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Sample records for plasma internal inductance

  1. Effects of capacitance termination of the internal antenna in inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, K.; Konishi, K.; Nakamura, K.; Sugai, H.

    2000-05-01

    In a conventional inductive rf discharge, the electrostatic coupling from the coil to the plasma causes a serous problem of sputtering of any dielectric materials in the vicinity of the coil. This paper reports the suppression of the electrostatic coupling by terminating the coil (inductance L ) with a capacitor (capacitance C ). The suppression resonantly takes place when the termination reactance (1/icons/Journals/Common/omega" ALT="omega" ALIGN="TOP"/> C ) coincides with a half of the coil reactance (icons/Journals/Common/omega" ALT="omega" ALIGN="TOP"/> L ). In this condition, the plasma density is observed to increase by ~50% at the same input power, in comparison with the conventional internal antenna inductively coupled plasma without the capacitance termination. The electrical transmission-line properties of the coil well account for the termination capacitance dependence of the coil voltages, currents, plasma potential oscillation, plasma density and dc self-bias voltage.

  2. Low-impedance internal linear inductive antenna for large-area flat panel display plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.N.; Jung, S.J.; Lee, Y.J.; Yeom, G.Y.; Lee, S.H.; Lee, J.K.

    2005-03-15

    An internal-type linear inductive antenna, that is, a double-comb-type antenna, was developed for a large-area plasma source having the size of 1020 mmx830 mm, and high density plasmas on the order of 2.3x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} were obtained with 15 mTorr Ar at 5000 W of inductive power with good plasma stability. This is higher than that for the conventional serpentine-type antenna, possibly due to the low impedance, resulting in high efficiency of power transfer for the double-comb antenna type. In addition, due to the remarkable reduction of the antenna length, a plasma uniformity of less than 8% was obtained within the substrate area of 880 mmx660 mm at 5000 W without having a standing-wave effect.

  3. Induction plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, D.E.

    1982-07-02

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  4. Induction plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Donald E.

    1984-01-01

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  5. Reduced electron temperature in a magnetized inductively-coupled plasma with internal coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arancibia Monreal, J.; Chabert, P.; Godyak, V.

    2013-10-01

    The effect of magnetic filtering on the electron energy distribution function is studied in an inductive discharge with internal coil coupling. The coil is placed inside the plasma and driven by a low-frequency power supply (5.8 MHz) which leads to a very high power transfer efficiency. A permanent dipole magnet may be placed inside the internal coil to produce a static magnetic field around 100 Gauss. The coil and the matching system are designed to minimize the capacitive coupling to the plasma. Capacitive coupling is quantified by measuring the radiofrequency (rf) plasma potential with a capacitive probe. Without the permanent magnet, the rf plasma potential is significantly smaller than the electron temperature. When the magnet is present, the rf plasma potential increases. The electron energy distribution function is measured as a function of space with and without the permanent magnet. When the magnet is present, electrons are cooled down to low temperature in the downstream region. This region of low electron temperature may be useful for plasma processing applications, as well as for efficient negative ion production.

  6. Reduced electron temperature in a magnetized inductively-coupled plasma with internal coil

    SciTech Connect

    Arancibia Monreal, J.; Chabert, P.; Godyak, V.

    2013-10-15

    The effect of magnetic filtering on the electron energy distribution function is studied in an inductive discharge with internal coil coupling. The coil is placed inside the plasma and driven by a low-frequency power supply (5.8 MHz) which leads to a very high power transfer efficiency. A permanent dipole magnet may be placed inside the internal coil to produce a static magnetic field around 100 Gauss. The coil and the matching system are designed to minimize the capacitive coupling to the plasma. Capacitive coupling is quantified by measuring the radiofrequency (rf) plasma potential with a capacitive probe. Without the permanent magnet, the rf plasma potential is significantly smaller than the electron temperature. When the magnet is present, the rf plasma potential increases. The electron energy distribution function is measured as a function of space with and without the permanent magnet. When the magnet is present, electrons are cooled down to low temperature in the downstream region. This region of low electron temperature may be useful for plasma processing applications, as well as for efficient negative ion production.

  7. [Interest and limits of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for urinary diagnosis of radionuclide internal contamination].

    PubMed

    Lecompte, Yannick; Bohand, Sandra; Laroche, Pierre; Cazoulat, Alain

    2013-01-01

    After a review of radiometric reference methods used in radiotoxicology, analytical performance of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the workplace urinary diagnosis of internal contamination by radionuclides are evaluated. A literature review (covering the period from 2000 to 2012) is performed to identify the different applications of ICP-MS in radiotoxicology for urine analysis. The limits of detection are compared to the recommendations of the International commission on radiological protection (ICRP 78: "Individual monitoring for internal exposure of workers"). Except one publication describing the determination of strontium-90 (β emitter), all methods using ICP-MS reported in the literature concern actinides (α emitters). For radionuclides with a radioactive period higher than 10(4) years, limits of detection are most often in compliance with ICRP publication 78 and frequently lower than radiometric methods. ICP-MS allows the specific determination of plutonium-239 + 240 isotopes which cannot be discriminated by α spectrometry. High resolution ICP-MS can also measure uranium isotopic ratios in urine for total uranium concentrations lower than 20 ng/L. The interest of ICP-MS in radiotoxicology concerns essentially the urinary measurement of long radioactive period actinides, particularly for uranium isotope ratio determination and 239 and 240 plutonium isotopes discrimination. Radiometric methods remain the most efficient for the majority of other radionuclides.

  8. Inductively coupled helium plasma torch

    DOEpatents

    Montaser, Akbar; Chan, Shi-Kit; Van Hoven, Raymond L.

    1989-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma torch including a base member, a plasma tube and a threaded insert member within the plasma tube for directing the plasma gas in a tangential flow pattern. The design of the torch eliminates the need for a separate coolant gas tube. The torch can be readily assembled and disassembled with a high degree of alignment accuracy.

  9. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    DOEpatents

    Manning, Thomas J.; Palmer, Byron A.; Hof, Douglas E.

    1990-01-01

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy.

  10. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    DOEpatents

    Manning, T.J.; Palmer, B.A.; Hof, D.E.

    1990-11-06

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies is disclosed. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy. 1 fig.

  11. Plasma-heating by induction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, K.; Thorpe, M. L.

    1969-01-01

    Induction-heated plasma torch operates with an input of 1 Mw of direct current of which 71 percent is transferred to the plasma and the remainder is consumed by electrical losses in the system. Continuous operation of the torch should be possible for as long as 5,000 hours.

  12. Starter for inductively coupled plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Donald E.; Bieniewski, Thomas M.

    1988-01-01

    A starter assembly is provided for use with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) tube to reliably initate a plasma at internal pressures above about 30 microns. A conductive probe is inserted within the inductor coil about the tube and insulated from the tube shield assembly. A capacitive circuit is arranged for momentarily connecting a high voltage radio-frequency generator to the probe while simultaneously energizing the coil. When the plasma is initiated the probe is disconnected from the generator and electrically connected to the shield assembly for operation.

  13. Starter for inductively coupled plasma tube

    DOEpatents

    Hull, D.E.; Bieniewski, T.M.

    1988-08-23

    A starter assembly is provided for use with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) tube to reliably initiate a plasma at internal pressures above about 30 microns. A conductive probe is inserted within the inductor coil about the tube and insulated from the tube shield assembly. A capacitive circuit is arranged for momentarily connecting a high voltage radio-frequency generator to the probe while simultaneously energizing the coil. When the plasma is initiated the probe is disconnected from the generator and electrically connected to the shield assembly for operation. 1 fig.

  14. Mobile inductively coupled plasma system

    DOEpatents

    D'Silva, Arthur P.; Jaselskis, Edward J.

    1999-03-30

    A system for sampling and analyzing a material located at a hazardous site. A laser located remote from the hazardous site is connected to an optical fiber, which directs laser radiation proximate the material at the hazardous site. The laser radiation abates a sample of the material. An inductively coupled plasma is located remotely from the material. An aerosol transport system carries the ablated particles to a plasma, where they are dissociated, atomized and excited to provide characteristic optical reduction of the elemental constituents of the sample. An optical spectrometer is located remotely from the site. A second optical fiber is connected to the optical spectrometer at one end and the plasma source at the other end to carry the optical radiation from the plasma source to the spectrometer.

  15. Mobile inductively coupled plasma system

    DOEpatents

    D`Silva, A.P.; Jaselskis, E.J.

    1999-03-30

    A system is described for sampling and analyzing a material located at a hazardous site. A laser located remotely from the hazardous site is connected to an optical fiber, which directs laser radiation proximate the material at the hazardous site. The laser radiation abates a sample of the material. An inductively coupled plasma is located remotely from the material. An aerosol transport system carries the ablated particles to a plasma, where they are dissociated, atomized and excited to provide characteristic optical reduction of the elemental constituents of the sample. An optical spectrometer is located remotely from the site. A second optical fiber is connected to the optical spectrometer at one end and the plasma source at the other end to carry the optical radiation from the plasma source to the spectrometer. 10 figs.

  16. Study on the heavy metal bioconcentrations of the Shadegan international wetland mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis, by inductively coupled plasma technique.

    PubMed

    Nasirian, Hassan; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Hosseini, Mostafa; Vazirianzadeh, Babak; Sadeghi, Sayyed Mohammad Taghi; Nazmara, Shahrokh

    2013-07-25

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the levels of heavy metal bioconcentration of the mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) in Shadegan international wetland. Sampling including the water, waterbed sediment and mosquitofish was carried out from the selected sampling sites during October and November 2011, and analyzed by the ICP-OES. Results show that the water has poor qualitative condition, according to EPA and WHO water quality standards. The level of the water Cr in the selected sites in both months and the levels of Fe, Mn and Zn during October in the SW1 site were higher than the instrumental detection limits indicating that the water was contaminated with these metals in the mentioned sites and months. The levels of the waterbed sediment As, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn, and mosquitofish Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn, Co and Cd were much higher than the instrumental detection limits, indicating that the waterbed sediment and mosquitofish were contaminated with them during October and November in the selected sites. Statistical assessments reveal that there is a significant difference between the mentioned contaminated water, waterbed sediment and mosquitofish heavy metals (all P-values < 0.05). In overall, it is considered that the contaminated heavy metals can be accumulated in the waterbed sediment and bioconcentrated in the wildlife tissues, then finally can be entered in the marine food chains and biomagnified there after long periods. In conclusion, this paper confirmed that the G. affinis can be used as a bioindicator of heavy metal pollution in marine ecosystems such as wetlands.

  17. Study on the heavy metal bioconcentrations of the Shadegan international wetland mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis, by inductively coupled plasma technique

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the levels of heavy metal bioconcentration of the mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) in Shadegan international wetland. Sampling including the water, waterbed sediment and mosquitofish was carried out from the selected sampling sites during October and November 2011, and analyzed by the ICP-OES. Results show that the water has poor qualitative condition, according to EPA and WHO water quality standards. The level of the water Cr in the selected sites in both months and the levels of Fe, Mn and Zn during October in the SW1 site were higher than the instrumental detection limits indicating that the water was contaminated with these metals in the mentioned sites and months. The levels of the waterbed sediment As, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn, and mosquitofish Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn, Co and Cd were much higher than the instrumental detection limits, indicating that the waterbed sediment and mosquitofish were contaminated with them during October and November in the selected sites. Statistical assessments reveal that there is a significant difference between the mentioned contaminated water, waterbed sediment and mosquitofish heavy metals (all P-values < 0.05). In overall, it is considered that the contaminated heavy metals can be accumulated in the waterbed sediment and bioconcentrated in the wildlife tissues, then finally can be entered in the marine food chains and biomagnified there after long periods. In conclusion, this paper confirmed that the G. affinis can be used as a bioindicator of heavy metal pollution in marine ecosystems such as wetlands. PMID:24499681

  18. Inductively generated streaming plasma ion source

    DOEpatents

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.; Greenly, John B.

    2006-07-25

    A novel pulsed, neutralized ion beam source is provided. The source uses pulsed inductive breakdown of neutral gas, and magnetic acceleration and control of the resulting plasma, to form a beam. The beam supplies ions for applications requiring excellent control of ion species, low remittance, high current density, and spatial uniformity.

  19. Inductively coupled plasma source for VASIMR engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godyak, V. A.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Sydorenko, D. Y.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Shevchenko, V. I.

    2004-11-01

    Various devices for plasma production differ in the way of plasma coupling to the electrical energy source. Power losses in the chain from the AC power line to the power deposited into the electrons are the most important for the overall efficiency of the plasma source while the losses to ionization, radiation and walls are typically very similar and do not depend on a mechanism of the electron interaction with the electromagnetic field. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) discharges with ferromagnetic cores, seems to be the most suitable candidate for a primary plasma source for VASIMR engine. Such commercial ICPs have coupling efficiency up to 98% (99% in laboratory devices). Combined with compact and efficient (90-95%) rf power converters operating at f < 1 MHz, it will allow to achieve high overall efficiency of plasma production and reduce the energy cost of the ion in the first stage plasma source. An important advantage of such sources is the ability to continuously work in a wide dynamic range (two orders of magnitude) of plasma density contrary to e.g. helicon sources where efficient operation is possible only on certain discrete modes (and plasma density) with discontinuous transitions between them.

  20. Pulsed Inductive Plasma Acceleration: Performance Optimization Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.

    2014-01-01

    Optimization criteria for pulsed inductive plasma acceleration are developed using an acceleration model consisting of a set of coupled circuit equations describing the time-varying current in the thruster and a one-dimensional momentum equation. The model is nondimensionalized, resulting in the identification of several scaling parameters that are varied to optimize the performance of the thruster. The analysis reveals the benefits of underdamped current waveforms and leads to a performance optimization criterion that requires the matching of the natural period of the discharge and the acceleration timescale imposed by the inertia of the working gas. In addition, the performance increases when a greater fraction of the propellant is initially located nearer to the inductive acceleration coil. While the dimensionless model uses a constant temperature formulation in calculating performance, the scaling parameters that yield the optimum performance are shown to be relatively invariant if a self-consistent description of energy in the plasma is instead used.

  1. Thyristor stack for pulsed inductive plasma generation

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, C.; Jacoby, J.; Schweizer, W.; Wiechula, J.

    2009-03-15

    A thyristor stack for pulsed inductive plasma generation has been developed and tested. The stack design includes a free wheeling diode assembly for current reversal. Triggering of the device is achieved by a high side biased, self supplied gate driver unit using gating energy derived from a local snubber network. The structure guarantees a hard firing gate pulse for the required high dI/dt application. A single fiber optic command is needed to achieve a simultaneous turn on of the thyristors. The stack assembly is used for switching a series resonant circuit with a ringing frequency of 30 kHz. In the prototype pulsed power system described here an inductive discharge has been generated with a pulse duration of 120 {mu}s and a pulse energy of 50 J. A maximum power transfer efficiency of 84% and a peak power of 480 kW inside the discharge were achieved. System tests were performed with a purely inductive load and an inductively generated plasma acting as a load through transformer action at a voltage level of 4.1 kV, a peak current of 5 kA, and a current switching rate of 1 kA/{mu}s.

  2. Thyristor stack for pulsed inductive plasma generation.

    PubMed

    Teske, C; Jacoby, J; Schweizer, W; Wiechula, J

    2009-03-01

    A thyristor stack for pulsed inductive plasma generation has been developed and tested. The stack design includes a free wheeling diode assembly for current reversal. Triggering of the device is achieved by a high side biased, self supplied gate driver unit using gating energy derived from a local snubber network. The structure guarantees a hard firing gate pulse for the required high dI/dt application. A single fiber optic command is needed to achieve a simultaneous turn on of the thyristors. The stack assembly is used for switching a series resonant circuit with a ringing frequency of 30 kHz. In the prototype pulsed power system described here an inductive discharge has been generated with a pulse duration of 120 micros and a pulse energy of 50 J. A maximum power transfer efficiency of 84% and a peak power of 480 kW inside the discharge were achieved. System tests were performed with a purely inductive load and an inductively generated plasma acting as a load through transformer action at a voltage level of 4.1 kV, a peak current of 5 kA, and a current switching rate of 1 kA/micros.

  3. Electrical Coupling Efficiency of Inductive Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Adam K.; Eskridge, Richard H.

    2005-01-01

    A single-stage pulsed inductive plasma accelerator is modeled as an inductive mass-driver. The plasma is treated as a rigid slug, which acts as the armature. The system is a transformer, with the drive coil serving as the primary and the slug as the secondary. We derive a set of coupled dynamic-circuit equations, which depend on five dimensionless coefficients, and on the functional form of the mutual inductance profile, M (z). For a given coil geometry, M (z) was determined experimentally and compared to the results of calculations carried out with QuickField. The equations are solved with various coefficient values, in order to determine the conditions that yield high efficiencies. It was found that the coupling efficiency can be quite high and likely scales with power, although this does not preclude operation at lower power with acceptable efficiency. The effect of an imbedded magnetic bias flux, as for the case of a plasmoid thruster, was also included in the calculations.

  4. Plasma instabilities in electronegative inductive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marakhtanov, Alexei Mikhail

    Plasma instabilities have been observed in low-pressure inductive discharges, in the transition between low density capacitive mode and high density inductive mode of the discharge when attaching gases such as SF6 and Ar/SF 6 mixtures are used. Oscillations of charged particles, plasma potential and light emitted from the plasma with the frequencies from a few hertz to tens of kilohertz are seen for gas pressures between 1 and 100 mTorr and the discharge power in the range of 75--1200 W. The region of instability increases as the plasma becomes more electronegative and the frequency of plasma oscillations increases as the power, pressure, and gas flow rate increase. The instability frequencies may also depend on the settings of a matching network. A volume-averaged (global) model of the instability has been developed, for a discharge containing time varying densities of electrons, positive ions, and negative ions, and time invariant excited states and neutral densities. The particle and energy balance equations are integrated to produce the dynamical behavior. As pressure or power is varied to cross a threshold, the instability goes through a series of oscillatory states to large scale relaxation oscillations between higher and lower density states. The model qualitatively agrees with experimental observations, and also shows a significant influence of the matching network. A stability analysis of an electronegative discharge has been performed, using a Hurwitz criterion, for a system of linearized particle and power balance differential equations. Capacitive coupling plays a crucial role in the instability process. A variable electrostatic (Faraday) shield has been used to control the capacitive coupling from the excitation coil to the plasma. The plasma instability disappears when the shielded area exceeds 65% of the total area of the coil. The global model of instability gives a slightly higher value of 85% for instability suppression with the same discharge

  5. Primary and rescue immune tolerance induction in children and adults: a multicentre international study with a VWF-containing plasma-derived FVIII concentrate.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, J; Jiménez-Yuste, V; Peiró-Jordán, R; Aledort, L M; Santagostino, E

    2014-01-01

    Most studies on immune tolerance induction (ITI) therapy in haemophilia A patients are focused on primary ITI in children. Here we report on the ITI outcome in a large retrospective cohort, including adults and patients with rescue ITI, treated with a pdFVIII/VWF concentrate. Retrospective data from haemophilic patients (FVIII< 2%) with inhibitors from 22 centres in Spain, Italy and Germany, who underwent primary or rescue ITI with pdFVIII/VWF concentrate, were collected. Complete success (CS), partial success (PS) and failure were defined based on the criteria of the consensus recommendations of the 2006 International ITI Workshop. A total of 41 cases of primary ITI (32 children and 9 adults) and 19 cases of rescue ITI (17 children and 2 adults) were evaluated. Success (CS+PS) rate of 87% was achieved in primary ITI and 74% in the higher risk profile of rescue ITI. Eight of nine (85%) patients with poorest prognosis (three or more of the known risk factors of poor response to ITI) achieved success (CS+PS). CS of 100% was observed in eight primary ITI patients with titre at start of ITI ≤2.5 BU and inhibitor peak ≤25 BU. The favourable response rates in primary and rescue ITI in children and in adult patients, even in the presence of poor prognostic factors, should be encouraged for broadening the indication of immune tolerance therapy in haemophilia A patients with inhibitors.

