691263

  7. Acute effects of ingestion of a novel whey-derived extract on vascular endothelial function in overweight, middle-aged men and women.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Kevin D; Kupchak, Brian R; Volk, Brittanie M; Mah, Eunice; Shkreta, Aida; Liptak, Cary; Ptolemy, Adam S; Kellogg, Mark S; Bruno, Richard S; Seip, Richard L; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S

    2013-03-14

    Whey protein intake reduces CVD risk, but little is known whether whey-derived bioactive peptides regulate vascular endothelial function (VEF). We determined the impact of a whey-derived extract (NOP-47) on VEF in individuals with an increased cardiovascular risk profile. Men and women with impaired brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) (n 21, age 55 (sem 1·3) years, BMI 27·8 (sem 0·6) kg/m2, FMD 3·7 (sem 0·4) %) completed a randomised, cross-over study to examine whether ingestion of NOP-47 (5 g) improves postprandial VEF. Brachial artery FMD, plasma amino acids, insulin, and endothelium-derived vasodilators and vasoconstrictors were measured for 2 h after ingestion of NOP-47 or placebo. Acute NOP-47 ingestion increased FMD at 30 min (4·6 (sem 0·5) %) and 120 min (5·1 (sem 0·5) %) post-ingestion (P< 0·05, time × trial interaction), and FMD responses at 120 min were significantly greater in the NOP-47 trial compared with placebo (4·3 (sem 0·5) %). Plasma amino acids increased at 30 min following NOP-47 ingestion (P< 0·05). Serum insulin increased at 15, 30 and 60 min (P< 0·001) following NOP-47 ingestion. No changes were observed between the trials for plasma NO∙ and prostacyclin metabolites or endothelin-1. Ingestion of a rapidly absorbed extract derived from whey protein improved endothelium-dependent dilation in older adults by a mechanism independent of changes in circulating vasoactive compounds. Future investigation is warranted in individuals at an increased CVD risk to further elucidate potential health benefits and the underlying mechanisms of extracts derived from whey.

  8. The Impact of Microgravity and Hypergravity on Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Jeanette A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The endothelial cells (ECs), which line the inner surface of vessels, play a fundamental role in maintaining vascular integrity and tissue homeostasis, since they regulate local blood flow and other physiological processes. ECs are highly sensitive to mechanical stress, including hypergravity and microgravity. Indeed, they undergo morphological and functional changes in response to alterations of gravity. In particular microgravity leads to changes in the production and expression of vasoactive and inflammatory mediators and adhesion molecules, which mainly result from changes in the remodelling of the cytoskeleton and the distribution of caveolae. These molecular modifications finely control cell survival, proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and angiogenesis. This review summarizes the state of the art on how microgravity and hypergravity affect cultured ECs functions and discusses some controversial issues reported in the literature. PMID:25654101

  9. The impact of microgravity and hypergravity on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Maier, Jeanette A M; Cialdai, Francesca; Monici, Monica; Morbidelli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The endothelial cells (ECs), which line the inner surface of vessels, play a fundamental role in maintaining vascular integrity and tissue homeostasis, since they regulate local blood flow and other physiological processes. ECs are highly sensitive to mechanical stress, including hypergravity and microgravity. Indeed, they undergo morphological and functional changes in response to alterations of gravity. In particular microgravity leads to changes in the production and expression of vasoactive and inflammatory mediators and adhesion molecules, which mainly result from changes in the remodelling of the cytoskeleton and the distribution of caveolae. These molecular modifications finely control cell survival, proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and angiogenesis. This review summarizes the state of the art on how microgravity and hypergravity affect cultured ECs functions and discusses some controversial issues reported in the literature.

  10. Interaction of recombinant octameric hemoglobin with endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gaucher, Caroline; Domingues-Hamdi, Élisa; Prin-Mathieu, Christine; Menu, Patrick; Baudin-Creuza, Véronique

    2015-02-01

    Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) may generate oxidative stress, vasoconstriction and inflammation. To reduce these undesirable vasoactive properties, we increased hemoglobin (Hb) molecular size by genetic engineering with octameric Hb, recombinant (r) HbβG83C. We investigate the potential side effects of rHbβG83C on endothelial cells. The rHbβG83C has no impact on cell viability, and induces a huge repression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene transcription, a marker of vasomotion. No induction of Intermolecular-Adhesion Molecule 1 and E-selectin (inflammatory markers) transcription was seen. In the presence of rHbβG83C, the transcription of heme oxygenase-1 (oxidative stress marker) is weakly increased compared to the two other HBOCs (references) or Voluven (control). This genetically engineered octameric Hb, based on a human Hb βG83C mutant, leads to little impact at the level of endothelial cell inflammatory response and thus appears as an interesting molecule for HBOC development.

  11. Deficient Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Innervation in the Sweat Glands of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz-Erian, Peter; Dey, Richard D.; Flux, Marinus; Said, Sami I.

    1985-09-01

    The innervation of acini and ducts of eccrine sweat glands by immunoreactive, vasoactive intestinal peptide--containing nerve fibers was sharply reduced in seven patients with cystic fibrosis compared to eight normal subjects. The decrease in innervation by this neuropeptide, which has been shown to promote blood flow and the movement of water and chloride across epithelial surfaces in other systems, may be a basic mechanism for the decreased water content and relative impermeability of the epithelium to chloride and other ions that characterize cystic fibrosis.

  12. [Comparison of efficacy of different neurometabolic and vasoactive medicines in ischemic stroke patients's rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Galkin, A S; Koval'chuk, V V; Gusev, A O

    2011-01-01

    The aim of present investigation is research of influence of vasoactive and neurometabolic medicines in stroke patients's rehabilitation. We had analysed 280 stroke patients. The degree of rehabilitation had been defined with the help of Barthel and Lindmark scales. The degree of cognitive functions's rehabilitation had been defined with the help of MMSE scale. For every medicine coefficients of efficiency were calculated. As the result of the present investigation the medicine's efficiency was found out. The most efficient medicines in ischaemic stroke patients's rehabilitation among the investigated ones are the medicines which activate the neuronal metabolism, first of all,--ceraxon (citicoline).

  13. [Vascular endothelial Barrier Function].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium is an important regulator of selective permeability of the vascular wall for different molecules and cells. This review summarizes current data on endothelial barrier function. Endothelial glycocalyx structure, its function and role in the molecular transport and leukocytes migration across the endothelial barrier are discussed. The mechanisms of transcellular transport of macromolecules and cell migration through endothelial cells are reviewed. Special section of this article addresses the structure and function of tight and adherens endothelial junction, as well as their importance for the regulation of paracellular transport across the endothelial barrier. Particular attention is paid to the signaling mechanism of endothelial barrier function regulation and the factors that influence on the vascular permeability.

  14. [Need for rheologically active, vasoactive and metabolically active substances in the initial treatment of acute acoustic trauma].

    PubMed

    Pilgramm, M; Schumann, K

    1986-10-01

    Two rheologically active and 8 vasoactive and metabolically active substances were compared in eight independent studies, some of which were randomised and double blind, on 400 patients who had suffered acute acoustic trauma. The control group was given saline. Spontaneous recovery was excluded as far as possible. The following substances were tested: Dextran 40, hydroxyethyl starch 40/0.5, naftidrofurylhydrogenoxalate, Vinpocetin, betahistine, pentoxifylline, flunaricine, Regeneresen AU 4 and 0.9% saline. All groups showed superior results to the control group in both long-term and short-term tests with respect to hearing gain and tinnitis improvement. The rheologically effective substances showed no statistically significant variations. None of the vasoactive or metabolically active substances used as adjunctive therapy improved the results achieved with rheologically effective substances alone. These results demonstrate that acute acoustic trauma can be most effectively treated by rheologically active substances; vasoactive and metabolically active substances are unnecessary. Hyperbaric oxygenation is advantageous as an adjunctive therapy. PMID:2432041

  15. Diphenylarsinic acid increased the synthesis and release of neuroactive and vasoactive peptides in rat cerebellar astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Masaki; Matsunaga, Yuki; Hirano, Seishiro; Tashiro, Tomoko

    2012-06-01

    An incident of poisoning occurred in Japan in 2003 when high-level contamination with arsenic, mainly diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA), was found in well water. People using this water particularly experienced cerebellar symptoms. In the present study, we investigated the adverse effects of DPAA on the cerebellum in vitro and in vivo to understand the biological mechanisms that cause cerebellar symptoms. Comprehensive gene expression analyses in primary cultured ratcerebellar cells exposed to 10 μM DPAA for 24 hours indicated significant alterations in the mRNA expression of genes encoding antioxidative stress proteins (heme oxigenase 1 and heat shock protein72) and neuroactive and vasoactive peptides (neuropeptide Y, adrenomedullin, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and fibroblast growth factor 2). Further analyses of proteins revealed that cultured cerebellar astrocytes expressed these antioxidative stress proteins and peptides in response to exposure to DPAA. In addition, these adverseeffects were also observed in the cerebellum exposed in vivo to DPAA (100 mg/L) for 21 days. These results suggested that cerebellarastrocytes irregularly secrete neuroactive and vasoactive peptidesagainst DPAA-induced oxidative stress, which leads to abnormal neural functions and disrupted cerebellar autoregulation dynamics and results in the onset of cerebellar symptoms.

  16. Assessing Myogenic Response and Vasoactivity In Resistance Mesenteric Arteries Using Pressure Myography.

    PubMed

    Jadeja, Ravirajsinh N; Rachakonda, Vikrant; Bagi, Zsolt; Khurana, Sandeep

    2015-07-06

    Small resistance arteries constrict and dilate respectively in response to increased or decreased intraluminal pressure; this phenomenon known as myogenic response is a key regulator of local blood flow. In isobaric conditions small resistance arteries develop sustained constriction known as myogenic tone (MT), which is a major determinant of systemic vascular resistance (SVR). Hence, ex vivo pressurized preparations of small resistance arteries are major tools to study microvascular function in near-physiological states. To achieve this, a freshly isolated intact segment of a small resistance artery (diameter ~260 μm) is mounted onto two small glass cannulas and pressurized. These arterial preparations retain most in vivo characteristics and permit assessment of vascular tone in real-time. Here we provide a detailed protocol for assessing vasoactivity in pressurized small resistance mesenteric arteries from rats; these arteries develop sustained vasoconstriction - approximately 25% of maximal diameter - when pressurized at 70 mmHg. These arterial preparations may be used to study the effect of investigational compounds on relationship between intra-arterial pressure and vasoactivity and determine changes in microvascular function in animal models of various diseases.

  17. Robust linear parameter-varying control of blood pressure using vasoactive drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luspay, Tamas; Grigoriadis, Karolos

    2015-10-01

    Resuscitation of emergency care patients requires fast restoration of blood pressure to a target value to achieve hemodynamic stability and vital organ perfusion. A robust control design methodology is presented in this paper for regulating the blood pressure of hypotensive patients by means of the closed-loop administration of vasoactive drugs. To this end, a dynamic first-order delay model is utilised to describe the vasoactive drug response with varying parameters that represent intra-patient and inter-patient variability. The proposed framework consists of two components: first, an online model parameter estimation is carried out using a multiple-model extended Kalman-filter. Second, the estimated model parameters are used for continuously scheduling a robust linear parameter-varying (LPV) controller. The closed-loop behaviour is characterised by parameter-varying dynamic weights designed to regulate the mean arterial pressure to a target value. Experimental data of blood pressure response of anesthetised pigs to phenylephrine injection are used for validating the LPV blood pressure models. Simulation studies are provided to validate the online model estimation and the LPV blood pressure control using phenylephrine drug injection models representing patients showing sensitive, nominal and insensitive response to the drug.

  18. Calcitonin gene-related peptide stimulates proliferation of human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Haegerstrand, A.; Larsson, O. ); Dalsgaard, C.J. Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm ); Jonzon, B. ); Nilsson, J. )

    1990-05-01

    The effects of the vasoactive perivascular neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), neurokinin A (NKA), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) on proliferation of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were investigated. CGRP was shown to increase both cell number and DNA synthesis, whereas NKA, NPY, and VIP were ineffective. {sup 125}I-labeled CGRP was shown to bind to HUVECs and this binding was displaced by addition of unlabeled CGRP, suggesting the existence of specific CGRP receptors. The effect of CGRP on formation of adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and inositol phosphates (InsP), two intracellular messengers known to be involved in regulation of cell proliferation, was investigated. CGRP stimulated cAMP formation but was without effect on the formation of InsP. Proliferation, as well as cAMP formation, was also stimulated by cholera toxin. Basic fibroblast growth factor stimulated growth without affecting cAMP or InsP formation, whereas thrombin, which increased InsP formation, did not stimulate proliferation. The authors thus suggest that CGRP may act as a local factor stimulating proliferation of endothelial cells; that the mechanism of action is associated with cAMP formation; and that this effect of CGRP may be important for formation of new vessels during physicological and pathophysiological events such as ischemia, inflammation, and wound healing.

  19. Alpha toxin from Clostridium perfringens induces proinflammatory changes in endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bunting, M; Lorant, D E; Bryant, A E; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M; Stevens, D L; Prescott, S M

    1997-01-01

    Alpha toxin from Clostridium perfringens type A, a phospholipase C, has been implicated in many of the localized and systemic features of gas gangrene. We demonstrated that human endothelial cells synthesize two vasoactive lipids, platelet-activating factor (PAF) and prostacyclin, in response to alpha toxin treatment. The stimulated synthesis of PAF required the enzymatic activity of the toxin and subsequent protein kinase C activation. Alpha toxin-treated endothelial cells accumulated the products of the phospholipase C reaction, diacylglycerol and ceramide, and exhibited a decrease in the enzymatic precursors phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. Furthermore, the temporal accumulation of PAF depended on the concentration of the toxin in the overlying medium and was blocked in the presence of a neutralizing antibody. The cultured endothelial cells also exhibited enhanced neutrophil adhesion in response to alpha toxin which was mediated through the PAF receptor and P-selectin. P-selectin expression by endothelial cells and extravascular neutrophil accumulation were also observed in tissue sections from alpha toxin-injected Sprague-Dawley rats. These endothelial cell-mediated processes are important in maintaining vascular homeostasis and, when activated in a dysregulated manner by C. perfringens alpha toxin, may contribute to localized and systemic manifestations of gas gangrene including enhanced vascular permeability, localized neutrophil accumulation, and myocardial dysfunction. PMID:9239403

  20. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  1. Endothelial heterogeneity in the umbilico-placental unit: DNA methylation as an innuendo of epigenetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Casanello, Paola; Schneider, Daniela; Herrera, Emilio A.; Uauy, Ricardo; Krause, Bernardo J.

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium is a multifunctional heterogeneous tissue playing a key role in the physiology of every organ. To accomplish this role the endothelium presents a phenotypic diversity that is early prompted during vascular development, allowing it to cope with specific requirements in a time- and site-specific manner. During the last decade several reports show that endothelial diversity is also present in the umbilico-placental vasculature, with differences between macro- and microvascular vessels as well as arterial and venous endothelium. This diversity is evidenced in vitro as a higher angiogenic capacity in the microcirculation; or disparity in the levels of several molecules that control endothelial function (i.e., receptor for growth factors, vasoactive mediators, and adhesion molecules) which frequently are differentially expressed between arterial and venous endothelium. Emerging evidence suggests that endothelial diversity would be prominently driven by epigenetic mechanisms which also control the basal expression of endothelial-specific genes. This review outlines evidence for endothelial diversity since early stages of vascular development and how this heterogeneity is expressed in the umbilico-placental vasculature. Furthermore a brief picture of epigenetic mechanisms and their role on endothelial physiology emphasizing new data on umbilical and placental endothelial cells is presented. Unraveling the role of epigenetic mechanisms on long term endothelial physiology and its functional diversity would contribute to develop more accurate therapeutic interventions. Altogether these data show that micro- versus macro-vascular, or artery versus vein comparisons are an oversimplification of the complexity occurring in the endothelium at different levels, and the necessity for the future research to establish the precise source of cells which are under study. PMID:24723887

  2. Reproductive hormones, hepatic deiodinase messenger ribonucleic acid, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-immunoreactive cells in hypothalamus in the heat stress-induced or chemically induced hypothyroid laying hen.

    PubMed

    Elnagar, S A; Scheideler, S E; Beck, M M

    2010-09-01

    Heat stress (HS) effects on reproductive and thyroid hormones have been well documented; however, mechanisms of action are not well understood. Two studies were conducted to determine whether HS-induced and hypothyroid-induced effects are similar in the laying hen, with regard to reproductive hormones and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)-immunoreactive cells in the hypothalamus. In study 1, thirty 32-wk-old Hy-Line W-36 laying hens, housed at 22 degrees C, were cannulated. On d 0 and then on d 1 to 5 of HS (35 degrees C, 50% RH), a daily blood sample was obtained and assayed for triiodothyronine (T(3)), thyroxine (T(4)), 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), progesterone (P(4)), prolactin (PRL), and VIP, and T(3):T(4)was calculated. On d 0, 1, 3, and 5, livers were obtained for hepatic type I deiodinase mRNA (cDI-1) determination. In study 2, eighty 32-wk-old hens were randomly assigned to 4 treatments of 20 birds each: 1) HS (36.5 degrees C, 50% RH), 2) thiouracil-induced hypothyroidism (HY), 3) HY + T(4) administration, and 4) control (22 degrees C). Beginning on d 1 of the 5-d study, daily blood samples (3.0 mL) were removed and assayed as in study 1. On d 5, brains were removed from 3 hens/treatment and immunoreactivity of VIP cells was determined. In study 1, HS reduced E(2), P(4), T(3) (P = 0.0001), T(3):T(4) ratio (P = 0.0078), and hepatic type I deiodinase mRNA (P = 0.0204) and increased T(4) (P = 0.0013); there was no effect on VIP or PRL. In study 2, HS and HY reduced T(3), T(3):T(4) ratio, and E(2) (P = 0.0001) and increased PRL (P = 0.0045); HS alone decreased P(4) (P = 0.0001). In HY + T(4), plasma E(2) and PRL were similar to control. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide increased in plasma of HY birds, but there was no effect of HS or HY + T(4). Immunoreactive VIP cells increased (P = 0.0036) in nucleus inferior hypothalami of HS and HY brains. In HY + T(4), VIP immunoreactive cell numbers were similar to control. It appears that HY induced chemically or by

  3. Interaction of epidermal growth factor with vasoactive hormones in the regulation of phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Hack, N; Margolis, B; Schlessinger, J; Skorecki, K

    1991-01-01

    The interaction of growth factors with their receptors initiates a series of intracellular events that are of critical importance in the control of normal cell proliferation. In this regard considerable attention has focused on the coupling of phospholipase C-gamma to growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases. In contrast, the interaction of growth factors with phospholipase A2 has received less attention, most likely because the arachidonic acid release response has been considered to be an accompaniment of phospholipase C activation. Work from our laboratory using a well defined model system demonstrated a distinct coupling relationship of epidermal growth factor to phospholipase A2. This review focuses on the interaction of the epidermal growth factor receptor with phospholipases involved in both mitogenic and non-mitogenic responses and discusses their possible relation with vasoactive hormones.

  4. Vasoactivity and Vasoconstriction Changes in Cattle Related to Time off Toxic Endophyte-Infected Tall Fescue

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, James L.; Aiken, Glen E.; Bussard, Jessica R.; Foote, Andrew P.; Harmon, David L.; Goff, Ben M.; Schrick, F. Neal; Strickland, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that serotonergic and α-adrenergic receptors in peripheral vasculature are affected by exposure of cattle grazing toxic endophyte-infected (E+; Epichlöe coenophialia) tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum). The objective of this experiment was to determine the period of time necessary for the vascular effects of ergot alkaloids to subside. Two experiments were conducted to investigate changes in vascular contractile response and vasoconstriction over time relative to removal from an ergot alkaloid-containing E+ tall fescue pasture. In Experiment 1, lateral saphenous vein biopsies were conducted on 21 predominantly Angus steers (357 ± 3 kg body weight) at 0 (n = 6), 7 (n = 6), 14 (n = 5), or 28 days (n = 4) after removal from grazing pasture (3.0 ha; endpoint ergovaline + ergovalinine = 1.35 mg/kg DM) for 126 days. In Experiment 2, lateral saphenous veins were biopsied from 24 Angus-cross steers (361 ± 4 kg body weight) at 0, 21, 42, and 63 days (n = 6 per time point) following removal from grazing tall fescue pastures (3.0 ha; first 88 days endpoint ergovaline + ergovalinine = 0.15 mg/kg DM; last 18 days endpoint ergovaline + ergovalinine = 0.57 mg/kg DM) for 106 total days. Six steers (370 ± 18 kg body weight) off of bermudagrass pasture for the same time interval were also biopsied on Day 0 and Day 63 (n = 3 per time point). Additionally, in Experiment 2, cross-sectional ultrasound scans of caudal artery at the fourth coccygeal vertebra were taken on Days 0, 8, 15, 21, 29, 36, 42, and 45 to determine mean artery luminal area to evaluate vasoconstriction. In both experiments, steers were removed from pasture and housed in a dry lot and fed a corn silage diet for the duration of biopsies and ultrasound scans. Biopsied vessels used to evaluate vasoactivity were cleaned, incubated in a multimyograph, and exposed to increasing concentrations of 4-Bromo-3,6-dimethoxybenzocyclobuten-1-yl) methylamine hydrobromide (TCB2; 5HT2A agonist

  5. Vasoactivity and Vasoconstriction Changes in Cattle Related to Time off Toxic Endophyte-Infected Tall Fescue.

    PubMed

    Klotz, James L; Aiken, Glen E; Bussard, Jessica R; Foote, Andrew P; Harmon, David L; Goff, Ben M; Schrick, F Neal; Strickland, James R

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that serotonergic and α-adrenergic receptors in peripheral vasculature are affected by exposure of cattle grazing toxic endophyte-infected (E+; Epichlöe coenophialia) tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum). The objective of this experiment was to determine the period of time necessary for the vascular effects of ergot alkaloids to subside. Two experiments were conducted to investigate changes in vascular contractile response and vasoconstriction over time relative to removal from an ergot alkaloid-containing E+ tall fescue pasture. In Experiment 1, lateral saphenous vein biopsies were conducted on 21 predominantly Angus steers (357 ± 3 kg body weight) at 0 (n = 6), 7 (n = 6), 14 (n = 5), or 28 days (n = 4) after removal from grazing pasture (3.0 ha; endpoint ergovaline + ergovalinine = 1.35 mg/kg DM) for 126 days. In Experiment 2, lateral saphenous veins were biopsied from 24 Angus-cross steers (361 ± 4 kg body weight) at 0, 21, 42, and 63 days (n = 6 per time point) following removal from grazing tall fescue pastures (3.0 ha; first 88 days endpoint ergovaline + ergovalinine = 0.15 mg/kg DM; last 18 days endpoint ergovaline + ergovalinine = 0.57 mg/kg DM) for 106 total days. Six steers (370 ± 18 kg body weight) off of bermudagrass pasture for the same time interval were also biopsied on Day 0 and Day 63 (n = 3 per time point). Additionally, in Experiment 2, cross-sectional ultrasound scans of caudal artery at the fourth coccygeal vertebra were taken on Days 0, 8, 15, 21, 29, 36, 42, and 45 to determine mean artery luminal area to evaluate vasoconstriction. In both experiments, steers were removed from pasture and housed in a dry lot and fed a corn silage diet for the duration of biopsies and ultrasound scans. Biopsied vessels used to evaluate vasoactivity were cleaned, incubated in a multimyograph, and exposed to increasing concentrations of 4-Bromo-3,6-dimethoxybenzocyclobuten-1-yl) methylamine hydrobromide (TCB2; 5HT2A agonist

  6. Dopaminergic modulation of adenylate cyclase stimulation by vasoactive intestinal peptide in anterior pituitary.

    PubMed Central

    Onali, P; Schwartz, J P; Costa, E

    1981-01-01

    The activation of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was used as a model to investigate the molecular mechanisms triggered by the occupancy of dopamine recognition sites in rat anterior pituitary. Dopamine failed to change the basal enzyme activity, but it inhibited the stimulation of adenylate cyclase elicited by VIP. Apomorphine, 2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene, and 2-bromo-alpha-ergocryptine mimicked the effect of dopamine, whereas (-)-sulpiride and and classical neuroleptics antagonized it. Dopamine failed to modulate the activation of pituitary adenylate cyclase by prostaglandin E1, which does not increase prolactin secretion. From these results we infer that stimulation of D-2 (dopamine) receptors may affect pituitary secretion by inhibiting the activation of anterior pituitary adenylate cyclase by VIP or other secretagogues. PMID:6171819

  7. The effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide on adrenal steroid hormone secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-immunoreactive nerve fibers have been demonstrated in the rat adrenal cortex in close association with zona glomerulosa cells. We have studied the effects of VIP on steroid hormone secretion from the outer zones of the normal rat adrenal cortex. Intact capsule-glomerulosa preparations, consisting of the capsule, zona glomerulosa, and a small portion of the zona fasciculata were perifused in vitro. The secretory responsiveness was assessed by measuring aldosterone and corticosterone release following stimulation with the physiological secretagogues ACTH and angiotensin II. The distribution of adrenal VIP receptors was assessed by in vitro autoradiography of {sup 125}I-VIP binding. {sup 125}I-VIP (0.75 and 2.0 nM) binding was concentrated in the capsule and zone glomerulosa, coincident with the distribution of VIP nerve fibers which aborize extensively in this region. The specificity of this binding was demonstrated using unlabelled VIP, ACTH and angiotensin II.

  8. Vasoactive properties of CORM-3, a novel water-soluble carbon monoxide-releasing molecule.

    PubMed

    Foresti, Roberta; Hammad, Jehad; Clark, James E; Johnson, Tony R; Mann, Brian E; Friebe, Andreas; Green, Colin J; Motterlini, Roberto

    2004-06-01

    1 Carbon monoxide (CO), one of the end products of heme catabolism by heme oxygenase, possesses antihypertensive and vasodilatory characteristics. We have recently discovered that certain transition metal carbonyls are capable of releasing CO in biological fluids and modulate physiological functions via the delivery of CO. Because the initial compounds identified were not water soluble, we have synthesized new CO-releasing molecules that are chemically modified to allow solubility in water. The aim of this study was to assess the vasoactive properties of tricarbonylchloro(glycinato)ruthenium(II) (CORM-3) in vitro and in vivo. 2 CORM-3 produced a concentration-dependent relaxation in vessels precontracted with phenylephrine, exerting significant vasodilatation starting at concentrations of 25-50 microm. Inactive CORM-3, which does not release CO, did not affect vascular tone. 3 Blockers of ATP-dependent potassium channels (glibenclamide) or guanylate cyclase activity (ODQ) considerably reduced CORM-3-dependent relaxation, confirming that potassium channels activation and cGMP partly mediate the vasoactive properties of CO. In fact, increased levels of cGMP were detected in aortas following CORM-3 stimulation. 4 The in vitro and in vivo vasorelaxant activities of CORM-3 were further enhanced in the presence of YC-1, a benzylindazole derivative which is known to sensitize guanylate cyclase to activation by CO. Interestingly, inhibiting nitric oxide production or removing the endothelium significantly decreased vasodilatation by CORM-3, suggesting that factors produced by the endothelium influence CORM-3 vascular activities. 5 These results, together with our previous findings on the cardioprotective functions of CORM-3, indicate that this molecule is an excellent prototype of water-soluble CO carriers for studying the pharmacological and biological features of CO. PMID:15148243

  9. ACE2 and vasoactive peptides: novel players in cardiovascular/renal remodeling and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Torres, Evelyn; Oyarzún, Alejandra; Mondaca-Ruff, David; Azocar, Andrés; Castro, Pablo F; Jalil, Jorge E; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio; Ocaranza, María Paz

    2015-08-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a key component of cardiovascular physiology and homeostasis due to its influence on the regulation of electrolyte balance, blood pressure, vascular tone and cardiovascular remodeling. Deregulation of this system contributes significantly to the pathophysiology of cardiovascular and renal diseases. Numerous studies have generated new perspectives about a noncanonical and protective RAS pathway that counteracts the proliferative and hypertensive effects of the classical angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin (Ang) II/angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) axis. The key components of this pathway are ACE2 and its products, Ang-(1-7) and Ang-(1-9). These two vasoactive peptides act through the Mas receptor (MasR) and AT2R, respectively. The ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/MasR and ACE2/Ang-(1-9)/AT2R axes have opposite effects to those of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis, such as decreased proliferation and cardiovascular remodeling, increased production of nitric oxide and vasodilation. A novel peptide from the noncanonical pathway, alamandine, was recently identified in rats, mice and humans. This heptapeptide is generated by catalytic action of ACE2 on Ang A or through a decarboxylation reaction on Ang-(1-7). Alamandine produces the same effects as Ang-(1-7), such as vasodilation and prevention of fibrosis, by interacting with Mas-related GPCR, member D (MrgD). In this article, we review the key roles of ACE2 and the vasoactive peptides Ang-(1-7), Ang-(1-9) and alamandine as counter-regulators of the ACE-Ang II axis as well as the biological properties that allow them to regulate blood pressure and cardiovascular and renal remodeling.

  10. Genetic, Immune, and Vasoactive Factors in the Vascular Dysfunction Associated with Hypertension in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Sajjadh M. J.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Preeclampsia (PE) is a major complication of pregnancy that could lead to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiological mechanisms of PE are not completely understood, but recent research has begun to unravel some of the potential mechanisms. Areas covered Genetic polymorphisms and altered maternal immune response may cause impaired remodeling of the spiral arteries; a potential early defect in PE. Inadequate invasion of cytotrophoblasts into the decidua leads to reduced uteroplacental perfusion pressure (RUPP) and placental ischemia/hypoxia. Placental ischemia causes the release of biologically active factors such as anti-angiogenic factors, inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species, hypoxia-inducible factors, and angiotensin II receptor autoantibodies. These vasoactive factors could cause systemic vascular endotheliosis and consequent increase in vascular resistance and blood pressure, glomerular endotheliosis causing proteinuria, cerebrovascular endotheliosis causing cerebral edema, seizures and visual disturbances, and hepatic endotheliosis which may contribute to the manifestations of HELLP syndrome. PE-associated vascular endotheliosis causes a decrease in vasodilator mediators such as nitric oxide, prostacyclin and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, an increase in vasoconstrictors such as endothelin-1, angiotensin II and thromboxane A2, and enhanced mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle contraction such as intracellular Ca2+, protein kinase C and Rho-kinase. Changes in matrix metalloproteinase activity and extracellular matrix cause vascular remodeling and further vasoconstriction. Expert opinion Some of the genetic, immune and vasoactive factors involved in vascular endotheliosis could be used as biomarkers for early detection, and as potential targets for prevention and treatment of PE. PMID:26294111

  11. Molecular adaptations in vasoactive systems during acute stroke in salt-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Nicole M; Peterson, Nichole T; Tse, M Yat; Andrew, R David; Pang, Stephen C; Jin, Albert Y

    2015-01-01

    Investigations regarding hypertension and dietary sodium, both factors that influence stroke risk, have previously been limited to using genetically disparate treatment and control groups, namely the stroke-prone, spontaneously hypertensive rat and Wistar-Kyoto rat. In this investigation, we have characterized and compared cerebral vasoactive system adaptations following stroke in genetically identical, salt-induced hypertensive, and normotensive control mice. Briefly, ANP(+/-) (C57BJ/6 × SV129 background) mice were fed chow containing either 0.8% NaCl (NS) or 8.0% NaCl (HS) for 7 weeks. Transient cerebral ischemia was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Infarct volumes were measured 24-h post-reperfusion and the mRNA expression of five major vasoactive systems was characterized using qPCR. Along with previous publications, our data validate a salt-induced hypertensive state in ANP(+/-) mice fed HS chow as they displayed left ventricular hypertrophy, increased systolic blood pressure, and increased urinary sodium excretion. Following MCAO, mice fed HS exhibited larger infarct volumes than their dietary counterparts. In addition, significant up-regulation in Et-1 and Nos3 mRNA expression in response to salt and stroke suggests implications with increased cerebral damage in this group. In conclusion, our data demonstrate increased cerebral susceptibility to stroke in salt-induced hypertensive mice. More importantly, however, we have characterized a novel method of investigating hypertension and stroke with the use of genetically identical treatment and control groups. This is the first investigation in which genetic confounding variables have been eliminated. PMID:25391363

  12. Vasoactive Inotrope Score as a tool for clinical care in children post cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Maneesh; Sharma, Rajesh; Sethi, Sidharth Kumar; Bazaz, Subeeta; Sharma, Prerna; Bhan, Anil; Kher, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Background: Neonates and infants undergoing heart surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) are at high risk for significant post-operative morbidity and mortality. Hence, there is a need to identify and quantify clinical factors during the early post-operative period that are indicative of short-term as well as long-term outcomes. Multiple inotrope scores have been used in practice to quantify the amount of cardiovascular support received by neonates. Aims: The goal of this study was to determine the association between inotropic/vasoactive support and clinical outcomes in children after open cardiac surgery. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of the 208 patients who underwent cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease at a tertiary pediatric cardiac surgery Intensive Care Unit (ICU) from January 2012 to March 2013. Multiple demographic, intra-operative and post-operative variables were recorded, including the Vasoactive Inotrope Score (VIS). Results: A total of 208 patients underwent cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease in the study period. The mean age and weight in the study were 66.94 months and 16.31 kg, respectively. Statistically significant associations were found in the various variables and VIS, including infancy, weight < 10 kg, CPB time, pump failure and post-operative variables like sepsis, hematological complications, hepatic dysfunction, acute kidney injury during admission, mortality, prolonged ventilator requirement, CPB time (in min) and hospital stay. Conclusions: Inotrope score and its adaptations are an excellent tool to measure illness severity, deciding interventions and during parental counseling in the pediatric cardiac surgery ICUs. PMID:25316975

  13. ACE2 and vasoactive peptides: novel players in cardiovascular/renal remodeling and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Torres, Evelyn; Oyarzún, Alejandra; Mondaca-Ruff, David; Azocar, Andrés; Castro, Pablo F; Jalil, Jorge E; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio; Ocaranza, María Paz

    2015-08-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is a key component of cardiovascular physiology and homeostasis due to its influence on the regulation of electrolyte balance, blood pressure, vascular tone and cardiovascular remodeling. Deregulation of this system contributes significantly to the pathophysiology of cardiovascular and renal diseases. Numerous studies have generated new perspectives about a noncanonical and protective RAS pathway that counteracts the proliferative and hypertensive effects of the classical angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin (Ang) II/angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) axis. The key components of this pathway are ACE2 and its products, Ang-(1-7) and Ang-(1-9). These two vasoactive peptides act through the Mas receptor (MasR) and AT2R, respectively. The ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/MasR and ACE2/Ang-(1-9)/AT2R axes have opposite effects to those of the ACE/Ang II/AT1R axis, such as decreased proliferation and cardiovascular remodeling, increased production of nitric oxide and vasodilation. A novel peptide from the noncanonical pathway, alamandine, was recently identified in rats, mice and humans. This heptapeptide is generated by catalytic action of ACE2 on Ang A or through a decarboxylation reaction on Ang-(1-7). Alamandine produces the same effects as Ang-(1-7), such as vasodilation and prevention of fibrosis, by interacting with Mas-related GPCR, member D (MrgD). In this article, we review the key roles of ACE2 and the vasoactive peptides Ang-(1-7), Ang-(1-9) and alamandine as counter-regulators of the ACE-Ang II axis as well as the biological properties that allow them to regulate blood pressure and cardiovascular and renal remodeling. PMID:26275770

  14. Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide (eNOS) Occurs through Different Membrane Domains in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Tran, Jason; Magenau, Astrid; Rodriguez, Macarena; Rentero, Carles; Royo, Teresa; Enrich, Carlos; Thomas, Shane R; Grewal, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to a large range of stimuli including circulating lipoproteins, growth factors and changes in haemodynamic mechanical forces to regulate the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and maintain blood pressure. While many signalling pathways have been mapped, the identities of membrane domains through which these signals are transmitted are less well characterized. Here, we manipulated bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) with cholesterol and the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC). Using a range of microscopy techniques including confocal, 2-photon, super-resolution and electron microscopy, we found that sterol enrichment had differential effects on eNOS and caveolin-1 (Cav1) colocalisation, membrane order of the plasma membrane, caveolae numbers and Cav1 clustering. We found a correlation between cholesterol-induced condensation of the plasma membrane and enhanced high density lipoprotein (HDL)-induced eNOS activity and phosphorylation suggesting that cholesterol domains, but not individual caveolae, mediate HDL stimulation of eNOS. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced and shear stress-induced eNOS activity was relatively independent of membrane order and may be predominantly controlled by the number of caveolae on the cell surface. Taken together, our data suggest that signals that activate and phosphorylate eNOS are transmitted through distinct membrane domains in endothelial cells.

  15. Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide (eNOS) Occurs through Different Membrane Domains in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Tran, Jason; Magenau, Astrid; Rodriguez, Macarena; Rentero, Carles; Royo, Teresa; Enrich, Carlos; Thomas, Shane R; Grewal, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to a large range of stimuli including circulating lipoproteins, growth factors and changes in haemodynamic mechanical forces to regulate the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and maintain blood pressure. While many signalling pathways have been mapped, the identities of membrane domains through which these signals are transmitted are less well characterized. Here, we manipulated bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) with cholesterol and the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC). Using a range of microscopy techniques including confocal, 2-photon, super-resolution and electron microscopy, we found that sterol enrichment had differential effects on eNOS and caveolin-1 (Cav1) colocalisation, membrane order of the plasma membrane, caveolae numbers and Cav1 clustering. We found a correlation between cholesterol-induced condensation of the plasma membrane and enhanced high density lipoprotein (HDL)-induced eNOS activity and phosphorylation suggesting that cholesterol domains, but not individual caveolae, mediate HDL stimulation of eNOS. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced and shear stress-induced eNOS activity was relatively independent of membrane order and may be predominantly controlled by the number of caveolae on the cell surface. Taken together, our data suggest that signals that activate and phosphorylate eNOS are transmitted through distinct membrane domains in endothelial cells. PMID:26977592

  16. Statins attenuate the development of atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction induced by exposure to urban particulate matter (PM{sub 10})

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Ryohei; Hiraiwa, Kunihiko; Cheng, Jui Chih; Bai, Ni; Vincent, Renaud; Francis, Gordon A.; Sin, Don D.; Van Eeden, Stephan F.

    2013-10-01

    Exposure to ambient air particulate matter (particles less than 10 μm or PM{sub 10}) has been shown to be an independent risk factor for the development and progression of atherosclerosis. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) have well-established anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of statins on the adverse functional and morphological changes in blood vessels induced by PM{sub 10}. New Zealand White rabbits fed with a high fat diet were subjected to balloon injury to their abdominal aorta followed by PM{sub 10}/saline exposure for 4 weeks ± lovastatin (5 mg/kg/day) treatment. PM{sub 10} exposure accelerated balloon catheter induced plaque formation and increased intimal macrophages and lipid accumulation while lovastatin attenuated these changes and promoted smooth muscle cell recruitment into plaques. PM{sub 10} impaired vascular acetylcholine (Ach) responses and increased vasoconstriction induced by phenylephrine as assessed by wire myograph. Supplementation of nitric oxide improved the impaired Ach responses. PM{sub 10} increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in blood vessels and increased the plasma levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1). Incubation with specific inhibitors for iNOS, COX-2 or ET-1 in the myograph chambers significantly improved the impaired vascular function. Lovastatin decreased the expression of these mediators in atherosclerotic lesions and improved endothelial dysfunction. However, lovastatin was unable to reduce blood lipid levels to the baseline level in rabbits exposed to PM{sub 10}. Taken together, statins protect against PM{sub 10}-induced cardiovascular disease by reducing atherosclerosis and improving endothelial function via their anti-inflammatory properties. - Highlights: • Coarse particulate matter (PM{sub 10}) accelerated balloon injury-induced plaque formation. • Lovastatin decreased intimal

  17. Increased plasma levels of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 1 (sFlt-1) in women by moderate exercise and increased plasma levels of VEGF in overweight/obese women

    PubMed Central

    Makey, Kristina L.; Patterson, Sharla G.; Robinson, James; Loftin, Mark; Waddell, Dwight E.; Miele, Lucio; Chinchar, Edmund; Huang, Min; Smith, Andrew D.; Weber, Mark; Gu, Jian-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer is increasing worldwide, and this seems to be related to an increase in lifestyle risk factors, including physical inactivity, and overweight/obesity. We previously reported that exercise induced a circulating angiostatic phenotype characterized by increased sFlt-1 and endostatin and decreased unbound-VEGF in men. However, there is no data on women. The present study determines the following: 1) whether moderate exercise increased sFlt-1 and endostatin and decreased unbound-VEGF in the circulation of adult female volunteers; 2) whether overweight/obese women have a higher plasma level of unbound-VEGF than lean women. 72 African American and Caucasian adult women volunteers aged from 18–44 were enrolled into the exercise study. All the participants walked on a treadmill for 30 minutes at a moderate intensity (55–59% heart rate reserve), and oxygen consumption (VO2) was quantified by utilizing a metabolic cart. We had the blood samples before and immediately after exercise from 63 participants. ELISA assays (R&D Systems) showed that plasma levels of sFlt-1 were 67.8±3.7 pg/ml immediately after exercise (30 minutes), significantly higher than basal levels, 54.5±3.3 pg/ml, before exercise (P < 0.01; n=63). There was no significant difference in the % increase of sFlt-1 levels after exercise between African American and Caucasian (P=0.533) or between lean and overweight/obese women (P=0.892). There was no significant difference in plasma levels of unbound VEGF (35.28±5.47 vs. 35.23±4.96 pg/ml; P=0.99) or endostatin (111.12±5.48 vs. 115.45±7.15 ng/ml; P=0.63) before and after exercise. Basal plasma levels of unbound-VEGF in overweight/obese women were 52.26±9.6 pg/ml, significantly higher than basal levels of unbound-VEGF in lean women, 27.34±4.99 pg/ml (P < 0.05). The results support our hypothesis that exercise-induced plasma levels of sFlt-1 could be an important clinical biomarker to explore the mechanisms of exercise

  18. Protective effects of vascular endothelial growth factor in cultured brain endothelial cells against hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Deng, Jiangshan; Yu, Xiaoyan; Li, Dawei; Shi, Hong; Zhao, Yuwu

    2015-08-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common and serious problem among patients with type 1 diabetes receiving treatment with insulin. Clinical studies have demonstrated that hypoglycemic edema is involved in the initiation of hypoglycemic brain damage. However, the mechanisms of this edema are poorly understood. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potent regulator of blood vessel function, has been observed an important candidate hormone induced by hypoglycemia to protect neurons by restoring plasma glucose. Whether VEGF has a protective effect against hypoglycemia-induced damage in brain endothelial cells is still unknown. To investigate the effects of hypoglycemia on cerebral microvascular endothelial cells and assess the protective effect of exogenous VEGF on endothelial cells during hypoglycemia, confluent monolayers of the brain endothelial cell line bEnd.3 were treated with normal (5.5 mM glucose), hypoglycemic (0, 0.5, 1 mM glucose) medium or hypoglycemic medium in the presence of VEGF. The results clearly showed that hypoglycemia significantly downregulated the expression of claudin-5 in bEnd.3 cells, without affecting ZO-1 and occludin expression and distribution. Besides, transendothelial permeability significantly increased under hypoglycemic conditions compared to that under control conditions. Moreover, the hypoglycemic medium in presence of VEGF decreased endothelial permeability via the inhibition of claudin-5 degradation and improved hypoglycemia-induced cell toxicity. Furthermore, Glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) and apoptosis regulator Bcl-2 expression were significantly upregulated. Taken together, hypoglycemia can significantly increase paraendocellular permeability by downregulating claudin-5 expression. We further showed that VEGF protected brain endothelial cells against hypoglycemia by enhancing glucose passage, reducing endothelial cell death, and ameliorating paraendocellular permeability.

  19. Endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction in disease: albuminuria and increased microvascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Andrew H J; Satchell, Simon C

    2012-03-01

    Appreciation of the glomerular microcirculation as a specialized microcirculatory bed, rather than as an entirely separate entity, affords important insights into both glomerular and systemic microvascular pathophysiology. In this review we compare regulation of permeability in systemic and glomerular microcirculations, focusing particularly on the role of the endothelial glycocalyx, and consider the implications for disease processes. The luminal surface of vascular endothelium throughout the body is covered with endothelial glycocalyx, comprising surface-anchored proteoglycans, supplemented with adsorbed soluble proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans and plasma constituents. In both continuous and fenestrated microvessels, this endothelial glycocalyx provides resistance to the transcapillary escape of water and macromolecules, acting as an integral component of the multilayered barrier provided by the walls of these microvessels (ie acting in concert with clefts or fenestrae across endothelial cell layers, basement membranes and pericytes). Dysfunction of any of these capillary wall components, including the endothelial glycocalyx, can disrupt normal microvascular permeability. Because of its ubiquitous nature, damage to the endothelial glycocalyx alters the permeability of multiple capillary beds: in the glomerulus this is clinically apparent as albuminuria. Generalized damage to the endothelial glycocalyx can therefore manifest as both albuminuria and increased systemic microvascular permeability. This triad of altered endothelial glycocalyx, albuminuria and increased systemic microvascular permeability occurs in a number of important diseases, such as diabetes, with accumulating evidence for a similar phenomenon in ischaemia-reperfusion injury and infectious disease. The detection of albuminuria therefore has implications for the function of the microcirculation as a whole. The importance of the endothelial glycocalyx for other aspects of vascular function

  20. Cytokine release and endothelial dysfunction: a perfect storm in orbivirus pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Howerth, Elizabeth W

    2015-01-01

    Although bluetongue viruses (BTV) and epizootic haemorrhagic disease viruses (EHDV) are closely related, there are differences in susceptibility to these viruses both between and within a species. White‑tailed deer are susceptible to disease by both BTV and EHDV, sheep are susceptible to BTV, but resistant to EHDV, and cattle can be infected with both viruses but disease is usually subclinical. Host genetics probably play a role in the disease outcome, but cytokine and endothelial responses are likely to determine if subclinical or clinical disease develops. Dendritic macrophages deliver virus to lymph nodes following the bite of an infected Culicoides. The virus then disseminates to many organs replicating in mononuclear phagocytes and endothelium. Initially, an interferon‑1 response probably determines if the disease develops. Replication in mononuclear cells and endothelium results in the release of cytokines and vasoactive mediators, and may result in endothelial cell death leading to the clinical features of fever, hyperaemia, exudation of fluid, and haemorrhage. Disease outcome may also be linked to virus binding Toll‑like receptor‑3 and upregulation of endothelial surface receptors potentiating cytokine release and allowing transmigration of inflammatory cells, respectively. Despite a wealth of information, host genetics involved in resistance to BTV and EHDV and how variations in cytokines and endothelial responses determine clinical outcome still need further elucidation. PMID:26741244

  1. HDL and endothelial protection

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Dinh, A; Diallo, D; Delbosc, S; Varela-Perez, L Maria; Dang, QB; Lapergue, B; Burillo, E; Michel, JB; Levoye, A; Martin-Ventura, JL; Meilhac, O

    2013-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) represent a family of particles characterized by the presence of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and by their ability to transport cholesterol from peripheral tissues back to the liver. In addition to this function, HDLs display pleiotropic effects including antioxidant, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic or anti-proteolytic properties that account for their protective action on endothelial cells. Vasodilatation via production of nitric oxide is also a hallmark of HDL action on endothelial cells. Endothelial cells express receptors for apoA-I and HDLs that mediate intracellular signalling and potentially participate in the internalization of these particles. In this review, we will detail the different effects of HDLs on the endothelium in normal and pathological conditions with a particular focus on the potential use of HDL therapy to restore endothelial function and integrity. PMID:23488589

  2. Vasoactivity of the gasotransmitters hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide in the chicken ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    van der Sterren, Saskia; Kleikers, Pamela; Zimmermann, Luc J I; Villamor, Eduardo

    2011-10-01

    Besides nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a third gaseous messenger that may play a role in controlling vascular tone and has been proposed to serve as an O(2) sensor. However, whether H(2)S is vasoactive in the ductus arteriosus (DA) has not yet been studied. We investigated, using wire myography, the mechanical responses induced by Na(2)S (1 μM-1 mM), which forms H(2)S and HS(-) in solution, and by authentic CO (0.1 μM-0.1 mM) in DA rings from 19-day chicken embryos. Na(2)S elicited a 100% relaxation (pD(2) 4.02) of 21% O(2)-contracted and a 50.3% relaxation of 62.5 mM KCl-contracted DA rings. Na(2)S-induced relaxation was not affected by presence of the NO synthase inhibitor l-NAME, the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) inhibitor ODQ, or the K(+) channel inhibitors tetraethylammonium (TEA; nonselective), 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, K(V)), glibenclamide (K(ATP)), iberiotoxin (BK(Ca)), TRAM-34 (IK(Ca)), and apamin (SK(Ca)). CO also relaxed O(2)-contracted (60.8% relaxation) and KCl-contracted (18.6% relaxation) DA rings. CO-induced relaxation was impaired by ODQ, TEA, and 4-AP (but not by L-NAME, glibenclamide, iberiotoxin, TRAM-34 or apamin), suggesting the involvement of sGC and K(V) channel stimulation. The presence of inhibitors of H(2)S or CO synthesis as well as the H(2)S precursor L-cysteine or the CO precursor hemin did not significantly affect the response of the DA to changes in O(2) tension. Endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxations were also unaffected. In conclusion, our results indicate that the gasotransmitters H(2)S and CO are vasoactive in the chicken DA but they do not suggest an important role for endogenous H(2)S or CO in the control of chicken ductal reactivity.

  3. Distribution of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-like immunoreactivity in the olfactory bulb of the rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri).

    PubMed

    Alonso, J R; Coveñas, R; Lara, J; de León, M; Aijón, J

    1989-06-26

    The distribution of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-like structures in the olfactory bulb of the rainbow trout was studied using an indirect-immunoperoxidase technique. Olfactory fibres were very strongly labelled, whereas the fibres or cell bodies in the remaining strata of the olfactory bulb showed no immunoreactivity. In addition, the olfactory nerve fibres were not immunoreactive for methionine- and leucine-enkephalins, motilin, neuropeptide Y, substance P, cholecystokinin-8 and tyrosine-hydroxylase.

  4. Endothelial lipase is a major determinant of HDL level

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Tatsuro; Choi, Sungshin; Kundu, Ramendra K.; Hirata, Ken-Ichi; Rubin, Edward M.; Cooper, Allen D.; Quertermous, Thomas

    2003-01-30

    For the past three decades, epidemiologic studies have consistently demonstrated an inverse relationship between plasma HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and coronary heart disease (CHD). Population-based studies have provided compelling evidence that low HDL-C levels are a risk factor for CHD, and several clinical interventions that increased plasma levels of HDL-C were associated with a reduction in CHD risk. These findings have stimulated extensive investigation into the determinants of plasma HDL-C levels. Turnover studies using radiolabeled apolipoprotein A-I, the major protein component of HDL, suggest that plasma HDL-C concentrations are highly correlated with the rate of clearance of apolipoprotein AI. However, the metabolic mechanisms by which HDL are catabolized have not been fully defined. Previous studies in humans with genetic deficiency of cholesteryl ester transfer protein, and in mice lacking the scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), have demonstrated that these proteins participate in the removal of cholesterol from HDL, while observations in individuals with mutations in hepatic lipase indicate that this enzyme hydrolyzes HDL triglycerides. In this issue of the JCI, reports from laboratories of Tom Quertermous and Dan Rader now indicate that endothelial lipase (LIPG), a newly identified member of the lipase family, catalyzes the hydrolysis of HDL phospholipids and facilitates the clearance of HDL from the circulation. Endothelial lipase was initially cloned by both of these laboratories using entirely different strategies. Quertermous and his colleagues identified endothelial lipase as a transcript that was upregulated in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells undergoing tube formation, whereas the Rader group cloned endothelial lipase as a transcript that was upregulated in the human macrophage-like cell line THP-1 exposed to oxidized LDL. Database searches revealed that endothelial lipase shows strong sequence similarity to lipoprotein

  5. Effects of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors, atorvastatin and simvastatin, on the expression of endothelin-1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Perera, O; Pérez-Sala, D; Navarro-Antolín, J; Sánchez-Pascuala, R; Hernández, G; Díaz, C; Lamas, S

    1998-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction associated with atherosclerosis has been attributed to alterations in the L-arginine-nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway or to an excess of endothelin-1 (ET-1). The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) have been shown to ameliorate endothelial function. However, the physiological basis of this observation is largely unknown. We investigated the effects of Atorvastatin and Simvastatin on the pre-proET-1 mRNA expression and ET-1 synthesis and on the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) transcript and protein levels in bovine aortic endothelial cells. These agents inhibited pre-proET-1 mRNA expression in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion (60-70% maximum inhibition) and reduced immunoreactive ET-1 levels (25-50%). This inhibitory effect was maintained in the presence of oxidized LDL (1-50 microg/ml). No significant modification of pre-proET-1 mRNA half-life was observed. In addition, mevalonate, but not cholesterol, reversed the statin-mediated decrease of pre-proET-1 mRNA levels. eNOS mRNA expression was reduced by oxidized LDL in a dose-dependent fashion (up to 57% inhibition), whereas native LDL had no effect. Statins were able to prevent the inhibitory action exerted by oxidized LDL on eNOS mRNA and protein levels. Hence, these drugs might influence vascular tone by modulating the expression of endothelial vasoactive factors. PMID:9637705

  6. Extended acclimatization is required to eliminate stress effects of periodic blood-sampling procedures on vasoactive hormones and blood volume in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, M R; Birmingham, J M; Patel, B; Whelan, G A; Krebs-Brown, A J; Hockings, P D; Osborne, J A

    2002-10-01

    Important in all experimental animal studies is the need to control stress stimuli associated with environmental change and experimental procedures. As the stress response involves alterations in levels of vasoactive hormones, ensuing changes in cardiovascular parameters may confound experimental outcomes. Accordingly, we evaluated the duration required for dogs (n = 4) to acclimatized to frequent blood sampling that involved different procedures. On each sampling occasion during a 6-week period, dogs were removed from their pen to a laboratory area and blood was collected either by venepuncture (days 2, 15, 34, 41) for plasma renin activity (PRA), epinephrine (EPI), norepinephrine, aldosterone, insulin, and atrial natriuretic peptide, or by cannulation (dogs restrained in slings; days 1, 8, 14, 22, 30, 33, 37, 40) for determination of haematocrit (HCT) alone (days 1 to 22) or HCT with plasma volume (PV; days 30 to 40). PRA was higher on days 2 and 15 compared with days 34 and 41 and had decreased by up to 48% by the end of the study (day 41 vs day 15; mean/SEM: 1.18/0.27 vs 2.88/0.79 ng ANG I/ml/h, respectively). EPI showed a time-related decrease from days 2 to 34, during which mean values had decreased by 51% (mean/SEM: 279/29 vs 134/20.9 pg/ml for days 2 and 34, respectively), but appeared stable from then on. None of the other hormones showed any significant variability throughout the course of the study. HCT was relatively variable between days 1 to 22 but stabilized from day 30, after which all mean values were approximately 6% lower than those between days 1 and 8. We conclude that an acclimatization period of at least 4 weeks is required to eliminate stress-related effects in dogs associated with periodic blood sampling. PMID:12396283

  7. Disrupted reproduction, estrous cycle, and circadian rhythms in female mice deficient in vasoactive intestinal peptide.

