Science.gov

Sample records for plasma energy recycle

  1. Plasma energy recycle and conversion of polymeric (MSW) waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Richard; Grossman, Elihu D.

    2000-12-05

    Final report summarizing research project results of studies of the thermal plasma recycling of polymers, including polyethylene and polypropylene. High levels of recovery of monomers were obtained from the process developed under this study.

  2. Plasma power recycling at the divertor surface

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xian -Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2016-12-03

    With a divertor made of solid materials like carbon and tungsten, plasma ions are expected to be recycled at the divertor surface with a time-averaged particle recycling coefficient very close to unity in steady-state operation. This means that almost every plasma ion (hydrogen and helium) will be returned to the plasma, mostly as neutrals. The power flux deposited by the plasma on the divertor surface, on the other hand, can have varying recycling characteristics depending on the material choice of the divertor; the run-time atomic composition of the surface, which can be modified by material mix due to impurity migration in the chamber; and the surface morphology change over time. In general, a high-Z–material (such as tungsten) surface tends to reflect light ions and produce stronger power recycling, while a low-Z–material (such as carbon) surface tends to have a larger sticking coefficient for light ions and hence lower power recycling. Here, an explicit constraint on target plasma density and temperature is derived from the truncated bi-Maxwellian sheath model, in relation to the absorbed power load and power recycling coefficient at the divertor surface. Lastly, it is shown that because of the surface recombination energy flux, the attached plasma has a sharper response to power recycling in comparison to a detached plasma.

  3. Plasma power recycling at the divertor surface

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, Xian -Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2016-12-03

    With a divertor made of solid materials like carbon and tungsten, plasma ions are expected to be recycled at the divertor surface with a time-averaged particle recycling coefficient very close to unity in steady-state operation. This means that almost every plasma ion (hydrogen and helium) will be returned to the plasma, mostly as neutrals. The power flux deposited by the plasma on the divertor surface, on the other hand, can have varying recycling characteristics depending on the material choice of the divertor; the run-time atomic composition of the surface, which can be modified by material mix due to impurity migrationmore » in the chamber; and the surface morphology change over time. In general, a high-Z–material (such as tungsten) surface tends to reflect light ions and produce stronger power recycling, while a low-Z–material (such as carbon) surface tends to have a larger sticking coefficient for light ions and hence lower power recycling. Here, an explicit constraint on target plasma density and temperature is derived from the truncated bi-Maxwellian sheath model, in relation to the absorbed power load and power recycling coefficient at the divertor surface. Lastly, it is shown that because of the surface recombination energy flux, the attached plasma has a sharper response to power recycling in comparison to a detached plasma.« less

  4. Energy implications of glass-container recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L L; Mintz, M M

    1994-03-01

    This report addresses the question of whether glass-container recycling actually saves energy. Glass-container production in 1991 was 10{sup 7} tons, with cullet making up about 30% of the input to manufacture. Two-thirds of the cullet is postconsumer waste; the remainder is in-house scrap (rejects). Most of the glass recycled is made into new containers. Total primary energy consumption includes direct process-energy use by the industry (adjusted to account for the efficiency of fuel production) plus fuel and raw-material transportation and production energies; the grand total for 1991 is estimated to be about 168 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu. The total primary energy use decreases as the percent of glass recycled rises, but the maximum energy saved is only about 13%. If distance to the landfill is kept fixed and that to the recovery facility multiplied by about eight, to 100 mi, a break-even point is reached, and recycling saves no energy. Previous work has shown that to save energy when using glass bottles, reuse is the clear choice. Recycling of glass does not save much energy or valuable raw material and does not reduce air or water pollution significantly. The most important impacts are the small reduction of waste sent to the landfill and increased production rates at glass plants.

  5. Energy implications of recycling packaging materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.; Stodolsky, F.

    1994-03-01

    In 1992, Congress sought to rewrite the United States comprehensive solid waste legislation -- the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Commodity-specific recycling rates were proposed for consumer-goods packaging materials and newsprint We compare the impacts on energy, materials use, and landfill volume of recycling at those rates to the impacts for alternative methods of material disposition to determine the optimum for each material. After products have served their intended uses, there are several alternative paths for material disposition. These include reuse, recycling to the same product, recycling to a lower-valued product, combustion for energy recovery, incineration without energy recovery, and landfill. Only options considered to be environmentally sound are Included. Both houses of Congress specifically excluded combustion for energy recovery from counting towards the recovery goats, probably because combustion is viewed as a form of disposal and is therefore assumed to waste resources and have n environmental effects. However, co-combustion in coal-fired plants or combustion in appropriately pollution-controlled waste-to-energy plants Is safe, avoids landfill costs, and can displace fossil fuels. In some cases, more fossil fuels can be displaced by combustion than by recycling. We compare the alternative life-cycle energies to the energies for producing the products from virgin materials. Results depend on the material and on the objective to be achieved. There are trade-offs among possible goals. For instance, paper packaging recycling conserves trees but may require greater fossil-fuel input than virgin production. Therefore, the objectives for proposed legislation must be examined to see whether they can most effectively be achieved by mandated recycling rates or by other methods of disposition. The optimal choices for the United States may not necessarily be the same as those for Europe and other parts of the world.

  6. Energy return on investment of used nuclear fuel recycling

    SciTech Connect

    2011-08-31

    N-EROI calculates energy return on investment (EROI) for recycling of used nublear fuel in four scenarios: one-pass recycle in light water reactors; two-pass recycle in light water reactors; mulit-pass recycle in burner fast reactora; one-pass recycle in breeder fast reactors.

  7. Transport of Recycled Deuterium to the Plasma Core in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V.; Jassby, D.L.; Park, H.; Skinner, C.H.; et al

    1997-10-01

    We report a study of the fueling of the plasma core by recycling in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Phys. Plasmas 2, 2176 (1995)]. We have analyzed discharges fueled by deuterium recycled from the limiter and tritium-only neutral beam injection. In these plasmas, the DT neutron rate provides a measure of the deuterium influx into the core plasma. We find a reduced influx with plasmas using lithium pellet conditioning and with plasmas of reduced major (and minor) radius. Modeling with the DEGAS neutrals code shows that the dependence on radius can be related to the penetration of neutrals through the scrape-off layer.

  8. Transport of recycled deuterium to the plasma core in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C.H.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V.; Jassby, D.L.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stotler, D.P.; Strachan, J.D.

    1997-10-01

    The authors report a study of the fueling of the plasma core by recycling in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). They have analyzed discharges fueled by deuterium recycled from the limiter and tritium-only neutral beam injection. In these plasmas, the DT neutron rate provides a measure of the deuterium influx into the core plasma. They find a reduced influx with plasmas using lithium pellet conditioning and with plasmas of reduced major (and minor) radius. Modeling with the DEGAS neutrals code shows that the dependence on radius can be related to the penetration of neutrals through the scrape-off layer.

  9. Recycling at tungsten wall and its impact on boundary plasma profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xianzhu; Guo, Zehua; Wang, Ying; Borovikov, Valery; Voter, Art

    2013-10-01

    High-Z refractory metals like tungsten, hydrogen absorbing metal like lithium, and carbon tiles represent three distinct choices in recycling properties. Tungsten divertor/first wall is considered a high recycling boundary, in contrast to the hydrogen absorbing lithium, by the usual definition of returned neutral versus incoming ion flux. Unlike carbon tile which is also high recycling, tungsten wall does not take in the ion heat flux as well in that most ions are reflected back to the plasma, keeping most of their kinetic energy. The inability of plasma ions to efficiently exhaust in particle and energy implies a high temperature boundary plasma. This leads to the peculiar scenario that tungsten wall tends to maintain high edge density like the carbon tiles, but retain a high ion temperature like the lithium surface. This is of course an unstable scenario, which must be resolved by either modifying the recycling at the surface, or exhausting the energy flux by other channels. Our calculations will (1) show the characteristics of particle and energy recycling at the tungsten surface, and (2) illustrate the effect of tungsten wall recycling on boundary plasmas, and the mitigation strategies. The issue of helium ions is a particular focus. Work supported by OFES.

  10. Biomass recycling heat technology and energy products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakaev, R. B.; Gergelizhiu, P. S.; Kazakov, A. V.; Zavorin, A. S.

    2014-10-01

    Relevance is determined by necessity of utilizing of local low-grade fuels by energy equpment. Most widespread Tomsk oblast (Russian Federation region) low-grade fuels are described and listed. Capability of utilizing is analysed. Mass balances of heat-technology conversion materials and derived products are described. As a result, recycling capability of low-grade fuels in briquette fuel is appraised.

  11. Recycling of metal bearing electronic scrap in a plasma furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarosz, Piotr; Małecki, Stanisław; Gargul, Krzysztof

    2011-12-01

    The recycling of electronic waste and the recovery of valuable components are large problems in the modern world economy. This paper presents the effects of melting sorted electronic scrap in a plasma furnace. Printed circuit boards, cables, and windings were processed separately. The characteristics of the obtained products (i.e., alloy metal, slag, dust, and gases) are presented. A method of their further processing in order to obtain commercial products is proposed. Because of the chemical composition and physical properties, the waste slag is environmentally inert and can be used for the production of abrasives. Process dusts containing large amounts of carbon and its compounds have a high calorific value. That makes it possible to use them for energy generation. The gas has a high calorific value, and its afterburning combined with energy recovery is necessary.

  12. Energy Return on Investment - Fuel Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, W; Simon, A J; Fratoni, M; Smith, C; Schwab, P; Murray, P

    2012-06-06

    This report provides a methodology and requisite data to assess the potential Energy Return On Investment (EROI) for nuclear fuel cycle alternatives, and applies that methodology to a limited set of used fuel recycle scenarios. This paper is based on a study by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and a parallel evaluation by AREVA Federal Services LLC, both of which were sponsored by the DOE Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program. The focus of the LLNL effort was to develop a methodology that can be used by the FCT program for such analysis that is consistent with the broader energy modeling community, and the focus of the AREVA effort was to bring industrial experience and operational data into the analysis. This cooperative effort successfully combined expertise from the energy modeling community with expertise from the nuclear industry. Energy Return on Investment is one of many figures of merit on which investment in a new energy facility or process may be judged. EROI is the ratio of the energy delivered by a facility divided by the energy used to construct, operate and decommission that facility. While EROI is not the only criterion used to make an investment decision, it has been shown that, in technologically advanced societies, energy supplies must exceed a minimum EROI. Furthermore, technological history shows a trend towards higher EROI energy supplies. EROI calculations have been performed for many components of energy technology: oil wells, wind turbines, photovoltaic modules, biofuels, and nuclear reactors. This report represents the first standalone EROI analysis of nuclear fuel reprocessing (or recycling) facilities.

  13. Energy transmission using recyclable quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ming-Yong; Lin, Xiu-Min

    2016-07-28

    It is known that faster-than-light (FTL) transmission of energy could be achieved if the transmission were considered in the framework of non-relativistic classical mechanics. Here we show that FTL transmission of energy could also be achieved if the transmission were considered in the framework of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. In our transmission protocol a two-spin Heisenberg model is considered and the energy is transmitted by two successive local unitary operations on the initially entangled spins. Our protocol does not mean that FTL transmission can be achieved in reality when the theory of relativity is considered, but it shows that quantum entanglement can be used in a recyclable way in energy transmission.

  14. Energy transmission using recyclable quantum entanglement

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ming-Yong; Lin, Xiu-Min

    2016-01-01

    It is known that faster-than-light (FTL) transmission of energy could be achieved if the transmission were considered in the framework of non-relativistic classical mechanics. Here we show that FTL transmission of energy could also be achieved if the transmission were considered in the framework of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. In our transmission protocol a two-spin Heisenberg model is considered and the energy is transmitted by two successive local unitary operations on the initially entangled spins. Our protocol does not mean that FTL transmission can be achieved in reality when the theory of relativity is considered, but it shows that quantum entanglement can be used in a recyclable way in energy transmission. PMID:27465431

  15. Bohm criterion and plasma particle/power exhaust to and recycling at the wall

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, Xianzhu; Guo, Zehua

    2017-06-07

    The plasma particle and power exhaust to the divertor surface drives both particle and power recycling at the surface, which in return constrains the plasma density and temperature at the target and their profile further upstream. Both particle and power exhaust fluxes are mediated by the plasma sheath next to the divertor surface. In particular, the Bohm criterion constrains the ion exit flow speed, which enters directly into the particle flux and the kinetic flow energy component of the ion power flux, and indirectly into the electron power flux through the sheath potential drop. Here we give an overview onmore » how the Bohm speed is set in a general plasma and how it enters power exhaust and power recycling at the divertor surface, and the implication on the correct implementation of sheath boundary conditions in numerical codes. The cases of ideal and non-ideal Bohm speed are distinguished as a result of the physics discussion.« less

  16. Mildly Recycled Pulsars at High-Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellizzoni, A.

    2011-08-01

    Mildly recyled pulsars (MRP), conventionally defined as neutron star having spin period in the 20-100 ms range and surface magnetic field <1011 Gauss, probably rise from binary systems (disrupted or not) with an intermediate or an high mass companion. Despite their relatively low spin-down energies compared to the ``fully'' recycled millisecond pulsars (arising from common low mass X-ray binaries), nearby MRPs can be detected by deep X-ray observations and by timing analysis of the very long data span provided by gamma-ray space detectors. The discovery of peculiar timing and spectral properties, possibly transitional, of the MRPs can be of the utmost importance to link different classes of neutron stars and study their evolution.

  17. Recent trends in automobile recycling: An energy and economic assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Curlee, T.R.; Das, S.; Rizy, C.G.; Schexanyder, S.M.

    1994-03-01

    Recent and anticipated trends in the material composition of domestic and imported automobiles and the increasing cost of landfilling the non-recyclable portion of automobiles (automobile shredder residue or ASR) pose questions about the future of automobile recycling. This report documents the findings of a study sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Analysis to examine the impacts of these and other relevant trends on the life-cycle energy consumption of automobiles and on the economic viability of the domestic automobile recycling industry. More specifically, the study (1) reviewed the status of the automobile recycling industry in the United States, including the current technologies used to process scrapped automobiles and the challenges facing the automobile recycling industry; (2) examined the current status and future trends of automobile recycling in Europe and Japan, with the objectives of identifying ``lessons learned`` and pinpointing differences between those areas and the United States; (3) developed estimates of the energy system impacts of the recycling status quo and projections of the probable energy impacts of alternative technical and institutional approaches to recycling; and (4) identified the key policy questions that will determine the future economic viability of automobile shredder facilities in the United States.

  18. Recycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinker, Barbara

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the range of benefits resulting from recycling efforts and projects. Presents information and data related to the recycling of metals, cans, paper, fans, and plastics. Suggestions for motivating and involving youth in recycling programs are also offered. (ML)

  19. Recycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinker, Barbara

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the range of benefits resulting from recycling efforts and projects. Presents information and data related to the recycling of metals, cans, paper, fans, and plastics. Suggestions for motivating and involving youth in recycling programs are also offered. (ML)

  20. Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    1988-10-01

    ;Contents: The Problem; What`s In Our Trash; Where Does Trash Go; Where Does Our Trash Go; The Solution; What Is Recycling; Why Should We Recycle; A National Goal of 25%; What Can We Recycle; What Do We Do With Our Recyclables.

  1. Endosomal recycling controls plasma membrane area during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Boucrot, Emmanuel; Kirchhausen, Tomas

    2007-05-08

    The shape and total surface of a cell and its daughters change during mitosis. Many cells round up during prophase and metaphase and reacquire their extended and flattened shape during cytokinesis. How does the total area of plasma membrane change to accommodate these morphological changes and by what mechanism is control of total membrane area achieved? Using single-cell imaging methods, we have found that the amount of plasma membrane in attached cells in culture decreases at the beginning of mitosis and recovers rapidly by the end. Clathrin-based endocytosis is normal throughout all phases of cell division, whereas recycling of internalized membranes back to the cell surface slows considerably during the rounding up period and resumes at the time at which recovery of cell membrane begins. Interference with either one of these processes by genetic or chemical means impairs cell division. The total cell-membrane area recovers even in the absence of a functional Golgi apparatus, which would be needed for export of newly synthesized membrane lipids and proteins. We propose a mechanism by which modulation of endosomal recycling controls cell area and surface expression of membrane-bound proteins during cell division.

  2. Treatment and recycling of incinerated ash using thermal plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Cheng, T W; Chu, J P; Tzeng, C C; Chen, Y S

    2002-01-01

    To treat incinerated ash is an important issue in Taiwan. Incinerated ashes contain a considerable amount of hazardous materials such as dioxins and heavy metals. If these hazardous materials are improperly treated or disposed of, they shall cause detrimental secondary contamination. Thermal plasma vitrification is a robust technology to treat and recycle the ash residues. Under the high temperature plasma environment, incinerated ashes are vitrified into benign slag with large volume reduction and extreme detoxification. Several one-step heat treatment processes are carried out at four temperatures (i.e. 850, 950, 1,050 and 1,150 degrees C) to obtain various "microstructure materials". The major phase to form these materials is a solid solution of gehlenite (Ca2Al2SiO7) and åkermanite (Ca2MgSi2O7) belonging to the melilite group. The physical and mechanical properties of the microstructure materials are improved by using one-step post-heat treatment process after plasma vitrification. These microstructure materials with good quality have great potential to serve as a viable alternative for construction applications.

  3. Update on the Transportable Plasma Waste to Energy System at Hurlburt Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    engineers and process technologists • Plasma is traditionally an expensive technology for waste treatment . • Identification of a niche market...systems •Marine expertise led to opportunities on “land-based” waste treatment From a Mere Idea to a Commercial Reality PyroGenesis’ Unique Plasma ...Produces Inert Aggregate Plasma Arc Gasification & Recycling PRRS: Plasma Waste to Energy System Jenbacher JCS 312 Syngas Electricity Recyclables

  4. Energy Return on Investment from Recycling Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    2011-08-17

    This report presents an evaluation of the Energy Return on Investment (EROI) from recycling an initial batch of 800 t/y of used nuclear fuel (UNF) through a Recycle Center under a number of different fuel cycle scenarios. The study assumed that apart from the original 800 t of UNF only depleted uranium was available as a feed. Therefore for each subsequent scenario only fuel that was derived from the previous fuel cycle scenario was considered. The scenarios represent a good cross section of the options available and the results contained in this paper and associated appendices will allow for other fuel cycle options to be considered.

  5. Spark Plasma Sintering As a Solid-State Recycling Technique: The Case of Aluminum Alloy Scrap Consolidation.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Dimos; Vanmeensel, Kim; Vleugels, Jef; Dewulf, Wim; Deng, Yelin; Duflou, Joost R

    2014-08-06

    Recently, "meltless" recycling techniques have been presented for the light metals category, targeting both energy and material savings by bypassing the final recycling step of remelting. In this context, the use of spark plasma sintering (SPS) is proposed in this paper as a novel solid-state recycling technique. The objective is two-fold: (I) to prove the technical feasibility of this approach; and (II) to characterize the recycled samples. Aluminum (Al) alloy scrap was selected to demonstrate the SPS effectiveness in producing fully-dense samples. For this purpose, Al alloy scrap in the form of machining chips was cold pre-compacted and sintered bellow the solidus temperature at 490 °C, under elevated pressure of 200 MPa. The dynamic scrap compaction, combined with electric current-based joule heating, achieved partial fracture of the stable surface oxides, desorption of the entrapped gases and activated the metallic surfaces, resulting in efficient solid-state chip welding eliminating residual porosity. The microhardness, the texture, the mechanical properties, the microstructure and the density of the recycled specimens have been investigated. An X-ray computed tomography (CT) analysis confirmed the density measurements, revealing a void-less bulk material with homogeneously distributed intermetallic compounds and oxides. The oxide content of the chips incorporated within the recycled material slightly increases its elastic properties. Finally, a thermal distribution simulation of the process in different segments illustrates the improved energy efficiency of this approach.

  6. Spark Plasma Sintering As a Solid-State Recycling Technique: The Case of Aluminum Alloy Scrap Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Paraskevas, Dimos; Vanmeensel, Kim; Vleugels, Jef; Dewulf, Wim; Deng, Yelin; Duflou, Joost R.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, “meltless” recycling techniques have been presented for the light metals category, targeting both energy and material savings by bypassing the final recycling step of remelting. In this context, the use of spark plasma sintering (SPS) is proposed in this paper as a novel solid-state recycling technique. The objective is two-fold: (I) to prove the technical feasibility of this approach; and (II) to characterize the recycled samples. Aluminum (Al) alloy scrap was selected to demonstrate the SPS effectiveness in producing fully-dense samples. For this purpose, Al alloy scrap in the form of machining chips was cold pre-compacted and sintered bellow the solidus temperature at 490 °C, under elevated pressure of 200 MPa. The dynamic scrap compaction, combined with electric current-based joule heating, achieved partial fracture of the stable surface oxides, desorption of the entrapped gases and activated the metallic surfaces, resulting in efficient solid-state chip welding eliminating residual porosity. The microhardness, the texture, the mechanical properties, the microstructure and the density of the recycled specimens have been investigated. An X-ray computed tomography (CT) analysis confirmed the density measurements, revealing a void-less bulk material with homogeneously distributed intermetallic compounds and oxides. The oxide content of the chips incorporated within the recycled material slightly increases its elastic properties. Finally, a thermal distribution simulation of the process in different segments illustrates the improved energy efficiency of this approach. PMID:28788153

  7. Energy, greenhouse gas, and cost reductions for municipal recycling systems.

    PubMed

    Chester, Mikhail; Martin, Elliot; Sathaye, Nakul

    2008-03-15

    Curbside recycling programs can be more cost-effective than landfilling and lead to environmental benefits from the recovery of materials. Significant reductions in energy and emissions are derived from the decrease of energy-intensive production with virgin materials. In many cities, competing priorities can lead to limited consideration given to system optimal collection and processing strategies that can drive down costs and increase revenue while simultaneously reducing system energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. We evaluate three alterations to a hypothetical California city's recycling network to discern the conditions under which the changes.constitute system improvements to cost, energy, and emissions. The system initially operates with a collection zoning scheme that does not mitigate the impact of seasonal variations in consumer tonnage. In addition, two collection organizations operate redundantly, collecting recyclables from different customer types on the same street network. Finally, the system is dual stream, meaning recyclables are separated at the curbside. In some scenarios, this practice can limit the consumer participation rate leading to lower collection quantities. First, we evaluate a "business as usual" (BAU) scenario and find that the system operates at a $1.7 M/yr loss but still avoids a net 18.7 GJ and 1700 kg of greenhouse gas equivalent (GGE) per ton of material recycled. Second, we apply an alternative zoning scheme for collection that creates a uniform daily pickup demand throughout the year reducing costs by $0.2 M/yr, energy by 30 MJ/ton, and GHG emissions by 2 kg GGE/ton. Next, the two collection organizations are consolidated into a single entity further reducing vehicle fleet size and weekly vehicle miles traveled resulting in savings from BAU of $0.3 M/yr, 100 MJ/ton, and 8 kg GGE/ton. Lastly, we evaluate a switch to a single-stream system (where recyclables are commingled). We showthat single-stream recycling

  8. Thermal energy recycling fuel cell arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Hanrahan, Paul R.

    2017-04-11

    An example fuel cell arrangement includes a fuel cell stack configured to receive a supply fluid and to provide an exhaust fluid that has more thermal energy than the supply fluid. The arrangement also includes an ejector and a heat exchanger. The ejector is configured to direct at least some of the exhaust fluid into the supply fluid. The heat exchanger is configured to increase thermal energy in the supply fluid using at least some of the exhaust fluid that was not directed into the supply fluid.

  9. Time-dependent recycling modeling with edge plasma transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigarov, A.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Rognlien, T.; Taverniers, S.; Hollmann, E.

    2013-10-01

    First,we discuss extensions to Macroblob approach which allow to simulate more accurately dynamics of ELMs, pedestal and edge transport with UEDGE code. Second,we present UEDGE modeling results for H mode discharge with infrequent ELMs and large pedestal losses on DIII-D. In modeled sequence of ELMs this discharge attains a dynamic equilibrium. Temporal evolution of pedestal plasma profiles, spectral line emission, and surface temperature matching experimental data over ELM cycle is discussed. Analysis of dynamic gas balance highlights important role of material surfaces. We quantified the wall outgassing between ELMs as 3X the NBI fueling and the recycling coefficient as 0.8 for wall pumping via macroblob-wall interactions. Third,we also present results from multiphysics version of UEDGE with built-in, reduced, 1-D wall models and analyze the role of various PMI processes. Progress in framework-coupled UEDGE/WALLPSI code is discussed. Finally, implicit coupling schemes are important feature of multiphysics codes and we report on the results of parametric analysis of convergence and performance for Picard and Newton iterations in a system of coupled deterministic-stochastic ODE and proposed modifications enhancing convergence.

  10. Thermal Recycling of Waelz Oxide Using Concentrated Solar Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzouganatos, N.; Matter, R.; Wieckert, C.; Antrekowitsch, J.; Gamroth, M.; Steinfeld, A.

    2013-12-01

    The dominating Zn recycling process is the so-called Waelz process. Waelz oxide (WOX), containing 55-65% Zn in oxidic form, is mainly derived from electric arc furnace dust produced during recycling of galvanized steel. After its wash treatment to separate off chlorides, WOX is used as feedstock along with ZnS concentrates for the electrolytic production of high-grade zinc. Novel and environmentally cleaner routes for the purification of WOX and the production of Zn are investigated using concentrated solar energy as the source of high-temperature process heat. The solar-driven clinkering of WOX and its carbothermal reduction were experimentally demonstrated using a 10 kWth packed-bed solar reactor. Solar clinkering at above 1265°C reduced the amount of impurities below 0.1 wt.%. Solar carbothermal reduction using biocharcoal as reducing agent in the 1170-1320°C range yielded 90 wt.% Zn.

  11. Evidence of extensive plasma glucose recycling following a glucose load in seabass.

    PubMed

    Rito, João; Viegas, Ivan; Pardal, Miguel A; Jones, John G

    2017-09-01

    Seabass and other carnivorous fish are highly dependent on gluconeogenesis from dietary amino acids to maintain glycemia. Glucose recycling (glucose→C3-intermediate→glucose) may potentiate the effects of glucose administration in sparing amino acid gluconeogenesis. To date, very few measurements of glucose recycling have been reported in fish. Thus, to determine the extent of glucose recycling following a glycemic challenge, juvenile seabass were given an intraperitoneal glucose load (2gkg(-1)) enriched with [U-(13)C]glucose. (13)C NMR analysis of plasma glucose (13)C-isotopomers was used to determine the fractional contributions of glucose derived directly from the load versus that from glucose recycling at 48h after the load. Both fed and 21-day fasted fish (20 per condition) were studied. In fasted fish, 18±4% of plasma glucose was directly derived from the load while 13±2% was derived from glucose recycling. In fed fish, the load accounted for 6±1% of plasma glucose levels while glucose recycling contributed 16±4%. (13)C NMR analysis of plasma lactate revealed (13)C-isotopomers corresponding to the expected C3-intermediates of peripheral [U-(13)C]glucose catabolism indicating that circulating lactate was a key intermediate in glucose carbon recycling under these conditions. In conclusion, glucose recycling was shown to contribute a significant portion of plasma glucose levels in both fed and fasted seabass 48h after an intraperitoneal glucose challenge and circulating lactate was shown to be an intermediate of this pathway. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Transport of carbon ion test particles and hydrogen recycling in the plasma of the Columbia tokamak HBT'' (High Beta Tokamak)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Hua.

    1990-01-01

    Carbon impurity ion transport is studied in the Columbia High Beta Tokamak (HBT), using a carbon tipped probe which is inserted into the plasma (n{sub e} {approx} 1 {minus} 5 {times} 10{sup 14} (cm{sup {minus}3}), T{sub e} {approx} 4 {minus} 10 (eV), B{sub t} {approx} 0.2 {minus} 0.4(T)). Carbon impurity light, mainly the strong lines of C{sub II}(4267A, emitted by the C{sup +} ions) and C{sub III} (4647A, emitted by the C{sup ++} ions), is formed by the ablation or sputtering of plasma ions and by the discharge of the carbon probe itself. The diffusion transport of the carbon ions is modeled by measuring the space-and-time dependent spectral light emission of the carbon ions with a collimated optical beam and photomultiplier. The point of emission can be observed in such a way as to sample regions along and transverse to the toroidal magnetic field. The carbon ion diffusion coefficients are obtained by fitting the data to a diffusion transport model. It is found that the diffusion of the carbon ions is classical'' and is controlled by the high collisionality of the HBT plasma; the diffusion is a two-dimensional problem and the expected dependence on the charge of the impurity ion is observed. The measurement of the spatial distribution of the H{sub {alpha}} emissivity was obtained by inverting the light signals from a 4-channel polychromator, the data were used to calculate the minor-radial influx, the density, and the recycling time of neutral hydrogen atoms or molecules. The calculation shows that the particle recycling time {tau}{sub p} is comparable with the plasma energy confinement time {tau}{sub E}; therefore, the recycling of the hot plasma ions with the cold neutrals from the walls is one of the main mechanisms for loss of plasma energy.

  13. Recycling endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Goldenring, James R

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal membrane recycling system represents a dynamic conduit for sorting and re-exporting internalized membrane constituents. The recycling system is composed of multiple tubulovesicular recycling pathways that likely confer distinct trafficking pathways for individual cargoes. In addition, elements of the recycling system are responsible for assembly and maintenance of apical membrane specializations including primary cilia and apical microvilli. The existence of multiple intersecting and diverging recycling tracks likely accounts for specificity in plasma membrane recycling trafficking. PMID:26022676

  14. Influence of impurity and recycling on high-β steady-state plasmas sustained by rotating magnetic fields current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H. Y.; Grossnickle, J. A.; Hoffman, A. L.; Vlases, G. C.

    2009-06-01

    A new upgrade of the Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment (TCS) device, TCSU, has been built to form and sustain high temperature compact toroids (CT), known as Field Reversed Configurations, using Rotating Magnetic Fields (RMF). In TCS the plasma temperature was limited to several 10s of eV due to high impurity content. These impurities are greatly reduced in TCSU by using advanced plasma chamber and helium glow discharge cleaning. Reducing impurity radiation, when coupled with reduced overall recycling, enabled the plasma to enter into a new, collisionless regime with temperatures well over 200 eV, substantially exceeding the radiation barrier. This is a first for CTs at low input power density. This was achieved using the simple even-parity RMF drive (despite transient opening of field lines by the RMF) because the associated energy loss is sheath-limited, coupled with the low edge density resulting from the RMF pinch effect.

  15. Spent nuclear fuel recycling with plasma reduction and etching

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Yong Ho

    2012-06-05

    A method of extracting uranium from spent nuclear fuel (SNF) particles is disclosed. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) (containing oxides of uranium, oxides of fission products (FP) and oxides of transuranic (TRU) elements (including plutonium)) are subjected to a hydrogen plasma and a fluorine plasma. The hydrogen plasma reduces the uranium and plutonium oxides from their oxide state. The fluorine plasma etches the SNF metals to form UF6 and PuF4. During subjection of the SNF particles to the fluorine plasma, the temperature is maintained in the range of 1200-2000 deg K to: a) allow any PuF6 (gas) that is formed to decompose back to PuF4 (solid), and b) to maintain stability of the UF6. Uranium (in the form of gaseous UF6) is easily extracted and separated from the plutonium (in the form of solid PuF4). The use of plasmas instead of high temperature reactors or flames mitigates the high temperature corrosive atmosphere and the production of PuF6 (as a final product). Use of plasmas provide faster reaction rates, greater control over the individual electron and ion temperatures, and allow the use of CF4 or NF3 as the fluorine sources instead of F2 or HF.

  16. 2010 Second Refrigerator Recycling Program NV Energy - Southern Nevada: Program Year 2010

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This measurement and verification report provides measured and verified energy impacts achieved by the Second Refrigerator Recycling Program that NV Energy offered to its customers in southern Nevada during 2010.

  17. Multi-channel energy recycling system with exergy regeneration -- A future energy system proposed by Professor Hijikata

    SciTech Connect

    Okazaki, Ken

    1999-07-01

    Professor Hijikata first mentioned in his paper in 1991 that multi-pass recycling between thermal to chemical energy might greatly contribute to energy saving. In general, fossil fuels possess a very high exergy (available energy) up to 95% of heat value as chemical energy, but they are usually burnt directly to form thermal energy with a large exergy loss in the combustion process. The exergy loss through the combustion process could be largely reduced by introducing a reforming process from hydrocarbon fuels to hydrogen before combustion, because the exergy loss in the hydrogen combustion is by far the smallest among various fuels. On this standpoint, methanol has an outstanding advantage that very low quality or low temperature thermal energies corresponding to 100 C can be used as heat source and stored in hydrogen as chemical energy. In other words, methanol is a key material to realize this new energy system with exergy regeneration. For this purpose, direct conversion from methane/water-vapor mixture to ethanol with a minimum required energy has been successfully developed using atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasma chemical reactions, surface discharge by Professor Hijikata and ultra-short pulsed silent discharge by the author (1998).

  18. Recycling of the Electronic Waste Applying the Plasma Reactor Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lázár, Marián; Jasminská, Natália; Čarnogurská, Mária; Dobáková, Romana

    2016-12-01

    The following paper discusses a high-temperature gasification process and melting of electronic components and computer equipment using plasma reactor technology. It analyses the marginal conditions of batch processing, as well as the formation of solid products which result from the procedure of waste processing. Attention is also paid to the impact of the emerging products on the environment.

  19. Waste to energy and recycling in Hempstead, Long Island

    SciTech Connect

    Aquino, J.T.

    1995-11-01

    Faced with the limiting of landfill disposal by New York state law, a Long Island township opted for both waste-to-energy (WTE) and curbside recycling. Since then, the township and its WTE facility achieved results through state-of-the-art technology, creative agreements, and some compromise. The $360-million, 2,505-tpd WTE facility opened for commercial use in October 1989. Soon after, the town`s waste disposal fees dropped to a reported $79 per ton. The facility has since processed more than 5 million tons of solid waste with an energy value of about 5,200 Btus per pound, slightly above the 4,500- to 5,000-Btu average for a pound of generic MSW. The bond is being paid off through tipping fees and the sale of electricity to the Long Island Lighting Co. (LILCO). The facility is projected to save the town more than $500 million in disposal costs over the next 20 years. And, by using trash to generate electricity, the facility will save the equivalent of 53 million gallons of imported oil.

  20. VAMP8-dependent fusion of recycling endosomes with the plasma membrane facilitates T lymphocyte cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Misty R.; Pattu, Varsha; Halimani, Mahantappa; Maier-Peuschel, Monika; Müller, Martha-Lena; Becherer, Ute; Hong, Wanjin; Hoth, Markus; Tschernig, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) eliminate infected and neoplastic cells through directed release of cytotoxic granule contents. Although multiple SNARE proteins have been implicated in cytotoxic granule exocytosis, the role of vesicular SNARE proteins, i.e., vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs), remains enigmatic. VAMP8 was posited to represent the cytotoxic granule vesicular SNARE protein mediating exocytosis in mice. In primary human CTLs, however, VAMP8 colocalized with Rab11a-positive recycling endosomes. Upon stimulation, these endosomes rapidly trafficked to and fused with the plasma membrane, preceding fusion of cytotoxic granules. Knockdown of VAMP8 blocked both recycling endosome and cytotoxic granule fusion at immune synapses, without affecting activating signaling. Mechanistically, VAMP8-dependent recycling endosomes deposited syntaxin-11 at immune synapses, facilitating assembly of plasma membrane SNARE complexes for cytotoxic granule fusion. Hence, cytotoxic granule exocytosis is a sequential, multivesicle fusion process requiring VAMP8-mediated recycling endosome fusion before cytotoxic granule fusion. Our findings imply that secretory granule exocytosis pathways in other cell types may also be more complex than previously appreciated. PMID:26124288

  1. Two-chamber model for divertors with plasma recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, W.D.; Singer, C.E.

    1984-11-01

    To model particle and heat loss terms at the edge of a tokamak with a divertor or pumped limiter, a simple two-chamber formulation of the scrapeoff has been constructed by integrating the fluid equations, including sources, along open field lines. The model is then solved for a wide range of density and temperature conditions in the scrapeoff, using geometrical parameters typical of the PDX poloidal divertor. The solutions characterize four divertor operating conditions for beam-heated plasmas: plugged, unplugged, blowthrough, and blowback.

  2. Energy and materials use in the production and recycling of consumer-goods packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.

    1981-02-01

    A comparison is made of the energy consumed annually in the United States to produce paper, glass, steel, aluminum, and plastic for consumer-goods packaging and types of energy used for production are examined. Energy saved through recycling and combustion for energy recovery also is considered. A maximum of 1.5 quad could be saved if this packaging material were recycled, and about 0.6 quad could be recovered if it were burned as part of municipal solid waste. Paper and plastic compete in several markets, including bags and milk containers: in almost all cases, the plastic container requires less energy to produce and recycle. However, the major energy input to paper manufacture is wood, rather than oil and natural gas. Glass bottles require less energy to produce than aluminum or steel cans. On the other hand, aluminum cans take less energy to recycle than bottles, and recycled aluminum cans are the least energy intensive of the single-serving beverage containers, except for refillable glass bottles that are reused several times. For family-sized beverage bottles, a plastic bottle uses less energy to make and to recycle than a glass bottle. In addition, plastic bottles are combustible. However, glass bottles could be made with no oil or natural gas input, and they can be reused.

  3. Fargo-Moorhead Urban Study. Energy Conservation Appendix. Recycling, Thermography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    1 II. PROJECT NEEDS AND OBJECTIVES 2 III. PROCEDURES 4 Recycling Committee 4 Selection of Marketing Consultants 5 Market Analysis 5 Marketing Strategy 7...the marketing strategy . o Monitoring and evaluation. The recycling committee operated in close cooperation with the representative of the St. Paul... Marketing Strategy : Upon the completion of the market analysis and the 71 determination that the marketing efforts would concentrate on newspaper

  4. Mandated recycling rates: Impacts on energy consumption and municipal solid waste volume

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.; Stodolsky, F.

    1993-12-01

    Two bills were introduced in the 102nd Congress that would have rewritten the nation`s comprehensive solid waste legislation--the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Commodity-specific recycling rates were proposed for consumer-goods packaging materials and newsprint. In this report, the authors compare the effects on energy use, materials use, and landfill volume of recycling at the mandated rates to the effects for alternative methods of material disposition to determine the optimum for each material. They also compare the alternative life-cycle energies to the energies required to produce the products from virgin materials. Results depend on the material and on the objective. Environmentally sound material disposition options considered include reuse, recycling to the same product, recycling to a lower-valued product, combustion for energy recovery, incineration without energy recovery, and landfill. Congress specifically excluded combustion for energy recovery from counting towards the recovery goals, probably because combustion is viewed as a form of disposal and is therefore assumed to waste resources and have negative environmental effects. However, co-combustion in coal-fired plants or combustion in appropriately pollution-controlled waste-to-energy plants is safe, avoids landfill costs, and can displace fossil fuels--in some cases, more fossil fuels than by recycling. Therefore, the objectives of the proposed legislation must be examined to see if they can most effectively be achieved by recycling at the mandated rates or by other methods of disposition.

  5. Energy Measurement in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ischebeck, R

    2007-07-06

    In the E-167 plasma wakefield acceleration experiment, electrons with an initial energy of 42GeV are accelerated in a meter-scale lithium plasma. Particles are leaving plasma with a large energy spread. To determine the spectrum of the accelerated particles, a two-plane spectrometer has been set up.

  6. Process analysis of recycled thermoplasts from consumer electronics by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fink, Herbert; Panne, Ulrich; Niessner, Reinhard

    2002-09-01

    An experimental setup for direct elemental analysis of recycled thermoplasts from consumer electronics by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS, or laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, LIBS) was realized. The combination of a echelle spectrograph, featuring a high resolution with a broad spectral coverage, with multivariate methods, such as PLS, PCR, and variable subset selection via a genetic algorithm, resulted in considerable improvements in selectivity and sensitivity for this complex matrix. With a normalization to carbon as internal standard, the limits of detection were in the ppm range. A preliminary pattern recognition study points to the possibility of polymer recognition via the line-rich echelle spectra. Several experiments at an extruder within a recycling plant demonstrated successfully the capability of LIPS for different kinds of routine on-line process analysis.

  7. Energy efficiency of electron plasma emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Zalesski, V. G.

    2011-12-15

    Electron emission influence from gas-discharge plasma on plasma emitter energy parameters is considered. It is shown, that electron emission from plasma is accompanied by energy contribution redistribution in the gas-discharge from plasma emitter supplies sources-the gas-discharge power supply and the accelerating voltage power supply. Some modes of electron emission as a result can be realized: 'a probe measurements mode,' 'a transitive mode,' and 'a full switching mode.'.

  8. Saving Energy and Developing Creativity in Recycling Clothing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohn, Marjorie

    1979-01-01

    To help counter the "throw-away society" the author says that home economists should include extending use of or recycling clothing in their classes or adult programs. She offers guidelines for altering garments, figuring costs, and determining what methods might be used. (MF)

  9. Near-field enhanced thermionic energy conversion for renewable energy recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghashami, Mohammad; Cho, Sung Kwon; Park, Keunhan

    2017-09-01

    This article proposes a new energy harvesting concept that greatly enhances thermionic power generation with high efficiency by exploiting the near-field enhancement of thermal radiation. The proposed near-field enhanced thermionic energy conversion (NETEC) system is uniquely configured with a low-bandgap semiconductor cathode separated from a thermal emitter with a subwavelength gap distance, such that a significant amount of electrons can be photoexcited by near-field thermal radiation to contribute to the enhancement of thermionic current density. We theoretically demonstrate that the NETEC system can generate electric power at a significantly lower temperature than the standard thermionic generator, and the energy conversion efficiency can exceed 40%. The obtained results reveal that near-field photoexcitation can enhance the thermionic power output by more than 10 times, making this hybrid system attractive for renewable energy recycling.

  10. Energy conservation and CO2 emission reductions due to recycling in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pimenteira, C A P; Pereira, A S; Oliveira, L B; Rosa, L P; Reis, M M; Henriques, R M

    2004-01-01

    The present paper aims to make the energy saving potential provided by waste recycling in Brazil evident by pointing out more specifically the benefits regarding climate change mitigation. In this case, based on the energy saved due to the recycling process of an exogenous amount of waste, we have built two scenarios in order to show the potential for indirectly avoiding CO2 emissions in the country as a result of the recycling process. According to the scenario, 1 Mt and 3.5 Mt of CO2, respectively, would be avoided per year due to solid waste recycling. The international context for greenhouse gas emissions reduction, such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and its Kyoto Protocol has been taken into account.

  11. The Cell-based L-Glutathione Protection Assays to Study Endocytosis and Recycling of Plasma Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cihil, Kristine M.; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    Membrane trafficking involves transport of proteins from the plasma membrane to the cell interior (i.e. endocytosis) followed by trafficking to lysosomes for degradation or to the plasma membrane for recycling. The cell based L-glutathione protection assays can be used to study endocytosis and recycling of protein receptors, channels, transporters, and adhesion molecules localized at the cell surface. The endocytic assay requires labeling of cell surface proteins with a cell membrane impermeable biotin containing a disulfide bond and the N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester at 4 ºC - a temperature at which membrane trafficking does not occur. Endocytosis of biotinylated plasma membrane proteins is induced by incubation at 37 ºC. Next, the temperature is decreased again to 4 ºC to stop endocytic trafficking and the disulfide bond in biotin covalently attached to proteins that have remained at the plasma membrane is reduced with L-glutathione. At this point, only proteins that were endocytosed remain protected from L-glutathione and thus remain biotinylated. After cell lysis, biotinylated proteins are isolated with streptavidin agarose, eluted from agarose, and the biotinylated protein of interest is detected by western blotting. During the recycling assay, after biotinylation cells are incubated at 37 °C to load endocytic vesicles with biotinylated proteins and the disulfide bond in biotin covalently attached to proteins remaining at the plasma membrane is reduced with L-glutathione at 4 ºC as in the endocytic assay. Next, cells are incubated again at 37 °C to allow biotinylated proteins from endocytic vesicles to recycle to the plasma membrane. Cells are then incubated at 4 ºC, and the disulfide bond in biotin attached to proteins that recycled to the plasma membranes is reduced with L-glutathione. The biotinylated proteins protected from L-glutathione are those that did not recycle to the plasma membrane. PMID:24378656

  12. The cell-based L-glutathione protection assays to study endocytosis and recycling of plasma membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Cihil, Kristine M; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka

    2013-12-13

    Membrane trafficking involves transport of proteins from the plasma membrane to the cell interior (i.e. endocytosis) followed by trafficking to lysosomes for degradation or to the plasma membrane for recycling. The cell based L-glutathione protection assays can be used to study endocytosis and recycling of protein receptors, channels, transporters, and adhesion molecules localized at the cell surface. The endocytic assay requires labeling of cell surface proteins with a cell membrane impermeable biotin containing a disulfide bond and the N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester at 4 ºC - a temperature at which membrane trafficking does not occur. Endocytosis of biotinylated plasma membrane proteins is induced by incubation at 37 ºC. Next, the temperature is decreased again to 4 ºC to stop endocytic trafficking and the disulfide bond in biotin covalently attached to proteins that have remained at the plasma membrane is reduced with L-glutathione. At this point, only proteins that were endocytosed remain protected from L-glutathione and thus remain biotinylated. After cell lysis, biotinylated proteins are isolated with streptavidin agarose, eluted from agarose, and the biotinylated protein of interest is detected by western blotting. During the recycling assay, after biotinylation cells are incubated at 37 °C to load endocytic vesicles with biotinylated proteins and the disulfide bond in biotin covalently attached to proteins remaining at the plasma membrane is reduced with L-glutathione at 4 ºC as in the endocytic assay. Next, cells are incubated again at 37 °C to allow biotinylated proteins from endocytic vesicles to recycle to the plasma membrane. Cells are then incubated at 4 ºC, and the disulfide bond in biotin attached to proteins that recycled to the plasma membranes is reduced with L-glutathione. The biotinylated proteins protected from L-glutathione are those that did not recycle to the plasma membrane.

  13. Automotive recycling in the United States : energy conservation and enviromental benefits.

    SciTech Connect

    Pomykala, J. A; Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Spangenberger, J. S.; Energy Systems

    2007-11-01

    The production and use of polymers has been growing and that trend is expected to continue. Likewise, the production of metals from ores is on the rise because of increasing demand. Recycling polymers and residual metals can result in significant energy savings and environmental benefits including a reduction in CO2 emissions. This article describes recycling options for the polymers and metals in end-of-life vehicles.

  14. Interactive analysis of waste recycling and energy recovery program in a small-scale incinerator.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeng-Chung; Chen, Wei-Hsin; Chang, Ni-Bin; Davila, Eric; Tsai, Cheng-Hsien

    2005-09-01

    Conflicting goals affecting solid waste management are explored in this paper to find the best implementation of resource recovery with a small-scale waste-to-energy process. Recycling paper and plastic material often leaves a shortage of thermal energy to support incineration that forces operators to supplement the process with auxiliary fuels. Although there are considerable profits to be made from material recovery, the increase of fuel usage causes conflict given that it is cost prohibitive. A series of trials performed on a small-scale 1.5-t/day incineration plant with a cyclone heat recovery system found that material recycling can impede performance. Experimental results are expressed as empirical regression formulas with regard to combustion temperature, energy transfer, and heat recovery. Process optimization is possible if the waste moisture content remains <30%. To test the robustness of the optimization analysis, a series of sensitivity analyses clarify the extent of material recycling needed with regard to plastic, paper, and metal. The experiments also test whether the moisture in the waste would decrease when recycling paper because of its exceptional capacity to absorb moisture. Results show that recycling paper is strongly recommended when the moisture content is >20%, whereas plastic recycling is not necessary at that moisture condition. Notably, plastic recovery reduces the heat needed to vaporize the water content of the solid waste, thus it is recommended only when the moisture content is <10%. For above-normal incineration temperatures, plastic recycling is encouraged, because it removes excess energy. Metal is confirmed as an overall priority in material recycling regardless of the moisture content of the incoming waste.

  15. Immune profiling of plasma and cervical secretions using recycling immunoaffinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Castle, Philip E; Phillips, Terry M; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando; Bratti, M Concepcion; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Morera, Lidia Ana; Pfeiffer, Ruth; Hutchinson, Martha L; Pinto, Ligia A; Schiffman, Mark

    2003-12-01

    Small volumes of cervical secretions have limited measurements of immunity at the cervix, which may be important to studies of human papillomavirus (HPV). We report the use of recycling immunoaffinity chromatography to efficiently study immune profiles in cervical secretions. Frozen pairs of plasma and cervical secretions (collected on ophthalmic sponges) were selected randomly from women with normal cervical cytology (n = 50) participating in a natural history study of HPV in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. Single 25- micro l aliquots of plasma and (diluted) cervical secretions were assayed for interleukin (IL) -1 beta, -2, -4, -6, -8, -10, -12, -13, -15, IFN-alpha, -beta, -gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, -beta, RANTES (regulated on activation normal T-cell express and secreted), MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein), -2, -3, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha, -1 beta (regulated on activation normal T-cell express and secreted), macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IgG, IgA, and cyclooxygenase 2. All of the specimens were tested as blind replicates, and refrozen plasma was retested 4 months later. To evaluate the reproducibility of the repeat measurements and to examine the correlation between plasma and cervical secretions, we calculated kappa values with 95% confidence intervals among categorized analyte values and Spearman correlation coefficients (rho) among detectable, continuous analyte values. Measurements of all of the analytes in either plasma or cervical secretions were highly reproducible, with all of the kappa > or = 0.78 (70% above 0.90), and all of the rho > or = 0.88 (96% above 0.90). Only IL-1 beta (kappa = 0.60 and rho = 0.82) and IL-6 (kappa = 0.50 and rho = 0.78) levels were strongly correlated between plasma and cervical secretions. IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-beta, RANTES, MCP-1, MCP -2, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha, and macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels were especially poorly correlated between plasma and

  16. High Energy Plasma Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    In order to meet NASA's challenge on advanced concept activity in the propulsion area, we initiated a new program entitled "High Energy Plasma Space Propulsion Studies" within the current cooperative agreement in 1998. The goals of this work are to gain further understanding of the engine of the AIMStar spacecraft, a concept which was developed at Penn State University, and to develop a prototype concept for the engine. The AIMStar engine concept was developed at Penn State University several years ago as a hybrid between antimatter and fusion technologies. Because of limited amounts of antimatter available, and concurrently the demonstrated ability for antiprotons to efficiently ignite nuclear fusion reactions, it was felt that this was a very good match. Investigations have been made concerning the performance of the reaction trap. This is a small Penning-like electromagnetic trap, which is used to simultaneously confine antiprotons and fusion fuels. Small DHe3 or DT droplets, containing a few percent molar of a fissile material, are injected into the trap, filled with antiprotons. We have found that it is important to separate the antiprotons into two adjacent wells, to inject he droplet between them and to simultaneously bring the antiprotons to the center of the trap, surrounding the droplet. Our previous concept had the droplet falling onto one cloud of antiprotons. This proved to be inefficient, as the droplet tended to evaporate away from the cloud as it interacted on its surface.

  17. Effect of plasma surface treatment of recycled carbon fiber on carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) interfacial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hooseok; Ohsawa, Isamu; Takahashi, Jun

    2015-02-01

    We studied the effects of plasma surface treatment of recycled carbon fiber on adhesion of the fiber to polymers after various treatment times. Conventional surface treatment methods have been attempted for recycled carbon fiber, but most require very long processing times, which may increase cost. Hence, in this study, plasma processing was performed for 0.5 s or less. Surface functionalization was quantified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. O/C increased from approximately 11% to 25%. The micro-droplet test of adhesion properties and the mechanical properties of CFRP were also investigated.

  18. Role of STARD4 in sterol transport between the endocytic recycling compartment and the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Iaea, David B.; Mao, Shu; Lund, Frederik W.; Maxfield, Frederick R.

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol is an essential constituent of membranes in mammalian cells. The plasma membrane and the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) are both highly enriched in cholesterol. The abundance and distribution of cholesterol among organelles are tightly controlled by a combination of mechanisms involving vesicular and nonvesicular sterol transport processes. Using the fluorescent cholesterol analogue dehydroergosterol, we examined sterol transport between the plasma membrane and the ERC using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and a novel sterol efflux assay. We found that sterol transport between these organelles in a U2OS cell line has a t1/2 =12–15 min. Approximately 70% of sterol transport is ATP independent and therefore is nonvesicular. Increasing cellular cholesterol levels dramatically increases bidirectional transport rate constants, but decreases in cholesterol levels have only a modest effect. A soluble sterol transport protein, STARD4, accounts for ∼25% of total sterol transport and ∼33% of nonvesicular sterol transport between the plasma membrane and ERC. This study shows that nonvesicular sterol transport mechanisms and STARD4 in particular account for a large fraction of sterol transport between the plasma membrane and the ERC. PMID:28209730

  19. Role of STARD4 in sterol transport between the endocytic recycling compartment and the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Iaea, David B; Mao, Shu; Lund, Frederik W; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2017-02-16

    Cholesterol is an essential constituent of membranes in mammalian cells. The plasma membrane and the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) are both highly enriched in cholesterol. The abundance and distribution of cholesterol among organelles are tightly controlled by a combination of mechanisms involving vesicular and non-vesicular sterol transport processes. Using the fluorescent cholesterol analog, dehydroergosterol, we examined sterol transport between the plasma membrane and the ERC using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and a novel sterol efflux assay. We found that sterol transport between these organelles in a U2OS cell line has a t1/2 of 12-15 minutes. Approximately 70% of sterol transport is ATP-independent and, therefore, non-vesicular. Increasing cellular cholesterol levels dramatically increases bidirectional transport rate constants, but decreases in cholesterol levels have only a modest effect. We found that a soluble sterol transport protein, STARD4, accounts for ∼25% of total sterol transport and ∼33% of non-vesicular sterol transport between the plasma membrane and ERC. This study shows that non-vesicular sterol transport mechanisms, and STARD4 in particular, account for a large fraction of sterol transport between the plasma membrane and the ERC.

  20. Stair negotiation made easier using novel interactive energy-recycling assistive stairs.

    PubMed

    Song, Yun Seong; Ha, Sehoon; Hsu, Hsiang; Ting, Lena H; Liu, C Karen

    2017-01-01

    Here we show that novel, energy-recycling stairs reduce the amount of work required for humans to both ascend and descend stairs. Our low-power, interactive, and modular steps can be placed on existing staircases, storing energy during stair descent and returning that energy to the user during stair ascent. Energy is recycled through event-triggered latching and unlatching of passive springs without the use of powered actuators. When ascending the energy-recycling stairs, naive users generated 17.4 ± 6.9% less positive work with their leading legs compared to conventional stairs, with the knee joint positive work reduced by 37.7 ± 10.5%. Users also generated 21.9 ± 17.8% less negative work with their trailing legs during stair descent, with ankle joint negative work reduced by 26.0 ± 15.9%. Our low-power energy-recycling stairs have the potential to assist people with mobility impairments during stair negotiation on existing staircases.

  1. Stair negotiation made easier using novel interactive energy-recycling assistive stairs

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yun Seong; Ha, Sehoon; Hsu, Hsiang; Ting, Lena H.

    2017-01-01

    Here we show that novel, energy-recycling stairs reduce the amount of work required for humans to both ascend and descend stairs. Our low-power, interactive, and modular steps can be placed on existing staircases, storing energy during stair descent and returning that energy to the user during stair ascent. Energy is recycled through event-triggered latching and unlatching of passive springs without the use of powered actuators. When ascending the energy-recycling stairs, naive users generated 17.4 ± 6.9% less positive work with their leading legs compared to conventional stairs, with the knee joint positive work reduced by 37.7 ± 10.5%. Users also generated 21.9 ± 17.8% less negative work with their trailing legs during stair descent, with ankle joint negative work reduced by 26.0 ± 15.9%. Our low-power energy-recycling stairs have the potential to assist people with mobility impairments during stair negotiation on existing staircases. PMID:28700719

  2. An energy-efficient, adiabatic electrode stimulator with inductive energy recycling and feedback current regulation.

    PubMed

    Arfin, Scott K; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we present a novel energy-efficient electrode stimulator. Our stimulator uses inductive storage and recycling of energy in a dynamic power supply. This supply drives an electrode in an adiabatic fashion such that energy consumption is minimized. It also utilizes a shunt current-sensor to monitor and regulate the current through the electrode via feedback, thus enabling flexible and safe stimulation. Since there are no explicit current sources or current limiters, wasteful energy dissipation across such elements is naturally avoided. The dynamic power supply allows efficient transfer of energy both to and from the electrode and is based on a DC-DC converter topology that we use in a bidirectional fashion in forward-buck or reverse-boost modes. In an exemplary electrode implementation intended for neural stimulation, we show how the stimulator combines the efficiency of voltage control and the safety and accuracy of current control in a single low-power integrated-circuit built in a standard .35 μm CMOS process. This stimulator achieves a 2x-3x reduction in energy consumption as compared to a conventional current-source-based stimulator operating from a fixed power supply. We perform a theoretical analysis of the energy efficiency that is in accord with experimental measurements. This theoretical analysis reveals that further improvements in energy efficiency may be achievable with better implementations in the future. Our electrode stimulator could be widely useful for neural, cardiac, retinal, cochlear, muscular and other biomedical implants where low power operation is important.

  3. Materials development and field demonstration of high-recycled-content concrete for energy-efficient building construction

    SciTech Connect

    Ostowari, Ken; Nosson, Ali

    2000-09-30

    The project developed high-recycled-content concrete material with balanced structural and thermal attributes for use in energy-efficient building construction. Recycled plastics, tire, wool, steel and concrete were used as replacement for coarse aggregates in concrete and masonry production. With recycled materials the specific heat and thermal conductivity of concrete could be tailored to enhance the energy-efficiency of concrete buildings. A comprehensive field project was implemented which confirmed the benefits of high-recycled-content concrete for energy-efficient building construction.

  4. High-energy laser plasma diagnostic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingjun M.; Aye, Tin M.; Fruehauf, Norbert; Savant, Gajendra D.; Erwin, Daniel A.; Smoot, Brayton E.; Loose, Richard W.

