Science.gov

Sample records for plasma energy recycle

  1. Plasma energy recycle and conversion of polymeric (MSW) waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Richard; Grossman, Elihu D.

    2000-12-05

    Final report summarizing research project results of studies of the thermal plasma recycling of polymers, including polyethylene and polypropylene. High levels of recovery of monomers were obtained from the process developed under this study.

  2. Regulation of Plasma Membrane Recycling by CFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradbury, Neil A.; Jilling, Tamas; Berta, Gabor; Sorscher, Eric J.; Bridges, Robert J.; Kirk, Kevin L.

    1992-04-01

    The gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is defective in patients with cystic fibrosis. Although the protein product of the CFTR gene has been proposed to function as a chloride ion channel, certain aspects of its function remain unclear. The role of CFTR in the adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent regulation of plasma membrane recycling was examined. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate is known to regulate endocytosis and exocytosis in chloride-secreting epithelial cells that express CFTR. However, mutant epithelial cells derived from a patient with cystic fibrosis exhibited no cAMP-dependent regulation of endocytosis and exocytosis until they were transfected with complementary DNA encoding wild-type CFTR. Thus, CFTR is critical for cAMP-dependent regulation of membrane recycling in epithelial tissues, and this function of CFTR could explain in part the pleiotropic nature of cystic fibrosis.

  3. Energy implications of glass-container recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L L; Mintz, M M

    1994-03-01

    This report addresses the question of whether glass-container recycling actually saves energy. Glass-container production in 1991 was 10{sup 7} tons, with cullet making up about 30% of the input to manufacture. Two-thirds of the cullet is postconsumer waste; the remainder is in-house scrap (rejects). Most of the glass recycled is made into new containers. Total primary energy consumption includes direct process-energy use by the industry (adjusted to account for the efficiency of fuel production) plus fuel and raw-material transportation and production energies; the grand total for 1991 is estimated to be about 168 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu. The total primary energy use decreases as the percent of glass recycled rises, but the maximum energy saved is only about 13%. If distance to the landfill is kept fixed and that to the recovery facility multiplied by about eight, to 100 mi, a break-even point is reached, and recycling saves no energy. Previous work has shown that to save energy when using glass bottles, reuse is the clear choice. Recycling of glass does not save much energy or valuable raw material and does not reduce air or water pollution significantly. The most important impacts are the small reduction of waste sent to the landfill and increased production rates at glass plants.

  4. Energy return on investment of used nuclear fuel recycling

    SciTech Connect

    2011-08-31

    N-EROI calculates energy return on investment (EROI) for recycling of used nublear fuel in four scenarios: one-pass recycle in light water reactors; two-pass recycle in light water reactors; mulit-pass recycle in burner fast reactora; one-pass recycle in breeder fast reactors.

  5. Energy implications of recycling packaging materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.; Stodolsky, F.

    1994-03-01

    In 1992, Congress sought to rewrite the United States comprehensive solid waste legislation -- the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Commodity-specific recycling rates were proposed for consumer-goods packaging materials and newsprint We compare the impacts on energy, materials use, and landfill volume of recycling at those rates to the impacts for alternative methods of material disposition to determine the optimum for each material. After products have served their intended uses, there are several alternative paths for material disposition. These include reuse, recycling to the same product, recycling to a lower-valued product, combustion for energy recovery, incineration without energy recovery, and landfill. Only options considered to be environmentally sound are Included. Both houses of Congress specifically excluded combustion for energy recovery from counting towards the recovery goats, probably because combustion is viewed as a form of disposal and is therefore assumed to waste resources and have n environmental effects. However, co-combustion in coal-fired plants or combustion in appropriately pollution-controlled waste-to-energy plants Is safe, avoids landfill costs, and can displace fossil fuels. In some cases, more fossil fuels can be displaced by combustion than by recycling. We compare the alternative life-cycle energies to the energies for producing the products from virgin materials. Results depend on the material and on the objective to be achieved. There are trade-offs among possible goals. For instance, paper packaging recycling conserves trees but may require greater fossil-fuel input than virgin production. Therefore, the objectives for proposed legislation must be examined to see whether they can most effectively be achieved by mandated recycling rates or by other methods of disposition. The optimal choices for the United States may not necessarily be the same as those for Europe and other parts of the world.

  6. Facilities Recycling for Energy Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredrickson, John H.

    Conservation of energy is within the control and very much within the responsibility of educators. Schools are among the greatest "wasters" of energy in the nation today. Principals must become more knowledgeable about their buildings than they have been in the past. Indepth inspections of the school facilities will identify the most flagrant…

  7. Energy Return on Investment - Fuel Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, W; Simon, A J; Fratoni, M; Smith, C; Schwab, P; Murray, P

    2012-06-06

    This report provides a methodology and requisite data to assess the potential Energy Return On Investment (EROI) for nuclear fuel cycle alternatives, and applies that methodology to a limited set of used fuel recycle scenarios. This paper is based on a study by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and a parallel evaluation by AREVA Federal Services LLC, both of which were sponsored by the DOE Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program. The focus of the LLNL effort was to develop a methodology that can be used by the FCT program for such analysis that is consistent with the broader energy modeling community, and the focus of the AREVA effort was to bring industrial experience and operational data into the analysis. This cooperative effort successfully combined expertise from the energy modeling community with expertise from the nuclear industry. Energy Return on Investment is one of many figures of merit on which investment in a new energy facility or process may be judged. EROI is the ratio of the energy delivered by a facility divided by the energy used to construct, operate and decommission that facility. While EROI is not the only criterion used to make an investment decision, it has been shown that, in technologically advanced societies, energy supplies must exceed a minimum EROI. Furthermore, technological history shows a trend towards higher EROI energy supplies. EROI calculations have been performed for many components of energy technology: oil wells, wind turbines, photovoltaic modules, biofuels, and nuclear reactors. This report represents the first standalone EROI analysis of nuclear fuel reprocessing (or recycling) facilities.

  8. Energy transmission using recyclable quantum entanglement.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ming-Yong; Lin, Xiu-Min

    2016-01-01

    It is known that faster-than-light (FTL) transmission of energy could be achieved if the transmission were considered in the framework of non-relativistic classical mechanics. Here we show that FTL transmission of energy could also be achieved if the transmission were considered in the framework of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. In our transmission protocol a two-spin Heisenberg model is considered and the energy is transmitted by two successive local unitary operations on the initially entangled spins. Our protocol does not mean that FTL transmission can be achieved in reality when the theory of relativity is considered, but it shows that quantum entanglement can be used in a recyclable way in energy transmission. PMID:27465431

  9. Energy transmission using recyclable quantum entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Ming-Yong; Lin, Xiu-Min

    2016-07-01

    It is known that faster-than-light (FTL) transmission of energy could be achieved if the transmission were considered in the framework of non-relativistic classical mechanics. Here we show that FTL transmission of energy could also be achieved if the transmission were considered in the framework of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. In our transmission protocol a two-spin Heisenberg model is considered and the energy is transmitted by two successive local unitary operations on the initially entangled spins. Our protocol does not mean that FTL transmission can be achieved in reality when the theory of relativity is considered, but it shows that quantum entanglement can be used in a recyclable way in energy transmission.

  10. Recycling legislation: A balanced approach for opening biomass energy opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Easterly, J.L.

    1995-09-01

    State recycling legislation represents one of the barriers to using wood wastes for energy. Although many states are setting recycling goals that often mandate a significant portion of the waste stream be recycled, legislation in the same states specifically excludes wood-to-energy as a recycling option. A significant supply of yard waste and wood waste could be available for biomass power generation of recycling legislation credited the use of wood-to-energy as an acceptable recycling alternative. This article discusses in some detail the approach Florida legislation has pursued. It could be a model for other innovative recycling programs. It provides checks and balances as well as reasonable compromises that help to avoid or minimize objections by the environmental community.

  11. Recycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinker, Barbara

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the range of benefits resulting from recycling efforts and projects. Presents information and data related to the recycling of metals, cans, paper, fans, and plastics. Suggestions for motivating and involving youth in recycling programs are also offered. (ML)

  12. Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    1988-10-01

    ;Contents: The Problem; What`s In Our Trash; Where Does Trash Go; Where Does Our Trash Go; The Solution; What Is Recycling; Why Should We Recycle; A National Goal of 25%; What Can We Recycle; What Do We Do With Our Recyclables.

  13. Treatment and recycling of incinerated ash using thermal plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Cheng, T W; Chu, J P; Tzeng, C C; Chen, Y S

    2002-01-01

    To treat incinerated ash is an important issue in Taiwan. Incinerated ashes contain a considerable amount of hazardous materials such as dioxins and heavy metals. If these hazardous materials are improperly treated or disposed of, they shall cause detrimental secondary contamination. Thermal plasma vitrification is a robust technology to treat and recycle the ash residues. Under the high temperature plasma environment, incinerated ashes are vitrified into benign slag with large volume reduction and extreme detoxification. Several one-step heat treatment processes are carried out at four temperatures (i.e. 850, 950, 1,050 and 1,150 degrees C) to obtain various "microstructure materials". The major phase to form these materials is a solid solution of gehlenite (Ca2Al2SiO7) and åkermanite (Ca2MgSi2O7) belonging to the melilite group. The physical and mechanical properties of the microstructure materials are improved by using one-step post-heat treatment process after plasma vitrification. These microstructure materials with good quality have great potential to serve as a viable alternative for construction applications.

  14. Mildly Recycled Pulsars at High-Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellizzoni, A.

    2011-08-01

    Mildly recyled pulsars (MRP), conventionally defined as neutron star having spin period in the 20-100 ms range and surface magnetic field <1011 Gauss, probably rise from binary systems (disrupted or not) with an intermediate or an high mass companion. Despite their relatively low spin-down energies compared to the ``fully'' recycled millisecond pulsars (arising from common low mass X-ray binaries), nearby MRPs can be detected by deep X-ray observations and by timing analysis of the very long data span provided by gamma-ray space detectors. The discovery of peculiar timing and spectral properties, possibly transitional, of the MRPs can be of the utmost importance to link different classes of neutron stars and study their evolution.

  15. Recent trends in automobile recycling: An energy and economic assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Curlee, T.R.; Das, S.; Rizy, C.G.; Schexanyder, S.M.

    1994-03-01

    Recent and anticipated trends in the material composition of domestic and imported automobiles and the increasing cost of landfilling the non-recyclable portion of automobiles (automobile shredder residue or ASR) pose questions about the future of automobile recycling. This report documents the findings of a study sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Analysis to examine the impacts of these and other relevant trends on the life-cycle energy consumption of automobiles and on the economic viability of the domestic automobile recycling industry. More specifically, the study (1) reviewed the status of the automobile recycling industry in the United States, including the current technologies used to process scrapped automobiles and the challenges facing the automobile recycling industry; (2) examined the current status and future trends of automobile recycling in Europe and Japan, with the objectives of identifying ``lessons learned`` and pinpointing differences between those areas and the United States; (3) developed estimates of the energy system impacts of the recycling status quo and projections of the probable energy impacts of alternative technical and institutional approaches to recycling; and (4) identified the key policy questions that will determine the future economic viability of automobile shredder facilities in the United States.

  16. Design and test of a large plasma torch for environmental recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Tuszewski, M.

    1996-12-31

    A 2.5-inch inductive plasma torch has been tested with up to 600 kW rf power and with argon, nitrogen, and oxygen gases. A complete power balance is obtained from electrical, thermal, and radiation measurements. These data indicate that torch efficiencies of up to 30% are obtained with molecular gases, while efficiencies around 15% are obtained with argon. The efficiencies obtained with molecular gases almost triple earlier torch efficiencies and confirm substantially the predictions of a torch model developed during a previous CRADA. Torch efficiencies of up to 50% could be obtained in future tests with an improved rf power supply, with steam gas, and with larger torch dimensions. Future applications of the Plasma Energy Recycle and Conversion (PERC) process could include the high explosives of DOE`s nuclear weapons, chemical and biological remediation, and the treatment and volume reduction of radioactive mixed waste.

  17. The Low-Recycling Lithium Boundary and Implications for Plasma Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granstedt, Erik Michael

    Pumping of incident hydrogen and impurity ions by lithium enables control of the particle inventory and fueling profile in magnetic-confined plasmas, and may raise the plasma temperature near the wall. As a result, the density gradient is expected to contribute substantially to the free-energy, affecting particle and thermal transport from micro-turbulence which is typically the dominant transport mechanism in high-temperature fusion experiments. Transport in gyrokinetic simulations of density-gradient-dominated profiles is characterized by a small linear critical gradient, large particle flux, and preferential diffusion of cold particles. As a result, the heat flux is below 5/2 or even 3/2 times the particle flux, usually assumed to be the minimum for convection. While surprising, this result is consistent with increasing entropy. Coupled TEM-ITG (ion-temperature-gradient) simulations using η e = ηi find η = ∇ T/∇n ≈ 0.8 maximizes the linear critical pressure gradient, which suggests that experiments operating near marginal ITG stability with larger η would increase the linear critical pressure gradient by transferring free-energy from the temperature gradient to the density gradient. Simulations were performed with profiles predicted for the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) if ion thermal transport was neoclassical, while electron thermal transport and particle transport were a fixed ratio above the neoclassical level. A robust TEM instability was found for the outer half radius, while the ITG was found to be driven unstable as well during gas puff fueling. This suggests that TEM transport will be an important transport mechanism in high-temperature low-recycling fusion experiments, and in the absence of stabilizing mechanisms, may dominate over neoclassical transport. A diagnostic suite has been developed to measure hydrogen and impurity emission in LTX in order to determine the lower bound on recycling that can be achieved in a small tokamak using

  18. Plasma Sheet Energy Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotirelis, T.; Lee, A. R.; Newell, P. T.

    2009-12-01

    Energy spectra of electrons and ions, as observed by DMSP, are fit to various distributions. The goal is to characterize the inner edge of the plasma sheet, so the focus is on large scale plasma sheet properties. Lower energy electron populations are ignored as they appear to be small-scale transients. Maxwellian, kappa and power-law distributed spectra are considered. Non-thermal ion distributions appear with greater frequency than anticipated. In order to be thermally distributed the differential energy flux must rise with a slope of ~2 toward a peak, after which the flux should fall sharply. The figure shows an apparently non-thermal ion distribution, together with a Maxwellian fit. The results from fits for one full year are presented.

  19. Transport of carbon ion test particles and hydrogen recycling in the plasma of the Columbia tokamak HBT'' (High Beta Tokamak)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Hua.

    1990-01-01

    Carbon impurity ion transport is studied in the Columbia High Beta Tokamak (HBT), using a carbon tipped probe which is inserted into the plasma (n{sub e} {approx} 1 {minus} 5 {times} 10{sup 14} (cm{sup {minus}3}), T{sub e} {approx} 4 {minus} 10 (eV), B{sub t} {approx} 0.2 {minus} 0.4(T)). Carbon impurity light, mainly the strong lines of C{sub II}(4267A, emitted by the C{sup +} ions) and C{sub III} (4647A, emitted by the C{sup ++} ions), is formed by the ablation or sputtering of plasma ions and by the discharge of the carbon probe itself. The diffusion transport of the carbon ions is modeled by measuring the space-and-time dependent spectral light emission of the carbon ions with a collimated optical beam and photomultiplier. The point of emission can be observed in such a way as to sample regions along and transverse to the toroidal magnetic field. The carbon ion diffusion coefficients are obtained by fitting the data to a diffusion transport model. It is found that the diffusion of the carbon ions is classical'' and is controlled by the high collisionality of the HBT plasma; the diffusion is a two-dimensional problem and the expected dependence on the charge of the impurity ion is observed. The measurement of the spatial distribution of the H{sub {alpha}} emissivity was obtained by inverting the light signals from a 4-channel polychromator, the data were used to calculate the minor-radial influx, the density, and the recycling time of neutral hydrogen atoms or molecules. The calculation shows that the particle recycling time {tau}{sub p} is comparable with the plasma energy confinement time {tau}{sub E}; therefore, the recycling of the hot plasma ions with the cold neutrals from the walls is one of the main mechanisms for loss of plasma energy.

  20. Energy conservation through recycling of factory asphalt roofing waste

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, P.B.; Powers, T.J. . Manville Technical Center); Hardy, J.; Maloof, R.; Patenaude, C.; Zilfi, J. )

    1989-12-31

    Prior DOE laboratory research showed that it was possible to recover the energy resource represented in factory shingle waste. This waste could be processed and recycled into the asphalt composition used to make new shingles. This bench-scale research concluded that factory experiments were all that were needed to provide a basis for commercial implementation. The project reported here completed that full scale research. Factory fiber glass shingle waste was processed to a form suitable for recycling. The processed waste was then mixed into the asphalt used to make new shingles. Process parameters and shingle quality were measured to provide a basis for commercial implementation.

  1. Energy Return on Investment from Recycling Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    2011-08-17

    This report presents an evaluation of the Energy Return on Investment (EROI) from recycling an initial batch of 800 t/y of used nuclear fuel (UNF) through a Recycle Center under a number of different fuel cycle scenarios. The study assumed that apart from the original 800 t of UNF only depleted uranium was available as a feed. Therefore for each subsequent scenario only fuel that was derived from the previous fuel cycle scenario was considered. The scenarios represent a good cross section of the options available and the results contained in this paper and associated appendices will allow for other fuel cycle options to be considered.

  2. Energy, greenhouse gas, and cost reductions for municipal recycling systems.

    PubMed

    Chester, Mikhail; Martin, Elliot; Sathaye, Nakul

    2008-03-15

    Curbside recycling programs can be more cost-effective than landfilling and lead to environmental benefits from the recovery of materials. Significant reductions in energy and emissions are derived from the decrease of energy-intensive production with virgin materials. In many cities, competing priorities can lead to limited consideration given to system optimal collection and processing strategies that can drive down costs and increase revenue while simultaneously reducing system energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. We evaluate three alterations to a hypothetical California city's recycling network to discern the conditions under which the changes.constitute system improvements to cost, energy, and emissions. The system initially operates with a collection zoning scheme that does not mitigate the impact of seasonal variations in consumer tonnage. In addition, two collection organizations operate redundantly, collecting recyclables from different customer types on the same street network. Finally, the system is dual stream, meaning recyclables are separated at the curbside. In some scenarios, this practice can limit the consumer participation rate leading to lower collection quantities. First, we evaluate a "business as usual" (BAU) scenario and find that the system operates at a $1.7 M/yr loss but still avoids a net 18.7 GJ and 1700 kg of greenhouse gas equivalent (GGE) per ton of material recycled. Second, we apply an alternative zoning scheme for collection that creates a uniform daily pickup demand throughout the year reducing costs by $0.2 M/yr, energy by 30 MJ/ton, and GHG emissions by 2 kg GGE/ton. Next, the two collection organizations are consolidated into a single entity further reducing vehicle fleet size and weekly vehicle miles traveled resulting in savings from BAU of $0.3 M/yr, 100 MJ/ton, and 8 kg GGE/ton. Lastly, we evaluate a switch to a single-stream system (where recyclables are commingled). We showthat single-stream recycling

  3. Spent nuclear fuel recycling with plasma reduction and etching

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong Ho

    2012-06-05

    A method of extracting uranium from spent nuclear fuel (SNF) particles is disclosed. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) (containing oxides of uranium, oxides of fission products (FP) and oxides of transuranic (TRU) elements (including plutonium)) are subjected to a hydrogen plasma and a fluorine plasma. The hydrogen plasma reduces the uranium and plutonium oxides from their oxide state. The fluorine plasma etches the SNF metals to form UF6 and PuF4. During subjection of the SNF particles to the fluorine plasma, the temperature is maintained in the range of 1200-2000 deg K to: a) allow any PuF6 (gas) that is formed to decompose back to PuF4 (solid), and b) to maintain stability of the UF6. Uranium (in the form of gaseous UF6) is easily extracted and separated from the plutonium (in the form of solid PuF4). The use of plasmas instead of high temperature reactors or flames mitigates the high temperature corrosive atmosphere and the production of PuF6 (as a final product). Use of plasmas provide faster reaction rates, greater control over the individual electron and ion temperatures, and allow the use of CF4 or NF3 as the fluorine sources instead of F2 or HF.

  4. Concrete with carpet recyclates: suitability assessment by surface energy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H; Cieślak, M

    2008-01-01

    Worn out textile floor coverings are burdensome wastes that are degraded in landfill sites after a very long period of time. One of the ways to manage this kind of waste may be the use of carpet recyclate (CR) as an additive for concrete reinforcement. Therefore, an attempt was made to predict the effects of recyclate additives on the durability a concrete-carpet mixture by employing the method of assessing surface properties of components in the concrete-carpet recyclates composite. Testing was performed on carpet wastes, containing polyamide (PA) and polypropylene (PP) piles and butadiene-styrene resin with chalk filler (BSC) as back coating, to assess the suitability of CR additive for concrete reinforcement by surface energy evaluation. Based on the measurements of contact angles, the free surface energy of recyclate components was determined. The reversible work of adhesion at the interface between these components in dry and wet states was also calculated. The results show that CR with both PA and PP fibers form a strong and water-resistant bond with concrete.

  5. Energy impacts in producing and recycling EV batteries

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This article reports that choosing the best EV battery involves more than a quest for greater range per charge, as total energy cycle assessment of batteries demonstrates. Much has been written about the performance characteristics of electric vehicle (EV) batteries, but information about materials and the production and recycling processes is not as readily available. Such information has not been the primary focus of interest, since designs and processes are still under development, and much of the information is proprietary. An overview of four electric vehicle batteries--advanced lead/acid, sodium/sulfur, nickel/cadmium and nickel/metal hydride--highlights significant differences in energy consumption during production and recycling of materials used in the batteries. Certain realities apply to these batteries, despite their technical distinctions. First, and most obvious, the batteries will make up a significant fraction, 20--40%, of vehicle mass. Impacts are increased because some batteries with lifetimes shorter than the vehicle`s will need replacement at least once. Another insight is that battery recyclability is being considered at the design stage because the electric vehicle is being born green, that is, environmentally benign from the onset. In contrast to the small consumer cells now simply being shredded, EV batteries will be large enough to warrant disassembly and material segregation as the first step in recycling. Electrode and electrolyte materials in advanced batteries are nonstandard in the automotive industry, so process information is not readily available.

  6. Recycling Energy to Restore Impaired Ankle Function during Human Walking

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Steven H.; Kuo, Arthur D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Humans normally dissipate significant energy during walking, largely at the transitions between steps. The ankle then acts to restore energy during push-off, which may be the reason that ankle impairment nearly always leads to poorer walking economy. The replacement of lost energy is necessary for steady gait, in which mechanical energy is constant on average, external dissipation is negligible, and no net work is performed over a stride. However, dissipation and replacement by muscles might not be necessary if energy were instead captured and reused by an assistive device. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a microprocessor-controlled artificial foot that captures some of the energy that is normally dissipated by the leg and “recycles” it as positive ankle work. In tests on subjects walking with an artificially-impaired ankle, a conventional prosthesis reduced ankle push-off work and increased net metabolic energy expenditure by 23% compared to normal walking. Energy recycling restored ankle push-off to normal and reduced the net metabolic energy penalty to 14%. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that reduced ankle push-off contributes to the increased metabolic energy expenditure accompanying ankle impairments, and demonstrate that energy recycling can be used to reduce such cost. PMID:20174659

  7. Coherent parasitic energy loss of the recycler beam

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2004-07-14

    Parasitic energy loss of the particle beam in the Recycler Ring is discussed. The long beam confined between two barrier waves has a spectrum that falls off rapidly with frequency. Discrete summation over the revolution harmonics must be made to obtain the correct energy loss per particle per turn, because only a few lower revolution harmonics of real part of the longitudinal impedance contribute to the parasitic energy loss. The longitudinal impedances of the broadband rf cavities, the broadband resistive-wall monitors, and the resistive wall of the vacuum chamber are discussed. They are the main sources of the parasitic energy loss.

  8. Symbiotically integrated organic recycling/renewable energy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hamburg, R.A.

    1983-06-01

    Two operating systems designed for the integrated recycling of organic materials and production of renewable energy are described. Both systems include the Chinese design, water-pressure biogas digesters, a solar greenhouse and algae/aquatic plant ponds, all in passive symbiotic relationships with a minimum of high technology sophistication. A discussion of fish ponds and fuel alcohol production is also included since they offer many possibilities for expanded integration.

  9. Hydrogen recycling coefficient in beryllium: Experimental determination and a test simulation of the density evolution in a JET plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saibene, G.; Sartori, R.; Tanga, A.; Peacock, A.; Pick, M.; Gaze, P.

    1990-12-01

    The aim of this work is to provide experimental data on the recycling of hydrogen isotopes in beryllium. The ratio D/2 Kr[m -2] ( D: diffusion coefficient, Kr: recombination rate coefficient), which characterises the hydrogen transient pumping behaviour of the material, has been measured for hydrogen and deuterium in Be as a function of temperature, in the range 373 ≤ T [ K] ≤ 553. D/2K r was found to be ˜- 10 20 m -2 and depend weakly on the Be temperature (activation energies of ˜-0.1 eV). This value of D/2K r was then used as an input parameter to the PERI code to simulate the plasma deuterium inventory behaviour assuming that the main processes governing the recycling during the discharge are diffusion in the bulk and recombination on the surface of beryllium. The deuterium fluxes from the plasma-facing surfaces are simulated with good accuracy. The simulation of the deuterium plasma inventory is somewhat worse, although a satisfactory agreement between the calculated and experimental time evolution is achieved.

  10. VAMP8-dependent fusion of recycling endosomes with the plasma membrane facilitates T lymphocyte cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Misty R.; Pattu, Varsha; Halimani, Mahantappa; Maier-Peuschel, Monika; Müller, Martha-Lena; Becherer, Ute; Hong, Wanjin; Hoth, Markus; Tschernig, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) eliminate infected and neoplastic cells through directed release of cytotoxic granule contents. Although multiple SNARE proteins have been implicated in cytotoxic granule exocytosis, the role of vesicular SNARE proteins, i.e., vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs), remains enigmatic. VAMP8 was posited to represent the cytotoxic granule vesicular SNARE protein mediating exocytosis in mice. In primary human CTLs, however, VAMP8 colocalized with Rab11a-positive recycling endosomes. Upon stimulation, these endosomes rapidly trafficked to and fused with the plasma membrane, preceding fusion of cytotoxic granules. Knockdown of VAMP8 blocked both recycling endosome and cytotoxic granule fusion at immune synapses, without affecting activating signaling. Mechanistically, VAMP8-dependent recycling endosomes deposited syntaxin-11 at immune synapses, facilitating assembly of plasma membrane SNARE complexes for cytotoxic granule fusion. Hence, cytotoxic granule exocytosis is a sequential, multivesicle fusion process requiring VAMP8-mediated recycling endosome fusion before cytotoxic granule fusion. Our findings imply that secretory granule exocytosis pathways in other cell types may also be more complex than previously appreciated. PMID:26124288

  11. Two-chamber model for divertors with plasma recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, W.D.; Singer, C.E.

    1985-06-01

    To model particle and heat-loss terms at the edge of a tokamak with a divertor or pumped limiter, a simple two-chamber formuluation of the scrapeoff has been constructed by integrating the fluid equations, including sources, along open field lines. The model is then solved for a wide range of density and temperature conditions in the scrapeoff, using geometrical parameters typical of the poloidal divertor in the poloidal divertor experiment (PDX). The solutions characterize four divertor operating conditions for beam-heated plasmas: plugged, unplugged, blowthrough, and blowback.

  12. Two-chamber model for divertors with plasma recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, W.D.; Singer, C.E.

    1984-11-01

    To model particle and heat loss terms at the edge of a tokamak with a divertor or pumped limiter, a simple two-chamber formulation of the scrapeoff has been constructed by integrating the fluid equations, including sources, along open field lines. The model is then solved for a wide range of density and temperature conditions in the scrapeoff, using geometrical parameters typical of the PDX poloidal divertor. The solutions characterize four divertor operating conditions for beam-heated plasmas: plugged, unplugged, blowthrough, and blowback.

  13. Thermal Recycling of Waelz Oxide Using Concentrated Solar Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzouganatos, N.; Matter, R.; Wieckert, C.; Antrekowitsch, J.; Gamroth, M.; Steinfeld, A.

    2013-12-01

    The dominating Zn recycling process is the so-called Waelz process. Waelz oxide (WOX), containing 55-65% Zn in oxidic form, is mainly derived from electric arc furnace dust produced during recycling of galvanized steel. After its wash treatment to separate off chlorides, WOX is used as feedstock along with ZnS concentrates for the electrolytic production of high-grade zinc. Novel and environmentally cleaner routes for the purification of WOX and the production of Zn are investigated using concentrated solar energy as the source of high-temperature process heat. The solar-driven clinkering of WOX and its carbothermal reduction were experimentally demonstrated using a 10 kWth packed-bed solar reactor. Solar clinkering at above 1265°C reduced the amount of impurities below 0.1 wt.%. Solar carbothermal reduction using biocharcoal as reducing agent in the 1170-1320°C range yielded 90 wt.% Zn.

  14. Achievement of Low Recycling and High Power Density Handling in CDX-U with Lithium Plasma-Facing Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaita, Robert

    2006-10-01

    The CDX-U spherical tokamak research program has focused on lithium as a large area plasma-facing component (PFC). The CDX-U experiments have used a toroidal lithium limiter and evaporated lithium wall coatings up to 100 nm thick. Under these conditions, a particle pumping rate of 1 - 2 x 10^21 particles/second was achieved from an active wall area of 0.4 m^2. The energy confinement times deduced from plasma equilibrium reconstructions showed a nearly six-fold improvement over discharges without lithium PFC's. This was an increase of up to a factor three over ITER98P(y,1) scaling, and reflect the largest enhancement in confinement ever seen in Ohmic plasmas. Recycling coefficients (R) of 0.3 or below were deduced from spectroscopic measurements. These are the lowest values of R observed to date in magnetically-confined plasmas, and for the first time, the wall was not the dominant source of fueling. The process of generating lithium evaporative coatings also showed the effectiveness of liquid lithium in redistributing heat loads at extremely high power densities. An electron beam was used to deposit about 1.5 kW of power on a 6 mm spot on the toroidal lithium limiter. Lithium evaporation was not localized to this spot, but occurred only after the entire volume of lithium was raised to the evaporation temperature. Infrared camera images showed that even with a lithium depth of 3 mm, convection due to the Marangoni effect was able to distribute a heat load of about 50 MW/m^2 for the 240 second duration of the electron beam pulse. This could have significant consequences for PFC's in burning plasma devices, where high power densities are a concern.

  15. Effect of plasma surface treatment of recycled carbon fiber on carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRP) interfacial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hooseok; Ohsawa, Isamu; Takahashi, Jun

    2015-02-01

    We studied the effects of plasma surface treatment of recycled carbon fiber on adhesion of the fiber to polymers after various treatment times. Conventional surface treatment methods have been attempted for recycled carbon fiber, but most require very long processing times, which may increase cost. Hence, in this study, plasma processing was performed for 0.5 s or less. Surface functionalization was quantified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. O/C increased from approximately 11% to 25%. The micro-droplet test of adhesion properties and the mechanical properties of CFRP were also investigated.

  16. Waste to energy and recycling in Hempstead, Long Island

    SciTech Connect

    Aquino, J.T.

    1995-11-01

    Faced with the limiting of landfill disposal by New York state law, a Long Island township opted for both waste-to-energy (WTE) and curbside recycling. Since then, the township and its WTE facility achieved results through state-of-the-art technology, creative agreements, and some compromise. The $360-million, 2,505-tpd WTE facility opened for commercial use in October 1989. Soon after, the town`s waste disposal fees dropped to a reported $79 per ton. The facility has since processed more than 5 million tons of solid waste with an energy value of about 5,200 Btus per pound, slightly above the 4,500- to 5,000-Btu average for a pound of generic MSW. The bond is being paid off through tipping fees and the sale of electricity to the Long Island Lighting Co. (LILCO). The facility is projected to save the town more than $500 million in disposal costs over the next 20 years. And, by using trash to generate electricity, the facility will save the equivalent of 53 million gallons of imported oil.

  17. Energy and materials use in the production and recycling of consumer-goods packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.

    1981-02-01

    A comparison is made of the energy consumed annually in the United States to produce paper, glass, steel, aluminum, and plastic for consumer-goods packaging and types of energy used for production are examined. Energy saved through recycling and combustion for energy recovery also is considered. A maximum of 1.5 quad could be saved if this packaging material were recycled, and about 0.6 quad could be recovered if it were burned as part of municipal solid waste. Paper and plastic compete in several markets, including bags and milk containers: in almost all cases, the plastic container requires less energy to produce and recycle. However, the major energy input to paper manufacture is wood, rather than oil and natural gas. Glass bottles require less energy to produce than aluminum or steel cans. On the other hand, aluminum cans take less energy to recycle than bottles, and recycled aluminum cans are the least energy intensive of the single-serving beverage containers, except for refillable glass bottles that are reused several times. For family-sized beverage bottles, a plastic bottle uses less energy to make and to recycle than a glass bottle. In addition, plastic bottles are combustible. However, glass bottles could be made with no oil or natural gas input, and they can be reused.

  18. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines

    PubMed Central

    López-Cruz, Roberto I.; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A.; Real-Valle, Roberto A.; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements. PMID:27375492

  19. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A; Real-Valle, Roberto A; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements.

  20. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A; Real-Valle, Roberto A; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements. PMID:27375492

  1. Energy efficiency of electron plasma emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Zalesski, V. G.

    2011-12-15

    Electron emission influence from gas-discharge plasma on plasma emitter energy parameters is considered. It is shown, that electron emission from plasma is accompanied by energy contribution redistribution in the gas-discharge from plasma emitter supplies sources-the gas-discharge power supply and the accelerating voltage power supply. Some modes of electron emission as a result can be realized: 'a probe measurements mode,' 'a transitive mode,' and 'a full switching mode.'.

  2. Energy conservation and CO2 emission reductions due to recycling in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pimenteira, C A P; Pereira, A S; Oliveira, L B; Rosa, L P; Reis, M M; Henriques, R M

    2004-01-01

    The present paper aims to make the energy saving potential provided by waste recycling in Brazil evident by pointing out more specifically the benefits regarding climate change mitigation. In this case, based on the energy saved due to the recycling process of an exogenous amount of waste, we have built two scenarios in order to show the potential for indirectly avoiding CO2 emissions in the country as a result of the recycling process. According to the scenario, 1 Mt and 3.5 Mt of CO2, respectively, would be avoided per year due to solid waste recycling. The international context for greenhouse gas emissions reduction, such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and its Kyoto Protocol has been taken into account.

  3. Automotive recycling in the United States : energy conservation and enviromental benefits.

    SciTech Connect

    Pomykala, J. A; Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Spangenberger, J. S.; Energy Systems

    2007-11-01

    The production and use of polymers has been growing and that trend is expected to continue. Likewise, the production of metals from ores is on the rise because of increasing demand. Recycling polymers and residual metals can result in significant energy savings and environmental benefits including a reduction in CO2 emissions. This article describes recycling options for the polymers and metals in end-of-life vehicles.

  4. Cholesterol and F-actin are required for clustering of recycling synaptic vesicle proteins in the presynaptic plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Dason, Jeffrey S; Smith, Alex J; Marin, Leo; Charlton, Milton P

    2014-02-15

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) and their proteins must be recycled for sustained synaptic transmission. We tested the hypothesis that SV cholesterol is required for proper sorting of SV proteins during recycling in live presynaptic terminals. We used the reversible block of endocytosis in the Drosophila temperature-sensitive dynamin mutant shibire-ts1 to trap exocytosed SV proteins, and then examined the effect of experimental treatments on the distribution of these proteins within the presynaptic plasma membrane by confocal microscopy. SV proteins synaptotagmin, vglut and csp were clustered following SV trapping in control experiments but dispersed in samples treated with the cholesterol chelator methyl-β-cyclodextrin to extract SV cholesterol. There was accumulation of phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2) in presynaptic terminals following SV trapping and this was reduced following SV cholesterol extraction. Reduced PIP2 accumulation was associated with disrupted accumulation of actin in presynaptic terminals. Similar to vesicular cholesterol extraction, disruption of actin by latrunculin A after SV proteins had been trapped on the plasma membrane resulted in the dispersal of SV proteins and prevented recovery of synaptic transmission due to impaired endocytosis following relief of the endocytic block. Our results demonstrate that vesicular cholesterol is required for aggregation of exocytosed SV proteins in the presynaptic plasma membrane and are consistent with a mechanism involving regulation of PIP2 accumulation and local actin polymerization by cholesterol. Thus, alteration of membrane or SV lipids may affect the ability of synapses to undergo sustained synaptic transmission by compromising the recycling of SV proteins.

  5. Materials development and field demonstration of high-recycled-content concrete for energy-efficient building construction

    SciTech Connect

    Ostowari, Ken; Nosson, Ali

    2000-09-30

    The project developed high-recycled-content concrete material with balanced structural and thermal attributes for use in energy-efficient building construction. Recycled plastics, tire, wool, steel and concrete were used as replacement for coarse aggregates in concrete and masonry production. With recycled materials the specific heat and thermal conductivity of concrete could be tailored to enhance the energy-efficiency of concrete buildings. A comprehensive field project was implemented which confirmed the benefits of high-recycled-content concrete for energy-efficient building construction.

  6. Energy-recycling pixel for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Che-Yu; Cho, Ting-Yi; Chen, Yen-Yu; Yang, Chih-Jen; Meng, Chao-Yu; Yang, Chieh-Hung; Yang, Po-Chuan; Chang, Hsu-Yu; Hsueh, Chun-Yuan; Wu, Chung-Chih; Lee, Si-Chen

    2007-06-01

    The authors report a pixel structure for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays that has a hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell inserted between the driving polycrystalline Si thin-film transistor and the pixel OLED. Such an active-matrix OLED pixel structure not only exhibits a reduced reflection (and thus improved contrast) compared to conventional OLEDs but also is capable of recycling both incident photon energies and internally generated OLED radiation. Such a feature of energy recycling may be of use for portable/mobile electronics, which are particularly power aware.

  7. Energy and environmental impacts of electric vehicle battery production and recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.; Singh, M.

    1995-12-31

    Electric vehicle batteries use energy and generate environmental residuals when they are produced and recycled. This study estimates, for 4 selected battery types (advanced lead-acid, sodium-sulfur, nickel-cadmium, and nickel-metal hydride), the impacts of production and recycling of the materials used in electric vehicle batteries. These impacts are compared, with special attention to the locations of the emissions. It is found that the choice among batteries for electric vehicles involves tradeoffs among impacts. For example, although the nickel-cadmium and nickel-metal hydride batteries are similar, energy requirements for production of the cadmium electrodes may be higher than those for the metal hydride electrodes, but the latter may be more difficult to recycle.

  8. Equilibrium fluctuation energy of gyrokinetic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.; Lee, W.W.; Oberman, C.

    1985-11-01

    The thermal equilibrium electric field fluctuation energy of the gyrokinetic model of magnetized plasma is computed, and found to be smaller than the well-known result (k)/8..pi.. = 1/2T/(1 + (klambda/sub D/)/sup 2/) valid for arbitrarily magnetized plasmas. It is shown that, in a certain sense, the equilibrium electric field energy is minimum in the gyrokinetic regime. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Mandated recycling rates: Impacts on energy consumption and municipal waste volume

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.; Stodolsky, F.

    1994-03-01

    In 1992, Congress sought to rewrite its comprehensive solid waste legislation the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Commodity-specific recycling rates were proposed for consumer-goods packaging, materials and newsprint. In this paper, we compare the impacts on energy, materials use, and landfill volume of recycling at those rates to the impacts associated with alternative methods of disposition to determine, the optimal method for each material. Alternative paths for material disposition include reuse, recycling to the same product, recycling to a lower-valued product, combustion for energy recovery, incineration without energy recovery, and landfilling. The recovery rates considered during RCRA reauthorization are summarized. Combustion was specifically excluded by Congress to meet recovery goals. This exclusion is probably based on the idea that combustion is a form of disposal and therefore wastes resources and has negative environmental effects. Our paper does not make that assumption. A report by Gaines and Stodolsky, from which this paper is derived, offers a more complete discussion of energy and S impacts.

  10. The Wheelabrator Falls story -- Integrated recycling, highly efficient energy recovery: An update two years later

    SciTech Connect

    Felago, R.T.; Anderson, R.L.; Scanlon, P.J.

    1996-12-31

    Wheelabrator Environmental Systems Inc., based in Hampton, New Hampshire, has developed America`s first privately initiated, totally integrated Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) with a commercial trash-to-energy facility in Falls Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. The MRF is successfully recovering and marketing a variety of recycled products, while demonstrating that waste-to-energy and recycling are compatible and can be successfully integrated at a single site. The energy recovery plant and the MRF have completed one year of operation, giving adequate time to evaluate the impact of project innovations. These innovations will have a significant impact on how future projects, including waste-to-energy, wastewater and biosolids processing, will be developed. The energy recovery facility is capable of processing 1,600 tons per day of municipal solid waste from the Bucks County area.

  11. Low energy stable plasma calibration facility.

    PubMed

    Frederick-Frost, K M; Lynch, K A

    2007-07-01

    We have designed and fabricated a low energy plasma calibration facility for testing and calibration of rocket-borne charged-particle detectors and for the investigation of plasma sheath formation in an environment with ionospheric plasma energies, densities, and Debye lengths. We describe the vacuum system and associated plasma source, which was modified from a Naval Research Laboratory design [Bowles et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 455 (1996)]. Mechanical and electrical modifications to this cylindrical microwave resonant source are outlined together with a different method of operating the magnetron that achieves a stable discharge. This facility produces unmagnetized plasmas with densities from 1x10(3)/cm(3) to 6x10(5)/cm(3), electron temperatures from 0.1 to 1.7 eV, and plasma potentials from 0.5 to 8 V depending on varying input microwave power and neutral gas flow. For the range of input microwave power explored (350-600 W), the energy density of the plasma remains constant because of an inverse relationship between density and temperature. This relationship allows a wide range of Debye lengths (0.3-8.4 cm) to be investigated, which is ideal for simulating the ionospheric plasma sheaths we explore.

  12. Assessing recycling versus incineration of key materials in municipal waste: The importance of efficient energy recovery and transport distances

    SciTech Connect

    Merrild, Hanna; Larsen, Anna W.; Christensen, Thomas H.

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the environmental impact of recycling and incineration of household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling of paper, glass, steel and aluminium is better than incineration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling and incineration of cardboard and plastic can be equally good alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclables can be transported long distances and still have environmental benefits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Paper has a higher environmental benefit than recyclables found in smaller amounts. - Abstract: Recycling of materials from municipal solid waste is commonly considered to be superior to any other waste treatment alternative. For the material fractions with a significant energy content this might not be the case if the treatment alternative is a waste-to-energy plant with high energy recovery rates. The environmental impacts from recycling and from incineration of six material fractions in household waste have been compared through life cycle assessment assuming high-performance technologies for material recycling as well as for waste incineration. The results showed that there are environmental benefits when recycling paper, glass, steel and aluminium instead of incinerating it. For cardboard and plastic the results were more unclear, depending on the level of energy recovery at the incineration plant, the system boundaries chosen and which impact category was in focus. Further, the environmental impact potentials from collection, pre-treatment and transport was compared to the environmental benefit from recycling and this showed that with the right means of transport, recyclables can in most cases be transported long distances. However, the results also showed that recycling of some of the material fractions can only contribute marginally in improving the overall waste management system taking into consideration their limited content in average Danish household waste.

  13. Greening the Department of Energy through waste prevention, recycling, and Federal acquisition. Strategic plan to implement Executive Order 13101

    SciTech Connect

    2000-11-01

    This Plan provides strategies and milestones to implement Executive Order 13101, Greening the Government Through Waste Prevention, Recycling, and Federal Acquisition, and to achieve the new Secretarial goals for 2005 and 2010. It serves as the principal Secretarial guidance to Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, Field Offices, and laboratory and contractor staff to improve sanitary waste prevention, recycling, and the purchase and use of recycled content and environmentally preferable products and services in the DOE.

  14. An energy-efficient, adiabatic electrode stimulator with inductive energy recycling and feedback current regulation.

    PubMed

    Arfin, Scott K; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we present a novel energy-efficient electrode stimulator. Our stimulator uses inductive storage and recycling of energy in a dynamic power supply. This supply drives an electrode in an adiabatic fashion such that energy consumption is minimized. It also utilizes a shunt current-sensor to monitor and regulate the current through the electrode via feedback, thus enabling flexible and safe stimulation. Since there are no explicit current sources or current limiters, wasteful energy dissipation across such elements is naturally avoided. The dynamic power supply allows efficient transfer of energy both to and from the electrode and is based on a DC-DC converter topology that we use in a bidirectional fashion in forward-buck or reverse-boost modes. In an exemplary electrode implementation intended for neural stimulation, we show how the stimulator combines the efficiency of voltage control and the safety and accuracy of current control in a single low-power integrated-circuit built in a standard .35 μm CMOS process. This stimulator achieves a 2x-3x reduction in energy consumption as compared to a conventional current-source-based stimulator operating from a fixed power supply. We perform a theoretical analysis of the energy efficiency that is in accord with experimental measurements. This theoretical analysis reveals that further improvements in energy efficiency may be achievable with better implementations in the future. Our electrode stimulator could be widely useful for neural, cardiac, retinal, cochlear, muscular and other biomedical implants where low power operation is important.

  15. An energy-efficient, adiabatic electrode stimulator with inductive energy recycling and feedback current regulation.

    PubMed

    Arfin, Scott K; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we present a novel energy-efficient electrode stimulator. Our stimulator uses inductive storage and recycling of energy in a dynamic power supply. This supply drives an electrode in an adiabatic fashion such that energy consumption is minimized. It also utilizes a shunt current-sensor to monitor and regulate the current through the electrode via feedback, thus enabling flexible and safe stimulation. Since there are no explicit current sources or current limiters, wasteful energy dissipation across such elements is naturally avoided. The dynamic power supply allows efficient transfer of energy both to and from the electrode and is based on a DC-DC converter topology that we use in a bidirectional fashion in forward-buck or reverse-boost modes. In an exemplary electrode implementation intended for neural stimulation, we show how the stimulator combines the efficiency of voltage control and the safety and accuracy of current control in a single low-power integrated-circuit built in a standard .35 μm CMOS process. This stimulator achieves a 2x-3x reduction in energy consumption as compared to a conventional current-source-based stimulator operating from a fixed power supply. We perform a theoretical analysis of the energy efficiency that is in accord with experimental measurements. This theoretical analysis reveals that further improvements in energy efficiency may be achievable with better implementations in the future. Our electrode stimulator could be widely useful for neural, cardiac, retinal, cochlear, muscular and other biomedical implants where low power operation is important. PMID:23852740

  16. Enhancing biomass energy yield from pilot-scale high rate algal ponds with recycling.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J; Shilton, A N

    2013-09-01

    This paper investigates the effect of recycling on biomass energy yield in High Rate Algal Ponds (HRAPs). Two 8 m(3) pilot-scale HRAPs treating primary settled sewage were operated in parallel and monitored over a 2-year period. Volatile suspended solids were measured from both HRAPs and their gravity settlers to determine biomass productivity and harvest efficiency. The energy content of the biomass was also measured. Multiplying biomass productivity and harvest efficiency gives the 'harvestable biomass productivity' and multiplying this by the energy content defines the actual 'biomass energy yield'. In Year 1, algal recycling was implemented in one of the ponds (HRAPr) and improved harvestable biomass productivity by 58% compared with the control (HRAPc) without recycling (HRAPr: 9.2 g/m(2)/d; HRAPc: 5.8 g/m(2)/d). The energy content of the biomass grown in HRAPr, which was dominated by Pediastrun boryanum, was 25% higher than the control HRAPc which contained a mixed culture of 4-5 different algae (HRAPr: 21.5 kJ/g; HRAPc: 18.6 kJ/g). In Year 2, HRAPc was then seeded with the biomass harvested from the P. boryanum dominated HRAPr. This had the effect of shifting algal dominance from 89% Dictyosphaerium sp. (which is poorly-settleable) to over 90% P. boryanum in 5 months. Operation of this pond was then switched to recycling its own harvested biomass, which maintained P. boryanum dominance for the rest of Year 2. This result confirms, for the first time in the literature, that species control is possible for similarly sized co-occurring algal colonies in outdoor HRAP by algal recycling. With regard to the overall improvement in biomass energy yield, which is a critical parameter in the context of algal cultivation for biofuels, the combined improvements that recycling triggered in biomass productivity, harvest efficiency and energy content enhanced the harvested biomass energy yield by 66% (HRAPr: 195 kJ/m(2)/day; HRAPc: 118 kJ/m(2)/day).

  17. HIGH ENERGY GASEOUS PLASMA CONTAINMENT DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Josephson, V.; Hammel, J.E.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presenied for producing neutrons as a result of collisions between ions in high temperature plasmas. The invention resides in the particular arrangement of ihe device whereby ihe magneiic and electric fields are made to cross at substantially right angles in several places along a torus shaped containment vessel. A plasma of deuterium gas is generated in the vessel under the electric fields and is "trapped" in any one of the "crossed field" regions to produce a release of energy.

  18. U.S. Department of Energy National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, V.; Bennett, M.; Bishop, L.

    1998-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle has recently been established. The vision of this new program is to develop a DOE culture that promotes pollution prevention by considering the recycle and reuse of metal as the first and primary disposition option and burial as a last option. The Center of Excellence takes the approach that unrestricted release of metal is the first priority because it is the most cost-effective disposition pathway. Where this is not appropriate, restricted release, beneficial reuse, and stockpile of ingots are considered. Current recycling activities include the sale of 40,000 tons of scrap metal from the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Plant) K-770 scrap yard, K-1064 surplus equipment and machinery, 7,000 PCB-contaminated drums, 12,000 tons of metal from the Y-l2 scrap yard, and 1,000 metal pallets. In addition, the Center of Excellence is developing a toolbox for project teams that will contain a number of specific tools to facilitate metals recycle. This Internet-based toolbox will include primers, computer programs, and case studies designed to help sites to perform life cycle analysis, perform ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) analysis for radiation exposures, provide pollution prevention information and documentation, and produce independent government estimates. The use of these tools is described for two current activities: disposition of scrap metal in the Y-12 scrapyard, and disposition of PCB-contaminated drums.

  19. Biomass recycle as a means to improve the energy efficiency of CELSS algal culture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radmer, R.; Cox, J.; Lieberman, D.; Behrens, P.; Arnett, K.

    Algal cultures can be very rapid and efficient means to generate biomass and regenerate the atmosphere for closed environmental life support systems. However, as in the case of most higher plants, a significant fraction of the biomass produced by most algae cannot be directly converted to a useful food product by standard food technology procedures. This waste biomass will serve as an energy drain on the overall system unless it can be efficiently recycled without a significant loss of its energy content. We report experiments in which cultures of the algae Scenedesmus obliquus were grown in the light and at the expense of an added carbon source, which either replaced or supplemented the actinic light. As part of these experiments we tested hydrolyzed waste biomass from these same algae to determine whether the algae themselves could be made part of the biological recycling process. Results indicate that hydrolyzed algal (and plant) biomass can serve as carbon and energy sources for the growth of these algae, suggesting that the efficiency of the closed system could be significantly improved using this recycling process.

  20. Biomass recycle as a means to improve the energy efficiency of CELSS algal culture systems.

    PubMed

    Radmer, R; Cox, J; Lieberman, D; Behrens, P; Arnett, K

    1987-01-01

    Algal cultures can be very rapid and efficient means to generate biomass and regenerate the atmosphere for closed environmental life support systems. However, as in the case of most higher plants, a significant fraction of the biomass produced by most algae cannot be directly converted to a useful food product by standard food technology procedures. This waste biomass will serve as an energy drain on the overall system unless it can be efficiently recycled without a significant loss of its energy content. We report experiments in which cultures of the algae Scenedesmus obliquus were grown in the light and at the expense of an added carbon source, which either replaced or supplemented the actinic light. As part of these experiments we tested hydrolyzed waste biomass from these same algae to determine whether the algae themselves could be made part of the biological recycling process. Results indicate that hydrolyzed algal (and plant) biomass can serve as carbon and energy sources for the growth of these algae, suggesting that the efficiency of the closed system could be significantly improved using this recycling process.

  1. Biomass recycle as a means to improve the energy efficiency of CELSS algal culture systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radmer, R.; Cox, J.; Lieberman, D.; Behrens, P.; Arnett, K.

    1987-01-01

    Algal cultures can be very rapid and efficient means to generate biomass and regenerate the atmosphere for closed environmental life support systems. However, as in the case of most higher plants, a significant fraction of the biomass produced by most algae cannot be directly converted to a useful food product by standard food technology procedures. This waste biomass will serve as an energy drain on the overall system unless it can be efficiently recycled without a significant loss of its energy content. Experiments are reported in which cultures of the alga Scenedesmus obliquus were grown in the light and at the expense of an added carbon source, which either replaced or supplemented the actinic light. As part of these experiments, hydrolyzed waste biomass from these same algae were tested to determine whether the algae themselves could be made part of the biological recycling process. Results indicate that hydrolyzed algal (and plant) biomass can serve as carbon and energy sources for the growth of these algae, suggesting that the efficiency of the closed system could be significantly improved using this recycling process.

  2. Assessing recycling versus incineration of key materials in municipal waste: The importance of efficient energy recovery and transport distances.

    PubMed

    Merrild, Hanna; Larsen, Anna W; Christensen, Thomas H

    2012-05-01

    Recycling of materials from municipal solid waste is commonly considered to be superior to any other waste treatment alternative. For the material fractions with a significant energy content this might not be the case if the treatment alternative is a waste-to-energy plant with high energy recovery rates. The environmental impacts from recycling and from incineration of six material fractions in household waste have been compared through life cycle assessment assuming high-performance technologies for material recycling as well as for waste incineration. The results showed that there are environmental benefits when recycling paper, glass, steel and aluminium instead of incinerating it. For cardboard and plastic the results were more unclear, depending on the level of energy recovery at the incineration plant, the system boundaries chosen and which impact category was in focus. Further, the environmental impact potentials from collection, pre-treatment and transport was compared to the environmental benefit from recycling and this showed that with the right means of transport, recyclables can in most cases be transported long distances. However, the results also showed that recycling of some of the material fractions can only contribute marginally in improving the overall waste management system taking into consideration their limited content in average Danish household waste.

  3. Assessing recycling versus incineration of key materials in municipal waste: The importance of efficient energy recovery and transport distances.

    PubMed

    Merrild, Hanna; Larsen, Anna W; Christensen, Thomas H

    2012-05-01

    Recycling of materials from municipal solid waste is commonly considered to be superior to any other waste treatment alternative. For the material fractions with a significant energy content this might not be the case if the treatment alternative is a waste-to-energy plant with high energy recovery rates. The environmental impacts from recycling and from incineration of six material fractions in household waste have been compared through life cycle assessment assuming high-performance technologies for material recycling as well as for waste incineration. The results showed that there are environmental benefits when recycling paper, glass, steel and aluminium instead of incinerating it. For cardboard and plastic the results were more unclear, depending on the level of energy recovery at the incineration plant, the system boundaries chosen and which impact category was in focus. Further, the environmental impact potentials from collection, pre-treatment and transport was compared to the environmental benefit from recycling and this showed that with the right means of transport, recyclables can in most cases be transported long distances. However, the results also showed that recycling of some of the material fractions can only contribute marginally in improving the overall waste management system taking into consideration their limited content in average Danish household waste. PMID:22265239

  4. Characterisation of the deuterium recycling at the W divertor target plates in JET during steady-state plasma conditions and ELMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brezinsek, S.; Wiesen, S.; Harting, D.; Guillemaut, C.; Webster, A. J.; Heinola, K.; Meigs, A. G.; Rack, M.; Gao, Y.; Sergienko, G.; Philipps, V.; Stamp, M. F.; Jachmich, S.; Contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    Experiments in the JET tokamak equipped with the ITER-like wall (ILW) revealed that the inner and outer target plate at the location of the strike points represent after one year of operation intact tungsten (W) surfaces without any beryllium (Be) surface coverage. The dynamics of near-surface retention, implantation, desorption and recycling of deuterium (D) in the divertor of plasma discharges are determined by W target plates. As the W plasma-facing components (PFCs) are not actively cooled, the surface temperature (T surface) is increasing with plasma exposure, varying the balance between these processes in addition to the impinging deuteron fluxes and energies. The dynamic behaviour on a slow time scale of seconds was quantified in a series of identical L-mode discharges (JET Pulse Number (JPN) \\# 81938-73) by intra-shot gas analysis providing the reduction of deuterium retention in W PFCs by 1/3 at a base temperature (T base) range at the outer target plate between 65 °C and 150 °C equivalent to a T surface span of 150 °C and 420 °C. The associated recycling and molecular D desorption during the discharge varies only at lowest temperatures moderately, whereas desorption between discharges rises significantly with increasing T base. The retention measurements represent the sum of inner and outer divertor interaction at comparable T surface. The dynamic behaviour on a fast time scale of ms was studied in a series of identical H-mode discharges (JPN \\#83623-83974) and coherent edge-localized mode (ELM) averaging. High energetic ELMs of about 3 keV are impacting on the W PFCs with fluxes of 3× {10}23 {{{D}}}+ {{{s}}}-1{{{m}}}-2 which is about four times higher than inter-ELM ion fluxes with an impact energy of about E im = 200 eV. This intra-ELM ion flux is associated with a high heat flux of about 60 MW m-2 to the outer target plate which causes T surface rise by Δ T = 100 K per ELM covering finally the range between 160 °C and 1400 °C during the flat

  5. Waste recycling primary source of energy in deep ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-02-01

    In the dark reaches of the deep ocean, far from the photosynthesizing plants and plankton that fuel life in the surface waters, ecosystems survive on chemical energy. Decades of research on the life that clusters around deep-sea hydrothermal vents has hinted at the importance of light-free food webs, but a recent analysis by Middelburg suggests that another system—waste recycling—could be the dominant pillar of life on the abyssal plains. The realization was a result of the author's attempt to calculate the importance of chemoautotrophy to the carbon cycles of different ocean regions. levels increase rates of denitrification and methanogenesis, thus increasing gas production rates. The authors also found that methane bubbles surpass diffused nitrous oxide in terms of global warming potential, which they suggest could warrant a rethinking of the importance of streams and rivers to global warming. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences, doi:10.1029/2011JG001656, 2011)

  6. CELLULOSE SYNTHASE INTERACTIVE1 Is Required for Fast Recycling of Cellulose Synthase Complexes to the Plasma Membrane in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Lei; Bashline, Logan; Li, Shundai

    2015-01-01

    Plants are constantly subjected to various biotic and abiotic stresses and have evolved complex strategies to cope with these stresses. For example, plant cells endocytose plasma membrane material under stress and subsequently recycle it back when the stress conditions are relieved. Cellulose biosynthesis is a tightly regulated process that is performed by plasma membrane-localized cellulose synthase (CESA) complexes (CSCs). However, the regulatory mechanism of cellulose biosynthesis under abiotic stress has not been well explored. In this study, we show that small CESA compartments (SmaCCs) or microtubule-associated cellulose synthase compartments (MASCs) are critical for fast recovery of CSCs to the plasma membrane after stress is relieved in Arabidopsis thaliana. This SmaCC/MASC-mediated fast recovery of CSCs is dependent on CELLULOSE SYNTHASE INTERACTIVE1 (CSI1), a protein previously known to represent the link between CSCs and cortical microtubules. Independently, AP2M, a core component in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, plays a role in the formation of SmaCCs/MASCs. Together, our study establishes a model in which CSI1-dependent SmaCCs/MASCs are formed through a process that involves endocytosis, which represents an important mechanism for plants to quickly regulate cellulose synthesis under abiotic stress. PMID:26443667

  7. Vacuum arc plasma thrusters with inductive energy storage driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A plasma thruster with a cylindrical inner and cylindrical outer electrode generates plasma particles from the application of energy stored in an inductor to a surface suitable for the formation of a plasma and expansion of plasma particles. The plasma production results in the generation of charged particles suitable for generating a reaction force, and the charged particles are guided by a magnetic field produced by the same inductor used to store the energy used to form the plasma.