    PubMed

    Loh, D H; Kuljis, D A; Azuma, L; Wu, Y; Truong, D; Wang, H B; Colwell, C S

    2014-10-01

    The female reproductive cycle is gated by the circadian timing system and may be vulnerable to disruptions in the circadian system. Prior work suggests that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-expressing neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are one pathway by which the circadian clock can influence the estrous cycle, but the impact of the loss of this peptide on reproduction has not been assessed. In the present study, we first examine the impact of the genetic loss of the neuropeptide VIP on the reproductive success of female mice. Significantly, mutant females produce about half the offspring of their wild-type sisters even when mated to the same males. We also find that VIP-deficient females exhibit a disrupted estrous cycle; that is, ovulation occurs less frequently and results in the release of fewer oocytes compared with controls. Circadian rhythms of wheel-running activity are disrupted in the female mutant mice, as is the spontaneous electrical activity of dorsal SCN neurons. On a molecular level, the VIP-deficient SCN tissue exhibits lower amplitude oscillations with altered phase relationships between the SCN and peripheral oscillators as measured by PER2-driven bioluminescence. The simplest explanation of our data is that the loss of VIP results in a weakened SCN oscillator, which reduces the synchronization of the female circadian system. These results clarify one of the mechanisms by which disruption of the circadian system reduces female reproductive success.

  8. Prednison provokes serum and vasoactive substances in a mice model of immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Chen, Ke; Li, Tiantian; He, Hao; Hou, Li; Wu, Xiaoyong; Sun, Yanping; Zheng, Lei; Chen, Zhixiong; Qin, Bei; Chen, Xinyi; Tian, Shaodan

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The main objective of this study was to investigate the variations of β-endorphin (β-EP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) mice as well as the regulatory mechanism of prednison. Materials and Methods: Sixty BALB/c mice were randomly divided into control group, model group and prednison intervention group. ITP mice model was duplicated by injecting with glycoprotein-antiplatelet serum (GP-APS) except in control group. After ITP disease model was successful established, prednison was used in prednison intervention group. The β-EP, VIP, 5-HT and NE contents of ITP mice were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: Compared with the values in control group, the detection values of VIP and 5-HT in model group declined, while the detection values of β-EP and NE increased. Compared with prednison intervention group, the detection values of VIP and 5-HT in model group increased, while the detection values of β-EP and NE showed no significant change. Conclusion: In this study, the β-EP, VIP, 5-HT and NE contents in ITP mice injected with GP-APS were changed by prednison. It shows that prednison as the first-line therapy for ITP with effective hemostasis function is likely to increasing the contents of VIP and 5-HT. These results suggest the therapeutic value of prednison for the treatment of ITP. PMID:27803789

  9. Characterization of vasoactive intestinal peptide pituitary membrane receptors in turkey hens during different stages of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Rozenboim, I; el Halawani, M E

    1993-05-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a prolactin-releasing factor in turkey hens. Membranes from anterior pituitaries of turkey hens were used to characterize VIP receptors. Using HPLC-purified monoiodinated VIP, we found specific VIP receptors in the anterior pituitary glands. Binding was saturable and was time- and temperature-dependent. Scatchard analysis of competitive binding studies indicated two binding sites, a high-affinity binding site (Kd1) of 6.6 +/- 1.8 pM and maximum binding (Bmax1) of 1.52 +/- 0.2 pM, and a low-affinity binding site (Kd2) of 542 +/- 200 pM and Bmax2 of 15.8 +/- 8.0 pM. Binding of VIp to pituitary membranes was specific, as compared to other peptides of the glucagon family. The rank order of potency of the peptides tested was chicken VIP > porcine VIP > peptide histidine isoleucine > secretin > glucagon > growth hormone-releasing factor. Two binding sites were found in all the examined reproductive stages. The lowest binding site levels were found in nonphotostimulated and photorefractory birds, followed by photostimulated birds and layers; highest levels were found in incubating birds. Nest deprivation significantly reduced Bmax1 levels without changing hypothalamic VIP content. These results suggest the involvement of the anterior pituitary VIP receptors in the regulation of prolactin secretion from the pituitary gland.

  10. The regional distribution of receptors for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Staun-Olsen, P; Ottesen, B; Gammeltoft, S; Fahrenkrug, J

    1985-03-25

    The regional distribution of receptors for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) was studied in the rat central nervous system (CNS). The specific binding was highest in cerebral cortex, limbic forebrain and cerebellum, whereas moderate to low binding was found in hypothalamus, thalamus, brainstem and pituitary. The lowest binding was observed in pons and spinal cord. Scatchard analysis showed curvilinear plots with upward concavity, which was interpreted as two classes of binding sites. The Kd values were similar in all regions and calculated as 2.4 and 62 nmol/liter, respectively. The variations of specific [125I]VIP binding were due to differences in the total amount of receptors and were in the range of 1.7-8.6 pmol per mg protein. The regional distribution of VIP receptors was parallel with the occurrence of VIP-containing nerve terminals with exceptions of cerebellum, olfactory areas and nucleus caudatus, where a greater number of receptors than expected from the VIP content was found. In these regions, VIP may interact with receptors for a different, but homologous neuropeptide. In conclusion, the regional distribution of VIP receptors in CNS gives further evidence for the role of VIP as a central neurotransmitter.

  11. Endothelin-2/vasoactive intestinal contractor via ROCK regulates transglutaminase 1 on differentiation of mouse keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kotake-Nara, Eiichi; Takizawa, Satoshi; Saida, Kaname

    2007-05-25

    We previously found that endothelin-2/vasoactive intestinal contractor (ET-2/VIC) greatly increased in mouse epidermis after birth. In the present study, we evaluated whether ET-2/VIC expression was associated with the calcium-induced differentiation of cultured mouse keratinocytes. The differentiation induction was revealed by morphological change, cornified envelope (CE) formation, and involucrin and transglutaminase 1 (TG 1) expressions. ET-2/VIC gene expression and peptide production subsequently increased in the induction of the differentiation. We also found that Y-27632, a Rho-associated coiled-coil forming protein serine/threonine kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, suppressed up-regulation of ET-2/VIC gene expression, the induction of morphological change, the CE formation, and TG 1 expression, but not involucrin expression. These results indicate new three findings, (1) ET-2/VIC expression increases and has potential as a differentiation marker, (2) ET-2/VIC expression is mediated by ROCK, and (3) the ROCK regulated TG 1 expression, on the calcium-induced differentiation of mouse keratinocytes.

  12. pH-driven colloidal transformations based on the vasoactive drug nicergoline.

    PubMed

    Salentinig, Stefan; Tangso, Kristian J; Hawley, Adrian; Boyd, Ben J

    2014-12-16

    The structure of colloidal self-assembled drug delivery systems can be influenced by intermolecular interactions between drug and amphiphilic molecules, and is important to understand in the context of designing improved delivery systems. Controlling these structures can enable controlled or targeted release systems for poorly water-soluble drugs. Here we present the interaction of the hydrophobic vasoactive drug nicergoline with the internal structure of nanostructured emulsion particles based on the monoglyceride-water system. Addition of this drug leads to modification of the internal bicontinuous cubic structure to generate highly pH-responsive systems. The colloidal structures were characterized with small-angle X-ray scattering and visualized using cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. Reversible transformations to inverse micelles at high pH, vesicles at low pH, and the modification of the spacing of the bicontinuous cubic structure at intermediate pH were observed, and enabled the in situ determination of an apparent pKa for the drug in this system--a difficult task using solution-based approaches. The characterization of this phase behavior is also highly interesting for the design of pH-responsive controlled release systems for poorly water-soluble drug molecules.

  13. Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide Promotes Intestinal Barrier Homeostasis and Protection Against Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiujuan; Conlin, Victoria S.; Morampudi, Vijay; Ryz, Natasha R.; Nasser, Yasmin; Bhinder, Ganive; Bergstrom, Kirk S.; Yu, Hong B.; Waterhouse, Chris C. M.; Buchan, Allison M. J.; Popescu, Oana E.; Gibson, William T.; Waschek, James A.; Vallance, Bruce A.; Jacobson, Kevan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory disorder associated with changes in neuropeptide expression and function, including vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP regulates intestinal vasomotor and secretomotor function and motility; however, VIP’s role in development and maintenance of colonic epithelial barrier homeostasis is unclear. Using VIP deficient (VIPKO) mice, we investigated VIP’s role in epithelial barrier homeostasis, and susceptibility to colitis. Colonic crypt morphology and epithelial barrier homeostasis were assessed in wildtype (WT) and VIPKO mice, at baseline. Colitic responses were evaluated following dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) or dextran-sodium sulfate (DSS) exposure. Mice were also treated with exogenous VIP. At baseline, VIPKO mice exhibited distorted colonic crypts, defects in epithelial cell proliferation and migration, increased apoptosis, and altered permeability. VIPKO mice also displayed reduced goblet cell numbers, and reduced expression of secreted goblet cell factors mucin 2 and trefoil factor 3. These changes were associated with reduced expression of caudal type homeobox 2 (Cdx2), a master regulator of intestinal function and homeostasis. DNBS and DSS-induced colitis were more severe in VIPKO than WT mice. VIP treatment rescued the phenotype, protecting VIPKO mice against DSS colitis, with results comparable to WT mice. In conclusion, VIP plays a crucial role in the development and maintenance of colonic epithelial barrier integrity under physiological conditions and promotes epithelial repair and homeostasis during colitis. PMID:25932952

  14. New formulation of vasoactive intestinal peptide using liposomes in hyaluronic acid gel for uveitis.

    PubMed

    Lajavardi, Laure; Camelo, Serge; Agnely, Florence; Luo, Wei; Goldenberg, Brigitte; Naud, Marie-Christine; Behar-Cohen, Francine; de Kozak, Yvonne; Bochot, Amélie

    2009-10-01

    We evaluated the benefits of a novel formulation of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) based on the incorporation of VIP-loaded rhodamine-conjugated liposomes (VIP-Rh-Lip) within hyaluronic acid (HA) gel (Gel-VIP-Rh-Lip) for the treatment of endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in comparison with VIP-Rh-Lip alone. In vitro release study and rheological analysis showed that interactions between HA chains and liposomes resulted in increased viscosity and reinforced elasticity of the gel. In vivo a single intravitreal injection of Gel-VIP-Rh-Lip was performed in rats 7 days prior to uveitis induction by subcutaneous lipopolysaccharide injection. The maximal ocular inflammation occurs within 16-24 h in controls (VIP-Rh-Lip, unloaded-Rh-Lip). Whereas intraocular injection of VIP-Rh-Lip had no effect on EIU severity compared with controls, Gel-VIP-Rh-Lip reduced significantly the clinical score and number of inflammatory cells infiltrating the eye. The fate of liposomes, VIP and HA in the eyes, regional and inguinal lymph nodes and spleen was analyzed by immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy. Retention of liposomes by HA gel was observed in vitro and in vivo. Inflammation severity seemed to impact on system stability resulting in the delayed release of VIP. Thus, HA gel containing VIP-Rh-Lip is an efficient strategy to obtain a sustained delivery of VIP in ocular and lymph node tissues.

  15. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide immunoreactivity in the spinal cord of the guinea pig. A mapping study.

    PubMed

    Triepel, J; Metz, J; Munroe, D; London, S; Sweriduk, S; Forssmann, W G

    1987-07-01

    The distribution of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-immunoreactive (VIP-IR) neurons in the lower medulla oblongata and the spinal cord has been analyzed in guinea pigs. This study includes results obtained by colchicine treatment and transection experiments. In the spinal cord, numerous VIP-IR varicosities were observed in the substantia gelatinosa of the columna dorsalis; some were also found in the substantia intermedia and the columna anterior. The spinal VIP-IR nerve fibers were mainly of intraspinal origin and oriented segmentally. VIP-IR nuclei in the spinal cord extended dorsally into corresponding regions of the caudal medulla oblongata, namely from the substantia intermedia medialis and lateralis into the vagus-solitarius complex and from the nucleus spinalis lateralis into the area of the nucleus reticularis lateralis. Additional VIP-IR perikarya were observed in the pars caudalis of the nucleus spinalis nervi trigemini. The VIP-IR nuclei within the caudal medulla oblongata probably form a continuous system with those localized within the spinal cord. They may be involved functionally in the modulation of cardiovascular and respiratory regulation in the guinea pig.

  16. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide mediates circadian rhythms in mammalian olfactory bulb and olfaction.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jae-Eun Kang; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; Wang, Thomas; Marpegan, Luciano; Holy, Timothy E; Herzog, Erik D

    2014-04-23

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the olfactory bulbs (OBs) function as an independent circadian system regulating daily rhythms in olfactory performance. However, the cells and signals in the olfactory system that generate and coordinate these circadian rhythms are unknown. Using real-time imaging of gene expression, we found that the isolated olfactory epithelium and OB, but not the piriform cortex, express similar, sustained circadian rhythms in PERIOD2 (PER2). In vivo, PER2 expression in the OB of mice is circadian, approximately doubling with a peak around subjective dusk. Furthermore, mice exhibit circadian rhythms in odor detection performance with a peak at approximately subjective dusk. We also found that circadian rhythms in gene expression and odor detection performance require vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) or its receptor VPAC2R. VIP is expressed, in a circadian manner, in interneurons in the external plexiform and periglomerular layers, whereas VPAC2R is expressed in mitral and external tufted cells in the OB. Together, these results indicate that VIP signaling modulates the output from the OB to maintain circadian rhythms in the mammalian olfactory system.

  17. Effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide on vascular conductance are unaffected by anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Bouder, T.G.; Huffman, L.J.; Hedge, G.A. )

    1988-12-01

    In rats anesthetized with ketamine and pentobarbital (KET/PB), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) increases vascular conductance (VC) in the salivary gland, pancreas, and thyroid gland, whereas no changes in VC are observed in a number of other organs. Because anesthesia may alter the responsiveness of physiological systems, we compared the effects of VIP on organ VC in conscious or anesthetized rats. Chronically catheterized rats were studied in the conscious state or 30 min after induction of anesthesia with KET/PB, isoflurane, or Inactin. Blood flows were measured by the reference sample version of the radioactive microsphere (MS) technique using two MS injections ({sup 141}Ce-MS/{sup 85}Sr-MS). Mean arterial blood pressure was monitored and used in the calculation of VC. Organ VCs were similar under basal conditions in conscious and anesthetized rats. VIP infusion caused systemic hypotension and increased VCs in the salivary gland, pancreas, and thyroid gland, and these responses were largely unaffected by anesthesia. These results indicate that the anesthetics used do not alter basal VC or the responsiveness of the vasculature to exogenous VIP.

  18. Vasoactive actions of local anaesthetics on human isolated umbilical veins and arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Monuszko, E.; Halevy, S.; Freese, K.; Liu-Barnett, M.; Altura, B.

    1989-01-01

    1. An in vitro study, using helical preparations of human umbilical arteries and veins obtained from healthy women at term pregnancy, was designed to determine: (a) whether three local anaesthetics commonly utilized in obstetric anaesthesia (bupivacaine, 2-chloroprocaine, and lignocaine) can induce contraction or relaxation of resting umbilical vessels; (b) whether these agents can induce contraction or relaxation of umbilical vessels which have been previously induced to contract by a known activator, potassium chloride (KCl); and (c) the relative potency of these agents as compared to KCl. 2. The results indicate that: (a) these local anaesthetics are vasoactive on human umbilical vascular smooth muscle; (b) bupivacaine induces contraction in over 90% of the resting vessels examined, while 2-chloroprocaine consistently causes relaxation and lignocaine causes a small degree of contraction in 40% of vessels examined; (c) bupivacaine causes further contraction (or potentiation) of KCl-contracted muscle in 50% of the vessels studied, while 2-chloroprocaine and lignocaine both induce relaxation of these contracted vessels. PMID:2758218

  19. Elevated Endothelial Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Contributes to Glomerular Injury and Promotes Hypertensive Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Luo, Renna; Zhang, Weiru; Zhao, Cheng; Zhang, Yujin; Wu, Hongyu; Jin, Jianping; Zhang, Wenzheng; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K; Tao, Lijian; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2015-07-01

    Hypertensive chronic kidney disease is one of the most prevalent medical conditions with high morbidity and mortality in the United States and worldwide. However, early events initiating the progression to hypertensive chronic kidney disease are poorly understood. We hypothesized that elevated endothelial hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is a common early insult triggering initial glomerular injury leading to hypertensive chronic kidney disease. To test our hypothesis, we used an angiotensin II infusion model of hypertensive chronic kidney disease to determine the specific cell type and mechanisms responsible for elevation of HIF-1α and its role in the progression of hypertensive chronic kidney disease. Genetic studies coupled with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction profiling revealed that elevated endothelial HIF-1α is essential to initiate glomerular injury and progression to renal fibrosis by the transcriptional activation of genes encoding multiple vasoactive proteins. Mechanistically, we found that endothelial HIF-1α gene expression was induced by angiotensin II in a nuclear factor-κB-dependent manner. Finally, we discovered reciprocal positive transcriptional regulation of endothelial Hif-1α and Nf-κb genes is a key driving force for their persistent activation and disease progression. Overall, our findings revealed that the stimulation of HIF-1α gene expression in endothelial cells is detrimental to induce kidney injury, hypertension, and disease progression. Our findings highlight early diagnostic opportunities and therapeutic approaches for hypertensive chronic kidney disease.

  20. Endothelial Function in the Time of the Giants: Paul M. Vanhoutte Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Heistad, Donald D.

    2010-01-01

    Paul Vanhoutte is one of the fathers of vascular biology. Among his great contributions, he demonstrated that endothelium modulates vasomotor response to vasoactive products (including serotonin) that are released when platelets aggregate in an artery. He found in arteries ex vivo that when endothelium is dysfunctional, in atherosclerosis or hypertension, normal relaxation to aggregation of platelets is impaired, and vessels may contract. He proposed that this mechanism may predispose to vasospasm. Our experiments in vivo indicated that atherosclerosis greatly potentiates vasoconstrictor responses to serotonin in the limb, brain, and eye of monkeys. We proposed that transient ischemic attacks may be mediated by platelet-induced vasospasm. We observed endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerotic monkeys, with improvement of endothelial function when hypercholesterolemia was corrected. Recently, we have studied the aortic valve (which has unique endothelium) in hypercholesterolemic mice, to examine the pathophysiology of aortic valvular stenosis. Oxidative stress is increased in stenotic valves, and severe aortic stenosis develops in about one-third of old, hypercholesterolemic mice. In stenotic aortic valves from humans, there is increased oxidative stress near calcified regions of the valves. Oxidative stress may trigger expression of pro-calcific genes in the aortic valve. Finally, we have used gene transfer of extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) to study endothelial effects of oxidative stress. Gene transfer of normal ecSOD improves endothelial dysfunction in several disease states, but gene transfer of ecSODR213G, a gene variant of ecSOD that is common in humans, fails to improve endothelial function. Gene transfer approaches may be useful to study mechanisms by which gene variants predispose to endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease. PMID:19033817

  1. Angiotensin II increases the permeability and PV-1 expression of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bodor, Csaba; Nagy, János Péter; Végh, Borbála; Németh, Adrienn; Jenei, Attila; MirzaHosseini, Shahrokh; Sebe, Attila; Rosivall, László

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II), the major effector molecule of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), is a powerful vasoactive mediator associated with hypertension and renal failure. In this study the permeability changes and its morphological attributes in endothelial cells of human umbilical vein (HUVECs) were studied considering the potential regulatory role of ANG II. The effects of ANG II were compared with those of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Permeability was determined by 40 kDa FITC-Dextran and electrical impedance measurements. Plasmalemmal vesicle-1 (PV-1) mRNA levels were measured by PCR. Endothelial cell surface was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and caveolae were visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in HUVEC monolayers. ANG II (10(-7) M), similarly to VEGF (100 ng/ml), increased the endothelial permeability parallel with an increase in the number of cell surface openings and caveolae. AT1 and VEGF-R2 receptor blockers (candesartan and ZM-323881, respectively) blunted these effects. ANG II and VEGF increased the expression of PV-1, which could be blocked by candesartan or ZM-323881 pretreatments and by the p38 mitogem-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitor SB-203580. Additionally, SB-203580 blocked the increase in endothelial permeability and the number of surface openings and caveolae. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that ANG II plays a role in regulation of permeability and formation of cell surface openings through AT1 receptor and PV-1 protein synthesis in a p38 MAP kinase-dependent manner in endothelial cells. The surface openings that increase in parallel with permeability may represent transcellular channels, caveolae, or both. These morphological and permeability changes may be involved in (patho-) physiological effects of ANG II. PMID:22012329

  2. Evolution of endothelial keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Price, Francis W; Price, Marianne O

    2013-11-01

    Endothelial keratoplasty has evolved into a popular alternative to penetrating keratoplasty (PK) for the treatment of endothelial dysfunction. Although the earliest iterations were challenging and were not widely adopted, the iteration known as Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty (DSEK) has gained widespread acceptance. DSEK combines a simplified technique for stripping dysfunctional endothelium from the host cornea and microkeratome dissection of the donor tissue, a step now commonly completed in advance by eye bank technicians. Studies show that a newer endothelial keratoplasty iteration, known as Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK), provides an even faster and better visual recovery than DSEK does. In addition, DMEK significantly reduces the risk of immunologic graft rejection episodes compared with that in DSEK or in PK. Although the DMEK donor tissue, consisting of the bare endothelium and Descemet membrane without any stroma, is more challenging to prepare and position in the recipient eye, recent improvements in instrumentation and surgical techniques are increasing the ease and the reliability of the procedure. DSEK successfully mitigates 2 of the main liabilities of PK: ocular surface complications and structural problems (including induced astigmatism and perpetually weak wounds), whereas DMEK further mitigates the 2 principal remaining liabilities of PK: immunologic graft reactions and secondary glaucoma from prolonged topical corticosteroid use.

  3. Transport of lipoprotein lipase across endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, U.; Klein, M.G.; Goldberg, I.J. )

    1991-03-15

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL), synthesized in muscle and fat, hydrolyzes plasma triglycerides primarily while bound to luminal endothelial cell surfaces. To obtain information about the movement of LPL from the basal to the luminal endothelial cell surface, the authors studied the transport of purified bovine milk LPL across bovine aortic endothelial cell monolayers. {sup 125}I-labeled LPL ({sup 125}I-LPL) added to the basal surface of the monolayers was detected on the apical side of the cells in two compartments: (1) in the medium of the upper chamber, and (2) bound to the apical cell surface. The amount of {sup 125}I-LPL on the cell surface, but not in the medium, reached saturation with time and LPL dose. Catalytically active LPL was transported to the apical surface but very little LPL activity appeared in the medium. Heparinase treatment of the basal cell surface and addition of dextran sulfate to the lower chamber decreased the amount of {sup 125}I-LPL appearing on the apical surface. Similarly, the presence of increasing molar ratios of oleic acid/bovine serum albumin at the basal surface decreased the transport of active LPL across the monolayer. Thus, a saturable transport system, which requires haparan sulfate proteoglycans and is inhibited by high concentrations of free fatty acids on the basal side of the cells, appears to exist for passage of enzymatically active LPL across endothelial cells. They postulate that regulation of LPL transport to the endothelial luminal surface modulates the physiologically active pool of LPL in vivo.

  4. Involvement of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in the parasympathetic vasodilatation of the rat masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Niioka, Takeharu; Ishii, Hisayoshi; Izumi, Hiroshi

    2009-10-01

    The parasympathetic vasodilatory fibres are known to innervate vessels in a rat masseter muscle via both cholinergic and non-cholinergic mechanisms. However, the non-cholinergic mechanisms are still unclear. Recently, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) was convincingly shown to be involved in the parasympathetic vasodilatation in orofacial areas, such as submandibular glands and lower lip. However, very little is known about the rat masseter muscle. The present study was designed in the rat masseter muscle to assess (1) whether the parasympathetic nerve innervating vessels have VIP immunoreactivities, (2) whether intravenous administration of VIP induces the vasodilatation, and (3) effects of selective VIP receptor antagonist ([4Cl-d-Phe(6), Leu(17)] VIP) in the presence or absence of atropine on the parasympathetic vasodilatation. The VIP immunoreactivities were found at two sites of the parasympathetic otic ganglion and nerve fibres located around vessels. The intravenous administration of VIP induced the vasodilatation, and [4Cl-d-Phe(6), Leu(17)] VIP markedly decreased the vasodilatation evoked by VIP administration. The parasympathetic vasodilatation was not inhibited by [4Cl-d-Phe(6), Leu(17)] VIP. However, treatment with [4Cl-d-Phe(6), Leu(17)] VIP markedly decreased the parasympathetic vasodilatation when [4Cl-d-Phe(6), Leu(17)] VIP was administered together with atropine. These results suggest that (1) VIP exists in the postganglionic parasympathetic nerve innervating the vessels in the masseter muscle, (2) the intravenous administration of VIP induces the vasodilatation in the masseter muscle, and (3) VIP may be involved in the parasympathetic vasodilatation in the masseter muscle when muscarinic cholinergic receptors are deactivated by either atropine or the suppression of the ACh release.

  5. Induction of aggregation of Raji human B-lymphoblastic cells by vasoactive intestinal peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Robichon, A; Sreedharan, S P; Yang, J; Shames, R S; Gronroos, E C; Cheng, P P; Goetzl, E J

    1993-01-01

    Subsets of neurons in the thymic cortex, Peyer's patches and lymphoid tissues of the respiratory system deliver vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) at nanomolar concentrations. The possible effects of VIP on B-cell adhesiveness in these tissues were examined in studies of the homotypic aggregation (HA) of human B-lymphoblastoid cells of the Raji line, which express a mean of 27,950 VIP receptors/cell with a mean Kd of 0.8 nM. Mean HA, assessed microscopically, attained a maximum of 54% after 8 hr with 0.1 microgram/ml of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) (P < 0.01) and 31% after 24 hr with 10(-8) M VIP (P < 0.05), as contrasted with 13% and 20% at the respective times in medium alone, and both stimuli also increased the mean size of aggregates. The presence of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor Ro 20-1724 permitted 10(-9) M VIP, which had no effect alone, to raise the mean cyclic AMP content of Raji cells by more than 10-fold and concurrently to elevate mean HA from 55% in medium alone at 48 hr to 70% and from 55% at 72 hr to 68% (P < 0.05 for both). Monoclonal antibodies to lymphocyte function-associated (LFA-1) adhesive protein and to intercellular adherence molecule-1 (ICAM-1) suppressed significantly the HA of Raji cells induced by VIP and PMA. The effects of VIP on compartmental immunity in the lungs and intestines thus may be mediated in part by increases in lymphocyte adhesiveness, which could contribute to the regional accumulation of specifically immunocompetent cells. Images Figure 2 PMID:8104888

  6. Circadian regulation of cardiovascular function: a role for vasoactive intestinal peptide

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Analyne; Loh, Dawn H.; Jordan, Maria C.; Roos, Kenneth P.

    2011-01-01

    The circadian system, driven by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), regulates properties of cardiovascular function. The dysfunction of this timing system can result in cardiac pathology. The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is crucial for circadian rhythms in a number of biological processes including SCN electrical activity and wheel running behavior. Anatomic evidence indicates that SCN neurons expressing VIP are well positioned to drive circadian regulation of cardiac function through interactions with the autonomic centers. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that loss of VIP would result in circadian deficits in heart rate (HR) and clock gene expression in cardiac tissue. We implanted radiotelemetry devices into VIP-deficient mice and wild-type (WT) controls and continuously recorded HR, body temperature, and cage activity in freely moving mice. Under light-dark conditions, VIP-deficient mice displayed weak rhythms in HR, body temperature, and cage activity, with onsets that were advanced in phase compared with WT mice. Similarly, clock gene expression in cardiac tissue was rhythmic but phase advanced in mutant mice. In constant darkness, the normal circadian rhythms in HR were lost in VIP-deficient mice; however, most mutant mice continued to exhibit circadian rhythms of body temperature with shortened free-running period. The loss of VIP altered, but did not abolish, autonomic regulation of HR. Analysis of the echocardiograms did not find any evidence for a loss of cardiac function in VIP-deficient mice, and the size of the hearts did not differ between genotypes. These results demonstrate that VIP is an important regulator of physiological circadian rhythmicity in the heart. PMID:20952671

  7. Effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide on the wound healing of alkali-burned corneas

    PubMed Central

    Tuncel, Nese; Yildirim, Nilgun; Gurer, Firdevs; Basmak, Hikmet; Uzuner, Kubilay; Sahinturk, Varol; Gursoy, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To study the effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on wound healing in experimental alkali burns of the cornea. METHODS Twenty-seven albino rabbits, weighing 3.2±0.75 kg were used. Alkali burns were induced on corneas by applying 10 mm Whatman paper No:50 soaked in 1 mol/L NaOH. They have further classified into 5 groups as follows: 1) control group given no treatment (n=5); 2) VIP given subconjunctivally (n=6); 3) VIP injected into anterior chamber (n=6); 4) NaCl 0.9% given subconjunctivally (n=5); 5) NaCl 0.9% given into the anterior chamber (n=5). All treatment protocols except control group were followed by topical eye drops composed of VIP at two hourly intervals for one week from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. RESULTS VIP treated groups of rabbits with alkali burns were found to have better wound healing findings histo-pathologically when compared to those of control group who have received no treatment on day 30. No differences were observed between groups in respect to degree of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) infiltration and degree of loss of amorphous substrate on day 15. However, PMNL infiltration and degree of loss of amorphous substrate were lower in Groups 2 and 3 when compared to that of control group on day 30 (P<0.05). CONCLUSION We have shown that VIP has positive effects on alkali induced corneal burns. VIP may inhibit PMNL migration to cornea through an immunomodulatory effect. Inhibition of PMNL migration might reduce the release of collagenases and this might prevent the extracellular amorphous substance loss. PMID:26949636

  8. Antioxidant activity of vasoactive intestinal peptide in HK2 human renal cells.

    PubMed

    Vacas, Eva; Bajo, Ana M; Schally, Andrew V; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Prieto, Juan C; Carmena, María J

    2012-12-01

    Oxidative stress is a major mediator of tissue and cell injuries. The injury in chronic nephrotic syndrome, acute renal failure, myeloma kidney injury and other kidney diseases is initiated by oxidative stress. We have previously demonstrated that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) acts as an antiproliferative agent in renal cancer cells. This study was designed to evaluate the renoprotective activity of VIP against H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative damage in a proximal tubule kidney cell line (human, non-tumor, HK2 cells) in order to investigate the potential usefulness of this peptide in the treatment of oxidative-stress related kidney diseases. HK2 cell viability was assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. Propidium iodide was used to identify cells undergoing apoptosis. Western blotting was performed with anti-Bcl-2, anti-Bax and anti-formyl peptide receptor (low-affinity variant FPRL-1) monoclonal antibodies whereas 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate was used for measurement of levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). HK2 cells were injured with H(2)O(2) in order to induce apoptosis: the effect was time- and dose-dependent. VIP increased the levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and decreased those of the proapoptotic protein Bax. VIP decreased the intracellular ROS levels reached by H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress. VIP effect on ROS levels involved FPLR-1 but not VPAC(1,2) receptors as evidenced by the use of the respective antagonists WRW4 and JV-1-53. Thus, VIP protects HK2 cells from apoptosis by increasing Bcl-2 levels and this effect is initiated through FPLR1 receptor. In conclusion, VIP might exert a renoprotective effect by the suppression of oxidative stress.

  9. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Excites GnRH Neurons in Male and Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Piet, Richard; Dunckley, Henry; Lee, Kiho; Herbison, Allan E

    2016-09-01

    A variety of external and internal factors modulate the activity of GnRH neurons to control fertility in mammals. A direct, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-mediated input to GnRH neurons originating from the suprachiasmatic nucleus is thought to relay circadian information within this network. In the present study, we examined the effects of VIP on GnRH neuron activity in male and female mice at different stages of the estrous cycle. We carried out cell-attached recordings in slices from GnRH-green fluorescent protein mice and calcium imaging in slices from a mouse line expressing the genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP3 selectively in GnRH neurons. We show that 50%-80% of GnRH neurons increase their firing rate in response to bath-applied VIP (1nM-1000nM) in both male and female mice and that this is accompanied by a robust increase in intracellular calcium concentrations. This effect is mediated directly at the GnRH neuron likely through activation of high-affinity VIP receptors. Because suprachiasmatic nucleus-derived timing cues trigger the preovulatory surge only on the afternoon of proestrus in female mice, we examined the effects of VIP during the estrous cycle at different times of day. VIP responsiveness in GnRH neurons did not vary significantly in diestrous and proestrous mice before or around the time of the expected preovulatory surge. These results indicate that the majority of GnRH neurons in male and female mice express functional VIP receptors and that the effects of VIP on GnRH neurons do not alter across the estrous cycle. PMID:27501185

  10. Excess LIGHT contributes to placental impairment increased secretion of vasoactive factors, hypertension and proteinuria in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Parchim, Nicholas; Iriyama, Takayuki; Luo, Renna; Zhao, Cheng; Liu, Chen; Irani, Roxanna A.; Zhang, Weiru; Ning, Chen; Zhang, Yujin; Blackwell, Sean C.; Chen, Lieping; Tao, Lijian; Hicks, John; Kellems, Rodney E.; Xia, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE), a prevalent hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, is believed to be secondary to uteroplacental ischemia. Accumulating evidence indicates that hypoxia-independent mediators, including inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, are associated with PE, but it is unclear whether these signals directly contribute to placental damage and disease development in vivo. We report that LIGHT, a novel TNF superfamily member, is significantly elevated in the circulation and placentas of preeclamptic women compared to normotensive pregnant individuals. Injection of LIGHT into pregnant mice induced placental apoptosis, small fetuses and key features of PE-hypertension and proteinuria. Mechanistically, using neutralizing antibodies specific for LIGHT receptors, we found that the LIGHT receptors, herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) and lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR), are required for LIGHT-induced placental impairment, small fetuses and PE features in pregnant mice. Accordingly, we further revealed that LIGHT functions through these two receptors to induce secretion of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and endothelin-1 (ET-1), two well-accepted pathogenic factors in PE, and thereby plays an important role in hypertension and proteinuria in pregnant mice. Lastly, we extended our animal findings to human studies and demonstrated that activation of LIGHT receptors resulted in increased apoptosis and elevation of sFlt-1 secretion in human placental villous explants. Overall, our human and mouse studies show that LIGHT signaling is a previously unrecognized pathway responsible for placental apoptosis, elevated secretion of vasoactive factors and subsequent maternal features of PE and reveal new therapeutic opportunities for the management of disease. PMID:24324043

  11. Roles of sphincter of Oddi motility and serum vasoactive intestinal peptide, gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Qin, Cheng-Kun; Wu, Shuo-Dong; Xu, Jian; Cui, Xian-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Yi; Xian, Guo-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate roles of sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility played in pigment gallbladder stone formation in model of guinea pigs. METHODS: Thirty-four adult male Hartley guinea pigs were divided randomly into two groups: the control group and pigment stone group. The pigment stone group was divided into 4 subgroups with 6 guinea pigs each according to time of sacrifice, and were fed a pigment lithogenic diet and sacrificed after 3, 6, 9 and 12 wk. SO manometry and recording of myoelectric activity of the guinea pigs were obtained by multifunctional physiograph at each stage. Serum vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) were detected at each stage in the process of pigment gallbladder stone formation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: The incidence of pigment gallstone formation was 0%, 0%, 16.7% and 66.7% in the 3-, 6-, 9- and 12-wk group, respectively. The frequency of myoelectric activity decreased in the 3-wk group. The amplitude of myoelectric activity had a tendency to decrease but not significantly. The frequency of the SO decreased significantly in the 9-wk group. The SO basal pressure and common bile duct pressure increased in the 12-wk group (25.19 ± 7.77 mmHg vs 40.56 ± 11.81 mmHg, 22.35 ± 7.60 mmHg vs 38.51 ± 11.57 mmHg, P < 0.05). Serum VIP was significantly elevated in the 6- and 12-wk groups and serum CCK-8 was decreased significantly in the 12-wk group. CONCLUSION: Pigment gallstone-causing diet may induce SO dysfunction. The tension of the SO increased. The disturbance in SO motility may play a role in pigment gallstone formation, and changes in serum VIP and CCK-8 may be important causes of SO dysfunction. PMID:24782626

  12. Gender-dependent association of type 2 diabetes with the vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Paladini, Fabiana; Adinolfi, Valerio; Cocco, Elisa; Ciociola, Ester; Tamburrano, Giulia; Cascino, Isabella; Lucantoni, Federica; Morano, Susanna; Sorrentino, Rosa

    2012-02-10

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by an inadequate pancreatic beta-cell response to the progressive insulin resistance. Its pathogenesis is complex and has been connected with a state of preclinical chronic inflammation. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and its receptors play a relevant role in the homeostasis of insulin secretion as well as in the control of inflammation. In particular, VIP receptor 1 (VPAC1) has been found to be down-modulated during inflammation, and to be associated with several diseases. The objective of this study was to compare the distribution of SNPs mapping in the VIP receptor 1 gene in cases with type 2 diabetes and matched controls. Seven hundred cases with type 2 diabetes (423 males and 277 females) and 830 random controls (419 males and 411 females) were analyzed for the distribution of three common SNPs mapping in the VPAC1 gene. The results show a significantly different genotype distribution of the SNP rs9677 in the 3'-UTR of VPAC1 in female cases with type 2 diabetes compared to gender-matched controls (ptrend=6×10(-4)). The rs9677 CC genotype confers the highest risk (OR: 2.1) and correlates with worse clinical parameters such as higher level of total cholesterol, higher LDL/HDL ratio and a higher HbA1c concentration. The genetic association reported here indicates that VIP/VPAC1 signaling can be a relevant pathway in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes in females suggesting that at least some aspects of the genetic predisposition to this disease can be gender-specific.

  13. Fluid resuscitation should respect the endothelial glycocalyx layer.

    PubMed

    Guidet, Bertrand; Ait-Oufella, Hafid

    2014-12-23

    Endothelial glycocalyx degradation induced by fluid overload adds to the concern of a detrimental effect of uncontrolled fluid resuscitation and the risk of unnecessary fluid infusion. As a consequence, the use of new tools for monitoring response to fluids appears promising. From that perspective, the monitoring of plasma concentration of glycocalyx degradation markers could be useful.

  14. Flow-dependent regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: role of protein kinases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boo, Yong Chool; Jo, Hanjoong

    2003-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are directly and continuously exposed to fluid shear stress generated by blood flow. Shear stress regulates endothelial structure and function by controlling expression of mechanosensitive genes and production of vasoactive factors such as nitric oxide (NO). Though it is well known that shear stress stimulates NO production from endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear and controversial. Shear-induced production of NO involves Ca2+/calmodulin-independent mechanisms, including phosphorylation of eNOS at several sites and its interaction with other proteins, including caveolin and heat shock protein-90. There have been conflicting results as to which protein kinases-protein kinase A, protein kinase B (Akt), other Ser/Thr protein kinases, or tyrosine kinases-are responsible for shear-dependent eNOS regulation. The functional significance of each phosphorylation site is still unclear. We have attempted to summarize the current status of understanding in shear-dependent eNOS regulation.

  15. Synergistic effect of vasoactive intestinal peptides on TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis in osteoblasts: amplification of p44/p42 MAP kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Hideo; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Mizutani, Jun; Adachi, Seiji; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Minamitani, Chiho; Kato, Kenji; Kozawa, Osamu; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2010-05-01

    We previously showed that tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) stimulates synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a potent bone resorptive agent, via p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis in these cells. VIP, which by itself slightly stimulated IL-6 synthesis, synergistically enhanced the TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis in MC3T3-E1 cells. The synergistic effect of VIP on the TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis was concentration-dependent in the range between 1 and 70 nM. We previously reported that VIP stimulated cAMP production in MC3T3-E1 cells. Forskolin, a direct activator of adenylyl cyclase, or 8-bromoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8bromo-cAMP), a plasma membrane-permeable cAMP analogue, markedly enhanced the TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis as well as VIP. VIP markedly up-regulated the TNF-alpha-induced p44/p42 MAP kinase phosphorylation. The Akt phosphorylation stimulated by TNF-alpha was only slightly affected by VIP. PD98059, a specific inhibitor of MEK1/2, significantly suppressed the enhancement of TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 synthesis by VIP. The synergistic effect of a combination of VIP and TNF-alpha on the phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase was diminished by H-89, an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These results strongly suggest that VIP synergistically enhances TNF-alpha-stimulated IL-6 synthesis via up-regulating p44/p42 MAP kinase through the adenylyl cyclase-cAMP system in osteoblasts.

  16. Augmentation of platelet and endothelial cell eNOS activity decreases sepsis-related neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Khan, Raymond; Kirschenbaum, Linda A; LaRow, Catherine; Berna, Gioiamaria; Griffin, Kelly; Astiz, Mark E

    2010-03-01

    NO is an important mediator of microvascular patency and blood flow. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of enhanced eNOS activity in attenuating sepsis-induced neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions. Microslides coated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells were stimulated with plasma from patients with septic shock. Neutrophil and platelets from control subjects were also stimulated with plasma from patients in septic shock and perfused over stimulated endothelial cells. l-Arginine (LA) with and without NG-monomethyl l-arginine (LNMMA), a nonselective NOS inhibitor, and N-(3-(aminomethyl) benzyl acetamide) ethanimidamide dihydrochloride (1400W), a highly selective iNOS inhibitor, were added to the septic plasma. The number of neutrophils adherent to endothelial cells, neutrophil rolling velocity, and the number of neutrophil aggregates were determined. Cell activation and the formation of platelet-neutrophil aggregates were assessed by flow cytometry. Separate experiments were done with isolated platelets using platelet aggregometry. l-Arginine significantly decreased sepsis-related neutrophil adhesion and aggregation and increased rolling velocity. The addition of LNMMA to LA and cell suspensions reversed the effects of LA on these parameters, whereas the addition of 1400W had no effect on LA-related changes. Platelet-neutrophil aggregation, platelet aggregation, platelet activation, and neutrophil activation induced by septic plasma were also significantly decreased by LA. Again, the addition of LNMMA reversed the effects of LA on these parameters, whereas 1400W had no effect on LA-related changes. These data suggest that enhancement of platelet and endothelial cell eNOS activity decreases sepsis-induced neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions and may play a role in maintaining microvascular patency in septic shock.

  17. CD44 regulates vascular endothelial barrier integrity via a PECAM-1 dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Kelly M; Michaud, Michael; Canosa, Sandra; Madri, Joseph A

    2013-07-01

    Vascular integrity is a critical parameter in normal growth and development. Loss of appropriate vascular barrier function is present in various immune- and injury-mediated pathological conditions. CD44 is an adhesion molecule expressed by multiple cell types, including endothelial cells (EC). The goal of the present study was to examine how loss of CD44 affected vascular permeability. Using C57BL/6 WT and CD44-KO mice, we found no significant permeability to Evan's Blue in either strain at baseline. However, there was significantly increased histamine-induced permeability in CD44-deficient mice compared to WT counterparts. Similar results were observed in vitro, where CD44-deficient endothelial monolayers were also impermeable to 40kD-FITC dextran in the absence of vasoactive challenge, but exhibited enhanced and prolonged permeability following histamine. However, CD44-KO monolayers have reduced baseline barrier strength by electrical resistance, which correlated with increased permeability, at baseline, to smaller molecular weight 4-kD FITC-dextran, suggesting weakly formed endothelial junctions. The CD44-KO EC displayed several characteristics consistent with impaired barrier function/dysfunctional EC junctions, including differential expression, phosphorylation, and localization of endothelial junction proteins, increased matrix metalloprotease expression, and altered cellular morphology. Reduced platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) expression by CD44-KO EC in vivo and in vitro was also observed. Reconstitution of murine CD44 or PECAM-1 restored these defects to near WT status, suggesting CD44 regulates vascular permeability and integrity through a PECAM-1 dependent mechanism.

  18. Firewall function of the endothelial glycocalyx in the regulation of sodium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Korte, Stefanie; Wiesinger, Anne; Straeter, Alexandra S; Peters, Wladimir; Oberleithner, Hans; Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina

    2012-02-01

    Plasma sodium, slightly above normal and in presence of aldosterone, stiffens vascular endothelium and reduces nitric oxide release with the consequence of endothelial dysfunction. This process is mediated by epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) and, most likely, the endothelial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Both, ENaC and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, are located in the plasma membrane of endothelial cells and embedded in the endothelial glycocalyx (eGC). This negatively charged biopolymer is directly exposed to the blood stream and selectively buffers sodium ions. We hypothesize that the glycocalyx could interfere with endothelial sodium transport when extracellular sodium varies in the physiological range. Therefore, we modeled the endothelial cell as a pump-leak system measuring changes of intracellular sodium in cultured human endothelial cells. Experiments were performed under low/high extracellular sodium conditions before and after enzymatic eGC removal, and with inhibition of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and ENaC, respectively. Three major observations were made: (1) eGC removal by heparinase treatment facilitates sodium to enter/exit the endothelial cells. (2) The direction of net sodium movement across the endothelial plasma membrane depends on the concentration of extracellular sodium which regulates both the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and ENaC activity. (3) Removal of eGC and inhibition of sodium transport modify the electrical resistance of endothelial cells. We conclude that the eGC serves as a potential "firewall" preventing uncontrolled access of sodium to the pump-leak system of the endothelial cell. After eGC removal, sodium access to the system is facilitated. Thus the pump-leak system could be regulated by ambient sodium and control vascular permeability in pathophysiological conditions. PMID:22057584

  19. Tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced pulmonary vascular endothelial injury.

    PubMed Central

    Goldblum, S E; Hennig, B; Jay, M; Yoneda, K; McClain, C J

    1989-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mediates components of the acute-phase response, stimulates granulocyte metabolism, and induces endothelial cell surface changes. We studied whether human recombinant TNF-alpha (rTNF-alpha) could increase pulmonary edema formation and pulmonary vascular permeability. Rabbits preinfused with 125I-albumin were administered rTNF-alpha or saline. Animals were sacrificed, and lung wet/dry weight ratios as well as bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma 125I activities were determined. rTNF-alpha increased lung wet/dry weight ratios by 151% (P less than 0.02) and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid/plasma 125I activity ratios by 376% (P less than 0.01) compared with values for saline controls. Electron microscopy of lung sections demonstrated endothelial injury, perivascular edema, and extravasation of an ultrastructural permeability tracer. To demonstrate that rTNF-alpha could directly increase pulmonary vascular endothelial permeability in vitro, we studied albumin transfer across cultured porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayers. rTNF-alpha induced time-dependent dose-response increments in transendothelial albumin flux in the absence of granulocyte effector cells. These observations suggest that rTNF-alpha can provoke acute pulmonary vascular endothelial injury in vivo as well as in vitro. Images PMID:2925247

  20. Effect of Flow on Gene Regulation in Smooth Muscle Cells and Macromolecular Transport Across Endothelial Cell Monolayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McIntire, Larry V.; Wagner, John E.; Papadaki, Maria; Whitson, Peggy A.; Eskin, Suzanne G.

    1996-01-01

    Endothelial cells line all of the vessels of the circulatory system, providing a non-thrombogenic conduit for blood flow; they regulate many complex functions in the vasculature, such as coagulation, fibrinolysis, platelet aggregation, vessel tone and growth, and leukocyte traffic; and they form the principal barrier to transport of substances between the blood and the surrounding tissue space. The permeability of endothelial cell changes with environmental stimuli; shear stress, in particular, applied either in vivo, or in vitro, induces changes in protein expression and secretion of vasoactive factors by endothelial cells. The ability to study the effects of shear on the macromolecular permeability of the cerebral vasculature is particularly important, since in no other place is the barrier function of the endothelium more important than in the brain. The endothelial cells of this organ have developed special barrier properties that keep the cerebral system from experiencing any drastic change in composition; together with glial cells, they form the blood brain barrier (BBB). We have studied the effect of flow on bovine BBB using flow chambers and tissue culture systems.

  1. Sensitivity to food additives, vaso-active amines and salicylates: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Skypala, Isabel J; Williams, M; Reeves, L; Meyer, R; Venter, C

    2015-01-01

    Although there is considerable literature pertaining to IgE and non IgE-mediated food allergy, there is a paucity of information on non-immune mediated reactions to foods, other than metabolic disorders such as lactose intolerance. Food additives and naturally occurring 'food chemicals' have long been reported as having the potential to provoke symptoms in those who are more sensitive to their effects. Diets low in 'food chemicals' gained prominence in the 1970s and 1980s, and their popularity remains, although the evidence of their efficacy is very limited. This review focuses on the available evidence for the role and likely adverse effects of both added and natural 'food chemicals' including benzoate, sulphite, monosodium glutamate, vaso-active or biogenic amines and salicylate. Studies assessing the efficacy of the restriction of these substances in the diet have mainly been undertaken in adults, but the paper will also touch on the use of such diets in children. The difficulty of reviewing the available evidence is that few of the studies have been controlled and, for many, considerable time has elapsed since their publication. Meanwhile dietary patterns and habits have changed hugely in the interim, so the conclusions may not be relevant for our current dietary norms. The conclusion of the review is that there may be some benefit in the removal of an additive or a group of foods high in natural food chemicals from the diet for a limited period for certain individuals, providing the diagnostic pathway is followed and the foods are reintroduced back into the diet to assess for the efficacy of removal. However diets involving the removal of multiple additives and food chemicals have the very great potential to lead to nutritional deficiency especially in the paediatric population. Any dietary intervention, whether for the purposes of diagnosis or management of food allergy or food intolerance, should be adapted to the individual's dietary habits and a suitably

  2. Sensitivity to food additives, vaso-active amines and salicylates: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Skypala, Isabel J; Williams, M; Reeves, L; Meyer, R; Venter, C

    2015-01-01

    Although there is considerable literature pertaining to IgE and non IgE-mediated food allergy, there is a paucity of information on non-immune mediated reactions to foods, other than metabolic disorders such as lactose intolerance. Food additives and naturally occurring 'food chemicals' have long been reported as having the potential to provoke symptoms in those who are more sensitive to their effects. Diets low in 'food chemicals' gained prominence in the 1970s and 1980s, and their popularity remains, although the evidence of their efficacy is very limited. This review focuses on the available evidence for the role and likely adverse effects of both added and natural 'food chemicals' including benzoate, sulphite, monosodium glutamate, vaso-active or biogenic amines and salicylate. Studies assessing the efficacy of the restriction of these substances in the diet have mainly been undertaken in adults, but the paper will also touch on the use of such diets in children. The difficulty of reviewing the available evidence is that few of the studies have been controlled and, for many, considerable time has elapsed since their publication. Meanwhile dietary patterns and habits have changed hugely in the interim, so the conclusions may not be relevant for our current dietary norms. The conclusion of the review is that there may be some benefit in the removal of an additive or a group of foods high in natural food chemicals from the diet for a limited period for certain individuals, providing the diagnostic pathway is followed and the foods are reintroduced back into the diet to assess for the efficacy of removal. However diets involving the removal of multiple additives and food chemicals have the very great potential to lead to nutritional deficiency especially in the paediatric population. Any dietary intervention, whether for the purposes of diagnosis or management of food allergy or food intolerance, should be adapted to the individual's dietary habits and a suitably

  3. Fibronectin coating of oxygenator membranes enhances endothelial cell attachment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can replace the lungs’ gas exchange capacity in refractory lung failure. However, its limited hemocompatibility, the activation of the coagulation and complement system as well as plasma leakage and protein deposition hamper mid- to long-term use and have constrained the development of an implantable lung assist device. In a tissue engineering approach, lining the blood contact surfaces of the ECMO device with endothelial cells might overcome these limitations. As a first step towards this aim, we hypothesized that coating the oxygenator’s gas exchange membrane with proteins might positively influence the attachment and proliferation of arterial endothelial cells. Methods Sheets of polypropylene (PP), polyoxymethylpentene (TPX) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), typical material used for oxygenator gas exchange membranes, were coated with collagen, fibrinogen, gelatin or fibronectin. Tissue culture treated well plates served as controls. Endothelial cell attachment and proliferation were analyzed for a period of 4 days by microscopic examination and computer assisted cell counting. Results Endothelial cell seeding efficiency is within range of tissue culture treated controls for fibronectin treated surfaces only. Uncoated membranes as well as all other coatings lead to lower cell attachment. A confluent endothelial cell layer develops on fibronectin coated PDMS and the control surface only. Conclusions Fibronectin increases endothelial cells’ seeding efficiency on different oxygenator membrane material. PDMS coated with fibronectin shows sustained cell attachment for a period of four days in static culture conditions. PMID:23356939

  4. Endothelial microparticles carrying hedgehog-interacting protein induce continuous endothelial damage in the pathogenesis of acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Nie, Di-Min; Wu, Qiu-Ling; Zheng, Peng; Chen, Ping; Zhang, Ran; Li, Bei-Bei; Fang, Jun; Xia, Ling-Hui; Hong, Mei

    2016-05-15

    Accumulating evidence suggests that endothelial microparticles (EMPs), a marker of endothelial damage, are elevated in acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), and that endothelial damage is implicated in the pathogenesis of aGVHD, but the mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we detected the plasma EMP levels and endothelial damage in patients and mice with aGVHD in vivo and then examined the effects of EMPs derived from injured endothelial cells (ECs) on endothelial damage and the role of hedgehog-interacting protein (HHIP) carried by EMPs in these effects in vitro. Our results showed that EMPs were persistently increased in the early posttransplantation phase in patients and mice with aGVHD. Meanwhile, endothelial damage was continuous in aGVHD mice, but was temporary in non-aGVHD mice after transplantation. In vitro, EMPs induced endothelial damage, including increased EC apoptosis, enhanced reactive oxygen species, decreased nitric oxide production and impaired angiogenic activity. Enhanced expression of HHIP, an antagonist for the Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway, was observed in patients and mice with aGVHD and EMPs from injured ECs. The endothelial damage induced by EMPs was reversed when the HHIP incorporated into EMPs was silenced with an HHIP small interfering RNA or inhibited with the SHH pathway agonist, Smoothened agonist. This work supports a feasible vicious cycle in which EMPs generated during endothelial injury, in turn, aggravate endothelial damage by carrying HHIP into target ECs, contributing to the continuously deteriorating endothelial damage in the development of aGVHD. EMPs harboring HHIP would represent a potential therapeutic target for aGVHD. PMID:27009877

  5. Viscoelastic response of a model endothelial glycocalyx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijenhuis, Nadja; Mizuno, Daisuke; Spaan, Jos A. E.; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2009-06-01

    Many cells cover themselves with a multifunctional polymer coat, the pericellular matrix (PCM), to mediate mechanical interactions with the environment. A particular PCM, the endothelial glycocalyx (EG), is formed by vascular endothelial cells at their luminal side, forming a mechanical interface between the flowing blood and the endothelial cell layer. The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) hyaluronan (HA) is involved in the main functions of the EG, mechanotransduction of fluid shear stress and molecular sieving. HA, due to its length, is the only GAG in the EG or any other PCM able to form an entangled network. The mechanical functions of the EG are, however, impaired when any one of its components is removed. We here used microrheology to measure the effect of the EG constituents heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, whole blood plasma and albumin on the high-bandwidth mechanical properties of a HA solution. Furthermore, we probed the effect of the hyaldherin aggrecan, a constituent of the PCM of chondrocytes, and very similar to versican (present in the PCM of various cells, and possibly in the EG). We show that components directly interacting with HA (chondroitin sulfate and aggrecan) can increase the viscoelastic shear modulus of the polymer composite.