  6. Non-Equilibrium Modeling of Inductively Coupled RF Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Technical Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) January 2015-March 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Non-Equilibrium Modeling of Inductively Coupled RF Plasmas...Mar 2015. PA#15120 14. ABSTRACT This paper discusses the modeling of non-equilibrium effects in inductively coupled plasma facilities. The model...98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 NON-EQUILIBRIUMMODELING OF INDUCTIVELY COUPLED RF PLASMAS Alessandro Munafò1, Jean-Luc Cambier2, and Marco

  7. Thrust Stand Measurements of a Conical Pulsed Inductive Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Emsellem, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters [1-3] are spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. The thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, pulsed inductive plasma thrusters can su er from both high pulse energy requirements imposed by the voltage demands of inductive propellant ionization, and low propellant utilization efficiencies. The Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA)[4], shown in Fig. 1 is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that is able to operate at lower pulse energies by partially ionizing propellant with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge inside a conical inductive coil whose geometry serves to potentially increase propellant and plasma plume containment relative to at coil geometries. The ECR plasma is created with the use of permanent mag- nets arranged to produce a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation and, in turn, current sheet formation to areas of high magnetic coupling to the driving coil.

  8. Design of a Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    A new plasma accelerator concept that employs electrodeless plasma preionization and pulsed inductive acceleration is presented. Preionization is achieved through an electron cyclotron resonance discharge that produces a weakly-ionized plasma at the face of a conical theta pinch-shaped inductive coil. The presence of the preionized plasma allows for current sheet formation at lower discharge voltages than those found in other pulsed inductive accelerators. The location of an electron cyclotron resonance discharge can be controlled through the design of the applied magnetic field in the thruster. A finite-element model of the magnetic field was used as a design tool, allowing for the implementation of an arrangement of permanent magnets that yields a small volume of preionized propellant at the coil face. This allows for current sheet formation at the face of the inductive coil, minimizing the initial inductance of the pulse circuit and maximizing the potential efficiency of the new accelerator.

  9. Computational analysis of a pulsed inductive plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corpening, Jeremy H.

    The pulsed inductive plasma accelerator allows for ionization of a cold gas propellant to plasma and acceleration of plasma with the same current pulse and without plasma contact with any part. This is beneficial since erosion is never a problem and lifetimes are limited only by the amount of carried propellant. To date, work involving the pulsed inductive plasma accelerator concept has been largely experimental with minimal computational analysis. The goal of the present research was to develop a computational tool using Maxwell's equations coupled with the Navier-Stokes fluid equations to fully analyze a pulsed inductive plasma accelerator. A plasma model was developed using the Saha equation and partition functions to calculate all required thermodynamic properties. The solution to Maxwell's equations was verified accurate and then coupled computations with propellant plasma were conducted. These coupled computations showed good order of magnitude accuracy with a simple onedimensional model however failed when the plasma began to accelerate due to the Lorentz force. The electric field, magnetic field, current density, and Lorentz force were all aligned in the proper vector directions. The computational failure occurred due to rapid, fictitious increases in the induced electric field in the vacuum created between the accelerating plasma and drive coil. Possible solutions to this problem are to decrease the time step and refine the grid density. Although complete acceleration of propellant plasma has yet to be computationally computed, this study has shown successful coupled computations with Maxwell and Navier-Stokes equations for a pulsed inductive plasma accelerator.

  10. Transition of RF internal antenna plasma by gas control

    SciTech Connect

    Hamajima, Takafumi; Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Kobayashi, Seiji; Hiruta, Toshihito; Kanno, Yoshinori

    2012-07-11

    The transition between the capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) and the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) was investigated with the internal radio frequency (RF) multi-turn antenna. The transition between them showed the hysteresis curve. The radiation power and the period of the self-pulse mode became small in proportion to the gas pressure. It was found that the ICP transition occurred by decreasing the gas pressure from 400 Pa.

  11. Thrust Stand Measurements of a Conical Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2013-01-01

    Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (iPPT) spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. The thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10 -- 100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, inductive pulsed plasma thrusters can suffer from both high pulse energy requirements imposed by the voltage demands of inductive propellant ionization, and low propellant utilization efficiencies. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, inductive pulsed plasma thrusters can suffer from both high pulse energy requirements imposed by the voltage demands of inductive propellant ionization, and low propellant utilization efficiencies. A conical coil geometry may offer higher propellant utilization efficiency over that of a at inductive coil, however an increase in propellant utilization may be met with a decrease in axial electromagnetic acceleration, and in turn, a decrease in the total axially-directed kinetic energy imparted to the propellant.

  12. Plasma igniter for internal-combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breshears, R. R.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Hot ionized gas (plasma) ignites air/fuel mixture in internal combustion engines more effectively than spark. Electromagnetic forces propel plasma into combustion zone. Combustion rate is not limited by flame-front speed.

  13. Analytical speciation of mercury in fish tissues by reversed phase liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with Bi(3+) as internal standard.

    PubMed

    Santoyo, María Maldonado; Figueroa, Julio Alberto Landero; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Wrobel, Katarzyna

    2009-08-15

    In this work, the quantification of two mercury species (Hg(2+) and CH(3)Hg(+)) in fish tissues has been revisited. The originality of our approach relies on the use of Bi(3+) as internal standard (IS) and on the modification of typical extraction conditions. The IS (125 microl, 1000 microg l(-1) Bi(3+)) was added to the aliquot of fresh fish tissue (400-500 mg). A high-speed blender and ultrasound-assisted homogenization/extraction was carried out in the presence of perchloric acid (1.5 ml, 0.6 mol l(-1)), l-cysteine (500 microl, 0.75 mol l(-1)) and 500 microl toluene:methanol (1:1). Perchloric acid was used for protein denaturation and precipitation, toluene helped to destroy lipid structures potentially sequestering CH(3)Hg(+), L-cysteine was used to form water-soluble complexes with Bi(3+), Hg(2+) and CH(3)Hg(+). The excess of perchloric acid was eliminated by addition of potassium hydroxide (pH 5 with acetic acid). The obtained extract, was diluted with the mobile phase (1:1) and introduced (20 microl) to the reversed phase HPLC-ICP-MS system. The separation was achieved by isocratic elution (2.5 mmol l(-1) cysteine, 12.5 mmol l(-1) (NH(4))(2)HPO(4), 0.05% triethylamine, pH 7.0:methanol (96:4)) at a flow rate 0.6 ml min(-1). Column effluent was on-line introduced to ICP-MS for specific detection of (202)Hg, (200)Hg and (209)Bi. Analytical signal was defined as the ratio between (202)Hg/(209)Bi peak areas. The detection limits evaluated for Hg(2+) and CH(3)Hg(+) were 0.8 and 0.7 microg l(-1). Recovery of the procedure, calculated as the sum of species concentrations found in the sample with respect to total ICP-MS-determined Hg was 91.9% for king mackerel muscle and 89.5% for red snapper liver. In the standard addition experiments, the recovery results were 98.9% for Hg(2+) and 100.6% for CH(3)Hg(+). It should be stressed that the use of Bi(3+) as IS enabled to improve analytical performance by compensating for incomplete extraction and for imprecision of

  14. Ion-wave stabilization of an inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Camparo, J.C.; Mackay, R.

    2006-04-24

    Stabilization of the rf power driving an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) has implications for fields ranging from atomic clocks to analytical chemistry to illumination technology. Here, we demonstrate a technique in which the plasma itself acts as a probe of radio wave power, and provides a correction signal for active rf-power control. Our technique takes advantage of the resonant nature of forced ion waves in the plasma, and their observation in the ICP's optical emission.

  15. Thrust Stand Measurements of a Conical Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2012-01-01

    Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (iPPT) are spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. The thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10 .. 100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, inductive pulsed plasma thrusters can suffer from both high pulse energy requirements imposed by the voltage demands of inductive propellant ionization, and low propellant utilization efficiencies. A conical coil geometry may o er higher propellant utilization efficiency over that of a at inductive coil, however an increase in propellant utilization may be met with a decrease in axial electromagnetic acceleration, and in turn, a decrease in the total axially-directed kinetic energy imparted to the propellant.

  16. Plasma diagnostics and plasma-surface interactions in inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, Monica Joy

    The semiconductor industry's continued trend of manufacturing device features on the nanometer scale requires increased plasma processing control and improved understanding of plasma characteristics and plasma-surface interactions. This dissertation presents a series of experimental results for focus studies conducted in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) system. First novel "on-wafer" diagnostic tools are characterized and related to plasma characteristics. Second, plasma-polymer interactions are characterized as a function of plasma species and processing parameters. Complementary simulations accompany each focus study to supplement experimental findings. Wafer heating mechanisms in inductively coupled molecular gas plasmas are explored with PlasmaTemp(TM), a novel "on-wafer" diagnostic tool. Experimental wafer measurements are obtained with the PlasmaTemp(TM) wafer processed in argon (Ar) and argon-oxygen (Ar/O2) mixed plasmas. Wafer heating mechanisms were determined by combining the experimental measurements with a 3-dimensional heat transfer model of the wafer. Comparisons between pure Ar and Ar/O2 plasmas demonstrate that two additional wafer heating mechanisms can be important in molecular gas plasmas compared to atomic gas discharges. Thermal heat conduction from the neutral gas and O-atom recombination on wafer surface can contribute as much as 60% to wafer heating under conditions of low-energy ion bombardment in molecular plasmas. Measurements of a second novel "on-wafer" diagnostic sensor, the PlasmaVolt(TM), were tested and validated in the ICP system for Ar plasmas varying in power and pressure. Sensor measurements were interpreted with a numerical sheath simulation and comparison to scaling laws derived from the inhomogeneous sheath model. The study demonstrates sensor measurements are proportional to the RF-current through the sheath and the scaling is a function of sheath impedance. PlasmaVolt(TM) sensor measurements are proportional to the

  17. Dynamics of a pulsed inductively coupled oxygen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaka-ul-Islam, Mujahid

    2016-11-01

    Inductively coupled plasma system (ICPs) is extensively used for a wide range of nanofabrication applications. The ICPs operated in a pulsed or power modulated mode has shown several advantages compared to the continuous discharge. In this work, the plasma dynamics in a planar coil pulsed inductively coupled plasma system (ICPs) operated in oxygen has been investigated, using phase and space resolved optical emission spectroscopy. It is well-known that the ICPs operates in two distinct operational modes as a function of power known as E and H modes, generated dominantly by capacitive and inductive couplings, respectively. The measurements show that the discharge ignites due a capacitive coupling (in the E-mode) and later transits to the H-mode as a function of time. The inductive coupling, however, starts during the E-mode along with capacitive coupling. The relative contribution of inductive coupling increases until the discharge reaches the E-H transition where the growth rate of inductive coupling becomes much faster. It is found that the time to reach E-H transition decreases with the pressure. At the E-H transition, the total emission has a spike-like feature (i.e., it first achieves a peak emission which later decreases and finally settles to a lower value). The 2D images of the discharge show that at the time of peak total-emission, the discharge structure is sharp and bright, which later decreases in brightness and becomes diffusive.

  18. Exemplary Teacher Induction: An International Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Edward R.

    2006-01-01

    How does one become an effective teacher? What can be done to stem high attrition rates among beginning teachers? While many teachers are left to "sink or swim" in their first year--learning by trial and error, there remain a number of outstanding examples of collaboration and collegiality in teacher induction programs. Analysis of the…

  19. Design of a Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    The design and construction of a thruster that employs electrodeless plasma preionization and pulsed inductive acceleration is described. Preionization is achieved through an electron cyclotron resonance discharge that produces a weakly-ionized plasma at the face of a conical theta pinch-shaped inductive coil. The presence of the preionized plasma allows for current sheet formation at lower discharge voltages than those employed in other pulsed inductive accelerators that do not employ preionization. The location of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge is controlled through the design of the applied magnetic field in the thruster. Finite element analysis shows that there is an arrangement of permanent magnets that yields a small volume of resonant magnetic field at the coil face. Preionization in the resonant zone leads to current sheet formation at the coil face, which minimizes the initial inductance of the pulse circuit and maximizes the potential electrical efficiency of the accelerator. A magnet assembly was constructed around an inductive coil to provide structural support to the selected arrangement of neodymium magnets. Measured values of the resulting magnetic field compare favorably with the finite element model.

  20. Inductively-coupled-plasma-induced electret enhancement for triboelectric nanogenerators.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Tang, Wei; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-01-20

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films' electret property was significantly enhanced after being treated with inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Based on this modified material, the triboelectric nanogenerators' (TENGs) transferred charges remained at 68.6% of the initial value after 400 000 cycles of contact-separation process, which was about three times that of the untreated samples.

  1. Inductively-coupled-plasma-induced electret enhancement for triboelectric nanogenerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Long; Tang, Wei; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films’ electret property was significantly enhanced after being treated with inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Based on this modified material, the triboelectric nanogenerators’ (TENGs) transferred charges remained at 68.6% of the initial value after 400 000 cycles of contact-separation process, which was about three times that of the untreated samples.

  2. Inductively coupled plasma torch with laminar flow cooling

    DOEpatents

    Rayson, Gary D.; Shen, Yang

    1991-04-30

    An improved inductively coupled gas plasma torch. The torch includes inner and outer quartz sleeves and tubular insert snugly fitted between the sleeves. The insert includes outwardly opening longitudinal channels. Gas flowing through the channels of the insert emerges in a laminar flow along the inside surface of the outer sleeve, in the zone of plasma heating. The laminar flow cools the outer sleeve and enables the torch to operate at lower electrical power and gas consumption levels additionally, the laminar flow reduces noise levels in spectroscopic measurements of the gaseous plasma.

  3. Method of processing materials using an inductively coupled plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hull, D.E.; Bieniewski, T.M.

    1987-04-13

    A method of processing materials. The invention enables ultrafine, ultrapure powders to be formed from solid ingots in a gas free environment. A plasma is formed directly from an ingot which insures purity. The vaporized material is expanded through a nozzle and the resultant powder settles on a cold surface. An inductively coupled plasma may also be used to process waste chemicals. Noxious chemicals are directed through a series of plasma tubes, breaking molecular bonds and resulting in relatively harmless atomic constituents. 3 figs.

  4. Resonant planar antenna as an inductive plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Guittienne, Ph.; Lecoultre, S.; Howling, A. A.; Hollenstein, Ch.; Fayet, P.; Larrieu, J.

    2012-04-15

    A resonant planar antenna as an inductive plasma source operating at 13.56 MHz inside a low pressure vacuum vessel is presented for potential plasma processing applications. Its principle consists in interconnecting elementary resonant meshes composed of inductive and capacitive elements. Due to its structure, the antenna shows a set of resonant modes associated with peaks of the real input impedance. Each of these modes is defined by its own current and voltage distribution oscillating at the frequency of the mode. A rectangular antenna of 0.55mx0.20m has been built, and first results obtained with argon plasmas are presented. Plasma generation is shown to be efficient as densities up to 4{center_dot}10{sup 17}m{sup -3} at 2000 W have been measured by microwave interferometry at a distance of 4 cm from the source plane. It is also demonstrated that the plasma couples inductively with the resonating currents flowing in the antenna above a threshold power of about 60 W. A non-uniformity of less than {+-}5% is obtained at 1000 W at a few centimeters above the antenna over 75% of its surface.

  5. Vacuum arc plasma thrusters with inductive energy storage driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schein, Jochen (Inventor); Gerhan, Andrew N. (Inventor); Woo, Robyn L. (Inventor); Au, Michael Y. (Inventor); Krishnan, Mahadevan (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus for producing a vacuum arc plasma source device using a low mass, compact inductive energy storage circuit powered by a low voltage DC supply acts as a vacuum arc plasma thruster. An inductor is charged through a switch, subsequently the switch is opened and a voltage spike of Ldi/dt is produced initiating plasma across a resistive path separating anode and cathode. The plasma is subsequently maintained by energy stored in the inductor. Plasma is produced from cathode material, which allows for any electrically conductive material to be used. A planar structure, a tubular structure, and a coaxial structure allow for consumption of cathode material feed and thereby long lifetime of the thruster for long durations of time.

  6. Impact of Gas Heating in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, D. B.; Bose, D.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cruden, B. A.; Meyyappan, M.; Sharma, S. P.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recently it has been recognized that the neutral gas in inductively coupled plasma reactors heats up significantly during processing. The resulting gas density variations across the reactor affect reaction rates, radical densities, plasma characteristics, and uniformity within the reactor. A self-consistent model that couples the plasma generation and transport to the gas flow and heating has been developed and used to study CF4 discharges. A Langmuir probe has been used to measure radial profiles of electron density and temperature. The model predictions agree well with the experimental results. As a result of these comparisons along with the poorer performance of the model without the gas-plasma coupling, the importance of gas heating in plasma processing has been verified.

  7. Inductive and Electrostatic Acceleration in Relativistic Jet-Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Johnny S.T.; Noble, Robert J.; /SLAC

    2005-07-13

    We report on the observation of rapid particle acceleration in numerical simulations of relativistic jet-plasma interactions and discuss the underlying mechanisms. The dynamics of a charge-neutral, narrow, electron-positron jet propagating through an unmagnetized electron-ion plasma was investigated using a three-dimensional, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell computer code. The interaction excited magnetic filamentation as well as electrostatic (longitudinal) plasma instabilities. In some cases, the longitudinal electric fields generated inductively and electrostatically reached the cold plasma wave-breaking limit, and the longitudinal momentum of about half the positrons increased by 50% with a maximum gain exceeding a factor of two. The results are relevant to understanding the micro-physics at the interface region of an astrophysical jet with the interstellar plasma, for example, the edge of a wide jet or the jet-termination point.