  8. CHMP6 and VPS4A mediate recycling of Ras to the plasma membrane to promote growth factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ze-Yi; Cheng, Chiang-Min; Fu, Xin-Rong; Chen, Liuh-Yow; Xu, Lizhong; Terrillon, Sonia; Wong, Stephen T.; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Songyang, Zhou; Chang, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    While Ras is well-known to function on the plasma membrane (PM) to mediate growth factor signaling, increasing evidence suggests that Ras has complex roles in the cytoplasm. To uncover these roles, we screened a cDNA library and isolated H-Ras-binding proteins that also influence Ras functions. Many isolated proteins regulate trafficking involving endosomes; CHMP6/VPS20 and VPS4A, which interact with ESCRT-III, were chosen for further study. We showed that the binding is direct and occurs in endosomes. Furthermore, the binding is most efficient when H-Ras has a functional effector-binding-loop and is GTP-bound and ubiquitylated. CHMP6 and VPS4A also bound N-Ras, but not K-Ras. Repressing CHMP6 and VPS4A blocked Ras-induced transformation, which correlated with inefficient Ras localization to the PM as measured by cell fractionation and photobleaching. Moreover, silencing CHMP6 and VPS4A also blocked EGFR recycling. These data suggest that Ras interacts with key ESCRT-III components to promote recycling of itself and EGFR back to the PM to create a positive feedback loop to enhance growth factor signaling. PMID:22231449

  9. Improving Energy Efficiency and Enabling Water Recycle in Biorefineries Using Bioelectrochemical Cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Borole, Abhijeet P

    2010-01-01

    Improving biofuel yield and water reuse are two important issues in further development of biorefineries. The total energy content of liquid fuels (including ethanol and hydrocarbon) produced from cellulosic biomass via biochemical or hybrid bio-thermochemical routes can vary from 49% to 70% of the biomass entering the biorefinery, on an energy basis. Use of boiler for combustion of residual organics and lignin results in significant energy and water losses. An alternate process to improve energy recovery from the residual organic streams is via use of bioelectrochemical systems such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs) microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). The potential advantages of this alternative scheme in a biorefinery include minimization of heat loss and generation of a higher value product, hydrogen. The need for 5-15 gallons of water per gallon of ethanol can be reduced significantly via recycle of water after MEC treatment. Removal of inhibitory byproducts such as furans, phenolics and acetate in MFC/MECs to generate energy, thus, has dual advantages including improvements in energy efficiency and ability to recycle water. Conversion of the sugar- and lignin- degradation products to hydrogen is synergistic with biorefinery hydrogen requirements for upgrading F-T liquids and other byproducts to high-octane fuels and/or high value products. Some of these products include sorbitol, succinic acid, furan and levulinate derivatives, glycols, polyols, 1,4-butenadiol, phenolics polymers, etc. Potential process alternatives utilizing MECs in biorefineries capable of improving energy efficiency by up to 30% are discussed.

  10. Hydrogen recycling study by Balmer lines emissions in linear plasma machine TPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, K.; Tanabe, T.; Causey, R.; Venhaus, T.; Okuno, K.

    2001-03-01

    We have investigated the influence of target materials and temperatures on Balmer series emission in a linear plasma apparatus, Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE). The intensities of the Balmer series emission in front of the target were higher for heavier mass target and also for lower target temperature, showing rather linear relationship between the emission intensity and hydrogen reflection coefficient. For exothermic hydrogen occluders of Ti and Ta, the intensity ratio of Dβ/ Dα increased with the target temperature markedly, whereas the intensity ratio stayed rather constant for endothermic hydrogen occluders of Ni, Cu and W. This is a clear demonstration that the target materials and temperatures modify the boundary plasma. In addition the intensity ratio Dβ/Dα is not simply a function of plasma temperature but has clear target temperature dependence.

  11. Preparation of Crumpled Graphite Oxide from Recycled Graphite Using Plasma Electrolysis and Its Application for Adsorption of Cadmium in Aqueous Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Phan Ngoc; Tuoi, Tran Thi; Ngan, Nguyen Thi Kim; Trang, Bui Thi; Minh, Phan Ngoc; Lam, Tran Dai; Hanh, Nguyen Thi; Van Thanh, Dang

    2016-05-01

    Household battery waste is considered hazardous and needs to be collected, managed, and recycled appropriately. In this study, using a plasma electrolysis method, we recycled graphite electrodes of exhausted dry batteries to prepare crumpled graphite oxide (CGO). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the CGO possessed spherical morphology with average dimensions of 0.5 μm to 5 μm. The as-prepared CGO was then applied to absorb cadmium in aqueous environment. The results showed that CGO appears to be a promising adsorbent for removal of toxic waste from polluted water.

  12. The Plasma Membrane Sialidase NEU3 Regulates the Malignancy of Renal Carcinoma Cells by Controlling β1 Integrin Internalization and Recycling*

    PubMed Central

    Tringali, Cristina; Lupo, Barbara; Silvestri, Ilaria; Papini, Nadia; Anastasia, Luigi; Tettamanti, Guido; Venerando, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    The human plasma membrane sialidase NEU3 is a key enzyme in the catabolism of membrane gangliosides, is crucial in the regulation of cell surface processes, and has been demonstrated to be significantly up-regulated in renal cell carcinomas (RCCs). In this report, we show that NEU3 regulates β1 integrin trafficking in RCC cells by controlling β1 integrin recycling to the plasma membrane and controlling activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/protein kinase B (AKT) signaling. NEU3 silencing in RCC cells increased the membrane ganglioside content, in particular the GD1a content, and changed the expression of key regulators of the integrin recycling pathway. In addition, NEU3 silencing up-regulated the Ras-related protein RAB25, which directs internalized integrins to lysosomes, and down-regulated the chloride intracellular channel protein 3 (CLIC3), which induces the recycling of internalized integrins to the plasma membrane. In this manner, NEU3 silencing enhanced the caveolar endocytosis of β1 integrin, blocked its recycling and reduced its levels at the plasma membrane, and, consequently, inhibited EGFR and FAK/AKT. These events had the following effects on the behavior of RCC cells: they (a) decreased drug resistance mediated by the block of autophagy and the induction of apoptosis; (b) decreased metastatic potential mediated by down-regulation of the metalloproteinases MMP1 and MMP7; and (c) decreased adhesion to collagen and fibronectin. Therefore, our data identify NEU3 as a key regulator of the β1 integrin-recycling pathway and FAK/AKT signaling and demonstrate its crucial role in RCC malignancy. PMID:23139422

  13. Energy conversion in the coronal plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, P. C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Solar and stellar X-ray emission are the observed waste products of the interplay between magnetic fields and the motion of stellar plasma. Theoretical understanding of the process of coronal heating is of utmost importance, since the high temperature is what defines the corona in the first place. Most of the research described deals with the aspects of the several rivalling theories for coronal heating. The rest of the papers deal with processes of energy conversion related to flares.

  14. Tritium recycling and inventory in eroded debris of plasma-facing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.

    1999-10-18

    Damage to plasma-facing components (PFCs) and structural materials due to loss of plasma confinement in magnetic fusion reactors remains one of the most serious concerns for safe, successful, and reliable tokamak operation. High erosion losses due to surface vaporization, spallation, and melt-layer splashing are expected during such an event. The eroded debris and dust of the PFCs, including trapped tritium, will be contained on the walls or within the reactor chamber therefore, they can significantly influence plasma behavior and tritium inventory during subsequent operations. Tritium containment and behavior in PFCS and in the dust and debris is an important factor in evaluating and choosing the ideal plasma-facing materials (PFMs). Tritium buildup and release in the debris of candidate materials is influenced by the effect of material porosity on diffusion and retention processes. These processes have strong nonlinear behavior due to temperature, volubility, and existing trap sites. A realistic model must therefore account for the nonlinear and multidimensional effects of tritium diffusion in the porous-redeposited and neutron-irradiated materials. A tritium-transport computer model, TRAPS (Tritium Accumulation in Porous Structure), was developed and used to evaluate and predict the kinetics of tritium transport in porous media. This model is coupled with the TRICS (Tritium In Compound Systems) code that was developed to study the effect of surface erosion during normal and abnormal operations on tritium behavior in PFCS.

  15. Integrated renewable energy/organic waste recycling system. Final report, July 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Hamburg, R.A.; Davenport, S.

    1982-01-01

    Two operating systems for integrated recycling of organic materials are described. The systems include Chinese water-pressure design biogas digesters/solar greenhouses/and algae and aquatic plant ponds-all in passive symbiotic relationships with a minimum of technological sophistication. Economic, Financial and Net Energy Analyses of these systems have been done with concern toward long term environmental effects. A discussion of fish ponds and fuel alcohol production is also included since they offer much potential for expanded integration. 21 tabs.

  16. Impact of recycling on cradle-to-gate energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of automotive lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Jennifer B; Gaines, Linda; Sullivan, John; Wang, Michael Q

    2012-11-20

    This paper addresses the environmental burdens (energy consumption and air emissions, including greenhouse gases, GHGs) of the material production, assembly, and recycling of automotive lithium-ion batteries in hybrid electric, plug-in hybrid electric, and battery electric vehicles (BEV) that use LiMn(2)O(4) cathode material. In this analysis, we calculated the energy consumed and air emissions generated when recovering LiMn(2)O(4), aluminum, and copper in three recycling processes (hydrometallurgical, intermediate physical, and direct physical recycling) and examined the effect(s) of closed-loop recycling on environmental impacts of battery production. We aimed to develop a U.S.-specific analysis of lithium-ion battery production and in particular sought to resolve literature discrepancies concerning energy consumed during battery assembly. Our analysis takes a process-level (versus a top-down) approach. For a battery used in a BEV, we estimated cradle-to-gate energy and GHG emissions of 75 MJ/kg battery and 5.1 kg CO(2)e/kg battery, respectively. Battery assembly consumes only 6% of this total energy. These results are significantly less than reported in studies that take a top-down approach. We further estimate that direct physical recycling of LiMn(2)O(4), aluminum, and copper in a closed-loop scenario can reduce energy consumption during material production by up to 48%.

  17. Impact of recycling on cradle-to-gate energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of automotive lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Jennifer B; Gaines, Linda; Sullivan, John; Wang, Michael Q

    2012-11-20

    This paper addresses the environmental burdens (energy consumption and air emissions, including greenhouse gases, GHGs) of the material production, assembly, and recycling of automotive lithium-ion batteries in hybrid electric, plug-in hybrid electric, and battery electric vehicles (BEV) that use LiMn(2)O(4) cathode material. In this analysis, we calculated the energy consumed and air emissions generated when recovering LiMn(2)O(4), aluminum, and copper in three recycling processes (hydrometallurgical, intermediate physical, and direct physical recycling) and examined the effect(s) of closed-loop recycling on environmental impacts of battery production. We aimed to develop a U.S.-specific analysis of lithium-ion battery production and in particular sought to resolve literature discrepancies concerning energy consumed during battery assembly. Our analysis takes a process-level (versus a top-down) approach. For a battery used in a BEV, we estimated cradle-to-gate energy and GHG emissions of 75 MJ/kg battery and 5.1 kg CO(2)e/kg battery, respectively. Battery assembly consumes only 6% of this total energy. These results are significantly less than reported in studies that take a top-down approach. We further estimate that direct physical recycling of LiMn(2)O(4), aluminum, and copper in a closed-loop scenario can reduce energy consumption during material production by up to 48%. PMID:23075406

  18. Measurements of plasma bremsstrahlung and plasma energy density produced by electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noland, Jonathan David

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to gain an understanding on the relative importance of microwave power, neutral pressure, and magnetic field configuration on the behavior of the hot electrons within an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) plasma. This was carried out through measurement of plasma bremsstrahlung with both NaI(Tl) (hv > 30 keV) and CdTe (2 keV < hv < 70 keV) x-ray detectors, and through measurement of the plasma energy density with a diamagnetic loop placed around the plasma chamber. We also examined the anisotropy in x-ray power by simultaneously measuring the x-ray spectra in two orthogonal directions: radially and axially, using NaI(Tl) detectors. We have seen that for a 6.4 GHz ECRIS, both the x-ray power produced by confined electrons and the plasma energy density behave logarithmically with microwave power. The x-ray flux created by electrons lost from the plasma, however, does not saturate. Thus, the small increase in plasma density that occurred at high microwave powers (> 150 W on a 6.4 GHz ECRIS) was accompanied by a large increase in total x-ray power. We suggest that the saturation of x-ray power and plasma energy density was due to rf-induced pitch-angle scattering of the electrons. X-ray power and plasma energy density were also shown to saturate with neutral pressure, and to increase nearly linearly as the gradient of the magnetic field in the resonance zone was decreased. All of these findings were in agreement with the theoretical models describing ECRIS plasmas. We have discussed the use of a diamagnetic loop as a means of exploring various plasma time scales on a relative basis. Specifically, we focused much of our attention on studying how changing ion source parameters, such as microwave power and neutral pressure, would effect the rise and decay of the integrated diamagnetic signal, which can be related to plasma energy density. We showed that increasing microwave power lowers the e-fold times at both the leading

  19. Combine waste-to-energy, recycling with fluid-bed boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M.L.

    1995-09-01

    An effective long-term solid-waste management program will soon be a reality for Bladen, Cumberland, and Hoke counties, North Carolina. The key element of the program is a 600-ton/day waste-to-energy (WTE) facility, scheduled to begin commercial operation later this year. The BCH Energy project, which gets its name from the initials of the three counties it serves, will become the first fluidized-bed boiler in the US designed to be fueled solely by refuse-derived fuel (RDF). As such, it provides an innovative and efficient approach to solid-waste management in several ways: (1) maximimizes community participation in a recovery and recycling effort; (2) maximizes additional waste handling and hauling efforts; (3) significantly reducing waste flow into landfill; (4) eliminating use of fossil fuel for a nearby chemical plant`s energy load; and (5) substantially improves air quality through use of the latest combustoin and emissions control technology.

  20. Solid-shape energy fuels from recyclable municipal solid waste and plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gug, Jeongin

    Diversion of waste streams, such as plastics, wood and paper, from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest across the country, especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling MSW (municipal solid waste) is to burn the high energy content components in standard coal boilers. This research seeks to reform wastes into briquette that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, moisture resistance, and retain high fuel value. Household waste with high paper and fibers content was used as the base material for this study. It was combined with recyclable plastics such as PE, PP, PET and PS for enhanced binding and energy efficiency. Fuel pellets were processed using a compression molding technique. The resulting moisture absorption, proximate analysis from burning, and mechanical properties were investigated after sample production and then compared with reference data for commercial coals and biomass briquettes. The effects of moisture content, compression pressure and processing temperature were studied to identify the optimal processing conditions with water uptake tests for the durability of samples under humid conditions and burning tests to examine the composition of samples. Lastly, mechanical testing revealed the structural stability of solid fuels. The properties of fuel briquettes produced from waste and recycled plastics improved with higher processing temperature but without charring the material. Optimization of moisture content and removal of air bubbles increased the density, stability and mechanical strength. The sample composition was found to be more similar to biomass fuels than coals because the majority of the starting material was paper-based solid waste. According to the proximate analysis results, the waste fuels can be expected to have

  1. Improving the actinides recycling in closed fuel cycles, a major step towards nuclear energy sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Poinssot, C.; Grandjean, S.; Masson, M.; Bouillis, B.; Warin, D.

    2013-07-01

    Increasing the sustainability of nuclear energy is a longstanding road that requires a stepwise approach to successively tackle the following 3 objectives. First of all, optimize the consumption of natural resource to preserve them for future generations and hence guarantee the energetic independence of the countries (no uranium ore is needed anymore). The current twice-through cycle of Pu implemented by France, UK, Japan and soon China is a first step in this direction and already allows the development and optimization of the relevant industrial processes. It also allows a major improvement regarding the conditioning of the ultimate waste in a durable and robust nuclear glass. Secondly, the recycling of americium could be an interesting option for the future with the deployment of FR fleet to save the repository resource and optimize its use by allowing a denser disposal. It would limit the burden towards the future generations and the need for additional repositories before several centuries. Thirdly, the recycling of the whole minor actinides inventory could be an interesting option for the far-future for strongly decreasing the waste long-term toxicity, down to a few centuries. It would bring the waste issue back within the human history, which should promote its acceptance by the social opinion.

  2. Free energy in plasmas under wave-induced diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N.J. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Rax, J.M. )

    1993-05-01

    When waves propagate through a bounded plasma, the wave may be amplified or damped at the expense of the plasma kinetic energy. In many cases of interest, the primary effect of the wave is to cause plasma diffusion in velocity and configuration space. In the absence of collisions, the rearrangement of the plasma conserves entropy, as large-grain structures are mixed and fine-grain structures emerge. The maximum extractable energy by waves so diffusing the plasma is a quantity of fundamental interest; it can be defined, but it is difficult to calculate. Through the consideration of specific examples, certain strategies for maximizing energy extraction are identified.

  3. Processing and properties of a solid energy fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW) and recycled plastics.

    PubMed

    Gug, JeongIn; Cacciola, David; Sobkowicz, Margaret J

    2015-01-01

    Diversion of waste streams such as plastics, woods, papers and other solid trash from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling municipal solid waste (MSW) is to burn the high-energy-content components in standard coal power plant. This research aims to reform wastes into briquettes that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, free of hazardous contaminants, and moisture resistant, while retaining high fuel value. This study aims to investigate the effects of processing conditions and added recyclable plastics on the properties of MSW solid fuels. A well-sorted waste stream high in paper and fiber content was combined with controlled levels of recyclable plastics PE, PP, PET and PS and formed into briquettes using a compression molding technique. The effect of added plastics and moisture content on binding attraction and energy efficiency were investigated. The stability of the briquettes to moisture exposure, the fuel composition by proximate analysis, briquette mechanical strength, and burning efficiency were evaluated. It was found that high processing temperature ensures better properties of the product addition of milled mixed plastic waste leads to better encapsulation as well as to greater calorific value. Also some moisture removal (but not complete) improves the compacting process and results in higher heating value. Analysis of the post-processing water uptake and compressive strength showed a correlation between density and stability to both mechanical stress and humid environment. Proximate analysis indicated heating values comparable to coal. The results showed that mechanical and moisture uptake stability were improved when the moisture and air contents were optimized. Moreover, the briquette

  4. Processing and properties of a solid energy fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW) and recycled plastics.

    PubMed

    Gug, JeongIn; Cacciola, David; Sobkowicz, Margaret J

    2015-01-01

    Diversion of waste streams such as plastics, woods, papers and other solid trash from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling municipal solid waste (MSW) is to burn the high-energy-content components in standard coal power plant. This research aims to reform wastes into briquettes that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, free of hazardous contaminants, and moisture resistant, while retaining high fuel value. This study aims to investigate the effects of processing conditions and added recyclable plastics on the properties of MSW solid fuels. A well-sorted waste stream high in paper and fiber content was combined with controlled levels of recyclable plastics PE, PP, PET and PS and formed into briquettes using a compression molding technique. The effect of added plastics and moisture content on binding attraction and energy efficiency were investigated. The stability of the briquettes to moisture exposure, the fuel composition by proximate analysis, briquette mechanical strength, and burning efficiency were evaluated. It was found that high processing temperature ensures better properties of the product addition of milled mixed plastic waste leads to better encapsulation as well as to greater calorific value. Also some moisture removal (but not complete) improves the compacting process and results in higher heating value. Analysis of the post-processing water uptake and compressive strength showed a correlation between density and stability to both mechanical stress and humid environment. Proximate analysis indicated heating values comparable to coal. The results showed that mechanical and moisture uptake stability were improved when the moisture and air contents were optimized. Moreover, the briquette

  5. Advances in plastic recycling. Volume 1: Recycling of polyurethanes

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, K.C.; Klempner, D.; Prentice, G.

    1999-07-01

    ``Recycling of Polyurethanes'', the first volume in the Advances in Plastics Recycling series, is focused on the physical and chemical recycling of polyurethanes, with attention given to energy conversion. A compilation of the present ongoing studies on recycling of urethane and, in general, isocyanate-based polymers, the focus is on thermosetting urethane polymers. Contents include: Recycling of Polyurethane Plastics in the European Automotive Industry; Present State of Polyurethane Recycling in Europe; Processing Overview of Bonded Polyurethane Foam; Mechanical Recycling of Polyurethane Scrap; Ecostream{trademark}--A Technology Beyond Recycling; Recycling of Flexible polyurethane Foam; General purpose Adhesives Prepared from Chemically Recycled Waste Rigid Polyurethane Foams; and Utilization of Isocyanate Binders in Recycling of Scrap Automotive Headliners.

  6. Fluid-particle hybrid simulation on the transports of plasma, recycling neutrals, and carbon impurities in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research divertor region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Deok-Kyu; Hong, Sang Hee

    2005-06-01

    A two-dimensional simulation modeling that has been performed in a self-consistent way for analysis on the fully coupled transports of plasma, recycling neutrals, and intrinsic carbon impurities in the divertor domain of tokamaks is presented. The numerical model coupling the three major species transports in the tokamak edge is based on a fluid-particle hybrid approach where the plasma is described as a single magnetohydrodynamic fluid while the neutrals and impurities are treated as kinetic particles using the Monte Carlo technique. This simulation code is applied to the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) tokamak [G. S. Lee, J. Kim, S. M. Hwang et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 575 (2000)] to calculate the peak heat flux on the divertor plate and to explore the divertor plasma behavior depending on the upstream conditions in its base line operation mode for various values of input heating power and separatrix plasma density. The numerical modeling for the KSTAR tokamak shows that its full-powered operation is subject to the peak heat loads on the divertor plate exceeding an engineering limit, and reveals that the recycling zone is formed in front of the divertor by increasing plasma density and by reducing power flow into the scrape-off layer. Compared with other researchers' work, the present hybrid simulation more rigorously reproduces severe electron pressure losses along field lines by the presence of recycling zone accounting for the transitions between the sheath limited and the detached divertor regimes. The substantial profile changes in carbon impurity population and ionic composition also represent the key features of this divertor regime transition.

  7. Recycling, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Amy

    1992-01-01

    Suggestions for creating a successful office recycling system are enumerated from start up plans to waste reduction and paper recycling. Contact information for recycling equipment, potential buyers of recycled materials, recycled products for purchase, and ideas for promotion and education of staff are included. (MCO)

  8. Processing and properties of a solid energy fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW) and recycled plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Gug, JeongIn Cacciola, David Sobkowicz, Margaret J.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Briquetting was used to produce solid fuels from municipal solid waste and recycled plastics. • Optimal drying, processing temperature and pressure were found to produce stable briquettes. • Addition of waste plastics yielded heating values comparable with typical coal feedstocks. • This processing method improves utilization of paper and plastic diverted from landfills. - Abstract: Diversion of waste streams such as plastics, woods, papers and other solid trash from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling municipal solid waste (MSW) is to burn the high-energy-content components in standard coal power plant. This research aims to reform wastes into briquettes that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, free of hazardous contaminants, and moisture resistant, while retaining high fuel value. This study aims to investigate the effects of processing conditions and added recyclable plastics on the properties of MSW solid fuels. A well-sorted waste stream high in paper and fiber content was combined with controlled levels of recyclable plastics PE, PP, PET and PS and formed into briquettes using a compression molding technique. The effect of added plastics and moisture content on binding attraction and energy efficiency were investigated. The stability of the briquettes to moisture exposure, the fuel composition by proximate analysis, briquette mechanical strength, and burning efficiency were evaluated. It was found that high processing temperature ensures better properties of the product addition of milled mixed plastic waste leads to better encapsulation as well as to greater calorific value. Also some moisture removal (but not complete) improves the compacting process and results in

  9. Magnetized Plasma Compression for Fusion Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnan, James; Grabowski, Christopher; Domonkos, Matthew; Amdahl, David

    2013-10-01

    Magnetized Plasma Compression (MPC) uses magnetic inhibition of thermal conduction and enhancement of charge particle product capture to greatly reduce the temporal and spatial compression required relative to un-magnetized inertial fusion (IFE)--to microseconds, centimeters vs nanoseconds, sub-millimeter. MPC greatly reduces the required confinement time relative to MFE--to microseconds vs minutes. Proof of principle can be demonstrated or refuted using high current pulsed power driven compression of magnetized plasmas using magnetic pressure driven implosions of metal shells, known as imploding liners. This can be done at a cost of a few tens of millions of dollars. If demonstrated, it becomes worthwhile to develop repetitive implosion drivers. One approach is to use arrays of heavy ion beams for energy production, though with much less temporal and spatial compression than that envisioned for un-magnetized IFE, with larger compression targets, and with much less ambitious compression ratios. A less expensive, repetitive pulsed power driver, if feasible, would require engineering development for transient, rapidly replaceable transmission lines such as envisioned by Sandia National Laboratories. Supported by DOE-OFES.

  10. Experimental investigation of the quality characteristics of agricultural plastic wastes regarding their recycling and energy recovery potential

    SciTech Connect

    Briassoulis, D.; Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E.; Antiohos, S.K.; Papadi, C.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definition of parameters characterising agricultural plastic waste (APW) quality. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of samples to determine APW quality for recycling or energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Majority of APW samples from various countries have very good quality for recycling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upper limit of 50% w/w soil contamination in APW acceptable for energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chlorine and heavy metals content in APW below the lowest limit for energy recovery. - Abstract: A holistic environmentally sound waste management scheme that transforms agricultural plastic waste (APW) streams into labelled guaranteed quality commodities freely traded in open market has been developed by the European research project LabelAgriWaste. The APW quality is defined by the APW material requirements, translated to technical specifications, for recycling or energy recovery. The present work investigates the characteristics of the APW quality and the key factors affecting it from the introduction of the virgin product to the market to the APW stream reaching the disposer. Samples of APW from different countries were traced from their application to the field through their storage phase and transportation to the final destination. The test results showed that the majority of APW retained their mechanical properties after their use preserving a 'very good quality' for recycling in terms of degradation. The degree of soil contamination concerning the APW recycling and energy recovery potential fluctuates depending on the agricultural plastic category and application. The chlorine and heavy metal content of the tested APW materials was much lower than the maximum acceptable limits for their potential use in cement industries.

  11. Combine waste-to-energy, recycling with fluid-bed boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M.L.

    1995-04-01

    This article describes a plant that will be the first to incorporate a fluidized-bed boiler to burn refuse-derived fuel exclusively. An effective long-term solid-waste management program will soon be a reality for Bladen, Cumberland, and Hoke counties, North Carolina. The key element of the program is a 600-ton/day waste-to-energy (WTE) facility, scheduled to begin commercial operation later this year. The BCH Energy project, which gets its name from the initials of the three counties it serves, will become the first fluidized-bed boiler in the US designed to be fueled solely by refuse-derived fuel (RDF). As such, it provides an innovative and efficient approach to solid-waste management in several ways: (1) Maximizes community participation in a recovery and recycling effort. (2) Maximizes additional waste handling and hauling efforts. (3) Significantly reducing waste flow into landfill. (4) Eliminating use of fossil fuel for a nearby chemical plant`s energy load. (5) Substantially improves air quality through use of the latest combustion and emissions control technology.

  12. Development of high energy pulsed plasma simulator for plasma-lithium trench experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Soonwook

    To simulate detrimental events in a tokamak and provide a test-stand for a liquid lithium infused trench (LiMIT) device, a pulsed plasma source utilizing a theta pinch in conjunction with a coaxial plasma accelerator has been developed. An overall objective of the project is to develop a compact device that can produce 100 MW/m2 to 1 GW/m2 of plasma heat flux (a typical heat flux level in a major fusion device) in ~ 100 mus (≤ 0.1 MJ/m2) for a liquid lithium plasma facing component research. The existing theta pinch device, DEVeX, was built and operated for study on lithium vapor shielding effect. However, a typical plasma energy of 3 - 4 kJ/m2 is too low to study an interaction of plasma and plasma facing components in fusion devices. No or little preionized plasma, ringing of magnetic field, collisions of high energy particles with background gas have been reported as the main issues. Therefore, DEVeX is reconfigured to mitigate these issues. The new device is mainly composed of a plasma gun for a preionization source, a theta pinch for heating, and guiding magnets for a better plasma transportation. Each component will be driven by capacitor banks and controlled by high voltage / current switches. Several diagnostics including triple Langmuir probe, calorimeter, optical emission measurement, Rogowski coil, flux loop, and fast ionization gauge are used to characterize the new device. A coaxial plasma gun is manufactured and installed in the previous theta pinch chamber. The plasma gun is equipped with 500 uF capacitor and a gas puff valve. The increase of the plasma velocity with the plasma gun capacitor voltage is consistent with the theoretical predictions and the velocity is located between the snowplow model and the weak - coupling limit. Plasma energies measured with the calorimeter ranges from 0.02 - 0.065 MJ/m2 and increases with the voltage at the capacitor bank. A cross-check between the plasma energy measured with the calorimeter and the triple probe

  13. Nuclear energy and radioactive waste disposal in the age of recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Conca, James L.; Apted, Michael

    2007-07-01

    The magnitude of humanity's energy needs requires that we embrace a multitude of various energy sources and applications. For a variety of reasons, nuclear energy must be a major portion of the distribution, at least one third. The often-cited strategic hurdle to this approach is nuclear waste disposal. Present strategies concerning disposal of nuclear waste need to be changed if the world is to achieve both a sustainable energy distribution by 2040 and solve the largest environmental issue of the 21. century - global warming. It is hoped that ambitious proposals to replace fossil fuel power generation by alternatives will drop the percentage of fossil fuel use substantially, but the absolute amount of fossil fuel produced electricity must be kept at or below its present 10 trillion kW-hrs/year. Unfortunately, the rapid growth in consumption to over 30 trillion kW-hrs/year by 2040, means that 20 trillion kW-hrs/yr of non-fossil fuel generated power has to come from other sources. If half of that comes from alternative non-nuclear, non-hydroelectric sources (an increase of 3000%), then nuclear still needs to increase by a factor of four worldwide to compensate. Many of the reasons nuclear energy did not expand after 1970 in North America (proliferation, capital costs, operational risks, waste disposal, and public fear) are no longer a problem. The WIPP site in New Mexico, an example of a solution to the nuclear waste disposal issue, and also to public fear, is an operating deep geologic nuclear waste repository in the massive bedded salt of the Salado Formation. WIPP has been operating for eight years, and as of this writing, has disposed of over 50,000 m{sup 3} of transuranic waste (>100 nCi/g but <23 Curie/liter) including high activity waste. The Salado Formation is an ideal host for any type of nuclear waste, especially waste from recycled spent fuel. (authors)

  14. Plasma energy balance in the L-2M stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Fedyanin, O. I.; Akulina, D. K.; Batanov, G. M.; Berezhetskii, M. S.; Vasil'kov, D. G.; Vafin, I. Yu.; Voronov, G. S.; Voronova, E. V.; Gladkov, G. A.; Grebenshchikov, S. E.; Kovrizhnykh, L. M.; Larionova, N. F.; Letunov, A. A.; Logvinenko, V. P.; Malykh, N. I.; Meshcheryakov, A. I.; Nechaev, Yu. I.; Sarksyan, K. A.; Skvortsova, N. N.; Shchepetov, S. V.

    2007-10-15

    Results are presented from studies of the effect of the discharge parameters (in particular, plasma density and heating power) and the characteristics of the magnetic configuration (e.g., rotational transform) on the confinement of a low-pressure plasma during electron-cyclotron resonance heating in the L-2M stellarator. An analysis shows that the plasma energy in the steady-state phase of a discharge is fairly well described by the product of power functions of the plasma density, heating power, and rotational transform: W = W{sub 0} n{sub e}{sup {alpha}{sub n}P{alpha}{sub p}{iota}{alpha}{sub {iota}}}. The energy scalings constructed in terms of the parameters in the initial stage of free plasma decay and those in the steady-state phase are close to one another. The dynamic analysis of the plasma energy decay is now under way.

  15. Benchmarking survey for recycling.

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, Margie Charlotte; Mizner, Jack Harry

    2005-06-01

    This report describes the methodology, analysis and conclusions of a comparison survey of recycling programs at ten Department of Energy sites including Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). The goal of the survey was to compare SNL/NM's recycling performance with that of other federal facilities, and to identify activities and programs that could be implemented at SNL/NM to improve recycling performance.

  16. Plasma response to electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K.

    2013-12-15

    An electron energy filter (EEF) is embedded in the Large Volume Plasma Device plasma for carrying out studies on excitation of plasma turbulence by a gradient in electron temperature (ETG) described in the paper of Mattoo et al. [S. K. Mattoo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255007 (2012)]. In this paper, we report results on the response of the plasma to the EEF. It is shown that inhomogeneity in the magnetic field of the EEF switches on several physical phenomena resulting in plasma regions with different characteristics, including a plasma region free from energetic electrons, suitable for the study of ETG turbulence. Specifically, we report that localized structures of plasma density, potential, electron temperature, and plasma turbulence are excited in the EEF plasma. It is shown that structures of electron temperature and potential are created due to energy dependence of the electron transport in the filter region. On the other hand, although structure of plasma density has origin in the particle transport but two distinct steps of the density structure emerge from dominance of collisionality in the source-EEF region and of the Bohm diffusion in the EEF-target region. It is argued and experimental evidence is provided for existence of drift like flute Rayleigh-Taylor in the EEF plasma.

  17. Abnormal energy deposition on the wall through plasma disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Schmidt, G. L.

    1984-12-01

    The dissipation of plasma kinetic and magnetic energy during sawtooth oscillations and disruptions in tokamaks is analyzed using Kadomtsev's disruption model and the plasma-circuit equations. New simple scalings of several characteristic times are obtained for sawteeth and for thermal and magnetic energy quenches of disruptions. The abnormal energy deposition on the wall during major or minor disruptions, estimated from this analysis, is compared with bolometric measurements in the PDX tokamak. Especially, magnetic energy dissipation during the current termination period is shown to be reduced by the strong coupling of the plasma current with external circuits. These analyses are found to be useful to predict the phenomenological behavior of plasma disruptions in large future tokamaks, and to estimate abnormal heat deposition on the wall during plasma disruptions.

  18. Abnormal energy deposition on the wall through plasma disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, K.; Schmidt, G. L.

    1984-06-01

    The dissipation of plasma kinetic and magnetic energy during sawtooth oscillations and disruptions in Tokamaks is analyzed using Kadomtsev's disruption model and the plasma-circuit equations. New simple scalings of several characteristic times are obtained for sawteeth and for thermal and magnetic energy quenches of disruptions. The abnormal energy deposition on the wall during major or minor disruptions, estimated from this analysis, is compared with bolometric measurements in the PDX Tokamak. Especially, magnetic energy dissipation during the current termination period is shown to be reduced by the strong coupling of the plasma current with external circuits. These analyses are found to be useful to predict the phenomenological behavior of plasma disruptions in large future Tokamaks, and to estimate abnormal heat deposition on the wall during plasma disruptions.

  19. Dense Plasma Focus - From Alternative Fusion Source to Versatile High Energy Density Plasma Source for Plasma Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF), a coaxial plasma gun, utilizes pulsed high current electrical discharge to heat and compress the plasma to very high density and temperature with energy densities in the range of 1-10 × 1010 J/m3. The DPF device has always been in the company of several alternative magnetic fusion devices as it produces intense fusion neutrons. Several experiments conducted on many different DPF devices ranging over several order of storage energy have demonstrated that at higher storage energy the neutron production does not follow I4 scaling laws and deteriorate significantly raising concern about the device's capability and relevance for fusion energy. On the other hand, the high energy density pinch plasma in DPF device makes it a multiple radiation source of ions, electron, soft and hard x-rays, and neutrons, making it useful for several applications in many different fields such as lithography, radiography, imaging, activation analysis, radioisotopes production etc. Being a source of hot dense plasma, strong shockwave, intense energetic beams and radiation, etc, the DPF device, additionally, shows tremendous potential for applications in plasma nanoscience and plasma nanotechnology. In the present paper, the key features of plasma focus device are critically discussed to understand the novelties and opportunities that this device offers in processing and synthesis of nanophase materials using, both, the top-down and bottom-up approach. The results of recent key experimental investigations performed on (i) the processing and modification of bulk target substrates for phase change, surface reconstruction and nanostructurization, (ii) the nanostructurization of PLD grown magnetic thin films, and (iii) direct synthesis of nanostructured (nanowire, nanosheets and nanoflowers) materials using anode target material ablation, ablated plasma and background reactive gas based synthesis and purely gas phase synthesis of various different types of

  20. Solar assisted sludge and energy recycling disposal system utilizing the old Princeton sewage treatment and solid waste incineration facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Slaby, S.M.

    1980-12-01

    Princeton, New Jersey, a town of 30,000 people is in a unique position to utilize solid waste and sewage sludge as supplementary energy sources. The Stony Brook Sewage Authority recently constructed a new twenty million dollar sewage treatment plant next to the old sewage treatment plant which served the community of Princeton for forty years. On the site of the old plant is an abandoned incinerator plant which presently is being used as a transfer station. The new sewage treatment plant is disposing of its sludge by burning it in multiple hearth furnaces using sixty gallons of precious oil to do this. The proposed Princeton Energy Recycling Center is designed to be retrofitted with solar sludge dryers to dry the sewage sludge which would be transported by conveyer to the old incinerator plant where it would be mixed with garbage and be burned in rehabilitated furnaces which would be retrofitted for steam generators, a steam engine driven electric generator and air pollution control equipment. It is estimated that the proposed energy recycling center would fulfill all electrical needs of the new sewage treatment plant in addition to solving the solid waste and sludge disposal problems of the Princeton community. The paper presents a detailed discussion on the proposed Princeton Energy Recycling Center.

  1. Local thermodynamic equilibrium in rapidly heated high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aslanyan, V.; Tallents, G. J.

    2014-06-15

    Emission spectra and the dynamics of high energy density plasmas created by optical and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) depend on the populations of atomic levels. Calculations of plasma emission and ionization may be simplified by assuming Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), where populations are given by the Saha-Boltzmann equation. LTE can be achieved at high densities when collisional processes are much more significant than radiative processes, but may not be valid if plasma conditions change rapidly. A collisional-radiative model has been used to calculate the times taken by carbon and iron plasmas to reach LTE at varying densities and heating rates. The effect of different energy deposition methods, as well as Ionization Potential Depression are explored. This work shows regimes in rapidly changing plasmas, such as those created by optical lasers and FELs, where the use of LTE is justified, because timescales for plasma changes are significantly longer than the times needed to achieve an LTE ionization balance.

  2. Layout optimization methodology of piezoelectric transducers in energy-recycling semi-active vibration control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takezawa, Akihiro; Makihara, Kanjuro; Kogiso, Nozomu; Kitamura, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    An optimization methodology is proposed for the piezoelectric transducer (PZT) layout of an energy-recycling semi-active vibration control (ERSAVC) system for a space structure composed of trusses. Based on numerical optimization techniques, we intend to generate optimal location of PZTs under the constraint for the total length of PZTs. The design variables are set as the length of the PZT on each truss based on the concept of the ground structure approach. The transient problems of the mechanical and electrical vibrations based on the ERSAVC theory are considered as the equations of state. The objective is to minimize the integration of the square of all displacement over the whole analysis time domain. The sensitivity of the objective function is derived based on the adjoint variable method. Based on these formulations, an optimization algorithm is constructed using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method and the method of moving asymptotes. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the validity and utility of the proposed methodology. Using the proposed methodology, the optimal location of PZTs for the vibration suppression for multi-modal vibration is studied, which can be benchmark results of further study in the context of ERSAVC systems.

  3. Macroscopic magnetic islands and plasma energy transport

    SciTech Connect

    Cima, G; Porcelli, F; Rossi, E; Wootton, A J

    1998-12-03

    A model is presented, based on the combined effects of m=n=l magnetic island dynamics, localized heat sources, large heat diffusivity along magnetic field lines and plasma rotation, which may explain the multipeaked temperature profiles and transport barriers observed in tokamak plasmas heated by electron cyclotron resonant waves.

  4. Measurement of energy distribution in flowing hydrogen microwave plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Morin, T.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into kinetic energy of a flowing gas is investigated. A calorimetry system enclosing a microwave plasma system has been developed to accurately measure the energy inputs and outputs of the microwave plasma system. The rate of energy transferred to the gas can be determined to within + or - 1.8 W from an energy balance around the microwave plasma system. The percentage of the power absorbed by the microwave plasma system transferred to the hydrogen gas as it flows through the system is found to increase with the increasing flow rate, to decrease with the increasing pressure, and to be independent of the absorbed power. An upper bound for the hydrogen gas temperature is estimated from the energy content, heat capacity, and flow rate of the gas stream. A lower bound for an overall heat-transfer coefficient is then calculated, characterizing the energy loss from the hydrogen gas stream to the air cooling of the plasma discharge tube wall. The heat-transfer coefficient is found to increase with the increasing flow rate and pressure and to be independent of the absorbed power. This result indicates that a convective-type mechanism is responsible for the energy transfer.

  5. On the energy crisis in the Io plasma torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert A.; Bagenal, Fran; Cheng, Andrew F.; Strobel, Darrell

    1988-01-01

    Recent calculations of the energy balance of the Io plasma torus show that the observed UV and EUV radiation cannot be maintained solely via energy input by the ion pickup mechanism. Current theoretical models of the torus must be modified to include non-local energy input. It is argued that the required energy may be supplied by inward diffusion of energetic heavy ions with energies less than about 20 keV.

  6. Energy coupling to the plasma in repetitive nanosecond pulse discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Adamovich, Igor V.; Nishihara, Munetake; Choi, Inchul; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Lempert, Walter R.

    2009-11-15

    A new analytic quasi-one-dimensional model of energy coupling to nanosecond pulse discharge plasmas in plane-to-plane geometry has been developed. The use of a one-dimensional approach is based on images of repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharge plasmas in dry air demonstrating that the plasma remains diffuse and uniform on a nanosecond time scale over a wide range of pressures. The model provides analytic expressions for the time-dependent electric field and electron density in the plasma, electric field in the sheath, sheath boundary location, and coupled pulse energy. The analytic model predictions are in very good agreement with numerical calculations. The model demonstrates that (i) the energy coupled to the plasma during an individual nanosecond discharge pulse is controlled primarily by the capacitance of the dielectric layers and by the breakdown voltage and (ii) the pulse energy coupled to the plasma during a burst of nanosecond pulses decreases as a function of the pulse number in the burst. This occurs primarily because of plasma temperature rise and resultant reduction in breakdown voltage, such that the coupled pulse energy varies approximately proportionally to the number density. Analytic expression for coupled pulse energy scaling has been incorporated into the air plasma chemistry model, validated previously by comparing with atomic oxygen number density measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges. The results of kinetic modeling using the modified air plasma chemistry model are compared with time-resolved temperature measurements in a repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharge in air, by emission spectroscopy, and purely rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy showing good agreement.

  7. Energy coupling to the plasma in repetitive nanosecond pulse discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamovich, Igor V.; Nishihara, Munetake; Choi, Inchul; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Lempert, Walter R.

    2009-11-01

    A new analytic quasi-one-dimensional model of energy coupling to nanosecond pulse discharge plasmas in plane-to-plane geometry has been developed. The use of a one-dimensional approach is based on images of repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharge plasmas in dry air demonstrating that the plasma remains diffuse and uniform on a nanosecond time scale over a wide range of pressures. The model provides analytic expressions for the time-dependent electric field and electron density in the plasma, electric field in the sheath, sheath boundary location, and coupled pulse energy. The analytic model predictions are in very good agreement with numerical calculations. The model demonstrates that (i) the energy coupled to the plasma during an individual nanosecond discharge pulse is controlled primarily by the capacitance of the dielectric layers and by the breakdown voltage and (ii) the pulse energy coupled to the plasma during a burst of nanosecond pulses decreases as a function of the pulse number in the burst. This occurs primarily because of plasma temperature rise and resultant reduction in breakdown voltage, such that the coupled pulse energy varies approximately proportionally to the number density. Analytic expression for coupled pulse energy scaling has been incorporated into the air plasma chemistry model, validated previously by comparing with atomic oxygen number density measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges. The results of kinetic modeling using the modified air plasma chemistry model are compared with time-resolved temperature measurements in a repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharge in air, by emission spectroscopy, and purely rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy showing good agreement.

  8. Vacuum arc plasma thrusters with inductive energy storage driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schein, Jochen (Inventor); Gerhan, Andrew N. (Inventor); Woo, Robyn L. (Inventor); Au, Michael Y. (Inventor); Krishnan, Mahadevan (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus for producing a vacuum arc plasma source device using a low mass, compact inductive energy storage circuit powered by a low voltage DC supply acts as a vacuum arc plasma thruster. An inductor is charged through a switch, subsequently the switch is opened and a voltage spike of Ldi/dt is produced initiating plasma across a resistive path separating anode and cathode. The plasma is subsequently maintained by energy stored in the inductor. Plasma is produced from cathode material, which allows for any electrically conductive material to be used. A planar structure, a tubular structure, and a coaxial structure allow for consumption of cathode material feed and thereby long lifetime of the thruster for long durations of time.

  9. Experimental investigation of the quality characteristics of agricultural plastic wastes regarding their recycling and energy recovery potential.

    PubMed

    Briassoulis, D; Hiskakis, M; Babou, E; Antiohos, S K; Papadi, C

    2012-06-01

    A holistic environmentally sound waste management scheme that transforms agricultural plastic waste (APW) streams into labelled guaranteed quality commodities freely traded in open market has been developed by the European research project LabelAgriWaste. The APW quality is defined by the APW material requirements, translated to technical specifications, for recycling or energy recovery. The present work investigates the characteristics of the APW quality and the key factors affecting it from the introduction of the virgin product to the market to the APW stream reaching the disposer. Samples of APW from different countries were traced from their application to the field through their storage phase and transportation to the final destination. The test results showed that the majority of APW retained their mechanical properties after their use preserving a "very good quality" for recycling in terms of degradation. The degree of soil contamination concerning the APW recycling and energy recovery potential fluctuates depending on the agricultural plastic category and application. The chlorine and heavy metal content of the tested APW materials was much lower than the maximum acceptable limits for their potential use in cement industries.

  10. Hanford recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, I.M.

    1996-09-01

    This paper is a study of the past and present recycling efforts on the Hanford site and options for future improvements in the recycling program. Until 1996, recycling goals were voluntarily set by the waste generators: this year, DOE has imposed goals for all its sites to accomplish by 1999. Hanford is presently meeting the voluntary site goals, but may not be able to meet all the new DOE goals without changes to the program. Most of these new DOE goals are recycling goals: * Reduce the generation of radioactive (low-level) waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of low-level mixed waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of hazardous waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Recycle 33 percent of the sanitary waste from all operations. * Increase affirmative procurement of EPA-designated recycled items to 100 percent. The Hanford recycling program has made great strides-there has been a 98 percent increase in the amount of paper recycled since its inception in 1990. Hanford recycles paper, chemicals cardboard, tires, oil, batteries, rags, lead weights, fluorescent tubes, aerosol products, concrete, office furniture, computer software, drums, toner cartridges, and scrap metal. Many other items are recycled or reused by individual groups on a one time basis without a formal contract. Several contracts are closed-loop contracts which involve all parts of the recycle loop. Considerable savings are generated from recycling, and much more is possible with increased attention and improvements to this program. General methods for improving the recycling program to ensure that the new goals can be met are: a Contract and financial changes 0 Tracking database and methods improvements 0 Expanded recycling efforts. Specifically, the Hanford recycling program would be improved by: 0 Establishing one overall

  11. Experimental study of the effects of lithium coated plasma facing components on energy confinement time in the CDX-U device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaleta, Jeffrey Dario

    Experimentally constrained equilibrium reconstructions are an important analysis tool used to understand the physics of magnetically confined plasmas. This thesis describes the first ever calculations of equilibrium reconstructions for spherical tokamak plasmas in the presence of lithium coated plasma facing components (PFC's) in the Current Drive eXperiment - Upgrade (CDX-U) device. Equilibria were calculated using a modified version of the Equilibrium and Stability Code (ESC), and were constrained by measurements made from a collection of magnetic field diagnostics. The ESC was modified to incorporate the first ever implementation of a novel response function technique for magnetic field diagnostic calibration. The technique is well suited for situations where the assumption of toroidal symmetry of the magnetic field is invalid, or when wall eddy currents are too large to neglect. Also included is a detailed discussion of the calculation of energy confinement time from power balance arguments, using parameters obtained from equilibrium reconstructions. The energy confinement time, as derived from plasma equilibria, was as large as 6 milliseconds for plasmas in the presence of both solid and liquid lithium PFC's. This represents a significant improvement over baseline plasmas, which typically had energy confinement times of 1 millisecond or less. The energy confinement for plasmas with lithium PFC's also showed an improvement over that expected from the ITER98y1 confinement scaling, which is derived from a database of earlier tokamak results. The improvement in confinement over this scaling correlates with the observed increase in density "pump-out", which is indicative of low wall-recycling. Traditionally, plasma fueling has been dominated by wall-recycling, with 90% or more of the fuel coming from recycling sources instead of externally controlled means, such as gas puffing or pellet injection. Previous lithium wall coating experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test

  12. Nonlinear laser energy depletion in laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, B.A.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.

    2009-04-03

    Energy depletion of intense, short-pulse lasers via excitation of plasma waves is investigated numerically and analytically. The evolution of a resonant laser pulse proceeds in two phases. In the first phase, the pulse steepens, compresses, and frequency red-shifts as energy is deposited in the plasma. The second phase of evolution occurs after the pulse reaches a minimum length at which point the pulse rapidly lengthens, losing resonance with the plasma. Expressions for the rate of laser energy loss and rate of laser red-shifting are derived and are found to be in excellent agreement with the direct numerical solution of the laser field evolution coupled to the plasma response. Both processes are shown to have the same characteristic length-scale. In the high intensity limit, for nearly-resonant Gaussian laser pulses, this scale length is shown to be independent of laser intensity.

  13. Applications of plasma core reactors to terrestrial energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, T. S.; Biancardi, F. R.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma core reactors offer several new options for future energy needs in addition to space power and propulsion applications. Power extraction from plasma core reactors with gaseous nuclear fuel allows operation at temperatures higher than conventional reactors. Highly efficient thermodynamic cycles and applications employing direct coupling of radiant energy are possible. Conceptual configurations of plasma core reactors for terrestrial applications are described. Closed-cycle gas turbines, MHD systems, photo- and thermo-chemical hydrogen production processes, and laser systems using plasma core reactors as prime energy sources are considered. Cycle efficiencies in the range of 50 to 65 percent are calculated for closed-cycle gas turbine and MHD electrical generators. Reactor advantages include continuous fuel reprocessing which limits inventory of radioactive by-products and thorium-U-233 breeder configurations with about 5-year doubling times.-

  14. Electron energy distribution in a dusty plasma: analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Denysenko, I B; Kersten, H; Azarenkov, N A

    2015-09-01

    Analytical expressions describing the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a dusty plasma are obtained from the homogeneous Boltzmann equation for electrons. The expressions are derived neglecting electron-electron collisions, as well as transformation of high-energy electrons into low-energy electrons at inelastic electron-atom collisions. At large electron energies, the quasiclassical approach for calculation of the EEDF is applied. For the moderate energies, we account for inelastic electron-atom collisions in the dust-free case and both inelastic electron-atom and electron-dust collisions in the dusty plasma case. Using these analytical expressions and the balance equation for dust charging, the electron energy distribution function, the effective electron temperature, the dust charge, and the dust surface potential are obtained for different dust radii and densities, as well as for different electron densities and radio-frequency (rf) field amplitudes and frequencies. The dusty plasma parameters are compared with those calculated numerically by a finite-difference method taking into account electron-electron collisions and the transformation of high-energy electrons at inelastic electron-neutral collisions. It is shown that the analytical expressions can be used for calculation of the EEDF and dusty plasma parameters at typical experimental conditions, in particular, in the positive column of a direct-current glow discharge and in the case of an rf plasma maintained by an electric field with frequency f=13.56MHz.

  15. Ferlins Show Tissue-Specific Expression and Segregate as Plasma Membrane/Late Endosomal or Trans-Golgi/Recycling Ferlins.

    PubMed

    Redpath, Gregory M I; Sophocleous, Reece A; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Cooper, Sandra T

    2016-03-01

    Ferlins are a family of transmembrane-anchored vesicle fusion proteins uniquely characterized by 5-7 tandem cytoplasmic C2 domains, Ca(2+)-regulated phospholipid-binding domains that regulate vesicle fusion in the synaptotagmin family. In humans, dysferlin mutations cause limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B (LGMD2B) due to defective Ca(2+)-dependent, vesicle-mediated membrane repair and otoferlin mutations cause non-syndromic deafness due to defective Ca(2+)-triggered auditory neurotransmission. In this study, we describe the tissue-specific expression, subcellular localization and endocytic trafficking of the ferlin family. Studies of endosomal transit together with 3D-structured illumination microscopy reveals dysferlin and myoferlin are abundantly expressed at the PM and cycle to Rab7-positive late endosomes, supporting potential roles in the late-endosomal pathway. In contrast, Fer1L6 shows concentrated localization to a specific compartment of the trans-Golgi/recycling endosome, cycling rapidly between this compartment and the PM via Rab11 recycling endosomes. Otoferlin also shows trans-Golgi to PM cycling, with very low levels of PM otoferlin suggesting either brief PM residence, or rare incorporation of otoferlin molecules into the PM. Thus, type-I and type-II ferlins segregate as PM/late-endosomal or trans-Golgi/recycling ferlins, consistent with different ferlins mediating vesicle fusion events in specific subcellular locations.

  16. Recycled roads

    SciTech Connect

    Tarricone, P.

    1993-04-01

    This article examines the efforts of various states in the USA to recycle waste materials in highway construction as fill and pavements. The topics of the article include recycling used tires whole, ground, and shredded, cost of recycling, wood fiber chips as fill material in embankments, and mining wastes used to construct embankments and as coarse aggregates in asphalt pavement.

  17. Review of high-energy plasma wakefield experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggli, Patric; Hogan, Mark J.

    2009-03-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) experiments have made considerable progress in the past decade by using high-energy particle beams to drive large amplitude waves or wakes in a plasma. Electron beam driven experiments have measured the integrated and dynamic aspects of plasma focusing, the bright flux of high-energy betatron radiation photons, particle beam refraction at the plasma/neutral gas interface, and the structure and amplitude of the accelerating wakefield. Gradients spanning kT/m to MT/m for focusing and 100 MeV/m to 50 GeV/m for acceleration have been excited in plasmas with densities of 10 14 to 10 cm, respectively. The large accelerating gradient led to the energy doubling of 42 GeV electrons in only 85 cm of plasma. Positron beam driven experiments have evidenced the comparatively more complex dynamic and integrated plasma focusing, the subsequent halo formation and emittance growth in the positron beam and demonstrated accelerating gradients of nearly 100 MeV/m. This article summarizes this experimental progress, illustrates the key enabling technologies that made the work possible, concludes with a brief discussion of proposed future directions, and suggests that the PWFA could one day revolutionize e/e linear colliders. To cite this article: P. Muggli, M.J. Hogan, C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  18. Investigating the energy crisis in Io's plasma torus: plasma energetics in rotating magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramer, K. M.; Kivelson, M.; Vogt, M.; Khurana, K. K.; Walker, R. J.; Strangeway, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    It has long been recognized that there is something lacking in our understanding of the temperature of the Io plasma torus. In situ observations show that the temperature in the torus increases more than can be accounted for by ion pickup; as much as 20% of the needed energy is missing. However, the role of centrifugal acceleration has not been investigated as a potential source of plasma heating. Analysis of the role of centrifugal forces on the plasma population is difficult as the effects are both energy and pitch-angle dependent: adiabatic outward displacement of flux tubes in a rotating frame results in net cooling of equatorially mirroring plasma even when a centrifugal force is acting, but this is not necessarily the case for particles mirroring off the equator. An ion in a rotating, adiabatically stretching system bouncing away from its mirror point will gain parallel energy from the centrifugal force, but will lose it again as it moves back towards its mirror point; the bounce-averaged change in energy is small. Therefore the centrifugal force in an adiabatically expanding system is only able to impart significant energy to a particle if the timescale of the stretching is less than that of a bounce period. As a prelude to a full Large Scale Kinetic (LSK) simulation of particles in a rotating magnetic field, here we check that two prerequisite conditions are met. Firstly, we estimate an upper bound to the thermal energy that could be gained through centrifugal acceleration in order to demonstrate that there is sufficient energy to account for the temperature anomaly observed at Io's plasma torus. Secondly, we calculate the bounce period of ions typical to the torus to establish the range of energies for which the quarter bounce times are is shorter than the ~4 days required for the field in the Io plasma torus to stretch from 6-10 RJ. We will also describe preliminary results from our modeling efforts.

  19. Plasma scale-length effects on electron energy spectra in high-irradiance laser plasmas.

    PubMed

    Culfa, O; Tallents, G J; Rossall, A K; Wagenaars, E; Ridgers, C P; Murphy, C D; Dance, R J; Gray, R J; McKenna, P; Brown, C D R; James, S F; Hoarty, D J; Booth, N; Robinson, A P L; Lancaster, K L; Pikuz, S A; Faenov, A Ya; Kampfer, T; Schulze, K S; Uschmann, I; Woolsey, N C

    2016-04-01

    An analysis of an electron spectrometer used to characterize fast electrons generated by ultraintense (10^{20}Wcm^{-2}) laser interaction with a preformed plasma of scale length measured by shadowgraphy is presented. The effects of fringing magnetic fields on the electron spectral measurements and the accuracy of density scale-length measurements are evaluated. 2D EPOCH PIC code simulations are found to be in agreement with measurements of the electron energy spectra showing that laser filamentation in plasma preformed by a prepulse is important with longer plasma scale lengths (>8 μm). PMID:27176413

  20. Inductively heated plasma waste treatment for energy recovery.

    PubMed

    Herdrich, G; Schmalzriedt, S; Laufer, R; Dropmann, M; Gabrielli, R

    2014-08-01

    An assessment of a decentralized inductively heated plasma waste treatment system for energy recovery has been done. The modular miniaturized high enthalpy plasma source IPG6 is a reference for the system and has been qualified for inert but also chemically aggressive gas compositions. An identification and review of applications were undertaken. Niches of high environmental and societal importance are considered: hospital waste (threshold countries), shipboard waste and marine litter. The wastes are reviewed deriving relevant parameter for a system analysis aiming for the derivation of energy production and efficiencies. The system analysis shows advantageous constellation due to the wastes' energy leading to self-feeding systems.