  6. [The role of endothelial lipase in atherogenesis].

    PubMed

    Pierart Z, Camila; Serrano L, Valentina

    2012-03-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is synthetized by endothelial cells and its main substrates are lipoprotein phospholipids. Over expression of EL reduces high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and phospholipids, in vivo and in vitro. Inhibition of the enzyme achieves the opposite effects. The synthesis of the enzyme is regulated by interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor a. These inflammatory cytokines play a role in diabetes and vascular disease. An increase in vascular mechanical forces, that play a role in atherogenesis, also increase the synthesis of EL. There is expression of EL in endothelial cells, macrophages and muscle cells of atherosclerotic lesions of coronary arteries of humans. This evidence leads to the suspicion that EL plays a role in atherogenesis. There are also higher plasma levels of EL in subjects with type 2 diabetes, who are especially susceptible to the development of vascular lesions. Therefore the inhibition of EL could play an important role in HDL metabolism and could be a new therapeutic strategy for the prevention of atherosclerosis. PMID:22689120

  7. Effects of chronic ethanol ingestion on the vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor-effector system from rat seminal vesicle membranes.

    PubMed

    Juarranz, M G; Marinero, M J; Bodega, G; Prieto, J C; Guijarro, L G

    1999-02-01

    We studied the modifications of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor/effector system from the rat seminal vesicle after chronic ethanol ingestion. Ethanol treatment resulted in a decreased height of the secretory epithelium of seminal vesicle as well as in a weight loss of this gland. These morphological changes were accompanied by an increase of immunoreactive vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) levels and a decrease of the stimulatory effect of VIP adenylate cyclase activity in the seminal vesicle. The loss of sensitivity of the enzyme to VIP was conceivably related to a decrease in the affinity of VIP receptors rather than to a decrease in their number. The changes in the affinity of the VIP receptors were accompanied with a lower sensitivity of VIP binding to GTP, which suggest an uncoupling between the receptor and the transductor molecules. However, chronic exposure to ethanol did not modify either the levels of G-protein subunits (alpha(s) and alpha(i1/2)) or the GTPase activity from seminal vesicle membranes. Moreover, ethanol feeding did not affect adenylate cyclase activity stimulated by forskolin or by Gpp(NH)p. Thus, ethanol-induced changes in the sensitivity of adenylate cyclase to VIP appear to be attributed to an alteration in the VIP-receptor/G-protein interphase rather than in the G-protein/adenylate cyclase connection. PMID:10069562

  8. Therapeutically targeting mitochondrial redox signalling alleviates endothelial dysfunction in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Cathal; Kenny, Louise C

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant placentation generating placental oxidative stress is proposed to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Unfortunately, therapeutic trials of antioxidants have been uniformly disappointing. There is provisional evidence implicating mitochondrial dysfunction as a source of oxidative stress in preeclampsia. Here we provide evidence that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediates endothelial dysfunction and establish that directly targeting mitochondrial scavenging may provide a protective role. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to 3% plasma from women with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia resulted in a significant decrease in mitochondrial function with a subsequent significant increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation compared to cells exposed to plasma from women with uncomplicated pregnancies. Real-time PCR analysis showed increased expression of inflammatory markers TNF-α, TLR-9 and ICAM-1 respectively in endothelial cells treated with preeclampsia plasma. MitoTempo is a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant, pre-treatment of cells with MitoTempo protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Furthermore MitoTempo significantly reduced mitochondrial superoxide production in cells exposed to preeclampsia plasma by normalising mitochondrial metabolism. MitoTempo significantly altered the inflammatory profile of plasma treated cells. These novel data support a functional role for mitochondrial redox signaling in modulating the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and identifies mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants as potential therapeutic candidates. PMID:27604418

  9. Therapeutically targeting mitochondrial redox signalling alleviates endothelial dysfunction in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Cathal; Kenny, Louise C.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant placentation generating placental oxidative stress is proposed to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Unfortunately, therapeutic trials of antioxidants have been uniformly disappointing. There is provisional evidence implicating mitochondrial dysfunction as a source of oxidative stress in preeclampsia. Here we provide evidence that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediates endothelial dysfunction and establish that directly targeting mitochondrial scavenging may provide a protective role. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to 3% plasma from women with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia resulted in a significant decrease in mitochondrial function with a subsequent significant increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation compared to cells exposed to plasma from women with uncomplicated pregnancies. Real-time PCR analysis showed increased expression of inflammatory markers TNF-α, TLR-9 and ICAM-1 respectively in endothelial cells treated with preeclampsia plasma. MitoTempo is a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant, pre-treatment of cells with MitoTempo protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Furthermore MitoTempo significantly reduced mitochondrial superoxide production in cells exposed to preeclampsia plasma by normalising mitochondrial metabolism. MitoTempo significantly altered the inflammatory profile of plasma treated cells. These novel data support a functional role for mitochondrial redox signaling in modulating the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and identifies mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants as potential therapeutic candidates. PMID:27604418

  10. Sphingosine 1-phosphate induced synthesis of glycocalyx on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ye; Liu, Xiao-Heng; Tarbell, John; Fu, Bingmei

    2015-11-15

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) protects glycocalyx against shedding, playing important roles in endothelial functions. We previously found that glycocalyx on endothelial cells (ECs) was shed after plasma protein depletion. In the present study, we investigated the role of S1P on the recovery of glycocalyx, and tested whether it is mediated by phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. After depletion of plasma protein, ECs were treated with S1P for another 6h. And then, the major components of glycocalyx including syndecan-1 with attached heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) on endothelial cells were detected using confocal fluorescence microscopy. Role of PI3K in the S1P-induced synthesis of glycocalyx was confirmed by using the PI3K inhibitor (LY294002). Syndecan-1 with attached HS and CS were degraded with duration of plasma protein depletion. S1P induced recovery of syndecan-1 with attached HS and CS. The PI3K inhibitor LY294002 abolished the effect of S1P on recovery of glycocalyx. Thus, S1P induced synthesis of glycocalyx on endothelial cells and it is mediated by PI3K pathway.

  11. Design and synthesis of boronic acid inhibitors of endothelial lipase.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Daniel P; LeBlanc, Daniel F; Cromley, Debra; Billheimer, Jeffrey; Rader, Daniel J; Bachovchin, William W

    2012-02-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) are homologous lipases that act on plasma lipoproteins. EL is predominantly a phospholipase and appears to be a key regulator of plasma HDL-C. LPL is mainly a triglyceride lipase regulating (V)LDL levels. The existing biological data indicate that inhibitors selective for EL over LPL should have anti-atherogenic activity, mainly through increasing plasma HDL-C levels. We report here the synthesis of alkyl, aryl, or acyl-substituted phenylboronic acids that inhibit EL. Many of the inhibitors evaluated proved to be nearly equally potent against both EL and LPL, but several exhibited moderate to good selectivity for EL. PMID:22225633

  12. CTRP9 induces mitochondrial biogenesis and protects high glucose-induced endothelial oxidative damage via AdipoR1 -SIRT1- PGC-1α activation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Li, Bin; Chen, Xu; Su, Jie; Wang, Hongbing; Yu, Shiqiang; Zheng, Qijun

    2016-09-01

    Vascular lesions caused by endothelial dysfunction are the most common and serious complication of diabetes. The vasoactive potency of CTRP9 has been reported in our previous study via nitric oxide (NO) production. However, the effect of CTRP9 on vascular endothelial cells remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the protection role of CTRP9 in the primary aortic vascular endothelial cells and HAECs under high-glucose condition. We found that the aortic vascular endothelial cells isolated from mice fed with a high fat diet generated more ROS production than normal cells, along with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis, which was also found in HAECs treated with high glucose. However, the treatment of CTPR9 significantly reduced ROS production and increased the activities of endogenous antioxidant enzymes, the expression of PGC-1α, NRF1, TFAM, ATP5A1 and SIRT1, and the activity of cytochrome c oxidase, indicating an induction of mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, silencing the expression of SIRT1 in HAECs impeded the effect of CTRP9 on mitochondrial biogenesis, while silencing the expression of AdipoR1 in HAECs reversed the expression of SIRT1 and PGC-1α. Based on these findings, this study showed that CTRP9 might induce mitochondrial biogenesis and protect high glucose-induced endothelial oxidative damage via AdipoR1-SIRT1-PGC-1α signaling pathway. PMID:27349872

  13. Endothelial RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function

    SciTech Connect

    Asdonk, Tobias; Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation alters HCAEC biology in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPC function is affected by RIG-I stimulation in vitro. -- Abstract: Background: Endothelial dysfunction is a crucial part of the chronic inflammatory atherosclerotic process and is mediated by innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that pattern recognition receptors (PRR) specialized in immunorecognition of nucleic acids may play an important role in endothelial biology in a proatherogenic manner. Here, we analyzed the impact of endothelial retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) activation upon vascular endothelial biology. Methods and results: Wild type mice were injected intravenously with 32.5 {mu}g of the RIG-ligand 3pRNA (RNA with triphosphate at the 5 Prime end) or polyA control every other day for 7 days. In 3pRNA-treated mice, endothelium-depended vasodilation was significantly impaired, vascular oxidative stress significantly increased and circulating endothelial microparticle (EMP) numbers significantly elevated compared to controls. To gain further insight in RIG-I dependent endothelial biology, cultured human coronary endothelial cells (HCAEC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) were stimulated in vitro with 3pRNA. Both cells types express RIG-I and react with receptor upregulation upon stimulation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation is enhanced in both cell types, whereas apoptosis and proliferation is not significantly affected in HCAEC. Importantly, HCAEC release significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines in response to RIG-I stimulation. Conclusion: This study shows that activation of the cytoplasmatic nucleic acid receptor RIG-I leads to endothelial dysfunction. RIG-I induced endothelial damage could therefore be an important pathway in atherogenesis.

  14. Oxygen-rich coating promotes binding of proteins and endothelialization of polyethylene terephthalate polymers.

    PubMed

    Jaganjac, Morana; Vesel, Alenka; Milkovic, Lidija; Recek, Nina; Kolar, Metod; Zarkovic, Neven; Latiff, Aishah; Kleinschek, Karin-Stana; Mozetic, Miran

    2014-07-01

    The formation of endothelial cell monolayer on prosthetic implants has not sufficiently explored. The main reasons leading to the development of thrombosis and/or intimal hyperplasia is the lack of endothelialization. In the present work, we have studied the influence of oxygen and fluorine plasma treatment of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) polymers on human microvascular endothelial cell adhesion and proliferation. We characterized the polymer surface, wettability, and oxidation potential upon plasma treatment. Moreover, binding of serum and media compounds on PET surface was monitored by Quartz crystal microbalance method, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Cell adhesion and morphology was assessed by light and scanning electron microscopy. The influence of plasma treatment on induction of cellular oxidative stress and cell proliferation was evaluated. The results obtained showed that treatment with oxygen plasma decreased the oxidation potential of the PET surface and revealed the highest affinity for binding of serum components. Accordingly, the cells reflected the best adhesion and morphological properties on oxygen-treated PET polymers. Moreover, treatment with oxygen plasma did not induce intracellular reactive oxygen species production while it stimulated endothelial cell proliferation by 25% suggesting the possible use of oxygen plasma treatment to enhance endothelialization of synthetic vascular grafts.

  15. Assessing mechanisms of GPIHBP1 and lipoprotein lipase movement across endothelial cells[S

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Brandon S. J.; Goulbourne, Chris N.; Barnes, Richard H.; Turlo, Kirsten A.; Gin, Peter; Vaughan, Sue; Vaux, David J.; Bensadoun, André; Beigneux, Anne P.; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G.

    2012-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is secreted into the interstitial spaces by adipocytes and myocytes but then must be transported to the capillary lumen by GPIHBP1, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein of capillary endothelial cells. The mechanism by which GPIHBP1 and LPL move across endothelial cells remains unclear. We asked whether the transport of GPIHBP1 and LPL across endothelial cells was uni- or bidirectional. We also asked whether GPIHBP1 and LPL are transported across cells in vesicles and whether this transport process requires caveolin-1. The movement of GPIHBP1 and LPL across cultured endothelial cells was bidirectional. Also, GPIHBP1 moved bidirectionally across capillary endothelial cells in live mice. The transport of LPL across endothelial cells was inhibited by dynasore and genistein, consistent with a vesicular transport process. Also, transmission electron microscopy (EM) and dual-axis EM tomography revealed GPIHBP1 and LPL in invaginations of the plasma membrane and in vesicles. The movement of GPIHBP1 across capillary endothelial cells was efficient in the absence of caveolin-1, and there was no defect in the internalization of LPL by caveolin-1-deficient endothelial cells in culture. Our studies show that GPIHBP1 and LPL move bidirectionally across endothelial cells in vesicles and that transport is efficient even when caveolin-1 is absent. PMID:23008484

  16. In Vitro Endothelialization Test of Biomaterials Using Immortalized Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Ken; Hiruma, Hitomi; Kobayashi, Shingo; Sato, Yoji; Tanaka, Masaru; Sawada, Rumi; Niimi, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Functionalizing biomaterials with peptides or polymers that enhance recruitment of endothelial cells (ECs) can reduce blood coagulation and thrombosis. To assess endothelialization of materials in vitro, primary ECs are generally used, although the characteristics of these cells vary among the donors and change with time in culture. Recently, primary cell lines immortalized by transduction of simian vacuolating virus 40 large T antigen or human telomerase reverse transcriptase have been developed. To determine whether immortalized ECs can substitute for primary ECs in material testing, we investigated endothelialization on biocompatible polymers using three lots of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and immortalized microvascular ECs, TIME-GFP. Attachment to and growth on polymer surfaces were comparable between cell types, but results were more consistent with TIME-GFP. Our findings indicate that TIME-GFP is more suitable for in vitro endothelialization testing of biomaterials. PMID:27348615

  17. Vasoactive intestinal peptide/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor relative expression in salivary glands as one endogenous modulator of acinar cell apoptosis in a murine model of Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hauk, V; Calafat, M; Larocca, L; Fraccaroli, L; Grasso, E; Ramhorst, R; Leirós, C Pérez

    2011-12-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by a progressive oral and ocular dryness that correlates poorly with the autoimmune damage of the glands. It has been proposed that a loss of homeostatic equilibrium in the glands is partly responsible for salivary dysfunction with acinar cells involved actively in the pathogenesis of SS. The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome develops secretory dysfunction and early loss of glandular homeostatic mechanisms, with mild infiltration of the glands. Based on the vasodilator, prosecretory and trophic effects of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) on acini as well as its anti-inflammatory properties we hypothesized that the local expression of VIP/vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor (VPAC) system in salivary glands could have a role in acinar cell apoptosis and macrophage function thus influencing gland homeostasis. Here we show a progressive decline of VIP expression in submandibular glands of NOD mice with no changes in VPAC receptor expression compared with normal mice. The deep loss of endogenous VIP was associated with a loss of acinar cells through apoptotic mechanisms that could be induced further by tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and reversed by VIP through a cyclic adenosine-5'-monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated pathway. The clearance of apoptotic acinar cells by macrophages was impaired for NOD macrophages but a shift from inflammatory to regulatory phenotype was induced in macrophages during phagocytosis of apoptotic acinar cells. These results support that the decline in endogenous VIP/VPAC local levels might influence the survival/apoptosis intracellular set point in NOD acinar cells and their clearance, thus contributing to gland homeostasis loss.

  18. Soluble Vascular Endothelial Cadherin as a New Biomarker of Irradiation in Highly Irradiated Baboons with Bone Marrow Protection.

    PubMed

    Hérodin, Francis; Voir, Diane; Vilgrain, Isabelle; Courçon, Marie; Drouet, Michel; Boittin, François-Xavier

    2016-06-01

    Vascular endothelial cadherin is the main component of adherens junctions enabling cohesion of the endothelial monolayer in vessels. The extracellular part of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) can be cleaved, releasing soluble fragments in blood (sVE-cadherin). In some diseases with endothelial dysfunction, a correlation between increased blood sVE-cadherin levels and disease state has been proposed. Irradiation is known to induce endothelial damage, but new serum biomarkers are needed to evaluate endothelial damage after irradiation. Here, the authors investigated whether sVE-cadherin may be an interesting biomarker of irradiation in highly irradiated baboons with bone marrow protection. sVE-cadherin was detected in the plasma of young as well as old baboons. Plasma sVE-cadherin levels significantly decrease a few days after irradiation but recover in the late time after irradiation. Kinetic analysis of plasma sVE-cadherin levels suggests a correlation with white blood cell counts in both the acute phase of irradiation and during hematopoietic recovery, suggesting that plasma sVE-cadherin levels may be partly linked to the disappearance and recovery of white blood cells. Interestingly, after hematopoietic recovery was completed, sVE-cadherin levels were found to exceed control values, suggesting that plasma sVE-cadherin may represent a new biomarker of endothelial damage or neovascularization in the late time after irradiation. PMID:27115227

  19. Mineralocorticoid Receptors Modulate Vascular Endothelial Function in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Luttrell, Meredith; Kim, Han-Kyul; Meade, Thomas H.; English, Mark; Segal, Mark S.; Christou, Demetra D.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity increases linearly with age and is associated with impaired vascular endothelial function and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) contribute to impaired vascular endothelial function in cardiovascular disease; however, their role in uncomplicated human obesity is unknown. Because plasma aldosterone levels are elevated in obesity and adipocytes may be a source of aldosterone, we hypothesized that MR modulate vascular endothelial function in older adults in an adiposity-dependent manner. To test this hypothesis, we administered MR blockade (Eplerenone; 100 mg/day) for 1 month in a balanced, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study to 22 older adults (10 men, 55–79 years) varying widely in adiposity (body mass index: 20–45 kg/m2) but who were free from overt cardiovascular disease. We evaluated vascular endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation [FMD] via ultrasonography) and oxidative stress (plasma F2-isoprostanes and vascular endothelial cell protein expression of nitrotyrosine and NADPH oxidase p47phox) during placebo and MR blockade. In the whole group, oxidative stress (P>0.05) and FMD did not change with MR blockade (6.39±0.67 vs. 6.23±0.73 %, P=0.7, placebo vs. Eplerenone). However, individual improvements in FMD in response to Eplerenone were associated with higher total body fat (body mass index: r=0.45, P=0.02 and DXA-derived % body fat: r=0.50, P=0.009) and abdominal fat (total: r=0.61, P=0.005, visceral: r=0.67, P=0.002 and subcutaneous: r=0.48, P=0.03). In addition, greater improvements in FMD with Eplerenone were related with higher baseline fasting glucose (r=0.53, P=0.01). MR influence vascular endothelial function in an adiposity-dependent manner in healthy older adults. PMID:23786536

  20. Changes in nitric oxide release in vivo in response to vasoactive substances.

    PubMed Central

    Nava, E.; Wiklund, N. P.; Salazar, F. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. Changes in the release of nitric oxide (NO) in vivo were studied in rats following the administration of endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilators as well as the NO synthesis inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). NO production was assessed by measuring variations of nitrate in plasma by capillary ion analysis. 2. Intravenous administration of the endothelium-dependent vasodilators, bradykinin (2 and 10 micrograms kg-1 min-1) or substance P (0.3-3 micrograms kg-1 min-1) caused a transient dose-dependent hypotension followed by an increase in plasma nitrate concentration (maximal increments: 33 +/- 5% and 38 +/- 6%, for bradykinin and substance P, respectively). Prior administration of L-NAME (10 mg kg-1 min-1) inhibited the hypotension and increase in plasma nitrate caused by these substances. Intravenous administration of sodium nitrate (200 micrograms kg-1) also produced a transitory elevation in plasma nitrate which was similar in magnitude as that caused by the vasodilators. A rapid and transitory increment in plasma nitrate was observed after i.v. administration of authentic NO (400 micrograms kg-1). 3. Rats receiving the endothelium-dependent vasodilators, prostacyclin (0.6 micrograms kg-1 min-1) or adenosine (3 mg kg-1 min-1) intravenously showed a drop in blood pressure paralleled by a decrease in plasma nitrate (maximal decreases: 34 +/- 5% and 24 +/- 4%, for prostacyclin and adenosine, respectively). A similar effect on the plasmatic concentration of nitrate was observed when L-NAME (10 mg kg-1 min-1, i.v.) was administered to the animals. 4. This study demonstrates that (i) changes in plasma nitrate can be detected in vivo after stimulation or inhibition of NO synthase, (ii) an increased production of NO, measured as plasma nitrate, is related to the hypotension caused by bradykinin and substance P and (iii) a diminished concentration of plasmatic nitrate is associated to the hypotension induced by adenosine or prostacyclin

  1. A Multi-Layered Computational Model of Coupled Elastin Degradation, Vasoactive Dysfunction, and Collagenous Stiffening in Aortic Aging

    PubMed Central

    Valentín, A.; Humphrey, J.D.; Holzapfel, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Arterial responses to diverse pathologies and insults likely occur via similar mechanisms. For example, many studies suggest that the natural process of aging and isolated systolic hypertension share many characteristics in arteries, including loss of functional elastin, decreased smooth muscle tone, and altered rates of deposition and/or cross-linking of fibrillar collagen. Our aim is to show computationally how these coupled effects can impact evolving aortic geometry and mechanical behavior. Employing a thick-walled, multi-layered constrained mixture model, we suggest that a coupled loss of elastin and vasoactive function are fundamental mechanisms by which aortic aging occurs. Moreover, it is suggested that collagenous stiffening, although itself generally an undesirable process, can play a key role in attenuating excessive dilatation, perhaps including the enlargement of abdominal aortic aneurysms. PMID:21380570

  2. Inhibitory effect of oatmeal extract oligomer on vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced inflammation in surviving human skin.

    PubMed

    Boisnic, S; Branchet-Gumila, M C; Coutanceau, C

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiinflammatory effect of oatmeal extract oligomer on skin fragments stimulated by a neuromediator, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Skin fragments (from plastic surgery) were maintained in survival conditions for 6 h. To induce inflammation, VIP was placed in contact with dermis by culture medium. Histological analysis was then performed on hematoxylin- and eosin-stained slides. Edema was evaluated with semiquantitative scores. Vasodilation was studied by quantifying the percentage of dilated vessels according to scores and by measuring their surface by morphometrical image analysis. TNF-alpha dosage was made on culture supernatants. Vasodilation was significantly increased after application of VIP. After treatment with oatmeal extract oligomer, the mean surface of dilated vessels and edema were significantly decreased compared with VIP-treated skin. Moreover, treatment with this extract decreased TNF-alpha.

  3. Angiopoietin-2 is associated with decreased endothelial nitric oxide and poor clinical outcome in severe falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Tsin W; Lampah, Daniel A; Gitawati, Retno; Tjitra, Emiliana; Kenangalem, Enny; Piera, Kim; Price, Ric N; Duffull, Stephen B; Celermajer, David S; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2008-11-01

    Adherence of parasitized erythrocytes to activated endothelium causes microvascular obstruction, tissue ischemia, and clinical complications in severe malaria (SM); however, the mechanisms leading to endothelial activation remain unclear. The angiogenic factors, angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are modulators of endothelial activation, with Ang-2 release from Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) being regulated by endothelial nitric oxide (NO). We explored the relationships between endothelial NO bioavailability, Ang-2, VEGF, tissue perfusion, and clinical outcomes in SM. We measured plasma Ang-2 and VEGF, together with biomarkers of severity from 146 adults with and without SM, in parallel with longitudinal measures of endothelial function by using reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry (a measure of endothelial NO bioavailability). Regression was used to relate concentrations of Ang-2/VEGF with malaria disease severity, biomarkers of perfusion, endothelial activation, and parasite biomass. The longitudinal relationship between Ang-2 and endothelial function was assessed by using a mixed-effects model. Ang-2 concentrations were elevated in SM and associated with increased venous lactate, plasma intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 concentrations, parasite biomass, and mortality. In contrast, VEGF concentrations were inversely associated with these biomarkers. Ang-2 concentrations were significantly better predictors of death than venous lactate (P = 0.03). Recovery of endothelial function was associated with falling concentrations of Ang-2. Ang-2 release from endothelial cells with reduced NO bioavailability is likely to contribute to endothelial activation, sequestered parasite biomass, impaired perfusion, and poor outcome in severe falciparum malaria. Agents that improve endothelial NO, reduce WPB exocytosis, and/or antagonize Ang-2 may have therapeutic roles in SM.

  4. Filamin redistribution in an endothelial cell reoxygenation injury model.

    PubMed

    Hastie, L E; Patton, W F; Hechtman, H B; Shepro, D

    1997-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury increases vascular permeability in part by generating reactive oxygen species that disassemble the endothelial cell actin dense peripheral band. This is followed by an increase in the number and diameter of intercellular gaps. Millimolar concentrations of reactive oxygen metabolites lead to nonspecific endothelial cell injury, but micromolar concentrations activate inflammatory second messenger cascades which produce distributional changes in endothelial cell cytoskeletal proteins. H2O2 (100 microM) causes translocation of filamin, from the membrane to the cytosol within 1 min. Subsequently, gap formation occurs within 10-25 min, which is attributed to rearrangement of the dense peripheral band of F-actin. Plasma membrane blebbing occurs after 90 min and decreases in mitochondrial activity occur after 1-2 h. Deferoxamine (iron chelator) and TEMPO (nonspecific free radical scavenger) inhibit these changes. H2O2 (100-1000 microM) does not increase endothelial cell intracellular Ca2+ through 30 min and pretreating cells with a Ca2+-calmodulin kinase inhibitor or an intracellular Ca2+ chelator does not prevent filamin translocation. Filamin redistribution and actin rearrangement are early events in H2O2-mediated endothelial cell injury that appear to occur through Ca2+-independent pathways.

  5. Rapid flow-induced responses in endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial cells alter their morphology, growth rate, and metabolism in response to fluid shear stress. To study rapid flow-induced responses in the 3D endothelial cell morphology and calcium distribution, coupled fluorescence microscopy with optical sectioning, digital imaging, and numerical deconvolution techniques have been utilized. Results demonstrate that within the first minutes of flow application nuclear calcium is increasing. In the same time frame whole cell height and nuclear height are reduced by about 1 microm. Whole cell height changes may facilitate reduction of shear stress gradients on the luminal surface, whereas nuclear structural changes may be important for modulating endothelial growth rate and metabolism. To study the role of the cytoskeleton in these responses, endothelial cells have been treated with specific disrupters (acrylamide, cytochalasin D, and colchicine) of each of the cytoskeleton elements (intermediate filaments, microfilaments, and microtubules, respectively). None of these compounds had any effect on the shear-induced calcium response. Cytochalasin D and acrylamide did not affect the shear-induced nuclear morphology changes. Colchicine, however, completely abrogated the response, indicating that microtubules may be implicated in force transmission from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. A pedagogical model based on tensegrity theory principles is presented that is consistent with the results on the 3D endothelial morphology.

  6. New insights in endothelial and smooth muscle cell communication.

    PubMed

    Conejo, Víctor Arana; De Haro, Roberto; Sosa-Melgarejo, Jorge; Méndez, José D

    2007-01-01

    Based on immunohistochemical techniques against connexins and the intercellular flux of staining molecules, it has previously been shown that electrotonic communication occurs among endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, this due to the presence of myoendothelial gap junctions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the density of myoendothelial contacts in the left coronary and internal mammary arteries as well as in the left saphenous vein by means of electron microscopy, the distance between both cells participating in an myoendothelial contact with a semi-automatic image analysis system and the presence of homocellular and heterocellular gap junctions between endothelial and smooth muscle cells by using the immunohistochemical technique and confocal microscopy in thoracic aorta were also analyzed. The results are that all blood vessels studied present myoendothelial contacts, while density studies show that they are more abundant in the saphenous vein. The myoendothelial contact distance is constant and in no case the cytoplasmic processes reach the plasma membrane of the partner cell toward which they are advanced. Homocellular gap junctions were found between smooth muscle cells and between endothelial cells. Heterocellular gap junctions were absent, evidencing the possibility that signaling molecules between endothelial and smooth muscle cells may be transferred through plasma membranes as was once thought and not necessarily by electrotonic communication. PMID:17383847

  7. Imidazolineoxyl N-oxide induces COX-2 in endothelial cells: role of free radicals.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Mercedes; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose; Rodriguez, Cristina; Siguero, Laura; Seriola, Cristina; Romero, Jose-Maria; Vila, Luis

    2012-01-01

    cPTIO (2-[4-carboxyphenyl]-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) exerts beneficial actions on systemic inflammatory response. Besides its nitric oxide (NO) scavenging properties cPTIO could exert beneficial effects through modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. We studied the effect of cPTIO on the biosynthesis of vasoactive prostaglandins (PG) by endothelial cells. Human cord umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were treated with cPTIO, and expression of cycloxygenase (COX) isoenzymes in terms of mRNA and protein was determined by real-time-PCR and immunoblotting. Release of PGE2 (as index of untransformed PGH2 release) and 6-oxo-PGF1alpha (PGI2 stable metabolite) was determined by enzyme-immunoassay. cPTIO significantly increases the release of untransformed PGH2 associated to the induction of COX-2 expression. Experiments with NO-synthase inhibitors and radical scavengers showed that induction of COX-2 by cPTIO was mediated by free radical species, likely caused by the mobilization of NO from cellular stores. Finally, using specific signal-transduction inhibitors we show the involvement of Src/PI3-K/PKC pathway. Additional effects other than a direct NO scavenging activity may confer therapeutic advantages to cPTIO as compared with NO-synthase inhibitors for the treatment of systemic inflammation-associated vascular hyporeactivity. PMID:22652668

  8. Gene expression profiling reveals novel protective effects of Aminaphtone on ECV304 endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Giulia; Bellocchi, Chiara; Todoerti, Katia; Saporiti, Federica; Piacentini, Luca; Scorza, Raffaella; Colombo, Gualtiero I

    2016-07-01

    Aminaphtone, a drug used in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), showed a remarkable role in the modulation of several vasoactive factors, like endothelin-1 and adhesion molecules. We analysed in vitro the effects of Aminaphtone on whole-genome gene expression and production of different inflammatory proteins. ECV-304 endothelial cells were stimulated with IL-1β 100U/ml in the presence or absence of Aminaphtone 6μg/ml. Gene expression profiles were compared at 1, 3, and 6h after stimulation by microarray. Supernatants of ECV-304 cultures were analysed at 3, 6, 12, and 24h by multiplex ELISA for production of several cytokine and chemokines. Microarrays showed a significant down-regulation at all times of a wide range of inflammatory genes. Aminaphtone appeared also able to modulate the regulation of immune response process (down-regulating cytokine biosynthesis, transcripts involved in lymphocyte differentiation and cell proliferation, and cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction) and to regulate genes engaged in homeostasis, secretion, body fluid levels, response to hypoxia, cell division, and cell-to-cell communication and signalling. Results were confirmed and extended analysing the secretome, which showed significant reduction of the release of 14 cytokines and chemokines. These effects are predicted to be mediated by interaction with different transcription factors. Aminaphtone was able to modulate the expression of inflammatory molecules relevant to the pathogenesis of several conditions in which the endothelial dysfunction is the main player and early event, like scleroderma, lung fibrosis, or atherosclerosis. PMID:27083548

  9. Interaction of human endothelial cells and nickel-titanium materials modified with silicon ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lotkov, Aleksandr I. Kashin, Oleg A.; Kudryavtseva, Yuliya A. Antonova, Larisa V. Matveeva, Vera G. Sergeeva, Evgeniya A.; Kudryashov, Andrey N.

    2015-10-27

    The paper studies the influence of chemical and phase compositions of NiTi surface layers modified with Si ions by plasma immersion implantation on their interaction with endothelial cells. It is shown that certain technological modes of Si ion implantation enhance the adhesion, proliferation, and viability of endothelial cells. It is found that the Si-modified NiTi surface is capable of stimulating the formation of capillary-like structures in the cell culture.

  10. Dengue virus NS1 triggers endothelial permeability and vascular leak that is prevented by NS1 vaccination.

    PubMed

    Beatty, P Robert; Puerta-Guardo, Henry; Killingbeck, Sarah S; Glasner, Dustin R; Hopkins, Kaycie; Harris, Eva

    2015-09-01

    The four dengue virus serotypes (DENV1 to DENV4) are mosquito-borne flaviviruses that cause up to ~100 million cases of dengue annually worldwide. Severe disease is thought to result from immunopathogenic processes involving serotype cross-reactive antibodies and T cells that together induce vasoactive cytokines, causing vascular leakage that leads to shock. However, no viral proteins have been directly implicated in triggering endothelial permeability, which results in vascular leakage. DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is secreted and circulates in patients' blood during acute infection; high levels of NS1 are associated with severe disease. We show that inoculation of mice with DENV NS1 alone induces both vascular leakage and production of key inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, simultaneous administration of NS1 with a sublethal dose of DENV2 results in a lethal vascular leak syndrome. We also demonstrate that NS1 from DENV1, DENV2, DENV3, and DENV4 triggers endothelial barrier dysfunction, causing increased permeability of human endothelial cell monolayers in vitro. These pathogenic effects of physiologically relevant amounts of NS1 in vivo and in vitro were blocked by NS1-immune polyclonal mouse serum or monoclonal antibodies to NS1, and immunization of mice with NS1 from DENV1 to DENV4 protected against lethal DENV2 challenge. These findings add an important and previously overlooked component to the causes of dengue vascular leak, identify a new potential target for dengue therapeutics, and support inclusion of NS1 in dengue vaccines. PMID:26355030

  11. Differential regulation of angiopoietin 1 and angiopoietin 2 during dengue virus infection of human umbilical vein endothelial cells: implications for endothelial hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Ong, Siew Pei; Ng, Mah Lee; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2013-12-01

    Infection with dengue virus (DV) can result in dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome, where patients suffer from bleeding and plasma leakage involving endothelial cells. Angiopoietins (Ang) 1 and 2 are important angiogenic factors that affect endothelial barrier integrity. In this study, DV was observed to induce endothelial leakage at multiplicity of infection of 10 in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with interendothelial gap formation. Immunostaining of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) and zona occludin 1 (ZO-1) showed the absence of these endothelial junctional proteins at the cell-cell contact zones between adjacent cells. In addition, Ang1 that is required for protecting against endothelial hyperpermeability was found to be down-regulated during DV infection. Treatment with increasing concentrations of recombinant Ang1 was shown to prevent DV-induced endothelial hyperpermeability in a dose-dependent manner by preventing the down-regulation of VE-cadherin and ZO-1 at cell membrane. In contrast, the expression of Ang2, the natural antagonist of Ang1, was observed to be up-regulated during DV infection. Recombinant Ang2 added to HUVEC at non-toxic concentrations showed decreased in transendothelial electrical resistance reading and the down-regulation of VE-cadherin and ZO-1. These findings suggest that DV reduces the expression of Ang1 and enhances the expression of Ang2 in endothelial cells and that this imbalance of Ang 1 and Ang 2 may play a contributing role to the increased permeability of human primary endothelial cells during DV infection. PMID:23989887

  12. Caveolae protect endothelial cells from membrane rupture during increased cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jade P.X.; Mendoza-Topaz, Carolina; Howard, Gillian; Chadwick, Jessica; Shvets, Elena; Cowburn, Andrew S.; Dunmore, Benjamin J.; Crosby, Alexi; Morrell, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Caveolae are strikingly abundant in endothelial cells, yet the physiological functions of caveolae in endothelium and other tissues remain incompletely understood. Previous studies suggest a mechanoprotective role, but whether this is relevant under the mechanical forces experienced by endothelial cells in vivo is unclear. In this study we have sought to determine whether endothelial caveolae disassemble under increased hemodynamic forces, and whether caveolae help prevent acute rupture of the plasma membrane under these conditions. Experiments in cultured cells established biochemical assays for disassembly of caveolar protein complexes, and assays for acute loss of plasma membrane integrity. In vivo, we demonstrate that caveolae in endothelial cells of the lung and cardiac muscle disassemble in response to acute increases in cardiac output. Electron microscopy and two-photon imaging reveal that the plasma membrane of microvascular endothelial cells in caveolin 1−/− mice is much more susceptible to acute rupture when cardiac output is increased. These data imply that mechanoprotection through disassembly of caveolae is important for endothelial function in vivo. PMID:26459598

  13. Systemic endothelial activation occurs in both mild and severe malaria. Correlating dermal microvascular endothelial cell phenotype and soluble cell adhesion molecules with disease severity.

    PubMed

    Turner, G D; Ly, V C; Nguyen, T H; Tran, T H; Nguyen, H P; Bethell, D; Wyllie, S; Louwrier, K; Fox, S B; Gatter, K C; Day, N P; Tran, T H; White, N J; Berendt, A R

    1998-06-01

    Fatal Plasmodium falciparum malaria is accompanied by systemic endothelial activation. To study endothelial activation directly during malaria and sepsis in vivo, the expression of cell adhesion molecules on dermal microvascular endothelium was examined in skin biopsies and correlated with plasma levels of soluble (circulating) ICAM-1, E-selectin, and VCAM-1 and the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. Skin biopsies were obtained from 61 cases of severe malaria, 42 cases of uncomplicated malaria, 10 cases of severe systemic sepsis, and 17 uninfected controls. Systemic endothelial activation, represented by the up-regulation of inducible cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) on endothelium and increased levels of soluble CAMs (sCAMs), were seen in both severe and uncomplicated malaria and sepsis when compared with uninfected controls. Plasma levels of sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, and sE-selectin correlated positively with the severity of malaria whereas TNF-alpha was raised nonspecifically in malaria and sepsis. Immunohistochemical evidence of endothelial activation in skin biopsies did not correlate with sCAM levels or disease severity. This indicates a background of systemic endothelial activation, which occurs in both mild and severe malaria and sepsis. The levels of sCAMs in malaria are thus not an accurate reflection of endothelial cell expression of CAMs in a particular vascular bed, and other factors must influence their levels during disease.

  14. Systemic endothelial activation occurs in both mild and severe malaria. Correlating dermal microvascular endothelial cell phenotype and soluble cell adhesion molecules with disease severity.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, G. D.; Ly, V. C.; Nguyen, T. H.; Tran, T. H.; Nguyen, H. P.; Bethell, D.; Wyllie, S.; Louwrier, K.; Fox, S. B.; Gatter, K. C.; Day, N. P.; Tran, T. H.; White, N. J.; Berendt, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Fatal Plasmodium falciparum malaria is accompanied by systemic endothelial activation. To study endothelial activation directly during malaria and sepsis in vivo, the expression of cell adhesion molecules on dermal microvascular endothelium was examined in skin biopsies and correlated with plasma levels of soluble (circulating) ICAM-1, E-selectin, and VCAM-1 and the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. Skin biopsies were obtained from 61 cases of severe malaria, 42 cases of uncomplicated malaria, 10 cases of severe systemic sepsis, and 17 uninfected controls. Systemic endothelial activation, represented by the up-regulation of inducible cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) on endothelium and increased levels of soluble CAMs (sCAMs), were seen in both severe and uncomplicated malaria and sepsis when compared with uninfected controls. Plasma levels of sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, and sE-selectin correlated positively with the severity of malaria whereas TNF-alpha was raised nonspecifically in malaria and sepsis. Immunohistochemical evidence of endothelial activation in skin biopsies did not correlate with sCAM levels or disease severity. This indicates a background of systemic endothelial activation, which occurs in both mild and severe malaria and sepsis. The levels of sCAMs in malaria are thus not an accurate reflection of endothelial cell expression of CAMs in a particular vascular bed, and other factors must influence their levels during disease. Images Figure 1 PMID:9626052

  15. Expression of an insulin-regulatable glucose carrier in muscle and fat endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilaró, Senen; Palacín, Manuel; Pilch, Paul F.; Testar, Xavier; Zorzano, Antonio

    1989-12-01

    INSULIN rapidly stimulates glucose use in the major target tissues, muscle and fat, by modulating a tissue-specific glucose transporter isoform1-6. Access of glucose to the target tissue is restricted by endothelial cells which line the walls of nonfenestrated capillaries of fat and muscle7. Thus, we examined whether the capillary endothelial cells are actively involved in the modulation of glucose availability by these tissues. We report here the abundant expression of the muscle/fat glucose transporter isoform in endothelial cells, using an immunocytochemical analysis with a monoclonal antibody specific for this isoform1. This expression is restricted to endothelial cells from the major insulin target tissues, and it is not detected in brain and liver where insulin does not activate glucose transport. The expression of the muscle/fat transporter isoform in endothelial cells is significantly greater than in the neighbouring muscle and fat cells. Following administration of insulin to animals in vivo, there occurs a rapid increase in the number of muscle/fat transporters present in the lumenal plasma membrane of the capillary endothelial cells. These results document that insulin promotes the translocation of the muscle/fat glucose transporter in endothelial cells. It is therefore likely that endothelial cells play an important role in the regulation of glucose use by the major insulin target tissues in normal and diseased states.

  16. Role of endothelial cells in bovine mammary gland health and disease.

    PubMed

    Ryman, Valerie E; Packiriswamy, Nandakumar; Sordillo, Lorraine M

    2015-12-01

    The bovine mammary gland is a dynamic and complex organ composed of various cell types that work together for the purpose of milk synthesis and secretion. A layer of endothelial cells establishes the blood-milk barrier, which exists to facilitate the exchange of solutes and macromolecules necessary for optimal milk production. During bacterial challenge, however, endothelial cells divert some of their lactation function to protect the underlying tissue from damage by initiating inflammation. At the onset of inflammation, endothelial cells tightly regulate the movement of plasma components and leukocytes into affected tissue. Unfortunately, endothelial dysfunction as a result of exacerbated or sustained inflammation can negatively affect both barrier integrity and the health of surrounding extravascular tissue. The objective of this review is to highlight the role of endothelial cells in supporting milk production and regulating optimal inflammatory responses. The consequences of endothelial dysfunction and sustained inflammation on milk synthesis and secretion are discussed. Given the important role of endothelial cells in orchestrating the inflammatory response, a better understanding of endothelial function during mastitis may support development of targeted therapies to protect bovine mammary tissue and mammary endothelium.

  17. Extracellular lactate as a dynamic vasoactive signal in the rat retinal microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, Shigeki; Katsumura, Kozo; Kobayashi, Takatoshi; Puro, Donald G

    2006-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that extracellular lactate regulates the function of pericyte-containing retinal microvessels. Although abluminally positioned pericytes appear to adjust capillary perfusion by contracting and relaxing, knowledge of the molecular signals that regulate the contractility of these mural cells is limited. Here, we focused on lactate because this metabolic product is in the retinal extracellular space under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In microvessels freshly isolated from the adult rat retina, we used perforated-patch pipettes to monitor ionic currents, fura-2 to measure calcium levels, and time-lapse photography to visualize changes in mural cell contractility and lumen diameter. During lactate exposure, pericyte calcium rose; these cells contracted, and lumens constricted. This contractile response appears to involve a cascade of events resulting in the inhibition of Na+/Ca2+ exchangers (NCXs), the decreased of which function causes pericyte calcium to increase and contraction to be triggered. On the basis of our observation that gap junction uncouplers minimized the lactate-induced rise in pericyte calcium, we propose that the NCXs inhibited by lactate are predominately located in the endothelium. Indicative of the importance of endothelial/pericyte gap junctions, uncouplers of these junctions switched the pericyte response to lactate from contraction to relaxation. In addition, we observed that hypoxia, which closes microvascular gap junctions, also switched lactate's effect from vasocontraction to vasorelaxation. Thus the response of pericyte-containing retinal microvessels to extracellular lactate is metabolically modulated. The ability of lactate to serve as a vasoconstrictor when energy supplies are ample and a vasodilator under hypoxic conditions may be an efficient mechanism to link capillary function with local metabolic need. PMID:16299264

  18. Endothelial cell permeability to water and antipyrine

    SciTech Connect

    Garrick, R.A.

    1986-03-05

    The endothelium provides a structural barrier between plasma constituents and the tissues. The permeability characteristics of the the endothelial cells regulate the transcellular movement of materials across this barrier while other movement is paracellular. In this study the permeability of the endothelial cells to tritiated water (/sup 3/HHO) and /sup 14/C-labeled antipyrine (AP) was investigated. The cells were isolated non-enzymatically from calf pulmonary artery and were maintained in culture and used between the seventh and fifteenth passage. The cells were removed from the T-flasks with a rubber policeman, titurated with a 22g needle and centrifuged. The cells were mixed with an extracellular marker, drawn into polyethylene tubing and packed by centrifugation for use in the linear diffusion technique. All measurements were made at 37 C. The diffusion coefficients for /sup 3/HHO through the packed cells (D), the intracellular material (D/sub 2/), and the extracellular material (D/sub 1/) were 0.682, 0.932 and 2.45 x 10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ and for AP were 0.273, 0.355 and 1.13 x 10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ respectively. The permeability coefficient calculated by the series-parallel pathway model for /sup 3/HHO was higher than that for AP and for both /sup 3/HHO and AP were lower than those calculated for isolated lung cells and erythrocytes.

  19. Differential radiation response of cultured endothelial cells and smooth myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.K.; Longenecker, J.P.; Fajardo, L.F.

    1982-09-01

    In vivo observations have suggested that endothelial cells are the most radiosensitive elements of the vascular wall. To test whether this represents an intrinsic differential sensitivity, the response of bovine aortic endothelial cells and smooth myocytes was investigated in confluent cell cultures exposed to single doses of gamma radiation (250, 500, 1,000 or 2,000 rad). Both cell types showed a dose-dependent decrease in attachment efficiency when dissociated and replated at six hours after radiation. However, the attachment efficiency in both cell types was similar when a 72-hour postirradiation incubation period was used prior to dissociation of the cells. Growth inhibition was significantly greater (7- to 10-fold) in endothelial cells than in myocytes when examined four days after attachment. Confluent endothelial monolayers showed a dose-dependent, progressive cell loss during the 72-hour postirradiation period (70% after 1,000 rad); the myocyte cultures showed no radiation effect on the cell numbers. In spite of the reduction in number, the endothelial cells maintained the continuity of their monolayer by compensation with an increase in mean cell size. Endothelial cells developed multiple structural lesions, including an increase in the number and size of residual and lysosomal bodies, electron-lucent cytoplasmic defects, interruptions in the plasma membrane and irregular aggregation of chromatin, causing electron-lucent nuclei. These changes increased in severity with time and dose and were most pronounced 24 to 72 hours after 1,000 rad. No significant ultrastructural alterations were detected in myocytes four days after 2,000 rad.

  20. Endothelial-regenerating cells: an expanding universe.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Martin; Nickenig, Georg; Werner, Nikos

    2010-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common cause for cardiovascular diseases and is based on endothelial dysfunction. A growing body of evidence suggests the contribution of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells, monocytic cells, and mature endothelial cells to vessel formation and endothelial rejuvenation. To this day, various subsets of these endothelial-regenerating cells have been identified according to cellular origin, phenotype, and properties in vivo and in vitro. However, the definition and biology, especially of endothelial progenitor cells, is complex and under heavy debate. In this review, we focus on current definitions of endothelial progenitor cells, highlight the clinical relevance of endothelial-regenerating cells, and provide new insights into cell-cell interactions involved in endothelial cell rejuvenation.

  1. [Piretanide in chronic and acute decompensated heart failure. Effect on hemodynamics and vasoactive hormones].

    PubMed

    Sievert, H; Hopf, R; Vens-Cappell, F; Kirsten, R; Nelson, K; Pooth, R; Kaltenbach, M

    1989-06-15

    Eight patients with chronic heart failure classified as NYHA class II to III (group 1) and nine patients with acute decompensated heart failure classified as NYHA class IV (group 2) were treated with piretanide at a dosage of 12 mg administered intravenously. In both groups the level of prostaglandine PGE2 as well as plasma renine activity significantly increased prior to the onset of diuresis. The percentage increase was more pronounced in group 1 which had lower baseline values. With a time-lag, the norepinephrine plasma level also increased significantly. During the first 30 minutes there was only little effect on blood pressure, pulmonary artery pressure and cardiac output in patients with chronic heart failure (group 1). Only after 60 minutes there was a significant decrease in mean pulmonary artery pressure (from 39 +/- 17 to 33 +/- 18 mm Hg; p less than 0.05). In patients with acute decompensated heart failure (group 2) piretanide led to a significant reduction in mean pulmonary artery pressure (from 42 +/- 13 to 37 +/- 12 mm Hg; p less than 0.05) within 15 minutes after administration, i.e. even prior to the onset of diuresis. Thus, the administration of piretanide had a positive effect on hemodynamics in patients with chronic as well as in patients with acute decompensated heart failure. Significant improvement prior to diuresis onset, however, was only found in patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These effects may be explained by a stimulation of prostaglandines which promote vasodilation. They are increased by the diuresis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Effects of a high-protein, low-carbohydrate v. high-protein, moderate-carbohydrate weight-loss diet on antioxidant status, endothelial markers and plasma indices of the cardiometabolic profile.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Alexandra M; Lobley, Gerald E; Horgan, Graham W; Bremner, David M; Fyfe, Claire L; Morrice, Philip C; Duthie, Garry G

    2011-07-01

    There are concerns that weight-loss (WL) diets based on very low carbohydrate (LC) intake have a negative impact on antioxidant status and biomarkers of cardiovascular and metabolic health. Obese men (n 16) participated in a randomised, cross-over design diet trial, with food provided daily, at approximately 8.3 MJ/d (approximately 70 % of energy maintenance requirements). They were provided with two high-protein diets (30 % of energy), each for a 4-week period, involving a LC (4 % carbohydrate) and a moderate carbohydrate (MC, 35 % carbohydrate) content. Body weight was measured daily, and weekly blood samples were collected. On average, subjects lost 6.75 and 4.32 kg of weight on the LC and MC diets, respectively (P < 0.001, SED 0.350). Although the LC and MC diets were associated with a small reduction in plasma concentrations of retinol, vitamin E (α-tocopherol) and β-cryptoxanthin (P < 0.005), these were still above the values indicative of deficiency. Interestingly, plasma vitamin C concentrations increased on consumption of the LC diet (P < 0.05). Plasma markers of insulin resistance (P < 0.001), lipaemia and inflammation (P < 0.05, TNF-α and IL-10) improved similarly on both diets. There was no change in other cardiovascular markers with WL. The present data suggest that a LC WL diet does not impair plasma indices of cardiometabolic health, at least within 4 weeks, in otherwise healthy obese subjects. In general, improvements in metabolic health associated with WL were similar between the LC and MC diets. Antioxidant supplements may be warranted if LC WL diets are consumed for a prolonged period.

  3. F-actin-rich contractile endothelial pores prevent vascular leakage during leukocyte diapedesis through local RhoA signalling.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, Niels; Schimmel, Lilian; Oort, Chantal; van Rijssel, Jos; Yin, Taofei; Ma, Bin; van Unen, Jakobus; Pitter, Bettina; Huveneers, Stephan; Goedhart, Joachim; Wu, Yi; Montanez, Eloi; Woodfin, Abigail; van Buul, Jaap D

    2016-01-27

    During immune surveillance and inflammation, leukocytes exit the vasculature through transient openings in the endothelium without causing plasma leakage. However, the exact mechanisms behind this intriguing phenomenon are still unknown. Here we report that maintenance of endothelial barrier integrity during leukocyte diapedesis requires local endothelial RhoA cycling. Endothelial RhoA depletion in vitro or Rho inhibition in vivo provokes neutrophil-induced vascular leakage that manifests during the physical movement of neutrophils through the endothelial layer. Local RhoA activation initiates the formation of contractile F-actin structures that surround emigrating neutrophils. These structures that surround neutrophil-induced endothelial pores prevent plasma leakage through actomyosin-based pore confinement. Mechanistically, we found that the initiation of RhoA activity involves ICAM-1 and the Rho GEFs Ect2 and LARG. In addition, regulation of actomyosin-based endothelial pore confinement involves ROCK2b, but not ROCK1. Thus, endothelial cells assemble RhoA-controlled contractile F-actin structures around endothelial pores that prevent vascular leakage during leukocyte extravasation.

  4. F-actin-rich contractile endothelial pores prevent vascular leakage during leukocyte diapedesis through local RhoA signalling

    PubMed Central

    Heemskerk, Niels; Schimmel, Lilian; Oort, Chantal; van Rijssel, Jos; Yin, Taofei; Ma, Bin; van Unen, Jakobus; Pitter, Bettina; Huveneers, Stephan; Goedhart, Joachim; Wu, Yi; Montanez, Eloi; Woodfin, Abigail; van Buul, Jaap D.

    2016-01-01

    During immune surveillance and inflammation, leukocytes exit the vasculature through transient openings in the endothelium without causing plasma leakage. However, the exact mechanisms behind this intriguing phenomenon are still unknown. Here we report that maintenance of endothelial barrier integrity during leukocyte diapedesis requires local endothelial RhoA cycling. Endothelial RhoA depletion in vitro or Rho inhibition in vivo provokes neutrophil-induced vascular leakage that manifests during the physical movement of neutrophils through the endothelial layer. Local RhoA activation initiates the formation of contractile F-actin structures that surround emigrating neutrophils. These structures that surround neutrophil-induced endothelial pores prevent plasma leakage through actomyosin-based pore confinement. Mechanistically, we found that the initiation of RhoA activity involves ICAM-1 and the Rho GEFs Ect2 and LARG. In addition, regulation of actomyosin-based endothelial pore confinement involves ROCK2b, but not ROCK1. Thus, endothelial cells assemble RhoA-controlled contractile F-actin structures around endothelial pores that prevent vascular leakage during leukocyte extravasation. PMID:26814335

  5. Zinc and dexamethasone induce metallothionein accumulation by endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Briske-Anderson, M.; Bobilya, D.J.; Reeves, P.G. )

    1991-03-11

    Several tissues increase their metallothionein (MT) concentration when exposed to elevated amounts of plasma Zn. Endothelial cells form the blood vessels that supply all tissues and constitute a barrier between cells of tissues and the blood. This study examined the ability of endothelial cells to synthesize MT and accumulate Zn in response to high amounts of Zn and dexamethasone. Bovine pulmonary endothelial cells were grown to confluence in Minimum Essential Medium with Earle's salts and 10% fetal calf serum. The monolayer was maintained for 2 d prior to use in medium containing EDTA-dialyzed serum. This low Zn medium was replaced with one containing 1, 6, 25, 50, 100, 150, or 200 {mu}M Zn and incubated for 24 hr before harvesting the cells. MT was quantified by the cadmium binding assay. Cellular Zn concentrations were analyzed by atomic absorption after a nitric acid digestion. The MT concentration was elevated in response to Zn concentrations of 100 {mu}M or more. Cellular Zn concentration was elevated when media Zn was 25 {mu}M or more. MT and cellular Zn concentrations were positively correlated. In another study, inclusion of 0.1 {mu}M dexamethasone in the media increased concentration at all Zn concentrations studied. However, the inclusion of 0.3 {mu}M cis-platinum had no effect. In conclusion, endothelial cells in culture respond to elevated amounts of Zn and dexamethasone in the media by accumulating Zn and MT.