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes the development of a non-contact diagnosis system for analyzing the plasma density profile, temperature profile, and ionic species of a high energy laser-generated plasma. The system was developed by Physical Optics Corporation in cooperation with the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command, High Energy Laser Systems Test Facility at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. The non- contact diagnostic system consists of three subsystems: an optical fiber-based interferometer, a plasma spectrometer, and a genetic algorithm-based fringe-image processor. In the interferometer subsystem, the transmitter and the receiver are each packaged as a compact module. A narrow notch filter rejects strong plasma light, passing only the laser probing beam, which carries the plasma density information. The plasma spectrum signal is collected by an optical fiber head, which is connected to a compact spectrometer. Real- time genetic algorithm-based data processing/display permits instantaneous analysis of the plasma characteristics. The research effort included design and fabrication of a vacuum chamber, and high-energy laser plasma generation. Compactness, real-time operation, and ease of use make the laser plasma diagnosis system well suited for dual use applications such as diagnosis of electric arc and other industrial plasmas.

  5. Energy and environmental impacts of electric vehicle battery production and recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.; Singh, M.

    1995-12-31

    Electric vehicle batteries use energy and generate environmental residuals when they are produced and recycled. This study estimates, for 4 selected battery types (advanced lead-acid, sodium-sulfur, nickel-cadmium, and nickel-metal hydride), the impacts of production and recycling of the materials used in electric vehicle batteries. These impacts are compared, with special attention to the locations of the emissions. It is found that the choice among batteries for electric vehicles involves tradeoffs among impacts. For example, although the nickel-cadmium and nickel-metal hydride batteries are similar, energy requirements for production of the cadmium electrodes may be higher than those for the metal hydride electrodes, but the latter may be more difficult to recycle.

  6. Trafficking of the plasma membrane gamma-aminobutyric acid transporter GAT1. Size and rates of an acutely recycling pool.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Quick, Michael W

    2005-05-13

    Plasma membrane neurotransmitter transporters rapidly traffic to and from the cell surface in neurons. This trafficking may be important in regulating neuronal signaling. Such regulation will be subject to the number of trafficking transporters and their trafficking rates. In the present study, we define an acutely recycling pool of endogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid transporters (GAT1) in cortical neurons that comprises approximately one-third of total cellular GAT1. Kinetic analysis of this pool estimates exocytosis and endocytosis time constants of 1.6 and 0.9 min, respectively, and thus approximately one-third of the recycling pool is plasma membrane resident in the basal state. Recent evidence shows that GAT1 substrates, second messengers, and interacting proteins regulate GAT1 trafficking. These triggers could act by altering trafficking rates or by changing the recycling pool size. In the present study we examine three GAT1 modulators. Calcium depletion decreases GAT1 surface expression by diminishing the recycling pool size. Sucrose increases GAT1 surface expression by blocking clathrin- and dynamin-dependent endocytosis, but it does not change the recycling pool size. Protein kinase C decreases surface GAT1 expression by increasing the endocytosis rate, but it does not change the exocytosis rate or the recycling pool size. Based upon estimates of GAT1 molecules in cortical boutons, the present data suggest that approximately 1000 transporters comprise the acutely recycling pool, of which 300 are on the surface in the basal state, and five transporters insert into the plasma membrane every second. This insertion could represent the fusion of one transporter-containing vesicle.

  7. The Benefits of Recycling for the Future of Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Hanson

    2006-07-01

    Robust increases in energy demand, improvements in the performance of existing nuclear power plants, renewed interest in assuring domestic energy supply and concern about climate change have recently provided powerful arguments for renewing and further expanding the use of nuclear energy in the United States. (author)

  8. Energy considerations for steam plasma gasification of black liquor and chemical recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Grandy, J.D.; Kong, P.C.

    1995-07-01

    This paper investigates the energy economics of using a hybrid steam plasma process to gasify black liquor. In the pulp and paper industry, gasification is gaining credibility as an incremental method to supplement the standard Kraft process, which burns the black liquor in large furnaces to recover energy and inorganic chemicals (sodium and sulfur) that are recycled back into the wood pulping process. This paper shows that despite the energy intensive nature of steam plasma processing, several fortuitous conditions arise that make it a viable technology for the gasification of black liquor.

  9. Energy considerations for steam plasma gasification of black liquor and chemical recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Grandy, J.D.; Kong, P.C.

    1995-10-01

    This paper investigates the energy economics of using a hybrid steam plasma process to gasify black liquor. In the pulp and paper industry, gasification is gaining credibility as an incremental method to supplement the standard Kraft process, which bums the black liquor in large furnaces to recover energy and inorganic chemicals (sodium and sulfur) that are recycled back into the wood pulping process. This paper shows that despite the energy intensive nature of steam plasma processing, several fortuitous conditions arise that make it a viable technology for the gasification of black liquor.

  10. Phospholipase D activity couples plasma membrane endocytosis with retromer dependent recycling

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Rajan; Panda, Aniruddha; Coessens, Elise; Raj, Nikita; Yadav, Shweta; Balakrishnan, Sruthi; Zhang, Qifeng; Georgiev, Plamen; Basak, Bishal; Pasricha, Renu; Wakelam, Michael JO; Ktistakis, Nicholas T; Raghu, Padinjat

    2016-01-01

    During illumination, the light-sensitive plasma membrane (rhabdomere) of Drosophila photoreceptors undergoes turnover with consequent changes in size and composition. However, the mechanism by which illumination is coupled to rhabdomere turnover remains unclear. We find that photoreceptors contain a light-dependent phospholipase D (PLD) activity. During illumination, loss of PLD resulted in an enhanced reduction in rhabdomere size, accumulation of Rab7 positive, rhodopsin1-containing vesicles (RLVs) in the cell body and reduced rhodopsin protein. These phenotypes were associated with reduced levels of phosphatidic acid, the product of PLD activity and were rescued by reconstitution with catalytically active PLD. In wild-type photoreceptors, during illumination, enhanced PLD activity was sufficient to clear RLVs from the cell body by a process dependent on Arf1-GTP levels and retromer complex function. Thus, during illumination, PLD activity couples endocytosis of RLVs with their recycling to the plasma membrane thus maintaining plasma membrane size and composition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18515.001 PMID:27848911

  11. Depolarization of D-T plasmas by recycling in material walls

    SciTech Connect

    Greenside, H.S.; Budny, R.V.; Post, D.E.

    1984-02-01

    The feasibility of using polarized deuterium (D) and tritium (T) plasmas in fusion reactors may be seriously affected by recycling in material walls. Theoretical and experimental results are reviewed which show how the depolarization rates of absorbed D and T depend on first wall parameters such as the temperature, the bulk and surface diffusivities, the density of electronic states at the Fermi surface, the spectral density of microscopic fluctuating electric field gradients, and the concentration of paramagnetic impurities. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of hydrogenated and deuterated amorphous semiconductors suggests that low-Z nonmetallic materials may provide a satisfactory first wall or limiter coating under reactor conditions with characteristic depolarization times of several seconds. Experiments are proposed to test the consequences of our analysis.

  12. The Wheelabrator Falls story -- Integrated recycling, highly efficient energy recovery: An update two years later

    SciTech Connect

    Felago, R.T.; Anderson, R.L.; Scanlon, P.J.

    1996-12-31

    Wheelabrator Environmental Systems Inc., based in Hampton, New Hampshire, has developed America`s first privately initiated, totally integrated Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) with a commercial trash-to-energy facility in Falls Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. The MRF is successfully recovering and marketing a variety of recycled products, while demonstrating that waste-to-energy and recycling are compatible and can be successfully integrated at a single site. The energy recovery plant and the MRF have completed one year of operation, giving adequate time to evaluate the impact of project innovations. These innovations will have a significant impact on how future projects, including waste-to-energy, wastewater and biosolids processing, will be developed. The energy recovery facility is capable of processing 1,600 tons per day of municipal solid waste from the Bucks County area.

  13. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A; Real-Valle, Roberto A; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements.

  14. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines

    PubMed Central

    López-Cruz, Roberto I.; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A.; Real-Valle, Roberto A.; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements. PMID:27375492

  15. Mandated recycling rates: Impacts on energy consumption and municipal waste volume

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.; Stodolsky, F.

    1994-03-01

    In 1992, Congress sought to rewrite its comprehensive solid waste legislation the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Commodity-specific recycling rates were proposed for consumer-goods packaging, materials and newsprint. In this paper, we compare the impacts on energy, materials use, and landfill volume of recycling at those rates to the impacts associated with alternative methods of disposition to determine, the optimal method for each material. Alternative paths for material disposition include reuse, recycling to the same product, recycling to a lower-valued product, combustion for energy recovery, incineration without energy recovery, and landfilling. The recovery rates considered during RCRA reauthorization are summarized. Combustion was specifically excluded by Congress to meet recovery goals. This exclusion is probably based on the idea that combustion is a form of disposal and therefore wastes resources and has negative environmental effects. Our paper does not make that assumption. A report by Gaines and Stodolsky, from which this paper is derived, offers a more complete discussion of energy and S impacts.

  16. Modeling High Energy Density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albritton, J. R.; Liberman, D. A.; Wilson, B. G.

    1999-11-01

    Ultra-short-pulse lasers are being used to form plasmas at near normal/solid density, heating a target in a time shorter than that on which it can expand. Radiative signatures of the dense plasma conditions are a key diagnostic, and typically require the support of modeling for their design and interpretation. Modeling also often serves to guide the experimental program of work. Here we report on our first attempts to use the INFERNO average-atom atomic model to a construct detailed-configuration-accounting description of the plasma equation-of-state, that is, its distribution of ionization and excitation states, and further, its radiative line, edge, and continuum features.

  17. RPM3: a multifunctional microporous MOF with recyclable framework and high H2 binding energy.

    PubMed

    Lan, Anjian; Li, Kunhao; Wu, Haohan; Kong, Lingzhu; Nijem, Nour; Olson, David H; Emge, Thomas J; Chabal, Yves J; Langreth, David C; Hong, Maochun; Li, Jing

    2009-08-03

    A microporous metal organic framework structure, Zn(2)(bpdc)(2)(bpee).2DMF (DMF: N,N-dimethylformamide), has been synthesized via solvothermal reactions. The compound is a new member of the RPM series (RPM = Rutgers Recyclable Porous Material) that possesses a flexible and recyclable three-dimensional framework containing one-dimensional channels. It exhibits interesting and multifold functionality, including porosity, commensurate adsorption for hydrocarbons, high hydrogen binding energy (determined by isosteric heats of hydrogen adsorption and confirmed by van der Waals density functional calculations) as a result of multifold binding to aromatic ligands (determined by IR spectroscopy), strong photoluminescence emission, and reversible fluorescence quenching properties.

  18. Laser-Plasma Interactions in High-Energy Density Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, C G; Baldis, H A; Schneider, M B; Hinkel, D E; Langdon, A B; Seka, W; Bahr, R; Depierreaux, S

    2005-08-24

    Laser-plasma interactions (LPI) have been studied experimentally in high-temperature, high-energy density plasmas. The studies have been performed using the Omega laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), Rochester, NY. Up to 10 TW of power was incident upon reduced-scale hohlraums, distributed in three laser beam cones. The hot hohlraums fill quickly with plasma. Late in the laser pulse, most of the laser energy is deposited at the laser entrance hole, where most of the LPI takes place. Due to the high electron temperature, the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectrum extends well beyond {omega}{sub 0}/2, due to the Bohm-Gross shift. This high-temperature, high-energy density regime provides a unique opportunity to study LPI beyond inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions.

  19. The phospholipid flippase ATP9A is required for the recycling pathway from the endosomes to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoshiki; Ono, Natsuki; Shima, Takahiro; Tanaka, Gaku; Katoh, Yohei; Nakayama, Kazuhisa; Takatsu, Hiroyuki; Shin, Hye-Won

    2016-01-01

    Type IV P-type ATPases (P4-ATPases) are phospholipid flippases that translocate phospholipids from the exoplasmic (or luminal) to the cytoplasmic leaflet of lipid bilayers. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, P4-ATPases are localized to specific subcellular compartments and play roles in compartment-mediated membrane trafficking; however, roles of mammalian P4-ATPases in membrane trafficking are poorly understood. We previously reported that ATP9A, one of 14 human P4-ATPases, is localized to endosomal compartments and the Golgi complex. In this study, we found that ATP9A is localized to phosphatidylserine (PS)-positive early and recycling endosomes, but not late endosomes, in HeLa cells. Depletion of ATP9A delayed the recycling of transferrin from endosomes to the plasma membrane, although it did not affect the morphology of endosomal structures. Moreover, depletion of ATP9A caused accumulation of glucose transporter 1 in endosomes, probably by inhibiting their recycling. By contrast, depletion of ATP9A affected neither the early/late endosomal transport and degradation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) nor the transport of Shiga toxin B fragment from early/recycling endosomes to the Golgi complex. Therefore ATP9A plays a crucial role in recycling from endosomes to the plasma membrane. PMID:27733620

  20. Low energy stable plasma calibration facility.

    PubMed

    Frederick-Frost, K M; Lynch, K A

    2007-07-01

    We have designed and fabricated a low energy plasma calibration facility for testing and calibration of rocket-borne charged-particle detectors and for the investigation of plasma sheath formation in an environment with ionospheric plasma energies, densities, and Debye lengths. We describe the vacuum system and associated plasma source, which was modified from a Naval Research Laboratory design [Bowles et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 455 (1996)]. Mechanical and electrical modifications to this cylindrical microwave resonant source are outlined together with a different method of operating the magnetron that achieves a stable discharge. This facility produces unmagnetized plasmas with densities from 1x10(3)/cm(3) to 6x10(5)/cm(3), electron temperatures from 0.1 to 1.7 eV, and plasma potentials from 0.5 to 8 V depending on varying input microwave power and neutral gas flow. For the range of input microwave power explored (350-600 W), the energy density of the plasma remains constant because of an inverse relationship between density and temperature. This relationship allows a wide range of Debye lengths (0.3-8.4 cm) to be investigated, which is ideal for simulating the ionospheric plasma sheaths we explore.

  1. Pavement recycling catching on

    SciTech Connect

    Dallaire, G.

    1980-11-01

    The soaring costs of asphalt, aggregates, energy, and labor have revived interest in the recycling of old pavements and road bases. Two types of techniqueshot mix recycling and cold mix recycling are described and compared. The experiences of Wisconsin and Texas with pavement recycling are reviewed. Wisconsin uses the hot mix recycling, while Texas refurbishes its roads with the cold mix recycling. One contractor's doubts about surface recycling of pavements are outlined. (13 photos)

  2. Greening the Department of Energy through waste prevention, recycling, and Federal acquisition. Strategic plan to implement Executive Order 13101

    SciTech Connect

    2000-11-01

    This Plan provides strategies and milestones to implement Executive Order 13101, Greening the Government Through Waste Prevention, Recycling, and Federal Acquisition, and to achieve the new Secretarial goals for 2005 and 2010. It serves as the principal Secretarial guidance to Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, Field Offices, and laboratory and contractor staff to improve sanitary waste prevention, recycling, and the purchase and use of recycled content and environmentally preferable products and services in the DOE.

  3. Assessing recycling versus incineration of key materials in municipal waste: The importance of efficient energy recovery and transport distances

    SciTech Connect

    Merrild, Hanna; Larsen, Anna W.; Christensen, Thomas H.

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the environmental impact of recycling and incineration of household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling of paper, glass, steel and aluminium is better than incineration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling and incineration of cardboard and plastic can be equally good alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclables can be transported long distances and still have environmental benefits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Paper has a higher environmental benefit than recyclables found in smaller amounts. - Abstract: Recycling of materials from municipal solid waste is commonly considered to be superior to any other waste treatment alternative. For the material fractions with a significant energy content this might not be the case if the treatment alternative is a waste-to-energy plant with high energy recovery rates. The environmental impacts from recycling and from incineration of six material fractions in household waste have been compared through life cycle assessment assuming high-performance technologies for material recycling as well as for waste incineration. The results showed that there are environmental benefits when recycling paper, glass, steel and aluminium instead of incinerating it. For cardboard and plastic the results were more unclear, depending on the level of energy recovery at the incineration plant, the system boundaries chosen and which impact category was in focus. Further, the environmental impact potentials from collection, pre-treatment and transport was compared to the environmental benefit from recycling and this showed that with the right means of transport, recyclables can in most cases be transported long distances. However, the results also showed that recycling of some of the material fractions can only contribute marginally in improving the overall waste management system taking into consideration their limited content in average Danish household waste.

  4. Enhancing biomass energy yield from pilot-scale high rate algal ponds with recycling.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J; Shilton, A N

    2013-09-01

    This paper investigates the effect of recycling on biomass energy yield in High Rate Algal Ponds (HRAPs). Two 8 m(3) pilot-scale HRAPs treating primary settled sewage were operated in parallel and monitored over a 2-year period. Volatile suspended solids were measured from both HRAPs and their gravity settlers to determine biomass productivity and harvest efficiency. The energy content of the biomass was also measured. Multiplying biomass productivity and harvest efficiency gives the 'harvestable biomass productivity' and multiplying this by the energy content defines the actual 'biomass energy yield'. In Year 1, algal recycling was implemented in one of the ponds (HRAPr) and improved harvestable biomass productivity by 58% compared with the control (HRAPc) without recycling (HRAPr: 9.2 g/m(2)/d; HRAPc: 5.8 g/m(2)/d). The energy content of the biomass grown in HRAPr, which was dominated by Pediastrun boryanum, was 25% higher than the control HRAPc which contained a mixed culture of 4-5 different algae (HRAPr: 21.5 kJ/g; HRAPc: 18.6 kJ/g). In Year 2, HRAPc was then seeded with the biomass harvested from the P. boryanum dominated HRAPr. This had the effect of shifting algal dominance from 89% Dictyosphaerium sp. (which is poorly-settleable) to over 90% P. boryanum in 5 months. Operation of this pond was then switched to recycling its own harvested biomass, which maintained P. boryanum dominance for the rest of Year 2. This result confirms, for the first time in the literature, that species control is possible for similarly sized co-occurring algal colonies in outdoor HRAP by algal recycling. With regard to the overall improvement in biomass energy yield, which is a critical parameter in the context of algal cultivation for biofuels, the combined improvements that recycling triggered in biomass productivity, harvest efficiency and energy content enhanced the harvested biomass energy yield by 66% (HRAPr: 195 kJ/m(2)/day; HRAPc: 118 kJ/m(2)/day). Copyright © 2013

  5. Endosome-to-Plasma Membrane Recycling of VEGFR2 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Regulates Endothelial Function and Blood Vessel Formation.

    PubMed

    Jopling, Helen M; Odell, Adam F; Pellet-Many, Caroline; Latham, Antony M; Frankel, Paul; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu; Walker, John H; Zachary, Ian C; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2014-04-29

    Rab GTPases are implicated in endosome-to-plasma membrane recycling, but how such membrane traffic regulators control vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2/KDR) dynamics and function are not well understood. Here, we evaluated two different recycling Rab GTPases, Rab4a and Rab11a, in regulating endothelial VEGFR2 trafficking and signalling with implications for endothelial cell migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. In primary endothelial cells, VEGFR2 displays co-localisation with Rab4a, but not Rab11a GTPase, on early endosomes. Expression of a guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-bound Rab4a S22N mutant caused increased VEGFR2 accumulation in endosomes. TfR and VEGFR2 exhibited differences in endosome-to-plasma membrane recycling in the presence of chloroquine. Depletion of Rab4a, but not Rab11a, levels stimulated VEGF-A-dependent intracellular signalling. However, depletion of either Rab4a or Rab11a levels inhibited VEGF-A-stimulated endothelial cell migration. Interestingly, depletion of Rab4a levels stimulated VEGF-A-regulated endothelial cell proliferation. Rab4a and Rab11a were also both required for endothelial tubulogenesis. Evaluation of a transgenic zebrafish model showed that both Rab4 and Rab11a are functionally required for blood vessel formation and animal viability. Rab-dependent endosome-to-plasma membrane recycling of VEGFR2 is important for intracellular signalling, cell migration and proliferation during angiogenesis.

  6. Delayed recycling of plasma FFA in mice: revised model of turnover and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Baker, N; Gan-Elepano, M; Guthrie, B A; Mead, J F

    1987-11-01

    We have reexamined the concept of the irreversible disposal rate (IDR) or fractional catabolic rate (FCR) in relation to the oxidation of a major metabolic fuel, plasma free fatty acids (FFA), in mice. We measured the disappearance of intravenously injected [1-14C]palmitate complexed to mouse serum albumin from the circulation of normal mice fed ad libitum and fasted approximately 4 h before tracer injection. We also measured the appearance of expired 14CO2 in the breath. Using multicompartmental analyses (SAAM) we found that, in contrast to earlier studies in this and other mammals where the estimated IDR has always been two to three times greater than the oxidative rate, the IDR (FCR) corresponded closely to the fractional rate of plasma FFA oxidation to CO2. This rate could be estimated accurately in a study of 10- to 15-min duration. In an extended study (5-h duration) we obtained kinetic evidence of a major transport pathway that involves delayed recycling of FFA through at least several unidentified relatively slowly turning compartments.

  7. HIGH ENERGY GASEOUS PLASMA CONTAINMENT DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Josephson, V.; Hammel, J.E.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presenied for producing neutrons as a result of collisions between ions in high temperature plasmas. The invention resides in the particular arrangement of ihe device whereby ihe magneiic and electric fields are made to cross at substantially right angles in several places along a torus shaped containment vessel. A plasma of deuterium gas is generated in the vessel under the electric fields and is "trapped" in any one of the "crossed field" regions to produce a release of energy.

  8. Laser-Plasma Interactions in High-Energy-Density Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baldis, H

    2006-10-17

    High temperature hohlraums (HTH) are designed to reach high radiation temperatures by coupling a maximum amount of laser energy into a small target in a short time. These 400-800 {micro}m diameter gold cylinders rapidly fill with hot plasma during irradiation with multiple beams in 1ns laser pulses. The high-Z plasmas are dense, (electron density, n{sub e}/n{sub c} {approx} 0.1-0.4), hot (electron temperature, T{sub e} {approx} 10keV) and are bathed in a high-temperature radiation field (radiation temperature, T{sub rad} {approx} 300eV). Here n{sub c}, the critical density, equals 9 x 10{sup 21}/cm{sup 3}. The laser beams heating this plasma are intense ({approx} 10{sup 15} - 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}). The coupling of the laser to the plasma is a rich regime for Laser-Plasma Interaction (LPI) physics. The LPI mechanisms in this study include beam deflection and forward scattering. In order to understand the LPI mechanisms, the plasma parameters must be known. An L-band spectrometer is used to measure the and electron temperature. A ride-along experiment is to develop the x-radiation emitted by the thin back wall of the half-hohlraum into a thermal radiation source.

  9. U.S. Department of Energy National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, V.; Bennett, M.; Bishop, L.

    1998-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle has recently been established. The vision of this new program is to develop a DOE culture that promotes pollution prevention by considering the recycle and reuse of metal as the first and primary disposition option and burial as a last option. The Center of Excellence takes the approach that unrestricted release of metal is the first priority because it is the most cost-effective disposition pathway. Where this is not appropriate, restricted release, beneficial reuse, and stockpile of ingots are considered. Current recycling activities include the sale of 40,000 tons of scrap metal from the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Plant) K-770 scrap yard, K-1064 surplus equipment and machinery, 7,000 PCB-contaminated drums, 12,000 tons of metal from the Y-l2 scrap yard, and 1,000 metal pallets. In addition, the Center of Excellence is developing a toolbox for project teams that will contain a number of specific tools to facilitate metals recycle. This Internet-based toolbox will include primers, computer programs, and case studies designed to help sites to perform life cycle analysis, perform ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) analysis for radiation exposures, provide pollution prevention information and documentation, and produce independent government estimates. The use of these tools is described for two current activities: disposition of scrap metal in the Y-12 scrapyard, and disposition of PCB-contaminated drums.

  10. Vacuum energy of a spherical plasma shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordag, M.; Khusnutdinov, N.

    2008-04-01

    We consider the vacuum energy of the electromagnetic field interacting with a spherical plasma shell together with a model for the classical motion of the shell. We calculate the heat kernel coefficients, especially that for the TM mode, and carry out the renormalization by redefining the parameters of the classical model. It turns out that this is possible and results in a model which, in the limit of the plasma shell becoming an ideal conductor, reproduces the vacuum energy found by Boyer in 1968.

  11. Biomass recycle as a means to improve the energy efficiency of CELSS algal culture systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R.; Cox, J.; Lieberman, D.; Behrens, P.; Arnett, K.

    1987-01-01

    Algal cultures can be very rapid and efficient means to generate biomass and regenerate the atmosphere for closed environmental life support systems. However, as in the case of most higher plants, a significant fraction of the biomass produced by most algae cannot be directly converted to a useful food product by standard food technology procedures. This waste biomass will serve as an energy drain on the overall system unless it can be efficiently recycled without a significant loss of its energy content. Experiments are reported in which cultures of the alga Scenedesmus obliquus were grown in the light and at the expense of an added carbon source, which either replaced or supplemented the actinic light. As part of these experiments, hydrolyzed waste biomass from these same algae were tested to determine whether the algae themselves could be made part of the biological recycling process. Results indicate that hydrolyzed algal (and plant) biomass can serve as carbon and energy sources for the growth of these algae, suggesting that the efficiency of the closed system could be significantly improved using this recycling process.

  12. Improving Energy Efficiency and Enabling Water Recycle in Biorefineries Using Bioelectrochemical Cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Borole, Abhijeet P

    2010-01-01

    Improving biofuel yield and water reuse are two important issues in further development of biorefineries. The total energy content of liquid fuels (including ethanol and hydrocarbon) produced from cellulosic biomass via biochemical or hybrid bio-thermochemical routes can vary from 49% to 70% of the biomass entering the biorefinery, on an energy basis. Use of boiler for combustion of residual organics and lignin results in significant energy and water losses. An alternate process to improve energy recovery from the residual organic streams is via use of bioelectrochemical systems such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs) microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). The potential advantages of this alternative scheme in a biorefinery include minimization of heat loss and generation of a higher value product, hydrogen. The need for 5-15 gallons of water per gallon of ethanol can be reduced significantly via recycle of water after MEC treatment. Removal of inhibitory byproducts such as furans, phenolics and acetate in MFC/MECs to generate energy, thus, has dual advantages including improvements in energy efficiency and ability to recycle water. Conversion of the sugar- and lignin- degradation products to hydrogen is synergistic with biorefinery hydrogen requirements for upgrading F-T liquids and other byproducts to high-octane fuels and/or high value products. Some of these products include sorbitol, succinic acid, furan and levulinate derivatives, glycols, polyols, 1,4-butenadiol, phenolics polymers, etc. Potential process alternatives utilizing MECs in biorefineries capable of improving energy efficiency by up to 30% are discussed.

  13. U.S. Department of Energy National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, V.; Bennett, M.; Bishop, L.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle has recently been established. The vision of this new program is to develop a DOE culture that promotes pollution prevention by considering the recycle and reuse of metal as the first and primary disposition option and burial as a last option. The Center of Excellence takes the approach that unrestricted release of metal is the first priority because it is the most cost-effective disposition pathway. Where this is not appropriate, restricted release, beneficial reuse, and stockpile of ingots are considered. The Center has gotten off to a fast start. Current recycling activities include the sale of 40,000 tons of scrap metal from the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Plant) K-770 scrap yard, K-1064 surplus equipment and machinery, 7,000 PCB-contaminated drums, 12,000 tons of metal from the Y-12 scrap yard, and 1,000 metal pallets. In addition, the Center of Excellence is developing a toolbox for project teams that will contain a number of specific tools to facilitate metals recycle. This Internet-based toolbox will include primers, computer software, and case studies designed to help sites to perform life cycle analysis, perform ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) analysis for radiation exposures, produce pollution prevention information and documentation, manage their materials inventory, produce independent government estimates, and implement sale/service contracts. The use of these tools is described for two current activities: disposition of scrap metal in the Y-12 scrap yard, and disposition of PCB-contaminated drums. Members of the Center look forward to working with all DOE sites, regulatory authorities, the private sector, and other stakeholders to achieve the metals recycle goals.

  14. Plasma polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) levels of workers in a transformer recycling company, their family members, and employees of surrounding companies.

    PubMed

    Schettgen, Thomas; Gube, Monika; Esser, Andre; Alt, Anne; Kraus, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In spring 2010, high internal exposures (up to 236 μg/L plasma) for the sum of indicator polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) were discovered in workers in a transformer recycling company in Germany, where PCB-contaminated material was not handled according to proper occupational hygiene. The release of PCB from this company raised growing concerns regarding possible adverse human health effects correlated with this exposure. This provided a basis for a large biological monitoring study in order to examine the internal exposure to PCB in individuals working in that recycling company, their family members, and relatives, as well as subjects working or living in the surroundings of this company. Blood samples from 116 individuals (formerly) employed in the transformer recycling company and 45 direct relatives of these persons were obtained. Further, blood samples of 190 subjects working in close vicinity of the recycling plant, 277 persons working in the larger area, and 41 residents of the area were investigated. Plasma samples were analyzed for the 6 indicator PCB (PCB 28, 52, 101, 138, 153, 180) and 12 dioxin-like PCB using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS; limit of detection [LOD] at 0.01 μg/L). Median concentrations (maximum) for the sum of the 6 indicator PCB in blood of the employees, their relatives, individuals working in close vicinity, persons working in the larger area, and the residents were 3.68 (236.3), 1.86 (22.8), 1.34 (22.9), 1.19 (6.42), and 0.85 (7.22) μg/L plasma, respectively. The (former) employees of the transformer recycling plant partly showed the highest plasma PCB levels determined thus far in Germany. Even family members displayed highly elevated levels of PCB in blood due to contaminations of their homes by laundering of contaminated clothes. Vicinity to the recycling plant including reported contact with possibly contaminated scrap was the main contributor to the PCB levels of the workers of the surrounding companies. Residents

  15. Assessing recycling versus incineration of key materials in municipal waste: The importance of efficient energy recovery and transport distances.

    PubMed

    Merrild, Hanna; Larsen, Anna W; Christensen, Thomas H

    2012-05-01

    Recycling of materials from municipal solid waste is commonly considered to be superior to any other waste treatment alternative. For the material fractions with a significant energy content this might not be the case if the treatment alternative is a waste-to-energy plant with high energy recovery rates. The environmental impacts from recycling and from incineration of six material fractions in household waste have been compared through life cycle assessment assuming high-performance technologies for material recycling as well as for waste incineration. The results showed that there are environmental benefits when recycling paper, glass, steel and aluminium instead of incinerating it. For cardboard and plastic the results were more unclear, depending on the level of energy recovery at the incineration plant, the system boundaries chosen and which impact category was in focus. Further, the environmental impact potentials from collection, pre-treatment and transport was compared to the environmental benefit from recycling and this showed that with the right means of transport, recyclables can in most cases be transported long distances. However, the results also showed that recycling of some of the material fractions can only contribute marginally in improving the overall waste management system taking into consideration their limited content in average Danish household waste. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The phospholipid flippase ATP9A is required for the recycling pathway from the endosomes to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshiki; Ono, Natsuki; Shima, Takahiro; Tanaka, Gaku; Katoh, Yohei; Nakayama, Kazuhisa; Takatsu, Hiroyuki; Shin, Hye-Won

    2016-12-01

    Type IV P-type ATPases (P4-ATPases) are phospholipid flippases that translocate phospholipids from the exoplasmic (or luminal) to the cytoplasmic leaflet of lipid bilayers. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, P4-ATPases are localized to specific subcellular compartments and play roles in compartment-mediated membrane trafficking; however, roles of mammalian P4-ATPases in membrane trafficking are poorly understood. We previously reported that ATP9A, one of 14 human P4-ATPases, is localized to endosomal compartments and the Golgi complex. In this study, we found that ATP9A is localized to phosphatidylserine (PS)-positive early and recycling endosomes, but not late endosomes, in HeLa cells. Depletion of ATP9A delayed the recycling of transferrin from endosomes to the plasma membrane, although it did not affect the morphology of endosomal structures. Moreover, depletion of ATP9A caused accumulation of glucose transporter 1 in endosomes, probably by inhibiting their recycling. By contrast, depletion of ATP9A affected neither the early/late endosomal transport and degradation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) nor the transport of Shiga toxin B fragment from early/recycling endosomes to the Golgi complex. Therefore ATP9A plays a crucial role in recycling from endosomes to the plasma membrane. © 2016 Tanaka, Ono, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  17. Hydrogen Gas Recycling for Energy Efficient Ammonia Recovery in Electrochemical Systems.

    PubMed

    Kuntke, Philipp; Rodríguez Arredondo, Mariana; Widyakristi, Laksminarastri; Ter Heijne, Annemiek; Sleutels, Tom H J A; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Buisman, Cees J N

    2017-03-07

    Recycling of hydrogen gas (H2) produced at the cathode to the anode in an electrochemical system allows for energy efficient TAN (Total Ammonia Nitrogen) recovery. Using a H2 recycling electrochemical system (HRES) we achieved high TAN transport rates at low energy input. At a current density of 20 A m(-2), TAN removal rate from the influent was 151 gN m(-2) d(-1) at an energy demand of 26.1 kJ gN(-1). The maximum TAN transport rate of 335 gN m(-2) d(-1) was achieved at a current density of 50 A m(-2) and an energy demand of 56.3 kJ gN(-1). High TAN removal efficiency (73-82%) and recovery (60-73%) were reached in all experiments. Therefore, our HRES is a promising alternative for electrochemical and bioelectrochemical TAN recovery. Advantages are the lower energy input and lower risk of chloride oxidation compared to electrochemical technologies and high rates and independence of organic matter compared to bioelectrochemical systems.

  18. Investigation of energy parameters of the plasma-resistive furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anshakov, A. S.; Aliferov, A. I.; Domarov, P. V.

    2016-09-01

    The electrical and thermal characteristics of plasma-resistive furnace in the drying zone at a recycling manmade waste were studied. The dependences of power output in the drying zone at different specific electrical resistances of the charge were derived. It is shown that introduction of additional resistance heating in the drying zone reduces the load on plasmatorch, increasing the lifetime of electrodes.

  19. Vacuum arc plasma thrusters with inductive energy storage driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A plasma thruster with a cylindrical inner and cylindrical outer electrode generates plasma particles from the application of energy stored in an inductor to a surface suitable for the formation of a plasma and expansion of plasma particles. The plasma production results in the generation of charged particles suitable for generating a reaction force, and the charged particles are guided by a magnetic field produced by the same inductor used to store the energy used to form the plasma.

  20. Deinking of recycled pulps using column flotation: Energy and environmental benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Chaiarrekij, S.; Dhingra, H.; Ramarao, B.V.

    1999-07-01

    Deinking of recycled pulps is an important operation intended to provide pulps appropriate for making paper and paperboard products from recycled wastepaper. Conventionally, deinking of recycled pulp is conducted in a flotation cell equipped with an agitator. The authors have investigated the applicability of a new flotation cell based on a column without an agitator present to accomplish the deinking of typical wastepaper feedstocks and also a feedstock consisting of rejects from a conventional deinking cell. Experimental results on the deinking operation indicate that it is possible to achieve deinking of a mixture of photocopier and laserprinted paper in the column flotation cell. The performance of the column as measured by the resultant pulp's brightness and ink particle size distributions is comparable to that of a conventional laboratory cell which incorporates severe agitation regimens. Thus, it is found that the agitator can be eliminated by using the column flotation design which could yield significant electrical energy savings in addition to savings in capital costs and other operational and maintenance costs. A series of deinking experiments were also performed on a feedstock consisting of rejected waste obtained from a conventional cell in a pilot plant. The authors found that de-inking of the rejected waste could yield significant usable fiber. This indicates the potential of the column flotation technique in enhancing the reuse of a waste component thus reducing the volume of deinking waste rejected into the environment.

  1. Modeling of particle and energy transport in the edge plasma of Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M.V.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Terry, J.L.

    1999-07-01

    In the present study recycling and transport in the edge plasma of Alcator C-Mod [I. H. Hutchinson {ital et al.}, Phys. Plasmas {bold 1}, 1511 (1994)] is modeled and analyzed with the multi-fluid code UEDGE [T. D. Rognlien {ital et al.}, J. Nucl. Mater. {bold 196{endash}198}, 347 (1992)]. Matching the experimental plasma density profiles in the scrape-off layer (SOL) requires a spatially dependent effective anomalous diffusion coefficient D{sub {perpendicular}} growing rapidly towards the wall. The midplane pressure of neutral gas, P{sub mid}, is a key parameter that reflects the magnitude of anomalous transport of plasma from the core. Recycling of plasma on the main chamber wall appears to be quite significant, especially in the case of high P{sub mid}{approximately}0.3 mTorr when the main wall provides {approximately}70{percent} of recycling neutrals in the main chamber. In the upper SOL (well above the {ital x} point) draining of particles by the poloidal flow is weak and thus the particle balance is predominantly radial. For the radial heat transport it is found that energy flux carried by radial plasma convection and by charge-exchange (CX) neutrals is quite significant in SOL. In the high P{sub mid} case, heat conduction by CX neutrals along with radial heat convection by plasma carries most of the power flux ({approximately}75{percent}) across the last closed flux surface. Even in the low P{sub mid} case, heat conduction by CX neutrals dominates the radial heat flux far out in the SOL. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Energy conversion in the coronal plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, P. C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Solar and stellar X-ray emission are the observed waste products of the interplay between magnetic fields and the motion of stellar plasma. Theoretical understanding of the process of coronal heating is of utmost importance, since the high temperature is what defines the corona in the first place. Most of the research described deals with the aspects of the several rivalling theories for coronal heating. The rest of the papers deal with processes of energy conversion related to flares.

  3. Integrated renewable energy/organic waste recycling system. Final report, July 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Hamburg, R.A.; Davenport, S.

    1982-01-01

    Two operating systems for integrated recycling of organic materials are described. The systems include Chinese water-pressure design biogas digesters/solar greenhouses/and algae and aquatic plant ponds-all in passive symbiotic relationships with a minimum of technological sophistication. Economic, Financial and Net Energy Analyses of these systems have been done with concern toward long term environmental effects. A discussion of fish ponds and fuel alcohol production is also included since they offer much potential for expanded integration. 21 tabs.

  4. CFB`s make waste-to-energy, recycling `perfect together`

    SciTech Connect

    Makansi, J.

    1997-05-01

    Proponents of circulating fluidized-bed boilers have long thought that the technology could align the objectives of recycling and waste-to-energy (WTC) enthusiasts. More than seven years in the making, the Robbins (III) Resource Recovery facility is the proof. Its success could invigorate a moribund market for WTE in North America, but the design is already being applied overseas. Robbins, located just south of Chicago, is not only the first large-scale application of CFB technology for waste combustion in North America, it is the largest facility of its type worldwide, though the concept has been applied commercially in other countries, such as Japan.

  5. The Rab11-FIP1/RCP gene codes for multiple protein transcripts related to the plasma membrane recycling system.

    PubMed

    Jin, Min; Goldenring, James R

    2006-06-01

    Rab11a is a member of the Rab11 small GTPase family, and plays an important role in plasma membrane recycling. Rab11-Family Interacting Protein 1 (Rab11-FIP1) binds to Rab11 through a carboxyl-terminal amphipathic alpha helix. We have identified eight alternatively spliced Rab11-FIP1 gene transcripts from human chromosome 8. Among them, Rab11-FIP1A-D have carboxyl terminal Rab11 binding domains, while Rab11-FIP1E-H do not contain the Rab11 binding domain. While Rab11-FIP1B and F gene transcripts are ubiquitous, other Rab11-FIP1 transcripts demonstrate more limited patterns of expression in human tissue cDNAs. EGFP-Rab11-FIP1A-D proteins over-expressed in HeLa cells targeted to Rab11a-containing membranes, while EGFP-Rab11-FIP1E/F and H proteins did not localize with recycling system membranes. However, transferrin trafficking was not significantly altered in HeLa cells over-expressing expressing any of the EGFP-Rab11-FIP1 proteins. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies specific for Rab11-FIP1B and Rab11-FIP1C/RCP demonstrated that Rab11-FIP1B and Rab11-FIP1C/RCP are expressed endogenously. Strikingly, endogenous staining for Rab11-FIP1C/RCP only partially co-localized with EGFP-Rab11-FIP1A, EGFP-Rab11-FIP1B, and EGFP-Rab11a in the perinuclear region, indicating that Rab11-FIP1C/RCP resides in a differentiable subcellular compartment within the plasma membrane recycling system compared with Rab11-FIP1A and Rab11-FIP1B. These data suggest that Rab11-FIP1 proteins may play coordinated roles in regulating plasma membrane recycling with regional specificity within the Rab11a-containing recycling system.

  6. Impact of recycling on cradle-to-gate energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of automotive lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Jennifer B; Gaines, Linda; Sullivan, John; Wang, Michael Q

    2012-11-20

    This paper addresses the environmental burdens (energy consumption and air emissions, including greenhouse gases, GHGs) of the material production, assembly, and recycling of automotive lithium-ion batteries in hybrid electric, plug-in hybrid electric, and battery electric vehicles (BEV) that use LiMn(2)O(4) cathode material. In this analysis, we calculated the energy consumed and air emissions generated when recovering LiMn(2)O(4), aluminum, and copper in three recycling processes (hydrometallurgical, intermediate physical, and direct physical recycling) and examined the effect(s) of closed-loop recycling on environmental impacts of battery production. We aimed to develop a U.S.-specific analysis of lithium-ion battery production and in particular sought to resolve literature discrepancies concerning energy consumed during battery assembly. Our analysis takes a process-level (versus a top-down) approach. For a battery used in a BEV, we estimated cradle-to-gate energy and GHG emissions of 75 MJ/kg battery and 5.1 kg CO(2)e/kg battery, respectively. Battery assembly consumes only 6% of this total energy. These results are significantly less than reported in studies that take a top-down approach. We further estimate that direct physical recycling of LiMn(2)O(4), aluminum, and copper in a closed-loop scenario can reduce energy consumption during material production by up to 48%.

  7. Cholesterol and F-actin are required for clustering of recycling synaptic vesicle proteins in the presynaptic plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Dason, Jeffrey S; Smith, Alex J; Marin, Leo; Charlton, Milton P

    2014-01-01

    AbstractSynaptic vesicles (SVs) and their proteins must be recycled for sustained synaptic transmission. We tested the hypothesis that SV cholesterol is required for proper sorting of SV proteins during recycling in live presynaptic terminals. We used the reversible block of endocytosis in the Drosophila temperature-sensitive dynamin mutant shibire-ts1 to trap exocytosed SV proteins, and then examined the effect of experimental treatments on the distribution of these proteins within the presynaptic plasma membrane by confocal microscopy. SV proteins synaptotagmin, vglut and csp were clustered following SV trapping in control experiments but dispersed in samples treated with the cholesterol chelator methyl-β-cyclodextrin to extract SV cholesterol. There was accumulation of phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2) in presynaptic terminals following SV trapping and this was reduced following SV cholesterol extraction. Reduced PIP2 accumulation was associated with disrupted accumulation of actin in presynaptic terminals. Similar to vesicular cholesterol extraction, disruption of actin by latrunculin A after SV proteins had been trapped on the plasma membrane resulted in the dispersal of SV proteins and prevented recovery of synaptic transmission due to impaired endocytosis following relief of the endocytic block. Our results demonstrate that vesicular cholesterol is required for aggregation of exocytosed SV proteins in the presynaptic plasma membrane and are consistent with a mechanism involving regulation of PIP2 accumulation and local actin polymerization by cholesterol. Thus, alteration of membrane or SV lipids may affect the ability of synapses to undergo sustained synaptic transmission by compromising the recycling of SV proteins. PMID:24297851

  8. Recycling of glucagon receptor to plasma membrane increases in adipocytes of obese rats by soy protein; implications for glucagon resistance.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Villegas, Laura A; Tovar-Palacio, Claudia; Palacios-González, Berenice; Torres, Nimbe; Tovar, Armando R; Díaz-Villaseñor, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    Hyperglucagonemia contributes to hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Previously, we have found that soy protein normalized fasting hyperglucagonemia in obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats, sensitizing the HSL-lipolytic signaling pathway in white adipose tissue (WAT), however the mechanism remains unknown. Zucker (fa/fa) rats were fed casein or soy protein diet in combination with soybean or coconut oil. Glucagon receptor (GR) was increased at the plasma membrane of adipocytes of rats fed soy protein compared to those fed casein, without changes in total GR abundance. The protein abundance of Rab4, a GTPase involved in GR fast recycling, was dramatically up-regulated in adipocytes of rats fed soy protein. The proportion of GR bound to Rab4 or to RAMP2, involved in promoting GR ligand-binding and G protein selectivity, increased when soy protein was combined with soybean oil as fat source. In rats fed soy protein with coconut oil, Rab11 levels, a protein involved in the slow recycling of GR, was also increased. Soy protein increases GR recycling to the membrane of adipocytes and its ligand-binding and G protein selectivity, suggesting, it could be used in T2D dietary treatment to reestablish glucagon sensitivity in WAT, leading to the regulation of circulating glucagon levels. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Solid-shape energy fuels from recyclable municipal solid waste and plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gug, Jeongin

    Diversion of waste streams, such as plastics, wood and paper, from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest across the country, especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling MSW (municipal solid waste) is to burn the high energy content components in standard coal boilers. This research seeks to reform wastes into briquette that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, moisture resistance, and retain high fuel value. Household waste with high paper and fibers content was used as the base material for this study. It was combined with recyclable plastics such as PE, PP, PET and PS for enhanced binding and energy efficiency. Fuel pellets were processed using a compression molding technique. The resulting moisture absorption, proximate analysis from burning, and mechanical properties were investigated after sample production and then compared with reference data for commercial coals and biomass briquettes. The effects of moisture content, compression pressure and processing temperature were studied to identify the optimal processing conditions with water uptake tests for the durability of samples under humid conditions and burning tests to examine the composition of samples. Lastly, mechanical testing revealed the structural stability of solid fuels. The properties of fuel briquettes produced from waste and recycled plastics improved with higher processing temperature but without charring the material. Optimization of moisture content and removal of air bubbles increased the density, stability and mechanical strength. The sample composition was found to be more similar to biomass fuels than coals because the majority of the starting material was paper-based solid waste. According to the proximate analysis results, the waste fuels can be expected to have

  10. Plasma Focusing of High Energy Density Electron and Positron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Johnny S.T.

    2000-10-09

    We present results from the SLAC E-150 experiment on plasma focusing of high energy density electron and, for the first time, positron beams. We also present results on plasma lens-induced synchrotron radiation, longitudinal dynamics of plasma focusing, and laser- and beam-plasma interactions.

  11. Improving the actinides recycling in closed fuel cycles, a major step towards nuclear energy sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Poinssot, C.; Grandjean, S.; Masson, M.; Bouillis, B.; Warin, D.

    2013-07-01

    Increasing the sustainability of nuclear energy is a longstanding road that requires a stepwise approach to successively tackle the following 3 objectives. First of all, optimize the consumption of natural resource to preserve them for future generations and hence guarantee the energetic independence of the countries (no uranium ore is needed anymore). The current twice-through cycle of Pu implemented by France, UK, Japan and soon China is a first step in this direction and already allows the development and optimization of the relevant industrial processes. It also allows a major improvement regarding the conditioning of the ultimate waste in a durable and robust nuclear glass. Secondly, the recycling of americium could be an interesting option for the future with the deployment of FR fleet to save the repository resource and optimize its use by allowing a denser disposal. It would limit the burden towards the future generations and the need for additional repositories before several centuries. Thirdly, the recycling of the whole minor actinides inventory could be an interesting option for the far-future for strongly decreasing the waste long-term toxicity, down to a few centuries. It would bring the waste issue back within the human history, which should promote its acceptance by the social opinion.

  12. Speculations about plasma free energy, 50 years later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, T. K.

    2016-10-01

    Plasma free energy is that part of the total energy that feeds the growth of turbulence. The most successful free energy formulation in plasma physics is the MHD Energy Principle - successful because, within magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), the free energy is both exact and self-adjoint (or Hermitian). A corresponding result in Vlasov theory is the free energy of equilibria neighbouring stable Maxwellian states - again giving a free energy of Hermitian form for the linearized equations. Since quantum mechanics is inherently Hermitian, here I speculate that quantum free energy is the ultimate way to understand classical plasma dynamics.

  13. Processing and properties of a solid energy fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW) and recycled plastics.

    PubMed

    Gug, JeongIn; Cacciola, David; Sobkowicz, Margaret J

    2015-01-01

    Diversion of waste streams such as plastics, woods, papers and other solid trash from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling municipal solid waste (MSW) is to burn the high-energy-content components in standard coal power plant. This research aims to reform wastes into briquettes that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, free of hazardous contaminants, and moisture resistant, while retaining high fuel value. This study aims to investigate the effects of processing conditions and added recyclable plastics on the properties of MSW solid fuels. A well-sorted waste stream high in paper and fiber content was combined with controlled levels of recyclable plastics PE, PP, PET and PS and formed into briquettes using a compression molding technique. The effect of added plastics and moisture content on binding attraction and energy efficiency were investigated. The stability of the briquettes to moisture exposure, the fuel composition by proximate analysis, briquette mechanical strength, and burning efficiency were evaluated. It was found that high processing temperature ensures better properties of the product addition of milled mixed plastic waste leads to better encapsulation as well as to greater calorific value. Also some moisture removal (but not complete) improves the compacting process and results in higher heating value. Analysis of the post-processing water uptake and compressive strength showed a correlation between density and stability to both mechanical stress and humid environment. Proximate analysis indicated heating values comparable to coal. The results showed that mechanical and moisture uptake stability were improved when the moisture and air contents were optimized. Moreover, the briquette

  14. Measurements of plasma bremsstrahlung and plasma energy density produced by electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noland, Jonathan David

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to gain an understanding on the relative importance of microwave power, neutral pressure, and magnetic field configuration on the behavior of the hot electrons within an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) plasma. This was carried out through measurement of plasma bremsstrahlung with both NaI(Tl) (hv > 30 keV) and CdTe (2 keV < hv < 70 keV) x-ray detectors, and through measurement of the plasma energy density with a diamagnetic loop placed around the plasma chamber. We also examined the anisotropy in x-ray power by simultaneously measuring the x-ray spectra in two orthogonal directions: radially and axially, using NaI(Tl) detectors. We have seen that for a 6.4 GHz ECRIS, both the x-ray power produced by confined electrons and the plasma energy density behave logarithmically with microwave power. The x-ray flux created by electrons lost from the plasma, however, does not saturate. Thus, the small increase in plasma density that occurred at high microwave powers (> 150 W on a 6.4 GHz ECRIS) was accompanied by a large increase in total x-ray power. We suggest that the saturation of x-ray power and plasma energy density was due to rf-induced pitch-angle scattering of the electrons. X-ray power and plasma energy density were also shown to saturate with neutral pressure, and to increase nearly linearly as the gradient of the magnetic field in the resonance zone was decreased. All of these findings were in agreement with the theoretical models describing ECRIS plasmas. We have discussed the use of a diamagnetic loop as a means of exploring various plasma time scales on a relative basis. Specifically, we focused much of our attention on studying how changing ion source parameters, such as microwave power and neutral pressure, would effect the rise and decay of the integrated diamagnetic signal, which can be related to plasma energy density. We showed that increasing microwave power lowers the e-fold times at both the leading

  15. Non-Enzymatic RNA Backbone Proofreading through Energy-Dissipative Recycling.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Angelica; Sutherland, John D

    2017-06-01

    Non-enzymatic oligomerization of activated ribonucleotides leads to ribonucleic acids that contain a mixture of 2',5'- and 3',5'-linkages, and overcoming this backbone heterogeneity has long been considered a major limitation to the prebiotic emergence of RNA. Herein, we demonstrate non-enzymatic chemistry that progressively converts 2',5'-linkages into 3',5'-linkages through iterative degradation and repair. The energetic costs of this proofreading are met by the hydrolytic turnover of a phosphate activating agent and an acylating agent. With multiple rounds of this energy-dissipative recycling, we show that all-3',5'-linked duplex RNA can emerge from a backbone heterogeneous mixture, thereby delineating a route that could have driven RNA evolution on the early earth. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Processing and properties of a solid energy fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW) and recycled plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Gug, JeongIn Cacciola, David Sobkowicz, Margaret J.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Briquetting was used to produce solid fuels from municipal solid waste and recycled plastics. • Optimal drying, processing temperature and pressure were found to produce stable briquettes. • Addition of waste plastics yielded heating values comparable with typical coal feedstocks. • This processing method improves utilization of paper and plastic diverted from landfills. - Abstract: Diversion of waste streams such as plastics, woods, papers and other solid trash from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling municipal solid waste (MSW) is to burn the high-energy-content components in standard coal power plant. This research aims to reform wastes into briquettes that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, free of hazardous contaminants, and moisture resistant, while retaining high fuel value. This study aims to investigate the effects of processing conditions and added recyclable plastics on the properties of MSW solid fuels. A well-sorted waste stream high in paper and fiber content was combined with controlled levels of recyclable plastics PE, PP, PET and PS and formed into briquettes using a compression molding technique. The effect of added plastics and moisture content on binding attraction and energy efficiency were investigated. The stability of the briquettes to moisture exposure, the fuel composition by proximate analysis, briquette mechanical strength, and burning efficiency were evaluated. It was found that high processing temperature ensures better properties of the product addition of milled mixed plastic waste leads to better encapsulation as well as to greater calorific value. Also some moisture removal (but not complete) improves the compacting process and results in

  17. Magnetized Plasma Compression for Fusion Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnan, James; Grabowski, Christopher; Domonkos, Matthew; Amdahl, David

    2013-10-01

    Magnetized Plasma Compression (MPC) uses magnetic inhibition of thermal conduction and enhancement of charge particle product capture to greatly reduce the temporal and spatial compression required relative to un-magnetized inertial fusion (IFE)--to microseconds, centimeters vs nanoseconds, sub-millimeter. MPC greatly reduces the required confinement time relative to MFE--to microseconds vs minutes. Proof of principle can be demonstrated or refuted using high current pulsed power driven compression of magnetized plasmas using magnetic pressure driven implosions of metal shells, known as imploding liners. This can be done at a cost of a few tens of millions of dollars. If demonstrated, it becomes worthwhile to develop repetitive implosion drivers. One approach is to use arrays of heavy ion beams for energy production, though with much less temporal and spatial compression than that envisioned for un-magnetized IFE, with larger compression targets, and with much less ambitious compression ratios. A less expensive, repetitive pulsed power driver, if feasible, would require engineering development for transient, rapidly replaceable transmission lines such as envisioned by Sandia National Laboratories. Supported by DOE-OFES.

  18. Characterisation of the deuterium recycling at the W divertor target plates in JET during steady-state plasma conditions and ELMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brezinsek, S.; Wiesen, S.; Harting, D.; Guillemaut, C.; Webster, A. J.; Heinola, K.; Meigs, A. G.; Rack, M.; Gao, Y.; Sergienko, G.; Philipps, V.; Stamp, M. F.; Jachmich, S.; Contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    Experiments in the JET tokamak equipped with the ITER-like wall (ILW) revealed that the inner and outer target plate at the location of the strike points represent after one year of operation intact tungsten (W) surfaces without any beryllium (Be) surface coverage. The dynamics of near-surface retention, implantation, desorption and recycling of deuterium (D) in the divertor of plasma discharges are determined by W target plates. As the W plasma-facing components (PFCs) are not actively cooled, the surface temperature (T surface) is increasing with plasma exposure, varying the balance between these processes in addition to the impinging deuteron fluxes and energies. The dynamic behaviour on a slow time scale of seconds was quantified in a series of identical L-mode discharges (JET Pulse Number (JPN) \\# 81938-73) by intra-shot gas analysis providing the reduction of deuterium retention in W PFCs by 1/3 at a base temperature (T base) range at the outer target plate between 65 °C and 150 °C equivalent to a T surface span of 150 °C and 420 °C. The associated recycling and molecular D desorption during the discharge varies only at lowest temperatures moderately, whereas desorption between discharges rises significantly with increasing T base. The retention measurements represent the sum of inner and outer divertor interaction at comparable T surface. The dynamic behaviour on a fast time scale of ms was studied in a series of identical H-mode discharges (JPN \\#83623-83974) and coherent edge-localized mode (ELM) averaging. High energetic ELMs of about 3 keV are impacting on the W PFCs with fluxes of 3× {10}23 {{{D}}}+ {{{s}}}-1{{{m}}}-2 which is about four times higher than inter-ELM ion fluxes with an impact energy of about E im = 200 eV. This intra-ELM ion flux is associated with a high heat flux of about 60 MW m-2 to the outer target plate which causes T surface rise by Δ T = 100 K per ELM covering finally the range between 160 °C and 1400 °C during the flat

  19. The role of energy forestry in alternative energy planning, waste recycling and agriculture in Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Sennerby-Forsse, L.; Christersson, L. . Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research)

    1994-09-01

    In Sweden, 15 years of research and development within the National Swedish Energy Forestry Programme (NSEFP) have resulted in a new agricultural crop with a high potential for sound ecological and economic outcome. Commercialization of energy plantations is in progress and about 10,000 ha of energy plantations have been established on private farm land. To replace the part of the imported oil used for heating purposes, approximately 200,000 ha of energy forests are needed. Thus, in the near future, bioenergy could constitute one-third of Sweden's total annual energy need which illustrates the potential of bioenergy as an important part of the energy supply. The further utilization of biomass plantations for environmental clean-up programs and waste cycling is now developing on a regional and local basis. As a complement to intensively cultivated pure energy plantations, mixed forest stands are of interest as multipurpose production systems for wood chips, short fiber and veneer. Economic calculations concerning natively produced bioenergy, from conventional forestry as well as from bioenergy plantations, are mostly positive today. Considering different environmental as well as the low profitability of agriculture, the waste mountain and the requirement for energy.