  1. Pulsed Energy Systems for Generating Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, M. Franklin; Shotts, Z.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will describe the techniques needed to electrically generate highly ionized dense plasmas for a variety of applications. The components needed in pulsed circuits are described in terms of general performance parameters currently available from commercial vendors. Examples of pulsed systems using these components are described and technical data from laboratory experiments presented. Experimental data are given for point designs, capable of multi-megawatt power levels.

  2. Energy exchange in strongly coupled plasmas with electron drift

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.; Ghorbanalilu, M.

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, the generalized viscoelastic collisional quantum hydrodynamic model is employed in order to investigate the linear dielectric response of a quantum plasma in the presence of strong electron-beam plasma interactions. The generalized Chandrasekhar's relativistic degeneracy pressure together with the electron-exchange and Coulomb interaction effects are taken into account in order to extend current research to a wide range of plasma number density relevant to big planetary cores and astrophysical compact objects. The previously calculated shear viscosity and the electron-ion collision frequencies are used for strongly coupled ion fluid. The effect of the electron-beam velocity on complex linear dielectric function is found to be profound. This effect is clearly interpreted in terms of the wave-particle interactions and their energy-exchange according to the sign of the imaginary dielectric function, which is closely related to the wave attenuation coefficient in plasmas. Such kinetic effect is also shown to be in close connection with the stopping power of a charged-particle beam in a quantum plasma. The effect of many independent plasma parameters, such as the ion charge-state, electron beam-velocity, and relativistic degeneracy, is shown to be significant on the growing/damping of plasma instability or energy loss/gain of the electron-beam.

  3. Energy exchange in strongly coupled plasmas with electron drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.; Ghorbanalilu, M.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the generalized viscoelastic collisional quantum hydrodynamic model is employed in order to investigate the linear dielectric response of a quantum plasma in the presence of strong electron-beam plasma interactions. The generalized Chandrasekhar's relativistic degeneracy pressure together with the electron-exchange and Coulomb interaction effects are taken into account in order to extend current research to a wide range of plasma number density relevant to big planetary cores and astrophysical compact objects. The previously calculated shear viscosity and the electron-ion collision frequencies are used for strongly coupled ion fluid. The effect of the electron-beam velocity on complex linear dielectric function is found to be profound. This effect is clearly interpreted in terms of the wave-particle interactions and their energy-exchange according to the sign of the imaginary dielectric function, which is closely related to the wave attenuation coefficient in plasmas. Such kinetic effect is also shown to be in close connection with the stopping power of a charged-particle beam in a quantum plasma. The effect of many independent plasma parameters, such as the ion charge-state, electron beam-velocity, and relativistic degeneracy, is shown to be significant on the growing/damping of plasma instability or energy loss/gain of the electron-beam.

  4. Atomic Oxygen Energy in Low Frequency Hyperthermal Plasma Ashers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K R.; Kneubel, Christian A.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and analytical analysis of the atomic oxygen erosion of pyrolytic graphite as well as Monte Carlo computational modeling of the erosion of Kapton H (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) polyimide was performed to determine the hyperthermal energy of low frequency (30 to 35 kHz) plasma ashers operating on air. It was concluded that hyperthermal energies in the range of 0.3 to 0.9 eV are produced in the low frequency air plasmas which results in texturing similar to that in low Earth orbit (LEO). Monte Carlo computational modeling also indicated that such low energy directed ions are fully capable of producing the experimentally observed textured surfaces in low frequency plasmas.

  5. Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, D.; Shu, A. J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Matlis, N. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Plateau, G.; Lin, C.; Toth, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10 m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  6. Staging laser plasma accelerators for increased beam energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shu, Anthony; Schroeder, Carl; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Matlis, Nicholas; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Plateau, Guillaume; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2008-09-29

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  7. Investigation of low energy space plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, Richard H.; Horwitz, James L.

    1987-01-01

    An important modification was made in the method for computing ion densities from DE1/RIMS observations, based on the observed relationship between total plasma density and spacecraft potential. An iterative technique was developed to require that this relationship be preserved in all individual observations, not just in the average sense observed. Results of employing this technique were examined closely and are found to generally improve the final densities in terms of agreement with densities obtained from PWI upper hybrid frequency observations. It also has the effect of reducing scatter in the density vs. L profiles.

  8. Effects of low-energy-electron-capture collisions (H/sub 0/ + c/sup n+/) on the particle and energy balance of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, J.T.

    1981-01-01

    To illustrate the way in which atomic data provides enlightenment in the search for understandable (and thus extrapolable) confinement models, we restrict our scope to electron capture collisions involving H/sub 0/ and multiply-charged ions. Many such foreign (impurity) multiply-charged ion species are found in plasma discharges, as a result of gas recycling and damage to the surrounding surfaces by energetic plasma particles. Typical low-Z ions are carbon and oxygen; the major constituents of the stainless steel wall (Fe, Ni, Cr) are intermediate impurities, while high-Z impurities (Mo, W) enter from limiter plates which constrict the hot plasma zone to reduce direct plasma-wall contact. In this discussion, however, attention will be given only to applications of data involving H/sub 0/ + C/sup n+/ ..-->.. H/sup +/ + C/sup (n-1)+/ reactions with energy 10 eV to 2 keV. This energy range is typical of the plasma edge in present devices.

  9. Solvent recycle/recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  10. Results from the SLAC High Energy Density Plasma Lens Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Johnny S. T.

    2000-04-01

    The plasma lens was proposed(P. Chen, Part. Acc. 20), 171 (1987). as a final focusing mechanism to achieve high luminosity for future high energy linear colliders. Previous experiments(See, for example, R. Govil et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett, 86, No. 16, 3202 (1999), and references therein. to test this concept were carried out at low energy densities. In this talk, results from the SLAC E-150 experiment(P. Chen et al.), Proposal for a Plasma Lens Experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam, SLAC Expt. Prop. E-150, April 1997. on plasma lens focusing of a high energy density beam with parameters relevant to linear colliders are presented and compared with theoretical expectations. The experiment was carried out at the SLAC Final Focus Test Beam, with nominal parameters of 30 GeV beam energy, 1.5× 10^10 electrons per bunch, bunch length σz = 0.7 mm and beam cross-section σ_x^* × σ_y^* = 7 μm × 3 μm. The plasma lens was produced by a fast pulsing gas-jet providing a neutral Nitrogen gas column with density up to 5× 10^18 / cm^3. The gas was then ionized by the leading portion of the incident high energy density electron beam, while the rest of the electrons in the same bunch were focused by the strong plasma pinching force and a reduction in the beam size of up to 40% was measured. The beam waist was also measured and compared with detailed numerical calculations with a particles-in-cell code. The reduction in focal length indicated a focusing strength approximately 100 times that of the FFTB final focus magnets. The synchrotron radiation with critical energy in the 1-10 MeV range due to the strong bending of beam particles inside the plasma lens was observed for the first time.

  11. Study on electron beam in a low energy plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair; Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow

    2014-03-05

    Electron beam emission was investigated in a low energy plasma focus device (2.2 kJ) using copper hollow anode. Faraday cup was used to estimate the energy of the electron beam. XR100CR X-ray spectrometer was used to explore the impact of the electron beam on the target observed from top-on and side-on position. Experiments were carried out at optimized pressure of argon gas. The impact of electron beam is exceptionally notable with two different approaches using lead target inside hollow anode in our plasma focus device.

  12. Theory and application of maximum magnetic energy in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.K.

    1992-02-01

    The magnetic energy in an inductively driven steady-state toroidal plasma is a maximum for a given rate of dissipation of energy (Poynting flux). A purely resistive steady state of the piecewise force-free configuration, however, cannot exist, as the periodic removal of the excess poloidal flux and pressure, due to heating, ruptures the static equilibrium of the partitioning rational surfaces intermittently. The rupture necessitates a plasma with a negative q{prime}/q (as in reverse field pinches and spheromaks) to have the same {alpha} in all its force-free regions and with a positive q{prime}/q (as in tokamaks) to have centrally peaked {alpha}`s.

  13. Theory and application of maximum magnetic energy in toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.K.

    1992-02-01

    The magnetic energy in an inductively driven steady-state toroidal plasma is a maximum for a given rate of dissipation of energy (Poynting flux). A purely resistive steady state of the piecewise force-free configuration, however, cannot exist, as the periodic removal of the excess poloidal flux and pressure, due to heating, ruptures the static equilibrium of the partitioning rational surfaces intermittently. The rupture necessitates a plasma with a negative q{prime}/q (as in reverse field pinches and spheromaks) to have the same {alpha} in all its force-free regions and with a positive q{prime}/q (as in tokamaks) to have centrally peaked {alpha}'s.

  14. Frontiers in plasma science: a high energy density perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    The potential for ground-breaking research in plasma physics in high energy density (HED) regimes is compelling. The combination of HED facilities around the world spanning microjoules to megajoules, with time scales ranging from femtoseconds to microseconds enables new regimes of plasma science to be experimentally probed. The ability to shock and ramp compress samples and simultaneously probe them allows dense, strongly coupled, Fermi degenerate plasmas relevant to planetary interiors to be studied. Shock driven hydrodynamic instabilities evolving into turbulent flows relevant to the dynamics of exploding stars are being probed. The physics and dynamics of magnetized plasmas relevant to astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion are also starting to be studied. High temperature, high velocity interacting flows are being probed for evidence of astrophysical collisionless shock formation. Turbulent, high magnetic Reynolds number flows are being experimentally generated to look for evidence of the turbulent magnetic dynamo effect. And new results from thermonuclear reactions in dense hot plasmas relevant to stellar interiors are starting to emerge. A selection of examples providing a compelling vision for frontier plasma science in the coming decade will be presented. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Solar energy converter using surface plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Sunlight is dispersed over a diffraction grating formed on the surface of a conducting film on a substrate. The angular dispersion controls the effective grating period so that a matching spectrum of surface plasmons is excited for parallel processing on the conducting film. The resulting surface plasmons carry energy to an array of inelastic tunnel diodes. This solar energy converter does not require different materials for each frequency band, and sunlight is directly converted to electricity in an efficient manner by extracting more energy from the more energetic photons.

  16. High energy density Z-pinch plasmas using flow stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Shumlak, U. Golingo, R. P. Nelson, B. A. Bowers, C. A. Doty, S. A. Forbes, E. G. Hughes, M. C. Kim, B. Knecht, S. D. Lambert, K. K. Lowrie, W. Ross, M. P. Weed, J. R.

    2014-12-15

    The ZaP Flow Z-Pinch research project[1] at the University of Washington investigates the effect of sheared flows on MHD instabilities. Axially flowing Z-pinch plasmas are produced that are 100 cm long with a 1 cm radius. The plasma remains quiescent for many radial Alfvén times and axial flow times. The quiescent periods are characterized by low magnetic mode activity measured at several locations along the plasma column and by stationary visible plasma emission. Plasma evolution is modeled with high-resolution simulation codes – Mach2, WARPX, NIMROD, and HiFi. Plasma flow profiles are experimentally measured with a multi-chord ion Doppler spectrometer. A sheared flow profile is observed to be coincident with the quiescent period, and is consistent with classical plasma viscosity. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements: interferometry for density; spectroscopy for ion temperature, plasma flow, and density[2]; Thomson scattering for electron temperature; Zeeman splitting for internal magnetic field measurements[3]; and fast framing photography for global structure. Wall stabilization has been investigated computationally and experimentally by removing 70% of the surrounding conducting wall to demonstrate no change in stability behavior.[4] Experimental evidence suggests that the plasma lifetime is only limited by plasma supply and current waveform. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve high energy density plasmas,[5] which are large, easy to diagnose, and persist for extended durations. A new experiment, ZaP-HD, has been built to investigate this approach by separating the flow Z-pinch formation from the radial compression using a triaxial-electrode configuration. This innovation allows more detailed investigations of the sheared flow stabilizing effect, and it allows compression to much higher densities than previously achieved on ZaP by reducing the linear density and increasing the pinch current. Experimental results and

  17. Neutral dynamics and ion energy transport in MST plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Zichuan; Nornberg, Mark; den Hartog, Daniel; Kumar, Santosh; Anderson, Jay

    2015-11-01

    Neutral dynamics can have a significant effect on ion energy transport through charge exchange collisions. Whereas previously charge exchange was considered a direct loss mechanism in MST plasmas, new analysis indicates that significant thermal charge exchange neutrals are reionized. Further, the temperatures of the neutral species in the core of the plasma are suspected to be much higher than room temperature, which has a large effect on ion energy losses due to charge exchange. The DEGAS2 Monte Carlo simulation code is applied to the MST reversed field pinch experiment to estimate the density and temperature profile of the neutral species. The result is then used to further examine the effect of the neutral species on ion energy transport in improved confinement plasmas. This enables the development of a model that accounts for collisional equilibration between species, classical convective and conductive energy transport, and energy loss due to charge exchange collisions. The goal is to quantify classical, stochastic, and anomalous ion heating and transport in RFP plasmas. Work supported by the US DOE. DEGAS2 is provided by PPPL and STRAHL is provided by Ralph Dux of the Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik.

  18. Experimental Study of the Effects of Lithium Coated Plasma Facing Components on Energy Confinement Time in the CDX-U Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaleta, Jeffrey; Zakharov, Leonid; Majeski, Richard; Kaita, Robert; Gray, Timothy

    2006-10-01

    The first ever measurements of energy confinement time for spherical tokamak plasmas in the presence of lithium coated plasma facing components (PFC's) have been made in the CDX-U device. The energy confinement time, as derived from power balance considerations using parameters calculated from plasma equilibria, was as large as 6 milliseconds for Ohmic plasmas in the presence of both solid and liquid lithium PFC's. This represents a significant improvement over baseline plasmas, which typically had energy confinement times of 1 millisecond or less. The energy confinement for plasmas with lithium PFC's also showed an improvement over that expected from the ITER98(y,1) confinement scaling. The improvement in confinement over this scaling correlates with the observed increase in density ``pump-out'', which is indicative of low wall-recycling. Plasma equilibria were calculated using a modified version of the Equilibrium and Stability Code (ESC), and were constrained by measurements made from a collection of magnetic field diagnostics. The ESC was modified to incorporate the first ever implementation of a novel response function technique for in-situ magnetic field diagnostic calibration that is insensitive to toroidal asymmetries and vessel wall currents.

  19. Sheath energy transmission in a collisional plasma with collisionless sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xian-Zhu Guo, Zehua

    2015-10-15

    Sheath energy transmission governs the plasma energy exhaust onto a material surface. The ion channel is dominated by convection, but the electron channel has a significant thermal conduction component, which is dominated by the Knudsen layer effect in the presence of an absorbing wall. First-principle kinetic simulations reveal a robustly supersonic sheath entry flow. The ion sheath energy transmission and the sheath potential are accurately predicted by a sheath model of truncated bi-Maxwellian electron distribution. The electron energy transmission is further enhanced by a parallel heat flux of the perpendicular degrees of freedom.

  20. Potassium plasma cell facilitates thermionic energy conversion process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, H. K.

    1967-01-01

    Thermionic energy converter converts nuclear generated heat directly into high frequency and direct current output. It consists of a potassium plasma cell, a tantalum emitter, and a silver plated copper collector. This conversion process eliminates the steam interface usually required between the atomic heat source and the electrical conversion system.

  1. Relaxation in Plasmas with Several Types of Free Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, Jan

    2008-10-15

    The problem of relaxation in plasmas with several types of free energy is discussed. In particular the competition between the relaxation of different free energies as expressed through e.g. the ratio of length scales such as {eta} = L{sub n}/L{sub T} etc. Parameters giving instability thresholds in linear theory tend to determine the ratio of outgoing, diagonal, fluxes and ingoing pinch fluxes nonlinearly. In general pinch fluxes require the coupling between different instability feedback loops.

  2. Symmetry Breaking and the Inverse Energy Cascade in a Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worstell, Matthew; Davis, M. S.; Garnier, D.; Mauel, M. E.; Roberts, T. M.; Kesner, J.

    2013-10-01

    The application of electrostatic bias to high density plasmas with turbulent fluctuations confined by a magnetic dipole are investigated. This research investigates the application of non-symmetric bias and the influence of broken symmetry on strongly turbulent plasmas. Non-symmetric bias is applied through either point biasing or an equatorial array spanning the device. In both cases, the spatial symmetry of applied bias dramatically effects the plasma fluctuations. With bias applied, the plasma achieves a new equilibrium characterized by amplified low order modes and diminished amplitude of higher order modes. Although the turbulent spectrum changes, the RMS fluctuation level is unchanged by the bias. Bias also causes the turbulent electrostatic fluctuations to coalesce into a quasicoherent mode and the appearance of increased coherence. The effect of bias configuration is also seen to change the measured levels of nonlinear coupling. Non-symmetric biasing increases nonlinear coupling in contrast to symmetric biasing. These results represent the first experimental demonstration of symmetry breaking driving the inverse energy cascade in a quasi-two dimensional plasma system. Supported by NSF and U.S. DOE/FES Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering.

  3. Electron energy distributions in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Sang-Heon E-mail: Sang-Heon.Song@us.tel.com; Yang, Yang; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-09-15

    Optimizing and controlling electron energy distributions (EEDs) is a continuing goal in plasma materials processing as EEDs determine the rate coefficients for electron impact processes. There are many strategies to customize EEDs in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), for example, pulsing and choice of frequency, to produce the desired plasma properties. Recent experiments have shown that EEDs in low pressure ICPs can be manipulated through the use of static magnetic fields of sufficient magnitudes to magnetize the electrons and confine them to the electromagnetic skin depth. The EED is then a function of the local magnetic field as opposed to having non-local properties in the absence of the magnetic field. In this paper, EEDs in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma (mICP) sustained in Ar are discussed with results from a two-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics model. Results are compared with experimental measurements. We found that the character of the EED transitions from non-local to local with application of the static magnetic field. The reduction in cross-field mobility increases local electron heating in the skin depth and decreases the transport of these hot electrons to larger radii. The tail of the EED is therefore enhanced in the skin depth and depressed at large radii. Plasmas densities are non-monotonic with increasing pressure with the external magnetic field due to transitions between local and non-local kinetics.

  4. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A. Mishagin, V.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.

    2015-11-15

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  5. A low-energy linear oxygen plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2007-01-08

    A new version of a Constricted Plasma Source is described,characterized by all metal-ceramic construction, a linear slit exit of180 mm length, and cw-operation (typically 50 kHz) at an average power of1.5 kW. The plasma source is here operated with oxygen gas, producingstreaming plasma that contains mainly positive molecular and atomic ions,and to a much lesser degree, negative ions. The maximum total ion currentobtained was about 0.5 A. The fraction of atomic ions reached more than10 percent of all ions when the flow rate was less then 10 sccm O2,corresponding to a chamber pressure of about 0.5 Pa for the selectedpumping speed. The energy distribution functions of the different ionspecies were measured with a combinedmass spectrometer and energyanalyzer. The time-averaged distribution functions were broad and rangedfrom about 30eV to 90 eV at 200 kHz and higher frequencies, while theywere only several eV broad at 50 kHz and lower frequencies, with themaximum located at about 40 eV for the grounded anode case. This maximumwas shifted down to about 7 eV when the anode was floating, indicatingthe important role of the plasma potential for the ion energy for a givensubstrate potential. The source could be scaled to greater length and maybe useful for functionalization of surfaces and plasma-assisteddeposition of compound films.

  6. Low energy ion distribution measurements in Madison Symmetric Torus plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, J. B.; Mezonlin, E. D.; Johnson, J. A.

    2014-06-01

    Charge-exchange neutrals contain information about the contents of a plasma and can be detected as they escape confinement. The Florida A&M University compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA), used to measure the contents of neutral particle flux, has been reconfigured, calibrated, and installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) for high temperature deuterium plasmas. The energy range of the CNPA has been extended to cover 0.34-5.2 keV through an upgrade of the 25 detection channels. The CNPA has been used on all types of MST plasmas at a rate of 20 kHz throughout the entire discharge (˜70 ms). Plasma parameter scans show that the ion distribution is most dependent on the plasma current. Magnetic reconnection events throughout these scans produce stronger poloidal electric fields, stronger global magnetic modes, and larger changes in magnetic energy all of which heavily influence the non-Maxwellian part of the ion distribution (the fast ion tail).

  7. High energy components and collective modes in thermonuclear plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Cowley, S.; Detragiache, P.; Kulsrud, R.; Pegoraro, F.

    1986-02-01

    The theory of a class of collective modes of a thermonuclear magnetically confined plasma, with frequencies in the range of the ion cyclotron frequency and of its harmonics, is presented. These modes can be excited by their resonant cyclotron interaction with a plasma component of relatively high energy particles characterized by a strongly anisotropic distribution in velocity space. Normal modes that are spatially localized by the inhomogeneity of the plasma density are found. This ensures that the energy gained by their resonant interaction is not convected away. The mode spatial localization can be significantly altered by the magnetic field inhomogeneity for a given class of plasma density profiles. Special attention is devoted to the case of a spin polarized plasma, where the charged products of fusion reactions are anisotropically distributed. We show that for the mode of polarization that enhances nuclear reaction rates the tritium will be rapidly depolarized to toroidal configurations with relatively mild gradients of the confining magnetic field. 18 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating.

    PubMed

    Deichuli, P; Davydenko, V; Ivanov, A; Korepanov, S; Mishagin, V; Smirnov, A; Sorokin, A; Stupishin, N

    2015-11-01

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  9. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Korepanov, S.; Mishagin, V.; Smirnov, A.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.

    2015-11-01

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  10. Low energy ion distribution measurements in Madison Symmetric Torus plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, J. B. Mezonlin, E. D.; Johnson, J. A.

    2014-06-15

    Charge-exchange neutrals contain information about the contents of a plasma and can be detected as they escape confinement. The Florida A and M University compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA), used to measure the contents of neutral particle flux, has been reconfigured, calibrated, and installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) for high temperature deuterium plasmas. The energy range of the CNPA has been extended to cover 0.34–5.2 keV through an upgrade of the 25 detection channels. The CNPA has been used on all types of MST plasmas at a rate of 20 kHz throughout the entire discharge (∼70 ms). Plasma parameter scans show that the ion distribution is most dependent on the plasma current. Magnetic reconnection events throughout these scans produce stronger poloidal electric fields, stronger global magnetic modes, and larger changes in magnetic energy all of which heavily influence the non-Maxwellian part of the ion distribution (the fast ion tail)

  11. Counter-facing plasma focus system as a repetitive and/or long-pulse high energy density plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Yutaka; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2009-11-01

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial plasma guns is proposed as a long-pulse and/or repetitive high energy density plasma source. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrated that with an assist of breakdown and outer electrode connections, current sheets evolved into a configuration for stable plasma confinement at the center of the electrodes. The current sheets could successively compress and confine the high energy density plasma every half period of the discharge current, enabling highly repetitive light emissions in extreme ultraviolet region with time durations in at least ten microseconds.

  12. Counter-facing plasma focus system as a repetitive and/or long-pulse high energy density plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Yutaka; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2009-11-15

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial plasma guns is proposed as a long-pulse and/or repetitive high energy density plasma source. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrated that with an assist of breakdown and outer electrode connections, current sheets evolved into a configuration for stable plasma confinement at the center of the electrodes. The current sheets could successively compress and confine the high energy density plasma every half period of the discharge current, enabling highly repetitive light emissions in extreme ultraviolet region with time durations in at least ten microseconds.

  13. The pattern of parallel edge plasma flows due to pressure gradients, recycling, and resonant magnetic perturbations in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerichs, H.; Schmitz, O.; Evans, T.; Feng, Y.; Reiter, D.

    2015-07-01

    High resolution plasma transport simulations with the EMC3-EIRENE code have been performed to address the parallel plasma flow structure in the boundary of a poloidal divertor configuration with non-axisymmetric perturbations at DIII-D. Simulation results show that a checkerboard pattern of flows with alternating direction is generated inside the separatrix. This pattern is aligned with the position of the main resonances (i.e., where the safety factor is equal to rational values q = m / n for a perturbation field with base mode number n): m pairs of alternating forward and backward flow channel exist for each resonance. The poloidal oscillations are aligned with the subharmonic Melnikov function, which indicates that the plasma flow is generated by parallel pressure gradients along perturbed field lines. An additional scrape-off layer-like domain is introduced by the perturbed separatrix which guides field lines from the interior to the divertor targets, resulting in an enhanced outward flow that is consistent with the experimentally observed particle pump-out effect. However, while the lobe structure of the perturbed separatrix is very well reflected in the temperature profile, the same lobes can appear to be smaller in the flow profile due to a competition between high upstream pressure and downstream particle sources driving flows in opposite directions.

  14. Conservation of energy and momentum in nonrelativistic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, H.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Nunami, M.

    2013-02-15

    Conservation laws of energy and momentum for nonrelativistic plasmas are derived from applying Noether's theorem to the action integral for the Vlasov-Poisson-Ampere system [Sugama, Phys. Plasmas 7, 466 (2000)]. The symmetric pressure tensor is obtained from modifying the asymmetric canonical pressure tensor with using the rotational symmetry of the action integral. Differences between the resultant conservation laws and those for the Vlasov-Maxwell system including the Maxwell displacement current are clarified. These results provide a useful basis for gyrokinetic conservation laws because gyrokinetic equations are derived as an approximation of the Vlasov-Poisson-Ampere system.

  15. Local full-wave energy in nonuniform plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Smithe, D.N.

    1988-10-01

    The subject of local wave energy in plasmas is treated via quasilinear theory from the dual perspectives of the action-angle formalism and gyrokinetics analysis. This work presents an extension to all orders in the gyroradius of the self-consistent wave-propagation/quasilinear-absorption problem using gyrokinetics. Questions of when and under what conditions local energy should be of definite sign are best answered using the action-angle formalism. An important result is that the ''dielectric operators'' of the linearized wave equation and of the local energy are not the same, a fact which is obscured when the eikonal or WKB assumption is invoked. Even though the two dielectrics are very different in character (one operates linearly on electric field for the plasma current, the other operates quadratically for the energy), it is demonstrated that they are nevertheless related by a simple mathematical statement. This study was originally motivated by concern and lively discussion over the questions of local energy for rf-heating of plasmas, where in certain instances, full-wave effects such as refraction, strong absorption, and mode conversion are of primary importance. Fundamentally, the rf-absorption must equate with the energy moment of the quasilinear term to achieve a correct energy balance. This fact governs the derivation (as opposed to postulation) of the local absorption. The troublesome ''kinetic flux'' may then be chosen (it is not unique) to satisfy a wave-energy balance relation with the Poynting flux and local absorption. It is shown that at least one such choice reduces asymptotically to the Stix form away from nonuniformities, thereby demonstrating energy conservation to all orders in Larmor radius. 25 refs.

  16. Feedback control of plasma electron density and ion energy in an inductively coupled plasma etcher

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Chaung; Leou, K.-C.; Huang, H.-M.; Hsieh, C.-H.

    2009-01-15

    Here the authors report the development of a fuzzy logic based feedback control of the plasma electron density and ion energy for high density plasma etch process. The plasma electron density was measured using their recently developed transmission line microstrip microwave interferometer mounted on the chamber wall, and the rf voltage was measured by a commercial impedance meter connected to the wafer stage. The actuators were two 13.56 MHz rf power generators which provided the inductively coupled plasma power and bias power, respectively. The control system adopted the fuzzy logic control algorithm to reduce frequent actuator action resulting from measurement noise. The experimental results show that the first wafer effect can be eliminated using closed-loop control for both poly-Si and HfO{sub 2} etching. In particular, for the HfO2 etch, the controlled variables in this work were much more effective than the previous one where ion current was controlled, instead of the electron density. However, the pressure disturbance effect cannot be reduced using plasma electron density feedback.

  17. Energy absorption in cold inhomogeneous plasmas - The Herlofson paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, F. W.; Harker, K. J.

    1972-01-01

    Confirmation of Barston's (1964) conclusions regarding the underlying mechanism of the Herlofson paradox by examining in detail several analytically tractable cases of delta-function and sinusoidal excitation. The effects of collisions and nonzero electron temperature in determining the steady state fields and dissipation are considered. Energy absorption without dissipation in plasmas is shown to be analogous to that occurring after application of a signal to a network of lossless resonant circuits. This analogy is pursued and is extended to cover Landau damping in a warm homogeneous plasma in which the resonating elements are the electron streams making up the velocity distribution. Some of the practical consequences of resonant absorption are discussed, together with a number of paradoxical plasma phenomena which can also be elucidated by considering a superposition of normal modes rather than a single Fourier component.

  18. Particle and recycling control in translation, confinement, and sustainment upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossnickle, J. A.; Vlases, G. C.; Hoffman, A. L.; Melnik, P. A.; Milroy, R. D.; Tankut, A.; Velas, K. M.

    2010-03-01

    Previous work in the translation, confinement, and sustainment upgrade (TCSU) device [H. Y. Guo et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 056101 (2008)] demonstrated improved plasma parameters; higher temperature, higher poloidal magnetic field, increased current drive, and increased energy confinement, for rotating magnetic field (RMF) driven field reversed configurations (FRC) relative to the earlier TCS device. This was accomplished by improving vacuum conditions and using moderate wall heating (˜100 °C) and glow discharge cleaning for wall conditioning. Two new wall conditioning techniques, siliconization and titanium gettering, have been employed to further reduce impurities and control recycling. Both techniques reduced oxygen line radiation by an order of magnitude, and total radiated power by 50%, but led to little change in overall FRC performance, reinforcing the earlier conclusion that TCSU FRCs are not radiation dominated. Titanium gettering substantially reduced deuterium recycling, requiring a new method of fueling to be developed. This is the first time a FRC has been operated without using wall recycling as the primary method of fueling. The low-recycling FRCs, maintained by enhanced puff fueling, performed similarly to standard recycling fueled FRCs in terms of a key current drive parameter Be/Bω, the ratio of maximum sustained poloidal field to applied RMF field, but better density control allowed for higher temperatures.

  19. Application of Plasma Waveguides to High Energy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Milchberg, Howard M

    2013-03-30

    The eventual success of laser-plasma based acceleration schemes for high-energy particle physics will require the focusing and stable guiding of short intense laser pulses in reproducible plasma channels. For this goal to be realized, many scientific issues need to be addressed. These issues include an understanding of the basic physics of, and an exploration of various schemes for, plasma channel formation. In addition, the coupling of intense laser pulses to these channels and the stable propagation of pulses in the channels require study. Finally, new theoretical and computational tools need to be developed to aid in the design and analysis of experiments and future accelerators. Here we propose a 3-year renewal of our combined theoretical and experimental program on the applications of plasma waveguides to high-energy accelerators. During the past grant period we have made a number of significant advances in the science of laser-plasma based acceleration. We pioneered the development of clustered gases as a new highly efficient medium for plasma channel formation. Our contributions here include theoretical and experimental studies of the physics of cluster ionization, heating, explosion, and channel formation. We have demonstrated for the first time the generation of and guiding in a corrugated plasma waveguide. The fine structure demonstrated in these guides is only possible with cluster jet heating by lasers. The corrugated guide is a slow wave structure operable at arbitrarily high laser intensities, allowing direct laser acceleration, a process we have explored in detail with simulations. The development of these guides opens the possibility of direct laser acceleration, a true miniature analogue of the SLAC RF-based accelerator. Our theoretical studies during this period have also contributed to the further development of the simulation codes, Wake and QuickPIC, which can be used for both laser driven and beam driven plasma based acceleration schemes. We

  20. Converting Garbage to Gold: Recycling Our Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, William U.

    1984-01-01

    Recycling conserves energy, fights pollution and inflation, creates jobs, and improves the outlook for the future of materials. But converting a throwaway society to recycling will depend on finding good markets for waste paper and scrap metals. (RM)

  1. Reuse of municipal solid wastes by recycling and conversion to energy and chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Broder, J.D.; Lightsey, G.R.; Pagan, E.M.; Villalba, A.M.

    1995-09-01

    The disposal of municipal solid waste (MSW) is becoming an environmental problem throughout the world. The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has been involved in developing technology to recover recyclables and convert MSW to chemicals such as fuel ethanol, since 1987. Resource assessments conducted in the United States have shown that there is about 240 million tons of MSW produced annually. Tests have been performed in TVA facilities with local MSW. In the tropical areas of the world, MSW may have a different composition and may be much wetter than in the United States. TVA initiated development work with Puerto Rico to evaluate wastes from a more tropical country and compare with local studies. Puerto Rico produces approximately 8,000 tons per day of MSW. This and other concerns led to the creation of a public/private alliance of Puerto Rico with Eco-Futures International, Inc., and its subsidiary Eco-Futures Caribe, Inc. This alliance is examining the feasibility of a new approach for dealing with the growing MSW issues of the Island. The Eco-Futures` approach involves the integration of multiple advanced technologies of which an important component would be biomass conversion based on an acid hydrolysis process developed by the TVA and Mississippi State University (MSU). This process produces simple sugars such as glucose and xylose that can be converted to fuel ethanol and other chemicals. The process also results in the production of a chemically clean and environmentally benign solid fuel which can be used in power production. A detailed survey of solid wastes delivered to the landfills over the entire island was conducted. The quantity and quality of recyclable materials such as metals, glass, and plastics were determined in the first phase of the project. The largest fraction of the wastes was biomass such as paper, yard wastes, and putrecibles.

  2. Binding of SEC11 indicates its role in SNARE recycling after vesicle fusion and identifies two pathways for vesicular traffic to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Karnik, Rucha; Zhang, Ben; Waghmare, Sakharam; Aderhold, Christin; Grefen, Christopher; Blatt, Michael R

    2015-03-01

    SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins drive vesicle fusion in all eukaryotes and contribute to homeostasis, pathogen defense, cell expansion, and growth in plants. Two homologous SNAREs, SYP121 (=SYR1/PEN1) and SYP122, dominate secretory traffic to the Arabidopsis thaliana plasma membrane. Although these proteins overlap functionally, differences between SYP121 and SYP122 have surfaced, suggesting that they mark two discrete pathways for vesicular traffic. The SNAREs share primary cognate partners, which has made separating their respective control mechanisms difficult. Here, we show that the regulatory protein SEC11 (=KEULE) binds selectively with SYP121 to affect secretory traffic mediated by this SNARE. SEC11 rescued traffic block by dominant-negative (inhibitory) fragments of both SNAREs, but only in plants expressing the native SYP121. Traffic and its rescue were sensitive to mutations affecting SEC11 interaction with the N terminus of SYP121. Furthermore, the domain of SEC11 that bound the SYP121 N terminus was itself able to block secretory traffic in the wild type and syp122 but not in syp121 mutant Arabidopsis. Thus, SEC11 binds and selectively regulates secretory traffic mediated by SYP121 and is important for recycling of the SNARE and its cognate partners.

  3. Plasma shaping in laser-plasma accelerators: injection, energy boost and beam collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaury, Cedric

    2015-11-01

    The longitudinal density profile is a key parameter to optimize the properties of electron beams in laser-plasma accelerators. Tailored density profile can notably be used to control injection or increase the electron energy via density tapering. Here we present three different experiments illustrating the use of density tailoring for injecting, increasing the energy or focusing relativistic electron beams. First, we discuss results on shock-front injection in a gas mixture. We show that shocks allow to confine injection and hence to reduce significantly the beam energy spread, compared to pure ionization injection. Then we demonstrate that, with a different setup, shock fronts can also be used to rephase the electron beam with the wakefield. Using this setup we obtained an increase of the electron energy by almost 50 percent. Finally, we present the principle of the laser-plasma lens and show that this device can be used to reduce the electron beam divergence by a factor of almost 3. This last result is of particular importance for applications requiring beam transport; the divergence reduction should actually be sufficient to avoid transverse emittance growth in quadrupole triplets, provided that the energy spread is lower than 3 percent (chromatic emittance growth is due to the combination of large divergence and energy spread).

  4. Ideas: Recycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chessin, Debby A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents classroom ideas focusing on connections among mathematics, concern for the environment, and conservation of natural resources, including decomposition, water conservation, packaging materials, use of manufactured cans, and recycling. Includes reproducible student worksheets. (MKR)

  5. Earth Day 1990: Lesson Plan and Home Survey--K-6. Energy, Solid Waste/Recycling, Toxics, and Water, with Follow-up Activities and Action Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sly, Carolie; Ruskey, Abby

    The purpose of this K-6 curriculum is to provide teachers and other educators with classroom lessons and home surveys that are a starting point for understanding four significant environmental issues--water, toxics, energy, and solid waste/recycling. While each of these environmental issues is complex and has far-reaching implications, the lessons…

  6. Earth Day 1990: Lesson Plan and Home Survey--7-12. Energy, Solid Waste/Recycling, Toxics, Transportation, and Water with Fact Sheets and Action Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holm-Shuett, Amy; Shuett, Greg

    The purpose of this 7-12 curriculum is to provide teachers and other educators with classroom lessons and home surveys that are a starting point for understanding five significant environmental issues - water, toxics, energy, transportation, and solid waste/recycling. While each of these environmental issues is complex and has far-reaching…

  7. Plasma expansion into vacuum assuming a steplike electron energy distribution.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Thomas; Schlegel, Theodor; Kaluza, Malte C

    2013-04-01

    The expansion of a semi-infinite plasma slab into vacuum is analyzed with a hydrodynamic model implying a steplike electron energy distribution function. Analytic expressions for the maximum ion energy and the related ion distribution function are derived and compared with one-dimensional numerical simulations. The choice of the specific non-Maxwellian initial electron energy distribution automatically ensures the conservation of the total energy of the system. The estimated ion energies may differ by an order of magnitude from the values obtained with an adiabatic expansion model supposing a Maxwellian electron distribution. Furthermore, good agreement with data from experiments using laser pulses of ultrashort durations τ(L)

  8. Observation of Inertial Energy Cascade in Interplanetary Space Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Noullez, A.; Bruno, R.; Bavassano, B.

    2007-09-14

    Direct evidence for the presence of an inertial energy cascade, the most characteristic signature of hydromagnetic turbulence (MHD), is observed in the solar wind by the Ulysses spacecraft. After a brief rederivation of the equivalent of Yaglom's law for MHD turbulence, a linear relation is indeed observed for the scaling of mixed third-order structure functions involving Elsaesser variables. This experimental result firmly establishes the turbulent character of low-frequency velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind plasma.

  9. Investigation of Ultrasonics as a tool for energy efficient recycling of Lactic acid from postconsumer PLA products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Gowrishankar

    The growing use of "ecofriendly," biodegradable polymers have created a need for a suitable recycling technique because, unlike petroleum derived plastics, their properties deteriorate during conventional recycling. These new techniques must be cost efficient and yield material properties same as virgin polymer. This research investigates the effectiveness of high-power ultrasonics as an efficient technique to recover lactic acid from postconsumer polylactic acid (PLA) products. Polylactic acid is a commercially available bioplastic derived from corn starch and/or sugar cane that is biorenewable and compostable (biodegradable). The various ongoing researches to recover lactic acid from PLA employ a common platform of high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) to effect polymer hydrolysis. The energy intensiveness of these HTHP processes prompted this work to investigate ultrasonics as an low energy alternative process to cause PLA depolymerization. The energy consumption and the time required for depolymerization were utilized as the metrics to quantify and compare depolymerization enhanced by ultrasonics with hot-bath technique. The coupled effect of catalysts concentration and different solvents, along with ultrasonic were studied based on preliminary trial results. In addition, the correlation between the rates of de-polymerization was analyzed for ultrasonic amplitude, treatment time, and catalyst concentration and types. The results indicate that depolymerization of PLA was largely effected by heating caused by ultrasonic-induced cavitations. Other effects of ultrasonics, namely cavitations and acoustic streaming, were shown to have minimal effects in enhancing depolymerization. In fact, thermal energy predominately affected the reaction kinetics; the heat introduced by conventional method (i.e., electrical heaters) was more efficient than ultrasonic heating in terms of energy (for depolymerization) per unit mass of PLA and depolymerizing time. The degree of

  10. Accelerating piston action and plasma heating in high-energy density laser plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, M. C.; Wilks, S. C.; Baring, M. G.

    2013-03-01

    In the field of high-energy density physics (HEDP), lasers in both the nanosecond and picosecond regimes can drive conditions in the laboratory relevant to a broad range of astrophysical phenomena, including gamma-ray burst afterglows and supernova remnants. In the short-pulse regime, the strong light pressure (>Gbar) associated ultraintense lasers of intensity I > 1018 W/cm2 plays a central role in many HEDP applications. Yet, the behavior of this nonlinear pressure mechanism is not well-understood at late time in the laser-plasma interaction. In this paper, a more realistic treatment of the laser pressure 'hole boring' process is developed through analytical modeling and particle-in-cell simulations. A simple Liouville code capturing the phase space evolution of ponderomotively-driven ions is employed to distill effects related to plasma heating and ion bulk acceleration. Taking into account these effects, our results show that the evolution of the laser-target system encompasses ponderomotive expansion, equipartition, and quasi-isothermal expansion epochs. These results have implications for light piston-driven ion acceleration scenarios, and astrophysical applications where the efficiencies of converting incident Poynting flux into bulk plasma flow and plasma heat are key unknown parameters.

  11. High-Energy Two-Stage Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, Tom

    2003-01-01

    A high-energy (28 kJ per pulse) two-stage pulsed plasma thruster (MSFC PPT-1) has been constructed and tested. The motivation of this project is to develop a high power (approximately 500 kW), high specific impulse (approximately 10000 s), highly efficient (greater than 50%) thruster for use as primary propulsion in a high power nuclear electric propulsion system. PPT-1 was designed to overcome four negative characteristics which have detracted from the utility of pulsed plasma thrusters: poor electrical efficiency, poor propellant utilization efficiency, electrode erosion, and reliability issues associated with the use of high speed gas valves and high current switches. Traditional PPTs have been plagued with poor efficiency because they have not been operated in a plasma regime that fully exploits the potential benefits of pulsed plasma acceleration by electromagnetic forces. PPTs have generally been used to accelerate low-density plasmas with long current pulses. Operation of thrusters in this plasma regime allows for the development of certain undesirable particle-kinetic effects, such as Hall effect-induced current sheet canting. PPT-1 was designed to propel a highly collisional, dense plasma that has more fluid-like properties and, hence, is more effectively pushed by a magnetic field. The high-density plasma loading into the second stage of the accelerator is achieved through the use of a dense plasma injector (first stage). The injector produces a thermal plasma, derived from a molten lithium propellant feed system, which is subsequently accelerated by the second stage using mega-amp level currents, which eject the plasma at a speed on the order of 100 kilometers per second. Traditional PPTs also suffer from dynamic efficiency losses associated with snowplow loading of distributed neutral propellant. The twostage scheme used in PPT-I allows the propellant to be loaded in a manner which more closely approximates the optimal slug loading. Lithium propellant

  12. Establishment of monitoring methods for autophagy in rice reveals autophagic recycling of chloroplasts and root plastids during energy limitation.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masanori; Hidema, Jun; Wada, Shinya; Kondo, Eri; Kurusu, Takamitsu; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Makino, Amane; Ishida, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular process leading to vacuolar or lysosomal degradation of cytoplasmic components in eukaryotes. Establishment of proper methods to monitor autophagy was a key step in uncovering its role in organisms, such as yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), mammals, and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), in which chloroplastic proteins were found to be recycled by autophagy. Chloroplast recycling has been predicted to function in nutrient remobilization for growing organs or grain filling in cereal crops. Here, to develop our understanding of autophagy in cereals, we established monitoring methods for chloroplast autophagy in rice (Oryza sativa). We generated transgenic rice-expressing fluorescent protein (FP) OsAuTophaGy8 (OsATG8) fusions as autophagy markers. FP-ATG8 signals were delivered into the vacuolar lumen in living cells of roots and leaves mainly as vesicles corresponding to autophagic bodies. This phenomenon was not observed upon the addition of wortmannin, an inhibitor of autophagy, or in an ATG7 knockout mutant. Markers for the chloroplast stroma, stromal FP, and FP-labeled Rubisco were delivered by a type of autophagic body called the Rubisco-containing body (RCB) in the same manner. RCB production in excised leaves was suppressed by supply of external sucrose or light. The release of free FP caused by autophagy-dependent breakdown of FP-labeled Rubisco was induced during accelerated senescence in individually darkened leaves. In roots, nongreen plastids underwent both RCB-mediated and entire organelle types of autophagy. Therefore, our newly developed methods to monitor autophagy directly showed autophagic degradation of leaf chloroplasts and root plastids in rice plants and its induction during energy limitation.

  13. Textile recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonowski, E. ); Carlton, J.

    1995-01-01

    The most common household textiles include clothing, linens, draperies, carpets, shoes, handbags, and rugs. Old clothing, of course, is the most readily reused and/or recycled residentially generated textile category. State and/or local mandates to recycle a percentage of the waste stream are providing the impetus to add new materials to existing collection programs. Concurrently, the textile industry is aggressively trying to increase its throughput by seeking new sources of material to meet increased world demand for product. As experienced with drop-off programs for traditional materials, a majority of residents will not recycle materials unless the collection programs are convenient, i.e., curbside collection. The tonnage of marketable textiles currently being landfilled provide evidence of this. It is the authors' contention that if textile recycling is made convenient and accessible to every household in a municipality or region, then the waste stream disposed may be reduced in a similar fashion as when traditional recyclables are included in curbside programs.

  14. Damped Modes in Plasma Microturbulence: Saturation, Regulation, and Energy Partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makwana, Kiritkumar D.

    Plasma microturbulence at the scale of the ion gyroradius and smaller is considered to be the primary cause of heat loss in tokamaks. Damped modes are stable roots of the plasma dispersion relation and form an inseparable part of the microturbulent spectrum. We study several microturbulence models that describe vastly different fusion plasmas. All of them show saturation by damped modes that dissipate energy at almost the same rate as the energy injection rate of the unstable modes. Dissipation by damped modes peaks at low wavenumbers where the instability also peaks, distinguishing it from the traditional viscous dissipation mechanism at large wavenumbers. Damped modes are typically found to be important in saturation when their damping rate is not much larger than the instability growth rate. Until now, the regulation of ion temperature gradient driven (ITG) turbulence by zonal flows has been explained using the zonal flow-drift wave shearing paradigm: zonal flow shearing enhances energy transfer from large scale drift waves to smaller, dissipative scales. However, we show, in both fluid and gyrokinetic simulations, that the zonal flows help transfer a majority of the energy injected by the unstable modes to the damped modes, leading to saturation. Although the transfer to damped modes simultaneously excites smaller scales, a significant fraction of the injected energy is dissipated by damped modes in the large-scale, unstable region. This transfer occurs via three-wave interactions that include a zonal flow, an unstable mode and a damped mode. Such interactions dominate due to their coupling coefficients, the strong zonal flow amplitude and their minimum frequency sum that leads to the largest correlation time and enhanced energy transfer. The slew of damped modes in gyrokinetic simulations is analyzed using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) modes and linear eigenmodes. Spectra of energy and amplitude attenuation rates of damped modes are calculated, showing

  15. Tire Recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Cryopolymers, Inc. tapped NASA expertise to improve a process for recycling vehicle tires by converting shredded rubber into products that can be used in asphalt road beds, new tires, hoses, and other products. In conjunction with the Southern Technology Applications Center and Stennis Space Center, NASA expertise in cryogenic fuel-handling needed for launch vehicle and spacecraft operations was called upon to improve the recycling concept. Stennis advised Cryopolymers on the type of equipment required, as well as steps to reduce the amount of liquid nitrogen used in the process. They also guided the company to use more efficient ways to control system hardware. It is estimated that more than 300 million tires nationwide are produced per year. Cryopolymers expects to reach a production rate of 5,000 tires recycled per day.

  16. Recycling polyurethanes

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This article reports on the PolyUrethane Recycle and Recovery Council`s continuing evaluation of the technical and commercial viability of polyurethane recovery and recycling technologies. In North America, 240,000 tonnes of post-industrial and 16,000 tonnes of post-consumer polyurethane foam was recycled into carpet rebound underlay and other applications in 1993. Demand was so great in North America that 60,000 t of primarily post-industrial scarp was imported from Europe and the Far East. Polyurethane from the seats of the 9 million vehicles scrapped each year could yield 82,000 t of flexible post-consumer foam scrap: instrument and door panels could yield another 10,000 t of semi-flexible scrap.

  17. The Hang-Ups on Recycling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1975

    1975-01-01

    While all seem to agree that recycling will alleviate solid waste problems and energy and mineral shortages, recycling is, at present, bogged down by the thin market for recycled materials, the recessionary business picture, the vertical integration of many companies, unfavorable tax laws, and high rail freight rates. (BT)

  18. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    ScienceCinema

    Ryan Ott

    2016-07-12

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  19. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan Ott

    2012-09-05

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  20. Energy efficiency in nanoscale synthesis using nanosecond plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Pai, David Z.; (Ken) Ostrikov, Kostya; Kumar, Shailesh; Lacoste, Deanna A.; Levchenko, Igor; Laux, Christophe O.

    2013-01-01

    We report a nanoscale synthesis technique using nanosecond-duration plasma discharges. Voltage pulses 12.5 kV in amplitude and 40 ns in duration were applied repetitively at 30 kHz across molybdenum electrodes in open ambient air, generating a nanosecond spark discharge that synthesized well-defined MoO3 nanoscale architectures (i.e. flakes, dots, walls, porous networks) upon polyamide and copper substrates. No nitrides were formed. The energy cost was as low as 75 eV per atom incorporated into a nanostructure, suggesting a dramatic reduction compared to other techniques using atmospheric pressure plasmas. These findings show that highly efficient synthesis at atmospheric pressure without catalysts or external substrate heating can be achieved in a simple fashion using nanosecond discharges. PMID:23386976

  1. Recycle of battery components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pemsler, J. P.; Spitz, R. A.

    The recycle disposal scenario for the batteries nickel/zinc, nickel/iron, zinc/chlorine, zinc/bromine, sodium/sulfur and lithium-aluminum/metal sulfide was considered. Flowsheets are presented which include disassembly, materials handling, melting or solubization, liquid/solid separations, purifications and waste handling. Material and energy balances are provided for all major streams and capital and operating costs for typical plant sizes are presented. Recycle is a a viable option in all cases. Recommendations are made for the best process options and for additional studies on the sodium/sulfur and lithium-aluminum/metal sulfide batteries.

  2. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chiping

    2013-08-26

    High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  3. Collisionless Plasma Modeling in an Arbitrary Potential Energy Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for calculating a collisionless plasma along a field line is presented. The primary feature of the new model is that it can handle an arbitrary (including nonmonotonic) potential energy distribution. This was one of the limiting constraints on the existing models in this class, and these constraints are generalized for an arbitrary potential energy composition. The formulation for relating current density to the field-aligned potential as well as formulas for density, temperature and energy flux calculations are presented for several distribution functions, ranging from a bi-Lorentzian with a loss cone to an isotropic Maxwellian. A comparison of these results with previous models shows that the formulation reduces.to the earlier models under similar assumptions.

  4. High-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar thermal storage materials using AZO/graphene hybrids by optimizing hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wen; Feng, Yiyu; Qin, Chengqun; Li, Man; Li, Shipei; Cao, Chen; Long, Peng; Liu, Enzuo; Hu, Wenping; Yoshino, Katsumi; Feng, Wei

    2015-10-01

    An important method for establishing a high-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar heat system is by designing and preparing novel photo-isomerizable molecules with a high enthalpy and a long thermal life by controlling molecular interactions. A meta- and ortho-bis-substituted azobenzene chromophore (AZO) is covalently grafted onto reduced graphene oxide (RGO) for solar thermal storage materials. High grafting degree and close-packed molecules enable intermolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) for both trans-(E) and cis-(Z) isomers of AZO on the surface of nanosheets, resulting in a dramatic increase in enthalpy and lifetime. The metastable Z-form of AZO on RGO is thermally stabilized with a half-life of 52 days by steric hindrance and intermolecular H-bonds calculated using density functional theory (DFT). The AZO-RGO fuel shows a high storage capacity of 138 Wh kg-1 by optimizing intermolecular H-bonds with a good cycling stability for 50 cycles induced by visible light at 520 nm. Our work opens up a new method for making advanced molecular solar thermal storage materials by tuning molecular interactions on a nano-template.An important method for establishing a high-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar heat system is by designing and preparing novel photo-isomerizable molecules with a high enthalpy and a long thermal life by controlling molecular interactions. A meta- and ortho-bis-substituted azobenzene chromophore (AZO) is covalently grafted onto reduced graphene oxide (RGO) for solar thermal storage materials. High grafting degree and close-packed molecules enable intermolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) for both trans-(E) and cis-(Z) isomers of AZO on the surface of nanosheets, resulting in a dramatic increase in enthalpy and lifetime. The metastable Z-form of AZO on RGO is thermally stabilized with a half-life of 52 days by steric hindrance and intermolecular H-bonds calculated using density functional theory (DFT). The AZO-RGO fuel shows a high

  5. Magnetic energy density and plasma energy density in the Venus wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez De Tejada, H. A.; Durand-Manterola, H. J.; Lundin, R.; Barabash, S.; Zhang, T.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Sauvaud, J.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic energy density and plasma energy density in the Venus wake H. Pérez-de-Tejada1, H. Durand-Manterola1, R. Lundin2, S. Barabash2, T. L. Zhang3, A. Sauvaud4, M. Reyes-Ruiz5. 1 - Institute of Geophysics, UNAM, México, D. F. 2 - Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Umea, Sweden 3 - Space Research Institute, Graz, Austria 4 - CESR, Toulouse, France 5 - Institute of Astronomy, UNAM, Ensenada, México Measurements conducted in the Venus wake with the magnetometer and the Aspera-4 plasma instrument of the Venus Express spacecraft show that average values of the kinetic energy density of the plasma in that region are comparable to average local values of the magnetic energy density. Observations were carried out in several orbits of the Venus Express near the midnight plane and suggest that the total energy content in the Venus wake is distributed with nearly comparable values between the plasma and the magnetic field. Processes associated with the solar wind erosion of planetary ions from the polar magnetic regions of the ionosphere are involved in the comparable distribution of both energy components.

  6. Plasma Synthesis of Nanoparticles for Nanocomposite Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Peter C. Kong; Alex W. Kawczak

    2008-09-01

    The nanocomposite energy applications for plasma reactor produced nanoparticles are reviewed. Nanoparticles are commonly defined as particles less than 100 nm in diameter. Due to this small size, nanoparticles have a high surface-to-volume ratio. This increases the surface energy compared to the bulk material. The high surface-to-volume ratio and size effects (quantum effects) give nanoparticles distinctive chemical, electronic, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties from those of the bulk material. Nanoparticles synthesis can be grouped into 3 broad approaches. The first one is wet phase synthesis (sol-gel processing), the second is mechanical attrition, and the third is gas-phase synthesis (aerosol). The properties of the final product may differ significantly depending on the fabrication route. Currently, there are no economical large-scale production processes for nanoparticles. This hinders the widespread applications of nanomaterials in products. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is engaging in research and development of advanced modular hybrid plasma reactors for low cost production of nanoparticles that is predicted to accelerate application research and enable the formation of technology innovation alliances that will result in the commercial production of nanocomposites for alternative energy production devices such as fuel cells, photovoltaics and electrochemical double layer capacitors.

  7. Low Energy Electrons in the Mars Plasma Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Link, Richard

    2001-01-01

    The ionosphere of Mars is rather poorly understood. The only direct measurements were performed by the Viking 1 and 2 landers in 1976, both of which carried a Retarding Potential Analyzer. The RPA was designed to measure ion properties during the descent, although electron fluxes were estimated from changes in the ion currents. Using these derived low-energy electron fluxes, Mantas and Hanson studied the photoelectron and the solar wind electron interactions with the atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars. Unanswered questions remain regarding the origin of the low-energy electron fluxes in the vicinity of the Mars plasma boundary. Crider, in an analysis of Mars Global Surveyor Magnetometer/Electron Reflectometer measurements, has attributed the formation of the magnetic pile-up boundary to electron impact ionization of exospheric neutral species by solar wind electrons. However, the role of photoelectrons escaping from the lower ionosphere was not determined. In the proposed work, we will examine the role of solar wind and ionospheric photoelectrons in producing ionization in the upper ionosphere of Mars. Low-energy (< 4 keV) electrons will be modeled using the two-stream electron transport code of Link. The code models both external (solar wind) and internal (photoelectron) sources of ionization, and accounts for Auger electron production. The code will be used to analyze Mars Global Surveyor measurements of solar wind and photoelectrons down to altitudes below 200 km in the Mars ionosphere, in order to determine the relative roles of solar wind and escaping photoelectrons in maintaining plasma densities in the region of the Mars plasma boundary.

  8. Recycling Philology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Peggy A.

    1993-01-01

    Proposes that English teachers recycle philology as a field of study. Redefines the shape of philology in view of postmodern theories of signification. Considers concepts of hermeneutics in retheorizing the aims of philology. Shows how such philological investigation might be used in the classroom to study literary texts. (HB)

  9. Transport and containment of plasma, particles and energy within flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. W.; Brown, W. A.; Bruner, M. E. C.; Haisch, B. M.; Strong, K. T.

    1983-01-01

    Results from the analysis of flares observed by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) and a recent rocket experiment are discussed. Evidence for primary energy release in the corona through the interaction of magnetic structures, particle and plasma transport into more than a single magnetic structure at the time of a flare and a complex and changing magnetic topology during the course of a flare is found. The rocket data are examined for constraints on flare cooling, within the context of simple loop models. These results form a basis for comments on the limitations of simple loop models for flares.

  10. Extraction of electron plasma energy distribution function using distortion meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azooz, A. A.

    2006-06-01

    A new method for direct evaluation of the electron energy distribution function in plasmas is suggested, which involves the use of audio frequencies distortion factor meters. The amount of distortion suffered by a Langmuir probe AC current produced by superimposing a clean AC voltage on the DC probe voltage is measured. Although such distortions are proportional to the second derivative of the probe characteristic at any point when its neighborhood can be approximated by a second-degree polynomial, the instrument function is always sharper than that of harmonic differentiation. The method is analyzed theoretically, and tested experimentally. It is also shown that distortion additionally provides a direct measure of the electron temperature.

  11. Observation of inertial energy cascade in interplanetary space plasma.

    PubMed

    Sorriso-Valvo, L; Marino, R; Carbone, V; Noullez, A; Lepreti, F; Veltri, P; Bruno, R; Bavassano, B; Pietropaolo, E

    2007-09-14

    Direct evidence for the presence of an inertial energy cascade, the most characteristic signature of hydromagnetic turbulence (MHD), is observed in the solar wind by the Ulysses spacecraft. After a brief rederivation of the equivalent of Yaglom's law for MHD turbulence, a linear relation is indeed observed for the scaling of mixed third-order structure functions involving Elsässer variables. This experimental result firmly establishes the turbulent character of low-frequency velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind plasma. PMID:17930445

  12. Efficiency of pulse high-current generator energy transfer into plasma liner energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshkin, V. I.