  8. Inductively coupled plasmas: Optimizing the inductive-coupling efficiency for large-area source design

    SciTech Connect

    Colpo, P.; Meziani, T.; Rossi, F.

    2005-03-01

    An inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source enabling high-density plasma generation was developed for large area processing. Technological difficulties related to the scaling up of the coil antenna, dielectric vacuum window, and gas distribution have been addressed. The proposed solution consists in using a magnetic core to concentrate the magnetic field produced by the antenna. Both are placed within the plasma chamber, and the gas injection is done through the magnetic pole. A 75x72- cm{sup 2} plasma source has been designed based on this solution. First, the electrical operation and coil geometries were optimized. The results show that the use of a low excitation frequency (2 MHz) increases the electrical efficiency of the magnetic core, enabling a higher plasma-density generation than at the classical radio frequency of 13.56 MHz. The antenna configuration providing the better uniformity is composed of three loops connected in parallel. Some tuning inductances in series with each loop were added to balance the rf power, i.e., the plasma density over the reactor area. Deviation from plasma uniformities better than 12% over 60x60 cm{sup 2} were achieved. Preliminary SiO{sub 2} etching experiments with CF{sub 4} gas show that the etching uniformity deviation reaches 7% over 60x60 cm{sup 2} with etching rates larger than 150 nm/min. These results are very promising and open the way to the successful scale-up of ICP sources to large areas.

  9. Plasma Interaction and Induction Signatures at Callisto: Preparations for JUICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzo, Lucas; Feyerabend, Moritz; Simon, Sven; Motschmann, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    The interaction of the Jovian magnetospheric environment with an atmosphere and induced dipole at Callisto is investigated by applying a hybrid (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) simulation code. Callisto is unique among the Galilean satellites in its interaction with the ambient magnetospheric plasma as the gyroradii of the impinging plasma and pickup ions are large compared to the size of the moon. A kinetic representation of the ions is therefore mandatory to adequately describe the resulting asymmetries in the electromagnetic fields and the deflection of the plasma flow near Callisto. When Callisto is embedded in the magnetodisk lobes of Jupiter, a dipolar magnetic field is generated via induction in a subsurface ocean. This field creates an obstacle to the impinging magnetospheric plasma flow at the moon. However, when Callisto is located near the center of the Jovian current sheet, local magnetic perturbations due to the magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction are more than twice the strength of the background field and may therefore obscure any magnetic signal generated via induction in a subsurface ocean. Our simulations demonstrate that the deflection of the magnetospheric plasma into Callisto's wake cannot alone explain the plasma density enhancement of two orders of magnitude measured in the wake of the interaction region during Galileo flybys of the moon. However, through inclusion of an ionosphere around Callisto, modeled densities in the wake are consistent with in situ measurements.

  10. H-mode inductive coupling plasma for PVC surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croccolo, F.; Quintini, A.; Barni, R.; Ripamonti, M.; Malgaroli, A.; Riccardi, C.

    2009-08-01

    An inductively coupled plasma machine has been modified to be able to apply working powers in the order of 1 kW, thus switching to the real inductive H-mode. The plasma is generated by applying a 13.56 MHz radio-frequency to a λ/4 antenna outside the plasma chamber in low pressure conditions. The working gas is argon at pressure in the range from 10 to 100 Pa. With this high power source we have been able to perform plasma etching on a poly(vinyl-chloride) (PVC) film. In particular the effect of the plasma is the selective removal of hydrogen and chlorine from the sample surface. The action of the high power plasma on the sample has been proved to be much more effective than that of the low power one. Results similar to those obtained with the low power machine at about 300 W for 120 min, have been obtained with the high power source at about 600 W for 30 min. The superficial generation of a conductive layer of double C=C bonds was obtained. The samples have been investigated by means of ATR spectroscopy, FIB/SEM microscopy and micro-electrical measurements, which revealed the change in charge conductivity.

  11. AETHER: A simulation platform for inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Turkoz, Emre Celik, Murat

    2015-04-01

    An in-house code is developed to simulate the inductively coupled plasma (ICP). The model comprises the fluid, electromagnetic and transformer submodels. Fluid equations are solved to evaluate the plasma flow parameters, including the plasma and neutral densities, ion and neutral velocities, electron flux, electron temperature, and electric potential. The model relies on the ambipolar approximation and offers the evaluation of plasma parameters without solving the sheath region. The electromagnetic model handles the calculation of the electric and magnetic fields using the magnetic vector potential. The transformer model captures the effect of the matching circuit utilized in laboratory experiments for RF power deposition. The continuity and momentum equations are solved using finite volume method. The energy, electric potential, and magnetic vector potential equations are solved using finite difference method. The resulting linear systems of equations are solved with iterative solvers including Jacobi and GMRES. The code is written using the C++ programming language, it works in parallel and has graphical user interface. The model is applied to study ICP characteristics of a plasma confined within a cylindrical chamber with dielectric walls for two different power deposition cases. The results obtained from the developed model are verified using the plasma module of COMSOL Multiphysics. The model is also applied to a plasma source configuration, and it is demonstrated that there is an overall increase in the plasma potential when current is extracted from ICP with a biased wall electrode.

  12. Improvement of uniformity in a weakly magnetized inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. H.; Cheong, H. W.; Kim, J. W.; Whang, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic fields are applied to inductively coupled plasma (ICP) to achieve high plasma densities using electromagnets. If the magnetic fields are set up such that the magnitude of magnetic flux density on the substrate decreases with both radial and axial distances from the substrate’s center (here after referred to as M-ICP-A), the plasma density increases by 237% compared with that for ICP although the non-uniformity of the plasma density for M-ICP-A (11.1%) is higher than that for ICP (10.9%). As the rate of decrease in the magnitude of magnetic flux density on the substrate increases both radially and axially, the non-uniformity in the plasma density increases further. The increase in the non-uniformity for M-ICP-A was confirmed to arise from the flute instability. To suppress the flute instability, we arranged the magnitude of magnetic flux density on the substrate to increase with increasing distance from the substrate center both radially and axially (here after referred to as M-ICP-V). In this configuration, plasma fluctuations were not observed, hence the plasma density non-uniformity was lowered to 8.1%, although the measured plasma density was higher than that for M-ICP-A. The oxide etch-rate non-uniformity in M-ICP-V (2.5%) was also lower than that for ICP (5.2%) or that for M-ICP-A (21.4%).

  13. PREFACE: 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmsson, Hans

    1982-01-01

    Invited Papers: The Physics of Hot Plasmas During the last decade a dramatic evolution of plasma physics has occurred. Not only have gigantic fusion plasma machines been planned, and are now being built, and elaborate spaceships and antenna systems been constructed to explore remote parts of the cosmos; new observations have revealed fascinating structures in space, ranging from pulsar plasmas under extreme conditions in very strong magnetic fields to large-scale magnetic field and electric current systems in cosmic plasmas. X-rays from very distant sources as well as radio-waves from the plasma in the magnetosphere and in the Aurora have recently been studied with new observational techniques. Ingenious laboratory experiments are continuously being carried out to exploit new fundamental processes in plasmas. These are of great interest for the basic understanding of plasmas and also have immediate consequences for applications, like plasma heating and diagnostics. The theoretical description of new plasma phenomena, and of the plasma state in general poses challenging problems, particularly in situations where high concentration of energy is located in the plasmas. Nonlinear wave analysis and turbulence theory have accordingly been extensively developed to describe in particular the collective plasma phenomena. New concepts have been envisaged like plasma solitons, which may be thought of as excitations of local concentrations of longitudinal plasma waves which turn out to be particularly stable. More and more sophisticated structures of nonlinear nature are being revealed by means of high capacity computer facilities. Simulation experiments allow for studies of chaotic behaviour of plasma particles. Related fields of activity form new trends in the development of plasma theory. The programme of the 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics, which was held in Göteborg, Sweden, stressed the role of the Physics of Hot Plasmas. Studies of such plasmas are

  14. Reactive deposition of tungsten and titanium carbides by induction plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X. L.; Gitzhofer, F.; Boulos, M. I.; Tiwari, R.

    1995-05-01

    A study is reported on the use of induction plasma technology for the preparation of dense free-standing deposits of tungsten carbide and titanium carbide from metallic powders and methane. Phase analysis by X-ray diffraction indicates that primary carburization of the particles takes place in-flight giving rise to the formation of W2C and TiC(1 - x). Secondary carburization occurs in the deposits resulting in the formation of tungsten and titanium carbides. Microstructures revealed by optical and scanning electron microscopy show uniform small grains of the carbides. The reactive plasma spray-formed tungsten carbide shows transgranular fracture, while pure tungsten deposits show intergranular fracture.

  15. Thin film coating process using an inductively coupled plasma

    DOEpatents

    Kniseley, Richard N.; Schmidt, Frederick A.; Merkle, Brian D.

    1990-01-30

    Thin coatings of normally solid materials are applied to target substrates using an inductively coupled plasma. Particles of the coating material are vaporized by plasma heating, and pass through an orifice to a first vacuum zone in which the particles are accelerated to a velocity greater than Mach 1. The shock wave generated in the first vacuum zone is intercepted by the tip of a skimmer cone that provides a second orifice. The particles pass through the second orifice into a second zone maintained at a higher vacuum and impinge on the target to form the coating. Ultrapure coatings can be formed.

  16. A progress report - Induction plasma simulation of the GCNR.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, C. E.

    1971-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the design, construction and operation of induction coupled devices which simulate the open cycle Gas Core Nuclear Rocket. These devices incorporate solid feed of the plasma forming material (uranium and uranium simulating materials), permeable walls, seeding of the propellant, and transpiration cooled, choked flow nozzles. Operating parameters and performance data of devices employing these design features are discussed. A uranium plasma experiment is included. In addition, operating data of several devices which compare theoretical and actual performance at a variety of powers, pressures, frequencies, and sizes are discussed.

  17. Relatively high plasma density in low pressure inductive discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-09-15

    Electron energy probability functions (EEPFs) were measured in a low pressure argon inductive discharge. As radio frequency (RF) power increases, discharge mode is changed from E-mode (capacitively coupled) to H-mode (inductively coupled) and the EEPFs evolve from a bi-Maxwellian distribution to a Maxwellian distribution. It is found that the plasma densities at low RF powers (<30 W) are much higher than the density predicted from the slope of the densities at high powers. Because high portion of high energy electrons of the bi-Maxwellian distribution lowers the collisional energy loss and low electron temperature of low energy electrons reduces particle loss rate at low powers. Therefore, the energy loss of plasma decreases and electron densities become higher at low powers.

  18. Effects of driving frequency on properties of inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godyak, Valery; Kolobov, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) can be maintained over a wide range of driving frequencies from 50 Hz up to GHz. In this paper, we analyze how the properties of ICP depend on driving frequency ω. With respect to the time of ion transport to the walls, τd and the electron energy relaxation time τɛ three operating regimes are distinguished. The quasi-static regime, ωτd << 1 , the high-frequency regime, ωτɛ >> 1 and the intermediate dynamic regime, 1 /τd < ω <1 /τɛ. In the quasi-static regime, plasma density oscillates significantly over the field period. In the high-frequency regime, the plasma density and the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) are constant. In the dynamic regime, the plasma density is constant, while the EEDF varies over the field period. Depending on ICP configuration, the induced by the coil magnetic fields inside ICP, Bc can be zero or not. For example, in ICP maintained by a long helical coil with the plasma current flowing outside the coil, Bc = 0 , while when the plasma current flows inside the coil, Bc ≠ 0 . We show that in the latter case, in the quasi-static regimes, electrons become magnetized over a significant part of the period that may strongly affect the plasma properties. Examples of ICP simulations in different frequency regimes will be demonstrated in this paper.

  19. A Comparison of Spectroscopic Measurements of an Inductive Plasma Source with the INDUCT Model

    SciTech Connect

    Huebschman, M.L.; Bakshi, V.; Bengtson, R.D.; Ekerdt, J.G.; Vitello, P.; Wiley, J.C.; Xiang, N.

    1999-10-03

    Noninvasive spectroscopic measurements of an inductively driven hydrogen plasma source with density and temperature characteristic of plasma processing tools have been made with an ultimate application of cleaning of silicon substrates. These measurements allow full radial and axial profiles of electron density and temperature to be measured from absolutely calibrated multichannel spectroscopic measurements of upper state number densities and a collisional radiative model. Profiles were obtained over a range of powers from 50 to 200 W and pressures from 5 to 50 mTorr in hydrogen in a small cylindrical source. The hydrogen working gas and simple cylindrical geometry was chosen to simplify detailed comparisons with a 2D computational model (INDUCT95) which uses a fluid approximation for tbc plasma and neutral gas. The code calculates the inductive coupling of the 13.56 MHz RF source, the collisional, radiative, and wall losses as well as a chemistry model for electrons, H{sub 2}, H, H{sup +}, H{sub 2}, and H{sub 3}{sup +}. Simulation results were sensitive to the value for the wall coefficient. The simulation and experimental temperature and density profiles in r and z were in rough agreement, but some details were quite different. The simulated axial density profile was located under the coil while the measured density profiles extended well beyond the edges of the coil. The scaling of conditions with pressure and power was in rough agreement between experiment and simulations.

  20. Diagnostic studies of ion beam formation in inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Jenee L.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation describes a variety of studies focused on the plasma and the ion beam in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The ability to use ICP-MS for measurements of trace elements in samples requires the analytes to be efficiently ionized. Updated ionization efficiency tables are discussed for ionization temperatures of 6500 K and 7000 K with an electron density of 1 x 1015 cm-3. These values are reflective of the current operating parameters of ICP-MS instruments. Calculations are also discussed for doubly charged (M2+) ion formation, neutral metal oxide (MO) ionization, and metal oxide (MO+) ion dissociation for similar plasma temperature values. Ionization efficiency results for neutral MO molecules in the ICP have not been reported previously.

  1. [Determination of trace elements in shark cartilage by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Deng, B; Zhang, Z

    1998-10-01

    Semiquantitative estimation of all elements in shark cartilage was investigated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The determination of trace elements, namely Fe, Zn, Se, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ti and Sr in shark cartilage, was carried out using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The matrix effects were overcome by using yttrium as an internal standard element. The recoveries are in the range of 81.6 to 100.7%. The determination limits of Fe, Zn, Se, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ti and Sr are 0.60, 0.55, 0.21, 0.39, 0.042, 0.27, 0.038 and 0.48 microg x g(-1), respectively. The results showed that the shark cartilage contains higher amount of Fe, Zn, Se, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ti and Sr than those in other fishes and in other animal bones.

  2. Study on spatial distribution of plasma parameters in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cheong, Hee-Woon; Lee, Woohyun; Kim, Ji-Won; Whang, Ki-Woong; Kim, Hyuk; Park, Wanjae

    2015-07-15

    Spatial distributions of various plasma parameters such as plasma density, electron temperature, and radical density in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and a magnetized inductively coupled plasma (M-ICP) were investigated and compared. Electron temperature in between the rf window and the substrate holder of M-ICP was higher than that of ICP, whereas the one just above the substrate holder of M-ICP was similar to that of ICP when a weak (<8 G) magnetic field was employed. As a result, radical densities in M-ICP were higher than those in ICP and the etch rate of oxide in M-ICP was faster than that in ICP without severe electron charging in 90 nm high aspect ratio contact hole etch.

  3. Low-pressure water-cooled inductively coupled plasma torch

    DOEpatents

    Seliskar, C.J.; Warner, D.K.

    1984-02-16

    An inductively coupled plasma torch is provided which comprises an inner tube, including a sample injection port to which the sample to be tested is supplied and comprising an enlarged central portion in which the plasma flame is confined; an outer tube surrounding the inner tube and containing water therein for cooling the inner tube, the outer tube including a water inlet port to which water is supplied and a water outlet port spaced from the water inlet port and from which water is removed after flowing through the outer tube; and an rf induction coil for inducing the plasma in the gas passing into the tube through the sample injection port. The sample injection port comprises a capillary tube including a reduced diameter orifice, projecting into the lower end of the inner tube. The water inlet is located at the lower end of the outer tube and the rf heating coil is disposed around the outer tube above and adjacent to the water inlet.

  4. Low-pressure water-cooled inductively coupled plasma torch

    DOEpatents

    Seliskar, Carl J.; Warner, David K.

    1988-12-27

    An inductively coupled plasma torch is provided which comprises an inner tube, including a sample injection port to which the sample to be tested is supplied and comprising an enlarged central portion in which the plasma flame is confined; an outer tube surrounding the inner tube and containing water therein for cooling the inner tube, the outer tube including a water inlet port to which water is supplied and a water outlet port spaced from the water inlet port and from which water is removed after flowing through the outer tube; and an r.f. induction coil for inducing the plasma in the gas passing into the tube through the sample injection port. The sample injection port comprises a capillary tube including a reduced diameter orifice, projecting into the lower end of the inner tube. The water inlet is located at the lower end of the outer tube and the r.f. heating coil is disposed around the outer tube above and adjacent to the water inlet.

  5. Effect of bias application to plasma density in weakly magnetized inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyuk; Lee, Woohyun; Park, Wanjae; Whang, Ki-Woong

    2013-07-15

    Independent control of the ion flux and energy can be achieved in a dual frequency inductively coupled plasma (ICP) system. Typically, the plasma density is controlled by the high-frequency antenna radio-frequency (RF) power and the ion energy is controlled by the low-frequency bias RF power. Increasing the bias power has been known to cause a decrease in the plasma density in capacitively coupled discharge systems as well as in ICP systems. However, an applied axial magnetic field was found to sustain or increase the plasma density as bias power is increased. Measurements show higher electron temperatures but lower plasma densities are obtained in ordinary ICP systems than in magnetized ICP systems under the same neutral gas pressure and RF power levels. Explanations for the difference in the behavior of plasma density with increasing bias power are given in terms of the difference in the heating mechanism in ordinary unmagnetized and magnetized ICP systems.

  6. Equivalent circuit effects on mode transitions in H{sub 2} inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hui-Jing; Zhao, Shu-Xia Zhang, Yu-Ru; Gao, Fei; Li, Xue-Chun; Wang, You-Nian

    2015-04-15

    It is well known experimentally that the circuit matching network plays an important role in the mode transition behavior of inductively coupled plasmas. To date, however, there have been no reports of numerical models being used to study the role of the matching circuit in the transition process. In this paper, a new two-dimensional self-consistent fluid model that couples the components of an equivalent circuit module is developed to investigate the effects of the equivalent circuit on the mode transition characteristics of an inductively coupled, hydrogen plasma. The equivalent circuit consists of a current source, impedance matching network, reactor impedance, and plasma transferred impedance. The nonlinear coupling of the external circuit with the internal plasma is investigated by adjusting the matching capacitance at a fixed input current. The electron density and temperature as well as the electromagnetic fields all change suddenly, and the E to H mode transition occurs abruptly at a certain matching capacitance as the impedance matching of the external circuit is varied. We also analyze the fields and the plasma characteristics during the transition process, especially for the case of the capacitive E mode.