  6. Microvesicles: potential markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Lin; Williams, Kevin Jon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Microvesicles (MVs, also known as microparticles) are small membranous structures that are released from platelets and cells upon activation or during apoptosis. Microvesicles have been found in blood, urine, synovial fluid, extracellular spaces of solid organs, atherosclerotic plaques, tumors, and elsewhere. Here, we focus on new clinical and basic work that implicates MVs as markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction and hence novel contributors to cardiovascular and other diseases. Recent findings Advances in the detection of MVs and the use of cell type-specific markers to determine their origin have allowed studies that associated plasma concentrations of specific MVs with major types of endothelial dysfunction – namely, inappropriate or maladaptive vascular tone, leukocyte recruitment, and thrombosis. Recent investigations have highlighted microvesicular transport of key biologically active molecules besides tissue factor, such as ligands for pattern-recognition receptors, elements of the inflammasome, and morphogens. Microvesicles generated from human cells under different pathologic circumstances, e.g., during cholesterol loading or exposure to endotoxin, carry different subsets of these molecules and thereby alter endothelial function through several distinct, well-characterized molecular pathways. Summary Clinical and basic studies indicate that MVs may be novel markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction. This work has advanced our understanding of the development of cardiovascular and other diseases. Opportunites and obstacles to clinical applications are discussed. PMID:22248645

  7. Mechanically Induced Intercellular Calcium Communication in Confined Endothelial Structures

    PubMed Central

    Junkin, Michael; Lu, Yi; Long, Juexuan; Deymier, Pierre A.; Hoying, James B.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2012-01-01

    Calcium signaling in the diverse vascular structures is regulated by a wide range of mechanical and biochemical factors to maintain essential physiological functions of the vasculature. To properly transmit information, the intercellular calcium communication mechanism must be robust against various conditions in the cellular microenvironment. Using plasma lithography geometric confinement, we investigate mechanically induced calcium wave propagation in networks of human umbilical vein endothelial cells organized. Endothelial cell networks with confined architectures were stimulated at the single cell level, including using capacitive force probes. Calcium wave propagation in the network was observed using fluorescence calcium imaging. We show that mechanically induced calcium signaling in the endothelial networks is dynamically regulated against a wide range of probing forces and repeated stimulations. The calcium wave is able to propagate consistently in various dimensions from monolayers to individual cell chains, and in different topologies from linear patterns to cell junctions. Our results reveal that calcium signaling provides a robust mechanism for cell-cell communication in networks of endothelial cells despite the diversity of the microenvironmental inputs and complexity of vascular structures. PMID:23267827

  8. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide requires parallel changes in adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C to entrain circadian rhythms to a predictable phase

    PubMed Central

    An, Sungwon; Irwin, Robert P.; Allen, Charles N.; Tsai, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Circadian oscillations in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) depend on transcriptional repression by Period (PER)1 and PER2 proteins within single cells and on vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) signaling between cells. Because VIP is released by SCN neurons in a circadian pattern, and, after photic stimulation, it has been suggested to play a role in the synchronization to environmental light cycles. It is not known, however, if or how VIP entrains circadian gene expression or behavior. Here, we tested candidate signaling pathways required for VIP-mediated entrainment of SCN rhythms. We found that single applications of VIP reset PER2 rhythms in a time- and dose-dependent manner that differed from light. Unlike VIP-mediated signaling in other cell types, simultaneous antagonism of adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C activities was required to block the VIP-induced phase shifts of SCN rhythms. Consistent with this, VIP rapidly increased intracellular cAMP in most SCN neurons. Critically, daily VIP treatment entrained PER2 rhythms to a predicted phase angle within several days, depending on the concentration of VIP and the interval between VIP applications. We conclude that VIP entrains circadian timing among SCN neurons through rapid and parallel changes in adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C activities. PMID:21389307

  9. Rhythmic secretion of prolactin in rats: action of oxytocin coordinated by vasoactive intestinal polypeptide of suprachiasmatic nucleus origin.

    PubMed

    Egli, Marcel; Bertram, Richard; Sellix, Michael T; Freeman, Marc E

    2004-07-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is secreted from lactotrophs of the anterior pituitary gland of rats in a unique pattern in response to uterine cervical stimulation (CS) during mating. Surges of PRL secretion occur in response to relief from hypothalamic dopaminergic inhibition and stimulation by hypothalamic releasing neurohormones. In this study, we characterized the role of oxytocin (OT) in this system and the involvement of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) from the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in controlling OT and PRL secretion of CS rats. The effect of OT on PRL secretion was demonstrated in cultured lactotrophs showing simultaneous enhanced secretion rate and increased intracellular Ca(2+). Neurosecretory OT cells of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus that express VIP receptors were identified by using immunocytochemical techniques in combination with the retrogradely transported neuronal tracer Fluoro-Gold (iv injected). OT measurements of serial blood samples obtained from ovariectomized (OVX) CS rats displayed a prominent increase at the time of the afternoon PRL peak. The injection of VIP antisense oligonucleotides into the SCN abolished the afternoon increase of OT and PRL in CS-OVX animals. These findings suggest that VIP from the SCN contributes to the regulation of OT and PRL secretion in CS rats. We propose that in CS rats the regulatory mechanism(s) for PRL secretion comprise coordinated action of neuroendocrine dopaminergic and OT cells, both governed by the daily rhythm of VIP-ergic output from the SCN. This hypothesis is illustrated with a mathematical model. PMID:15033917

  10. Vasoactivity of the ventral aorta of the American eel (Anguilla rostrata), Atlantic hagfish ( Myxine glutinosa), and sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus).

    PubMed

    Evans, D H; Harrie, A C

    2001-04-15

    To determine if vascular smooth muscle from teleost and agnathan fishes expresses receptors for signaling agents that are important in vascular tension in other vertebrates, we exposed rings of aortic vascular smooth muscle from the eel (Anguilla rostrata), the hagfish (Myxine glutinosa), and the lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) to a suite of putative agonists, including: acetylcholine, endothelin, nitric oxide, natriuretic peptides, and prostanoids. Acetylcholine constricted aortic rings from the eel, but had no effect on the rings from lamprey. On the other hand, endothelin constricted rings from all three species. Use of receptor-specific ET agonists demonstrated that only ET(A) receptors are expressed in the eel and lamprey aorta. The nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside or nitric oxide itself dilated rings from the eel, but both agonists constricted rings from the hagfish and NO produced a biphasic response (constriction followed by dilation) in the lamprey. Two natriuretic peptides, eel ANP and porcine CNP, produced marginally significant dilation in the eel aorta, human ANP dilated the hagfish rings, and pCNP and eANP dilated the lamprey rings. The prostanoids PGE(1) and PGE(2) both dilated the eel aortic rings, and PGE(1) and carbaprostacyclin (stable PGI(2) agonist) dilated the hagfish and lamprey rings. Our results suggest that receptors for a variety of vasoactive signaling agents are expressed in the aortic smooth muscle of the earliest vertebrates (lamprey and hagfish), as well as the more advanced teleosts (eel).

  11. Vasoactive intestinal peptide stimulates melanogenesis in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells via CREB/MITF/tyrosinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xing-Hua; Yao, Cheng; Oh, Jang-Hee; Park, Chi-Hyun; Tian, Yu-Dan; Han, Mira; Kim, Ji Eun; Chung, Jin Ho; Jin, Zhe-Hu; Lee, Dong Hun

    2016-08-26

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), one of the major skin neuropeptides, has been suggested to have active roles in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin disorders such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, which can commonly cause post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. However, the effect of VIP on melanogenesis remains unknown. In this study, we showed that the melanin contents, tyrosinase activity, and gene expression of tyrosinase and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) were significantly increased by treatment with VIP in B16F10 mouse melanoma cells and the stimulatory melanogenic effect was further examined in human epidermal melanocytes (HEMns). In addition, phosphorylated levels of CRE-binding protein (CREB) and protein kinase A (PKA) were markedly increased after VIP treatment, but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), or Akt, indicating the possible PKA-CREB signaling pathway involved in VIP-induced melanogenesis. This result was further verified by the fact that VIP induced increased melanin synthesis, and protein levels of phosphorylated CREB, MITF, tyrosinase were significantly attenuated by H89 (a specific PKA inhibitor). These data suggest that VIP-induced upregulation of tyrosinase through the CREB-MITF signaling pathway plays an important role in finding new treatment strategy for skin inflammatory diseases related pigmentation disorders. PMID:27343558

  12. Short-term regulation of glycolysis by vasoactive intestinal peptide in epithelial cells isolated from rat small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, I; Monge, L; Feliu, J E

    1989-01-01

    In epithelial cells isolated from rat small intestine, we have studied the influence of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a neurotransmitter which markedly increases enterocyte cyclic AMP, and of two cyclic AMP analogues (8-bromo cyclic AMP and N6,2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic AMP) on the rate of glycolysis, fructose 2,6-bisphosphate concentration and 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase activity, as well as on the rate of 3-O-methyl-D-[14C]glucose uptake. Our results show that, without affecting the rate of 3-O-methyl-D-[14C]glucose accumulation, VIP and cyclic AMP analogues were able to inhibit glucose consumption and L-lactate formation by isolated rat enterocytes. These effects occurred parallel to a significant decrease in the cellular concentration of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate and to a partial inactivation of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase. These findings support the hypothesis that VIP inhibits glycolysis in rat enterocytes through a cyclic AMP-dependent mechanism. PMID:2552995

  13. Distinct regulation of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) expression at mRNA and peptide levels in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Agoston, D V; Colburn, S; Krajniak, K G; Waschek, J A

    1992-05-25

    Neuronal differentiation was induced in cultures of the human neuroblastoma cell line subclone SH-SY5Y by 14-day treatment with dibutyryl cAMP (dBcAMP), retinoic acid, and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). An approximate 4-fold increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) mRNA concentration was observed after differentiation with retinoic acid, whereas no change in VIP mRNA concentration was observed after differentiation with dBcAMP or PMA. A short-term treatment of cells with PMA did however result in a 5-fold transient increase in VIP mRNA; prior differentiation with retinoic acid or dBcAMP diminished this effect. Observed increases in VIP mRNA were in all cases accompanied by increases in VIP immunoreactivity. Remarkably, however, long-term treatment of cells with dBcAMP, which caused no change in mRNA levels, resulted in a six-fold increase in VIP immunoreactivity. Acute (36-h) treatment with carbachol also caused an increase in VIP immunoreactivity (about 2-fold, and blocked by atropine) without an increase in VIP mRNA level. Thus, a quantitative change in gene transcription or mRNA stability appears not to be a prerequisite for increased VIP expression, indicating that regulation can occur at translational or post-translational steps.

  14. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide modulates trophoblast-derived cell line function and interaction with phagocytic cells through autocrine pathways

    PubMed Central

    Vota, Daiana; Paparini, Daniel; Hauk, Vanesa; Toro, Ayelén; Merech, Fatima; Varone, Cecilia; Ramhorst, Rosanna; Pérez Leirós, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Trophoblast cells migrate and invade the decidual stroma in a tightly regulated process to maintain immune homeostasis at the maternal-placental interface during the first weeks of pregnancy. Locally synthesized factors modulate trophoblast cell function and their interaction with maternal leukocytes to promote the silent clearance of apoptotic cells. The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a pleiotropic polypeptide with trophic and anti-inflammatory effects in murine pregnancy models. We explored the effect of VIP on two human first trimester trophoblast cell lines, particularly on their migration, invasiveness and interaction with phagocytic cells, and the signalling and regulatory pathways involved. We found that VIP enhanced trophoblast cell migration and invasion through the activation of high affinity VPAC receptors and PKA-CRE signalling pathways. VIP knocked-down trophoblast cells showed reduced migration in basal and leukemic inhibitor factor (LIF)-elicited conditions. In parallel, VIP-silenced trophoblast cells failed to induce the phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies and the expression of immunosuppressant markers by human monocytes. Our results suggest that VIP-mediated autocrine pathways regulate trophoblast cell function and contribute to immune homeostasis maintenance at placentation and may provide new clues for therapeutic intervention in pregnancies complicated by defective deep placentation. PMID:27212399

  15. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide modulates trophoblast-derived cell line function and interaction with phagocytic cells through autocrine pathways.

    PubMed

    Vota, Daiana; Paparini, Daniel; Hauk, Vanesa; Toro, Ayelén; Merech, Fatima; Varone, Cecilia; Ramhorst, Rosanna; Pérez Leirós, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Trophoblast cells migrate and invade the decidual stroma in a tightly regulated process to maintain immune homeostasis at the maternal-placental interface during the first weeks of pregnancy. Locally synthesized factors modulate trophoblast cell function and their interaction with maternal leukocytes to promote the silent clearance of apoptotic cells. The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a pleiotropic polypeptide with trophic and anti-inflammatory effects in murine pregnancy models. We explored the effect of VIP on two human first trimester trophoblast cell lines, particularly on their migration, invasiveness and interaction with phagocytic cells, and the signalling and regulatory pathways involved. We found that VIP enhanced trophoblast cell migration and invasion through the activation of high affinity VPAC receptors and PKA-CRE signalling pathways. VIP knocked-down trophoblast cells showed reduced migration in basal and leukemic inhibitor factor (LIF)-elicited conditions. In parallel, VIP-silenced trophoblast cells failed to induce the phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies and the expression of immunosuppressant markers by human monocytes. Our results suggest that VIP-mediated autocrine pathways regulate trophoblast cell function and contribute to immune homeostasis maintenance at placentation and may provide new clues for therapeutic intervention in pregnancies complicated by defective deep placentation. PMID:27212399

  16. Distribution of vasotocin- and vasoactive intestinal peptide-like immunoreactivity in the brain of blue tit (Cyanistes coeruleus)

    PubMed Central

    Montagnese, Catherine M.; Székely, Tamás; Csillag, András; Zachar, Gergely

    2015-01-01

    Blue tits (Cyanistes coeruleus) are songbirds, used as model animals in numerous studies covering a wide field of research. Nevertheless, the distribution of neuropeptides in the brain of this avian species remains largely unknown. Here we present some of the first results on distribution of Vasotocine (AVT) and Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the brain of males and females of this songbird species, using immunohistochemistry mapping. The bulk of AVT-like cells are found in the hypothalamic supraoptic, paraventricular and suprachiasmatic nuclei, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and along the lateral forebrain bundle. Most AVT-like fibers course toward the median eminence, some reaching the arcopallium, and lateral septum. Further terminal fields occur in the dorsal thalamus, ventral tegmental area and pretectal area. Most VIP-like cells are in the lateral septal organ and arcuate nucleus. VIP-like fibers are distributed extensively in the hypothalamus, preoptic area, lateral septum, diagonal band of Broca. They are also found in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, amygdaloid nucleus of taenia, robust nucleus of the arcopallium, caudo-ventral hyperpallium, nucleus accumbens and the brainstem. Taken together, these results suggest that both AVT and VIP immunoreactive structures show similar distribution to other avian species, emphasizing evolutionary conservatism in the history of vertebrates. The current study may enable future investigation into the localization of AVT and VIP, in relation to behavioral and ecological traits in the brain of tit species. PMID:26236200

  17. Influence of renovascular hypertension on the distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide in the stomach and heart of rats

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska, Żaneta; Janiuk, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is associated with serious dysfunction of the cardiovascular system and digestive system. Given the relevant role of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the regulation of digestion process, control of blood pressure and heart rate as well as cardio- and gastro-protective character of the peptide, it appeared worthwhile to undertake the research aimed at immunohistochemical identification and evaluation of VIP-positive structures in the pylorus and heart of hypertensive rats. Up to now, this issue has not been investigated. The experimental model of hypertension in rats according to Goldblatt (two-kidney one clip model of hypertension) was used in the study. The experimental material (pylorus and heart) was collected in the sixth week of the study. VIP-containing structures were evaluated using immunohistochemical and morphometric methods. The analysis of the results showed a significant increase in the number of immunoreactive VIP structures and in the intensity of immunohistochemical staining in the stomach and in the heart of hypertensive rats. Our findings indicate that VIP is an important regulator of cardiovascular and digestive system in physiological and pathological conditions. However, to better understand the exact role of VIP in hypertension further studies need to be carried out. PMID:25990439

  18. Immunoreactive vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and vasopressin cells after a protein malnutrition diet in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Castañeda, J; Vigueras-Villaseñor, R M; Rojas, P; Rojas, C; Cintra, L

    2008-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of prenatal and postnatal protein deprivation on the morphology and density of vasopressin (VP) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) immunoreactive neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of young rats. Female Wistar rats were fed either 6% (malnourished group) or 25% (control group) casein diet five weeks before conception, during gestation and lactation. After weaning, the pups were maintained on the same diet until sacrificed at 30 days of age. The major and minor axes, somatic area and the density of VP- and VIP-immunoreactive neurons were evaluated in the middle sections of the SCN. The present study shows that chronic protein malnutrition (ChPM) in VP neurons induces a significant decrease in number of cells (-31%,) and a significant increase in major and minor axes and somatic area (+12.2%, +21.1% and +15.0%, respectively). The VIP cells showed a significant decrease in cellular density (-41.5%) and a significant increase in minor axis (+13.5%) and somatic area (+10.1%). Our findings suggest that ChPM induces abnormalities in the density and morphology of the soma of VP and VIP neurons. These alterations may be a morphological substrate underlying circadian alterations previously observed in malnourished rats.

  19. Effects of aortic pressure and vasoactive agents on the vascular resistance of the vasa vasorum in canine isolated thoracic aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Ohhira, A; Ohhashi, T

    1992-01-01

    1. We have developed a new preparation for continuously measuring changes in vascular resistance of the vasa vasorum of the canine isolated thoracic aorta perfused at a constant flow rate with Krebs-bicarbonate solution. 2. An increase of more than 150 mmHg in aortic pressure caused a significant increase in the vascular resistance of the vasa vasorum. 3. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline and dopamine caused dose-dependent increases in the vascular resistance of the vasa vasorum. The decreasing order of potency in the vasoconstrictor responses was as follows: 5-HT >> NA = adrenaline >> dopamine. The 5-HT- and adrenaline-induced vasoconstrictor responses were inhibited by methysergide and by phentolamine plus propranolol, respectively. 4. Acetylcholine (ACh), isoprenaline (ISP), histamine (His), ATP, ADP and adenosine produced dose-related decreases in the vascular resistance of aortic vasa vasorum perfused with the Krebs solution containing 10(-5) M-NA. The decreasing order of potency in the response was as follows: ACh = ISP > His >> adenosine = ATP = ADP. The ACh-, ISP- and His-induced vasodilator responses were antagonized by atropine, propranolol and famotidine, respectively. 5. The results suggest that the preparation described is useful for studying the regulation of vascular resistance of aortic vasa vasorum and that aortic pressure and vasoactive compounds may directly regulate the vascular resistance of the vasa vasorum in canine isolated thoracic aorta. Images Fig. 2 PMID:1464829

  20. Characterization of the vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor in rat submandibular gland: radioligand binding assay in membrane preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.T.; Bylund, D.B.

    1987-09-01

    The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor in membranes from rat submandibular gland was studied using radioligand binding assays with /sup 125/I-VIP and various unlabeled competing ligands. In addition to the necessity of working within the parameters under which all radioligand binding assays should be performed, binding studies with /sup 125/I-VIP, as with other peptide hormones and neurotransmitters, are subject to additional technical difficulties. Specific problems that were addressed included radioligand proteolysis, the identification of an effective protease inhibitor (leupeptin) and the deleterious effects of a commonly used inhibitor (bacitracin); avid radioligand absorption to incubation tubes that was eliminated by precoating of the tubes with a combination of polyethylenimine and an organosilane; and a disproportionate effect of increasing membrane protein concentration on affinity estimates. Under optimized conditions, the affinity (Kd) and density Bmax values for /sup 125/I-VIP obtained from saturation assays (76 pM, 2.0 pmol/mg) were in excellent agreement. Membrane protein (or receptor) levels beyond the linear portion of the receptor concentration curve are often used in radioligand binding assays. Results from /sup 125/I-VIP binding studies at elevated receptor concentrations revealed the predicted marked decrease in receptor affinity. In addition, the rank order potency of unlabeled ligands in inhibition binding assays was changed. The optimization of the assay for measuring VIP receptors in submandibular gland membrane provides a reliable method for studying the role of receptor regulation in stimulus-secretion coupling for this neuropeptide.

  1. Neurokinin A increases short-circuit current across rat colonic mucosa: a role for vasoactive intestinal polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Tien, X Y; Wallace, L J; Kachur, J F; Won-Kim, S; Gaginella, T S

    1991-01-01

    1. Neurokinin A (NKA) is a mammalian tachykinin distributed principally in the nervous system, including the myenteric innervation of the gut. 2. NKA may be involved in neurogenic inflammation and as a modulatory factor in the diarrhoea associated with mucosal inflammation of inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis). 3. We evaluated the effect of NKA on the short-circuit current ISC, assumed to reflect electrogenic chloride secretion, across muscle-stripped rat colonic mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers. 4. Serosal addition of NKA produced a concentration-dependent (0.1-100 nM) increase in ISC with an EC50 (half-maximal effective concentration) value of 7.5 nM. The maximum (mean +/- S.E.M.) increase in ISC (microA/cm2) for NKA was 111 +/- 10. 5. Tetrodotoxin (0.5 microM) and bumetanide (10 microM), but not atropine (1.0 microM), hexamethonium (100 microM) or pyrilamine (10 microM), significantly inhibited NKA-induced increases in ISC. 6. The response to NKA was attenuated by 45 min pre-treatment with antisera raised against vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). Moreover, prior desensitization to VIP attenuated the effect of NKA. 7. These studies suggest that NKA increases ISC in rat colon, in part, through a non-cholinergic neural mechanism involving VIP. PMID:1653854

  2. Vasoactive intestinal peptide binding sites and fibers in the brain of the pigeon Columba livia: An autoradiographic and immunohistochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Hof, P.R.; Dietl, M.M.; Charnay, Y.; Martin, J.L.; Bouras, C.; Palacios, J.M.; Magistretti, P.J. )

    1991-03-15

    The distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) binding sites in the pigeon brain was examined by in vitro autoradiography on slide-mounted sections. A fully characterized monoiodinated form of VIP, which maintains the biological activity of the native peptide, was used throughout this study. The highest densities of binding sites were observed in the hyperstriatum dorsale, archistriatum, auditory field L of neostriatum, area corticoidea dorsolateralis and temporo-parieto-occipitalis, area parahippocampalis, tectum opticum, nucleus dorsomedialis anterior thalami, and in the periventricular area of the hypothalamus. Lower densities of specific binding occurred in the neostriatum, hyperstriatum ventrale and nucleus septi lateralis, dorsolateral area of the thalamus, and lateral and posteromedial hypothalamus. Very low to background levels of VIP binding were detected in the ectostriatum, paleostriatum primitivum, paleostriatum augmentatum, lobus parolfactorius, nucleus accumbens, most of the brainstem, and the cerebellum. The distribution of VIP-containing fibers and terminals was examined by indirect immunofluorescence using a polyclonal antibody against porcine VIP. Fibers and terminals were observed in the area corticoidea dorsolateralis, area parahippocampalis, hippocampus, hyperstriatum accessorium, hyperstriatum dorsale, archistriatum, tuberculum olfactorium, nuclei dorsolateralis and dorsomedialis of the thalamus, and throughout the hypothalamus and the median eminence. Long projecting fibers were visualized in the tractus septohippocampalis. In the brainstem VIP immunoreactive fibers and terminals were observed mainly in the substantia grisea centralis, fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, lemniscus lateralis, and in the area surrounding the nuclei of the 7th, 9th, and 10th cranial nerves.

  3. Vasoactive intestinal peptide antagonist treatment during mouse embryogenesis impairs social behavior and cognitive function of adult male offspring.

    PubMed

    Hill, Joanna M; Cuasay, Katrina; Abebe, Daniel T

    2007-07-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a regulator of rodent embryogenesis during the period of neural tube closure. VIP enhanced growth in whole cultured mouse embryos; treatment with a VIP antagonist during embryogenesis inhibited growth and development. VIP antagonist treatment during embryogenesis also had permanent effects on adult brain chemistry and impaired social recognition behavior in adult male mice. The neurological deficits of autism appear to be initiated during neural tube closure and social behavior deficits are among the key characteristics of this disorder that is more common in males and is frequently accompanied by mental retardation. The current study examined the blockage of VIP during embryogenesis as a model for the behavioral deficits of autism. Treatment of pregnant mice with a VIP antagonist during embryonic days 8 through 10 had no apparent effect on the general health or sensory or motor capabilities of adult offspring. However, male offspring exhibited reduced sociability in the social approach task and deficits in cognitive function, as assessed through cued and contextual fear conditioning. Female offspring did not show these deficiencies. These results suggest that this paradigm has usefulness as a mouse model for aspects of autism as it selectively impairs male offspring who exhibit the reduced social behavior and cognitive dysfunction seen in autism. Furthermore, the study indicates that the foundations of some aspects of social behavior are laid down early in mouse embryogenesis, are regulated in a sex specific manner and that interference with embryonic regulators such as VIP can have permanent effects on adult social behavior.

  4. Influence of renovascular hypertension on the distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide in the stomach and heart of rats.

    PubMed

    Kasacka, Irena; Piotrowska, Żaneta; Janiuk, Izabela

    2015-11-01

    Arterial hypertension is associated with serious dysfunction of the cardiovascular system and digestive system. Given the relevant role of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the regulation of digestion process, control of blood pressure and heart rate as well as cardio- and gastro-protective character of the peptide, it appeared worthwhile to undertake the research aimed at immunohistochemical identification and evaluation of VIP-positive structures in the pylorus and heart of hypertensive rats. Up to now, this issue has not been investigated. The experimental model of hypertension in rats according to Goldblatt (two-kidney one clip model of hypertension) was used in the study. The experimental material (pylorus and heart) was collected in the sixth week of the study. VIP-containing structures were evaluated using immunohistochemical and morphometric methods. The analysis of the results showed a significant increase in the number of immunoreactive VIP structures and in the intensity of immunohistochemical staining in the stomach and in the heart of hypertensive rats. Our findings indicate that VIP is an important regulator of cardiovascular and digestive system in physiological and pathological conditions. However, to better understand the exact role of VIP in hypertension further studies need to be carried out.

  5. Rhythmic Secretion of Prolactin in Rats: Action of Oxytocin Coordinated by Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide of Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Origin

    PubMed Central

    Egli, Marcel; Bertram, Richard; Sellix, Michael T.; Freeman, Marc E.

    2007-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is secreted from lactotrophs of the anterior pituitary gland of rats in a unique pattern in response to uterine cervical stimulation (CS) during mating. Surges of PRL secretion occur in response to relief from hypothalamic dopaminergic (DA) inhibition and stimulation by hypothalamic releasing neurohormones. In this study we characterize the role of oxytocin (OT) in this system and the involvement of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) from the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in controlling OT and PRL secretion of CS rats. The effect of OT on PRL secretion was demonstrated in cultured lactotrophs showing simultaneous enhanced secretion rate and increased intracellular Ca2+. Neurosecretory OT cells of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus which express VIP receptors were identified by using immunocytochemical techniques in combination with the retrogradely transported neuronal tracer Fluoro-Gold (i.v. injected). OT measurements of serial blood samples obtained from ovariectomized (OVX) CS rats displayed a prominent secretory peak at the time of the afternoon PRL peak. The injection of VIP antisense oligonucleotides into the SCN abolished the afternoon increase of OT and PRL in CS-OVX animals. These findings suggest that there is an involvement of VIP from the SCN contributing in the regulation of OT and PRL secretion in CS rats. We propose that in CS rats the regulatory mechanism(s) for PRL secretion comprise coordinated action of neuroendocrine DA and OT cells, both governed by the daily rhythm of VIPergic output from the SCN. This hypothesis is illustrated with a mathematical model. PMID:15033917

  6. Endothelial function in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Atkeson, Amy; Yeh, Susie Yim; Malhotra, Atul; Jelic, Sanja

    2009-01-01

    Untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an independent risk factor for hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. The repetitive hypoxia/reoxygenation and sleep fragmentation associated with OSA impair endothelial function. Endothelial dysfunction, in turn, may mediate increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. Specifically, in OSA, endothelial nitric oxide availability and repair capacity are reduced, whereas oxidative stress and inflammation are enhanced. Treatment of OSA improves endothelial vasomotor tone and reduces inflammation. We review the evidence and possible mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction as well as the effect of treatment on endothelial function in OSA.

  7. Estetrol Modulates Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthesis in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Montt-Guevara, Maria Magdalena; Giretti, Maria Silvia; Russo, Eleonora; Giannini, Andrea; Mannella, Paolo; Genazzani, Andrea Riccardo; Genazzani, Alessandro David; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    Estetrol (E4) is a natural human estrogen that is present at high concentrations during pregnancy. E4 has been reported to act as an endogenous estrogen receptor modulator, exerting estrogenic actions on the endometrium or the central nervous system but presenting antagonistic effects on the breast. Due to these characteristics, E4 is currently being developed for a number of clinical applications, including contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) is a key player for vascular function and disease during pregnancy and throughout aging in women. Endothelial NO is an established target of estrogens that enhance its formation in human endothelial cells. We here addressed the effects of E4 on the activity and expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). E4 stimulated the activation of eNOS and NO secretion in HUVEC. E4 was significantly less effective compared to E2, and a peculiar concentration-dependent effect was found, with higher amounts of E4 being less effective than lower concentrations. When E2 was combined with E4, an interesting pattern was noted. E4 antagonized NO synthesis induced by pregnancy-like E2 concentrations. However, E4 did not impede the modest induction of NO synthesis associated with postmenopausal-like E2 levels. These results support the hypothesis that E4 may be a regulator of NO synthesis in endothelial cells and raise questions on its peculiar signaling in this context. Our results may be useful to interpret the role of E4 during human pregnancy and possibly to help develop this interesting steroid for clinical use. PMID:26257704

  8. Estetrol Modulates Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthesis in Human Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Montt-Guevara, Maria Magdalena; Giretti, Maria Silvia; Russo, Eleonora; Giannini, Andrea; Mannella, Paolo; Genazzani, Andrea Riccardo; Genazzani, Alessandro David; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    Estetrol (E4) is a natural human estrogen that is present at high concentrations during pregnancy. E4 has been reported to act as an endogenous estrogen receptor modulator, exerting estrogenic actions on the endometrium or the central nervous system but presenting antagonistic effects on the breast. Due to these characteristics, E4 is currently being developed for a number of clinical applications, including contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) is a key player for vascular function and disease during pregnancy and throughout aging in women. Endothelial NO is an established target of estrogens that enhance its formation in human endothelial cells. We here addressed the effects of E4 on the activity and expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). E4 stimulated the activation of eNOS and NO secretion in HUVEC. E4 was significantly less effective compared to E2, and a peculiar concentration-dependent effect was found, with higher amounts of E4 being less effective than lower concentrations. When E2 was combined with E4, an interesting pattern was noted. E4 antagonized NO synthesis induced by pregnancy-like E2 concentrations. However, E4 did not impede the modest induction of NO synthesis associated with postmenopausal-like E2 levels. These results support the hypothesis that E4 may be a regulator of NO synthesis in endothelial cells and raise questions on its peculiar signaling in this context. Our results may be useful to interpret the role of E4 during human pregnancy and possibly to help develop this interesting steroid for clinical use. PMID:26257704

  9. Replacing the Transfusion of 1–2 Units of Blood with Plasma Expanders that Increase Oxygen Delivery Capacity: Evidence from Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Amy G.; Salazar Vázquez, Beatriz Y.; Cabrales, Pedro; Kistler, Erik B.; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Subramaniam, Shankar; Acharya, Seetharama A.; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    At least a third of the blood supply in the world is used to transfuse 1–2 units of packed red blood cells for each intervention and most clinical trials of blood substitutes have been carried out at this level of oxygen carrying capacity (OCC) restoration. However, the increase of oxygenation achieved is marginal or none at all for molecular hemoglobin (Hb) products, due to their lingering vasoactivity. This has provided the impetus for the development of “oxygen therapeutics” using Hb-based molecules that have high oxygen affinity and target delivery of oxygen to anoxic areas. However it is still unclear how these oxygen carriers counteract or mitigate the functional effects of anemia due to obstruction, vasoconstriction and under-perfusion. Indeed, they are administered as a low dosage/low volume therapeutic Hb (subsequently further diluted in the circulatory pool) and hence induce extremely small OCC changes. Hyperviscous plasma expanders provide an alternative to oxygen therapeutics by increasing the oxygen delivery capacity (ODC); in anemia they induce supra-perfusion and increase tissue perfusion (flow) by as much as 50%. Polyethylene glycol conjugate albumin (PEG-Alb) accomplishes this by enhancing the shear thinning behavior of diluted blood, which increases microvascular endothelial shear stress, causes vasodilation and lowering peripheral vascular resistance thus facilitating cardiac function. Induction of supra-perfusion takes advantage of the fact that ODC is the product of OCC and blood flow and hence can be maintained by increasing either or both. Animal studies suggest that this approach may save a considerable fraction of the blood supply. It has an additional benefit of enhancing tissue clearance of toxic metabolites. PMID:25350267

  10. Regulation of endothelial permeability by second messengers.

    PubMed

    Siflinger-Birnboim, A; Malik, A B

    1996-02-01

    The mechanisms by which mediators such as oxidants released by neutrophil (PMN) activation increase endothelial permeability are poorly understood. The focus of this article is to identify some of these mechanisms. Studies using endothelial cell monolayers in culture have shown that PMN activation increases endothelial permeability both in the presence and absence of PMN-endothelial monolayer contact. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an oxidant released by PMN activation, plays an important role in PMN-induced increases in endothelial permeability. The results of these studies suggest that, as with other mediators of inflammation (e.g., histamine, thrombin) the mechanism of H2O2-induced increase in endothelial permeability involves activation of endothelial protein kinase C (PKC) and increase in endothelial cytosolic Ca2+.

  11. The endothelial glycocalyx: a review of the vascular barrier.

    PubMed

    Alphonsus, C S; Rodseth, R N

    2014-07-01

    The endothelial glycocalyx is an important part of the vascular barrier. The glycocalyx is intimately linked to the homoeostatic functions of the endothelium. Damage to the glycocalyx precedes vascular pathology. In the first part of this paper, we have reviewed the structure, physiology and pathology of the endothelial glycocalyx, based on a literature search of the past five years. In the second part, we have systematically reviewed interventions to protect or repair the glycocalyx. Glycocalyx damage can be caused by hypervolaemia and hyperglycaemia and can be prevented by maintaining a physiological concentration of plasma protein, particularly albumin. Other interventions have been investigated in animal models: these require clinical research before their introduction into medical practice.

  12. Do endothelial cells belong to the primitive stem leukemic clone in CML? Role of extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Teresa L; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; López-Ruano, Guillermo; Muntión, Sandra; Preciado, Silvia; Hernández-Ruano, Montserrat; Rosado, Belén; de las Heras, Natalia; Chillón, M Carmen; Hernández-Hernández, Ángel; González, Marcos; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; Del Cañizo, Consuelo

    2015-08-01

    The expression of BCR-ABL in hematopoietic stem cells is a well-defined primary event in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Some reports have described the presence of BCR-ABL on endothelial cells from CML patients, suggesting the origin of the disease in a primitive hemangioblastic cell. On the other hand, extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by CML leukemic cells are involved in the angiogenesis modulation process. In the current work we hypothesized that EVs released from BCR-ABL(+) cells may carry inside the oncogene that can be transferred to endothelial cells leading to the expression of both BCR-ABL transcript and the oncoprotein. EVs from K562 cells and plasma of newly diagnosed CML patients were isolated by ultracentrifugation. RT-PCR analysis detected the presence of BCR-ABL RNA in the EVs isolated from both K562 cells and plasma of CML patients. The incorporation of these EVs into endothelial cells was demonstrated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that after 24h of incubation most EVs were incorporated. BCR-ABL transcripts were detected in all experiments on endothelial cells incubated with EVs from both sources. The presence of BCR-ABL on endothelial cells incubated with Philadelphia(+) EVs was also confirmed by Western blot assays. In summary, endothelial cells acquire BCR-ABL RNA and the oncoprotein after incubation with EVs released from Ph(+) positive cells (either from K562 cells or from plasma of newly diagnosed CML patients). This results challenge the hypothesis that endothelial cells may be part of the Philadelphia(+) clone in CML.

  13. Key endothelial cell angiogenic mechanisms are stimulated by the circulating milieu in sickle cell disease and attenuated by hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Flavia C M; Traina, Fabiola; Almeida, Camila B; Leonardo, Flavia C; Franco-Penteado, Carla F; Garrido, Vanessa T; Colella, Marina P; Soares, Raquel; Olalla-Saad, Sara T; Costa, Fernando F; Conran, Nicola

    2015-06-01

    As hypoxia-induced inflammatory angiogenesis may contribute to the manifestations of sickle cell disease, we compared the angiogenic molecular profiles of plasma from sickle cell disease individuals and correlated these with in vitro endothelial cell-mediated angiogenesis-stimulating activity and in vivo neovascularization. Bioplex demonstrated that plasma from patients with steady-state sickle cell anemia contained elevated concentrations of pro-angiogenic factors (angiopoietin-1, basic fibroblast growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor-D and placental growth factor) and displayed potent pro-angiogenic activity, significantly increasing endothelial cell proliferation, migration and capillary-like structure formation. In vivo neovascularization of Matrigel plugs was significantly greater in sickle cell disease mice than in non-sickle cell disease mice, consistent with an up-regulation of angiogenesis in the disease. In plasma from patients with hemoglobin SC disease without proliferative retinopathy, anti-angiogenic endostatin and thrombospondin-2 were significantly elevated. In contrast, plasma from hemoglobin SC individuals with proliferative retinopathy had a pro-angiogenic profile and more significant effects on endothelial cell proliferation and capillary formation than plasma from patients without retinopathy. Hydroxyurea therapy was associated with significant reductions in plasma angiogenic factors and inhibition of endothelial cell-mediated angiogenic mechanisms and neovascularization. Thus, individuals with sickle cell anemia or hemoglobin SC disease with retinopathy present a highly angiogenic circulating milieu, capable of stimulating key endothelial cell-mediated angiogenic mechanisms. Combination anti-angiogenic therapy to prevent the progression of unregulated neovascularization and associated manifestations in sickle cell disease, such as pulmonary hypertension, may be indicated; furthermore, the

  14. Vascular endothelial growth factor in human preterm lung.

    PubMed

    Lassus, P; Ristimäki, A; Ylikorkala, O; Viinikka, L; Andersson, S

    1999-05-01

    Endothelial cell damage is characteristic for respiratory distress syndrome and development of chronic lung disease. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial mitogen that takes part in the growth and repair of vascular endothelial cells. We measured VEGF in 189 tracheal aspirate samples (TAF), and in 24 plasma samples from 44 intubated preterm infants (gestational age, 27.3 +/- 2.0 wk; birth weight, 962 +/- 319 g) during their first postnatal week. VEGF in TAF increased from 25 +/- 12 pg/ml (mean +/- SEM) on Day 1 to 526 +/- 120 pg/ml on Day 7 (mean concentrations, 106 +/- 25 pg/ml on Days 1 to 3 and 342 +/- 36 pg/ml on Days 4 to 7). In plasma, mean concentration of VEGF during the first week was 48 +/- 6 pg/ml, with no increase observed. In TAF, higher VEGF was found in patients born to mothers with premature rupture of the membranes, or chorionamnionitis, whereas preeclampsia of the mother was associated with lower VEGF (all p < 0.05). In TAF, no correlations existed between VEGF and gestational age or birth weight, but a correlation existed between lecithin/sphengomyelin ratio and VEGF (p < 0.05). During Days 4 to 7 patients developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) had lower VEGF in TAF than did those surviving without BPD (235 +/- 31 versus 383 +/- 50; p < 0.05). VEGF increased rapidly in the lungs of the preterm infant during the first days of life. VEGF may be indicative of pulmonary maturity and may participate in pulmonary repair after acute lung injury.

  15. Retinal Endothelial Cell Apoptosis Stimulates Recruitment of Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhatwadekar, Ashay D.; Glenn, Josephine V.; Curtis, Tim M.; Grant, Maria B.; Stitt, Alan W.; Gardiner, Tom A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Bone marrow–derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to vascular repair although it is uncertain how local endothelial cell apoptosis influences their reparative function. This study was conducted to determine how the presence of apoptotic bodies at sites of endothelial damage may influence participation of EPCs in retinal microvascular repair. Methods Microlesions of apoptotic cell death were created in monolayers of retinal microvascular endothelial cells (RMECs) by using the photodynamic drug verteporfin. The adhesion of early-EPCs to these lesions was studied before detachment of the apoptotic cells or after their removal from the wound site. Apoptotic bodies were fed to normal RMECs and mRNA levels for adhesion molecules were analyzed. Results Endothelial lesions where apoptotic bodies were left attached at the wound site showed a fivefold enhancement in EPC recruitment (P < 0.05) compared with lesions where the apoptotic cells had been removed. In intact RMEC monolayers exposed to apoptotic bodies, expression of ICAM, VCAM, and E-selectin was upregulated by 5- to 15-fold (P < 0.05– 0.001). EPCs showed a characteristic chemotactic response (P < 0.05) to conditioned medium obtained from apoptotic bodies, whereas analysis of the medium showed significantly increased levels of VEGF, IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α when compared to control medium; SDF-1 remained unchanged. Conclusions The data indicate that apoptotic bodies derived from retinal capillary endothelium mediate release of proangiogenic cytokines and chemokines and induce adhesion molecule expression in a manner that facilitates EPC recruitment. PMID:19474402

  16. The Novel Methods for Analysis of Exosomes Released from Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinju; Guo, Runmin; Yang, Yi; Jacobs, Bradley; Chen, Suhong; Iwuchukwu, Ifeanyi; Gaines, Kenneth J.; Chen, Yanfang; Simman, Richard; Lv, Guiyuan; Wu, Keng; Bihl, Ji C.

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes (EXs) are cell-derived vesicles that mediate cell-cell communication and could serve as biomarkers. Here we described novel methods for purification and phenotyping of EXs released from endothelial cells (ECs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) by combining microbeads and fluorescence quantum dots (Q-dots®) techniques. EXs from the culture medium of ECs and EPCs were isolated and detected with cell-specific antibody conjugated microbeads and second antibody conjugated Q-dots by using nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) system. The sensitivities of the cell origin markers for ECs (CD105, CD144) and EPCs (CD34, KDR) were evaluated. The sensitivity and specificity were determined by using positive and negative markers for EXs (CD63), platelets (CD41), erythrocytes (CD235a), and microvesicles (Annexin V). Moreover, the methods were further validated in particle-free plasma and patient samples. Results showed that anti-CD105/anti-CD144 and anti-CD34/anti-KDR had the highest sensitivity and specificity for isolating and detecting EC-EXs and EPC-EXs, respectively. The methods had the overall recovery rate of over 70% and were able to detect the dynamical changes of circulating EC-EXs and EPC-EXs in acute ischemic stroke. In conclusion, we have developed sensitive and specific microbeads/Q-dots fluorescence NTA methods for EC-EX and EPC-EX isolation and detection, which will facilitate the functional study and biomarker discovery. PMID:27118976

  17. The Novel Methods for Analysis of Exosomes Released from Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinju; Guo, Runmin; Yang, Yi; Jacobs, Bradley; Chen, Suhong; Iwuchukwu, Ifeanyi; Gaines, Kenneth J; Chen, Yanfang; Simman, Richard; Lv, Guiyuan; Wu, Keng; Bihl, Ji C

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes (EXs) are cell-derived vesicles that mediate cell-cell communication and could serve as biomarkers. Here we described novel methods for purification and phenotyping of EXs released from endothelial cells (ECs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) by combining microbeads and fluorescence quantum dots (Q-dots®) techniques. EXs from the culture medium of ECs and EPCs were isolated and detected with cell-specific antibody conjugated microbeads and second antibody conjugated Q-dots by using nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) system. The sensitivities of the cell origin markers for ECs (CD105, CD144) and EPCs (CD34, KDR) were evaluated. The sensitivity and specificity were determined by using positive and negative markers for EXs (CD63), platelets (CD41), erythrocytes (CD235a), and microvesicles (Annexin V). Moreover, the methods were further validated in particle-free plasma and patient samples. Results showed that anti-CD105/anti-CD144 and anti-CD34/anti-KDR had the highest sensitivity and specificity for isolating and detecting EC-EXs and EPC-EXs, respectively. The methods had the overall recovery rate of over 70% and were able to detect the dynamical changes of circulating EC-EXs and EPC-EXs in acute ischemic stroke. In conclusion, we have developed sensitive and specific microbeads/Q-dots fluorescence NTA methods for EC-EX and EPC-EX isolation and detection, which will facilitate the functional study and biomarker discovery.

  18. How Can a Radiologist Reveal More Practical Information Using Dynamic Study of Cavernosal Artery After Injection of Vasoactive Agents?

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Seyyed Morteza; Gharib, Mohammad Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Erection is a dynamic multi-stage neurovascular phenomenon consisting of 4 phases. Conventional protocol of color Doppler study can easily overlook these ongoing dynamic events. Objectives: Here, we tried to designate patterns for these dynamic spectral waveform changes of cavernosal arteries in patients with erectile dysfunction and subsequently better describe the extent of their underlying problem. Patients and Methods: We evaluated 59 men who were referred for post-intracavernosal injection (ICI) color Doppler investigation of suspected erectile dysfunction (ED). The demographic data and medical history were recorded. Afterwards, first scan injection was done. Then scanning of cavernosal arteries was started about one minute after the injection and was continued thereafter. For better description of temporal changes in the waveform of cavernosal arteries, new patterns were defined and used. Patients were also classified based on previously known etiologic categories (i.e. arterial insufficiency, venous leak, mixed type, and normal response). Results: The mean age was 45.6 ± 13.1 (24 to 74 ) years. Twenty-two were normal responders [considered as non-organic causes (37.3% of all patients)], 27 were classified as venous leakage, eight had arterial insufficiency and two were mixed type. Maximum PSV occurred before the fifth minute in 47 patients (92.2%). Eight patients completed all phases of erection in the first 5 minutes. We defined 8 patterns for the temporal changes in cavernosal arterial waveform. Pattern 5 was the most common pattern of venous leak; while, patterns 3 and 4 were considered as the uncommon group. Six patients demonstrated the uncommon patterns of venous leak (22.2%). Hypertension was more prevalent in the uncommon pattern of venous leak. Conclusions: We highlight the considerable role of continuous evaluation starting one minute after intra cavernosal with ICI injection of the vasoactive agent for better description of the

  19. Somatostatin-, vasoactive intestinal peptide-, and granulin-like peptides isolated from intestinal extracts of goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Uesaka, T; Yano, K; Yamasaki, M; Ando, M

    1995-09-01

    Three new peptides were originally isolated from intestinal extracts of goldfish. They were structurally related with somatostatin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and granulin (GRN) and thus termed goldfish somatostatin (gSS-28), gVIP, and gGRN, respectively. The primary structures of these peptides were determined as: SVESSNHLPA 10RERKAGCKNF20YWKGFTSC for the gSS-28; HSDAVFTDNY10SRYRKQMAAK20KYLNSVLA-NH2 for the gVIP, and VIHCDSSTIC10 PDGTTCCLSP20YGVWYCCPFS30MGQCCRDGIH40CCRHGYHCDS50TSTHCLR for the gGRN. The amino acid sequence of the gSS-28 was more similar (79-86% similarity) to somatostatins obtained in anglerfish, flounder, and sculpin, but far (21% similarity) from the catfish somatostatin, whereas goldfish and catfish belong to the same superorder. The structure of the gVIP was closely related to that of the cod VIP; only one residue (Tyr13) being substituted for Phe13 in the cod VIP. Comparing amino acid sequences of VIPs obtained in various vertebrates, the primary structure of this peptide was revealed to be relatively well conserved among vertebrates. In addition, the dose-response curve for the effect of gVIP on the short-circuit current (Isc) across the eel intestine was similar to that of human VIP, suggesting that VIPs in vertebrates have similar effect. The amino acid sequence of gGRN was 96% identical to that of carp GRN-1; only two residues (Ser6-Ser7) being substituted for Ala6-Ala7 in the carp GRN-1. The physiological significance of these peptides is discussed. PMID:8536941

  20. Regulation of rat adrenal vasoactive intestinal peptide content: effects of adrenocorticotropic hormone treatment and changes in dietary sodium intake.

    PubMed

    Hinson, J P; Renshaw, D; Carroll, M; Kapas, S

    2001-09-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is well established as a paracrine regulator of adrenal function. It is present in nerves supplying the adrenal cortex, although previous studies have found that the amount of VIP in the outer zones of the rat adrenal is not affected by ligating the splanchnic nerve supplying the adrenal gland. The present studies were designed to investigate the mechanisms involved in regulating the VIP content of the rat adrenal gland. This study examined the effects of changes in electrolyte balance and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) administration on the adrenal content of VIP as measured by radioimmunoassay. Rats on a low sodium diet had a significantly increased capsular/zona glomerulosa immunoreactive VIP (irVIP) level, while rats on a high sodium diet had suppressed levels relative to controls. Changes in dietary sodium did not affect inner zone/medullary VIP content. Administration of ACTH caused a decrease in irVIP levels in the capsular/zona glomerulosa portion of the adrenal gland but had no effect on the inner zone/medulla. Analysis of mRNA encoding VIP revealed a large increase in expression of VIP in the sodium-deplete group compared with the control, with no change in VIP expression in the sodium-loaded group. ACTH treatment was found to significantly decrease VIP mRNA levels in the capsular portion. Neither ACTH treatment nor changes in sodium intake affected inner zones/medullary VIP message. These data suggest that VIP in the capsule and zona glomerulosa region of the adrenal cortex is regulated in response to the physiological status of the animal, with changes in capsular/zona glomerulosa VIP correlating with changes in zona glomerulosa function.

  1. Effects of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide on antigen-induced bronchoconstriction and thromboxane release in guinea-pig lung.

    PubMed Central

    Ciabattoni, G.; Montuschi, P.; Currò, D.; Togna, G.; Preziosi, P.

    1993-01-01

    1. Exogenous vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) infused into the pulmonary artery of isolated and ventilated lungs of guinea-pigs decreased, in a dose-dependent fashion (1.0-10.0 nmol), airway resistance and thromboxane B2 (TXB2, the stable hydrolysis product of TXA2) release in the perfusion medium. Prostacyclin (PGI2) synthesis, as reflected by the release of its stable hydrolysis product 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha, was unaffected. Pretreatment with the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor BWA4c (3.5 x 10(-5) M) did not modify the bronchodilatory effect of VIP or its inhibitory action on TXB2 release. 2. Basal release of immunoreactive VIP from perfused lungs decreased from an initial value of 0.96 +/- 0.10 ng min-1 (mean +/- s.e.mean) in the first 2 min to an average of 0.58 +/- 0.10 ng min-1 in the following 15-20 min. 3. Antigen challenge with ovalbumin (0.1%) in sensitized lungs caused an anaphylactic reaction in 45% of tested lungs, concomitant with a 5 fold increase in both VIP and TXB2 release. Tetrodotoxin pretreatment (10(-6) M) reduced basal VIP release by > 80% and abolished the VIP increase observed during anaphylaxis, without modifying TXB2 release or the bronchoconstrictor response. 4. Indomethacin (10(-6) M) inhibited TXB2 synthesis and release by > 90%, delayed the bronchoconstrictor response and blunted the increased VIP release during lung anaphylaxis, without influencing basal VIP release. 5. The 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor BWA4c (3.5 x 10(-5) M) blunted the increase of TXB2 and VIP release from guinea-pig lung and attenuated the bronchoconstrictor response following ovalbumin challenge.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8495242

  2. Framework of Collagen Type I – Vasoactive Vessels Structuring Invariant Geometric Attractor in Cancer Tissues: Insight into Biological Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Jairo A.; Murillo, Mauricio F.; Jaramillo, Natalia A.