    2013-08-01

    The efficiency of capacitor-bank energy transfer from a high-current pulse generator into kinetic energy of a plasma liner has been analyzed. The analysis was performed using a model including the circuit equations and equations of the cylindrical shell motion. High efficiency of the energy transfer into kinetic energy of the liner is shown to be achieved only by a low-inductance generator. We considered an "ideal" liner load in which the load current is close to zero in the final of the shell compression. This load provides a high (up to 80%) efficiency of energy transfer and higher stability when compressing the liner.

  13. Ion energy distributions in dual frequency RF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Peter; Rees, John; Bort, Sam; Seymour, Dave

    2015-09-01

    For many surface-processing applications involving plasmas operated at RF frequencies it has been found helpful to combine two sources of power operating at different frequencies. By choosing suitable input powers at the two frequencies and varying the phase relationship set between the two inputs, the energy distributions (IEDs) for the ions arriving at the target surface can be optimised. There have been, however, only a limited number of published reports of measured or modelled distributions. In the present work IEDs for both positive and negative ions formed in plasmas in argon and nitrous oxide have been measured for mass-identified ions in two different reactors, one of which is a parallel-plate, capacitatively-coupled, system and the other is an inductively-coupled system. Typical data for 13.56 and 27.1 MHz inputs are presented for a range of phase relationships. The IEDs show clearly significant differences between the data for different species of ions which result in part from the ion-molecule collisions occurring, particularly in the plasma/surface sheath regions.

  14. Plasma polymerized high energy density dielectric films for capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamagishi, F. G.

    1983-01-01

    High energy density polymeric dielectric films were prepared by plasma polymerization of a variety of gaseous monomers. This technique gives thin, reproducible, pinhole free, conformable, adherent, and insoluble coatings and overcomes the processing problems found in the preparation of thin films with bulk polymers. Thus, devices are prepared completely in a vacuum environment. The plasma polymerized films prepared all showed dielectric strengths of greater than 1000 kV/cm and in some cases values of greater than 4000 kV/cm were observed. The dielectric loss of all films was generally less than 1% at frequencies below 10 kHz, but this value increased at higher frequencies. All films were self healing. The dielectric strength was a function of the polymerization technique, whereas the dielectric constant varied with the structure of the starting material. Because of the thin films used (thickness in the submicron range) surface smoothness of the metal electrodes was found to be critical in obtaining high dielectric strengths. High dielectric strength graft copolymers were also prepared. Plasma polymerized ethane was found to be thermally stable up to 150 C in the presence of air and 250 C in the absence of air. No glass transitions were observed for this material.

  15. CO2 recycling: a key strategy to introduce green energy in the chemical production chain.

    PubMed

    Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    2014-05-01

    The introduction of renewable energy in the chemical production chain is a key strategic factor both to realize a sustainable, resource-efficient, low-carbon economy and society and to drive innovation and competiveness in the chemical production. This Concept discusses this concept in terms of motivations, perspectives, and impact as well as technical barriers to achieve this goal. It is shown how an important element to realize this scenario is to foster the paths converting carbon dioxide (CO2) into feedstock for the chemical/process industry, which is one of the most efficient methods to rapidly introduce renewable energy into the chemical production chain. Some of the possible options to proceed in this direction are discussed, with focus on the technical barriers and enabling factors such as catalysis. The tight interconnection between CO2 management and the use of renewable energy is evidenced. PMID:24599714

  16. CO2 recycling: a key strategy to introduce green energy in the chemical production chain.

    PubMed

    Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    2014-05-01

    The introduction of renewable energy in the chemical production chain is a key strategic factor both to realize a sustainable, resource-efficient, low-carbon economy and society and to drive innovation and competiveness in the chemical production. This Concept discusses this concept in terms of motivations, perspectives, and impact as well as technical barriers to achieve this goal. It is shown how an important element to realize this scenario is to foster the paths converting carbon dioxide (CO2) into feedstock for the chemical/process industry, which is one of the most efficient methods to rapidly introduce renewable energy into the chemical production chain. Some of the possible options to proceed in this direction are discussed, with focus on the technical barriers and enabling factors such as catalysis. The tight interconnection between CO2 management and the use of renewable energy is evidenced.

  17. Low-Energy Hot Plasma and Particles in Saturn's Magnetosphere.

    PubMed

    Krimigis, S M; Armstrong, T P; Axford, W I; Bostrom, C O; Gloeckler, G; Keath, E P; Lanzerotti, L J; Carbary, J F; Hamilton, D C; Roelof, E C

    1982-01-29

    The low-energy charged particle instrument on Voyager 2 measured low-energy electrons and ions (energies greater, similar 22 and greater, similar 28 kiloelectron volts, respectively) in Saturn's magnetosphere. The magnetosphere structure and particle population were modified from those observed during the Voyager 1 encounter in November 1980 but in a manner consistent with the same global morphology. Major results include the following. (i) A region containing an extremely hot ( approximately 30 to 50 kiloelectron volts) plasma was identified and extends from the orbit of Tethys outward past the orbit of Rhea. (ii) The low-energy ion mantle found by Voyager 1 to extend approximately 7 Saturn radii inside the dayside magnetosphere was again observed on Voyager 2, but it was considerably hotter ( approximately 30 kiloelectron volts), and there was an indication of a cooler ( < 20 kiloelectron volts) ion mantle on the nightside. (iii) At energies greater, similar 200 kiloelectron volts per nucleon, H(1), H(2), and H(3) (molecular hydrogen), helium, carbon, and oxygen are important constituents in the Saturnian magnetosphere. The presence of both H(2) and H(3) suggests that the Saturnian ionosphere feeds plasma into the magnetosphere, but relative abundances of the energetic helium, carbon, and oxygen ions are consistent with a solar wind origin. (iv) Low-energy ( approximately 22 to approximately 60 kiloelectron volts) electron flux enhancements observed between the L shells of Rhea and Tethys by Voyager 2 on the dayside were absent during the Voyager 1 encounter. (v) Persistent asymmetric pitch-angle distributions of electrons of 60 to 200 kiloelectron volts occur in the outer magnetosphere in conjunction with the hot ion plasma torus. (vi) The spacecraft passed within approximately 1.1 degrees in longitude of the Tethys flux tube outbound and observed it to be empty of energetic ions and electrons; the microsignature of Enceladus inbound was also observed. (vii

  18. Electron-temperature and energy-flow history in an imploding plasma.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, L; Kroupp, E; Davara, G; Starobinets, A; Fisher, V I; Bernshtam, V A; Ralchenko, Yu V; Maron, Y; Fisher, A; Hoffmann, D H H

    2005-05-01

    The time-dependent radial distribution of the electron temperature in a 0.6 micros, 220-kA gas-puff z-pinch plasma is studied using spatially-resolved observations of line emission from singly to fivefold ionized oxygen ions during the plasma implosion, up to 50 ns before maximum compression. The temperature obtained, together with the previously determined radial distributions of the electron density, plasma radial velocity, and magnetic field, allows for studying the history of the magnetic-field energy coupling to the plasma by comparing the energy deposition and dissipation rates in the plasma. It is found that at this phase of the implosion, approximately 65% of the energy deposited in the plasma is imparted to the plasma radial flow, with the rest of the energy being converted into internal energy and radiation. PMID:16089655

  19. Electron-temperature and energy-flow history in an imploding plasma.

    PubMed

    Gregorian, L; Kroupp, E; Davara, G; Starobinets, A; Fisher, V I; Bernshtam, V A; Ralchenko, Yu V; Maron, Y; Fisher, A; Hoffmann, D H H

    2005-05-01

    The time-dependent radial distribution of the electron temperature in a 0.6 micros, 220-kA gas-puff z-pinch plasma is studied using spatially-resolved observations of line emission from singly to fivefold ionized oxygen ions during the plasma implosion, up to 50 ns before maximum compression. The temperature obtained, together with the previously determined radial distributions of the electron density, plasma radial velocity, and magnetic field, allows for studying the history of the magnetic-field energy coupling to the plasma by comparing the energy deposition and dissipation rates in the plasma. It is found that at this phase of the implosion, approximately 65% of the energy deposited in the plasma is imparted to the plasma radial flow, with the rest of the energy being converted into internal energy and radiation.

  20. Measurements of energy distribution and wall temperature in flowing hydrogen microwave plasma systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into translational energy of the flowing gas is being investigated. A calorimetric experimental system has been designed and built enclosing the microwave plasma system to accurately determine the net energy transferred to the flowing gas. For a flow rate of 8900 micromoles/sec, a pressure of 7.4 torr, and an absorbed power level of 80 W, an energy transfer efficiency of 50 percent has been measured. A heat transfer model that characterizes the energy transfer processes in the plasma is developed. A wall temperature for the plasma system is calculated.

  1. High-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar thermal storage materials using AZO/graphene hybrids by optimizing hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wen; Feng, Yiyu; Qin, Chengqun; Li, Man; Li, Shipei; Cao, Chen; Long, Peng; Liu, Enzuo; Hu, Wenping; Yoshino, Katsumi; Feng, Wei

    2015-10-21

    An important method for establishing a high-energy, stable and recycled molecular solar heat system is by designing and preparing novel photo-isomerizable molecules with a high enthalpy and a long thermal life by controlling molecular interactions. A meta- and ortho-bis-substituted azobenzene chromophore (AZO) is covalently grafted onto reduced graphene oxide (RGO) for solar thermal storage materials. High grafting degree and close-packed molecules enable intermolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) for both trans-(E) and cis-(Z) isomers of AZO on the surface of nanosheets, resulting in a dramatic increase in enthalpy and lifetime. The metastable Z-form of AZO on RGO is thermally stabilized with a half-life of 52 days by steric hindrance and intermolecular H-bonds calculated using density functional theory (DFT). The AZO-RGO fuel shows a high storage capacity of 138 Wh kg(-1) by optimizing intermolecular H-bonds with a good cycling stability for 50 cycles induced by visible light at 520 nm. Our work opens up a new method for making advanced molecular solar thermal storage materials by tuning molecular interactions on a nano-template.

  2. Design and Implementation of a Compact Master-Slave Robotic System with Force Feedback and Energy Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunguang; Inoue, Yoshio; Liu, Tao; Shibata, Kyoko; Oka, Koichi

    Master-slave control is becoming increasingly popular in the development of robotic systems which can provide rehabilitation training for hemiplegic patients with a unilaterally disabled limb. However, the system structures and control strategies of existent master-slave systems are always complex. An innovative master-slave system implementing force feedback and motion tracking for a rehabilitation robot is presented in this paper. The system consists of two identical motors with a wired connection, and the two motors are located at the master and slave manipulator sites respectively. The slave motor tracks the motion of the master motor directly driven by a patient. As well, the interaction force produced at the slave site is fed back to the patient. Therefore, the impaired limb driven by the slave motor can imitate the motion of the healthy limb controlling the master motor, and the patient can regulate the control force of the healthy limb properly according to the force sensation. The force sensing and motion tracking are achieved simultaneously with neither force sensors nor sophisticated control algorithms. The system is characterized by simple structure, bidirectional controllability, energy recycling, and force feedback without a force sensor. Test experiments on a prototype were conducted, and the results appraise the advantages of the system and demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed control scheme for a rehabilitation robot.

  3. Interaction between a high-kinetic-energy plasma jet and a target surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.K.; Varghese, P.L.; Howell, J.R.

    1986-12-01

    A model is constructed to estimate the net energy deposited on a target wall bombarded by a plasma jet with gross kinetic energy much greater than its temperature and with density on the order of about 10/sup 19//cc (such as the plasma generated by a rail gun). Both one- and two-dimensional cases are examined to study the interactions between incident and reflected plasma ions. The results show that the reflected plasma plays an essential role in stopping the incident plasma energy over some small range of parameters.

  4. Elemental concentration analysis in soil contaminated with recyclable urban garbage by tube-excited energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjos, M. J.; Lopes, R. T.; Jesus, E. F. O.; Assis, J. T.; Cesareo, R.; Barroso, R. C.; Barradas, C. A. A.

    2002-11-01

    Soil and radish (Raphanus Sp) samples from areas treated with organic compost of recyclable urban garbage were quantitatively analyzed by using tube-excited energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis. Soils treated with 10, 20 and 30 t/ha of recyclable urban garbage and control soil were analyzed. The layer soils were collected at 0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-40, 40-60 cm depth. It was possible simultaneously to determine the elemental concentration of various elements: K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr and Pb in recyclable urban garbage, soil treated with organic compost of recyclable urban garbage and radish plants cultivated in these soils. The elemental concentration of K, Ca, Ti and Fe were determined at percent level (macro-elements) and the other elements at ppm level (micro-elements). It was also possible to observe a significant increase in the contents of K, Ca, Zn, Rb, Sr, Zr and Pb in the soil treated in comparison with the control soil and it was also verified whether the transport of these elements to radish plants cultivated in these soils occurred.

  5. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics. PMID:26482650

  6. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-10-20

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics.

  7. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-10-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics.

  8. Proton motive force, energy recycling by end product excretion, and metabolic uncoupling during anaerobic growth of Pseudomonas mendocina.

    PubMed Central

    Verdoni, N; Aon, M A; Lebeault, J M; Thomas, D

    1990-01-01

    Batch cultures of Pseudomonas mendocina, grown in rich medium with glucose excess, showed metabolic differences dependent upon whether the growth conditions were aerobic or anaerobic, with or without added electron acceptor. Under anaerobic conditions in the absence of nitrate, P. mendocina reached the stationary phase of growth after 2 or 3 days, followed by a stationary phase of 4 to 5 days. Under these conditions, a mixed-type fermentative metabolism (formic, lactic, and acetic acids) appeared. A fivefold-higher specific rate of glucose consumption and eightfold-higher production of organic acids, compared with aerobic cultures, were shown by this microorganism growing anaerobically in the absence of exogenous electron acceptors. The gradients of organic acid produced by P. mendocina under these conditions reached a maximum (lactate, 180 mV; formate, 150 mV; acetate, 215 mV) between days 2 and 3 of culture. The proton motive force (delta p) decreased during growth from -254 to -71 mV. The intracellular pH remained alkaline during the culture, reaching a steady-state value of 7.9. The gradients of organic acids apparently contributed to the generation of a delta p, which, according to the Energy Recycling Model (P. A. M. Michels, J. P. J. Michels, J. Boonstra, and W. N. Konings, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 5:357-364, 1979), would produce an average energy gain of 1 or 1.5 mol of ATP equivalents per mol of glucose consumed with H+/ATP stoichiometry of 3 or 2, respectively. Low YATP and Yglucose values were observed, suggesting that an uncoupled metabolism exists; i.e., ATP produced by catabolic processes is not directly used for biomass synthesis. This metabolic uncoupling could be induced at least in part by organic acids and the ATP wastage could be induced by a membrane-bound ATPase involved in intracellular pH regulation. PMID:2254245

  9. Precipitation Recycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.; Bras, Rafael L.

    1996-01-01

    The water cycle regulates and reflects natural variability in climate at the regional and global scales. Large-scale human activities that involve changes in land cover, such as tropical deforestation, are likely to modify climate through changes in the water cycle. In order to understand, and hopefully be able to predict, the extent of these potential global and regional changes, we need first to understand how the water cycle works. In the past, most of the research in hydrology focused on the land branch of the water cycle, with little attention given to the atmospheric branch. The study of precipitation recycling which is defined as the contribution of local evaporation to local precipitation, aims at understanding hydrologic processes in the atmospheric branch of the water cycle. Simply stated, any study on precipitation recycling is about how the atmospheric branch of the water cycle works, namely, what happens to water vapor molecules after they evaporate from the surface, and where will they precipitate?

  10. The effect of the inclusion of recycled poultry bedding and the physical form of diet on the performance, ruminal fermentation, and plasma metabolites of fattening lambs.

    PubMed

    Mirmohammadi, D; Rouzbehan, Y; Fazaeli, H

    2015-08-01

    During a 125-d experimental period, 24 Afshari × Kurdish male lambs initially weighing 25.2 ± 1.2 kg were grouped by BW and randomly assigned to treatments under a completely randomized design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments to evaluate the effects of feeding recycled poultry bedding (RPB; 0 and 200 g/kg DM) and the physical form of the diet (mash and block) on nutrient intake and digestibility, ruminal and plasma parameters, microbial N supply, N balance, feeding behavior, and growth performance of the lambs. Two diets with and without RPB in both mash and block form were prepared. Neither the inclusion of RPB nor the physical form of the diet affected the concentration of VFA or the total tract apparent digestibility of nutrients. Dietary RPB inclusion increased DMI ( < 0.01), tended ( = 0.10) to reduce ADG, and decreased G:F ( = 0.05). The physical form of the diet had no effect on DMI but decreased ADG ( = 0.01) and G:F ( = 0.02) in lambs fed on the block diet compared with those fed on the mash diet. Neither the inclusion of RPB nor the physical form of the diets had any effect on microbial N supply (g/d) and N retention. Rate of eating ( = 0.07), time spent eating ( = 0.87) and ruminating ( = 0.28), and total chewing activity ( = 0.65) were not affected by dietary RPB inclusion. Rate of eating decreased ( < 0.01) and time spent eating and total chewing activity increased ( = 0.01 and = 0.02, respectively) in lambs fed on the block diet compared with those fed on the mash diet. Results of the current study showed that inclusion of RPB up to 200 g/kg DM in diets for fattening was possible without any effect on performance and animal health. Processing of feed into the mash form gave higher livestock productivity in comparison to the block form.

  11. A Midsize Tokamak As Fast Track To Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    E. Mazzucato

    2010-07-14

    This paper presents a midsize tokamak as a fast track to the investigation of burning plasmas. It is shown that it could reach large values of energy gain (≥10) with only a modest improvement in confinement over the scaling that was used for designing the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). This could be achieved by operating in a low plasma recycling regime that experiments indicate can lead to improved plasma confinement. The possibility of reaching the necessary conditions of low recycling using a more efficient magnetic divertor than those of present tokamaks is discussed.

  12. Casimir effects for a flat plasma sheet: I. Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, G.

    2005-04-01

    We study a fluid model of an infinitesimally thin plasma sheet occupying the xy plane, loosely imitating a single base plane from graphite. In terms of the fluid charge e/a2 and mass m/a2 per unit area, the crucial parameters are q ⋡ 2πe2/mc2a2, a Debye-type cutoff K\\equiv \\sqrt{4\\pi }/a on surface-parallel normal-mode wavenumbers k, and X ⋡ K/q. The cohesive energy β per unit area is determined from the zero-point energies of the exact normal modes of the plasma coupled to the Maxwell field, namely TE and TM photon modes, plus bound modes decaying exponentially with |z|. Odd-parity modes (with Ex,y(z = 0) = 0) are unaffected by the sheet except for their overall phases, and are irrelevant to β, although the following paper shows that they are essential to the fields (e.g. to their vacuum expectation values), and to the stresses on the sheet. Realistically one has X Gt 1, the result β ~ planckcq1/2K5/2 is nonrelativistic, and it comes from the surface modes. By contrast, X Lt 1 (nearing the limit of perfect reflection) would entail β ~ -planckcqK2log(1/X): contrary to folklore, the surface energy of perfect reflectors is divergent rather than zero. An appendix spells out the relation, for given k, between bound modes and photon phase-shifts. It is very different from Levinson's theorem for 1D potential theory: cursory analogies between TM and potential scattering are apt to mislead.

  13. Energy and matter flows in a plasma focus discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikhrev, V. V.; Suslin, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    The Plasma Focus is a type of z-pinch that is widely used for both basic research and applied tasks, e.g., as materials modification or research on intense plasma flows. Although the basic mechanisms of z-pinch compression are well-known, many of the processes that occur in the plasma focus have received less attention. This article is devoted to the study of plasma jets and some of its consequences in plasma focus discharges.

  14. Pathways and mechanisms of endocytic recycling

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Barth D.; Donaldson, Julie G.

    2011-01-01

    Endocytic recycling is coordinated with endocytic uptake to control the composition of the plasma membrane. Although much of our understanding of endocytic recycling has come from studies on the transferrin receptor, a protein internalized through clathrin-dependent endocytosis, increased interest in clathrin-independent endocytosis has led to the discovery of new endocytic recycling systems. Recent insights into the regulatory mechanisms that control endocytic recycling have focused on recycling through tubular carriers and the return to the cell surface of cargo that enters cells through clathrin-independent mechanisms. Recent work emphasizes the importance of regulated recycling in such diverse processes as cytokinesis, cell adhesion and morphogenesis, cell fusion, and learning and memory. PMID:19696797

  15. Very low pressure plasma sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coating using a low-energy plasma gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Nannan; Bolot, Rodolphe; Planche, Marie-Pierre; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, a more economical low-energy plasma source was used to perform a very low pressure plasma-spray (VLPPS) process. The plasma-jet properties were analyzed by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Moreover, yttria-stabilized zirconia coating (YSZ) was elaborated by a F100 low-power plasma gun under working pressure of 1 mbar, and the substrate specimens were partially shadowed by a baffle-plate during plasma spraying for obtaining different coating microstructures. Based on the SEM observation, a column-like grain coating was deposited by pure vapor deposition at the shadowed region, whereas, in the unshadowed region, the coating exhibited a binary microstructure which was formed by a mixed deposition of melted particles and evaporated particles. The mechanical properties of the coating were also well under investigation.

  16. THE IRON OPACITY PROJECT: High-Energy-Density Plasma Opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palay, E.; Orban, C.; Nahar, S.; Pradhan, A.; Pinnsonoault, M.; Bailey, J.

    2013-05-01

    Opacity governs radiation flow in plasma sources. Accurate opacities are needed to model unobservable laboratory and astrophysical conditions. High-energy-density (HED) plasma conditions prevalent in stellar interiors can now be recreated in the laboratory. The Z-pinch fusion device at the Sandia National Lab can reproduce temperatures and densities near the boundary where radiation transport changes from diffusion to convection inside the Sun. To benchmark theoretical opacities experiments are essential to resolve the outstanding discrepancy in solar abundances. The most common volatile elements C, N, O, Ne, etc. have been spectroscopically measured to be up to 50% lower than the standard abundances. This introduces conflict in the derived values of basic solar parameters such as the radiation/convection boundary, sound speed, and the primordial He abundance with precisely measured oscillations of the Sun through Helioseismology. A potential solution is increment of stellar opacities, which has inverse but complex relation with abundacnes, at least 30%. New iron opacity calculations include hitherto neglected atomic physics of fine structure and resonances which are largely treated as lines in existing opacities calculations. Preliminary results on radiative transitions in Ne Partial support: DOE,NSF.

  17. Energy recycling by co-combustion of coal and recovered paint solids from automobile paint operations.

    PubMed

    Suriyawong, Achariya; Magee, Rogan; Peebles, Ken; Biswas, Pratim

    2009-05-01

    During the past decade, there has been substantial interest in recovering energy from many unwanted byproducts from industries and municipalities. Co-combustion of these products with coal seems to be the most cost-effective approach. The combustion process typically results in emissions of pollutants, especially fine particles and trace elements. This paper presents the results of an experimental study of particulate emission and the fate of 13 trace elements (arsenic [As], barium [Ba], cadmium [Cd], chromium [Cr], copper [Cu], cobalt [Co], manganese [Mn], molybdenum [Mo], nickel [Ni], lead [Pb], mercury [Hg], vanadium [V], and zinc [Zn]) during combustion tests of recovered paint solids (RPS) and coal. The emissions from combustions of coal or RPS alone were compared with those of co-combustion of RPS with subbituminous coal. The distribution/partitioning of these toxic elements between a coarse-mode ash (particle diameter [dp] > 0.5 microm), a submicrometer-mode ash (dp < 0.5 microm), and flue gases was also evaluated. Submicrometer particles generated by combustion of RPS alone were lower in concentration and smaller in size than that from combustion of coal. However, co-combustion of RPS and coal increased the formation of submicrometer-sized particles because of the higher reducing environment in the vicinity of burning particles and the higher volatile chlorine species. Hg was completely volatilized in all cases; however, the fraction in the oxidized state increased with co-combustion. Most trace elements, except Zn, were retained in ash during combustion of RPS alone. Mo was mostly retained in all samples. The behavior of elements, except Mn and Mo, varied depending on the fuel samples. As, Ba, Cr, Co, Cu, and Pb were vaporized to a greater extent from cocombustion of RPS and coal than from combustion of either fuel. Evidence of the enrichment of certain toxic elements in submicrometer particles has also been observed for As, Cd, Cr, Cu, and Ni during co

  18. A Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) comparison of three management options for waste papers: bioethanol production, recycling and incineration with energy recovery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Templer, Richard; Murphy, Richard J

    2012-09-01

    This study uses Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to assess the environmental profiles and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for bioethanol production from waste papers and to compare them with the alternative waste management options of recycling or incineration with energy recovery. Bioethanol production scenarios both with and without pre-treatments were conducted. It was found that an oxidative lime pre-treatment reduced GHG emissions and overall environmental burdens for a newspaper-to-bioethanol process whereas a dilute acid pre-treatment raised GHG emissions and overall environmental impacts for an office paper-to-bioethanol process. In the comparison of bioethanol production systems with alternative management of waste papers by different technologies, it was found that the environmental profiles of each system vary significantly and this variation affects the outcomes of the specific comparisons made. Overall, a number of configurations of bioethanol production from waste papers offer environmentally favourable or neutral profiles when compared with recycling or incineration.

  19. CENTER FOR PULSED POWER DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PLASMA STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Professor Bruce R. Kusse; Professor David A. Hammer

    2007-04-18

    This annual report summarizes the activities of the Cornell Center for Pulsed-Power-Driven High-Energy-Density Plasma Studies, for the 12-month period October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006. This period corresponds to the first year of the two-year extension (awarded in October, 2005) to the original 3-year NNSA/DOE Cooperative Agreement with Cornell, DE-FC03-02NA00057. As such, the period covered in this report also corresponds to the fourth year of the (now) 5-year term of the Cooperative Agreement. The participants, in addition to Cornell University, include Imperial College, London (IC), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), the University of Rochester (UR), the Weizmann Institute of Science (WSI), and the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Moscow. A listing of all faculty, technical staff and students, both graduate and undergraduate, who participated in Center research activities during the year in question is given in Appendix A.

  20. Plasma Jet Braking: Energy Dissipation and Nonadiabatic Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Cully, C. M.; Vaivads, A.; Andre, M.; Owen, C. J.

    2011-04-22

    We report in situ observations by the Cluster spacecraft of wave-particle interactions in a magnetic flux pileup region created by a magnetic reconnection outflow jet in Earth's magnetotail. Two distinct regions of wave activity are identified: lower-hybrid drift waves at the front edge and whistler-mode waves inside the pileup region. The whistler-mode waves are locally generated by the electron temperature anisotropy, and provide evidence for ongoing betatron energization caused by magnetic flux pileup. The whistler-mode waves cause fast pitch-angle scattering of electrons and isotropization of the electron distribution, thus making the flow braking process nonadiabatic. The waves strongly affect the electron dynamics and thus play an important role in the energy conversion chain during plasma jet braking.

  1. Surface energy increase of oxygen-plasma-treated PET

    SciTech Connect

    Cioffi, M.O.H.; Voorwald, H.J.C.; Mota, R.P

    2003-03-15

    Prosthetic composite is a widely used biomaterial that satisfies the criteria for application as an organic implant without adverse reactions. Polyethylene therephthalate (PET) fiber-reinforced composites have been used because of the excellent cell adhesion, biodegradability and biocompatibility. The chemical inertness and low surface energy of PET in general are associated with inadequate bonds for polymer reinforcements. It is recognized that the high strength of composites, which results from the interaction between the constituents, is directly related to the interfacial condition or to the interphase. A radio frequency plasma reactor using oxygen was used to treat PET fibers for 5, 20, 30 and 100 s. The treatment conditions were 13.56 MHz, 50 W, 40 Pa and 3.33x10{sup -7} m{sup 3}/s. A Rame-Hart goniometer was used to measure the contact angle and surface energy variation of fibers treated for different times. The experimental results showed contact angle values from 47 deg. to 13 deg. and surface energies from 6.4x10{sup -6} to 8.3x10{sup -6} J for the range of 5 to 100 s, respectively. These results were confirmed by the average ultimate tensile strength of the PET fiber/ polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) matrix composite tested in tensile mode and by scanning electron microscopy.

  2. Energy transport in laser-plasma interactions: a UK perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Kathryn

    2008-11-01

    A range of experimental and theoretical work has been performed recently to gain a greater insight into energy transport in laser plasma interactions. Experiments have been performed on the VULCAN Petawatt facility in the UK and the LULI2000 facility in France to look at energy transport as a function of a number of different parameters. The parameters studied range from the introduction of controlled pre-pulses, material properties / target geometry through to absorption as a function of density scale length. A wide range of diagnostics were used such as transverse shadowgraphy, rear-side optical emission imaging, X-ray imaging and spectroscopy, and streaked harmonic measurements. To support and stimulate this work, computational tools such as Vlasov-Fokker-Planck (LEDA, K2 (K2 constructed by M. Sherlock)) and radiation hydrodynamic codes. One highlight that will be discussed in detail is the observation of changes to the beam divergence pattern with the addition of a cone-guide. Preliminary results from very recent studies conducted at the VULCAN facility to study the characterization and energy transport in warm dense matter in the context of the HiPER project will be presented. A.P.L Robinson et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100 025002 2008 K.L.Lancaster et al, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett www.hiper-laser.org

  3. Reverse Energy Cascade in Turbulent Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Kyron; Appartaim, R.; Belay, K.; Johnson, J. A., III

    1998-01-01

    For systems far from equilibrium, the neglect of a role for viscous effects in turbulence may be generally inappropriate when the relaxation time for the molecular process approaches the local flow time (Orou et al. (1996)). Furthermore, for stationary collisional plasmas, the conventional Reynolds number is irrelevant under circumstances where the standard features of turbulence in ordinary gases are observed in the plasma (Johnson et al. (1987)). The current theoretical understanding of these turbulent phenomenon is particularly inadequate for turbulence associated with ionizing shock waves; generally speaking, thermodynamic, acoustic and pressure fluctuations are all seen as amplified across the shock wave followed by a dramatic decay (relaminarization) usually attributed to a lack of importance of viscosity in the turbulent regions. This decay would be accelerated when the flow speed is also reduced due to the importance usually given to the conventional Reynolds number (which is directly proportional to velocity) as a quality of turbulence index. However, evidence supporting this consensus is lacking. By contrast, recent evidence of vanishing triple correlations form De Silva et al. (1996) provides strong support for early theoretical speculation of inherently molecular effects in macroscopic turbulence in Tsuge (1974). This specifically suggests that the role of compressive effects ordinarily associated with the shock wave could be significantly muted by the existence of a strongly turbulent local environment. There is also more recent theoretical speculation (Frisch et al. (1984)) of an inherently and previously unsuspected non-dissipative nature to turbulence, with energy conservation being nurtured by reverse energy cascades in the turbulent fluctuation spectra. Furthermore, the role which might be played by fluctuations on quantum mechanical phenomena and variations in molecular parameters is completely unknown, especially of the sort which might be found

  4. Effect of the electron energy distribution on total energy loss with argon in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, June Young; Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-01-15

    The total energy lost per electron-ion pair lost ε{sub T} is investigated with the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The EEDFs are measured at various argon powers in RF inductively coupled plasma, and the EEDFs show a depleted distribution (a discontinuity occurring at the minimum argon excitation threshold energy level) with the bulk temperature and the tail temperature. The total energy loss per electron-ion pair lost ε{sub T} is calculated from a power balance model with the Maxwellian EEDFs and the depleted EEDFs and then compared with the measured ε{sub T} from the floating probe. It is concluded that the small population of the depleted high energy electrons dramatically increases the collisional energy loss, and the calculated ε{sub T} from the depleted EEDFs has a value that is similar to the measured ε{sub T}.

  5. A burning plasma program strategy to advance fusion energy. Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, Burning Plasma Strategy Panel

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2002-09-01

    Fusion energy shows great promise to contribute to securing the energy future of humanity. The risk of conflicts arising from energy shortages and supply cutoffs, as well as the risk of severe environmental impacts from existing methods of energy production, are strong reasons to pursue fusion energy now. The world effort to develop fusion energy is at the threshold of a new stage in its research: the investigation of burning plasmas. This investigation, at the frontier of the physics of complex systems, would be a huge step in establishing the potential of magnetic fusion energy to contribute to the world’s energy security. The defining feature of a burning plasma is that it is self-heated: the 100 million degree temperature of the plasma is maintained mainly by the heat generated by the fusion reactions themselves, as occurs in burning stars. The fusion-generated alpha particles produce new physical phenomena that are strongly coupled together as a nonlinear complex system. Understanding all elements of this system poses a major challenge to fundamental plasma physics. The technology needed to produce and control a burning plasma presents challenges in engineering science similarly essential to the development of fusion energy.

  6. Plastics recycling: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Hopewell, Jefferson; Dvorak, Robert; Kosior, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight and durable materials, which can readily be moulded into a variety of products that find use in a wide range of applications. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased markedly over the last 60 years. However, current levels of their usage and disposal generate several environmental problems. Around 4 per cent of world oil and gas production, a non-renewable resource, is used as feedstock for plastics and a further 3–4% is expended to provide energy for their manufacture. A major portion of plastic produced each year is used to make disposable items of packaging or other short-lived products that are discarded within a year of manufacture. These two observations alone indicate that our current use of plastics is not sustainable. In addition, because of the durability of the polymers involved, substantial quantities of discarded end-of-life plastics are accumulating as debris in landfills and in natural habitats worldwide. Recycling is one of the most important actions currently available to reduce these impacts and represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Recycling provides opportunities to reduce oil usage, carbon dioxide emissions and the quantities of waste requiring disposal. Here, we briefly set recycling into context against other waste-reduction strategies, namely reduction in material use through downgauging or product reuse, the use of alternative biodegradable materials and energy recovery as fuel. While plastics have been recycled since the 1970s, the quantities that are recycled vary geographically, according to plastic type and application. Recycling of packaging materials has seen rapid expansion over the last decades in a number of countries. Advances in technologies and systems for the collection, sorting and reprocessing of recyclable plastics are creating new opportunities for recycling, and with the combined actions of the public, industry and governments it

  7. Plastics recycling: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Hopewell, Jefferson; Dvorak, Robert; Kosior, Edward

    2009-07-27

    Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight and durable materials, which can readily be moulded into a variety of products that find use in a wide range of applications. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased markedly over the last 60 years. However, current levels of their usage and disposal generate several environmental problems. Around 4 per cent of world oil and gas production, a non-renewable resource, is used as feedstock for plastics and a further 3-4% is expended to provide energy for their manufacture. A major portion of plastic produced each year is used to make disposable items of packaging or other short-lived products that are discarded within a year of manufacture. These two observations alone indicate that our current use of plastics is not sustainable. In addition, because of the durability of the polymers involved, substantial quantities of discarded end-of-life plastics are accumulating as debris in landfills and in natural habitats worldwide. Recycling is one of the most important actions currently available to reduce these impacts and represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Recycling provides opportunities to reduce oil usage, carbon dioxide emissions and the quantities of waste requiring disposal. Here, we briefly set recycling into context against other waste-reduction strategies, namely reduction in material use through downgauging or product reuse, the use of alternative biodegradable materials and energy recovery as fuel. While plastics have been recycled since the 1970s, the quantities that are recycled vary geographically, according to plastic type and application. Recycling of packaging materials has seen rapid expansion over the last decades in a number of countries. Advances in technologies and systems for the collection, sorting and reprocessing of recyclable plastics are creating new opportunities for recycling, and with the combined actions of the public, industry and governments it

  8. Plastics recycling: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Hopewell, Jefferson; Dvorak, Robert; Kosior, Edward

    2009-07-27

    Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight and durable materials, which can readily be moulded into a variety of products that find use in a wide range of applications. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased markedly over the last 60 years. However, current levels of their usage and disposal generate several environmental problems. Around 4 per cent of world oil and gas production, a non-renewable resource, is used as feedstock for plastics and a further 3-4% is expended to provide energy for their manufacture. A major portion of plastic produced each year is used to make disposable items of packaging or other short-lived products that are discarded within a year of manufacture. These two observations alone indicate that our current use of plastics is not sustainable. In addition, because of the durability of the polymers involved, substantial quantities of discarded end-of-life plastics are accumulating as debris in landfills and in natural habitats worldwide. Recycling is one of the most important actions currently available to reduce these impacts and represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Recycling provides opportunities to reduce oil usage, carbon dioxide emissions and the quantities of waste requiring disposal. Here, we briefly set recycling into context against other waste-reduction strategies, namely reduction in material use through downgauging or product reuse, the use of alternative biodegradable materials and energy recovery as fuel. While plastics have been recycled since the 1970s, the quantities that are recycled vary geographically, according to plastic type and application. Recycling of packaging materials has seen rapid expansion over the last decades in a number of countries. Advances in technologies and systems for the collection, sorting and reprocessing of recyclable plastics are creating new opportunities for recycling, and with the combined actions of the public, industry and governments it

  9. Recycling Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Dept. of Environmental Resources, Harrisburg.

    This document contains lesson plans about recycling for teachers in grades K-12. Titles include: (1) "Waste--Where Does It Come From? Where Does It Go?" (2) "Litter Detectives," (3) "Classroom Paper Recycling," (4) "Recycling Survey," (5) "Disposal and Recycling Costs," (6) "Composting Project," (7) Used Motor Oil Recycling," (8) "Unwrapping…

  10. Energy branching in the Io plasma torus - The failure of neutral cloud theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shemansky, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Model calculations are used to explore the energy source characteristics of the energy branching of the hot Io plasma torus. It is assumed that the energy is derived from the kinetic energy acquired by ions created in the rotating planetary magnetic field, and that Coulomb collisions with the electron gas control the flow of energy to the ionizing and radiative processes. The results show that neutral cloud theory is qualitatively inadequate. It is shown that neutral cloud theory can only support a dominantly singly ionized system (at the measured electron densities in the plasma torus) and that it fails to predict observed plasma properties relative to variations in number density.

  11. Ion Temperature and Hydrodynamic-Energy Measurements in a Z-Pinch Plasma at Stagnation

    SciTech Connect

    Kroupp, E.; Osin, D.; Starobinets, A.; Fisher, V.; Bernshtam, V.; Weingarten, L.; Maron, Y.; Uschmann, I.; Foerster, E.; Fisher, A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Deeney, C.; Giuliani, J. L.

    2011-09-02

    The time history of the local ion kinetic energy in a stagnating plasma was determined from Doppler-dominated line shapes. Using independent determination of the plasma properties for the same plasma region, the data allowed for inferring the time-dependent ion temperature, and for discriminating the temperature from the total ion kinetic energy. It is found that throughout most of the stagnation period the ion thermal energy constitutes a small fraction of the total ion kinetic energy; the latter is dominated by hydrodynamic motion. Both the ion hydrodynamic and thermal energies are observed to decrease to the electron thermal energy by the end of the stagnation period. It is confirmed that the total ion kinetic energy available at the stagnating plasma and the total radiation emitted are in balance, as obtained in our previous experiment. The dissipation time of the hydrodynamic energy thus appears to determine the duration (and power) of the K emission.

  12. Recycling of plastics in Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Thienen, N. von; Patel, M.

    1999-07-01

    This article deals with the waste management of post-consumer plastics in Germany and its potential to save fossil fuels and reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Since most experience is available for packaging, the paper first gives an overview of the legislative background and the material flows for this sector. Then recycling and recovery processes for plastics waste from all sectors are assessed in terms of their contribution to energy saving and CO{sub 2} abatement. Practically all the options studied show a better performance than waste treatment in an average incinerator which has been chosen as the reference case. High ecological benefits can be achieved by mechanical recycling if virgin polymers are substituted. The paper then presents different scenarios for managing plastic waste in Germany in 1995: considerable savings can be made by strongly enhancing the efficiency of waste incinerators. Under these conditions the distribution of plastics waste among mechanical recycling, feedstock recycling and energy recovery has a comparatively mall impact on the overall results. The maximum savings amount to 74 PJ of energy, i.e, 9% of the chemical sector energy demand in 1995 and 7.0 Mt CO{sub 2}, representing 13% of the sector's emissions. The assessment does not support a general recommendation of energy recovery due to the large difference between the German average and the best available municipal waste-to-energy facilities and also due to new technological developments in the field of mechanical recycling.

  13. High performance polyester concrete using recycled PET

    SciTech Connect

    Rebeiz, K.S.

    1995-10-01

    Recycled polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic wastes could be used in production of unsaturated polyester resins. In turn, these resins could be mixed with inorganic aggregates to produce polymer concrete (PC). Unsaturated polyesters based on recycled PET might be a potentially lower source cost of resins for producing useful PC based-products. The advantage of recycling PET in PC is that the PET materials do not have to be purified, including removal of colors, to the same extent as other PET recycling applications, which should facilitate the recycling operation and minimize its cost. The recycling of PET in PC could also help save energy and allow the long term disposal of the PET waste, an important advantage in recycling applications.

  14. METHOD FOR EXCHANGING ENERGY WITH A PLASMA BY MAGNETIC PUMPING

    DOEpatents

    Hall, L.S.

    1963-12-31

    A method of heating a plasma confined by a static magnetic field is presented. A time-varying magnetic field having a rise time to a predetermined value substantially less than its fall time is applied to a portion of the plasma. Because of the much shorter rise time, the plasma is reversibly heated. This cycle is repeated until the desired plasma temperature is reached. (AEC)

  15. Kinetic-energy structure of a laser-produced-plasma channel in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Xiao-Fang; Yu, Cheng-Xin; Li, Wei; Liu, Shi-Bing

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to calculate the fine structure of kinetic energy of laser-produced plasma, which bridges the two parts of researches of plasma channel usually studied independently of each other, i.e., the extension of the length of plasma filament and the prolongation of the lifetime of plasma channel generated by the laser pulse. The kinetic energy structure of the plasma channel is calculated by solving the motion equation of ionized electrons and utilizing the ionization rate as the weighting factor. With the study on the laser intensity, we analyze the formation mechanisms of the kinetic energy structure. This work holds great promise for optimizing the initial conditions of the evolutions of plasma channel after the laser pulse.

  16. Characterization of plasma chemistry and ion energy in cathodic arc plasma from Ti-Si cathodes of different compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, A. O.; Zhirkov, I.; Dahlqvist, M.; Jensen, J.; Hultman, L.; Rosen, J.

    2013-04-28

    Arc plasma from Ti-Si compound cathodes with up to 25 at. % Si was characterized in a DC arc system with respect to chemistry and charge-state-resolved ion energy. The plasma ion composition showed a lower Si content, diverging up to 12 at. % compared to the cathode composition, yet concurrently deposited films were in accordance with the cathode stoichiometry. Significant contribution to film growth from neutrals is inferred besides ions, since the contribution from macroparticles, estimated by scanning electron microscopy, cannot alone account for the compositional difference between cathode, plasma, and film. The average ion charge states for Ti and Si were higher than reference data for elemental cathodes. This result is likely related to TiSi{sub x} phases of higher cohesive energies in the compound cathodes and higher effective electron temperature in plasma formation. The ion energy distributions extended up to {approx}200 and {approx}130 eV for Ti and Si, respectively, with corresponding average energies of {approx}60 and {approx}30 eV. These averages were, however, not dependent on Si content in the cathode, except for 25 at. % Si where the average energies were increased up to 72 eV for Ti and 47 eV for Si.

  17. Thermal ablation of plasma-facing surfaces in tokamak disruptions: Sensitivity to particle kinetic energy

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.; Hassanein, A.

    1996-02-01

    Ablation damage to solid targets with high heat flux impulses is generally greater high-energy electron beam heat sources compared to low-energy plasma guns. This sensitivity to incoming particle kinetic energy is explored with computer modelling; a fast-running routine (DESIRE) is developed for initial scoping analysis and is found to be in reasonable agreement with several experiments on graphite and tungsten targets. If tokamak disruptions are characterized by particle energies less than {approximately}1 keV, then we expect plasma guns are a better analogue than electron beams for simulating disruption behavior and testing candidate plasma-facing materials.

  18. Atomic Oxygen Durability Evaluation of Protected Polymers Using Thermal Energy Plasma Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Degroh, Kim K.; Stidham, Curtis R.; Gebauer, Linda; Lamoreaux, Cynthia M.

    1995-01-01

    The durability evaluation of protected polymers intended for use in low Earth orbit (LEO) has necessitated the use of large-area, high-fluence, atomic oxygen exposure systems. Two thermal energy atomic oxygen exposure systems which are frequently used for such evaluations are radio frequency (RF) plasma ashers and electron cyclotron resonance plasma sources. Plasma source testing practices such as ample preparation, effective fluence prediction, atomic oxygen flux determination, erosion measurement, operational considerations, and erosion yield measurements are presented. Issues which influence the prediction of in-space durability based on ground laboratory thermal energy plasma system testing are also addressed.

  19. Measurements of low-energy electron reflection at a plasma boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. I.; Adams, S. F.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Koepke, M. E.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.

    2015-10-15

    It is demonstrated that low-energy (<3 eV) electron reflection from a solid surface in contact with a low-temperature plasma can have significant variation with time. An uncontaminated, i.e., “clean,” metallic surface (just after heating up to glow) in a plasma environment may have practically no reflection of low-energy incident electrons. However, a contaminated, i.e., “dirty,” surface (in some time after cleaning by heating) that has a few monolayers of absorbent can reflect low-energy incident electrons and therefore significantly affect the net electron current collected by the surface. This effect may significantly change plasma properties and should be taken into account in plasma experiments and models. A diagnostic method is demonstrated for measurements of low-energy electron absorption coefficient in plasmas with a mono-energetic electron group.

  20. Conversion of magnetic energy in the magnetic reconnection layer of a laboratory plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Yamada, Masaaki; Yoo, Jongsoo; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Ji, Hantao; Kulsrud, Russell M.; Myers, Clayton E.

    2014-09-10

    Magnetic reconnection, in which magnetic field lines break and reconnect to change their topology, occurs throughout the universe. The essential feature of reconnection is that it energizes plasma particles by converting magnetic energy. Despite the long history of reconnection research, how this energy conversion occurs remains a major unresolved problem in plasma physics. Here we report that the energy conversion in a laboratory reconnection layer occurs in a much larger region than previously considered. The mechanisms for energizing plasma particles in the reconnection layer are identified, and a quantitative inventory of the converted energy is presented for the first timemore » in a well defined reconnection layer; 50% of the magnetic energy is converted to particle energy, 2/3 of which transferred to ions and 1/3 to electrons. Our results are compared with simulations and space measurements, for a key step toward resolving one of the most important problems in plasma physics.« less

  1. Conversion of magnetic energy in the magnetic reconnection layer of a laboratory plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Masaaki; Yoo, Jongsoo; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Ji, Hantao; Kulsrud, Russell M.; Myers, Clayton E.

    2014-09-10

    Magnetic reconnection, in which magnetic field lines break and reconnect to change their topology, occurs throughout the universe. The essential feature of reconnection is that it energizes plasma particles by converting magnetic energy. Despite the long history of reconnection research, how this energy conversion occurs remains a major unresolved problem in plasma physics. Here we report that the energy conversion in a laboratory reconnection layer occurs in a much larger region than previously considered. The mechanisms for energizing plasma particles in the reconnection layer are identified, and a quantitative inventory of the converted energy is presented for the first time in a well defined reconnection layer; 50% of the magnetic energy is converted to particle energy, 2/3 of which transferred to ions and 1/3 to electrons. Our results are compared with simulations and space measurements, for a key step toward resolving one of the most important problems in plasma physics.

  2. Plasma particle and energy reflection at a wall with an obliquely incident magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Knize, R.J.

    1985-07-01

    The particle and energy reflection coefficients are calculated for a plasma incident at a wall with an obliquely incident magnetic field. The salient result of these calculations is that the reflection coefficients can approach unity when the magnetic field is incident at grazing angles. This reflection of particles and energy will be an important process in determining the particle and energy balance in the edge plasma.

  3. Energy density dependence of hydrogen combustion efficiency in atmospheric pressure microwave plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, T.; Ezumi, N.; Sawada, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K.

    2015-03-15

    The recovery of tritium in nuclear fusion plants is a key issue for safety. So far, the oxidation procedure using an atmospheric pressure plasma is expected to be part of the recovery method. In this study, in order to clarify the mechanism of hydrogen oxidation by plasma chemistry, we have investigated the dependence of hydrogen combustion efficiency on gas flow rate and input power in the atmospheric pressure microwave plasma. It has been found that the combustion efficiency depends on energy density of absorbed microwave power. Hence, the energy density is considered as a key parameter for combustion processes. Also neutral gas temperatures inside and outside the plasma were measured by an optical emission spectroscopy method and thermocouple. The result shows that the neutral gas temperature in the plasma is much higher than the outside temperature of plasma. The high neutral gas temperature may affect the combustion reaction. (authors)

  4. Using rf impedance probe measurements to determine plasma potential and the electron energy distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D. N.; Fernsler, R. F.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2010-11-15

    Earlier work has demonstrated the usefulness of a network analyzer in plasma diagnostics using spherical probes in the thin sheath limit. The rf signal applied to the probe by the network analyzer is small in magnitude compared to probe bias voltages, and the instrument returns both real and imaginary parts of the complex plasma impedance as a function of frequency for given bias voltages. This information can be used to determine sheath resistance, sheath density profiles, and a technique for measuring electron temperature. The present work outlines a method for finding plasma potential and the electron energy distribution within a limited energy range. The results are compared to those using conventional Langmuir probe techniques. The rf method has general application to diverse areas of plasma investigations when the plasma is uniform and probe dimensions are much less than the size of the plasma. These applications include laboratory and space environments.

  5. Recycled pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, Bryan Anthony

    2005-11-01

    In a survey of ~4,150 square degrees, we discovered 26 previously unknown pulsars, including 7 "recycled" millisecond or binary pulsars. The most significant discovery of this survey is PSR J1909-3744, a 2.95 ms pulsar in an extremely circular 1.5 d orbit with a low-mass white dwarf companion. Though this system is a fairly typical low-mass binary pulsar (LMBP) system, it has several exceptional qualities: an extremely narrow pulse profile and stable rotation have enabled the most precise long-term timing ever reported, and a nearly edge-on orbit gives rise to a strong Shapiro delay which has allowed the most precise measurement of the mass of a millisecond pulsar: m p = (1.438 +/- 0.024) [Special characters omitted.] . Our accurate parallax distance measurement, d p = ([Special characters omitted.] ) kpc, combined with the mass of the optically-detected companion, m c = (0.2038 +/- 0.022) [Special characters omitted.] , will provide an important calibration for white dwarf models relevant to other LMBP companions. We have detected optical counterparts for two intermediate mass binary pulsar (IMBP) systems; taken together with optical detections and non-detections of several similar systems, our results indicate that the characteristic age t = c P /2 P consistently overestimates the time since the end of mass accretion in these recycled systems. We have measured orbital decay in the double neutron star system PSR B2127+11C in the globular cluster M15. This has allowed an improved measurement of the mass of the pulsar, m p = (1.3584 +/- 0.0097) [Special characters omitted.] , and companion, m c = (1.3544 +/- 0.0097) [Special characters omitted.] , as well as a test of general relativity at the 3% level. We find that the proper motions of this pulsar as well as PSR B2127+11A and PSR B2127+11B are consistent with each other and with one published measurement of the cluster proper motion. We have discovered three binary millisecond pulsars in the globular cluster M62

  6. Green Science: Revisiting Recycling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palliser, Janna

    2011-01-01

    Recycling has been around for a long time--people have reused materials and refashioned them into needed items for thousands of years. More recently, war efforts encouraged conservation and reuse of materials, and in the 1970s recycling got its official start when recycling centers were created. Now, curbside recycling programs and recycling…

  7. Radial profile of the electron energy distribution function in RF capacitive gas-discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, M.; Popov, Tsv; Puac, N.; Skoro, N.; Spasic, K.; Malovic, G.; Dias, F. M.; Petrovic, Z. Lj

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports experimental results on low-pressure argon capacitive RF discharge (parallel-plate capacitively-coupled plasma - CCP) under different conditions, namely, gas pressure in the range 3 -r- 30 Pa and RF power in the range 10 - 100 W. The IV characteristics measured were processed by two different second-derivative probe techniques for determination of the plasma parameters and the electron energy distribution function. The radial profiles of the main plasma parameters are presented.

  8. APPARATUS FOR MINIMIZING ENERGY LOSSES FROM MAGNETICALLY CONFINED VOLUMES OF HOT PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1961-10-01

    An apparatus is described for controlling electron temperature in plasma confined in a Pyrotron magnetic containment field. Basically the device comprises means for directing low temperature electrons to the plasma in controlled quantities to maintain a predetermined optimum equilibrium electron temperature whereat minimum losses of plasma ions due to ambipolar effects and energy damping of the ions due to dynamical friction with the electrons occur. (AEC)

  9. Understanding of Edge Plasmas in Magnetic Fusion Energy Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T

    2004-11-01

    A limited overview is given of the theoretical understanding of edge plasmas in fusion devices. This plasma occupies the thin region between the hot core plasma and material walls in magnetically confinement configurations. The region is often formed by a change in magnetic topology from close magnetic field lines (i.e., the core region) and open field lines that contact material surfaces (i.e., the scrape-off layer [SOL]), with the most common example being magnetically diverted tokamaks. The physics of this region is determined by the interaction of plasma with neutral gas in the presence of plasma turbulence, with impurity radiation being an important component. Recent advances in modeling strong, intermittent micro-turbulent edge-plasma transport is given, and the closely coupled self-consistent evolution of the edge-plasma profiles in tokamaks. In addition, selected new results are given for the characterization of edge-plasmas behavior in the areas of edge-pedestal relaxation and SOL transport via Edge-Localize Modes (ELMs), impurity formation including dust, and magnetic field-line stochasticity in tokamaks.

  10. Energy enhancement of proton acceleration in combinational radiation pressure and bubble by optimizing plasma density

    SciTech Connect

    Bake, Muhammad Ali; Xie Baisong; Shan Zhang; Hong Xueren; Wang Hongyu

    2012-08-15

    The combinational laser radiation pressure and plasma bubble fields to accelerate protons are researched through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. The dephasing length of the accelerated protons bunch in the front of the bubble and the density gradient effect of background plasma on the accelerating phase are analyzed in detail theoretically. The radiation damping effect on the accelerated protons energy is also considered. And it is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations that the protons bunch energy can be increased by using the background plasma with negative density gradient. However, radiation damping makes the maximal energy of the accelerated protons a little reduction.

  11. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase SCFTIR1/AFB and Membrane Sterols Play Key Roles in Auxin Regulation of Endocytosis, Recycling, and Plasma Membrane Accumulation of the Auxin Efflux Transporter PIN2 in Arabidopsis thaliana[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jianwei; Fujioka, Shozo; Peng, Jianling; Chen, Jianghua; Li, Guangming; Chen, Rujin

    2009-01-01

    The PIN family of auxin efflux transporters exhibit polar plasma membrane (PM) localization and play a key role in auxin gradient-mediated developmental processes. Auxin inhibits PIN2 endocytosis and promotes its PM localization. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we show that the inhibitory effect of auxin on PIN2 endocytosis was impaired in SCFTIR1/AFB auxin signaling mutants. Similarly, reducing membrane sterols impaired auxin inhibition of PIN2 endocytosis. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analyses indicate that membrane sterols were significantly reduced in SCFTIR1/AFB mutants, supporting a link between membrane sterols and auxin signaling in regulating PIN2 endocytosis. We show that auxin promoted PIN2 recycling from endosomes to the PM and increased PIN2 steady state levels in the PM fraction. Furthermore, we show that the positive effect of auxin on PIN2 levels in the PM was impaired by inhibiting membrane sterols or auxin signaling. Consistent with this, the sterol biosynthetic mutant fk-J79 exhibited pronounced defects in primary root elongation and gravitropic response. Our data collectively indicate that, although there are distinct processes involved in endocytic regulation of specific PM-resident proteins, the SCFTIR1/AFB-dependent processes are required for auxin regulation of endocytosis, recycling, and PM accumulation of the auxin efflux transporter PIN2 in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:19218398

  12. Numerical simulation of the plasma current quench following a disruptive energy loss

    SciTech Connect

    Strickler, D.J.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Holmes, J.A.; Miller, J.B.; Rothe, K.E.

    1983-11-01

    The plasma electromagnetic interaction with poloidal field coils and nearby passive conductor loops during the current quench following a disruptive loss of plasma energy is simulated. By solving a differential/algebraic system consisting of a set of circuit equations (including the plasma circuit) coupled to a plasma energy balance equation and an equilibrium condition, the electromagnetic consequences of an abrupt thermal quench are observed. Limiters on the small and large major radium sides of the plasma are assumed to define the plasma cross section. The presence of good conductors near the plasma and a small initial distance (i.e., 5 to 10% of the plasma minor radius) between the plasma edge and an inboard limiter are shown to lead to long current decay times. For a plasma with an initial major radius R/sub o/ = 4.3 m, aspect ratio A = 3.6, and current I/sub P/ = 4.0 MA, introducing nearby passive conductors lengthens the current decay from milliseconds to hundreds of milliseconds.

  13. Environmental analysis of a construction and demolition waste recycling plant in Portugal--Part I: energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

    PubMed

    Coelho, André; de Brito, Jorge

    2013-05-01

    This work is a part of a wider study involving the economic and environmental implications of managing construction and demolition waste (CDW), focused on the operation of a large scale CDW recycling plant. This plant, to be operated in the Lisbon Metropolitan Area (including the Setúbal peninsula), is analysed for a 60 year period, using primary energy consumption and CO2eq emission impact factors as environmental impact performance indicators. Simplified estimation methods are used to calculate industrial equipment incorporated, and the operation and transport related impacts. Material recycling--sorted materials sent to other industries, to act as input--is taken into account by discounting the impacts related to industrial processes no longer needed. This first part focuses on calculating the selected impact factors for a base case scenario (with a 350 tonnes/h installed capacity), while a sensitivity analysis is provided in part two. Overall, a 60 year global primary energy consumption of 71.4 thousand toe (tonne of oil equivalent) and a total CO2eq emission of 135.4 thousand tonnes are expected. Under this operating regime, around 563 thousand toe and 1465 thousand tonnes CO2eq could be prevented by replacing raw materials in several construction materials industries (e.g.: ferrous and non-ferrous metals, plastics, paper and cardboard).

  14. Environmental analysis of a construction and demolition waste recycling plant in Portugal--Part I: energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

    PubMed

    Coelho, André; de Brito, Jorge

    2013-05-01

    This work is a part of a wider study involving the economic and environmental implications of managing construction and demolition waste (CDW), focused on the operation of a large scale CDW recycling plant. This plant, to be operated in the Lisbon Metropolitan Area (including the Setúbal peninsula), is analysed for a 60 year period, using primary energy consumption and CO2eq emission impact factors as environmental impact performance indicators. Simplified estimation methods are used to calculate industrial equipment incorporated, and the operation and transport related impacts. Material recycling--sorted materials sent to other industries, to act as input--is taken into account by discounting the impacts related to industrial processes no longer needed. This first part focuses on calculating the selected impact factors for a base case scenario (with a 350 tonnes/h installed capacity), while a sensitivity analysis is provided in part two. Overall, a 60 year global primary energy consumption of 71.4 thousand toe (tonne of oil equivalent) and a total CO2eq emission of 135.4 thousand tonnes are expected. Under this operating regime, around 563 thousand toe and 1465 thousand tonnes CO2eq could be prevented by replacing raw materials in several construction materials industries (e.g.: ferrous and non-ferrous metals, plastics, paper and cardboard). PMID:23422042

  15. High energy density micro plasma bunch from multiple laser interaction with thin target

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Han; Yu, Wei; Luan, S. X.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yu, M. Y.; Cai, H. B.; Zhou, C. T.; Yang, X. H.; Yin, Y.; Zhuo, H. B.; Wang, J. W.; Murakami, M.