  7. Induction plasma calcining of pigment particles for thermal control coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    Induction plasma heating techniques were studied for calcining zinc orthotitanate particles for use in thermal control coatings. Previous studies indicated that the optimum calcining temperature is between 1400 and 1750 C. An intermediate temperature (1670 C) was chosen as a reference point for running a temperature series at the reference point and 220 C on both sides. The effect of varying chamber temperature on the reflectance spectra, before and after vacuum UV irradiation, is presented. The correlation between Zn2Ti04 paramagnetic resonance activity and its susceptibility to vacuum UV damage is discussed.

  8. A double inductively coupled plasma for sterilization of medical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfmann, H.; Bibinov, N.; Wunderlich, J.; Awakowicz, P.

    2007-07-01

    A double inductively coupled low pressure plasma for sterilization of bio-medical materials is introduced. It is developed for homogeneous treatment of three-dimensional objects. The short treatment times and low temperatures allow the sterilization of heat sensitive materials like ultra-high-molecular-weight-polyethylene or polyvinyl chloride. Using a non-toxic atmosphere reduces the total process time in comparision with common methods. Langmuir probe measurements are presented to show the difference between ICP- and CCP-mode discharges, the spatial homogeneity and the influence on the sterilization efficiency. To know more about the sterilization mechanisms optical emission is measured and correlated with sterilization results.

  9. Inductive plasma current start-up by the outer vertical field coil in a spherical tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitarai, Osamu

    1999-12-01

    Plasma current-start up induced by an outer vertical field coil is studied during the ignition access phase in a spherical tokamak reactor. We have illustrated the concept that the plasma current of ~50 MA could be induced by the outer vertical field coil in the proposed spherical tokamak with the help of the small central solenoid flux of +/-5 V s and the strong heating power less than 100 MW for the internal inductance of icons/Journals/Common/ell" ALT="ell" ALIGN="TOP"/>i~0.4-0.8 without the help of bootstrap current and non-inductive current drive power. The required condition to achieve this operation scenario is that the flux produced by the equilibrium vertical field is larger than the inductive flux. Current start-up operation is achieved by adding the small ohmic heating solenoid flux for the flux waveform adjustment because the flux from the outer vertical field coil cannot solely induce the desired plasma current waveform in the case of the preprogramming of the heating power.

  10. Induction of stable ER–plasma-membrane junctions by Kv2.1 potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Philip D.; Haberkorn, Christopher J.; Akin, Elizabeth J.; Seel, Peter J.; Krapf, Diego; Tamkun, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Junctions between cortical endoplasmic reticulum (cER) and the plasma membrane are a subtle but ubiquitous feature in mammalian cells; however, very little is known about the functions and molecular interactions that are associated with neuronal ER–plasma-membrane junctions. Here, we report that Kv2.1 (also known as KCNB1), the primary delayed-rectifier K+ channel in the mammalian brain, induces the formation of ER–plasma-membrane junctions. Kv2.1 localizes to dense, cell-surface clusters that contain non-conducting channels, indicating that they have a function that is unrelated to membrane-potential regulation. Accordingly, Kv2.1 clusters function as membrane-trafficking hubs, providing platforms for delivery and retrieval of multiple membrane proteins. Using both total internal reflection fluorescence and electron microscopy we demonstrate that the clustered Kv2.1 plays a direct structural role in the induction of stable ER–plasma-membrane junctions in both transfected HEK 293 cells and cultured hippocampal neurons. Glutamate exposure results in a loss of Kv2.1 clusters in neurons and subsequent retraction of the cER from the plasma membrane. We propose Kv2.1-induced ER–plasma-membrane junctions represent a new macromolecular plasma-membrane complex that is sensitive to excitotoxic insult and functions as a scaffolding site for both membrane trafficking and Ca2+ signaling. PMID:25908859

  11. Synthesis of Silicon Nanoparticles in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markosyan, Aram H.; Le Picard, Romain; Girshick, Steven L.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis of silicon nanoparticles (Si-NPs) is being investigated for their use in photo-emitting electronics, photovoltaics, and biotechnology. The ability to control the size and mono-disperse nature of Si-NPs is important to optimizing these applications. In this paper we discuss results from a computational investigation of Si-NP formation and growth in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor with the goal of achieving this control. We use a two dimensional numerical model where the algorithms for the kinetics of NP formation are self-consistently coupled with a plasma hydrodynamics simulation. The reactor modeled here resembles a GEC reference cell through which, for the base case, a mixture of Ar/SiH4 = 70/30 flows at 150 sccm at a pressure of 100 mTorr. In continuous wave mode, three coils located on top of the reactor deliver 150 W. The electric plasma potential confines negatively charged particles at the center of the discharge, increasing the residence time of negative NPs, which enables the NPs to potentially grow to large and controllable sizes of many to 100s nm. We discuss methods of controlling NP growth rates by varying the mole fraction and flow rate of SiH4, and using a pulsed plasma by varying the pulse period and duty cycle. Work supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and National Science Foundation.

  12. Characterization of the Inductively Heated Plasma Source IPG6-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2014-10-01

    In close collaboration between the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) at Baylor University, Texas, and the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, two plasma facilities have been established using the Inductively heated Plasma Generator 6 (IPG6). The facility at Baylor University (IPG6-B) works at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and a maximum power of 15 kW. A vacuum pump of 160 m3/h in combination with a butterfly valve allows pressure control over a wide range. Intended fields of research include basic investigation into thermo-chemistry and plasma radiation, space plasma environments and high heat fluxes e.g. those found in fusion devices or during atmospheric re-entry of spacecraft. After moving the IPG6-B facility to the Baylor Research and Innovation Collaborative (BRIC) it was placed back into operation during the summer of 2014. Initial characterization in the new lab, using a heat flux probe, Pitot probe and cavity calorimeter, has been conducted for Air, Argon and Helium. The results of this characterization are presented.

  13. Plasma igniter for internal combustion engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, D. J.; Breshears, R. R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An igniter for the air/fuel mixture used in the cylinders of an internal combustion engine is described. A conventional spark is used to initiate the discharge of a large amount of energy stored in a capacitor. A high current discharge of the energy in the capacitor switched on by a spark discharge produces a plasma and a magnetic field. The resultant combined electromagnetic current and magnetic field force accelerates the plasma deep into the combustion chamber thereby providing an improved ignition of the air/fuel mixture in the chamber.

  14. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry on the Thrust Efficiency of a Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley; Polzin, Kurt; Emsellem, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters [1-3] are spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. The thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, pulsed inductive plasma thrusters require high pulse energies to inductively ionize propellant. The Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA) [4, 5] is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that addressees this issue by partially ionizing propellant inside a conical inductive coil via an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge. The ECR plasma is produced using microwaves and permanent magnets that are arranged to create a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation, and in turn current sheet formation, to a region where the magnetic coupling between the plasma and the inductive coil is high. The use of a conical theta-pinch coil is under investigation. The conical geometry serves to provide neutral propellant containment and plasma plume focusing that is improved relative to the more common planar geometry of the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT) [2, 3], however a conical coil imparts a direct radial acceleration of the current sheet that serves to rapidly decouple the propellant from the coil, limiting the direct axial electromagnetic acceleration in favor of an indirect acceleration mechanism that requires significant heating of the propellant within the volume bounded by the current sheet. In this paper, we describe thrust stand measurements performed to characterize the performance

  15. Effects of antenna coil turns on plasma density and antenna voltage in solenoidal inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Jun-Hyeon; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Lin, Ming-Chieh; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-11-01

    The number of antenna coil turns, N , that affects the plasma density is a significant factor to design an inductively coupled plasma source. The equivalent resistance and inductance of a transformer circuit seen at the antenna coil are known to increase with N . This can enhance the power transfer efficiency. However, there is an undesired capacitive coupling between the antenna coil and the plasma. The antenna voltage related to the capacitive coupling is known to be proportional to N . In this work, to investigate the effects of N , the plasma density and the antenna coil voltage are measured by a floating probe and high-voltage probes, respectively. A terminal capacitor is used to suppress the capacitive coupling. As a result, the effects of N are clearly observed on the plasma densities and the voltages of the antenna coil. The plasma density was found to dramatically increase with N while the capacitive coupling is suppressed. The antenna voltage was not increased with N , and it was investigated by the ratio of the antenna voltage to the total voltage.

  16. Matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoshan

    1995-07-07

    The inductively coupled plasma is an electrodeless discharge in a gas (usually Ar) at atmospheric pressure. Radio frequency energy generated by a RF power source is inductively coupled to the plasma gas through a water cooled load coil. In ICP-MS the "Fassel" TAX quartz torch commonly used in emission is mounted horizontally. The sample aerosol is introduced into the central flow, where the gas kinetic temperature is about 5000 K. The aerosol is vaporized, atomized, excited and ionized in the plasma, and the ions are subsequently extracted through two metal apertures (sampler and skimmer) into the mass spectrometer. In ICP-MS, the matrix effects, or non-spectroscopic interferences, can be defined as the type of interferences caused by dissolved concomitant salt ions in the solution. Matrix effects can be divided into two categories: (1) signal drift due to the deposition of solids on the sampling apertures; and/or (2) signal suppression or enhancement by the presence of the dissolved salts. The first category is now reasonably understood. The dissolved salts, especially refractory oxides, tend to deposit on the cool tip of the sampling cone. The clogging of the orifices reduces the ion flow into the ICP-MS, lowers the pressure in the first stage of ICP-MS, and enhances the level of metal oxide ions. Because the extent of the clogging increases with the time, the signal drifts down. Even at the very early stage of the development of ICP-MS, matrix effects had been observed. Houk et al. found out that the ICP-MS was not tolerant to solutions containing significant amounts of dissolved solids.

  17. An argon-nitrogen-hydrogen mixed-gas plasma as a robust ionization source for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makonnen, Yoseif; Beauchemin, Diane

    2014-09-01

    Multivariate optimization of an argon-nitrogen-hydrogen mixed-gas plasma for minimum matrix effects, while maintaining analyte sensitivity as much as possible, was carried out in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In the presence of 0.1 M Na, the 33.9 ± 3.9% (n = 13 elements) analyte signal suppression on average observed in an all-argon plasma was alleviated with the optimized mixed-gas plasma, the average being - 4.0 ± 8.8%, with enhancement in several cases. An addition of 2.3% v/v N2 in the outer plasma gas, and 0.50% v/v H2 to the central channel, as a sheath around the nebulizer gas flow, was sufficient for this drastic increase in robustness. It also reduced the background from ArO+ and Ar2+ as well as oxide levels by over an order of magnitude. On the other hand, the background from NO+ and ArN+ increased by up to an order of magnitude while the levels of doubly-charged ions increased to 7% (versus 2.7% in an argon plasma optimized for sensitivity). Furthermore, detection limits were generally degraded by 5 to 15 fold when using the mixed-gas plasma versus the argon plasma for matrix-free solution (although they were better for several elements in 0.1 M Na). Nonetheless, the drastically increased robustness allowed the direct quantitative multielement analysis of certified ore reference materials, as well as the determination of Mo and Cd in seawater, without using any matrix-matching or internal standardization.

  18. Research on the mechanism of multiple inductively coupled plasma source for large area processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jangjae; Kim, Sijun; Kim, Daewoong; Kim, Kwangki; Lee, Youngseok; You, Shinjae

    2016-09-01

    In the plasma processing, inductively coupled plasma having the high-density is often used for high productivity. In large area plasma processing, the plasma can be generated by using the multi-pole connected in parallel. However, in case of this, it is difficult for power to be transferred to plasma uniformly. To solve the problem, we studied the mechanism of inductively coupled plasma connected in parallel. By using the transformer model, the multiple ICP source is treated. We also studied about the change of the plasma parameters over the time through the power balance equation and particle balance equation. Corresponding author.

  19. Combination induction plasma tube and current concentrator for introducing a sample into a plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Donald E.; Bieniewski, Thomas M.

    1988-01-01

    An induction plasma tube in combination with a current concentrator. The rent concentrator has a substantially cylindrical body having an open end and a partially closed end which defines an aperture. A first slot extends the longitudinal length of the cylindrical body and a second slot extends radially outward from the aperture. Together the first and second slots form a single L-shaped slot. The current concentrator is disposed within a volume bounded by an induction coil substantially along the axis thereof, and when power is applied to the induction coil a concentrated current is induced within the current concentrator aperture. The concentrator is moveable relative to the coil along the longitudinal axis of the coil to control the amount of current which is concentrated at the aperture.

  20. Thermochemical Nonequilibrium 2D Modeling of Nitrogen Inductively Coupled Plasma Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Minghao; Yusuke, Takahashi; Hisashi, Kihara; Ken-ichi, Abe; Kazuhiko, Yamada; Takashi, Abe; Satoshi, Miyatani

    2015-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulations of thermochemical nonequilibrium inductively coupled plasma (ICP) flows inside a 10-kW inductively coupled plasma wind tunnel (ICPWT) were carried out with nitrogen as the working gas. Compressible axisymmetric Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations coupled with magnetic vector potential equations were solved. A four-temperature model including an improved electron-vibration relaxation time was used to model the internal energy exchange between electron and heavy particles. The third-order accuracy electron transport properties (3rd AETP) were applied to the simulations. A hybrid chemical kinetic model was adopted to model the chemical nonequilibrium process. The flow characteristics such as thermal nonequilibrium, inductive discharge, effects of Lorentz force were made clear through the present study. It was clarified that the thermal nonequilibrium model played an important role in properly predicting the temperature field. The prediction accuracy can be improved by applying the 3rd AETP to the simulation for this ICPWT. supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (No. 23560954), sponsored by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science

  1. Quantitative aspects of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulska, Ewa; Wagner, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Accurate determination of elements in various kinds of samples is essential for many areas, including environmental science, medicine, as well as industry. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a powerful tool enabling multi-elemental analysis of numerous matrices with high sensitivity and good precision. Various calibration approaches can be used to perform accurate quantitative measurements by ICP-MS. They include the use of pure standards, matrix-matched standards, or relevant certified reference materials, assuring traceability of the reported results. This review critically evaluates the advantages and limitations of different calibration approaches, which are used in quantitative analyses by ICP-MS. Examples of such analyses are provided. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  2. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Uranium Error Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, D P; Maclean, S; Shepley, D; Shaw, R K

    2001-07-01

    The Hazards Control Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP/MS) technology to analyze uranium in urine. The ICP/MS used by the Hazards Control Department is a Perkin-Elmer Elan 6000 ICP/MS. The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program requires that the total error be assessed for bioassay measurements. A previous evaluation of the errors associated with the ICP/MS measurement of uranium demonstrated a {+-} 9.6% error in the range of 0.01 to 0.02 {micro}g/l. However, the propagation of total error for concentrations above and below this level have heretofore been undetermined. This document is an evaluation of the errors associated with the current LLNL ICP/MS method for a more expanded range of uranium concentrations.

  3. Quantitative aspects of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bulska, Ewa; Wagner, Barbara

    2016-10-28

    Accurate determination of elements in various kinds of samples is essential for many areas, including environmental science, medicine, as well as industry. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a powerful tool enabling multi-elemental analysis of numerous matrices with high sensitivity and good precision. Various calibration approaches can be used to perform accurate quantitative measurements by ICP-MS. They include the use of pure standards, matrix-matched standards, or relevant certified reference materials, assuring traceability of the reported results. This review critically evaluates the advantages and limitations of different calibration approaches, which are used in quantitative analyses by ICP-MS. Examples of such analyses are provided.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  4. Phosphorus doped graphene by inductively coupled plasma and triphenylphosphine treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dong-Wook Kim, Tae Sung; Yoo, Ji-Beom

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Substitution doping is a promising method for opening the energy band gap of graphene. • Substitution doping with phosphorus in the graphene lattice has numerous advantage such as high band gap, low formation energy, and high net charge density compared to nitrogen. • V{sub dirac} of Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and triphenylphosphine (TPP) treated graphene was −57 V, which provided clear evidence of n-type doping. • Substitutional doping of graphene with phosphorus is verified by the XPS spectra of P 2p core level and EELS mapping of phosphorus. • The chemical bonding between P and graphene is very stable for a long time in air (2 months). - Abstract: Graphene is considered a host material for various applications in next-generation electronic devices. However, despite its excellent properties, one of the most important issues to be solved as an electronic material is the creation of an energy band gap. Substitution doping is a promising method for opening the energy band gap of graphene. Herein, we demonstrate the substitutional doping of graphene with phosphorus using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and triphenylphosphine (TPP) treatments. The electrical transfer characteristics of the phosphorus doped graphene field effect transistor (GFET) have a V{sub dirac} of ∼ − 54 V. The chemical bonding between P and C was clearly observed in XPS spectra, and uniform distribution of phosphorus within graphene domains was confirmed by EELS mapping. The capability for substitutional doping of graphene with phosphorus can significantly promote the development of graphene based electronic devices.

  5. A study on plasma parameters in Ar/SF6 inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Seung-Ju; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2017-01-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) gas or Ar/SF6 mixing gas is widely used in plasma processes. However, there are a little experimental studies with various external parameters such as gas pressure and mixing ratio. In this work, a study of the plasma parameters by changing the gas mixing ratio was done in an Ar/SF6 inductively coupled plasma from the measurement of the electron energy distribution function. At a low gas pressure, as the mixing ratio of SF6 gas increased at a fixed inductively coupled plasma (ICP) power, the electron density decreased and the electron temperature increased, while they were not changed drastically. At a high gas pressure, a remarkable increase in the electron temperature was observed with the decrease in the electron density. These variations are due to the electron loss reactions such as the electron attachment. It was also found that at a fixed ICP power, the negative ion creation with the diluted SF6 gas can change the discharge mode transition from an inductive mode to a capacitive mode at the high gas pressure. The electron attachment reactions remove the low energy electrons and change the mean electron energy towards higher energies with diluting SF6 gas at high pressure. The measured results were compared with the simplified global model, and the global model is in relatively good agreement with the measured plasma parameters except for the result in the case of the large portion of SF6 gas at the high pressure and the capacitive mode, which causes strong negative ion formation by the electron attachment reactions.