  20. Available energy and ground states of collisionless plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helander, Per

    2017-08-01

    The energy budget of a collisionless plasma subject to electrostatic fluctuations is considered, and the excess of thermal energy over the minimum accessible to it under various constraints that limit the possible forms of plasma motion is calculated. This excess measures how much thermal energy is `available' for conversion into plasma instabilities, and therefore constitutes a nonlinear measure of plasma stability. A distribution function with zero available energy defines a `ground state' in the sense that its energy cannot decrease by any linear or nonlinear plasma motion. In a Vlasov plasma with small density and temperature fluctuations, the available energy is proportional to the mean square of these quantities, and exceeds the corresponding energy in ideal or resistive magnetohydrodynamics. If the first or second adiabatic invariant is conserved, ground states generally have inhomogeneous density and temperature. Magnetically confined plasmas are usually not in any ground state, but certain types of stellarator plasmas are so with respect to fluctuations that conserve both these adiabatic invariants, making the plasma linearly and nonlinearly stable to such fluctuations. Similar stability properties can also be enjoyed by plasmas confined by a dipole magnetic field.

  1. Recyclable transmission line concept for z-pinch driven inertial fusion energy.

    SciTech Connect

    De Groot, J. S.; Olson, Craig Lee; Cochrane, Kyle Robert; Slutz, Stephen A.; Vesey, Roger Alan; Peterson, Per F.

    2003-12-01

    Recyclable transmission lines (RTL)s are being studied as a means to repetitively drive z pinches to generate fusion energy. We have shown previously that the RTL mass can be quite modest. Minimizing the RTL mass reduces recycling costs and the impulse delivered to the first wall of a fusion chamber. Despite this reduction in mass, a few seconds will be needed to reload an RTL after each subsequent shot. This is in comparison to other inertial fusion approaches that expect to fire up to ten capsules per second. Thus a larger fusion yield is needed to compensate for the slower repetition rate in a z-pinch driven fusion reactor. We present preliminary designs of z-pinch driven fusion capsules that provide an adequate yield of 1-4 GJ. We also present numerical simulations of the effect of these fairly large fusion yields on the RTL and the first wall of the reactor chamber. These simulations were performed with and without a neutron absorbing blanket surrounding the fusion explosion. We find that the RTL will be fully vaporized out to a radius of about 3 meters assuming normal incidence. However, at large enough radius the RTL will remain in either the liquid or solid state and this portion of the RTL could fragment and become shrapnel. We show that a dynamic fragmentation theory can be used to estimate the size of these fragmented particles. We discuss how proper design of the RTL can allow this shrapnel to be directed away from the sensitive mechanical parts of the reactor chamber.

  2. Experimental investigation of the quality characteristics of agricultural plastic wastes regarding their recycling and energy recovery potential

    SciTech Connect

    Briassoulis, D.; Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E.; Antiohos, S.K.; Papadi, C.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definition of parameters characterising agricultural plastic waste (APW) quality. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of samples to determine APW quality for recycling or energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Majority of APW samples from various countries have very good quality for recycling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upper limit of 50% w/w soil contamination in APW acceptable for energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chlorine and heavy metals content in APW below the lowest limit for energy recovery. - Abstract: A holistic environmentally sound waste management scheme that transforms agricultural plastic waste (APW) streams into labelled guaranteed quality commodities freely traded in open market has been developed by the European research project LabelAgriWaste. The APW quality is defined by the APW material requirements, translated to technical specifications, for recycling or energy recovery. The present work investigates the characteristics of the APW quality and the key factors affecting it from the introduction of the virgin product to the market to the APW stream reaching the disposer. Samples of APW from different countries were traced from their application to the field through their storage phase and transportation to the final destination. The test results showed that the majority of APW retained their mechanical properties after their use preserving a 'very good quality' for recycling in terms of degradation. The degree of soil contamination concerning the APW recycling and energy recovery potential fluctuates depending on the agricultural plastic category and application. The chlorine and heavy metal content of the tested APW materials was much lower than the maximum acceptable limits for their potential use in cement industries.

  3. CELLULOSE SYNTHASE INTERACTIVE1 Is Required for Fast Recycling of Cellulose Synthase Complexes to the Plasma Membrane in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Lei; Bashline, Logan; Li, Shundai

    2015-01-01

    Plants are constantly subjected to various biotic and abiotic stresses and have evolved complex strategies to cope with these stresses. For example, plant cells endocytose plasma membrane material under stress and subsequently recycle it back when the stress conditions are relieved. Cellulose biosynthesis is a tightly regulated process that is performed by plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthase (CESA) complexes (CSCs). However, the regulatory mechanism of cellulose biosynthesis under abiotic stress has not been well explored. In this study, we show that small CESA compartments (SmaCCs) or microtubule-associated cellulose synthase compartments (MASCs) are critical for fast recovery of CSCs to the plasma membrane after stress is relieved in Arabidopsis thaliana. This SmaCC/MASC-mediated fast recovery of CSCs is dependent on CELLULOSE SYNTHASE INTERACTIVE1 (CSI1), a protein previously known to represent the link between CSCs and cortical microtubules. Independently, AP2M, a core component in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, plays a role in the formation of SmaCCs/MASCs. Together, our study establishes a model in which CSI1-dependent SmaCCs/MASCs are formed through a process that involves endocytosis, which represents an important mechanism for plants to quickly regulate cellulose synthesis under abiotic stress. PMID:26443667

  4. CELLULOSE SYNTHASE INTERACTIVE1 Is Required for Fast Recycling of Cellulose Synthase Complexes to the Plasma Membrane in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Lei; Singh, Abhishek; Bashline, Logan; Li, Shundai; Yingling, Yaroslava G.; Gu, Ying

    2015-10-06

    Plants are constantly subjected to various biotic and abiotic stresses and have evolved complex strategies to cope with these stresses. For example, plant cells endocytose plasma membrane material under stress and subsequently recycle it back when the stress conditions are relieved. Cellulose biosynthesis is a tightly regulated process that is performed by plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthase (CESA) complexes (CSCs). However, the regulatory mechanism of cellulose biosynthesis under abiotic stress has not been well explored. In this study, we show that small CESA compartments (SmaCCs) or microtubule-associated cellulose synthase compartments (MASCs) are critical for fast recovery of CSCs to the plasma membrane after stress is relieved in Arabidopsis thaliana. This SmaCC/MASC-mediated fast recovery of CSCs is dependent on CELLULOSE SYNTHASE INTERACTIVE1 (CSI1), a protein previously known to represent the link between CSCs and cortical microtubules. Independently, AP2M, a core component in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, plays a role in the formation of SmaCCs/MASCs. Together, our study establishes a model in which CSI1-dependent SmaCCs/MASCs are formed through a process that involves endocytosis, which represents an important mechanism for plants to quickly regulate cellulose synthesis under abiotic stress.

  5. Nuclear energy and radioactive waste disposal in the age of recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Conca, James L.; Apted, Michael

    2007-07-01

    The magnitude of humanity's energy needs requires that we embrace a multitude of various energy sources and applications. For a variety of reasons, nuclear energy must be a major portion of the distribution, at least one third. The often-cited strategic hurdle to this approach is nuclear waste disposal. Present strategies concerning disposal of nuclear waste need to be changed if the world is to achieve both a sustainable energy distribution by 2040 and solve the largest environmental issue of the 21. century - global warming. It is hoped that ambitious proposals to replace fossil fuel power generation by alternatives will drop the percentage of fossil fuel use substantially, but the absolute amount of fossil fuel produced electricity must be kept at or below its present 10 trillion kW-hrs/year. Unfortunately, the rapid growth in consumption to over 30 trillion kW-hrs/year by 2040, means that 20 trillion kW-hrs/yr of non-fossil fuel generated power has to come from other sources. If half of that comes from alternative non-nuclear, non-hydroelectric sources (an increase of 3000%), then nuclear still needs to increase by a factor of four worldwide to compensate. Many of the reasons nuclear energy did not expand after 1970 in North America (proliferation, capital costs, operational risks, waste disposal, and public fear) are no longer a problem. The WIPP site in New Mexico, an example of a solution to the nuclear waste disposal issue, and also to public fear, is an operating deep geologic nuclear waste repository in the massive bedded salt of the Salado Formation. WIPP has been operating for eight years, and as of this writing, has disposed of over 50,000 m{sup 3} of transuranic waste (>100 nCi/g but <23 Curie/liter) including high activity waste. The Salado Formation is an ideal host for any type of nuclear waste, especially waste from recycled spent fuel. (authors)

  6. Anomalous transmission of electromagnetic energy through a plasma slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradov, O. M.; Stenflo, L.

    1982-05-01

    An electromagnetic wave, incident on a plasma slab, is considered. It is pointed out that the transmitted energy can be larger than the incident energy during restricted time intervals, if the slab density varies properly in time.

  7. Energy loss of heavy ions in a dense hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, K.-G.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Wahl, H.; Haas, C. R.; Kunze, H.; Brandenburg, W.; Noll, R.

    1990-12-01

    The energy loss of heavy ions with an energy of 1.4 MeV/u in a hydrogen plasma has been measured. A 20 cm long z-pinch has been used as plasma target. Our data show a strong enhancement of the stopping power of the plasma compared to that of a cold gas with equal density. The results completely confirm the predictions of the standard stopping power model.

  8. Energy Measurements of Trapped Electrons from a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Neil; Berry, Melissa; Blumenfeld, Ian; Decker, Franz-Josef; Hogan, Mark J.; Ischebeck, Rasmus; Iverson, Richard; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, Dieter; Auerbach, David; Clayton, Christopher E.; Huang, Chengkun; Johnson, Devon; Joshi, Chandrashekhar; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; Zhou, Miaomiao; Katsouleas, Thomas; Muggli, Patric

    2006-11-27

    Recent electron beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator experiments carried out at SLAC indicate trapping of plasma electrons. More charge came out of than went into the plasma. Most of this extra charge had energies at or below the 10 MeV level. In addition, there were trapped electron streaks that extended from a few GeV to tens of GeV, and there were mono-energetic trapped electron bunches with tens of GeV in energy.

  9. Energy Measurements of Trapped Electrons from a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Neal; Auerbach, David; Berry, Melissa; Blumenfeld, Ian; Clayton, Christopher E.; Decer, Franz-Josef; Hogan, Mark J.; Huang, Chengkun; Ischebeck, Rasmus; Iverson, Richard; Johnson, Devon; Joshi, Chadrashekhar; Katsouleas, Thomas; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; Muggli, Patric; Oz, Erdem; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, Dieter; Zhou, Miaomiao; /SLAC /UCLA /Southern California U.

    2007-01-03

    Recent electron beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator experiments carried out at SLAC indicate trapping of plasma electrons. More charge came out of than went into the plasma. Most of this extra charge had energies at or below the 10 MeV level. In addition, there were trapped electron streaks that extended from a few GeV to tens of GeV, and there were mono-energetic trapped electron bunches with tens of GeV in energy.

  10. Preparation of Crumpled Graphite Oxide from Recycled Graphite Using Plasma Electrolysis and Its Application for Adsorption of Cadmium in Aqueous Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Phan Ngoc; Tuoi, Tran Thi; Ngan, Nguyen Thi Kim; Trang, Bui Thi; Minh, Phan Ngoc; Lam, Tran Dai; Hanh, Nguyen Thi; Van Thanh, Dang

    2016-05-01

    Household battery waste is considered hazardous and needs to be collected, managed, and recycled appropriately. In this study, using a plasma electrolysis method, we recycled graphite electrodes of exhausted dry batteries to prepare crumpled graphite oxide (CGO). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the CGO possessed spherical morphology with average dimensions of 0.5 μm to 5 μm. The as-prepared CGO was then applied to absorb cadmium in aqueous environment. The results showed that CGO appears to be a promising adsorbent for removal of toxic waste from polluted water.

  11. Measurement of parallel ion energy distribution function in PISCES plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tynan, G.R.; Goebel, D.M.; Conn, R.W.

    1987-08-01

    The PISCES facility is used to conduct controlled plasma-surface interaction experiments. Plasma parameters typical of those found in the edge plasmas of major fusion confinement experiments are produced. In this work, the energy distribution of the ion flux incident on a material surface is measured using a gridded energy analyzer in place of a material sample. The full width at half maximum energy distribution of the ion flux is found to vary from 10 eV to 30 eV both hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. Helium plasmas have a much lower FWHM energy spread than hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. The FWHM ion energy spread is found to be linearly related to the electron temperature. The most probable ion energy is found to be linearly related to the bias applied to the energy analyzer. Other plasma parameters have a weak influence upon the energy distribution of the ion flux. Two possible physical mechanisms for producing the observed results are introduced and suggestions for further work are made. The impact of the reported measurements on the materials experiments conducted in the PISCES facility are discussed and recommendations for future experiments are made. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  12. Macroscopic magnetic islands and plasma energy transport

    SciTech Connect

    Cima, G; Porcelli, F; Rossi, E; Wootton, A J

    1998-12-03

    A model is presented, based on the combined effects of m=n=l magnetic island dynamics, localized heat sources, large heat diffusivity along magnetic field lines and plasma rotation, which may explain the multipeaked temperature profiles and transport barriers observed in tokamak plasmas heated by electron cyclotron resonant waves.

  13. Tritium recycling and inventory in eroded debris of plasma-facing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.

    1999-10-18

    Damage to plasma-facing components (PFCs) and structural materials due to loss of plasma confinement in magnetic fusion reactors remains one of the most serious concerns for safe, successful, and reliable tokamak operation. High erosion losses due to surface vaporization, spallation, and melt-layer splashing are expected during such an event. The eroded debris and dust of the PFCs, including trapped tritium, will be contained on the walls or within the reactor chamber therefore, they can significantly influence plasma behavior and tritium inventory during subsequent operations. Tritium containment and behavior in PFCS and in the dust and debris is an important factor in evaluating and choosing the ideal plasma-facing materials (PFMs). Tritium buildup and release in the debris of candidate materials is influenced by the effect of material porosity on diffusion and retention processes. These processes have strong nonlinear behavior due to temperature, volubility, and existing trap sites. A realistic model must therefore account for the nonlinear and multidimensional effects of tritium diffusion in the porous-redeposited and neutron-irradiated materials. A tritium-transport computer model, TRAPS (Tritium Accumulation in Porous Structure), was developed and used to evaluate and predict the kinetics of tritium transport in porous media. This model is coupled with the TRICS (Tritium In Compound Systems) code that was developed to study the effect of surface erosion during normal and abnormal operations on tritium behavior in PFCS.

  14. Modeling ohmic heating in the drying zone of the plasma shaft electric furnace, when recycling the technogenic waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliferov, A. I.; Anshakov, A. S.; Sinitsyn, V. A.; Domarov, P. V.; Danilenko, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Efficient use of ohmic heating in the drying zone of the plasma shaft furnace for gasification of organic and technogenic wastes is studied. It is shown that by using ohmic heating in the drying zone, energy release takes place in the filling along the entire zone.

  15. Advances in plastic recycling. Volume 1: Recycling of polyurethanes

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, K.C.; Klempner, D.; Prentice, G.

    1999-07-01

    ``Recycling of Polyurethanes'', the first volume in the Advances in Plastics Recycling series, is focused on the physical and chemical recycling of polyurethanes, with attention given to energy conversion. A compilation of the present ongoing studies on recycling of urethane and, in general, isocyanate-based polymers, the focus is on thermosetting urethane polymers. Contents include: Recycling of Polyurethane Plastics in the European Automotive Industry; Present State of Polyurethane Recycling in Europe; Processing Overview of Bonded Polyurethane Foam; Mechanical Recycling of Polyurethane Scrap; Ecostream{trademark}--A Technology Beyond Recycling; Recycling of Flexible polyurethane Foam; General purpose Adhesives Prepared from Chemically Recycled Waste Rigid Polyurethane Foams; and Utilization of Isocyanate Binders in Recycling of Scrap Automotive Headliners.

  16. Energy Balance in DC Arc Plasma Melting Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Peng; Meng, Yuedong; Yu, Xinyao; Chen, Longwei; Jiang, Yiman; Ni, Guohua; Chen, Mingzhou

    2009-04-01

    In order to treat hazardous municipal solid waste incinerator's (MSWI) fly ash, a new DC arc plasma furnace was developed. Taking an arc of 100 V/1000 A DC as an example, the heat transfer characteristics of the DC arc plasma, ablation of electrodes, heat properties of the fly ash during melting, heat transfer characteristics of the flue gas, and heat loss of the furnace were analyzed based on the energy conservation law, so as to achieve the total heat information and energy balance during plasma processing, and to provide a theoretical basis for an optimized design of the structure and to improve energy efficiency.

  17. Measurement of energy distribution in flowing hydrogen microwave plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Morin, T.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into kinetic energy of a flowing gas is investigated. A calorimetry system enclosing a microwave plasma system has been developed to accurately measure the energy inputs and outputs of the microwave plasma system. The rate of energy transferred to the gas can be determined to within + or - 1.8 W from an energy balance around the microwave plasma system. The percentage of the power absorbed by the microwave plasma system transferred to the hydrogen gas as it flows through the system is found to increase with the increasing flow rate, to decrease with the increasing pressure, and to be independent of the absorbed power. An upper bound for the hydrogen gas temperature is estimated from the energy content, heat capacity, and flow rate of the gas stream. A lower bound for an overall heat-transfer coefficient is then calculated, characterizing the energy loss from the hydrogen gas stream to the air cooling of the plasma discharge tube wall. The heat-transfer coefficient is found to increase with the increasing flow rate and pressure and to be independent of the absorbed power. This result indicates that a convective-type mechanism is responsible for the energy transfer.

  18. Local thermodynamic equilibrium in rapidly heated high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanyan, V.; Tallents, G. J.

    2014-06-15

    Emission spectra and the dynamics of high energy density plasmas created by optical and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) depend on the populations of atomic levels. Calculations of plasma emission and ionization may be simplified by assuming Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), where populations are given by the Saha-Boltzmann equation. LTE can be achieved at high densities when collisional processes are much more significant than radiative processes, but may not be valid if plasma conditions change rapidly. A collisional-radiative model has been used to calculate the times taken by carbon and iron plasmas to reach LTE at varying densities and heating rates. The effect of different energy deposition methods, as well as Ionization Potential Depression are explored. This work shows regimes in rapidly changing plasmas, such as those created by optical lasers and FELs, where the use of LTE is justified, because timescales for plasma changes are significantly longer than the times needed to achieve an LTE ionization balance.

  19. Development of high energy pulsed plasma simulator for plasma-lithium trench experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Soonwook

    To simulate detrimental events in a tokamak and provide a test-stand for a liquid lithium infused trench (LiMIT) device, a pulsed plasma source utilizing a theta pinch in conjunction with a coaxial plasma accelerator has been developed. An overall objective of the project is to develop a compact device that can produce 100 MW/m2 to 1 GW/m2 of plasma heat flux (a typical heat flux level in a major fusion device) in ~ 100 mus (≤ 0.1 MJ/m2) for a liquid lithium plasma facing component research. The existing theta pinch device, DEVeX, was built and operated for study on lithium vapor shielding effect. However, a typical plasma energy of 3 - 4 kJ/m2 is too low to study an interaction of plasma and plasma facing components in fusion devices. No or little preionized plasma, ringing of magnetic field, collisions of high energy particles with background gas have been reported as the main issues. Therefore, DEVeX is reconfigured to mitigate these issues. The new device is mainly composed of a plasma gun for a preionization source, a theta pinch for heating, and guiding magnets for a better plasma transportation. Each component will be driven by capacitor banks and controlled by high voltage / current switches. Several diagnostics including triple Langmuir probe, calorimeter, optical emission measurement, Rogowski coil, flux loop, and fast ionization gauge are used to characterize the new device. A coaxial plasma gun is manufactured and installed in the previous theta pinch chamber. The plasma gun is equipped with 500 uF capacitor and a gas puff valve. The increase of the plasma velocity with the plasma gun capacitor voltage is consistent with the theoretical predictions and the velocity is located between the snowplow model and the weak - coupling limit. Plasma energies measured with the calorimeter ranges from 0.02 - 0.065 MJ/m2 and increases with the voltage at the capacitor bank. A cross-check between the plasma energy measured with the calorimeter and the triple probe

  20. Maintaining protein homeostasis: early and late endosomal dual recycling for the maintenance of intracellular pools of the plasma membrane protein Chs3

    PubMed Central

    Arcones, Irene; Sacristán, Carlos; Roncero, Cesar

    2016-01-01

    The major chitin synthase activity in yeast cells, Chs3, has become a paradigm in the study of the intracellular traffic of transmembrane proteins due to its tightly regulated trafficking. This includes an efficient mechanism for the maintenance of an extensive reservoir of Chs3 at the trans-Golgi network/EE, which allows for the timely delivery of the protein to the plasma membrane. Here we show that this intracellular reservoir of Chs3 is maintained not only by its efficient AP-1–mediated recycling, but also by recycling through the retromer complex, which interacts with Chs3 at a defined region in its N-terminal cytosolic domain. Moreover, the N-terminal ubiquitination of Chs3 at the plasma membrane by Rsp5/Art4 distinctly labels the protein and regulates its retromer-mediated recycling by enabling Chs3 to be recognized by the ESCRT machinery and degraded in the vacuole. Therefore the combined action of two independent but redundant endocytic recycling mechanisms, together with distinct labels for vacuolar degradation, determines the final fate of the intracellular traffic of the Chs3 protein, allowing yeast cells to regulate morphogenesis, depending on environmental constraints. PMID:27798229

  1. On the energy crisis in the Io plasma torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert A.; Bagenal, Fran; Cheng, Andrew F.; Strobel, Darrell

    1988-01-01

    Recent calculations of the energy balance of the Io plasma torus show that the observed UV and EUV radiation cannot be maintained solely via energy input by the ion pickup mechanism. Current theoretical models of the torus must be modified to include non-local energy input. It is argued that the required energy may be supplied by inward diffusion of energetic heavy ions with energies less than about 20 keV.

  2. On the energy crisis in the Io plasma torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert A.; Bagenal, Fran; Cheng, Andrew F.; Strobel, Darrell

    1988-01-01

    Recent calculations of the energy balance of the Io plasma torus show that the observed UV and EUV radiation cannot be maintained solely via energy input by the ion pickup mechanism. Current theoretical models of the torus must be modified to include non-local energy input. It is argued that the required energy may be supplied by inward diffusion of energetic heavy ions with energies less than about 20 keV.

  3. Experimental investigation of the quality characteristics of agricultural plastic wastes regarding their recycling and energy recovery potential.

    PubMed

    Briassoulis, D; Hiskakis, M; Babou, E; Antiohos, S K; Papadi, C

    2012-06-01

    A holistic environmentally sound waste management scheme that transforms agricultural plastic waste (APW) streams into labelled guaranteed quality commodities freely traded in open market has been developed by the European research project LabelAgriWaste. The APW quality is defined by the APW material requirements, translated to technical specifications, for recycling or energy recovery. The present work investigates the characteristics of the APW quality and the key factors affecting it from the introduction of the virgin product to the market to the APW stream reaching the disposer. Samples of APW from different countries were traced from their application to the field through their storage phase and transportation to the final destination. The test results showed that the majority of APW retained their mechanical properties after their use preserving a "very good quality" for recycling in terms of degradation. The degree of soil contamination concerning the APW recycling and energy recovery potential fluctuates depending on the agricultural plastic category and application. The chlorine and heavy metal content of the tested APW materials was much lower than the maximum acceptable limits for their potential use in cement industries.

  4. Plasma response to electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K.

    2013-12-15

    An electron energy filter (EEF) is embedded in the Large Volume Plasma Device plasma for carrying out studies on excitation of plasma turbulence by a gradient in electron temperature (ETG) described in the paper of Mattoo et al. [S. K. Mattoo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255007 (2012)]. In this paper, we report results on the response of the plasma to the EEF. It is shown that inhomogeneity in the magnetic field of the EEF switches on several physical phenomena resulting in plasma regions with different characteristics, including a plasma region free from energetic electrons, suitable for the study of ETG turbulence. Specifically, we report that localized structures of plasma density, potential, electron temperature, and plasma turbulence are excited in the EEF plasma. It is shown that structures of electron temperature and potential are created due to energy dependence of the electron transport in the filter region. On the other hand, although structure of plasma density has origin in the particle transport but two distinct steps of the density structure emerge from dominance of collisionality in the source-EEF region and of the Bohm diffusion in the EEF-target region. It is argued and experimental evidence is provided for existence of drift like flute Rayleigh-Taylor in the EEF plasma.

  5. Comments on experimental results of energy confinement of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.K.

    1989-04-01

    The results of energy-confinement experiments on steady-state tokamak plasmas are examined. For plasmas with auxiliary heating, an analysis based on the heat diffusion equation is used to define heat confinement time (the incremental energy confinement time). For ohmically sustained plasmas, experiments show that the onset of the saturation regime of energy confinement, marfeing, detachment, and disruption are marked by distinct values of the parameter /bar n//sub e///bar j/. The confinement results of the two types of experiments can be described by a single surface in 3-dimensional space spanned by the plasma energy, the heating power, and the plasma density: the incremental energy confinement time /tau//sub inc/ = ..delta..W/..delta..P is the correct concept for describing results of heat confinement in a heating experiment; the commonly used energy confinement time defined by /tau//sub E/ = W/P is not. A further examination shows that the change of edge parameters, as characterized by the change of the effective collision frequency ..nu../sub e/*, governs the change of confinement properties. The totality of the results of tokamak experiments on energy confinement appears to support a hypothesis that energy transport is determined by the preservation of the pressure gradient scale length. 70 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Energy coupling to the plasma in repetitive nanosecond pulse discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Adamovich, Igor V.; Nishihara, Munetake; Choi, Inchul; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Lempert, Walter R.

    2009-11-15

    A new analytic quasi-one-dimensional model of energy coupling to nanosecond pulse discharge plasmas in plane-to-plane geometry has been developed. The use of a one-dimensional approach is based on images of repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharge plasmas in dry air demonstrating that the plasma remains diffuse and uniform on a nanosecond time scale over a wide range of pressures. The model provides analytic expressions for the time-dependent electric field and electron density in the plasma, electric field in the sheath, sheath boundary location, and coupled pulse energy. The analytic model predictions are in very good agreement with numerical calculations. The model demonstrates that (i) the energy coupled to the plasma during an individual nanosecond discharge pulse is controlled primarily by the capacitance of the dielectric layers and by the breakdown voltage and (ii) the pulse energy coupled to the plasma during a burst of nanosecond pulses decreases as a function of the pulse number in the burst. This occurs primarily because of plasma temperature rise and resultant reduction in breakdown voltage, such that the coupled pulse energy varies approximately proportionally to the number density. Analytic expression for coupled pulse energy scaling has been incorporated into the air plasma chemistry model, validated previously by comparing with atomic oxygen number density measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges. The results of kinetic modeling using the modified air plasma chemistry model are compared with time-resolved temperature measurements in a repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharge in air, by emission spectroscopy, and purely rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy showing good agreement.

  7. Vacuum arc plasma thrusters with inductive energy storage driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schein, Jochen (Inventor); Gerhan, Andrew N. (Inventor); Woo, Robyn L. (Inventor); Au, Michael Y. (Inventor); Krishnan, Mahadevan (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus for producing a vacuum arc plasma source device using a low mass, compact inductive energy storage circuit powered by a low voltage DC supply acts as a vacuum arc plasma thruster. An inductor is charged through a switch, subsequently the switch is opened and a voltage spike of Ldi/dt is produced initiating plasma across a resistive path separating anode and cathode. The plasma is subsequently maintained by energy stored in the inductor. Plasma is produced from cathode material, which allows for any electrically conductive material to be used. A planar structure, a tubular structure, and a coaxial structure allow for consumption of cathode material feed and thereby long lifetime of the thruster for long durations of time.

  8. Transition energies and polarizabilities of hydrogen like ions in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Madhusmita

    2012-09-01

    Effect of plasma screening on various properties like transition energy, polarizability (dipole and quadrupole), etc. of hydrogen like ions is studied. The bound and free state wave functions and transition matrix elements are obtained by numerically integrating the radial Schrodinger equation for appropriate plasma potential. We have used adaptive step size controlled Runge-Kutta method to perform the numerical integration. Debye-Huckel potential is used to investigate the variation in transition lines and polarizabilities (dipole and quadrupole) with increasing plasma screening. For a strongly coupled plasma, ion sphere potential is used to show the variation in excitation energy with decreasing ion sphere radius. It is observed that plasma screening sets in phenomena like continuum lowering and pressure ionization, which are unique to ions in plasma. Of particular interest is the blue (red) shift in transitions conserving (non-conserving) principal quantum number. The plasma environment also affects the dipole and quadrupole polarizability of ions in a significant manner. The bound state contribution to polarizabilities decreases with increase in plasma density whereas the continuum contribution is significantly enhanced. This is a result of variation in the behavior of bound and continuum state wave functions in the presence of plasma. We have compared the results with existing theoretical and experimental data wherever present.

  9. Transition energies and polarizabilities of hydrogen like ions in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Madhusmita

    2012-09-15

    Effect of plasma screening on various properties like transition energy, polarizability (dipole and quadrupole), etc. of hydrogen like ions is studied. The bound and free state wave functions and transition matrix elements are obtained by numerically integrating the radial Schrodinger equation for appropriate plasma potential. We have used adaptive step size controlled Runge-Kutta method to perform the numerical integration. Debye-Huckel potential is used to investigate the variation in transition lines and polarizabilities (dipole and quadrupole) with increasing plasma screening. For a strongly coupled plasma, ion sphere potential is used to show the variation in excitation energy with decreasing ion sphere radius. It is observed that plasma screening sets in phenomena like continuum lowering and pressure ionization, which are unique to ions in plasma. Of particular interest is the blue (red) shift in transitions conserving (non-conserving) principal quantum number. The plasma environment also affects the dipole and quadrupole polarizability of ions in a significant manner. The bound state contribution to polarizabilities decreases with increase in plasma density whereas the continuum contribution is significantly enhanced. This is a result of variation in the behavior of bound and continuum state wave functions in the presence of plasma. We have compared the results with existing theoretical and experimental data wherever present.

  10. The injection of energy into the Io plasma torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shemansky, D. E.; Sandel, B. R.

    1982-01-01

    Voyager EUV observations of the Io plasma torus indicate the presence of an intensity modulation in the corotating reference frame of significant magnitude on a 10-hour time scale. The phenomenon has a persistence which suggests it is a permanent feature, and the magnitude is such that a substantial amount of energy is injected into the torus at a 10-hour periodic rate. An investigation is conducted regarding the nature of the energy enjection process as determined by the plasma parameters and the observed characteristics. Attention is given to excitation-relaxation relations, aspects of ion-electron relaxation, and electron-electron relaxation and energy transfer rates. The radial distribution of temperature at the eastern and western elongations is found to indicate that the energy input to the electrons is distributed over the width of the torus. The dominant mechanism of energy transport to the plasma appears to be electron-electron heating.

  11. Applications of plasma core reactors to terrestrial energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, T. S.; Biancardi, F. R.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma core reactors offer several new options for future energy needs in addition to space power and propulsion applications. Power extraction from plasma core reactors with gaseous nuclear fuel allows operation at temperatures higher than conventional reactors. Highly efficient thermodynamic cycles and applications employing direct coupling of radiant energy are possible. Conceptual configurations of plasma core reactors for terrestrial applications are described. Closed-cycle gas turbines, MHD systems, photo- and thermo-chemical hydrogen production processes, and laser systems using plasma core reactors as prime energy sources are considered. Cycle efficiencies in the range of 50 to 65 percent are calculated for closed-cycle gas turbine and MHD electrical generators. Reactor advantages include continuous fuel reprocessing which limits inventory of radioactive by-products and thorium-U-233 breeder configurations with about 5-year doubling times.-

  12. Applications of plasma core reactors to terrestrial energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, T. S.; Biancardi, F. R.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma core reactors offer several new options for future energy needs in addition to space power and propulsion applications. Power extraction from plasma core reactors with gaseous nuclear fuel allows operation at temperatures higher than conventional reactors. Highly efficient thermodynamic cycles and applications employing direct coupling of radiant energy are possible. Conceptual configurations of plasma core reactors for terrestrial applications are described. Closed-cycle gas turbines, MHD systems, photo- and thermo-chemical hydrogen production processes, and laser systems using plasma core reactors as prime energy sources are considered. Cycle efficiencies in the range of 50 to 65 percent are calculated for closed-cycle gas turbine and MHD electrical generators. Reactor advantages include continuous fuel reprocessing which limits inventory of radioactive by-products and thorium-U-233 breeder configurations with about 5-year doubling times.-

  13. Dense Plasma Focus - From Alternative Fusion Source to Versatile High Energy Density Plasma Source for Plasma Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF), a coaxial plasma gun, utilizes pulsed high current electrical discharge to heat and compress the plasma to very high density and temperature with energy densities in the range of 1-10 × 1010 J/m3. The DPF device has always been in the company of several alternative magnetic fusion devices as it produces intense fusion neutrons. Several experiments conducted on many different DPF devices ranging over several order of storage energy have demonstrated that at higher storage energy the neutron production does not follow I4 scaling laws and deteriorate significantly raising concern about the device's capability and relevance for fusion energy. On the other hand, the high energy density pinch plasma in DPF device makes it a multiple radiation source of ions, electron, soft and hard x-rays, and neutrons, making it useful for several applications in many different fields such as lithography, radiography, imaging, activation analysis, radioisotopes production etc. Being a source of hot dense plasma, strong shockwave, intense energetic beams and radiation, etc, the DPF device, additionally, shows tremendous potential for applications in plasma nanoscience and plasma nanotechnology. In the present paper, the key features of plasma focus device are critically discussed to understand the novelties and opportunities that this device offers in processing and synthesis of nanophase materials using, both, the top-down and bottom-up approach. The results of recent key experimental investigations performed on (i) the processing and modification of bulk target substrates for phase change, surface reconstruction and nanostructurization, (ii) the nanostructurization of PLD grown magnetic thin films, and (iii) direct synthesis of nanostructured (nanowire, nanosheets and nanoflowers) materials using anode target material ablation, ablated plasma and background reactive gas based synthesis and purely gas phase synthesis of various different types of

  14. Computational Simulation of High Energy Density Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-30

    flow. NumerEx used MACH2 to simulate the flow using compressible, inviscid hydrodynamics with the SESAME equations of state . The depth of the...Figure 1 shows the liner state versus the radius of a collapsing 10 cm tall lithium liner driven by an RLC circuit model of Shiva Star. This work...the coaxial gun section, and Figure 4 shows the physical state of the plasma just prior to pinch. Figure 5 shows neutron yield reaching 1014 in this

  15. Pulsed Energy Systems for Generating Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, M. Franklin; Shotts, Z.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will describe the techniques needed to electrically generate highly ionized dense plasmas for a variety of applications. The components needed in pulsed circuits are described in terms of general performance parameters currently available from commercial vendors. Examples of pulsed systems using these components are described and technical data from laboratory experiments presented. Experimental data are given for point designs, capable of multi-megawatt power levels.

  16. Investigation of low energy space plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    A statistical study of 1982 data for occurrences of equatorially trapped plasma has been extended. The previous survey, which utilized only the MSFC summary fiche, has been supplemented with the GSFC summary fiche, which has had the effect of substantially improving the late 1982 coverage. It was found that in the post midnight region (1 - 3 LT), the trapped plasma is limited to + or - 5 degrees magnetic latitude, while in the early afternoon (13-15 LT), latitude ranges as high as + or 30 degrees are found. This survey has provided a link to earlier ATS-6 and ISEE studies of pancake distributions. Although the most energetic, and most anisotopic plasmas are trapped within a few degrees of the equator, the results of these equatorial interactions extend substantially along the magnetic field line in the afternoon and dusk region and these high latitude extensions were previously studied by the Huntsville group. Results of this study were incorporated into a revision of the equatorial ion paper, which has been resubmitted and accepted for publication.

  17. Energy Flow in Dense Off-Equilibrium Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-15

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0254 Energy Flow in Dense Off-Equilibrium Plasma Seth Putterman UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LOS ANGELES 11000 KINROSS AVE STE 102...April l, 2012 - Jun 30, 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Energy Flow in Dense Off-Equilibrium Plasma 5a. CON TRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-l-0062...ABSTRACT u c. THIS PAGE u 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area ccda) 310-825-2269 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. Energy

  18. Low-energy plasma observations at synchronous orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, W.; Reasoner, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    The University of California at San Diego Auroral Particles Experiment on the ATS 6 satellite in synchronous orbit has detected a low-energy plasma population which is separate and distinct from both the ring current and the plasma sheet populations. The density and temperature of this low-energy population are highly variable, with temperatures in the range kT = 1-30 eV and densities ranging from less than 1 per cu cm to more than 10 per cu cm. The occurrence of a dense low-energy plasma is most likely in the afternoon and dusk local time sectors, whereas n greater than 1 per cu cm is seen in the local night sector only during magnetically quiet periods. These observations suggest that this plasma is the outer zone of the plasmasphere. During magnetically active periods this low-energy plasma is often observed flowing sunward. In the dusk sector, strong sunward plasma flow is often observed for 1-2 hours prior to the onset of a substorm-associated particle injection.

  19. Low-energy plasma observations at synchronous orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, W.; Reasoner, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    The University of California at San Diego Auroral Particles Experiment on the ATS 6 satellite in synchronous orbit has detected a low-energy plasma population which is separate and distinct from both the ring current and the plasma sheet populations. The density and temperature of this low-energy population are highly variable, with temperatures in the range kT = 1-30 eV and densities ranging from less than 1 per cu cm to more than 10 per cu cm. The occurrence of a dense low-energy plasma is most likely in the afternoon and dusk local time sectors, whereas n greater than 1 per cu cm is seen in the local night sector only during magnetically quiet periods. These observations suggest that this plasma is the outer zone of the plasmasphere. During magnetically active periods this low-energy plasma is often observed flowing sunward. In the dusk sector, strong sunward plasma flow is often observed for 1-2 hours prior to the onset of a substorm-associated particle injection.

  20. Benchmarking survey for recycling.

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, Margie Charlotte; Mizner, Jack Harry

    2005-06-01

    This report describes the methodology, analysis and conclusions of a comparison survey of recycling programs at ten Department of Energy sites including Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). The goal of the survey was to compare SNL/NM's recycling performance with that of other federal facilities, and to identify activities and programs that could be implemented at SNL/NM to improve recycling performance.

  1. Economical disposal of municipal solid waste with minimal discharges to the atmosphere and maximum recycling of energy and metal values

    SciTech Connect

    Grohse, E.W.; Steinberg, M.; Koppel, P.E.; Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA )

    1989-03-01

    A process has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the disposal of municipal solid wastes with minimal discharges to the atmosphere and maximum recycling of the energy and metal values contained therein. The energy values are recovered as zero ash, zero sulfur, zero nitrogen, zero chlorine particulate carbon (carbon black) fuels and a hydrogen-rich (or methane-rich) gaseous co-product. The process is especially adaptable to the disposal of plastic wastes and recycling of its energy values. Also, the inclusion of medical wastes should be no problem. The process consists of hydrogasifying prepared MSW (or any carbonaceous feedstock) to form a methane-rich process gas, which is then thermally decomposed (cracked) to form the primary product, carbon black, and hydrogen which is recycled to the hydrogasifier. Oxygen in the MSW is presently removed as water from the hydrogasifier effluent before it enters the methane decomposer. Any remaining hydrogen in the MSW feed is ultimately removed from the process as a co-product gas as hydrogen per se and/or methane (SNG). Chlorine in feed containing PVCs, for example, is removed as relatively minute amounts of hydrogen chloride in the condensed water discharged from the recuperative partial condenser. Desulfurization is not required to produce sulfur-free carbon black per se. Various options are available for desulfurization of the co-product gas. Since the process operates under a highly-reducing hydrogen atmosphere, toxic oxygenated compounds such as dioxins cannot form and metals entering with the MSW are removed with the ash'' as metals, not oxides.

  2. Solar energy converter using surface plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Sunlight is dispersed over a diffraction grating formed on the surface of a conducting film on a substrate. The angular dispersion controls the effective grating period so that a matching spectrum of surface plasmons is excited for parallel processing on the conducting film. The resulting surface plasmons carry energy to an array of inelastic tunnel diodes. This solar energy converter does not require different materials for each frequency band, and sunlight is directly converted to electricity in an efficient manner by extracting more energy from the more energetic photons.

  3. Energy exchange in strongly coupled plasmas with electron drift

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.; Ghorbanalilu, M.

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, the generalized viscoelastic collisional quantum hydrodynamic model is employed in order to investigate the linear dielectric response of a quantum plasma in the presence of strong electron-beam plasma interactions. The generalized Chandrasekhar's relativistic degeneracy pressure together with the electron-exchange and Coulomb interaction effects are taken into account in order to extend current research to a wide range of plasma number density relevant to big planetary cores and astrophysical compact objects. The previously calculated shear viscosity and the electron-ion collision frequencies are used for strongly coupled ion fluid. The effect of the electron-beam velocity on complex linear dielectric function is found to be profound. This effect is clearly interpreted in terms of the wave-particle interactions and their energy-exchange according to the sign of the imaginary dielectric function, which is closely related to the wave attenuation coefficient in plasmas. Such kinetic effect is also shown to be in close connection with the stopping power of a charged-particle beam in a quantum plasma. The effect of many independent plasma parameters, such as the ion charge-state, electron beam-velocity, and relativistic degeneracy, is shown to be significant on the growing/damping of plasma instability or energy loss/gain of the electron-beam.

  4. Atomic Oxygen Energy in Low Frequency Hyperthermal Plasma Ashers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K R.; Kneubel, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and analytical analysis of the atomic oxygen erosion of pyrolytic graphite as well as Monte Carlo computational modeling of the erosion of Kapton H (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) polyimide was performed to determine the hyperthermal energy of low frequency (30 to 35 kHz) plasma ashers operating on air. It was concluded that hyperthermal energies in the range of 0.3 to 0.9 eV are produced in the low frequency air plasmas which results in texturing similar to that in low Earth orbit (LEO). Monte Carlo computational modeling also indicated that such low energy directed ions are fully capable of producing the experimentally observed textured surfaces in low frequency plasmas.

  5. Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, D.; Shu, A. J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Matlis, N. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Plateau, G.; Lin, C.; Toth, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10 m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  6. Ion energy distributions in silane-hydrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hamers, E.A.G.; Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van; Bezemer, J.; Weg, W.F. van der; Goedheer, W.J.

    1996-12-31

    For the first time ion energy distributions (IED) of different ions from silane-hydrogen (SiH{sub 4}-H{sub 2}) RF plasmas are presented, i.e., the distributions of SiH{sub 3}{sup +}, SiH{sub 2}{sup +} and Si{sub 2}H{sub 4}{sup +}. The energy distributions of SiH{sub 3}{sup +} and SiH{sub 2}{sup +} ions show peaks, which are caused by a charge exchange process in the sheath. A method is presented by which the net charge density in the sheath is determined from the plasma potential and the energy positions of the charge exchange peaks. Knowing the net charge density in the sheath and the plasma potential, the sheath thickness can be determined and an estimation of the absolute ion fluxes can be made. The flux of ions can, at maximum, account for 10% of the observed deposition rate.

  7. Staging laser plasma accelerators for increased beam energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shu, Anthony; Schroeder, Carl; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Matlis, Nicholas; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Plateau, Guillaume; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2008-09-29

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  8. Investigating the energy crisis in Io's plasma torus: plasma energetics in rotating magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramer, K. M.; Kivelson, M.; Vogt, M.; Khurana, K. K.; Walker, R. J.; Strangeway, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    It has long been recognized that there is something lacking in our understanding of the temperature of the Io plasma torus. In situ observations show that the temperature in the torus increases more than can be accounted for by ion pickup; as much as 20% of the needed energy is missing. However, the role of centrifugal acceleration has not been investigated as a potential source of plasma heating. Analysis of the role of centrifugal forces on the plasma population is difficult as the effects are both energy and pitch-angle dependent: adiabatic outward displacement of flux tubes in a rotating frame results in net cooling of equatorially mirroring plasma even when a centrifugal force is acting, but this is not necessarily the case for particles mirroring off the equator. An ion in a rotating, adiabatically stretching system bouncing away from its mirror point will gain parallel energy from the centrifugal force, but will lose it again as it moves back towards its mirror point; the bounce-averaged change in energy is small. Therefore the centrifugal force in an adiabatically expanding system is only able to impart significant energy to a particle if the timescale of the stretching is less than that of a bounce period. As a prelude to a full Large Scale Kinetic (LSK) simulation of particles in a rotating magnetic field, here we check that two prerequisite conditions are met. Firstly, we estimate an upper bound to the thermal energy that could be gained through centrifugal acceleration in order to demonstrate that there is sufficient energy to account for the temperature anomaly observed at Io's plasma torus. Secondly, we calculate the bounce period of ions typical to the torus to establish the range of energies for which the quarter bounce times are is shorter than the ~4 days required for the field in the Io plasma torus to stretch from 6-10 RJ. We will also describe preliminary results from our modeling efforts.

  9. Helium Removal and Recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Reiter, D.; Wiesen, S

    2004-03-15

    Removal of helium, the ash from the D-T-fusion reaction, from a burning plasma flame, is one of the critical issues for future thermonuclear burning plasma. Even in plasmas driven by additional heating to large Q-values this is a severe problem. Recombination of fuel and ash ions at plasma exposed surfaces, re-emission as neutral particles and subsequent pumping (''recycling'') provides, at least in principle, the mechanism to flush the plasma from its ash. However, plasma surface interaction has to be limited in order to protect vessel components from excessive thermal load, often a conflicting requirement.

  10. Theory and application of maximum magnetic energy in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.K.

    1992-02-01

    The magnetic energy in an inductively driven steady-state toroidal plasma is a maximum for a given rate of dissipation of energy (Poynting flux). A purely resistive steady state of the piecewise force-free configuration, however, cannot exist, as the periodic removal of the excess poloidal flux and pressure, due to heating, ruptures the static equilibrium of the partitioning rational surfaces intermittently. The rupture necessitates a plasma with a negative q{prime}/q (as in reverse field pinches and spheromaks) to have the same {alpha} in all its force-free regions and with a positive q{prime}/q (as in tokamaks) to have centrally peaked {alpha}'s.

  11. Theory and application of maximum magnetic energy in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.K.

    1992-02-01

    The magnetic energy in an inductively driven steady-state toroidal plasma is a maximum for a given rate of dissipation of energy (Poynting flux). A purely resistive steady state of the piecewise force-free configuration, however, cannot exist, as the periodic removal of the excess poloidal flux and pressure, due to heating, ruptures the static equilibrium of the partitioning rational surfaces intermittently. The rupture necessitates a plasma with a negative q{prime}/q (as in reverse field pinches and spheromaks) to have the same {alpha} in all its force-free regions and with a positive q{prime}/q (as in tokamaks) to have centrally peaked {alpha}`s.

  12. Study on electron beam in a low energy plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair; Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow

    2014-03-05

    Electron beam emission was investigated in a low energy plasma focus device (2.2 kJ) using copper hollow anode. Faraday cup was used to estimate the energy of the electron beam. XR100CR X-ray spectrometer was used to explore the impact of the electron beam on the target observed from top-on and side-on position. Experiments were carried out at optimized pressure of argon gas. The impact of electron beam is exceptionally notable with two different approaches using lead target inside hollow anode in our plasma focus device.

  13. Cross-scale energy transport in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. W.; Nykyri, K.; Dimmock, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    The solar wind is a supersonic magnetized plasma streaming far into the heliosphere. Although cooling as it flows, it is rapidly heated upon encountering planetary obstacles. At Earth, this interaction forms the magnetosphere and its sub-regions. The present paper focuses on particle heating across the boundary separating the shocked solar wind and magnetospheric plasma, which is driven by mechanisms operating on fluid, ion and electron scales. The cross-scale energy transport between these scales is a compelling and fundamental problem of plasma physics. Here, we present evidence of the energy transport between fluid and ion scales: free energy is provided in terms of a velocity shear generating fluid-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. We show the unambiguous observation of an ion-scale magnetosonic wave packet, inside a Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex, with sufficient energy to account for observed ion heating. The present finding has universal consequences in understanding cross-scale energy transport, applicable to environments experiencing velocity shears during comparable plasma regimes.

  14. Frontiers in plasma science: a high energy density perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    The potential for ground-breaking research in plasma physics in high energy density (HED) regimes is compelling. The combination of HED facilities around the world spanning microjoules to megajoules, with time scales ranging from femtoseconds to microseconds enables new regimes of plasma science to be experimentally probed. The ability to shock and ramp compress samples and simultaneously probe them allows dense, strongly coupled, Fermi degenerate plasmas relevant to planetary interiors to be studied. Shock driven hydrodynamic instabilities evolving into turbulent flows relevant to the dynamics of exploding stars are being probed. The physics and dynamics of magnetized plasmas relevant to astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion are also starting to be studied. High temperature, high velocity interacting flows are being probed for evidence of astrophysical collisionless shock formation. Turbulent, high magnetic Reynolds number flows are being experimentally generated to look for evidence of the turbulent magnetic dynamo effect. And new results from thermonuclear reactions in dense hot plasmas relevant to stellar interiors are starting to emerge. A selection of examples providing a compelling vision for frontier plasma science in the coming decade will be presented. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Plasma scale-length effects on electron energy spectra in high-irradiance laser plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culfa, O.; Tallents, G. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Wagenaars, E.; Ridgers, C. P.; Murphy, C. D.; Dance, R. J.; Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P.; Brown, C. D. R.; James, S. F.; Hoarty, D. J.; Booth, N.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Lancaster, K. L.; Pikuz, S. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Kampfer, T.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2016-04-01

    An analysis of an electron spectrometer used to characterize fast electrons generated by ultraintense (1020W cm-2 ) laser interaction with a preformed plasma of scale length measured by shadowgraphy is presented. The effects of fringing magnetic fields on the electron spectral measurements and the accuracy of density scale-length measurements are evaluated. 2D EPOCH PIC code simulations are found to be in agreement with measurements of the electron energy spectra showing that laser filamentation in plasma preformed by a prepulse is important with longer plasma scale lengths (>8 μ m ).

  16. Sheath energy transmission in a collisional plasma with collisionless sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xian-Zhu Guo, Zehua

    2015-10-15

    Sheath energy transmission governs the plasma energy exhaust onto a material surface. The ion channel is dominated by convection, but the electron channel has a significant thermal conduction component, which is dominated by the Knudsen layer effect in the presence of an absorbing wall. First-principle kinetic simulations reveal a robustly supersonic sheath entry flow. The ion sheath energy transmission and the sheath potential are accurately predicted by a sheath model of truncated bi-Maxwellian electron distribution. The electron energy transmission is further enhanced by a parallel heat flux of the perpendicular degrees of freedom.

  17. Electron energy distribution produced by beam-plasma discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, H. R.; Gordeuk, J.; Jost, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    In an investigation of a beam-plasma discharge (BPD), the electron energy distribution of an electron beam moving through a partially ionized gas is analyzed. Among other results, it is found that the occurrence of BPD heats the initially cold electron beam from the accelerator. The directional intensity of electrons measured outside the beam core indicates that most particles suffer a single scattering in energy and pitch angle. At low currents this result is expected as beam particles collide with the neutral atmosphere, while in BPD the majority of particles is determined to still undergo a single scattering near the original beam core. The extended energy spectra at various beam currents show two rather distinct plasma populations, one centered at the initial beam energy (approximately 1500 eV) and the other at approximately 150 eV.

  18. Electron energy distribution produced by beam-plasma discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, H. R.; Gordeuk, J.; Jost, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    In an investigation of a beam-plasma discharge (BPD), the electron energy distribution of an electron beam moving through a partially ionized gas is analyzed. Among other results, it is found that the occurrence of BPD heats the initially cold electron beam from the accelerator. The directional intensity of electrons measured outside the beam core indicates that most particles suffer a single scattering in energy and pitch angle. At low currents this result is expected as beam particles collide with the neutral atmosphere, while in BPD the majority of particles is determined to still undergo a single scattering near the original beam core. The extended energy spectra at various beam currents show two rather distinct plasma populations, one centered at the initial beam energy (approximately 1500 eV) and the other at approximately 150 eV.

  19. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Shumlak, U. Golingo, R. P. Nelson, B. A. Bowers, C. A. Doty, S. A. Forbes, E. G. Hughes, M. C. Kim, B. Knecht, S. D. Lambert, K. K. Lowrie, W. Ross, M. P. Weed, J. R.

    2014-12-15

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes – Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. A sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results and

  20. Study of Volumetrically Heated Ultra-High Energy Density Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    2016-10-27

    Heating dense matter to millions of degrees is important for applications, but requires complex and expensive methods. The major goal of the project was to demonstrate using a compact laser the creation of a new ultra-high energy density plasma regime characterized by simultaneous extremely high temperature and high density, and to study it combining experimental measurements and advanced simulations. We have demonstrated that trapping of intense femtosecond laser pulses deep within ordered nanowire arrays can heat near solid density matter into a new ultra hot plasma regime. Extreme electron densities, and temperatures of several tens of million degrees were achieved using laser pulses of only 0.5 J energy from a compact laser. Our x-ray spectra and simulations showed that extremely highly ionized plasma volumes several micrometers in depth are generated by irradiation of gold and Nickel nanowire arrays with femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities. We obtained extraordinarily high degrees of ionization (e.g. we peeled 52 electrons from gold atoms, and up to 26 electrons from nickel atoms). In the process we generated Gigabar pressures only exceeded in the central hot spot of highly compressed thermonuclear fusion plasmas.. The plasma created after the dissolved wires expand, collide, and thermalize, is computed to have a thermal energy density of 0.3 GJ cm-3 and a pressure of 1-2 Gigabar. These are pressures only exceeded in highly compressed thermonuclear fusion plasmas. Scaling these results to higher laser intensities promises to create plasmas with temperatures and pressures exceeding those in the center of the sun.

  1. Control of ion energy at the substrates during plasma processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiang-Bau

    1999-11-01

    Ion bombardment plays a significant role in many aspects of plasma processing in integrated circuit manufacturing, including etch rate, etch selectivity, etched feature profiles, differential charging, deposited film quality, damage, etc. Some of these have emerged as new challenges as device sizes continue shrinking. Since those challenges are somewhat related to the ion trajectory (or ion energy), more precise control of ion bombarding energy is critical and necessary. This study combined plasma model simulation and experimental implementation to develop an ion energy distribution function (IEDF) control technique by carefully tailoring the bias voltage waveform applied to the substrate. A time-dependent, spherical-shell, whole-region plasma fluid model was constructed first to investigate the factors that affect the ion energy distribution. The simulation results show that a greatly narrowed IEDF can be obtained by applying a specially tailored bias voltage waveform composed of a series of pulses and a slow negative linear slope between pulses. The simulation also demonstrates that the IEDF produced with this technique is independent of ion mass, the technique does not induce a non-uniform substrate potential, and does produce a more precisely controllable ion energy compared to the conventional sinusoidal bias voltage power supply design. Experiments in a helicon argon plasma show good agreement with simulation results. Not limited to electropositive plasmas, this technique also demonstrates similar performance in an electronegative SF6 plasma. Experiments related to the applications of this technique in a real-time non-intrusive ion bombarding flux measurement as well as to SiO2/Si etching selectivity improvement have also been performed. The real-time non-intrusive ion bombarding flux measurements show more accurate results than are obtainable with Langmuir probes and the output can serve as a meaningful control variable for etching processes. This technique

  2. Transition of energy transfer from MHD turbulence to kinetic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan; Matthaeus, William; Parashar, Tulasi; Shi, Yipeng; Wan, Minping; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-11-01

    The classical energy cascade scenario is of great importance in explaining the heating of corona and solar wind. One can envision that energy residing in large-scale fluctuations is transported to smaller scales where dissipation occurs and finally drives kinetic processes that absorb the energy flux and energize charged particles. Here we inquire how the cascade operates in a compressible plasma, and how the characteristics of energy transfer vary going from MHD to kinetic scales. When filtering MHD equations, we can get an apparent inertial range over which the conservative energy cascade occurs and the scale locality of energy transfer is similar to the cases of incompressible MHD turbulence. Pervasive shocks not only make a significant difference on energy cascade and magnetic amplification, but can also introduce considerable pressure dilation, a complement of viscous and ohmic dissipation that can trigger an alternative channel of the conversion between kinetic and internal energy. The procedure can also be applied to the Vlasov equation and kinetic simulation, in comparison with MHD turbulence, and is a good candidate to investigate the energy cascade process and the analogous role of the (tensor) pressure dilation in collisionless plasma.

  3. Study of barrier properties and chemical resistance of recycled PET coated with amorphous carbon through a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process.

    PubMed

    Cruz, S A; Zanin, M; Nerin, C; De Moraes, M A B

    2006-01-01

    Many studies have been carried out in order to make bottle-to-bottle recycling feasible. The problem is that residual contaminants in recycled plastic intended for food packaging could be a risk to public health. One option is to use a layer of virgin material, named functional barrier, which prevents the contaminants migration process. This paper shows the feasibility of using polyethylene terephthalate (PET) recycled for food packaging employing a functional barrier made from hydrogen amorphous carbon film deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD) process. PET samples were deliberately contaminated with a series of surrogates using a FDA protocol. After that, PET samples were coated with approximately 600 and 1200 Angstrons thickness of amorphous carbon film. Then, the migration tests using as food simulants: water, 10% ethanol, 3% acetic acid, and isooctane were applied to the sample in order to check the chemical resistance of the new coated material. After the tests, the liquid extracts were analysed using a solid-phase microextraction device (SPME) coupled to GC-MS.

  4. Modeling Nuclear Fusion in High Energy Density Plasmas Using a Strongly Magnetized Non-neutral Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, D. H. E.

    2005-10-01

    In the hot dense interiors of stars and giant planets, nuclear reactions are predicted to occur at rates that are greatly enhanced compared to those at low densities. The enhancement is caused by plasma screening of the reacting pairs, increasing the probability of close collisions. However, strongly enhanced nuclear reaction rates have never been observed in the laboratory. This poster discusses a method for observing the enhancement using an analogy between nuclear energy and cyclotron energy in a non-neutral plasma in a strong magnetic field. In such a plasma, cyclotron energy is an adiabatic invariant, and is released only through close collisions that break this invariant. It is shown that the rate of release of cyclotron energy is enhanced by precisely the same factor as that for the release of nuclear energy, because both processes rely on close collisions that are enhanced by plasma screening.ootnotetextD. Dubin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 025002 (2005). Simulations measuring the screening enhancement will be presented, and the possibility of exciting and studying burn fronts will be discussed.ootnotetextSee also adjacent poster by J. Bollinger.