    2014-01-13

    Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation is used to investigate radiation-pressure driven acceleration and compression of small solid-density plasma by intense laser pulses. It is found that multiple impacts by presently available short-pulse lasers on a small hemispheric shell target can create a long-living tiny quasineutral monoenergetic plasma bunch of very high energy density.

  16. Low Energy Plasma in the Outer Magnetosphere as Observed by Interball Tail Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Vaisberg, Oleg L.; Gallagher, Dennis L.; Chandler, Michael O.

    1999-01-01

    The Interball Tail Probe crosses the dayside magnetopause at low latitudes where it frequently measures low energy ion plasma (<100 eV) in the outer magnetosphere. We present the plasma characteristics of this cold component, including it's dependence on solar wind parameters and interaction with PC-5 type waves.

  17. Energy change of a heavy quark in a viscous quark-gluon plasma with fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bing-feng; Hou, De-fu; Li, Jia-rong

    2016-09-01

    When a heavy quark travels through the quark-gluon plasma, the polarization and fluctuating chromoelectric fields will be produced simultaneously in the plasma. The drag force due to those fields exerting in return on the moving heavy quark will cause energy change to it. Based on the dielectric functions derived from the viscous chromohydrodynamics, we have studied the collisional energy change of a heavy quark traversing the viscous quark-gluon plasma including fluctuations of chromoelectric field. Numerical results indicate that the chromoelectric field fluctuations lead to an energy gain of the moving heavy quark. Shear viscosity suppresses the fluctuation-induced energy gain and the viscous suppression effect for the charm quark is much more remarkable than that for the bottom quark. While, the fluctuation energy gain is much smaller than the polarization energy loss in magnitude and the net energy change for the heavy quark is at loss.

  18. INEEL Lead Recycling in a Moratorium Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kooda, Kevin Evan; Mc Cray, Casey William; Aitken, Darren William; Galloway, Kelly

    2003-02-01

    Since 1999, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Lead Project successfully recycled over 700,000 pounds of excess INEEL lead to the private sector. On February 14, 2000, the Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, formalized the January 12, 2000, moratorium on recycling radioactive scrap metal that prevented the unrestricted release of recycled scrap metals to the private sector. This moratorium created significant problems for the INEEL lead recycling program and associated plans; however, through the cooperative efforts of the INEEL and Idaho State University as well as innovative planning and creative thinking the recycling issues were resolved. This collaboration has recycled over 160,000 pounds of excess lead to Idaho State University with a cost savings of over $.5M.

  19. INEEL Lead Recycling in a Moratorium Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kooda, K. E.; Galloway, K.; McCray, C. W.; Aitken, D. W.

    2003-02-26

    Since 1999, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Lead Project successfully recycled over 700,000 pounds of excess INEEL lead to the private sector. On February 14, 2000, the Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, formalized the January 12, 2000, moratorium on recycling radioactive scrap metal that prevented the unrestricted release of recycled scrap metals to the private sector. This moratorium created significant problems for the INEEL lead recycling program and associated plans; however, through the cooperative efforts of the INEEL and Idaho State University as well as innovative planning and creative thinking the recycling issues were resolved. This collaboration has recycled over 160,000 pounds of excess lead to Idaho State University with a cost savings of over $.5M.

  20. Plasma gasification of waste as a method of energy saving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, V. E.; Bratsev, A. N.; Kuznetsov, V. A.; Shtengel, S. V.; Ufimtsev, A. A.

    2011-01-01

    Several versions of the organizations of the process of plasma-chemical gasification with the use of air, carbon dioxide, steam and their mixtures as the plasma-forming gas are considered in the presentation. The results of the calculation-theoretical evaluations of the quality of synthesis gas and efficiency of gasification, and also the results of experiments on plasma gasification of wood waste carried out on the experimental IEE RAS test-bench are given. The results of calculations are compared with experimental data.

  1. Idea Notebook: Recycling with an Educational Purpose.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerth, Tom; Wilson, David A.

    1986-01-01

    Four students at St. Louis University High School developed a project to clean up the environment while saving energy and natural resources. Aluminum and steel cans were recycled and the money was used to buy and plant trees. Students learned about recycling, organization, money management, and improving the environment. (JMM)

  2. Recycling Primer: Getting Back to Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Environmental Protection, Hartford.

    The disposal of garbage is a complex issue. Four strategies have been developed to attack the problem. They deal with: (1) waste reduction; (2) recycling; (3) energy recovery; and (4) land filling. This handbook emphasizes recycling as a method of handling the problem of dealing with solid wastes. Included are a list of the categories and uses of…

  3. Energy shifts of K- and L-lines as spectroscopic diagnostic of Z-pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Słabkowska, K.; Szymańska, E.; Polasik, M.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Syrocki, Ł.; Pereira, N. R.

    2014-12-15

    Ultrafast molybdenum wire implosions on the Z machine at Sandia produce intense pulses of multi-keV x-rays from partially ionized plasmas. The most intense radiation comes from a hot, dense core of thermal plasma in ionization equilibrium with Mo ionized to within the L-shell. Non-thermal, energetic electrons in the plasma generate Kα and Kβ radiation, whose energy is affected by Mo’s ionization state, and therefore on the plasma temperature. Based on an extensive series of recent computations on this effect, we recalculate the pinch’ Mo x-ray spectrum, with reasonable results.

  4. Energy distributions and radiation transport in uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, G. H.; Bathke, C.; Maceda, E.; Choi, C.

    1976-01-01

    An approximate analytic model, based on continuous electron slowing, has been used for survey calculations. Where more accuracy is required, a Monte Carlo technique is used which combines an analytic representation of Coulombic collisions with a random walk treatment of inelastic collisions. The calculated electron distributions have been incorporated into another code that evaluates both the excited atomic state densities within the plasma and the radiative flux emitted from the plasma.

  5. Modelling erosion damage from low-energy plasma gun simulations of disruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.; Hassanein, A.

    1993-10-01

    Energy transfer to material surfaces is dominated by photon radiation through low temperature plasma vapors if tokamak disruptions are due to low kinetic energy particles ({approx_lt} 100 eV). Simple models of radiation transport are derived and incorporated into a fast-running computer routine to model this process. The results of simulations are in good agreement with plasma gun erosion tests on several metal targets.

  6. Energy Distribution of Electrons in Radiation Induced-Helium Plasmas. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Energy distribution of high energy electrons as they slow down and thermalize in a gaseous medium is studied. The energy distribution in the entire energy range from source energies down is studied analytically. A helium medium in which primary electrons are created by the passage of heavy-charged particles from nuclear reactions is emphasized. A radiation-induced plasma is of interest in a variety of applications, such as radiation pumped lasers and gaseous core nuclear reactors.

  7. Numerical modeling of plasma meta-materials for electromagnetic energy flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtzanidis, Konstantinos; Pederson, Dylan; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2015-09-01

    Meta-materials are a new and promising technology that could enable advances in several scientific fields - especially in electromagnetic (EM) energy flow control. These materials though present a major drawback: They can only interact with a limited range of EM frequencies and their structure is pre-defined, rendering them non-tunable and non-reconfigurable. Instead of using structural crystal patterns as in common meta-materials, micro-plasma discharges can be used to control the EM energy propagation. Plasmas present resonant frequencies depending on their degree of ionization - their charged particles density. By adjusting the plasma density, different EM wave frequencies can be manipulated - controlled. In this article, we present 2D and 3D numerical results of plasma meta-materials and their interaction with high frequency (HF) EM waves. Maxwell's equations are coupled with the electron momentum equation and a quasi-neutral fluid description for the plasma dynamics. We study the interaction between a plasma array and HF EM waves demonstrating significant reduction in the transmitted EM energy. Remote ignition of the plasma micro-discharges by the EM waves is also numerically investigated in a simplified configuration. Supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) through a Multi-University Research Initiative (MURI) grant titled ``Plasma-Based Reconfigurable Photonic Crystals and Metamaterials'' with Dr. Mitat Birkan as the program manager.

  8. Recyclable transmission line (RTL) and linear transformer driver (LTD) development for Z-pinch inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE) and high yield.

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Robin Arthur; Kingsep, Alexander S. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Smith, David Lewis; Olson, Craig Lee; Ottinger, Paul F. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Schumer, Joseph Wade (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Welch, Dale Robert (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Kim, Alexander (High Currents Institute, Tomsk, Russia); Kulcinski, Gerald L. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Kammer, Daniel C. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Rose, David Vincent (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Nedoseev, Sergei L. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Pointon, Timothy David; Smirnov, Valentin P.; Turgeon, Matthew C.; Kalinin, Yuri G. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Bruner, Nichelle "Nicki" (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Barkey, Mark E. (University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL); Guthrie, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Thoma, Carsten (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Genoni, Tom C. (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Langston, William L.; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos

    2007-01-01

    Z-Pinch Inertial Fusion Energy (Z-IFE) complements and extends the single-shot z-pinch fusion program on Z to a repetitive, high-yield, power plant scenario that can be used for the production of electricity, transmutation of nuclear waste, and hydrogen production, all with no CO{sub 2} production and no long-lived radioactive nuclear waste. The Z-IFE concept uses a Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) accelerator, and a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to connect the LTD driver to a high-yield fusion target inside a thick-liquid-wall power plant chamber. Results of RTL and LTD research are reported here, that include: (1) The key physics issues for RTLs involve the power flow at the high linear current densities that occur near the target (up to 5 MA/cm). These issues include surface heating, melting, ablation, plasma formation, electron flow, magnetic insulation, conductivity changes, magnetic field diffusion changes, possible ion flow, and RTL mass motion. These issues are studied theoretically, computationally (with the ALEGRA and LSP codes), and will work at 5 MA/cm or higher, with anode-cathode gaps as small as 2 mm. (2) An RTL misalignment sensitivity study has been performed using a 3D circuit model. Results show very small load current variations for significant RTL misalignments. (3) The key structural issues for RTLs involve optimizing the RTL strength (varying shape, ribs, etc.) while minimizing the RTL mass. Optimization studies show RTL mass reductions by factors of three or more. (4) Fabrication and pressure testing of Z-PoP (Proof-of-Principle) size RTLs are successfully reported here. (5) Modeling of the effect of initial RTL imperfections on the buckling pressure has been performed. Results show that the curved RTL offers a much greater buckling pressure as well as less sensitivity to imperfections than three other RTL designs. (6) Repetitive operation of a 0.5 MA, 100 kV, 100 ns, LTD cavity with gas purging between shots and automated operation is

  9. Comparison of measured and simulated electron energy distribution functions in low-pressure helium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruenwald, J.; Tskhakaya, D.; Kovačič, J.; Čerček, M.; Gyergyek, T.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2013-02-01

    Knowledge of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) is of great interest in different branches of plasma physics ranging from laboratory to fusion plasmas. In the frame of this work systematic measurements of the EEDF in low temperature helium plasmas (Te ≈ 2 eV) at different working gas pressures and discharge currents (Idis between 1 and 2 A) will be presented and compared with numerical particle-in-cell (PIC) code simulations. The experiments were conducted in the Innsbruck double plasma machine and in the Ljubljana linear magnetic plasma device with helium as the working gas. The EEDF was obtained by the second derivative of the characteristic of a Langmuir probe. The PIC code was used to simulate the EEDF by taking into account most of the physical parameters in the plasma vessel.

  10. Role of charge transfer in heavy-ion-beam-plasma interactions at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortner, A.; Frank, A.; Blažević, A.; Roth, M.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the influence of the plasma properties on the charge state distribution of a swift heavy ion beam interacting with a plasma. The main finding is that the charge state in plasma can be lower than in cold matter. The charge state distribution is determined by the ionization and recombination rates which are balancing each other out. Both, ionization and recombination rates, as well as atomic excitation and decay rates, depend on the plasma parameters in different ways. These effects have been theoretically studied by Monte Carlo simulations on the example of an argon ion beam at an energy of 4 MeV /u in a carbon plasma. This study covers a plasma parameter space ranging from ion densities from 1018 to 1023 cm-3 and electron temperatures from 10 to 200 eV.

  11. Survey of low energy plasma electrons in Saturn's magnetosphere: Voyagers 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Scudder, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The low energy plasma electron environment within Saturn's magnetosphere was surveyed by the Plasma Science Experiment (PLS) during the Voyager encounters with Saturn. Over the full energy range of the PLS instrument (10 eV to 6 keV) the electron distribution functions are clearly non-Maxwellian in character; they are composed of a cold (thermal) component with Maxwellian shape and a hot (suprathermal) non-Maxwellian component. A large scale positive radial gradient in electron temperature is observed, increasing from less than 1 eV in the inner magnetosphere to as high as 800 eV in the outer magnetosphere. Three fundamentally different plasma regimes were identified from the measurements: (1) the hot outer magnetosphere, (2) the extended plasma sheet, and (3) the inner plasma torus.

  12. Plasma Physics Regimes in Tokamaks with Li Walls

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Zakharo; N.N. Gorelenkov; R.B. White; S.I. Krasheninnikov; G.V. Pereverzev

    2003-08-21

    Low recycling regimes with a plasma limited by a lithium wall surface suggest enhanced stability and energy confinement, both necessary for tokamak reactors. These regimes could make ignition feasible in compact tokamaks. Ignited Spherical Tokamaks (IST), self-sufficient in the bootstrap current, are introduced as a necessary step for development of the physics and technology of power reactors.

  13. Recycled Art: Create Puppets Using Recycled Objects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents an activity from "Healthy Foods from Healthy Soils" for making puppets using recycled food packaging materials. Includes background information, materials, instructions, literature links, resources, and benchmarks. (NB)

  14. Energy deposition of heavy ions in the regime of strong beam-plasma correlations.

    PubMed

    Gericke, D O; Schlanges, M

    2003-03-01

    The energy loss of highly charged ions in dense plasmas is investigated. The applied model includes strong beam-plasma correlation via a quantum T-matrix treatment of the cross sections. Dynamic screening effects are modeled by using a Debye-like potential with a velocity dependent screening length that guarantees the known low and high beam velocity limits. It is shown that this phenomenological model is in good agreement with simulation data up to very high beam-plasma coupling. An analysis of the stopping process shows considerably longer ranges and a less localized energy deposition if strong coupling is treated properly.

  15. High-resolution submicron retarding field energy analyzer for low-temperature plasma analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, M. G.; Stevens, J. E.; Woodworth, J. R.

    1999-12-20

    A retarding potential energy analyzer having 750 nm diameter, self-aligned grid apertures and micron scale grid separation has been fabricated using polycrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide. High-resolution in situ measurements of ion velocity distributions have been demonstrated in inductively coupled argon plasmas. Measurement results agree well with those from a macroscopic analyzer. Important differences are observed in the energies of plasma ions when measured with respect to chamber wall versus those measured with respect to the plasma floating potential. Preliminary measurements under rf bias conditions have also been made and results follow the expected trends. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Energy deposition of heavy ions in the regime of strong beam-plasma correlations.

    PubMed

    Gericke, D O; Schlanges, M

    2003-03-01

    The energy loss of highly charged ions in dense plasmas is investigated. The applied model includes strong beam-plasma correlation via a quantum T-matrix treatment of the cross sections. Dynamic screening effects are modeled by using a Debye-like potential with a velocity dependent screening length that guarantees the known low and high beam velocity limits. It is shown that this phenomenological model is in good agreement with simulation data up to very high beam-plasma coupling. An analysis of the stopping process shows considerably longer ranges and a less localized energy deposition if strong coupling is treated properly. PMID:12689203

  17. Exploring turbulent energy dissipation and particle energization in space plasmas: the science of THOR mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retinò, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The Universe is permeated by hot, turbulent magnetized plasmas. They are found in active galactic nuclei, supernova remnants, the intergalactic and interstellar medium, as well as in the solar corona, the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere. Turbulent plasmas are also found in laboratory devices such as e.g. tokamaks. Our comprehension of the plasma Universe is largely based on measurements of electromagnetic radiation such as light or X-rays which originate from particles that are heated and accelerated as a result of energy dissipation in turbulent environments. Therefore it is of key importance to study and understand how plasma is energized by turbulence. Most of the energy dissipation occurs at kinetic scales, where plasma no longer behaves as a fluid and the properties of individual plasma species (electrons, protons and other ions) become important. THOR (Turbulent Heating ObserveR - http://thor.irfu.se/) is a space mission currently in Study Phase as candidate for M-class mission within the Cosmic Vision program of the European Space Agency. The scientific theme of the THOR mission is turbulent energy dissipation and particle energization in space plasmas, which ties in with ESA's Cosmic Vision science. The main focus is on turbulence and shock processes, however areas where the different fundamental processes interact, such as reconnection in turbulence or shock generated turbulence, are also of high importance. The THOR mission aims to address fundamental questions such as how plasma is heated and particles are accelerated by turbulent fluctuations at kinetic scales, how energy is partitioned among different plasma components and how dissipation operates in different regimes of turbulence. To reach the goal, a careful design of the THOR spacecraft and its payload is ongoing, together with a strong interaction with numerical simulations. Here we present the science of THOR mission and we discuss implications of THOR observations for space

  18. Estimation of the energy transferred from the capacitor bank to the plasma in plasma focus systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, Miguel; Soto, Leopoldo

    2009-01-21

    We consider the snowplow model to describe the axial phase of a plasma focus device. We show that, within this framework, the dynamics of a given system can be recovered at different energetic and geometric scales. Then, we consider two different criteria that would plausibly optimize the plasma focus performance. By solving the dynamics equations for the axial phase, we estimate the values of the parameters that do indeed satisfy the aforementioned criteria and compare those values with the corresponding ones attached to few practical devices.

  19. Estimation of the energy transferred from the capacitor bank to the plasma in plasma focus systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas, Miguel; Soto, Leopoldo

    2009-01-01

    We consider the snowplow model to describe the axial phase of a plasma focus device. We show that, within this framework, the dynamics of a given system can be recovered at different energetic and geometric scales. Then, we consider two different criteria that would plausibly optimize the plasma focus performance. By solving the dynamics equations for the axial phase, we estimate the values of the parameters that do indeed satisfy the aforementioned criteria and compare those values with the corresponding ones attached to few practical devices.

  20. Chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer biosensing platform for site-specific determination of DNA methylation and assay of DNA methyltransferase activity using exonuclease III-assisted target recycling amplification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun; Li, Baoxin

    2014-04-15

    Site-specific determination of DNA methylation and assay of MTase activity can be used for determining specific cancer types, providing insights into the mechanism of gene repression, and developing novel drugs to treat methylation-related diseases. Herein, we develop a simple and highly sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) biosensing platform for site-specific determination of DNA methylation using Exonuclease III (Exo III)-assisted target recycling signal amplification. After bisulfite treatment of mixture of methylated DNA and unmethylated DNA, methylated DNA can hybridize with fluorescein (FAM)-labeled probe DNA to form double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), removing the FAM-labeled probe DNA from the surface of grapheme oxide, and the chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) sensing signal can be observed and then amplified using Exo III-based recycling strategy. The biosensing platform exhibits excellent high sensitivity, and it can ever distinguish as low as 0.002% methylation level from the mixture, which is superior to most currently reported methods used for DNA methylation assay. In addition, the proposed method can also be used to sensitively assay MTase activity with determination limit of 0.007 U/mL. This CL biosensing offers the advantages of being facile, sensitive, rapid and cost-effective. These features make the system promising for future use for early cancer diagnosis and discover of new anticancer drugs.

  1. Automotive shredder residue (ASR): reviewing its production from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) and its recycling, energy or chemicals' valorisation.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, I; Van Caneghem, J; Block, C; Baeyens, J; Vandecasteele, C

    2011-06-15

    ASR is in Europe classified as hazardous waste. Both the stringent landfill legislation and the objectives/legislation related to ELV treatment of various countries, will limit current landfilling practice and impose an increased efficiency of the recovery and recycling of ELVs. The present paper situates ASR within the ELV context. Primary recovery techniques recycle up to 75% of the ELV components; the remaining 25% is called ASR. Characteristics of ASR and possible upgrading by secondary recovery techniques are reviewed. The latter techniques can produce a fuel- or fillergrade ASR, however with limitations as discussed. A further reduction of ASR to be disposed of calls upon (co-)incineration or the use of thermo-chemical processes, such as pyrolysis or gasification. The application in waste-to-energy plants, in cement kilns or in metallurgical processes is possible, with attention to the possible environmental impact: research into these impacts is discussed in detail. Pyrolysis and gasification are emerging technologies: although the sole use of ASR is debatable, its mixing with other waste streams is gradually being applied in commercial processes. The environmental impacts of the processes are acceptable, but more supporting data are needed and the advantage over (co-)incineration remains to be proven. PMID:21440364

  2. Automotive shredder residue (ASR): reviewing its production from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) and its recycling, energy or chemicals' valorisation.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, I; Van Caneghem, J; Block, C; Baeyens, J; Vandecasteele, C

    2011-06-15

    ASR is in Europe classified as hazardous waste. Both the stringent landfill legislation and the objectives/legislation related to ELV treatment of various countries, will limit current landfilling practice and impose an increased efficiency of the recovery and recycling of ELVs. The present paper situates ASR within the ELV context. Primary recovery techniques recycle up to 75% of the ELV components; the remaining 25% is called ASR. Characteristics of ASR and possible upgrading by secondary recovery techniques are reviewed. The latter techniques can produce a fuel- or fillergrade ASR, however with limitations as discussed. A further reduction of ASR to be disposed of calls upon (co-)incineration or the use of thermo-chemical processes, such as pyrolysis or gasification. The application in waste-to-energy plants, in cement kilns or in metallurgical processes is possible, with attention to the possible environmental impact: research into these impacts is discussed in detail. Pyrolysis and gasification are emerging technologies: although the sole use of ASR is debatable, its mixing with other waste streams is gradually being applied in commercial processes. The environmental impacts of the processes are acceptable, but more supporting data are needed and the advantage over (co-)incineration remains to be proven.

  3. Plasma simulations of emission line regions in high energy environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Chris T.

    This dissertation focuses on understanding two different, but in each case extreme, astrophysical environments: the Crab Nebula and emission line galaxies. These relatively local objects are well constrained by observations and are test cases of phenomena seen at high-z where detailed observations are rare. The tool used to study these objects is the plasma simulation code known as Cloudy. The introduction provides a brief summary of relevant physical concepts in nebular astrophysics and presents the basic features and assumptions of Cloudy. The first object investigated with Cloudy, the Crab Nebula, is a nearby supernova remnant that previously has been subject to photoionization modeling to reproduce the ionized emission seen in the nebula's filamentary structure. However, there are still several unanswered questions: (1) What excites the H2 emitting gas? (2) How much mass is in the molecular component? (3) How did the H2 form? (4) What is nature of the dust grains? A large suite of observations including long slit optical and NIR spectra over ionized, neutral and molecular gas in addition to HST and NIR ground based images constrain a particularly bright region of H2 emission, Knot 51, which exhibits a high excitation temperature of ˜3000 K. Simulations of K51 revealed that only a trace amount of H2 is needed to reproduce the observed emission and that H2 forms through an uncommon nebular process known as associative detachment. The final chapters of this dissertation focus on interpreting the narrow line region (NLR) in low-z emission line galaxies selected by a novel technique known as mean field independent component analysis (MFICA). A mixture of starlight and radiation from an AGN excites the gas present in galaxies. MFICA separates galaxies over a wide range of ionization into subsets of pure AGN and pure star forming galaxies allowing simulations to reveal the properties responsible for their observed variation in ionization. Emission line ratios can

  4. Reduction of Argon Consumption to Less than 2 L min(-1) by Gas Recycling in Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tirk, Paul; Wolfgang, Matthias; Wiltsche, Helmar

    2016-07-19

    An innovative interface between the torch and the entrance optics for inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) is proposed. This system is capable of collecting all argon which was initially supplied to the torch, cooling and cleaning it and feeding most of the argon back to the outer gas port of the torch. Thereby, the total argon consumption could be reduced from 14 to 1.4 L min(-1) using a standard torch and without restricting the rf power. The excitation- and rotational temperature of the plasma were identical when comparing the traditional setup with the enclosed plasma interface. However, the limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) of 27 elements investigated were degraded about 5-fold, though this fact can be expected to stem from a change of the observed zone in the plasma caused by the slight overpressure of 2000 Pa within the interface. Though the enclosed plasma interface was located close to the load coil, the rf power coupled to the interface was well below 1 W and no rf arcing was observed for two different rf generator designs.

  5. Reduction of Argon Consumption to Less than 2 L min(-1) by Gas Recycling in Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tirk, Paul; Wolfgang, Matthias; Wiltsche, Helmar

    2016-07-19

    An innovative interface between the torch and the entrance optics for inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) is proposed. This system is capable of collecting all argon which was initially supplied to the torch, cooling and cleaning it and feeding most of the argon back to the outer gas port of the torch. Thereby, the total argon consumption could be reduced from 14 to 1.4 L min(-1) using a standard torch and without restricting the rf power. The excitation- and rotational temperature of the plasma were identical when comparing the traditional setup with the enclosed plasma interface. However, the limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantification (LOQ) of 27 elements investigated were degraded about 5-fold, though this fact can be expected to stem from a change of the observed zone in the plasma caused by the slight overpressure of 2000 Pa within the interface. Though the enclosed plasma interface was located close to the load coil, the rf power coupled to the interface was well below 1 W and no rf arcing was observed for two different rf generator designs. PMID:27306111

  6. Study of radiatively sustained cesium plasmas for solar energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, A. J.; Dunning, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a study aimed at developing a high temperature solar electric converter are reported. The converter concept is based on the use of an alkali plasma to serve as both an efficient high temperature collector of solar radiation as well as the working fluid for a high temperature working cycle. The working cycle is a simple magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Rankine cycle employing a solid electrode Faraday MHD channel. Research milestones include the construction of a theoretical model for coupling sunlight in a cesium plasma and the experimental demonstration of cesium plasma heating with a solar simulator in excellent agreement with the theory. Analysis of a solar MHD working cycle in which excimer laser power rather than electric power is extracted is also presented. The analysis predicts a positive gain coefficient on the cesium-xenon excimer laser transition.

  7. Influence of damping on proton energy loss in plasmas of all degeneracies

    SciTech Connect

    Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D.

    2007-07-15

    The purpose of the present paper is to describe the effects of electron-electron collisions on the stopping power of plasmas of any degeneracy. Plasma targets are considered fully ionized so electronic stopping is only due to the free electrons. We focus our analysis on plasmas which electronic density is around solid values n{sub e}{approx_equal}10{sup 23} cm{sup -3} and which temperature is around T{approx_equal}10 eV; these plasmas are in the limit of weakly coupled plasmas. This type of plasma has not been studied extensively though it is very important for inertial confinement fusion. The electronic stopping is obtained from an exact quantum mechanical evaluation, which takes into account the degeneracy of the target plasma, and later it is compared with common classical and degenerate approximations. Differences are around 30% in some cases which can produce bigger mistakes in further energy deposition and projectile range studies. Then we consider electron-electron collisions in the exact quantum mechanical electronic stopping calculation. Now the maximum stopping occurs at velocities smaller than for the calculations without considering collisions for all kinds of plasmas analyzed. The energy loss enhances for velocities smaller than the velocity at maximum while decreases for higher velocities. Latter effects are magnified with increasing collision frequency. Differences with the same results for the case of not taking into account collisions are around 20% in the analyzed cases.

  8. Improvement of early cell adhesion on Thai silk fibroin surface by low energy plasma.

    PubMed

    Amornsudthiwat, Phakdee; Mongkolnavin, Rattachat; Kanokpanont, Sorada; Panpranot, Joongjai; Wong, Chiow San; Damrongsakkul, Siriporn

    2013-11-01

    Low energy plasma has been introduced to treat the surface of Thai silk fibroin which should be enhanced for cell adhesion due to its native hydrophobic surface. Plasma surface treatment could introduce desirable hydrophilic functionalities on the surface without using any chemicals. In this work, nitrogen glow discharge plasma was generated by a low energy AC50Hz power supply system. The plasma operating conditions were optimized to reach the highest nitrogen active species by using optical emission spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that amine, hydroxyl, ether, and carboxyl groups were induced on Thai silk fibroin surface after plasma treatment. The results on Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy confirmed that the plasma treated effects were only on the outermost layer since there was no change in the bulk chemistry. The surface topography was insignificantly changed from the detection with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The plasma-treated effects were the improved surface wettability and cell adhesion. After a 90-s treatment, the water contact angle was at 20°, while the untreated surface was at 70°. The early cell adhesion of L929 mouse fibroblast was accelerated. L929 cells only took 3h to reach 100% cell adhesion on 90 s N2 plasma-treated surface, while there was less than 50% cell adhesion on the untreated Thai silk fibroin surface after 6h of culture. The cell adhesion results were in agreement with the cytoskeleton development. L929 F-actin was more evident on 90 s N2 plasma-treated surface than others. It could be concluded that a lower energy AC50Hz plasma system enhanced early L929 mouse fibroblast adhesion on Thai silk fibroin surface without any significant change in surface topography and bulk chemistry. PMID:23893032

  9. Experimental investigation of opacity models for stellar interior, inertial fusion, and high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Mancini, R. C.; Iglesias, C. A.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I. E.; Blancard, C.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.

    2009-05-15

    Theoretical opacities are required for calculating energy transport in plasmas. In particular, understanding stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and Z pinches depends on the opacities of mid-atomic-number elements over a wide range of temperatures. The 150-300 eV temperature range is particularly interesting. The opacity models are complex and experimental validation is crucial. For example, solar models presently disagree with helioseismology and one possible explanation is inadequate theoretical opacities. Testing these opacities requires well-characterized plasmas at temperatures high enough to produce the ion charge states that exist in the sun. Typical opacity experiments heat a sample using x rays and measure the spectrally resolved transmission with a backlight. The difficulty grows as the temperature increases because the heating x-ray source must supply more energy and the backlight must be bright enough to overwhelm the plasma self-emission. These problems can be overcome with the new generation of high energy density (HED) facilities. For example, recent experiments at Sandia's Z facility [M. K. Matzen et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 055503 (2005)] measured the transmission of a mixed Mg and Fe plasma heated to 156{+-}6 eV. This capability will also advance opacity science for other HED plasmas. This tutorial reviews experimental methods for testing opacity models, including experiment design, transmission measurement methods, accuracy evaluation, and plasma diagnostics. The solar interior serves as a focal problem and Z facility experiments illustrate the techniques.

  10. Recycling overview in Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    This article discusses the recycling programs currently in use in Sweden. Recycling of newspapers, batteries, plastics are all mentioned in this report by the Swedish Association of Public Cleansing and Solid Waste Management.

  11. Highly flexible binder-free core-shell nanofibrous electrode for lightweight electrochemical energy storage using recycled water bottles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, HaoTian H.; Naguib, Hani E.

    2016-08-01

    The creation of a novel flexible nanocomposite fiber with conductive polymer polyaniline (PAni) coating on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate allowed for increased electrochemical performance while retaining ideal mechanical properties such as very high flexibility. Binder-free PAni-wrapped PET (PAni@PET) fiber with a core-shell structure was successfully fabricated through a novel technique. The PET nanofiber substrate was fabricated through an optimized electrospinning method, while the PAni shell was chemically polymerized onto the surface of the nanofibers. The PET substrate can be made directly from recycled PETE1 grade plastic water bottles. The resulting nanofiber with an average diameter of 121 nm ± 39 nm, with a specific surface area of 83.72 m2 g-1, led to better ionic interactions at the electrode/electrolyte interface. The PAni active layer coating was found to be 69 nm in average thickness. The specific capacitance was found to have increased dramatically from pure PAni with carbon binders. The specific capacitance was found to be 347 F g-1 at a relatively high scan rate of 10 mV s-1. The PAni/PET fiber also experienced very little degradation (4.4%) in capacitance after 1500 galvanostatic charge/discharge cycles at a specific current of 1.2 A g-1. The mesoporous structure of the PAni@PET fibrous mat also allowed for tunable capacitance by controlling the pore sizes. This novel fabrication method offers insights for the utilization of recycled PETE1 based bottles as a high performance, low cost, highly flexible supercapacitor device.

  12. Highly flexible binder-free core–shell nanofibrous electrode for lightweight electrochemical energy storage using recycled water bottles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, HaoTian H.; Naguib, Hani E.

    2016-08-01

    The creation of a novel flexible nanocomposite fiber with conductive polymer polyaniline (PAni) coating on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate allowed for increased electrochemical performance while retaining ideal mechanical properties such as very high flexibility. Binder-free PAni-wrapped PET (PAni@PET) fiber with a core–shell structure was successfully fabricated through a novel technique. The PET nanofiber substrate was fabricated through an optimized electrospinning method, while the PAni shell was chemically polymerized onto the surface of the nanofibers. The PET substrate can be made directly from recycled PETE1 grade plastic water bottles. The resulting nanofiber with an average diameter of 121 nm ± 39 nm, with a specific surface area of 83.72 m2 g‑1, led to better ionic interactions at the electrode/electrolyte interface. The PAni active layer coating was found to be 69 nm in average thickness. The specific capacitance was found to have increased dramatically from pure PAni with carbon binders. The specific capacitance was found to be 347 F g‑1 at a relatively high scan rate of 10 mV s‑1. The PAni/PET fiber also experienced very little degradation (4.4%) in capacitance after 1500 galvanostatic charge/discharge cycles at a specific current of 1.2 A g‑1. The mesoporous structure of the PAni@PET fibrous mat also allowed for tunable capacitance by controlling the pore sizes. This novel fabrication method offers insights for the utilization of recycled PETE1 based bottles as a high performance, low cost, highly flexible supercapacitor device.

  13. Adsorption removal of pollutants by active cokes produced from sludge in the energy recycle process of wastes.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Naozumi; Mitomo, Aki; Itaya, Yoshinori; Mori, Shigekatsu; Yoshida, Shuichi

    2002-01-01

    This study proposes a recycling system of sludge into active cokes and the fundamental examinations for the application were carried out. In the system, active cokes were produced by carbonizing pellets of sludge in a steam stream. Pyrolysis gas yielded by carbonization can be available to a fuel for a steam generation boiler. The exhaust heat from the boiler is used sequentially for drying of sludge. The active cokes are applied to the adsorbent for dioxin removal in exhaust gas from incinerators of wastes, or for purification of gas obtained in a gasification process of wastes, particularly removal of H2S. The used adsorbent is not recycled, but incinerated in the furnace without a desorption process to decompose adsorbed dioxin or to oxidize H2S for a sequential desulfurization process of SO2. Dry pellets of sludge were carbonized in a quartz tube reactor under various atmospheres. The micro pore structure and the adsorption performance of the cokes produced without activation process were examined. The micro pore structure was influenced by the temperature, the sort of flow gas (N2, CO2 and steam) and carbonization time, and the active cokes produced under the condition of the temperature 823 K for 60 min in the steam atmosphere had a largest specific surface area in the diameter less than 5 nm. The amount of benzene adsorption as an alternative substance of dioxin into the active cokes had a similar quality to a commercial active char produced from coal if it was evaluated by adsorption per a unit specific surface area. This fundamental knowledge must be reflected to an optimum design for development of a simple continuous process to produce the active cokes by a fluidized bed type of the carbonization furnace.

  14. Suprathermal electron energy spectrum and nonlocally affected plasma-wall interaction in helium/air micro-plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, V. I.; Adams, S. F.; Miles, J. A.; Koepke, M. E.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.

    2016-10-01

    Details of ground-state and excited-state neutral atoms and molecules in an atmospheric-pressure micro-discharge plasma may be obtained by plasma electron spectroscopy (PLES), based on a wall probe. The presence and transport of energetic (suprathermal) electrons, having a nonlocal origin, are responsible for electrostatic charging of the plasma boundary surfaces to potentials many times that associated with the ambient electron kinetic energy. The energy-flux distribution function is shown to be controllable for applications involving analysis of composition and processes taking place in a multiphase (plasma-gas-solid), chemically reactive, interaction region.

  15. On the evolution of jet energy and opening angle in strongly coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesler, Paul M.; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2016-05-01

    We calculate how the energy and the opening angle of jets in {N} = 4 SYM theory evolve as they propagate through the strongly coupled plasma of that theory. We define the rate of energy loss dE jet /dx and the jet opening angle in a straightforward fashion directly in the gauge theory before calculating both holographically, in the dual gravitational description. In this way, we rederive the previously known result for dE jet /dx without the need to introduce a finite slab of plasma. We obtain a striking relationship between the initial opening angle of the jet, which is to say the opening angle that it would have had if it had found itself in vacuum instead of in plasma, and the thermalization distance of the jet. Via this relationship, we show that {N} = 4 SYM jets with any initial energy that have the same initial opening angle and the same trajectory through the plasma experience the same fractional energy loss. We also provide an expansion that describes how the opening angle of the {N} = 4 SYM jets increases slowly as they lose energy, over the fraction of their lifetime when their fractional energy loss is not yet large. We close by looking ahead toward potential qualitative lessons from our results for QCD jets produced in heavy collisions and propagating through quark-gluon plasma.

  16. On the evolution of jet energy and opening angle in strongly coupled plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Chesler, Paul M.; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2016-05-17

    We calculate how the energy and the opening angle of jets in N = 4SYM theory evolve as they propagate through the strongly coupled plasma of that theory. We define the rate of energy loss dEjet/dx and the jet opening angle in a straightforward fashion directly in the gauge theory before calculating both holographically, in the dual gravitational description. In this way, we rederive the previously known result for dEjet/dx without the need to introduce a finite slab of plasma. We obtain a striking relationship between the initial opening angle of the jet, which is to say the opening anglemore » that it would have had if it had found itself in vacuum instead of in plasma, and the thermalization distance of the jet. Via this relationship, we show that N = 4SYM jets with any initial energy that have the same initial opening angle and the same trajectory through the plasma experience the same fractional energy loss. We also provide an expansion that describes how the opening angle of the N = 4SYM jets increases slowly as they lose energy, over the fraction of their lifetime when their fractional energy loss is not yet large. In conclusion, we close by looking ahead toward potential qualitative lessons from our results for QCD jets produced in heavy collisions and propagating through quark-gluon plasma.« less

  17. X-ray studies of structure defects in recycled aluminum alloy during equal channel angular extrusion: Dislocation density and stored energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhlouf, T.; Njah, N.

    2012-02-01

    A recycled aluminum alloy was severely deformed by Equal Channel Angular Extrusion (ECAE) using the processing route Bc, to study the evolution of the micro structure and associated changes of mechanical properties. XRD patterns were analyzed to determine crystallite size, lattice strain and lattice parameter. As a result, ultrafine grains material has been obtained with microstructure showing a mixture of highly strained crystallites. High density of dislocations is achieved as a result of severe plastic deformation through the die. This can explain an important decrease of the lattice parameter observed after the first passage. Changes in mechanical behavior are also reveled after ECAE. This is due to strain hardening. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) results show overlapped exothermic peaks indicating the succession of the recovery, recrystallization and grain growth phenomena's. Moreover, we demonstrate that the energy stored during ECAE can be related to the dislocation density introduced by severe plastic deformation.

  18. Current fundamental science challenges in low temperature plasma science that impact energy security and international competitiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebner, Greg

    2010-11-01

    Products and consumer goods that utilize low temperature plasmas at some point in their creation touch and enrich our lives on almost a continuous basis. Examples are many but include the tremendous advances in microelectronics and the pervasive nature of the internet, advanced material coatings that increase the strength and reliability of products from turbine engines to potato chip bags, and the recent national emphasis on energy efficient lighting and compact fluorescent bulbs. Each of these products owes their contributions to energy security and international competiveness to fundamental research investments. However, it would be a mistake to believe that the great commercial success of these products implies a robust understanding of the complicated interactions inherent in plasma systems. Rather, current development of the next generation of low temperature plasma enabled products and processes is clearly exposing a new set of exciting scientific challenges that require leaps in fundamental understanding and interdisciplinary research teams. Emerging applications such as liquid-plasma systems to improve water quality and remediate hazardous chemicals, plasma-assisted combustion to increase energy efficiency and reduce emissions, and medical applications promise to improve our lives and the environment only if difficult science questions are solved. This talk will take a brief look back at the role of low temperature plasma science in enabling entirely new markets and then survey the next generation of emerging plasma applications. The emphasis will be on describing the key science questions and the opportunities for scientific cross cutting collaborations that underscore the need for increased outreach on the part of the plasma science community to improve visibility at the federal program level. This work is supported by the DOE, Office of Science for Fusion Energy Sciences, and Sandia National Laboratories, a multi-program laboratory managed and operated

  19. 75 FR 71003 - America Recycles Day, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-19

    ... American recycling and refurbishing industry, and advance our clean energy economy. While we can celebrate... thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-29455 Filed 11-18-10; 11:15 am] Billing code 3195-W1-P...

  20. Rethink, Rework, Recycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrhen, Linda; DiSpezio, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Information about the recycling and reuse of plastics, aluminum, steel, glass, and newspapers is presented. The phases of recycling are described. An activity that allows students to separate recyclable materials is included. The objectives, a list of needed materials, and procedure are provided. (KR)

  1. Much Ado about Recycling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Ian

    1993-01-01

    Discusses a solid waste recycling workshop for students and teachers sponsored by the Southwest Connecticut Regional Operating Committee (SWEROC), a consortium of 19 towns and cities organized to help implement a regional recycling program. The SWEROC workshop utilized games and team activities to teach students about recycling and the…

  2. Buying recycled helps market

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, G.

    1996-08-01

    The waste reduction and recycling program of Thousand Oaks, California is summarized. Descriptions of the program, market development for recycled products, business development, and economic development are provided. The emphasis of the program is on market development for recycled products. Procurement guidelines used by the city are reprinted in the paper.

  3. Relativistic corrections for screening effects on the energies of hydrogen-like atoms embedded in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Poszwa, A.; Bahar, M. K.

    2015-01-15

    The influence of relativistic and plasma screening effects on energies of hydrogen-like atoms embedded in plasmas has been studied. The Dirac equation with a more general exponential cosine screened potential has been solved numerically and perturbatively, by employing the direct perturbation theory. Properties of spectra corresponding to bound states and to different sets of the potential parameters have been studied both in nonrelativistic and relativistic approximations. Binding energies, fine-structure splittings, and relativistic energy shifts have been determined as functions of parameters of the potential. The results have been compared with the ones known from the literature.

  4. Jet energy loss in the quark-gluon plasma by stream instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Mannarelli, Massimo; Manuel, Cristina; Gonzalez-Solis, Sergi; Strickland, Michael

    2010-04-01

    We study the evolution of the plasma instabilities induced by two jets of particles propagating in opposite directions and crossing a thermally equilibrated non-Abelian plasma. In order to simplify the analysis we assume that the two jets of partons can be described with uniform distribution functions in coordinate space and by Gaussian distribution functions in momentum space. We find that while crossing the quark-gluon plasma, the jets of particles excite unstable chromomagnetic and chromoelectric modes. These fields interact with the particles (or hard modes) of the plasma inducing the production of currents; thus, the energy lost by the jets is absorbed by both the gauge fields and the hard modes of the plasma. We compare the outcome of the numerical simulations with the analytical calculation performed assuming that the jets of particles can be described by a tsunamilike distribution function. We find qualitative and semiquantitative agreement between the results obtained with the two methods.

  5. Dielectric energy versus plasma energy, and Hamiltonian action-angle variables for the Vlasov equation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, P.J.; Pfirsch, D.

    1992-04-01

    Expressions for the energy content of one-dimensional electrostatic perturbations about homogeneous equilibria are revisited. The well-known dielectric energy, {var_epsilon}{sub D}, is compared with the exact plasma free energy expression, {delta}{sup 2}F, that is conserved by the Vlasov-Poisson system. The former is an expression in terms of the perturbed electric field amplitude, while the latter is determined by a generating function, which describes perturbations of the distribution function that respect the important constraint of dynamical accessibility of the system. Thus the comparison requires solving the Vlasov equation for such a perturbations of the distribution function in terms of the electric field. This is done for neutral modes of oscillation that occur for equilibria with stationary inflection points, and it is seen that for these special modes {delta}{sup 2}F = {var_epsilon}{sub D}. In the case of unstable and corresponding damped modes it is seen that {delta}{sup 2}F {ne} {var_epsilon}{sub D}; in fact {delta}{sup 2}F {equivalent_to} 0. This failure of the dielectric energy expression persists even for arbitrarily small growth and damping rates since {var_epsilon}{sub D} is nonzero in this limit, whereas {delta}{sup 2}F remains zero. The connection between the new exact energy expression and the at-best approximate {var_epsilon}{sub D} is described. The new expression motivates natural definitions of Hamiltonian action variables and signature. A general linear integral transform is introduced that maps the linear version of the noncanonical Hamiltonian structure, which describes the Vlasov equation, to action-angle (diagonal) form.

  6. Dielectric energy versus plasma energy, and Hamiltonian action-angle variables for the Vlasov equation

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, P.J. . Inst. for Fusion Studies); Pfirsch, D. )

    1992-04-01

    Expressions for the energy content of one-dimensional electrostatic perturbations about homogeneous equilibria are revisited. The well-known dielectric energy, {var epsilon}{sub D}, is compared with the exact plasma free energy expression, {delta}{sup 2}F, that is conserved by the Vlasov-Poisson system. The former is an expression in terms of the perturbed electric field amplitude, while the latter is determined by a generating function, which describes perturbations of the distribution function that respect the important constraint of dynamical accessibility of the system. Thus the comparison requires solving the Vlasov equation for such a perturbations of the distribution function in terms of the electric field. This is done for neutral modes of oscillation that occur for equilibria with stationary inflection points, and it is seen that for these special modes {delta}{sup 2}F = {var epsilon}{sub D}. In the case of unstable and corresponding damped modes it is seen that {delta}{sup 2}F {ne} {var epsilon}{sub D}; in fact {delta}{sup 2}F {equivalent to} 0. This failure of the dielectric energy expression persists even for arbitrarily small growth and damping rates since {var epsilon}{sub D} is nonzero in this limit, whereas {delta}{sup 2}F remains zero. The connection between the new exact energy expression and the at-best approximate {var epsilon}{sub D} is described. The new expression motivates natural definitions of Hamiltonian action variables and signature. A general linear integral transform is introduced that maps the linear version of the noncanonical Hamiltonian structure, which describes the Vlasov equation, to action-angle (diagonal) form.

  7. Advances in Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma potential and electron-energy distribution function in magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Tsv K.; Dimitrova, M.; Ivanova, P.; Kovačič, J.; Gyergyek, T.; Dejarnac, R.; Stöckel, J.; Pedrosa, M. A.; López-Bruna, D.; Hidalgo, C.

    2016-06-01

    Advanced Langmuir probe techniques for evaluating the plasma potential and electron-energy distribution function (EEDF) in magnetized plasma are reviewed. It is shown that when the magnetic field applied is very weak and the electrons reach the probe without collisions in the probe sheath the second-derivative Druyvesteyn formula can be used for EEDF evaluation. At low values of the magnetic field, an extended second-derivative Druyvesteyn formula yields reliable results, while at higher values of the magnetic field, the first-derivative probe technique is applicable for precise evaluation of the plasma potential and the EEDF. There is an interval of intermediate values of the magnetic field when both techniques—the extended second-derivative and the first-derivative one—can be used. Experimental results from probe measurements in different ranges of magnetic field are reviewed and discussed: low-pressure argon gas discharges in the presence of a magnetic field in the range from 0.01 to 0.08 T, probe measurements in circular hydrogen plasmas for high-temperature fusion (magnetic fields from 0.45 T to 1.3 T) in small ISTTOK and CASTOR tokamaks, D-shape COMPASS tokamak plasmas, as well as in the TJ-II stellarator. In the vicinity of the last closed flux surface (LCFS) in tokamaks and in the TJ-II stellarator, the EEDF obtained is found to be bi-Maxwellian, while close to the tokamak chamber wall it is Maxwellian. The mechanism of the appearance of a bi-Maxwellian EEDF in the vicinity of the LCFS is discussed. Comparison of the results from probe measurements with those obtained from calculations using the ASTRA and EIRENE codes shows that the main reason for the appearance of a bi-Maxwellian EEDF in the vicinity of the LCFS is the ionization of the neutral atoms.

  8. A direct measurement of the energy flux density in plasma surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussart, Remi; Thomann, Anne-Lise; Semmar, Nadjib; Pichon, Laurianne; Bedra, Larbi; Mathias, Jacky; Tessier, Yves; Lefaucheux, Philippe

    2008-10-01

    The energy flux transferred from a plasma to a surface is a key issue for materials processing (sputtering, etching). We present direct measurements made with a Heat Flux Microsensor (HFM) in an Ar plasma interacting with the surface of the sensor. The HFM is a thermopile of about one thousand metal couples mounted in parallel. An Inductively Coupled Plasma in Argon was used to make the experiments. Langmuir probe and tuneable laser diode absorption measurements were carried out to estimate the contribution of ions, neutrals (conduction) and metastables. In order to evaluate the ability of the HFM to measure the part due to chemical reactions, a Si surface in contact with the HFM was submitted to an SF6 plasma. The direct measurements are in good agreement with the estimation we made knowing the etch rate and the enthalpy of the reaction. Finally, tests were performed on a sputtering reactor. Additional energy flux provided by condensing atoms (Pt) was also measured.

  9. Precise energy eigenvalues of hydrogen-like ion moving in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.; Saha, Jayanta K.; Mukherjee, T. K.

    2015-06-15

    The analytic form of the electrostatic potential felt by a slowly moving test charge in quantum plasma is developed. It has been shown that the electrostatic potential is composed of two parts: the Debye-Huckel screening term and the near-field wake potential. The latter depends on the velocity of the test charge as well as on the number density of the plasma electrons. Rayleigh-Ritz variational calculation has been done to estimate precise energy eigenvalues of hydrogen-like carbon ion under such plasma environment. A detailed analysis shows that the energy levels gradually move to the continuum with increasing plasma electron density while the level crossing phenomenon has been observed with the variation of ion velocity.

  10. Disentangling fluxes of energy and matter in plasma-surface interactions: Effect of process parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Wolter, M.; Levchenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.; Kersten, H.; Kumar, S.

    2010-09-15

    The possibility to discriminate between the relative importance of the fluxes of energy and matter in plasma-surface interaction is demonstrated by the energy flux measurements in low-temperature plasmas ignited by the radio frequency discharge (power and pressure ranges 50-250 W and 8-11.5 Pa) in Ar, Ar+H{sub 2}, and Ar+H{sub 2}+CH{sub 4} gas mixtures typically used in nanoscale synthesis and processing of silicon- and carbon-based nanostructures. It is shown that by varying the gas composition and pressure, the discharge power, and the surface bias one can effectively control the surface temperature and the matter supply rates. The experimental findings are explained in terms of the plasma-specific reactions in the plasma bulk and on the surface.

  11. Magnetowave Induced Plasma Wakefield Acceleration for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Feng-Yin; Chen, Pisin; Lin, Guey-Lin; Noble, Robert; Sydora, Richard; /Alberta U.

    2009-10-17

    Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration (MPWA) in a relativistic astrophysical outflow has been proposed as a viable mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic particles to ultrahigh energies. Here we present simulation results that clearly demonstrate the viability of this mechanism for the first time. We invoke the high frequency and high speed whistler mode for the driving pulse. The plasma wakefield obtained in the simulations compares favorably with our newly developed relativistic theory of the MPWA. We show that, under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over hundreds of plasma skin depths. Invoking active galactic nuclei as the site, we show that MPWA production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays beyond ZeV (10{sup 21} eV) is possible.

  12. Measurements of electron energy distribution in tantalum laser-generated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Torrisi, L.; Giuffrida, L.; Mascali, D.; Miracoli, R.; Gammino, S.; Gambino, N.; Margarone, D.

    2010-06-15

    The time and space resolved characterization of laser-generated pulsed plasmas is useful not only for the comprehension of basic phenomena involved in the plasma generation and following supersonic expansion, but it also permits to control the nonequilibrium process that is useful for many applications (e.g., ion implantation). The ''on-line'' characterization can be performed by means of Langmuir probes, ion collectors, and ion energy analyzers, in order to measure the plasma temperatures and densities of atoms, ions, and electrons. The investigated plasmas were generated by means of laser pulses with intensity of the order of 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}. The contemporary characterization of the electron (through the Langmuir probe) and ion energy distribution functions, EEDF and IEDF, respectively, permits to correlate the ion properties, like charge states and temperatures, with the electron properties, like the shape of the EEDF at different times and distances from the ablated target surface.

  13. Energy Doubling of 42 GeV Electrons in a Meter-scale Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenfeld, Ian; Clayton, Christopher E.; Decker, Franz-Josef; Hogan, Mark J.; Huang, Chengkun; Ischebeck, Rasmus; Iverson, Richard; Joshi, Chandrashekhar; Katsouleas, Thomas; Kirby, Neil; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; Muggli, Patric; Oz, Erdem; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, Dieter; Zhou, Miaomiao; /SLAC /UCLA /Southern California U.

    2007-03-14

    The energy frontier of particle physics is several trillion electron volts, but colliders capable of reaching this regime (such as the Large Hadron Collider and the International Linear Collider) are costly and time-consuming to build; it is therefore important to explore new methods of accelerating particles to high energies. Plasma-based accelerators are particularly attractive because they are capable of producing accelerating fields that are orders of magnitude larger than those used in conventional colliders. In these accelerators, a drive beam (either laser or particle) produces a plasma wave (wakefield) that accelerates charged particles. The ultimate utility of plasma accelerators will depend on sustaining ultrahigh accelerating fields over a substantial length to achieve a significant energy gain. Here we show that an energy gain of more than 42 GeV is achieved in a plasma wakefield accelerator of 85 cm length, driven by a 42 GeV electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The results are in excellent agreement with the predictions of three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Most of the beam electrons lose energy to the plasma wave, but some electrons in the back of the same beam pulse are accelerated with a field of {approx} 52GV m{sup -1}. This effectively doubles their energy, producing the energy gain of the 3-km-long SLAC accelerator in less than a meter for a small fraction of the electrons in the injected bunch. This is an important step towards demonstrating the viability of plasma accelerators for high-energy physics applications.

  14. ZaP-HD: High Energy Density Z-Pinch Plasmas using Sheared Flow Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golingo, R. P.; Shumlak, U.; Nelson, B. A.; Claveau, E. L.; Doty, S. A.; Forbes, E. G.; Hughes, M. C.; Kim, B.; Ross, M. P.; Weed, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The ZaP-HD flow Z-pinch project investigates scaling the flow Z-pinch to High Energy Density Plasma, HEDP, conditions by using sheared flow stabilization. ZaP used a single power supply to produce 100 cm long Z-pinches that were quiescent for many radial Alfven times and axial flow-through times. The flow Z-pinch concept provides an approach to achieve HED plasmas, which are dimensionally large and persist for extended durations. The ZaP-HD device replaces the single power supply from ZaP with two separate power supplies to independently control the plasma flow and current in the Z-pinch. Equilibrium is determined by diagnostic measurements of the density with interferometry and digital holography, the plasma flow and temperature with passive spectroscopy, the magnetic field with surface magnetic probes, and plasma emission with optical imaging. The diagnostics fully characterize the plasma from its initiation in the coaxial accelerator, through the pinch, and exhaust from the assembly region. The plasma evolution is modeled with high resolution codes: Mach2, WARPX, and NIMROD. Experimental results and scaling analyses are presented. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration.

  15. Strongly Driven Magnetic Reconnection in a Magnetized High-Energy-Density Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiksel, G.; Barnak, D. H.; Chang, P.-Y.; Haberberger, D.; Hu, S. X.; Ivancic, S.; Nilson, P. M.; Fox, W.; Deng, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection in a magnetized high-energy-density plasma is characterized by measuring the dynamics of the plasma density and magnetic field between two counter-propagating and colliding plasma flows. The density and magnetic field were profiled using the 4 ω angular filter refractometry and fast proton deflectometry diagnostics, respectively. The plasma flows are created by irradiating oppositely placed plastic targets with 1.8-kJ, 2-ns laser beams on the OMEGA EP Laser System. The two plumes are magnetized by an externally controlled magnetic field with an x-type null point geometry with B = 0 at the midplane and B = 8 T at the targets. The interaction region is pre-filled with a low-density background plasma. The counterflowing super-Alfvénic plasma plumes sweep up and compress the magnetic field and the background plasma into a pair of magnetized ribbons, which collide, stagnate, and reconnect at the midplane, allowing for the first detailed observation of a stretched current sheet in laser-driven reconnection experiments. The measurements are in good agreement with first-principles particle-in-cell simulations. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and NLUF Grant DE-SC0008655.

  16. Kinetic analysis and energy efficiency of phenol degradation in a plasma-photocatalysis system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-juan; Chen, Xiao-yang

    2011-02-28

    Combination of two kinds of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) is an effective approach to control wastewater pollution. In this research, a pulsed discharge plasma system with multi-point-to-plate electrode and an immobilized TiO(2) photocatalysis system is coupled to oxidize target pollutant in aqueous solution. Kinetic analysis (pseudo-first order kinetic constant, k) and energy efficiency (energy yield value at 50% phenol conversion, G(50)) of phenol oxidation in different reaction systems (plasma alone and plasma-photocatalysis) are reviewed to account for the synergistic mechanism of plasma and photocatalysis. The experimental results show that higher k and G(50) of phenol oxidation can be obtained in the plasma-photocatalysis system under the conditions of different gas bubbling varieties, initial solution pH and radical scavenger addition. Moreover, the investigation tested hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important species for phenol removal in the synergistic system of plasma-photocatalysis as well as in the plasma alone system.

  17. The influence of the energy reservoir on the plasma channel in focused femtosecond laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dergachev, A. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kandidov, V. P.; Mokrousova, D. V.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.; Shlenov, S. A.

    2015-06-01

    The influence of the energy reservoir on plasma channel formation during the filamentation of tightly focused femtosecond laser beams was studied both experimentally and numerically. It was found that for the reservoir localized near the propagation axis, its diameter is much smaller than in the case of a collimated beam and decreases in the vicinity of the focus. A small diaphragm placed in the focal area does not eliminate the plasma channel behind the focal point.

  18. A nonlinear kinetic energy principle for two-dimensional collision-free plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, K.; Goldstein, H.

    1983-08-01

    The existence of a nonlinear kinetic-energy principle for the 2D collisionless plasmas described by the Vlasov theory is demonstrated analytically, accounting for the relevant dynamical constraints. A method similar to that of Gardner (1963) is applied to spatially inhomogeneous plasmas, restricting the theory to cases with translational invariance. Despite this limitation, the principle is considered applicable in analyses such as that of the stability of the geomagnetic tail.