  6. Plasma Charging of the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikatarian, R.; Kern, J. W.; Barsamian, H. R.; Koontz, S.; Roussel, J.-R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses electron and ion current collection on the International Space Station (ISS). A theoretical model of spacecraft charging is presented and the basis for its theoretical development discussed. A review of on-orbit ISS measurements of ISS potentials with and without an operating Plasma Contactor Unit is discussed. Additionally, correlations of in-orbit measurements with various ionospheric properties, i.e. electron temperature, plasma concentration, vxB etc., are discussed. It is shown how these on-orbit measurements are utilized in developing the theoretical model. The theoretical model accounts for orbital conditions, solar array shunting/unshunting, vehicle attitude and solar array position, ionosphereric properties, etc. Calculational results for the theoretical model are compared against available flight data for the exiting ISS configuration. Additionally, predictions are made for future ISS mission builds. Sensitivities of model predictions to expected variations of ionospheric properties are also examined.

  7. Thrust Stand Measurements of the Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Emsellem, Gregory D.

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters [1-3] are spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. This type of pulsed thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, pulsed inductive plasma thrusters require high pulse energies to inductively ionize propellant. The Microwave Assisted Dis- charge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA), shown in Fig. 1, is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that addressees this issue by partially ionizing propellant inside a conical inductive coil before the main current pulse via an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge. The ECR plasma is produced using microwaves and a static magnetic field from a set of permanent magnets arranged to create a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation, and in turn current sheet formation, to a region where the magnetic coupling between the plasma and the theta-pinch coil is high. The use of a conical theta-pinch coil also serves to provide neutral propellant containment and plasma plume focusing that is improved relative to the more common planar geometry of the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT) [1, 2]. In this paper, we describe thrust stand measurements performed to characterize the performance (specific impulse, thrust efficiency) of the MAD-IPA thruster. Impulse data are obtained at various pulse energies, mass flow rates and inductive coil geometries. Dependencies on these experimental parameters are discussed in the context of the current sheet formation and electromagnetic plasma

  8. Synthesis of Lithium Metal Oxide Nanoparticles by Induction Thermal Plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Manabu; Kageyama, Takuya; Sone, Hirotaka; Yoshida, Shuhei; Okamoto, Daisuke; Watanabe, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Lithium metal oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by induction thermal plasma. Four different systems—Li–Mn, Li–Cr, Li–Co, and Li–Ni—were compared to understand formation mechanism of Li–Me oxide nanoparticles in thermal plasma process. Analyses of X-ray diffractometry and electron microscopy showed that Li–Me oxide nanoparticles were successfully synthesized in Li–Mn, Li–Cr, and Li–Co systems. Spinel structured LiMn2O4 with truncated octahedral shape was formed. Layer structured LiCrO2 or LiCoO2 nanoparticles with polyhedral shapes were also synthesized in Li–Cr or Li–Co systems. By contrast, Li–Ni oxide nanoparticles were not synthesized in the Li–Ni system. Nucleation temperatures of each metal in the considered system were evaluated. The relationship between the nucleation temperature and melting and boiling points suggests that the melting points of metal oxides have a strong influence on the formation of lithium metal oxide nanoparticles. A lower melting temperature leads to a longer reaction time, resulting in a higher fraction of the lithium metal oxide nanoparticles in the prepared nanoparticles.

  9. Analysis of trimethylgallium with inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bertenyi, I.; Barnes, R.M.

    1986-07-01

    Two methods for the analysis of trimethylgallium (TMG) are described. Since TMG is pyrophoric and volatile and the nature of its impurity species is not known, separate methods were employed for volatile and nonvolatile impurities. The nonvolatile impurities (Al, Cu, Fe, Mg) were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) in an aqueous solution of decomposed TMG with conventional nebulization. The volatile impurity silicon in TMG also was determined by ICP-AES but with exponential dilution. A known quantity of TMG was placed in an exponential dilution flask, and argon swept the vapor out of the flask into the plasma. Limits of detection in 1 g of TMG were 2 ..mu..g of Al, 0.6 ..mu..g of Fe, 0.6 ..mu..g of Cu, and 0.08 ..mu..g of Mg. The Si detection limit was 0.6 ..mu..g. The analysis precision for practical samples was 10-20%.

  10. Transient plasma potential in pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled plasmas and effect of substrate biasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Anurag; Yeom, Geun Young

    2016-09-01

    An electron emitting probe in saturated floating potential mode has been used to investigate the temporal evolution of plasma potential and the effect of substrate RF biasing on it for pulsed dual frequency (2 MHz/13.56 MHz) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The low frequency power (P2MHz) has been pulsed at 1 KHz and a duty ratio of 50%, while high frequency power (P13.56MHz) has been used in continuous mode. The substrate has been biased with a separate bias power at (P12.56MHz) Argon has been used as a discharge gas. During the ICP power pulsing, three distinct regions in a typical plasma potential profile, have been identified as `initial overshoot', pulse `on-phase' and pulse `off-phase'. It has been found out that the RF biasing of the substrate significantly modulates the temporal evolution of the plasma potential. During the initial overshoot, plasma potential decreases with increasing RF biasing of the substrate, however it increases with increasing substrate biasing for pulse `on-phase' and `off-phase'. An interesting structure in plasma potential profile has also been observed when the substrate bias is applied and its evolution depends upon the magnitude of bias power. The reason of the evolution of this structure may be the ambipolar diffusion of electron and its dependence on bias power.

  11. Parametric investigations of plasma characteristics in a remote inductively coupled plasma system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Prasoon; Roy, Abhra; Jain, Kunal; Bhoj, Ananth

    2016-09-01

    Designing a remote plasma system involves source chamber sizing, selection of coils and/or electrodes to power the plasma, designing the downstream tubes, selection of materials used in the source and downstream regions, locations of inlets and outlets and finally optimizing the process parameter space of pressure, gas flow rates and power delivery. Simulations can aid in spatial and temporal plasma characterization in what are often inaccessible locations for experimental probes in the source chamber. In this paper, we report on simulations of a remote inductively coupled Argon plasma system using the modeling platform CFD-ACE +. The coupled multiphysics model description successfully address flow, chemistry, electromagnetics, heat transfer and plasma transport in the remote plasma system. The SimManager tool enables easy setup of parametric simulations to investigate the effect of varying the pressure, power, frequency, flow rates and downstream tube lengths. It can also enable the automatic solution of the varied parameters to optimize a user-defined objective function, which may be the integral ion and radical fluxes at the wafer. The fast run time coupled with the parametric and optimization capabilities can add significant insight and value in design and optimization.

  12. Analysis of biological reference materials, prepared by microwave dissolution, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Friel, J K; Skinner, C S; Jackson, S E; Longerich, H P

    1990-03-01

    A procedure has been developed for the analysis of biological materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Fast, efficient and complete sample digestion is achieved by a combined microwave-nitric acid/open beaker-nitric acid-hydrogen peroxide procedure. The ICP-MS analysis is performed with an on-line five-element internal standard to correct for matrix and instrumental drift effects. Results are presented for 24 elements in three biological reference materials (National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Materials 5277a Liver and 1566 Oyster and International Atomic Energy Agency Certified Reference Material H4 Animal Muscle). For all elements significantly above the detection limit and reagent blank concentrations, good agreement exists between ICP-MS and certified values.

  13. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry and Current Sheet Trajectory of a Conical Theta Pinch Pulsed Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Bonds, Kevin W.; Emsellem, Gregory D.

    2011-01-01

    Results are presented demonstrating the e ect of inductive coil geometry and current sheet trajectory on the exhaust velocity of propellant in conical theta pinch pulsed induc- tive plasma accelerators. The electromagnetic coupling between the inductive coil of the accelerator and a plasma current sheet is simulated, substituting a conical copper frustum for the plasma. The variation of system inductance as a function of plasma position is obtained by displacing the simulated current sheet from the coil while measuring the total inductance of the coil. Four coils of differing geometries were employed, and the total inductance of each coil was measured as a function of the axial displacement of two sep- arate copper frusta both having the same cone angle and length as the coil but with one compressed to a smaller size relative to the coil. The measured relationship between total coil inductance and current sheet position closes a dynamical circuit model that is used to calculate the resulting current sheet velocity for various coil and current sheet con gura- tions. The results of this model, which neglects the pinching contribution to thrust, radial propellant con nement, and plume divergence, indicate that in a conical theta pinch ge- ometry current sheet pinching is detrimental to thruster performance, reducing the kinetic energy of the exhausting propellant by up to 50% (at the upper bound for the parameter range of the study). The decrease in exhaust velocity was larger for coils and simulated current sheets of smaller half cone angles. An upper bound for the pinching contribution to thrust is estimated for typical operating parameters. Measurements of coil inductance for three di erent current sheet pinching conditions are used to estimate the magnetic pressure as a function of current sheet radial compression. The gas-dynamic contribution to axial acceleration is also estimated and shown to not compensate for the decrease in axial electromagnetic acceleration

  14. Aerosol detection efficiency in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Joshua A.; Zigmond, Joseph A.

    2016-03-02

    We used an electrostatic size classification technique to segregate particles of known composition prior to being injected into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Moreover, we counted size-segregated particles with a condensation nuclei counter as well as sampled with an ICP-MS. By injecting particles of known size, composition, and aerosol concentration into the ICP-MS, efficiencies of the order of magnitude aerosol detection were calculated, and the particle size dependencies for volatile and refractory species were quantified. Similar to laser ablation ICP-MS, aerosol detection efficiency was defined as the rate at which atoms were detected in the ICP-MS normalized by the rate at which atoms were injected in the form of particles. This method adds valuable insight into the development of technologies like laser ablation ICP-MS where aerosol particles (of relatively unknown size and gas concentration) are generated during ablation and then transported into the plasma of an ICP-MS. In this study, we characterized aerosol detection efficiencies of volatile species gold and silver along with refractory species aluminum oxide, cerium oxide, and yttrium oxide. Aerosols were generated with electrical mobility diameters ranging from 100 to 1000 nm. In general, it was observed that refractory species had lower aerosol detection efficiencies than volatile species, and there were strong dependencies on particle size and plasma torch residence time. Volatile species showed a distinct transition point at which aerosol detection efficiency began decreasing with increasing particle size. This critical diameter indicated the largest particle size for which complete particle detection should be expected and agreed with theories published in other works. Aerosol detection efficiencies also displayed power law dependencies on particle size. Aerosol detection efficiencies ranged from 10-5 to 10-11. Free molecular heat and mass transfer

  15. Behavior of Excited Argon Atoms in Inductively Driven Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    HEBNER,GREGORY A.; MILLER,PAUL A.

    1999-12-07

    Laser induced fluorescence has been used to measure the spatial distribution of the two lowest energy argon excited states, 1s{sub 5} and 1s{sub 4}, in inductively driven plasmas containing argon, chlorine and boron trichloride. The behavior of the two energy levels with plasma conditions was significantly different, probably because the 1s{sub 5} level is metastable and the 1s{sub 4} level is radiatively coupled to the ground state but is radiation trapped. The argon data is compared with a global model to identify the relative importance of processes such as electron collisional mixing and radiation trapping. The trends in the data suggest that both processes play a major role in determining the excited state density. At lower rfpower and pressure, excited state spatial distributions in pure argon were peaked in the center of the discharge, with an approximately Gaussian profile. However, for the highest rfpowers and pressures investigated, the spatial distributions tended to flatten in the center of the discharge while the density at the edge of the discharge was unaffected. The spatially resolved excited state density measurements were combined with previous line integrated measurements in the same discharge geometry to derive spatially resolved, absolute densities of the 1s{sub 5} and 1s{sub 4} argon excited states and gas temperature spatial distributions. Fluorescence lifetime was a strong fi.mction of the rf power, pressure, argon fraction and spatial location. Increasing the power or pressure resulted in a factor of two decrease in the fluorescence lifetime while adding Cl{sub 2} or BCl{sub 3} increased the fluorescence lifetime. Excited state quenching rates are derived from the data. When Cl{sub 2} or BCl{sub 3} was added to the plasma, the maximum argon metastable density depended on the gas and ratio. When chlorine was added to the argon plasma, the spatial density profiles were independent of chlorine fraction. While it is energetically possible for

  16. Aerosol detection efficiency in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Joshua A.; Zigmond, Joseph A.

    2016-05-01

    An electrostatic size classification technique was used to segregate particles of known composition prior to being injected into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Size-segregated particles were counted with a condensation nuclei counter as well as sampled with an ICP-MS. By injecting particles of known size, composition, and aerosol concentration into the ICP-MS, efficiencies of the order of magnitude aerosol detection were calculated, and the particle size dependencies for volatile and refractory species were quantified. Similar to laser ablation ICP-MS, aerosol detection efficiency was defined as the rate at which atoms were detected in the ICP-MS normalized by the rate at which atoms were injected in the form of particles. This method adds valuable insight into the development of technologies like laser ablation ICP-MS where aerosol particles (of relatively unknown size and gas concentration) are generated during ablation and then transported into the plasma of an ICP-MS. In this study, we characterized aerosol detection efficiencies of volatile species gold and silver along with refractory species aluminum oxide, cerium oxide, and yttrium oxide. Aerosols were generated with electrical mobility diameters ranging from 100 to 1000 nm. In general, it was observed that refractory species had lower aerosol detection efficiencies than volatile species, and there were strong dependencies on particle size and plasma torch residence time. Volatile species showed a distinct transition point at which aerosol detection efficiency began decreasing with increasing particle size. This critical diameter indicated the largest particle size for which complete particle detection should be expected and agreed with theories published in other works. Aerosol detection efficiencies also displayed power law dependencies on particle size. Aerosol detection efficiencies ranged from 10- 5 to 10- 11. Free molecular heat and mass transfer theory was applied, but

  17. Aerosol detection efficiency in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Hubbard, Joshua A.; Zigmond, Joseph A.

    2016-03-02

    We used an electrostatic size classification technique to segregate particles of known composition prior to being injected into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Moreover, we counted size-segregated particles with a condensation nuclei counter as well as sampled with an ICP-MS. By injecting particles of known size, composition, and aerosol concentration into the ICP-MS, efficiencies of the order of magnitude aerosol detection were calculated, and the particle size dependencies for volatile and refractory species were quantified. Similar to laser ablation ICP-MS, aerosol detection efficiency was defined as the rate at which atoms were detected in the ICP-MS normalized bymore » the rate at which atoms were injected in the form of particles. This method adds valuable insight into the development of technologies like laser ablation ICP-MS where aerosol particles (of relatively unknown size and gas concentration) are generated during ablation and then transported into the plasma of an ICP-MS. In this study, we characterized aerosol detection efficiencies of volatile species gold and silver along with refractory species aluminum oxide, cerium oxide, and yttrium oxide. Aerosols were generated with electrical mobility diameters ranging from 100 to 1000 nm. In general, it was observed that refractory species had lower aerosol detection efficiencies than volatile species, and there were strong dependencies on particle size and plasma torch residence time. Volatile species showed a distinct transition point at which aerosol detection efficiency began decreasing with increasing particle size. This critical diameter indicated the largest particle size for which complete particle detection should be expected and agreed with theories published in other works. Aerosol detection efficiencies also displayed power law dependencies on particle size. Aerosol detection efficiencies ranged from 10-5 to 10-11. Free molecular heat and mass transfer theory was

  18. Advances in Steady Inductive Helicity Injection for Plasma Startup and Toroidal Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, Brian S.; Jarboe, Thomas R.; Hossack, Aaron C.; Ennis, David A.; Nelson, Brian A.; Hansen, Chris J.; Wrobel, Jonathan S.

    The Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (HIT-SI) has achieved a breakthrough in the development of a new method of toroidal plasma startup and current drive. HIT-SI accomplishes helicity injection current drive on a spheromak of major radius 0.3 m with two injectors driven sinusoidally at 14.5 kHz. Results include the first sustainment of toroidal plasma current of over 50 kA at up to 3 times the injected currents added in quadrature. Separatrix toroidal currents—currents not linking the helicity injectors—are sustained at up to 40 kA. Toroidal currents persist for up to 0.65 ms after the injectors are turned off. Results are achieved after helium operations condition the alumina plasma-facing surface. The conditioned alumina walls then act to pump the deuterium, thereby reducing the spheromak density. High performance discharges (Itor/Iinj ≥ 2) are characterized by a decrease in the n = 1 mode activity measured by surface probes near the midplane of the confinement volume. Suppression of internal magnetic fields (measured by an internal probe) below the predicted Taylor equilibrium indicates that the magnetic fields in HIT-SI can no longer be described by a zero pressure, constant λ equilibrium.

  19. Feedback control of plasma electron density and ion energy in an inductively coupled plasma etcher

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Chaung; Leou, K.-C.; Huang, H.-M.; Hsieh, C.-H.

    2009-01-15

    Here the authors report the development of a fuzzy logic based feedback control of the plasma electron density and ion energy for high density plasma etch process. The plasma electron density was measured using their recently developed transmission line microstrip microwave interferometer mounted on the chamber wall, and the rf voltage was measured by a commercial impedance meter connected to the wafer stage. The actuators were two 13.56 MHz rf power generators which provided the inductively coupled plasma power and bias power, respectively. The control system adopted the fuzzy logic control algorithm to reduce frequent actuator action resulting from measurement noise. The experimental results show that the first wafer effect can be eliminated using closed-loop control for both poly-Si and HfO{sub 2} etching. In particular, for the HfO2 etch, the controlled variables in this work were much more effective than the previous one where ion current was controlled, instead of the electron density. However, the pressure disturbance effect cannot be reduced using plasma electron density feedback.

  20. Complex image method for RF antenna-plasma inductive coupling calculation in planar geometry. Part I: basic concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howling, A. A.; Guittienne, Ph; Jacquier, R.; Furno, I.

    2015-12-01

    The coupling between an inductive source and the plasma determines the power transfer efficiency and the reflected impedance in the primary circuit. Usually, the plasma coupling is analysed by means of a transformer equivalent circuit, where the plasma inductance and resistance are estimated using a global plasma model. This paper shows that, for planar RF antennas, the mutual inductance between the plasma and the primary circuit can be calculated using partial inductances and the complex image method, where the plasma coupling is determined in terms of the plasma skin depth and the distance to the plasma. To introduce the basic concepts, the mutual inductance is calculated here for a linear conductor parallel to the plasma surface. In the accompanying paper part II Guittienne et al (2015 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 24 065015), impedance measurements on a RF resonant planar plasma source are modeled using an impedance matrix where the plasma-antenna mutual impedances are calculated using the complex image method presented here.