    2009-01-01

    In a previous research, we have described and documented self-assembly of geometric triangular chiral hexagon crystal-like complex organizations (GTCHC) in human pathological tissues. This article documents and gathers insights into the magnetic field in cancer tissues and also how it generates an invariant functional geometric attractor constituted for collider partners in their entangled environment. The need to identify this hierarquic attractor was born out of the concern to understand how the vascular net of these complexes are organized, and to determine if the spiral vascular subpatterns observed adjacent to GTCHC complexes and their assembly are interrelational. The study focuses on cancer tissues and all the macroscopic and microscopic material in which GTCHC complexes are identified, which have been overlooked so far, and are rigorously revised. This revision follows the same parameters that were established in the initial phase of the investigation, but with a new item: the visualization and documentation of external dorsal serous vascular bed areas in spatial correlation with the localization of GTCHC complexes inside the tumors. Following the standard of the electro-optical collision model, we were able to reproduce and replicate collider patterns, that is, pairs of left and right hand spin-spiraled subpatterns, associated with the orientation of the spinning process that can be an expansion or contraction disposition of light particles. Agreement between this model and tumor data is surprisingly close; electromagnetic spiral patterns generated were identical at the spiral vascular arrangement in connection with GTCHC complexes in malignant tumors. These findings suggest that the framework of collagen type 1 – vasoactive vessels that structure geometric attractors in cancer tissues with invariant morphology sets generate collider partners in their magnetic domain with opposite biological behavior. If these principles are incorporated into

  3. Angiotensin II-induced endothelial dysfunction is temporally linked with increases in interleukin-6 and vascular macrophage accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Gomolak, Jessica R.; Didion, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is associated with vascular hypertrophy, endothelial dysfunction and activation of a number of inflammatory molecules, however the linear events involved in the development of hypertension and endothelial dysfunction produced in response to Ang II are not well defined. The goal of this study was to examine the dose- and temporal-dependent development of endothelial dysfunction in response to Ang II. Blood pressure and responses of carotid arteries were examined in control (C57Bl/6) mice and in mice infused with 50, 100, 200, 400, or 1000 ng/kg/min Ang II for either 14 or 28 Days. Infusion of Ang II was associated with graded and marked increases in systolic blood pressure and plasma Ang II concentrations. While low doses of Ang II (i.e., 50 and 100 ng/kg/min) had little to no effect on blood pressure or endothelial function, high doses of Ang II (e.g., 1000 ng/kg/min) were associated with large increases in arterial pressure and marked impairment of endothelial function. In contrast, intermediate doses of Ang II (200 and 400 ng/kg/min) while initially having no effect on systolic blood pressure were associated with significant increases in pressure over time. Despite increasing blood pressure, 200 ng/kg/min had no effect on endothelial function, whereas 400 ng/kg/min produced modest impairment on Day 14 and marked impairment of endothelial function on Day 28. The degree of endothelial dysfunction produced by 400 and 1000 ng/kg/min Ang II was reflective of parallel increases in plasma IL-6 levels and vascular macrophage content, suggesting that increases in arterial blood pressure precede the development of endothelial dysfunction. These findings are important as they demonstrate that along with increases in arterial pressure that increases in IL-6 and vascular macrophage accumulation correlate with the impairment of endothelial function produced by Ang II. PMID:25400581

  4. Biomarkers of endothelial cell activation in early sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Skibsted, Simon; Jones, Alan E; Puskarich, Michael A.; Arnold, Ryan; Sherwin, Robert; Trzeciak, Stephen; Schuetz, Philipp; Aird, William C.; Shapiro, Nathan I

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate the association of endothelial-related markers with organ dysfunction and in-hospital mortality to validate our earlier findings in a multicenter study. We hypothesize that: 1) endothelial biomarkers will be associated with organ dysfunction and mortality in sepsis; and, that sFlt-1, holds promise as novel prognostic markers in sepsis. METHODS A prospective, multicenter, observational study of a convenience sample of Emergency Department (ED) patients with a suspected infection presenting to one of four urban, academic medical center EDs between January 2009 and January 2010. We collected plasma while the patients were in the ED, and subsequently assayed endothelial-related biomarkers, namely sFlt-1, sE-Selectin, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, and PAI-1. Outcomes were organ dysfunction and in-hospital mortality. RESULTS We enrolled at a total of 166 patients: 63 with sepsis (38%), 61 with severe sepsis (37%) and 42 with septic shock (25%). All endothelial biomarkers were significantly associated with sepsis severity, P < 0.002. We found a significant inter-correlation between all biomarkers, strongest between sFlt1 and PAI-1 (r=0.61, P < 0.001) and PAI-1 and sE-selectin and sICAM-1 (r=0.49, P < 0.001). Among the endothelial biomarkers, sFlt-1 had the strongest association with SOFA score (r=0.58, P < 0.001). sFlt-1 and PAI-1 had the highest area under the operating receiver characteristic curve for mortality of 0.87. CONCLUSIONS This multi-center validation study confirms that markers of endothelial activation are associated with sepsis severity, organ dysfunction and mortality in sepsis. This supports the hypothesis that the endothelium plays a central role in the pathophysiology of sepsis and may serve as a more accurate prediction tool and a target for therapies aimed at ameliorating endothelial cell dysfunction. Additionally, sFLT-1 holds promise as a novel sepsis severity biomarker. PMID:23524845

  5. Aronia melanocarpa juice, a rich source of polyphenols, induces endothelium-dependent relaxations in porcine coronary arteries via the redox-sensitive activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Hun; Auger, Cyril; Kurita, Ikuko; Anselm, Eric; Rivoarilala, Lalainasoa Odile; Lee, Hyong Joo; Lee, Ki Won; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2013-11-30

    This study examined the ability of Aronia melanocarpa (chokeberry) juice, a rich source of polyphenols, to cause NO-mediated endothelium-dependent relaxations of isolated coronary arteries and, if so, to determine the underlying mechanism and the active polyphenols. A. melanocarpa juice caused potent endothelium-dependent relaxations in porcine coronary artery rings. Relaxations to A. melanocarpa juice were minimally affected by inhibition of the formation of vasoactive prostanoids and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated responses, and markedly reduced by N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine (endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) inhibitor), membrane permeant analogs of superoxide dismutase and catalase, PP2 (Src kinase inhibitor), and wortmannin (PI3-kinase inhibitor). In cultured endothelial cells, A. melanocarpa juice increased the formation of NO as assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy using the spin trap iron(II)diethyldithiocarbamate, and reactive oxygen species using dihydroethidium. These responses were associated with the redox-sensitive phosphorylation of Src, Akt and eNOS. A. melanocarpa juice-derived fractions containing conjugated cyanidins and chlorogenic acids induced the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS. The present findings indicate that A. melanocarpa juice is a potent stimulator of the endothelial formation of NO in coronary arteries; this effect involves the phosphorylation of eNOS via the redox-sensitive activation of the Src/PI3-kinase/Akt pathway mostly by conjugated cyanidins and chlorogenic acids.

  6. Polystyrene-Divinylbenzene-Based Adsorbents Reduce Endothelial Activation and Monocyte Adhesion Under Septic Conditions in a Pore Size-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, Tanja; Rauscher, Sabine; Hammer, Caroline; Gröger, Marion; Fischer, Michael B; Weber, Viktoria

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial activation with excessive recruitment and adhesion of immune cells plays a central role in the progression of sepsis. We established a microfluidic system to study the activation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells by conditioned medium containing plasma from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated whole blood or from septic blood and to investigate the effect of adsorption of inflammatory mediators on endothelial activation. Treatment of stimulated whole blood with polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based cytokine adsorbents (average pore sizes 15 or 30 nm) prior to passage over the endothelial layer resulted in significantly reduced endothelial cytokine and chemokine release, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 secretion, adhesion molecule expression, and in diminished monocyte adhesion. Plasma samples from sepsis patients differed substantially in their potential to induce endothelial activation and monocyte adhesion despite their almost identical interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels. Pre-incubation of the plasma samples with a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based adsorbent (30 nm average pore size) reduced endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression to baseline levels, resulting in significantly diminished monocyte adhesion. Our data support the potential of porous polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based adsorbents to reduce endothelial activation under septic conditions by depletion of a broad range of inflammatory mediators. PMID:27503310

  7. Polystyrene-Divinylbenzene-Based Adsorbents Reduce Endothelial Activation and Monocyte Adhesion Under Septic Conditions in a Pore Size-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, Tanja; Rauscher, Sabine; Hammer, Caroline; Gröger, Marion; Fischer, Michael B; Weber, Viktoria

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial activation with excessive recruitment and adhesion of immune cells plays a central role in the progression of sepsis. We established a microfluidic system to study the activation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells by conditioned medium containing plasma from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated whole blood or from septic blood and to investigate the effect of adsorption of inflammatory mediators on endothelial activation. Treatment of stimulated whole blood with polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based cytokine adsorbents (average pore sizes 15 or 30 nm) prior to passage over the endothelial layer resulted in significantly reduced endothelial cytokine and chemokine release, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 secretion, adhesion molecule expression, and in diminished monocyte adhesion. Plasma samples from sepsis patients differed substantially in their potential to induce endothelial activation and monocyte adhesion despite their almost identical interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels. Pre-incubation of the plasma samples with a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based adsorbent (30 nm average pore size) reduced endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression to baseline levels, resulting in significantly diminished monocyte adhesion. Our data support the potential of porous polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based adsorbents to reduce endothelial activation under septic conditions by depletion of a broad range of inflammatory mediators.

  8. Analysis of Endothelial Barrier Function In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuping; Alexander, J. Steven

    2016-01-01

    Increased microvascular solute permeability underlies many forms of pathophysiological conditions, including inflammation. Endothelial monolayer cultures provide an excellent model system which allows systemic and mechanistic study of endothelial barrier function and paracellular permeability in vitro. The endothelial-specific complexus adherens junction protein VE-cadherin and their intracellular complex form pericellular structures along the cell borders which are critical to regulate endothelial barrier function by controlling pericellular permeability of vasculature. Here, we describe methods for both visualizing and quantifying junctional permeability and barrier changes in endothelial monolayers in vitro. PMID:21874457

  9. Evolving functions of endothelial cells in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pober, Jordan S; Sessa, William C

    2007-10-01

    Inflammation is usually analysed from the perspective of tissue-infiltrating leukocytes. Microvascular endothelial cells at a site of inflammation are both active participants in and regulators of inflammatory processes. The properties of endothelial cells change during the transition from acute to chronic inflammation and during the transition from innate to adaptive immunity. Mediators that act on endothelial cells also act on leukocytes and vice versa. Consequently, many anti-inflammatory therapies influence the behaviour of endothelial cells and vascular therapeutics influence inflammation. This Review describes the functions performed by endothelial cells at each stage of the inflammatory process, emphasizing the principal mediators and signalling pathways involved and the therapeutic implications. PMID:17893694

  10. Analysis of endothelial barrier function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuping; Alexander, J Steven

    2011-01-01

    Increased microvascular solute permeability underlies many forms of pathophysiological conditions, including inflammation. Endothelial monolayer cultures provide an excellent model system which allows systemic and mechanistic study of endothelial barrier function and paracellular permeability in vitro. The endothelial-specific complexus adherens junction protein VE-cadherin and their intracellular complex form pericellular structures along the cell borders which are critical to regulate endothelial barrier function by controlling pericellular permeability of vasculature. Here, we describe methods for both visualizing and quantifying junctional permeability and barrier changes in endothelial monolayers in vitro. PMID:21874457

  11. Scaffold-Free Tubular Tissues Created by a Bio-3D Printer Undergo Remodeling and Endothelialization when Implanted in Rat Aortae

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Manabu; Nakayama, Koichi; Noguchi, Ryo; Kamohara, Keiji; Furukawa, Kojirou; Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Toda, Shuji; Oyama, Jun-ichi; Node, Koichi; Morita, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    Background Small caliber vascular prostheses are not clinically available because synthetic vascular prostheses lack endothelial cells which modulate platelet activation, leukocyte adhesion, thrombosis, and the regulation of vasomotor tone by the production of vasoactive substances. We developed a novel method to create scaffold-free tubular tissue from multicellular spheroids (MCS) using a “Bio-3D printer”-based system. This system enables the creation of pre-designed three-dimensional structures using a computer controlled robotics system. With this system, we created a tubular structure and studied its biological features. Methods and Results Using a “Bio-3D printer,” we made scaffold-free tubular tissues (inner diameter of 1.5 mm) from a total of 500 MCSs (2.5× 104 cells per one MCS) composed of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (40%), human aortic smooth muscle cells (10%), and normal human dermal fibroblasts (50%). The tubular tissues were cultured in a perfusion system and implanted into the abdominal aortas of F344 nude rats. We assessed the flow by ultrasonography and performed histological examinations on the second (n = 5) and fifth (n = 5) day after implantation. All grafts were patent and remodeling of the tubular tissues (enlargement of the lumen area and thinning of the wall) was observed. A layer of endothelial cells was confirmed five days after implantation. Conclusions The scaffold-free tubular tissues made of MCS using a Bio-3D printer underwent remodeling and endothelialization. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the underlying mechanism of endothelialization and its function, as well as the long-term results. PMID:26325298

  12. Endothelial Plasticity: Shifting Phenotypes through Force Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Krenning, Guido; Barauna, Valerio G.; Krieger, José E.; Harmsen, Martin C.; Moonen, Jan-Renier A. J.

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial lining of the vasculature is exposed to a large variety of biochemical and hemodynamic stimuli with different gradients throughout the vascular network. Adequate adaptation requires endothelial cells to be highly plastic, which is reflected by the remarkable heterogeneity of endothelial cells in tissues and organs. Hemodynamic forces such as fluid shear stress and cyclic strain are strong modulators of the endothelial phenotype and function. Although endothelial plasticity is essential during development and adult physiology, proatherogenic stimuli can induce adverse plasticity which contributes to disease. Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT), the hallmark of endothelial plasticity, was long thought to be restricted to embryonic development but has emerged as a pathologic process in a plethora of diseases. In this perspective we argue how shear stress and cyclic strain can modulate EndMT and discuss how this is reflected in atherosclerosis and pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:26904133

  13. Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing for the Quantification of Endothelial Proliferation, Barrier Function, and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Szulcek, Robert; Bogaard, Harm Jan; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P.

    2014-01-01

    Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) is an in vitro impedance measuring system to quantify the behavior of cells within adherent cell layers. To this end, cells are grown in special culture chambers on top of opposing, circular gold electrodes. A constant small alternating current is applied between the electrodes and the potential across is measured. The insulating properties of the cell membrane create a resistance towards the electrical current flow resulting in an increased electrical potential between the electrodes. Measuring cellular impedance in this manner allows the automated study of cell attachment, growth, morphology, function, and motility. Although the ECIS measurement itself is straightforward and easy to learn, the underlying theory is complex and selection of the right settings and correct analysis and interpretation of the data is not self-evident. Yet, a clear protocol describing the individual steps from the experimental design to preparation, realization, and analysis of the experiment is not available. In this article the basic measurement principle as well as possible applications, experimental considerations, advantages and limitations of the ECIS system are discussed. A guide is provided for the study of cell attachment, spreading and proliferation; quantification of cell behavior in a confluent layer, with regard to barrier function, cell motility, quality of cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesions; and quantification of wound healing and cellular responses to vasoactive stimuli. Representative results are discussed based on human microvascular (MVEC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), but are applicable to all adherent growing cells. PMID:24747269

  14. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by cell-surface peptidase activity on endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Whitson, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a fluid-regulating peptide hormone that promotes vasorelaxation, natriuresis, and diuresis. The mechanisms for the release of ANP and for its clearance from the circulation play important roles in modulating its biological effects. Recently, we have reported that the cell surface of an endothelial cell line, CPA47, could degrade 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA. In this study, we have characterized this degradation of 125I-ANP. The kinetics of ANP degradation by the surface of CPA47 cells were first order, with a Km of 320 +/- 60 nM and Vmax of 35 +/- 14 pmol of ANP degraded/10 min/10(5) cells at pH 7.4. ANP is degraded by the surface of CPA47 cells over a broad pH range from 7.0-8.5. Potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor and bestatin inhibited 125I-ANP degradation, suggesting that this degradative activity on the surface of CPA47 cells has exopeptidase characteristics. The selectivity of CPA47 cell-surface degradation of ANP was demonstrated when 125I-ANP degradation was inhibited in the presence of neuropeptide Y and angiotensin I and II but not bradykinin, bombesin, endothelin-1, or substance P. The C-terminal amino acids phe26 and tyr28 were deduced to be important for ANP interaction with the cell-surface peptidase(s) based on comparison of the IC50 of various ANP analogues and other natriuretic peptides for the inhibition of ANP degradation. These data suggest that a newly characterized divalent cation-independent exopeptidase(s) that selectively recognizes ANP and some other vasoactive peptides exists on the surface of endothelial cells.

  15. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene polymorphism in early term chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, E; Mir, S; Berdeli, A

    2009-12-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) is a complex phenomenon caused by underlying kidney disease with superimposed enviromental and genetic factors. CAN development begins with progressive renal microvascular injury. Endothelial cells play key roles in the regulation of vascular tone, permeability, and remodeling. A reduction in basal nitric oxide (NO) release as a result of genetic variation in endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) function may predispose to hypertension, thrombosis, vasospasm, and atherosclerosis, all contributing to the development of CAN. We analyzed the G894T mutation at exon 7 of the eNOS gene in relationship to CAN among 81 children with renal transplantations. The 20 patients who developed CAN underwent renal biopsies for histological confirmation. Proteinuria and hypertension were observed in CAN. We selected 173 healthy reference subjects. The G894T polymorphism of the eNOS gene was determined by PCR-restriction fragment-length polymorphism analysis. The group included 33 male and 48 female subjects who received 32 living-related grafts and 49 from deceased donors (DD) donors. Donor age (y) was 32.7 +/- 13.7 and the HLA A,B,DR mismatch number of the cadaveric cases was 3.5 +/- 0.79. The distribution of the genotypes were ENOS GG/GT/TT 48%, 33%, 19%, respectively. G-alleles frequency was 64.8%; T-allele frequency was 35.2%. ENOS G894T gene polymorphism did not seem to influence long-term renal allograft outcome. Recipient ENOS G894T gene polymorphism did not alter the risk of chronic allograft failure. Even if NO synthesis and bioactivity are influenced by this polymorphism, many vasoactive factors may have roles to suppress the advantageous effects of NO. PMID:20005399

  16. Examining Endothelial Function and Platelet Reactivity in Patients with Depression before and after SSRI Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Tye; Barton, David A; Lambert, Elisabeth A; Eikelis, Nina; Lambert, Gavin W

    2016-01-01

    Although it is recognized that patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) the mechanisms responsible remain unknown. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the first signs of CVD. Using two techniques, flow-mediated dilatation in response to reactive hyperemia and laser Doppler velocimetry with iontophoresis, we examined endothelial function in the forearm before and after serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment in 31 patients with MDD. Measurement of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, soluble P-selectin, and noradrenaline in plasma was also performed. Prior to treatment, markers of endothelial and vascular function and platelet reactivity were within the normal range. Following SSRI therapy (95 ± 5 days) symptoms of depression were reduced (paired difference between pre- and post-treatment Hamilton rating -18 ± 1, P < 0.001) with 19 patients recovered and 4 remitted. There occurred no significant change in markers of endothelial or vascular function following SSRI therapy. The improvement in Hamilton depression rating in response to therapy could be independently predicted by the baseline arterial plasma noradrenaline concentration (r (2) = 0.36, P = 0.003). In this cohort of patients with MDD, SSRI therapy did not influence endothelial function or markers of vascular or platelet reactivity. Patient response to SSRI therapy could be predicted by the initial circulating level of noradrenaline, with noradrenaline levels being lower in responders. PMID:26924994

  17. Examining Endothelial Function and Platelet Reactivity in Patients with Depression before and after SSRI Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, Tye; Barton, David A.; Lambert, Elisabeth A.; Eikelis, Nina; Lambert, Gavin W.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is recognized that patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) the mechanisms responsible remain unknown. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the first signs of CVD. Using two techniques, flow-mediated dilatation in response to reactive hyperemia and laser Doppler velocimetry with iontophoresis, we examined endothelial function in the forearm before and after serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment in 31 patients with MDD. Measurement of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, soluble P-selectin, and noradrenaline in plasma was also performed. Prior to treatment, markers of endothelial and vascular function and platelet reactivity were within the normal range. Following SSRI therapy (95 ± 5 days) symptoms of depression were reduced (paired difference between pre- and post-treatment Hamilton rating −18 ± 1, P < 0.001) with 19 patients recovered and 4 remitted. There occurred no significant change in markers of endothelial or vascular function following SSRI therapy. The improvement in Hamilton depression rating in response to therapy could be independently predicted by the baseline arterial plasma noradrenaline concentration (r2 = 0.36, P = 0.003). In this cohort of patients with MDD, SSRI therapy did not influence endothelial function or markers of vascular or platelet reactivity. Patient response to SSRI therapy could be predicted by the initial circulating level of noradrenaline, with noradrenaline levels being lower in responders. PMID:26924994

  18. Endothelial dysfunction: a comprehensive appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Esper, Ricardo J; Nordaby, Roberto A; Vilariño, Jorge O; Paragano, Antonio; Cacharrón, José L; Machado, Rogelio A

    2006-01-01

    The endothelium is a thin monocelular layer that covers all the inner surface of the blood vessels, separating the circulating blood from the tissues. It is not an inactive organ, quite the opposite. It works as a receptor-efector organ and responds to each physical or chemical stimulus with the release of the correct substance with which it may maintain vasomotor balance and vascular-tissue homeostasis. It has the property of producing, independently, both agonistic and antagonistic substances that help to keep homeostasis and its function is not only autocrine, but also paracrine and endocrine. In this way it modulates the vascular smooth muscle cells producing relaxation or contraction, and therefore vasodilatation or vasoconstriction. The endothelium regulating homeostasis by controlling the production of prothrombotic and antithrombotic components, and fibrynolitics and antifibrynolitics. Also intervenes in cell proliferation and migration, in leukocyte adhesion and activation and in immunological and inflammatory processes. Cardiovascular risk factors cause oxidative stress that alters the endothelial cells capacity and leads to the so called endothelial "dysfunction" reducing its capacity to maintain homeostasis and leads to the development of pathological inflammatory processes and vascular disease. There are different techniques to evaluate the endothelium functional capacity, that depend on the amount of NO produced and the vasodilatation effect. The percentage of vasodilatation with respect to the basal value represents the endothelial functional capacity. Taking into account that shear stress is one of the most important stimulants for the synthesis and release of NO, the non-invasive technique most often used is the transient flow-modulate "endothelium-dependent" post-ischemic vasodilatation, performed on conductance arteries such as the brachial, radial or femoral arteries. This vasodilatation is compared with the vasodilatation produced by drugs that

  19. Ascorbate Reverses High Glucose- and RAGE-induced Leak of the Endothelial Permeability Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, M. Elizabeth; Qu, Zhi-chao; May, James M.

    2014-01-01

    High glucose concentrations due to diabetes increase leakage of plasma constituents across the endothelial permeability barrier. We sought to determine whether vitamin C, or ascorbic acid (ascorbate), could reverse such high glucose-induced increases in endothelial barrier permeability. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells and two brain endothelial cell lines cultured at 25 mM glucose showed increases in endothelial barrier permeability to radiolabeled inulin compared to cells cultured at 5 mM glucose. Acute loading of the cells for 30–60 min with ascorbate before the permeability assay prevented the high glucose-induced increase in permeability and decreased basal permeability at 5 mM glucose. High glucose-induced barrier leakage was mediated largely by activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), since it was prevented by RAGE blockade and mimicked by RAGE ligands. Intracellular ascorbate completely prevented RAGE ligand-induced increases in barrier permeability. The high glucose-induced increase in endothelial barrier permeability was also acutely decreased by several cell-penetrant antioxidants, suggesting that at least part of the ascorbate effect could be due to its ability to act as an antioxidant. PMID:24472555

  20. Circulating Endothelial Microparticles: A Key Hallmark of Atherosclerosis Progression

    PubMed Central

    Panth, Nisha; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    The levels of circulating microparticles (MPs) are raised in various cardiovascular diseases. Their increased level in plasma is regarded as a biomarker of alteration in vascular function. The prominent MPs present in blood are endothelial microparticles (EMPs) described as complex submicron (0.1 to 1.0 μm) vesicles like structure, released in response to endothelium cell activation or apoptosis. EMPs possess both physiological and pathological effects and may promote oxidative stress and vascular inflammation. EMPs release is triggered by inducer like angiotensin II, lipopolysaccharide, and hydrogen peroxide leading to the progression of atherosclerosis. However, there are multiple physiological pathways for EMPs generation like NADPH oxidase derived endothelial ROS formation, Rho kinase pathway, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Endothelial dysfunction is a key initiating event in atherosclerotic plaque formation. Atheroemboli, resulting from ruptured carotid plaques, is a major cause of stroke. Increasing evidence suggests that EMPs play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, acting as a marker of damage, either exacerbating disease progression or triggering a repair response. In this regard, it has been suggested that EMPs have the potential to act as biomarkers of disease status. This review aims to provide updated information of EMPs in relation to atherosclerosis pathogenesis. PMID:27066292

  1. Salt controls endothelial and vascular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina; Schmitz, Boris; Brand, Eva

    2015-03-01

    High salt (NaCl) intake promotes the development of vascular diseases independent of a rise in blood pressure, whereas reduction of salt consumption has beneficial effects for the arterial system. This article summarizes our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of high salt-induced alterations of the endothelial phenotype, the impact of the individual endothelial genotype, and the overall vascular phenotype. We focus on the endothelial Na(+) channel (EnNaC)-controlled nanomechanical properties of the endothelium, since high Na(+) leads to an EnNaC-induced Na(+)-influx and subsequent stiffening of endothelial cells. The mechanical stiffness of the endothelial cell (i.e., the endothelial phenotype) plays a crucial role as it controls the production of the endothelium-derived vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) which directly affects the tone of the vascular smooth muscle cells. In contrast to soft endothelial cells, stiff endothelial cells release reduced amounts of NO, the hallmark of endothelial dysfunction. This endothelium-born process is followed by the development of arterial stiffness (i.e., the vascular phenotype), predicting the development of vascular end-organ damage such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and renal impairment. In this context, we outline the potential clinical implication of direct (amiloride) and indirect (spironolactone) EnNaC inhibition on vascular function. However, interindividual differences exist in the response to high salt intake which involves different endothelial genotypes. Thus, selected genes and genetic variants contributing to the development of salt-induced endothelial dysfunction and hypertension are discussed. In this review, we focus on the role of salt in endothelial and vascular (dys)function and the link between salt-induced changes of the endothelial and vascular phenotype and its clinical implications.

  2. Culture of human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gallicchio, M A

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial cells line the luminal surface of all blood vessels in the body. The endothelial surface in adult humans is composed of approximately l-6×l0(13) cells and covers an area of 1-7 m(2). Endothelium serves many functions, including fluid and solute exchange through cell contraction, provision of an antithrombogenic surface through tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and prostacyclin release, synthesis of angiogenic factors such as adenosine, allowance of leukocyte trafficking through adhesion molecule synthesis, presentation of antigens to the immune system, maintenance of vascular tone through nitric oxide and endothelin synthesis, and metabolism of circulating molecules through the release of enzymes such as lipoprotein lipase. PMID:21340938

  3. Do incretins improve endothelial function?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An impaired endothelial function has been recognized in the early stage of atherosclerosis, and is a major factor affecting the future development of cardiovascular events. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is widely prevalent, and is one of the most important risk factors for cardiovascular disease. T2DM is associated with increases in both morbidity and mortality, particularly from cardiovascular disease. New therapies based on the incretin hormone and its actions are now becoming widely used, and appear to offer advantages over conventional therapies by keeping the body weight steady and limiting hypoglycemia, while also achieving attractive glycemic control. However, there is little data available about the effects of incretins on the cardiovascular system. This review will focus on the effects of incretin therapies, including glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors, on the endothelial function, and will discuss the potential mechanisms underlying these effects. PMID:24428883

  4. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Mediates Endothelial Cell Activation Through NF-κB but Is Not Associated with Endothelial Dysfunction in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Menghini, Rossella; Campia, Umberto; Tesauro, Manfredi; Marino, Arianna; Rovella, Valentina; Rodia, Giuseppe; Schinzari, Francesca; Tolusso, Barbara; di Daniele, Nicola; Federici, Massimo; Zoli, Angelo; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Cardillo, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of TLR4 antagonism on human endothelial cells activation and cytokine expression, and whether the Asp299Gly TLR4 polymorphism is associated with better endothelial function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), OxPAPC, and free fatty acids (FFA) at baseline and after incubation with the TLR4 antagonist eritoran (E5564). Cytokine expression was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. In vivo endothelial function was assessed as brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in RA patients with the wild type gene (aa) and with the Asp299Gly TLR4 polymorphic variant (ag). Results In HAEC, TLR4 antagonism with eritoran inhibited LPS-induced mRNA expression of IL-6, IL-8, TNFα, CCL-2, VCAM and ICAM (P<0.05 for all) and inhibited Ox-PAPC-induced mRNA expression of IL-8 (P<0.05) and IL-6, albeit not to a statistically significant level (p = 0.07). In contrast, eritoran did not affect FFA-induced mRNA expression of IL-6 (P>0.05). In 30 patients with RA (15 with the ag allele) undergoing measurement of FMD, no differences in FMD and plasma levels of IL-6, IL-8, VCAM, and ICAM were found between the aa and the ag phenotype (P>0.05 for all). Conclusions TLR4 signaling in endothelial cells may be triggered by LPS and oxidized phospholipids, leading to endothelial activation and inflammation, which are inhibited by eritoran. Our in vivo investigation, however, does not support an association between the Asp299Gly TLR4 polymorphism and improved endothelium-dependent vasodilator function in patients with RA. Further study is needed to better understand the potential role of TLR4 on endothelial dysfunction in this and other patient populations. PMID:24918924

  5. Flow-Mediated Endothelial Mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Peter F.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical forces associated with blood flow play important roles in the acute control of vascular tone, the regulation of arterial structure and remodeling, and the localization of atherosclerotic lesions. Major regulation of the blood vessel responses occurs by the action of hemodynamic shear stresses on the endothelium. The transmission of hemodynamic forces throughout the endothelium and the mechanotransduction mechanisms that lead to biophysical, biochemical, and gene regulatory responses of endothelial cells to hemodynamic shear stresses are reviewed. PMID:7624393

  6. ENDOTHELIAL CELLS IN ALLOGRAFT REJECTION

    PubMed Central

    Al-Lamki, Rafia S.; Bradley, John R.; Pober, Jordan S.

    2008-01-01

    In organ transplantation, blood borne cells and macromolecules (e.g. antibodies) of the host immune system are brought into direct contact with the endothelial cell (EC) lining of graft vessels. In this location, graft ECs play several roles in allograft rejection, including the initiation of rejection responses by presentation of alloantigen to circulating T cells; the development of inflammation and thrombosis; and as targets of injury and agents of repair. PMID:19034000

  7. Angiotensin II stimulates expression of the chemokine RANTES in rat glomerular endothelial cells. Role of the angiotensin type 2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, G; Ziyadeh, F N; Thaiss, F; Tomaszewski, J; Caron, R J; Wenzel, U; Zahner, G; Helmchen, U; Stahl, R A

    1997-01-01

    Glomerular influx of monocytes/macrophages (M/M) occurs in many immune- and non-immune-mediated renal diseases. The mechanisms targeting M/M into the glomerulus are incompletely understood, but may involve stimulated expression of chemokines. We investigated whether angiotensin II (ANG II) induces the chemokine RANTES in cultured glomerular endothelial cells of the rat and in vivo. ANG II stimulated mRNA and protein expression of RANTES in cultured glomerular endothelial cells. The ANG II-induced RANTES protein was chemotactic for human monocytes. Surprisingly, the ANG II-stimulated RANTES expression was transduced by AT2 receptors because the AT2 receptor antagonists PD 123177 and CGP-42112A, but not an AT1 receptor blocker, abolished the induced RANTES synthesis. Intraperitoneal infusion of ANG II (500 ng/h) into naive rats for 4 d significantly stimulated glomerular RANTES mRNA and protein expression compared with solvent-infused controls. Immunohistochemistry revealed induction of RANTES protein mainly in glomerular endothelial cells and small capillaries. Moreover, ANG II- infused animals exhibited an increase in glomerular ED-1- positive cells compared with controls. Oral treatment with PD 123177 (50 mg/liter drinking water) attenuated the glomerular M/M influx without normalizing the slightly elevated systolic blood pressure caused by ANG II infusion, suggesting that the effects on blood pressure and RANTES induction can be separated. We conclude that the vasoactive peptide ANG II may play an important role in glomerular chemotaxis of M/M through local induction of the chemokine RANTES. The observation that the ANG II- mediated induction of RANTES is transduced by AT2 receptors may influence the decision as to which substances might be used for the therapeutic interference with the activity of the renin-angiotensin system. PMID:9276721

  8. Dengue Virus NS1 Disrupts the Endothelial Glycocalyx, Leading to Hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Puerta-Guardo, Henry; Glasner, Dustin R; Harris, Eva

    2016-07-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent arboviral disease in humans and a major public health problem worldwide. Systemic plasma leakage, leading to hypovolemic shock and potentially fatal complications, is a critical determinant of dengue severity. Recently, we and others described a novel pathogenic effect of secreted dengue virus (DENV) non-structural protein 1 (NS1) in triggering hyperpermeability of human endothelial cells in vitro and systemic vascular leakage in vivo. NS1 was shown to activate toll-like receptor 4 signaling in primary human myeloid cells, leading to secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and vascular leakage. However, distinct endothelial cell-intrinsic mechanisms of NS1-induced hyperpermeability remained to be defined. The endothelial glycocalyx layer (EGL) is a network of membrane-bound proteoglycans and glycoproteins lining the vascular endothelium that plays a key role in regulating endothelial barrier function. Here, we demonstrate that DENV NS1 disrupts the EGL on human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells, inducing degradation of sialic acid and shedding of heparan sulfate proteoglycans. This effect is mediated by NS1-induced expression of sialidases and heparanase, respectively. NS1 also activates cathepsin L, a lysosomal cysteine proteinase, in endothelial cells, which activates heparanase via enzymatic cleavage. Specific inhibitors of sialidases, heparanase, and cathepsin L prevent DENV NS1-induced EGL disruption and endothelial hyperpermeability. All of these effects are specific to NS1 from DENV1-4 and are not induced by NS1 from West Nile virus, a related flavivirus. Together, our data suggest an important role for EGL disruption in DENV NS1-mediated endothelial dysfunction during severe dengue disease. PMID:27416066

  9. Dengue Virus NS1 Disrupts the Endothelial Glycocalyx, Leading to Hyperpermeability

    PubMed Central

    Puerta-Guardo, Henry; Glasner, Dustin R.; Harris, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent arboviral disease in humans and a major public health problem worldwide. Systemic plasma leakage, leading to hypovolemic shock and potentially fatal complications, is a critical determinant of dengue severity. Recently, we and others described a novel pathogenic effect of secreted dengue virus (DENV) non-structural protein 1 (NS1) in triggering hyperpermeability of human endothelial cells in vitro and systemic vascular leakage in vivo. NS1 was shown to activate toll-like receptor 4 signaling in primary human myeloid cells, leading to secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and vascular leakage. However, distinct endothelial cell-intrinsic mechanisms of NS1-induced hyperpermeability remained to be defined. The endothelial glycocalyx layer (EGL) is a network of membrane-bound proteoglycans and glycoproteins lining the vascular endothelium that plays a key role in regulating endothelial barrier function. Here, we demonstrate that DENV NS1 disrupts the EGL on human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells, inducing degradation of sialic acid and shedding of heparan sulfate proteoglycans. This effect is mediated by NS1-induced expression of sialidases and heparanase, respectively. NS1 also activates cathepsin L, a lysosomal cysteine proteinase, in endothelial cells, which activates heparanase via enzymatic cleavage. Specific inhibitors of sialidases, heparanase, and cathepsin L prevent DENV NS1-induced EGL disruption and endothelial hyperpermeability. All of these effects are specific to NS1 from DENV1-4 and are not induced by NS1 from West Nile virus, a related flavivirus. Together, our data suggest an important role for EGL disruption in DENV NS1-mediated endothelial dysfunction during severe dengue disease. PMID:27416066

  10. Isolating and Using Sections of Bovine Mesenteric Artery and Vein as a Bioassay to Test for Vasoactivity in the Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, James L.; Barnes, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian gastrointestinal systems are constantly exposed to compounds (desirable and undesirable) that can have an effect on blood flow to and from that system. Changes in blood flow to the small intestine can result in effects on the absorptive functions of the organ. Particular interest in toxins liberated from feedstuffs through fermentative and digestive processes has developed in ruminants as an area where productive efficiencies could be improved. The video associated with this article describes an in vitro bioassay developed to screen compounds for vasoactivity in isolated cross-sections of bovine mesenteric artery and vein using a multimyograph. Once the blood vessels are mounted and equilibrated in the myograph, the bioassay itself can be used: as a screening tool to evaluate the contractile response or vasoactivity of compounds of interest; determine the presence of receptor types by pharmacologically targeting receptors with specific agonists; determine the role of a receptor with the presence of one or more antagonists; or determine potential interactions of compounds of interest with antagonists. Through all of this, data are collected real-time, tissue collected from a single animal can be exposed to a large number of different experimental treatments (an in vitro advantage), and represents vasculature on either side of the capillary bed to provide an accurate picture of what could be happening in the afferent and efferent blood supply supporting the small intestine. PMID:25350042

  11. Isolating and using sections of bovine mesenteric artery and vein as a bioassay to test for vasoactivity in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Klotz, James L; Barnes, Adam J

    2014-10-07

    Mammalian gastrointestinal systems are constantly exposed to compounds (desirable and undesirable) that can have an effect on blood flow to and from that system. Changes in blood flow to the small intestine can result in effects on the absorptive functions of the organ. Particular interest in toxins liberated from feedstuffs through fermentative and digestive processes has developed in ruminants as an area where productive efficiencies could be improved. The video associated with this article describes an in vitro bioassay developed to screen compounds for vasoactivity in isolated cross-sections of bovine mesenteric artery and vein using a multimyograph. Once the blood vessels are mounted and equilibrated in the myograph, the bioassay itself can be used: as a screening tool to evaluate the contractile response or vasoactivity of compounds of interest; determine the presence of receptor types by pharmacologically targeting receptors with specific agonists; determine the role of a receptor with the presence of one or more antagonists; or determine potential interactions of compounds of interest with antagonists. Through all of this, data are collected real-time, tissue collected from a single animal can be exposed to a large number of different experimental treatments (an in vitro advantage), and represents vasculature on either side of the capillary bed to provide an accurate picture of what could be happening in the afferent and efferent blood supply supporting the small intestine.

  12. Higher Levels of Adiponectin in Vascular Endothelial Cells are Associated with Greater Brachial Artery Flow-mediated Dilation in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Luttrell, Meredith J.; Kim, Han-Kyul; Meade, Thomas H.; English, Mark; Segal, Mark S.; Christou, Demetra D.

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived protein, exerts anti-atherosclerotic effects on the vascular endothelium. Recently adiponectin protein has been reported in murine vascular endothelial cells, however, whether adiponectin is present in human vascular endothelial cells remains unexplored. We sought to examine 1) adiponectin protein in vascular endothelial cells collected from older adults free of overt cardiovascular disease; 2) the relation between endothelial cell adiponectin and in vivo vascular endothelial function; and 3) the relation between endothelial cell adiponectin, circulating (plasma) adiponectin and related factors. We measured vascular endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation using ultrasonography), vascular endothelial cell adiponectin (biopsy coupled with quantitative immunofluorescence) and circulating adiponectin (Mercodia, ELISA) in older, sedentary, non-smoking, men and women (55 – 79 years). We found that higher endothelial cell adiponectin was related with greater flow-mediated dilation (r=0.43, P<0.05) and greater flow-mediated dilation normalized for shear stress (r=0.56, P<0.01), but was not related with vascular smooth muscle responsiveness to nitric oxide (r=0.04, P=0.9). Vascular endothelial cell adiponectin was not related with circulating adiponectin (r=−0.14, P=0.6). Endothelial cell and circulating adiponectin were differentially associated with adiposity, metabolic and other factors, but both were inversely associated with renal function (r=0.44 to 0.62, P ≤ 0.04). In conclusion, higher endothelial cell adiponectin levels are associated with higher vascular endothelial function, independent of circulating adiponectin levels in older adults. PMID:25572013

  13. Cytotoxicity of Metal Ions Released from Nitinol Alloys on Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haider, W.; Munroe, N.; Tek, V.; Gill, P.K.S.; Tang, Y.; McGoron, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Most implantable medical devices are expected to function in the body over an extended period of time. Therefore, immersion tests under simulated conditions can be useful for assessing the amount of metal ions released in situ. In this investigation, dissolved ions from as-received binary and ternary Nitinol alloys in cell culture media were periodically measured under static and dynamic conditions. Endothelial cells were grown in aliquots of culture media obtained and the effect of dissolved ions on cell proliferation and viability of endothelial cells (HUVEC) was studied by cytotoxicity assays. The concentration of metal ions in the media was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. PMID:21666855

  14. Cytotoxicity of Metal Ions Released from Nitinol Alloys on Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, W.; Munroe, N.; Tek, V.; Gill, P. K. S.; Tang, Y.; McGoron, A. J.

    2011-07-01

    Most implantable medical devices are expected to function in the body over an extended period of time. Therefore, immersion tests under simulated conditions can be useful for assessing the amount of metal ions released in situ. In this investigation, dissolved ions from as-received binary and ternary Nitinol alloys in cell culture media were periodically measured under static and dynamic conditions. Endothelial cells were grown in aliquots of culture media obtained and the effect of dissolved ions on cell proliferation and viability of endothelial cells (HUVEC) was studied by cytotoxicity assays. The concentration of metal ions in the media was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

  15. Novel regulators of endothelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Krishnan; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial barrier function is an essential and tightly regulated process that ensures proper compartmentalization of the vascular and interstitial space, while allowing for the diffusive exchange of small molecules and the controlled trafficking of macromolecules and immune cells. Failure to control endothelial barrier integrity results in excessive leakage of fluid and proteins from the vasculature that can rapidly become fatal in scenarios such as sepsis or the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding on the regulation of endothelial permeability, with a specific focus on the endothelial glycocalyx and endothelial scaffolds, regulatory intracellular signaling cascades, as well as triggers and mediators that either disrupt or enhance endothelial barrier integrity, and provide our perspective as to areas of seeming controversy and knowledge gaps, respectively. PMID:25381026

  16. The endothelial glycocalyx in syndecan-1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Savery, Michele D; Jiang, John X; Park, Pyong Woo; Damiano, Edward R

    2013-05-01

    The existence of a hydrodynamically relevant endothelial glycocalyx has been established in capillaries, venules, and arterioles in vivo. The glycocalyx is thought to consist primarily of membrane-bound proteoglycans with glycosaminoglycan side-chains, membrane-bound glypicans, and adsorbed plasma proteins. The proteoglycans found on the luminal surface of endothelial cells are syndecans-1, -2, and -4, and glypican-1. The extent to which any of these proteins might serve to anchor the glycocalyx to the endothelium has not yet been determined. To test whether syndecan-1, in particular, is an essential anchoring protein, we performed experiments to determine the hydrodynamically relevant glycocalyx thickness in syndecan-1 deficient (Sdc1(-/-)) mice. Micro-particle image velocimetry data were collected using a previously described method. Microviscometric analysis of these data consistently revealed the existence of a hydrodynamically relevant endothelial glycocalyx in Sdc1(-/-) mice in vivo. The mean glycocalyx thickness found in Sdc1(-/-) mice was 0.45±0.10 μm (N=15), as compared with 0.54±0.12 μm (N=11) in wild-type (WT) mice (p=0.03). The slightly thinner glycocalyx observed in Sdc1(-/-) mice relative to WT mice may be due to the absence of syndecan-1. These findings show that healthy Sdc1(-/-) mice are able to synthesize and maintain a hydrodynamically relevant glycocalyx, which indicates that syndecan-1 is not an essential anchoring protein for the glycocalyx in Sdc1(-/-) mice. This may also be the case for WT mice; however, Sdc1(-/-) mice might adapt to the lack of syndecan-1 by increasing the expression of other proteoglycans. In any case, syndecan-1 does not appear to be a prerequisite for the existence of an endothelial glycocalyx.

  17. Replication of human endothelial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Lewis, L J; Hoak, J C; Maca, R D; Fry, G L

    1973-08-01

    Investigative studies dealing with the properties and functions of endothelial cells have been hampered because there has been little or no success in the isolation, growth, and passage of individual cells in large numbers. We have developed a system whereby pure cultures of endothelial cells derived from umbilical veins can be subcultured for at least five serial passages. Many facets of endothelial function and interaction can be evaluated with the use of this new adaptive system of isolation and culture. PMID:4718112

  18. Renal Endothelial Dysfunction in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Huifang; Harris, Raymond C.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been posited to play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Due to the heterogeneity of endothelial cells (ECs), it is difficult to generalize about endothelial responses to diabetic stimuli. At present, there are limited techniques fordirectly measuring EC function in vivo, so diagnosis of endothelial disorders still largely depends on indirect assessment of mediators arising from EC injury. In the kidney microcirculation, both afferent and efferent arteries, arterioles and glomerular endothelial cells (GEnC) have all been implicated as targets of diabetic injury. Both hyperglycemia per se, as well as the metabolic consequences of glucose dysregulation, are thought to lead to endothelial cell dysfunction. In this regard, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays a central role in EC dysfunction. Impaired eNOS activity can occur at numerous levels, including enzyme uncoupling, post-translational modifications, internalization and decreased expression. Reduced nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability exacerbates oxidative stress, further promoting endothelial dysfunction and injury. The injured ECs may then function as active signal transducers of metabolic, hemodynamic and inflammatory factors that modify the function and morphology of the vessel wall and interact with adjacent cells, which may activate a cascade of inflammatory and proliferative and profibrotic responses in progressive DN. Both pharmacological approaches and potential regenerative therapies hold promise for restoration of impaired endothelial cells in diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24720460

  19. Progenitor endothelial cell involvement in Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Budinger, Thomas F.

    2003-05-01

    There is compelling evidence that endothelial cells of the brain and periphery are dysfunctional in Alzheimer's Disease. There is evidence for a fundamental defect in, or abnormal aging of, endothelial progenitor cells in atherosclerosis. The possibility that endothelial cell defects are a primary cause for Alzheimer's Disease or other dementias can be researched by molecular and cell biology studies as well as cell trafficking studies using recently demonstrated molecular imaging methods. The evidence for abnormal endothelial function and the methods to explore this hypothesis are presented.

  20. Endothelial cells in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Eckers, Anna; Haendeler, Judith

    2015-05-10

    According to the World Health Organization, from 2014, cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the number one cause of death worldwide. One of the key players in maintaining proper cardiovascular function is the endothelium, the inner layer of all blood vessels. This monolayer of cells on one hand serves as a barrier between blood and the surrounding tissue and on the other hand regulates many aspects of vessel function. Therefore, it is not surprising that interventions reducing the risk for CVD improve endothelial function. There is a clear correlation between endothelial dysfunction, in which the endothelial homeostasis is disturbed, and the development and progression of many CVD. Thus, the development of diagnostic tools for early detection of disturbances in endothelial homeostasis or interventions aimed at improving endothelial function after insults require a comprehensive knowledge not only of the cellular reactions to the positive or negative stimuli but also of the molecular mechanisms relaying these responses. Thus, this Forum on "endothelial cells in health and disease" focuses on key molecules and processes intimately involved in endothelial cell function and covers areas from endothelial nitric oxide synthase-dependent processes, over the group of Phox-Bem1 domain proteins, cytochrome P450 epoxygenase-derived metabolites, and pre-mRNA splicing to microRNAs. Finally, one has to conclude that keeping endothelial homeostasis is the central key for a healthy long life of the human individual.

  1. Myoferlin is critical for endocytosis in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bernatchez, Pascal N.; Sharma, Arpeeta; Kodaman, Pinar

    2009-01-01

    Myoferlin is a member of the ferlin family of proteins that promotes endomembrane fusion with the plasma membrane in muscle cells and endothelial cells. In addition, myoferlin is necessary for the surface expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 through the formation of a protein complex with dynamin-2 (Dyn-2). Since Dyn-2 is necessary for the fission of endocytic vesicles from the plasma membrane, we tested the hypothesis that myoferlin may regulates aspects of receptor-dependent endocytosis. Here we show that myoferlin gene silencing decreases both clathrin and caveolae/raft-dependent endocytosis, whereas ectopic myoferlin expression in COS-7 cells increases endocytosis by up to 125%. Interestingly, we have observed that inhibition of Dyn-2 activity or caveolin-1 (Cav-1) expression impairs endocytosis as well as membrane resealing after injury, indicating that Dyn-2 and Cav-1 also participate in both membrane fission and fusion processes. Mechanistically, myoferlin partially colocalizes with Dyn-2 and Cav-1 and forms a protein complex with Cav-1 solubilized from tissue extracts. Together, these data describe a new role for myoferlin in receptor-dependent endocytosis and an overlapping role for myoferlin-Dyn-2-Cav-1 protein complexes in membrane fusion and fission events. PMID:19494235

  2. Impact of endothelial lipase on cellular lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Riederer, Monika; Köfeler, Harald; Lechleitner, Margarete; Tritscher, Michaela; Frank, Saša

    2012-07-01

    Using mass spectrometry (MS), we examined the impact of endothelial lipase (EL) overexpression on the cellular phospholipid (PL) and triglyceride (TG) content of human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) and of mouse plasma and liver tissue. In HAEC incubated with the major EL substrate, HDL, adenovirus (Ad)-mediated EL overexpression resulted in the generation of various lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE) species in cell culture supernatants. While the cellular phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) content remained unaltered, cellular phosphatidylcholine (PC)-, LPC- and TG-contents were significantly increased upon EL overexpression. Importantly, cellular lipid composition was not altered when EL was overexpressed in the absence of HDL. [(14)C]-LPC accumulated in EL overexpressing, but not LacZ-control cells, incubated with [(14)C]-PC labeled HDL, indicating EL-mediated LPC supply. Exogenously added [(14)C]-LPC accumulated in HAEC as well. Its conversion to [(14)C]-PC was sensitive to a lysophospholipid acyltransferase (LPLAT) inhibitor, thimerosal. Incorporation of [(3)H]-Choline into cellular PC was 56% lower in EL compared with LacZ cells, indicating decreased endogenous PC synthesis. In mice, adenovirus mediated EL overexpression decreased plasma PC, PE and LPC and increased liver LPC, LPE and TG content. Based on our results, we conclude that EL not only supplies cells with FFA as found previously, but also with HDL-derived LPC and LPE species resulting in increased cellular TG and PC content as well as decreased endogenous PC synthesis. PMID:23075452

  3. Aberrant Glycosylation of Plasma Proteins in Severe Preeclampsia Promotes Monocyte Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Kazanjian, Avedis A.; Tinnemore, Deborah; Gafken, Philip R.; Ogata, Yuko; Napolitano, Peter G.; Stallings, Jonathan D.; Ippolito, Danielle L.

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation of plasma proteins increases during pregnancy. Our objectives were to investigate an anti-inflammatory role of these proteins in normal pregnancies and determine whether aberrant protein glycosylation promotes monocyte adhesion in preeclampsia. Plasma was prospectively collected from nonpregnant controls and nulliparous patients in all 3 trimesters. Patients were divided into cohorts based on the applicable postpartum diagnosis. U937 monocytes were preconditioned with enzymatically deglycosylated plasma, and monocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayers was quantified by spectrophotometry. Plasma from nonpregnant controls, first trimester normotensives, and first trimester patients with mild preeclampsia inhibited monocyte–endothelial cell adhesion (P < .05), but plasma from first trimester patients with severe preeclampsia and second and third trimester normotensives did not. Deglycosylating plasma proteins significantly increased adhesion in all the cohorts. These results support a role of plasma glycoprotein interaction in monocyte–endothelial cell adhesion and could suggest a novel therapeutic target for severe preeclampsia. PMID:23757314

  4. Air pollution upregulates endothelial cell procoagulant activity via ultrafine particle-induced oxidant signaling and tissue factor expression.

    PubMed

    Snow, S J; Cheng, W; Wolberg, A S; Carraway, M S

    2014-07-01

    Air pollution exposure is associated with cardiovascular events triggered by clot formation. Endothelial activation and initiation of coagulation are pathophysiological mechanisms that could link inhaled air pollutants to vascular events. Here we investigated the underlying mechanisms of increased endothelial cell procoagulant activity following exposure to soluble components of ultrafine particles (soluble UF). Human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) were exposed to soluble UF and assessed for their ability to trigger procoagulant activity in platelet-free plasma. Exposed HCAEC triggered earlier thrombin generation and faster fibrin clot formation, which was abolished by an anti-tissue factor (TF) antibody, indicating TF-dependent effects. Soluble UF exposure increased TF mRNA expression without compensatory increases in key anticoagulant proteins. To identify early events that regulate TF expression, we measured endothelial H2O2 production following soluble UF exposure and identified the enzymatic source. Soluble UF exposure increased endothelial H2O2 production, and antioxidants attenuated UF-induced upregulation of TF, linking the procoagulant responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Chemical inhibitors and RNA silencing showed that NOX-4, an important endothelial source of H2O2, was involved in UF-induced upregulation of TF mRNA. These data indicate that soluble UF exposure induces endothelial cell procoagulant activity, which involves de novo TF synthesis, ROS production, and the NOX-4 enzyme. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the adverse cardiovascular effects associated with air pollution exposure.

  5. Air pollution upregulates endothelial cell procoagulant activity via ultrafine particle-induced oxidant signaling and tissue factor expression.

    PubMed

    Snow, S J; Cheng, W; Wolberg, A S; Carraway, M S

    2014-07-01

    Air pollution exposure is associated with cardiovascular events triggered by clot formation. Endothelial activation and initiation of coagulation are pathophysiological mechanisms that could link inhaled air pollutants to vascular events. Here we investigated the underlying mechanisms of increased endothelial cell procoagulant activity following exposure to soluble components of ultrafine particles (soluble UF). Human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) were exposed to soluble UF and assessed for their ability to trigger procoagulant activity in platelet-free plasma. Exposed HCAEC triggered earlier thrombin generation and faster fibrin clot formation, which was abolished by an anti-tissue factor (TF) antibody, indicating TF-dependent effects. Soluble UF exposure increased TF mRNA expression without compensatory increases in key anticoagulant proteins. To identify early events that regulate TF expression, we measured endothelial H2O2 production following soluble UF exposure and identified the enzymatic source. Soluble UF exposure increased endothelial H2O2 production, and antioxidants attenuated UF-induced upregulation of TF, linking the procoagulant responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Chemical inhibitors and RNA silencing showed that NOX-4, an important endothelial source of H2O2, was involved in UF-induced upregulation of TF mRNA. These data indicate that soluble UF exposure induces endothelial cell procoagulant activity, which involves de novo TF synthesis, ROS production, and the NOX-4 enzyme. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the adverse cardiovascular effects associated with air pollution exposure. PMID:24752501

  6. CD226 reduces endothelial cell glucose uptake under hyperglycemic conditions with inflammation in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zilong; Zhang, Jinxue; Sun, Yizheng; Jin, Boquan; Gao, Feng; Guo, Shuzhong; Zhuang, Ran

    2016-01-01

    CD226 is a co-stimulatory adhesion molecule found on immune and endothelial cells. Here, we evaluated a possible role for CD226 in inhibiting glucose uptake in isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and in wild-type (WT) and CD226 knockout (KO) mice with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced type 2 diabetes (T2DM). CD226 expression increased under hyperglycemic conditions in the presence of TNF-α. Furthermore, CD226 knockdown improved glucose uptake in endothelial cells, and CD226 KO mice exhibited increased glucose tolerance. Levels of soluble CD226 in plasma were higher in T2DM patients following an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) than under fasting conditions. Our results indicate that low-grade inflammation coupled with elevated blood glucose increases CD226 expression, resulting in decreased endothelial cell glucose uptake in T2DM. PMID:26910838

  7. Comparison of endothelial evaluation techniques.

    PubMed

    Langston, R H; Roisman, T S

    1981-01-01

    Comparative evaluation of the corneal endothelium with the Heyer-Schulte specular photomicroscope, the McIntyre CEB reticle affixed to a slitlamp, and a slitlamp alone found the reticle-slitlamp combination to give results within a 10% average of endothelial cell counts determined with the specular microscope. The reticle also compared favorably in time and cost savings. All three methods of corneal evaluation were effective for observation of polymegathism. Because of its lower magnification, the slitlamp without the reticle was best suited for evaluation of cornea guttata. PMID:7287565

  8. Neurons containing gastrin-releasing peptide and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide are involved in the reception of the photic signal in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the Syrian hamster: an immunocytochemical ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Aïoun, J; Chambille, I; Peytevin, J; Martinet, L

    1998-02-01

    In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nuclei are involved in the generation of biological rhythms and are synchronized by light input coming from the retina. The targets of retinal afferents and the involvement of neurons containing gastrin-releasing and vasoactive intestinal peptides in photic reception were investigated in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the Syrian hamster by using light- and electron-microscopic immunocytochemistry. Cholera toxin was used to trace retinal fibers and Fos immunoreactivity to visualize cellular response to light stimulation. Ultrastructural observations were made in the intermediate third of the nuclei, the area of highest overlap for the immunoreactivities investigated. Gastrin-releasing peptide and vasoactive intestinal peptide cell bodies were localized in the ventral part of the nuclei; their dense immunoreactive fiber network often displayed synaptic contacts. Both neuropeptides were colocalized in elongated cells observed near the optic chiasm. Following a light pulse in the middle of the subjective night, Fos protein was expressed in most gastrin-releasing peptide perikarya and in some vasoactive intestinal peptide cells. Retinal terminals mostly occurred in the midline zone between the suprachiasmatic nuclei. Symmetrical or asymmetrical retinal synapses were observed on gastrin-releasing peptide-immunoreactive dendrites and somata, but never on vasoactive intestinal peptide neurons. These results are discussed in relation to the photic entrainment of the circadian clock.