  5. A low-energy linear oxygen plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2007-01-08

    A new version of a Constricted Plasma Source is described,characterized by all metal-ceramic construction, a linear slit exit of180 mm length, and cw-operation (typically 50 kHz) at an average power of1.5 kW. The plasma source is here operated with oxygen gas, producingstreaming plasma that contains mainly positive molecular and atomic ions,and to a much lesser degree, negative ions. The maximum total ion currentobtained was about 0.5 A. The fraction of atomic ions reached more than10 percent of all ions when the flow rate was less then 10 sccm O2,corresponding to a chamber pressure of about 0.5 Pa for the selectedpumping speed. The energy distribution functions of the different ionspecies were measured with a combinedmass spectrometer and energyanalyzer. The time-averaged distribution functions were broad and rangedfrom about 30eV to 90 eV at 200 kHz and higher frequencies, while theywere only several eV broad at 50 kHz and lower frequencies, with themaximum located at about 40 eV for the grounded anode case. This maximumwas shifted down to about 7 eV when the anode was floating, indicatingthe important role of the plasma potential for the ion energy for a givensubstrate potential. The source could be scaled to greater length and maybe useful for functionalization of surfaces and plasma-assisteddeposition of compound films.

  6. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Korepanov, S.; Mishagin, V.; Smirnov, A.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.

    2015-11-01

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  7. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A. Mishagin, V.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.

    2015-11-15

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  8. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating.

    PubMed

    Deichuli, P; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Korepanov, S; Mishagin, V; Smirnov, A; Sorokin, A; Stupishin, N

    2015-11-01

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  9. High energy components and collective modes in thermonuclear plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Cowley, S.; Detragiache, P.; Kulsrud, R.; Pegoraro, F.

    1986-02-01

    The theory of a class of collective modes of a thermonuclear magnetically confined plasma, with frequencies in the range of the ion cyclotron frequency and of its harmonics, is presented. These modes can be excited by their resonant cyclotron interaction with a plasma component of relatively high energy particles characterized by a strongly anisotropic distribution in velocity space. Normal modes that are spatially localized by the inhomogeneity of the plasma density are found. This ensures that the energy gained by their resonant interaction is not convected away. The mode spatial localization can be significantly altered by the magnetic field inhomogeneity for a given class of plasma density profiles. Special attention is devoted to the case of a spin polarized plasma, where the charged products of fusion reactions are anisotropically distributed. We show that for the mode of polarization that enhances nuclear reaction rates the tritium will be rapidly depolarized to toroidal configurations with relatively mild gradients of the confining magnetic field. 18 refs., 9 figs.

  10. Low energy ion distribution measurements in Madison Symmetric Torus plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, J. B. Mezonlin, E. D.; Johnson, J. A.

    2014-06-15

    Charge-exchange neutrals contain information about the contents of a plasma and can be detected as they escape confinement. The Florida A and M University compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA), used to measure the contents of neutral particle flux, has been reconfigured, calibrated, and installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) for high temperature deuterium plasmas. The energy range of the CNPA has been extended to cover 0.34–5.2 keV through an upgrade of the 25 detection channels. The CNPA has been used on all types of MST plasmas at a rate of 20 kHz throughout the entire discharge (∼70 ms). Plasma parameter scans show that the ion distribution is most dependent on the plasma current. Magnetic reconnection events throughout these scans produce stronger poloidal electric fields, stronger global magnetic modes, and larger changes in magnetic energy all of which heavily influence the non-Maxwellian part of the ion distribution (the fast ion tail)

  11. Energy transfer, pressure tensor, and heating of kinetic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan; Matthaeus, William H.; Parashar, Tulasi N.; Haggerty, Colby C.; Roytershteyn, Vadim; Daughton, William; Wan, Minping; Shi, Yipeng; Chen, Shiyi

    2017-07-01

    Kinetic plasma turbulence cascade spans multiple scales ranging from macroscopic fluid flow to sub-electron scales. Mechanisms that dissipate large scale energy, terminate the inertial range cascade, and convert kinetic energy into heat are hotly debated. Here, we revisit these puzzles using fully kinetic simulation. By performing scale-dependent spatial filtering on the Vlasov equation, we extract information at prescribed scales and introduce several energy transfer functions. This approach allows highly inhomogeneous energy cascade to be quantified as it proceeds down to kinetic scales. The pressure work, - ( P . ∇ ) . u , can trigger a channel of the energy conversion between fluid flow and random motions, which contains a collision-free generalization of the viscous dissipation in collisional fluid. Both the energy transfer and the pressure work are strongly correlated with velocity gradients.

  12. Hanford recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, I.M.

    1996-09-01

    This paper is a study of the past and present recycling efforts on the Hanford site and options for future improvements in the recycling program. Until 1996, recycling goals were voluntarily set by the waste generators: this year, DOE has imposed goals for all its sites to accomplish by 1999. Hanford is presently meeting the voluntary site goals, but may not be able to meet all the new DOE goals without changes to the program. Most of these new DOE goals are recycling goals: * Reduce the generation of radioactive (low-level) waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of low-level mixed waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of hazardous waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Recycle 33 percent of the sanitary waste from all operations. * Increase affirmative procurement of EPA-designated recycled items to 100 percent. The Hanford recycling program has made great strides-there has been a 98 percent increase in the amount of paper recycled since its inception in 1990. Hanford recycles paper, chemicals cardboard, tires, oil, batteries, rags, lead weights, fluorescent tubes, aerosol products, concrete, office furniture, computer software, drums, toner cartridges, and scrap metal. Many other items are recycled or reused by individual groups on a one time basis without a formal contract. Several contracts are closed-loop contracts which involve all parts of the recycle loop. Considerable savings are generated from recycling, and much more is possible with increased attention and improvements to this program. General methods for improving the recycling program to ensure that the new goals can be met are: a Contract and financial changes 0 Tracking database and methods improvements 0 Expanded recycling efforts. Specifically, the Hanford recycling program would be improved by: 0 Establishing one overall

  13. The low energy plasma in the Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, J. W.; Bridge, H. S.; Goertz, C. K.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements below 6 keV from the plasma science experiment on the Voyager spacecraft show that positive ions with temperatures as low as 30 eV to several keV are observed to distances at least as great as 40 Jupiter radii in the dayside Jovian magnetosphere. When velocity determinations are possible between 10 and 40 Jupiter radii, the plasma velocity component along the rigid corotation direction is found to be consistently less than the full corotation speed. Positive ion measurements above 28 keV from the low energy charged particle experiment on Voyager demonstrate the existence of positive ions with temperatures of 20-30 keV at all distances greater than 30 Jupiter radii. Taken together, these observations suggest that the low energy plasma population from 30 to at least 40 Jupiter radii frequently contains both a cold and a hot component. A two-component plasma of this nature may indicate different sources, acceleration mechanisms, or time histories for the disparate components. It may also be indicative of a single acceleration mechanism which is highly energy dependent.

  14. Conservation of energy and momentum in nonrelativistic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, H.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Nunami, M.

    2013-02-15

    Conservation laws of energy and momentum for nonrelativistic plasmas are derived from applying Noether's theorem to the action integral for the Vlasov-Poisson-Ampere system [Sugama, Phys. Plasmas 7, 466 (2000)]. The symmetric pressure tensor is obtained from modifying the asymmetric canonical pressure tensor with using the rotational symmetry of the action integral. Differences between the resultant conservation laws and those for the Vlasov-Maxwell system including the Maxwell displacement current are clarified. These results provide a useful basis for gyrokinetic conservation laws because gyrokinetic equations are derived as an approximation of the Vlasov-Poisson-Ampere system.

  15. Electron kinetic energy and plasma emission diagnosis from femtosecond laser produced air plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heins, A.; Singh, S. C.; Guo, C.

    2017-07-01

    The characteristics of a plasma formed by a focused ultrashort laser in atmospheric-pressure air are studied with linear and circular pulses. We show that the ionization threshold for circular pulses is 1.36 times higher than for that linear pulses. Using an intensified CCD camera, we study plasma emission over seven orders of magnitude in a dynamic range. In spite of possessing a lower total ion number, plasmas produced by circular pulses are found to be brighter visible-light emitters than those produced by linear pulses of the same energy. This indicates that circular pulses produce plasmas with more electron kinetic energy than linear pulses and that kinetic energy plays a role in the optical emission intensity. The presence of high energy electrons is verified by demonstrating that a high-ionization-potential gas can be made to radiate more brightly by the addition of a low-ionization-potential gas even though the second gas lowers the achievable focal intensity.

  16. Refractory recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Oxnard, R.T. )

    1994-10-01

    Businesses are run by profit and opportunity. Businesses will not recycle or reduce waste unless it is profitable, mandatory or perceived to be either in the future. Pressure from investors, government, consumers and accountants will increase the importance of recycling of refractories. The history and trends of refractory recycling and a method for auditing waste is discussed in this article.

  17. Energy absorption in cold inhomogeneous plasmas - The Herlofson paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, F. W.; Harker, K. J.

    1972-01-01

    Confirmation of Barston's (1964) conclusions regarding the underlying mechanism of the Herlofson paradox by examining in detail several analytically tractable cases of delta-function and sinusoidal excitation. The effects of collisions and nonzero electron temperature in determining the steady state fields and dissipation are considered. Energy absorption without dissipation in plasmas is shown to be analogous to that occurring after application of a signal to a network of lossless resonant circuits. This analogy is pursued and is extended to cover Landau damping in a warm homogeneous plasma in which the resonating elements are the electron streams making up the velocity distribution. Some of the practical consequences of resonant absorption are discussed, together with a number of paradoxical plasma phenomena which can also be elucidated by considering a superposition of normal modes rather than a single Fourier component.

  18. Plasma expansion into vacuum assuming a steplike electron energy distribution.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Thomas; Schlegel, Theodor; Kaluza, Malte C

    2013-04-01

    The expansion of a semi-infinite plasma slab into vacuum is analyzed with a hydrodynamic model implying a steplike electron energy distribution function. Analytic expressions for the maximum ion energy and the related ion distribution function are derived and compared with one-dimensional numerical simulations. The choice of the specific non-Maxwellian initial electron energy distribution automatically ensures the conservation of the total energy of the system. The estimated ion energies may differ by an order of magnitude from the values obtained with an adiabatic expansion model supposing a Maxwellian electron distribution. Furthermore, good agreement with data from experiments using laser pulses of ultrashort durations τ(L)

  19. Application of Plasma Waveguides to High Energy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Milchberg, Howard M

    2013-03-30

    The eventual success of laser-plasma based acceleration schemes for high-energy particle physics will require the focusing and stable guiding of short intense laser pulses in reproducible plasma channels. For this goal to be realized, many scientific issues need to be addressed. These issues include an understanding of the basic physics of, and an exploration of various schemes for, plasma channel formation. In addition, the coupling of intense laser pulses to these channels and the stable propagation of pulses in the channels require study. Finally, new theoretical and computational tools need to be developed to aid in the design and analysis of experiments and future accelerators. Here we propose a 3-year renewal of our combined theoretical and experimental program on the applications of plasma waveguides to high-energy accelerators. During the past grant period we have made a number of significant advances in the science of laser-plasma based acceleration. We pioneered the development of clustered gases as a new highly efficient medium for plasma channel formation. Our contributions here include theoretical and experimental studies of the physics of cluster ionization, heating, explosion, and channel formation. We have demonstrated for the first time the generation of and guiding in a corrugated plasma waveguide. The fine structure demonstrated in these guides is only possible with cluster jet heating by lasers. The corrugated guide is a slow wave structure operable at arbitrarily high laser intensities, allowing direct laser acceleration, a process we have explored in detail with simulations. The development of these guides opens the possibility of direct laser acceleration, a true miniature analogue of the SLAC RF-based accelerator. Our theoretical studies during this period have also contributed to the further development of the simulation codes, Wake and QuickPIC, which can be used for both laser driven and beam driven plasma based acceleration schemes. We

  20. Investigation of Ultrasonics as a tool for energy efficient recycling of Lactic acid from postconsumer PLA products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Gowrishankar

    The growing use of "ecofriendly," biodegradable polymers have created a need for a suitable recycling technique because, unlike petroleum derived plastics, their properties deteriorate during conventional recycling. These new techniques must be cost efficient and yield material properties same as virgin polymer. This research investigates the effectiveness of high-power ultrasonics as an efficient technique to recover lactic acid from postconsumer polylactic acid (PLA) products. Polylactic acid is a commercially available bioplastic derived from corn starch and/or sugar cane that is biorenewable and compostable (biodegradable). The various ongoing researches to recover lactic acid from PLA employ a common platform of high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) to effect polymer hydrolysis. The energy intensiveness of these HTHP processes prompted this work to investigate ultrasonics as an low energy alternative process to cause PLA depolymerization. The energy consumption and the time required for depolymerization were utilized as the metrics to quantify and compare depolymerization enhanced by ultrasonics with hot-bath technique. The coupled effect of catalysts concentration and different solvents, along with ultrasonic were studied based on preliminary trial results. In addition, the correlation between the rates of de-polymerization was analyzed for ultrasonic amplitude, treatment time, and catalyst concentration and types. The results indicate that depolymerization of PLA was largely effected by heating caused by ultrasonic-induced cavitations. Other effects of ultrasonics, namely cavitations and acoustic streaming, were shown to have minimal effects in enhancing depolymerization. In fact, thermal energy predominately affected the reaction kinetics; the heat introduced by conventional method (i.e., electrical heaters) was more efficient than ultrasonic heating in terms of energy (for depolymerization) per unit mass of PLA and depolymerizing time. The degree of

  1. Energy transfer and dual cascade in kinetic magnetized plasma turbulence.

    PubMed

    Plunk, G G; Tatsuno, T

    2011-04-22

    The question of how nonlinear interactions redistribute the energy of fluctuations across available degrees of freedom is of fundamental importance in the study of turbulence and transport in magnetized weakly collisional plasmas, ranging from space settings to fusion devices. In this Letter, we present a theory for the dual cascade found in such plasmas, which predicts a range of new behavior that distinguishes this cascade from that of neutral fluid turbulence. These phenomena are explained in terms of the constrained nature of spectral transfer in nonlinear gyrokinetics. Accompanying this theory are the first observations of these phenomena, obtained via direct numerical simulations using the gyrokinetic code AstroGK. The basic mechanisms that are found provide a framework for understanding the turbulent energy transfer that couples scales both locally and nonlocally.

  2. Earth Day 1990: Lesson Plan and Home Survey--7-12. Energy, Solid Waste/Recycling, Toxics, Transportation, and Water with Fact Sheets and Action Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holm-Shuett, Amy; Shuett, Greg

    The purpose of this 7-12 curriculum is to provide teachers and other educators with classroom lessons and home surveys that are a starting point for understanding five significant environmental issues - water, toxics, energy, transportation, and solid waste/recycling. While each of these environmental issues is complex and has far-reaching…

  3. Earth Day 1990: Lesson Plan and Home Survey--K-6. Energy, Solid Waste/Recycling, Toxics, and Water, with Follow-up Activities and Action Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sly, Carolie; Ruskey, Abby

    The purpose of this K-6 curriculum is to provide teachers and other educators with classroom lessons and home surveys that are a starting point for understanding four significant environmental issues--water, toxics, energy, and solid waste/recycling. While each of these environmental issues is complex and has far-reaching implications, the lessons…

  4. Earth Day 1990: Lesson Plan and Home Survey--7-12. Energy, Solid Waste/Recycling, Toxics, Transportation, and Water with Fact Sheets and Action Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holm-Shuett, Amy; Shuett, Greg

    The purpose of this 7-12 curriculum is to provide teachers and other educators with classroom lessons and home surveys that are a starting point for understanding five significant environmental issues - water, toxics, energy, transportation, and solid waste/recycling. While each of these environmental issues is complex and has far-reaching…

  5. Observation of Inertial Energy Cascade in Interplanetary Space Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Noullez, A.; Bruno, R.; Bavassano, B.

    2007-09-14

    Direct evidence for the presence of an inertial energy cascade, the most characteristic signature of hydromagnetic turbulence (MHD), is observed in the solar wind by the Ulysses spacecraft. After a brief rederivation of the equivalent of Yaglom's law for MHD turbulence, a linear relation is indeed observed for the scaling of mixed third-order structure functions involving Elsaesser variables. This experimental result firmly establishes the turbulent character of low-frequency velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind plasma.

  6. Energy loss of correlated ions in dense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Baida Muhsen; Ahmed, Khalid A.; Ahmed, Riayhd Khalil

    2016-05-01

    The interaction between proton clusters and plasma gas is studied using the dielectric function by fried-conte formalism. The theoretical formula of the potential basis equation derived and the energy loss of incident proton (point-like, correlate and dicluster) with different parameters (velocity, distance, densities and temperatures) is calculated numerically. Two different equations were used to enhance the correlation stopping (ECS), it is clear that the present results are consistent with the dielectric calculation of energy loss at parameters ne = 1017cm-3 and T = (2 - 10) eV. The result showed a good correlation with the previous work.

  7. Mean excitation energies for ions in gases and plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbet, Xavier; Deutsch, Claude; Maynard, Gilles

    1987-02-01

    A variational approach yields accurate upper and lower bounds for mean excitation energies and other related parameters describing the stopping of nonrelativistic point charges by isolated species and ions embedded in dense and hot matter of relevance to particle-driven inertial fusion. The resulting I compares nicely with previous ones by Hartree-Fock-Slater and with experimental data when available. An efficient pseudo-analytic formula based on the Thomas-Fermi method is obtained, together with a cubic spline interpolation variationally improved. It is shown that in high temperature plasmas (kBT≥10 eV) mean excitation energies are significantly smaller than their cold homologue.

  8. Classical strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma. VII. Energy loss

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Sungtae; Zahed, Ismail

    2010-12-15

    We use linear response analysis and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to derive the energy loss of a heavy quark in the SU(2) classical Coulomb plasma in terms of the l=1 monopole and nonstatic structure factor. The result is valid for all Coulomb couplings {Gamma}=V/K, the ratio of the mean potential to kinetic energy. We use the Liouville equation in the collisionless limit to assess the SU(2) nonstatic structure factor. We find the energy loss to be strongly dependent on {Gamma}. In the liquid phase with {Gamma}{approx_equal}4, the energy loss is mostly metallic and soundless with neither a Cerenkov nor a Mach cone. Our analytical results compare favorably with the SU(2) molecular dynamics simulations at large momentum and for heavy quark masses.

  9. Efficiency of pulse high-current generator energy transfer into plasma liner energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshkin, V. I.

    2013-08-01

    The efficiency of capacitor-bank energy transfer from a high-current pulse generator into kinetic energy of a plasma liner has been analyzed. The analysis was performed using a model including the circuit equations and equations of the cylindrical shell motion. High efficiency of the energy transfer into kinetic energy of the liner is shown to be achieved only by a low-inductance generator. We considered an "ideal" liner load in which the load current is close to zero in the final of the shell compression. This load provides a high (up to 80%) efficiency of energy transfer and higher stability when compressing the liner.

  10. Ferlins Show Tissue-Specific Expression and Segregate as Plasma Membrane/Late Endosomal or Trans-Golgi/Recycling Ferlins.

    PubMed

    Redpath, Gregory M I; Sophocleous, Reece A; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Cooper, Sandra T

    2016-03-01

    Ferlins are a family of transmembrane-anchored vesicle fusion proteins uniquely characterized by 5-7 tandem cytoplasmic C2 domains, Ca(2+)-regulated phospholipid-binding domains that regulate vesicle fusion in the synaptotagmin family. In humans, dysferlin mutations cause limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B) due to defective Ca(2+)-dependent, vesicle-mediated membrane repair and otoferlin mutations cause non-syndromic deafness due to defective Ca(2+)-triggered auditory neurotransmission. In this study, we describe the tissue-specific expression, subcellular localization and endocytic trafficking of the ferlin family. Studies of endosomal transit together with 3D-structured illumination microscopy reveals dysferlin and myoferlin are abundantly expressed at the PM and cycle to Rab7-positive late endosomes, supporting potential roles in the late-endosomal pathway. In contrast, Fer1L6 shows concentrated localization to a specific compartment of the trans-Golgi/recycling endosome, cycling rapidly between this compartment and the PM via Rab11 recycling endosomes. Otoferlin also shows trans-Golgi to PM cycling, with very low levels of PM otoferlin suggesting either brief PM residence, or rare incorporation of otoferlin molecules into the PM. Thus, type-I and type-II ferlins segregate as PM/late-endosomal or trans-Golgi/recycling ferlins, consistent with different ferlins mediating vesicle fusion events in specific subcellular locations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Sludge thermal oxidation processes: mineral recycling, energy impact, and greenhouse effect gases release.

    PubMed

    Guibelin, E

    2004-01-01

    Different treatment routes have been studied for a mixed sludge: the conventional agricultural use is compared with the thermal oxidation processes, including incineration (in gaseous phase) and wet air oxidation (in liquid phase). The interest of a sludge digestion prior to the final treatment has been also considered according to the two major criteria, which are the fossil energy utilisation and the greenhouse effect gases (CO2, CH4, N2O) release. Thermal energy has to be recovered on thermal processes to make these processes environmentally friendly, otherwise their main interest is to extract or destroy micropollutants and pathogens from the carbon cycle. In case of continuous energy recovery, incineration can produce more energy than it consumes. Digestion is especially interesting for agriculture: according to these two schemes, the energy final balance can also be in excess. As to wet air oxidation, it is probably one of the best ways to minimize greenhouse effect gases emission.

  12. Magnetic energy density and plasma energy density in the Venus wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez De Tejada, H. A.; Durand-Manterola, H. J.; Lundin, R.; Barabash, S.; Zhang, T.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Sauvaud, J.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic energy density and plasma energy density in the Venus wake H. Pérez-de-Tejada1, H. Durand-Manterola1, R. Lundin2, S. Barabash2, T. L. Zhang3, A. Sauvaud4, M. Reyes-Ruiz5. 1 - Institute of Geophysics, UNAM, México, D. F. 2 - Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Umea, Sweden 3 - Space Research Institute, Graz, Austria 4 - CESR, Toulouse, France 5 - Institute of Astronomy, UNAM, Ensenada, México Measurements conducted in the Venus wake with the magnetometer and the Aspera-4 plasma instrument of the Venus Express spacecraft show that average values of the kinetic energy density of the plasma in that region are comparable to average local values of the magnetic energy density. Observations were carried out in several orbits of the Venus Express near the midnight plane and suggest that the total energy content in the Venus wake is distributed with nearly comparable values between the plasma and the magnetic field. Processes associated with the solar wind erosion of planetary ions from the polar magnetic regions of the ionosphere are involved in the comparable distribution of both energy components.

  13. Impact of postconsumer recycling initiatives on industrial energy demand-opportunities and threats for natural gas. Final report, December 1991-June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Artz, N.; Kinkelaar, M.; Kirk, M.

    1993-01-01

    The rapid change in municipal solid waste and industrial waste management practices in the U.S. could have significant impact on industrial energy demand and ultimately, natural gas demand. The study examines the impact of increased rates of postconsumer recycling and waste used as fuel on industrial natural gas demand for the time period 1990 to 2005. Increased postconsumer recycling and waste used as fuel are projected to decrease natural gas demand in the U.S. by 29 trillion Btu per year by 1995 and over 71 trillion Btu by 2005. Increased ferrous scrap use in electric are furnaces and postconsumer plastics recycling are projected to cause the most significant loss in natural gas demand.

  14. Counter-facing plasma focus system as a repetitive and/or long-pulse high energy density plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Yutaka; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2009-11-15

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial plasma guns is proposed as a long-pulse and/or repetitive high energy density plasma source. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrated that with an assist of breakdown and outer electrode connections, current sheets evolved into a configuration for stable plasma confinement at the center of the electrodes. The current sheets could successively compress and confine the high energy density plasma every half period of the discharge current, enabling highly repetitive light emissions in extreme ultraviolet region with time durations in at least ten microseconds.

  15. Counter-facing plasma focus system as a repetitive and/or long-pulse high energy density plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Yutaka; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2009-11-01

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial plasma guns is proposed as a long-pulse and/or repetitive high energy density plasma source. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrated that with an assist of breakdown and outer electrode connections, current sheets evolved into a configuration for stable plasma confinement at the center of the electrodes. The current sheets could successively compress and confine the high energy density plasma every half period of the discharge current, enabling highly repetitive light emissions in extreme ultraviolet region with time durations in at least ten microseconds.

  16. Solvent recycle/recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  17. High-Energy Two-Stage Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, Tom

    2003-01-01

    A high-energy (28 kJ per pulse) two-stage pulsed plasma thruster (MSFC PPT-1) has been constructed and tested. The motivation of this project is to develop a high power (approximately 500 kW), high specific impulse (approximately 10000 s), highly efficient (greater than 50%) thruster for use as primary propulsion in a high power nuclear electric propulsion system. PPT-1 was designed to overcome four negative characteristics which have detracted from the utility of pulsed plasma thrusters: poor electrical efficiency, poor propellant utilization efficiency, electrode erosion, and reliability issues associated with the use of high speed gas valves and high current switches. Traditional PPTs have been plagued with poor efficiency because they have not been operated in a plasma regime that fully exploits the potential benefits of pulsed plasma acceleration by electromagnetic forces. PPTs have generally been used to accelerate low-density plasmas with long current pulses. Operation of thrusters in this plasma regime allows for the development of certain undesirable particle-kinetic effects, such as Hall effect-induced current sheet canting. PPT-1 was designed to propel a highly collisional, dense plasma that has more fluid-like properties and, hence, is more effectively pushed by a magnetic field. The high-density plasma loading into the second stage of the accelerator is achieved through the use of a dense plasma injector (first stage). The injector produces a thermal plasma, derived from a molten lithium propellant feed system, which is subsequently accelerated by the second stage using mega-amp level currents, which eject the plasma at a speed on the order of 100 kilometers per second. Traditional PPTs also suffer from dynamic efficiency losses associated with snowplow loading of distributed neutral propellant. The twostage scheme used in PPT-I allows the propellant to be loaded in a manner which more closely approximates the optimal slug loading. Lithium propellant

  18. High-Energy Two-Stage Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, Tom

    2003-01-01

    A high-energy (28 kJ per pulse) two-stage pulsed plasma thruster (MSFC PPT-1) has been constructed and tested. The motivation of this project is to develop a high power (approximately 500 kW), high specific impulse (approximately 10000 s), highly efficient (greater than 50%) thruster for use as primary propulsion in a high power nuclear electric propulsion system. PPT-1 was designed to overcome four negative characteristics which have detracted from the utility of pulsed plasma thrusters: poor electrical efficiency, poor propellant utilization efficiency, electrode erosion, and reliability issues associated with the use of high speed gas valves and high current switches. Traditional PPTs have been plagued with poor efficiency because they have not been operated in a plasma regime that fully exploits the potential benefits of pulsed plasma acceleration by electromagnetic forces. PPTs have generally been used to accelerate low-density plasmas with long current pulses. Operation of thrusters in this plasma regime allows for the development of certain undesirable particle-kinetic effects, such as Hall effect-induced current sheet canting. PPT-1 was designed to propel a highly collisional, dense plasma that has more fluid-like properties and, hence, is more effectively pushed by a magnetic field. The high-density plasma loading into the second stage of the accelerator is achieved through the use of a dense plasma injector (first stage). The injector produces a thermal plasma, derived from a molten lithium propellant feed system, which is subsequently accelerated by the second stage using mega-amp level currents, which eject the plasma at a speed on the order of 100 kilometers per second. Traditional PPTs also suffer from dynamic efficiency losses associated with snowplow loading of distributed neutral propellant. The twostage scheme used in PPT-I allows the propellant to be loaded in a manner which more closely approximates the optimal slug loading. Lithium propellant

  19. Feedback control of plasma electron density and ion energy in an inductively coupled plasma etcher

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Chaung; Leou, K.-C.; Huang, H.-M.; Hsieh, C.-H.

    2009-01-15

    Here the authors report the development of a fuzzy logic based feedback control of the plasma electron density and ion energy for high density plasma etch process. The plasma electron density was measured using their recently developed transmission line microstrip microwave interferometer mounted on the chamber wall, and the rf voltage was measured by a commercial impedance meter connected to the wafer stage. The actuators were two 13.56 MHz rf power generators which provided the inductively coupled plasma power and bias power, respectively. The control system adopted the fuzzy logic control algorithm to reduce frequent actuator action resulting from measurement noise. The experimental results show that the first wafer effect can be eliminated using closed-loop control for both poly-Si and HfO{sub 2} etching. In particular, for the HfO2 etch, the controlled variables in this work were much more effective than the previous one where ion current was controlled, instead of the electron density. However, the pressure disturbance effect cannot be reduced using plasma electron density feedback.

  20. Overview of the Tri Alpha Energy Plasma Diagnostics Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Matthew; Gota, Hiroshi; Putvinski, Sergei; Tuszewski, Michel; Binderbauer, Michl; the TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    Tri Alpha Energy (TAE) seeks to study the evolution of advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas sustained and heated by neutral beam (NB) injection. Heating of FRCs is the focus of the upcoming C-2W program. Data on the FRC plasma performance is provided by a comprehensive suite of diagnostics including magnetic sensors, interferometry, Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, bolometry, reflectometry, and NB-related fast-ion/neutral diagnostics. While many of these diagnostic systems were first implemented for the earlier C-2 and C-2U experiments, virtually all of them benefit from continuous improvement and upgrades. TAE maintains a large plasma diagnostics development program working on a variety of new systems for future devices including: far-infrared polarimetry, visible and infrared fast imaging cameras, proton detector arrays, end loss analyzers, impurity and majority ion CHERS, and 100-channel bolometer units with proprietary compact local data acquisition. In addition, extensive ongoing work focuses on developing advanced methods of measuring the internal magnetic fields of the FRC plasma.

  1. Electron energy spectrum in circularly polarized laser irradiated overdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K.; Shao, Xi; Kumar, Pawan

    2014-10-15

    A circularly polarized laser normally impinged on an overdense plasma thin foil target is shown to accelerate the electrons in the skin layer towards the rear, converting the quiver energy into streaming energy exactly if one ignores the space charge field. The energy distribution of electrons is close to Maxwellian with an upper cutoff ε{sub max}=mc{sup 2}[(1+a{sub 0}{sup 2}){sup 1/2}−1], where a{sub 0}{sup 2}=(1+(2ω{sup 2}/ω{sub p}{sup 2})|a{sub in}|{sup 2}){sup 2}−1, |a{sub in}| is the normalized amplitude of the incident laser of frequency ω, and ω{sub p} is the plasma frequency. The energetic electrons create an electrostatic sheath at the rear and cause target normal sheath acceleration of protons. The energy gain by the accelerated ions is of the order of ε{sub max}.

  2. The Recycler Electron Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Shemyakin, A.; Prost, L. R.

    2013-03-19

    The Recycler Electron cooler was the first (and so far, the only) cooler working at a relativistic energy (γ = 9.5). It was successfully developed in 1995-2004 and was in operation at Fermilab in 2005-2011, providing cooling of antiprotons in the Recycler ring. This paper describes the cooler, difficulties in achieving the required electron beam parameters and the ways to overcome them, cooling measurements, and details of operation.

  3. Collisionless Plasma Modeling in an Arbitrary Potential Energy Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for calculating a collisionless plasma along a field line is presented. The primary feature of the new model is that it can handle an arbitrary (including nonmonotonic) potential energy distribution. This was one of the limiting constraints on the existing models in this class, and these constraints are generalized for an arbitrary potential energy composition. The formulation for relating current density to the field-aligned potential as well as formulas for density, temperature and energy flux calculations are presented for several distribution functions, ranging from a bi-Lorentzian with a loss cone to an isotropic Maxwellian. A comparison of these results with previous models shows that the formulation reduces.to the earlier models under similar assumptions.

  4. Collisionless Plasma Modeling in an Arbitrary Potential Energy Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for calculating a collisionless plasma along a field line is presented. The primary feature of the new model is that it can handle an arbitrary (including nonmonotonic) potential energy distribution. This was one of the limiting constraints on the existing models in this class, and these constraints are generalized for an arbitrary potential energy composition. The formulation for relating current density to the field-aligned potential as well as formulas for density, temperature and energy flux calculations are presented for several distribution functions, ranging from a bi-Lorentzian with a loss cone to an isotropic Maxwellian. A comparison of these results with previous models shows that the formulation reduces.to the earlier models under similar assumptions.

  5. CO2 recycling: a key strategy to introduce green energy in the chemical production chain.

    PubMed

    Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    2014-05-01

    The introduction of renewable energy in the chemical production chain is a key strategic factor both to realize a sustainable, resource-efficient, low-carbon economy and society and to drive innovation and competiveness in the chemical production. This Concept discusses this concept in terms of motivations, perspectives, and impact as well as technical barriers to achieve this goal. It is shown how an important element to realize this scenario is to foster the paths converting carbon dioxide (CO2) into feedstock for the chemical/process industry, which is one of the most efficient methods to rapidly introduce renewable energy into the chemical production chain. Some of the possible options to proceed in this direction are discussed, with focus on the technical barriers and enabling factors such as catalysis. The tight interconnection between CO2 management and the use of renewable energy is evidenced.

  6. Energy efficiency in nanoscale synthesis using nanosecond plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Pai, David Z.; (Ken) Ostrikov, Kostya; Kumar, Shailesh; Lacoste, Deanna A.; Levchenko, Igor; Laux, Christophe O.

    2013-01-01

    We report a nanoscale synthesis technique using nanosecond-duration plasma discharges. Voltage pulses 12.5 kV in amplitude and 40 ns in duration were applied repetitively at 30 kHz across molybdenum electrodes in open ambient air, generating a nanosecond spark discharge that synthesized well-defined MoO3 nanoscale architectures (i.e. flakes, dots, walls, porous networks) upon polyamide and copper substrates. No nitrides were formed. The energy cost was as low as 75 eV per atom incorporated into a nanostructure, suggesting a dramatic reduction compared to other techniques using atmospheric pressure plasmas. These findings show that highly efficient synthesis at atmospheric pressure without catalysts or external substrate heating can be achieved in a simple fashion using nanosecond discharges. PMID:23386976

  7. Energy deposition in low-power coaxial plasma thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, R. M.; Kelly, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental examination of energy deposition in self-field, coaxial plasma thrusters revealed that the thrust efficiency ranged from 2-9 percent and that the dominant losses resulted from electrode heating and propellant ionization. Sensible enthalpy and radiative losses were negligible. Thruster specific impulse increased with current, ranging from 550-1750 seconds. Spectroscopic studies of the plume plasma showed that the electron temperature ranged from 0.5-2.5 eV and that the dominant species were singly and doubly ionized argon. Attempts to raise thruster efficiency by increasing the chamber pressure resulted in reduced electrode losses and lowered I(sp), but the thrust efficiency decreased because of a current redistribution that lowered the thrust beyond expectations.

  8. Modeling Plasmas with a Kappa Electron Energy Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Michael; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2016-06-01

    Nonthermal kappa electron energy distributions have been observed in the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind, and are likely also present in the solar corona and in solar flares. In order to model the spectra of these plasmas, it is necessary to obtain the appropriate collision rate coefficients. We show that this can be done simply by summing appropriately weighted Maxwellian rate coefficients. The resulting data have similar or better accuracies than are obtained with other approaches. Summing Maxwellians has the additional advantages of being easy to implement and extendable to many different collision processes. We apply this technique to modeling the charge state distribution (CSD) of kappa-distribution plasmas. In particular, we examine the influence of electron impact multiple ionization on the equilibrium CSD and calculate the time variation of the CSD during a solar flare.

  9. Modeling Plasmas with a Kappa Electron Energy Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Michael; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2016-05-01

    Nonthermal kappa electron energy distributions have been observed in the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind, and are likely also present in the solar corona and in solar flares. In order to model the spectra of these plasmas, it is necessary to obtain the appropriate collision rate coefficients. We show that this can be done simply by summing appropriately weighted Maxwellian rate coefficients. The resulting data have similar or better accuracies than are obtained with other approaches. Summing Maxwellians has the additional advantages of being easy to implement and extendable to many different collision processes. We apply this technique to modeling the charge state distribution (CSD) of kappa-distribution plasmas. In particular, we examine the influence of electron impact multiple ionization on the equilibrium CSD and calculate the time variation of the CSD during a solar flare.

  10. Energy deposition in low-power coaxial plasma thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, R. M.; Kelly, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental examination of energy deposition in self-field, coaxial plasma thrusters revealed that the thrust efficiency ranged from 2-9 percent and that the dominant losses resulted from electrode heating and propellant ionization. Sensible enthalpy and radiative losses were negligible. Thruster specific impulse increased with current, ranging from 550-1750 seconds. Spectroscopic studies of the plume plasma showed that the electron temperature ranged from 0.5-2.5 eV and that the dominant species were singly and doubly ionized argon. Attempts to raise thruster efficiency by increasing the chamber pressure resulted in reduced electrode losses and lowered I(sp), but the thrust efficiency decreased because of a current redistribution that lowered the thrust beyond expectations.

  11. Hydrogen and helium recycling from a JxB -force convected liquid metal Ga67In20.5Sn12.5 under steady state plasma bombardment

    DOE PAGES

    Hirooka, Yoshi; Bi, Hailin; Shimada, Michiya; ...

    2016-07-20

    A series of first-of-a-kind laboratory-scale experiments on the JxB-force convected liquid metal divertor concept have been carried out in the temperature range from room temperature to ~200 °C, employing a eutectic alloy: Ga67In20.5Sn12.5, the melting point of which is 10.5 °C. The electrical current conducted through the alloy is set at about 70A and the magnetic field is set at about 700 G. Finally, it has reproducibly been observed that hydrogen as well as helium particle recycling is noticeably reduced under steady state plasma bombardment when the liquid is convected by the JxB force.

  12. High-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar thermal storage materials using AZO/graphene hybrids by optimizing hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wen; Feng, Yiyu; Qin, Chengqun; Li, Man; Li, Shipei; Cao, Chen; Long, Peng; Liu, Enzuo; Hu, Wenping; Yoshino, Katsumi; Feng, Wei

    2015-10-01

    An important method for establishing a high-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar heat system is by designing and preparing novel photo-isomerizable molecules with a high enthalpy and a long thermal life by controlling molecular interactions. A meta- and ortho-bis-substituted azobenzene chromophore (AZO) is covalently grafted onto reduced graphene oxide (RGO) for solar thermal storage materials. High grafting degree and close-packed molecules enable intermolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) for both trans-(E) and cis-(Z) isomers of AZO on the surface of nanosheets, resulting in a dramatic increase in enthalpy and lifetime. The metastable Z-form of AZO on RGO is thermally stabilized with a half-life of 52 days by steric hindrance and intermolecular H-bonds calculated using density functional theory (DFT). The AZO-RGO fuel shows a high storage capacity of 138 Wh kg-1 by optimizing intermolecular H-bonds with a good cycling stability for 50 cycles induced by visible light at 520 nm. Our work opens up a new method for making advanced molecular solar thermal storage materials by tuning molecular interactions on a nano-template.An important method for establishing a high-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar heat system is by designing and preparing novel photo-isomerizable molecules with a high enthalpy and a long thermal life by controlling molecular interactions. A meta- and ortho-bis-substituted azobenzene chromophore (AZO) is covalently grafted onto reduced graphene oxide (RGO) for solar thermal storage materials. High grafting degree and close-packed molecules enable intermolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) for both trans-(E) and cis-(Z) isomers of AZO on the surface of nanosheets, resulting in a dramatic increase in enthalpy and lifetime. The metastable Z-form of AZO on RGO is thermally stabilized with a half-life of 52 days by steric hindrance and intermolecular H-bonds calculated using density functional theory (DFT). The AZO-RGO fuel shows a high

  13. Fast endocytic recycling determines TRPC1-STIM1 clustering in ER-PM junctions and plasma membrane function of the channel.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Lorena Brito; Ong, Hwei Ling; Liu, Xibao; Ambudkar, Indu S

    2015-10-01

    Stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) senses depletion of ER-Ca2+ store and clusters in ER-PM junctions where it associates with and gates Ca2+ influx channels, Orai1 and TRPC1. Clustering of TRPC1 with STIM1 and Orai1 in these junctions is critical since Orai1-mediated Ca2+ entry triggers surface expression of TRPC1 while STIM1 gates the channel. Thus, plasma membrane function of TRPC1 depends on the delivery of the channel to the sites where STIM1 puncta are formed. This study examines intracellular trafficking mechanism(s) that determine plasma membrane expression and function of TRPC1 in cells where Orai1 and TRPC1 are endogenously expressed and contribute to Ca2+ entry. We report that TRPC1 is internalized by Arf6-dependent pathway, sorted to Rab5-containing early endosomes, and trafficked to ER-PM junctions by Rab4-dependent fast recycling. Overexpression of Arf6, or Rab5, but not the respective dominant negative mutants, induced retention of TRPC1 in early endosomes and suppressed TRPC1 function. Notably, cells expressing Arf6 or Rab5 displayed an inwardly rectifying ICRAC current that is mediated by Orai1 instead of TRPC1-associated ISOC, demonstrating that Orai1 function was not altered. Importantly, expression of Rab4, but not STIM1, with Rab5 rescued surface expression and function of TRPC1, restoring generation of ISOC. Together, these data demonstrate that trafficking via fast recycling endosomes determines TRPC1-STIM1 clustering within ER-PM junctions following ER-Ca2+ store depletion which is critical for the surface expression and function of the channel. Ca2+ influx mediated by TRPC1 modifies Ca2+-dependent physiological response of cells. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Nanoscale control of energy and matter in plasma-surface interactions: towards energy-efficient nanotech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrikov, Kostya

    2010-11-01

    This presentation focuses on the plasma issues related to the solution of the grand challenge of directing energy and matter at nanoscales. This ability is critical for the renewable energy and energy-efficient technologies for sustainable future development. It will be discussed how to use environmentally and human health benign non-equilibrium plasma-solid systems and control the elementary processes of plasma-surface interactions to direct the fluxes of energy and matter at multiple temporal and spatial scales. In turn, this makes it possible to achieve the deterministic synthesis of self- organised arrays of metastable nanostructures in the size range beyond the reach of the present-day nanofabrication. Such structures have tantalising prospects to enhance performance of nanomaterials in virtually any area of human activity yet remain almost inaccessible because the Nature's energy minimisation rules allow only a small number of stable equilibrium states. By using precisely controlled and kinetically fast nanoscale transfer of energy and matter under non-equilibrium conditions and harnessing numerous plasma- specific controls of species creation, delivery to the surface, nucleation and large-scale self-organisation of nuclei and nanostructures, the arrays of metastable nanostructures can be created, arranged, stabilised, and further processed to meet the specific requirements of the envisaged applications. These approaches will eventually lead to faster, unprecedentedly- clean, human-health-friendly, and energy-efficient nanoscale synthesis and processing technologies for the next-generation renewable energy and light sources, biomedical devices, information and communication systems, as well as advanced functional materials for applications ranging from basic food, water, health and clean environment needs to national security and space missions.

  15. Plasma Synthesis of Nanoparticles for Nanocomposite Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Peter C. Kong; Alex W. Kawczak

    2008-09-01

    The nanocomposite energy applications for plasma reactor produced nanoparticles are reviewed. Nanoparticles are commonly defined as particles less than 100 nm in diameter. Due to this small size, nanoparticles have a high surface-to-volume ratio. This increases the surface energy compared to the bulk material. The high surface-to-volume ratio and size effects (quantum effects) give nanoparticles distinctive chemical, electronic, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties from those of the bulk material. Nanoparticles synthesis can be grouped into 3 broad approaches. The first one is wet phase synthesis (sol-gel processing), the second is mechanical attrition, and the third is gas-phase synthesis (aerosol). The properties of the final product may differ significantly depending on the fabrication route. Currently, there are no economical large-scale production processes for nanoparticles. This hinders the widespread applications of nanomaterials in products. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is engaging in research and development of advanced modular hybrid plasma reactors for low cost production of nanoparticles that is predicted to accelerate application research and enable the formation of technology innovation alliances that will result in the commercial production of nanocomposites for alternative energy production devices such as fuel cells, photovoltaics and electrochemical double layer capacitors.

  16. Free energy and entropy flows in magnetised plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schekochihin, A.; Cowley, S.; Dorland, W.; Howes, G. G.; Quataert, E.; Tatsuno, T.; Plunk, G.; TenBarge, J.; Mallet, A.; Kanekar, A.

    2011-12-01

    Just as fluid turbulence can be conceptualised as a cascade of kinetic energy from large to small scales, kinetic plasma turbulence is a cascade of free energy in the 6D phase space (position and velocity). I will discuss this as a general principle and then specialise to the case of magnetised plasma turbulence at kinetic (sub-ion-Larmor) scales. At these scales, the free energy flux arriving from the inertial range splits into two channels: the kinetic Alfven wave cascade destined to be dissipated into electron heat and the ion entropy cascade, resulting in ion heating. The phase-space nature of the cascade is particularly manifest in this case as the ion entropy cascade involves simultaneous generation of small spatial scales and small scales in velocity space, the latter via a nonlinear phase-mixing process due to ion gyromotion. I will also discuss how the electron Landau damping and the associated process of parallel phase mixing fit into this cascade picture and whether they represent an effective dissipation mechanism in a strongly turbulent nonlinear system.

  17. Energy deposition in low power coaxial plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Roger Metcalf

    The energy deposition in steady-state, low power, coaxial plasma thrusters operated between 10 and 30 kW with argon and nitrogen propellants was studied experimentally and analytically. The major energy sinks were found to be electrode losses (primarily anode), propellant ionization, and thrust. Performance measurements showed the efficiency and specific impulse to vary between two and ten percent and 500 and 1200 seconds, respectively, as functions of thruster current level, propellant flow rate, and thruster geometry. Thrust was found to increase quadratically with current, in agreement with theoretical models of self-field electromagnetic thrusters. Spectroscopic studies of the plasma exhaust with argon propellant showed it to consist primarily of singly and doubly ionized argon, with an electron temperature between 1.2 and 1.7 eV and electron densities between 2 x 10 (exp 13) cu cm and 5 x 10 (exp 13) cu cm. Floating potential measurements showed the anode fall voltage to be between 65 and 95 percent of the total thruster voltage depending on thruster geometry, propellant, and current level. Non-intrusive cathode surface temperature and erosion measurements revealed that the cathode energy balance was governed by electron cooling, surface radiation and conduction through the cathode base. Comparisons of these new results with data from megawatt class, quasi-steady magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters revealed similarities between the plasma properties and acceleration mechanisms of the devices, but showed they have dramatically different anode power fractions. Attempts to increase thruster efficiency by decreasing the chamber radius were not successful, indicating that major changes in thruster design and/or power level will be required to achieve high efficiency, high specific impulse operation.

  18. Low Energy Electrons in the Mars Plasma Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Link, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The ionosphere of Mars is rather poorly understood. The only direct measurements were performed by the Viking 1 and 2 landers in 1976, both of which carried a Retarding Potential Analyzer. The RPA was designed to measure ion properties during the descent, although electron fluxes were estimated from changes in the ion currents. Using these derived low-energy electron fluxes, Mantas and Hanson studied the photoelectron and the solar wind electron interactions with the atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars. Unanswered questions remain regarding the origin of the low-energy electron fluxes in the vicinity of the Mars plasma boundary. Crider, in an analysis of Mars Global Surveyor Magnetometer/Electron Reflectometer measurements, has attributed the formation of the magnetic pile-up boundary to electron impact ionization of exospheric neutral species by solar wind electrons. However, the role of photoelectrons escaping from the lower ionosphere was not determined. In the proposed work, we will examine the role of solar wind and ionospheric photoelectrons in producing ionization in the upper ionosphere of Mars. Low-energy (< 4 keV) electrons will be modeled using the two-stream electron transport code of Link. The code models both external (solar wind) and internal (photoelectron) sources of ionization, and accounts for Auger electron production. The code will be used to analyze Mars Global Surveyor measurements of solar wind and photoelectrons down to altitudes below 200 km in the Mars ionosphere, in order to determine the relative roles of solar wind and escaping photoelectrons in maintaining plasma densities in the region of the Mars plasma boundary.

  19. Food Waste to Energy: An Overview of Sustainable Approaches for Food Waste Management and Nutrient Recycling.

    PubMed

    Paritosh, Kunwar; Kushwaha, Sandeep K; Yadav, Monika; Pareek, Nidhi; Chawade, Aakash; Vivekanand, Vivekanand

    2017-01-01

    Food wastage and its accumulation are becoming a critical problem around the globe due to continuous increase of the world population. The exponential growth in food waste is imposing serious threats to our society like environmental pollution, health risk, and scarcity of dumping land. There is an urgent need to take appropriate measures to reduce food waste burden by adopting standard management practices. Currently, various kinds of approaches are investigated in waste food processing and management for societal benefits and applications. Anaerobic digestion approach has appeared as one of the most ecofriendly and promising solutions for food wastes management, energy, and nutrient production, which can contribute to world's ever-increasing energy requirements. Here, we have briefly described and explored the different aspects of anaerobic biodegrading approaches for food waste, effects of cosubstrates, effect of environmental factors, contribution of microbial population, and available computational resources for food waste management researches.

  20. Food Waste to Energy: An Overview of Sustainable Approaches for Food Waste Management and Nutrient Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Paritosh, Kunwar; Kushwaha, Sandeep K.; Yadav, Monika; Pareek, Nidhi; Chawade, Aakash

    2017-01-01

    Food wastage and its accumulation are becoming a critical problem around the globe due to continuous increase of the world population. The exponential growth in food waste is imposing serious threats to our society like environmental pollution, health risk, and scarcity of dumping land. There is an urgent need to take appropriate measures to reduce food waste burden by adopting standard management practices. Currently, various kinds of approaches are investigated in waste food processing and management for societal benefits and applications. Anaerobic digestion approach has appeared as one of the most ecofriendly and promising solutions for food wastes management, energy, and nutrient production, which can contribute to world's ever-increasing energy requirements. Here, we have briefly described and explored the different aspects of anaerobic biodegrading approaches for food waste, effects of cosubstrates, effect of environmental factors, contribution of microbial population, and available computational resources for food waste management researches. PMID:28293629

  1. Low-Energy Hot Plasma and Particles in Saturn's Magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Krimigis, S M; Armstrong, T P; Axford, W I; Bostrom, C O; Gloeckler, G; Keath, E P; Lanzerotti, L J; Carbary, J F; Hamilton, D C; Roelof, E C

    1982-01-29

    The low-energy charged particle instrument on Voyager 2 measured low-energy electrons and ions (energies greater, similar 22 and greater, similar 28 kiloelectron volts, respectively) in Saturn's magnetosphere. The magnetosphere structure and particle population were modified from those observed during the Voyager 1 encounter in November 1980 but in a manner consistent with the same global morphology. Major results include the following. (i) A region containing an extremely hot ( approximately 30 to 50 kiloelectron volts) plasma was identified and extends from the orbit of Tethys outward past the orbit of Rhea. (ii) The low-energy ion mantle found by Voyager 1 to extend approximately 7 Saturn radii inside the dayside magnetosphere was again observed on Voyager 2, but it was considerably hotter ( approximately 30 kiloelectron volts), and there was an indication of a cooler ( < 20 kiloelectron volts) ion mantle on the nightside. (iii) At energies greater, similar 200 kiloelectron volts per nucleon, H(1), H(2), and H(3) (molecular hydrogen), helium, carbon, and oxygen are important constituents in the Saturnian magnetosphere. The presence of both H(2) and H(3) suggests that the Saturnian ionosphere feeds plasma into the magnetosphere, but relative abundances of the energetic helium, carbon, and oxygen ions are consistent with a solar wind origin. (iv) Low-energy ( approximately 22 to approximately 60 kiloelectron volts) electron flux enhancements observed between the L shells of Rhea and Tethys by Voyager 2 on the dayside were absent during the Voyager 1 encounter. (v) Persistent asymmetric pitch-angle distributions of electrons of 60 to 200 kiloelectron volts occur in the outer magnetosphere in conjunction with the hot ion plasma torus. (vi) The spacecraft passed within approximately 1.1 degrees in longitude of the Tethys flux tube outbound and observed it to be empty of energetic ions and electrons; the microsignature of Enceladus inbound was also observed. (vii

  2. Lithium and sodium ion capacitors with high energy and power densities based on carbons from recycled olive pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajuria, Jon; Redondo, Edurne; Arnaiz, Maria; Mysyk, Roman; Rojo, Teófilo; Goikolea, Eider

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we are presenting both lithium and sodium ion capacitors (LIC and NIC) entirely based on electrodes designed from recycled olive pit bio-waste derived carbon materials. On the one hand, olive pits were pyrolized to obtain a low specific surface area semigraphitic hard carbon to be used as the ion intercalation (battery-type) negative electrode. On the other hand, the same hard carbon was chemically activated with KOH to obtain a high specific surface area activated carbon that was further used as the ion-adsorption (capacitor-type) positive electrode. Both electrodes were custom-made to be assembled in a hybrid cell to either build a LIC or NIC in the corresponding Li- and Na-based electrolytes. For comparison purposes, a symmetric EDLC supercapacitor cell using the same activated carbon in 1.5 M Et4NBF4/acetonitrile electrolyte was also built. Both LIC and NIC systems demonstrate remarkable energy and power density enhancement over its EDLC counterpart while showing good cycle life. This breakthrough offers the possibility to easily fabricate versatile hybrid ion capacitors, covering a wide variety of applications where different requirements are demanded.

  3. Design and Implementation of a Compact Master-Slave Robotic System with Force Feedback and Energy Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunguang; Inoue, Yoshio; Liu, Tao; Shibata, Kyoko; Oka, Koichi

    Master-slave control is becoming increasingly popular in the development of robotic systems which can provide rehabilitation training for hemiplegic patients with a unilaterally disabled limb. However, the system structures and control strategies of existent master-slave systems are always complex. An innovative master-slave system implementing force feedback and motion tracking for a rehabilitation robot is presented in this paper. The system consists of two identical motors with a wired connection, and the two motors are located at the master and slave manipulator sites respectively. The slave motor tracks the motion of the master motor directly driven by a patient. As well, the interaction force produced at the slave site is fed back to the patient. Therefore, the impaired limb driven by the slave motor can imitate the motion of the healthy limb controlling the master motor, and the patient can regulate the control force of the healthy limb properly according to the force sensation. The force sensing and motion tracking are achieved simultaneously with neither force sensors nor sophisticated control algorithms. The system is characterized by simple structure, bidirectional controllability, energy recycling, and force feedback without a force sensor. Test experiments on a prototype were conducted, and the results appraise the advantages of the system and demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed control scheme for a rehabilitation robot.

  4. Plasma polymerized high energy density dielectric films for capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamagishi, F. G.

    1983-01-01

    High energy density polymeric dielectric films were prepared by plasma polymerization of a variety of gaseous monomers. This technique gives thin, reproducible, pinhole free, conformable, adherent, and insoluble coatings and overcomes the processing problems found in the preparation of thin films with bulk polymers. Thus, devices are prepared completely in a vacuum environment. The plasma polymerized films prepared all showed dielectric strengths of greater than 1000 kV/cm and in some cases values of greater than 4000 kV/cm were observed. The dielectric loss of all films was generally less than 1% at frequencies below 10 kHz, but this value increased at higher frequencies. All films were self healing. The dielectric strength was a function of the polymerization technique, whereas the dielectric constant varied with the structure of the starting material. Because of the thin films used (thickness in the submicron range) surface smoothness of the metal electrodes was found to be critical in obtaining high dielectric strengths. High dielectric strength graft copolymers were also prepared. Plasma polymerized ethane was found to be thermally stable up to 150 C in the presence of air and 250 C in the absence of air. No glass transitions were observed for this material.

  5. Fly ash particles spheroidization using low temperature plasma energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhovtsov, V. V.; Volokitin, O. G.; Kondratyuk, A. A.; Vitske, R. E.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the investigations on producing spherical particles 65-110 μm in size using the energy of low temperature plasma (LTP). These particles are based on flow ash produced by the thermal power plant in Seversk, Tomsk region, Russia. The obtained spherical particles have no defects and are characterized by a smooth exterior surface. The test bench is designed to produce these particles. With due regard for plasma temperature field distribution, it is shown that the transition of fly ash particles to a state of viscous flow occurs at 20 mm distance from the plasma jet. The X-ray phase analysis is carried out for the both original state of fly ash powders and the particles obtained. This analysis shows that fly ash contains 56.23 wt.% SiO2; 20.61 wt.% Al2O3 and 17.55 wt.% Fe2O3 phases that mostly contribute to the integral (experimental) intensity of the diffraction maximum. The LTP treatment results in a complex redistribution of the amorphous phase amount in the obtained spherical particles, including the reduction of O2Si, phase, increase of O22Al20 and Fe2O3 phases and change in Al, O density of O22Al20 chemical unit cell.

  6. Ion energy distributions in dual frequency RF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Peter; Rees, John; Bort, Sam; Seymour, Dave

    2015-09-01

    For many surface-processing applications involving plasmas operated at RF frequencies it has been found helpful to combine two sources of power operating at different frequencies. By choosing suitable input powers at the two frequencies and varying the phase relationship set between the two inputs, the energy distributions (IEDs) for the ions arriving at the target surface can be optimised. There have been, however, only a limited number of published reports of measured or modelled distributions. In the present work IEDs for both positive and negative ions formed in plasmas in argon and nitrous oxide have been measured for mass-identified ions in two different reactors, one of which is a parallel-plate, capacitatively-coupled, system and the other is an inductively-coupled system. Typical data for 13.56 and 27.1 MHz inputs are presented for a range of phase relationships. The IEDs show clearly significant differences between the data for different species of ions which result in part from the ion-molecule collisions occurring, particularly in the plasma/surface sheath regions.