  1. External control of electron energy distributions in a dual tandem inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lei; Sridhar, Shyam; Zhu, Weiye; Donnelly, Vincent M. Economou, Demetre J.; Logue, Michael D.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-08-28

    The control of electron energy probability functions (EEPFs) in low pressure partially ionized plasmas is typically accomplished through the format of the applied power. For example, through the use of pulse power, the EEPF can be modulated to produce shapes not possible under continuous wave excitation. This technique uses internal control. In this paper, we discuss a method for external control of EEPFs by transport of electrons between separately powered inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs). The reactor incorporates dual ICP sources (main and auxiliary) in a tandem geometry whose plasma volumes are separated by a grid. The auxiliary ICP is continuously powered while the main ICP is pulsed. Langmuir probe measurements of the EEPFs during the afterglow of the main ICP suggests that transport of hot electrons from the auxiliary plasma provided what is effectively an external source of energetic electrons. The tail of the EEPF and bulk electron temperature were then elevated in the afterglow of the main ICP by this external source of power. Results from a computer simulation for the evolution of the EEPFs concur with measured trends.

  2. External control of electron energy distributions in a dual tandem inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Sridhar, Shyam; Zhu, Weiye; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.; Logue, Michael D.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-08-01

    The control of electron energy probability functions (EEPFs) in low pressure partially ionized plasmas is typically accomplished through the format of the applied power. For example, through the use of pulse power, the EEPF can be modulated to produce shapes not possible under continuous wave excitation. This technique uses internal control. In this paper, we discuss a method for external control of EEPFs by transport of electrons between separately powered inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs). The reactor incorporates dual ICP sources (main and auxiliary) in a tandem geometry whose plasma volumes are separated by a grid. The auxiliary ICP is continuously powered while the main ICP is pulsed. Langmuir probe measurements of the EEPFs during the afterglow of the main ICP suggests that transport of hot electrons from the auxiliary plasma provided what is effectively an external source of energetic electrons. The tail of the EEPF and bulk electron temperature were then elevated in the afterglow of the main ICP by this external source of power. Results from a computer simulation for the evolution of the EEPFs concur with measured trends.

  3. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in the analysis of biological samples and pharmaceutical drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossipov, K.; Seregina, I. F.; Bolshov, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is widely used in the analysis of biological samples (whole blood, serum, blood plasma, urine, tissues, etc.) and pharmaceutical drugs. The shortcomings of this method related to spectral and non-spectral interferences are manifested in full measure in determination of the target analytes in these complex samples strongly differing in composition. The spectral interferences are caused by similarity of masses of the target component and sample matrix components. Non-spectral interferences are related to the influence of sample matrix components on the physicochemical processes taking place during formation and transportation of liquid sample aerosols into the plasma, on the value and spatial distribution of plasma temperature and on the transmission of the ion beam from the interface to mass spectrometer detector. The review is devoted to analysis of different mechanisms of appearance of non-spectral interferences and to ways for their minimization or elimination. Special attention is paid to the techniques of biological sample preparation, which largely determine the mechanisms of the influence of sample composition on the results of element determination. The ways of lowering non-spectral interferences by instrumental parameter tuning and application of internal standards are considered. The bibliography includes 189 references.

  4. Design and Testing of a Small Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Adam K.; Dominguez, Alexandra; Eskridge, Richard H.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Riley, Daniel P.; Perdue, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    The design and testing of a small inductive pulsed plasma thruster (IPPT) is described. The device was built as a test-bed for the pulsed gas-valves and solid-state switches required for a thruster of this kind, and was designed to be modular to facilitate modification. The thruster in its present configuration consists of a multi-turn, spiral-wound acceleration coil (270 millimeters outer diameter, 100 millimeters inner diameter) driven by a 10 microfarad capacitor and switched with a high-voltage thyristor, a propellant delivery system including a fast pulsed gas-valve, and a glow-discharge pre-ionizer circuit. The acceleration coil circuit may be operated at voltages up to 4 kilovolts (the thyristor limit is 4.5 kilovolts) and the thruster operated at cyclic-rates up to 30 Herz. Initial testing of the thruster, both bench-top and in-vacuum, has been performed. Cyclic operation of the complete device was demonstrated (at 2 Herz), and a number of valuable insights pertaining to the design of these devices have been gained.

  5. Induced magnetic-field effects in inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Ronald H.; Rognlien, Thomas D.

    1996-05-01

    In inductive plasma sources, the rapid spatial decay of the electric field arising from the skin effect produces a large radio frequency (RF) magnetic field via Faraday's law. It was previously shown that this magnetic field leads to a reduction of the electron density in the skin region, as well as a reduction in the collisionless heating rate. The electron deficit leads to the formation of an electrostatic potential which pulls electrons in to restore quasineutrality. Here the electron density calculation is extended to include both the induced and electrostatic fields. If the wave frequency is not too low, the ions respond only to the averaged fields, and hence the electrostatic field is oscillatory, predominantly at the second harmonic of the applied field. The potential required to establish a constant electron density is calculated and compared with numerical orbit-code calculations. For times short compared to ion transit times, the quasineutral density is just the initial ion density. For timescales long enough that the ions can relax, the density profile can be found from the solution of fluid equations with an effective (ponderomotive-like) potential added. Although the time-varying electrostatic potential is an extra source of heating, the net effect of the induced magnetic and electrostatic fields through trapping, early turning, and direct heating is a significant reduction in collisionless heating for parameters of interest.

  6. Environmental analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, Diane

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the numerous ways in which inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has been used for the analysis of environmental samples since it was commercially introduced in 1983. Its multielemental isotopic capability, high sensitivity and wide linear dynamic range makes it ideally suited for environmental analysis. Provided that some care is taken during sample preparation and that appropriate calibration strategies are used to circumvent non-spectroscopic interferences, the technique is readily applicable to the analysis of a wide variety of environmental samples (natural waters, soils, rocks, sediments, vegetation, etc.), using quadrupole, time-of-flight or double-focusing sector-field mass spectrometers. In cases where spectroscopic interferences arising from the sample matrix cannot be resolved, then separation methods can be implemented either on- or off-line, which can simultaneously allow analyte preconcentration, thus further decreasing the already low detection limits that are achievable. In most cases, the blank, prepared by following the same steps as for the sample but without the sample, limits the ultimate detection limits that can be reached.

  7. Gold fingerprinting by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watling, R. John; Herbert, Hugh K.; Delev, Dianne; Abell, Ian D.

    1994-02-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) has been applied to the characterization of the trace element composition "fingerprint" of selected gold samples from Western Australia and South Africa. By comparison of the elemental associations it is possible to relate gold to a specific mineralizing event, mine or bullion sample. This methodology facilitates identification of the provenance of stolen gold or gold used in salting activities. In this latter case, it is common for gold from a number of sources to be used in the salting process. Consequently, gold in the prospect being salted will not come from a single source and identification of multiple sources for this gold will establish that salting has occurred. Preliminary results also indicate that specific elemental associations could be used to identify the country of origin of gold. The technique has already been applied in 17 cases involving gold theft in Western Australia, where it is estimated that up to 2% of gold production is "relocated" each year as a result of criminal activities.

  8. Inductively Coupled Plasma Zoom-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Elise A; Ray, Steven J; Enke, Christie G; Hieftje, Gary M

    2016-03-01

    A zoom-time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been coupled to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionization source. Zoom-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (zoom-TOFMS) combines two complementary types of velocity-based mass separation. Specifically, zoom-TOFMS alternates between conventional, constant-energy acceleration (CEA) TOFMS and energy-focused, constant-momentum acceleration (CMA) (zoom) TOFMS. The CMA mode provides a mass-resolution enhancement of 1.5-1.7× over CEA-TOFMS in the current, 35-cm ICP-zoom-TOFMS instrument geometry. The maximum resolving power (full-width at half-maximum) for the ICP-zoom-TOFMS instrument is 1200 for CEA-TOFMS and 1900 for CMA-TOFMS. The CMA mode yields detection limits of between 0.02 and 0.8 ppt, depending upon the repetition rate and integration time-compared with single ppt detection limits for CEA-TOFMS. Isotope-ratio precision is shot-noise limited at approximately 0.2% relative-standard deviation (RSD) for both CEA- and CMA-TOFMS at a 10 kHz repetition rate and an integration time of 3-5 min. When the repetition rate is increased to 43.5 kHz for CMA, the shot-noise limited, zoom-mode isotope-ratio precision is improved to 0.09% RSD for the same integration time.

  9. Induced magnetic-field effects in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1995-11-04

    In inductive plasma sources, the rapid spatial decay of the electric field arising from the skin effect produces a large radio frequency (RF) magnetic field via Faraday`s law. We previously determined that this magnetic field leads to a reduction of the electron density in the skin region, as well as a reduction in the collisionless heating rate. The electron deficit leads to the formation of an electrostatic potential which pulls electrons in to restore quasineutrality. Here we calculate the electron density including both the induced and electrostatic fields. If the wave frequency is not too low, the ions respond only to the averaged fields, and hence the electrostatic field is oscillatory, predominantly at the second harmonic of the applied field. We calculate the potential required to establish a constant electron density, and compare with numerical orbit-code calculations. For times short compared to ion transit times, the quasineutral density is just the initial ion density. For timescales long enough that the ions can relax, the density profile can be found from the solution of fluid equations with an effective (ponderomotive-like) potential added. Although the time-varying electrostatic potential is an extra source of heating, the net effect of the induced magnetic and electrostatic fields through trapping, early turning, and direct heating is a significant reduction in collisionless heating for parameters of interest.

  10. Determination of the rare-earth elements in geological materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lichte, F.E.; Meier, A.L.; Crock, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    A method of analysis of geological materials for the determination of the rare-earth elements using the Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric technique (ICP-MS) has been developed. Instrumental parameters and factors affecting analytical results have been first studied and then optimized. Samples are analyzed directly following an acid digestion, without the need for separation or preconcentration with limits of detection of 2-11 ng/g, precision of ?? 2.5% relative standard deviation, and accuracy comparable to inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis. A commercially available ICP-MS instrument is used with modifications to the sample introduction system, torch, and sampler orifice to reduce the effects of high salt content of sample solutions prepared from geologic materials. Corrections for isobaric interferences from oxide ions and other diatomic and triatomic ions are made mathematically. Special internal standard procedures are used to compensate for drift in metahmetal oxide ratios and sensitivity. Reference standard values are used to verify the accuracy and utility of the method.

  11. A study on the maximum power transfer condition in an inductively coupled plasma using transformer circuit model

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Do; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2013-09-15

    Correlations between the external discharge parameters (the driving frequency ω and the chamber dimension R) and plasma characteristics (the skin depth δ and the electron-neutral collision frequency ν{sub m}) are studied using the transformer circuit model [R. B. Piejak et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 1, 179 (1992)] when the absorbed power is maximized in an inductively coupled plasma. From the analysis of the transformer circuit model, the maximum power transfer conditions, which depend on the external discharge parameters and the internal plasma characteristics, were obtained. It was found that a maximum power transfer occurs when δ≈0.38R for the discharge condition at which ν{sub m}/ω≪1, while it occurs when δ≈√(2)√(ω/ν{sub m})R for the discharge condition at which ν{sub m}/ω≫1. The results of this circuit analysis are consistent with the stable last inductive mode region of an inductive-to-capacitive mode transition [Lee and Chung, Phys. Plasmas 13, 063510 (2006)], which was theoretically derived from Maxwell's equations. Our results were also in agreement with the experimental results. From this work, we demonstrate that a simple circuit analysis can be applied to explain complex physical phenomena to a certain extent.

  12. Vacuum arc plasma thrusters with inductive energy storage driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A plasma thruster with a cylindrical inner and cylindrical outer electrode generates plasma particles from the application of energy stored in an inductor to a surface suitable for the formation of a plasma and expansion of plasma particles. The plasma production results in the generation of charged particles suitable for generating a reaction force, and the charged particles are guided by a magnetic field produced by the same inductor used to store the energy used to form the plasma.

  13. Electromagnetic, complex image model of a large area RF resonant antenna as inductive plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guittienne, Ph; Jacquier, R.; Howling, A. A.; Furno, I.

    2017-03-01

    A large area antenna generates a plasma by both inductive and capacitive coupling; it is an electromagnetically coupled plasma source. In this work, experiments on a large area planar RF antenna source are interpreted in terms of a multi-conductor transmission line coupled to the plasma. This electromagnetic treatment includes mutual inductive coupling using the complex image method, and capacitive matrix coupling between all elements of the resonant network and the plasma. The model reproduces antenna input impedance measurements, with and without plasma, on a 1.2× 1.2 m2 antenna used for large area plasma processing. Analytic expressions are given, and results are obtained by computation of the matrix solution. This method could be used to design planar inductive sources in general, by applying the termination impedances appropriate to each antenna type.

  14. Bulk plasma fragmentation in a C4F8 inductively coupled plasma: A hybrid modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shu-Xia; Zhang, Yu-Ru; Gao, Fei; Wang, You-Nian; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2015-06-01

    A hybrid model is used to investigate the fragmentation of C4F8 inductive discharges. Indeed, the resulting reactive species are crucial for the optimization of the Si-based etching process, since they determine the mechanisms of fluorination, polymerization, and sputtering. In this paper, we present the dissociation degree, the density ratio of F vs. CxFy (i.e., fluorocarbon (fc) neutrals), the neutral vs. positive ion density ratio, details on the neutral and ion components, and fractions of various fc neutrals (or ions) in the total fc neutral (or ion) density in a C4F8 inductively coupled plasma source, as well as the effect of pressure and power on these results. To analyze the fragmentation behavior, the electron density and temperature and electron energy probability function (EEPF) are investigated. Moreover, the main electron-impact generation sources for all considered neutrals and ions are determined from the complicated C4F8 reaction set used in the model. The C4F8 plasma fragmentation is explained, taking into account many factors, such as the EEPF characteristics, the dominance of primary and secondary processes, and the thresholds of dissociation and ionization. The simulation results are compared with experiments from literature, and reasonable agreement is obtained. Some discrepancies are observed, which can probably be attributed to the simplified polymer surface kinetics assumed in the model.

  15. Design and Testing of a Small Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Adam K.; Eskridge, Richard H.; Dominguez, Alexandra; Polzin, Kurt A.; Riley, Daniel P.; Kimberlin, Adam C.

    2015-01-01

    The design and testing of a small inductive pulsed plasma thruster (IPPT), shown in Fig. 1 with all the major subsystems required for a thruster of this kind are described. Thrust measurements and imaging of the device operated in rep-rated mode are presented to quantify the performance envelope of the device. The small IPPT described in this paper was designed to serve as a test-bed for the pulsed gas-valves and solid-state switches required for a IPPTs. A modular design approach was used to permit future modifications and upgrades. The thruster consists of the following sub-systems: a) a multi-turn, spiral-wound acceleration coil (27 cm o.d., 10 cm i.d.) driven by a 10 microFarad capacitor and switched with a high-voltage thyristor, b) a fast pulsed gas-valve, and c.) a glow-discharge pre-ionizer (PI) circuit. The acceleration-coil circuit may be operated at voltages up to 4 kV (the thyristor limit is 4.5 kV). The device may be operated at rep-rates up to 30 Hz with the present gas-valve. Thrust measurements and imaging of the device operated in rep-rated mode will be presented. The pre-ionizer consists of a 0.3 microFarad capacitor charged to 4 kV and connected to two annular stainless-steel electrodes bounding the area of the coil-face. The 4 kV potential is held across them and when the gas is puffed in over the coil, the PI circuit is completed, and a plasma is formed. Even at the less than optimal base-pressure in the chamber (approximately 5 × 10(exp -4) torr), the PI held-off the applied voltage, and only discharged upon command. For a capacitor charge of 2 kV the peak coil current is 4.1 kA, and during this pulse a very bright discharge (much brighter than from the PI alone) was observed (see Fig. 2). Interestingly, for discharges at this charge voltage the PI was not required as the current rise rate, dI/dt, of the coil itself was sufficient to ionize the gas.

  16. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and the Determination of Neptunium and Plutonium in the Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, Kate

    This project is concerned with the application of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to the determination of neptunium-237, plutonium-239 and plutonium-240 concentrations in the marine environment…

  17. Determination of elemental content off rocks by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lichte, F.E.

    1995-01-01

    A new method of analysis for rocks and soils is presented using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. It is based on a lithium borate fusion and the free-running mode of a Nd/YAG laser. An Ar/N2 sample gas improves sensitivity 7 ?? for most elements. Sixty-three elements are characterized for the fusion, and 49 elements can be quantified. Internal standards and isotopic spikes ensure accurate results. Limits of detection are 0.01 ??g/g for many trace elements. Accuracy approaches 5% for all elements. A new quality assurance procedure is presented that uses fundamental parameters to test relative response factors for the calibration.

  18. Optical Diagnostics of the Plasma and Surface during Inductively Coupled Plasma Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Irving P.

    1999-10-01

    The use of optical diagnostics to analyze the etching of Si, Ge, and InP by chlorine in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) is investigated. Optical probes, along with other conventional plasma diagnostics, are used to characterize the process through measurements of the constituents of the plasma and the surface composition to obtain a more complete picture of the etching process. Neutral Cl2 and Cl densities are determined by optical emission actinometry by following optical emission from Cl_2. The absolute densities of Cl_2^+ and Cl^+ are determined by laser- induced fluorescence (LIF) of Cl_2^+ and Langmuir probe measurements of the total positive ion density. The surface is probed by using laser-induced thermal desorption with an XeCl laser (308 nm) to desorb the steady-state adlayer and optical methods to detect these desorbed species. The development of a new method to detect optically these laser desorbed (LD) species is detailed, that of examining transient changes in the plasma-induced emission (PIE). This LD-PIE method is more universal than the previously reported detection by LIF (LD-LIF), but requires more calibration due to varying electron density and temperature with varying plasma conditions. This is detailed for Si etching, for which LD-PIE and LD-LIF results are compared. The calibration methods are seen to be valid when the surface is analyzed as the rf power supplied to the reactor is varied. The electron density - needed for LD-PIE calibration - is measured by microwave interferometry. An improved understanding of the etching mechanism is obtained by combining the results of each of these measurements. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-98-15846. note

  19. Incorporation of an energy equation into a pulsed inductive plasma acceleration model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reneau, Jarred

    Electric propulsion systems utilize electrical energy to produce thrust for spacecraft propulsion. These systems have multiple applications ranging from Earth orbit North-South station keeping to solar system exploratory missions such as NASA's Discovery, New Frontiers, and Flagship class missions that focus on exploring scientifically interesting targets. In an electromagnetic thruster, a magnetic field interacting with current in an ionized gas (plasma) accelerates the propellant to produce thrust. Pulsed inductive thrusters rely on an electrodeless discharge where both the magnetic field in the plasma and the plasma current are induced by a time-varying current in an external circuit. The multi-dimensional acceleration model for a pulsed inductive plasma thruster consists of a set of circuit equations describing the electrical behavior of the thruster coupled to a one-dimensional momentum equation that allow for estimating thruster performance. Current models lack a method to account for the time-varying energy distribution in an inductive plasma accelerator.