  9. Endothelial Expression of Scavenger Receptor Class B, Type I Protects against Development of Atherosclerosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vaisman, Boris L.; Vishnyakova, Tatyana G.; Freeman, Lita A.; Amar, Marcelo J.; Demosky, Stephen J.; Liu, Chengyu; Stonik, John A.; Sampson, Maureen L.; Pryor, Milton; Bocharov, Alexander V.; Eggerman, Thomas L.; Patterson, Amy P.; Remaley, Alan T.

    2015-01-01

    The role of scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) in endothelial cells (EC) was examined in several novel transgenic mouse models expressing SR-BI in endothelium of mice with normal C57Bl6/N, apoE-KO, or Scarb1-KO backgrounds. Mice were also created expressing SR-BI exclusively in endothelium and liver. Endothelial expression of the Tie2-Scarb1 transgene had no significant effect on plasma lipoprotein levels in mice on a normal chow diet but on an atherogenic diet, significantly decreased plasma cholesterol levels, increased plasma HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, and protected mice against atherosclerosis. In 8-month-old apoE-KO mice fed a normal chow diet, the Tie2-Scarb1 transgene decreased aortic lesions by 24%. Mice expressing SR-BI only in EC and liver had a 1.5 ± 0.1-fold increase in plasma cholesterol compared to mice synthesizing SR-BI only in liver. This elevation was due mostly to increased HDL-C. In EC culture studies, SR-BI was found to be present in both basolateral and apical membranes but greater cellular uptake of cholesterol from HDL was found in the basolateral compartment. In summary, enhanced expression of SR-BI in EC resulted in a less atherogenic lipoprotein profile and decreased atherosclerosis, suggesting a possible role for endothelial SR-BI in the flux of cholesterol across EC. PMID:26504816

  10. The relationship between plasma and salivary NOx.

    PubMed

    Clodfelter, William H; Basu, Swati; Bolden, Crystal; Dos Santos, Patricia C; King, S Bruce; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B

    2015-05-01

    Several studies have shown that fasting plasma nitrite (NO2(-)) is an indicator of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity while plasma nitrate (NO3(-)) or the sum of NO2(-) and NO3(-) (NOx) does not reflect NOS function. Plasma NO2(-) can also be elevated through dietary NO3(-) where the NO3(-) is partially reduced to NO2(-) by oral bacteria and enters the plasma through the digestive system. NO3(-) is taken up from plasma by salivary glands and the cycle repeats itself. Thus, one may propose that salivary NO2(-) is an indicator of plasma NO2(-) and consequently of NO production. Many brands of nitric oxide (NO) saliva test strips have been developed that suggest that their product is indicative of circulatory NO availability. However, data supporting a relationship between salivary and plasma NO2(-) or NO bioavailability are lacking. Here we have measured basal salivary and plasma NO2(-) and NO3(-) to determine if any correlation exists between these in 13 adult volunteers. We found no significant correlation between basal salivary and plasma NO2(-). Also no correlation exists between salivary NO3(-) and plasma NO2(-). However, we did see a correlation between salivary NO3(-) and plasma NO3(-), and between salivary NO2(-) and plasma NO3(-). In a separate study, we compared the efficiency of salivary NO3(-) reduction with the efficacy of increasing plasma NO3(-) and NO2(-) after drinking beet juice, a high NO3(-)-containing beverage, in 10 adult volunteers. No significant correlation was observed between the ex vivo salivary reduction of NO3(-) to NO2(-) and plasma increases in NO3(-) or NO2(-). These results suggest that measures of salivary NO3(-), NO2(-) or NOx are not good indicators of endothelial function. In addition, the efficiency of saliva to reduce NO3(-) to NO2(-)ex-vivo does not demonstrate one's ability to increase plasma NO2(-) following consumption of dietary NO3(-).

  11. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  12. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-11-26

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  13. Relationship between endogenous concentrations of vasoactive substances and measures of peripheral vasodilator function in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Casey, Darren P; Nichols, Wilmer W; Conti, C Richard; Braith, Randy W

    2010-01-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between plasma concentrations of nitrite/nitrate (NO(x)) and endothelin (ET)-1 and non-invasive measures of peripheral vasodilator function in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). 2. Twenty-two patients with angiographic CAD underwent non-invasive measurement of peripheral vasodilator function in the brachial conduit artery (flow-mediated dilation (FMD) testing via ultrasound) and in the forearm resistance arteries (via venous occlusion plethysmography) during reactive hyperaemia after 5 min ischaemia. In addition, plasma NO(x) and ET-1 concentrations were determined. 3. The plasma concentration of NO(x) was related to the peak brachial FMD response when expressed as either the relative (%) or absolute (mm) change in diameter (r = 0.73, P < 0.001; and r = 0.64, P < 0.01, respectively). Moreover, plasma concentrations of NO(x) demonstrated a relationship with forearm vasodilation estimated by total forearm blood flow following 5 min ischaemia (r = 0.63, P < 0.01) and the flow debt repayment of the forearm (r = 0.54, P < 0.01). Finally, ET-1 concentrations were inversely related to FMD% (r = -0.45, P < 0.05). 4. The findings of the present study demonstrate a relationship between the plasma concentrations of NO(x) and measures of vascular reactivity in conduit and resistance arteries in patients with CAD. Therefore, measurement of plasma NO(x) may serve as a reliable marker for peripheral vasodilator dysfunction in patients with CAD. PMID:19515062

  14. Endothelial Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dhananjayan, R; Koundinya, K S Srivani; Malati, T; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is an imbalance in the production of vasodilator factors and when this balance is disrupted, it predisposes the vasculature towards pro-thrombotic and pro-atherogenic effects. This results in vasoconstriction, leukocyte adherence, platelet activation, mitogenesis, pro-oxidation, impaired coagulation and nitric oxide production, vascular inflammation, atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Endothelial dysfunction is focussed as it is a potential contributor to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in diabetes mellitus. Under physiological conditions, there is a balanced release of endothelial-derived relaxing and contracting factors, but this delicate balance is altered in diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis, thereby contributing to further progression of vascular and end-organ damage. This review focuses on endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, oxidative stress associated with diabetes mellitus, markers and genetics that are implicated in endothelial dysfunction.

  15. Endothelial cell micropatterning: Methods, effects, and applications

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Deirdre E.J.; Hinds, Monica T.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of flow on endothelial cells have been widely examined for the ability of fluid shear stress to alter cell morphology and function; however, the effects of endothelial cell morphology without flow have only recently been observed. An increase in lithographic techniques in cell culture spurred a corresponding increase in research aiming to confine cell morphology. These studies lead to a better understanding of how morphology and cytoskeletal configuration affect the structure and function of the cells. This review examines endothelial cell micropatterning research by exploring both the many alternative methods used to alter endothelial cell morphology and the resulting changes in cellular shape and phenotype. Micropatterning induced changes in endothelial cell proliferation, apoptosis, cytoskeletal organization, mechanical properties, and cell functionality. Finally, the ways these cellular manipulation techniques have been applied to biomedical engineering research, including angiogenesis, cell migration, and tissue engineering, is discussed. PMID:21761242

  16. Endothelial Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dhananjayan, R; Koundinya, K S Srivani; Malati, T; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is an imbalance in the production of vasodilator factors and when this balance is disrupted, it predisposes the vasculature towards pro-thrombotic and pro-atherogenic effects. This results in vasoconstriction, leukocyte adherence, platelet activation, mitogenesis, pro-oxidation, impaired coagulation and nitric oxide production, vascular inflammation, atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Endothelial dysfunction is focussed as it is a potential contributor to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in diabetes mellitus. Under physiological conditions, there is a balanced release of endothelial-derived relaxing and contracting factors, but this delicate balance is altered in diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis, thereby contributing to further progression of vascular and end-organ damage. This review focuses on endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, oxidative stress associated with diabetes mellitus, markers and genetics that are implicated in endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27605734

  17. Palmitoyl acyltransferase DHHC21 mediates endothelial dysfunction in systemic inflammatory response syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Richard S.; Yang, Xiaoyuan; Meegan, Jamie E.; Overstreet, Jonathan W.; Yang, Clement G.Y.; Elliott, John A.; Reynolds, Jason J.; Cha, Byeong J.; Pivetti, Christopher D.; Mitchell, David A.; Wu, Mack H.; Deschenes, Robert J.; Yuan, Sarah Y.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a hallmark of systemic inflammatory response underlying multiple organ failure. Here we report a novel function of DHHC-containing palmitoyl acyltransferases (PATs) in mediating endothelial inflammation. Pharmacological inhibition of PATs attenuates barrier leakage and leucocyte adhesion induced by endothelial junction hyperpermeability and ICAM-1 expression during inflammation. Among 11 DHHCs detected in vascular endothelium, DHHC21 is required for barrier response. Mice with DHHC21 function deficiency (Zdhhc21dep/dep) exhibit marked resistance to injury, characterized by reduced plasma leakage, decreased leucocyte adhesion and ameliorated lung pathology, culminating in improved survival. Endothelial cells from Zdhhc21dep/dep display blunted barrier dysfunction and leucocyte adhesion, whereas leucocytes from these mice did not show altered adhesiveness. Furthermore, inflammation enhances PLCβ1 palmitoylation and signalling activity, effects significantly reduced in Zdhhc21dep/dep and rescued by DHHC21 overexpression. Likewise, overexpression of wild-type, not mutant, PLCβ1 augments barrier dysfunction. Altogether, these data suggest the involvement of DHHC21-mediated PLCβ1 palmitoylation in endothelial inflammation. PMID:27653213

  18. Role for Tetrahydrobiopterin in the Fetoplacental Endothelial Dysfunction in Maternal Supraphysiological Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Leiva, Andrea; Fuenzalida, Bárbara; Toledo, Fernando; Salomón, Carlos; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Sanhueza, Carlos; Pardo, Fabián

    2016-01-01

    Maternal physiological hypercholesterolemia occurs during pregnancy, ensuring normal fetal development. In some cases, the maternal plasma cholesterol level increases to above this physiological range, leading to maternal supraphysiological hypercholesterolemia (MSPH). This condition results in endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in the fetal and placental vasculature. The fetal and placental endothelial dysfunction is related to alterations in the L-arginine/nitric oxide (NO) pathway and the arginase/urea pathway and results in reduced NO production. The level of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a cofactor for endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), is reduced in nonpregnant women who have hypercholesterolemia, which favors the generation of the superoxide anion rather than NO (from eNOS), causing endothelial dysfunction. However, it is unknown whether MSPH is associated with changes in the level or metabolism of BH4; as a result, eNOS function is not well understood. This review summarizes the available information on the potential link between MSPH and BH4 in causing human fetoplacental vascular endothelial dysfunction, which may be crucial for understanding the deleterious effects of MSPH on fetal growth and development. PMID:26697136

  19. Daily variations in concentration of vasoactive intestinal peptide immunoreactivity in hypothalamic nuclei of rats rendered diurnal by restricted-schedule feeding.

    PubMed

    Morin, A J; Denoroy, L; Jouvet, M

    1993-04-01

    We previously described that in the suprachiasmatic (SCN), peri-(PeVN) and paraventricular (PaVN) nuclei of normal rats, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-like immunoreactivity (VIP-LI) accumulates during the night period and decreases during the day. In order to determine whether these variations are linked to the light-dark cycle or are a consequence of sleep-wake rhythm expression, we dissociated these two parameters by restricting feeding to diurnal hours. In these conditions which inverse the paradoxical sleep rhythm, the VIP-LI pattern is perturbed and its minimum advanced by 4 h in the SCN. In the PeVN, the daily pattern is maintained but the minimum is also advanced by 4 h. Finally, the rhythm is abolished in the PaVN. These circadian fluctuations indicate that the hypothalamic VIP-LI rhythm is not linked to the paradoxical sleep rhythm but could be sensitive to photic and non-photic Zeitgeber.

  20. Hydrokinetic activity of secretion and secretin analogues, modified in the N-terminal sequence, and of vasoactive intestinal peptide in the dog pancreas.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, P; Forell, M M; Jaeger, E; Moroder, L; Wünsch, E

    1981-01-01

    In the dog pancreas in vivo, the biological activity of secretin and vasoactive intestinal peptide was compared to that of secretin analogues modified in their N-terminal hexapeptide and to X-secretion (alpha, beta-Asp3-secretin) and Y-secretin (a conversion product of X-secretin consisting of about 15% secretin and 85% beta-Asp3-secretin). Replacement of Asp3 by glutamic acid reduced secretin activity markedly. Replacement by neutral amino acids abolished the activity nearly completely. alpha, beta-Asp3-secretin and beta-Asp3-secretin appeared to be ineffective. The results indicate that the free beta-carboxy group of the side chain of the Asp3 residue of the secretin molecule is of decisive importance for hydrokinetic action.

  1. High doses of ultraviolet-C irradiation increases vasoactive intestinal contractor/endothelin-2 expression in keratinocytes of the newborn mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Adur, Javier; Takizawa, Satoshi; Uchide, Tsuyoshi; Casco, Victor; Saida, Kaname

    2007-05-01

    We examined the expression profiles of vasoactive intestinal contractor/endothelin-2 (VIC/ET-2) at both gene and peptide level in skin irradiated with different ultraviolet wavelengths. We found that VIC/ET-2 gene expression is sensitive only to ultraviolet-C (UVC) irradiation and has an immediate response. These results provide direct evidence that high doses of UVC irradiation induce an increase in gene expression and protein production of VIC/ET-2 and endothelin (ET) receptors in a dose-dependent manner in epidermal keratinocytes. We suggest that VIC/ET-2 can play an essential role in the maintenance, protection and hyperpigmentation of the epidermis exposed to UVC irradiation from artificial or natural sources.

  2. Hydrokinetic activity of secretion and secretin analogues, modified in the N-terminal sequence, and of vasoactive intestinal peptide in the dog pancreas.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, P; Forell, M M; Jaeger, E; Moroder, L; Wünsch, E

    1981-01-01

    In the dog pancreas in vivo, the biological activity of secretin and vasoactive intestinal peptide was compared to that of secretin analogues modified in their N-terminal hexapeptide and to X-secretion (alpha, beta-Asp3-secretin) and Y-secretin (a conversion product of X-secretin consisting of about 15% secretin and 85% beta-Asp3-secretin). Replacement of Asp3 by glutamic acid reduced secretin activity markedly. Replacement by neutral amino acids abolished the activity nearly completely. alpha, beta-Asp3-secretin and beta-Asp3-secretin appeared to be ineffective. The results indicate that the free beta-carboxy group of the side chain of the Asp3 residue of the secretin molecule is of decisive importance for hydrokinetic action. PMID:7274610

  3. Vasoactive intestinal peptide synergistically stimulates DNA synthesis in mouse 3T3 cells: Role of cAMP, Ca sup 2+ , and protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Zurier, B.B.; Kozma, M.; Sinnett-Smith, J.; Rozengurt, E. )

    1988-05-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide synergistically stimulated initiation of DNA synthesis in Swiss 3T3 cells. The peptide stimulated ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation in the presence of insulin and either forskolin or an inhibitor of cAMP phosphodiesterase in a concentration-dependent manner. Half-maximal effect was obtained at 1 nM. At mitogenic concentrations, VIP stimulated a marked accumulation (eightfold) of cAMP. In contrast to other growth-promoting neuropeptides, VIP did not induce an increase in cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} or the activation of protein kinase C. The authors conclude that neuropeptides can modulate long-term cell proliferation through multiple signaling pathways.

  4. Increase in plasma thrombomodulin level in patients with vibration syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kanazuka, M; Shigekiyo, T; Toibana, N; Saito, S

    1996-04-01

    To determine whether endothelial cells are injured in vibration syndrome, we measured plasma levels of thrombomodulin (TM) in 100 patients with this syndrome using one-step sandwich enzyme immunoassay. Plasma level of TM in patients with vibration syndrome was significantly higher than that in normal control (p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the plasma TM level between patients with vibration syndrome and those with collagen disease. Plasma TM concentration in chain-saw operators was significantly higher than that in rock-drill operators (p < 0.05). Plasma TM value did not significantly differ between patients with vibration-induced white finger (VWF) and those without VWF. These results suggest that endothelial injury is present in patients with vibration syndrome, the degree of endothelial injury in patients with vibration syndrome equals that in patients with collagen disease, and the endothelial injury in chain-saw operators is greater than that in rock-drill operators. However, there was no difference in the degree of endothelial injury between patients with VWF and those without VWF.

  5. Fluorescent imaging of endothelial glycocalyx layer with wheat germ agglutinin using intravital microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hanae; Ushiyama, Akira; Kawakami, Hayato; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Matsubara, Sachie; Iijima, Takehiko

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial glycocalyx (GCX) is located on the apical surface of vascular endothelial cells and is composed of a negatively-charged network of proteoglycans and glycoproteins. The GCX plays an important role in maintaining the integrity of vascular walls and preventing leakage of plasma. Therefore, degradation of the GCX is believed to lead to pathological leakage of plasma. Because the GCX is a very thin layer, its ultrastructural image has been demonstrated on electron microscope. To explore the function of the GCX, it should be visualized by a microscope in vivo. Thus, we developed in vivo visualization technique of the GCX under fluorescence microscopy using a mouse dorsal skinfold chamber (DSC) model. To label and visualize the GCX, we used fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled lectin, which has a high specificity for sugar moieties. We examined the affinity of the different lectins to epivascular regions under an intravital fluorescent microscope. Among seven different lectins we examined, FITC labeled Triticum vulgaris (wheat germ) agglutinin (WGA) delineated the GCX most clearly. Binding of WGA to the GCX was inhibited by chitin hydrolysate, which contained WGA-binding polysaccharide chains. Furthermore, the septic condition attenuated this structure, suggesting structural degradation of endothelial GCX layer. In conclusion, FITC-labeled WGA lectin enabled visualization of endothelial GCX under in vivo fluorescence microscopy.

  6. Intractable and dramatic diarrhea in liver transplantation recipient with vasoactive intestinal peptide-producing tumor after split liver transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Haiqing, W; Jiayin, Y; Jian, Y; Lunan, Y

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea after liver transplantation is a common complication. Vasoactive intestinal peptide-producing tumor (VIPoma) is a rare cause of watery diarrhea; 80% of such tumors occur in the pancreas, but it is rare in liver. Hypersecretion of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide can stimulate intestinal water and electrolyte secretion, and patients with VIPoma present with watery diarrhea, hypokalemia, and dehydration. Here we report on a 50-year-old man who presented with a 7-month history of watery diarrhea. He had undergone an orthotopic split-liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma in November 2011. Two months after the liver transplantation, he presented with watery diarrhea, dehydration, and hypokalemia. Antibiotics, immunosuppressive drugs modification, antidiarrheal agents, antispasmodics, adsorbents, and fasting were alternately used to control the diarrhea, but his symptoms remained unchanged. A chromogranin examination, a marker of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm, was positive in the third month of the diarrhea history and VIPoma was considered. Treatment with somatostatin immediately controlled the diarrhea, but the primary lesion could not be identified even after corresponding examinations were completed. In the ninth month of diarrhea, a 1 × 1-cm lesion was detected in the right liver by ultrasonography. Radiofrequency ablation was performed, and the diarrhea stopped. Seventeen months later, the chromogranin level decreased to normal and the patient was asymptomatic. Neither the recipient sharing the other liver portion nor the donor presented with any symptoms, so we wondered how the tumor occurred. It is possible that a small VIPoma lesion existed in the liver donor before the transplantation, and that the immunosuppressive drugs induced tumor development. PMID:25596962

  7. Platelet and endothelial activation in catastrophic and quiescent antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bontadi, A; Ruffatti, A; Falcinelli, E; Giannini, S; Marturano, A; Tonello, M; Hoxha, A; Pengo, V; Punzi, L; Momi, S; Gresele, P

    2013-05-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) seem to induce a prothrombotic state by activating endothelium and platelets, but no studies have evaluated systematically the effects of aPL from patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in quiescent versus catastrophic phase. Our aims were to evaluate the in vitro effects on platelet activation of anti-β2 glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI) antibodiesisolated from APS patientin either quiescent or catastrophic phase and to investigate ex vivo platelet and endothelial activation in patients with quiescent or catastrophic APS. Anti-β2GPI antibodies were isolated from plasma of a pregnant woman in two different stages of APS (quiescent and catastrophic, respectively). They were co-incubated with washed platelets from healthy controls that were then challenged with TRAP-6 (thrombin receptor activating peptide 6) and the expression of P- selectin (P-sel) on platelets was assessed by flow cytometry. Moreover, plasma samples from six patients with quiescent, four with catastrophic APS and 10 controls were assessed for several markers of platelet and endothelial activation. The results showed that purified anti-β2GPI antibodies co-incubated with platelets enhanced TRAP-6- induced platelet P-sel expression. Notably, anti-β2GPI antibodies isolated during the catastrophic phase enhanced platelet P-sel expression more than antibodies isolated from the same patient in the quiescent stage of disease. Moreover, APS patients had significantly higher plasma levels of soluble (s) Psel, sCD40 ligand, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 than control subjects. In addition, sP-sel and von Willebrand factor activity were significantly higher during catastrophic than in quiescent phase. PMID:23572134

  8. [Endothelial function: role, assessment and limits].

    PubMed

    Puissant, C; Abraham, P; Durand, S; Humeau-Heurtier, A; Faure, S; Rousseau, P; Mahé, G

    2014-02-01

    For several years, detecting and preventing cardiovascular diseases have become a major issue. Different methods have been developed to evaluate endothelial function. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the first steps leading to atherosclerosis. This review presents an insight into endothelial function, the interests of its assessment and methods for studying endothelial function. To date, the vascular endothelium must be considered as a specific organ with its own functions that contribute to the homeostasis of the cardiovascular system. Endothelial dysfunction typically corresponds to a decrease of nitric oxide NO bioavailability. Biological or physico-chemical methods may be used to assess dysfunction. Biological methods allow measuring NO metabolites and pro-inflammatory and vasoconstrictor mediators released by the endothelium. The physico-chemical methods include intra-coronary injections, plethysmography, flow-mediated dilation (FMD), digital plethysmography and optical techniques using laser (laser Doppler single-point, laser Doppler imager, laser speckle contrast imaging) that can be coupled with provocation tests (iontophoresis, microdialysis, post-ischemic hyperemia, local heating). The principle of each technique and its use in clinical practice are discussed. Studying endothelial dysfunction is a particularly promising field because of new drugs being developed. Nevertheless, assessment methodology still needs further development to enable reliable, non-invasive, reproducible, and inexpensive ways to analyze endothelial dysfunction.

  9. Endothelial Heparan Sulfate in Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fuster, Mark M.; Wang, Lianchun

    2013-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is a linear polysaccharide composed of 50–200 glucosamine and uronic acid (glucuronic acid or iduronic acid) disaccharide repeats with epimerization and various sulfation modifications. HS is covalently attached to core proteins to form HS-proteoglycans. Most of the functions of HS-proteoglycans are mediated by their HS moieties. The biosynthesis of HS is initiated by chain polymerization and is followed by stepwise modification reactions, including sulfation and epimerization. These modifications generate ligand-binding sites that modulate cell functions and activities of proteinases and/or proteinase inhibitors. HS is abundantly expressed in developing and mature vasculature, and understanding its roles in vascular biology and related human diseases is an area of intense investigation. In this chapter, we summarize the significant recent advances in our understanding of the roles of HS in developmental and pathological angiogenesis with a major focus on studies using transgenic as well as gene knockout/knockdown models in mice and zebrafish. These studies have revealed that HS critically regulates angiogenesis by playing a proangiogenic role, and this regulatory function critically depends on HS fine structure. The latter is responsible for facilitating cell-surface binding of various proangiogenic growth factors that in turn mediate endothelial growth signaling. In cancer, mouse studies have revealed important roles for endothelial cell-surface HS as well as matrix-associated HS, wherein signaling by multiple growth factors as well as matrix storage of growth factors may be regulated by HS. We also discuss important mediators that may fine-tune such regulation, such as heparanase and sulfatases; and models wherein targeting HS (or core protein) biosynthesis may affect tumor growth and vascularization. Finally, the importance of targeting HS in other human diseases wherein angiogenesis may play pathophysiologic (or even therapeutic) roles

  10. Mechanisms of Endothelial Dysfunction in Resistance Arteries from Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Luksha, Leanid; Stenvinkel, Peter; Hammarqvist, Folke; Carrero, Juan Jesús; Davidge, Sandra T.; Kublickiene, Karolina

    2012-01-01

    The study focuses on the mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in the uremic milieu. Subcutaneous resistance arteries from 35 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients and 28 matched controls were studied ex-vivo. Basal and receptor-dependent effects of endothelium-derived factors, expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), prerequisites for myoendothelial gap junctions (MEGJ), and associations between endothelium-dependent responses and plasma levels of endothelial dysfunction markers were assessed. The contribution of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) to endothelium-dependent relaxation was impaired in uremic arteries after stimulation with bradykinin, but not acetylcholine, reflecting the agonist-specific differences. Diminished vasodilator influences of the endothelium on basal tone and enhanced plasma levels of asymmetrical dimethyl L-arginine (ADMA) suggest impairment in NO-mediated regulation of uremic arteries. eNOS expression and contribution of MEGJs to EDHF type responses were unaltered. Plasma levels of ADMA were negatively associated with endothelium-dependent responses in uremic arteries. Preserved responses of smooth muscle to pinacidil and NO-donor indicate alterations within the endothelium and tolerance of vasodilator mechanisms to the uremic retention products at the level of smooth muscle. We conclude that both EDHF and NO pathways that control resistance artery tone are impaired in the uremic milieu. For the first time, we validate the alterations in EDHF type responses linked to kinin receptors in ESRD patients. The association between plasma ADMA concentrations and endothelial function in uremic resistance vasculature may have diagnostic and future therapeutic implications. PMID:22563439

  11. Role of Lipotoxicity in Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-a; Montagnani, Monica; Chandrasekran, Sruti; Quon, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lipotoxicity, caused in large part by overnutrition, directly leads to endothelial dysfunction. Excess lipids in both the circulation and at the tissue level contribute to endothelial dysfunction that underlies much of the pathophysiology of both metabolic disease, including obesity and diabetes and their CV complications. Direct lipotoxic effects on other organs as well as secondary insults from endothelial dysfunction synergize to cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Lifestyle interventions, including reduced calorie intake, diet, and exercise as well as a variety of pharmacologic interventions targeting various mechanisms underlying lipotoxicity in vascular endothelium significantly modify metabolic and CV risk. PMID:22999242

  12. Circulating endothelial cells: a new biomarker of endothelial dysfunction in hematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Nicolas; Smadja, David M

    2016-08-01

    The endothelium and its integrity are in the center of numerous cardiovascular, pulmonary and tumoral diseases. Several studies identified different circulating cellular sub-populations, which allow a noninvasive exploration of endothelial dysfunction. Furthermore, angiogenesis plays a major role in the biology of benign and malignant hematologic diseases. Among these biomarkers, circulating endothelial cells could be considered as a marker of endothelial injury and/or endothelial activation as well as vascular remodeling, whereas circulating endothelial progenitor cells would be only involved in the vascular regeneration. In the future, the quantification of circulating endothelial cells in many diseases could be a noninvasive biomarker used in diagnosis, prognostic and therapeutic follow-up of lung vasculopathy and/or residual disease of hematological malignancies.

  13. C. pneumoniae disrupts eNOS trafficking and impairs NO production in human aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Konrad E; Wolf, Katerina

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) generated NO plays a crucial physiological role in the regulation of vascular tone. eNOS is a constitutively expressed synthase whose enzymatic function is regulated by dual acylation, phosphorylation, protein-protein interaction and subcellular localization. In endothelial cells, the enzyme is primarily localized to the Golgi apparatus (GA) and the plasma membrane where it binds to caveolin-1. Upon stimulation, the enzyme is translocated from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm where it generates NO. When activation of eNOS ceases, the majority of the enzyme is recycled back to the membrane fraction. An inability of eNOS to cycle between the cytosol and the membrane leads to impaired NO production and vascular dysfunction. Chlamydia pneumoniae is a Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterium that primarily infects epithelial cells of the human respiratory tract, but unlike any other chlamydial species, C. pneumoniae displays tropism toward atherosclerotic tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that C. pneumoniae inclusions colocalize with eNOS, and the microorganism interferes with trafficking of the enzyme from the GA to the plasma membrane in primary human aortic endothelial cells. This mislocation of eNOS results in significant inhibition of NO release by C. pneumoniae-infected cells. Furthermore, we show that the distribution of eNOS in C. pneumoniae-infected cells is altered due to an intimate association of the Golgi complex with chlamydial inclusions rather than by direct interaction of the enzyme with the chlamydial inclusion membrane.

  14. Biological properties of different type carbon particles in vitro study on primary culture of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Czerniak-Reczulska, M; Niedzielski, P; Balcerczyk, A; Bartosz, G; Karowicz-Bilińska, A; Mitura, K

    2010-02-01

    Carbon powders have extended surface of carbon layers, which is of significant biomedical importance since the powders are employed to cover implants material. Carbon Powder Particles are produced by different methods: by a detonation method, by RF PACVD (Radio Frequency Plasma Activated Chemical Vapour Deposition) or MW/RF PCVD (Microwave/Radio Frequency Plasma Activated Chemical Vapour Deposition) and others. Our previous data showed that Carbon Powder Particles may act as antioxidant and/or anti-inflammatory factor. However the mechanism of such behavior has been not fully understood. The aim of the work was tested influence carbon powders manufactured by Radio Frequency Plasma Activated Chemical Vapour Deposition RFPACVD method and detonation method on selected parameters of human endothelial cells, which play a crucial role in the regulation of the circulation and vascular wall homeostasis. Graphite powder was used as a control substance. Endothelial cells are actively involved in a wide variety of processes e.g., inflammatory responses to a different type of stimuli (ILs, TNF-alpha) or regulating vasomotor tone via production of vasorelaxants and vasocontrictors. Biological activation is dependent on the type and quantity of chemical bonds on the surface of the powders. The effect of powders on the proliferation of HUVECs (Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells) was determined by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reduction assay. We found decreased cell proliferation after 72 h treatment with graphite as well as Carbon Powder Particles. PMID:20352757

  15. Chronic shear induces caveolae formation and alters ERK and Akt responses in endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Nolan L.; Park, Heonyong; Yi, Hong; Boo, Yong Chool; Sorescu, George P.; Sykes, Michelle; Jo, Hanjoong

    2003-01-01

    Caveolae are plasmalemmal domains enriched with cholesterol, caveolins, and signaling molecules. Endothelial cells in vivo are continuously exposed to shear conditions, and their caveolae density and location may be different from that of static cultured cells. Here, we show that chronic shear exposure regulates formation and localization of caveolae and caveolin-1 in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Chronic exposure (1 or 3 days) of BAEC to laminar shear increased the total number of caveolae by 45-48% above static control. This increase was due to a rise in the luminal caveolae density without changing abluminal caveolae numbers or increasing caveolin-1 mRNA and protein levels. Whereas some caveolin-1 was found in the plasma membrane in static-cultured cells, it was predominantly localized in the Golgi. In contrast, chronic shear-exposed cells showed intense caveolin-1 staining in the luminal plasma membrane with minimum Golgi association. The preferential luminal localization of caveolae may play an important role in endothelial mechanosensing. Indeed, we found that chronic shear exposure (preconditioning) altered activation patterns of two well-known shear-sensitive signaling molecules (ERK and Akt) in response to a step increase in shear stress. ERK activation was blunted in shear preconditioned cells, whereas the Akt response was accelerated. These results suggest that chronic shear stimulates caveolae formation by translocating caveolin-1 from the Golgi to the luminal plasma membrane and alters cell signaling responses.

  16. Endothelial Markers May Link Kidney Function to Cardiovascular Events in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Christina; Clodi, Martin; Neuhold, Stephanie; Resl, Michael; Elhenicky, Marie; Prager, Rudolf; Moertl, Deddo; Strunk, Guido; Luger, Anton; Struck, Joachim; Pacher, Richard; Hülsmann, Martin

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The increased cardiovascular risk in diabetes has been linked to endothelial and renal dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of stable fragments of the precursors of adrenomedullin, endothelin-1, vasopressin, and atrial natriuretic peptide in progression of cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a prospective, observational study design with a composite end point (death or unexpected admission to hospital due to a cardiovascular event) on 781 patients with type 2 diabetes (54 events, median duration of observation 15 months). The four stable precursor peptides midregional adrenomedullin (MR-proADM), midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), COOH-terminal proendothelin-1 (CT-proET-1), and COOH-terminal provasopressin or copeptin (CT-proAVP) were determined at baseline, and their association to renal function and cardiovascular events was studied using stepwise linear and Cox logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic analysis, respectively. RESULTS MR-proADM, CT-proET-1, CT-proAVP, and MR-proANP were all elevated in patients with future cardiovascular events and independently correlated to serum creatinine. MR-proADM and MR-proANP were significant predictors of a future cardiovascular event, with MR-proANP being the stronger (area under the curve 0.802 ± 0.034, sensitivity 0.833, specificity 0.576, positive predictive value 0.132, and negative predictive value 0.978 with a cutoff value of 75 pmol/l). CONCLUSIONS The four serum markers of vasoactive and natriuretic peptides are related to both kidney function and cardiovascular events, thus linking two major complications of diabetes, diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular disease. PMID:19564455

  17. Weibel-Palade body size modulates the adhesive activity of its von Willebrand Factor cargo in cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Francesco; Mafalda Lopes da, Silva; Grimes, William; Lee, Hwee Kuan; Ketteler, Robin; Kriston-Vizi, Janos; Cutler, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the size of cellular organelles are often linked to modifications in their function. Endothelial cells store von Willebrand Factor (vWF), a glycoprotein essential to haemostasis in Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs), cigar-shaped secretory granules that are generated in a wide range of sizes. We recently showed that forcing changes in the size of WPBs modifies the activity of this cargo. We now find that endothelial cells treated with statins produce shorter WPBs and that the vWF they release at exocytosis displays a reduced capability to recruit platelets to the endothelial cell surface. Investigating other functional consequences of size changes of WPBs, we also report that the endothelial surface-associated vWF formed at exocytosis recruits soluble plasma vWF and that this process is reduced by treatments that shorten WPBs, statins included. These results indicate that the post-exocytic adhesive activity of vWF towards platelets and plasma vWF at the endothelial surface reflects the size of their storage organelle. Our findings therefore show that changes in WPB size, by influencing the adhesive activity of its vWF cargo, may represent a novel mode of regulation of platelet aggregation at the vascular wall. PMID:27576551

  18. Weibel-Palade body size modulates the adhesive activity of its von Willebrand Factor cargo in cultured endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Francesco; Mafalda Lopes da, Silva; Grimes, William; Lee, Hwee Kuan; Ketteler, Robin; Kriston-Vizi, Janos; Cutler, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the size of cellular organelles are often linked to modifications in their function. Endothelial cells store von Willebrand Factor (vWF), a glycoprotein essential to haemostasis in Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs), cigar-shaped secretory granules that are generated in a wide range of sizes. We recently showed that forcing changes in the size of WPBs modifies the activity of this cargo. We now find that endothelial cells treated with statins produce shorter WPBs and that the vWF they release at exocytosis displays a reduced capability to recruit platelets to the endothelial cell surface. Investigating other functional consequences of size changes of WPBs, we also report that the endothelial surface-associated vWF formed at exocytosis recruits soluble plasma vWF and that this process is reduced by treatments that shorten WPBs, statins included. These results indicate that the post-exocytic adhesive activity of vWF towards platelets and plasma vWF at the endothelial surface reflects the size of their storage organelle. Our findings therefore show that changes in WPB size, by influencing the adhesive activity of its vWF cargo, may represent a novel mode of regulation of platelet aggregation at the vascular wall. PMID:27576551

  19. Asiaticoside Inhibits TNF-α-Induced Endothelial Hyperpermeability of Human Aortic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Fong, Lai Yen; Ng, Chin Theng; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Baharuldin, Mohamad Taufik Hidayat; Arifah, Abdul Kadir; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul; Zuraini, Ahmad

    2015-10-01

    The increase in endothelial permeability often promotes edema formation in various pathological conditions. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), a pro-atherogenic cytokine, impairs endothelial barrier function and causes endothelial dysfunction in early stage of atherosclerosis. Asiaticoside, one of the triterpenoids derived from Centella asiatica, is known to possess antiinflammatory activity. In order to examine the role of asiaticoside in preserving the endothelial barrier, we assessed its effects on endothelial hyperpermeability and disruption of actin filaments evoked by TNF-α in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). TNF-α caused an increase in endothelial permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran. Asiaticoside pretreatment significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced increased permeability. Asiaticoside also prevented TNF-α-induced actin redistribution by suppressing stress fiber formation. However, the increased F to G actin ratio stimulated by TNF-α was not changed by asiaticoside. Cytochalasin D, an actin depolymerizing agent, was used to correlate the anti-hyperpermeability effect of asiaticoside with actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, asiaticoside failed to prevent cytochalasin D-induced increased permeability. These results suggest that asiaticoside protects against the disruption of endothelial barrier and actin rearrangement triggered by TNF-α without a significant change in total actin pool. However, asiaticoside seems to work by other mechanisms to maintain the integrity of endothelial barrier rather than stabilizing the F-actin organization.

  20. Human monocyte-endothelial cell interaction in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, N A; Abraham, E L; Pontier, S; Scott, W A; Cohn, Z A

    1985-12-01

    We have examined the interaction of freshly isolated human blood monocytes with cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro. Purified monocytes incubated with confluent primary or passaged endothelial cells (EC) for 90 min at 37 degrees C bound at maximal densities of 6.5-7.0 X 10(3)/mm2 (8 or 9 per EC) without causing disruption of the monolayer. Monocyte-EC binding proceeded in the presence of plasma proteins or optimal phagocytic doses of opsonized zymosan particles. The avidity of attachment was not diminished by alternative monocyte isolation techniques. Monocyte attachment to EC was dependent upon the presence of divalent cations (magnesium greater than calcium) and was inhibited at 4 degrees C. Monocytes selectively bound to EC when incubated with monolayers composed of smooth muscle cells and EC. Neither EC monolayer confluence nor a variety of EC culture conditions affected the high levels of monocyte binding. In contrast, human neutrophils (less than 1 per EC) and lymphocytes (less than 2-3.5 per EC) bound at lower maximal densities under the same conditions, while platelet reactivity remained minimal. The distinctively higher affinity of human blood monocytes relative to other circulating white cells for binding to cultured human EC may have relevance to their function in vivo.

  1. A thiocarbamate inhibitor of endothelial lipase raises HDL cholesterol levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Greco, M N; Connelly, M A; Leo, G C; Olson, M W; Powell, E; Huang, Z; Hawkins, M; Smith, C; Schalk-Hihi, C; Darrow, A L; Xin, H; Lang, W; Damiano, B P; Hlasta, D J

    2013-05-01

    By screening directed libraries of serine hydrolase inhibitors using the cell surface form of endothelial lipase (EL), we identified a series of carbamate-derived (EL) inhibitors. Compound 3 raised plasma HDL-C levels in the mouse, and a correlation was found between HDL-C and plasma compound levels. Spectroscopic and kinetic studies support a covalent mechanism of inhibition. Our findings represent the first report of EL inhibition as an effective means for increasing HDL-C in an in vivo model. PMID:23528297

  2. Endothelial cell permeability during hantavirus infection involves factor XII-dependent increased activation of the kallikrein-kinin system.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Shannon L; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Copeland, Anna Maria; Jahrling, Peter B; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) are diseases caused by hantavirus infections and are characterized by vascular leakage due to alterations of the endothelial barrier. Hantavirus-infected endothelial cells (EC) display no overt cytopathology; consequently, pathogenesis models have focused either on the influx of immune cells and release of cytokines or on increased degradation of the adherens junction protein, vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, due to hantavirus-mediated hypersensitization of EC to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). To examine endothelial leakage in a relevant in vitro system, we co-cultured endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) to generate capillary blood vessel-like structures. In contrast to results obtained in monolayers of cultured EC, we found that despite viral replication in both cell types as well as the presence of VEGF, infected in vitro vessels neither lost integrity nor displayed evidence of VE-cadherin degradation. Here, we present evidence for a novel mechanism of hantavirus-induced vascular leakage involving activation of the plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS). We show that incubation of factor XII (FXII), prekallikrein (PK), and high molecular weight kininogen (HK) plasma proteins with hantavirus-infected EC results in increased cleavage of HK, higher enzymatic activities of FXIIa/kallikrein (KAL) and increased liberation of bradykinin (BK). Measuring cell permeability in real-time using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS), we identified dramatic increases in endothelial cell permeability after KKS activation and liberation of BK. Furthermore, the alterations in permeability could be prevented using inhibitors that directly block BK binding, the activity of FXIIa, or the activity of KAL. Lastly, FXII binding and autoactivation is increased on the surface of hantavirus-infected EC. These data are the first to demonstrate KKS activation during

  3. Soluble endoglin, hypercholesterolemia and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rathouska, Jana; Jezkova, Katerina; Nemeckova, Ivana; Nachtigal, Petr

    2015-12-01

    A soluble form of endoglin (sEng) is known to be an extracellular domain of the full-length membrane endoglin, which is elevated during various pathological conditions related to vascular endothelium. In the current review, we tried to summarize a possible role of soluble endoglin in cardiovascular pathologies, focusing on its relation to endothelial dysfunction and cholesterol levels. We discussed sEng as a proposed biomarker of cardiovascular disease progression, cardiovascular disease treatment and endothelial dysfunction. We also addressed a potential interaction of sEng with TGF-β/eNOS or BMP-9 signaling. We suggest soluble endoglin levels to be monitored, because they reflect the progression/treatment efficacy of cardiovascular diseases related to endothelial dysfunction and hypercholesterolemia. A possible role of soluble endoglin as an inducer of endothelial dysfunction however remains to be elucidated. PMID:26520890

  4. [Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK)].

    PubMed

    Cursiefen, C; Kruse, F E

    2009-10-01

    Penetrating keratoplasty has been the gold standard for the surgical treatment of corneal endothelial pathologies, but tremendous progress has been made in recent years in improving the technology of posterior lamellar keratoplasty techniques such as Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK). This progress is shown by a literature review using PubMed sources and our own clinical and experimental data. Posterior lamellar keratoplasty using a microkeratome is a reliable surgical technique for Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy and pseudophakic bullous keratopathy. Visual rehabilitation is faster with lamellar compared with penetrating keratoplasty, but final visual acuity seems to be a bit reduced. Posterior lamellar keratoplasty techniques such as DSAEK may replace penetrating keratoplasty as the gold standard for treating a large proportion of corneal endothelial pathologies. PMID:19798505

  5. Mitochondria, endothelial cell function, and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoqiang; Luo, Yu-Xuan; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, De-Pei

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are perhaps the most sophisticated and dynamic responsive sensing systems in eukaryotic cells. The role of mitochondria goes beyond their capacity to create molecular fuel and includes the generation of reactive oxygen species, the regulation of calcium, and the activation of cell death. In endothelial cells, mitochondria have a profound impact on cellular function under both healthy and diseased conditions. In this review, we summarize the basic functions of mitochondria in endothelial cells and discuss the roles of mitochondria in endothelial dysfunction and vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, diabetic vascular dysfunction, pulmonary artery hypertension, and hypertension. Finally, the potential therapeutic strategies to improve mitochondrial function in endothelial cells and vascular diseases are also discussed, with a focus on mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants and calorie restriction. PMID:24834056

  6. Circulating and tissue resident endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Basile, David P; Yoder, Mervin C

    2014-01-01

    Progenitor cells for the endothelial lineage have been widely investigated for more than a decade, but continue to be controversial since no unique identifying marker has yet been identified. This review will begin with a discussion of the basic tenets originally proposed for proof that a cell displays properties of an endothelial progenitor cell. We then provide an overview of the methods for putative endothelial progenitor cell derivation, expansion, and enumeration. This discussion includes consideration of cells that are present in the circulation as well as cells resident in the vascular endothelial intima. Finally, we provide some suggested changes in nomenclature that would greatly clarify and demystify the cellular elements involved in vascular repair.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Fuchs endothelial dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a protein that is part of type VIII collagen. Type VIII collagen is largely found within the cornea, surrounding the endothelial cells. Specifically, type VIII collagen is a major component of a tissue at ...

  8. Endothelial glucocorticoid receptor suppresses atherogenesis- Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinbo; Rotllan, Noemi; Feng, Yan; Zhou, Han; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Yu, Jun; Sessa, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the role of the endothelial glucocorticoid receptor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Approach and Results Control mice and mice lacking the endothelial glucocorticoid receptor were bred onto an Apoe knockout background and subjected to high-fat diet feeding for 12 weeks. Assessment of body weight and total cholesterol and triglycerides before and after the diet revealed no differences between the two groups of mice. However, mice lacking the endothelial glucocorticoid receptor developed more severe atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta, brachiocephalic artery and aortic sinus as well as a heightened inflammatory milieu as evidence by increased macrophage recruitment in the lesions. Conclusions These data suggest the endothelial glucocorticoid receptor is important for tonic inhibition of inflammation and limitation of atherosclerosis progression in this model. PMID:25810297

  9. Endothelial progenitor cells in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Poay Sian Sabrina; Poh, Kian Keong

    2014-07-26

    Endothelial dysfunction has been associated with the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. Adult endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are derived from hematopoietic stem cells and are capable of forming new blood vessels through a process of vasculogenesis. There are studies which report correlations between circulating EPCs and cardiovascular risk factors. There are also studies on how pharmacotherapies may influence levels of circulating EPCs. In this review, we discuss the potential role of endothelial progenitor cells as both diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. In addition, we look at the interaction between cardiovascular pharmacotherapies and endothelial progenitor cells. We also discuss how EPCs can be used directly and indirectly as a therapeutic agent. Finally, we evaluate the challenges facing EPC research and how these may be overcome.

  10. Leptin Induces Hypertension and Endothelial Dysfunction via Aldosterone-Dependent Mechanisms in Obese Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huby, Anne-Cecile; Otvos, Laszlo; Belin de Chantemèle, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in males and females. Whether obesity triggers cardiovascular disease via similar mechanisms in both the sexes is, however, unknown. In males, the adipokine leptin highly contributes to obesity-related cardiovascular disease by increasing sympathetic activity. Females secrete 3× to 4× more leptin than males, but do not exhibit high sympathetic tone with obesity. Nevertheless, females show inappropriately high aldosterone levels that positively correlate with adiposity and blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in females. Leptin control of the cardiovascular function was analyzed in female mice sensitized to leptin via the deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (knockout) and in agouti yellow obese hyperleptinemic mice (Ay). Hypersensitivity to leptin (wild-type, 115±2; protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout, 124±2 mm Hg; P<0.05) and obesity elevated BP (a/a, 113±1; Ay, 128±7 mm Hg; P<0.05) and impaired endothelial function. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism restored BP and endothelial function in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout and Ay mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity reduced BP response to ganglionic blockade in both strains and plasma catecholamine levels in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity significantly increased plasma aldosterone levels and adrenal CYP11B2 expression. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism reduced aldosterone levels. Furthermore, chronic leptin and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade reduced BP and improved endothelial function in both leptin-sensitized and obese hyperleptinemic female mice. Together, these data demonstrate that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in female mice and suggest that obesity leads to cardiovascular disease via sex

  11. Leptin Induces Hypertension and Endothelial Dysfunction via Aldosterone-Dependent Mechanisms in Obese Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Huby, Anne-Cécile; Otvos, Laszlo; Belin de Chantemèle, Eric J

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in males and females. Whether obesity triggers cardiovascular disease via similar mechanisms in both the sexes is, however, unknown. In males, the adipokine leptin highly contributes to obesity-related cardiovascular disease by increasing sympathetic activity. Females secrete 3× to 4× more leptin than males, but do not exhibit high sympathetic tone with obesity. Nevertheless, females show inappropriately high aldosterone levels that positively correlate with adiposity and blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in females. Leptin control of the cardiovascular function was analyzed in female mice sensitized to leptin via the deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (knockout) and in agouti yellow obese hyperleptinemic mice (Ay). Hypersensitivity to leptin (wild-type, 115 ± 2; protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout, 124 ± 2 mm Hg; P<0.05) and obesity elevated BP (a/a, 113 ± 1; Ay, 128 ± 7 mm Hg; P<0.05) and impaired endothelial function. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism restored BP and endothelial function in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout and Ay mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity reduced BP response to ganglionic blockade in both strains and plasma catecholamine levels in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b knockout mice. Hypersensitivity to leptin and obesity significantly increased plasma aldosterone levels and adrenal CYP11B2 expression. Chronic leptin receptor antagonism reduced aldosterone levels. Furthermore, chronic leptin and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade reduced BP and improved endothelial function in both leptin-sensitized and obese hyperleptinemic female mice. Together, these data demonstrate that leptin induces hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via aldosterone-dependent mechanisms in female mice and suggest that obesity leads to cardiovascular disease via sex

  12. Administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid prevents endothelial dysfunction caused by an oral glucose load.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Lauren K; Restaino, Robert M; Neuringer, Martha; Manrique, Camila; Padilla, Jaume

    2016-11-01

    Postprandial hyperglycaemia leads to a transient impairment in endothelial function; however, the mechanisms remain largely unknown. Previous work in cell culture models demonstrate that high glucose results in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and, in animal studies, ER stress has been implicated as a cause of endothelial dysfunction. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that acute oral administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA, 1500 mg), a chemical chaperone known to alleviate ER stress, would prevent hyperglycaemia-induced endothelial dysfunction. In 12 young healthy subjects (seven men, five women), brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was assessed at baseline, and at 60 and 120 min after an oral glucose challenge. Subjects were tested on two separate visits in a single-blind randomized cross-over design: after oral ingestion of TUDCA or placebo capsules. FMD was reduced from baseline during hyperglycaemia under the placebo condition (-32% at 60 min and -28% at 120 min post oral glucose load; P<0.05 from baseline) but not under the TUDCA condition (-4% at 60 min and +0.3% at 120 min post oral glucose load; P>0.05 from baseline). Postprandial plasma glucose and insulin were not altered by TUDCA ingestion. Plasma oxidative stress markers 3-nitrotyrosine and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) remained unaltered throughout the oral glucose challenge in both conditions. These results suggest that hyperglycaemia-induced endothelial dysfunction can be mitigated by oral administration of TUDCA, thus supporting the hypothesis that ER stress may contribute to endothelial dysfunction during postprandial hyperglycaemia.

  13. Endothelin-1 induces endothelial barrier failure in the cat hindlimb.

    PubMed

    Porter, L P; McNamee, J E; Wolf, M B

    1999-02-01

    Our purpose was to see whether endothelin- (ET) 1 could produce a change in the endothelial membrane barrier to protein in skeletal muscle. Previous studies in other tissues have suggested that ET-1 affects this barrier, but the measurement methods used could not exclude vascular protein extravasation due to microvascular pressure changes or the effects of changes in perfused capillary surface area. We measured the protein sieving coefficient, a specific measure of the permeability of the membrane to protein, in the isolated, perfused cat hindlimb preparation. The integral-mass balance method determined this coefficient from the changes in hematocrit and plasma protein concentration induced by a period of transvascular fluid filtration. The data clearly indicate that ET-1 produces a dose (1-20 nM) dependent increase in permeability indicative of barrier dysfunction. Hence, elevated ET levels may contribute to the perivascular edema, hemoconcentration, and impaired tissue perfusion found in systemic inflammatory response syndromes and related diseases. PMID:10030797

  14. Plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Hu, G.

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

  15. High fat diet exacerbates vascular endothelial dysfunction in rats exposed to continuous hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-Xia; Tang, Feng; Ga, Qin; Wuren, Tana; Wang, Ya-Ping; Rondina, Matthew T; Ge, Ri-Li

    2015-02-13

    Independently, a high fat diet and hypoxia are associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) and often occur concurrently in patients. Nevertheless, the effects of a high fat diet on vascular endothelial function combined with hypoxia, a situation occurring with increasing frequency in many parts of the world, remain largely unknown. We investigated the effects of a high fat diet on vascular endothelial function in rats exposed to continuous hypoxia for 4 weeks. Seventy two male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: a hypoxia group fed regular chow, a combined hypoxia and high fat diet (HFD) group, and for comparison, rats maintained in normoxia, regular chow conditions were set as baseline (BL) group. The experimental data of BL group were obtained at beginning of hypoxia given in the other groups. Continuous hypoxia was induced in a hypobaric chamber maintained at an altitude of 5000 m. Compared to hypoxic conditions alone, hypoxia plus a HFD prevented adaptive changes in plasma nitric oxide (NOx) levels and caused earlier and more severe changes in aortic endothelial structures. Functionally, hypoxia plus a HFD resulted in impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation responses to acetylcholine and altered the bioavailability of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) substrate L-Arginine. At the molecular level, hypoxia plus a HFD blunted increases in endothelial NOS (eNOS) mRNA and protein in aortic endothelial tissue. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that in the setting of hypoxia, a high fat diet leads to earlier and more severe VED than hypoxia alone. These data have important implications for populations residing at high-altitude, as dietary patterns shift towards increased fat intake. PMID:25603049

  16. High density lipoproteins and endothelial functions: mechanistic insights and alterations in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Riwanto, Meliana; Landmesser, Ulf

    2013-12-01

    Prospective population studies in the primary prevention setting have shown that reduced plasma levels of HDL cholesterol are associated with an increased risk of coronary disease and myocardial infarction. Experimental and translational studies have further revealed several potential anti-atherogenic effects of HDL, including protective effects on endothelial cell functions. HDL has been suggested to protect endothelial cell functions by prevention of oxidation of LDL and its adverse endothelial effects. Moreover, HDL from healthy subjects can directly stimulate endothelial cell production of nitric oxide and anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and anti-thrombotic effects as well as endothelial repair processes. However, several recent clinical trials using HDL cholesterol-raising agents, such as torcetrapib, dalcetrapib, and niacin, did not demonstrate a significant reduction of cardiovascular events in patients with coronary disease. Of note, growing evidence suggests that the vascular effects of HDL can be highly heterogeneous and vasoprotective properties of HDL are altered in patients with coronary disease. Characterization of underlying mechanisms and understanding of the clinical relevance of this "HDL dysfunction" is currently an active field of cardiovascular research. Notably, in some recent studies no clear association of higher HDL cholesterol levels with a reduced risk of cardiovascular events was observed in patients with already established coronary disease. A greater understanding of mechanisms of action of HDL and its altered vascular effects is therefore critical within the context of HDL-targeted therapies. In this review, we will address different effects of HDL on endothelial cell functions potentially relevant to atherosclerotic vascular disease and explore molecular mechanisms leading to "dysfunctional HDL".

  17. DEP Induction of ROS in Capillary-like Endothelial Tubes Leads to VEGF-A Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Ming Wei; Po, Iris; Laumbach, Robert; Koslosky, John; Cooper, Keith; Gordon, Marion K.