  7. X-ray Thomson scattering in high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, Siegfried H.; Redmer, Ronald

    2009-10-15

    Accurate x-ray scattering techniques to measure the physical properties of dense plasmas have been developed for applications in high energy density physics. This class of experiments produces short-lived hot dense states of matter with electron densities in the range of solid density and higher where powerful penetrating x-ray sources have become available for probing. Experiments have employed laser-based x-ray sources that provide sufficient photon numbers in narrow bandwidth spectral lines, allowing spectrally resolved x-ray scattering measurements from these plasmas. The backscattering spectrum accesses the noncollective Compton scattering regime which provides accurate diagnostic information on the temperature, density, and ionization state. The forward scattering spectrum has been shown to measure the collective plasmon oscillations. Besides extracting the standard plasma parameters, density and temperature, forward scattering yields new observables such as a direct measure of collisions and quantum effects. Dense matter theory relates scattering spectra with the dielectric function and structure factors that determine the physical properties of matter. Applications to radiation-heated and shock-compressed matter have demonstrated accurate measurements of compression and heating with up to picosecond temporal resolution. The ongoing development of suitable x-ray sources and facilities will enable experiments in a wide range of research areas including inertial confinement fusion, radiation hydrodynamics, material science, or laboratory astrophysics.

  8. Numerical simulations of energy transfer in counter-streaming plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, S. P.; Capdessus, R.; d'Humières, E.; Jequier, S.; Andriyash, I.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2013-03-01

    Collisionless shock formation is investigated with large scale fully electromagnetic two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell numerical simulations. Two plasmas are colliding in the center of mass reference frame at sub-relativistic velocities. Their interaction leads to collisionless stochastic electron heating, ion slowing down and formation of a shock front. We focus here on the initial stage of evolution where electron heating is due to the Weibel-like micro-instability driven by the high-speed ion flow. A two stage process is described in the detailed analysis of our simulation results. Filament generation, followed by turbulent mixing, constitute the dominant mechanism for energy repartition. The global properties are illustrated by examination of single filament evolution in terms of energy/particle density and fields.

  9. Effect of the electron energy distribution on total energy loss with argon in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, June Young; Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-01-15

    The total energy lost per electron-ion pair lost ε{sub T} is investigated with the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The EEDFs are measured at various argon powers in RF inductively coupled plasma, and the EEDFs show a depleted distribution (a discontinuity occurring at the minimum argon excitation threshold energy level) with the bulk temperature and the tail temperature. The total energy loss per electron-ion pair lost ε{sub T} is calculated from a power balance model with the Maxwellian EEDFs and the depleted EEDFs and then compared with the measured ε{sub T} from the floating probe. It is concluded that the small population of the depleted high energy electrons dramatically increases the collisional energy loss, and the calculated ε{sub T} from the depleted EEDFs has a value that is similar to the measured ε{sub T}.

  10. Generation of Gigabar Pressures for High-Energy-Density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theobald, W.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Seka, W.; Stoeckl, C.; Mangino, D.; Casner, A.; Beg, F. N.; Llor Aisa, E.; Ribeyre, X.; Wei, M. S.; Schoff, M. E.; Florido, R.; Mancini, R. C.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments on the OMEGA laser were performed to study gigabar pressures in small (50- μm-diam) Ti and Cu target samples for high-energy-density plasma applications. The samples were precisely placed (better than 10 μm) at the center of a spherical plastic matrix that is irradiated at incident laser intensities of 5 ×1015 W /cm2 . The laser launches a spherical shock wave that converges in the center in order to reach Gbar pressures in the sample. The shock convergence produces a short burst ( 30ps) of x-ray emission. Time-resolved and time-integrated x-ray spectroscopy provides the means to diagnose the plasma conditions in the sample. The time-resolved spectra are compared to predictions from radiation-hydrodynamic simulations to infer the material conditions at Gbar pressures. A second x-ray flash delayed by 600ps caused by the breakout of the rebounded shock through the outer surface of the compressed plastic was observed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and by the Fusion Science Center under Grant No. DE-FC02-04ER54789.

  11. Converting Garbage to Gold: Recycling Our Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, William U.

    1984-01-01

    Recycling conserves energy, fights pollution and inflation, creates jobs, and improves the outlook for the future of materials. But converting a throwaway society to recycling will depend on finding good markets for waste paper and scrap metals. (RM)

  12. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chiping

    2013-08-26

    High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  13. Energy recycling by co-combustion of coal and recovered paint solids from automobile paint operations.

    PubMed

    Suriyawong, Achariya; Magee, Rogan; Peebles, Ken; Biswas, Pratim

    2009-05-01

    During the past decade, there has been substantial interest in recovering energy from many unwanted byproducts from industries and municipalities. Co-combustion of these products with coal seems to be the most cost-effective approach. The combustion process typically results in emissions of pollutants, especially fine particles and trace elements. This paper presents the results of an experimental study of particulate emission and the fate of 13 trace elements (arsenic [As], barium [Ba], cadmium [Cd], chromium [Cr], copper [Cu], cobalt [Co], manganese [Mn], molybdenum [Mo], nickel [Ni], lead [Pb], mercury [Hg], vanadium [V], and zinc [Zn]) during combustion tests of recovered paint solids (RPS) and coal. The emissions from combustions of coal or RPS alone were compared with those of co-combustion of RPS with subbituminous coal. The distribution/partitioning of these toxic elements between a coarse-mode ash (particle diameter [dp] > 0.5 microm), a submicrometer-mode ash (dp < 0.5 microm), and flue gases was also evaluated. Submicrometer particles generated by combustion of RPS alone were lower in concentration and smaller in size than that from combustion of coal. However, co-combustion of RPS and coal increased the formation of submicrometer-sized particles because of the higher reducing environment in the vicinity of burning particles and the higher volatile chlorine species. Hg was completely volatilized in all cases; however, the fraction in the oxidized state increased with co-combustion. Most trace elements, except Zn, were retained in ash during combustion of RPS alone. Mo was mostly retained in all samples. The behavior of elements, except Mn and Mo, varied depending on the fuel samples. As, Ba, Cr, Co, Cu, and Pb were vaporized to a greater extent from cocombustion of RPS and coal than from combustion of either fuel. Evidence of the enrichment of certain toxic elements in submicrometer particles has also been observed for As, Cd, Cr, Cu, and Ni during co-combustion.

  14. Effect of electron energy distribution functions on plasma generated vacuum ultraviolet in a diffusion plasma excited by a microwave surface wave

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. P.; Chen, L.; Funk, M.; Sundararajan, R.; Nozawa, T.; Samukawa, S.

    2013-07-15

    Plasma generated vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) in diffusion plasma excited by a microwave surface wave has been studied by using dielectric-based VUV sensors. Evolution of plasma VUV in the diffusion plasma as a function of the distance from the power coupling surface is investigated. Experimental results have indicated that the energy and spatial distributions of plasma VUV are mainly controlled by the energy distribution functions of the plasma electrons, i.e., electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs). The study implies that by designing EEDF of plasma, one could be able to tailor plasma VUV in different applications such as in dielectric etching or photo resist smoothing.

  15. Surface energy increase of oxygen-plasma-treated PET

    SciTech Connect

    Cioffi, M.O.H.; Voorwald, H.J.C.; Mota, R.P

    2003-03-15

    Prosthetic composite is a widely used biomaterial that satisfies the criteria for application as an organic implant without adverse reactions. Polyethylene therephthalate (PET) fiber-reinforced composites have been used because of the excellent cell adhesion, biodegradability and biocompatibility. The chemical inertness and low surface energy of PET in general are associated with inadequate bonds for polymer reinforcements. It is recognized that the high strength of composites, which results from the interaction between the constituents, is directly related to the interfacial condition or to the interphase. A radio frequency plasma reactor using oxygen was used to treat PET fibers for 5, 20, 30 and 100 s. The treatment conditions were 13.56 MHz, 50 W, 40 Pa and 3.33x10{sup -7} m{sup 3}/s. A Rame-Hart goniometer was used to measure the contact angle and surface energy variation of fibers treated for different times. The experimental results showed contact angle values from 47 deg. to 13 deg. and surface energies from 6.4x10{sup -6} to 8.3x10{sup -6} J for the range of 5 to 100 s, respectively. These results were confirmed by the average ultimate tensile strength of the PET fiber/ polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) matrix composite tested in tensile mode and by scanning electron microscopy.

  16. Ideas: Recycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chessin, Debby A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents classroom ideas focusing on connections among mathematics, concern for the environment, and conservation of natural resources, including decomposition, water conservation, packaging materials, use of manufactured cans, and recycling. Includes reproducible student worksheets. (MKR)

  17. THE IRON OPACITY PROJECT: High-Energy-Density Plasma Opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palay, E.; Orban, C.; Nahar, S.; Pradhan, A.; Pinnsonoault, M.; Bailey, J.

    2013-05-01

    Opacity governs radiation flow in plasma sources. Accurate opacities are needed to model unobservable laboratory and astrophysical conditions. High-energy-density (HED) plasma conditions prevalent in stellar interiors can now be recreated in the laboratory. The Z-pinch fusion device at the Sandia National Lab can reproduce temperatures and densities near the boundary where radiation transport changes from diffusion to convection inside the Sun. To benchmark theoretical opacities experiments are essential to resolve the outstanding discrepancy in solar abundances. The most common volatile elements C, N, O, Ne, etc. have been spectroscopically measured to be up to 50% lower than the standard abundances. This introduces conflict in the derived values of basic solar parameters such as the radiation/convection boundary, sound speed, and the primordial He abundance with precisely measured oscillations of the Sun through Helioseismology. A potential solution is increment of stellar opacities, which has inverse but complex relation with abundacnes, at least 30%. New iron opacity calculations include hitherto neglected atomic physics of fine structure and resonances which are largely treated as lines in existing opacities calculations. Preliminary results on radiative transitions in Ne Partial support: DOE,NSF.

  18. Plasma Jet Braking: Energy Dissipation and Nonadiabatic Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Cully, C. M.; Vaivads, A.; Andre, M.; Owen, C. J.

    2011-04-22

    We report in situ observations by the Cluster spacecraft of wave-particle interactions in a magnetic flux pileup region created by a magnetic reconnection outflow jet in Earth's magnetotail. Two distinct regions of wave activity are identified: lower-hybrid drift waves at the front edge and whistler-mode waves inside the pileup region. The whistler-mode waves are locally generated by the electron temperature anisotropy, and provide evidence for ongoing betatron energization caused by magnetic flux pileup. The whistler-mode waves cause fast pitch-angle scattering of electrons and isotropization of the electron distribution, thus making the flow braking process nonadiabatic. The waves strongly affect the electron dynamics and thus play an important role in the energy conversion chain during plasma jet braking.

  19. Plasma Jet Braking: Energy Dissipation and Nonadiabatic Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Cully, C. M.; Vaivads, A.; André, M.; Owen, C. J.

    2011-04-01

    We report in situ observations by the Cluster spacecraft of wave-particle interactions in a magnetic flux pileup region created by a magnetic reconnection outflow jet in Earth’s magnetotail. Two distinct regions of wave activity are identified: lower-hybrid drift waves at the front edge and whistler-mode waves inside the pileup region. The whistler-mode waves are locally generated by the electron temperature anisotropy, and provide evidence for ongoing betatron energization caused by magnetic flux pileup. The whistler-mode waves cause fast pitch-angle scattering of electrons and isotropization of the electron distribution, thus making the flow braking process nonadiabatic. The waves strongly affect the electron dynamics and thus play an important role in the energy conversion chain during plasma jet braking.

  20. Plasma jet braking: energy dissipation and nonadiabatic electrons.

    PubMed

    Khotyaintsev, Yu V; Cully, C M; Vaivads, A; André, M; Owen, C J

    2011-04-22

    We report in situ observations by the Cluster spacecraft of wave-particle interactions in a magnetic flux pileup region created by a magnetic reconnection outflow jet in Earth's magnetotail. Two distinct regions of wave activity are identified: lower-hybrid drift waves at the front edge and whistler-mode waves inside the pileup region. The whistler-mode waves are locally generated by the electron temperature anisotropy, and provide evidence for ongoing betatron energization caused by magnetic flux pileup. The whistler-mode waves cause fast pitch-angle scattering of electrons and isotropization of the electron distribution, thus making the flow braking process nonadiabatic. The waves strongly affect the electron dynamics and thus play an important role in the energy conversion chain during plasma jet braking.

  1. CENTER FOR PULSED POWER DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PLASMA STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Bruce R. Kusse; Professor David A. Hammer

    2007-04-18

    This annual report summarizes the activities of the Cornell Center for Pulsed-Power-Driven High-Energy-Density Plasma Studies, for the 12-month period October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006. This period corresponds to the first year of the two-year extension (awarded in October, 2005) to the original 3-year NNSA/DOE Cooperative Agreement with Cornell, DE-FC03-02NA00057. As such, the period covered in this report also corresponds to the fourth year of the (now) 5-year term of the Cooperative Agreement. The participants, in addition to Cornell University, include Imperial College, London (IC), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), the University of Rochester (UR), the Weizmann Institute of Science (WSI), and the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Moscow. A listing of all faculty, technical staff and students, both graduate and undergraduate, who participated in Center research activities during the year in question is given in Appendix A.

  2. Reverse Energy Cascade in Turbulent Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Kyron; Appartaim, R.; Belay, K.; Johnson, J. A., III

    1998-01-01

    For systems far from equilibrium, the neglect of a role for viscous effects in turbulence may be generally inappropriate when the relaxation time for the molecular process approaches the local flow time (Orou et al. (1996)). Furthermore, for stationary collisional plasmas, the conventional Reynolds number is irrelevant under circumstances where the standard features of turbulence in ordinary gases are observed in the plasma (Johnson et al. (1987)). The current theoretical understanding of these turbulent phenomenon is particularly inadequate for turbulence associated with ionizing shock waves; generally speaking, thermodynamic, acoustic and pressure fluctuations are all seen as amplified across the shock wave followed by a dramatic decay (relaminarization) usually attributed to a lack of importance of viscosity in the turbulent regions. This decay would be accelerated when the flow speed is also reduced due to the importance usually given to the conventional Reynolds number (which is directly proportional to velocity) as a quality of turbulence index. However, evidence supporting this consensus is lacking. By contrast, recent evidence of vanishing triple correlations form De Silva et al. (1996) provides strong support for early theoretical speculation of inherently molecular effects in macroscopic turbulence in Tsuge (1974). This specifically suggests that the role of compressive effects ordinarily associated with the shock wave could be significantly muted by the existence of a strongly turbulent local environment. There is also more recent theoretical speculation (Frisch et al. (1984)) of an inherently and previously unsuspected non-dissipative nature to turbulence, with energy conservation being nurtured by reverse energy cascades in the turbulent fluctuation spectra. Furthermore, the role which might be played by fluctuations on quantum mechanical phenomena and variations in molecular parameters is completely unknown, especially of the sort which might be found

  3. Reverse Energy Cascade in Turbulent Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Kyron; Appartaim, R.; Belay, K.; Johnson, J. A., III

    1998-01-01

    For systems far from equilibrium, the neglect of a role for viscous effects in turbulence may be generally inappropriate when the relaxation time for the molecular process approaches the local flow time (Orou et al. (1996)). Furthermore, for stationary collisional plasmas, the conventional Reynolds number is irrelevant under circumstances where the standard features of turbulence in ordinary gases are observed in the plasma (Johnson et al. (1987)). The current theoretical understanding of these turbulent phenomenon is particularly inadequate for turbulence associated with ionizing shock waves; generally speaking, thermodynamic, acoustic and pressure fluctuations are all seen as amplified across the shock wave followed by a dramatic decay (relaminarization) usually attributed to a lack of importance of viscosity in the turbulent regions. This decay would be accelerated when the flow speed is also reduced due to the importance usually given to the conventional Reynolds number (which is directly proportional to velocity) as a quality of turbulence index. However, evidence supporting this consensus is lacking. By contrast, recent evidence of vanishing triple correlations form De Silva et al. (1996) provides strong support for early theoretical speculation of inherently molecular effects in macroscopic turbulence in Tsuge (1974). This specifically suggests that the role of compressive effects ordinarily associated with the shock wave could be significantly muted by the existence of a strongly turbulent local environment. There is also more recent theoretical speculation (Frisch et al. (1984)) of an inherently and previously unsuspected non-dissipative nature to turbulence, with energy conservation being nurtured by reverse energy cascades in the turbulent fluctuation spectra. Furthermore, the role which might be played by fluctuations on quantum mechanical phenomena and variations in molecular parameters is completely unknown, especially of the sort which might be found

  4. Antimullerian Hormone Level and Endometrioma Ablation Using Plasma Energy

    PubMed Central

    Bubenheim, Michael; Auber, Mathieu; Marpeau, Loïc; Puscasiu, Lucian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of ovarian endometrioma vaporization using plasma energy on antimullerian hormone (AMH) level. Method: We report a prospective, noncomparative series (NCT01596985). Twenty-two patients with unilateral ovarian endometriomas ≥30 mm, with no surgical antecedent and no ongoing pregnancy, underwent vaporization of ovarian endometriomas using plasma energy during the period of November 29, 2010 to November 28, 2012. We assessed AMH levels before surgery, 3 months postoperatively, and at the end of follow-up. Results: The mean length of postoperative follow-up was 18.2 ± 8 months. AMH level significantly varied through the 3 assessments performed in the study, as the mean values ± SD were 3.9 ± 2.6 ng/mL before the surgery, 2.3 ± 1.1 ng/mL at 3 months, and 3.1 ± 2.2 ng/mL at the end of the follow-up (P = .001). There was a significant increase from 3 months postoperatively to the end of follow-up (median change 0.7 ng/mL, P = .01). Seventy-one percent of patients had an AMH level >2 ng/mL at the end of the follow-up versus 76% before the surgery (P = 1). During the postoperative follow-up, 11 patients tried to conceive, of whom 8 (73%) became pregnant. Conclusions: The ablation of unilateral endometriomas is followed in a majority of cases by a significant decrease in AMH level 3 months after surgery. In subsequent months, this level progressively increases, raising questions about the real factors that impact postoperative ovarian AMH production. PMID:25392649

  5. Glass recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Dalmijn, W.L.; Houwelingen, J.A. van

    1995-12-31

    Glass recycling in the Netherlands has grown from 10,000 to 300,000 tonnes per annum. The various advantages and problems of the glass cycle with reference to the state of the art in the Netherlands is given. Special attention is given to new technologies for the automated sorting of cullet with detection systems. In Western Europe the recycling of glass has become a success story. Because of this, the percentage of glass cullet used in glass furnaces has increased. To meet the quality demands of the glass industry, automated sorting for the removal of stones, non-ferrous metals and other impurities had to be developed and incorporated in glass recycling plants. In Holland, Germany and other countries, the amount of glass collected has reached a level that color-sorting becomes necessary to avoid market saturation with mixed cullet. Recently, two systems for color-sorting have been developed and tested for the separation of bottles and cullet in the size range of 20--50 mm. With the increased capacity of the new glass recycling plants, 120,000--200,000 tpy, the quality systems have also to be improved and automated. These quality control systems are based on the automated sorting technology developed earlier for the glass recycling plants. The data obtained are automatically processed and printed. The sampling system and its relation to the theory of Gy will be described. Results of both developments in glass recycling plants will be described.

  6. Influence of emitter temperature on the energy deposition in a low-pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-03-15

    The influence of emitter temperature on the energy deposition into low-pressure plasma is studied by the self-consistent one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model. Depending on the emitter temperature, different modes of discharge operation are obtained. The mode type depends on the plasma frequency and does not depend on the ratio between the densities of beam and plasma electrons. Namely, plasma is stable when the plasma frequency is small. For this plasma, the energy transfer from emitted electrons to plasma electrons is inefficient. The increase in the plasma frequency results first in the excitation of two-stream electron instability. However, since the thermal velocity of plasma electrons is smaller than the electrostatic wave velocity, the resonant wave-particle interaction is inefficient for the energy deposition into the plasma. Further increase in the plasma frequency leads to the distortion of beam of emitted electrons. Then, the electrostatic wave generated due to two-stream instability decays into multiple slower waves. Phase velocities of these waves are comparable with the thermal velocity of plasma electrons which makes possible the resonant wave-particle interaction. This results in the efficient energy deposition from emitted electrons into the plasma.

  7. Plasma engineering of silicon quantum dots and their properties through energy deposition and chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Bibhuti Bhusan; Yin, Yongyi; Gauter, Sven; Han, Jeon Geon; Kersten, Holger

    2016-09-21

    The characterization of plasma and atomic radical parameters along with the energy influx from plasma to the substrate during plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of Si quantum dot (QD) films is presented and discussed. In particular, relating to the Si QD process optimization and control of film growth, the necessity to control the deposition environment by inducing the effect of the energy of the key plasma species is realized. In this contribution, we report dual frequency PECVD processes for the low-temperature and high-rate deposition of Si QDs by chemistry and energy control of the key plasma species. The dual frequency plasmas can effectively produce a very high plasma density and atomic H and N densities, which are found to be crucial for the growth and nucleation of QDs. Apart from the study of plasma chemistry, the crucial role of the energy imparted due to these plasma activated species on the substrate is determined in light of QD formation. Various plasma diagnostics and film analysis methods are integrated to correlate the effect of plasma and energy flux on the properties of the deposited films prepared in the reactive mixtures of SiH4/NH3 at various pressures. The present results are highly relevant to the development of the next-generation plasma process for devices that rely on effective control of the QD size and film properties.

  8. The pattern of parallel edge plasma flows due to pressure gradients, recycling, and resonant magnetic perturbations in DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Frerichs, H.; Schmitz, Oliver; Evans, Todd; ...

    2015-07-13

    High resolution plasma transport simulations with the EMC3-EIRENE code have been performed to address the parallel plasma flow structure in the boundary of a poloidal divertor configuration with non-axisymmetric perturbations at DIII-D. Simulation results show that a checkerboard pattern of flows with alternating direction is generated inside the separatrix. This pattern is aligned with the position of the main resonances (i.e. where the safety factor is equal to rational values q = m/n for a perturbation field with base mode number n): m pairs of alternating forward and backward flow channel exist for each resonance. The poloidal oscillations are alignedmore » with the subharmonic Melnikov function, which indicates that the plasma flow is generated by parallel pressure gradients along perturbed field lines. Lastly, an additional scrape-off layer-like domain is introduced by the perturbed separatrix which guides field lines from the interior to the divertor targets, resulting in an enhanced outward flow that is consistent with the experimentally observed particle pump-out effect. However, while the lobe structure of the perturbed separatrix is very well reflected in the temperature profile, the same lobes can appear to be smaller in the flow profile due to a competition between high upstream pressure and downstream particle sources driving flows in opposite directions.« less

  9. The pattern of parallel edge plasma flows due to pressure gradients, recycling, and resonant magnetic perturbations in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerichs, H.; Schmitz, O.; Evans, T.; Feng, Y.; Reiter, D.

    2015-07-01

    High resolution plasma transport simulations with the EMC3-EIRENE code have been performed to address the parallel plasma flow structure in the boundary of a poloidal divertor configuration with non-axisymmetric perturbations at DIII-D. Simulation results show that a checkerboard pattern of flows with alternating direction is generated inside the separatrix. This pattern is aligned with the position of the main resonances (i.e., where the safety factor is equal to rational values q = m / n for a perturbation field with base mode number n): m pairs of alternating forward and backward flow channel exist for each resonance. The poloidal oscillations are aligned with the subharmonic Melnikov function, which indicates that the plasma flow is generated by parallel pressure gradients along perturbed field lines. An additional scrape-off layer-like domain is introduced by the perturbed separatrix which guides field lines from the interior to the divertor targets, resulting in an enhanced outward flow that is consistent with the experimentally observed particle pump-out effect. However, while the lobe structure of the perturbed separatrix is very well reflected in the temperature profile, the same lobes can appear to be smaller in the flow profile due to a competition between high upstream pressure and downstream particle sources driving flows in opposite directions.

  10. Matching kinetics of synaptic vesicle recycling and enhanced neurotransmitter influx by Ca2+ in brain plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kovács, I; Szárics, E; Nyitrai, G; Blandl, T; Kardos, J

    1998-11-01

    Using native plasma membrane vesicle suspensions from the rat cerebral cortex under conditions designed to alter intravesicular [Ca2+], we found that Ca2+ induced 47 +/- 5% more influx of [3H]GABA, [3H]D-aspartate and [3H]glycine at 37 degrees C with half-times 1.7 +/- 0.5, 1.3 +/- 0.4 and 1.3 +/- 0.4 min, respectively. We labelled GABA transporter sites with the uptake inhibitor, [3H]-(R,S)-N-[4,4-bis(3-methyl-2-thienyl)but-3-en-1-yl]nipecotic acid and found that Ca2+ induced a partial dissociation of the bound inhibitor from GABA transporter sites with a similar half-time. By means of rapid kinetic techniques applied to native plasma membrane vesicle suspensions, containing synaptic vesicles stained with the amphipathic fluorescent styryl membrane probe N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-[4-(dibutylamino)styryl]pyrid inium dibromide, we have measured the progress of the release and reuptake of synaptic vesicles in response to Ca2+ and high-[K+] depolarization in the 0.0004-100 s range of time. Synaptic vesicle exocytosis, strongly influenced by external [Ca2+], appeared with the kinetics accelerated by depolarization. These results are consistent with the potential involvement of Ca2+ in taking low-affinity transporters to the plasma membrane surface via exocytosis.

  11. A Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) comparison of three management options for waste papers: bioethanol production, recycling and incineration with energy recovery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Templer, Richard; Murphy, Richard J

    2012-09-01

    This study uses Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to assess the environmental profiles and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for bioethanol production from waste papers and to compare them with the alternative waste management options of recycling or incineration with energy recovery. Bioethanol production scenarios both with and without pre-treatments were conducted. It was found that an oxidative lime pre-treatment reduced GHG emissions and overall environmental burdens for a newspaper-to-bioethanol process whereas a dilute acid pre-treatment raised GHG emissions and overall environmental impacts for an office paper-to-bioethanol process. In the comparison of bioethanol production systems with alternative management of waste papers by different technologies, it was found that the environmental profiles of each system vary significantly and this variation affects the outcomes of the specific comparisons made. Overall, a number of configurations of bioethanol production from waste papers offer environmentally favourable or neutral profiles when compared with recycling or incineration.

  12. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics. PMID:26482650

  13. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-10-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics.

  14. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-10-20

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics.

  15. A burning plasma program strategy to advance fusion energy. Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, Burning Plasma Strategy Panel

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2002-09-01

    Fusion energy shows great promise to contribute to securing the energy future of humanity. The risk of conflicts arising from energy shortages and supply cutoffs, as well as the risk of severe environmental impacts from existing methods of energy production, are strong reasons to pursue fusion energy now. The world effort to develop fusion energy is at the threshold of a new stage in its research: the investigation of burning plasmas. This investigation, at the frontier of the physics of complex systems, would be a huge step in establishing the potential of magnetic fusion energy to contribute to the world’s energy security. The defining feature of a burning plasma is that it is self-heated: the 100 million degree temperature of the plasma is maintained mainly by the heat generated by the fusion reactions themselves, as occurs in burning stars. The fusion-generated alpha particles produce new physical phenomena that are strongly coupled together as a nonlinear complex system. Understanding all elements of this system poses a major challenge to fundamental plasma physics. The technology needed to produce and control a burning plasma presents challenges in engineering science similarly essential to the development of fusion energy.

  16. The Hang-Ups on Recycling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1975

    1975-01-01

    While all seem to agree that recycling will alleviate solid waste problems and energy and mineral shortages, recycling is, at present, bogged down by the thin market for recycled materials, the recessionary business picture, the vertical integration of many companies, unfavorable tax laws, and high rail freight rates. (BT)

  17. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    ScienceCinema

    Ryan Ott

    2016-07-12

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  18. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan Ott

    2012-09-05

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  19. The Hang-Ups on Recycling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1975

    1975-01-01

    While all seem to agree that recycling will alleviate solid waste problems and energy and mineral shortages, recycling is, at present, bogged down by the thin market for recycled materials, the recessionary business picture, the vertical integration of many companies, unfavorable tax laws, and high rail freight rates. (BT)

  20. Identification of molecular heterogeneity in SNX27–retromer-mediated endosome-to-plasma-membrane recycling

    PubMed Central

    McGough, Ian J.; Steinberg, Florian; Gallon, Matthew; Yatsu, Ayaka; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Heesom, Kate J.; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Cullen, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retromer is a protein assembly that orchestrates the sorting of transmembrane cargo proteins into endosome-to-Golgi and endosome-to-plasma-membrane transport pathways. Here, we have employed quantitative proteomics to define the interactome of human VPS35, the core retromer component. This has identified a number of new interacting proteins, including ankyrin-repeat domain 50 (ANKRD50), seriologically defined colon cancer antigen 3 (SDCCAG3) and VPS9-ankyrin-repeat protein (VARP, also known as ANKRD27). Depletion of these proteins resulted in trafficking defects of retromer-dependent cargo, but differential and cargo-specific effects suggested a surprising degree of functional heterogeneity in retromer-mediated endosome-to-plasma-membrane sorting. Extending this, suppression of the retromer-associated WASH complex did not uniformly affect retromer cargo, thereby confirming cargo-specific functions for retromer-interacting proteins. Further analysis of the retromer–VARP interaction identified a role for retromer in endosome-to-melanosome transport. Suppression of VPS35 led to mistrafficking of the melanogenic enzymes, tyrosinase and tryrosine-related protein 1 (Tyrp1), establishing that retromer acts in concert with VARP in this trafficking pathway. Overall, these data reveal hidden complexities in retromer-mediated sorting and open up new directions in our molecular understanding of this essential sorting complex. PMID:25278552

  1. Binding of SEC11 Indicates Its Role in SNARE Recycling after Vesicle Fusion and Identifies Two Pathways for Vesicular Traffic to the Plasma Membrane[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Karnik, Rucha; Zhang, Ben; Waghmare, Sakharam; Aderhold, Christin; Grefen, Christopher; Blatt, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins drive vesicle fusion in all eukaryotes and contribute to homeostasis, pathogen defense, cell expansion, and growth in plants. Two homologous SNAREs, SYP121 (=SYR1/PEN1) and SYP122, dominate secretory traffic to the Arabidopsis thaliana plasma membrane. Although these proteins overlap functionally, differences between SYP121 and SYP122 have surfaced, suggesting that they mark two discrete pathways for vesicular traffic. The SNAREs share primary cognate partners, which has made separating their respective control mechanisms difficult. Here, we show that the regulatory protein SEC11 (=KEULE) binds selectively with SYP121 to affect secretory traffic mediated by this SNARE. SEC11 rescued traffic block by dominant-negative (inhibitory) fragments of both SNAREs, but only in plants expressing the native SYP121. Traffic and its rescue were sensitive to mutations affecting SEC11 interaction with the N terminus of SYP121. Furthermore, the domain of SEC11 that bound the SYP121 N terminus was itself able to block secretory traffic in the wild type and syp122 but not in syp121 mutant Arabidopsis. Thus, SEC11 binds and selectively regulates secretory traffic mediated by SYP121 and is important for recycling of the SNARE and its cognate partners. PMID:25747882

  2. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-09-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, indicates that there are more-than-two stable points in a given condition, and it has been considered to one of the most important topics in fundamental physics. Recently, the hysteresis of plasma has become a focus of research because stable plasma operation is very important for fusion reactors, bio-medical plasmas, and industrial plasmas for nano-device fabrication process. Interestingly, the bi-stability characteristics of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop have been observed in inductive discharge plasmas Because hysteresis study in such plasmas can provide a universal understanding of plasma physics, many researchers have attempted experimental and theoretical studies. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics. This research was partially supported by Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science.

  3. Textile recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonowski, E. ); Carlton, J.

    1995-01-01

    The most common household textiles include clothing, linens, draperies, carpets, shoes, handbags, and rugs. Old clothing, of course, is the most readily reused and/or recycled residentially generated textile category. State and/or local mandates to recycle a percentage of the waste stream are providing the impetus to add new materials to existing collection programs. Concurrently, the textile industry is aggressively trying to increase its throughput by seeking new sources of material to meet increased world demand for product. As experienced with drop-off programs for traditional materials, a majority of residents will not recycle materials unless the collection programs are convenient, i.e., curbside collection. The tonnage of marketable textiles currently being landfilled provide evidence of this. It is the authors' contention that if textile recycling is made convenient and accessible to every household in a municipality or region, then the waste stream disposed may be reduced in a similar fashion as when traditional recyclables are included in curbside programs.

  4. METHOD FOR EXCHANGING ENERGY WITH A PLASMA BY MAGNETIC PUMPING

    DOEpatents

    Hall, L.S.

    1963-12-31

    A method of heating a plasma confined by a static magnetic field is presented. A time-varying magnetic field having a rise time to a predetermined value substantially less than its fall time is applied to a portion of the plasma. Because of the much shorter rise time, the plasma is reversibly heated. This cycle is repeated until the desired plasma temperature is reached. (AEC)

  5. Tire Recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Cryopolymers, Inc. tapped NASA expertise to improve a process for recycling vehicle tires by converting shredded rubber into products that can be used in asphalt road beds, new tires, hoses, and other products. In conjunction with the Southern Technology Applications Center and Stennis Space Center, NASA expertise in cryogenic fuel-handling needed for launch vehicle and spacecraft operations was called upon to improve the recycling concept. Stennis advised Cryopolymers on the type of equipment required, as well as steps to reduce the amount of liquid nitrogen used in the process. They also guided the company to use more efficient ways to control system hardware. It is estimated that more than 300 million tires nationwide are produced per year. Cryopolymers expects to reach a production rate of 5,000 tires recycled per day.

  6. Atomic, Molecular and Plasma-Surface Interaction Data for Fusion Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. E. H.; Humbert, D.

    2009-05-02

    Research on fusion energy requires a large amount of data in order to predict the behaviour of complex plasma devices. As plasma systems are updated and new machines are designed, data are required for a variety of different materials over a wide range of plasma conditions. The Atomic and Molecular Data Unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency works to coordinate multinational efforts to establish databases for this fusion research effort.

  7. Energy balance of a plasma with a wave, taking the wave nonpotentiality into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelberg, M. G.; Volosevich, A. V.

    It is shown that the potential electric field of low-frequency plasma waves in the ionosphere is phase-shifted by approximately -pi/2 with respect to current fluctuations, while the vortex field is nearly cophase with the current. Thus, the work of energy transfer between the plasma and the wave occurs primarily with the participation of the vortex field. The wave nonpotentiality is shown to have a substantial effect on the energy balance of the wave-plasma system.

  8. Comparison of plasma excitation, ionization, and energy influx in single and dual frequency capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, B. B.; Han, Jeon G.

    2016-12-01

    Argon (Ar) plasma characteristics in a single and dual-frequency (DF), capacitively coupled plasma processing system are compared for drive frequencies 13.56 MHz, 320 MHz and their mixture as dual frequencies (DF). We present frequency dependent changes that occur in discharges in terms of plasma parameters such as plasma density, electron temperature, electron energy distribution function, optical emission, gas temperature, and metastable Ar density in a pressure range of 10-150 mTorr. Additionally, this work also presents the formulation and characterization of energy fluxes from plasma to a substrate/probe during the plasma generation. By variation of the operating pressure and plasma excitation frequency, the different contributions originating from the kinetic energy, the recombination of charge carriers such as electrons and ions at the surface along with the contributions from the neutral and excited species are determined. Data reveals that Ar metastable density in low-frequency radio frequency (RF) plasma is not a strong function of operating pressure even though plasma ionization increases with pressure. However, in the case of high-frequency and DF, the excitation of Ar metastable decreases and ionization increases due to enhanced collisions and efficient electron-neutral momentum/energy transfer. Also, data reveals that energy flux in the low-frequency RF plasmas is very high compared to that of high-frequency and DF operations.

  9. Auditing an intensive care unit recycling program.

    PubMed

    Kubicki, Mark A; McGain, Forbes; O'Shea, Catherine J; Bates, Samantha

    2015-06-01

    The provision of health care has significant direct environmental effects such as energy and water use and waste production, and indirect effects, including manufacturing and transport of drugs and equipment. Recycling of hospital waste is one strategy to reduce waste disposed of as landfill, preserve resources, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and potentially remain fiscally responsible. We began an intensive care unit recycling program, because a significant proportion of ICU waste was known to be recyclable. To determine the weight and proportion of ICU waste recycled, the proportion of incorrect waste disposal (including infectious waste contamination), the opportunity for further recycling and the financial effects of the recycling program. We weighed all waste and recyclables from an 11-bed ICU in an Australian metropolitan hospital for 7 non-consecutive days. As part of routine care, ICU waste was separated into general, infectious and recycling streams. Recycling streams were paper and cardboard, three plastics streams (polypropylene, mixed plastics and polyvinylchloride [PVC]) and commingled waste (steel, aluminium and some plastics). ICU waste from the waste and recycling bins was sorted into those five recycling streams, general waste and infectious waste. After sorting, the waste was weighed and examined. Recycling was classified as achieved (actual), potential and total. Potential recycling was defined as being acceptable to hospital protocol and local recycling programs. Direct and indirect financial costs, excluding labour, were examined. During the 7-day period, the total ICU waste was 505 kg: general waste, 222 kg (44%); infectious waste, 138 kg (27%); potentially recyclable waste, 145 kg (28%). Of the potentially recyclable waste, 70 kg (49%) was actually recycled (14% of the total ICU waste). In the infectious waste bins, 82% was truly infectious. There was no infectious contamination of the recycling streams. The PVC waste was 37% contaminated

  10. Very low pressure plasma sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coating using a low-energy plasma gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Nannan; Bolot, Rodolphe; Planche, Marie-Pierre; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, a more economical low-energy plasma source was used to perform a very low pressure plasma-spray (VLPPS) process. The plasma-jet properties were analyzed by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Moreover, yttria-stabilized zirconia coating (YSZ) was elaborated by a F100 low-power plasma gun under working pressure of 1 mbar, and the substrate specimens were partially shadowed by a baffle-plate during plasma spraying for obtaining different coating microstructures. Based on the SEM observation, a column-like grain coating was deposited by pure vapor deposition at the shadowed region, whereas, in the unshadowed region, the coating exhibited a binary microstructure which was formed by a mixed deposition of melted particles and evaporated particles. The mechanical properties of the coating were also well under investigation.

  11. Transition Region Emission and the Energy Input to Thermal Plasma in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.; Haga, Leah; Raymond, John C.; Panasyuk, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the energetics of solar flares depends on obtaining reliable determinations of the energy input to flare plasma. X-ray observations of the thermal bremsstrahlung from hot flare plasma provide temperatures and emission measures which, along with estimates of the plasma volume, allow the energy content of this hot plasma to be computed. However, if thermal energy losses are significant or if significant energy goes directly into cooler plasma, this is only a lower limit on the total energy injected into thermal plasma during the flare. We use SOHO UVCS observations of O VI flare emission scattered by coronal O VI ions to deduce the flare emission at transition region temperatures between 100,000 K and 1 MK for the 2002 July 23 and other flares. We find that the radiated energy at these temperatures significantly increases the deduced energy input to the thermal plasma, but by an amount that is less than the uncertainty in the computed energies. Comparisons of computed thermal and nonthermal electron energies deduced from RHESSI, GOES, and UVCS are shown.

  12. Transition Region Emission and the Energy Input to Thermal Plasma in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.; Haga, Leah; Raymond, John C.; Panasyuk, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the energetics of solar flares depends on obtaining reliable determinations of the energy input to flare plasma. X-ray observations of the thermal bremsstrahlung from hot flare plasma provide temperatures and emission measures which, along with estimates of the plasma volume, allow the energy content of this hot plasma to be computed. However, if thermal energy losses are significant or if significant energy goes directly into cooler plasma, this is only a lower limit on the total energy injected into thermal plasma during the flare. We use SOHO UVCS observations of O VI flare emission scattered by coronal O VI ions to deduce the flare emission at transition region temperatures between 100,000 K and 1 MK for the 2002 July 23 and other flares. We find that the radiated energy at these temperatures significantly increases the deduced energy input to the thermal plasma, but by an amount that is less than the uncertainty in the computed energies. Comparisons of computed thermal and nonthermal electron energies deduced from RHESSI, GOES, and UVCS are shown.

  13. Recycling Philology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Peggy A.

    1993-01-01

    Proposes that English teachers recycle philology as a field of study. Redefines the shape of philology in view of postmodern theories of signification. Considers concepts of hermeneutics in retheorizing the aims of philology. Shows how such philological investigation might be used in the classroom to study literary texts. (HB)

  14. Thermal ablation of plasma-facing surfaces in tokamak disruptions: Sensitivity to particle kinetic energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.; Hassanein, A.

    1996-02-01

    Ablation damage to solid targets with high heat flux impulses is generally greater high-energy electron beam heat sources compared to low-energy plasma guns. This sensitivity to incoming particle kinetic energy is explored with computer modelling; a fast-running routine (DESIRE) is developed for initial scoping analysis and is found to be in reasonable agreement with several experiments on graphite and tungsten targets. If tokamak disruptions are characterized by particle energies less than {approximately}1 keV, then we expect plasma guns are a better analogue than electron beams for simulating disruption behavior and testing candidate plasma-facing materials.

  15. Conversion of magnetic energy in the magnetic reconnection layer of a laboratory plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Yamada, Masaaki; Yoo, Jongsoo; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; ...

    2014-09-10

    Magnetic reconnection, in which magnetic field lines break and reconnect to change their topology, occurs throughout the universe. The essential feature of reconnection is that it energizes plasma particles by converting magnetic energy. Despite the long history of reconnection research, how this energy conversion occurs remains a major unresolved problem in plasma physics. Here we report that the energy conversion in a laboratory reconnection layer occurs in a much larger region than previously considered. The mechanisms for energizing plasma particles in the reconnection layer are identified, and a quantitative inventory of the converted energy is presented for the first timemore » in a well defined reconnection layer; 50% of the magnetic energy is converted to particle energy, 2/3 of which transferred to ions and 1/3 to electrons. Our results are compared with simulations and space measurements, for a key step toward resolving one of the most important problems in plasma physics.« less

  16. Conversion of magnetic energy in the magnetic reconnection layer of a laboratory plasma.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masaaki; Yoo, Jongsoo; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Ji, Hantao; Kulsrud, Russell M; Myers, Clayton E

    2014-09-10

    Magnetic reconnection, in which magnetic field lines break and reconnect to change their topology, occurs throughout the universe. The essential feature of reconnection is that it energizes plasma particles by converting magnetic energy. Despite the long history of reconnection research, how this energy conversion occurs remains a major unresolved problem in plasma physics. Here we report that the energy conversion in a laboratory reconnection layer occurs in a much larger region than previously considered. The mechanisms for energizing plasma particles in the reconnection layer are identified, and a quantitative inventory of the converted energy is presented for the first time in a well-defined reconnection layer; 50% of the magnetic energy is converted to particle energy, 2/3 of which transferred to ions and 1/3 to electrons. Our results are compared with simulations and space measurements, for a key step towards resolving one of the most important problems in plasma physics.

  17. Conversion of magnetic energy in the magnetic reconnection layer of a laboratory plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Masaaki; Yoo, Jongsoo; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Ji, Hantao; Kulsrud, Russell M.; Myers, Clayton E.

    2014-09-10

    Magnetic reconnection, in which magnetic field lines break and reconnect to change their topology, occurs throughout the universe. The essential feature of reconnection is that it energizes plasma particles by converting magnetic energy. Despite the long history of reconnection research, how this energy conversion occurs remains a major unresolved problem in plasma physics. Here we report that the energy conversion in a laboratory reconnection layer occurs in a much larger region than previously considered. The mechanisms for energizing plasma particles in the reconnection layer are identified, and a quantitative inventory of the converted energy is presented for the first time in a well defined reconnection layer; 50% of the magnetic energy is converted to particle energy, 2/3 of which transferred to ions and 1/3 to electrons. Our results are compared with simulations and space measurements, for a key step toward resolving one of the most important problems in plasma physics.

  18. Low energy electron-impact ionization of hydrogen atom for coplanar equal-energy-sharing kinematics in Debye plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Song Bin; Ye, Bang Jiao; Wang, Jian Guo; Janev, R. K.

    2016-12-01

    Low energy electron-impact ionization of hydrogen atom in Debye plasmas has been investigated by employing the exterior complex scaling method. The interactions between the charged particles in the plasma have been represented by Debye-Hückel potentials. Triple differential cross sections (TDCS) in the coplanar equal-energy-sharing geometry at an incident energy of 15.6 eV for different screening lengths are reported. As the screening strength increases, TDCS change significantly. The evolutions of dominant typical peak structures of the TDCS are studied in detail for different screening lengths and for different coplanar equal-energy-sharing geometries.

  19. Measurements of low-energy electron reflection at a plasma boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. I.; Adams, S. F.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Koepke, M. E.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.

    2015-10-15

    It is demonstrated that low-energy (<3 eV) electron reflection from a solid surface in contact with a low-temperature plasma can have significant variation with time. An uncontaminated, i.e., “clean,” metallic surface (just after heating up to glow) in a plasma environment may have practically no reflection of low-energy incident electrons. However, a contaminated, i.e., “dirty,” surface (in some time after cleaning by heating) that has a few monolayers of absorbent can reflect low-energy incident electrons and therefore significantly affect the net electron current collected by the surface. This effect may significantly change plasma properties and should be taken into account in plasma experiments and models. A diagnostic method is demonstrated for measurements of low-energy electron absorption coefficient in plasmas with a mono-energetic electron group.

  20. Energy Transport and Ionization Balance in Isochorically Heated Dense Plasmas*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landen, Otto

    2003-04-01

    Dense plasmas, a principal state of matter in inertial confinement fusion research and in planetary and stellar environments, can now be routinely created in the laboratory at diagnosable mm-scales by x-ray radiative heating provided by high power laser produced plasmas. We discuss two recent studies in such isochorically-heated plasmas, the first examining supersonic diffusive radiative transport in foam cylinders using spectrally and temporally-resolved soft x-ray imaging [1] and the second studying solid density plasma ionization balance [2] using spectrally resolved x-ray scattering [3]. The radiation transport data provides a measure of the dense plasma heat capacity and opacity for the various foam and wall materials tested. Moreover, data from more complex radiation flow geometries further constrain the radiation transport modelling. In the case of x-ray scattering measurements, by spectrally resolving both the Compton downshifted and Doppler broadened inelastic component and the Rayleigh scattered elastic component, we can infer both the plasma electron temperature and ratio of weakly bound and free electron fraction to tightly bound electron fraction in low Z samples. The results are compared to various dense plasma ionization balance models. [1] C.A. Back, et. al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 (2000) 274 and Phys. Plasmas 7 (2000 ) 2126. [2] S.H. Glenzer, et. al., submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. (2003). [3] O.L. Landen, et. al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. 71 (2001) 465.

  1. Understanding of Edge Plasmas in Magnetic Fusion Energy Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T

    2004-11-01

    A limited overview is given of the theoretical understanding of edge plasmas in fusion devices. This plasma occupies the thin region between the hot core plasma and material walls in magnetically confinement configurations. The region is often formed by a change in magnetic topology from close magnetic field lines (i.e., the core region) and open field lines that contact material surfaces (i.e., the scrape-off layer [SOL]), with the most common example being magnetically diverted tokamaks. The physics of this region is determined by the interaction of plasma with neutral gas in the presence of plasma turbulence, with impurity radiation being an important component. Recent advances in modeling strong, intermittent micro-turbulent edge-plasma transport is given, and the closely coupled self-consistent evolution of the edge-plasma profiles in tokamaks. In addition, selected new results are given for the characterization of edge-plasmas behavior in the areas of edge-pedestal relaxation and SOL transport via Edge-Localize Modes (ELMs), impurity formation including dust, and magnetic field-line stochasticity in tokamaks.

  2. Atomic Oxygen Durability Evaluation of Protected Polymers Using Thermal Energy Plasma Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Degroh, Kim K.; Stidham, Curtis R.; Gebauer, Linda; Lamoreaux, Cynthia M.

    1995-01-01

    The durability evaluation of protected polymers intended for use in low Earth orbit (LEO) has necessitated the use of large-area, high-fluence, atomic oxygen exposure systems. Two thermal energy atomic oxygen exposure systems which are frequently used for such evaluations are radio frequency (RF) plasma ashers and electron cyclotron resonance plasma sources. Plasma source testing practices such as ample preparation, effective fluence prediction, atomic oxygen flux determination, erosion measurement, operational considerations, and erosion yield measurements are presented. Issues which influence the prediction of in-space durability based on ground laboratory thermal energy plasma system testing are also addressed.

  3. The low-energy plasma in the Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Burke and Franklin (1955) discovered radio emissions from Jupiter at 22.2 MHz. Subsequent observations established the strong control of the decametric emissions by the satellite Io. The Voyager encounters with Jupiter in 1979 have resulted in a dramatic increase in detailed knowledge of the plasma properties of the Jovian magnetosphere. The Io plasma torus is discussed, taking into account the Voyager plasma science experiment, positive-ion temperatures in the torus, electron distribution functions in the torus, elementary-charge concentrations in the torus, positive-ion composition in the torus, and plasma velocities in the torus. The Io flux tube is considered along with the middle magnetosphere and the outer magnetosphere. Attention is given to the sources of plasma, aspects of diffusive transport, questions of inertial loading, and the existence of nonazimuthal flow velocities in the middle magnetosphere.

  4. Characterization of plasma chemistry and ion energy in cathodic arc plasma from Ti-Si cathodes of different compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, A. O.; Zhirkov, I.; Dahlqvist, M.; Jensen, J.; Hultman, L.; Rosen, J.

    2013-04-28

    Arc plasma from Ti-Si compound cathodes with up to 25 at. % Si was characterized in a DC arc system with respect to chemistry and charge-state-resolved ion energy. The plasma ion composition showed a lower Si content, diverging up to 12 at. % compared to the cathode composition, yet concurrently deposited films were in accordance with the cathode stoichiometry. Significant contribution to film growth from neutrals is inferred besides ions, since the contribution from macroparticles, estimated by scanning electron microscopy, cannot alone account for the compositional difference between cathode, plasma, and film. The average ion charge states for Ti and Si were higher than reference data for elemental cathodes. This result is likely related to TiSi{sub x} phases of higher cohesive energies in the compound cathodes and higher effective electron temperature in plasma formation. The ion energy distributions extended up to {approx}200 and {approx}130 eV for Ti and Si, respectively, with corresponding average energies of {approx}60 and {approx}30 eV. These averages were, however, not dependent on Si content in the cathode, except for 25 at. % Si where the average energies were increased up to 72 eV for Ti and 47 eV for Si.

  5. Environmental analysis of a construction and demolition waste recycling plant in Portugal--Part I: energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

    PubMed

    Coelho, André; de Brito, Jorge

    2013-05-01

    This work is a part of a wider study involving the economic and environmental implications of managing construction and demolition waste (CDW), focused on the operation of a large scale CDW recycling plant. This plant, to be operated in the Lisbon Metropolitan Area (including the Setúbal peninsula), is analysed for a 60 year period, using primary energy consumption and CO2eq emission impact factors as environmental impact performance indicators. Simplified estimation methods are used to calculate industrial equipment incorporated, and the operation and transport related impacts. Material recycling--sorted materials sent to other industries, to act as input--is taken into account by discounting the impacts related to industrial processes no longer needed. This first part focuses on calculating the selected impact factors for a base case scenario (with a 350 tonnes/h installed capacity), while a sensitivity analysis is provided in part two. Overall, a 60 year global primary energy consumption of 71.4 thousand toe (tonne of oil equivalent) and a total CO2eq emission of 135.4 thousand tonnes are expected. Under this operating regime, around 563 thousand toe and 1465 thousand tonnes CO2eq could be prevented by replacing raw materials in several construction materials industries (e.g.: ferrous and non-ferrous metals, plastics, paper and cardboard). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Energy Loss of a High Charge Bunched Electron Beam in Plasma: Nonlinear Plasma Response and Linear Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Barov, N.; Thompson, M. C.; Yoder, R.

    2002-12-01

    There has been much experimental and theoretical interest in blowout regime of plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA), which features ultra-high accelerating fields, linear transverse focusing forces, and nonlinear plasma motion. Using an exact analysis, we examine here a fundamental limit of nonlinear PWFA excitation, by an infinitesimally short, relativistic electron beam. The beam energy loss in this case is shown to be linear in charge even for nonlinear plasma response, where a normalized, unitless charge exceeds unity, and relativistic plasma effects become important or dominant. The physical bases for this persistence of linear response are pointed out. As a byproduct of our analysis, we re-examine the issue of field divergence as the point-charge limit is approached, suggesting an important modification of commonly held views of evading unphysical energy loss. Deviations from linear behavior are investigated using simulations with finite length beams. The peak accelerating field in the plasma wave excited behind a finite-length beam is also examined, with the artifact of wave spiking adding to the apparent persistence of linear scaling of the peak field amplitude well into the nonlinear regime. On the other hand, at large enough normalized charge, linear scaling of fields collapses, with serious consequences for plasma wave excitation efficiency. The dramatic implications of these results for observing the collapse of linear scaling in planned experiments are discussed.

  7. Precipitation Recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.; Bras, Rafael L.

    1996-01-01

    The water cycle regulates and reflects natural variability in climate at the regional and global scales. Large-scale human activities that involve changes in land cover, such as tropical deforestation, are likely to modify climate through changes in the water cycle. In order to understand, and hopefully be able to predict, the extent of these potential global and regional changes, we need first to understand how the water cycle works. In the past, most of the research in hydrology focused on the land branch of the water cycle, with little attention given to the atmospheric branch. The study of precipitation recycling which is defined as the contribution of local evaporation to local precipitation, aims at understanding hydrologic processes in the atmospheric branch of the water cycle. Simply stated, any study on precipitation recycling is about how the atmospheric branch of the water cycle works, namely, what happens to water vapor molecules after they evaporate from the surface, and where will they precipitate?

  8. Precipitation Recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.; Bras, Rafael L.

    1996-01-01

    The water cycle regulates and reflects natural variability in climate at the regional and global scales. Large-scale human activities that involve changes in land cover, such as tropical deforestation, are likely to modify climate through changes in the water cycle. In order to understand, and hopefully be able to predict, the extent of these potential global and regional changes, we need first to understand how the water cycle works. In the past, most of the research in hydrology focused on the land branch of the water cycle, with little attention given to the atmospheric branch. The study of precipitation recycling which is defined as the contribution of local evaporation to local precipitation, aims at understanding hydrologic processes in the atmospheric branch of the water cycle. Simply stated, any study on precipitation recycling is about how the atmospheric branch of the water cycle works, namely, what happens to water vapor molecules after they evaporate from the surface, and where will they precipitate?

  9. Computer-Controlled System for Plasma Ion Energy Auto-Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xian-qiu; Chen, Jun-fang; Jiang, Zhen-mei; Zhong, Qing-hua; Xiong, Yu-ying; Wu, Kai-hua

    2003-02-01

    A computer-controlled system for plasma ion energy auto-analyzer was technically studied for rapid and online measurement of plasma ion energy distribution. The system intelligently controls all the equipments via a RS-232 port, a printer port and a home-built circuit. The software designed by Lab VIEW G language automatically fulfils all of the tasks such as system initializing, adjustment of scanning-voltage, measurement of weak-current, data processing, graphic export, etc. By using the system, a few minutes are taken to acquire the whole ion energy distribution, which rapidly provides important parameters of plasma process techniques based on semiconductor devices and microelectronics.

  10. Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong; Shan Zhang; Hong Xueren; Wang Hongyu

    2012-08-15

    The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

  11. Recycling and Life Cycle Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sujit

    2010-01-01

    This chapter addresses recycling and life cycle considerations related to the growing use of lightweight materials in vehicles. The chapter first addresses the benefit of a life cycle perspective in materials choice, and the role that recycling plays in reducing energy inputs and environmental impacts in a vehicle s life cycle. Some limitations of life cycle analysis and results of several vehicle- and fleet-level assessments are drawn from published studies. With emphasis on lightweight materials such as aluminum, magnesium, and polymer composites, the status of the existing recycling infrastructure and technological challenges being faced by the industry also are discussed.

  12. Energy density dependence of hydrogen combustion efficiency in atmospheric pressure microwave plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, T.; Ezumi, N.; Sawada, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K.

    2015-03-15

    The recovery of tritium in nuclear fusion plants is a key issue for safety. So far, the oxidation procedure using an atmospheric pressure plasma is expected to be part of the recovery method. In this study, in order to clarify the mechanism of hydrogen oxidation by plasma chemistry, we have investigated the dependence of hydrogen combustion efficiency on gas flow rate and input power in the atmospheric pressure microwave plasma. It has been found that the combustion efficiency depends on energy density of absorbed microwave power. Hence, the energy density is considered as a key parameter for combustion processes. Also neutral gas temperatures inside and outside the plasma were measured by an optical emission spectroscopy method and thermocouple. The result shows that the neutral gas temperature in the plasma is much higher than the outside temperature of plasma. The high neutral gas temperature may affect the combustion reaction. (authors)

  13. Dielectric energy versus plasma energy, and Hamiltonian action-angle variables for the Vlasov equation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, P.J.; Pfirsch, D.

    1992-04-01

    Expressions for the energy content of one-dimensional electrostatic perturbations about homogeneous equilibria are revisited. The well-known dielectric energy, {var_epsilon}{sub D}, is compared with the exact plasma free energy expression, {delta}{sup 2}F, that is conserved by the Vlasov-Poisson system. The former is an expression in terms of the perturbed electric field amplitude, while the latter is determined by a generating function, which describes perturbations of the distribution function that respect the important constraint of dynamical accessibility of the system. Thus the comparison requires solving the Vlasov equation for such a perturbations of the distribution function in terms of the electric field. This is done for neutral modes of oscillation that occur for equilibria with stationary inflection points, and it is seen that for these special modes {delta}{sup 2}F = {var_epsilon}{sub D}. In the case of unstable and corresponding damped modes it is seen that {delta}{sup 2}F {ne} {var_epsilon}{sub D}; in fact {delta}{sup 2}F {equivalent_to} 0. This failure of the dielectric energy expression persists even for arbitrarily small growth and damping rates since {var_epsilon}{sub D} is nonzero in this limit, whereas {delta}{sup 2}F remains zero. The connection between the new exact energy expression and the at-best approximate {var_epsilon}{sub D} is described. The new expression motivates natural definitions of Hamiltonian action variables and signature. A general linear integral transform is introduced that maps the linear version of the noncanonical Hamiltonian structure, which describes the Vlasov equation, to action-angle (diagonal) form.