  20. Thrust Stand Measurements Using Alternative Propellants in the Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2011-01-01

    Storable propellants (for example water, ammonia, and hydrazine) are attractive for deep space propulsion due to their naturally high density at ambient interplanetary conditions, which obviates the need for a cryogenic/venting system. Water in particular is attractive due to its ease of handling and availability both terrestrially and extra-terrestrially. While many storable propellants are reactive and corrosive, a propulsion scheme where the propellant is insulated from vulnerable (e.g. metallic) sections of the assembly would be well-suited to process these otherwise incompatible propellants. Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters meet this criterion because they can be operated without direct propellant-electrode interaction. During operation of these devices, electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil creating a time-varying current in the coil that interacts with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, many pulsed inductive plasma thrusters require high pulse energies to inductively ionize propellant. The Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA) is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that addressees this issue by partially ionizing propellant inside a conical inductive coil before the main current pulse via an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge. The ECR plasma is produced using microwaves and a static magnetic field from a set of permanent magnets arranged to create a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation, and in turn current sheet formation, to a region where the magnetic coupling between the plasma and the theta

  1. A Self-Consistent Plasma-Sheath Model for the Inductively Coupled Plasma Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Deepak; Govindam, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2000-01-01

    Accurate determination of ion flux on a wafer requires a self-consistent, multidimensional modeling of plasma reactor that adequately resolves the sheath region adjoining the wafer. This level of modeling is difficult to achieve since non-collisional sheath lengths are usually 3-4 orders of magnitude smaller than the reactor scale. Also, the drift-diffusion equations used for ion transport becomes invalid in the sheath since the ion frictional force is no longer in equilibrium with drift and diffusion forces. The alternative is to use a full momentum equation for each ionic species. In this work we will present results from a self-consistent reactor scale-sheath scale model for 2D inductively coupled plasmas. The goal of this study is to improve the modeling capabilities and assess the importance of additional physics in determining important reactor performance features, such as the ion flux uniformity, coil frequency and configuration effects, etc. Effect of numerical dissipation on the solution quality will also be discussed.

  2. Local cooling, plasma reheating and thermal pinching induced by single aerosol droplets injected into an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, George C.-Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2016-07-01

    The injection of a single micrometer-sized droplet into an analytical inductively coupled plasma (ICP) perturbs the plasma and involves three sequential effects: local cooling, thermal pinching and plasma reheating. Time-resolved two-dimensional monochromatic imaging of the load-coil region of an ICP was used to monitor this sequence of plasma perturbations. When a microdroplet enters the plasma, it acts as a local heat sink and cools the nearby plasma region. The cooling effect is considered local, although the cooling volume can be large and extends 6 mm from the physical location of the vaporizing droplet. The liberated hydrogen, from decomposition of water, causes a thermal pinch effect by increasing the thermal conductivity of the bulk plasma and accelerating heat loss at the plasma periphery. As a response to the heat loss, the plasma shrinks in size, which increases its power density. Plasma shrinkage starts around the same time when the microdroplet enters the plasma and lasts at least 2 ms after the droplet leaves the load-coil region. Once the vaporizing droplet passes through a particular plasma volume, that volume is reheated to an even higher temperature than under steady-state conditions. Because of the opposing effects of plasma cooling and reheating, the plasma conditions are different upstream (downward) and downstream (upward) from a vaporizing droplet - cooling dominates the downstream region whereas reheating controls in the upstream domain. The boundary between the local cooling and reheating zones is sharp and is only ~ 1 mm thick. The reheating effect persists a relatively long time in the plasma, at least up to 4 ms after the droplet moves out of the load-coil region. The restoration of plasma equilibrium after the perturbation induced by microdroplet injection is slow. Microdroplet injection also induces a momentary change in plasma impedance, and the impedance change was found to correlate qualitatively with the different stages of plasma

  3. Analysis of tungsten carbide coatings by UV laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanicky, V.; Otruba, V.; Mermet, J.-M.

    2000-06-01

    Tungsten carbide coatings (thickness 0.1-0.2 mm) containing 8.0, 12.2, 17.2 and 22.9% Co were studied with laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-AES). Composition of these plasma sprayed deposits on steel disks was determined using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and electron microprobe energy/wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The coatings were ablated by means of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm (10 Hz, 10 mJ per shot) coupled to an ICP echelle-based spectrometer equipped with a segmented charge-coupled device detector. Non-linear dependences of cobalt lines intensities on the Co percentage were observed both at a single spot ablation and at a sample translation. This behaviour could be attributed to a complex phase composition of the system W-C-Co. However, employing tungsten as internal standard the linear calibration was obtained for studied analytical lines Co II 228.616 nm, Co II 230.786 nm, Co II 236.379 nm and Co II 238.892 nm.

  4. [Analysis of Trace Inorganic Elements in Castor Oil by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Tan-ping; Xie, Hua-lin; Nie, Xi-du

    2015-10-01

    A method for the determination of Na, Mg, Si, P, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Sr, Mo, Cd, Hg and Pb in castor oil after direct dilution with ethanol by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was established. The sample was diluted by ethanol before ICP-MS determination. The condensation and deposition of high concentrations of carbon in mass cone interface and ion lens, which will decrease the sensitivity of element analysis, were avoided effectively by introducing O2 to plasma. The mass spectral interferences were eliminated by octopole reaction system (ORS). The matrix effects were calibrated to using Sc, Ge, Rh and Ir as internal standard elements. Au standard solution, which could form amalgam alloy with Hg, was dropped to eliminate the memory effect of Hg. The results show that the correlation coefficient for analyte is no less than 0.999 5, the detection limits is in the range of 0.06 - 20.1 ng x L(-1), the recovery is in the range of 990.4% - 110.2%, and the RSD is less than 4.8%. This method was very fast, simple and accurate to simultaneously analyze multi-elements in castor oil.

  5. The immune tolerance induction (ITI) dose debate: does the International ITI Study provide a clearer picture?

    PubMed

    Ettingshausen, C Escuriola; Kreuz, W

    2013-01-01

    Among the proposed predictors for immune tolerance induction (ITI) outcome, the therapeutic regimen - specifically the dose and frequency of administered factor VIII (FVIII) as well as FVIII product type - is intensely debated. Are there any advantages for low-dose regimens (50 IU FVIII kg(-1) three times a week) over high-dose regimens (200 IU FVIII kg day(-1)) or vice versa? Are von Willebrand factor (VWF)-containing plasma-derived concentrates superior to recombinant FVIII concentrates for tolerance induction? A review of the available literature indicates that patients with good prognostic factors can achieve success with either low-dose or high-dose ITI regimens. Retrospective data suggest that patient characteristics such as maximum historical inhibitor titres and pre-ITI inhibitor titres are better predictors of treatment success than dose. Results of the prospective International ITI Study have recently become available. In inhibitor patients with good prognosis, success rates were similar between low-dose (50 IU FVIII kg(-1) three times a week) and high-dose (200 IU FVIII kg(-1) daily) regimens. However, patients receiving low-dose ITI took longer to achieve various ITI milestones and had a significantly higher bleed rate per month compared with the high-dose group (0.62 vs. 0.28; P = 0.00024), findings with important clinical implications. Inhibitor patients with poor prognostic features should be treated with a high-dose protocol. This conclusion is supported by a meta-analysis of the International Immune Tolerance Registry and North American Immune Tolerance Registry and by data from Germany showing good success rates with the high-dose, high-frequency Bonn protocol in poor prognosis patients. Type of concentrate also appears to have an influence on ITI success rates in this patient subgroup, with evidence suggesting an advantage for VWF-containing plasma-derived FVIII concentrates over recombinant or VWF-free concentrates. The ongoing prospective

  6. Ion flux and ion distribution function measurements in synchronously pulsed inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Brihoum, Melisa; Cunge, Gilles; Darnon, Maxime; Joubert, Olivier; Gahan, David; Braithwaite, Nicholas St. J.

    2013-03-15

    Changes in the ion flux and the time-averaged ion distribution functions are reported for pulsed, inductively coupled RF plasmas (ICPs) operated over a range of duty cycles. For helium and argon plasmas, the ion flux increases rapidly after the start of the RF pulse and after about 50 {mu}s reaches the same steady state value as that in continuous ICPs. Therefore, when the plasma is pulsed at 1 kHz, the ion flux during the pulse has a value that is almost independent of the duty cycle. By contrast, in molecular electronegative chlorine/chlorosilane plasmas, the ion flux during the pulse reaches a steady state value that depends strongly on the duty cycle. This is because both the plasma chemistry and the electronegativity depend on the duty cycle. As a result, the ion flux is 15 times smaller in a pulsed 10% duty cycle plasma than in the continuous wave (CW) plasma. The consequence is that for a given synchronous RF biasing of a wafer-chuck, the ion energy is much higher in the pulsed plasma than it is in the CW plasma of chlorine/chlorosilane. Under these conditions, the wafer is bombarded by a low flux of very energetic ions, very much as it would in a low density, capacitively coupled plasma. Therefore, one can extend the operating range of ICPs through synchronous pulsing of the inductive excitation and capacitive chuck-bias, offering new means by which to control plasma etching.

  7. Characterization of inductively coupled plasma generated by a quadruple antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafir, G.; Zolotukhin, D.; Godyak, V.; Shlapakovski, A.; Gleizer, S.; Slutsker, Ya; Gad, R.; Bernshtam, V.; Ralchenko, Yu; Krasik, Ya E.

    2017-02-01

    The results of the characterization of large-scale RF plasma for studying nonlinear interaction with a high-power (˜400 MW) short duration (˜0.8 ns) microwave (˜10 GHz) beam are presented. The plasma was generated inside a Pyrex tube 80 cm in length and 25 cm in diameter filled by either Ar or He gas at a pressure in the range 1.3-13 Pa using a 2 MHz RF generator with a matching system and a quadruple antenna. Good matching was obtained between the plasma parameters, which were determined using different methods including a movable Langmuir probe, microwave cut-off, interferometry, and optical emission spectroscopy. It was shown that, depending on the gas pressure and RF power delivered to the antenna, the plasma density and electron temperature can be controlled in the range 1 × 1010-5 × 1012 cm-3 and 1-3.5 eV, respectively. The plasma density was found to be uniform in terms of axial (˜60 cm) and radial (˜10 cm) dimensions. Further, it was also shown that the application of the quadruple antenna, with resonating capacitors inserted in its arms, decreases the capacitive coupling of the antenna and the plasma as well as the RF power loss along the antenna. These features make this plasma source suitable for microwave plasma wake field experiments.

  8. Performance Effects of Adding a Parallel Capacitor to a Pulse Inductive Plasma Accelerator Powertrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Sivak, Amy D.; Balla, Joseph V.

    2011-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma accelerators are electrodeless space propulsion devices where a capacitor is charged to an initial voltage and then discharged through a coil as a high-current pulse that inductively couples energy into the propellant. The field produced by this pulse ionizes the propellant, producing a plasma near the face of the coil. Once a plasma is formed if can be accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity by the Lorentz force arising from the interaction of an induced plasma current and the magnetic field. While there are many coil geometries that can be employed to inductively accelerate a plasma, in this paper the discussion is limit to planar geometries where the coil take the shape of a flat spiral. A recent review of the developmental history of planar-geometry pulsed inductive thrusters can be found in Ref. [1]. Two concepts that have employed this geometry are the Pulsed Inductive Thruster (PIT) and the Faraday Accelerator with Radio-frequency Assisted Discharge (FARAD).

  9. Flow dynamics and magnetic induction in the von-Kármán plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plihon, N.; Bousselin, G.; Palermo, F.; Morales, J.; Bos, W. J. T.; Godeferd, F.; Bourgoin, M.; Pinton, J.-F.; Moulin, M.; Aanesland, A.

    2015-01-01

    The von-Kármán plasma experiment is a novel versatile experimental device designed to explore the dynamics of basic magnetic induction processes and the dynamics of flows driven in weakly magnetized plasmas. A high-density plasma column (1016-1019 particles. m-3) is created by two radio-frequency plasma sources located at each end of a 1 m long linear device. Flows are driven through J × B azimuthal torques created from independently controlled emissive cathodes. The device has been designed such that magnetic induction processes and turbulent plasma dynamics can be studied from a variety of time-averaged axisymmetric flows in a cylinder. MHD simulations implementing volume-penalization support the experimental development to design the most efficient flow-driving schemes and understand the flow dynamics. Preliminary experimental results show that a rotating motion of up to nearly 1 km/s is controlled by the J × B azimuthal torque.

  10. Supporting First Year Alternatively Certified Urban and Rural Intern Teachers through a Multicomponent Distance Induction Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresko, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    The pathway for entering the K-12 classroom as a teacher varies compared to what was once the traditional model of teacher preparation. In this mixed-methods action research study, I explore supporting first year alternatively certified urban and rural intern teachers through a multicomponent distance induction program. The induction model in this…

  11. Current status of IMS plasma wave research. [International Magnetospheric Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with a review of the status of magnetospheric plasma wave science as a result of the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS). The presence of an international effort has supported the development and completion of the numerous magnetospheric science spacecraft launched during the IMS, including GEOS, ISEE, and EXOS B. Ground-based VLF observations are considered along with coordinated ground-based and satellite observations. During the IMS, plasma wave research using satellite data has covered a wide range of subjects. Attention is given to magnetospheric electrostatic emissions, magnetospheric electromagnetic plasma waves, continuum radiation, auroral kilometric radiation, auroral zone plasma waves, plasma waves in the magnetosheath and near the mangetopause, and plasma waves at the bow shock.

  12. Comparative analysis of ancient ceramics by neutron activation analysis, inductively coupled plasma-optical-emission spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Tsolakidou, Alexandra; Kilikoglou, Vassilis

    2002-10-01

    The accurate measurement of the maximum possible number of elements in ancient ceramic samples is the main requirement in provenance studies. For this reason neutron activation analysis (NAA) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) have been successfully used for most of the studies. In this work the analytical performance of inductively coupled plasma-optical-emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been compared with that of XRF and NAA for the chemical characterization of archaeological pottery. Correlation coefficients between ICP techniques and XRF or NAA data were generally better than 0.90. The reproducibility of data calculated on a sample prepared and analysed independently ten times was approximately 5% for most of the elements. Results from the ICP techniques were finally evaluated for their capacity to identify the same compositional pottery groups as results from XRF and NAA analysis, by use of multivariate statistics.

  13. A comprehensive study of different gases in inductively coupled plasma torch operating at one atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Punjabi, Sangeeta B.; Joshi, N. K.; Mangalvedekar, H. A.; Lande, B. K.; Das, A. K.; Kothari, D. C.

    2012-01-15

    A numerical study is done to understand the possible operating regimes of RF-ICP torch (3 MHz, 50 kW) using different gases for plasma formation at atmospheric pressure. A two dimensional numerical simulation of RF-ICP torch using argon, nitrogen, oxygen, and air as plasma gas has been investigated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software fluent{sup (c)}. The operating parameters varied here are central gas flow, sheath gas flow, RF-power dissipated in plasma, and plasma gas. The temperature contours, flow field, axial, and radial velocity profiles were investigated under different operating conditions. The plasma resistance, inductance of the torch, and the heat distribution for various plasma gases have also been investigated. The plasma impedance of ICP torch varies with different operating parameters and plays an important role for RF oscillator design and power coupling. These studies will be useful to decide the design criteria for ICP torches required for different material processing applications.

  14. Transient electromagnetic behaviour in inductive oxygen and argon-oxygen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, A. R.; Herdrich, G.; Kim, M.; Dally, B.

    2016-12-01

    In order to develop inductive electric propulsion as a flexible, throttleable technology for future space operations, a greater understanding of discharge transitions within the inductive plasma generator discharge chamber is required. This paper presents a non-intrusive method to determine the conditions under which transitions between the capacitive, low inductive, and high inductive regimes occur with greater accuracy, as well as determining the proportion of a single discharge cycle the plasma spends in either capacitive or inductive regime. Such a method allows a more robust method of classification of inductive discharges than previously available and can be applied to numerous gases. This approach presents an advantage over previous methods which relied on strongly radiating or thermally reactive gases to exhibit certain behaviour (due to the restriction of classical diagnostics on such high power sources) before a transition could be confirmed. This paper presents results from the proposed method applied to a pure oxygen plasma as well as two combinations of argon and oxygen (at 1:1 and 3:2 Ar:O2 volumetric ratios) in order to assess the tunability of electromagnetic regime transitions through modifications of gas composition rather than mechanical alterations. Transitions to the higher inductive mode were observed for much lower input powers for the argon-oxygen blends, as was expected, allowing final discharge conditions to occupy the inductive regime for 94% and 85% of a single discharge cycle for the 3:2 and 1:1 Ar:O2 mixtures, respectively. Pure oxygen achieved a maximum inductive proportion of 71% by comparison.

  15. Effect of a Second, Parallel Capacitor on the Performance of a Pulse Inductive Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Balla, Joseph V.

    2010-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma accelerators are electrodeless space propulsion devices where a capacitor is charged to an initial voltage and is then discharged through an inductive coil that couples energy into the propellant, ionizing and accelerating it to produce thrust. A model that employs a set of circuit equations (as illustrated in Fig. 1a) coupled to a one-dimensional momentum equation has been previously used by Lovberg and Dailey [1] and Polzin et al. [2-4] to model the plasma acceleration process in pulsed inductive thrusters. In this paper an extra capacitor, inductor, and resistor are added to the system in the manner illustrated in the schematic shown in Fig. 1b. If the second capacitor has a smaller value than the initially charged capacitor, it can serve to increase the current rise rate through the inductive coil. Increasing the current rise rate should serve to better ionize the propellant. The equation of motion is solved to find the effect of an increased current rise rate on the acceleration process. We examine the tradeoffs between enhancing the breakdown process (increasing current rise rate) and altering the plasma acceleration process. These results provide insight into the performance of modified circuits in an inductive thruster, revealing how this design permutation can affect an inductive thruster's performance.

  16. Discontinuity of mode transition and hysteresis in hydrogen inductively coupled plasma via a fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui-Jing; Zhao, Shu-Xia; Fei, Gao; Yu-Ru, Zhang; Xue-Chun, Li; You-Nian, Wang

    2015-11-01

    A new type of two-dimensional self-consistent fluid model that couples an equivalent circuit module is used to investigate the mode transition characteristics and hysteresis in hydrogen inductively coupled plasmas at different pressures, by varying the series capacitance of the matching box. The variations of the electron density, temperature, and the circuit electrical properties are presented. As cycling the matching capacitance, at high pressure both the discontinuity and hysteresis appear for the plasma parameters and the transferred impedances of both the inductive and capacitive discharge components, while at low pressure only the discontinuity is seen. The simulations predict that the sheath plays a determinative role on the presence of discontinuity and hysteresis at high pressure, by influencing the inductive coupling efficiency of applied power. Moreover, the values of the plasma transferred impedances at different pressures are compared, and the larger plasma inductance at low pressure due to less collision frequency, as analyzed, is the reason why the hysteresis is not seen at low pressure, even with a wider sheath. Besides, the behaviors of the coil voltage and current parameters during the mode transitions are investigated. They both increase (decrease) at the E to H (H to E) mode transition, indicating an improved (worsened) inductive power coupling efficiency. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175034, 11205025, 11305023, and 11075029).