  19. Energy Confinement of High-Density Pellet-Fueled Plasmas in the Alcator C Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, M.; Gwinn, D.; Milora, S.; Parker, J.; Parker, R.; Wolfe, S.; Besen, M.; Camacho, F.; Fairfax, S.; Fiore, C.; Foord, M.; Gandy, R.; Gomez, C.; Granetz, R.; Labombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Lloyd, B.; Marmar, E.; McCool, S.; Pappas, D.; Petrasso, R.; Pribyl, P.; Rice, J.; Schuresko, D.; Takase, Y.; Terry, J.; Watterson, R.

    1984-07-01

    A series of pellet-fueling experiments has been carried out on the Alcator C tokamak. High-speed hydrogen pellets penetrate to within a few centimeters of the magnetic axis, raise the plasma density, and produce peaked density profiles. Energy confinement is observed to increase over similar discharges fueled only by gas puffing. In this manner record values of electron density, plasma pressure, and Lawson number (n τ) have been achieved.

  20. Controlling protein adsorption on graphene for cryo-EM using low-energy hydrogen plasmas.

    PubMed

    Russo, Christopher J; Passmore, Lori A

    2014-06-01

    Despite its many favorable properties as a sample support for biological electron microscopy, graphene is not widely used because its hydrophobicity precludes reliable protein deposition. We describe a method to modify graphene with a low-energy hydrogen plasma, which reduces hydrophobicity without degrading the graphene lattice. Use of plasma-treated graphene enables better control of protein distribution in ice for electron cryo-microscopy and improves image quality by reducing radiation-induced sample motion.

  1. Controlling protein adsorption on graphene for cryo-EM using low-energy hydrogen plasmas.

    PubMed

    Russo, Christopher J; Passmore, Lori A

    2014-06-01

    Despite its many favorable properties as a sample support for biological electron microscopy, graphene is not widely used because its hydrophobicity precludes reliable protein deposition. We describe a method to modify graphene with a low-energy hydrogen plasma, which reduces hydrophobicity without degrading the graphene lattice. Use of plasma-treated graphene enables better control of protein distribution in ice for electron cryo-microscopy and improves image quality by reducing radiation-induced sample motion. PMID:24747813

  2. An Exact Calculation of Electron-Ion Energy Splitting in a Hot Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, Robert L

    2012-09-10

    In this brief report, I summarize the rather involved recent work of Brown, Preston, and Singleton (BPS). In Refs. [2] and [3], BPS calculate the energy partition into ions and electrons as a charged particle traverses a non-equilibrium two-temperature plasma. These results are exact to leading and next-to-leading order in the plasma coupling g, and are therefore extremely accurate in a weakly coupled plasma. The new BPS calculations are compared with the more standard work of Fraley et al. [12]. The results differ substantially at higher temperature when T{sub I} {ne} T{sub e}.

  3. PIV analysis of the homogeneity of energy deposition during development of a plasma actuator channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazyrin, F. N.; Znamenskaya, I. A.; Mursenkova, I. V.; Naumov, D. S.; Sysoev, N. N.

    2016-01-01

    Nonstationary velocity fields that arise during the development of flows behind shock (blast) waves initiated by pulsed surface sliding discharge in air at a pressure of (2-4) × 104 Pa have been experimentally studied by the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. Plasma sheets (nanosecond discharges slipping over a dielectric surface) were initiated on walls of a rectangular chamber. Spatial analysis of the shape of shock-wave fronts and the distribution of flow velocities behind these waves showed that the pulsed energy deposition is homogeneous along discharge channels of a plasma sheet, while the integral visible plasma glow intensity decreases in the direction of channel propagation.

  4. Energy deposition in parallel-plate plasma accelerators. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicapua, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    To appraise the ratio of energy deposition into kinetic and thermal modes in plasma accelerators, a parallel-plate plasma accelerator has been operated in the quasi-steady mode with current pulses in the range of 10 to 100 kilo-amperes (kA), durations of the order of one millisecond, and argon mass flows up to 100 grams/sec. From photographic observations, spectroscopic measurements of velocity and electron density, and pressure measurements with a fast-rise piezoelectric transducer it is found that, for currents between 50 and 90 kA, the accelerated argon plasma is supersonic with ion velocities of 5 to 6 kilometers/sec.

  5. Preconceptual Design Description for Caustic Recycle Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2008-04-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify both high-level and low-activity waste at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. One aspect of the planning includes a need for a caustic recycle process to separate sodium hydroxide for recycle. Sodium is already a major limitation to the waste-oxide loading in the low-activity waste glass to be vitrified at the Waste Treatment Plant, and additional sodium hydroxide will be added to remove aluminum and to control precipitation in the process equipment. Aluminum is being removed from the high level sludge to reduce the number of high level waste canisters produced. A sodium recycle process would reduce the volume of low-activity waste glass produced and minimize the need to purchase new sodium hydroxide, so there is a renewed interest in investigating sodium recycle. This document describes an electrochemical facility for recycling sodium for the WTP.

  6. Magnetic flux conversion and relaxation toward a minimum-energy state in S-1 spheromak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Janos, A.

    1985-09-01

    S-1 Spheromak currents and magnetic fluxes have been measured with Rogowski coils and flux loops external to the plasma. Toroidal plasma currents up to 350 kA and spheromak configuration lifetimes over 1.0 msec have been achieved at moderate power levels. The plasma formation in the S-1 Spheromak device is based on an inductive transfer of poloidal and toroidal magnetic flux from a toroidal ''flux core'' to the plasma. Formation is programmed to guide the configuration into a force-free, minimum-energy Taylor state. Properly detailed programming of the formation process is found not to be essential since plasmas adjust themselves during formation to a final equilibrium near the Taylor state. After formation, if the plasma evolves away from the stable state, then distinct relaxation oscillation events occur which restore the configuration to that stable state. The relaxation process involves reconnection of magnetic field lines, and conversion of poloidal to toroidal magnetic flux (and vice versa) has been observed and documented. The scaling of toroidal plasma current and toroidal magnetic flux in the plasma with externally applied currents is consistent with the establishment of a Taylor state after formation. In addition, the magnetic helicity is proportional to that injected from the flux core, independent of how that helicity is generated.

  7. Suprathermal plasma analyzer for the measurement of low-energy electron distribution in the ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, M; Oyama, K-I; Abe, T; Yau, A W

    2011-07-01

    It is commonly believed that an energy transfer from thermal to suprathermal electrons (energy budget of the ionosphere. However, observation of electron energy spectrum in this energy range is quite limited because of technical difficulties of measurement. We have developed an instrument to measure electron energy distribution from thermal to suprathermal energy continuously with high-energy resolution of about 0.15 eV. The measurement principle is based on the combination of a retarding potential analyzer with a channel electron multiplier (CEM) and the Druyvesteyn method, which derives energy distribution from the current-voltage characteristics. The capability of detecting plasma space potential enables absolute calibration of electron energy. The instrument with a small vacuum pump, which is required for the CEM to work in low-vacuum region, was first successfully tested by a sounding rocket S-310-37 in the ionospheric E region. The instrument is expected to provide new opportunities to measure energy distribution of thermal and non-thermal electrons in low-density plasma, where a Langmuir probe cannot measure electron temperature because of low plasma density. PMID:21806205

  8. Suprathermal plasma analyzer for the measurement of low-energy electron distribution in the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoyama, M.; Yau, A. W.; Oyama, K.-I.; Abe, T.

    2011-07-15

    It is commonly believed that an energy transfer from thermal to suprathermal electrons (energy budget of the ionosphere. However, observation of electron energy spectrum in this energy range is quite limited because of technical difficulties of measurement. We have developed an instrument to measure electron energy distribution from thermal to suprathermal energy continuously with high-energy resolution of about 0.15 eV. The measurement principle is based on the combination of a retarding potential analyzer with a channel electron multiplier (CEM) and the Druyvesteyn method, which derives energy distribution from the current-voltage characteristics. The capability of detecting plasma space potential enables absolute calibration of electron energy. The instrument with a small vacuum pump, which is required for the CEM to work in low-vacuum region, was first successfully tested by a sounding rocket S-310-37 in the ionospheric E region. The instrument is expected to provide new opportunities to measure energy distribution of thermal and non-thermal electrons in low-density plasma, where a Langmuir probe cannot measure electron temperature because of low plasma density.

  9. Recent Ion Energy Distribution Observations on MST RFP Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jerry; Titus, J. B.; Mezonlin, E. D.; Johnson, J. A., III; Almagri, A. F.; Andeson, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    Ion energy distribution and temperature measurements have been made on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) using the Florida A&M University compact neutral particle analyzer (CNPA). The CNPA is a low energy (0.34-5.2 keV), high energy resolution (25 channels) neutral particle analyzer, with a radial view on MST. Recently, a retarding potential system was built to allow CNPA measurements to ensemble a complete ion energy distribution with high-energy resolution, providing insight into the dynamics of the bulk and fast ion populations. Recent work has also been done to improve the analysis techniques used to infer the ion temperature measurements, allowing us to understand temperature dynamics better during global magnetic reconnection events. Work supported in part by grants to FAMU and to UW from NSF and from Fusion Energy Sciences at DOE.

  10. Drag Reduction by Laser-Plasma Energy Addition in Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, A. C.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Myrabo, L. N.

    2008-04-28

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the drag reduction by laser-plasma energy addition in a low density Mach 7 hypersonic flow. The experiments were conducted in a shock tunnel and the optical beam of a high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA laser operating with 7 J of energy and 30 MW peak power was focused to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The non-intrusive schlieren optical technique was used to visualize the effects of the energy addition to hypersonic flow, from the plasma generation until the mitigation of the shock wave profile over the model surface. Aside the optical technique, a piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to measure the impact pressure at stagnation point of the hemispherical model and the pressure reduction could be observed.

  11. Spatial distribution of low energy plasma at comet 67P from Rosetta RPC-LAP measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edberg, Niklas J. T.; Eriksson, Anders I.; Odelstad, Elias; Vigren, Erik; Henri, Pierre; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Mandt, Kathleen; Nilsson, Hans; Carr, Chris; Cupido, Emanuele; Vallat, Claire; Altwegg, Kathrin

    2015-04-01

    We present in situ measurements of the low energy plasma environment around comet 67P from the two Langmuir probes (LAP) on the Rosetta spacecraft, which form part of the Rosetta plasma consortium (RPC). RPC-LAP has operated almost continuously as Rosetta has orbited the comet at close distance (10-30 km) at low velocity (about 1 m/s) since August 2014. Using the RPC-LAP measurements we have produced global maps of the low energy plasma in the vicinity of 67P. Initial estimates indicate that the plasma density has reached values of several 100 cm^-3 and that the electron temperature has typically been in the range 5-10 eV, when the comet was beyond 2.5 AU from the sun. Photoionisation is the dominating process for producing the plasma around the comet while charge-exchange and impact ionisation may also contribute. The plasma environment has been found to be strongly coupled to the local neutral gas density, which in turn is coupled to which area on the comet is facing the sun. The northern summer neck-area of the comet outgasses more than other areas and above this region are the highest densities observed. In the southern winter and above the two main lobes of the comet body, the plasma density is lower. The plasma density is hence not determined by the solar wind, but by the outgassing from the comet. The 12.4-hour rotation period of the comet together with the varying latitude of the slow-moving Rosetta provide strong modulation of the RPC-LAP measurements. Besides orbiting the comet, Rosetta will also perform flybys of the comet in early 2015 when Rosetta will move to distances of several hundred kilometres from the nucleus. These flybys provide a cut-through view of the near-comet plasma environment, which will possibly give some insight to the solar-wind interaction with the cometary coma.

  12. Performance of large electron energy filter in large volume plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.; Sanyasi, A. K.; Singh, R.; Kaw, P. K.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes an in-house designed large Electron Energy Filter (EEF) utilized in the Large Volume Plasma Device (LVPD) [S. K. Mattoo, V. P. Anita, L. M. Awasthi, and G. Ravi, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 3864 (2001)] to secure objectives of (a) removing the presence of remnant primary ionizing energetic electrons and the non-thermal electrons, (b) introducing a radial gradient in plasma electron temperature without greatly affecting the radial profile of plasma density, and (c) providing a control on the scale length of gradient in electron temperature. A set of 19 independent coils of EEF make a variable aspect ratio, rectangular solenoid producing a magnetic field (Bx) of 100 G along its axis and transverse to the ambient axial field (Bz ˜ 6.2 G) of LVPD, when all its coils are used. Outside the EEF, magnetic field reduces rapidly to 1 G at a distance of 20 cm from the center of the solenoid on either side of target and source plasma. The EEF divides LVPD plasma into three distinct regions of source, EEF and target plasma. We report that the target plasma (ne ˜ 2 × 1011 cm-3 and Te ˜ 2 eV) has no detectable energetic electrons and the radial gradients in its electron temperature can be established with scale length between 50 and 600 cm by controlling EEF magnetic field. Our observations reveal that the role of the EEF magnetic field is manifested by the energy dependence of transverse electron transport and enhanced transport caused by the plasma turbulence in the EEF plasma.

  13. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the rubber and plastics research association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains a minimum of 89 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains a minimum of 96 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  15. Energy loss of tens keV charged particles traveling in the hot dense carbon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, ZhenGuo; Wang, ZhiGang; He, Bin; Li, DaFang; Zhang, Ping

    2016-08-01

    The energy loss of charged particles, including electrons, protons, and α-particles with tens keV initial energy E 0, traveling in the hot dense carbon (C) plasma for densities from 2.281 to 22.81 g/cm3 and temperatures from 400 to 1500 eV is systematically and quantitatively studied by using the dimensional continuation method. The behaviors of different charged particles are readily distinguishable from each other. Firstly, because an ion is thousands times heavier than an electron, the penetration distance of the electron is much longer than that of proton and α-particle traveling in the plasma. Secondly, most energy of electron projectile with E 0 < 100 keV deposits into the electron species of C plasma, while for the cases of proton and α-particle with E 0 < 100 keV, about more than half energy transfers into the ion species of C plasma. A simple decreasing law of the penetration distance as a function of the plasma density is fitted, and different behaviors of each projectile particle can be clearly found from the fitted data. We believe that with the advanced progress of the present experimental technology, the findings shown here could be confirmed in ion-stopping experiments in the near future.

  16. Energy and momentum flow in electromagnetic fields and plasma. [solar wind-magnetospheric interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parish, J. L.; Raitt, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    The energy momentum tensor for a perfect fluid in a magnetic field is used to predict the momentum density, energy density, momentum flow, and energy flow of the fluid and the electromagnetic field. It is shown that taking the momentum flow from the energy momentum tensor, rather than starting with differential magnetohydrodynamic equations, can produce more accurate results on the basis of magnetic field data. It is suggested that the use of the energy momentum tensor has the potential for application to analysis of data from the more dynamic regions of the solar system, such as the plasma boundaries of Venus, the Jovian ionosphere, and the terrestrial magnetopause.

  17. Spatial distribution of low-energy plasma around comet 67P/CG from Rosetta measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edberg, N. J. T.; Eriksson, A. I.; Odelstad, E.; Henri, P.; Lebreton, J.-P.; Gasc, S.; Rubin, M.; André, M.; Gill, R.; Johansson, E. P. G.; Johansson, F.; Vigren, E.; Wahlund, J. E.; Carr, C. M.; Cupido, E.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Goldstein, R.; Koenders, C.; Mandt, K.; Nemeth, Z.; Nilsson, H.; Richter, I.; Wieser, G. Stenberg; Szego, K.; Volwerk, M.

    2015-06-01

    We use measurements from the Rosetta plasma consortium Langmuir probe and mutual impedance probe to study the spatial distribution of low-energy plasma in the near-nucleus coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The spatial distribution is highly structured with the highest density in the summer hemisphere and above the region connecting the two main lobes of the comet, i.e., the neck region. There is a clear correlation with the neutral density and the plasma to neutral density ratio is found to be ˜1-2·10-6, at a cometocentric distance of 10 km and at 3.1 AU from the Sun. A clear 6.2 h modulation of the plasma is seen as the neck is exposed twice per rotation. The electron density of the collisionless plasma within 260 km from the nucleus falls off with radial distance as ˜1/r. The spatial structure indicates that local ionization of neutral gas is the dominant source of low-energy plasma around the comet.

  18. The small GTPase Cdc42 interacts with Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) and controls its movement from endocytic recycling compartment to plasma membrane in a cholesterol-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chang; Li, Na; Chen, Zheng-Jun; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang

    2011-10-14

    Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) is a multi-transmembrane protein that mediates the absorption of dietary and biliary cholesterol through vesicular endocytosis. The subcellular localization of NPC1L1 is regulated by cholesterol. Cholesterol depletion induces the transport of NPC1L1 to plasma membrane (PM) from endocytic recycling compartment that requires MyoVb·Rab11a·Rab11-FIP2 triple complex, and cholesterol-replenishment renders the internalization of NPC1L1 together with cholesterol. Here, we find that GTP-bound Cdc42 interacts with NPC1L1. Cholesterol depletion regulates the activation of Cdc42 and enhances NPC1L1-Cdc42 interaction. Overexpression of constitutive GTP-bound Cdc42 mutant form or knockdown of Cdc42 inhibits the transport of NPC1L1 to the PM and disturbs the cholesterol-regulated binding of NPC1L1 to Rab11a, MyoVb, and actin. Knockdown of Cdc42 downstream effectors N-WASP or Arp3 also leads to the similar results. In liver-specific Cdc42 knock-out (Cdc42 LKO) mice, NPC1L1 fails to localize to bile canaliculi, and the biliary cholesterol cannot be efficiently reabsorbed. These results indicate that Cdc42 controls the cholesterol-regulated transport and localization of NPC1L1, and plays a role in cholesterol absorption.

  19. The Small GTPase Cdc42 Interacts with Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) and Controls Its Movement from Endocytic Recycling Compartment to Plasma Membrane in a Cholesterol-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chang; Li, Na; Chen, Zheng-Jun; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang

    2011-01-01

    Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) is a multi-transmembrane protein that mediates the absorption of dietary and biliary cholesterol through vesicular endocytosis. The subcellular localization of NPC1L1 is regulated by cholesterol. Cholesterol depletion induces the transport of NPC1L1 to plasma membrane (PM) from endocytic recycling compartment that requires MyoVb·Rab11a·Rab11-FIP2 triple complex, and cholesterol-replenishment renders the internalization of NPC1L1 together with cholesterol. Here, we find that GTP-bound Cdc42 interacts with NPC1L1. Cholesterol depletion regulates the activation of Cdc42 and enhances NPC1L1-Cdc42 interaction. Overexpression of constitutive GTP-bound Cdc42 mutant form or knockdown of Cdc42 inhibits the transport of NPC1L1 to the PM and disturbs the cholesterol-regulated binding of NPC1L1 to Rab11a, MyoVb, and actin. Knockdown of Cdc42 downstream effectors N-WASP or Arp3 also leads to the similar results. In liver-specific Cdc42 knock-out (Cdc42 LKO) mice, NPC1L1 fails to localize to bile canaliculi, and the biliary cholesterol cannot be efficiently reabsorbed. These results indicate that Cdc42 controls the cholesterol-regulated transport and localization of NPC1L1, and plays a role in cholesterol absorption. PMID:21844200

  20. Converting garbage to gold: recycling our materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, W.U.

    1984-02-01

    Despite the conservation and environmental advantages of recycling household wastes, only about one-fourth of the paper, aluminum, and steel are recovered. A summary of the progress to date in these three areas concludes with an analysis of the three steps a society must take: consumers must pay the full costs of materials to reduce energy price subsidies; world markets must be established for recycled materials; and efficient collection procedures must be developed. Local, state, and national commitments are necessary before these steps to a recycling society can be taken. (DCK)

  1. Measurements of energy distribution and thrust for microwave plasma coupling of electrical energy to hydrogen for propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, T.; Chapman, R.; Filpus, J.; Hawley, M.; Kerber, R.; Asmussen, J.; Nakanishi, S.

    1982-01-01

    A microwave plasma system for transfer of electrical energy to hydrogen flowing through the system has potential application for coupling energy to a flowing gas in the electrothermal propulsion concept. Experimental systems have been designed and built for determination of the energy inputs and outputs and thrust for the microwave coupling of energy to hydrogen. Results for experiments with pressure in the range 100 microns-6 torr, hydrogen flow rate up to 1000 micronmoles/s, and total absorbed power to 700 w are presented.

  2. Charge and energy transferred from a plasma jet to liquid and dielectric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussard, M. Dang Van Sung; Foucher, E.; Rousseau, A.

    2015-10-01

    A key parameter in using plasma jets for biomedical applications is the transferred energy to the living tissues. The objective of this paper is to understand which parameters control the energy transfer from the plasma jet to a liquid or a dielectric surface. The plasma jet is flown with helium and ignited by a 600 Hz ac high voltage (up to 15 kV). Capacitors are connected to two measurement electrodes placed in the plasma source region, and under the sample. Charge and energy transferred are estimated by plotting Lissajous cycles; the number of bullets and the charge probability density function are also calculated. It is shown that the applied voltage and the gap (distance between the end of the tube and the sample) have a dramatic influence on the energy deposition on the sample as well as on the charge probability density function. Surprisingly, both gap distance and voltage have very little influence on the number of bullets reaching the sample per cycle. It is also shown that the conductivity of the liquid sample has almost no influence on the energy deposition and charge probability density function.

  3. Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster Model with Time-Evolution of Energy and State Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Sankaran, Kamesh

    2012-01-01

    A model for pulsed inductive plasma acceleration is presented that consists of a set of circuit equations coupled to both a one-dimensional equation of motion and an equation governing the partitioning of energy. The latter two equations are obtained for the plasma current sheet by treating it as a single element of finite volume and integrating the governing equations over that volume. The integrated terms are replaced where necessary by physically-equivalent quantities that are calculated through the solution of other parts of the governing equation set. The model improves upon previous one-dimensional performance models by permitting the time-evolution of the energy and state properties of the plasma, the latter allowing for the tailoring of the model to different gases that may be chosen as propellants. The time evolution of the various energy modes in the system and the associated plasma properties, calculated for argon propellant, are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the model. The model produces a result where efficiency is maximized at a given value of the electrodynamic scaling term known as the dynamic impedance parameter. Qualitatively and quantitatively, the model compares favorably with performance measured for two separate inductive pulsed plasma thrusters, with disagreements attributable to simplifying assumptions employed in the generation of the model solution.

  4. Electron residual energy due to stochastic heating in field-ionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz; Yazdanpanah, Jam Chakhmachi, Amir; Jahanpanah, Jafar; Yazdani, Elnaz

    2015-11-15

    The electron residual energy originated from the stochastic heating in under-dense field-ionized plasma is investigated here. Initially, the optical response of plasma is modeled by using two counter-propagating electromagnetic waves. In this case, the solution of motion equation of a single electron indicates that by including the ionization, the electron with higher residual energy compared with that without ionization could be obtained. In agreement with chaotic nature of the motion, it is found that the electron residual energy will be significantly changed by applying a minor change in the initial conditions. Extensive kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulations have been performed in order to resolve full plasma reactions. In this way, two different regimes of plasma behavior are observed by varying the pulse length. The results indicate that the amplitude of scattered fields in a proper long pulse length is high enough to act as a second counter-propagating wave and trigger the stochastic electron motion. On the contrary, the analyses of intensity spectrum reveal the fact that the dominant scattering mechanism tends to Thomson rather than Raman scattering by increasing the pulse length. A covariant formalism is used to describe the plasma heating so that it enables us to measure electron temperature inside and outside of the pulse region.

  5. MASS AND ENERGY OF ERUPTING SOLAR PLASMA OBSERVED WITH THE X-RAY TELESCOPE ON HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jin-Yi; Moon, Yong-Jae; Kim, Kap-Sung; Raymond, John C.; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2015-01-10

    We investigate seven eruptive plasma observations by Hinode/XRT. Their corresponding EUV and/or white light coronal mass ejection features are visible in some events. Five events are observed in several passbands in X-rays, which allows for the determination of the eruptive plasma temperature using a filter ratio method. We find that the isothermal temperatures vary from 1.6 to 10 MK. These temperatures are an average weighted toward higher temperature plasma. We determine the mass constraints of eruptive plasmas by assuming simplified geometrical structures of the plasma with isothermal plasma temperatures. This method provides an upper limit to the masses of the observed eruptive plasmas in X-ray passbands since any clumping causes the overestimation of the mass. For the other two events, we assume the temperatures are at the maximum temperature of the X-ray Telescope (XRT) temperature response function, which gives a lower limit of the masses. We find that the masses in XRT, ∼3 × 10{sup 13}-5 × 10{sup 14} g, are smaller in their upper limit than the total masses obtained by LASCO, ∼1 × 10{sup 15} g. In addition, we estimate the radiative loss, thermal conduction, thermal, and kinetic energies of the eruptive plasma in X-rays. For four events, we find that the thermal conduction timescales are much shorter than the duration of eruption. This result implies that additional heating during the eruption may be required to explain the plasma observations in X-rays for the four events.

  6. High-energy 4{omega} probe laser for laser-plasma experiments at nova

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S. H., LLNL

    1998-06-02

    For the characterization of inertial confinement fusion plasmas we implemented a high-energy 4{omega} probe laser at the Nova laser facility. A total energy of > 50 Joules at 4{omega}, a focal spot size of order 100 {micro}m, and a pointing accuracy of 100 {micro}m was demonstrated for target shots. This laser provides intensities of up to 3 x 10{sup 14}W cm{sup -2} and therefore fulfills high-power requirements for laser-plasma interaction experiments. The 4{omega} probe laser is now routinely used for Thomson scattering. Successful experiments were performed in gas-filled hohlraums at electron densities of n{sub e} > 2 X 10{sup 21}cm{sup -3} which represents the highest density plasma so far being diagnosed with Thomson scattering.

  7. Energy transport by energetic electrons released during solar flares. II - Current filamentation and plasma heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Dulk, G. A.; Pritchett, P. L.

    1988-01-01

    Two-dimensional electrostatic particle simulations are performed in order to investigate energy transport associated with the propagation of energetic electrons through a flaring flux tube. Results indicate that as the energetic electrons flow outward, a return current of ambient plasma electrons is drawn inward (to maintain quasi-neutrality) which can be spatially separate from the primary current carried by the energetic electrons. Return current electrons are shown to accumulate on either side of the acceleration region of the energetic electrons, and depletions of ambient plasma electrons develop in the return current regions. Plasma ions accelerate across the field lines to produce current closure or charge neutralization, achieving energies comparable to those of the energetic electrons.

  8. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  9. Hydrogen recycling in graphite at higher fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, D.; Bergsåker, H.; Hedqvist, A.

    Understanding hydrogen recycling is essential for particle control in fusion devices with a graphite wall. At Extrap T2 three different models have been used. A zero-dimensional (0D) recycling model reproduces the density behavior in plasma discharges as well as in helium glow discharge. A more sophisticated one-dimensional (1D) model is used along with a simple mixing model to explain the results in isotopic exchange experiments. Due to high fluxes some changes in the models were needed. In the paper, the three models are discussed and the results are compared with experimental data.

  10. Antiproton cooling in the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Bolshakov, A.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, Alexey V.; Carlson, K.; Gattuso, C.; Hu, M.; Kazakevich, G.; Kramper, B.; Kroc, T.; Leibfritz, J.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Saewert, G; Schmidt, C.W.; Seletskiy, S.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Tupikov, V.; Warner, A.; Zenkevich, P.; /Fermilab /Moscow, ITEP /Novosibirsk, IYF /Rochester U.

    2005-12-01

    The 8.9-GeV/c Recycler antiproton storage ring is equipped with both stochastic and electron cooling systems. These cooling systems are designed to assist accumulation of antiprotons for the Tevatron collider operations. In this paper we report on an experimental demonstration of electron cooling of high-energy antiprotons. At the time of writing this report, the Recycler electron cooling system is routinely used in collider operations. It has helped to set recent peak luminosity records.

  11. Extraction characteristics of a low-energy ion beam system with a remote plasma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, M. R.; Wada, M.

    2016-02-01

    Low-energy argon beams were extracted from a dual-chamber ion source system. The first chamber is a quartz cylinder where dense inductively coupled plasmas were produced using 13.56 MHz radio frequency (rf) power. The discharge was driven into an adjacent chamber which acts as a reservoir for ion beam extraction using a dual-electrode extractor configuration. Extraction of ions from the second chamber with energies in the 100 eV range was achieved while minimizing fluctuations induced by the rf signal. A custom-built retarding potential analyzer was used to analyze the effectiveness of ion beam transport using the remote plasma chamber. Well-defined beams were extracted between 60 and 100 V extraction potentials at 50-100 W rf powers. An increase in rf power resulted in an increase in average ion energy, increase in ion current density while the energy spread remains constant.

  12. Observation of Electron Energy Pinch in HT-7 ICRF Heated Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Siye; Wan, Baonian; Wang, Lu; Ti, Ang; Zhang, Xinjun; Liu, Zixi; Qian, Jinping; Zhong, Guoqiang; Duan, Yanmin

    2014-09-01

    Inward energy transport (pinch phenomenon) in the electron channel is observed in HT-7 plasmas using off-axis ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating. Experimental results and power balance transport analysis by TRANSP code are presented in this article. With the aids of GLF23 and Chang-Hinton transport models, which predict energy diffusivity in experimental conditions, the estimated electron pinch velocity is obtained by experimental data and is found reasonably comparable to the results in the previous study, such as Song on Tore Supra. Density scanning shows that the energy convective velocity in the electron channel has a close relation to density scale length, which is qualitatively in agreement with Wang's theoretical prediction. The parametric dependence of electron energy convective velocity on plasma current is still ambiguous and is worthy of future research on EAST.

  13. Experimental investigation of opacity models for stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and high energy density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, James

    2008-11-01

    Theoretical opacities are required for calculating energy transport in plasmas. In particular, understanding stellar interiors, inertial fusion, and Z-pinches depends on the opacities of mid-atomic-number elements in the 150-300 eV temperature range. These models are complex and experimental validation is crucial. For example, solar models presently disagree with helioseismology and one possible explanation is inadequate opacities. Testing these opacities requires a uniform plasma at temperatures high enough to produce the ion charge states that exist in the sun. Typical opacity experiments heat a sample using x-rays and measure the spectrally resolved transmission with a backlight. The difficulty grows as the temperature increases because the heating x-ray source must supply more energy and the backlighter source must be bright enough to overwhelm the plasma self emission. These problems were overcome using the dynamic hohlraum x-ray source at Sandia's Z facility to measure the transmission of a mixed Mg-Fe plasma heated above 150 eV. This capability will also advance opacity science for other high energy density plasmas. This tutorial describes opacity experiment challenges including accurate transmission measurements, plasma diagnostics, and quantitative model comparisons. The solar interior serves as a focal problem and Z facility experiments are used to illustrate the techniques. **In collaboration with C. Iglesias (LLNL), R. Mancini (U. Nevada), J.MacFarlane, I. Golovkin and P. Wang (Prism), C. Blancard, Ph. Cosse, G. Faussurier, F. Gilleron, and J.C. Pain (CEA), J. Abdallah Jr. (LANL), and G.A. Rochau and P.W. Lake (Sandia). ++Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Micro-scale Plasma Arc Gasification for Waste Treatment and Energy Production Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccio, Anne

    2015-01-01

    As NASA continues to develop technology for spaceflight beyond low earth orbit, we must develop the right systems for sustaining human life on a long duration or planetary mission. Plasma arc gasification (PAG) is an energy efficient mechanism of waste management for power generation and synthetic gas(syngas) production.

  15. Electron energy distribution in a helium plasma created by nuclear radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. H.; Miley, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    An integral balance technique for calculation of the electron energy distribution in a radiation-induced plasma is described. Results predict W-values reasonably well and compare favorably with more complicated Monte-Carlo calculations. The distribution found differs from that in a normal electrical discharge and is of interest in radiation-pumped laser research.

  16. Electron energy probability function and L-p similarity in low pressure inductively coupled bounded plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Chatterjee, Sanghamitro; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Roderick

    2015-02-01

    Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations are carried out to investigate the effect of discharge length (L) and pressure (p) on Electron Energy Probability Function (EEPF) in a low pressure radio frequency (rf) inductively coupled plasma at 13.56 MHz. It is found that for both cases of varying L (0.1 - 0.5 m) and p (1 - 10 mTorr), the EEPF is a bi-Maxwellian with a step in the bounded direction (x) and in the symmetric unbounded directions (y, z) the EEPF are a Maxwellian with a hot tail. The plasma space potential decreases with increase in both L and p, the trapped electrons having energies in the range 0 to 20 eV. In a conventional discharge bounded in all directions, we infer that L and p are similarity parameters for low energy electrons trapped in the bulk plasma that have energies below the plasma space potential (eVp). The simulation results are consistent with a particle balance model.

  17. Investigation of pulsed X-ray radiation of a plasma focus in a broad energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Savelov, A. S. Salakhutdinov, G. Kh.; Koltunov, M. V.; Lemeshko, B. D.; Yurkov, D. I.; Sidorov, P. P.

    2011-12-15

    The results of the experimental investigations of the spectral composition of plasma focus X-ray radiation in the photon energy range of 1.5 keV-400 keV are presented. Three regions in the radiation spectrum where the latter is of a quasi-thermal nature with a corresponding effective temperature are distinguished.

  18. On the lower bound of the internal energy of the one-component-plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khrapak, S. A.; Khrapak, A. G.

    2015-04-15

    A new simple yet accurate analytical estimate for the internal energy of the classical one-component-plasma is proposed. In the limit of weak coupling, it reduces to the Debye-Hückel result. In the opposite limit of strong coupling, the ion sphere approximation is recovered. The agreement with the accurate numerical results in the intermediate coupling regime is fairly good.

  19. Impact of the Pedestal Plasma Density on ELM Dynamics and Energy Loss Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. Q.; Ma, J. F.; Li, G. Q.; BOUT++ Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    The latest BOUT + + studies show an emerging understanding of ELM dynamics and the consistent collisionality scaling of ELM energy losses with ITPA multi-tokamak database. A series of BOUT + + simulations are conducted to investigate the scaling characteristics of the ELM energy losses vs collisionality via a density scan, while keeping the plasma cross-sectional shape, total stored energy, total plasma current, pressure profiles fixed. The neoclassical collisionality at peak gradient position increases by a factor of 3262 from 0.0019 to 6.197. The critical trend of linear simulations emerges as a transition from ballooning-dominated states at high collisionality to peeling-dominated states at low collsionality with decreasing density. Nonlinear BOUT + + simulations show a two-stage process of ELM crash evolution of (i) initial bursts of pressure blob and void creation and (ii) inward turbulence spreading as void propagation. The inward void propagation stirs the top of pedestal plasma and yields an increasing ELM size with decreasing collisionality after a series of micro-bursts. The pedestal plasma density plays a major role in determining the ELM energy loss through its effect on the edge bootstrap current and ion diamagnetic stabilization. This work was performed for USDOE by LLNL under DE-AC52-07NA27344, LLNL LDRD project 12-ERD-022 and the China Natural Science Foundation under Contract No. 10721505. LLNL-ABS-656793.

  20. Suppression and energy loss in Quark-Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, M.

    2016-01-01

    High momentum suppression of light and heavy flavor observables is considered to be an excellent probe of jet-medium interactions in QCD matter created at RHIC and LHC. Utilizing this tool requires accurate suppression predictions for different experiments, probes and experimental conditions, and their unbiased comparison with experimental data. We developed the dynamical energy loss formalism which takes into account both radiative and collision energy loss computed within the same theoretical framework, dynamical (as opposed to static) scattering centers, finite magnetic mass, running coupling and uses no free parameters in comparison with experimental data. Within this formalism, we provide predictions, and a systematic comparison with the experimental data, for a diverse set of probes, various centrality ranges and various collision energies at RHIC and LHC. We also provide clear qualitative and quantitative predictions for the upcoming LHC experiments. A comprehensive agreement between our predictions and experimental results suggests that our dynamical energy loss formalism can well explain the jet-medium interactions in QGP, which will be further tested by the obtained predictions for the upcoming data.

  1. Plasma guns for controlled fusion at megagauss energy-densities

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, Peter J; Roderick, Norman F; Degnan, James H; Frese, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    Electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at a low power level has been used on Tore Supra to induce local perturbations of the current density profile. Regimes with strong MHD activity have been analysed, and compared with similar stable discharges, in order to investigate the possible causes of their instability and relate the evolution of the discharge to the localization of EC power deposition. Both co- and counter-current drive pulses have been applied to dominantly or fully non-inductive discharges, sustained by a lower hybrid current drive. Detailed reconstructions by current diffusion calculations have been performed and the error bars evaluated. This method has proved valuable for shedding light on the complex interplay between the evolutions of temperature and safety factor profiles in steady-state tokamak plasmas. The crucial role of the dynamic evolution of rational surfaces has been identified. Moreover, we demonstrate that the operational domain in which ECCD can be employed must cope with the overall current profile characteristics, in particular the position where the safety factor has a minimum.

  2. A low energy positron accumulator for the plasma confinement in a compact magnetic mirror trap

    SciTech Connect

    Higaki, Hiroyuki Kaga, Chikato; Nagayasu, Katsushi; Okamoto, Hiromi; Nagata, Yugo; Kanai, Yasuyuki; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2015-06-29

    A low energy positron accumulator was constructed at RIKEN for the purpose of confining an electron-positron plasma. The use of 5 mCi {sup 22}Na RI source with a standard solid Ne moderator and N{sub 2} buffer gas cooling resulted in a low energy positron yield of ∼ 3 × 10{sup 5} e+/s. So far, 2 × 10{sup 6} positrons have been accumulated in 120s.

  3. Suprathermal electron energy deposition in plasmas with the Fokker-Planck method

    SciTech Connect

    Wienke, B.R.

    1983-08-01

    A one-dimensional, multigroup, discrete-ordinates technique for computing electron energy deposition in plasmas is detailed. The Fokker-Planck collision operator is employed in the continuous approximation and electric fields (considered external) are included in the equation. Bremsstrahlung processes are not treated. Comparisons with analytic and Monte Carlo results are given. Fits to deposition and energy scaling are proposed and discussed for monoenergetic and Maxwellian sources in the rnge 0--150 keV, with and without uniform fields.

  4. Efficient evaluation of collisional energy transfer terms for plasma particle simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrell, A. E.; Sherlock, M.; Rose, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    Particle-based simulations, such as in particle-in-cell (PIC) codes, are widely used in plasma physics research. The analysis of particle energy transfers, as described by the second moment of the Boltzmann equation, is often necessary within these simulations. We present computationally efficient, analytically derived equations for evaluating collisional energy transfer terms from simulations using discrete particles. The equations are expressed as a sum over the properties of the discrete particles.

  5. Secondary resources and recycling in developing economies.

    PubMed

    Raghupathy, Lakshmi; Chaturvedi, Ashish

    2013-09-01

    Recycling of metals extends the efficient use of minerals and metals, reduces pressure on environment and results in major energy savings in comparison to primary production. In developing economies recycling had been an integral part of industrial activity and has become a major concern due to the handling of potentially hazardous material without any regard to the occupational health and safety (OH&S) needs. With rising awareness and interest from policy makers, the recycling scenario is changing and the large scale enterprises are entering the recycling sector. There is widespread expectation that these enterprises would use the Best Available Technologies (BAT) leading to better environment management and enhanced resource recovery. The major challenge is to enhance and integrate the activities of other stakeholders in the value chain to make recycling an economically viable and profitable enterprise. This paper is an attempt to propose a sustainable model for recycling in the developing economies through integration of the informal and formal sectors. The main objective is to augment the existing practices using a scientific approach and providing better technology without causing an economic imbalance to the present practices. In this paper studies on lead acid batteries and e-waste recycling in India are presented to evolve a model for "green economy".

  6. The formation of reverse shocks in magnetized high energy density supersonic plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, S. V. E-mail: l.suttle10@imperial.ac.uk; Suttle, L.; Swadling, G. F.; Bennett, M.; Bland, S. N.; Burdiak, G. C.; Chittenden, J. P.; Grouchy, P. de; Hall, G. N.; Hare, J. D.; Kalmoni, N.; Niasse, N.; Patankar, S.; Smith, R. A.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Burgess, D.; Clemens, A.; Ciardi, A.; Sheng, L.; Yuan, J.; and others

    2014-05-15

    A new experimental platform was developed, based on the use of supersonic plasma flow from the ablation stage of an inverse wire array z-pinch, for studies of shocks in magnetized high energy density physics plasmas in a well-defined and diagnosable 1-D interaction geometry. The mechanism of flow generation ensures that the plasma flow (Re{sub M} ∼ 50, M{sub S} ∼ 5, M{sub A} ∼ 8, V{sub flow} ≈ 100 km/s) has a frozen-in magnetic field at a level sufficient to affect shocks formed by its interaction with obstacles. It is found that in addition to the expected accumulation of stagnated plasma in a thin layer at the surface of a planar obstacle, the presence of the magnetic field leads to the formation of an additional detached density jump in the upstream plasma, at a distance of ∼c/ω{sub pi} from the obstacle. Analysis of the data obtained with Thomson scattering, interferometry, and local magnetic probes suggests that the sub-shock develops due to the pile-up of the magnetic flux advected by the plasma flow.

  7. The Science and Technology Challenges of the Plasma-Material Interface for Magnetic Fusion Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyte, Dennis

    2013-09-01

    The boundary plasma and plasma-material interactions of magnetic fusion devices are reviewed. The boundary of magnetic confinement devices, from the high-temperature, collisionless pedestal through to the surrounding surfaces and the nearby cold high-density collisional plasmas, encompasses an enormous range of plasma and material physics, and their integrated coupling. Due to fundamental limits of material response the boundary will largely define the viability of future large MFE experiments (ITER) and reactors (e.g. ARIES designs). The fusion community faces an enormous knowledge deficit in stepping from present devices, and even ITER, towards fusion devices typical of that required for efficient energy production. This deficit will be bridged by improving our fundamental science understanding of this complex interface region. The research activities and gaps are reviewed and organized to three major axes of challenges: power density, plasma duration, and material temperature. The boundary can also be considered a multi-scale system of coupled plasma and material science regulated through the non-linear interface of the sheath. Measurement, theory and modeling across these scales are reviewed, with a particular emphasis on establishing the use dimensionless parameters to understand this complex system. Proposed technology and science innovations towards solving the PMI/boundary challenges will be examined. Supported by US DOE award DE-SC00-02060 and cooperative agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  8. Recycling behaviour in healthcare: waste handling at work.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Joachim; Nunes, Katia R A

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the motivational factors for environmental behaviour in general, presenting a case study on recycling disposable plastics in hospitals. Results show that 90% of over 600 employees from six analysed hospitals in Germany reported that the recycling of disposable plastics on the wards makes sense from an environmental and economic point of view. The case study reports an assessment of recycling attitudes and problems of hospital staff, mainly nurses. Employees in eco-certified hospitals were much more satisfied and reported fewer problems with the recycling system. The gender effect was significant only for saving energy, while age correlated with nearly all reported pro-environmental behaviour at home. At work, the mere introduction of a recycling system was insufficient to achieve good recycling results. Based on the study findings, recommendations are given aimed at improving the safety and sustainability of the recycling system.

  9. Recycling behaviour in healthcare: waste handling at work.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Joachim; Nunes, Katia R A

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the motivational factors for environmental behaviour in general, presenting a case study on recycling disposable plastics in hospitals. Results show that 90% of over 600 employees from six analysed hospitals in Germany reported that the recycling of disposable plastics on the wards makes sense from an environmental and economic point of view. The case study reports an assessment of recycling attitudes and problems of hospital staff, mainly nurses. Employees in eco-certified hospitals were much more satisfied and reported fewer problems with the recycling system. The gender effect was significant only for saving energy, while age correlated with nearly all reported pro-environmental behaviour at home. At work, the mere introduction of a recycling system was insufficient to achieve good recycling results. Based on the study findings, recommendations are given aimed at improving the safety and sustainability of the recycling system. PMID:24617848

  10. Detailed energy distributions in laser-produced plasmas of solid gold and foam gold planar targets

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yunsong; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Jiamin; Shang, Wanli

    2013-12-15

    Foam gold was proposed to increase the laser to x-ray conversion efficiency due to its important applications. To understand the mechanism of x-ray enhancement, the detailed energy distributions and plasma profiles for laser-irradiated solid gold and foam gold targets were studied comparatively by hydrodynamic simulations using the code Multi-1D. It is confirmed that the radiation heat wave is subsonic for the normal solid gold target, while supersonic for the foam gold target. The shock wave, which is behind the supersonic radiation heat wave for the foam gold target, generates a plasma temperature gradient with high temperature near the shock wave front to produce an additional net outward radiation for enhancement of the x-ray emission. Much larger inward plasma velocity is also driven by the shock wave as an initial plasma velocity for the laser deposition and electron thermal conduct zone, which decreases the expanding plasma kinetic energy loss and helps to increase the x-ray radiation.

  11. Ion energy-angle distribution functions at the plasma-material interface in oblique magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Khaziev, Rinat; Curreli, Davide

    2015-04-15

    The ion energy-angle distribution (IEAD) at the wall of a magnetized plasma is of fundamental importance for the determination of the material processes occurring at the plasma-material interface, comprising secondary emissions and material sputtering. Here, we present a numerical characterization of the IEAD at the wall of a weakly collisional magnetized plasma with the magnetic field inclined at an arbitrary angle with respect to the wall. The analysis has been done using two different techniques: (1) a fluid-Monte Carlo method, and (2) particle-in-cell simulations, the former offering a fast but approximate method for the determination of the IEADs, the latter giving a computationally intensive but self-consistent treatment of the plasma behavior from the quasi-neutral region to the material boundary. The two models predict similar IEADs, whose similarities and differences are discussed. Data are presented for magnetic fields inclined at angles from normal to grazing incidence (0°–85°). We show the scaling factors of the average and peak ion energy and trends of the pitch angle at the wall as a function of the magnetic angle, for use in the correlation of fluid plasma models to material models.

  12. Numerical Modeling and Testing of an Inductively-Driven and High-Energy Pulsed Plasma Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parma, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPTs) are advanced electric space propulsion devices that are characterized by simplicity and robustness. They suffer, however, from low thrust efficiencies. This summer, two approaches to improve the thrust efficiency of PPTs will be investigated through both numerical modeling and experimental testing. The first approach, an inductively-driven PPT, uses a double-ignition circuit to fire two PPTs in succession. This effectively changes the PPTs configuration from an LRC circuit to an LR circuit. The LR circuit is expected to provide better impedance matching and improving the efficiency of the energy transfer to the plasma. An added benefit of the LR circuit is an exponential decay of the current, whereas a traditional PPT s under damped LRC circuit experiences the characteristic "ringing" of its current. The exponential decay may provide improved lifetime and sustained electromagnetic acceleration. The second approach, a high-energy PPT, is a traditional PPT with a variable size capacitor bank. This PPT will be simulated and tested at energy levels between 100 and 450 joules in order to investigate the relationship between efficiency and energy level. Arbitrary Coordinate Hydromagnetic (MACH2) code is used. The MACH2 code, designed by the Center for Plasma Theory and Computation at the Air Force Research Laboratory, has been used to gain insight into a variety of plasma problems, including electric plasma thrusters. The goals for this summer include numerical predictions of performance for both the inductively-driven PPT and high-energy PFT, experimental validation of the numerical models, and numerical optimization of the designs. These goals will be met through numerical and experimental investigation of the PPTs current waveforms, mass loss (or ablation), and impulse bit characteristics.

  13. Particle energy distributions and metastable atoms in transient low pressure interpulse microwave plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Shail; Nath Patel, Dudh; Ram Baitha, Anuj; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2015-12-01

    The electron energies and its distribution function are measured in non-equilibrium transient pulsed microwave plasmas in the interpulse regime using a retarding field electron energy analyzer. The plasmas are driven to different initial conditions by varying the electromagnetic (EM) wave pulse duration, peak power, or the wave frequency. Two cases of wave excitation are investigated: (i) short-pulse (pulse duration, t w ~ 1 μs), high-power (~60 kW) waves of 9.45 GHz and (ii) medium-pulse (t w ~ 20 μs), and moderate power waves of ~3 kW at 2.45 GHz. It is found that high-power, short-duration pulses lead to a significantly different electron energy probability function (EEPF) in the interpulse phase—a Maxwellian with a bump on the tail, although the average energy per pulse (~60 mJ) is maintained the same in the two modes of wave excitation. Electrons with energies  >250 eV are found to exist in the discharge in the both cases. Another subset of experiments is performed to delineate the effect of the wave frequency and the peak power on EEPF. A traveling wave tube (TWT) amplifier based microwave source for generating pulsed plasma (t w  =  230 μs) in a wide frequency range (6-18 GHz) is employed for this purpose. Further experiments on measurements of metastable density using optical emission spectroscopy and ion energy analyzer have been carried out. By tailoring the EEPF of the transient plasma and metastable densities, new applications in plasma processing, chemistry and biology can be realized in the interpulse phase of the discharge.

  14. Inductive pulsed plasma thruster model with time-evolution of energy and state properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Sankaran, K.; Ritchie, A. G.; Reneau, J. P.

    2013-11-01

    A model for pulsed inductive plasma acceleration is presented that consists of a set of circuit equations coupled to both a one-dimensional (1D) equation of motion and an equation governing the partitioning of energy. The latter two equations are obtained for the plasma current sheet by treating it as a single element of finite volume and integrating the governing equations over that volume. The integrated terms are replaced where necessary by physically equivalent approximations that are calculated through the solution of other parts of the governing equation set. The model improves upon previous 1D performance models by permitting the time-evolution of the temperature consistent with the time-varying energy flux into the plasma. The plasma state properties are also more realistically modelled and evolved in time, allowing for the tailoring of the model to different gases that may be chosen as propellants. Computational results for argon propellant are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the model. The model produces a result where efficiency is maximized at a given value of the electrodynamic scaling term known as the dynamic impedance parameter. The scaling of different energy sinks as a function of the dynamic impedance parameter provides insight into the global energy partitioning in these types of accelerators. Results from the present model deviate from the previous version where temperature is selected as an input without regard for the energy that would be deposited to heat the gas to that temperature. Qualitatively and quantitatively, the model predicts specific impulse values that compare favourably with those measured for two separate inductive pulsed plasma thrusters. Efficiency is underpredicted in the regime where data are available, but the trends in the data and simulations follow similar trajectories that appear to be converging towards a predicted peak efficiency as the dynamic impedance parameter is increased.

  15. Electron-ion energy partition when a charged particle slows in a plasma: theory.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lowell S; Preston, Dean L; Singleton, Robert L

    2012-07-01

    The preceding paper [Brown, Preston, and Singleton Jr., Phys. Rev. E 86, 016406 (2012)] presented precise results for the partition of the initial energy E(0) of a fast particle into the ions and electrons--E(I)/E(0) and E(e)/E(0)--when the fast particle slows in a plasma whose ion and electron temperatures may differ. As emphasized in that paper, this is an important problem because nuclear fusion reactions, such as those that occur in an inertial confinement fusion capsule, involve ion temperatures that run away from the electron temperatures. As also noted in the preceding paper, a precise evaluation entails the use of a well-defined Fokker-Planck equation for the phase-space evolution of initially fast projectile particles. When the plasma has differing ion and electron temperatures, the projectiles must slow into a "schizophrenic" final ensemble of particles that has neither the electron nor the ion temperature. This is not a simple Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution since the electrons are not in thermal equilibrium with the ions. Thus, detailed calculations are required for the solution of the problem. These we provide here for a weakly to moderately coupled plasma. The Fokker-Planck equation holds to first subleading order in the dimensionless plasma coupling constant, which translates to computing to order n ln n (leading) and n (subleading) in the plasma density n. The energy partitions for a background plasma in thermal equilibrium have been previously computed, but the order n terms have not been calculated, only estimated. The "schizophrenic" final ensemble of slowed particles gives a new mechanism to bring the electron and ion temperatures together. The rate at which this new mechanism brings the electrons and ions in the plasma into thermal equilibrium will be computed. PMID:23005550

  16. Numerical and experimental investigations of MHD processes of energy transforming in inhomogenious gas-plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Slavin, V.S.; Gavrilov, V.M.; Lobasova, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    The results of experimental and theoretical research of MHD interaction processes of a plasma clot with carrying gas flow in Faraday MHD channel with continuous electrodes are represented. Two possible situations are being analysed: (1) working medium is air without seed, plasma clot is an equilibrium are stabilized with radiation (T-layer); (2) argon without seed, plasma exists in the form of a non-equilibrium are stabilized with electrons energy losses in elastic collisions with gas atoms. The experiment was being carried in a linear MHD channel started by a shock tube. Plasma clot was formed by an impulse electric discharge in a gasodynamic nozzle being placed between a throat and MHD channel. Self-supported current layer (T-layer) was being formed of a plasma clot under the influence of Lorentz force and Joule dissipation in the MHD channel. For compensation of near electrode voltage drop a charged battery of condensers was connected to the MHD channel electrodes instead of the load resistor. Plasma layer has steadily passed through the MHD channel {approximately}1.5 m length. In this case its parameters check well with the calculations performed on the basis of a piston model. Plasma clot initiation regime realized in this experiment was being simulated with the help of non-stationary quasi-one-dimensional design programm. Identity of the major calculation and experimental results has been shown. Dynamics of impulse strong current discharge has been studied; in so doing the role of gasodynamic expansion of a discharge zone and ionized air radiation in overall energy balance is determined.

  17. The TELEC - A plasma type of direct energy converter. [Thermo-Electronic Laser Energy Converter for electric power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Thermo-Electronic Laser Energy Converter (TELEC) is a high-power density plasma device designed to convert a 10.6-micron CO2 laser beam into electric power. Electromagnetic radiation is absorbed in plasma electrons, creating a high-electron temperature. Energetic electrons diffuse from the plasma and strike two electrodes having different areas. The larger electrode collects more electrons and there is a net transport of current. An electromagnetic field is generated in the external circuit. A computer program has been designed to analyze TELEC performance allowing parametric variation for optimization. Values are presented for TELEC performance as a function of cesium pressure and for current density and efficiency as a function of output voltage. Efficiency is shown to increase with pressure, reaching a maximum over 45%.

  18. Developing a plasma focus research training system for the fusion energy age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.

    2014-08-01

    The 3 kJ UNU/ICTP Plasma Focus Facility is the most significant device associated with the AAAPT (Asian African Association for Plasma Training). In original and modified/upgraded form it has trained generations of plasma focus (PF) researchers internationally, producing many PhD theses and peer-reviewed papers. The Lee Model code was developed for the design of this PF. This code has evolved to cover all PF machines for design, interpretation and optimization, for derivation of radiation scaling laws; and to provide insights into yield scaling limitations, radiative collapse, speed-enhanced and current-stepped PF variants. As example of fresh perspectives derivable from this code, this paper presents new results on energy transfers of the axial and radial phases of generalized PF devices. As the world moves inexorably towards the Fusion Energy Age it becomes ever more important to train plasma fusion researchers. A recent workshop in Nepal shows that demand for such training continues. Even commercial project development consultants are showing interest. We propose that the AAAPT-proven research package be upgraded, by modernizing the small PF for extreme modes of operation, switchable from the typical strong-focus mode to a slow-mode which barely pinches, thus producing a larger, more uniform plasma stream with superior deposition properties. Such a small device would be cost-effective and easily duplicated, and have the versatility of a range of experiments from intense multi-radiation generation and target damage studies to superior advanced-materials deposition. The complementary code is used to reference experiments up to the largest existing machine. This is ideal for studying machine limitations and scaling laws and to suggest new experiments. Such a modernized versatile PF machine complemented by the universally versatile code would extend the utility of the PF experience; so that AAAPT continues to provide leadership in pulsed plasma research training in

  19. Carbon dioxide recycling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether is seen to offer a substantial route to renewable and environmentally carbon neutral fuels. One of the authors has championed the “Methanol Economy" in articles and a book. By recycling ambient CO2, the authors argue ...

  20. Recycling at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, William M.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines a Michigan summer camp's efforts to reduce solid waste disposal by recycling cardboard, tin, glass, aluminum, and plastic milk containers. Points out variables affecting the success of such efforts. Discusses Michigan state funding for the development of recycling programs. (SV)

  1. Wee Recyclers Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Natural Resources, Madison.

    Hands-on activities in this guide are designed to help preschool children (ages 3-5) understand that reducing, reusing, and recycling preserves natural resources and prolongs the life of landfills. Children sort, match and compare recyclable items and learn to separate some items by number and color. The 29 activities are divided into units that…

  2. Progress in development of neutron energy spectrometer for deuterium plasma operation in KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, H. Yamashita, F.; Nakayama, Y.; Morishima, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Sakai, Y.; Hayashi, S.; Kawarabayashi, J.; Iguchi, T.; Cheon, M. S.; Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.

    2014-11-15

    Two types of DD neutron energy spectrometer (NES) are under development for deuterium plasma operation in KSTAR to understand behavior of beam ions in the plasma. One is based on the state-of-the-art nuclear emulsion technique. The other is based on a coincidence detection of a recoiled proton and a scattered neutron caused by an elastic scattering of an incident DD neutron, which is called an associated particle coincidence counting-NES. The prototype NES systems were installed at J-port in KSTAR in 2012. During the 2012 and 2013 experimental campaigns, multiple shots-integrated neutron spectra were preliminarily obtained by the nuclear emulsion-based NES system.

  3. Mean excitation energies for stopping powers in various materials using local plasma oscillator strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.; Kamaratos, E.; Chang, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    The basic model of Lindhard and Scharff, known as the local plasma model, is used to study the effects on stopping power of the chemical and physical state of the medium. Unlike previous work with the local plasma model, in which individual electron shifts in the plasma frequency were estimated empirically, he Pines correction derived for a degenerate Fermi gas is shown herein to provide a reasonable estimate, even on the atomic scale. Thus, the model is moved to a complete theoretical base requiring no empirical adjustments, as characteristic of past applications. The principal remaining error is in the overestimation of the low-energy absorption properties that are characteristic of the plasma model in the region of the atomic discrete spectrum, although higher-energy phenomena are accurately represented, and even excitation-to-ionization ratios are given to fair accuracy. Mean excitation energies for covalent-bonded gases and solids, for ionic gases and crystals, and for metals are calculated using first-order models of the bonded states.

  4. An equation of state for partially ionized plasmas: The Coulomb contribution to the free energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Hakel, P.; Fontes, C. J.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-06-20

    We have previously developed an equation of state (EOS) model called ChemEOS (Hakel and Kilcrease, Atomic Processes in Plasmas, Eds., J. Cohen et al., AIP, 2004) for a plasma of interacting ions, atoms and electrons. It is based on a chemical picture of the plasma and is derived from an expression for the Helmholtz free energy of the interacting species. All other equilibrium thermodynamic quantities are then obtained by minimizing this free energy subject to constraints, thus leading to a thermodynamically consistent EOS. The contribution to this free energy from the Coulomb interactions among the particles is treated using the method of Chabrier and Potekhin (Phys. Rev. E 58, 4941 (1998)) which we have adapted for partially ionized plasmas. This treatment is further examined and is found to give rise to unphysical behavior for various elements at certain values of the density and temperature where the Coulomb coupling begins to become significant and the atoms are partially ionized. We examine the source of this unphysical behavior and suggest corrections that produce acceptable results. The sensitivity of the thermodynamic properties and frequency-dependent opacity of iron is examined with and without these corrections. Lastly, the corrected EOS is used to determine the fractional ion populations and level populations for a new generation of OPLIB low-Z opacity tables currently being prepared at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the ATOMIC code.