  14. Dielectric energy versus plasma energy, and Hamiltonian action-angle variables for the Vlasov equation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, P.J. . Inst. for Fusion Studies); Pfirsch, D. )

    1992-04-01

    Expressions for the energy content of one-dimensional electrostatic perturbations about homogeneous equilibria are revisited. The well-known dielectric energy, {var epsilon}{sub D}, is compared with the exact plasma free energy expression, {delta}{sup 2}F, that is conserved by the Vlasov-Poisson system. The former is an expression in terms of the perturbed electric field amplitude, while the latter is determined by a generating function, which describes perturbations of the distribution function that respect the important constraint of dynamical accessibility of the system. Thus the comparison requires solving the Vlasov equation for such a perturbations of the distribution function in terms of the electric field. This is done for neutral modes of oscillation that occur for equilibria with stationary inflection points, and it is seen that for these special modes {delta}{sup 2}F = {var epsilon}{sub D}. In the case of unstable and corresponding damped modes it is seen that {delta}{sup 2}F {ne} {var epsilon}{sub D}; in fact {delta}{sup 2}F {equivalent to} 0. This failure of the dielectric energy expression persists even for arbitrarily small growth and damping rates since {var epsilon}{sub D} is nonzero in this limit, whereas {delta}{sup 2}F remains zero. The connection between the new exact energy expression and the at-best approximate {var epsilon}{sub D} is described. The new expression motivates natural definitions of Hamiltonian action variables and signature. A general linear integral transform is introduced that maps the linear version of the noncanonical Hamiltonian structure, which describes the Vlasov equation, to action-angle (diagonal) form.

  15. Plasma (Accretion) Disks with High Magnetic Energy Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, F.; Coppi, B.

    2006-04-01

    ``Corrugated'' plasma disks can form in the dominant gravity of a central object when the peak plasma pressure in the disk is of the same order as that of the pressure of the ``external'' magnetic field, while the magnetic field resulting from internal plasma currents is of the same order as the external field. The corrugation refers to a periodic variation of the plasma density in a region around the equatorial plane. The considered structure represents a transition between a ``classical'' accretion disk and a ``rings sequence'' configuration^2. The common feature of the ``corrugated'' and the ``rings sequence'' configurations is the ``crystal'' structure of the magnetic surfaces that consist of a sequence of pairs of oppositely directed toroidal current density filaments. The connection between the characteristics of these configurations and those of the marginally stable ballooning modes that can be found in a model accretion disk is pointed out and analyzed.

  16. Application of Plasma Waveguides to High Energy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Milchberg, Howard

    2016-07-01

    This grant supported basic experimental, theoretical and computer simulation research into developing a compact, high pulse repetition rate laser accelerator using the direct laser acceleration mechanism in plasma-based slow wave structures.

  17. Energy distributions and radiation transport in uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, G. H.; Bathke, C.; Maceda, E.; Choi, C.

    1976-01-01

    An approximate analytic model, based on continuous electron slowing, has been used for survey calculations. Where more accuracy is required, a Monte Carlo technique is used which combines an analytic representation of Coulombic collisions with a random walk treatment of inelastic collisions. The calculated electron distributions have been incorporated into another code that evaluates both the excited atomic state densities within the plasma and the radiative flux emitted from the plasma.

  18. Atom-Scale Reaction Pathways and Free-Energy Landscapes in Oxygen Plasma Etching of Graphene.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Kenichi; Boero, Mauro; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Oshiyama, Atsushi

    2013-05-16

    We report first-principles molecular dynamics calculations combined with rare events sampling techniques that clarify atom-scale mechanisms of oxygen plasma etching of graphene. The obtained reaction pathways and associated free-energy landscapes show that the etching proceeds near vacancies via a two-step mechanism, formation of precursor lactone structures and the subsequent exclusive CO2 desorption. We find that atomic oxygen among the plasma components is most efficient for etching, providing a guidline in tuning the plasma conditions.

  19. APPARATUS FOR MINIMIZING ENERGY LOSSES FROM MAGNETICALLY CONFINED VOLUMES OF HOT PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1961-10-01

    An apparatus is described for controlling electron temperature in plasma confined in a Pyrotron magnetic containment field. Basically the device comprises means for directing low temperature electrons to the plasma in controlled quantities to maintain a predetermined optimum equilibrium electron temperature whereat minimum losses of plasma ions due to ambipolar effects and energy damping of the ions due to dynamical friction with the electrons occur. (AEC)

  20. Plasma-sprayed materials for magnetic fusion energy devices

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.F.; Croessmann, C.D.; Hosking, F.M.; Watson, R.D.; Koski, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma spray technology is being evaluated as a means to address important fabrication and maintenance problems associated with plasma-interactive components in magnetic fusion devices (e.g., limiters, divertors, and some first wall surfaces). Low-oxygen vacuum plasma sprayed copper has been tested as a ductile, high thermal conductivity interlayer to limit thermal stress and prevent cracking when brazing pyrolytic graphite (PG) tiles to high-strength metal cooling tubes. A brazed tile/tube assembly with this sprayed interlayer has survived thermal testing up to a surface heat flux of 2.0 kW cm{sup {minus}2} as computed on the basis of the power removed in the sample cooling water. A vacuum-sprayed, tungsten-wire-reinforced, copper composite has also been studied as a means to produce an interlayer with highly anisotropic thermal expansion similar to that of PG. Beryllium and tungsten are the present alternatives to graphite for plasma-facing surfaces. High heat flux testing of plasma-sprayed beryllium samples indicates that adhesion and thermal conductivity must be improved. Plasma-sprayed tungsten has performed well in thermal tests, but other factors may rule out the use of tungsten in near term fusion devices. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Energy Distribution of Electrons in Radiation Induced-Helium Plasmas. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Energy distribution of high energy electrons as they slow down and thermalize in a gaseous medium is studied. The energy distribution in the entire energy range from source energies down is studied analytically. A helium medium in which primary electrons are created by the passage of heavy-charged particles from nuclear reactions is emphasized. A radiation-induced plasma is of interest in a variety of applications, such as radiation pumped lasers and gaseous core nuclear reactors.

  2. Plasma simulations of emission line regions in high energy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Chris T.

    This dissertation focuses on understanding two different, but in each case extreme, astrophysical environments: the Crab Nebula and emission line galaxies. These relatively local objects are well constrained by observations and are test cases of phenomena seen at high-z where detailed observations are rare. The tool used to study these objects is the plasma simulation code known as Cloudy. The introduction provides a brief summary of relevant physical concepts in nebular astrophysics and presents the basic features and assumptions of Cloudy. The first object investigated with Cloudy, the Crab Nebula, is a nearby supernova remnant that previously has been subject to photoionization modeling to reproduce the ionized emission seen in the nebula's filamentary structure. However, there are still several unanswered questions: (1) What excites the H2 emitting gas? (2) How much mass is in the molecular component? (3) How did the H2 form? (4) What is nature of the dust grains? A large suite of observations including long slit optical and NIR spectra over ionized, neutral and molecular gas in addition to HST and NIR ground based images constrain a particularly bright region of H2 emission, Knot 51, which exhibits a high excitation temperature of ˜3000 K. Simulations of K51 revealed that only a trace amount of H2 is needed to reproduce the observed emission and that H2 forms through an uncommon nebular process known as associative detachment. The final chapters of this dissertation focus on interpreting the narrow line region (NLR) in low-z emission line galaxies selected by a novel technique known as mean field independent component analysis (MFICA). A mixture of starlight and radiation from an AGN excites the gas present in galaxies. MFICA separates galaxies over a wide range of ionization into subsets of pure AGN and pure star forming galaxies allowing simulations to reveal the properties responsible for their observed variation in ionization. Emission line ratios can

  3. High energy density micro plasma bunch from multiple laser interaction with thin target

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Han; Yu, Wei; Luan, S. X.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yu, M. Y.; Cai, H. B.; Zhou, C. T.; Yang, X. H.; Yin, Y.; Zhuo, H. B.; Wang, J. W.; Murakami, M.

    2014-01-13

    Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation is used to investigate radiation-pressure driven acceleration and compression of small solid-density plasma by intense laser pulses. It is found that multiple impacts by presently available short-pulse lasers on a small hemispheric shell target can create a long-living tiny quasineutral monoenergetic plasma bunch of very high energy density.

  4. Low ion energy RF reactor using an array of plasmas through a grounded grid

    SciTech Connect

    Chesaux, Michaeel; Howling, Alan A.; Hollenstein, Christoph; Domine, Didier; Kroll, Ulrich

    2013-03-15

    A reactor using localized remote plasma in a grid electrode is presented in this study. The aim is to reduce the ion bombardment energy inherent in RF capacitively coupled parallel plate reactors used to deposit large area thin film silicon solar cells. High ion bombardment energy could cause defects in silicon layers and deteriorate electrical interfaces, therefore, by reducing the ion bombardment energy, lower defect density might be obtained. In this study, the low ion bombardment energy results from the reactor design. By inserting a grounded grid close to the RF electrode of a parallel plate reactor, the electrode area asymmetry is increased while retaining the lateral uniformity required for large area deposition. This asymmetry causes a strong negative self-bias voltage, which reduces the time-averaged plasma potential and thus lowers the ion bombardment energy. In addition to the self-bias, the time evolution of plasma light emission and plasma potential RF waveform are also affected by the grid, thereby further reducing the time-averaged plasma potential and ion bombardment energy. Finally, a good correlation between the measured time-averaged plasma potential and measured low ion bombardment energy is found in a broad range of RF voltages.

  5. Plastics recycling: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Hopewell, Jefferson; Dvorak, Robert; Kosior, Edward

    2009-07-27

    Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight and durable materials, which can readily be moulded into a variety of products that find use in a wide range of applications. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased markedly over the last 60 years. However, current levels of their usage and disposal generate several environmental problems. Around 4 per cent of world oil and gas production, a non-renewable resource, is used as feedstock for plastics and a further 3-4% is expended to provide energy for their manufacture. A major portion of plastic produced each year is used to make disposable items of packaging or other short-lived products that are discarded within a year of manufacture. These two observations alone indicate that our current use of plastics is not sustainable. In addition, because of the durability of the polymers involved, substantial quantities of discarded end-of-life plastics are accumulating as debris in landfills and in natural habitats worldwide. Recycling is one of the most important actions currently available to reduce these impacts and represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Recycling provides opportunities to reduce oil usage, carbon dioxide emissions and the quantities of waste requiring disposal. Here, we briefly set recycling into context against other waste-reduction strategies, namely reduction in material use through downgauging or product reuse, the use of alternative biodegradable materials and energy recovery as fuel. While plastics have been recycled since the 1970s, the quantities that are recycled vary geographically, according to plastic type and application. Recycling of packaging materials has seen rapid expansion over the last decades in a number of countries. Advances in technologies and systems for the collection, sorting and reprocessing of recyclable plastics are creating new opportunities for recycling, and with the combined actions of the public, industry and governments it

  6. Plastics recycling: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Hopewell, Jefferson; Dvorak, Robert; Kosior, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight and durable materials, which can readily be moulded into a variety of products that find use in a wide range of applications. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased markedly over the last 60 years. However, current levels of their usage and disposal generate several environmental problems. Around 4 per cent of world oil and gas production, a non-renewable resource, is used as feedstock for plastics and a further 3–4% is expended to provide energy for their manufacture. A major portion of plastic produced each year is used to make disposable items of packaging or other short-lived products that are discarded within a year of manufacture. These two observations alone indicate that our current use of plastics is not sustainable. In addition, because of the durability of the polymers involved, substantial quantities of discarded end-of-life plastics are accumulating as debris in landfills and in natural habitats worldwide. Recycling is one of the most important actions currently available to reduce these impacts and represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Recycling provides opportunities to reduce oil usage, carbon dioxide emissions and the quantities of waste requiring disposal. Here, we briefly set recycling into context against other waste-reduction strategies, namely reduction in material use through downgauging or product reuse, the use of alternative biodegradable materials and energy recovery as fuel. While plastics have been recycled since the 1970s, the quantities that are recycled vary geographically, according to plastic type and application. Recycling of packaging materials has seen rapid expansion over the last decades in a number of countries. Advances in technologies and systems for the collection, sorting and reprocessing of recyclable plastics are creating new opportunities for recycling, and with the combined actions of the public, industry and governments it

  7. Numerical simulation of the plasma current quench following a disruptive energy loss

    SciTech Connect

    Strickler, D.J.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Holmes, J.A.; Miller, J.B.; Rothe, K.E.

    1983-11-01

    The plasma electromagnetic interaction with poloidal field coils and nearby passive conductor loops during the current quench following a disruptive loss of plasma energy is simulated. By solving a differential/algebraic system consisting of a set of circuit equations (including the plasma circuit) coupled to a plasma energy balance equation and an equilibrium condition, the electromagnetic consequences of an abrupt thermal quench are observed. Limiters on the small and large major radium sides of the plasma are assumed to define the plasma cross section. The presence of good conductors near the plasma and a small initial distance (i.e., 5 to 10% of the plasma minor radius) between the plasma edge and an inboard limiter are shown to lead to long current decay times. For a plasma with an initial major radius R/sub o/ = 4.3 m, aspect ratio A = 3.6, and current I/sub P/ = 4.0 MA, introducing nearby passive conductors lengthens the current decay from milliseconds to hundreds of milliseconds.

  8. Comparison of pressure dependence of electron energy distributions in oxygen capacitively and inductively coupled plasmas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Hyong; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-04-01

    Electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) were measured with increasing gas pressure in oxygen capacitively and inductively coupled plasmas. It was found that, in the capacitive discharge, abnormally low-energy electrons became highly populated and the EEDF evolved to a more distinct bi-Maxwellian distribution as the gas pressure was increased. This pressure dependence of the EEDF in the oxygen capacitive discharge is contrary to argon capacitively coupled plasma, where--at high gas pressure--low-energy electrons are significantly reduced due to collisional heating and the EEDF evolves to the Maxwellian. The highly populated low-energy electrons at high gas pressure, which was not observed in inductively coupled oxygen plasma, show that collisional heating is very inefficient in terms of the oxygen capacitive discharge. It appears that this inefficient collisional heating seems to be attributed to a low electric field strength at the center of the oxygen capacitive plasma.

  9. PC-5 Waves and Low Energy Plasma in the Outer Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallanger, Dennis L.; Vaisberg, Oleg L.; Coffey, Victoria N.

    1999-01-01

    The Interball Tail Probe crosses the dayside magnetopause at low latitudes where it frequently measures low energy ion plasma (<100 eV) in the outer magnetosphere. We present the wave characteristics associated with this cold component.

  10. Low energy plasma treatment of a proton exchange membrane used for low temperature fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, C.; Ramdutt, D.; Brault, P.; Caillard, A.; Bulla, D.; Boswell, R.; Rabat, H.; Dicks, A.

    2007-05-01

    A low energy (~30 V) plasma treatment of Nafion, a commercial proton exchange membrane used for low temperature fuel cells, is performed in a helicon radiofrequency (13.56 MHz) plasma system. For argon densities in the 109-1010 cm-3 range, the water contact angle (hydrophobicity) of the membrane surface linearly decreases with an increase in the plasma energy dose, which is maintained below 5.1 J cm-2, and which results from the combination of an ion energy dose (up to 3.8 J cm-2) and a photon (mostly UV) energy dose (up to 1.3 J cm-2). The decrease in water contact angle is essentially a result of the energy brought to the surface by ion bombardment. The measured effect of the energy brought to the surface by UV light is found to be negligible.

  11. Recyclable transmission line (RTL) and linear transformer driver (LTD) development for Z-pinch inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE) and high yield.

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Robin Arthur; Kingsep, Alexander S. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Smith, David Lewis; Olson, Craig Lee; Ottinger, Paul F. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Schumer, Joseph Wade (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Welch, Dale Robert (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Kim, Alexander (High Currents Institute, Tomsk, Russia); Kulcinski, Gerald L. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Kammer, Daniel C. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Rose, David Vincent (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Nedoseev, Sergei L. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Pointon, Timothy David; Smirnov, Valentin P.; Turgeon, Matthew C.; Kalinin, Yuri G. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Bruner, Nichelle "Nicki" (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Barkey, Mark E. (University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL); Guthrie, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Thoma, Carsten (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Genoni, Tom C. (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Langston, William L.; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos

    2007-01-01

    Z-Pinch Inertial Fusion Energy (Z-IFE) complements and extends the single-shot z-pinch fusion program on Z to a repetitive, high-yield, power plant scenario that can be used for the production of electricity, transmutation of nuclear waste, and hydrogen production, all with no CO{sub 2} production and no long-lived radioactive nuclear waste. The Z-IFE concept uses a Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) accelerator, and a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to connect the LTD driver to a high-yield fusion target inside a thick-liquid-wall power plant chamber. Results of RTL and LTD research are reported here, that include: (1) The key physics issues for RTLs involve the power flow at the high linear current densities that occur near the target (up to 5 MA/cm). These issues include surface heating, melting, ablation, plasma formation, electron flow, magnetic insulation, conductivity changes, magnetic field diffusion changes, possible ion flow, and RTL mass motion. These issues are studied theoretically, computationally (with the ALEGRA and LSP codes), and will work at 5 MA/cm or higher, with anode-cathode gaps as small as 2 mm. (2) An RTL misalignment sensitivity study has been performed using a 3D circuit model. Results show very small load current variations for significant RTL misalignments. (3) The key structural issues for RTLs involve optimizing the RTL strength (varying shape, ribs, etc.) while minimizing the RTL mass. Optimization studies show RTL mass reductions by factors of three or more. (4) Fabrication and pressure testing of Z-PoP (Proof-of-Principle) size RTLs are successfully reported here. (5) Modeling of the effect of initial RTL imperfections on the buckling pressure has been performed. Results show that the curved RTL offers a much greater buckling pressure as well as less sensitivity to imperfections than three other RTL designs. (6) Repetitive operation of a 0.5 MA, 100 kV, 100 ns, LTD cavity with gas purging between shots and automated operation is

  12. Modelling erosion damage from low-energy plasma gun simulations of disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.; Hassanein, A.

    1993-10-01

    Energy transfer to material surfaces is dominated by photon radiation through low temperature plasma vapors if tokamak disruptions are due to low kinetic energy particles ({approx_lt} 100 eV). Simple models of radiation transport are derived and incorporated into a fast-running computer routine to model this process. The results of simulations are in good agreement with plasma gun erosion tests on several metal targets.

  13. Energy conversion and magnetic reconnection in space plasmas: Role of nonlinear kinetic processes and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kropotkin, A. P.

    2014-07-01

    Dynamics of plasma systems in space involves processes of large-scale energy conversion. Like in conventional gas dynamics, the conversion can occur on shocks. However, in collisionless magnetized plasma systems, quite different nonlinear structures may be responsible for energy conversion. Those are anisotropic kinetic current sheets. It is demonstrated that observations at the Earth's magnetopause provide evidence of long-term existence of such structures.

  14. Recycling Lesson Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okaz, Abeer Ali

    2013-01-01

    This lesson plan designed for grade 2 students has the goal of teaching students about the environmental practice of recycling. Children will learn language words related to recycling such as: "we can recycle"/"we can't recycle" and how to avoid littering with such words as: "recycle paper" and/or "don't throw…

  15. Electron heating and control of electron energy distribution in hybrid plasma source for the enhancement of the plasma ashing processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-09-01

    In this study, control of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) is investigated in hybrid plasma source with inductive and capacitive fields. With the addition of a small amount of antenna coil power to the capacitive discharge, low energy electrons are effectively heated and the EEDF is controlled. This method is applied to the ashing process of the photoresistor (PR). It is revealed that the ashing rate of the PR is significantly increased due to O radicals produced by the controlled EEDF, even though the ion density/energy flux is not increased. The roles of the power transfer mode, the electron heating, and the discharge parameters are also presented in the hybrid plasma source. This work can be used to an inter-ashing method during etching process.

  16. Enhancing the Efficiency and Contrast Ratio of White Organic Light-Emitting Diode Using Energy-Recyclable Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Meiso; Wu, Chung-Ming; Su, Shui-Hsiang

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate that power recycling is feasible by using a semitransparent strip of Al electrode as an interconnecting layer to merge a white organic light-emitting device (WOLED) and an organic photovoltaic (OPV) cell. The device is called a photovoltaic organic light-emitting device (PVOLED). It has a glass/indium tin oxide (ITO)/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/4,4,4-tris(3-methyl-phenylphenylamino) triphenylamine (m-MTDATA):V2O5/2-N',N-bis(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (NPB)/4,4'-bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP):bis[3,5-difluoro-2-(2-pyridyl) phenyl-(2-carboxypyridyl)] iridium(II) (FIrpic):4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-t-butyl-6 (1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran (DCJTB)/4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen)/LiF/Al/poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):[6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM)/V2O5/Al structure. A power recycling efficiency of 10.133% is achieved using the WOLED of the PVOLED operated at 9 V and a brightness of 2110 cd/m2 when the conversion efficiency of the OPV cell is 2.3%. We found that the power recycling efficiency decreases at a high brightness and a high applied voltage owing to an increase in the input power of the WOLED. A high efficiency (18.3 cd/A) and a high contrast ratio (9.3) are obtained in the device operated at 2500 cd/m2 under an ambient illumination of 24000 lx. Reasonable white light emission with Commission Internationale De L'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates of (0.32, 0.44) at 20 mA/cm2 and a slight color shift occur in spite of the high current density of 50 mA/cm2.

  17. Study of radiatively sustained cesium plasmas for solar energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, A. J.; Dunning, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a study aimed at developing a high temperature solar electric converter are reported. The converter concept is based on the use of an alkali plasma to serve as both an efficient high temperature collector of solar radiation as well as the working fluid for a high temperature working cycle. The working cycle is a simple magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Rankine cycle employing a solid electrode Faraday MHD channel. Research milestones include the construction of a theoretical model for coupling sunlight in a cesium plasma and the experimental demonstration of cesium plasma heating with a solar simulator in excellent agreement with the theory. Analysis of a solar MHD working cycle in which excimer laser power rather than electric power is extracted is also presented. The analysis predicts a positive gain coefficient on the cesium-xenon excimer laser transition.

  18. High performance polyester concrete using recycled PET

    SciTech Connect

    Rebeiz, K.S.

    1995-10-01

    Recycled polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic wastes could be used in production of unsaturated polyester resins. In turn, these resins could be mixed with inorganic aggregates to produce polymer concrete (PC). Unsaturated polyesters based on recycled PET might be a potentially lower source cost of resins for producing useful PC based-products. The advantage of recycling PET in PC is that the PET materials do not have to be purified, including removal of colors, to the same extent as other PET recycling applications, which should facilitate the recycling operation and minimize its cost. The recycling of PET in PC could also help save energy and allow the long term disposal of the PET waste, an important advantage in recycling applications.

  19. Magnetic field reconnection. [energy conversion in space plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnerup, U. O.

    1979-01-01

    A reasonably detailed description is obtained of the current status of our understanding of magnetic field reconnection. The picture that emerges is of a process, simple in concept but extremely complicated and multifaceted in detail. Nonlinear MHD processes in the external flow region, governed by distant boundary conditions, are coupled to nonlinear microscopic plasma processes in the diffusion region, in a manner not clearly understood. It appears that reconnection may operate in entirely different ways for different plasma parameters and different external boundary conditions. Steady reconnection may be allowed in some cases, forbidden in others, with intermediate situations involving impulsive or pulsative events.

  20. Energy shifts of K- and L-lines as spectroscopic diagnostic of Z-pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Słabkowska, K.; Szymańska, E.; Polasik, M.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Syrocki, Ł.; Pereira, N. R.

    2014-12-15

    Ultrafast molybdenum wire implosions on the Z machine at Sandia produce intense pulses of multi-keV x-rays from partially ionized plasmas. The most intense radiation comes from a hot, dense core of thermal plasma in ionization equilibrium with Mo ionized to within the L-shell. Non-thermal, energetic electrons in the plasma generate Kα and Kβ radiation, whose energy is affected by Mo’s ionization state, and therefore on the plasma temperature. Based on an extensive series of recent computations on this effect, we recalculate the pinch’ Mo x-ray spectrum, with reasonable results.

  1. Binding energy levels of a slowly moving ion in dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hongwei; Li, Fuli

    2013-02-01

    The near field electric potential of a slowly moving ion in complex plasmas is studied. We find that the potential consists of the Debye-Hückel potential, the wake potential, and the potential associated with charge fluctuations. The binding energy levels of the ion are calculated by use of the Ritz variation method. The results show that the binding energy levels are related to the magnetic quantum number m. The binding energy levels are affected by speed of the ion and dust grain number density. In contract to isolated ion or static ion in plasmas, the binding energy levels of the ion are pushed up and even become unbounded.

  2. The effect of the inclusion of recycled poultry bedding and the physical form of diet on the performance, ruminal fermentation, and plasma metabolites of fattening lambs.

    PubMed

    Mirmohammadi, D; Rouzbehan, Y; Fazaeli, H

    2015-08-01

    During a 125-d experimental period, 24 Afshari × Kurdish male lambs initially weighing 25.2 ± 1.2 kg were grouped by BW and randomly assigned to treatments under a completely randomized design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments to evaluate the effects of feeding recycled poultry bedding (RPB; 0 and 200 g/kg DM) and the physical form of the diet (mash and block) on nutrient intake and digestibility, ruminal and plasma parameters, microbial N supply, N balance, feeding behavior, and growth performance of the lambs. Two diets with and without RPB in both mash and block form were prepared. Neither the inclusion of RPB nor the physical form of the diet affected the concentration of VFA or the total tract apparent digestibility of nutrients. Dietary RPB inclusion increased DMI ( < 0.01), tended ( = 0.10) to reduce ADG, and decreased G:F ( = 0.05). The physical form of the diet had no effect on DMI but decreased ADG ( = 0.01) and G:F ( = 0.02) in lambs fed on the block diet compared with those fed on the mash diet. Neither the inclusion of RPB nor the physical form of the diets had any effect on microbial N supply (g/d) and N retention. Rate of eating ( = 0.07), time spent eating ( = 0.87) and ruminating ( = 0.28), and total chewing activity ( = 0.65) were not affected by dietary RPB inclusion. Rate of eating decreased ( < 0.01) and time spent eating and total chewing activity increased ( = 0.01 and = 0.02, respectively) in lambs fed on the block diet compared with those fed on the mash diet. Results of the current study showed that inclusion of RPB up to 200 g/kg DM in diets for fattening was possible without any effect on performance and animal health. Processing of feed into the mash form gave higher livestock productivity in comparison to the block form.

  3. Adsorption removal of pollutants by active cokes produced from sludge in the energy recycle process of wastes.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Naozumi; Mitomo, Aki; Itaya, Yoshinori; Mori, Shigekatsu; Yoshida, Shuichi

    2002-01-01

    This study proposes a recycling system of sludge into active cokes and the fundamental examinations for the application were carried out. In the system, active cokes were produced by carbonizing pellets of sludge in a steam stream. Pyrolysis gas yielded by carbonization can be available to a fuel for a steam generation boiler. The exhaust heat from the boiler is used sequentially for drying of sludge. The active cokes are applied to the adsorbent for dioxin removal in exhaust gas from incinerators of wastes, or for purification of gas obtained in a gasification process of wastes, particularly removal of H2S. The used adsorbent is not recycled, but incinerated in the furnace without a desorption process to decompose adsorbed dioxin or to oxidize H2S for a sequential desulfurization process of SO2. Dry pellets of sludge were carbonized in a quartz tube reactor under various atmospheres. The micro pore structure and the adsorption performance of the cokes produced without activation process were examined. The micro pore structure was influenced by the temperature, the sort of flow gas (N2, CO2 and steam) and carbonization time, and the active cokes produced under the condition of the temperature 823 K for 60 min in the steam atmosphere had a largest specific surface area in the diameter less than 5 nm. The amount of benzene adsorption as an alternative substance of dioxin into the active cokes had a similar quality to a commercial active char produced from coal if it was evaluated by adsorption per a unit specific surface area. This fundamental knowledge must be reflected to an optimum design for development of a simple continuous process to produce the active cokes by a fluidized bed type of the carbonization furnace.

  4. Highly flexible binder-free core-shell nanofibrous electrode for lightweight electrochemical energy storage using recycled water bottles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, HaoTian H.; Naguib, Hani E.

    2016-08-01

    The creation of a novel flexible nanocomposite fiber with conductive polymer polyaniline (PAni) coating on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate allowed for increased electrochemical performance while retaining ideal mechanical properties such as very high flexibility. Binder-free PAni-wrapped PET (PAni@PET) fiber with a core-shell structure was successfully fabricated through a novel technique. The PET nanofiber substrate was fabricated through an optimized electrospinning method, while the PAni shell was chemically polymerized onto the surface of the nanofibers. The PET substrate can be made directly from recycled PETE1 grade plastic water bottles. The resulting nanofiber with an average diameter of 121 nm ± 39 nm, with a specific surface area of 83.72 m2 g-1, led to better ionic interactions at the electrode/electrolyte interface. The PAni active layer coating was found to be 69 nm in average thickness. The specific capacitance was found to have increased dramatically from pure PAni with carbon binders. The specific capacitance was found to be 347 F g-1 at a relatively high scan rate of 10 mV s-1. The PAni/PET fiber also experienced very little degradation (4.4%) in capacitance after 1500 galvanostatic charge/discharge cycles at a specific current of 1.2 A g-1. The mesoporous structure of the PAni@PET fibrous mat also allowed for tunable capacitance by controlling the pore sizes. This novel fabrication method offers insights for the utilization of recycled PETE1 based bottles as a high performance, low cost, highly flexible supercapacitor device.

  5. Highly flexible binder-free core-shell nanofibrous electrode for lightweight electrochemical energy storage using recycled water bottles.

    PubMed

    Shi, HaoTian H; Naguib, Hani E

    2016-08-12

    The creation of a novel flexible nanocomposite fiber with conductive polymer polyaniline (PAni) coating on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate allowed for increased electrochemical performance while retaining ideal mechanical properties such as very high flexibility. Binder-free PAni-wrapped PET (PAni@PET) fiber with a core-shell structure was successfully fabricated through a novel technique. The PET nanofiber substrate was fabricated through an optimized electrospinning method, while the PAni shell was chemically polymerized onto the surface of the nanofibers. The PET substrate can be made directly from recycled PETE1 grade plastic water bottles. The resulting nanofiber with an average diameter of 121 nm ± 39 nm, with a specific surface area of 83.72 m(2) g(-1), led to better ionic interactions at the electrode/electrolyte interface. The PAni active layer coating was found to be 69 nm in average thickness. The specific capacitance was found to have increased dramatically from pure PAni with carbon binders. The specific capacitance was found to be 347 F g(-1) at a relatively high scan rate of 10 mV s(-1). The PAni/PET fiber also experienced very little degradation (4.4%) in capacitance after 1500 galvanostatic charge/discharge cycles at a specific current of 1.2 A g(-1). The mesoporous structure of the PAni@PET fibrous mat also allowed for tunable capacitance by controlling the pore sizes. This novel fabrication method offers insights for the utilization of recycled PETE1 based bottles as a high performance, low cost, highly flexible supercapacitor device.

  6. Formation of electron energy spectra during magnetic reconnection in laser-produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai; Lu, Quanming; Huang, Can; Dong, Quanli; Wang, Huanyu; Fan, Feibin; Sheng, Zhengming; Wang, Shui; Zhang, Jie

    2017-10-01

    Energetic electron spectra formed during magnetic reconnection between two laser-produced plasma bubbles are investigated by the use of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that the evolution of such an interaction between the two plasma bubbles can be separated into two distinct stages: squeezing and reconnection stages. In the squeezing stage, when the two plasma bubbles expand quickly and collide with each other, the magnetic field in the inflow region is greatly enhanced. In the second stage, a thin current sheet is formed between the two plasma bubbles, and then, magnetic reconnection occurs therein. During the squeezing stage, electrons are heated in the perpendicular direction by betatron acceleration due to the enhancement of the magnetic field around the plasma bubbles. Meanwhile, non-thermal electrons are generated by the Fermi mechanism when these electrons bounce between the two plasma bubbles approaching quickly and get accelerated mainly by the convective electric field associated with the plasma bubbles. During the reconnection stage, electrons get further accelerated mainly by the reconnection electric field in the vicinity of the X line. When the expanding speed of the plasma bubbles is sufficiently large, the formed electron energy spectra have a kappa distribution, where the lower energy part satisfies a Maxwellian function and the higher energy part is a power-law distribution. Moreover, the increase in the expanding speed will result in the hardening of formed power-law spectra in both the squeezing and reconnection stages.

  7. The role of thermal energy accommodation and atomic recombination probabilities in low pressure oxygen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Andrew Robert; Foucher, Mickaël; Marinov, Daniil; Chabert, Pascal; Gans, Timo; Kushner, Mark J.; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2017-02-01

    Surface interaction probabilities are critical parameters that determine the behaviour of low pressure plasmas and so are crucial input parameters for plasma simulations that play a key role in determining their accuracy. However, these parameters are difficult to estimate without in situ measurements. In this work, the role of two prominent surface interaction probabilities, the atomic oxygen recombination coefficient γ O and the thermal energy accommodation coefficient α E in determining the plasma properties of low pressure inductively coupled oxygen plasmas are investigated using two-dimensional fluid-kinetic simulations. These plasmas are the type used for semiconductor processing. It was found that α E plays a crucial role in determining the neutral gas temperature and neutral gas density. Through this dependency, the value of α E also determines a range of other plasma properties such as the atomic oxygen density, the plasma potential, the electron temperature, and ion bombardment energy and neutral-to-ion flux ratio at the wafer holder. The main role of γ O is in determining the atomic oxygen density and flux to the wafer holder along with the neutral-to-ion flux ratio. It was found that the plasma properties are most sensitive to each coefficient when the value of the coefficient is small causing the losses of atomic oxygen and thermal energy to be surface interaction limited rather than transport limited.

  8. Energy deposition of heavy ions in the regime of strong beam-plasma correlations.

    PubMed

    Gericke, D O; Schlanges, M

    2003-03-01

    The energy loss of highly charged ions in dense plasmas is investigated. The applied model includes strong beam-plasma correlation via a quantum T-matrix treatment of the cross sections. Dynamic screening effects are modeled by using a Debye-like potential with a velocity dependent screening length that guarantees the known low and high beam velocity limits. It is shown that this phenomenological model is in good agreement with simulation data up to very high beam-plasma coupling. An analysis of the stopping process shows considerably longer ranges and a less localized energy deposition if strong coupling is treated properly.

  9. High-resolution submicron retarding field energy analyzer for low-temperature plasma analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, M. G.; Stevens, J. E.; Woodworth, J. R.

    1999-12-20

    A retarding potential energy analyzer having 750 nm diameter, self-aligned grid apertures and micron scale grid separation has been fabricated using polycrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide. High-resolution in situ measurements of ion velocity distributions have been demonstrated in inductively coupled argon plasmas. Measurement results agree well with those from a macroscopic analyzer. Important differences are observed in the energies of plasma ions when measured with respect to chamber wall versus those measured with respect to the plasma floating potential. Preliminary measurements under rf bias conditions have also been made and results follow the expected trends. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Atomic physics calculations in support of studies for high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, P.; MacFarlane, J.J.; Moses, G.A.; Mehlhorn, T.A.

    1995-12-31

    The studies of high energy density plasmas require basic atomic data, equations of state, opacities, and stopping power. Unfortunately, the related experimental data are very limited. To obtain these data for a wide domain of plasma conditions, one must rely on theoretical calculations. The authors have developed an atomic physics calculation package which can provide high quality atomic data for numerical simulations of high energy density plasmas. In this paper, they give detailed descriptions of physics models used in the package. Particular emphasis will be on a hybrid model for equations of state, a self-consistent field model for ion stopping power, and opacity calculations.

  11. Survey of low energy plasma electrons in Saturn's magnetosphere: Voyagers 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Scudder, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The low energy plasma electron environment within Saturn's magnetosphere was surveyed by the Plasma Science Experiment (PLS) during the Voyager encounters with Saturn. Over the full energy range of the PLS instrument (10 eV to 6 keV) the electron distribution functions are clearly non-Maxwellian in character; they are composed of a cold (thermal) component with Maxwellian shape and a hot (suprathermal) non-Maxwellian component. A large scale positive radial gradient in electron temperature is observed, increasing from less than 1 eV in the inner magnetosphere to as high as 800 eV in the outer magnetosphere. Three fundamentally different plasma regimes were identified from the measurements: (1) the hot outer magnetosphere, (2) the extended plasma sheet, and (3) the inner plasma torus.

  12. Incorporation of an energy equation into a pulsed inductive plasma acceleration model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reneau, Jarred

    Electric propulsion systems utilize electrical energy to produce thrust for spacecraft propulsion. These systems have multiple applications ranging from Earth orbit North-South station keeping to solar system exploratory missions such as NASA's Discovery, New Frontiers, and Flagship class missions that focus on exploring scientifically interesting targets. In an electromagnetic thruster, a magnetic field interacting with current in an ionized gas (plasma) accelerates the propellant to produce thrust. Pulsed inductive thrusters rely on an electrodeless discharge where both the magnetic field in the plasma and the plasma current are induced by a time-varying current in an external circuit. The multi-dimensional acceleration model for a pulsed inductive plasma thruster consists of a set of circuit equations describing the electrical behavior of the thruster coupled to a one-dimensional momentum equation that allow for estimating thruster performance. Current models lack a method to account for the time-varying energy distribution in an inductive plasma accelerator.

  13. Survey of low-energy plasma electrons in Saturn's magnetosphere - Voyagers 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Scudder, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The low energy plasma electron environment within Saturn's magnetosphere was surveyed by the Plasma Science Experiment (PLS) during the Voyager encounters with Saturn. Over the full energy range of the PLS instrument (10 eV to 6 keV) the electron distribution functions are clearly non-Maxwellian in character; they are composed of a cold (thermal) component with Maxwellian shape and a hot (suprathermal) non-Maxwellian component. A large scale positive radial gradient in electron temperature is observed, increasing from less than 1 eV in the inner magnetosphere to as high as 800 eV in the outer magnetosphere. Three fundamentally different plasma regimes were identified from the measurements: (1) the hot outer magnetosphere, (2) the extended plasma sheet, and (3) the inner plasma torus. Previously announced in STAR as N83-34872

  14. Electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma characterization by energy dispersive x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rácz, R.; Mascali, D.; Biri, S.; Caliri, C.; Castro, G.; Galatà, A.; Gammino, S.; Neri, L.; Pálinkás, J.; Romano, F. P.; Torrisi, G.

    2017-07-01

    Pinhole and CCD based quasi-optical x-ray imaging technique was applied to investigate the plasma of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). Spectrally integrated and energy resolved images were taken from an axial perspective. The comparison of integrated images taken of argon plasma highlights the structural changes affected by some ECRIS setting parameters, like strength of the axial magnetic confinement, RF frequency and microwave power. Photon counting analysis gives precise intensity distribution of the x-ray emitted by the argon plasma and by the plasma chamber walls. This advanced technique points out that the spatial positions of the electron losses are strongly determined by the kinetic energy of the electrons themselves to be lost and also shows evidences how strongly the plasma distribution is affected by slight changes in the RF frequency.

  15. Electron-ion energy partition when a charged particle slows in a plasma: results.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lowell S; Preston, Dean L; Singleton, Robert L

    2012-07-01

    This paper concerns plasmas in which the electrons and ions may have different temperatures. This is a case that must be examined because nuclear fusion processes, such as those that appear in ICF capsules, have ions whose temperature runs away from the electron temperature. A fast charged particle traversing a plasma--such as the α particle created in deuterium-tritium fusion--loses its energy to both the electrons and the ions in the plasma. In this paper, we present and discuss the results for the energy partition, the fractions E(e)/E(0) and E(I)/E(0) of the initial energy E(0) of this projectile particle that are deposited into the electrons and ions when it has slowed to its minimum energy distribution. The calculations, performed in the following paper [Brown, Preston, and Singleton Jr., Phys. Rev. E 86, 016407 (2012)], use a well-defined Fokker-Planck equation for the phase-space distribution of the charged projectiles in a weakly to moderately coupled plasma. The Fokker-Planck equation holds to first subleading order in the dimensionless plasma coupling constant, which translates to computing to order n ln n (leading) and n (subleading) in the plasma density n. We present an examination of the energy partition for the general case, in which the temperatures of the ions and electrons in the background plasma are not equal. The energy partitions for a background plasma in thermal equilibrium have been previously computed, but the order n terms have not been calculated, only estimated. Our Fokker-Planck formulation provides an unambiguous, precise definition of the energy fractions.

  16. High-energy ion generation in interaction. of short laser pulse with high-density plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentoku, Y.; Bychenkov, V. Y.; Flippo, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Mima, K.; Mourou, G.; Sheng, Z. M.; Umstadter, D.

    2002-03-01

    Multi-MeV ion production from the interaction of a short laser pulse with a high-density plasma, accompanied by an underdense preplasma, has been studied with a particle-in-cell simulation and good agreement is found with experiment. The mechanism primarily responsible for the acceleration of ions is identified. Comparison with experiments sheds light on the ion-energy dependence on laser intensity, preplasma scale length, and relative ion energies for a multi-species plasma. Two regimes of maximum ion-energy dependence on laser intensity, I, have been identified: subrelativistic, ∝I; and relativistic, ∝. Simulations show that the energy of the accelerated ions versus the preplasma scale length increases linearly and then saturates. In contrast, the ion energy decreases with the thickness of the solid-density plasma.

  17. Relationship between directions of wave and energy propagation for cold plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Zdzislaw E.

    1986-01-01

    The dispersion relation for plasma waves is considered in the 'cold' plasma approximation. General formulas for the dependence of the phase and group velocities on the direction of wave propagation with respect to the local magnetic field are obtained for a cold magnetized plasma. The principal cold plasma resonances and cut-off frequencies are defined for an arbitrary angle and are used to establish basic regimes of frequency where the cold plasma waves can propagate or can be evanescent. The relationship between direction of wave and energy propagation, for cold plasma waves in hydrogen atmosphere, is presented in the form of angle diagrams (angle between group velocity and magnetic field versus angle between phase velocity and magnetic field) and polar diagrams (also referred to as 'Friedrich's diagrams') for different directions of wave propagation. Morphological features of the diagrams as well as some critical angles of propagation are discussed.

  18. Increase in the energy absorption of pulsed plasma by the formation of tungsten nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, D.; Ohno, N.; Domon, F.; Kajita, S.; Kikuchi, Y.; Sakuma, I.

    2017-06-01

    The synergistic effects of steady-state and pulsed plasma irradiation to material have been investigated in the device NAGDIS-PG (NAGoya DIvertor Simulator with Plasma Gun). The duration of the pulsed plasma was ~0.25 ms. To investigate the pulsed plasma heat load on the materials, we developed a temperature measurement system using radiation from the sample in a high time resolution. The heat deposited in response to the transient plasma on a tungsten surface was revealed by using this system. When the nanostructures were formed by helium plasma irradiation, the temperature increase on the bulk sample was enhanced. The result suggested that the amount of absorbed energy on the surface was increased by the formation of nanostructures. The possible mechanisms causing the phenomena are discussed with the calculation of a sample temperature in response to the transient heat load.

  19. Relationship between directions of wave and energy propagation for cold plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Zdzislaw E.

    1986-01-01

    The dispersion relation for plasma waves is considered in the 'cold' plasma approximation. General formulas for the dependence of the phase and group velocities on the direction of wave propagation with respect to the local magnetic field are obtained for a cold magnetized plasma. The principal cold plasma resonances and cut-off frequencies are defined for an arbitrary angle and are used to establish basic regimes of frequency where the cold plasma waves can propagate or can be evanescent. The relationship between direction of wave and energy propagation, for cold plasma waves in hydrogen atmosphere, is presented in the form of angle diagrams (angle between group velocity and magnetic field versus angle between phase velocity and magnetic field) and polar diagrams (also referred to as 'Friedrich's diagrams') for different directions of wave propagation. Morphological features of the diagrams as well as some critical angles of propagation are discussed.

  20. Nanoscale control of energy and matter in plasma-surface interactions: Toward energy- and matter-efficient nanotech

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrikov, K.

    2011-05-15

    The approach to control the elementary processes of plasma-surface interactions to direct the fluxes of energy and matter at nano- and subnanometer scales is introduced. This ability is related to the solution of the grand challenge of directing energy and matter at nanoscales and is critical for the renewable energy and energy-efficient technologies for a sustainable future development. The examples of deterministic synthesis of self-organized arrays of metastable nanostructures in the size range beyond the reach of the present-day nanofabrication are considered to illustrate this possibility. By using precisely controlled and kinetically fast nanoscale transfer of energy and matter under nonequilibrium conditions and harnessing numerous plasma-specific controls of species creation, delivery to the surface, nucleation, and large-scale self-organization of nuclei and nanostructures, the arrays of metastable nanostructures can be created, arranged, stabilized, and further processed to meet the specific requirements of the envisaged applications.

  1. Exploring turbulent energy dissipation and particle energization in space plasmas: the science of THOR mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retinò, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The Universe is permeated by hot, turbulent magnetized plasmas. They are found in active galactic nuclei, supernova remnants, the intergalactic and interstellar medium, as well as in the solar corona, the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere. Turbulent plasmas are also found in laboratory devices such as e.g. tokamaks. Our comprehension of the plasma Universe is largely based on measurements of electromagnetic radiation such as light or X-rays which originate from particles that are heated and accelerated as a result of energy dissipation in turbulent environments. Therefore it is of key importance to study and understand how plasma is energized by turbulence. Most of the energy dissipation occurs at kinetic scales, where plasma no longer behaves as a fluid and the properties of individual plasma species (electrons, protons and other ions) become important. THOR (Turbulent Heating ObserveR - http://thor.irfu.se/) is a space mission currently in Study Phase as candidate for M-class mission within the Cosmic Vision program of the European Space Agency. The scientific theme of the THOR mission is turbulent energy dissipation and particle energization in space plasmas, which ties in with ESA's Cosmic Vision science. The main focus is on turbulence and shock processes, however areas where the different fundamental processes interact, such as reconnection in turbulence or shock generated turbulence, are also of high importance. The THOR mission aims to address fundamental questions such as how plasma is heated and particles are accelerated by turbulent fluctuations at kinetic scales, how energy is partitioned among different plasma components and how dissipation operates in different regimes of turbulence. To reach the goal, a careful design of the THOR spacecraft and its payload is ongoing, together with a strong interaction with numerical simulations. Here we present the science of THOR mission and we discuss implications of THOR observations for space

  2. Broad ion energy distributions in helicon wave-coupled helium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woller, K. B.; Whyte, D. G.; Wright, G. M.

    2017-05-01

    Helium ion energy distributions were measured in helicon wave-coupled plasmas of the dynamics of ion implantation and sputtering of surface experiment using a retarding field energy analyzer. The shape of the energy distribution is a double-peak, characteristic of radiofrequency plasma potential modulation. The broad distribution is located within a radius of 0.8 cm, while the quartz tube of the plasma source has an inner radius of 2.2 cm. The ion energy distribution rapidly changes from a double-peak to a single peak in the radius range of 0.7-0.9 cm. The average ion energy is approximately uniform across the plasma column including the double-peak and single peak regions. The widths of the broad distribution, ΔE , in the wave-coupled mode are large compared to the time-averaged ion energy, ⟨E ⟩. On the axis (r = 0), ΔE / ⟨E ⟩ ≲ 3.4, and at a radius near the edge of the plasma column (r = 2.2 cm), ΔE / ⟨E ⟩ ˜ 1.2. The discharge parameter space is scanned to investigate the effects of the magnetic field, input power, and chamber fill pressure on the wave-coupled mode that exhibits the sharp radial variation in the ion energy distribution.

  3. New approaches to recycling tires

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, R.

    1991-03-01

    Steel-belted radial tires are potentially one of the most recyclable products created by modern industry, although the potential has been barely tapped. Discarded tires pile up at an astonishing rate each year - 234 million in the US and 26 million passenger tire equivalents in Canada. They represent a mother lode of raw material waiting for modern day miners to transform them into recycled rubber, steel, fiber and energy. The tremendous increase in use of steel belted radials since the early 1970s has complicated their recyclability compared to the bias ply tire, but it has also accomplished waste reduction by tripling tire service life. Part one of this report describes processes being developed to convert tires to crumb rubber, as well as some potential uses of recycled rubber. Part two, to appear next month, will examine such uses as rubberized athletic tracks and highway asphalt.

  4. Carbon reduction potential from recycling in primary materials manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, R.N.

    1993-12-31

    This study assesses the potential for energy savings and carbon emissions reduction by increasing the recycled content of energy-intensive materials. Aluminum, steel, paper, plastics, and container glass are considered. Government policies to encourage higher recycling rates and increased recycled materials content are proposed.

  5. COPPER CABLE RECYCLING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Chelsea Hubbard

    2001-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective technologies for use in deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsors large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs). At these LSDDPs, developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to the DOE's projects and to others in the D&D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, and decreased costs of operation. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) generated a list of statements defining specific needs and problems where improved technology could be incorporated into ongoing D&D tasks. One such need is to reduce the volume of waste copper wire and cable generated by D&D. Deactivation and decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities generates hundreds of tons of contaminated copper cable, which are sent to radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology separates the clean copper from contaminated insulation and dust materials in these cables. The recovered copper can then be reclaimed and, more importantly, landfill disposal volumes can be reduced. The existing baseline technology for disposing radioactively contaminated cables is to package the cables in wooden storage boxes and dispose of the cables in radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology is applicable to facility decommissioning projects at many Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and commercial nuclear power plants undergoing decommissioning activities. The INEEL Copper Cable Recycling Technology Demonstration investigated the effectiveness and efficiency to recycle 13.5 tons of copper cable. To determine the effectiveness of separating

  6. Recent Ion Energy Distribution Observations on MST RFP Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jerry; Titus, J. B.; Mezonlin, E. D.; Johnson, J. A., III; Almagri, A. F.; Andeson, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    Ion energy distribution and temperature measurements have been made on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) using the Florida A&M University compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA). The CNPA is a low energy (0.34-5.2 keV), high energy resolution (25 channels) neutral particle analyzer, with a radial view on MST. Recently, a retarding potential system was built to allow CNPA measurements to ensemble a complete ion energy distribution with high-energy resolution, providing insight into the dynamics of the bulk and fast ion populations. Recent work has also been done to improve the analysis techniques used to infer the ion temperature measurements, allowing us to understand temperature dynamics better during global magnetic reconnection events. Work supported in part by grants to FAMU and to UW from NSF and from Fusion Energy Sciences at DOE.

  7. Mid-infrared lasers for energy frontier plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Kimura, W. D.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma wake field accelerators driven with solid-state near-IR lasers have been considered as an alternative to conventional rf accelerators for next-generation TeV-class lepton colliders. Here, we extend this study to the mid-IR spectral domain covered by CO2 lasers. We conclude that the increase in the laser driver wavelength favors the regime of laser wake field acceleration with a low plasma density and high electric charge. This regime is the most beneficial for gamma colliders to be converted from lepton colliders via inverse Compton scattering. Selecting a laser wavelength to drive a Compton gamma source is essential for the design of such a machine. The revealed benefits from spectral diversification of laser drivers for future colliders and off-spring applications validate ongoing efforts in advancing the ultrafast CO2 laser technology.

  8. Mid-infrared lasers for energy frontier plasma accelerators

    DOE PAGES

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Kimura, W. D.

    2016-09-12

    Plasma wake field accelerators driven with solid-state near-IR lasers have been considered as an alternative to conventional rf accelerators for next-generation TeV-class lepton colliders. Here, we extend this study to the mid-IR spectral domain covered by CO2 lasers. We conclude that the increase in the laser driver wavelength favors the regime of laser wake field acceleration with a low plasma density and high electric charge. This regime is the most beneficial for gamma colliders to be converted from lepton colliders via inverse Compton scattering. Selecting a laser wavelength to drive a Compton gamma source is essential for the design ofmore » such a machine. In conclusion, the revealed benefits from spectral diversification of laser drivers for future colliders and off-spring applications validate ongoing efforts in advancing the ultrafast CO2 laser technology.« less

  9. Optimization of Light Measurements for a Low Energy Plasma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    investigate the behavior of the phenomenon of surface flashover and develop techniques to control its behavior. As part of this research, studies...discussed in the hopes of obtaining an understanding of all aspects of the plasma resulting from surface flashover technologies. II...initiation. Infrared photodiodes offer sufficiently fast response times (1 ns) to measure the pulse waveforms of this class of surface flashover

  10. High-energy tail formation in an ion energy distribution function in the cylindrical Hall thruster plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Youbong; Kim, Holak; Park, Jaesun; Seon, Jongho; Choe, Wonho

    2014-10-01

    Ion energy distribution functions (IEDFs) of individual ion species having different charge states (i.e. Xe+, Xe2+, Xe3+, etc.) in the Hall thruster plasma are obtained from the measured E × B probe spectrum by a novel inversion technique using the iterative Tikhonov regularization method. The obtained IEDFs show the existence of a high-energy tail in the cylindrical Hall thruster plasmas that is mainly due to Xe+ ions despite the presence of Xe2+ and Xe3+ ions with a large fraction. Ion dynamics inside the plasma was numerically investigated to demonstrate that the high-energy tail is due to nonlinear ion acceleration in the plasma oscillating at typically 100 to 500 kHz. We found that this oscillation driven by transit-time instability is responsible for the shift of the IEDF of the Xe+ ions toward the high-energy side, showing the formation of high-energy tail in the overall IEDF. It was also found that the Xe flow rate raised from 4 to 10 sccm increases the oscillation strength at the same frequency of 360 kHz, which can be applied to control of the shape of the IEDF.

  11. Estimation of the energy transferred from the capacitor bank to the plasma in plasma focus systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, Miguel; Soto, Leopoldo

    2009-01-21

    We consider the snowplow model to describe the axial phase of a plasma focus device. We show that, within this framework, the dynamics of a given system can be recovered at different energetic and geometric scales. Then, we consider two different criteria that would plausibly optimize the plasma focus performance. By solving the dynamics equations for the axial phase, we estimate the values of the parameters that do indeed satisfy the aforementioned criteria and compare those values with the corresponding ones attached to few practical devices.

  12. On the evolution of jet energy and opening angle in strongly coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chesler, Paul M.; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2016-05-17

    We calculate how the energy and the opening angle of jets in N = 4SYM theory evolve as they propagate through the strongly coupled plasma of that theory. We define the rate of energy loss dEjet/dx and the jet opening angle in a straightforward fashion directly in the gauge theory before calculating both holographically, in the dual gravitational description. In this way, we rederive the previously known result for dEjet/dx without the need to introduce a finite slab of plasma. We obtain a striking relationship between the initial opening angle of the jet, which is to say the opening angle that it would have had if it had found itself in vacuum instead of in plasma, and the thermalization distance of the jet. Via this relationship, we show that N = 4SYM jets with any initial energy that have the same initial opening angle and the same trajectory through the plasma experience the same fractional energy loss. We also provide an expansion that describes how the opening angle of the N = 4SYM jets increases slowly as they lose energy, over the fraction of their lifetime when their fractional energy loss is not yet large. In conclusion, we close by looking ahead toward potential qualitative lessons from our results for QCD jets produced in heavy collisions and propagating through quark-gluon plasma.

  13. On the evolution of jet energy and opening angle in strongly coupled plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Chesler, Paul M.; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2016-05-17

    We calculate how the energy and the opening angle of jets in N = 4SYM theory evolve as they propagate through the strongly coupled plasma of that theory. We define the rate of energy loss dEjet/dx and the jet opening angle in a straightforward fashion directly in the gauge theory before calculating both holographically, in the dual gravitational description. In this way, we rederive the previously known result for dEjet/dx without the need to introduce a finite slab of plasma. We obtain a striking relationship between the initial opening angle of the jet, which is to say the opening anglemore » that it would have had if it had found itself in vacuum instead of in plasma, and the thermalization distance of the jet. Via this relationship, we show that N = 4SYM jets with any initial energy that have the same initial opening angle and the same trajectory through the plasma experience the same fractional energy loss. We also provide an expansion that describes how the opening angle of the N = 4SYM jets increases slowly as they lose energy, over the fraction of their lifetime when their fractional energy loss is not yet large. In conclusion, we close by looking ahead toward potential qualitative lessons from our results for QCD jets produced in heavy collisions and propagating through quark-gluon plasma.« less

  14. On the evolution of jet energy and opening angle in strongly coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesler, Paul M.; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2016-05-01

    We calculate how the energy and the opening angle of jets in {N} = 4 SYM theory evolve as they propagate through the strongly coupled plasma of that theory. We define the rate of energy loss dE jet /dx and the jet opening angle in a straightforward fashion directly in the gauge theory before calculating both holographically, in the dual gravitational description. In this way, we rederive the previously known result for dE jet /dx without the need to introduce a finite slab of plasma. We obtain a striking relationship between the initial opening angle of the jet, which is to say the opening angle that it would have had if it had found itself in vacuum instead of in plasma, and the thermalization distance of the jet. Via this relationship, we show that {N} = 4 SYM jets with any initial energy that have the same initial opening angle and the same trajectory through the plasma experience the same fractional energy loss. We also provide an expansion that describes how the opening angle of the {N} = 4 SYM jets increases slowly as they lose energy, over the fraction of their lifetime when their fractional energy loss is not yet large. We close by looking ahead toward potential qualitative lessons from our results for QCD jets produced in heavy collisions and propagating through quark-gluon plasma.

  15. Ion energy and plasma measurements in the near field of an ICRF antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, J. B. O., II; Ruzic, D. N.; Hoffman, D. J.