    2012-01-01

    Inhalation of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) is associated with pulmonary and cardiovascular disease. One contributor to pathogenesis is inhaled particles reaching and injuring the lung capillary endothelial cells, and possibly gaining access to the blood stream. Using in vitro capillary tubes as a simplified vascular model system for this process, it was previously shown that DEPs induce the redistribution of vascular endothelial cell-cadherin (VE-Cad) away from the plasma membrane to intracellular locations. This allowed DEPs into the cell cytoplasm and tube lumen, suggesting the tubes may have become permeable (Chao et al., 2011). Here some of the mechanisms responsible for endothelial tube changes after DEP exposure were examined. The results demonstrate that endothelial tube cells mounted an oxidative stress response to DEP exposure. Hydrogen peroxide and oxidized proteins were detected after 24 hr of exposure to DEPs. Particles induced relocalization of Nrf2 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, upregulating the expression of the enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Surprisingly, vascular endothelial cell growth factor-A (VEGF-A), initially termed “vascular permeability factor” (VPF), was found to be up-regulated in response to the HO-1 expression induced by DEPs. Similar to DEPs, applied VEGF-A induced relocalization of VE-Cadherin from the cell membrane surface to an intracellular location, and relocalization of VE-cadherin was associated with permeability. These data suggest that the DEPs may induce or contribute to the permeability of capillary-like endothelial tube cells via induction of HO-1 and VEGF-A. PMID:22507881

  18. Adenoviral modification of mouse brain derived endothelial cells, bEnd3, to induce apoptosis by vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Mitsuuchi, Y; Powell, D R; Gallo, J M

    2006-02-01

    A second generation genetically-engineered cell-based drug delivery system, referred to as apoptotic-induced drug delivery (AIDD), was developed using endothelial cells (ECs) that undergo apoptosis upon binding of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to a Flk-1:Fas fusion protein (FF). This new AIDD was redesigned using mouse brain derived ECs, bEnd3 cells, and an adenovirus vector in order to enhance and control the expression of FF. The FF was tagged with a HA epitope (FFHA) and designed to be coexpressed with green fluorescence protein (GFP) by the regulation of cytomegalovirus promoters in the adenovirus vector. bEnd3 cells showed favorable coexpression of FFHA and GFP consistent with the multiplicity of infection of the adenovirus. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that FFHA was localized at the plasma membrane, whereas GFP was predominantly located in the cytoplasm of ECs. Cell death was induced by VEGF, but not by platelet derived growth factor or fibroblast growth factor in a dose-dependent manner (range 2-20 ng/ml), and revealed caspase-dependent apoptotic profiles. The FFHA expressing bEnd3 cells underwent apoptosis when cocultured with a glioma cell (SF188V+) line able to overexpress VEGF. The combined data indicated that the FFHA adenovirus system can induce apoptotic signaling in ECs in response to VEGF, and thus, is an instrumental modification to the development of AIDD.

  19. Adenoviral modification of mouse brain derived endothelial cells, bEnd3, to induce apoptosis by vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Mitsuuchi, Y; Powell, D R; Gallo, J M

    2006-02-01

    A second generation genetically-engineered cell-based drug delivery system, referred to as apoptotic-induced drug delivery (AIDD), was developed using endothelial cells (ECs) that undergo apoptosis upon binding of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to a Flk-1:Fas fusion protein (FF). This new AIDD was redesigned using mouse brain derived ECs, bEnd3 cells, and an adenovirus vector in order to enhance and control the expression of FF. The FF was tagged with a HA epitope (FFHA) and designed to be coexpressed with green fluorescence protein (GFP) by the regulation of cytomegalovirus promoters in the adenovirus vector. bEnd3 cells showed favorable coexpression of FFHA and GFP consistent with the multiplicity of infection of the adenovirus. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that FFHA was localized at the plasma membrane, whereas GFP was predominantly located in the cytoplasm of ECs. Cell death was induced by VEGF, but not by platelet derived growth factor or fibroblast growth factor in a dose-dependent manner (range 2-20 ng/ml), and revealed caspase-dependent apoptotic profiles. The FFHA expressing bEnd3 cells underwent apoptosis when cocultured with a glioma cell (SF188V+) line able to overexpress VEGF. The combined data indicated that the FFHA adenovirus system can induce apoptotic signaling in ECs in response to VEGF, and thus, is an instrumental modification to the development of AIDD. PMID:16247462

  20. Endothelial Cell Apoptosis Induces TGF-β Signaling-Dependent Host Endothelial-Mesenchymal Transition to Promote Transplant Arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Xiong, J; Yang, B; Zhou, Q; Wu, Y; Luo, H; Zhou, H; Liu, N; Li, Y; Song, Z; Zheng, Q

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) apoptosis is an initial event in transplant arteriosclerosis (TA), resulting in allograft function loss. To elucidate the precise mechanisms of ECs apoptosis leading to neointimal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) accumulation during TA. We induced apoptosis in cultured ECs by overexpressing p53 through lentivirus-mediated transfection. ECs apoptosis induced the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in both apoptotic and neighboring viable cells, leading to increased TGF-β1 in the culture media. Conditioned media from Ltv-p53-transfected ECs further promoted transition of cultured ECs to SM-like cells by activating TGF-β/Smad3, PI3K/Akt/mTOR, and MAPK/ERK signaling in a TGF-β-dependent manner. In transgenic rat aorta transplantation models, inhibition of ECs apoptosis in Bcl-xL(+/+) knock-in rat aortic allografts significantly reduced TGF-β1 production both in allograft endothelia and in blood plasma, which in turn decreased accumulation of SM22α+ cells from transgenic recipient ECs originally marked with EGFP knock-in in neointima and alleviated TA. Systemic treatment with SIS3, AP23573, or PD98059 also prevented recipient ECs-originated SM-like cells accumulation and intima hyperplasia in aortic allografts. These data suggest that allograft EC apoptosis induced recipient endothelial-mesenchymal (smooth muscle) transition via TGF-β signaling, resulting in recipient EC-derived SMC accumulation as a major mechanism of vascular remodeling during TA.

  1. Atrial and brain natriuretic peptides stimulate the production and secretion of C-type natriuretic peptide from bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nazario, B; Hu, R M; Pedram, A; Prins, B; Levin, E R

    1995-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is a member of the natriuretic peptide family which is produced in vascular endothelial cells and may play an important paracrine role in the vasaculature. We sought to determine the regulation of CNP production by other vasoactive peptides from cultured aortic endothelial cells. The vasoconstrictors endothelin-1 and angiotensin II had little effect on the basal secretion of CNP. In contrast, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) strongly stimulated the secretion of CNP. BNP caused as much as a 400-fold enhancement above the basal accumulated secretion of CNP over 24 h at a concentration of 1 microM; this was 20 times greater than the stimulatory effect of ANP, BNP and ANP also significantly enhanced the production of new CNP protein (translation) and mRNA expressed in the BAEC. In contrast, C-ANP-4-23, a truncated form of ANP which selectively binds to the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor, did not stimulate CNP secretion. The enhanced production and secretion of CNP, caused by either ANP or BNP, was significantly prevented by LY 83583, an inhibitor of cGMP generation, and was also attenuated by KT 5823, an inhibitor of cGMP-dependent protein kinase. Our results indicate that ANP and BNP can stimulate CNP production through a guanylate cyclase receptor on endothelial cells. BNP is a much more potent stimulator of CNP secretion, compared to ANP. Our findings suggest that the vasodilatory, and anti-mitogenic effects of ANP and BNP in the vasculature could occur in part through CNP production and subsequent action if these interactions occur in vivo. Images PMID:7883964

  2. HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitor Improves Endothelial Dysfunction in Spontaneous Hypertensive Rats Via Down-regulation of Caveolin-1 and Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jung-Won; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cho, Young-Seok; Youn, Tae-Jin; Chae, In-Ho; Kim, Kwang-Il; Kim, Cheol-Ho; Kim, Hyo-soo; Oh, Buyng-Hee; Park, Young-Bae

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension is associated with endothelial dysfunction and increased cardiovascular risk. Caveolin-1 regulates nitric oxide (NO) signaling by modulating endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The purpose of this study was to examine whether HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor improves impaired endothelial function of the aorta in spontaneous hypertensive rat (SHR) and to determine the underlying mechanisms involved. Eight-week-old male SHR were assigned to either a control group (CON, n=11) or a rosuvastatin group (ROS, n=12), rosuvastatin (10 mg/kg/day) administered for eight weeks. Abdominal aortic rings were prepared and responses to acetylcholine (10-9-10-4 M) were determined in vitro. To evaluate the potential role of NO and caveolin-1, we examined the plasma activity of NOx, eNOS, phosphorylated-eNOS and expression of caveolin-1. The relaxation in response to acetylcholine was significantly enhanced in ROS compared to CON. Expression of eNOS RNA was unchanged, whereas NOx level and phosphorylated-eNOS at serine-1177 was increased accompanied with depressed level of caveolin-1 in ROS. We conclude that 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme-A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor can improve impaired endothelial dysfunction in SHR, and its underlying mechanisms are associated with increased NO production. Furthermore, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor can activate the eNOS by phosphorylation related to decreased caveolin-1 abundance. These results imply the therapeutic strategies for the high blood pressure-associated endothelial dysfunction through modifying caveolin status. PMID:20052342

  3. Antioxidants, endothelial dysfunction, and DCS: in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Mazur, Aleksandra; Guerrero, François; Lambrechts, Kate; Buzzacott, Peter; Belhomme, Marc; Theron, Michaël

    2015-12-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is a well-known effect in individuals after an undersea dive. This study aimed to delineate the links between ROS, endothelial dysfunction, and decompression sickness (DCS) through the use of antioxidants in vitro and in vivo. The effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on superoxide and peroxynitrite, nitric oxide (NO) generation, and cell viability during in vitro diving simulation were analyzed. Also analyzed was the effect of vitamin C and NAC on plasma glutathione thiol and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, and angiotensin-II and DCS morbidity during in vivo diving simulation. During an in vitro diving simulation, vascular endothelial cells showed overproduction of superoxide and peroxynitrite, obvious attenuation of NO generation, and promotion of cell death, all of which were reversed by NAC treatment. After in vivo diving simulation, plasma ACE activity and angiotensin-II level were not affected. The plasma level of glutathione thiol was downregulated after the dive, which was attenuated partially by NAC treatment. Plasma TBARS level was upregulated; however, either NAC or vitamin C treatment failed to prevent DCS morbidity. During in vitro simulation, endothelial superoxide and peroxynitrite-mediated oxidative stress were involved in the attenuation of NO availability and cell death. This study is the first attempt to link oxidative stress and DCS occurrence, and the link could not be confirmed in vivo. Even in the presence of antioxidants, ROS and bubbles generated during diving and/or decompression might lead to embolic or biochemical stress and DCS. Diving-induced oxidative stress might not be the only trigger of DCS morbidity. PMID:26472863

  4. Antioxidants, endothelial dysfunction, and DCS: in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Mazur, Aleksandra; Guerrero, François; Lambrechts, Kate; Buzzacott, Peter; Belhomme, Marc; Theron, Michaël

    2015-12-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is a well-known effect in individuals after an undersea dive. This study aimed to delineate the links between ROS, endothelial dysfunction, and decompression sickness (DCS) through the use of antioxidants in vitro and in vivo. The effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on superoxide and peroxynitrite, nitric oxide (NO) generation, and cell viability during in vitro diving simulation were analyzed. Also analyzed was the effect of vitamin C and NAC on plasma glutathione thiol and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, and angiotensin-II and DCS morbidity during in vivo diving simulation. During an in vitro diving simulation, vascular endothelial cells showed overproduction of superoxide and peroxynitrite, obvious attenuation of NO generation, and promotion of cell death, all of which were reversed by NAC treatment. After in vivo diving simulation, plasma ACE activity and angiotensin-II level were not affected. The plasma level of glutathione thiol was downregulated after the dive, which was attenuated partially by NAC treatment. Plasma TBARS level was upregulated; however, either NAC or vitamin C treatment failed to prevent DCS morbidity. During in vitro simulation, endothelial superoxide and peroxynitrite-mediated oxidative stress were involved in the attenuation of NO availability and cell death. This study is the first attempt to link oxidative stress and DCS occurrence, and the link could not be confirmed in vivo. Even in the presence of antioxidants, ROS and bubbles generated during diving and/or decompression might lead to embolic or biochemical stress and DCS. Diving-induced oxidative stress might not be the only trigger of DCS morbidity.

  5. Mesenchymal-endothelial-transition contributes to cardiac neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Ubil, Eric; Duan, Jinzhu; Pillai, Indulekha C.L.; Rosa-Garrido, Manuel; Wu, Yong; Bargiacchi, Francesca; Lu, Yan; Stanbouly, Seta; Huang, Jie; Rojas, Mauricio; Vondriska, Thomas M.; Stefani, Enrico; Deb, Arjun

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells contribute to a subset of cardiac fibroblasts by undergoing endothelial-to-mesenchymal-transition, but whether cardiac fibroblasts can adopt an endothelial cell fate and directly contribute to neovascularization after cardiac injury is not known. Here, using genetic fate map techniques, we demonstrate that cardiac fibroblasts rapidly adopt an endothelial cell like phenotype after acute ischemic cardiac injury. Fibroblast derived endothelial cells exhibit anatomical and functional characteristics of native endothelial cells. We show that the transcription factor p53 regulates such a switch in cardiac fibroblast fate. Loss of p53 in cardiac fibroblasts severely decreases the formation of fibroblast derived endothelial cells, reduces post infarct vascular density and worsens cardiac function. Conversely, stimulation of the p53 pathway in cardiac fibroblasts augments mesenchymal to endothelial transition, enhances vascularity and improves cardiac function. These observations demonstrate that mesenchymal-to-endothelial-transition contributes to neovascularization of the injured heart and represents a potential therapeutic target for enhancing cardiac repair. PMID:25317562

  6. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Foster, J.S. Jr.

    1958-03-11

    This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

  7. Vascular endothelial growth factor B, a novel growth factor for endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, B; Pajusola, K; Kaipainen, A; von Euler, G; Joukov, V; Saksela, O; Orpana, A; Pettersson, R F; Alitalo, K; Eriksson, U

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized a novel growth factor for endothelial cells, vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGF-B), with structural similarities to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placenta growth factor. VEGF-B was particularly abundant in heart and skeletal muscle and was coexpressed with VEGF in these and other tissues. VEGF-B formed cell-surface-associated disulfide-linked homodimers and heterodimerized with VEGF when coexpressed. Conditioned medium from transfected 293EBNA cells expressing VEGF-B stimulated DNA synthesis in endothelial cells. Our results suggest that VEGF-B has a role in angiogenesis and endothelial cell growth, particularly in muscle. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8637916

  8. Endothelial adhesion receptors are recruited to adherent leukocytes by inclusion in preformed tetraspanin nanoplatforms

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Olga; Zamai, Moreno; Yáñez-Mó, María; Tejera, Emilio; López-Romero, Pedro; Monk, Peter N.; Gratton, Enrico; Caiolfa, Valeria R.; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, receptors for leukocyte integrins, are recruited to cell–cell contact sites on the apical membrane of activated endothelial cells. In this study, we show that this recruitment is independent of ligand engagement, actin cytoskeleton anchorage, and heterodimer formation. Instead, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 are recruited by inclusion within specialized preformed tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, which act as endothelial adhesive platforms (EAPs). Using advanced analytical fluorescence techniques, we have characterized the diffusion properties at the single-molecule level, nanoscale organization, and specific intradomain molecular interactions of EAPs in living primary endothelial cells. This study provides compelling evidence for the existence of EAPs as physical entities at the plasma membrane, distinct from lipid rafts. Scanning electron microscopy of immunogold-labeled samples treated with a specific tetraspanin-blocking peptide identify nanoclustering of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 within EAPs as a novel mechanism for supramolecular organization that regulates the leukocyte integrin–binding capacity of both endothelial receptors during extravasation. PMID:18955551

  9. Functional characterization of late outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells in patients with end-stage renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Bolton, Eleanor M; Randle, Lucy; Bradley, John Andrew; Lever, Andrew M L

    2014-01-01

    Renal transplantation is potentially curative in renal failure, but long-term efficacy is limited by untreatable chronic rejection. Endothelial damage contributes to chronic rejection and is potentially repairable by circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). The frequency and function of EPC are variably influenced by end-stage renal failure (ESRF). Here, we isolated and functionally characterized the late outgrowth EPC (LO-EPC) from ESRF patients to investigate their potential for endothelial repair. Patients with ESRF generated more LO-EPC colonies than healthy controls and had higher plasma levels of IL-1rα, IL-16, IL-6, MIF, VEGF, Prolactin, and PLGF. Patients' LO-EPC displayed normal endothelial cell morphology, increased secretion of PLGF, MCP-1, and IL-1β, and normal network formation in vitro and in vivo. They demonstrated decreased adhesion to extracellular matrix. Integrin gene profiles and protein expression were comparable in patients and healthy volunteers. In some patients, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were co-isolated and could be differentiated into adipocytes and osteocytes in vitro. This is the first study to characterize LO-EPC from patients with ESRF. Their behavior in vitro reflects the presence of elevated trophic factors; their ability to proliferate in vitro and angiogenic function makes them candidates for prevention of chronic rejection. Their impaired adhesion and the presence of MSC are areas for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:24471420

  10. Black tea protects against hypertension-associated endothelial dysfunction through alleviation of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    San Cheang, Wai; Yuen Ngai, Ching; Yen Tam, Ye; Yu Tian, Xiao; Tak Wong, Wing; Zhang, Yang; Wai Lau, Chi; Chen, Zhen Yu; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Huang, Yu; Ping Leung, Fung

    2015-01-01

    Hypertensive patients have been found to be associated with elevated levels of homocysteine, known as hyperhomocysteinemia. Homocysteine (Hcy) can induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in endothelial cells. This study aims to investigate whether black tea (BT) protects against hypertension-associated endothelial dysfunction through alleviation of ER stress. Rat aortae and cultured rat aortic endothelial cells were treated with Hcy, BT extract, and theaflavin-3,3'-digallate (TF3). Male Sprague Dawley rats were infused with angiotensin II (Ang II) to induce hypertension and orally administrated with BT extract at 15 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks. Hcy impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations of rat aortae and led to ER stress in endothelial cells, which were ameliorated by co-incubation of BT extract and TF3. The blood pressure of Ang II-infused rats and plasma Hcy level were normalized by BT consumption. Impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations in renal arteries, carotid arteries and aortae, and flow-mediated dilatations in third-order mesenteric resistance arteries were improved. Elevations of ER stress markers and ROS level, plus down-regulation of Hcy metabolic enzymes in aortae from Ang II-infused rats were prevented by BT treatment. Our data reveal the novel cardiovascular benefits of BT in ameliorating vascular dysfunctions, providing insight into developing BT into beneficial dietary supplements in hypertensive patients. PMID:25976123

  11. Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell Interaction with Fluorine-Incorporated Amorphous Carbon Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Yukihiro; Hasebe, Terumitsu; Nagashima, So; Kamijo, Aki; Nakatani, Tatsuyuki; Yamagami, Takuji; Kitamura, Noriko; Kitagawa, Tomoya; Hotta, Atsushi; Takahashi, Koki; Suzuki, Tetsuya

    2012-09-01

    A major clinical concern in coronary intervention for cardiovascular disease is late stent thrombosis after the implantation of drug eluting stents (DES). DES widely used in clinical settings currently utilize polymer coatings, which can induce persistent arterial wall inflammation and delayed vascular healing, resulting in impaired endothelialization. We examined the viability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) for fluorine-incorporated amorphous carbon (a-C:H:F) coatings, which are known to be anti-thrombogenic. a-C:H:F and a-C:H were synthesized on the tissue culture dishes using radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition by varying the ratio of hexafluoroethane and acetylene. HUVECs were seeded on coated dishes for 6 days. The results indicate that the a-C:H:F surface does not disturb HUVEC proliferation in 6 days of culture and is promising for stent materials that allows the preservation of endothelialization, even if the fluorine concentration of a-C:H surface affects the early adhesion of endothelial cells.

  12. Loss of cortactin causes endothelial barrier dysfunction via disturbed adrenomedullin secretion and actomyosin contractility.

    PubMed

    García Ponce, Alexander; Citalán Madrid, Alí F; Vargas Robles, Hilda; Chánez Paredes, Sandra; Nava, Porfirio; Betanzos, Abigail; Zarbock, Alexander; Rottner, Klemens; Vestweber, Dietmar; Schnoor, Michael

    2016-06-30

    Changes in vascular permeability occur during inflammation and the actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in regulating endothelial cell contacts and permeability. We demonstrated recently that the actin-binding protein cortactin regulates vascular permeability via Rap1. However, it is unknown if the actin cytoskeleton contributes to increased vascular permeability without cortactin. As we consistently observed more actin fibres in cortactin-depleted endothelial cells, we hypothesised that cortactin depletion results in increased stress fibre contractility and endothelial barrier destabilisation. Analysing the contractile machinery, we found increased ROCK1 protein levels in cortactin-depleted endothelium. Concomitantly, myosin light chain phosphorylation was increased while cofilin, mDia and ERM were unaffected. Secretion of the barrier-stabilising hormone adrenomedullin, which activates Rap1 and counteracts actomyosin contractility, was reduced in plasma from cortactin-deficient mice and in supernatants of cortactin-depleted endothelium. Importantly, adrenomedullin administration and ROCK1 inhibition reduced actomyosin contractility and rescued the effect on permeability provoked by cortactin deficiency in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest a new role for cortactin in controlling actomyosin contractility with consequences for endothelial barrier integrity.

  13. Black tea protects against hypertension-associated endothelial dysfunction through alleviation of endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    San Cheang, Wai; Yuen Ngai, Ching; Yen Tam, Ye; Yu Tian, Xiao; Tak Wong, Wing; Zhang, Yang; Wai Lau, Chi; Chen, Zhen Yu; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Huang, Yu; Ping Leung, Fung

    2015-01-01

    Hypertensive patients have been found to be associated with elevated levels of homocysteine, known as hyperhomocysteinemia. Homocysteine (Hcy) can induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in endothelial cells. This study aims to investigate whether black tea (BT) protects against hypertension-associated endothelial dysfunction through alleviation of ER stress. Rat aortae and cultured rat aortic endothelial cells were treated with Hcy, BT extract, and theaflavin-3,3’-digallate (TF3). Male Sprague Dawley rats were infused with angiotensin II (Ang II) to induce hypertension and orally administrated with BT extract at 15 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks. Hcy impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations of rat aortae and led to ER stress in endothelial cells, which were ameliorated by co-incubation of BT extract and TF3. The blood pressure of Ang II-infused rats and plasma Hcy level were normalized by BT consumption. Impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations in renal arteries, carotid arteries and aortae, and flow-mediated dilatations in third-order mesenteric resistance arteries were improved. Elevations of ER stress markers and ROS level, plus down-regulation of Hcy metabolic enzymes in aortae from Ang II-infused rats were prevented by BT treatment. Our data reveal the novel cardiovascular benefits of BT in ameliorating vascular dysfunctions, providing insight into developing BT into beneficial dietary supplements in hypertensive patients. PMID:25976123

  14. Endothelial cells are damaged by autophagic induction before hepatocytes in Con A-induced acute hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Chen; Chang, Chih-Peng; Lei, Huan-Yao

    2010-08-01

    We have reported both T-cell-dependent and -independent hepatitis in immunocompetent and immunodeficiency mice, respectively, after intravenous injection of Con A in mice. The mode of hepatocyte cell death is different: autophagy for T-cell-independent hepatitis in contrast to apoptosis for T-cell-dependent one. In this study, we further demonstrate that liver blood vessels are the first target in both modes. The infused Con A bond to the hepatic vascular endothelial cells and cause its damage with autophagy. Before the elevation of the serum alanine aminotransferase at 6 h post-injection, the plasma leakage and hemorrhage occur at 1-3 h without inflammation. Con A induces autophagy of endothelial cells and hemorrhage that is enhanced by IFN-gamma. Using the endothelial cell line HMEC-1, a dose- and time-dependent cell death with autophagic LC3-II (microtubule-associated protein light chain 3) conversion was induced by Con A and was enhanced by IFN-gamma. In conclusion, Con A induced autophagy on hepatic endothelial cells; the damage of liver blood vessel occurs before the induction of T-cell-dependent hepatitis via apoptosis or T-cell-independent hepatitis via autophagy.

  15. Endothelial cell dysfunction and cardiac hypertrophy in the STOX1 model of preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Ducat, Aurélien; Doridot, Ludivine; Calicchio, Rosamaria; Méhats, Celine; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Castille, Johann; Barbaux, Sandrine; Couderc, Betty; Jacques, Sébastien; Letourneur, Franck; Buffat, Christophe; Le Grand, Fabien; Laissue, Paul; Miralles, Francisco; Vaiman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a disease of pregnancy involving systemic endothelial dysfunction. However, cardiovascular consequences of preeclampsia are difficult to analyze in humans. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the cardiovascular dysfunction induced by preeclampsia by examining the endothelium of mice suffering of severe preeclampsia induced by STOX1 overexpression. Using Next Generation Sequencing on endothelial cells of mice carrying either transgenic or control embryos, we discovered significant alterations of gene networks involved in inflammation, cell cycle, and cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, the heart of the preeclamptic mice revealed cardiac hypertrophy associated with histological anomalies. Bioinformatics comparison of the networks of modified genes in the endothelial cells of the preeclamptic mice and HUVECs exposed to plasma from preeclamptic women identified striking similarities. The cardiovascular alterations in the pregnant mice are comparable to those endured by the cardiovascular system of preeclamptic women. The STOX1 mice could help to better understand the endothelial dysfunction in the context of preeclampsia, and guide the search for efficient therapies able to protect the maternal endothelium during the disease and its aftermath. PMID:26758611

  16. Loss of cortactin causes endothelial barrier dysfunction via disturbed adrenomedullin secretion and actomyosin contractility

    PubMed Central

    García Ponce, Alexander; Citalán Madrid, Alí F.; Vargas Robles, Hilda; Chánez Paredes, Sandra; Nava, Porfirio; Betanzos, Abigail; Zarbock, Alexander; Rottner, Klemens; Vestweber, Dietmar; Schnoor, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Changes in vascular permeability occur during inflammation and the actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in regulating endothelial cell contacts and permeability. We demonstrated recently that the actin-binding protein cortactin regulates vascular permeability via Rap1. However, it is unknown if the actin cytoskeleton contributes to increased vascular permeability without cortactin. As we consistently observed more actin fibres in cortactin-depleted endothelial cells, we hypothesised that cortactin depletion results in increased stress fibre contractility and endothelial barrier destabilisation. Analysing the contractile machinery, we found increased ROCK1 protein levels in cortactin-depleted endothelium. Concomitantly, myosin light chain phosphorylation was increased while cofilin, mDia and ERM were unaffected. Secretion of the barrier-stabilising hormone adrenomedullin, which activates Rap1 and counteracts actomyosin contractility, was reduced in plasma from cortactin-deficient mice and in supernatants of cortactin-depleted endothelium. Importantly, adrenomedullin administration and ROCK1 inhibition reduced actomyosin contractility and rescued the effect on permeability provoked by cortactin deficiency in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest a new role for cortactin in controlling actomyosin contractility with consequences for endothelial barrier integrity. PMID:27357373

  17. Kidney-derived mesenchymal stem cells contribute to vasculogenesis, angiogenesis and endothelial repair

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Park, Hyeong-Cheon; Addabbo, Francesco; Ni, Jie; Pelger, Edward; Li, Houwei; Plotkin, Matthew; Goligorsky, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    We isolated a clonal cell line (4E) from kidneys of mice expressing green fluorescent protein controlled by the endothelial-specific Tie2 promoter. When grown in a three-dimensional matrigel matrix they formed a fluorescent capillary network. In vivo angiogenesis assays using growth factor-depleted matrigel implanted plugs promoted a moderate angiogenesis of host endothelial cells. Using vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A and fibroblast growth factor-2 in the plugs containing 4E-cells resulted in a robust vasculogenesis. Transplantation of 4E cells into mice with acute renal ischemia showed selective engraftment in the ischemic kidney which promoted tubular regeneration by increasing epithelial proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis. This resulted in an accelerated functional recovery 3 days after ischemia. These mice showed a 5-fold increase in tissue VEGF expression compared to controls, but no difference in plasma VEGF level corresponding with better preservation of peritubular capillaries, perhaps due to a local paracrine effect following systemic 4E infusion. One month after ischemia, 9% of engrafted 4E cells expressed green fluorescent protein in the peritubular region while half of them expressed α-smooth muscle actin. Our study shows that kidney mesenchymal stem cells are capable of differentiation toward endothelial and smooth muscle cell lineages in vitro and in vivo, support new blood vessel formation in favorable conditions and promote functional recovery of an ischemic kidney. PMID:18596729

  18. Loss of cortactin causes endothelial barrier dysfunction via disturbed adrenomedullin secretion and actomyosin contractility.

    PubMed

    García Ponce, Alexander; Citalán Madrid, Alí F; Vargas Robles, Hilda; Chánez Paredes, Sandra; Nava, Porfirio; Betanzos, Abigail; Zarbock, Alexander; Rottner, Klemens; Vestweber, Dietmar; Schnoor, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Changes in vascular permeability occur during inflammation and the actin cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in regulating endothelial cell contacts and permeability. We demonstrated recently that the actin-binding protein cortactin regulates vascular permeability via Rap1. However, it is unknown if the actin cytoskeleton contributes to increased vascular permeability without cortactin. As we consistently observed more actin fibres in cortactin-depleted endothelial cells, we hypothesised that cortactin depletion results in increased stress fibre contractility and endothelial barrier destabilisation. Analysing the contractile machinery, we found increased ROCK1 protein levels in cortactin-depleted endothelium. Concomitantly, myosin light chain phosphorylation was increased while cofilin, mDia and ERM were unaffected. Secretion of the barrier-stabilising hormone adrenomedullin, which activates Rap1 and counteracts actomyosin contractility, was reduced in plasma from cortactin-deficient mice and in supernatants of cortactin-depleted endothelium. Importantly, adrenomedullin administration and ROCK1 inhibition reduced actomyosin contractility and rescued the effect on permeability provoked by cortactin deficiency in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest a new role for cortactin in controlling actomyosin contractility with consequences for endothelial barrier integrity. PMID:27357373

  19. Modulation of endothelial cell phenotype by physical activity: impact on obesity-related endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bender, Shawn B; Laughlin, M Harold

    2015-07-01

    Increased levels of physical activity are associated with reduced cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and mortality in obesity and diabetes. Available evidence suggests that local factors, including local hemodynamics, account for a significant portion of this CVD protection, and numerous studies have interrogated the therapeutic benefit of physical activity/exercise training in CVD. Less well established is whether basal differences in endothelial cell phenotype between/among vasculatures related to muscle recruitment patterns during activity may account for reports of nonuniform development of endothelial dysfunction in obesity. This is the focus of this review. We highlight recent work exploring the vulnerability of two distinct vasculatures with established differences in endothelial cell phenotype. Specifically, based largely on dramatic differences in underlying hemodynamics, arteries perfusing soleus muscle (slow-twitch muscle fibers) and those perfusing gastrocnemius muscle (fast-twitch muscle fibers) in the rat exhibit an exercise training-like versus an untrained endothelial cell phenotype, respectively. In the context of obesity, therefore, arteries to soleus muscle exhibit protection from endothelial dysfunction compared with vulnerable arteries to gastrocnemius muscle. This disparate vulnerability is consistent with numerous animal and human studies, demonstrating increased skeletal muscle blood flow heterogeneity in obesity coincident with reduced muscle function and exercise intolerance. Mechanistically, we highlight emerging areas of inquiry exploring novel aspects of hemodynamic-sensitive signaling in endothelial cells and the time course of physical activity-associated endothelial adaptations. Lastly, further exploration needs to consider the impact of endothelial heterogeneity on the development of endothelial dysfunction because endothelial dysfunction independently predicts CVD events.

  20. Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laroussi, M.; Kong, M. G.; Morfill, G.; Stolz, W.

    2012-05-01

    Foreword R. Satava and R. J. Barker; Part I. Introduction to Non-equilibrium Plasma, Cell Biology, and Contamination: 1. Introduction M. Laroussi; 2. Fundamentals of non-equilibrium plasmas M. Kushner and M. Kong; 3. Non-equilibrium plasma sources M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 4. Basic cell biology L. Greene and G. Shama; 5. Contamination G. Shama and B. Ahlfeld; Part II. Plasma Biology and Plasma Medicine: 6. Common healthcare challenges G. Isbary and W. Stolz; 7. Plasma decontamination of surfaces M. Kong and M. Laroussi; 8. Plasma decontamination of gases and liquids A. Fridman; 9. Plasma-cell interaction: prokaryotes M. Laroussi and M. Kong; 10. Plasma-cell interaction: eukaryotes G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 11. Plasma based wound healing G. Isbary, G. Morfill and W. Stolz; 12. Plasma ablation, surgery, and dental applications K. Stalder, J. Woloszko, S. Kalghatgi, G. McCombs, M. Darby and M. Laroussi; Index.

  1. Activation of endothelial cells after exposure to ambient ultrafine particles: The role of NADPH oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Mo Yiqun; Wan Rong; Chien Sufan; Tollerud, David J.; Zhang Qunwei

    2009-04-15

    Several studies have shown that ultrafine particles (UFPs) may pass from the lungs to the circulation because of their very small diameter, and induce lung oxidative stress with a resultant increase in lung epithelial permeability. The direct effects of UFPs on vascular endothelium remain unknown. We hypothesized that exposure to UFPs leads to endothelial cell O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}}{sup -} generation via NADPH oxidase and results in activation of endothelial cells. Our results showed that UFPs, at a non-toxic dose, induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in mouse pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (MPMVEC) that was inhibited by pre-treatment with the ROS scavengers or inhibitors, but not with the mitochondrial inhibitor, rotenone. UFP-induced ROS generation in MPMVEC was abolished by p67{sup phox} siRNA transfection and UFPs did not cause ROS generation in MPMVEC isolated from gp91{sup phox} knock-out mice. UFP-induced ROS generation in endothelial cells was also determined in vivo by using a perfused lung model with imaging. Moreover, Western blot and immunofluorescence staining results showed that MPMVEC treated with UFPs resulted in the translocation of cytosolic proteins of NADPH oxidase, p47{sup phox}, p67{sup phox} and rac 1, to the plasma membrane. These results demonstrate that NADPH oxidase in the pulmonary endothelium is involved in ROS generation following exposure to UFPs. To investigate the activation of endothelial cells by UFP-induced oxidative stress, we determined the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in MPMVEC. Our results showed that exposure of MPMVEC to UFPs caused increased phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPKs that was blocked by pre-treatment with DPI or p67{sup phox} siRNA. Exposure of MPMVEC obtained from gp91{sup phox} knock-out mice to UFPs did not cause increased phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPKs. These findings confirm that UFPs can cause endothelial cells to generate ROS directly

  2. VPAC2 (vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor type 2) receptor deficient mice develop exacerbated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis with increased Th1/Th17 and reduced Th2/Treg responses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuqi; Lopez, Robert; Waschek, James

    2014-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) are two structurally-related neuropeptides with widespread expression in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Although these peptides have been repeatedly shown to exert potent anti-inflammatory actions when administered in animal models of inflammatory disease, mice deficient in VIP and PACAP were recently shown to exhibit different phenotypes (ameliorated and exacerbated, respectively) in response to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Therefore, elucidating what are the specific immunoregulatory roles played by each of their receptor subtypes (VPAC1, VPAC2, and PAC1) is critical. In this study, we found that mice with a genetic deletion of VIPR2, encoding the VPAC2 receptor, exhibited exacerbated (MOG35-55)-induced EAE compared to wild type mice, characterized by enhanced clinical and histopathological features, increased proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ (Th1), and IL-17 (Th17)) and reduced anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, TGFβ, and IL-4 (Th2)) in the CNS and lymph nodes. Moreover, the abundance and proliferative index of lymph node, thymus and CNS CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs were strikingly reduced in VPAC2-deficient mice with EAE. Finally, the in vitro suppressive activity of lymph node and splenic Tregs from VPAC2-deficient mice was impaired. Overall, our results demonstrate critical protective roles for PACAP and the VPAC2 receptor against autoimmunity, promoting the expansion and maintenance of the Treg pool. PMID:25305591

  3. Peripheral nerve reconstruction with epsilon-caprolactone conduits seeded with vasoactive intestinal peptide gene-transfected mesenchymal stem cells in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Cortés, P.; Toledo-Romero, M. A.; Delgado, M.; Sánchez-González, C. E.; Martin, F.; Galindo-Moreno, P.; O'Valle, F.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Attempts have been made to improve nerve conduits in peripheral nerve reconstruction. We investigated the potential therapeutic effect of a vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a neuropeptide with neuroprotective, trophic and developmental regulatory actions, in peripheral nerve regeneration in a severe model of nerve injury that was repaired with nerve conduits. Approach. The sciatic nerve of each male Wistar rat was transected unilaterally at 10 mm and then repaired with Dl-lactic-ɛ-caprolactone conduits. The rats were treated locally with saline, with the VIP, with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) or with ASCs that were transduced with the VIP-expressing lentivirus. The rats with the transected nerve, with no repairs, were used as untreated controls. At 12 weeks post-surgery, we assessed their limb function by measuring the ankle stance angle and the percentage of their muscle mass reduction, and we evaluated the histopathology, immunohistochemistry and morphometry of the myelinated fibers. Main results. The rats that received a single injection of VIP-expressing ASCs showed a significant functional recovery in the ankle stance angle (p = 0.049) and a higher number of myelinated fibers in the middle and distal segments of the operated nerve versus the other groups (p = 0.046). Significance. These results suggest that utilization of a cellular substrate, plus a VIP source, is a promising method for enhancing nerve regeneration using Dl-lactic-ɛ-caprolactone conduits and that this method represents a potential useful clinical approach to repairing peripheral nerve damage.

  4. Augmentation of the effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide aerosol on pulmonary hypertension via coapplication of a neutral endopeptidase 24.11 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Leuchte, Hanno H; Prechtl, Christoph; Callegari, Jens; Meis, Tobias; Haziraj, Shani; Bevec, Dorian; Behr, Jürgen

    2015-03-15

    A deficiency of the pulmonary vasodilative vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has been suggested to be involved in the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Supplementation of VIP as an aerosol is hampered by the fact that it is rapidly inactivated by neutral endopeptidases (NEP) located on the lung surface. Coapplication of thiorphan, an NEP 24.11 inhibitor, could augment the biological effects of inhaled VIP alone. A stable pulmonary vasoconstriction with a threefold increase of pulmonary artery pressure was established by application the thromboxane mimetic U46619 in the isolated rabbit lung model. VIP and thiorphan were either applied intravascularly or as an aerosol. VIP caused a significant pulmonary vasodilation either during intravascular application or inhalation. These effects were of short duration. Thiorphan application had no effects on pulmonary vasoconstriction per se but significantly augmented the effects of VIP aerosol. Thiorphan, not only augmented the maximum hemodynamic effects of VIP aerosol, but also led to a significant prolongation of these effects. VIP causes pulmonary vasodilation in a model of acute experimental PH. The hemodynamic effects of VIP aerosol can be significantly augmented via coapplication of an NEP inhibitor.

  5. Combined ultrastructural and biochemical study of cellular processing of vasoactive intestinal peptide and its receptors in human colonic carcinoma cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Hejblum, G; Gali, P; Boissard, C; Astesano, A; Marie, J C; Anteunis, A; Hui Bon Hoa, D; Rosselin, G

    1988-11-01

    Desensitization of human carcinoma colonic cells in culture (HT-29) to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has been reported previously (C. Boissard, J. C. Marie, G. Hejblum, C. Gespach, and G. Rosselin, Cancer Res., 46: 4406-4413, 1986). In the present study, we have determined the ultrastructural localization of VIP and its receptor after exposure of HT-29 cells to VIP monoiodinated on tyrosyl residue 10 together with the molecular forms and the activity of the internalized VIP receptor. Quantitative electron microscope autoradiography showed that after binding at the cell surface, VIP is internalized in heterogeneous endosomes. Cross-linking experiments followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis were performed in different experimental conditions allowing us to selectively obtain cell surface-associated, internalized, or recycled receptors. No detectable alteration of the labeled VIP-receptor complex occurred during the internalization and recycling processes. Furthermore, a loss of the forskolin potentiation of the VIP-induced stimulation of adenylate cyclase was observed after VIP exposure. This feature was time and temperature dependent as was the VIP-induced loss of cell surface receptors, indicating that the internalized VIP receptor is dissociated from the adenylate cyclase. PMID:2844402

  6. Generation of highly selective VPAC2 receptor agonists by high throughput mutagenesis of vasoactive intestinal peptide and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide.

    PubMed

    Yung, Stephanie L; Dela Cruz, Fernando; Hamren, Sarah; Zhu, Jian; Tsutsumi, Manami; Bloom, James W; Caudle, Margaret; Roczniak, Steve; Todd, Tracey; Lemoine, Lynn; MacDougall, Margit; Shanafelt, Armen B; Pan, Clark Q

    2003-03-21

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) has a specific receptor PAC1 and shares two receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2 with vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VPAC2 activation enhances glucose-induced insulin release while VPAC1 activation elevates glucose output. To generate a large pool of VPAC2 selective agonists for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, structure-activity relationship studies were performed on PACAP, VIP, and a VPAC2 selective VIP analog. Chemical modifications on this analog that prevent recombinant expression were sequentially removed to show that a recombinant peptide would retain VPAC2 selectivity. An efficient recombinant expression system was then developed to produce and screen hundreds of mutant peptides. The 11 mutations found on the VIP analog were systematically replaced with VIP or PACAP sequences. Three of these mutations, V19A, L27K, and N28K, were sufficient to provide most of the VPAC2 selectivity. C-terminal extension with the KRY sequence from PACAP38 led to potent VPAC2 agonists with improved selectivity (100-1000-fold). Saturation mutagenesis at positions 19, 27, 29, and 30 of VIP and charge-scanning mutagenesis of PACAP27 generated additional VPAC2 selective agonists. We have generated the first set of recombinant VPAC2 selective agonists described, which exhibit activity profiles that suggest therapeutic utility in the treatment of diabetes.

  7. Effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide and naloxone combination on urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase level and kidney histology of rats exposed to severe hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Akin, M Z; Tunçel, N; Gürer, F; Kural, N; Uslu, S

    1993-09-01

    Renal hypoperfusion which occurs in hemorrhagic shock creates an environment in which cellular injury and organ dysfunction can occur during the episode of shock as well as reoxygenation and reperfusion. At the same time, mast cell degranulation which is observed during hemorrhage may have an additional deleterious effect on the kidney. Twenty-two (Mus norvegicus albinos) rats (200-250 g) of either sex were used. The animals were divided into three groups. Group 1, the control group, was exposed to a 40% hemorrhage. Group 2 was exposed to 40% hemorrhage and then shed blood reperfused. Group 3 was exposed to 40% hemorrhage, and in addition to shed blood reperfusion 25 ng kg-1 vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) + 5 mg kg-1 naloxone (NLX) were given. At the end of the experiment the kidneys were evaluated either histologically or by measurement of the urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) activity. Shed blood reperfusion caused continuation of ischemic tissue damage and elevation of urinary NAG activity. Addition of VIP and NLX to the blood reperfusion caused a decrease in urinary NAG excretion, and the histology of renal tissue was almost normal.

  8. Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Detection of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Receptor 2 Agonist Therapy in a Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Olson, Katherine E; Bade, Aditya N; Schutt, Charles R; Dong, Jingdong; Shandler, Scott J; Boska, Michael D; Mosley, R Lee; Gendelman, Howard E; Liu, Yutong

    2016-07-01

    Neuroprotective immunity is defined by transformation of T-cell polarity for therapeutic gain. For neurodegenerative disorders and specifically for Parkinson's disease (PD), granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor or vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2 (VIPR2) agonists elicit robust anti-inflammatory microglial responses leading to neuronal sparing in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-intoxicated mice. While neurotherapeutic potential was demonstrated for PD, there remain inherent limitations in translating these inventions from the laboratory to patients. One obstacle in translating such novel neurotherapeutics centers on the availability of suitable noninvasive methods to track disease progression and therapeutic efficacy. To this end, we developed manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) assays as a way to track a linkage between glial activation and VIPR2 agonist (LBT-3627)-induced neuroprotective immunity for MPTP-induced nigrostriatal degeneration. Notably, LBT-3627-treated, MPTP-intoxicated mice show reduced MEMRI brain signal intensities. These changes paralleled reduced astrogliosis and resulted in sparing of nigral tyrosine hydroxylase neurons. Most importantly, the data suggest that MEMRI can be developed as a biomarker tool to monitor neurotherapeutic responses that are relevant to common neurodegenerative disorders used to improve disease outcomes. PMID:27329163

  9. Endothelial progenitor cells in diabetic foot syndrome.

    PubMed

    Drela, Ewelina; Stankowska, Katarzyna; Kulwas, Arleta; Rość, Danuta

    2012-01-01

    In the late 20th century endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were discovered and identified as cells capable of differentiating into endothelial cells. Antigens characteristic of endothelial cells and hematopoietic cells are located on their surface. EPCs can proliferate, adhere, migrate and have the specific ability to form vascular structure, and they have a wide range of roles: They participate in maintaining hemostasis, and play an important part in the processes of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. They are sources of angiogenic factors, especially vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). EPCs exist in bone marrow, from which they are recruited into circulation in response to specific stimuli. Tissue ischemia is thought to be the strongest inductor of EPC mobilization. Local ischemia accompanies many pathological states, including diabetic foot syndrome (DFS). Impaired angiogenesis--in which EPCs participate--is typical of DFS. An analysis of the available literature indicates that in diabetic patients the number of EPCs declines and their functioning is impaired. Endothelial progenitor cells are crucial to vasculogenesis and angiogenesis during ischemic neovascularization. The pathomechanisms underlying impaired angiogenesis in patients with DFS is complicated, but the discovery of EPCs has shed new light on the pathogenesis of many diseases, including diabetes foot syndrome.

  10. [Cytokines, endothelial dysfunction, and insulin resistance].

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Maria Helena C; Colaço, André Luiz; Fortes, Zuleica Bruno

    2006-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is associated with several vascular conditions as atherosclerosis, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and diabetes mellitus. In all these conditions insulin resistance (IR) is present. Cytokines are low molecular weight proteins with several endocrine and metabolic functions that participate of inflammation and immune response. Several of these cytokines are independent risk factors for cerebrovascular and coronary artery disease. The major sources of cytokines (adipokines) are the visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues. Thus, increased adipose tissue mass is associated with alteration in adipokine production as over expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, and under expression of adiponectin in adipocite tissue. The pro-inflammatory status associated with these changes provides a potential link between IR and endothelial dysfunction, the early stage in the atherosclerotic process, in obese individuals, and type 2 diabetic patients. Reduction of adipose tissue mass through weight reduction in association with exercise reduces TNF-alpha, IL-6, and PAI-1, increases adiponectin, and is associated with improved insulin sensitivity and endothelial function. This review will focus on the evidence for regulation of endothelial function by insulin and the adypokines such as adyponectin, leptin, resistin, IL-6 and TNF-alpha. Interaction between insulin signaling and adypokines will be discussed, as well as the concept that aberrant adypokine secretion in IR and/or obesity impairs endothelial function and contributes further to reduce insulin sensitivity.

  11. PECAM-1: regulator of endothelial junctional integrity.

    PubMed

    Privratsky, Jamie R; Newman, Peter J

    2014-03-01

    PECAM-1 (also known as CD31) is a cellular adhesion and signaling receptor comprising six extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like homology domains, a short transmembrane domain and a 118 amino acid cytoplasmic domain that becomes serine and tyrosine phosphorylated upon cellular activation. PECAM-1 expression is restricted to blood and vascular cells. In circulating platelets and leukocytes, PECAM-1 functions largely as an inhibitory receptor that, via regulated sequential phosphorylation of its cytoplasmic domain, limits cellular activation responses. PECAM-1 is also highly expressed at endothelial cell intercellular junctions, where it functions as a mechanosensor, as a regulator of leukocyte trafficking and in the maintenance of endothelial cell junctional integrity. In this review, we will describe (1) the functional domains of PECAM-1 and how they contribute to its barrier-enhancing properties, (2) how the physical properties of PECAM-1 influence its subcellular localization and its ability to influence endothelial cell barrier function, (3) various stimuli that initiate PECAM-1 signaling and/or function at the endothelial junction and (4) cross-talk of PECAM-1 with other junctional molecules, which can influence endothelial cell function. PMID:24435645

  12. Endothelial Cell Response to Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Reila Tainá; Nguyen, Daniel; Stephens, Danielle; Pamuk, Ferda; Fernandes, Daniel; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Kantarci, Alpdogan

    2016-07-01

    Vascular response is an essential aspect of an effective immune response to periodontal disease pathogens, as new blood vessel formation contributes to wound healing and inflammation. Gaining a greater understanding of the factors that affect vascular response may then contribute to future breakthroughs in dental medicine. In this study, we have characterized the endothelial cell response to the common bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum, an important bridging species that facilitates the activity of late colonizers of the dental biofilm. Endothelial cells were infected with Fusobacterium nucleatum (strain 25586) for periods of 4, 12, 24, or 48 h. Cell proliferation and tube formation were analyzed, and expression of adhesion molecules (CD31 and CD34) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors 1 and 2 was measured by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Data indicate that F. nucleatum impaired endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation. The findings suggest that the modified endothelial cell response acts as a mechanism promoting the pathogenic progression of periodontal diseases and may potentially suggest the involvement of periodontopathogens in systemic diseases associated with periodontal inflammation.

  13. Structural and functional characterization of endothelial microparticles released by cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Serban, Karina A; Rezania, Samin; Petrusca, Daniela N; Poirier, Christophe; Cao, Danting; Justice, Matthew J; Patel, Milan; Tsvetkova, Irina; Kamocki, Krzysztof; Mikosz, Andrew; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Jacobson, Sean; Cardoso, Angelo; Carlesso, Nadia; Hubbard, Walter C; Kechris, Katerina; Dragnea, Bogdan; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McClintock, Jeanette; Petrache, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Circulating endothelial microparticles (EMPs) are emerging as biomarkers of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in individuals exposed to cigarette smoke (CS), but their mechanism of release and function remain unknown. We assessed biochemical and functional characteristics of EMPs and circulating microparticles (cMPs) released by CS. CS exposure was sufficient to increase microparticle levels in plasma of humans and mice, and in supernatants of primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. CS-released EMPs contained predominantly exosomes that were significantly enriched in let-7d, miR-191; miR-126; and miR125a, microRNAs that reciprocally decreased intracellular in CS-exposed endothelium. CS-released EMPs and cMPs were ceramide-rich and required the ceramide-synthesis enzyme acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) for their release, an enzyme which was found to exhibit significantly higher activity in plasma of COPD patients or of CS-exposed mice. The ex vivo or in vivo engulfment of EMPs or cMPs by peripheral blood monocytes-derived macrophages was associated with significant inhibition of efferocytosis. Our results indicate that CS, via aSMase, releases circulating EMPs with distinct microRNA cargo and that EMPs affect the clearance of apoptotic cells by specialized macrophages. These targetable effects may be important in the pathogenesis of diseases linked to endothelial injury and inflammation in smokers. PMID:27530098

  14. Association of Microvascular Function and Endothelial Biomarkers With Clinical Outcome in Dengue: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, Sophie; Lam, Phung Khanh; Vu, Le Hoang Mai; Le, Thi Lien; Ha, Ngo Thanh; Toan, Tran Thi; Van, Nguyen Thu; Quyen, Nguyen Than Ha; Le Duyen, Huynh Thi; Van Kinh, Nguyen; Fox, Annette; Mongkolspaya, Juthathip; Wolbers, Marcel; Simmons, Cameron Paul; Screaton, Gavin Robert; Wertheim, Heiman; Wills, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Background. The hallmark of severe dengue is increased microvascular permeability, but alterations in the microcirculation and their evolution over the course of dengue are unknown. Methods. We conducted a prospective observational study to evaluate the sublingual microcirculation using side-stream dark-field imaging in patients presenting early (<72 hours after fever onset) and patients hospitalized with warning signs or severe dengue in Vietnam. Clinical findings, microvascular function, global hemodynamics assessed with echocardiography, and serological markers of endothelial activation were determined at 4 time points. Results. A total of 165 patients were enrolled. No difference was found between the microcirculatory parameters comparing dengue with other febrile illnesses. The proportion of perfused vessels (PPV) and the mean flow index (MFI) were lower in patients with dengue with plasma than those without leakage (PPV, 88.1% vs 90.6% [P = .01]; MFI, 2.1 vs 2.4 [P = .007]), most markedly during the critical phase. PPV and MFI were correlated with the endothelial activation markers vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (P < .001 for both) and angiopoietin 2 (P < .001 for both), negatively correlated. Conclusions. Modest microcirculatory alterations occur in dengue, are associated with plasma leakage, and are correlate with molecules of endothelial activation, angiopoietin 2 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. PMID:27230099

  15. Structural and functional characterization of endothelial microparticles released by cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Serban, Karina A.; Rezania, Samin; Petrusca, Daniela N.; Poirier, Christophe; Cao, Danting; Justice, Matthew J.; Patel, Milan; Tsvetkova, Irina; Kamocki, Krzysztof; Mikosz, Andrew; Schweitzer, Kelly S.; Jacobson, Sean; Cardoso, Angelo; Carlesso, Nadia; Hubbard, Walter C.; Kechris, Katerina; Dragnea, Bogdan; Berdyshev, Evgeny V.; McClintock, Jeanette; Petrache, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Circulating endothelial microparticles (EMPs) are emerging as biomarkers of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in individuals exposed to cigarette smoke (CS), but their mechanism of release and function remain unknown. We assessed biochemical and functional characteristics of EMPs and circulating microparticles (cMPs) released by CS. CS exposure was sufficient to increase microparticle levels in plasma of humans and mice, and in supernatants of primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. CS-released EMPs contained predominantly exosomes that were significantly enriched in let-7d, miR-191; miR-126; and miR125a, microRNAs that reciprocally decreased intracellular in CS-exposed endothelium. CS-released EMPs and cMPs were ceramide-rich and required the ceramide-synthesis enzyme acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) for their release, an enzyme which was found to exhibit significantly higher activity in plasma of COPD patients or of CS-exposed mice. The ex vivo or in vivo engulfment of EMPs or cMPs by peripheral blood monocytes-derived macrophages was associated with significant inhibition of efferocytosis. Our results indicate that CS, via aSMase, releases circulating EMPs with distinct microRNA cargo and that EMPs affect the clearance of apoptotic cells by specialized macrophages. These targetable effects may be important in the pathogenesis of diseases linked to endothelial injury and inflammation in smokers. PMID:27530098

  16. Ricinus communis agglutinin I leads to rapid down-regulation of VEGFR-2 and endothelial cell apoptosis in tumor blood vessels.

    PubMed

    You, Weon-Kyoo; Kasman, Ian; Hu-Lowe, Dana D; McDonald, Donald M

    2010-04-01

    Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA I), a galactose-binding lectin from castor beans, binds to endothelial cells at sites of plasma leakage, but little is known about the amount and functional consequences of binding to tumor endothelial cells. We addressed this issue by examining the effects of RCA I on blood vessels of spontaneous pancreatic islet-cell tumors in RIP-Tag2 transgenic mice. After intravenous injection, RCA I bound strongly to tumor vessels but not to normal blood vessels. At 6 minutes, RCA I fluorescence of tumor vessels was largely diffuse, but over the next hour, brightly fluorescent dots appeared as the lectin was internalized by endothelial cells. RCA I injection led to a dose- and time-dependent decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) immunoreactivity in tumor endothelial cells, with 95% loss over 6 hours. By comparison, VEGFR-3, CD31, and CD105 had decreases in the range of 21% to 33%. Loss of VEGFR-2 was followed by increased activated caspase-3 in tumor vessels. Prior inhibition of VEGF signaling by AG-028262 decreased RCA I binding and internalization into tumor vessels. These findings indicate RCA I preferentially binds to and is internalized by tumor endothelial cells, which leads to VEGFR-2 down-regulation, endothelial cell apoptosis, and tumor vessel regression. Together, the results illustrate the selective impact of RCA I on VEGF signaling in tumor blood vessels.