  5. An equation of state for partially ionized plasmas: The Coulomb contribution to the free energy

    DOE PAGES

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Hakel, P.; Fontes, C. J.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-06-20

    We have previously developed an equation of state (EOS) model called ChemEOS (Hakel and Kilcrease, Atomic Processes in Plasmas, Eds., J. Cohen et al., AIP, 2004) for a plasma of interacting ions, atoms and electrons. It is based on a chemical picture of the plasma and is derived from an expression for the Helmholtz free energy of the interacting species. All other equilibrium thermodynamic quantities are then obtained by minimizing this free energy subject to constraints, thus leading to a thermodynamically consistent EOS. The contribution to this free energy from the Coulomb interactions among the particles is treated using themore » method of Chabrier and Potekhin (Phys. Rev. E 58, 4941 (1998)) which we have adapted for partially ionized plasmas. This treatment is further examined and is found to give rise to unphysical behavior for various elements at certain values of the density and temperature where the Coulomb coupling begins to become significant and the atoms are partially ionized. We examine the source of this unphysical behavior and suggest corrections that produce acceptable results. The sensitivity of the thermodynamic properties and frequency-dependent opacity of iron is examined with and without these corrections. Lastly, the corrected EOS is used to determine the fractional ion populations and level populations for a new generation of OPLIB low-Z opacity tables currently being prepared at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the ATOMIC code.« less

  6. Online platform for simulations of ion energy distribution functions behind a plasma boundary sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollny, Alexander; Shihab, Mohammed; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2012-10-01

    Plasma processes, particularly plasma etching and plasma deposition are crucial for a large variety of industrial manufacturing purposes. For these processes the knowledge of the ion energy distribution function plays a key role. Measurements of the ion energy and ion angular distribution functions (IEDF, IADF) are at least challenging and often impossible in industrial processes. An alternative to measurements of the IEDF are simulations. With this contribution we present a self-consistent model available online for everyone. The simulation of ion energy and ion angular distribution functions involves the well known plasma boundary sheath model by Brinkmann [1-4], which is controlled via a web interface (http://sheath.tet.rub.de). After a successful simulation run all results are evaluable within the browser and ready for download for further analysis.[4pt] [1] R.P. Brinkmann, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 44, 042002 (2011)[0pt] [2] R.P. Brinkmann, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 42, 194009 (2009)[0pt] [3] R.P. Brinkmann, J. App. Phys. 102, 093303 (2007)[0pt] [4] M. Kratzer et al., J. Appl. Phys. 90, 2169 (2001)

  7. An equation of state for partially ionized plasmas: The Coulomb contribution to the free energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Hakel, P.; Fontes, C. J.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-09-01

    We have previously developed an equation of state (EOS) model called ChemEOS (Hakel and Kilcrease, Atomic Processes in Plasmas, Eds., J. Cohen et al., AIP, 2004) for a plasma of interacting ions, atoms and electrons. It is based on a chemical picture of the plasma and is derived from an expression for the Helmholtz free energy of the interacting species. All other equilibrium thermodynamic quantities are then obtained by minimizing this free energy subject to constraints, thus leading to a thermodynamically consistent EOS. The contribution to this free energy from the Coulomb interactions among the particles is treated using the method of Chabrier and Potekhin (Phys. Rev. E 58, 4941 (1998)) which we have adapted for partially ionized plasmas. This treatment is further examined and is found to give rise to unphysical behavior for various elements at certain values of the density and temperature where the Coulomb coupling begins to become significant and the atoms are partially ionized. We examine the source of this unphysical behavior and suggest corrections that produce acceptable results. The sensitivity of the thermodynamic properties and frequency-dependent opacity of iron is examined with and without these corrections. The corrected EOS is used to determine the fractional ion populations and level populations for a new generation of OPLIB low-Z opacity tables currently being prepared at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the ATOMIC code.

  8. CERA-V: Microwave plasma stream source with variable ion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Balmashnov, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    A microwave plasma stream source with variable ion energy operated under low magnetic field electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A two mode resonant cavity (TE{sub 111}, {ital E}{sub 010}) was used. It was established that overdense plasma creation (TE{sub 111}) and high energy in-phase space localized electron plasma oscillations ({ital E}{sub 010}) in a decreased magnetic field lead to the potential for ion energy variation from 10 to 300 eV (up to 1 A of ion current, and a plasma cross section of 75 cm{sup 2}, hydrogen) by varying the TE{sub 111}, {ital E}{sub 010} power, the value of the magnetic field, and pressure. The threshold level of {ital E}{sub 010}-mode power was also determined. An application of this CERA-V source to hydrogenation of semiconductor devices without deterioration of surface layers by ions and fast atoms is under investigation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  9. Efficient numerical modelling of the emittance evolution of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrling, T. J.; Robson, R. E.; Erbe, J.-H.; Osterhoff, J.

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces a semi-analytic numerical approach (SANA) for the rapid computation of the transverse emittance of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators in the blowout regime. The SANA method is used to model the beam emittance evolution when injected into and extracted from realistic plasma profiles. Results are compared to particle-in-cell simulations, establishing the accuracy and efficiency of the procedure. In addition, it is demonstrated that the tapering of vacuum-to-plasma and plasma-to-vacuum transitions is a viable method for the mitigation of emittance growth of beams during their injection and extraction from and into plasma cells.

  10. Fast electron energy deposition in a magnetized plasma: Kinetic theory and particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Robiche, J.; Rax, J.-M.; Bonnaud, G.; Gremillet, L.

    2010-03-15

    The collisional dynamics of a relativistic electron jet in a magnetized plasma are investigated within the framework of kinetic theory. The relativistic Fokker-Planck equation describing slowing down, pitch angle scattering, and cyclotron rotation is derived and solved. Based on the solution of this Fokker-Planck equation, an analytical formula for the root mean square spot size transverse to the magnetic field is derived and this result predicts a reduction in radial transport. Some comparisons with particle-in-cell simulation are made and confirm striking agreement between the theory and the simulation. For fast electron with 1 MeV typical kinetic energy interacting with a solid density hydrogen plasma, the energy deposition density in the transverse direction increases by a factor 2 for magnetic field of the order of 1 T. Along the magnetic field, the energy deposition profile is unaltered compared with the field-free case.

  11. Energy exchange during stimulated Raman scattering of a relativistic laser in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, D. N.; Hur, M. S.; Suk, H.

    2006-11-15

    Energy exchange between pump and daughter waves during the stimulated Raman scattering process in a plasma is investigated, including the effect of a damping coefficient of electron-ion collision at different initial three-wave phases. To obey the energy and momentum conservations, the resonance conditions are satisfied at an optimal initial phase difference between the interacting waves. The amplitudes of the interacting waves exhibit behaviors such as a parametric oscillator. The variations in initial three-wave phase difference generate a phase mismatch, which enhances the rate of the amplitude variations of the interacting waves. The relativistic mass effect modifies the dispersion relations of the interacting waves, and consequently the energy exchange during the stimulated Raman scattering is affected. The collisional damping in the plasma is shown to have an important effect on the evolution of the interacting waves.

  12. Modeling of energy transfer between two crossing smoothed laser beams in a plasma with flow profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaitis, A.; Hüller, S.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Pesme, D.; Duchateau, G.; Porzio, A.

    2016-05-01

    We study the crossed beam energy transfer (CBET) between laser fields generated by optical smoothing methods. The energy transfer, as well as the angular distribution of the outgoing light fields are investigated for two incident smoothed laser beams in a plasma with a flow gradient, allowing for resonant transfer close to the sonic point. Simulations with the code HARMONY based on time-dependent paraxial light propagation are compared to simulations using a new approach based on paraxial complex geometrical optics (PCGO). Both approaches show good agreement for the average energy transfer past a short transient period, which is a promising result for the use of the PCGO method as a module within a hydrodynamics code to efficiently compute CBET in mm-scale plasma configurations. Statistical aspects related to role of laser speckles in CBET are considered via an ensemble of different phase plate realizations.

  13. Brilliant GeV electron beam with narrow energy spread generated by a laser plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ronghao; Lu, Haiyang; Shou, Yinren; Lin, Chen; Zhuo, Hongbin; Chen, Chia-erh; Yan, Xueqing

    2016-09-01

    The production of GeV electron beam with narrow energy spread and high brightness is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. A controlled electron injection scheme and a method for phase-space manipulation in a laser plasma accelerator are found to be essential. The injection is triggered by the evolution of two copropagating laser pulses near a sharp vacuum-plasma transition. The collection volume is well confined and the injected bunch is isolated in phase space. By tuning the parameters of the laser pulses, the parameters of the injected electron bunch, such as the bunch length, energy spread, emittance and charge, can be adjusted. Manipulating the phase-space rotation with the rephasing technique, the injected electron bunch can be accelerated to GeV level while keeping relative energy spread below 0.5% and transverse emittance below 1.0 μ m . The results present a very promising way to drive coherent x-ray sources.

  14. Low-energy energetic neutral atom imaging of Io plasma and neutral tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Wieser, Martin; Wieser, Gabriella S.; Wurz, Peter; Krupp, Norbert; Brandt, Pontus C.:son

    2015-04-01

    Io's plasma and neutral tori play significant roles in the Jovian magnetosphere. We present feasibility studies of measuring low-energy energetic neutral atoms (LENAs) generated from the Io tori. We calculate the LENA flux between 10 eV and 3 keV. The energy range includes the corotational plasma flow energy. The expected differential flux at Ganymede distance is typically 103-105 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 eV-1 near the energy of the corotation. It is above the detection level of the planned LENA sensor that is to be flown to the Jupiter system with integration times of 0.01-1 s. The flux has strong asymmetry with respective to the Io phase. The observations will exhibit periodicities, which can be attributed to the Jovian magnetosphere rotation and the rotation of Io around Jupiter. The energy spectra will exhibit dispersion signatures, because of the non-negligible flight time of the LENAs from Io to the satellite. In 2030, the Jupiter exploration mission JUICE will conduct a LENA measurement with a LENA instrument, the Jovian Neutrals Analyzer (JNA). From the LENA observations collected by JNA, we will be able to derive characteristic quantities, such as the density, velocity, velocity distribution function, and composition of plasma-torus particles. We also discuss the possible physics to be explored by JNA in addition to the constraints for operating the sensor and analyzing the obtained dataset.

  15. Energy levels and multipole transition properties of C4+ ion in Debye plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, L. Y.; Wang, J. G.; Janev, R. K.; Qu, Y. Z.; Dong, C. Z.

    2012-05-01

    Plasma screening effects on the energy structure and radiative transition properties of helium-like C4+ ions embedded in Debye plasmas are investigated by using the multi-configuration Dirac-Hartree-Fock method incorporating the Debye-Hückel potential for both the electron-nucleus and electron-electron interactions. Seventeen fine-structure energy levels of the low-lying 1 s 2, 1 s2 l( l = s,p) and 1 s3 l'( l' = s,p,d) configurations, as well as the electric-dipole ( E1), magnetic-dipole ( M1) and magnetic-quadrupole ( M2) transition probabilities and oscillator strengths between these levels have been calculated over a wide range of screening parameters. It is found that the plasma screening leads to a decrease of excitation energies and alters the energy levels remarkably. For Δn ≠ 0 transitions, the spontaneous decay spectra are red-shifted and their oscillator strengths and transition probabilities decrease with increasing the interaction screening, while those for the Δn = 0 transitions exhibit opposite patterns. The influence of electron-nucleus and electron-electron screened interactions on the changes of energy levels and transition properties are analyzed. Comparison is made of present results with other data available in the literature for this ion.

  16. On energy and momentum conservation in particle-in-cell plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackbill, J. U.

    2016-07-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations are a productive and valued tool for the study of nonlinear plasma phenomena, yet there are basic questions about the simulation methods themselves that remain unanswered. Here we study energy and momentum conservation by PIC. We employ both analysis and simulations of one-dimensional, electrostatic plasmas to understand why PIC simulations are either energy or momentum conserving but not both, what role a numerical stability plays in non-conservation, and how errors in conservation scale with the numerical parameters. Conserving both momentum and energy make it possible to model problems such as Jeans'-type equilibria. Avoiding numerical instability is useful, but so is being able to identify when its effect on the results may be important. Designing simulations to achieve the best possible accuracy with the least expenditure of effort requires results on the scaling of error with the numerical parameters. Our results identify the central role of Gauss' law in conservation of both momentum and energy, and the significant differences in numerical stability and error scaling between energy-conserving and momentum-conserving simulations.

  17. Dietary fat type and energy restriction interactively influence plasma leptin concentration in rats.

    PubMed

    Cha, M C; Jones, P J

    1998-08-01

    To investigate whether dietary fat source and energy restriction interactively influence plasma leptin levels and its association of leptin with insulin action, rats were fed diets containing either fish, safflower oil, or beef tallow (20% wt/wt) for 10 weeks. Groups of rats consumed each diet ad libitum or at 85% or 70% of ad libitum energy intake in a design that held fat intake constant. Graded levels of energy restriction caused body weight to decrease (P < 0.001) differently according to the dietary fat provided. Plasma leptin concentrations were 60% higher (P < 0.05) in the groups fed fish oil and safflower oil ad libitum compared with those in the beef tallow group, despite smaller perirenal fat mass and fat cell size in the fish oil-fed animals. Energy restriction resulted in a 62% decrease (P < 0.05) in leptin levels in fish oil- and safflower oil-fed rats, whereas no changes were observed in beef tallow-fed animals. Plasma insulin levels were lower (P < 0.05) in the fish oil group fed ad libitum compared with those in the two other diet groups. These data demonstrate a hyperleptinemic effect in animals consuming diets rich in polyunsaturated fatty acid, which can be normalized to the level of saturated fat consumption by mild energy restriction. Thus, dietary fatty acid composition, independent of adipose tissue mass, is an important determinant of circulating leptin level in diet-induced obesity.

  18. The plasma membrane as a capacitor for energy and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ray, Supriyo; Kassan, Adam; Busija, Anna R; Rangamani, Padmini; Patel, Hemal H

    2016-02-01

    When considering which components of the cell are the most critical to function and physiology, we naturally focus on the nucleus, the mitochondria that regulate energy and apoptotic signaling, or other organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, ribosomes, etc. Few people will suggest that the membrane is the most critical element of a cell in terms of function and physiology. Those that consider the membrane critical will point to its obvious barrier function regulated by the lipid bilayer and numerous ion channels that regulate homeostatic gradients. What becomes evident upon closer inspection is that not all membranes are created equal and that there are lipid-rich microdomains that serve as platforms of signaling and a means of communication with the intracellular environment. In this review, we explore the evolution of membranes, focus on lipid-rich microdomains, and advance the novel concept that membranes serve as "capacitors for energy and metabolism." Within this framework, the membrane then is the primary and critical regulator of stress and disease adaptation of the cell.

  19. Impurity accumulation in plasma regimes with high energy confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, L. B.; Roberts, D. E.; Yang, H. R.; Dodel, G.; Gentle, K.; Von Goeler, S.; Holzhauer, E.; Hübner, K.; Keilhacker, M.; Korotkov, A.; Luce, T. C.; Miura, Y.; Tsois, N.; Würz, H.; Fussmann, G.; Hofmann, J.; Janeschitz, G.; Krieger, K.; Müller, E. R.; Nolte, R.; Röhr, H.; Steuer, K. H.; Becker, G.; Bomba, B.; Bruhns, H.; Büchl, K.; Carlson, A.; Eberhagen, A.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; Giannone, L.; Von Gierke, G.; Glock, E.; Gruber, O.; Haas, G.; Herrmann, H.; Kaesdorf, S.; Karger, F.; Kaufmann, M.; Klüber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lackner, K.; Lang, R.; Lee, P.; Lisitano, G.; Mast, F.; Mayer, H. M.; McCormick, K.; Meisel, D.; Mertens, V.; Murmann, H.; Neuhauser, J.; Niedermeyer, H.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Poschenrieder, W.; Preis, R.; Rapp, H.; Rudyj, A.; Sandmann, W.; Schneider, F.; Schnider, U.; Siller, G.; Simmet, E.; Speth, E.; Söldner, F.; Stäbler, A.; Steinmetz, K.; Stroth, U.; Vollmer, O.; Zasche, D.

    1989-04-01

    Investigations of impurity accumulation phenomena in ASDEX are reviewed. There are four different operating regimes where pronounced accumulation is observed and these regimes are also characterized by improved energy confinement. In particular, medium-Z metallic ions are involved in accumulation processes whereas low-Z ions appear almost unaffected. The rapid accumulation observed in the case of metallic ions may be explained by neoclassical inward drifts if we assume that the anomalous diffusion is sufficiently suppressed, some indication of this being found from laser blow-off studies. The present results, however, can only be partly explained by neoclassical theory, according to which accumulation of low-Z impurities should also occur. The temporal behaviour of accumulation and the retarding effect of proton dilution for collision dominated transport are also discussed. Finally, we conclude that the full benefits of improved energy confinement can be achieved only if the impurity influxes are kept to a sufficiently low level. Expressed in terms of concentrations under low confinement conditions we have to postulate, for ASDEX, concentrations ≲ 10 -4 for metals and ≲ 2% for all light impurities.

  20. The plasma membrane as a capacitor for energy and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ray, Supriyo; Kassan, Adam; Busija, Anna R; Rangamani, Padmini; Patel, Hemal H

    2016-02-01

    When considering which components of the cell are the most critical to function and physiology, we naturally focus on the nucleus, the mitochondria that regulate energy and apoptotic signaling, or other organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, ribosomes, etc. Few people will suggest that the membrane is the most critical element of a cell in terms of function and physiology. Those that consider the membrane critical will point to its obvious barrier function regulated by the lipid bilayer and numerous ion channels that regulate homeostatic gradients. What becomes evident upon closer inspection is that not all membranes are created equal and that there are lipid-rich microdomains that serve as platforms of signaling and a means of communication with the intracellular environment. In this review, we explore the evolution of membranes, focus on lipid-rich microdomains, and advance the novel concept that membranes serve as "capacitors for energy and metabolism." Within this framework, the membrane then is the primary and critical regulator of stress and disease adaptation of the cell. PMID:26771520

  1. Asphalt recycle plant and method

    SciTech Connect

    Brashears, D. F.; Butler, T. G.; Elliott, E. J.

    1984-10-16

    An asphalt recycling system and process are incorporated into an existing batch type asphalt plant. The existing asphalt plant has an aggregate dryer and air discharge ducts connected to a filtering system. A recycling dryer has input ducts connected to the existing aggregate dryer discharge ducts and output ducts connected from the recycling dryer back to the existing ducts to the filtering system. A recycle feeder bin for feeding reclaimed asphalt pavement to the recycle dryer is connected to the recycle dryer. A recycle booster burner is operatively connected to the recycle dryer through the input duct to the dryer for providing additional heat to the recycle dryer so that the waste heat from the existing aggregate dryer and the booster burner provide a predetermined heat to the recycle dryer for heating the asphalt material. A recycling storage bin or silo is connected to receive the heated recycled asphalt from the recycle dryer. A hammermill or other means may be provided for breaking up the old asphaltic materials, such as old paving materials prior to entry of the material into the recycle dryer. Dampers are provided for directing heated gases from the existing batch type asphalt plant to the recycling system, as needed, and temperature controls are utilized to control the recycled booster burner to provide the right combination of existing waste and added heat for the recycled dryer. The stored recycled asphalt materials may be fed to an existing plant batching tower for batching and loading into vehicles.

  2. The feasibility of recycling contaminated concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Ayers, K.W,; Corroon, W.; Parker, F.L.

    1999-07-01

    The changing mission of the Department of Energy along with the aging of many of its facilities has resulted in renewed emphasis on decontaminating and decommissioning surplus structures. Currently DOE is decontaminating some concrete and sending the clean material to C and D disposal facilities. In other instance, DOE is sending contaminated concrete to LLW disposal facilities. This paper examines the economic feasibility of decontaminating the concrete and recycling the rubble as clean aggregate. A probabilistic cost model was used to examine six potential recycling and disposal scenarios. The model predicted potential costs saving across the DOE complex of nearly one billion dollars. The ability of local markets to assimilate the recycled material was estimated for Washington, Idaho, Tennessee, New Mexico, and South Carolina. The relationships between a number of the economic model's variables were examined to develop operating ranges for initial managerial evaluation of recycling.

  3. Evaluation of radioactive scrap metal recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y.; Kohout, E.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wilson, S.E.

    1995-12-01

    This report evaluates the human health risks and environmental and socio-political impacts of options for recycling radioactive scrap metal (RSM) or disposing of and replacing it. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is assisting the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Oak Ridge Programs Division, in assessing the implications of RSM management alternatives. This study is intended to support the DOE contribution to a study of metal recycling being conducted by the Task Group on Recycling and Reuse of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The focus is on evaluating the justification for the practice of recycling RSM, and the case of iron and steel scrap is used as an example in assessing the impacts. To conduct the evaluation, a considerable set of data was compiled and developed. Much of this information is included in this document to provide a source book of information.

  4. Injection of electrons with predominantly perpendicular energy into an area of toroidal field ripple in a tokamak plasma to improve plasma confinement

    DOEpatents

    Ono, Masayuki; Furth, Harold

    1993-01-01

    An electron injection scheme for controlling transport in a tokamak plasma. Electrons with predominantly perpendicular energy are injected into a ripple field region created by a group of localized poloidal field bending magnets. The trapped electrons then grad-B drift vertically toward the plasma interior until they are detrapped, charging the plasma negative. Calculations indicate that the highly perpendicular velocity electrons can remain stable against kinetic instabilities in the regime of interest for tokamak experiments. The penetration distance can be controlled by controlling the "ripple mirror ratio", the energy of the injected electrons, and their v.sub..perp. /v.sub.51 ratio. In this scheme, the poloidal torque due to the injected radial current is taken by the magnets and not by the plasma. Injection is accomplished by the flat cathode containing an ECH cavity to pump electrons to high v.sub..perp..

  5. Plasma Damping Effects on the Radiative Energy Loss of Relativistic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, M.; Gossiaux, P. B.; Aichelin, J.

    2011-12-23

    The energy loss of a relativistic charge undergoing multiple scatterings while traversing an infinite, polarizable and absorptive plasma is investigated. Polarization and absorption mechanisms in the medium are phenomenologically modeled by a complex index of refraction. Apart from the known Ter-Mikaelian effect related to the dielectric polarization of matter, we find an additional, substantial reduction of the energy loss due to the damping of radiation. The observed effect is more prominent for larger damping and/or larger energy of the charge. A conceivable analog of this phenomenon in QCD could influence the study of jet quenching phenomena in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC.

  6. Predictions for the energy loss of light ions in laser-generated plasmas at low and medium velocities.

    PubMed

    Cayzac, W; Bagnoud, V; Basko, M M; Blažević, A; Frank, A; Gericke, D O; Hallo, L; Malka, G; Ortner, A; Tauschwitz, An; Vorberger, J; Roth, M

    2015-11-01

    The energy loss of light ions in dense plasmas is investigated with special focus on low to medium projectile energies, i.e., at velocities where the maximum of the stopping power occurs. In this region, exceptionally large theoretical uncertainties remain and no conclusive experimental data are available. We perform simulations of beam-plasma configurations well suited for an experimental test of ion energy loss in highly ionized, laser-generated carbon plasmas. The plasma parameters are extracted from two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, and a Monte Carlo calculation of the charge-state distribution of the projectile ion beam determines the dynamics of the ion charge state over the whole plasma profile. We show that the discrepancies in the energy loss predicted by different theoretical models are as high as 20-30%, making these theories well distinguishable in suitable experiments.

  7. Pavement recycling guidelines for state and local governments: Participant`s reference book. Final report, September 1995--December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Kandhal, P.S.; Mallick, R.B.

    1997-12-01

    Recycling or reuse of existing asphalt pavement materials to produce new pavement materials has the following advantages: (1) reduced costs of construction, (2) conservation of aggregate and binder, (3) preservation of the existing pavement geometrics, (4) preservation of the environment, and (5) conservation of energy. This document was prepared to provide the following information on recycling of asphalt pavements: (1) performance data, (2) legislation/specification limits, (3) selection of pavement for recycling and recycling strategies, (4) economics of recycling, and (5) structural design of recycled pavements. The following recycling methods have been included: hot-mix asphalt recycling (both batch and drum plants), asphalt surface recycling, hot-in-place recycling, cold-mix asphalt recycling, and full depth reclamation. Materials and mix design, construction methods and equipment, case histories and quality control/quality assurance have been discussed for all recycling methods.

  8. Spectroscopic Study of a Pulsed High-Energy Plasma Deflagration Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebner, Keith; Underwood, Thomas; Mouratidis, Theodore; Cappelli, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Observations of broadened Balmer lines emitted by a highly-ionized transient plasma jet are presented. A gated CCD camera coupled to a high-resolution spectrometer is used to obtain chord-averaged broadening data for a complete cross section of the plasma jet, and the data is Abel inverted to derive the radial plasma density distribution. This measurement is performed over narrow gate widths and at multiple axial positions to provide high spatial and temporal resolution. A streak camera coupled to a spectrometer is used to obtain continuous-time broadening data over the entire duration of the discharge event (10-50 microseconds). Analyses of discharge characteristics and comparisons with previous work are discussed. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Program, as well as the National Defense Science Engineering Graduate Fellowship.

  9. Laboratory Studies of Thermal Energy Charge Transfer of Silicon and Iron Ions in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, Victor H. S.

    1997-01-01

    The laser ablation/ion storage facility at the UNLV Physics Department is dedicated to the study of atomic processes in low temperature plasmas. Our current program is directed to the study of charge transfer of multiply charged ions and neutrals that are of importance to astrophysics at energies less than 1 eV (about 10(exp 4) K). Specifically, we measure the charge transfer rate coefficient of ions such as N(2+), Si(3+), Si(3+), with helium and Fe(2+) with molecular and atomic hydrogen. All these ions are found in a variety of astrophysical plasmas. Their electron transfer reactions with neutral atoms can affect the ionization equilibrium of the plasma.

  10. Energy spectrum of argon ions emitted from Filippov type Sahand plasma focus.

    PubMed

    Mohammadnejad, M; Pestehe, S J; Mohammadi, M A

    2013-07-01

    The energy and flux of the argon ions produced in Sahand plasma focus have been measured by employing a well-designed Faraday cup. The secondary electron emission effects on the ion signals are simulated and the dimensions of Faraday cup are optimized to minimize these effects. The measured ion energy spectrum is corrected for the ion energy loss and charge exchange in the background gas. The effects of the capacitor bank voltage and working gas pressure on the ion energy spectrum are also investigated. It has been shown that the emitted ion number per energy increases as the capacitor bank voltage increases. Decreasing the working gas pressure leads to the increase in the number of emitted ion per energy. PMID:23902061

  11. Energy spectrum of argon ions emitted from Filippov type Sahand plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadnejad, M.; Pestehe, S. J.; Mohammadi, M. A.

    2013-07-15

    The energy and flux of the argon ions produced in Sahand plasma focus have been measured by employing a well-designed Faraday cup. The secondary electron emission effects on the ion signals are simulated and the dimensions of Faraday cup are optimized to minimize these effects. The measured ion energy spectrum is corrected for the ion energy loss and charge exchange in the background gas. The effects of the capacitor bank voltage and working gas pressure on the ion energy spectrum are also investigated. It has been shown that the emitted ion number per energy increases as the capacitor bank voltage increases. Decreasing the working gas pressure leads to the increase in the number of emitted ion per energy.

  12. Energy spectrum of argon ions emitted from Filippov type Sahand plasma focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadnejad, M.; Pestehe, S. J.; Mohammadi, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    The energy and flux of the argon ions produced in Sahand plasma focus have been measured by employing a well-designed Faraday cup. The secondary electron emission effects on the ion signals are simulated and the dimensions of Faraday cup are optimized to minimize these effects. The measured ion energy spectrum is corrected for the ion energy loss and charge exchange in the background gas. The effects of the capacitor bank voltage and working gas pressure on the ion energy spectrum are also investigated. It has been shown that the emitted ion number per energy increases as the capacitor bank voltage increases. Decreasing the working gas pressure leads to the increase in the number of emitted ion per energy.

  13. The Wheelabrator Falls story: Integrated recycling, highly efficient energy recovery, innovative use of by-products and timing to advance the state-of-the-art in integrated waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Felago, R.T.; Anderson, R.L.; Scanlon, P.J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses how significant state-of-the-art advancements in recycling, utilization of recycled materials and energy production will cut the template for future projects. A corollary benefit will be the enhancement of the concept of privatization of any plant, waste-to-energy, wastewater or biosolids processing, by providing an understanding of private initiation of the project, and the demonstration of a Company`s commitment through self-financing of the facility. All of these advancements point to the fact that waste-to-energy projects of the future will include some or all of these points from the Wheelabrator Falls Project: innovative on-site recycling; innovative utilization of mixed glass cullet; maximum post-combustion automatic recovery of ferrous metal; state-of-the-art boiler upgrades, including a super-efficient thermal cycle design refinements in the plant; specific innovations at falls; sequencing in the operations of the plant`s quality of operations; and expectations going forward.

  14. Improving biomass resource recycling capacity of Rubrivivax gelatinosus cultivated in wastewater through regulating the generation and use of energy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pan; Wang, Yan-ling; Zhang, Guang-ming; Liu, Xian-shu; Du, Cong; Tong, Qing-yue; Li, Ning

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigated Mg2+ enhancement of biomass production through regulating the generation and use of energy in Rubrivivax gelatinosus wastewater treatment. Results showed that proper Mg2+ dosage range was 1.5-15 mg/L. With optimal Mg2+ dosage (10 mg/L), biomass production (5010 mg/L) was improved by 60%. Both protein and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals reached above 90%. Biomass yield improved by 38%. Hydraulic retention time was shortened by 25%. Mechanism analysis indicated that as activator, Mg2+ promoted specifically isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) and Ca2+ / Mg2+ -ATPase activities in energy metabolism, and then improved the generation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and the use of ATP. This enhanced the secretion and activity of protease, protein and COD removals, and then led to more biomass production. With 10 mg/L Mg2+, IDH and Ca2+ / Mg2+ -ATPase activities, ATP production, protease activity were improved by 43.8%, 40.6%, 39.4% and 46.5%, respectively.

  15. Nitrogen mass transfer models for plasma-based low-energy ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Bocong; Wang, Kesheng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Che, Honglong; Lei, Mingkai

    2015-03-15

    The nitrogen mass transfer process in plasma-based low-energy ion implantation (PBLEII) is theoretically and experimentally studied in order to explore the process mechanism of PBLEII and therefore to optimize the apparatus design and the process conditions. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave discharge generates the nitrogen plasma with a high density of 10{sup 11}–10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 3}, which diffuses downstream to the process chamber along the divergent magnetic field. The nitrogen ions in the plasma implant into the surface and transport to the matrix of an austenitic stainless steel under the low negative pulsed bias of −2 kV at a process temperature of 400 °C. A global plasma model is used to simulate the ECR microwave plasma discharge for a range of working pressures and microwave powers. The fluid models are adopted to calculate the plasma downstream diffusion, the sheath expansion and the low-energy ion implantation on the surface. A nonlinear kinetic discrete model is established to describe the nitrogen transport in the austenitic stainless steel and the results are compared with the experimental measurements. Under an average implantation current density of 0.3–0.6 mA/cm{sup 2}, the surface nitrogen concentration in the range from 18.5 to 29 at. % is a critical factor for the nitrogen transport in the AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel by PBLEII, which accelerates the implanted nitrogen diffusion inward up to 6–12 μm during a nitriding time of 4 h.

  16. Identification of deep trap energies and influences of oxygen plasma ashing on semiconductor carrier lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, A.; Humbel, O.; Plappert, M.; Krenn, H.

    2015-03-01

    We have performed an analytical study of the effects of oxygen plasma ashing processes in semiconductor device fabrication and its impact on minority carrier lifetime in high voltage semiconductor devices. Our work includes a critical background study of life time killing mechanisms by deep traps imparted into the semiconductor by barrel plasma ashing. The Elymat technique provides the opportunity to measure lifetime and diffusion length of minority carriers and surface photo voltage (SPV) measurement was used to analyse influences of process parameters such as photoresist, time budget and positioning in the process chamber. It was shown that in microwave plasma processes the diffusion length changes severely with tempering at 200 °C, whereas RF-plasma processes show a significant process time-dependence. Batch tools in general suffer from a strong first wafer effect which could be correlated with the static electrical parameters of the semiconductor devices. The trap identities were detected by using deep level transient spectroscopy and the chemical species of the traps has been proven by inductive coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The deep-bandgap trap energies are reliable fingerprints of the chosen process parameters such as process time and of resist-influences. By microwave plasma processes intrinsic Fe and FeB-complex levels were identified and a good agreement with the SPV-measurement and electrical device characteristic was shown. RF-plasma processes impart levels attributed to Pt levels and an additional level, which could be identified as a trap level probably forming a complex of Pt and H.

  17. Review of Burning Plasma Physics. Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, Herb; Betti, Riccardo; Dahlburg, Jill; Freidberg, Jeff; Hopper, Bick; Meade, Dale; Navritil, Jerry; Nevins, Bill; Ono, Masa; Perkins, Rip; Prager, Stewart; Schoenburg, Kurt; Taylor, Tony; Uckan, Nermin

    2001-09-01

    The next frontier in the quest for magnetic fusion energy is the development of a basic understanding of plasma behavior in the regime of strong self-heating, the so called “burning plasma” regime. The general consensus in the fusion community is that the exploration of this frontier requires a new, relatively large experimental facility - a burning plasma experiment. The motivation, justification, and steps required to build such a facility are the primary focus of our report. The specific goals of the report are as follows. First, the report describes the critical scientific and engineering phenomena that are expected to arise for the first time, or else in a strongly modified form, in a burning plasma. Second, the report shows that the capabilities of existing experiments are inadequate to investigate these phenomena, thereby providing a major justification for a new facility. Third, the report compares the features and predicted performance of the three major next generation burning plasma experiments under current consideration (ITER-FEAT, FIRE, and IGNITOR), which are aimed at addressing these problems. Deliberately, no selection of the best option is made or attempted since such a decision involves complex scientific and cost issues that are beyond the scope of the present panel report. Fourth, the report makes specific recommendations regarding a process to move the burning plasma program forward, including a procedure for choosing the best option and the future activities of the Next Step Option (NSO) program. Fifth, the report attempts to provide a proper perspective for the role of burning plasmas with respect to the overall U.S. fusion program. The introduction provides the basic background information required for understanding the context in which the U.S. fusion community thinks about burning plasma issues. It “sets the stage” for the remainder of the report.

  18. The impact of Hall physics on magnetized high energy density plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdain, P.-A.; Seyler, C. E.; Atoyan, L.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.; Pikuz, S. A.; Potter, W. M.; Schrafel, P. C.; Shelkovenko, T. A.

    2014-05-15

    Hall physics is often neglected in high energy density plasma jets due to the relatively high electron density of such jets (n{sub e} ∼ 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}). However, the vacuum region surrounding the jet has much lower densities and is dominated by Hall electric field. This electric field redirects plasma flows towards or away from the axis, depending on the radial current direction. A resulting change in the jet density has been observed experimentally. Furthermore, if an axial field is applied on the jet, the Hall effect is enhanced and ignoring it leads to serious discrepancies between experimental results and numerical simulations. By combining high currents (∼1 MA) and magnetic field helicity (15° angle) in a pulsed power generator such as COBRA, plasma jets can be magnetized with a 10 T axial field. The resulting field enhances the impact of the Hall effect by altering the density profile of current-free plasma jets and the stability of current-carrying plasma jets (e.g., Z-pinches)

  19. Magnetic reconnection in high-energy-density plasmas in the presence of an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fiksel, G.; Nilson, P.; Hu, S.; Chang, P.-Y.; Barnak, D.; Betti, R.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection has recently been observed and studied in high-energy-density, laser-produced plasmas. These experiments are interesting both for obtaining fundamental data on reconnection, and may also be relevant for inertial fusion, as this magnetic reconnection geometry, with multiple, colliding, magnetized plasma bubbles, occurs naturally inside ICF hohlraums. We present initial results of experiments conducted on the OMEGA EP facility on magnetic reconnection between colliding, magnetized blowoff plasmas. While in previous experiments the magnetic fields were self-generated in the plasma by the Biermann battery effect, in these experiments the seed magnetic field is generated by pulsing current through a pair of external foils using the MIFEDS current generator (Magneto-Inertial Fusion Electrical Discharge System) developed at LLE. Time-resolved images of the magnetic fields and plasma dynamics are obtained from proton radiography and x-ray self-emission, respectively. We present initial results of the experiments, including comparison to ``null'' experiments with zero MIFEDS magnetic field, and associated modeling using the radiation-hydro code DRACO and the particle-in-cell code PSC.

  20. Effects of laser radiation field on energies of hydrogen atom in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence of laser radiation field within the Ehlotzky approximation using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms in consideration of different sets of the parameters in the potential. By applying laser field, the total interaction potential of hydrogen atom embedded in plasmas converts to double well-type potential. The plasma screening effects under the influence of laser field as well as confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the Schrödinger equation with the laser-dressed MGECSC potential. It is resulted that since applying a monochromatic laser field on hydrogen atom embedded in a Debye and quantum plasma causes to shift in the profile of the total interaction potential, the confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in plasmas modeled by the MGECSC potential change localizations of energy states.

  1. The impact of Hall physics on magnetized high energy density plasma jetsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdain, P.-A.; Seyler, C. E.; Atoyan, L.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.; Pikuz, S. A.; Potter, W. M.; Schrafel, P. C.; Shelkovenko, T. A.

    2014-05-01

    Hall physics is often neglected in high energy density plasma jets due to the relatively high electron density of such jets (ne ˜ 1019 cm-3). However, the vacuum region surrounding the jet has much lower densities and is dominated by Hall electric field. This electric field redirects plasma flows towards or away from the axis, depending on the radial current direction. A resulting change in the jet density has been observed experimentally. Furthermore, if an axial field is applied on the jet, the Hall effect is enhanced and ignoring it leads to serious discrepancies between experimental results and numerical simulations. By combining high currents (˜1 MA) and magnetic field helicity (15° angle) in a pulsed power generator such as COBRA, plasma jets can be magnetized with a 10 T axial field. The resulting field enhances the impact of the Hall effect by altering the density profile of current-free plasma jets and the stability of current-carrying plasma jets (e.g., Z-pinches).

  2. Pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic interchange instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Seguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Landen, O. L.; Town, R. P. J.; Betti, R.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Soures, J. M.

    2009-07-15

    Recent experiments using proton backlighting of laser-foil interactions provide unique opportunities for studying magnetized plasma instabilities in laser-produced high-energy-density plasmas. Time-gated proton radiograph images indicate that the outer structure of a magnetic field entrained in a hemispherical plasma bubble becomes distinctly asymmetric after the laser turns off. It is shown that this asymmetry is a consequence of pressure-driven, resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) interchange instabilities. In contrast to the predictions made by ideal MHD theory, the increasing plasma resistivity after laser turn-off allows for greater low-mode destabilization (m>1) from reduced stabilization by field-line bending. For laser-generated plasmas presented herein, a mode-number cutoff for stabilization of perturbations with m>{approx}[8{pi}{beta}(1+D{sub m}k{sub perpendicular}{sup 2}{gamma}{sub max}{sup -1})]{sup 1/2} is found in the linear growth regime. The growth is measured and is found to be in reasonable agreement with model predictions.

  3. Low-Energy Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging of Io Plasma and Neutral Tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Wieser, Martin; Wieser, Gabriella S.; Wurz, Peter; Krupp, Norbert; Brandt, Pontus C.

    2014-05-01

    Io's plasma neutral tori play significant roles in the Jovian magnetosphere. We present a feasibility study of measuring low-energy energetic neutral atoms (LENAs) generated from the tori. We calculate the LENA flux between 10 eV and 3 keV, which covers the energy range of the corotational plasma flow. The differential flux is typically 103-105cm-2sr-1s-1eV -1 near the energy of the corotation measured from the Ganymede orbit. It is above the detection level of the planned LENA sensor that is to be flown to the Jupiter system with a time integral of 0.01-1 seconds. The flux is typically observed from the dawn side of Jupiter. The observed flux will exhibit periodicities though the assumed ENA generation is time independent, which can be attributed to the Jovian magnetosphere rotation and the rotation of Io around Jupiter. The energy spectra will exhibit dispersion signatures, because of the non-negligible flight time of the LENAs from Io to the satellite. In 2030, the Jupiter exploration mission JUICE will conduct a LENA measurement with a LENA instrument, the Jovian Neutrals Analyzer (JNA). From the LENA observations collected by JNA, we will be able to derive characteristic quantities, such as the density, velocity, velocity distribution function, and composition of plasma-torus particles. We also discuss the possible physics to be explored by JNA in addition to the constraints for operating the sensor and analyzing the obtained dataset.

  4. Discovery of an Io-correlated energy source for Io's hot plasma torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandel, B. R.; Broadfoot, A. L.

    1982-01-01

    Energy flowing into Io's hot plasma torus from a local-time correlated source and from an Io-related source are discussed, and a correlation of the brightness of the ansae of the torus with the apparent orbital phase of Io is reported. It is shown that the energy flows cause an azimuthal modulation of the brightness of the torus that is correlated with the position of Io, and the plasma downstream from Io is shown to be brighter in S III 685-A emission, which indicates a higher electron temperature. Differences in electron temperature inferred from spectral analyses account for all observed differences in brightness, implying that no change in the composition or density of the hot plasma occurs. The mechanism regulating the Io-related source is clearly distinct from the mechanism driving the local time source, although both draw on the same pool of energy, and the combination of the two sources is easily capable of supplying all the energy radiated by the torus.

  5. Plasma treatment of polymer dielectric films to improve capacitive energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yializis, A.; Binder, M.; Mammone, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    Demand for compact instrumentation, portable field equipment, and new electromagnetic weapons is creating a need for new dielectric materials with higher energy storage capabilities. Recognizing the need for higher energy storage capacitors, the Army Research Lab at Fort Monmouth, NJ, initiated a program a year ago to investigate potential methods for increasing the dielectric strength of polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) film, which is the highest energy density material commercially available today. Treatment of small area PVDF films in a CF4/O2 plasma showed that the dielectric strength of PVDF films can be increased by as much as 20 percent when treated in a 96 percent CF4/4 percent O2 plasma. This 44 percent increase in energy storage of a PVDF capacitor is significant considering that the treatment can be implemented in a conventional metallizing chamber, with minimum capital investment. The data shows that improved breakdown strength may be unique to PVDF film and the particular CF4/O2 gas mixture, because PVDF film treated with 100 percent CF4, 100 percent O2, Ar gas plasma, and electron irradiation shows no improvement in breakdown strength. Other data presented includes dissipation factor, dielectric constant, and surface tension measurements.

  6. Discovery of an Io-correlated energy source for Io's hot plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandel, B. R.; Broadfoot, A. L.

    1982-04-01

    Energy flowing into Io's hot plasma torus from a local-time correlated source and from an Io-related source are discussed, and a correlation of the brightness of the ansae of the torus with the apparent orbital phase of Io is reported. It is shown that the energy flows cause an azimuthal modulation of the brightness of the torus that is correlated with the position of Io, and the plasma downstream from Io is shown to be brighter in S III 685-A emission, which indicates a higher electron temperature. Differences in electron temperature inferred from spectral analyses account for all observed differences in brightness, implying that no change in the composition or density of the hot plasma occurs. The mechanism regulating the Io-related source is clearly distinct from the mechanism driving the local time source, although both draw on the same pool of energy, and the combination of the two sources is easily capable of supplying all the energy radiated by the torus.

  7. Recycling of steel slag and glass cullet from energy saving lamps by fast firing production of ceramics.

    PubMed

    Furlani, E; Tonello, G; Maschio, S

    2010-01-01

    The paper reports on some experimental results obtained from the production of ceramics containing steel slag and glass cullet from exhaust energy saving lamps mixed in different proportions. Blending of components was done by attrition milling. Pressed powders were fast fired (50 min, cold to cold) in air up to several temperatures in the range 1000-1140 degrees C. The sintering behaviour was studied by shrinkage and water absorption measurements. Density, strength and hardness of the fired bodies were determined and XRD were examined. The fired samples were finally tested in acidic environment in order to evaluate their elution behaviour and consequently their possible environmental compatibility. It is observed that the composition containing 60 wt.% of steel slag and 40 wt.% of glass cullet displayed the best overall behaviour.

  8. A statistical analysis of the low-energy geosynchronous plasma environment. I - Electrons. II - Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, H. B.; Schwank, D. C.; Deforest, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Data on the geosynchronous plasma environment between approximately 30 eV and 80 keV are analyzed statistically. Nearly 50 days of 10 minute averages of the first four moments of the distribution function from low-energy plasma detectors on the ATS-5 and ATS-6 geosynchronous satellites were used. The data were studied in terms of occurrence frequency, local time variations, and response to geomagnetic activity. These techniques revealed marked differences in the ATS-5 and ATS-6 data bases. When translated into a 2-Maxwellian representation, it was found that (1) the ATS-6 data covered an energy range not covered by ATS-5 (between 1 and 50 eV) and (2) there was a definite change in the ion plasma between the ATS-5 and ATS-6 measurements. Simple expressions are derived to simulate the relationship between the four moments, and a model is presented, which takes into account the ATS-5 and ATS-6 plasma variations. Despite the differences in the ion data, the accuracy of the four-moment representation was found valid for characterizing the geosynchronous electron population.

  9. Kinetic Energy Oscillations during Disorder Induced Heating in an Ultracold Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langin, Thomas; McQuillen, Patrick; Strickler, Trevor; Pohl, Thomas; Killian, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Ultracold neutral plasmas of strontium are generated by photoionizing laser-cooled atoms at temperature TMOT ~ 10 mK and density n ~1016 m-3 in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). After photoionization, the ions heat to ~ 1 K by a mechanism known as Disorder Induced Heating (DIH). During DIH kinetic energy oscillations (KEO) occur at a frequency ~ 2ωpi , where ωpi is the plasma frequency, indicating coupling to collective modes of the plasma. Electron screening also comes into play by changing the interaction from a Coulomb to a Yukawa interaction. Although DIH has been previously studied, improved measurements combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations allow us to probe new aspects. We demonstrate a measurement of the damping of the KEO due to electron screening which agrees with the MD simulations. We show that the MD simulations can be used to fit experimental DIH curves for plasma density n, resulting in very accurate density measurements. Finally, we discuss how ion temperature measurements are affected by the non-thermal distribution of the ions during the early stages of DIH. This work was supported by the United States National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy (PHY-0714603), the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550- 12-1-0267), the Shell Foundation, and the Department of Defense (NDSEG Fellowship)

  10. Self-shielding of a plasma-exposed surface during extreme transient heat loads

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, J. J.; Meiden, H. J. van der; Morgan, T. W.; Hoen, M. H. J. 't; De Temmerman, G.; Schram, D. C.

    2014-03-24

    The power deposition on a tungsten surface exposed to combined pulsed/continuous high power plasma is studied. A study of the correlation between the plasma parameters and the power deposition on the surface demonstrates the effect of particle recycling in the strongly coupled regime. Upon increasing the input power to the plasma source, the energy density to the target first increases then decreases. We suggest that the sudden outgassing of hydrogen particles from the target and their subsequent ionization causes this. This back-flow of neutrals impedes the power transfer to the target, providing a shielding of the metal surface from the intense plasma flux.

  11. Ionization energy shift of characteristic K x-ray lines from high-Z materials for plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Słabkowska, K.; Szymańska, E.; Polasik, M.; Pereira, N. R.; Rzadkiewicz, J.; Seely, J. F.; Weber, B. V.; Schumer, J. W.

    2014-03-15

    The energy of the characteristic x-rays emitted by high atomic number atoms in a plasma that contains energetic electrons depends on the atom's ionization. For tungsten, the ionization energy shift of the L-lines has recently been used to diagnose the plasma's ionization; the change in energy of a K-line has been measured for iridium and observed for ytterbium. Here, we present detailed computations of the ionization energy shift to K-lines of these and an additional element, dysprosium; for these atoms, some K-lines nearly coincide in energy with K-edges of slightly lower Z atoms so that a change in transmission behind a K-edge filter betrays a change in energy. The ionization energy shift of such high-energy K-lines may enable a unique diagnostic when the plasma is inside an otherwise opaque enclosure such as hohlraums used on the National Ignition Facility.

  12. Two-stage acceleration of interstellar ions driven by high-energy lepton plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, YunQian; Sheng, ZhengMing; Lu, QuanMing; Li, YuTong; Zhang, Jie

    2015-10-01

    We present the particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation results of the interaction of a high-energy lepton plasma flow with background electron-proton plasma and focus on the acceleration processes of the protons. It is found that the acceleration follows a two-stage process. In the first stage, protons are significantly accelerated transversely (perpendicular to the lepton flow) by the turbulent magnetic field "islands" generated via the strong Weibel-type instabilities. The accelerated protons shows a perfect inverse-power energy spectrum. As the interaction continues, a shockwave structure forms and the protons in front of the shockwave are reflected at twice of the shock speed, resulting in a quasi-monoenergetic peak located near 200 MeV under the simulation parameters. The presented scenario of ion acceleration may be relevant to cosmic-ray generation in some astrophysical environments.

  13. Energy loss of argon in a laser-generated carbon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A.; Harres, K.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Knobloch-Maas, R.; Nuernberg, F.; Pelka, A.; Schaumann, G.; Schoekel, A.; Schollmeier, M.; Schumacher, D.; Schuetrumpf, J.; Roth, M.; Blazevic, A.; Hessling, T.; Grande, P. L.; Kuznetsov, P. G.; Vatulin, V. V.; Vinokurov, O. A.; Schiwietz, G.

    2010-02-15

    The experimental data presented in this paper address the energy loss determination for argon at 4 MeV/u projectile energy in laser-generated carbon plasma covering a huge parameter range in density and temperature. Furthermore, a consistent theoretical description of the projectile charge state evolution via a Monte Carlo code is combined with an improved version of the CasP code that allows us to calculate the contributions to the stopping power of bound and free electrons for each projectile charge state. This approach gets rid of any effective charge description of the stopping power. Comparison of experimental data and theoretical results allows us to judge the influence of different plasma parameters.

  14. Laboratory Studies of Thermal Energy Charge Transfer of Silicon and Iron Ions in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, Victor H. S.

    1996-01-01

    Charge transfer at electron-volt energies between multiply charged atomic ions and neutral atoms and molecules is of considerable importance in astrophysics, plasma physics, and in particular, fusion plasmas. In the year covered by this report, several major tasks were completed. These include: (1) the re-calibration of the ion gauge to measure the absolute particle densities of H2, He, N2, and CO for our current measurements; (2) the analysis of data for charge transfer reactions of N(exp 2 plus) ion and He, H2, N2, and CO; (3) measurement and data analysis of the charge transfer reaction of (Fe(exp 2 plus) ion and H2; (4) charge transfer measurement of Fe(exp 2 plus) ion and H2; and (5) redesign and modification of the ion detection and data acquisition system for the low energy beam facility (reflection time of flight mass spectrometer) dedicated to the study of state select charge transfer.

  15. Reduced entropic model for studies of multidimensional nonlocal transport in high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Del Sorbo, D.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Dubroca, B.; Guisset, S.; Touati, M.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2015-08-15

    Hydrodynamic simulations of high-energy-density plasmas require a detailed description of energy fluxes. For low and intermediate atomic number materials, the leading mechanism is the electron transport, which may be a nonlocal phenomenon requiring a kinetic modeling. In this paper, we present and test the results of a nonlocal model based on the first angular moments of a simplified Fokker-Planck equation. This multidimensional model is closed thanks to an entropic relation (the Boltzman H-theorem). It provides a better description of the electron distribution function, thus enabling studies of small scale kinetic effects within the hydrodynamic framework. Examples of instabilities of electron plasma and ion-acoustic waves, driven by the heat flux, are presented and compared with the classical formula.

  16. Scrap tire recycling in Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    The author discusses the problems associated with scrap tires. For example, surface storing of scrap tires poses a fire hazard and the rainwater trapped in the tire casings is an ideal breeding ground for mosquitoes. Use as a fuel for energy production is unattractive as long as oil retails at its present low price. Past reclamation processes have not met expectations. Legislation alone is not the answer, because scrap tires cannot be regulated out of existence. However, the Minnesota state legislature has come up with an approach that seems to be successful. It has passed the Waste Tire Act, which not only formulates regulations but also provides funding for research and development. Thus, it has established a tire disposal fund for financing construction costs of tire recycling facilities. One of the outcomes was the construction of the St. Louis county Waste Tire Recycling Facility. Through a leasing arrangement with Minneapolis-based Rubber Elastomerics, Inc. (RRE), construction costs financed by the tire disposal fund eventually will be repaid by RRE to the fund. The arrangement is described in detail. By a process also described, RRE produces a product that can be used in thermoset and in thermoplastic compounds. The user can incorporate between 50 percent and 85 percent of the recycled product into a rubber or plastic compound without significantly affecting the physical properties of the compound.

  17. Energy dependence of ion-assisted chemical etch rates in reactive plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stafford, L.; Margot, J.; Chaker, M.; Pearton, S.J.

    2005-08-15

    In a highly cited paper, Steinbruechel [C. Steinbruechel, Appl. Phys. Lett. 55, 1960 (1989)] has demonstrated that in the sub-keV region the etch yield scales like the square root of the ion energy. Based on this result, many authors have subsequently applied this specific energy dependence to ion-assisted chemical etch rates of various materials in different etch tools. In this work, it is demonstrated that in contrast to the etch yield, the etch rate cannot universally be modeled by a simple square-root energy dependence. A novel model accounting for the correct energy dependence of ion-assisted chemical etch rates is therefore proposed. Application of this model to the etching of SiO{sub 2} and ZnO in halogenated plasma chemistries provides a quantitative description of the simultaneous dependence of the etch rate on ion energy and on ion and reactive neutral fluxes.

  18. Detector and energy analyzer for energetic-hydrogen in beams and plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Bastasz, R.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Wampler, W.R.

    1988-11-01

    A detector for detecting energetic hydrogen ions and atoms ranging in energy from about 1 eV up to 1 keV in an evacuated environment includes a Schottky diode with a palladium or palladium-alloy gate metal applied to a silicon-dioxide layer on an n-silicon substrate. An array of the energetic-hydrogen detectors having a range of energy sensitivities form a plasma energy analyzer having a rapid response time and a sensitivity for measuring fluxes of energetic hydrogen. The detector is sensitive to hydrogen and its isotopes but is insensitive to non-hydrogenic particles. The array of energetic-hydrogen detectors can be formed on a single silicon chip, with thin-film layers of gold metal applied in various thicknesses to successive detectors in the array. The gold layers serve as particle energy-filters so that each detector is sensitive to a different range of hydrogen energies. 4 figs.

  19. Detector and energy analyzer for energetic-hydrogen in beams and plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Bastasz, Robert J.; Hughes, Robert C.; Wampler, William R.

    1988-01-01

    A detector for detecting energetic hydrogen ions and atoms ranging in energy from about 1 eV up to 1 keV in an evacuated environment includes a Schottky diode with a palladium or palladium-alloy gate metal applied to a silicondioxide layer on an n-silicon substrate. An array of the energetic-hydrogen detectors having a range of energy sensitivities form a plasma energy analyzer having a rapid response time and a sensitivity for measuring fluxes of energetic hydrogen. The detector is sensitive to hydrogen and its isotopes but is insensitive to non-hydrogenic particles. The array of energetic-hydrogen detectors can be formed on a single silicon chip, with thin-film layers of gold metal applied in various thicknesses to successive detectors in the array. The gold layers serve as particle energy-filters so that each detector is sensitive to a different range of hydrogen energies.

  20. Energy deposition characteristics of nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators: Influence of dielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correale, G.; Winkel, R.; Kotsonis, M.

    2015-08-01

    An experimental study aimed at the characterization of energy deposition of nanosecond Dielectric Barrier Discharge (ns-DBD) plasma actuators was carried out. Special attention was given on the effect of the thickness and material used for dielectric barrier. The selected materials for this study were polyimide film (Kapton), polyamide based nylon (PA2200), and silicone rubber. Schlieren measurements were carried out in quiescent air conditions in order to observe density gradients induced by energy deposited. Size of heated area was used to qualify the energy deposition coupled with electrical power measurements performed using the back-current shunt technique. Additionally, light intensity measurements showed a different nature of discharge based upon the material used for barrier, for a fixed thickness and frequency of discharge. Finally, a characterisation study was performed for the three tested materials. Dielectric constant, volume resistivity, and thermal conductivity were measured. Strong trends between the control parameters and the energy deposited into the fluid during the discharge were observed. Results indicate that efficiency of energy deposition mechanism relative to the thickness of the barrier strongly depends upon the material used for the dielectric barrier itself. In general, a high dielectric strength and a low volumetric resistivity are preferred for a barrier, together with a high heat capacitance and a low thermal conductivity coefficient in order to maximize the efficiency of the thermal energy deposition induced by an ns-DBD plasma actuator.

  1. Enhancement of the maximum proton energy by funnel-geometry target in laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peng; Fan, Dapeng; Li, Yuxiao

    2016-09-01

    Enhancement of the maximum proton energy using a funnel-geometry target is demonstrated through particle simulations of laser-plasma interactions. When an intense short-pulse laser illuminate a thin foil target, the foil electrons are pushed by the laser ponderomotive force, and then form an electron cloud at the target rear surface. The electron cloud generates a strong electrostatic field, which accelerates the protons to high energies. If there is a hole in the rear of target, the shape of the electron cloud and the distribution of the protons will be affected by the protuberant part of the hole. In this paper, a funnel-geometry target is proposed to improve the maximum proton energy. Using particle-in-cell 2-dimensional simulations, the transverse electric field generated by the side wall of four different holes are calculated, and protons inside holes are restricted to specific shapes by these field. In the funnel-geometry target, more protons are restricted near the center of the longitudinal accelerating electric field, thus protons experiencing longer accelerating time and distance in the sheath field compared with that in a traditional cylinder hole target. Accordingly, more and higher energy protons are produced from the funnel-geometry target. The maximum proton energy is improved by about 4 MeV compared with a traditional cylinder-shaped hole target. The funnel-geometry target serves as a new method to improve the maximum proton energy in laser-plasma interactions.

  2. Energy relaxation of multi-MeV protons traveling in compressed DT+Be plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhigang; He, Bin; Fu, Zhen-Guo; Zhang, Ping

    2014-07-15

    We investigate the stopping power of the multi-MeV protons moving in the hot dense deuterium-tritium plasmas mixed with beryllium (Be), which is important in inertial confinement fusion experiments. It is shown that with increasing the density of Be, the stopping power of the proton also increases with the peaks shifting towards higher projectile velocity, which leads to the reduction of both the projectile range and the energy transferred to the electrons.