    Plasma properties and ion energies have been measured in the near field of an ICRF antenna to determine the effects of RF fields in a magnetized plasma sheath on the energy of ions incident on the surface of the Faraday shield. A resonant loop antenna with a two- tier Faraday shield was used on the RF Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The magnetic field near the antenna is approximately 2 kG, and the plasma density is approximately 10(11)/cu cm with an electron temperature of 6 to 10 eV. The time-varying floating potential was measured with a capacitively coupled probe, and the time-averaged electron temperature, electron density, and floating potential were measured with a Langmuir probe. Both probes were scanned poloidally in front of the antenna, parallel to the current strap. Diagnostics for measuring ion energies included a gridded energy analyzer located directly below the antenna. Measured ion energies are compared with predictions from a computational model for determining the energy and angular distribution of ions incident on a surface in a magnetized plasma sheath with a time-varying plasma potential.

  16. Experimental investigation of opacity models for stellar interior, inertial fusion, and high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Mancini, R. C.; Iglesias, C. A.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I. E.; Blancard, C.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.

    2009-05-15

    Theoretical opacities are required for calculating energy transport in plasmas. In particular, understanding stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and Z pinches depends on the opacities of mid-atomic-number elements over a wide range of temperatures. The 150-300 eV temperature range is particularly interesting. The opacity models are complex and experimental validation is crucial. For example, solar models presently disagree with helioseismology and one possible explanation is inadequate theoretical opacities. Testing these opacities requires well-characterized plasmas at temperatures high enough to produce the ion charge states that exist in the sun. Typical opacity experiments heat a sample using x rays and measure the spectrally resolved transmission with a backlight. The difficulty grows as the temperature increases because the heating x-ray source must supply more energy and the backlight must be bright enough to overwhelm the plasma self-emission. These problems can be overcome with the new generation of high energy density (HED) facilities. For example, recent experiments at Sandia's Z facility [M. K. Matzen et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 055503 (2005)] measured the transmission of a mixed Mg and Fe plasma heated to 156{+-}6 eV. This capability will also advance opacity science for other HED plasmas. This tutorial reviews experimental methods for testing opacity models, including experiment design, transmission measurement methods, accuracy evaluation, and plasma diagnostics. The solar interior serves as a focal problem and Z facility experiments illustrate the techniques.

  17. Plasma Physics/Fusion Energy Education at the Liberty Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, Andrew; Delooper, John; Carpe, Andy; Amara, Joe; Butnick, Nancy; Lynch, Ellen; Osowski, Jeff

    2007-11-01

    The Liberty Science Center (LSC) is the largest (300,000 sq. ft.) education resource in the New Jersey-New York City region. A major 109 million expansion and renewal was recently completed. Accordingly, PPPL has expanded the science education collaboration with the Center into three innovative, hands-on programs. On the main floor, a new fusion exhibit is one of the focuses of ``Energy Quest.'' This includes a DC glow discharge tube with a permanent external magnet allowing visitors to manipulate the plasma while reading information on plasma creation and fusion energy. In the section of LSC dedicated to intensive science investigations (20,000 sq. ft) we have added ``Live from NSTX'' which will give students an opportunity to connect via video-conferencing to the NSTX control room during plasma operations. A prototype program was completed in May, 2007 with three high school physics classes and will be expanded when NSTX resumes operation. Finally, a plasma physics laboratory in this area will have a fully functioning, research-grade plasma source that will allow long-term visitors an opportunity to perform experiments in plasma processing, plasma spectroscopy, and dusty plasmas.

  18. Energy Density in Aligned Nanowire Arrays Irradiated with Relativistic Intensities: Path to Terabar Pressure Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, J.; Bargsten, C.; Hollinger, R.; Shylaptsev, V.; Wang, S.; Rockwood, A.; Wang, Y.; Keiss, D.; Capeluto, M.; Kaymak, V.; Pukhov, A.; Tommasini, R.; London, R.; Park, J.

    2016-10-01

    Ultra-high-energy-density (UHED) plasmas, characterized by energy densities >1 x 108 J cm-3 and pressures greater than a gigabar are encountered in the center of stars and in inertial confinement fusion capsules driven by the world's largest lasers. Similar conditions can be obtained with compact, ultra-high contrast, femtosecond lasers focused to relativistic intensities onto aligned nanowire array targets. Here we report the measurement of the key physical process in determining the energy density deposited in high aspect ratio nanowire array plasmas: the energy penetration. By monitoring the x-ray emission from buried Co tracer segments in Ni nanowire arrays irradiated at an intensity of 4 x 1019 W cm-2, we demonstrate energy penetration depths of several μm, leading to UHED plasmas of that size. Relativistic 3D particle-in-cell-simulations validated by these measurements predict that irradiation of nanostructures at increased intensity will lead to a virtually unexplored extreme UHED plasma regime characterized by energy densities in excess of 8 x 1010 J cm-3, equivalent to a pressure of 0.35 Tbar. This work was supported by the Fusion Energy Program, Office of Science of the U.S Department of Energy, and by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

  19. Improvement of early cell adhesion on Thai silk fibroin surface by low energy plasma.

    PubMed

    Amornsudthiwat, Phakdee; Mongkolnavin, Rattachat; Kanokpanont, Sorada; Panpranot, Joongjai; Wong, Chiow San; Damrongsakkul, Siriporn

    2013-11-01

    Low energy plasma has been introduced to treat the surface of Thai silk fibroin which should be enhanced for cell adhesion due to its native hydrophobic surface. Plasma surface treatment could introduce desirable hydrophilic functionalities on the surface without using any chemicals. In this work, nitrogen glow discharge plasma was generated by a low energy AC50Hz power supply system. The plasma operating conditions were optimized to reach the highest nitrogen active species by using optical emission spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that amine, hydroxyl, ether, and carboxyl groups were induced on Thai silk fibroin surface after plasma treatment. The results on Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy confirmed that the plasma treated effects were only on the outermost layer since there was no change in the bulk chemistry. The surface topography was insignificantly changed from the detection with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The plasma-treated effects were the improved surface wettability and cell adhesion. After a 90-s treatment, the water contact angle was at 20°, while the untreated surface was at 70°. The early cell adhesion of L929 mouse fibroblast was accelerated. L929 cells only took 3h to reach 100% cell adhesion on 90 s N2 plasma-treated surface, while there was less than 50% cell adhesion on the untreated Thai silk fibroin surface after 6h of culture. The cell adhesion results were in agreement with the cytoskeleton development. L929 F-actin was more evident on 90 s N2 plasma-treated surface than others. It could be concluded that a lower energy AC50Hz plasma system enhanced early L929 mouse fibroblast adhesion on Thai silk fibroin surface without any significant change in surface topography and bulk chemistry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Measurements of energy distribution and thrust for microwave plasma coupling of electrical energy to hydrogen for propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, T.; Chapman, R.; Filpus, J.; Hawley, M.; Kerber, R.; Asmussen, J.; Nakanishi, S.

    1982-01-01

    A microwave plasma system for transfer of electrical energy to hydrogen flowing through the system has potential application for coupling energy to a flowing gas in the electrothermal propulsion concept. Experimental systems have been designed and built for determination of the energy inputs and outputs and thrust for the microwave coupling of energy to hydrogen. Results for experiments with pressure in the range 100 microns-6 torr, hydrogen flow rate up to 1000 micronmoles/s, and total absorbed power to 700 w are presented.

  1. Measurements of energy distribution and thrust for microwave plasma coupling of electrical energy to hydrogen for propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, T.; Chapman, R.; Filpus, J.; Hawley, M.; Kerber, R.; Asmussen, J.; Nakanishi, S.

    1982-01-01

    A microwave plasma system for transfer of electrical energy to hydrogen flowing through the system has potential application for coupling energy to a flowing gas in the electrothermal propulsion concept. Experimental systems have been designed and built for determination of the energy inputs and outputs and thrust for the microwave coupling of energy to hydrogen. Results for experiments with pressure in the range 100 microns-6 torr, hydrogen flow rate up to 1000 micronmoles/s, and total absorbed power to 700 w are presented.

  2. Dispersion and energy conservation relations of surface waves in semi-infinite plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, V.

    1981-04-01

    The hydrodynamic theory of surface wave propagation in semiinfinite homogeneous isotropic plasma is considered. Explicit linear surface wave solutions are given for the electric and magnetic fields, charge and current densities. These solutions are used to obtain the well-known dispersion relations and, together with the general energy conservation equation, to find appropriate definitions for the energy and the energy flow densities of surface waves. These densities are associated with the dispersion relation and the group velocity by formulae similar to those for bulk waves in infinite plasmas. Both cases of high-frequency and low-frequency surface waves are considered.

  3. Energy transfer between degrees of freedom of a dusty plasma system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semyonov, V. P.; Timofeev, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    Dust particles under certain conditions can acquire kinetic energy of the order of 10 eV and higher, far above the temperature of gas and temperatures of ions and electrons in the discharge. Such heating can be explained by the energy transfer between degrees of freedom of a dusty plasma system. One of the mechanisms of such energy transfer is based on parametric resonance. A model of dust particles system in gas discharge plasma including fluctuations of dust particles charge and features of near-electrode layer is presented. Molecular dynamics simulation of the dust particles system is performed. Conditions of the resonance occurrence are obtained for a wide range of parameters.

  4. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    DOE PAGES

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; ...

    2016-11-14

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metalmore » contributions. As a result, this technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.« less

  5. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited).

    PubMed

    Delgado-Aparicio, L F; Maddox, J; Pablant, N; Hill, K; Bitter, M; Rice, J E; Granetz, R; Hubbard, A; Irby, J; Greenwald, M; Marmar, E; Tritz, K; Stutman, D; Stratton, B; Efthimion, P

    2016-11-01

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metal contributions. This technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.

  6. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; Hill, K.; Bitter, M.; Rice, J. E.; Granetz, R.; Hubbard, A.; Irby, J.; Greenwald, M.; Marmar, E.; Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Stratton, B.; Efthimion, P.

    2016-11-14

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metal contributions. As a result, this technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.

  7. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; Hill, K.; Bitter, M.; Rice, J. E.; Granetz, R.; Hubbard, A.; Irby, J.; Greenwald, M.; Marmar, E.; Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Stratton, B.; Efthimion, P.

    2016-11-01

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metal contributions. This technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.

  8. Current fundamental science challenges in low temperature plasma science that impact energy security and international competitiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebner, Greg

    2010-11-01

    Products and consumer goods that utilize low temperature plasmas at some point in their creation touch and enrich our lives on almost a continuous basis. Examples are many but include the tremendous advances in microelectronics and the pervasive nature of the internet, advanced material coatings that increase the strength and reliability of products from turbine engines to potato chip bags, and the recent national emphasis on energy efficient lighting and compact fluorescent bulbs. Each of these products owes their contributions to energy security and international competiveness to fundamental research investments. However, it would be a mistake to believe that the great commercial success of these products implies a robust understanding of the complicated interactions inherent in plasma systems. Rather, current development of the next generation of low temperature plasma enabled products and processes is clearly exposing a new set of exciting scientific challenges that require leaps in fundamental understanding and interdisciplinary research teams. Emerging applications such as liquid-plasma systems to improve water quality and remediate hazardous chemicals, plasma-assisted combustion to increase energy efficiency and reduce emissions, and medical applications promise to improve our lives and the environment only if difficult science questions are solved. This talk will take a brief look back at the role of low temperature plasma science in enabling entirely new markets and then survey the next generation of emerging plasma applications. The emphasis will be on describing the key science questions and the opportunities for scientific cross cutting collaborations that underscore the need for increased outreach on the part of the plasma science community to improve visibility at the federal program level. This work is supported by the DOE, Office of Science for Fusion Energy Sciences, and Sandia National Laboratories, a multi-program laboratory managed and operated

  9. Energy doubling of 42 GeV electrons in a metre-scale plasma wakefield accelerator.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Ian; Clayton, Christopher E; Decker, Franz-Josef; Hogan, Mark J; Huang, Chengkun; Ischebeck, Rasmus; Iverson, Richard; Joshi, Chandrashekhar; Katsouleas, Thomas; Kirby, Neil; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A; Mori, Warren B; Muggli, Patric; Oz, Erdem; Siemann, Robert H; Walz, Dieter; Zhou, Miaomiao

    2007-02-15

    The energy frontier of particle physics is several trillion electron volts, but colliders capable of reaching this regime (such as the Large Hadron Collider and the International Linear Collider) are costly and time-consuming to build; it is therefore important to explore new methods of accelerating particles to high energies. Plasma-based accelerators are particularly attractive because they are capable of producing accelerating fields that are orders of magnitude larger than those used in conventional colliders. In these accelerators, a drive beam (either laser or particle) produces a plasma wave (wakefield) that accelerates charged particles. The ultimate utility of plasma accelerators will depend on sustaining ultrahigh accelerating fields over a substantial length to achieve a significant energy gain. Here we show that an energy gain of more than 42 GeV is achieved in a plasma wakefield accelerator of 85 cm length, driven by a 42 GeV electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The results are in excellent agreement with the predictions of three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Most of the beam electrons lose energy to the plasma wave, but some electrons in the back of the same beam pulse are accelerated with a field of approximately 52 GV m(-1). This effectively doubles their energy, producing the energy gain of the 3-km-long SLAC accelerator in less than a metre for a small fraction of the electrons in the injected bunch. This is an important step towards demonstrating the viability of plasma accelerators for high-energy physics applications.

  10. Mass and Energy of Erupting Solar Plasma Observed with the X-Ray Telescope on Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin-Yi; Raymond, John C.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Moon, Yong-Jae; Kim, Kap-Sung

    2015-01-01

    We investigate seven eruptive plasma observations by Hinode/XRT. Their corresponding EUV and/or white light coronal mass ejection features are visible in some events. Five events are observed in several passbands in X-rays, which allows for the determination of the eruptive plasma temperature using a filter ratio method. We find that the isothermal temperatures vary from 1.6 to 10 MK. These temperatures are an average weighted toward higher temperature plasma. We determine the mass constraints of eruptive plasmas by assuming simplified geometrical structures of the plasma with isothermal plasma temperatures. This method provides an upper limit to the masses of the observed eruptive plasmas in X-ray passbands since any clumping causes the overestimation of the mass. For the other two events, we assume the temperatures are at the maximum temperature of the X-ray Telescope (XRT) temperature response function, which gives a lower limit of the masses. We find that the masses in XRT, ~3 × 1013-5 × 1014 g, are smaller in their upper limit than the total masses obtained by LASCO, ~1 × 1015 g. In addition, we estimate the radiative loss, thermal conduction, thermal, and kinetic energies of the eruptive plasma in X-rays. For four events, we find that the thermal conduction timescales are much shorter than the duration of eruption. This result implies that additional heating during the eruption may be required to explain the plasma observations in X-rays for the four events.

  11. Suprathermal plasma analyzer for the measurement of low-energy electron distribution in the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoyama, M.; Yau, A. W.; Oyama, K.-I.; Abe, T.

    2011-07-15

    It is commonly believed that an energy transfer from thermal to suprathermal electrons (energy budget of the ionosphere. However, observation of electron energy spectrum in this energy range is quite limited because of technical difficulties of measurement. We have developed an instrument to measure electron energy distribution from thermal to suprathermal energy continuously with high-energy resolution of about 0.15 eV. The measurement principle is based on the combination of a retarding potential analyzer with a channel electron multiplier (CEM) and the Druyvesteyn method, which derives energy distribution from the current-voltage characteristics. The capability of detecting plasma space potential enables absolute calibration of electron energy. The instrument with a small vacuum pump, which is required for the CEM to work in low-vacuum region, was first successfully tested by a sounding rocket S-310-37 in the ionospheric E region. The instrument is expected to provide new opportunities to measure energy distribution of thermal and non-thermal electrons in low-density plasma, where a Langmuir probe cannot measure electron temperature because of low plasma density.

  12. Suprathermal plasma analyzer for the measurement of low-energy electron distribution in the ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, M; Oyama, K-I; Abe, T; Yau, A W

    2011-07-01

    It is commonly believed that an energy transfer from thermal to suprathermal electrons (energy budget of the ionosphere. However, observation of electron energy spectrum in this energy range is quite limited because of technical difficulties of measurement. We have developed an instrument to measure electron energy distribution from thermal to suprathermal energy continuously with high-energy resolution of about 0.15 eV. The measurement principle is based on the combination of a retarding potential analyzer with a channel electron multiplier (CEM) and the Druyvesteyn method, which derives energy distribution from the current-voltage characteristics. The capability of detecting plasma space potential enables absolute calibration of electron energy. The instrument with a small vacuum pump, which is required for the CEM to work in low-vacuum region, was first successfully tested by a sounding rocket S-310-37 in the ionospheric E region. The instrument is expected to provide new opportunities to measure energy distribution of thermal and non-thermal electrons in low-density plasma, where a Langmuir probe cannot measure electron temperature because of low plasma density.

  13. Suprathermal plasma analyzer for the measurement of low-energy electron distribution in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoyama, M.; Oyama, K.-I.; Abe, T.; Yau, A. W.

    2011-07-01

    It is commonly believed that an energy transfer from thermal to suprathermal electrons (energy budget of the ionosphere. However, observation of electron energy spectrum in this energy range is quite limited because of technical difficulties of measurement. We have developed an instrument to measure electron energy distribution from thermal to suprathermal energy continuously with high-energy resolution of about 0.15 eV. The measurement principle is based on the combination of a retarding potential analyzer with a channel electron multiplier (CEM) and the Druyvesteyn method, which derives energy distribution from the current-voltage characteristics. The capability of detecting plasma space potential enables absolute calibration of electron energy. The instrument with a small vacuum pump, which is required for the CEM to work in low-vacuum region, was first successfully tested by a sounding rocket S-310-37 in the ionospheric E region. The instrument is expected to provide new opportunities to measure energy distribution of thermal and non-thermal electrons in low-density plasma, where a Langmuir probe cannot measure electron temperature because of low plasma density.

  14. Low-energy plasma observations in the magnetosphere of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Selesnick, Richard S.; Richardson, John D.

    1987-01-01

    The large, low density plasma-containing magnetosphere detected at Uranus by Voyager 2 appears to be primarily composed of protons and electrons. On a long time scale, the protons are apparently transported from the planet's nightside to the dayside by a convective electric field that is generated by the solar wind. The time for the particles to convect through the Uranian magnetosphere is estimated to be about 1 week. The proton distribution functions are characterized by a warm, subsonic core and a non-Maxwellian tail that varies significantly along the spacecraft trajectory.

  15. Control of plasma stored energy for burn control using DIII-D in-vessel coils

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, Richard J.; Eidietis, Nicholas W.; Grierson, Brian A.; Hyatt, Alan W.; Kolemen, Egemen; Logan, Nikolas C.; Nazikian, Raffi M.; Paz-Soldan, Carlos A.; Solomon, Wayne M.; Wolfe, Stephen M.

    2015-04-09

    A new approach has been experimentally demonstrated to control the stored energy by applying a non-axisymmetric magnetic field using the DIII-D in-vessel coils to modify the energy confinement time. In future burning plasma experiments as well as magnetic fusion energy power plants, various concepts have been proposed to control the fusion power. The fusion power in a power plant operating at high gain can be related to the plasma stored energy and hence, is a strong function of the energy confinement time. Thus, an actuator that modifies the confinement time can be used to adjust the fusion power. In relatively low collisionality DIII-D discharges, the application of nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields results in a decrease in confinement time and density pumpout. Furthermore, gas puffing was used to compensate the density pumpout in the pedestal while control of the stored energy was demonstrated by the application of non-axisymmetric fields.

  16. Operational experience and performance characteristics of a valve-regulated lead-acid battery energy-storage system for providing the customer with critical load protection and energy-management benefits at a lead-recycling plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, G. W.

    The Power Control Division of GNB Technologies, commissioned on May 13, 1996 a new facility which houses a 5-MW battery energy-storage system (BESS) at GNB's Lead Recycling Centre in Vernon, CA. When the plant loses utility power (which typically happens two or three times a year), the BESS will provide up to 5 MW of power at 4160 VAC in support of all the plant loads. Since the critical loads are not isolated, it is necessary to carry the entire plant load (maximum of 5 MVA) for a short period immediately following an incident until non-critical loads have been automatically shed. Plant loading typically peaks at 3.5 MVA with critical loads of about 2.1 MVA. The BESS also provides the manufacturing plant with customer-side-of-the-meter energy management options to reduce its energy demand during peak periods of the day. The BESS has provided a reduction in monthly electric bills through daily peak-shaving. By design, the battery can provide up to 2.5 MWh of energy and still retain 2.5 MWh of capacity in reserve to handle the possibility of a power outage in protecting the critical loads for up to 1 h. By storing energy from the utility during off-peak hours of the night in the batteries when the cost is low (US4.5¢ per kWh), GNB can then discharge this energy during high demand periods of the day (US14.50 per kW). For example, by reducing its peak demand by 300 kW, the lead-recycling centre can save over US4000 per month in its electric bills. The BESS at Vernon represents a first large-scale use of valve-regulated lead-acid batteries in such a demanding application. This paper presents a summary of the operational experience and performance characteristics of the BESS over the past 2 years.

  17. Ion energy distribution functions of vacuum arc plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Byon, Eungsun; Anders, Andre

    2002-09-16

    The velocity distribution function of vacuum arc ions can be measured by a time-of-flight technique similar to a method originally proposed by Yushkov. The measuring principle makes use of the well-justified assumption that the ion drift velocity from the cathode spot region to a collector is approximately constant. It is shown that the negative time derivative of the collector current is directly proportional to the ion distribution function provided that the time-averaged source intensity (i.e., emission of ions from cathode spots) is constant until the arc is rapidly switched off. In the experiment, arc termination took about 700 ns, which is much faster than the decay of the ion current measured at the collector placed in more than 2 meters distance from the cathode. The experimental distribution functions for most cathode materials show one large peak with a tail and one or more small peaks at higher ion velocities. The distribution functions for some other materials exhibit several peaks. No conclusive answer can be given about the nature of these peaks. Arguments are presented that the peaks are not caused by different charge states or plasma contamination but rather due to insufficiently averaged source fluctuations and/or acceleration by plasma instabilities.

  18. Magnetowave Induced Plasma Wakefield Acceleration for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Feng-Yin; Chen, Pisin; Lin, Guey-Lin; Noble, Robert; Sydora, Richard; /Alberta U.

    2009-10-17

    Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration (MPWA) in a relativistic astrophysical outflow has been proposed as a viable mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic particles to ultrahigh energies. Here we present simulation results that clearly demonstrate the viability of this mechanism for the first time. We invoke the high frequency and high speed whistler mode for the driving pulse. The plasma wakefield obtained in the simulations compares favorably with our newly developed relativistic theory of the MPWA. We show that, under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over hundreds of plasma skin depths. Invoking active galactic nuclei as the site, we show that MPWA production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays beyond ZeV (10{sup 21} eV) is possible.

  19. Precise energy eigenvalues of hydrogen-like ion moving in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.; Saha, Jayanta K.; Mukherjee, T. K.

    2015-06-15

    The analytic form of the electrostatic potential felt by a slowly moving test charge in quantum plasma is developed. It has been shown that the electrostatic potential is composed of two parts: the Debye-Huckel screening term and the near-field wake potential. The latter depends on the velocity of the test charge as well as on the number density of the plasma electrons. Rayleigh-Ritz variational calculation has been done to estimate precise energy eigenvalues of hydrogen-like carbon ion under such plasma environment. A detailed analysis shows that the energy levels gradually move to the continuum with increasing plasma electron density while the level crossing phenomenon has been observed with the variation of ion velocity.

  20. Pulsed floating-type Langmuir probe for measurements of electron energy distribution function in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ikjin; Kim, Aram; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2017-01-01

    A floating type Langmuir probe was studied to measure the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in plasmas. This method measures the current (I)-voltage (V) curve with rising and falling variations based on a floating potential by using charge-discharge characteristics of the series capacitor when a square-pulse voltage is applied. In addition, this method measures the EEDF by using the alternating current (ac) superposition method. The measured EEDFs were in good agreement with results from a conventional single Langmuir probe. This technique could be applied as a plasma diagnostic method in the capacitively coupled plasma where the plasma potential is extremely high or the processing plasma where the deposition gas is used.

  1. Illinois recycled materials: market directory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This market directory serves as a guide for recyclers desiring a comprehensive list of companies purchasing large volumes of residential and commercial post-consumer recyclables. Throughout the directory, recyclers are reminded to check with buyers regarding current-delivery schedules, requirements for material preparation and shipping, and to determine if buyers are actually purchasing the type of materials that you have to sell. In summary, this is a detailed guide to who is buying what and how they want it processed. But since market conditions and buying policies change, recyclers are cautioned to always contact buyers before shipping. The directory provides data on end manufacturers, major material processors, and brokers. It does not include a listing of collection centers for consumers to take recyclables nor does it include buyers of scrap iron and steel. That information is provided in the Directory of Illinois Recycling Centers, available from the Department of Energy and Natural Resources (ENR). Information was obtained primarily through telephone contacts with individual buyers.

  2. Green residues from Bangkok green space for renewable energy recovery, phosphorus recycling and greenhouse gases emission reduction.

    PubMed

    Thitanuwat, Bussarakam; Polprasert, Chongchin; Englande, Andrew J

    2017-03-01

    Effective ways to integrate human life quality, environmental pollution mitigation and efficient waste management strategies are becoming a crisis challenge for sustainable urban development. The aims of this study are: (1) to evaluate and recommend an optimum Urban Green Space (UGS) area for the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA); and (2) to quantify potential renewable resources including electricity generation and potential nutrient recovery from generated ash. Green House Gases (GHGs) emissions from the management of Green Residues (GR) produced in a recommended UGS expansion are estimated and compared with those from the existing BMA waste management practice. Results obtained from this study indicate that an increase in UGS from its current 2.02% to 22.4% of the BMA urban area is recommended. This optimum value is primarily due to the area needed as living space for its population. At this scale, GR produced of about 334kt·y(-1) may be used to generate electricity at the rate of 206GWh·y(-1) by employing incineration technology. Additionally, instead of going to landfill, phosphorus (P) contained in the ash of 1077 t P·y(-1) could be recovered to produce P fertilizer to be recycled for agricultural cultivation. Income earned from selling these products is found to offset all of the operational cost of the proposed GR management methodology itself plus 7% of the cost of BMA's Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) operations. About 70% of the current GHGs emission may be reduced based on incineration simulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A non-contact energy transferring system for an electric vehicle-charging system based on recycled products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Y.; Sakamoto, H.; Shibuya, H.; Murata, S.

    2006-04-01

    A non-contact automatic charging system for electric vehicle application is presented. The principle is the same as that of the transformer where the primary and the secondary circuits are separable but coupled with each other without using the hand coupler. In this paper, we present a possibility of removing the core of the secondary coil on the body for reducing the weight of the car. In our experiments, the primary core, which is placed on the earth floor, is made of Mn-Zn ferrite with square shape as 1 m×1 m×10 mm for a large cross-sectional area. The steel floor of the car assists to pass the magnetic flux. An efficiency rate over 90% with the test device of 2 kW is obtained without the conventional secondary core. The leakage inductance is well compensated by a resonance capacitor inserted in the secondary coil. In this experiment, the distance between the primary and the secondary coil is 100 mm and the switching frequency is 100 kHz. In addition, we developed a pavement method for the system. The method utilizes plates made from the waste of expanded polystyrene and rubber mats made from used tire. The plates are set up on the rubber mats and these mats are arranged over the non-contact charging system. The pavements can be replaced easily when the system is exchanged. Therefore, this pavement method is not only practical for the non-contact charging system but is also useful for recycling of resources and reduction of waste matters.

  4. Plasma processing of III-V materials for energy efficient electronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayne, Iain; Li, Xu; Millar, David; Fu, Yen-Chun; Peralagu, Uthayasankararan

    2017-03-01

    This paper reviews some recent activity at the James Watt Nanofabrication Centre in the University of Glasgow in the area of plasma processing for energy efficient compound semiconductor-based transistors. Atomic layer etching suitable for controllable recess etching in GaN power transistors will be discussed. In addition, plasma based surface passivation techniques will be reviewed for a variety of compound semiconductor materials ((100) and (110) oriented InGaAs and InGaSb).

  5. Feasibility of low energy plasma torch for reaction control thruster ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chunyoung

    A DC--thermal plasma jet is proposed as a reliable ignition source for reaction control system (RCS) thrusters employing oxygen with hydrocarbons, like methane. Industrial plasma torch systems are analyzed to understand the behavioral characteristics of DC--thermal plasmas. Nitrogen is used as a working gas for the source of plasma jet to understand the general mechanism of thermal plasma formation. DC--thermal plasmas require high electrical energy to maintain their arc discharge status which presents challenges in space systems. The purpose of this study is, therefore, to find a suitable configuration which minimizes power consumption. Various physical and electrical conditions relate to a thermal plasma formation. In this study, the input voltage (221--332V) and pressure (5--15 psi) are applied as initial conditions. The DC--power module and starter module are designed as plasma drivers and a commercial off--the--shelf torch head is used for this research. The normalized method is developed to estimate the arc temperature. Test results show that the lowest power consumption and arc--starting voltage are 1,321W and 248.8 VDC, respectively. In addition, it is found that the current is a major factor for varying the mass flow rate. Since the lowest power consumption is still high, future improvements and research should focus on integrating a high--power and lightweight energy source, developing a high--frequency and half--duty cycle power system, and incorporating a composite cathode. In addition, a new conceptual torch design is proposed to be considered as an igniter for RCS thrusters. The next step would be to repeat the plasma torch tests with the new configuration at ambient and vacuum conditions. These would be followed by combustion tests to verify the actual functionality of the plasma igniter for RCS thrusters with various oxidizer and fuel mixture ratios. In parallel, research should focus on miniaturization of the electrical system.

  6. Experimental measurement of plasma parameters and electron energy distribution in ferrite-core side type Ar/He inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Duksun; Bang, Jin-Young; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2012-10-01

    Spatial distributions of a plasma density and an effective electron temperature (Teff) were studied from the measurement of an electron energy probability function (EEPF) in the side type ferrite-core inductively coupled plasma with an argon-helium mixture. As the helium gas was diluted at the fixed total gas pressure of 5 mTorr in an argon discharge, the distribution of the plasma density was changed from a concave to a flat, and finally became a convex, while all spatial profiles of Teff were the hollow shapes with the helium dilution. This evolution of the plasma uniformity with the helium gas could be explained by the increased energy relaxation length and the changed plasma potential, indicating the transition of the electron kinetics from the local to non-local kinetics. From this result, it is expected that the addition of helium gas could be applied as a method to control the plasma uniformity in a large area plasma processing.

  7. Recycling Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Environmental Resources, Harrisburg.

    This document contains lesson plans about recycling for teachers in grades K-12. Titles include: (1) "Waste--Where Does It Come From? Where Does It Go?" (2) "Litter Detectives," (3) "Classroom Paper Recycling," (4) "Recycling Survey," (5) "Disposal and Recycling Costs," (6) "Composting…

  8. Green Science: Revisiting Recycling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palliser, Janna

    2011-01-01

    Recycling has been around for a long time--people have reused materials and refashioned them into needed items for thousands of years. More recently, war efforts encouraged conservation and reuse of materials, and in the 1970s recycling got its official start when recycling centers were created. Now, curbside recycling programs and recycling…

  9. Green Science: Revisiting Recycling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palliser, Janna

    2011-01-01

    Recycling has been around for a long time--people have reused materials and refashioned them into needed items for thousands of years. More recently, war efforts encouraged conservation and reuse of materials, and in the 1970s recycling got its official start when recycling centers were created. Now, curbside recycling programs and recycling…

  10. An Exact Calculation of Electron-Ion Energy Splitting in a Hot Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, Robert L

    2012-09-10

    In this brief report, I summarize the rather involved recent work of Brown, Preston, and Singleton (BPS). In Refs. [2] and [3], BPS calculate the energy partition into ions and electrons as a charged particle traverses a non-equilibrium two-temperature plasma. These results are exact to leading and next-to-leading order in the plasma coupling g, and are therefore extremely accurate in a weakly coupled plasma. The new BPS calculations are compared with the more standard work of Fraley et al. [12]. The results differ substantially at higher temperature when T{sub I} {ne} T{sub e}.

  11. Energy deposition in parallel-plate plasma accelerators. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicapua, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    To appraise the ratio of energy deposition into kinetic and thermal modes in plasma accelerators, a parallel-plate plasma accelerator has been operated in the quasi-steady mode with current pulses in the range of 10 to 100 kilo-amperes (kA), durations of the order of one millisecond, and argon mass flows up to 100 grams/sec. From photographic observations, spectroscopic measurements of velocity and electron density, and pressure measurements with a fast-rise piezoelectric transducer it is found that, for currents between 50 and 90 kA, the accelerated argon plasma is supersonic with ion velocities of 5 to 6 kilometers/sec.

  12. Atomic mean excitation energies for stopping powers from local plasma oscillator strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.; Chang, C. K.; Kamaratos, E.

    1984-01-01

    The stopping of a charged particle by isolated atoms is investigated theoretically using an 'atomic plasma' model in which atomic oscillator strengths are replaced by the plasma frequency spectrum. The plasma-frequency correction factor for individual electron motion proposed by Pines (1953) is incorporated, and atomic mean excitation energies are calculated for atoms through Sr. The results are compared in a graph with those obtained theoretically by Inokuti et al. (1978, 1981) and Dehmer et al. (1975) and with the experimental values compiled by Seltzer and Berger (1982): good agreement is shown.

  13. Structure of the plasmapause from ISEE 1 low-energy ion and plasma wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagai, T.; Horwitz, J. L.; Anderson, R. R.; Chappell, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Low-energy ion pitch angle distributions are compared with plasma density profiles in the near-earth magnetosphere using ISEE 1 observations. The classical plasmapause determined by the sharp density gradient is not always observed in the dayside region, whereas there almost always exists the ion pitch angle distribution transition from cold, isotropic to warm, bidirectional, field-aligned distributions. In the nightside region the plasmapause density gradient is typically found, and it normally coincides with the ion pitch angle distribution transition. The sunward motion of the plasma is found in the outer part of the 'plasmaspheric' plasma in the dusk bulge region.

  14. Generation of high energy electron accelerated by using a tapered capillary discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minseok; Nam, Inhyuk; Lee, Taehee; Lee, Seungwoo; Suk, Hyyong

    2014-10-01

    The tapered plasma density in a gas-filled capillary waveguide can suppress the dephasing problem in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). As a result, the acceleration distance and the gained electron energy are expected to be increased. For this purpose, we developed a tapered capillary waveguide, which can produce a plasma density of ~ 1018 cm-3. Using this capillary discharge plasma, we performed the acceleration experiments with the high power laser system (20 TW/40 fs) constructed at GIST. In this presentation, the detailed electron acceleration experiments will be reported.

  15. Structure of the plasmapause from ISEE 1 low-energy ion and plasma wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagai, T.; Horwitz, J. L.; Anderson, R. R.; Chappell, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Low-energy ion pitch angle distributions are compared with plasma density profiles in the near-earth magnetosphere using ISEE 1 observations. The classical plasmapause determined by the sharp density gradient is not always observed in the dayside region, whereas there almost always exists the ion pitch angle distribution transition from cold, isotropic to warm, bidirectional, field-aligned distributions. In the nightside region the plasmapause density gradient is typically found, and it normally coincides with the ion pitch angle distribution transition. The sunward motion of the plasma is found in the outer part of the 'plasmaspheric' plasma in the dusk bulge region.

  16. Kinetic analysis and energy efficiency of phenol degradation in a plasma-photocatalysis system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-juan; Chen, Xiao-yang

    2011-02-28

    Combination of two kinds of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) is an effective approach to control wastewater pollution. In this research, a pulsed discharge plasma system with multi-point-to-plate electrode and an immobilized TiO(2) photocatalysis system is coupled to oxidize target pollutant in aqueous solution. Kinetic analysis (pseudo-first order kinetic constant, k) and energy efficiency (energy yield value at 50% phenol conversion, G(50)) of phenol oxidation in different reaction systems (plasma alone and plasma-photocatalysis) are reviewed to account for the synergistic mechanism of plasma and photocatalysis. The experimental results show that higher k and G(50) of phenol oxidation can be obtained in the plasma-photocatalysis system under the conditions of different gas bubbling varieties, initial solution pH and radical scavenger addition. Moreover, the investigation tested hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important species for phenol removal in the synergistic system of plasma-photocatalysis as well as in the plasma alone system.

  17. Fermilab recycler stochastic cooling commissioning and performance

    SciTech Connect

    D. Broemmelsiek; Ralph Pasquinelli

    2003-06-04

    The Fermilab Recycler is a fixed 8 GeV kinetic energy storage ring located in the Fermilab Main Injector tunnel near the ceiling. The Recycler has two roles in Run II. First, to store antiprotons from the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator so that the antiproton production rate is no longer compromised by large numbers of antiprotons stored in the Accumulator. Second, to receive antiprotons from the Fermilab Tevatron at the end of luminosity periods. To perform each of these roles, stochastic cooling in the Recycler is needed to preserve and cool antiprotons in preparation for transfer to the Tevatron. The commissioning and performance of the Recycler stochastic cooling systems will be reviewed.

  18. Influence of pressure on ion energy distribution functions in EUV-induced hydrogen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Ven, T. H. M.; Reefman, P.; de Meijere, C. A.; Banine, V. Y.; Beckers, J.

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation lithography tools currently use Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation to create even smaller features on computer chips. The high energy photons (92 eV) induce a plasma in the low pressure background gas by photoionization. Industries have realized that these plasmas are of significant importance with respect to machine lifetime because impacting ions affect exposed surfaces. The mass resolved ion energy distribution function (IEDF) is therefore one of the main plasma parameters of interest. In this research an ion mass spectrometer is used to investigate IEDFs of ions impacting on surfaces in EUV-induced plasmas. EUV radiation is focused into a vessel with a low pressure hydrogen environment. Here, photoionization creates free electrons with energies up to 76 eV, which further ionize the background gas. The influence of the pressure on plasma composition and IEDFs has been investigated in the range 0.1-10 Pa. In general the ion fluxes towards the surface increase with pressure. However, above 5 Pa the flux of H2+ is not affected by the increase in pressure due to the balance between the creation of H2+ and the conversion of H2+ to H3+. These results will be used to benchmark plasma scaling models and verify numerical simulations.

  19. Energy Confinement Recovery in Low Collisionality ITER Shape Plasmas with Applied Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, L.; Grierson, B.; Logan, N.; Nazikian, R.

    2016-10-01

    Application of RMPs to low collisionality (ν*e < 0.4) ITER shape plasmas on DIII-D leads to a rapid reduction in stored energy due to density pumpout that is sometimes followed by a gradual recovery in the plasma stored energy. Understanding this confinement recovery is essential to optimize the confinement of RMP plasmas in present and future devices such as ITER. Transport modeling using TRANSP+TGLF indicates that the core a/LTi is stiff in these plasmas while the ion temperature gradient is much less stiff in the pedestal region. The reduction in the edge density during pumpout leads to an increase in the core ion temperature predicted by TGLF based on experimental data. This is correlated to the increase in the normalized ion heat flux. Transport stiffness in the core combined with an increase in the edge a/LTi results in an increase of the plasma stored energy, consistent with experimental observations. For plasmas where the edge density is controlled using deuterium gas puffs, the effect of the RMP on ion thermal confinement is significantly reduced. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. Energy and momentum flow in electromagnetic fields and plasma. [solar wind-magnetospheric interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parish, J. L.; Raitt, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    The energy momentum tensor for a perfect fluid in a magnetic field is used to predict the momentum density, energy density, momentum flow, and energy flow of the fluid and the electromagnetic field. It is shown that taking the momentum flow from the energy momentum tensor, rather than starting with differential magnetohydrodynamic equations, can produce more accurate results on the basis of magnetic field data. It is suggested that the use of the energy momentum tensor has the potential for application to analysis of data from the more dynamic regions of the solar system, such as the plasma boundaries of Venus, the Jovian ionosphere, and the terrestrial magnetopause.

  1. The influence of energy deposition parameters on laser plasma drag reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Zhiguo; Liu, Zhun; Yao, Honglin; Li, Xiuqian

    2013-09-01

    Laser plasma drag reduction is a new method to reduce the wave drag of hypersonic flight. The research of the laser plasma drag reduction performance is an important work. The purpose of this paper is investigating laser plasma drag reduction by numerical simulation to enhance the understanding of the drag reduction mechanism, get the drag reduction performance in different conditions, and provide references for laser plasma drag reduction experiment in the future. Based on summarizing correlative references systematically, through building the model of energy deposition and comparison the simulated results to the empirical formula and computation results to verify the program correctness, the influence of laser energy parameters to laser plasma drag reduction were simulated numerically for optimize the performance. The follow conclusions were got by numerical simulation: The computation program can well simulate the interacting of LSDW(laser supported detonation wave) to the bow shock in front of the blunt body. Results indicate that the blunt body drag could be decreased by injecting laser energy into the incoming hypersonic flow. The correctness of program was verified by compare result to the experiment and computation results. Blunt body drag will be greatly decreased with injected laser power increased, The bigger laser power is injected, the more drag decreases. There's an energy saturation value for each laser power level, the injecting laser power effectiveness values are never quite high for all laser power level. There is an optimized energy deposition location in upstream flow, this location is right ahead of the blunt body. When the distance from deposition location to the surface of blunt body is 5 times the blunt radius, blunt body drag decreased the most. This paper investigated the parameters which primary influence the performance of drag reduction. The numerical simulation data and obtained results are meaningful for laser plasma drag reduction

  2. 3-D Measurement of Recycling and Radiation in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norval, Ryan; Goetz, John; Schmitz, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    The MST reversed-field pinch (RFP) can undergo spontaneous transition to a helical core state, associated with the growth of the innermost resonant magnetic mode. Currently multiple 2-D imaging cameras are in place allowing for nearly full vessel viewing and measurement of recycling and impurities fluxes. The transition from the standard to helical RFP causes an observable change in edge plasma. While in the helical state the plasma wall interaction (PWI) on MSTs poloidal limiter strongly correlates with the helicity of the core mode. PWI on the toroidal limiter overall is reduced, with the remaining PWI sites corresponding the helicity of the core mode, or the locations of diagnostic limiters and the error fields they create. EIRENE, a neutral particle code use for modeling edge plasmas, is used to compute the neutral profiles based on measured recycling fluxes. EIRENE computes the radiative and charge exchange power losses. Comparison is made between the standard and helical RFP plasmas. Bolometer measurements of total radiation are currently in progress to supplement the modeling. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. Idea Notebook: Recycling with an Educational Purpose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerth, Tom; Wilson, David A.

    1986-01-01

    Four students at St. Louis University High School developed a project to clean up the environment while saving energy and natural resources. Aluminum and steel cans were recycled and the money was used to buy and plant trees. Students learned about recycling, organization, money management, and improving the environment. (JMM)

  4. Recycling Primer: Getting Back to Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Environmental Protection, Hartford.

    The disposal of garbage is a complex issue. Four strategies have been developed to attack the problem. They deal with: (1) waste reduction; (2) recycling; (3) energy recovery; and (4) land filling. This handbook emphasizes recycling as a method of handling the problem of dealing with solid wastes. Included are a list of the categories and uses of…

  5. Idea Notebook: Recycling with an Educational Purpose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerth, Tom; Wilson, David A.

    1986-01-01

    Four students at St. Louis University High School developed a project to clean up the environment while saving energy and natural resources. Aluminum and steel cans were recycled and the money was used to buy and plant trees. Students learned about recycling, organization, money management, and improving the environment. (JMM)

  6. INEEL Lead Recycling in a Moratorium Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kooda, K. E.; Galloway, K.; McCray, C. W.; Aitken, D. W.

    2003-02-26

    Since 1999, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Lead Project successfully recycled over 700,000 pounds of excess INEEL lead to the private sector. On February 14, 2000, the Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, formalized the January 12, 2000, moratorium on recycling radioactive scrap metal that prevented the unrestricted release of recycled scrap metals to the private sector. This moratorium created significant problems for the INEEL lead recycling program and associated plans; however, through the cooperative efforts of the INEEL and Idaho State University as well as innovative planning and creative thinking the recycling issues were resolved. This collaboration has recycled over 160,000 pounds of excess lead to Idaho State University with a cost savings of over $.5M.

  7. INEEL Lead Recycling in a Moratorium Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kooda, Kevin Evan; Mc Cray, Casey William; Aitken, Darren William; Galloway, Kelly

    2003-02-01

    Since 1999, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Lead Project successfully recycled over 700,000 pounds of excess INEEL lead to the private sector. On February 14, 2000, the Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, formalized the January 12, 2000, moratorium on recycling radioactive scrap metal that prevented the unrestricted release of recycled scrap metals to the private sector. This moratorium created significant problems for the INEEL lead recycling program and associated plans; however, through the cooperative efforts of the INEEL and Idaho State University as well as innovative planning and creative thinking the recycling issues were resolved. This collaboration has recycled over 160,000 pounds of excess lead to Idaho State University with a cost savings of over $.5M.

  8. Ion energy distribution near a plasma meniscus for multielement focused ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Jose V.; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2009-05-01

    The axial ion energy spread near a plasma meniscus for multielement focused ion beams is investigated experimentally in atomic and molecular gaseous plasmas of krypton, argon, and hydrogen by tailoring the magnetic field in the region. In the case of magnetic end plugging, the ion energy spread reduces by approx50% near the meniscus as compared to the bulk plasma, thereby facilitating beam focusing. A quadrupole filter can be used to control the mean energy of the ions. Comparison with standard Maxwellian and Druyvesteyn distributions with the same mean energy indicates that the ion energy distribution in the meniscus is deficient in the population of low and high energy tail ions, resulting in a Gaussian-like profile with a spread of approx4 and approx5 eV for krypton and argon ions, respectively. By carefully tuning the wave power, plasma collisionality, and the magnetic field in the meniscus, the spread can be made lower than that of liquid metal ion sources, for extracting focused ion beams of other elements with adequate current density, for research and applications in nanosystems

  9. Ion behaviour in pulsed plasma regime by means of Time-resolved energy mass spectroscopy (TREMS) applied to an industrial radiofrequency Plasma Immersion Ion Implanter PULSION®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrere, M.; Torregrosa, F.; Kaeppelin, V.

    2006-11-01

    In order to face the requirements for P+/N junctions requested for < 45 nm ITRS nodes, new doping techniques are studied. Among them Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) has been largely studied. IBS has designed and developed its own PIII machine named PULSION®. This machine is using a pulsed plasma. As other modem technological applications of low pressure plasma, PULSION® needs a precise control over plasma parameters in order to optimise process characteristics. In order to improve pulsed plasma discharge devoted to PIII, a nitrogen pulsed plasma has been studied in the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) of PULSION® and an argon pulsed plasma has been studied in the helicon discharge of the laboratory reactor of LPIIM (PHYSIS). Measurements of the Ion Energy Distribution Function (IEDF) with EQP300 (Hidden) have been performed in both pulsed plasma. This study has been done for different energies which allow to reconstruct the IEDF resolved in time (TREMS). By comparing these results, we found that the beginning of the plasma pulse, named ignition, exhaust at least three phases, or more. All these results allowed us to explain plasma dynamics during the pulse while observing transitions between capacitive and inductive coupling. This study leads in a better understanding of changes in discharge parameters as plasma potential, electron temperature, ion density.

  10. Drag Reduction by Laser-Plasma Energy Addition in Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, A. C.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Myrabo, L. N.

    2008-04-28

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the drag reduction by laser-plasma energy addition in a low density Mach 7 hypersonic flow. The experiments were conducted in a shock tunnel and the optical beam of a high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA laser operating with 7 J of energy and 30 MW peak power was focused to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The non-intrusive schlieren optical technique was used to visualize the effects of the energy addition to hypersonic flow, from the plasma generation until the mitigation of the shock wave profile over the model surface. Aside the optical technique, a piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to measure the impact pressure at stagnation point of the hemispherical model and the pressure reduction could be observed.

  11. Electron heating and control of electron energy distribution for the enhancement of the plasma ashing processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-04-01

    Control of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) is investigated through applying an inductive field in oxygen capacitively coupled plasma (CCP). With the addition of a small amount of antenna coil power to the CCP, low energy electrons are effectively heated and the EEDF is controlled. This method is applied to the ashing process of the photoresistor (PR). It is revealed that the ashing rate of the PR is significantly increased due to O radicals produced by the controlled EEDF, even though the ion density/energy flux is not increased. The roles of the power transfer mode in the electron heating and plasma control are also presented in the hybrid plasma source with inductive and capacitive fields. This work provides a route to enhance or control the processing result.

  12. Influence of laser energy on the electron temperature of a laser-induced Mg plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asamoah, Emmanuel; Hongbing, Yao

    2017-01-01

    The magnesium plasma induced by a 1064-nm Q-switched Nd:YAG laser in atmospheric air was investigated. The evolution of the plasma was studied by acquiring spectral images at different laser energies and delay times. We observed that the intensities of the spectral lines decrease with larger delay times. The electron temperature was determined using the Boltzmann plot method. At a delay time of 100 ns and laser energy of 350 mJ, the electron temperature attained their highest value at 10164 K and then decreases slowly up to 8833.6 K at 500 ns. We found that the electron temperature of the magnesium plasma increases rapidly with increasing laser energy.

  13. The Next Generation of Space Plasma Analyzer - Deployable Radial Imaging for Velocity, Energy, and Density (DRIVEN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collinson, G. A.; Moore, T. E.; Durachka, D.; Olson, D. K.; Knudsen, D. J.; Rozmarynowski, P.; Beamer, A. A.; Klenzing, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    We present initial developments towards a space plasma analyzer capable of making simultaneous observations of cold (<1eV) and high-energy (5keV) space plasmas at revolutionary temporal and spatial resolution. "Top Hat" plasma analyzers [1] (the current "state of the art") typically have modest azimuthal resolution (c.f. 10 degrees, for reasons of electronic practicality), and can only read out a single energy at a time, thereby requiring a swept voltage to sample a range of energies. True energy imaging of particle populations was achieved with the Freja Cold Plasma Analyzer [2], and at higher time and energy resolution on subsequent sounding rocket flights using a CCD-based detection scheme, but only at energies below 200 eV [3]. We propose to overcome these shortcomings using novel particle optics and directly imaging space plasma distributions using a revolutionary 2D position-sensitive readout technique, thereby covering particle energies from cold to energetic while eliminating the need for an energy sweep. Measurements of <1eV electrons and ions are currently very challenging owing to effects of spacecraft charging. Existing s/c systems such as ASPOC on Cluster are complex, expensive and have a limited lifetime. Our boom-mounted sensor will automatically compensate for changes in spacecraft potential through the reverse biasing of its outer skin according to measurements from an integrated Langmuir probe. [1] Carlson et al., Adv. Space Res., 2(7), 67, (1982) [2] Whalen et al., Space Sci. Rev., (70), 541. (1994) [3] Knudsen et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum., (74), 202. (2003)

  14. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Mechanism of high-energy electron production in a laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, V. S.

    2004-01-01

    A mechanism of high-energy electron production in the interaction of high-intensity short laser pulses with a solid target is proposed and analysed. The theoretical dependences of fast-electron kinetic energy on the parameters of laser radiation and target material are given. The effect of ionisation of the target material is considered. The generation of ultrastrong magnetic fields in the laser plasma is shown to play the key part in the formation, transfer, and acceleration of electron beams. This results in the production of vortex electric fields accelerating electrons. The theoretical dependences yield well-proved limits for the electron energy and are in good agreement with the results of experiments performed on high-intensity laser setups, including the results obtained with participation of the author.

  15. High Energy-Density Plasma Dynamics in Plasma-Filled Rod-Pinch Diodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    integrated x-ray images. A self-similar hydrodynamic expansion model based on Sesame -tabulated equation of state data indicates the maximum energy density...L lines. The energy shift is attributed to an average ionization of +17 and the Lβ2 line shape is attributed to ionization states in the +10 to +28...energy and broadened by multiple ionization states between +10 and +28 (from Ref. 6). strips are staggered to make an array of 20 diodes with 0.5 mm

  16. Suprathermal electron energy spectrum and nonlocally affected plasma-wall interaction in helium/air micro-plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, V. I.; Adams, S. F.; Miles, J. A.; Koepke, M. E.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.

    2016-10-01

    Details of ground-state and excited-state neutral atoms and molecules in an atmospheric-pressure micro-discharge plasma may be obtained by plasma electron spectroscopy (PLES), based on a wall probe. The presence and transport of energetic (suprathermal) electrons, having a nonlocal origin, are responsible for electrostatic charging of the plasma boundary surfaces to potentials many times that associated with the ambient electron kinetic energy. The energy-flux distribution function is shown to be controllable for applications involving analysis of composition and processes taking place in a multiphase (plasma-gas-solid), chemically reactive, interaction region.

  17. Energy and matter-efficient size-selective growth of thin quantum wires in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrikov, K.; Mehdipour, H.

    2011-01-17

    It is shown that plasmas can minimize the adverse Gibbs-Thompson effect in thin quantum wire growth. The model of Si nanowire nucleation includes the unprecedented combination of the plasma sheath, ion- and radical-induced species creation and heating effects on the surface and within an Au catalyst nanoparticle. Compared to neutral gas thermal processes, much thinner, size-selective wires can nucleate at the same temperature and pressure while much lower energy and matter budget is needed to grow same-size wires. This explains the experimental observations and may lead to energy- and matter-efficient synthesis of a broader range of one-dimensional quantum structures.

  18. High-energy ions from near-critical density plasmas via magnetic vortex acceleration.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Bulanov, Sergei V; Esirkepov, Timur Zh; Kando, Masaki

    2010-09-24

    Ultraintense laser pulses propagating in near-critical density plasmas generate magnetic dipole vortex structures. In the region of decreasing plasma density, the vortex expands both in forward and lateral directions. The magnetic field pressure pushes electrons and ions to form a density jump along the vortex axis and induces a longitudinal electric field. This structure moves together with the expanding dipole vortex. The background ions located ahead of the electric field are accelerated to high energies. The energy scaling of ions generated by this magnetic vortex acceleration mechanism is derived and corroborated using particle-in-cell simulations.

  19. High-Energy Ions from Near-Critical Density Plasmas via Magnetic Vortex Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Bulanov, Sergei V.; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki

    2010-09-24

    Ultraintense laser pulses propagating in near-critical density plasmas generate magnetic dipole vortex structures. In the region of decreasing plasma density, the vortex expands both in forward and lateral directions. The magnetic field pressure pushes electrons and ions to form a density jump along the vortex axis and induces a longitudinal electric field. This structure moves together with the expanding dipole vortex. The background ions located ahead of the electric field are accelerated to high energies. The energy scaling of ions generated by this magnetic vortex acceleration mechanism is derived and corroborated using particle-in-cell simulations.

  20. Tuning the electron energy by controlling the density perturbation position in laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Brijesh, P.; Thaury, C.; Phuoc, K. T.; Corde, S.; Lambert, G.; Malka, V.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Bloom, M.; Kneip, S.

    2012-06-15

    A density perturbation in an underdense plasma was used to improve the quality of electron bunches produced in the laser-plasma wakefield acceleration scheme. Quasi-monoenergetic electrons were generated by controlled injection in the longitudinal density gradients of the density perturbation. By tuning the position of the density perturbation along the laser propagation axis, a fine control of the electron energy from a mean value of 60 MeV to 120 MeV has been demonstrated with a relative energy-spread of 15 {+-} 3.6%, divergence of 4 {+-} 0.8 mrad, and charge of 6 {+-} 1.8 pC.

  1. Advances in Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma potential and electron-energy distribution function in magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Tsv K.; Dimitrova, M.; Ivanova, P.; Kovačič, J.; Gyergyek, T.; Dejarnac, R.; Stöckel, J.; Pedrosa, M. A.; López-Bruna, D.; Hidalgo, C.

    2016-06-01

    Advanced Langmuir probe techniques for evaluating the plasma potential and electron-energy distribution function (EEDF) in magnetized plasma are reviewed. It is shown that when the magnetic field applied is very weak and the electrons reach the probe without collisions in the probe sheath the second-derivative Druyvesteyn formula can be used for EEDF evaluation. At low values of the magnetic field, an extended second-derivative Druyvesteyn formula yields reliable results, while at higher values of the magnetic field, the first-derivative probe technique is applicable for precise evaluation of the plasma potential and the EEDF. There is an interval of intermediate values of the magnetic field when both techniques—the extended second-derivative and the first-derivative one—can be used. Experimental results from probe measurements in different ranges of magnetic field are reviewed and discussed: low-pressure argon gas discharges in the presence of a magnetic field in the range from 0.01 to 0.08 T, probe measurements in circular hydrogen plasmas for high-temperature fusion (magnetic fields from 0.45 T to 1.3 T) in small ISTTOK and CASTOR tokamaks, D-shape COMPASS tokamak plasmas, as well as in the TJ-II stellarator. In the vicinity of the last closed flux surface (LCFS) in tokamaks and in the TJ-II stellarator, the EEDF obtained is found to be bi-Maxwellian, while close to the tokamak chamber wall it is Maxwellian. The mechanism of the appearance of a bi-Maxwellian EEDF in the vicinity of the LCFS is discussed. Comparison of the results from probe measurements with those obtained from calculations using the ASTRA and EIRENE codes shows that the main reason for the appearance of a bi-Maxwellian EEDF in the vicinity of the LCFS is the ionization of the neutral atoms.

  2. Measurement of continuous x-radiation and determination of the energy distribution function of high-energy electrons from an ECR plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardi, Karl

    1980-02-12

    Investigations were made on the x-radiation emitted by a plasma. The methods applied here represent a further development of experimental and numerical methods used hitherto for determining the bremsstrahlung emitted by a plasma, and makes possible a more precise determination of the high-energy electron component of a plasma.

  3. Recycling Endosomes Supply AMPA Receptors for LTP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Mikyoung; Penick, Esther C.; Edwards, Jeffrey G.; Kauer, Julie A.; Ehlers, Michael D.

    2004-09-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic strength, the most established cellular model of information storage in the brain, is expressed by an increase in the number of postsynaptic AMPA receptors. However, the source of AMPA receptors mobilized during LTP is unknown. We report that AMPA receptors are transported from recycling endosomes to the plasma membrane for LTP. Stimuli that triggered LTP promoted not only AMPA receptor insertion but also generalized recycling of cargo and membrane from endocytic compartments. Thus, recycling endosomes supply AMPA receptors for LTP and provide a mechanistic link between synaptic potentiation and membrane remodeling during synapse modification.