  17. Plasmodium falciparum Histidine-Rich Protein II Compromises Brain Endothelial Barriers and May Promote Cerebral Malaria Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Priya; Daniels, Brian P.; Oskman, Anna; Diamond, Michael S.; Klein, Robyn S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cerebral malaria (CM) is a disease of the vascular endothelium caused by Plasmodium falciparum. It is characterized by parasite sequestration, inflammatory cytokine production, and vascular leakage. A distinguishing feature of P. falciparum infection is parasite production and secretion of histidine-rich protein II (HRPII). Plasma HRPII is a diagnostic and prognostic marker for falciparum malaria. We demonstrate that disruption of a human cerebral microvascular endothelial barrier by P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes depends on expression of HRPII. Purified recombinant or native HRPII can recapitulate these effects. HRPII action occurs via activation of the inflammasome, resulting in decreased integrity of tight junctions and increased endothelial permeability. We propose that HRPII is a virulence factor that may contribute to cerebral malaria by compromising endothelial barrier integrity within the central nervous system. PMID:27273825

  18. Plasma Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, D. H. E.

    This chapter explores several aspects of the linear electrostatic normal modes of oscillation for a single-species non-neutral plasma in a Penning trap. Linearized fluid equations of motion are developed, assuming the plasma is cold but collisionless, which allow derivation of the cold plasma dielectric tensor and the electrostatic wave equation. Upper hybrid and magnetized plasma waves in an infinite uniform plasma are described. The effect of the plasma surface in a bounded plasma system is considered, and the properties of surface plasma waves are characterized. The normal modes of a cylindrical plasma column are discussed, and finally, modes of spheroidal plasmas, and finite temperature effects on the modes, are briefly described.

  19. KRIT1 Protein Depletion Modifies Endothelial Cell Behavior via Increased Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, Peter V.; Kuebel, Julia M.; Sarelius, Ingrid H.; Glading, Angela J.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of endothelial cell-cell contact is a key event in many cardiovascular diseases and a characteristic of pathologically activated vascular endothelium. The CCM (cerebral cavernous malformation) family of proteins (KRIT1 (Krev-interaction trapped 1), PDCD10, and CCM2) are critical regulators of endothelial cell-cell contact and vascular homeostasis. Here we show novel regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in KRIT1-depleted endothelial cells. Loss of KRIT1 and PDCD10, but not CCM2, increases nuclear β-catenin signaling and up-regulates VEGF-A protein expression. In KRIT1-depleted cells, increased VEGF-A levels led to increased VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) activation and subsequent alteration of cytoskeletal organization, migration, and barrier function and to in vivo endothelial permeability in KRIT1-deficient animals. VEGFR2 activation also increases β-catenin phosphorylation but is only partially responsible for KRIT1 depletion-dependent disruption of cell-cell contacts. Thus, VEGF signaling contributes to modifying endothelial function in KRIT1-deficient cells and microvessel permeability in Krit1+/− mice; however, VEGF signaling is likely not the only contributor to disrupted endothelial cell-cell contacts in the absence of KRIT1. PMID:25320085

  20. Development of Endothelial-Specific Single Inducible Lentiviral Vectors for Genetic Engineering of Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guanghua; Kramer, M Gabriela; Fernandez-Ruiz, Veronica; Kawa, Milosz P; Huang, Xin; Liu, Zhongmin; Prieto, Jesus; Qian, Cheng

    2015-11-27

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are able to migrate to tumor vasculature. These cells, if genetically modified, can be used as vehicles to deliver toxic material to, or express anticancer proteins in tumor. To test this hypothesis, we developed several single, endothelial-specific, and doxycycline-inducible self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors. Two distinct expression cassettes were inserted into a SIN-vector: one controlled by an endothelial lineage-specific, murine vascular endothelial cadherin (mVEcad) promoter for the expression of a transactivator, rtTA2S-M2; and the other driven by an inducible promoter, TREalb, for a firefly luciferase reporter gene. We compared the expression levels of luciferase in different vector constructs, containing either the same or opposite orientation with respect to the vector sequence. The results showed that the vector with these two expression cassettes placed in opposite directions was optimal, characterized by a robust induction of the transgene expression (17.7- to 73-fold) in the presence of doxycycline in several endothelial cell lines, but without leakiness when uninduced. In conclusion, an endothelial lineage-specific single inducible SIN lentiviral vector has been developed. Such a lentiviral vector can be used to endow endothelial progenitor cells with anti-tumor properties.

  1. Apoptosis of Endothelial Cells by 13-HPODE Contributes to Impairment of Endothelial Barrier Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Ryman, Valerie E.; Packiriswamy, Nandakumar

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an essential host response during bacterial infections such as bovine mastitis. Endothelial cells are critical for an appropriate inflammatory response and loss of vascular barrier integrity is implicated in the pathogenesis of Streptococcus uberis-induced mastitis. Previous studies suggested that accumulation of linoleic acid (LA) oxygenation products derived from 15-lipoxygenase-1 (15-LOX-1) metabolism could regulate vascular functions. The initial LA derivative from the 15-LOX-1 pathway, 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (HPODE), can induce endothelial death, whereas the reduced hydroxyl product, 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE), is abundantly produced during vascular activation. However, the relative contribution of specific LA-derived metabolites on impairment of mammary endothelial integrity is unknown. Our hypothesis was that S. uberis-induced LA-derived 15-LOX-1 oxygenation products impair mammary endothelial barrier integrity by apoptosis. Exposure of bovine mammary endothelial cells (BMEC) to S. uberis did not increase 15-LOX-1 LA metabolism. However, S. uberis challenge of bovine monocytes demonstrated that monocytes may be a significant source of both 13-HPODE and 13-HODE during mastitis. Exposure of BMEC to 13-HPODE, but not 13-HODE, significantly reduced endothelial barrier integrity and increased apoptosis. Changing oxidant status by coexposure to an antioxidant during 13-HPODE treatment prevented adverse effects of 13-HPODE, including amelioration of apoptosis. A better understanding of how the oxidant status of the vascular microenvironment impacts endothelial barrier properties could lead to more efficacious treatments for S. uberis mastitis.

  2. Glassy Dynamics, Cell Mechanics and Endothelial Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, Corey; Rajendran, Kavitha; Manomohan, Greeshma; Tambe, Dhananjay T.; Butler, James P.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Martinelli, Roberta; Carman, Christopher V.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy

    2013-01-01

    A key feature of all inflammatory processes is disruption of the vascular endothelial barrier. Such disruption is initiated in part through active contraction of the cytoskeleton of the endothelial cell (EC). Because contractile forces are propagated from cell to cell across a great many cell-cell junctions, this contractile process is strongly cooperative and highly nonlocal. We show here that the characteristic length scale of propagation is modulated by agonists and antagonists that impact permeability of the endothelial barrier. In the presence of agonists including thrombin, histamine, and H202, force correlation length increases, whereas in the presence of antagonists including sphingosine-1-phosphate, hepatocyte growth factor, and the rho kinase inhibitor, Y27632, force correlation length decreases. Intercellular force chains and force clusters are also evident, both of which are reminiscent of soft glassy materials approaching a glass transition. PMID:23638866

  3. Mutant B-Raf(V600E) Promotes Melanoma Paracellular Transmigration by Inducing Thrombin-mediated Endothelial Junction Breakdown.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pu; Feng, Shan; Liu, Gentao; Wang, Heyong; Zhu, Huifeng; Ren, Qiao; Bai, Huiyuan; Fu, Changliang; Dong, Cheng

    2016-01-29

    Tumor invasiveness depends on the ability of tumor cells to breach endothelial barriers. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which the adhesion of melanoma cells to endothelium regulates adherens junction integrity and modulates tumor transendothelial migration (TEM) by initiating thrombin generation. We found that the B-Raf(V600E) mutation in metastatic melanoma cells up-regulated tissue factor (TF) expression on cell membranes and promoted thrombin production. Co-culture of endothelial monolayers with metastatic melanoma cells mediated the opening of inter-endothelial spaces near melanoma cell contact sites in the presence of platelet-free plasma (PFP). By using small interfering RNA (siRNA), we demonstrated that B-Raf(V600E) and TF silencing attenuated the focal disassembly of adherens junction induced by tumor contact. Vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin) disassembly was dependent on phosphorylation of p120-catenin on Ser-879 and VE-cadherin on Tyr-658, Tyr-685, and Tyr-731, which can be prevented by treatment with the thrombin inhibitor, hirudin, or by silencing the thrombin receptor, protease-activated receptor-1, in endothelial cells. We also provided strong evidence that tumor-derived thrombin enhanced melanoma TEM by inducing ubiquitination-coupled VE-cadherin internalization, focal adhesion formation, and actin assembly in endothelium. Confocal microscopic analysis of tumor TEM revealed that junctions transiently opened and resealed as tumor cells accomplished TEM. In addition, in the presence of PFP, tumor cells preferentially transmigrated via paracellular routes. PFP supported melanoma transmigration under shear conditions via a B-Raf(V600E)-thrombin-dependent mechanism. We concluded that the activation of thrombin generation by cancer cells in plasma is an important process regulating melanoma extravasation by disrupting endothelial junction integrity. PMID:26504080

  4. Establishment of outgrowth endothelial cells from peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Martin-Ramirez, Javier; Hofman, Menno; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Hebbel, Robert P; Voorberg, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) are important tools when investigating diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for vascular disease. In this protocol, mononuclear cells are isolated from peripheral blood and plated on type I collagen at ∼135,000 cells per cm(2) in endothelial cell differentiation medium. On average, 0.34 colonies of endothelial cells per milliliter of blood can be obtained. Colonies of endothelial cells become visible after 14-28 d. Upon confluence, these rapidly expanding colonies can be passaged and have been shown to propagate up to 10(18)-fold. Isolated BOECs are phenotypically similar to vascular endothelial cells, as revealed by their cobblestone morphology, the presence of endothelial cell-specific Weibel-Palade bodies and the expression of endothelial cell markers such as VE-cadherin. The protocol presented here also provides a particularly useful tool for the ex vivo assessment of endothelial cell function from patients with different vascular abnormalities. PMID:22918388

  5. Successive deep dives impair endothelial function and enhance oxidative stress in man.

    PubMed

    Obad, Ante; Marinovic, Jasna; Ljubkovic, Marko; Breskovic, Toni; Modun, Darko; Boban, Mladen; Dujic, Zeljko

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of successive deep dives on endothelial function of large conduit arteries and plasma pro-oxidant and antioxidant activity. Seven experienced divers performed six dives in six consecutive days using a compressed mixture of oxygen, helium and nitrogen (trimix) with diving depths ranging from 55 to 80 m. Before and after first, third and sixth dive, venous gas emboli formation and brachial artery function (flow-mediated dilation, FMD) was assessed by ultrasound. In addition, plasma antioxidant capacity (AOC) was measured by ferric reducing antioxidant power, and the level of oxidative stress was assessed by thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) method. Although the FMD was reduced to a similar extent after each dive, the comparison of predive FMD showed a reduction from 8.6% recorded before the first dive to 6.3% before the third (P = 0.03) and 5.7% before the sixth dive (P = 0.003). A gradual shift in baseline was also detected with TBARS assay, with malondialdehyde values increasing from 0.10 ± 0.02 μmol l⁻¹ before the first dive to 0.16 ± 0.03 before the sixth (P = 0.005). Predive plasma AOC values also showed a decreasing trend from 0.67 ± 0.20 mmol l⁻¹ trolox equivalents (first day) to 0.56 ± 0.12 (sixth day), although statistical significance was not reached (P = 0.08). This is the first documentation of acute endothelial dysfunction in the large conduit arteries occurring after successive deep trimix dives. Both endothelial function and plasma pro-oxidant and antioxidant activity did not return to baseline during the course of repetitive dives, indicating possible cumulative and longer lasting detrimental effects.

  6. Crossing the endothelial barrier during metastasis.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Nicolas; d'Água, Bárbara Borda; Ridley, Anne J

    2013-12-01

    During metastasis, cancer cells disseminate to other parts of the body by entering the bloodstream in a process that is called intravasation. They then extravasate at metastatic sites by attaching to endothelial cells that line blood vessels and crossing the vessel walls of tissues or organs. This Review describes how cancer cells cross the endothelial barrier during extravasation and how different receptors, signalling pathways and circulating cells such as leukocytes and platelets contribute to this process. Identification of the mechanisms that underlie cancer cell extravasation could lead to the development of new therapies to reduce metastasis.

  7. Enhancing endothelial progenitor cell for clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Lei; Poh, Kian-Keong

    2015-01-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been demonstrated to correlate negatively with vascular endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk factors. However, translation of basic research into the clinical practice has been limited by the lack of unambiguous and consistent definitions of EPCs and reduced EPC cell number and function in subjects requiring them for clinical use. This article critically reviews the definition of EPCs based on commonly used protocols, their value as a biomarker of cardiovascular risk factor in subjects with cardiovascular disease, and strategies to enhance EPCs for treatment of ischemic diseases. PMID:26240678

  8. Enhancing endothelial progenitor cell for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Poh, Kian-Keong

    2015-07-26

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have been demonstrated to correlate negatively with vascular endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk factors. However, translation of basic research into the clinical practice has been limited by the lack of unambiguous and consistent definitions of EPCs and reduced EPC cell number and function in subjects requiring them for clinical use. This article critically reviews the definition of EPCs based on commonly used protocols, their value as a biomarker of cardiovascular risk factor in subjects with cardiovascular disease, and strategies to enhance EPCs for treatment of ischemic diseases.

  9. Endothelial progenitor cells--an evolving story.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Jeremy D

    2010-05-01

    The first description of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) in 1997 led rapidly to substantial changes in our understanding of angiogenesis, and within 5 years to the first clinical studies in humans using bone marrow derived EPC to enhance coronary neovascularisation and cardiac function after myocardial ischemia. However, to improve the success of this therapy a clearer understanding of the biology of EPC is needed. This article summarises recent data indicating that most EPC are not, in fact, endothelial progenitors but can be better described as angiogenic monocytes, and explores the implications this has for their future therapeutic use.

  10. Cocaine and specific cocaine metabolites induce von Willebrand Factor release from endothelial cells in a tissue-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, William E.; Moore, Emily E.; Penkala, Rebecca A.; Bolgiano, D.; López, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cocaine use is associated with arterial thrombosis, including myocardial infarction and stroke. Cocaine use results in increased plasma von Willebrand Factor (VWF), accelerated atherosclerosis, and platelet-rich arterial thrombi, suggesting that cocaine activates the endothelium, promoting platelet-VWF interactions. Approach and Results Human umbilical vein (HUVEC), brain microvasculature (BMVEC), or coronary artery (CAEC) endothelial cells were treated with cocaine or metabolites benzoylecgonine, cocaethylene, norcocaine, or ecgonine methylester. Supernatant VWF concentration and multimer structure were measured, and platelet–VWF strings formed on the endothelial surface under flow were quantified. Cocaine, benzoylecgonine, and cocaethylene induced endothelial VWF release, with the two metabolites being more potent than the parent molecule. BMVEC were more sensitive to cocaine and metabolites than were HUVEC or CAEC. CAEC released VWF into the supernatant but did not form VWF–platelet strings. Intracellular cAMP concentration was not increased after treatment with cocaine or its metabolites. Conclusions Both cocaine and metabolites benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene induced endothelial VWF secretion, possibly explaining thrombotic risk after cocaine ingestion. VWF secretion is likely to vary between vascular beds, with brain endothelial cells being particularly sensitive. These results suggest that clinical management of cocaine-induced ischemia may benefit from therapies aimed at disrupting the VWF–platelet interaction. PMID:23539221

  11. Degradation of the endothelial glycocalyx in clinical settings: searching for the sheddases

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Bernhard F; Jacob, Matthias; Leipert, Stephanie; Salmon, Andrew H J; Chappell, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The endothelial glycocalyx has a profound influence at the vascular wall on the transmission of shear stress, on the maintenance of a selective permeability barrier and a low hydraulic conductivity, and on attenuating firm adhesion of blood leukocytes and platelets. Major constituents of the glycocalyx, including syndecans, heparan sulphates and hyaluronan, are shed from the endothelial surface under various acute and chronic clinical conditions, the best characterized being ischaemia and hypoxia, sepsis and inflammation, atherosclerosis, diabetes, renal disease and haemorrhagic viral infections. Damage has also been detected by in vivo microscopic techniques. Matrix metalloproteases may shed syndecans and heparanase, released from activated mast cells, cleaves heparan sulphates from core proteins. According to new data, not only hyaluronidase but also the serine proteases thrombin, elastase, proteinase 3 and plasminogen, as well as cathepsin B lead to loss of hyaluronan from the endothelial surface layer, suggesting a wide array of potentially destructive conditions. Appropriately, pharmacological agents such as inhibitors of inflammation, antithrombin and inhibitors of metalloproteases display potential to attenuate shedding of the glycocalyx in various experimental models. Also, plasma components, especially albumin, stabilize the glycocalyx and contribute to the endothelial surface layer. Though symptoms of the above listed diseases and conditions correlate with sequelae expected from disturbance of the endothelial glycocalyx (oedema, inflammation, leukocyte and platelet adhesion, low reflow), therapeutic studies to prove a causal connection have yet to be designed. With respect to studies on humans, some clinical evidence exists for benefits from application of sulodexide, a preparation delivering precursors of the glycocalyx constituent heparan sulphate. At present, the simplest option for protecting the glycocalyx seems to be to ensure an adequate level of

  12. Inhibitory Effect of Serotonin Antagonist on Leukocyte-Endothelial Interactions In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Hiroshi; Ariyama, Yuno; Deushi, Michiyo; Osaka, Mizuko; Nitta, Kosaku; Yoshida, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Although 5-HT2A serotonergic antagonists have been used to treat vascular disease in patients with diabetes mellitus or obesity, their effects on leukocyte-endothelial interactions have not been fully investigated. In this study, we assessed the effects of sarpogrelate hydrochloride (SRPO), a 5-HT2A receptor inverse agonist, on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in obesity both in vivo and in vitro. Methods and Findings In the in vivo experiment, C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat high-fructose diet (HFFD), comprising 20% fat and 30% fructose, with or without intraperitoneal injection of 5 mg/kg/day SRPO for 4 weeks. The body weight, visceral fat weight, and serum monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels in the mice increased significantly with the HFFD, but these effects were prevented by chronic injections of SRPO. Intravital microscopy of the femoral artery detected significant leukocyte-endothelial interactions after treatment with HFFD, but these leukocyte-endothelial interactions were reduced in the mice injected with SRPO. In the in vitro experiment, pre-incubation of activated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) induced THP-1 cell adhesion under physiological flow conditions, but the adhesion was reduced by pretreatment of PRP with SRPO. A fluorescent immunobinding assay showed that PRP induced significant upregulation of E-selectin in HUVECs, but this upregulation was reduced by pretreatment of PRP with SRPO. In other in vitro conditions, pre-incubation of THP-1 cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate increased the adhesion of THP-1 cells to activated HUVECs under rotational conditions, but this adhesion was reduced by pretreatment with SRPO. Western blotting analysis showed that protein kinase C α activation in THP-1 cells was inhibited by SRPO. Conclusion Our findings indicated that SRPO inhibits vascular inflammation in obesity via inactivation of platelets and leukocytes, and improvement of

  13. Epalrestat increases glutathione, thioredoxin, and heme oxygenase-1 by stimulating Nrf2 pathway in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Yama, Kaori; Sato, Keisuke; Abe, Natsuki; Murao, Yu; Tatsunami, Ryosuke; Tampo, Yoshiko

    2014-01-01

    Epalrestat (EPS) is the only aldose reductase inhibitor that is currently available for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. Recently, we found that EPS at near-plasma concentration increases the intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH) in rat Schwann cells. GSH plays a crucial role in protecting endothelial cells from oxidative stress, thereby preventing vascular diseases. Here we show that EPS increases GSH levels in not only Schwann cells but also endothelial cells. Treatment of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs), an in vitro model of the vascular endothelium, with EPS caused a dramatic increase in intracellular GSH levels. This was concomitant with the up-regulation of glutamate cysteine ligase, an enzyme catalyzing the first and rate-limiting step in de novo GSH synthesis. Moreover, EPS stimulated the expression of thioredoxin and heme oxygenase-1, which have important redox regulatory functions in endothelial cells. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a key transcription factor that regulates the expression of antioxidant genes. EPS increased nuclear Nrf2 levels in BAECs. Nrf2 knockdown by siRNA suppressed the EPS-induced glutamate cysteine ligase, thioredoxin-1, and heme oxygenase-1 expression. Interestingly, LY294002, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, abolished the EPS-stimulated GSH synthesis, suggesting that the kinase is associated with Nrf2 activation induced by EPS. Furthermore, EPS reduced the cytotoxicity induced by H2O2 and tert-butylhydroperoxide, indicating that EPS plays a role in protecting cells from oxidative stress. Taken together, the results provide evidence that EPS exerts new beneficial effects on endothelial cells by increasing GSH, thioredoxin, and heme oxygenase-1 levels through the activation of Nrf2. We suggest that EPS has the potential to prevent several vascular diseases caused by oxidative stress. PMID:25529839

  14. Degradation of the endothelial glycocalyx in clinical settings: searching for the sheddases.

    PubMed

    Becker, Bernhard F; Jacob, Matthias; Leipert, Stephanie; Salmon, Andrew H J; Chappell, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    The endothelial glycocalyx has a profound influence at the vascular wall on the transmission of shear stress, on the maintenance of a selective permeability barrier and a low hydraulic conductivity, and on attenuating firm adhesion of blood leukocytes and platelets. Major constituents of the glycocalyx, including syndecans, heparan sulphates and hyaluronan, are shed from the endothelial surface under various acute and chronic clinical conditions, the best characterized being ischaemia and hypoxia, sepsis and inflammation, atherosclerosis, diabetes, renal disease and haemorrhagic viral infections. Damage has also been detected by in vivo microscopic techniques. Matrix metalloproteases may shed syndecans and heparanase, released from activated mast cells, cleaves heparan sulphates from core proteins. According to new data, not only hyaluronidase but also the serine proteases thrombin, elastase, proteinase 3 and plasminogen, as well as cathepsin B lead to loss of hyaluronan from the endothelial surface layer, suggesting a wide array of potentially destructive conditions. Appropriately, pharmacological agents such as inhibitors of inflammation, antithrombin and inhibitors of metalloproteases display potential to attenuate shedding of the glycocalyx in various experimental models. Also, plasma components, especially albumin, stabilize the glycocalyx and contribute to the endothelial surface layer. Though symptoms of the above listed diseases and conditions correlate with sequelae expected from disturbance of the endothelial glycocalyx (oedema, inflammation, leukocyte and platelet adhesion, low reflow), therapeutic studies to prove a causal connection have yet to be designed. With respect to studies on humans, some clinical evidence exists for benefits from application of sulodexide, a preparation delivering precursors of the glycocalyx constituent heparan sulphate. At present, the simplest option for protecting the glycocalyx seems to be to ensure an adequate level of

  15. The endothelial glycocalyx and its disruption, protection and regeneration: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Schött, Ulf; Solomon, Cristina; Fries, Dietmar; Bentzer, Peter

    2016-04-12

    The glycocalyx is a carbohydrate-rich layer that lines the luminal side of the vascular endothelium. Its soluble components exist in a dynamic equilibrium with the bloodstream and play an important role in maintaining endothelial layer integrity. However, the glycocalyx can be easily damaged and is extremely vulnerable to insults from a variety of sources, including inflammation, trauma, haemorrhagic shock, hypovolemia and ischaemia-reperfusion. Damage to the glycocalyx commonly precedes further damage to the vascular endothelium. Preclinical research has identified a number of different factors capable of protecting or regenerating the glycocalyx. Initial investigations suggest that plasma may convey protective and regenerative effects. However, it remains unclear which exact components or properties of plasma are responsible for this protective effect. Studies have reported protective effects for several plasma proteins individually, including antithrombin, orosomucoid and albumin; the latter of which may be of particular interest, due to the high levels of albumin present in plasma. A further possibility is that plasma is simply a better intravascular volume expander than other resuscitation fluids. It has also been proposed that the protective effects are mediated indirectly via plasma resuscitation-induced changes in gene expression. Further work is needed to determine the importance of specific plasma proteins or other factors for glycocalyx protection, particularly in a clinical setting.

  16. Greater endothelial activation, Weibel-Palade body release and host inflammatory response to Plasmodium vivax, compared with Plasmodium falciparum: a prospective study in Papua, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Tsin W; Lampah, Daniel A; Tjitra, Emiliana; Piera, Kim; Gitawati, Retno; Kenangalem, Enny; Price, Ric N; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2010-07-01

    Pathogenic mechanisms underlying vivax malaria are poorly understood, with few studies comparing endothelial and inflammatory responses with falciparum malaria. In adults with uncomplicated vivax or falciparum malaria, we compared plasma measurements of endothelial Weibel-Palade body release (angiopoietin-2) and activation (ICAM-1, E-selectin), as well as selected cytokines. Despite a lower median parasite count, angiopoietin-2 concentrations were higher in patients with vivax malaria, compared with falciparum malaria. Per peripheral parasite, median plasma angiopoietin-2, ICAM-1, E-selectin, interleukin-6, and interleukin-10 concentrations were higher in patients with malaria due to Plasmodium vivax. P. vivax induces greater endothelial Weibel-Palade body release and activation and greater host inflammatory responses, compared with Plasmodium falciparum.

  17. Acid Sphingomyelinase Promotes Endothelial Stress Response in Systemic Inflammation and Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ha-Yeun; Hupe, Daniel C; Otto, Gordon P; Sprenger, Marcel; Bunck, Alexander C; Dorer, Michael J; Bockmeyer, Clemens L; Deigner, Hans-Peter; Gräler, Markus H; Claus, Ralf A

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of sepsis involves activation of acid sphingomyelinase (SMPD1) with subsequent generation of the bioactive mediator ceramide. We herein evaluate the hypothesis that the enzyme exerts biological effects in endothelial stress response. Plasma-secreted sphingomyelinase activity, ceramide generation and lipid raft formation were measured in human microcirculatory endothelial cells (HMEC-1) stimulated with serum obtained from sepsis patients. Clustering of receptors relevant for signal transduction was studied by immunostaining. The role of SMPD1 for macrodomain formation was tested by pharmacological inhibition. To confirm the involvement of the stress enzyme, direct inhibitors (amino bisphosphonates) and specific downregulation of the gene was tested with respect to ADAMTS13 expression and cytotoxicity. Plasma activity and amount of SMPD1 were increased in septic patients dependent on clinical severity. Increased breakdown of sphingomyelin to ceramide in HMECs was observed following stimulation with serum from sepsis patients in vitro. Hydrolysis of sphingomyelin, clustering of receptor complexes, such as the CD95L/Fas-receptor, as well as formation of ceramide enriched macrodomains were abrogated using functional inhibitors (desipramine and NB6). Strikingly, the stimulation of HMECs with serum obtained from sepsis patients or mixture of proinflammatory cytokines resulted in cytotoxicity and ADAMTS13 downregulation which was abrogated using desipramine, amino bisphosphonates and genetic inhibitors. SMPD1 is involved in the dysregulation of ceramide metabolism in endothelial cells leading to macrodomain formation, cytotoxicity and downregulation of ADAMTS13 expression. Functional inhibitors, such as desipramine, are capable of improving endothelial stress response during sepsis and might be considered as a pharmacological treatment strategy to obtain a favorable outcome. PMID:27341515

  18. Elevated circulating levels and tissue expression of pentraxin 3 in uremia: a reflection of endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Witasp, Anna; Rydén, Mikael; Carrero, Juan Jesús; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Nordfors, Louise; Näslund, Erik; Hammarqvist, Folke; Arefin, Samsul; Kublickiene, Karolina; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Elevated systemic pentraxin 3 (PTX3) levels appear to be a powerful marker of inflammatory status and a superior outcome predictor in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). As previous data imply that PTX3 is involved in vascular pathology and that adipose tissue mass may influence circulating PTX3 levels, we aimed to study the importance of adipose tissue expression of PTX3 in the uremic milieu and its relation to endothelial dysfunction parameters. Plasma PTX3 and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) PTX3 mRNA levels were quantified in 56 stage 5 CKD patients (median age 57 [range 25-75] years, 30 males) and 40 age and gender matched controls (median age 58 [range 20-79] years, 27 males). Associations between PTX3 measures and an extensive panel of clinical parameters, including surrogate markers of endothelial function, were assessed. Functional ex vivo studies on endothelial status and immunohistochemical staining for PTX3 were conducted in resistance subcutaneous arteries isolated from SAT. SAT PTX3 mRNA expression correlated with plasma PTX3 concentrations (rho = 0.54, p = 0.0001) and was increased (3.7 [0.4-70.3] vs. 1.2 [0.2-49.3] RQ, p = 0.02) in CKD patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD), but was not significantly different between patients and controls. The association to CVD was lost after adjustments. SAT PTX3 mRNA levels were independently correlated to asymmetric dimethylarginine and basal resistance artery tone developed after inhibition with nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase (rho = -0.58, p = 0.002). Apparent positive PTX3 immunoreactivity was observed in both patient and control arteries. In conclusion, fat PTX3 mRNA levels are associated with measures of endothelial cell function in patients with CKD. PTX3 may be involved in adipose tissue-orchestrated mechanisms that are restricted to the uremic milieu and modify inflammation and vascular complications in CKD patients.

  19. [Endothelial dysfunction: role in the maternal syndrome of preeclampsia and long-term consequences for the cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Calicchio, R; Buffat, C; Vaiman, D; Miralles, F

    2013-06-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy disorder being a leading cause of maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. It is a complex multisystem disease characterized by hypertension and proteinuria. In preeclampsia the placenta releases factors into the maternal circulation which cause a systemic endothelial dysfunction. Here, we review data demonstrating the central role played by the endothelium in the development of the maternal syndrome of preeclampsia. We present also original data showing how circulating factors present in the plasma of preeclamptic women can alter the transcriptome of endothelial cells. The expression of genes involved in essential functions such as vasoregulation, oxidative stress, apoptosis and cell proliferation show differential expression when endothelial cells are exposed to preeclamptic or normal pregnancy plasma. We conclude by discussing the growing evidences that the alterations of the endothelium during preeclampsia are linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases latter on life. Therefore, a better understanding of the modifications undergone by the endothelial cells during preeclampsia is essential to develop new therapeutic approaches to both, manage preeclampsia and to prevent the long-term sequelae of the disease on women cardiovascular system.

  20. Argonaute‐2 Promotes miR‐18a Entry in Human Brain Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Raquel; Santos, Tiago; Amar, Arun; Gong, Alex; Chen, Thomas C.; Tahara, Stanley M.; Giannotta, Steven L.; Hofman, Florence M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a vascular disease exhibiting abnormal blood vessel morphology and function. miR‐18a ameliorates the abnormal characteristics of AVM‐derived brain endothelial cells (AVM‐BEC) without the use of transfection reagents. Hence, our aim was to identify the mechanisms by which miR‐18a is internalized by AVM‐BEC. Since AVM‐BEC overexpress RNA‐binding protein Argonaute‐2 (Ago‐2) we explored the clinical potential of Ago‐2 as a systemic miRNA carrier. Methods and Results Primary cultures of AVM‐BEC were isolated from surgical specimens and tested for endogenous miR‐18a levels using qPCR. Conditioned media (CM) was derived from AVM‐BEC cultures (AVM‐BEC‐CM). AVM‐BEC‐CM significantly enhanced miR‐18a internalization. Ago‐2 was detected using western blotting and immunostaining techniques. Ago‐2 was highly expressed in AVM‐BEC; and siAgo‐2 decreased miR‐18a entry into brain‐derived endothelial cells. Only brain‐derived endothelial cells were responsive to the Ago‐2/miR‐18a complex and not other cell types tested. Secreted products (eg, thrombospondin‐1 [TSP‐1]) were tested using ELISA. Brain endothelial cells treated with the Ago‐2/miR‐18a complex in vitro increased TSP‐1 secretion. In the in vivo angiogenesis glioma model, animals were treated with miR‐18a in combination with Ago‐2. Plasma was obtained and tested for TSP‐1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)‐A. In this angiogenesis model, the Ago‐2/miR‐18a complex caused a significant increase in TSP‐1 and decrease in VEGF‐A secretion in the plasma. Conclusions Ago‐2 facilitates miR‐18a entry into brain endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. This study highlights the clinical potential of Ago‐2 as a miRNA delivery platform for the treatment of brain vascular diseases. PMID:24837588

  1. The Effects of Inhaled Nickel Nanoparticles on Murine Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberda, Eric N.

    Introduction. Particulate air pollution, specifically nickel found on or in particulate matter, has been associated with an increased risk of mortality in human population studies and can cause increases in vascular inflammation, generate reactive oxygen species, alter vasomotor tone, and potentiate atherosclerosis in murine exposures. With the discovery of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), a door has been opened which may explain these observed cardiovascular effects associated with inhaled air particles and nickel exposure. In order to further quantify the effects of inhaled nickel nanoparticles and attempt to elucidate how the observed findings from other studies may occur, several whole body inhalation exposure experiments to nickel nanoparticles were performed. Methods. Following whole body exposure to approximately 500mug/m3 of nickel nanoparticles for 5 hrs, bone marrow EPCs from C57BL/6 mice were isolated. EPCs were harvested for their RNA or used in a variety of assays including chemotaxis, tube formation, and proliferation. Gene expression was assessed for important receptors involved in EPC mobilization and homing using RT-PCR methods. EPCs, circulating endothelial progenitor cells, circulating endothelial cells (CECs), and endothelial microparticles (EMPs) were quantified on a BD FACSCalibur to examine endothelial damage and repair associated with the inhalation exposure. Plasma proteins were assessed using the 2D DIGE proteomic approach and commercially available ELISAs. Results and Conclusions. Exposure to inhaled nickel nanoparticles significantly increased both bone marrow EPCs as well as their levels in circulation. CECs were significantly upregulated suggesting that endothelial damage occurred due to the exposure. There was no significant difference in EMPs between the two groups. Tube formation and chemotaxis, but not proliferation, of bone marrow EPCs was impaired in the nickel nanoparticle exposed group. This decrease in EPC function

  2. Rapamycin inhibits re-endothelialization after percutaneous coronary intervention by impeding the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells and inducing apoptosis of endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Tao; Li, Fei; Wang, Wen-Yong; Li, Xiao-Jing; Liu, Yi-Meng; Wang, Rui-An; Guo, Wen-Yi; Wang, Hai-Chang

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial-cell function is important in the healing of damaged endothelium after percutaneous coronary artery damage. In 3 different animal models, we sought to determine whether rapamycin (sirolimus) affects the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells. First, after we implanted stents in dogs, we found that re-endothelialization was impeded more by drug-eluting stents than by bare-metal stents, 30 days after percutaneous coronary intervention. Second, in vitro in rats, we found that 1-100 ng/mL of rapamycin time- and dose-dependently inhibited proliferation over 72 hr (with effects evident as early as 24 hr) and also dose-dependently induced endothelial progenitor-cell apoptosis. Finally, in vivo in rats, we observed that vascular endothelial growth factor expression was decreased after 5 days of rapamycin treatment. We conclude that rapamycin impedes re-endothelialization after drug-eluting stent implantation by inhibiting the proliferation and migration of coronary endothelial cells, inducing endothelial progenitor-cell apoptosis, and decreasing vascular endothelial growth factor expression in the circulation. PMID:20401293

  3. Endothelial damage in major depression patients is modulated by SSRI treatment, as demonstrated by circulating biomarkers and an in vitro cell model

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Vilchez, I; Diaz-Ricart, M; Navarro, V; Torramade, S; Zamorano-Leon, J; Lopez-Farre, A; Galan, A M; Gasto, C; Escolar, G

    2016-01-01

    There is a link between depression, cardiovascular events and inflammation. We have explored this connection through endothelial dysfunction, using in vivo and in vitro approaches. We evaluated circulating biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction in patients with major depression at their diagnosis (MD-0) and during antidepressant treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram, for 8 and 24 weeks (MD-8 and MD-24). Results were always compared with matched healthy controls (CON). We measured in vivo circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in blood samples, and assessed plasma levels of soluble von Willebrand factor (VWF) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). CEC counts, soluble VWF and VCAM-1 were statistically elevated in MD-0 (P<0.01 versus CON) and gradually decreased during treatment. Conversely, EPC levels were lower in MD-0, tending to increase throughout treatment. In vitro studies were performed in human endothelial cells cultured in the presence of sera from each study group. Elevated expression of the inflammation marker intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and oxidative stress, with lower presence of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and higher reactive oxygen species production, were found in cells exposed to MD-0 sera (P<0.05 versus CON). These results were normalized in cells exposed to MD-24 sera. Thrombogenicity of extracellular matrices generated by these cells, measured as expression of VWF, tissue factor and platelet reactivity, showed non-significant differences. We provide a model of cultured endothelial cells reproducing endothelial dysfunction in naive patients with major depression, demonstrating endothelial damage and inflammation at diagnosis, and recovering with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment for 24 weeks. PMID:27598970

  4. Endothelial damage in major depression patients is modulated by SSRI treatment, as demonstrated by circulating biomarkers and an in vitro cell model.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Vilchez, I; Diaz-Ricart, M; Navarro, V; Torramade, S; Zamorano-Leon, J; Lopez-Farre, A; Galan, A M; Gasto, C; Escolar, G

    2016-01-01

    There is a link between depression, cardiovascular events and inflammation. We have explored this connection through endothelial dysfunction, using in vivo and in vitro approaches. We evaluated circulating biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction in patients with major depression at their diagnosis (MD-0) and during antidepressant treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram, for 8 and 24 weeks (MD-8 and MD-24). Results were always compared with matched healthy controls (CON). We measured in vivo circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in blood samples, and assessed plasma levels of soluble von Willebrand factor (VWF) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). CEC counts, soluble VWF and VCAM-1 were statistically elevated in MD-0 (P<0.01 versus CON) and gradually decreased during treatment. Conversely, EPC levels were lower in MD-0, tending to increase throughout treatment. In vitro studies were performed in human endothelial cells cultured in the presence of sera from each study group. Elevated expression of the inflammation marker intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and oxidative stress, with lower presence of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and higher reactive oxygen species production, were found in cells exposed to MD-0 sera (P<0.05 versus CON). These results were normalized in cells exposed to MD-24 sera. Thrombogenicity of extracellular matrices generated by these cells, measured as expression of VWF, tissue factor and platelet reactivity, showed non-significant differences. We provide a model of cultured endothelial cells reproducing endothelial dysfunction in naive patients with major depression, demonstrating endothelial damage and inflammation at diagnosis, and recovering with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment for 24 weeks. PMID:27598970

  5. Hyperphosphatemia, Phosphoprotein Phosphatases, and Microparticle Release in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbasian, Nima; Burton, James O.; Herbert, Karl E.; Tregunna, Barbara-Emily; Brown, Jeremy R.; Ghaderi-Najafabadi, Maryam; Brunskill, Nigel J.; Goodall, Alison H.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia in patients with advanced CKD is thought to be an important contributor to cardiovascular risk, in part because of endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction induced by inorganic phosphate (Pi). Such patients also have an elevated circulating concentration of procoagulant endothelial microparticles (MPs), leading to a prothrombotic state, which may contribute to acute occlusive events. We hypothesized that hyperphosphatemia leads to MP formation from ECs through an elevation of intracellular Pi concentration, which directly inhibits phosphoprotein phosphatases, triggering a global increase in phosphorylation and cytoskeletal changes. In cultured human ECs (EAhy926), incubation with elevated extracellular Pi (2.5 mM) led to a rise in intracellular Pi concentration within 90 minutes. This was mediated by PiT1/slc20a1 Pi transporters and led to global accumulation of tyrosine- and serine/threonine-phosphorylated proteins, a marked increase in cellular Tropomyosin-3, plasma membrane blebbing, and release of 0.1- to 1-μm-diameter MPs. The effect of Pi was independent of oxidative stress or apoptosis. Similarly, global inhibition of phosphoprotein phosphatases with orthovanadate or fluoride yielded a global protein phosphorylation response and rapid release of MPs. The Pi-induced MPs expressed VE-cadherin and superficial phosphatidylserine, and in a thrombin generation assay, they displayed significantly more procoagulant activity than particles derived from cells incubated in medium with a physiologic level of Pi (1 mM). These data show a mechanism of Pi-induced cellular stress and signaling, which may be widely applicable in mammalian cells, and in ECs, it provides a novel pathologic link between hyperphosphatemia, generation of MPs, and thrombotic risk. PMID:25745026

  6. Hyperphosphatemia, Phosphoprotein Phosphatases, and Microparticle Release in Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Abbasian, Nima; Burton, James O; Herbert, Karl E; Tregunna, Barbara-Emily; Brown, Jeremy R; Ghaderi-Najafabadi, Maryam; Brunskill, Nigel J; Goodall, Alison H; Bevington, Alan

    2015-09-01

    Hyperphosphatemia in patients with advanced CKD is thought to be an important contributor to cardiovascular risk, in part because of endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction induced by inorganic phosphate (Pi). Such patients also have an elevated circulating concentration of procoagulant endothelial microparticles (MPs), leading to a prothrombotic state, which may contribute to acute occlusive events. We hypothesized that hyperphosphatemia leads to MP formation from ECs through an elevation of intracellular Pi concentration, which directly inhibits phosphoprotein phosphatases, triggering a global increase in phosphorylation and cytoskeletal changes. In cultured human ECs (EAhy926), incubation with elevated extracellular Pi (2.5 mM) led to a rise in intracellular Pi concentration within 90 minutes. This was mediated by PiT1/slc20a1 Pi transporters and led to global accumulation of tyrosine- and serine/threonine-phosphorylated proteins, a marked increase in cellular Tropomyosin-3, plasma membrane blebbing, and release of 0.1- to 1-μm-diameter MPs. The effect of Pi was independent of oxidative stress or apoptosis. Similarly, global inhibition of phosphoprotein phosphatases with orthovanadate or fluoride yielded a global protein phosphorylation response and rapid release of MPs. The Pi-induced MPs expressed VE-cadherin and superficial phosphatidylserine, and in a thrombin generation assay, they displayed significantly more procoagulant activity than particles derived from cells incubated in medium with a physiologic level of Pi (1 mM). These data show a mechanism of Pi-induced cellular stress and signaling, which may be widely applicable in mammalian cells, and in ECs, it provides a novel pathologic link between hyperphosphatemia, generation of MPs, and thrombotic risk. PMID:25745026

  7. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 and mechanotransduction in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, K

    2006-04-01

    Endothelial cells are known to respond to mechanical forces such as fluid shear stress and cyclic stretch, but elucidating the mechanism for mechanosensing has been difficult. Experimental data indicate that there are probably several sensing mechanisms. We have recently proposed a novel mechanoresponse mechanism that involves platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1). When endothelial cells are stimulated by fluid shear stress, PECAM-1 is tyrosine phosphorylated and activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) signalling cascade. The same signalling events occurred when we applied pulling force directly on PECAM-1 on the endothelial cell surface using magnetic beads coated with antibodies against the external domain of PECAM-1. These results appear to indicate that PECAM-1 is a mechanotransduction molecule. To our knowledge, this is the first mammalian molecule that is shown to respond to mechanical force directly exerted to it. PMID:16594905

  8. Differential up-regulation of circulating soluble and endothelial cell intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, S.; Flores, S.; Gerritsen, M. E.; Anderson, D. C.; Granger, D. N.

    1997-01-01

    Although circulating levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) are frequently used as an indicator of the severity of different immune, inflammatory, or neoplastic diseases, little is known about the factors that govern plasma sICAM-1 concentration and its relationship to the membranous form of ICAM-1 (mICAM-1) expressed on vascular endothelial cells. Plasma sICAM-1 concentration (measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and mICAM-1 expression (measured using the dual radiolabeled monoclonal antibody technique) in different vascular beds (eg, lung, small intestine, and spleen) were monitored in wild-type (C57BL) and ICAM-1-deficient mice, before and after administration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. In wild-type mice, TNF-alpha elicited time-dependent increases in lung and intestine mICAM-1 (plateau achieved at 12 hours), with a corresponding increase in plasma sICAM-1 (peaked at 5 hours and then declined). The initial increases in mICAM-1 and pulmonary leukocyte sequestration (measured as lung myeloperoxidase activity) induced by TNF-alpha preceded any detectable elevation in sICAM-1. In ICAM-1-deficient mice, plasma sICAM-1 was reduced by approximately 70%, with > 95% reductions of mICAM-1 in lung and intestine, and > 75% reduction in splenic accumulation of anti-ICAM-1 antibody. Although TNF-alpha doubled plasma sICAM-1 in ICAM-1-deficient mice, mICAM-1 was unaffected in all tissues. Either splenectomy or pretreatment with cycloheximide resulted in an attenuated TNF-induced increase in sICAM-1, without affecting mICAM-1 expression. These findings indicate that plasma sICAM-1 concentration does not accurately reflect the level of ICAM-1 expression on endothelial cells in different vascular beds. PMID:9212746

  9. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) as a source of endothelial cells in the reconstruction of endothelialized skin equivalents.

    PubMed

    Auxenfans, C; Lequeux, C; Perrusel, E; Mojallal, A; Kinikoglu, B; Damour, O

    2012-07-01

    Tissue-engineered autologous skin is a potential alternative to autograft for burn coverage, but produces poor clinical responses such as unsatisfactory graft intake due to insufficient vascularization. Endothelialized skin equivalents comprising human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) survive significantly longer due to inosculation with the capillaries of the host, but these cells are allogeneic by definition. The aim of this study was to reconstruct an autologous endothelialized skin equivalent by incorporating progenitor or pre-differentiated endothelial cells derived from adipose tissue, easily accessible source for autologous transplantation. Human adipose tissue-derived stem cells were isolated from lipoaspirates and amplified to obtain endothelial progenitor cells, which were subsequently differentiated into endothelial cells. These cells were then seeded along with human fibroblasts into a porous collagen-glycosaminoglycan-chitosan scaffold to obtain an endothelialized dermal equivalent. Then, human keratinocytes give rise to a endothelialized skin equivalent. Immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy results demonstrate the presence of capillary-like tubular structures in skin equivalents comprising pre-differentiated endothelial cells, but not endothelial progenitor cells. The former expressed both EN4 and von Willebrand factor, and Weibel-Palade bodies were detected in their cytoplasm. This study demonstrates that adipose tissue is an excellent source of autologous endothelial cells to reconstruct endothelialized tissue equivalents, and that pre-differentiation of stem cells is necessary to obtain vasculature in such models. PMID:21755603

  10. The Subcellular Compartmentalization of Arginine Metabolizing Enzymes and Their Role in Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Lucas, Rudolf; Fulton, David

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO) mediates endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and restrains vascular inflammation, smooth muscle cell proliferation, and platelet aggregation. Impaired production of NO is a hallmark of endothelial dysfunction and promotes the development of cardiovascular disease. In endothelial cells, NO is generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) through the conversion of its substrate, l-arginine to l-citrulline. Reduced access to l-arginine has been proposed as a major mechanism underlying reduced eNOS activity and NO production in cardiovascular disease. The arginases (Arg1 and Arg2) metabolize l-arginine to generate l-ornithine and urea and increased expression of arginase has been proposed as a mechanism of reduced eNOS activity secondary to the depletion of l-arginine. Indeed, supplemental l-arginine and suppression of arginase activity has been shown to improve endothelium-dependent relaxation and ameliorate cardiovascular disease. However, this simple relationship is complicated by observations that l-arginine concentrations in endothelial cells remain sufficiently high to support NO synthesis. Accordingly, the subcellular compartmentalization of intracellular l-arginine into poorly interchangeable pools has been proposed to allow for the local depletion of pools or pockets of l-arginine. In agreement with this, there is considerable evidence supporting the importance of the subcellular localization of l-arginine metabolizing enzymes. In endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo, eNOS is found in discrete intracellular locations and the capacity to generate NO is heavily influenced by its localization inside the cell. Arg1 and Arg2 also reside in different subcellular environments and are thought to differentially influence endothelial function. The plasma membrane solute transporter, CAT-1 and the arginine recycling enzyme, arginosuccinate lyase, co-localize with eNOS and facilitate NO release. Herein, we

  11. Rapid glucocorticoid inhibition of vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced cyclic AMP accumulation and prolactin release in rat pituitary cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rotsztejn, W H; Dussaillant, M; Nobou, F; Rosselin, G

    1981-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) stimulates both adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and prolactin release in normal rat pituitary cells in culture. cAMP accumulation is significant (P less than 0.01) at VIP concentrations as low as 1 nM and reaches a maximum with 0.1 microM. Addition of dexamethasone as early as 15 min before VIP inhibits VIP stimulation of both cAMP production and PRL secretion. The rapid inhibition is dose-dependent: it appears at doses as low as 0.01 pM and is complete at 1 pM dexamethasone. Increasing concentrations of dexamethasone induce a noncompetitive type of inhibition, as shown by the decrease in Vmax with no change in the apparent Km for VIP. Cycloheximide (1 mM) counteracts the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on VIP-induced cAMP production, which suggests the involvement of a rapid protein synthesis mechanism. Ru-26988, a specific glucocorticoid devoid of any mineralocorticoid activity and which does not bind to intracellular transcortin-like component, also produces an inhibition of VIP-induced cAMP accumulation. Corticosterone also inhibits VIP-induced cAMP production but at concentrations higher than those of dexamethasone. In contrast, aldosterone, progesterone, estradiol, and testosterone have no effect. These results demonstrate that, in normal rat pituitary cells in culture, glucocorticoids at physiological concentrations rapidly inhibit the cAMP production and prolactin release induced by VIP by acting through specific glucocorticoid receptors. PMID:6278481

  12. Vasoactive intestinal peptide: A potent stimulator of adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate accumulation in gut carcinoma cell lines in culture*

    PubMed Central

    Laburthe, M.; Rousset, M.; Boissard, C.; Chevalier, G.; Zweibaum, A.; Rosselin, G.

    1978-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a potent and efficient stimulator of adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation in a human colon carcinoma cell line, HT 29. cAMP accumulation is sensitive to a concentration of VIP as low as 3×10-12 M. Maximum VIP-induced cAMP levels were observed with 10-9 M VIP and are about 200 times above the basal levels. Half-maximum cAMP production was obtained at 3×10-10 M VIP. 125I-Labeled VIP was found to bind to HT 29 cells; this binding was competitively inhibited by concentrations of unlabeled VIP between 10-10 and 10-7 M. Half-maximum inhibition of binding was observed with 2×10-9 M VIP. Secretin also stimulated cAMP accumulation in HT 29 cells, but its effectiveness was 1/1000 that of VIP. The other peptides tested at 10-7 M, such as insulin, glucagon, bovine pancreatic polypeptide, somatostatin, octapeptide of cholecystokinin, neurotensin, and substance P, did not stimulate cAMP accumulation. Prostaglandin E1 and catecholamines stimulated cAMP production but were 1/2.3 and 1/5.5 as efficient as VIP, respectively. Another malignant cell line from the gut, the human rectal tumor cell line HRT 18, is also sensitive to VIP. In HRT 18 cells, VIP stimulated cAMP accumulation with a maximal effect at 10-8 M; half-maximum stimulation was observed at about 10-9 M. These results demonstrate the presence of VIP receptors in two malignant human intestinal cell lines (HT 29 and HRT 18) in culture and provide a model for studying the action of VIP on cell proliferation. PMID:208077

  13. Vasoactive side effects of intravenous immunoglobulin preparations in a rat model and their treatment with recombinant platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase.

    PubMed

    Bleeker, W K; Teeling, J L; Verhoeven, A J; Rigter, G M; Agterberg, J; Tool, A T; Koenderman, A H; Kuijpers, T W; Hack, C E

    2000-03-01

    Previously, we observed in a rat model that intravenous administration of intramuscular immunoglobulin preparations induced a long-lasting hypotension, which appeared to be associated with the presence of IgG polymers and dimers in the preparations, but unrelated to complement activation. We found evidence that this hypotensive response is mediated by platelet-activating factor (PAF) produced by macrophages. In this study, we compared the vasoactive effects of 16 intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) products from 10 different manufacturers, in anesthetized rats. Eight of the IVIG preparations showed no hypotensive effects (less than 15% decrease), whereas the other 8 had relatively strong effects (15%-50% decrease). The hypotensive effects correlated with the IgG dimer content of the preparations. Pretreatment of the rats with recombinant PAF acetylhydrolase completely prevented the hypotensive reaction on IVIG infusion, and administration after the onset of hypotension resulted in normalization of the blood pressure. We also observed PAF production on in vitro incubation of human neutrophils with IVIG, which could be blocked by anti-Fcgamma receptor antibodies. This indicates that induction of PAF generation may also occur in a human system. Our findings support the hypothesis that the clinical side effects of IVIG in patients may be caused by macrophage and neutrophil activation through interaction of IgG dimers with Fcgamma receptors. Because phagocyte activation may also lead to the release of other inflammatory mediators, recombinant PAF acetylhydrolase (rPAF-AH) provides a useful tool to determine whether PAF plays a role in the clinical side effects of IVIG. If so, rPAF-AH can be used for the treatment of those adverse reactions. (Blood. 2000;95:1856-1861)

  14. Mono(125I)iodo-Tyr10,MetO17)-vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. Preparation, characterization, and use for radioimmunoassay and receptor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.L.; Rose, K.; Hughes, G.J.; Magistretti, P.J.

    1986-04-25

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) was labeled with sodium (125I)iodide using the chloramine-T method and subsequently purified by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography.Three main 125I-labeled peaks designated A, B, and C resulted from the radioiodination and purification procedures. They were characterized by electrophoresis of tryptic fragments; Edman degradation (for Peaks A and C); enzymatic digestion to amino acids by leucine aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase Y and Pronase; and treatment with cyanogen bromide. Peak A corresponds to VIP monoiodinated on Tyr10 and with the Met17 residue oxidized to methionine sulfoxide. This (mono(125I)iodo-Tyr10,MetO17)VIP displays the following characteristics. 1) It constitutes quantitatively the major product of the iodination procedure (62.5%); 2) it is well resolved from other labeled and unlabeled products; 3) it is stable (2 months at -20 degrees C); 4) it possesses a high specific activity (2050 Ci/mmol); 5) it maintains the biological activity of native VIP; and 6) it binds to antibody and membrane recognition sites in a specific, saturable, and reversible manner. Reduction of (mono(125I)iodo-Tyr10, Met-O17)VIP to (mono(125I)iodo-Tyr10)VIP does not improve the performance of the tracer in a radioimmunoassay. The method described in this article is simple and rapid and yields a molecular form of 125I-labeled VIP that has been fully characterized and is suitable for use in biological studies.

  15. Ventilatory and cardiovascular actions of centrally and peripherally administered trout pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the unanaesthetized trout.

    PubMed

    Le Mével, J-C; Lancien, F; Mimassi, N; Conlon, J M

    20