  3. Solutions and reductions for radiative energy transport in laser-heated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Broadbridge, P.; Ivanova, N. M.

    2015-01-15

    A full symmetry classification is given for models of energy transport in radiant plasma when the mass density is spatially variable and the diffusivity is nonlinear. A systematic search for conservation laws also leads to some potential symmetries and to an integrable nonlinear model. Classical point symmetries, potential symmetries, and nonclassical symmetries are used to effect variable reductions and exact solutions. The simplest time-dependent solution is shown to be stable and relevant to a closed system.

  4. Calculations on charge state and energy loss of argon ions in partially and fully ionized carbon plasmas.

    PubMed

    Barriga-Carrasco, Manuel D; Casas, David; Morales, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    The energy loss of argon ions in a target depends on their velocity and charge density. At the energies studied in this work, it depends mostly on the free and bound electrons in the target. Here the random-phase approximation is used for analyzing free electrons at any degeneracy. For the plasma-bound electrons, an interpolation between approximations for low and high energies is applied. The Brandt-Kitagawa (BK) model is employed to depict the projectile charge space distribution, and the stripping criterion of Kreussler et al. is used to determine its equilibrium charge state Q(eq). This latter criterion implies that the equilibrium charge state depends slightly on the electron density and temperature of the plasma. On the other hand, the effective charge Q(eff) is obtained as the ratio between the energy loss of the argon ion and that of the proton for the same plasma conditions. This effective charge Q(eff) is larger than the equilibrium charge state Q(eq) due to the incorporation of the BK charge distribution. Though our charge-state estimations are not exactly the same as the experimental values, our energy loss agrees quite well with the experiments. It is noticed that the energy loss in plasmas is higher than that in the same cold target of about, ∼42-62.5% and increases with carbon plasma ionization. This confirms the well-known enhanced plasma stopping. It is also observed that only a small part of this energy loss enhancement is due to an increase of the argon charge state, namely only ∼2.2 and 5.1%, for the partially and the fully ionized plasma, respectively. The other contribution is connected with a better energy transfer to the free electrons at plasma state than to the bound electrons at solid state of about, ∼38.8-57.4%, where higher values correspond to a fully ionized carbon plasma. PMID:27078472

  5. An enhanced chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer system based on target recycling G-guadruplexes/hemin DNAzyme catalysis and its application in ultrasensitive detection of DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Huang, Yong; Vdovenko, Marina; Sakharov, Ivan Yu; Su, Guifa; Zhao, Shulin

    2015-06-01

    An enhanced chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) system based on target recycling G-guadruplexes/hemin DNAzyme catalysis was developed for ultrasensitive detection of DNA. CRET system consists of luminol as chemiluminescent donor, and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) as acceptor. The sensitive detection was achieved by using the system consisted of G-riched DNA, blocker DNA, and the Nb.BbvCI biocatalyst. Upon addition of target DNA to the system, target DNA hybridizes with the quasi-circular DNA structure, and forms a DNA duplex. The formation of DNA duplex triggers selective enzymatic cleavage of quasi-circular DNA by Nb.BbvCI, resulting in the release of target DNA and two G-riched DNAzyme segments. Released target DNA then hybridizes with another quasi-circular DNA structure to initiate the cleavage of the quasi-circular DNA structure. Eventually, each target DNA can go through many cycles, resulting in the digestion of many quasi-circular DNA structures, generating many G-riched DNAzyme segments. G-riched DNAzyme segment products assemble with hemin to form stable hemin/G-quadruplexes that exhibit peroxidase-like activity which can catalyze the oxidation of luminol by H2O2 to produce CL signals. In the presence of FITC, CL of luminol can excite FITC molecules, and thus produced CRET between the luminol and FITC. This unique analysis strategy gives a detection limit down to 80 fM, which is at least four orders of magnitude lower than that of unamplified DNA detection methods.

  6. Experimental and Computational Studies of High Energy Density Plasma Streams Ablated from Fine Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Greenly, John B.; Seyler, Charles

    2014-03-30

    Experimental and computational studies of high energy density plasma streams ablated from fine wires. Laboratory of Plasma Studies, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cornell University. Principal Investigators: Dr. John B. Greenly and Dr. Charles E. Seyler. This report summarizes progress during the final year of this project to study the physics of high energy density (HED) plasma streams of 10^17-10^20/cm3 density and high velocity (~100-500 km/s). Such streams are produced from 5-250 micrometer diameter wires heated and ionized by a 1 MA, 250 ns current pulse on the COBRA pulsed power facility at Cornell University. Plasma is ablated from the wires and is driven away to high velocity by unbalanced JxB force. A wire, or an array of wires, can persist as an essentially stationary, continuous source of this streaming plasma for >200 ns, even with driving magnetic fields of many Tesla and peak current densities in the plasma of many MA/cm2. At the heart of the ablation stream generation is the continuous transport of mass from the relatively cold, near-solid-density wire "core" into current-carrying plasma within 1 mm of the wire, followed by the magnetic acceleration of that plasma and its trapped flux to form a directed stream. In the first two years of this program, an advancing understanding of ablation physics led to the discovery of several novel wire ablation experimental regimes. In the final year, one of these new HED plasma regimes has been studied in quantitative detail. This regime studies highly reproducible magnetic reconnection in strongly radiating plasma with supersonic and superalfvenic flow, and shock structures in the outflow. The key discovery is that very heavy wires, e.g. 250 micrometer diameter Al or 150 micrometer Cu, behave in a qualitatively different way than the lighter wires typically used in wire-array Z-pinches. Such wires can be configured to produce a static magnetic X-point null geometry that stores magnetic and

  7. Recycle plastics into feedstocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, H.; Kaminsky, W.

    1995-05-01

    Thermal cracking of mixed-plastics wastes with a fluidized-bed reactor can be a viable and cost-effective means to meet mandatory recycling laws. Strict worldwide environmental statutes require the hydrocarbon processing industry (HPI) to develop and implement product applications and technologies that reuse post-consumer mixed-plastics waste. Recycling or reuse of plastics waste has a broad definition. Recycling entails more than mechanical regranulation and remelting of polymers for film and molding applications. A European consortium of academia and refiners have investigated if it is possible and profitable to thermally crack plastics into feedstocks for refining and petrochemical applications. Development and demonstration of pyrolysis methods show promising possibilities of converting landfill garbage into valuable feedstocks such as ethylene, propylene, BTX, etc. Fluidized-bed reactor technologies offer HPI operators a possible avenue to meet recycling laws, conserve raw materials and yield a profit. The paper describes thermal cracking for feedstocks and pyrolysis of polyolefins.

  8. The Totem Pole Recycled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewall, Susan Breyer

    1991-01-01

    Presents an activity that integrates science, environmental education, art, and social studies. Students identify and research an endangered species and construct a totem pole depicting the species using a recyclable material. (MDH)

  9. A Practical Recycling Project . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durant, Raymond H.; Mikuska, James M.

    1973-01-01

    Descirbes a school district's recycling program of aluminum lunch trays that are collected after their use. The trays are used as scrap metal in industrial education workshop and used for sand castings. (PS)

  10. Low flux and low energy helium ion implantation into tungsten using a dedicated plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentecoste, Lucile; Thomann, Anne-Lise; Melhem, Amer; Caillard, Amael; Cuynet, Stéphane; Lecas, Thomas; Brault, Pascal; Desgardin, Pierre; Barthe, Marie-France

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the first stages of defect formation in tungsten (W) due to the accumulation of helium (He) atoms inside the crystal lattice. To reach the required implantation conditions, i.e. low He ion fluxes (1011-1014 ions.cm2.s-1) and kinetic energies below the W atom displacement threshold (about 500 eV for He+), an ICP source has been designed and connected to a diffusion chamber. Implantation conditions have been characterized by means of complementary diagnostics modified for measurements in this very low density helium plasma. It was shown that lowest ion fluxes could only be reached for the discharge working in capacitive mode either in α or γ regime. Special attention was paid to control the energy gained by the ions by acceleration through the sheath at the direct current biased substrate. At very low helium pressure, in α regime, a broad ion energy distribution function was evidenced, whereas a peak centered on the potential difference between the plasma and the biased substrate was found at higher pressures in the γ mode. Polycrystalline tungsten samples were exposed to the helium plasma in both regimes of the discharge and characterized by positron annihilation spectroscopy in order to detect the formed vacancy defects. It was found that W vacancies are able to be formed just by helium accumulation and that the same final implanted state is reached, whatever the operating mode of the capacitive discharge.

  11. On the instability and energy flux of lower hybrid waves in the Venus plasma mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangeway, R. J.; Crawford, G. K.

    1993-01-01

    Waves generated near the lower hybrid resonance frequency by the modified two stream instability have been invoked as a possible source of energy flux into the topside ionosphere of Venus. These waves are observed above the ionopause in a region known as the plasma mantle. The plasma within the mantle appears to be a mixture of magnetosheath and ionospheric plasmas. Since the magnetosheath electrons and ions have temperatures of several tens of eV, any instability analysis of the modified two stream instability requires the inclusion of finite electron and ion temperatures. Finite temperature effects are likely to reduce the growth rate of the instability. Furthermore, the lower hybrid waves are only quasi-electrostatic, and the energy flux of the waves is mainly carried by parallel Poynting flux. The magnetic field in the mantle is draped over the ionopause. Lower hybrid waves therefore cannot transport any significant wave energy to lower altitudes, and so do not act as a source of additional heat to the topside ionosphere.

  12. Poynting vector, energy densities, and pressure of collective transverse electromagnetic fluctuations in unmagnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schlickeiser, R.

    2012-01-15

    A systematic calculation of the electromagnetic properties (Poynting vector, electromagnetic energy, and pressure) of the collective transverse fluctuations in unmagnetized plasmas with velocity-anisotropic plasma particle distributions functions is presented. Time-averaged electromagnetic properties for monochromatic weakly damped wave-like fluctuations and space-averaged electromagnetic properties for monochromatic weakly propagating and aperiodic fluctuations are calculated. For aperiodic fluctuations, the Poynting vector as well as the sum of the space-averaged electric and magnetic field energy densities vanish. However, aperiodic fluctuations possess a positive pressure given by its magnetic energy density. This finite pressure density p{sub a} of aperiodic fluctuations has important consequences for the dynamics of cosmic unmagnetized plasmas such as the intergalactic medium after reionization. Adopting the standard cosmological evolution model, we show that this additional pressure changes the expansion law of the universe leading to further deceleration. Negative vacuum pressure counterbalances this deceleration to an accelerating universe provided that the negative vacuum pressure is greater than 1.5p{sub a}, which we estimate to be of the order 2.1 {center_dot} 10{sup -16} dyn cm{sup -2}.

  13. Scaling of surface-plasma reactors with a significantly increased energy density for NO conversion.

    PubMed

    Malik, Muhammad Arif; Xiao, Shu; Schoenbach, Karl H

    2012-03-30

    Comparative studies revealed that surface plasmas developing along a solid-gas interface are significantly more effective and energy efficient for remediation of toxic pollutants in air than conventional plasmas propagating in air. Scaling of the surface plasma reactors to large volumes by operating them in parallel suffers from a serious problem of adverse effects of the space charges generated at the dielectric surfaces of the neighboring discharge chambers. This study revealed that a conductive foil on the cathode potential placed between the dielectric plates as a shield not only decoupled the discharges, but also increased the electrical power deposited in the reactor by a factor of about forty over the electrical power level obtained without shielding and without loss of efficiency for NO removal. The shield had no negative effect on efficiency, which is verified by the fact that the energy costs for 50% NO removal were about 60 eV/molecule and the energy constant, k(E), was about 0.02 L/J in both the shielded and unshielded cases.

  14. Fernald scrap metal recycling and beneficial reuse

    SciTech Connect

    Motl, G.P.; Burns, D.D.

    1993-10-01

    The Fernald site, formerly the Feed Materials Production Facility, produced uranium metal products to meet defense production requirements for the Department of Energy from 1953 to 1989. In this report is is described how the Fernald scrap metal project has demonstrated that contractor capabilities can be used successfully to recycle large quantities of Department of Energy scrap metal. The project has proven that the {open_quotes}beneficial reuse{close_quotes} concept makes excellent economic sense when a market for recycled products can be identified. Topics covered in this report include the scrap metal pile history, the procurement strategy, scrap metal processing, and a discussion of lessons learned.

  15. Determination of Electron and Ion Energy Distribution Functions in a Plasma Ion Assisted Deposition (PIAD) Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harhausen, J.; Foest, R.; Ohl, A.

    2011-10-01

    High performance optical coatings are commonly produced by PIAD in order to achieve comparably high deposition rates. Here, the plasma source is a hot cathode direct current discharge with an auxiliary magnetic field (APS). Its design is such to generate a population of fast ions to be released into the deposition chamber. A detailed understanding of the plasma properties in the chamber is mandatory to increase the level of uniformity and reproducibility of the deposition process. In order to determine the electron and ion energy distribution functions (EEDF, IEDF) the concepts of the Langmuir probe, the retarding field energy analyzer and optical emission spectroscopy are employed. Fundamental findings are that the EEDF can be described in the framework of the non-local approximation and that the degree of ionization inside the APS is close to unity. The shape of the IEDF and its evolution along the beam path can be described consistently by considering charge exchange reactions with the background neutral gas and the profile of the plasma potential. High performance optical coatings are commonly produced by PIAD in order to achieve comparably high deposition rates. Here, the plasma source is a hot cathode direct current discharge with an auxiliary magnetic field (APS). Its design is such to generate a population of fast ions to be released into the deposition chamber. A detailed understanding of the plasma properties in the chamber is mandatory to increase the level of uniformity and reproducibility of the deposition process. In order to determine the electron and ion energy distribution functions (EEDF, IEDF) the concepts of the Langmuir probe, the retarding field energy analyzer and optical emission spectroscopy are employed. Fundamental findings are that the EEDF can be described in the framework of the non-local approximation and that the degree of ionization inside the APS is close to unity. The shape of the IEDF and its evolution along the beam path can be

  16. Measurements of Ion Stopping around the Bragg Peak in High-Energy-Density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, Johan

    2015-11-01

    Over the last few decades, ion stopping in weakly- to strongly-coupled High-Energy-Density (HED) plasmas has been subject to extensive analytical and numerical studies, but only a limited set of experimental data exists to check the validity of these theories. Most of these experiments also did not probe the detailed characteristics of the Bragg peak (peak ion stopping) where the ion velocity is similar to the average thermal electron velocity. To the best of our knowledge, only one exploratory attempt to do this was conducted by Hicks et al., who were able to describe qualitatively the behavior of the Bragg peak for one plasma condition. The work described in this presentation makes significant advances over previous experimental efforts by quantitatively assessing the characteristics of the ion stopping, ranging from low-velocity stopping, through the Bragg peak, to high-velocity stopping for different HED plasma conditions. This was achieved by measuring the energy loss of DD-tritons, D3He-alphas, DD-protons and D3He-protons, with distinctly different velocities, and the results indicate that the stopping power varies strongly with Te and ne. This effort represents the first experimental test of state-of-art plasma-stopping-power theories around the Bragg peak, which is an important first step in our efforts of getting a fundamental understanding of DT-alpha stopping in HED plasmas, a prerequisite for understanding ignition margins in various implosion designs with varying hot spot areal density at the National Ignition Facility. The work described here was performed in part at the LLE National Laser User's Facility (NLUF), and was supported in part by US DOE (Grant No. DE-FG03- 03SF22691), LLNL (subcontract Grant No. B504974) and LLE (subcontract Grant No. 412160-001G).

  17. Radial energy transport by magnetospheric ULF waves: Effects of magnetic curvature and plasma pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouznetsov, Igor; Lotko, William

    1995-01-01

    The 'radial' transport of energy by internal ULF waves, stimulated by dayside magnetospheric boundary oscillations, is analyzed in the framework of one-fluid magnetohydrodynamics. (the term radial is used here to denote the direction orthogonal to geomagnetic flux surfaces.) The model for the inhomogeneous magnetospheric plasma and background magnetic field is axisymmetric and includes radial and parallel variations in the magnetic field, magnetic curvature, plasma density, and low but finite plasma pressure. The radial mode structure of the coupled fast and intermediate MHD waves is determined by numerical solution of the inhomogeneous wave equation; the parallel mode structure is characterized by a Wentzel-Kramer-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. Ionospheric dissipation is modeled by allowing the parallel wave number to be complex. For boudnary oscillations with frequencies in the range from 10 to 48 mHz, and using a dipole model for the background magnetic field, the combined effects of magnetic curvature and finite plasma pressure are shown to (1) enhance the amplitude of field line resonances by as much as a factor of 2 relative to values obtained in a cold plasma or box-model approximation for the dayside magnetosphere; (2) increase the energy flux delivered to a given resonance by a factor of 2-4; and (3) broaden the spectral width of the resonance by a factor of 2-3. The effects are attributed to the existence of an 'Alfven buoyancy oscillation,' which approaches the usual shear mode Alfven wave at resonance, but unlike the shear Alfven mode, it is dispersive at short perpendicular wavelengths. The form of dispersion is analogous to that of an internal atmospheric gravity wave, with the magnetic tension of the curved background field providing the restoring force and allowing radial propagation of the mode. For nominal dayside parameters, the propagation band of the Alfven buoyancy wave occurs between the location of its (field line) resonance and that of the

  18. Low energy magnetospheric plasma interactions with space systems: The role of predictions. [spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, H. B.

    1979-01-01

    The present status of low energy magnetospheric plasma interactions with space systems is reviewed. The role of predictions in meeting user needs in assessing the impact of such interactions is described. In light of the perceived needs of the user community and of the current status of modeling and prediction efforts, it is suggested that for most user needs more detailed statistical models of the low energy environment are required. In order to meet current prediction requirements, real-time in situ measurements are proposed as a near-term solution.

  19. The extent of power-law energy spectra in collisionless relativistic magnetic reconnection in pair plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, G. R.; Uzdensky, D. A.; Cerutti, B.; Nalewajko, K.; Begelman, M. C.

    2015-12-30

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we characterize the energy spectra of particles accelerated by relativistic magnetic reconnection (without guide field) in collisionless electron–positron plasmas, for a wide range of upstream magnetizations σ and system sizes L. The particle spectra are well-represented by a power law ${\\gamma }^{-\\alpha }$, with a combination of exponential and super-exponential high-energy cutoffs, proportional to σ and L, respectively. As a result, for large L and σ, the power-law index α approaches about 1.2.

  20. The extent of power-law energy spectra in collisionless relativistic magnetic reconnection in pair plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Werner, G. R.; Uzdensky, D. A.; Cerutti, B.; Nalewajko, K.; Begelman, M. C.

    2015-12-30

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we characterize the energy spectra of particles accelerated by relativistic magnetic reconnection (without guide field) in collisionless electron–positron plasmas, for a wide range of upstream magnetizations σ and system sizes L. The particle spectra are well-represented by a power lawmore » $${\\gamma }^{-\\alpha }$$, with a combination of exponential and super-exponential high-energy cutoffs, proportional to σ and L, respectively. As a result, for large L and σ, the power-law index α approaches about 1.2.« less

  1. The Extent of Power-law Energy Spectra in Collisionless Relativistic Magnetic Reconnection in Pair Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, G. R.; Uzdensky, D. A.; Cerutti, B.; Nalewajko, K.; Begelman, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we characterize the energy spectra of particles accelerated by relativistic magnetic reconnection (without guide field) in collisionless electron-positron plasmas, for a wide range of upstream magnetizations σ and system sizes L. The particle spectra are well-represented by a power law {γ }-α , with a combination of exponential and super-exponential high-energy cutoffs, proportional to σ and L, respectively. For large L and σ, the power-law index α approaches about 1.2.

  2. Oral plasma zinc tolerance test in patients with protein energy malnutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Atalay, Y; Arcasoy, A; Kürkçüoğlu, M

    1989-01-01

    Zinc absorption was measured in 37 children with malnutrition using the oral zinc tolerance test (22.5 mg elementary zinc) and the results compared with those of a group of healthy control subjects. The increase in plasma zinc was significantly lower in patients with marasmic kwashiorkor than in the control group. The zinc tolerance test was, however, normal in marasmic patients. We conclude that zinc deficiency occurs in some types of protein energy malnutrition, and that malabsorption may aggravate zinc deficiency. It is reasonable to give higher doses of zinc than are usually recommended during oral zinc supplementation in patients with protein energy malnutrition. PMID:2513780

  3. Recycling of nonmetallics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amey, E.B.; Kelly, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    The first factor determining recyclability is the composition of the material itself. Metals, for example, can be reused with little or no loss in quality. Paper and rubber, by this criterion, are less recyclable. Each time paper is recycled, some cellulose fibers are broken. Shorter fibers can mean weaker paper of perceived lower quality and value. Vulcanizing is an irreversible chemical process that precludes recycling rubber in its original form. Both materials may be reused in other applications often of lower value than the original one. To be recyclable, the discarded material must have a collection infrastructure at the source of waste generation, at a central collection site, or at curbside. The recovered material must also have a market. If it is priced noncompetitively or no market exists, if it does not meet specifications, or if it requires special technology investments which cannot be recovered through future sales, the recovered material may be stockpiled or discarded rather than recycled. ?? 1996 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  4. Research Opportunities in High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas on the NDCX-II Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, John; Cohen, Ron; Friedman, Alex; Grote, Dave; Lund, Steven; Sharp, Bill; Bieniosek, Frank; Ni, Pavel; Roy, Prabir; Henestroza, Enrique; Jung, Jin-Young; Kwan, Joe; Lee, Ed; Leitner, Matthaeus; Lidia, Steven; Logan, Grant; Seidl, Peter; Vay, Jean-Luc; Waldron, Will

    2009-03-23

    Intense beams of heavy ions offer a very attractive tool for fundamental research in high energy density physics and inertial fusion energy science. These applications build on the significant recent advances in the generation, compression and focusing of intense heavy ion beams in the presence of a neutralizing background plasma. Such beams can provide uniform volumetric heating of the target during a time-scale shorter than the hydrodynamic response time, thereby enabling a significant suite of experiments that will elucidate the underlying physics of dense, strongly-coupled plasma states, which have been heretofore poorly understood and inadequately diagnosed, particularly in the warm dense matter regime. The innovations, fundamental knowledge, and experimental capabilities developed in this basic research program is also expected to provide new research opportunities to study the physics of directly-driven ion targets, which can dramatically reduce the size of heavy ion beam drivers for inertial fusion energy applications. Experiments examining the behavior of thin target foils heated to the warm dense matter regime began at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in 2008, using the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment - I (NDCX-I) facility, and its associated target chamber and diagnostics. The upgrade of this facility, called NDCX-II, will enable an exciting set of scientific experiments that require highly uniform heating of the target, using Li{sup +} ions which enter the target with kinetic energy in the range of 3 MeV, slightly above the Bragg peak for energy deposition, and exit with energies slightly below the Bragg peak. This document briefly summarizes the wide range of fundamental scientific experiments that can be carried out on the NDCX-II facility, pertaining to the two charges presented to the 2008 Fusion Energy Science Advisory Committee (FESAC) panel on High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas (HEDLP). These charges include: (1) Identify

  5. Using a CCD for the direct detection of electrons in a low energy space plasma spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedington, R.; Kataria, D.; Walton, D.

    2012-01-01

    An E2V CCD64 back-illuminated, ion-implanted CCD (charge-coupled device) has been used as a direct electron imaging detector with CATS (Conceptual And Tiny Spectrometer), a highly miniaturised prototype plasma analyser head. This is in place of an MCP (microchannel plate) with a position sensing anode which would more conventionally be used as a detector in traditional low energy space plasma analyser instruments. The small size of CATS however makes it well matched to the size of the CCD, and the ion implants reduce the depth of the CCD backside electron potential well making it more sensitive to lower energy electrons than standard untreated silicon. Despite ionisation damage from prolonged exposure to excessively energetic electrons, the CCD has been able to detect electrons with energies above 500eV, at temperatures around room temperature. Using both a long integration 'current measuring' mode and a short integration `electron counting' mode it has been used to image the low energy electrons exiting the analyser, enhancing our understanding of the CATS electrostatic optics. The CCD has been selected as the detector for use with CATS for an instrument on a low-altitude student sounding rocket flight. Although it cannot detect the lowest energy electrons that an MCP can detect, and it is more sensitive to stray light, the low voltages required, the lack of vacuum requirements and its novelty and availability made it the most attractive candidate detector.

  6. 9 GeV energy gain in a beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litos, M.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Corde, S.; Clayton, C. E.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Schmeltz, M.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-03-01

    An electron beam has gained a maximum energy of 9 GeV per particle in a 1.3 m-long electron beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator. The amount of charge accelerated in the spectral peak was 28.3 pC, and the root-mean-square energy spread was 5.0%. The mean accelerated charge and energy gain per particle of the 215 shot data set was 115 pC and 5.3 GeV, respectively, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 4.0 GeV m-1at the spectral peak. The mean energy spread of the data set was 5.1%. These results are consistent with the extrapolation of the previously reported energy gain results using a shorter, 36 cm-long plasma source to within 10%, evincing a non-evolving wake structure that can propagate distances of over a meter in length. Wake-loading effects were evident in the data through strong dependencies observed between various spectral properties and the amount of accelerated charge.

  7. 9 GeV energy gain in a beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Litos, M.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Corde, S.; Clayton, C. E.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Green, S. Z.; et al

    2016-02-15

    An electron beam has gained a maximum energy of 9 GeV per particle in a 1.3 m-long electron beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator. The amount of charge accelerated in the spectral peak was 28.3 pC, and the root-mean-square energy spread was 5.0%. The mean accelerated charge and energy gain per particle of the 215 shot data set was 115 pC and 5.3 GeV, respectively, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 4.0 GeV m-1 at the spectral peak. Moreover, the mean energy spread of the data set was 5.1%. Our results are consistent with the extrapolation of the previously reported energy gainmore » results using a shorter, 36 cm-long plasma source to within 10%, evincing a non-evolving wake structure that can propagate distances of over a meter in length. Wake-loading effects were evident in the data through strong dependencies observed between various spectral properties and the amount of accelerated charge.« less

  8. Gaussian energy distribution of fast ions emitted by laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krása, J.

    2013-05-01

    The analysis of ion collector signals with the use of a time-of-fight signal function derived from a shifted Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution is used to quantify the ion characteristics as the ion temperature and velocity of centre-of-mass motion of groups of ionized species constituting the ablated plasma. The analysis is also focused on velocity and energy distributions derived from the signal of a time-of-flight detector taking into account the underlying principle of sensor operation. The energy Maxwell spectra of ions are compared with the Gauss distribution with respect to the ratio of the centre-of-mass energy of ions to their temperature. The difference threshold between the Gauss and energy Maxwell spectra is determined via the limited validity of the basic relationship between spreads in energy and time-of-flight spectra ½ΔE/E = Δt/t. The analysis of velocity spectrum of fast ions emitted by Ti plasma produced with 300 ps, kJ-class iodine laser operating at PALS facility shows that ion bursts consist of almost monoenergetic ion beams.

  9. Ion energy distribution near a plasma meniscus with beam extraction for multi element focused ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Jose V.; Paul, Samit; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2010-05-15

    An earlier study of the axial ion energy distribution in the extraction region (plasma meniscus) of a compact microwave plasma ion source showed that the axial ion energy spread near the meniscus is small ({approx}5 eV) and comparable to that of a liquid metal ion source, making it a promising candidate for focused ion beam (FIB) applications [J. V. Mathew and S. Bhattacharjee, J. Appl. Phys. 105, 96101 (2009)]. In the present work we have investigated the radial ion energy distribution (IED) under the influence of beam extraction. Initially a single Einzel lens system has been used for beam extraction with potentials up to -6 kV for obtaining parallel beams. In situ measurements of IED with extraction voltages upto -5 kV indicates that beam extraction has a weak influence on the energy spread ({+-}0.5 eV) which is of significance from the point of view of FIB applications. It is found that by reducing the geometrical acceptance angle at the ion energy analyzer probe, close to unidirectional distribution can be obtained with a spread that is smaller by at least 1 eV.

  10. Ion Energy Distributions and their Relative Abundance in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J. S.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cappelli, M. A.; Sharma, S. P.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Study of kinetics of ions and neutrals produced in high density inductively coupled plasma (ICP) discharges is of great importance for achieving a high degree of plasma assisted deposition and etching. In this paper, we present the ion energy distributions (IEDs) of various ions arriving at the grounded lower electrode. The ions were energy as well as mass analyzed by a combination of electrostatic analyzer-quadrupole mass spectrometer for pure Ar and CF4/Ar mixtures. The measurements have been made at gas pressures ranging from 30 to 100 mTorr. In addition, the IEDs were measured when the wafer-supporting electrode was also rf-powered and the effect of the self-bias was observed in the energy distributions of ions. The shapes of the IEDs are discussed an related to the sheath properties and measured electrical waveforms, as a function of pressure and applied power. Relative ion intensities were obtained by integration of each ion kinetic energy distribution function over its energy range.

  11. Modelling of Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douai, D.; Wauters, T.; Lyssoivan, A.; Marchuk, O.; Wünderlich, D.; Brémond, S.; Lombard, G.; Mollard, P.; Pegourié, B.; Van Oost, G.

    2011-12-01

    Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) is envisioned in ITER to clean the wall from impurities, to control the wall isotopic ratio and the hydrogen recycling in the presence of the toroidal magnetic field. Various experiments and modelling are advancing to consolidate this technique. In this contribution the modeling of ICWC is presented, which can be divided in two parts: plasma description and plasma wall interaction. Firstly a 0D plasma model, based on a set of energy and particle balance equations for Maxwellian Hydrogen and Helium species, is presented. The model takes into account elementary collision processes, coupled RF power, particle confinement, wall recycling, and active gas injection and pumping. The RF plasma production process is based mainly on electron collisional ionization. The dependency of the plasma parameters, the Hydrogen and Helium partial pressures and neutral or ionic fluxes on pressure and RF power are quantitatively in good agreement with those obtained experimentally on TORE SUPRA. Secondly an extension of the 0D model including the description of the wall interaction is presented and compared to TORE SUPRA multi-pulse ICWC discharges.

  12. Transverse momentum diffusion and collisional jet energy loss in non-Abelian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schenke, Bjoern; Strickland, Michael; Dumitru, Adrian; Nara, Yasushi; Greiner, Carsten

    2009-03-15

    We consider momentum broadening and energy loss of high-momentum partons in a hot non-Abelian plasma due to collisions. We solve the coupled system of Wong-Yang-Mills equations on a lattice in real time, including binary hard elastic collisions among the partons. The collision kernel is constructed such that the total collisional energy loss and momentum broadening are lattice-spacing independent. We find that the transport coefficient q corresponding to transverse momentum broadening receives sizable contributions from a power-law tail in the p{sub perpendicular} distribution of high-momentum partons. We establish the scaling of q and of dE/dx with density, temperature, and energy in the weak-coupling regime. We also estimate the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} due to elastic energy loss of a jet in a classical Yang-Mills field.

  13. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Conversion of the energy of fast electrons to thermal plasma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergunova, G. A.; Rozanov, Vladislav B.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis is made of the conversion of the energy of highly energetic fast electrons, generated by the action of CO2 laser radiation on a target, into characteristic radiation emitted by a plasma formed from shell targets which, for instance, may be present inside targets irradiated by the CO2 laser. Analytical formulas are obtained for the temperature of the converted radiation. The results show that it is possible to control this radiation by choosing the parameters of the target and of the fast electron flux. The efficiency of conversion into characteristic thermal radiation is found numerically to be 95%. This method of conversion is more favorable than direct interaction of CO2 laser radiation with a target since the emitting region is localized in the target mass. When a laser interacts with a target the mass of this region increases with time and so the temperature of the emitted radiation is lower than in the case when fast electrons act on the target.

  14. 3-D simulations of magnetic reconnection in high-energy-density laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection has recently been observed and studied in high-energy-density, laser-produced plasmas, in a regime characterized by extremely high magnetic fields, high plasma beta and strong, supersonic plasma inflow. These experiments are interesting both for obtaining fundamental data on reconnection, and may also be relevant for inertial fusion, as this magnetic reconnection geometry, with multiple, colliding, magnetized plasma bubbles occurs naturally inside ICF hohlraums. Previous 2-d particle-in-cell reconnection simulations, with parameters and geometry relevant to the experiments, identified key ingredients for obtaining the very fast reconnection rates, namely two-fluid reconnection mediated by collisionless effects (the Hall current and electron pressure tensor), and strong flux pile-up of the inflowing magnetic field [1]. We present results from extending the previous simulations to 3-d, and discuss 3-d effects in the experiments, including instabilities in the reconnection layer, the topological skeleton of null-null lines, and field-generation from the Biermann battery effect. [4pt] [1] W. Fox, A. Bhattacharjee, and K. Germaschewski, PRL 106, 215003 (2011).

  15. Energy and costs scoping study for plasma pyrolysis thermal processing system

    SciTech Connect

    Sherick, K.E.; Findley, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide information in support of an investigation of thermal technologies as possible treatment process for buried wastes at the INEL. Material and energy balances and a cost estimate were generated for a representative plasma torch-based thermal waste treatment system operating in a pyrolysis mode. Two waste streams were selected which are representative of INEL buried wastes, large in volume, and difficult to treat by other technologies. These streams were a solidified nitrate sludge waste stream and a waste/soil mix of other buried waste components. The treatment scheme selected includes a main plasma chamber operating under pyrolyzing conditions; a plasma afterburner to provide additional residence time at high temperature to ensure complete destruction of hazardous organics; an off-gas treatment system; and a incinerator and stack to oxidize carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and vent the clean, oxidized gases to atmosphere. The material balances generated provide materials flow and equipment duty information of sufficient accuracy to generate initial rough-order-of-magnitude (ROM) system capital and operating cost estimates for a representative plasma thermal processing system.

  16. Ringing After a High-Energy Collision: Ambipolar Oscillations During Impact Plasma Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Stubbs, T. J.

    2012-01-01

    High-velocity impacts on the Moon and other airless bodies deliver energy and material to the lunar surface and exosphere. The target and i mpactor material may become vaporized and ionized to form a collision al plasma that expands outward and eventually becomes collisionless. In the present work, kinetic simulations of the later collision less stage of impact plasma expansion are performed. Attention is paid to characterizing "ambipolar oscillations" in which thermodynamic distur bances propagate outward to generate "ringing" within the expanding e lectron cloud, which could radiate an electromagnetic signature of lo cal plasma conditions. The process is not unlike a beam-plasma intera ction, with the perturbing electron population in the present case ac ting as a highly thermal "beam" that resonates along the expanding de nsity gradient. Understanding the electromagnetic aspects of impact p lasma expansion could provide insight into the lasting effects of nat ural, impact-generated currents on airless surfaces and charging haza rds to human exploration infrastructure and instrumentation.

  17. Experimental, Theoretical and Computational Studies of Plasma-Based Concepts for Future High Energy Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Chan; Mori, W.

    2013-10-21

    This is the final report on the DOE grant number DE-FG02-92ER40727 titled, “Experimental, Theoretical and Computational Studies of Plasma-Based Concepts for Future High Energy Accelerators.” During this grant period the UCLA program on Advanced Plasma Based Accelerators, headed by Professor C. Joshi has made many key scientific advances and trained a generation of students, many of whom have stayed in this research field and even started research programs of their own. In this final report however, we will focus on the last three years of the grant and report on the scientific progress made in each of the four tasks listed under this grant. Four tasks are focused on: Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Research at FACET, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, In House Research at UCLA’s Neptune and 20 TW Laser Laboratories, Laser-Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) in Self Guided Regime: Experiments at the Callisto Laser at LLNL, and Theory and Simulations. Major scientific results have been obtained in each of the four tasks described in this report. These have led to publications in the prestigious scientific journals, graduation and continued training of high quality Ph.D. level students and have kept the U.S. at the forefront of plasma-based accelerators research field.

  18. External control of electron energy distributions in a dual tandem inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Sridhar, Shyam; Zhu, Weiye; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.; Logue, Michael D.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-08-01

    The control of electron energy probability functions (EEPFs) in low pressure partially ionized plasmas is typically accomplished through the format of the applied power. For example, through the use of pulse power, the EEPF can be modulated to produce shapes not possible under continuous wave excitation. This technique uses internal control. In this paper, we discuss a method for external control of EEPFs by transport of electrons between separately powered inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs). The reactor incorporates dual ICP sources (main and auxiliary) in a tandem geometry whose plasma volumes are separated by a grid. The auxiliary ICP is continuously powered while the main ICP is pulsed. Langmuir probe measurements of the EEPFs during the afterglow of the main ICP suggests that transport of hot electrons from the auxiliary plasma provided what is effectively an external source of energetic electrons. The tail of the EEPF and bulk electron temperature were then elevated in the afterglow of the main ICP by this external source of power. Results from a computer simulation for the evolution of the EEPFs concur with measured trends.

  19. External control of electron energy distributions in a dual tandem inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lei; Sridhar, Shyam; Zhu, Weiye; Donnelly, Vincent M. Economou, Demetre J.; Logue, Michael D.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-08-28

    The control of electron energy probability functions (EEPFs) in low pressure partially ionized plasmas is typically accomplished through the format of the applied power. For example, through the use of pulse power, the EEPF can be modulated to produce shapes not possible under continuous wave excitation. This technique uses internal control. In this paper, we discuss a method for external control of EEPFs by transport of electrons between separately powered inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs). The reactor incorporates dual ICP sources (main and auxiliary) in a tandem geometry whose plasma volumes are separated by a grid. The auxiliary ICP is continuously powered while the main ICP is pulsed. Langmuir probe measurements of the EEPFs during the afterglow of the main ICP suggests that transport of hot electrons from the auxiliary plasma provided what is effectively an external source of energetic electrons. The tail of the EEPF and bulk electron temperature were then elevated in the afterglow of the main ICP by this external source of power. Results from a computer simulation for the evolution of the EEPFs concur with measured trends.

  20. Impacts of EV battery production and recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.; Singh, M.

    1996-06-01

    Electric vehicles batteries use energy and produce environmental residuals when they are produced and recycled. This study estimates, for four selected battery types (sodium-sulfur, nickel-metal hydride, nickel-cadmium, and advanced lead-acid), the impacts of production and recycling of the materials used in electric vehicle batteries. These impacts are compared, with special attention to the locations of the emissions. It is found that the choice among batteries for electric vehicles involves tradeoffs among impacts. Nickel-cadmium and nickel-metal hydride batteries are similar, for example, but energy requirements for the production of cadmium electrodes may be higher than those for metal hydride electrodes, while the latter may be more difficult to recycle.

  1. Towards sustainability in water recycling.

    PubMed

    Sala, L; Serra, M

    2004-01-01

    Those like us who believe in and spread the gospel of planned wastewater reclamation and reuse usually emphasize that this is a step towards sustainability in water resource management, but this is something that is very seldom analyzed. This paper discusses, from a critical point of view, issues such as goals in water reuse and influence on water demands, ecological analysis of the cycle of the main pollutants, health aspects and treatment requirements, energy consumption and measurable environmental benefits, in order to provide a set of criteria to assess sustainability in water recycling projects and to decrease the impact of the cultural water cycle on the environment. PMID:15344766

  2. Towards sustainability in water recycling.

    PubMed

    Sala, L; Serra, M

    2004-01-01

    Those like us who believe in and spread the gospel of planned wastewater reclamation and reuse usually emphasize that this is a step towards sustainability in water resource management, but this is something that is very seldom analyzed. This paper discusses, from a critical point of view, issues such as goals in water reuse and influence on water demands, ecological analysis of the cycle of the main pollutants, health aspects and treatment requirements, energy consumption and measurable environmental benefits, in order to provide a set of criteria to assess sustainability in water recycling projects and to decrease the impact of the cultural water cycle on the environment.

  3. Solar High-energy Astrophysical Plasmas Explorer (SHAPE). Volume 1: Proposed concept, statement of work and cost plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Martin, Franklin D.; Prince, T.; Lin, R.; Bruner, M.; Culhane, L.; Ramaty, R.; Doschek, G.; Emslie, G.; Lingenfelter, R.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of the Solar High-Energy Astrophysical Plasmas Explorer (SHAPE) is studied. The primary goal is to understand the impulsive release of energy, efficient acceleration of particles to high energies, and rapid transport of energy. Solar flare studies are the centerpieces of the investigation because in flares these high energy processes can be studied in unmatched detail at most wavelenth regions of the electromagnetic spectrum as well as in energetic charged particles and neutrons.

  4. Nanodomain stabilization dynamics in plasma membranes of biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Tamal; Maiti, Tapas K.; Chakraborty, Suman

    2011-02-01

    We discover that a synergistically amplifying role of stabilizing membrane proteins and continuous lipid recycling can explain the physics governing the stability, polydispersity, and dynamics of lipid raft domains in plasma membranes of biological cells. We establish the conjecture using a generalized order parameter based on theoretical formalism, endorsed by detailed scaling arguments and domain mapping. Quantitative agreements with morphological distributions of raft complexes, as obtained from Förster resonance energy transfer based visualization, support the present theoretical conjecture.

  5. Management of recyclable fissile and fertile materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bertel, Evelyne; Dujardin, Thierry

    2007-07-01

    The possibility to recycle fuel is a very attractive - nearly unique - feature of nuclear energy systems. Fissile and fertile materials that are contained in spent nuclear fuels and enrichment plant tails for example may be retrieved and re-used to provide additional energy and reduce the amount and toxicity of ultimate waste to be sent to repositories. While recycling becomes increasingly attractive in the context of renewed interest for nuclear energy and of sustainable development goals, extended interim storage and direct disposal of recyclable materials remain options favoured by many countries. Recyclable materials which are not intended to be re-used may be disposed of in a safe way guaranteeing their isolation from the biosphere over very long periods of time until they become harmless for humans and the environment. The study on recyclable fissile and fertile materials published in 2007 by the OECD was carried out by its Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in order to review technical, strategic and policy issues raised by the management of those materials and to provide some insights on the opportunities and challenges offered by alternative options in this regard. The materials considered include: spent fuel; depleted uranium from enrichment plant tails; separated uranium and plutonium from commercial reprocessing plants; ex-military materials (highly enriched uranium and plutonium) declared excess to national security by the Russian Federation and the United States; and thorium inventories. The present paper is based on the analyses, findings and conclusions from the NEA study. It provides overview on the quantities and potential energetic value of recyclable materials available worldwide. The main advantages and drawbacks of the two management options that may be adopted are described. Some findings and conclusions are drawn from the identification and analysis of economic, social and environmental indicators associated with each option that need to be taken

  6. Recycler lattice for Project X at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Meiqin; Johnson, David E.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    Project X is an intense proton source that provides beam for various physics programs. The source consists of an 8 GeV H- superconducting linac that injects into the Fermilab Recycler where H- are converted to protons. Protons are provided to the Main Injector and accelerated to desired energy (in the range 60-120 GeV) or extracted from the Recycler for the 8 GeV program. A long drift space is needed to accommodate the injection chicane with stripping foils. The Recycler is a fixed 8 GeV kinetic energy storage ring using permanent gradient magnets. A phase trombone straight section is used to control the tunes. In this paper, the existing FODO lattice in RR10 straight section being converted into doublet will be described. Due to this change, the phase trombone straight section has to be modified to bring the tunes to the nominal working point. A toy lattice of recycler ring is designed to simulate the end-shim effects of each permanent gradient magnet to add the flexibility to handle the tune shift to the lattice during the operation of 1.6E14 with KV distribution of the proton beam to give {approx}0.05 of space charge tune shift. The comparison or the combinations of the two modification ways for the Recycler ring lattice will be presented also in this paper.

  7. Redefining recycling: Everything is a product

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, B.

    1995-10-01

    Texas-based Chaparral Steel has redefined recycling, not only in its environmental responses, but in the managerial direction of the company itself. Through Project STAR (Systems and Technology for Advanced Recycling), Chaparral has reduced its resources consumption, enhanced its by-products value and reduced waste in areas ranging from mill scale and solvents to water and energy. Chaparral represents an industry rooted in recycling. Steel is the world`s most recycled material, and electric-arc furnace (EAF) steelmakers rely on recycled material as their primary raw resource. In 1994, the entire US EAF industry produced 35 million tons of steel. Chaparral, one of the largest EAF steelmakers, produced 1.41 million tons that same year, with much of its raw material provided by its on-site automobile shredder. Along with steel, the industry produces huge amounts of waste. Chaparral initiated Project STAR in conjunction with an adjacent cement plant owned and operated by Chaparral`s parent company, Texas Industries, Inc. (TXI). The project mission was to develop synergies between the two facilities to reduce or eliminate hazardous waste generation, create new products, conserve energy and resources and protect the environment. The challenge was to apply technologies that would achieve both environmental and economic objectives that address a number of different waste streams, including hazardous waste.

  8. Design of a High-Energy, Two-Stage Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, T. E.; Thio, Y. C. F.; Cassibry, J. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Design details of a proposed high-energy (approx. 50 kJ/pulse), two-stage pulsed plasma thruster are presented. The long-term goal of this project is to develop a high-power (approx. 500 kW), high specific impulse (approx. 7500 s), highly efficient (approx. 50%),and mechanically simple thruster for use as primary propulsion in a high-power nuclear electric propulsion system. The proposed thruster (PRC-PPT1) utilizes a valveless, liquid lithium-fed thermal plasma injector (first stage) followed by a high-energy pulsed electromagnetic accelerator (second stage). A numerical circuit model coupled with one-dimensional current sheet dynamics, as well as a numerical MHD simulation, are used to qualitatively predict the thermal plasma injection and current sheet dynamics, as well as to estimate the projected performance of the thruster. A set of further modelling efforts, and the experimental testing of a prototype thruster, is suggested to determine the feasibility of demonstrating a full scale high-power thruster.

  9. Compact disposal of high-energy electron beams using passive or laser-driven plasma decelerating stage

    SciTech Connect

    Bonatto, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Vay, J. -L.; Geddes, C. R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey and, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2014-07-13

    A plasma decelerating stage is investigated as a compact alternative for the disposal of high-energy beams (beam dumps). This could benefit the design of laser-driven plasma accelerator (LPA) applications that require transportability and or high-repetition-rate operation regimes. Passive and laser-driven (active) plasma-based beam dumps are studied analytically and with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in a 1D geometry. Analytical estimates for the beam energy loss are compared to and extended by the PIC simulations, showing that with the proposed schemes a beam can be efficiently decelerated in a centimeter-scale distance.

  10. Interaction of the high energy deuterons with the graphite target in the plasma focus devices based on Lee model

    SciTech Connect

    Akel, M. Alsheikh Salo, S.; Ismael, Sh.; Saw, S. H.; Lee, S.

    2014-07-15

    Numerical experiments are systematically carried out using the Lee model code extended to compute the ion beams on various plasma focus devices operated with Deuterium gas. The deuteron beam properties of the plasma focus are studied for low and high energy plasma focus device. The energy spectral distribution for deuteron ions ejected from the pinch plasma is calculated and the ion numbers with energy around 1 MeV is then determined. The deuteron–graphite target interaction is studied for different conditions. The yield of the reaction {sup 12}C(d,n){sup 13}N and the induced radioactivity for one and multi shots plasma focus devices in the graphite solid target is investigated. Our results present the optimized high energy repetitive plasma focus devices as an alternative to accelerators for the production of {sup 13}N short lived radioisotopes. However, technical challenges await solutions on two fronts: (a) operation of plasma focus machines at high rep rates for a sufficient period of time (b) design of durable targets that can take the thermal load.

  11. Energy distribution of electron flux at electrodes in a low pressure capacitively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Shahid; Dorf, Leonid; Kenney, Jason; Collins, Ken

    2013-01-01

    A one-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) model is used to examine the energy distribution of electron flux at electrodes [labeled ge(ɛ,t), where ɛ is energy and t is time] in a low pressure 60 MHz capacitively coupled Ar discharge. The effect of gas pressure and an auxiliary DC voltage on ge(ɛ,t) is also investigated. It is found that the electrons only leave the plasma for a short time period during the radio-frequency (RF) cycle when the sheath collapses at the electrode. Furthermore, majority of the exiting electrons have energies below 10 eV with a distribution ge(ɛ,t) that is narrow in both energy and time. At relatively high pressures (≥4.67 Pa for the conditions considered), the relationship between the time-average distribution ge(ɛ) and electron temperature in the plasma (Te) can be easily established. Below 4.67 Pa, kinetic effects become important, making it difficult to interpret ge(ɛ) in terms of Te. At low pressures, ge(ɛ,t) is found to broaden in both energy and time except for a narrow pressure range around 1.2 Pa where the distribution narrows temporally. These low pressure kinetic phenomena are observed when the electrons can be accelerated by expanding sheaths to speeds that allow them to traverse the inter-electrode distance quickly (<1.5 RF cycles for conditions considered) and when electrons undergo few collisions during this excursion. The mean energy of exiting electrons increases with decreasing gas pressure, especially below 1.0 Pa, due to higher Te and secondary electrons retaining a larger fraction of the energy they gained during initial sheath acceleration. For the relatively small DC voltages examined (|Vdc|/Vrf ≤ 0.15), the application of a negative DC voltage on an electrode decreases the electron flux there but has a weak impact on the ge profile.

  12. High energy electron fluxes in dc-augmented capacitively coupled plasmas I. Fundamental characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingmei; Kushner, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Power deposition from electrons in capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs) has components from stochastic heating, Joule heating, and from the acceleration of secondary electrons through sheaths produced by ion, electron, or photon bombardment of electrodes. The sheath accelerated electrons can produce high energy beams which, in addition to producing excitation and ionization in the gas can penetrate through the plasma and be incident on the opposite electrode. In the use of CCPs for microelectronics fabrication, there may be an advantage to having these high energy electrons interact with the wafer. To control the energy and increase the flux of the high energy electrons, a dc bias can be externally imposed on the electrode opposite the wafer, thereby producing a dc-augmented CCP (dc-CCP). In this paper, the characteristics of dc-CCPs will be discussed using results from a computational study. We found that for a given rf bias power, beams of high energy electrons having a narrow angular spread (<1°) can be produced incident on the wafer. The maximum energy in the high energy electron flux scales as ɛmax=-Vdc+Vrf+Vrf0, for a voltage on the dc electrode of Vdc, rf voltage of Vrf, and dc bias on the rf electrode of Vrf0. The dc current from the biased electrode must return to ground through surfaces other than the rf electrode and so seeks out a ground plane, typically the side walls. If the side wall is coated with a poorly conducting polymer, the surface will charge to drive the dc current through.

  13. Subsonic and Supersonic shear flows in laser driven high-energy-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Gillespie, R. S.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Kuranz, C. C.; Visco, A.; Ditmar, J. R.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Bono, M. J.; Plewa, T.

    2009-05-01

    Shear flows arise in many high-energy-density (HED) and astrophysical systems, yet few laboratory experiments have been carried out to study their evolution in these extreme environments. Fundamentally, shear flows can initiate mixing via the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability and may eventually drive a transition to turbulence. We present two dedicated shear flow experiments that created subsonic and supersonic shear layers in HED plasmas. In the subsonic case the Omega laser was used to drive a shock wave along a rippled plastic interface, which subsequently rolled-upped into large KH vortices. In the supersonic shear experiment the Nike laser was used to drive Al plasma across a low-density foam surface also seeded with a ripple. Unlike the subsonic case, detached shocks developed around the ripples in response to the supersonic Al flow.

  14. The energy associated with MHD waves generation in the solar wind plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    delaTorre, A.

    1995-01-01

    Gyrotropic symmetry is usually assumed in measurements of electron distribution functions in the heliosphere. This prevents the calculation of a net current perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. Previous theoretical results derived by one of the authors for a collisionless plasma with isotropic electrons in a strong magnetic field have shown that the excitation of MHD modes becomes possible when the external perpendicular current is non-zero. We consider then that any anisotropic electron population can be thought of as 'external', interacting with the remaining plasma through the self-consistent electromagnetic field. From this point of view any perpendicular current may be due to the anisotropic electrons, or to an external source like a stream, or to both. As perpendicular currents cannot be derived from the measured distribution functions, we resort to Ampere's law and experimental data of magnetic field fluctuations. The transfer of energy between MHD modes and external currents is then discussed.

  15. Electron energy transport in ion waves and its relevance to laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Electron energy transport in plasmas is examined in the context of ion waves which are intermediate between collisionless isothermal ion acoustic waves and collisional adiabatic sound waves. The conductivity is found to be much less than the Spitzer-Haerm result for wavelengths less than 1000 electron mean free paths. This is expected to be relevant to laser-produced ablating plasmas in which the temperature can vary considerably over a distance of 10 to 100 mean free paths. The reduction in conductivity is independent of the wave amplitude thus differing from the reduction due to saturation found recently by numerical solution of the Fokker--Planck equation. At short wavelengths the heat flow approaches an upper limit which depends on the phase velocity of the wave. Diffusive ion wave damping is strong over a large range of wavelengths.

  16. New developments in energy transfer and transport studies in relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norreys, P. A.; Green, J. S.; Lancaster, K. L.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Scott, R. H. H.; Perez, F.; Schlenvoight, H.-P.; Baton, S.; Hulin, S.; Vauzour, B.; Santos, J. J.; Adams, D. J.; Markey, K.; Ramakrishna, B.; Zepf, M.; Quinn, M. N.; Yuan, X. H.; McKenna, P.; Schreiber, J.; Davies, J. R.; Higginson, D. P.; Beg, F. N.; Chen, C.; Ma, T.; Patel, P.

    2010-12-01

    Two critical issues related to the success of fast ignition inertial fusion have been vigorously investigated in a co-ordinated campaign in the European Union and the United States. These are the divergence of the fast electron beam generated in intense, PW laser-plasma interactions and the fast electron energy transport with the use of high intensity contrast ratio laser pulses. Proof is presented that resistivity gradient-induced magnetic fields can guide fast electrons over significant distances in (initially) cold metallic targets. Comparison of experiments undertaken in both France and the United States suggests that an important factor in obtaining efficient coupling into dense plasma is the irradiation with high intensity contrast ratio laser pulses, rather than the colour of the laser pulse itself.

  17. Effect of Radial Density Configuration on Wave Field and Energy Flow in Axially Uniform Helicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lei; Li, Qingchong; Zhang, Huijie; Li, Yinghong; Wu, Yun; Zhang, Bailing; Zhuang, Zhong

    2016-08-01

    The effect of the radial density configuration in terms of width, edge gradient and volume gradient on the wave field and energy flow in an axially uniform helicon plasma is studied in detail. A three-parameter function is employed to describe the density, covering uniform, parabolic, linear and Gaussian profiles. It finds that the fraction of power deposition near the plasma edge increases with density width and edge gradient, and decays in exponential and “bump-on-tail” profiles, respectively, away from the surface. The existence of a positive second-order derivative in the volume density configuration promotes the power deposition near the plasma core, which to our best knowledge has not been pointed out before. The transverse structures of wave field and current density remain almost the same during the variation of density width and gradient, confirming the robustness of the m=1 mode observed previously. However, the structure of the electric wave field changes significantly from a uniform density configuration, for which the coupling between the Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) mode and the helicon mode is very strong, to non-uniform ones. The energy flow in the cross section of helicon plasma is presented for the first time, and behaves sensitive to the density width and edge gradient but insensitive to the volume gradient. Interestingly, the radial distribution of power deposition resembles the radial profile of the axial component of current density, suggesting the control of the power deposition profile in the experiment by particularly designing the antenna geometry to excite a required axial current distribution. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11405271)

  18. Recycling in a megacity.

    PubMed

    Themelis, Nickolas J; Todd, Claire E

    2004-04-01

    In the aftermath of the 9/11 disaster, Mayor Bloomberg of New York City unveiled an aggressive budget plan that included the temporary suspension of glass and plastics recycling. This was considered by many to be anti-environmental, but the results of this study show that for lack of markets, even at zero or negative prices, nearly 90% of the plastic and glass set aside by thoughtful New Yorkers was transported to materials recovery facilities (MRFs) and from there to landfills. Sending bales of plastics to landfills is not limited to New York City. It is an environmental paradox that the United States is digging up new oil fields in pristine areas and, at the same time, continues to convert greenfields to brownfields by burying nearly 20 million tons of plastic fuel annually. The study also determined that at the present rate of source separation, estimated to be less than 30% of the available recyclables in 1999, building large, modern MRFs may increase substantially the rate of New York City recycling and also allow single-stream collection of commingled recyclables, as is done in Phoenix, AZ. Single-stream collection simplifies separation at the source by citizens and increases the amount of collected recyclables. Also, because collection represents a large fraction of the costs of waste management, it may have a significant economic advantage.

  19. Recycling of Reinforced Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R. D.; Collins, Andrew; Cooper, Duncan; Wingfield-Digby, Mark; Watts-Farmer, Archibald; Laurence, Anna; Patel, Kayur; Stevens, Mark; Watkins, Rhodri

    2014-02-01

    This work has shown is that it is possible to recycle continuous and short fibre reinforced thermosetting resins while keeping almost the whole of the original material, both fibres and matrix, within the recyclate. By splitting, crushing hot or cold, and hot forming, it is possible to create a recyclable material, which we designate a Remat, which can then be used to remanufacture other shapes, examples of plates and tubes being demonstrated. Not only can remanufacturing be done, but it has been shown that over 50 % of the original mechanical properties, such as the E modulus, tensile strength, and interlaminar shear strength, can be retained. Four different forms of composite were investigated, a random mat Glass Fibre Reinforced Plastic (GFRP) bathroom component and boat hull, woven glass and carbon fibre cloth impregnated with an epoxy resin, and unidirectional carbon fibre pre-preg. One of the main factors found to affect composite recyclability was the type of resin matrix used in the composite. Thermoset resins tested were shown to have a temperature range around the Glass Transition Temperature (Tg) where they exhibit ductile behaviour, hence aiding reforming of the material. The high-grade carbon fibre prepreg was found to be less easy to recycle than the woven of random fibre laminates. One method of remanufacturing was by heating the Remat to above its glass transition temperature, bending it to shape, and then cooling it. However, unless precautions are taken, the geometric form may revert. This does not happen with the crushed material.

  20. Electrostatic energy analyzer measurements of low energy zirconium beam parameters in a plasma sputter-type negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Malapit, Giovanni M; Mahinay, Christian Lorenz S; Poral, Matthew D; Ramos, Henry J

    2012-02-01

    A plasma sputter-type negative ion source is utilized to produce and detect negative Zr ions with energies between 150 and 450 eV via a retarding potential-type electrostatic energy analyzer. Traditional and modified semi-cylindrical Faraday cups (FC) inside the analyzer are employed to sample negative Zr ions and measure corresponding ion currents. The traditional FC registered indistinct ion current readings which are attributed to backscattering of ions and secondary electron emissions. The modified Faraday cup with biased repeller guard ring, cut out these signal distortions leaving only ringings as issues which are theoretically compensated by fitting a sigmoidal function into the data. The mean energy and energy spread are calculated using the ion current versus retarding potential data while the beam width values are determined from the data of the transverse measurement of ion current. The most energetic negative Zr ions yield tighter energy spread at 4.11 eV compared to the least energetic negative Zr ions at 4.79 eV. The smallest calculated beam width is 1.04 cm for the negative Zr ions with the highest mean energy indicating a more focused beam in contrast to the less energetic negative Zr ions due to space charge forces.