  4. Plasma guns for controlled fusion at megagauss energy-densities

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, Peter J; Roderick, Norman F; Degnan, James H; Frese, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    Electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at a low power level has been used on Tore Supra to induce local perturbations of the current density profile. Regimes with strong MHD activity have been analysed, and compared with similar stable discharges, in order to investigate the possible causes of their instability and relate the evolution of the discharge to the localization of EC power deposition. Both co- and counter-current drive pulses have been applied to dominantly or fully non-inductive discharges, sustained by a lower hybrid current drive. Detailed reconstructions by current diffusion calculations have been performed and the error bars evaluated. This method has proved valuable for shedding light on the complex interplay between the evolutions of temperature and safety factor profiles in steady-state tokamak plasmas. The crucial role of the dynamic evolution of rational surfaces has been identified. Moreover, we demonstrate that the operational domain in which ECCD can be employed must cope with the overall current profile characteristics, in particular the position where the safety factor has a minimum.

  5. Model of enhanced energy deposition in a Z-pinch plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Velikovich, A. L.; Davis, J.; Thornhill, J. W.; Giuliani, J. L. Jr.; Rudakov, L. I.; Deeney, C.

    2000-08-01

    In numerous experiments, magnetic energy coupled to strongly radiating Z-pinch plasmas exceeds the thermalized kinetic energy, sometimes by a factor of 2-3. An analytical model describing this additional energy deposition based on the concept of macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent pinch heating proposed by Rudakov and Sudan [Phys. Reports 283, 253 (1997)] is presented. The pinch plasma is modeled as a foam-like medium saturated with toroidal ''magnetic bubbles'' produced by the development of surface m=0 Rayleigh-Taylor and MHD instabilities. As the bubbles converge to the pinch axis, their magnetic energy is converted to thermal energy of the plasma through pdV work. Explicit formulas for the average dissipation rate of this process and the corresponding contribution to the resistance of the load, which compare favorably to the experimental data and simulation results, are presented. The possibility of using this enhanced (relative to Ohmic heating) dissipation mechanism to power novel plasma radiation sources and produce high K-shell yields using long current rise time machines is discussed. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  6. Charge and energy transferred from a plasma jet to liquid and dielectric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussard, M. Dang Van Sung; Foucher, E.; Rousseau, A.

    2015-10-01

    A key parameter in using plasma jets for biomedical applications is the transferred energy to the living tissues. The objective of this paper is to understand which parameters control the energy transfer from the plasma jet to a liquid or a dielectric surface. The plasma jet is flown with helium and ignited by a 600 Hz ac high voltage (up to 15 kV). Capacitors are connected to two measurement electrodes placed in the plasma source region, and under the sample. Charge and energy transferred are estimated by plotting Lissajous cycles; the number of bullets and the charge probability density function are also calculated. It is shown that the applied voltage and the gap (distance between the end of the tube and the sample) have a dramatic influence on the energy deposition on the sample as well as on the charge probability density function. Surprisingly, both gap distance and voltage have very little influence on the number of bullets reaching the sample per cycle. It is also shown that the conductivity of the liquid sample has almost no influence on the energy deposition and charge probability density function.

  7. Constitutive apical membrane recycling in Aplysia enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Robert Aaron; Runge, Steven William; Moran, William Michael

    2004-11-01

    In Aplysia californica enterocytes, alanine-stimulated Na+ absorption increases both apical membrane exocytosis and fractional capacitance (fCa; a measure of relative apical membrane surface area). These increases are thought to reduce membrane tension during periods of nutrient absorption that cause the enterocytes to swell osmotically. In the absence of alanine, exocytosis and fCa are constant. These findings imply equal rates of constitutive endocytosis and exocytosis and constitutive recycling of the apical plasma membrane. Thus, the purpose of this study was to confirm and determine the relative extent of constitutive apical membrane recycling in Aplysia enterocytes. Biotinylated lectins are commonly used to label plasma membranes and to investigate plasma membrane recycling. Of fourteen biotinylated lectins tested, biotinylated wheat germ agglutinin (bWGA) bound preferentially to the enterocytes apical surface. Therefore, we used bWGA, avidin D (which binds tightly to biotin), and the UV fluorophore 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin-3-acetic acid (AMCA)-conjugated avidin D to assess the extent of constitutive apical membrane recycling. A temperature-dependent (20 vs. 4 degrees C) experimental protocol employed the use of two tissues from each of five snails and resulted in a approximately 60% difference in apical surface fluorescence intensity. Because the extent of membrane recycling is proportional to the difference in surface fluorescence intensity, this difference reveals a relatively high rate of constitutive apical membrane recycling in Aplysia enterocytes.

  8. The TELEC - A plasma type of direct energy converter. [Thermo-Electronic Laser Energy Converter for electric power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Thermo-Electronic Laser Energy Converter (TELEC) is a high-power density plasma device designed to convert a 10.6-micron CO2 laser beam into electric power. Electromagnetic radiation is absorbed in plasma electrons, creating a high-electron temperature. Energetic electrons diffuse from the plasma and strike two electrodes having different areas. The larger electrode collects more electrons and there is a net transport of current. An electromagnetic field is generated in the external circuit. A computer program has been designed to analyze TELEC performance allowing parametric variation for optimization. Values are presented for TELEC performance as a function of cesium pressure and for current density and efficiency as a function of output voltage. Efficiency is shown to increase with pressure, reaching a maximum over 45%.

  9. Application of advanced plasma technology to energy materials and environmental problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Akira

    2015-04-01

    Advanced plasma system has been proposed for various energy materials and for its application to environmental problems. The gas tunnel type plasma device developed by the author exhibits high energy density and also high efficiency. Regarding the application to thermal processing, one example is the plasma spraying of ceramics such as Al2O3 and ZrO2 as thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). The performances of these ceramic coatings are superior to conventional ones, namely, the properties such as the mechanical and chemical properties, thermal behavior and high temperature oxidation resistance of the alumina/zirconia thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been clarified and discussed. The ZrO2 composite coating has a possibility for the development of high functionally graded TBC. The results showed that the alumina/zirconia composite system exhibited an improvement of mechanical properties and oxidation resistance. Another application of gas tunnel type plasma to a functional material is the surface modification of metals. TiN films were formed in a short time of 5 s on Ti and its alloy. Also, thick TiN coatings were easily obtained by gas tunnel type plasma reactive spraying on any metals. Regarding the application to the environmental problems, the decomposition of CO2 gas is also introduced by applying the gas tunnel type plasma system.

  10. Fully-kinetic simulations of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, E. Paulo; Mori, Warren B.; Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-10-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in high-energy-density (HED) plasmas is a central problem in a wide range of scenarios. It dictates, for instance, the dynamics of supernovae in astrophysical plasmas, and is also recognized as a critical challenge to achieving ignition in inertial confinement fusion. In some of these conditions the Larmor radius or Coulomb mean free path (m.f.p.) is finite, allowing kinetic effects to become important, and it is not fully clear how the development of the RTI deviates from standard hydrodynamic behavior. In order to obtain an accurate description of the RTI in these HED conditions it is essential to capture the self-consistent interplay between collisional and collisionless plasma processes, and the role of self-generated electric and magnetic fields. We have explored the dynamics of the RTI in HED plasma conditions using first-principles particle-in-cell simulations combined with Monte Carlo binary collisions. Our simulations capture the role of kinetic diffusion as well as the self-generated electric (e.g. space-charge) and magnetic (e.g. Biermann battery) fields on the growth rate and nonlinear evolution of the RTI for different plasma conditions. We will discuss how different collisional m.f.p. relative to the collisionless plasma skin depth affect the RTI development. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science (FWP 100182).

  11. Electron residual energy due to stochastic heating in field-ionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz; Yazdanpanah, Jam Chakhmachi, Amir; Jahanpanah, Jafar; Yazdani, Elnaz

    2015-11-15

    The electron residual energy originated from the stochastic heating in under-dense field-ionized plasma is investigated here. Initially, the optical response of plasma is modeled by using two counter-propagating electromagnetic waves. In this case, the solution of motion equation of a single electron indicates that by including the ionization, the electron with higher residual energy compared with that without ionization could be obtained. In agreement with chaotic nature of the motion, it is found that the electron residual energy will be significantly changed by applying a minor change in the initial conditions. Extensive kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulations have been performed in order to resolve full plasma reactions. In this way, two different regimes of plasma behavior are observed by varying the pulse length. The results indicate that the amplitude of scattered fields in a proper long pulse length is high enough to act as a second counter-propagating wave and trigger the stochastic electron motion. On the contrary, the analyses of intensity spectrum reveal the fact that the dominant scattering mechanism tends to Thomson rather than Raman scattering by increasing the pulse length. A covariant formalism is used to describe the plasma heating so that it enables us to measure electron temperature inside and outside of the pulse region.

  12. Electron residual energy due to stochastic heating in field-ionized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz; Yazdanpanah, Jam; Jahanpanah, Jafar; Chakhmachi, Amir; Yazdani, Elnaz

    2015-11-01

    The electron residual energy originated from the stochastic heating in under-dense field-ionized plasma is investigated here. Initially, the optical response of plasma is modeled by using two counter-propagating electromagnetic waves. In this case, the solution of motion equation of a single electron indicates that by including the ionization, the electron with higher residual energy compared with that without ionization could be obtained. In agreement with chaotic nature of the motion, it is found that the electron residual energy will be significantly changed by applying a minor change in the initial conditions. Extensive kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulations have been performed in order to resolve full plasma reactions. In this way, two different regimes of plasma behavior are observed by varying the pulse length. The results indicate that the amplitude of scattered fields in a proper long pulse length is high enough to act as a second counter-propagating wave and trigger the stochastic electron motion. On the contrary, the analyses of intensity spectrum reveal the fact that the dominant scattering mechanism tends to Thomson rather than Raman scattering by increasing the pulse length. A covariant formalism is used to describe the plasma heating so that it enables us to measure electron temperature inside and outside of the pulse region.

  13. Numerical simulation of inducing characteristics of high energy electron beam plasma for aerodynamics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongfeng, DENG; Jian, JIANG; Xianwei, HAN; Chang, TAN; Jianguo, WEI

    2017-04-01

    The problem of flow active control by low temperature plasma is considered to be one of the most flourishing fields of aerodynamics due to its practical advantages. Compared with other means, the electron beam plasma is a potential flow control method for large scale flow. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics model coupled with a multi-fluid plasma model is established to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics induced by electron beam plasma. The results demonstrate that the electron beam strongly influences the flow properties, not only in the boundary layers, but also in the main flow. A weak shockwave is induced at the electron beam injection position and develops to the other side of the wind tunnel behind the beam. It brings additional energy into air, and the inducing characteristics are closely related to the beam power and increase nonlinearly with it. The injection angles also influence the flow properties to some extent. Based on this research, we demonstrate that the high energy electron beam air plasma has three attractive advantages in aerodynamic applications, i.e. the high energy density, wide action range and excellent action effect. Due to the rapid development of near space hypersonic vehicles and atmospheric fighters, by optimizing the parameters, the electron beam can be used as an alternative means in aerodynamic steering in these applications.

  14. Numerical simulation of inducing characteristics of high energy electron beam plasma for aerodynamics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yongfeng; Jiang, Jian; Han, Xianwei; Tan, Chang; Wei, Jianguo

    2017-04-01

    The problem of flow active control by low temperature plasma is considered to be one of the most flourishing fields of aerodynamics due to its practical advantages. Compared with other means, the electron beam plasma is a potential flow control method for large scale flow. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics model coupled with a multi-fluid plasma model is established to investigate the aerodynamic characteristics induced by electron beam plasma. The results demonstrate that the electron beam strongly influences the flow properties, not only in the boundary layers, but also in the main flow. A weak shockwave is induced at the electron beam injection position and develops to the other side of the wind tunnel behind the beam. It brings additional energy into air, and the inducing characteristics are closely related to the beam power and increase nonlinearly with it. The injection angles also influence the flow properties to some extent. Based on this research, we demonstrate that the high energy electron beam air plasma has three attractive advantages in aerodynamic applications, i.e. the high energy density, wide action range and excellent action effect. Due to the rapid development of near space hypersonic vehicles and atmospheric fighters, by optimizing the parameters, the electron beam can be used as an alternative means in aerodynamic steering in these applications.

  15. Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster Model with Time-Evolution of Energy and State Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Sankaran, Kamesh

    2012-01-01

    A model for pulsed inductive plasma acceleration is presented that consists of a set of circuit equations coupled to both a one-dimensional equation of motion and an equation governing the partitioning of energy. The latter two equations are obtained for the plasma current sheet by treating it as a single element of finite volume and integrating the governing equations over that volume. The integrated terms are replaced where necessary by physically-equivalent quantities that are calculated through the solution of other parts of the governing equation set. The model improves upon previous one-dimensional performance models by permitting the time-evolution of the energy and state properties of the plasma, the latter allowing for the tailoring of the model to different gases that may be chosen as propellants. The time evolution of the various energy modes in the system and the associated plasma properties, calculated for argon propellant, are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the model. The model produces a result where efficiency is maximized at a given value of the electrodynamic scaling term known as the dynamic impedance parameter. Qualitatively and quantitatively, the model compares favorably with performance measured for two separate inductive pulsed plasma thrusters, with disagreements attributable to simplifying assumptions employed in the generation of the model solution.

  16. Recycling production designs: the value of coordination and flexibility in aluminum recycling operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brommer, Tracey H.

    The growing motivation for aluminum recycling has prompted interest in recycling alternative and more challenging secondary materials. The nature of these alternative secondary materials necessitates the development of an intermediate recycling facility that can reprocess the secondary materials into a liquid product Two downstream aluminum remelters will incorporate the liquid products into their aluminum alloy production schedules. Energy and environmental benefits result from delivering the products as liquid but coordination challenges persist because of the energy cost to maintain the liquid. Further coordination challenges result from the necessity to establish a long term recycling production plan in the presence of long term downstream aluminum remelter production uncertainty and inherent variation in the daily order schedule of the downstream aluminum remelters. In this context a fundamental question arises, considering the metallurgical complexities of dross reprocessing, what is the value of operating a coordinated set of by-product reprocessing plants and remelting cast houses? A methodology is presented to calculate the optimal recycling center production parameters including 1) the number of recycled products, 2) the volume of recycled products, 3) allocation of recycled materials across recycled products, 4) allocation of recycled products across finished alloys, 4) the level of flexibility for the recycling center to operate. The methods implemented include, 1) an optimization model to describe the long term operations of the recycling center, 2) an uncertainty simulation tool, 3) a simulation optimization method, 4) a dynamic simulation tool with four embedded daily production optimization models of varying degrees of flexibility. This methodology is used to quantify the performance of several recycling center production designs of varying levels of coordination and flexibility. This analysis allowed the identification of the optimal recycling

  17. The plasma membrane as a capacitor for energy and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Supriyo; Kassan, Adam; Busija, Anna R.; Rangamani, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    When considering which components of the cell are the most critical to function and physiology, we naturally focus on the nucleus, the mitochondria that regulate energy and apoptotic signaling, or other organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, ribosomes, etc. Few people will suggest that the membrane is the most critical element of a cell in terms of function and physiology. Those that consider the membrane critical will point to its obvious barrier function regulated by the lipid bilayer and numerous ion channels that regulate homeostatic gradients. What becomes evident upon closer inspection is that not all membranes are created equal and that there are lipid-rich microdomains that serve as platforms of signaling and a means of communication with the intracellular environment. In this review, we explore the evolution of membranes, focus on lipid-rich microdomains, and advance the novel concept that membranes serve as “capacitors for energy and metabolism.” Within this framework, the membrane then is the primary and critical regulator of stress and disease adaptation of the cell. PMID:26771520

  18. The plasma membrane as a capacitor for energy and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ray, Supriyo; Kassan, Adam; Busija, Anna R; Rangamani, Padmini; Patel, Hemal H

    2016-02-01

    When considering which components of the cell are the most critical to function and physiology, we naturally focus on the nucleus, the mitochondria that regulate energy and apoptotic signaling, or other organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, ribosomes, etc. Few people will suggest that the membrane is the most critical element of a cell in terms of function and physiology. Those that consider the membrane critical will point to its obvious barrier function regulated by the lipid bilayer and numerous ion channels that regulate homeostatic gradients. What becomes evident upon closer inspection is that not all membranes are created equal and that there are lipid-rich microdomains that serve as platforms of signaling and a means of communication with the intracellular environment. In this review, we explore the evolution of membranes, focus on lipid-rich microdomains, and advance the novel concept that membranes serve as "capacitors for energy and metabolism." Within this framework, the membrane then is the primary and critical regulator of stress and disease adaptation of the cell.

  19. Electron Energy Distribution function in a weakly magnetized expanding helicon plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirse, Nishant; Harvey, Cleo; Gaman, Cezar; Ellingboe, Bert

    2016-09-01

    Helicon wave heating is well known to produce high-density plasma source for application in plasma thrusters, plasma processing and many more. Our previous study (B Ellingboe et al. APS Gaseous Electronics Conference 2015, abstract #KW2.005) has shown observation of helicon wave in a weakly magnetized inductively coupled plasma source excited by m =0 antenna at 13.56 MHz. In this paper, we investigated the Electron Energy Distribution Function (EEDF) in the same setup by using an RF compensated Langmuir probe. The ac signal superimposition technique (second harmonic technique) is used to determine EEDF. The EEDF is measured for 5-100 mTorr gas pressure, 100 W - 1.5 kW rf power and at different locations in the source chamber, boundary and diffusion chamber. This paper will discuss the change in the shape of EEDF for various heating mode transitions.

  20. Recent developments in plasma spray processes for applications in energy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauer, G.; Jarligo, M. O.; Marcano, D.; Rezanka, S.; Zhou, D.; Vaßen, R.

    2017-03-01

    This work focuses on recent developments of plasma spray processes with respect to specific demands in energy technology. High Velocity Atmospheric Plasma Spraying (HV-APS) is a novel variant of plasma spraying devoted to materials which are prone to oxidation or decomposition. It is shown how this process can be used for metallic bondcoats in thermal barrier coating systems. Furthermore, Suspension Plasma Spraying (SPS) is a new method to process submicron-sized feedstock powders which are not sufficiently flowable to feed them in dry state. SPS is presently promoted by the development of novel torch concepts with axial feedstock injection. An example for a columnar structured double layer thermal barrier coating is given. Finally, Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) is a novel technology operating in controlled atmosphere at low pressure and high plasma power. At such condition, vaporization even of high-melting oxide ceramics is possible enabling the formation of columnar structured, strain tolerant coatings with low thermal conductivity. Applying different conditions, the deposition is still dominated by liquid splats. Such process is termed Low Pressure Plasma Spraying-Thin Film (LPPS-TF). Two examples of applications are gas-tight and highly ionic and electronic conductive electrolyte and membrane layers which were deposited on porous metallic substrates.

  1. Extraction characteristics of a low-energy ion beam system with a remote plasma chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Vasquez, M. R.; Wada, M.

    2016-02-15

    Low-energy argon beams were extracted from a dual-chamber ion source system. The first chamber is a quartz cylinder where dense inductively coupled plasmas were produced using 13.56 MHz radio frequency (rf) power. The discharge was driven into an adjacent chamber which acts as a reservoir for ion beam extraction using a dual-electrode extractor configuration. Extraction of ions from the second chamber with energies in the 100 eV range was achieved while minimizing fluctuations induced by the rf signal. A custom-built retarding potential analyzer was used to analyze the effectiveness of ion beam transport using the remote plasma chamber. Well-defined beams were extracted between 60 and 100 V extraction potentials at 50–100 W rf powers. An increase in rf power resulted in an increase in average ion energy, increase in ion current density while the energy spread remains constant.

  2. Correlating ion energies and CF2 surface production during fluorocarbon plasma processing of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Ina T.; Zhou, Jie; Fisher, Ellen R.

    2006-07-01

    Ion energy distribution (IED) measurements are reported for ions in the plasma molecular beam source of the imaging of radicals interacting with surfaces (IRIS) apparatus. The IEDs and relative intensities of nascent ions in C3F8 and C4F8 plasma molecular beams were measured using a Hiden PSM003 mass spectrometer mounted on the IRIS main chamber. The IEDs are complex and multimodal, with mean ion energies ranging from 29to92eV. Integrated IEDs provided relative ion intensities as a function of applied rf power and source pressure. Generally, higher applied rf powers and lower source pressures resulted in increased ion intensities and mean ion energies. Most significantly, a comparison to CF2 surface interaction measurements previously made in our laboratories reveals that mean ion energies are directly and linearly correlated to CF2 surface production in these systems.

  3. Study of Energy Conversion and Partitioning in the Magnetic Reconnection Layer in Laboratory and Space Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, M.

    2014-12-01

    The essential feature of magnetic reconnection is that it energizes plasma particles by converting magnetic energy to particle energy [1]. This talk addresses this key unresolved question; how is magnetic energy converted to plasma kinetic energy during reconnection? The mechanisms responsible for the energization of plasma particles in the magnetic reconnection layer have been investigated in the MRX device together with quantitative evaluation of conversion of magnetic energy to ions and electrons. An analysis is made in terms of two-fluid physics based on the measurements of two-dimensional profiles of 1) electric potential, 2) flow vectors of electrons and ions, and 3) the electron temperature, Te and the ion temperature, Ti in the layer [2,3]. It is shown that more than 50 % of magnetic energy is converted to plasma particles, of which 2/3 transferred to ions and 1/3 to electrons, at a remarkably fast speed (~0.2VA) in the reconnection layer [3]. In a reconnection region of effectively similar size in the Earth's magnetotail, the energy partition was recently measured during multiple passages of the Cluster satellites [4]. The half length of the tail reconnection layer (L) was estimated to be 2000-4000 km namely 3-6di; the scale length is very similar to the MRX case, L ~ 3di. Reconnection in the magneto-tail is driven by an external force, i.e., the solar wind, and the boundary conditions are very similar to the MRX setup. The observed energy partition is notably similar, namely, more than 50% of the magnetic energy flux is converted to the particle energy flux, which is dominated by the ion enthalpy flux, with smaller contributions from the electron enthalpy and heat flux. A broad implication will be discussed. Work supported by DOE, NASA, and NSF. Fig.1: Measured ion flow vectors in the reconnection plane with measured 2-D profile of the plasma potential φ_p. The thin lines are measured poloidal flux counters.[1] M. Yamada, R. Kulsrud, & H. Ji, Rev. Mod

  4. Recycled Art: Create Puppets Using Recycled Objects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents an activity from "Healthy Foods from Healthy Soils" for making puppets using recycled food packaging materials. Includes background information, materials, instructions, literature links, resources, and benchmarks. (NB)

  5. Recycle Used Oil on America Recycles Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Boyd W.

    2000-01-01

    Explains that motor oils can be reused and recycled. Educates students about environmental hazards and oil management and includes classroom activities. Addresses the National Science Education Standards. (YDS)

  6. Recycled Art: Create Puppets Using Recycled Objects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents an activity from "Healthy Foods from Healthy Soils" for making puppets using recycled food packaging materials. Includes background information, materials, instructions, literature links, resources, and benchmarks. (NB)

  7. Diagnosing collisionless energy transfer using field-particle correlations: Vlasov-Poisson plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howes, Gregory G.; Klein, Kristopher G.; Li, Tak Chu

    2017-02-01

    Turbulence plays a key role in the conversion of the energy of large-scale fields and flows to plasma heat, impacting the macroscopic evolution of the heliosphere and other astrophysical plasma systems. Although we have long been able to make direct spacecraft measurements of all aspects of the electromagnetic field and plasma fluctuations in near-Earth space, our understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for the damping of the turbulent fluctuations in heliospheric plasmas remains incomplete. Here we propose an innovative field-particle correlation technique that can be used to measure directly the secular energy transfer from fields to particles associated with collisionless damping of the turbulent fluctuations. Furthermore, this novel procedure yields information about the collisionless energy transfer as a function of particle velocity, providing vital new information that can help to identify the dominant collisionless mechanism governing the damping of the turbulent fluctuations. Kinetic plasma theory is used to devise the appropriate correlation to diagnose Landau damping, and the field-particle correlation technique is thoroughly illustrated using the simplified case of the Landau damping of Langmuir waves in a 1D-1V (one dimension in physical space and one dimension in velocity space) Vlasov-Poisson plasma. Generalizations necessary to apply the field-particle correlation technique to diagnose the collisionless damping of turbulent fluctuations in the solar wind are discussed, highlighting several caveats. This novel field-particle correlation technique is intended to be used as a primary analysis tool for measurements from current, upcoming and proposed spacecraft missions that are focused on the kinetic microphysics of weakly collisional heliospheric plasmas, including the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS), Solar Probe Plus, Solar Orbiter and Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) missions.

  8. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase SCFTIR1/AFB and Membrane Sterols Play Key Roles in Auxin Regulation of Endocytosis, Recycling, and Plasma Membrane Accumulation of the Auxin Efflux Transporter PIN2 in Arabidopsis thaliana[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jianwei; Fujioka, Shozo; Peng, Jianling; Chen, Jianghua; Li, Guangming; Chen, Rujin

    2009-01-01

    The PIN family of auxin efflux transporters exhibit polar plasma membrane (PM) localization and play a key role in auxin gradient-mediated developmental processes. Auxin inhibits PIN2 endocytosis and promotes its PM localization. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we show that the inhibitory effect of auxin on PIN2 endocytosis was impaired in SCFTIR1/AFB auxin signaling mutants. Similarly, reducing membrane sterols impaired auxin inhibition of PIN2 endocytosis. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analyses indicate that membrane sterols were significantly reduced in SCFTIR1/AFB mutants, supporting a link between membrane sterols and auxin signaling in regulating PIN2 endocytosis. We show that auxin promoted PIN2 recycling from endosomes to the PM and increased PIN2 steady state levels in the PM fraction. Furthermore, we show that the positive effect of auxin on PIN2 levels in the PM was impaired by inhibiting membrane sterols or auxin signaling. Consistent with this, the sterol biosynthetic mutant fk-J79 exhibited pronounced defects in primary root elongation and gravitropic response. Our data collectively indicate that, although there are distinct processes involved in endocytic regulation of specific PM-resident proteins, the SCFTIR1/AFB-dependent processes are required for auxin regulation of endocytosis, recycling, and PM accumulation of the auxin efflux transporter PIN2 in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:19218398

  9. Charge, quantum state, and energy distributions of impurities released in plasma-wall interaction processes

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    Conventional wisdom has it that total sputtering yields correlate with high Z-impurity levels found in fusion plasmas. The charge, quantum states and energy distributions of sputtered atoms have been virtually ignored in these considerations. Impurity transport from the wall or limiter to the plasma is, however, strongly influenced by these factors which may play a crucial role in determining impurity levels in the deeper plasma regions. Preliminary calculations have shown that positively charged impurities would most likely be redeposited on their surfaces of origin. The conditions leading to charged or excited state atoms emission and the energy distributions of such species are reviewed. Techniques for measuring these quantities are discussed and the need for a wider data base in this field is pointed out.

  10. Energy Stable Space-Time Discontinuous Galerkin Approximations of the 2-Fluid Plasma Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossmanith, James; Barth, Tim

    2010-11-01

    Energy stable variants of the space-time discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element method are developed that approximate the ideal two-fluid plasma equations. Using standard symmetrization techniques, the two-fluid plasma equations are symmeterized via convex entropy function and the introduction of entropy variables. Using these entropy variables, the source term coupling in the two-fluid plasma equations is shown to have iso-energetic properties so that the source term neither creates nor removes energy from the system. Finite-dimensional approximation spaces utilizing entropy variables are utilized in the DG discretization yielding provable nonlinear stability and exact preservation of this iso-energetic source term property. Numerical results for the two-fluid approximation of magnetic reconnection are presented verifying and assessing properties of the present method.

  11. Energy transport by energetic electrons released during solar flares. II - Current filamentation and plasma heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Dulk, G. A.; Pritchett, P. L.

    1988-01-01

    Two-dimensional electrostatic particle simulations are performed in order to investigate energy transport associated with the propagation of energetic electrons through a flaring flux tube. Results indicate that as the energetic electrons flow outward, a return current of ambient plasma electrons is drawn inward (to maintain quasi-neutrality) which can be spatially separate from the primary current carried by the energetic electrons. Return current electrons are shown to accumulate on either side of the acceleration region of the energetic electrons, and depletions of ambient plasma electrons develop in the return current regions. Plasma ions accelerate across the field lines to produce current closure or charge neutralization, achieving energies comparable to those of the energetic electrons.

  12. A low energy positron accumulator for the plasma confinement in a compact magnetic mirror trap

    SciTech Connect

    Higaki, Hiroyuki Kaga, Chikato; Nagayasu, Katsushi; Okamoto, Hiromi; Nagata, Yugo; Kanai, Yasuyuki; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2015-06-29

    A low energy positron accumulator was constructed at RIKEN for the purpose of confining an electron-positron plasma. The use of 5 mCi {sup 22}Na RI source with a standard solid Ne moderator and N{sub 2} buffer gas cooling resulted in a low energy positron yield of ∼ 3 × 10{sup 5} e+/s. So far, 2 × 10{sup 6} positrons have been accumulated in 120s.

  13. Resource Efficient Metal and Material Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Markus A.; van Schaik, Antoinette

    Metals enable sustainability through their use and their recyclability. However, various factors can affect the Resource Efficiency of Metal Processing and Recycling. Some typical factors that enable Resource Efficiency include and arranged under the drivers of sustainability: Environment (Maximize Resource Efficiency — Energy, Recyclates, Materials, Water, Sludges, Emissions, Land); Economic Feasibility (BAT & Recycling Systems Simulation / Digitalization, Product vis-à-vis Material Centric Recycling); and Social — Licence to Operate (Legislation, consumer, policy, theft, manual labour.). In order to realize this primary production has to be linked systemically with typical actors in the recycling chain such as Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), Recyclers & Collection, Physical separation specialists as well as process metallurgical operations that produce high value metals, compounds and products that recycle back to products. This is best done with deep knowledge of multi-physics, technology, product & system design, process control, market, life cycle management, policy, to name a few. The combination of these will be discussed as Design for Sustainability (DfS) and Design for Recycling (DfR) applications.

  14. Challenges in metal recycling.

    PubMed

    Reck, Barbara K; Graedel, T E

    2012-08-10

    Metals are infinitely recyclable in principle, but in practice, recycling is often inefficient or essentially nonexistent because of limits imposed by social behavior, product design, recycling technologies, and the thermodynamics of separation. We review these topics, distinguishing among common, specialty, and precious metals. The most beneficial actions that could improve recycling rates are increased collection rates of discarded products, improved design for recycling, and the enhanced deployment of modern recycling methodology. As a global society, we are currently far away from a closed-loop material system. Much improvement is possible, but limitations of many kinds--not all of them technological--will preclude complete closure of the materials cycle.

  15. Micro-scale Plasma Arc Gasification for Waste Treatment and Energy Production Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccio, Anne

    2015-01-01

    As NASA continues to develop technology for spaceflight beyond low earth orbit, we must develop the right systems for sustaining human life on a long duration or planetary mission. Plasma arc gasification (PAG) is an energy efficient mechanism of waste management for power generation and synthetic gas(syngas) production.

  16. Electron energy distribution in a helium plasma created by nuclear radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. H.; Miley, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    An integral balance technique for calculation of the electron energy distribution in a radiation-induced plasma is described. Results predict W-values reasonably well and compare favorably with more complicated Monte-Carlo calculations. The distribution found differs from that in a normal electrical discharge and is of interest in radiation-pumped laser research.

  17. Covalent bonding effect on the mean excitation energy of H2 with the local plasma model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamaratos, E.

    1984-01-01

    Chemical bonding is taken into account explicitly in the determination of the mean excitation energy (I) for stopping power of H2 with the local plasma approximation by employing molecular electronic wave functions for H2 for the first time. This procedure leads to a new value for IH2 that is higher than all accepted experimental and theoretical values.

  18. On the lower bound of the internal energy of the one-component-plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, S. A.; Khrapak, A. G.

    2015-04-15

    A new simple yet accurate analytical estimate for the internal energy of the classical one-component-plasma is proposed. In the limit of weak coupling, it reduces to the Debye-Hückel result. In the opposite limit of strong coupling, the ion sphere approximation is recovered. The agreement with the accurate numerical results in the intermediate coupling regime is fairly good.

  19. Experimental investigation of opacity models for stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and high energy density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, James

    2008-11-01

    Theoretical opacities are required for calculating energy transport in plasmas. In particular, understanding stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and Z-pinches depends on the opacities of mid-atomic-number elements in the 150-300 eV temperature range. These models are complex and experimental validation is crucial. For example, solar models presently disagree with helioseismology and one possible explanation is inadequate opacities. Testing these opacities requires a uniform plasma at temperatures high enough to produce the ion charge states that exist in the sun. Typical opacity experiments heat a sample using x-rays and measure the spectrally resolved transmission with a backlight. The difficulty grows as the temperature increases because the heating x-ray source must supply more energy and the backlighter source must be bright enough to overwhelm the plasma self emission. These problems were overcome using the dynamic hohlraum x-ray source at Sandia's Z facility to measure the transmission of a mixed Mg-Fe plasma heated above 150 eV. This capability will also advance opacity science for other high energy density plasmas. This tutorial describes opacity experiment challenges including accurate transmission measurements, plasma diagnostics, and quantitative model comparisons. The solar interior serves as a focal problem and Z facility experiments are used to illustrate the techniques. **In collaboration with C. Iglesias (LLNL), R. Mancini (U. Nevada), J.MacFarlane, I. Golovkin and P. Wang (Prism), C. Blancard, Ph. Cosse, G. Faussurier, F. Gilleron, and J.C. Pain (CEA), J. Abdallah Jr. (LANL), and G.A. Rochau and P.W. Lake (Sandia). ++Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Energy Dissipation and Landau Damping in Two- and Three-dimensional Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tak Chu; Howes, Gregory G.; Klein, Kristopher G.; TenBarge, Jason M.

    2016-12-01

    Plasma turbulence is ubiquitous in space and astrophysical plasmas, playing an important role in plasma energization, but the physical mechanisms leading to dissipation of the turbulent energy remain to be definitively identified. Kinetic simulations in two dimensions (2D) have been extensively used to study the dissipation process. How the limitation to 2D affects energy dissipation remains unclear. This work provides a model of comparison between two- and three-dimensional (3D) plasma turbulence using gyrokinetic simulations; it also explores the dynamics of distribution functions during the dissipation process. It is found that both 2D and 3D nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of a low-beta plasma generate electron velocity-space structures with the same characteristics as that of the linear Landau damping of Alfvén waves in a 3D linear simulation. The continual occurrence of the velocity-space structures throughout the turbulence simulations suggests that the action of Landau damping may be responsible for the turbulent energy transfer to electrons in both 2D and 3D, and makes possible the subsequent irreversible heating of the plasma through collisional smoothing of the velocity-space fluctuations. Although, in the 2D case where variation along the equilibrium magnetic field is absent, it may be expected that Landau damping is not possible, a common trigonometric factor appears in the 2D resonant denominator, leaving the resonance condition unchanged from the 3D case. The evolution of the 2D and 3D cases is qualitatively similar. However, quantitatively, the nonlinear energy cascade and subsequent dissipation is significantly slower in the 2D case.

  1. Measurements of energy distribution in microwave plasmas of N2 and He and comparisons with results for H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Hawley, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into translational energy of the flowing gas is being investigated. Specifically, this study compares the energy transfer characteristics of three different gases, H2, N2, and He, to gain some insight as to the dominant energy transfer processes present in a microwave plasma. A calorimetric experimental system has been designed and built enclosing the microwave plasma system to accurately determine the net energy transferred to the flowing gas. Results are obtained for N2 and He discharges and compared with previously reported experimental results for H2.

  2. Hydrogen and helium recycling from a JxB -force convected liquid metal Ga67In20.5Sn12.5 under steady state plasma bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Hirooka, Yoshi; Bi, Hailin; Shimada, Michiya; Ono, Masa

    2016-07-20

    A series of first-of-a-kind laboratory-scale experiments on the JxB-force convected liquid metal divertor concept have been carried out in the temperature range from room temperature to ~200 °C, employing a eutectic alloy: Ga67In20.5Sn12.5, the melting point of which is 10.5 °C. The electrical current conducted through the alloy is set at about 70A and the magnetic field is set at about 700 G. Finally, it has reproducibly been observed that hydrogen as well as helium particle recycling is noticeably reduced under steady state plasma bombardment when the liquid is convected by the JxB force.

  3. MASS AND ENERGY OF ERUPTING SOLAR PLASMA OBSERVED WITH THE X-RAY TELESCOPE ON HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jin-Yi; Moon, Yong-Jae; Kim, Kap-Sung; Raymond, John C.; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2015-01-10

    We investigate seven eruptive plasma observations by Hinode/XRT. Their corresponding EUV and/or white light coronal mass ejection features are visible in some events. Five events are observed in several passbands in X-rays, which allows for the determination of the eruptive plasma temperature using a filter ratio method. We find that the isothermal temperatures vary from 1.6 to 10 MK. These temperatures are an average weighted toward higher temperature plasma. We determine the mass constraints of eruptive plasmas by assuming simplified geometrical structures of the plasma with isothermal plasma temperatures. This method provides an upper limit to the masses of the observed eruptive plasmas in X-ray passbands since any clumping causes the overestimation of the mass. For the other two events, we assume the temperatures are at the maximum temperature of the X-ray Telescope (XRT) temperature response function, which gives a lower limit of the masses. We find that the masses in XRT, ∼3 × 10{sup 13}-5 × 10{sup 14} g, are smaller in their upper limit than the total masses obtained by LASCO, ∼1 × 10{sup 15} g. In addition, we estimate the radiative loss, thermal conduction, thermal, and kinetic energies of the eruptive plasma in X-rays. For four events, we find that the thermal conduction timescales are much shorter than the duration of eruption. This result implies that additional heating during the eruption may be required to explain the plasma observations in X-rays for the four events.

  4. Radioactive materials in recycled metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lubenau, J.O.; Yusko, J.G.

    1995-04-01

    In recent years, the metal recycling industry has become increasingly aware of an unwanted component in metal scrap-radioactive material. Worldwide, there have been 35 instances where radioactive sources were unintentionally smelted in the course of recycling metal scrap. In some cases contaminated metal consumer products were distributed internationally. In at least one case, serious radiation exposures of workers and the public occurred. Radioactive material appearing in metal scrap includes sources subject to licensing under the Atomic Energy Act and also naturally occurring radioactive material. U.S. mills that have smelted a radioactive source face costs resulting from decontamination, waste disposal, and lost profits that range from 7 to 23 million U.S. dollars for each event. To solve the problem, industry and the government have jointly undertaken initiatives to increase awareness of the problem within the metal recycling industry. Radiation monitoring of recycled metal scrap is being performed increasingly by mills and, to a lesser extent, by scrap processors. The monitoring does not, however, provide 100% protection. Improvements in regulatory oversight by the government could stimulate improved accounting and control of licensed sources. However, additional government effort in this area must be reconciled with competing priorities in radiation safety and budgetary constraints. The threat of radioactive material in recycled metal scrap will continue for the foreseeable future and, thus, poses regulatory policy challenges for both developed and developing nations.

  5. Radioactive materials in recycled metals.

    PubMed

    Lubenau, J O; Yusko, J G

    1995-04-01

    In recent years, the metal recycling industry has become increasingly aware of an unwanted component in metal scrap--radioactive material. Worldwide, there have been 35 instances where radioactive sources were unintentionally smelted in the course of recycling metal scrap. In some cases contaminated metal consumer products were distributed internationally. In at least one case, serious radiation exposures of workers and the public occurred. Radioactive material appearing in metal scrap includes sources subject to licensing under the Atomic Energy Act and also naturally occurring radioactive material. U.S. mills that have smelted a radioactive source face costs resulting from decontamination, waste disposal, and lost profits that range from 7 to 23 million U.S. dollars for each event. To solve the problem, industry and the government have jointly undertaken initiatives to increase awareness of the problem within the metal recycling industry. Radiation monitoring of recycled metal scrap is being performed increasingly by mills and, to a lesser extent, by scrap processors. The monitoring does not, however, provide 100% protection. Improvements in regulatory oversight by the government could stimulate improved accounting and control of licensed sources. However, additional government effort in this area must be reconciled with competing priorities in radiation safety and budgetary constraints. The threat of radioactive material in recycled metal scrap will continue for the foreseeable future and, thus, poses regulatory policy challenges for both developed and developing nations.

  6. Improving biomass resource recycling capacity of Rubrivivax gelatinosus cultivated in wastewater through regulating the generation and use of energy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pan; Wang, Yan-ling; Zhang, Guang-ming; Liu, Xian-shu; Du, Cong; Tong, Qing-yue; Li, Ning

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigated Mg2+ enhancement of biomass production through regulating the generation and use of energy in Rubrivivax gelatinosus wastewater treatment. Results showed that proper Mg2+ dosage range was 1.5-15 mg/L. With optimal Mg2+ dosage (10 mg/L), biomass production (5010 mg/L) was improved by 60%. Both protein and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals reached above 90%. Biomass yield improved by 38%. Hydraulic retention time was shortened by 25%. Mechanism analysis indicated that as activator, Mg2+ promoted specifically isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) and Ca2+ / Mg2+ -ATPase activities in energy metabolism, and then improved the generation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and the use of ATP. This enhanced the secretion and activity of protease, protein and COD removals, and then led to more biomass production. With 10 mg/L Mg2+, IDH and Ca2+ / Mg2+ -ATPase activities, ATP production, protease activity were improved by 43.8%, 40.6%, 39.4% and 46.5%, respectively.

  7. Particle energy distributions and metastable atoms in transient low pressure interpulse microwave plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Shail; Nath Patel, Dudh; Ram Baitha, Anuj; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2015-12-01

    The electron energies and its distribution function are measured in non-equilibrium transient pulsed microwave plasmas in the interpulse regime using a retarding field electron energy analyzer. The plasmas are driven to different initial conditions by varying the electromagnetic (EM) wave pulse duration, peak power, or the wave frequency. Two cases of wave excitation are investigated: (i) short-pulse (pulse duration, t w ~ 1 μs), high-power (~60 kW) waves of 9.45 GHz and (ii) medium-pulse (t w ~ 20 μs), and moderate power waves of ~3 kW at 2.45 GHz. It is found that high-power, short-duration pulses lead to a significantly different electron energy probability function (EEPF) in the interpulse phase—a Maxwellian with a bump on the tail, although the average energy per pulse (~60 mJ) is maintained the same in the two modes of wave excitation. Electrons with energies  >250 eV are found to exist in the discharge in the both cases. Another subset of experiments is performed to delineate the effect of the wave frequency and the peak power on EEPF. A traveling wave tube (TWT) amplifier based microwave source for generating pulsed plasma (t w  =  230 μs) in a wide frequency range (6-18 GHz) is employed for this purpose. Further experiments on measurements of metastable density using optical emission spectroscopy and ion energy analyzer have been carried out. By tailoring the EEPF of the transient plasma and metastable densities, new applications in plasma processing, chemistry and biology can be realized in the interpulse phase of the discharge.

  8. Inductive pulsed plasma thruster model with time-evolution of energy and state properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Sankaran, K.; Ritchie, A. G.; Reneau, J. P.

    2013-11-01

    A model for pulsed inductive plasma acceleration is presented that consists of a set of circuit equations coupled to both a one-dimensional (1D) equation of motion and an equation governing the partitioning of energy. The latter two equations are obtained for the plasma current sheet by treating it as a single element of finite volume and integrating the governing equations over that volume. The integrated terms are replaced where necessary by physically equivalent approximations that are calculated through the solution of other parts of the governing equation set. The model improves upon previous 1D performance models by permitting the time-evolution of the temperature consistent with the time-varying energy flux into the plasma. The plasma state properties are also more realistically modelled and evolved in time, allowing for the tailoring of the model to different gases that may be chosen as propellants. Computational results for argon propellant are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the model. The model produces a result where efficiency is maximized at a given value of the electrodynamic scaling term known as the dynamic impedance parameter. The scaling of different energy sinks as a function of the dynamic impedance parameter provides insight into the global energy partitioning in these types of accelerators. Results from the present model deviate from the previous version where temperature is selected as an input without regard for the energy that would be deposited to heat the gas to that temperature. Qualitatively and quantitatively, the model predicts specific impulse values that compare favourably with those measured for two separate inductive pulsed plasma thrusters. Efficiency is underpredicted in the regime where data are available, but the trends in the data and simulations follow similar trajectories that appear to be converging towards a predicted peak efficiency as the dynamic impedance parameter is increased.

  9. Numerical Modeling and Testing of an Inductively-Driven and High-Energy Pulsed Plasma Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parma, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPTs) are advanced electric space propulsion devices that are characterized by simplicity and robustness. They suffer, however, from low thrust efficiencies. This summer, two approaches to improve the thrust efficiency of PPTs will be investigated through both numerical modeling and experimental testing. The first approach, an inductively-driven PPT, uses a double-ignition circuit to fire two PPTs in succession. This effectively changes the PPTs configuration from an LRC circuit to an LR circuit. The LR circuit is expected to provide better impedance matching and improving the efficiency of the energy transfer to the plasma. An added benefit of the LR circuit is an exponential decay of the current, whereas a traditional PPT s under damped LRC circuit experiences the characteristic "ringing" of its current. The exponential decay may provide improved lifetime and sustained electromagnetic acceleration. The second approach, a high-energy PPT, is a traditional PPT with a variable size capacitor bank. This PPT will be simulated and tested at energy levels between 100 and 450 joules in order to investigate the relationship between efficiency and energy level. Arbitrary Coordinate Hydromagnetic (MACH2) code is used. The MACH2 code, designed by the Center for Plasma Theory and Computation at the Air Force Research Laboratory, has been used to gain insight into a variety of plasma problems, including electric plasma thrusters. The goals for this summer include numerical predictions of performance for both the inductively-driven PPT and high-energy PFT, experimental validation of the numerical models, and numerical optimization of the designs. These goals will be met through numerical and experimental investigation of the PPTs current waveforms, mass loss (or ablation), and impulse bit characteristics.

  10. Numerical Modeling and Testing of an Inductively-Driven and High-Energy Pulsed Plasma Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parma, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPTs) are advanced electric space propulsion devices that are characterized by simplicity and robustness. They suffer, however, from low thrust efficiencies. This summer, two approaches to improve the thrust efficiency of PPTs will be investigated through both numerical modeling and experimental testing. The first approach, an inductively-driven PPT, uses a double-ignition circuit to fire two PPTs in succession. This effectively changes the PPTs configuration from an LRC circuit to an LR circuit. The LR circuit is expected to provide better impedance matching and improving the efficiency of the energy transfer to the plasma. An added benefit of the LR circuit is an exponential decay of the current, whereas a traditional PPT s under damped LRC circuit experiences the characteristic "ringing" of its current. The exponential decay may provide improved lifetime and sustained electromagnetic acceleration. The second approach, a high-energy PPT, is a traditional PPT with a variable size capacitor bank. This PPT will be simulated and tested at energy levels between 100 and 450 joules in order to investigate the relationship between efficiency and energy level. Arbitrary Coordinate Hydromagnetic (MACH2) code is used. The MACH2 code, designed by the Center for Plasma Theory and Computation at the Air Force Research Laboratory, has been used to gain insight into a variety of plasma problems, including electric plasma thrusters. The goals for this summer include numerical predictions of performance for both the inductively-driven PPT and high-energy PFT, experimental validation of the numerical models, and numerical optimization of the designs. These goals will be met through numerical and experimental investigation of the PPTs current waveforms, mass loss (or ablation), and impulse bit characteristics.

  11. Energy loss of ions by electric-field fluctuations in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nersisyan, Hrachya B.; Deutsch, Claude

    2011-06-15

    The results of a theoretical investigation of the energy loss of charged particles in a magnetized classical plasma due to the electric-field fluctuations are reported. The energy loss for a test particle is calculated through the linear-response theory. At vanishing magnetic field, the electric-field fluctuations lead to an energy gain of the charged particle for all velocities. It has been shown that in the presence of strong magnetic field, this effect occurs only at low velocities. In the case of high velocities, the test particle systematically loses its energy due to the interaction with a stochastic electric field. The net effect of the fluctuations is the systematic reduction of the total energy loss (i.e., the sum of the polarization and stochastic energy losses) at vanishing magnetic field and reduction or enhancement at strong field, depending on the velocity of the particle. It is found that the energy loss of the slow heavy ion contains an anomalous term that depends logarithmically on the projectile mass. The physical origin of this anomalous term is the coupling between the cyclotron motion of the plasma electrons and the long-wavelength, low-frequency fluctuations produced by the projectile ion. This effect may strongly enhance the stochastic energy gain of the particle.

  12. Energy loss of ions by electric-field fluctuations in a magnetized plasma.

    PubMed

    Nersisyan, Hrachya B; Deutsch, Claude

    2011-06-01

    The results of a theoretical investigation of the energy loss of charged particles in a magnetized classical plasma due to the electric-field fluctuations are reported. The energy loss for a test particle is calculated through the linear-response theory. At vanishing magnetic field, the electric-field fluctuations lead to an energy gain of the charged particle for all velocities. It has been shown that in the presence of strong magnetic field, this effect occurs only at low velocities. In the case of high velocities, the test particle systematically loses its energy due to the interaction with a stochastic electric field. The net effect of the fluctuations is the systematic reduction of the total energy loss (i.e., the sum of the polarization and stochastic energy losses) at vanishing magnetic field and reduction or enhancement at strong field, depending on the velocity of the particle. It is found that the energy loss of the slow heavy ion contains an anomalous term that depends logarithmically on the projectile mass. The physical origin of this anomalous term is the coupling between the cyclotron motion of the plasma electrons and the long-wavelength, low-frequency fluctuations produced by the projectile ion. This effect may strongly enhance the stochastic energy gain of the particle.

  13. Forthcoming Break-Even Conditions of Tokamak Plasma Performance for Fusion Energy Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiwatari, Ryoji; Okano, Kunihiko; Asaoka, Yoshiyuki; Tokimatsu, Koji; Konishi, Satoshi; Ogawa, Yuichi

    The present study reveals forthcoming break-even conditions of tokamak plasma performance for the fusion energy development. The first condition is the electric break-even condition, which means that the gross electric power generation is equal to the circulating power in a power plant. This is required for fusion energy to be recognized as a suitable candidate for an alternative energy source. As for the plasma performance (normalized beta value ΒN), confinement improvement factor for H-mode HH, the ratio of plasma density to Greenwald density fnGW), the electric break-even condition requires the simultaneous achievement of 1.2 < ΒN < 2.7, 0.8 < HH, and 0.3 < fnGW < 1.1 under the conditions of a maximum magnetic field on the TF coil Btmax = 16 T, thermal efficiency ηe = 30 %, and current drive power PNBI < 200 MW. It should be noted that the relatively moderate conditions of ΒN ˜ 1.8, HH ˜ 1.0, and fnGW ˜ 0.9, which correspond to the ITER reference operation parameters, have a strong potential to achieve the electric break-even condition. The second condition is the economic break-even condition, which is required for fusion energy to be selected as an alternative energy source in the energy market. By using a long-term world energy scenario, a break-even price for introduction of fusion energy in the year 2050 is estimated to lie between 65 mill/kWh and 135 mill/kWh under the constraint of 550 ppm CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. In the present study, this break-even price is applied to the economic break-even condition. However, because this break-even price is based on the present energy scenario including uncertainties, the economic break-even condition discussed here should not be considered the sufficient condition, but a necessary condition. Under the conditions of Btmax = 16 T, ηe = 40 %, plant availability 60 %, and a radial build with/without CS coil, the economic break-even condition requires ΒN ˜ 5.0 for 65 mill/kWh of lower break

  14. Ion energy-angle distribution functions at the plasma-material interface in oblique magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Khaziev, Rinat; Curreli, Davide

    2015-04-15

    The ion energy-angle distribution (IEAD) at the wall of a magnetized plasma is of fundamental importance for the determination of the material processes occurring at the plasma-material interface, comprising secondary emissions and material sputtering. Here, we present a numerical characterization of the IEAD at the wall of a weakly collisional magnetized plasma with the magnetic field inclined at an arbitrary angle with respect to the wall. The analysis has been done using two different techniques: (1) a fluid-Monte Carlo method, and (2) particle-in-cell simulations, the former offering a fast but approximate method for the determination of the IEADs, the latter giving a computationally intensive but self-consistent treatment of the plasma behavior from the quasi-neutral region to the material boundary. The two models predict similar IEADs, whose similarities and differences are discussed. Data are presented for magnetic fields inclined at angles from normal to grazing incidence (0°–85°). We show the scaling factors of the average and peak ion energy and trends of the pitch angle at the wall as a function of the magnetic angle, for use in the correlation of fluid plasma models to material models.

  15. High-Energy Ion Acceleration Mechanisms in a Dense Plasma Focus Z-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginson, D. P.; Link, A.; Schmidt, A.; Welch, D.

    2016-10-01

    The compression of a Z-pinch plasma, specifically in a dense plasma focus (DPF), is known to accelerate high-energy electrons, ions and, if using fusion-reactant ions (e.g. D, T), neutrons. The acceleration of particles is known to coincide with the peak constriction of the pinch, however, the exact physical mechanism responsible for the acceleration remains an area of debate and uncertainty. Recent work has suggested that this acceleration is linked to the growth of an m =0 (sausage) instability that evacuates a region of low-density, highly-magnetized plasma and creates a strong (>MV/cm) electric field. Using the fully kinetic particle-in-cell code LSP in 2D-3V, we simulate the compression of a 2 MA, 35 kV DPF plasma and investigate in detail the formation of the electric field. The electric field is found to be predominantly in the axial direction and driven via charge-separation effects related to the resistivity of the kinetic plasma. The strong electric and magnetic fields are shown to induce non-Maxwellian distributions in both the ions and electrons and lead to the acceleration of high-energy tails. We compare the results in the kinetic simulations to assumptions of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Ion energy-angle distribution functions at the plasma-material interface in oblique magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaziev, Rinat; Curreli, Davide

    2015-04-01

    The ion energy-angle distribution (IEAD) at the wall of a magnetized plasma is of fundamental importance for the determination of the material processes occurring at the plasma-material interface, comprising secondary emissions and material sputtering. Here, we present a numerical characterization of the IEAD at the wall of a weakly collisional magnetized plasma with the magnetic field inclined at an arbitrary angle with respect to the wall. The analysis has been done using two different techniques: (1) a fluid-Monte Carlo method, and (2) particle-in-cell simulations, the former offering a fast but approximate method for the determination of the IEADs, the latter giving a computationally intensive but self-consistent treatment of the plasma behavior from the quasi-neutral region to the material boundary. The two models predict similar IEADs, whose similarities and differences are discussed. Data are presented for magnetic fields inclined at angles from normal to grazing incidence (0°-85°). We show the scaling factors of the average and peak ion energy and trends of the pitch angle at the wall as a function of the magnetic angle, for use in the correlation of fluid plasma models to material models.

  17. Detailed energy distributions in laser-produced plasmas of solid gold and foam gold planar targets

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yunsong; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Jiamin; Shang, Wanli

    2013-12-15

    Foam gold was proposed to increase the laser to x-ray conversion efficiency due to its important applications. To understand the mechanism of x-ray enhancement, the detailed energy distributions and plasma profiles for laser-irradiated solid gold and foam gold targets were studied comparatively by hydrodynamic simulations using the code Multi-1D. It is confirmed that the radiation heat wave is subsonic for the normal solid gold target, while supersonic for the foam gold target. The shock wave, which is behind the supersonic radiation heat wave for the foam gold target, generates a plasma temperature gradient with high temperature near the shock wave front to produce an additional net outward radiation for enhancement of the x-ray emission. Much larger inward plasma velocity is also driven by the shock wave as an initial plasma velocity for the laser deposition and electron thermal conduct zone, which decreases the expanding plasma kinetic energy loss and helps to increase the x-ray radiation.

  18. Recycling of steel slag and glass cullet from energy saving lamps by fast firing production of ceramics.

    PubMed

    Furlani, E; Tonello, G; Maschio, S

    2010-01-01

    The paper reports on some experimental results obtained from the production of ceramics containing steel slag and glass cullet from exhaust energy saving lamps mixed in different proportions. Blending of components was done by attrition milling. Pressed powders were fast fired (50 min, cold to cold) in air up to several temperatures in the range 1000-1140 degrees C. The sintering behaviour was studied by shrinkage and water absorption measurements. Density, strength and hardness of the fired bodies were determined and XRD were examined. The fired samples were finally tested in acidic environment in order to evaluate their elution behaviour and consequently their possible environmental compatibility. It is observed that the composition containing 60 wt.% of steel slag and 40 wt.% of glass cullet displayed the best overall behaviour. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fossil Energy Program. Progress report for November 1979. [35 Wt % Illinois No. 6 coal with Wilsonville recycle solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This report - the sixty-fourth of a series - is a compendium of monthly progress reports for the ORNL research and development programs that are in support of the increased utilization of coal and other fossil fuel alternatives to oil and gas as sources of clean energy. The projects reported this month include those for coal conversion development, materials engineering, a coal equipment test program, an atmospheric fluid bed combustor for cogeneration, engineering studies and technical support, process and program analysis, environmental assessment studies, magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal, technical support to the TVA fluid bed combustion program, coal cogeneration/district heating plant assessment, chemical research and development, and technical support to major liquefaction projects.

  20. Energy spectrum of argon ions emitted from Filippov type Sahand plasma focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadnejad, M.; Pestehe, S. J.; Mohammadi, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    The energy and flux of the argon ions produced in Sahand plasma focus have been measured by employing a well-designed Faraday cup. The secondary electron emission effects on the ion signals are simulated and the dimensions of Faraday cup are optimized to minimize these effects. The measured ion energy spectrum is corrected for the ion energy loss and charge exchange in the background gas. The effects of the capacitor bank voltage and working gas pressure on the ion energy spectrum are also investigated. It has been shown that the emitted ion number per energy increases as the capacitor bank voltage increases. Decreasing the working gas pressure leads to the increase in the number of emitted ion per energy.