  17. Kinetic simulations and photometry measurements of the E-H transition in cylindrical inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattei, S.; Nishida, K.; Mochizuki, S.; Grudiev, A.; Lettry, J.; Tran, M. Q.; Hatayama, A.

    2016-12-01

    Inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) are well known to exhibit two modes of operation: a low density capacitive E-mode and a high density inductive H-mode. In this study we investigate the E-H transition in a cylindrical ICP, and show the effect of an external magnetic cusp field on the transition dynamics. The plasma is simulated by an electro-magnetic particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision code in order to take into account spatio-temporal variations of the plasma dynamics as well as kinetic effects. Simulations are compared to photometry measurements on the Linac4 H-ion source plasma chamber. We show that the E-H transition is characterized by strong spatial variations of the plasma parameters, with an axial plasma oscillation in E-mode followed by a centring in the coil region in H-mode. The external magnetic cusp field prevents electrons close to the wall to be accelerated and reduces the inductive power deposition in the plasma. This resulted in a  ≈50% higher current to achieve E-H transition compared to the configuration without cusp field. The results indicate possible improvements to the magnetic cusp field configuration in order to achieve optimal power transfer.

  18. Non-inductive current drive and transport in high beta(N) plasmas in JET

    SciTech Connect

    Voitsekhovitch, I; Alper, B.; Budny, R. V.; Buratti, P.; Challis, C D; Ferron, J.R.; Giroud, C.; Laborde, L.; Luce, T.C.; McCune, D.; Menard, J.; Murakami, Masanori; Park, Jin Myung

    2009-01-01

    A route to stationary MHD stable operation at high beta(N) has been explored at the Joint European Torus (JET) by optimizing the current ramp-up, heating start time and the waveform of neutral beam injection (NBI) power. In these scenarios the current ramp-up has been accompanied by plasma pre-heat (or the NBI has been started before the current flat-top) and NBI power up to 22 MW has been applied during the current flat-top. In the discharges considered transient total beta(N) approximate to 3.3 and stationary (during high power phase) beta(N) approximate to 3 have been achieved by applying the feedback control of beta(N) with the NBI power in configurations with monotonic or flat core safety factor profile and without an internal transport barrier (ITB). The transport and current drive in this scenario is analysed here by using the TRANSP and ASTRA codes. The interpretative analysis performed with TRANSP shows that 50-70% of current is driven non-inductively; half of this current is due to the bootstrap current which has a broad profile since an ITB was deliberately avoided. The GLF23 transport model predicts the temperature profiles within a +/- 22% discrepancy with the measurements over the explored parameter space. Predictive simulations with this model show that the E x B rotational shear plays an important role for thermal ion transport in this scenario, producing up to a 40% increase of the ion temperature. By applying transport and current drive models validated in self-consistent simulations of given reference scenarios in a wider parameter space, the requirements for fully non-inductive stationary operation at JET are estimated. It is shown that the strong stiffness of the temperature profiles predicted by the GLF23 model restricts the bootstrap current at larger heating power. In this situation full non-inductive operation without an ITB can be rather expensive strongly relying on the external non-inductive current drive sources.

  19. Flow-field differences and electromagnetic-field properties of air and N2 inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Minghao; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Takahashi, Yusuke; Liu, Kai; Zhao, Tong

    2016-12-01

    A numerical model for simulating air and nitrogen inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) was developed considering thermochemical nonequilibrium and the third-order electron transport properties. A modified far-field electromagnetic model was introduced and tightly coupled with the flow field equations to describe the Joule heating and inductive discharge phenomena. In total, 11 species and 49 chemical reactions of air, which include 5 species and 8 chemical reactions of nitrogen, were employed to model the chemical reaction process. The internal energy transfers among translational, vibrational, rotational, and electronic energy modes of chemical species were taken into account to study thermal nonequilibrium effects. The low-Reynolds number Abe-Kondoh-Nagano k-ɛ turbulence model was employed to consider the turbulent heat transfer. In this study, the fundamental characteristics of an ICP flow, such as the weak ionization, high temperature but low velocity in the torch, and wide area of the plasma plume, were reproduced by the developed numerical model. The flow field differences between the air and nitrogen ICP flows inside the 10-kW ICP wind tunnel were made clear. The interactions between the electromagnetic and flow fields were also revealed for an inductive discharge.

  20. Comprehensive Chemical Analysis of Metal Alloys by Means of Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    Multielement standard solutions were prepared from commercially available atomic absorbtion standard solutions or Spex Industries plasma-grade materials... SPECTROSCOPY W. E. Glad D"TIC LECTEfl Naval Ocean Systems Center scR. San Diego, California 92152-5000 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 0...MEANS OF INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA OPTICAL EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY 12. PENSOIAF 111151 W.. la boron Stitaim tantlum nibim tn sten and EC zircNI in n n

  1. Modelling of an inductively coupled plasma torch with argon at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahouh, Hanene; Rebiai, Saida; Rochette, David; Vacher, Damien; Dudeck, Michel

    2014-05-01

    A fluid dynamic model is used to simulate the electromagnetic field, fluid flow and heat transfer in an inductively coupled plasma torch working at atmospheric pressure for argon plasma. The numerical simulation is carried out by using the finite element method based on COMSOL software. The two-dimensional profiles of the electric field, temperature, velocity and charged particle densities are demonstrated inside the discharge region. These numerical results are obtained for a fixed flow rate, frequency and electric power.

  2. Synthesis of carbon onionlike nanostructures from methane in plasma flow of induction plasmatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchukov, K. E.; Zalogin, G. N.; Krasil'nikov, A. V.; Popov, M. Yu.; Kul'nitskii, B. A.

    2015-11-01

    The results of synthesis of carbon onionlike nanostructures from methane in plasma flow of inert gas (argon) generated in induction high-frequency plasmatron are considered and discussed. Carbon vapor obtained via dissociation of methane in plasma flow was condensed on copper substrates placed in a working chamber of the setup. The content of the synthesized soot was analyzed using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. As a result of the performed experiments, carbon onionlike structures with 20- to 100-nm sizes were obtained.

  3. Energetic electron avalanches and mode transitions in planar inductively coupled radio-frequency driven plasmas operated in oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Zaka-ul-Islam, M.; Niemi, K.; Gans, T.; O'Connell, D.

    2011-07-25

    Space and phase resolved optical emission spectroscopic measurements reveal that in certain parameter regimes, inductively coupled radio-frequency driven plasmas exhibit three distinct operation modes. At low powers, the plasma operates as an alpha-mode capacitively coupled plasma driven through the dynamics of the plasma boundary sheath potential in front of the antenna. At high powers, the plasma operates in inductive mode sustained through induced electric fields due to the time varying currents and associated magnetic fields from the antenna. At intermediate powers, close to the often observed capacitive to inductive (E-H) transition regime, energetic electron avalanches are identified to play a significant role in plasma sustainment, similar to gamma-mode capacitively coupled plasmas. These energetic electrons traverse the whole plasma gap, potentially influencing plasma surface interactions as exploited in technological applications.

  4. Plasma characteristics in inductively and capacitively coupled hybrid source using single RF power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwan-Yong; Lee, Moo-Young; Kim, Tae-Woo; Kim, Ju-Ho; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-09-01

    Parallel combined inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) using single RF generator was proposed to linear control of the plasma density with RF power. In the case of ICP, linear control of the plasma density is difficult because there is a density jump up due to E to H transition. Although the plasma density of CCP changes linearly with power, the density is lower than that of ICP due to high ion energy loss at the substrate. In our hybrid source, the single RF power generator was connected to electrode and antenna, and the variable capacitor was installed between the antenna and the power generator to control the current flowing through the antenna and the electrode. By adjusting the current ratio between the antenna and the electrode, linear characteristic of plasma density with RF power is achieved.

  5. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 136 - Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometric Method for Trace Element Analysis of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic... to Part 136—Inductively Coupled Plasma—Atomic Emission Spectrometric Method for Trace Element... technique. Samples are nebulized and the aerosol that is produced is transported to the plasma torch...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 136 - Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometric Method for Trace Element Analysis of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic... to Part 136—Inductively Coupled Plasma—Atomic Emission Spectrometric Method for Trace Element... technique. Samples are nebulized and the aerosol that is produced is transported to the plasma torch...

  7. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Braymen, Steven D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization.

  8. Atlas of atomic spectral lines of plutonium emitted by an inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Edelson, M.C.; DeKalb, E.L.; Winge, R.K.; Fassel, V.A.

    1986-09-01

    Optical emission spectra from high-purity Pu-242 were generated with a glovebox-enclosed inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. Spectra covering the 2280 to 7008 Angstrom wavelength range are presented along with general commentary on ICP-Pu spectroscopy.

  9. DETERMINATION OF BROMATE IN DRINKING WATERS BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRIC DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromate is a disinfection by-product in drinking water, formed during the ozonation of source water containing bromide. An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer is combined with an ion chromatograph for the analysis of bromate in drinking waters. Three chromatographic colu...

  10. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS COUPLED ON-LINE WITH INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR ELEMENTAL SPECIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel interface to connect a capillary electrophoresis (CE) system with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (ICPMS) detector is reported here. The interface was built using a direct injection nebulizer (DIN) system. In this interface, the CE capillary was placed co...

  11. The analysis of some evidential materials by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, R C

    1985-03-01

    Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) is under evaluation at the Central Research Establishment for the analysis of evidential materials. The analysis of standard reference materials has demonstrated that quantitative multi-element data can be obtained from small samples of a variety of materials. The results of some determinations carried out in support of casework investigations are reported.

  12. ULTRASONIC NEBULIZATION AND ARSENIC VALENCE STATE CONSIDERATIONS PRIOR TO DETERMINATION VIA INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ultrasonic nebulizer (USN) was utilized as a sample introduction device for an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer in an attempt to increase the sensitivity for As. The USN produced a valence state response difference for As. The As response was suppressed approximate...

  13. Atlas of atomic spectral lines of neptunium emitted by an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekalb, E. L.; Edelson, M. C.

    1987-08-01

    Optical emission spectra from high-purity Np-237 were generated with a glovebox-enclosed inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. Spectra covering the 230 to 700 nm wavelength range are presented along with general commentary on the methodology used in collecting the data.

  14. Determination of Arsenic in Sinus Wash and Tap Water by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnell, Anna M.; Nahan, Keaton; Holloway, Dawone; Vonderheide, Anne P.

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is a toxic element to which humans are primarily exposed through food and water; it occurs as a result of human activities and naturally from the earth's crust. An experiment was developed for a senior level analytical laboratory utilizing an Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) for the analysis of arsenic in household…

  15. Sulfur-based absolute quantification of proteins using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-Seok; Heun Kim, Sook; Jeong, Ji-Seon; Lee, Yong-Moon; Yim, Yong-Hyeon

    2015-10-01

    An element-based reductive approach provides an effective means of realizing International System of Units (SI) traceability for high-purity biological standards. Here, we develop an absolute protein quantification method using double isotope dilution (ID) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) combined with microwave-assisted acid digestion for the first time. We validated the method and applied it to certify the candidate protein certified reference material (CRM) of human growth hormone (hGH). The concentration of hGH was determined by analysing the total amount of sulfur in hGH. Next, the size-exclusion chromatography method was used with ICP-MS to characterize and quantify sulfur-containing impurities. By subtracting the contribution of sulfur-containing impurities from the total sulfur content in the hGH CRM, we obtained a SI-traceable certification value. The quantification result obtained with the present method based on sulfur analysis was in excellent agreement with the result determined via a well-established protein quantification method based on amino acid analysis using conventional acid hydrolysis combined with an ID liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The element-based protein quantification method developed here can be generally used for SI-traceable absolute quantification of proteins, especially pure-protein standards.

  16. Arsenic speciation in soil using high performance liquid chromatography/inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, D.A.; Yaeger, J.S.; Parish, K.J.; Crain, J.S.; Kiely, J.T.; Gowdy, M.J.; Mohrman, G.B.; Besmer, M.G.

    1996-08-01

    A method has been developed to identify and quantify As(III), As(V), and organoarsenic compounds in soil samples from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) by high performance liquid chromatography/inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (HPLC/ICP/MS). The soils were extracted using tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAH) and sonication. The percentages of As(III), As(V), and organoarsenic species extracted from soil samples were 30, 50, and 100 respectively. The arsenic species were not altered during the extraction process. They were separated by reversed-phase, ion-pairing, HPLC using a microbore Inertsil-ODS{trademark} column. The HPLC column effluent was introduced into an ICP/MS system using a direct injection nebulizer (DIN). Detection limits of less than 1 pg were readily obtained for each arsenic species. Internal standards are recommended to increase accuracy and precision. Soil samples spiked with arsenic oxide, sodium arsenate, dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA), and chlorovinyl arsenious acid (CVAA) were extracted, identified and quantified with the HPLC/ICP/MS system. The soil samples were analyzed in support of the analytical needs of a thermal desorption treatability study being conducted at the RMA.

  17. Depleted uranium analysis in blood by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todorov, T.I.; Xu, H.; Ejnik, J.W.; Mullick, F.G.; Squibb, K.; McDiarmid, M.A.; Centeno, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report depleted uranium (DU) analysis in whole blood samples. Internal exposure to DU causes increased uranium levels as well as change in the uranium isotopic composition in blood specimen. For identification of DU exposure we used the 235U/238U ratio in blood samples, which ranges from 0.00725 for natural uranium to 0.002 for depleted uranium. Uranium quantification and isotopic composition analysis were performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For method validation we used eight spiked blood samples with known uranium concentrations and isotopic composition. The detection limit for quantification was determined to be 4 ng L-1 uranium in whole blood. The data reproduced within 1-5% RSD and an accuracy of 1-4%. In order to achieve a 235U/238U ratio range of 0.00698-0.00752% with 99.7% confidence limit a minimum whole blood uranium concentration of 60 ng L??1 was required. An additional 10 samples from a cohort of veterans exposed to DU in Gulf War I were analyzed with no knowledge of their medical history. The measured 235U/ 238U ratios in the blood samples were used to identify the presence or absence of DU exposure within this patient group. ?? 2009 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  18. Precise determination of seawater calcium using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hou-Chun; You, Chen-Feng; Cai, Wei-Jun; Chung, Chuan-Hsiung; Huang, Kuo-Fang; Chen, Bao-Shan; Li, Yen

    2014-02-21

    We describe a method for rapid, precise and accurate determination of calcium ion (Ca(2+)) concentration in seawater using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS). A 10 μL aliquot of seawater was spiked with an appropriate (43)Ca enriched solution for (44)Ca/(43)Ca ID-ICP-MS analyses, using an Element XR (Thermo Fisher Scientific), operated at low resolution in E-scan acquisition mode. A standard-sample bracketing technique was applied to correct for potential mass discrimination and ratio drift at every 5 samples. A precision of better than 0.05% for within-run and 0.10% for duplicate measurements of the IAPSO seawater standard was achieved using 10 μL solutions with a measuring time less than 3 minutes. Depth profiles of seawater samples collected from the Arctic Ocean basin were processed and compared with results obtained by the classic ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid (EGTA) titration. Our new ID-ICP-MS data agreed closely with the conventional EGTA data, with the latter consistently displaying 1.5% excess Ca(2+) values, possibly due to a contribution of interference from Mg(2+) and Sr(2+) in the EGTA titration. The newly obtained Sr/Ca profiles reveal sensitive water mass mixing in the upper oceanic column to reflect ice melting in the Arctic region. This novel technique provides a tool for seawater Ca(2+) determination with small sample size, high throughput, excellent internal precision and external reproducibility.

  19. Temperature dependence of inductively coupled plasma assisted growth of TiN thin films.

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, W. J.; Curtis, T. J.; Rehn, L. E.; Baldo, P. M.; Materials Science Division; Louisiana State Univ.

    1999-11-01

    The use of low pressure high density plasmas to assist the synthesis of ceramic thin film materials is in its infancy. Using an inductively coupled plasma assisted magnetron sputtering system, we examine the dependence of plasma-assisted growth of TiN thin films on growth temperature at different ratios of ion flux to neutral atom flux. Our results indicate that a temperature independent densification of TiN films occurs above a certain ion to neutral atom flux ratio. As an example of this temperature independent densification, we demonstrate the formation of dense B1 TiN crystalline thin films at growth temperatures down to {approx}100 K.

  20. Development of very small-diameter, inductively coupled magnetized plasma device.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, D; Mishio, A; Nakagawa, T; Shinohara, S

    2013-10-01

    In order to miniaturize a high-density, inductively coupled magnetized plasma or helicon plasma to be applied to, e.g., an industrial application and an electric propulsion field, small helicon device has been developed. The specifications of this device along with the experimental results are described. We have succeeded in generating high-density (~10(19) m(-3)) plasmas using quartz tubes with very small diameters of 10 and 20 mm, with a radio frequency power ~1200 and 700 W, respectively, in the presence of the magnetic field less than 1 kG.

  1. Relationship between the discharge mode and the spatial oxygen plasma distribution in a large size ferrite inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Jun; Hwang, Hye Ju; Cho, Jeong Hee; Chae, Hee Sun; Kim, Dong Hwan; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-04-15

    The electrical characteristics and the spatial distribution of oxygen plasma according to the number of turns in ferrite inductively coupled plasmas (ferrite ICPs) are investigated. Through a new ICP model, which includes the capacitive coupling and the power loss of the ferrite material with the conventional ICP model, the variation of the oxygen discharge characteristics depending on the number of turns is simply understood by the electrical measurement, such as the antenna voltages and the currents. As the number of the turns increases, the capacitive coupling dominantly affects the spatial plasma distribution. This capacitive coupling results in a center focused density profile along the radial direction. In spite of the same discharge conditions (discharge chamber, neutral gas, and pressure), the spatial plasma distribution over 450 mm has drastic changes by increasing number of the turns. In addition, the effect of the negative species to the density profile is compared with the argon discharge characteristics at the same discharge configuration.

  2. On the possibility of the multiple inductively coupled plasma and helicon plasma sources for large-area processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jin-Won; Lee, Yun-Seong Chang, Hong-Young; An, Sang-Hyuk

    2014-08-15

    In this study, we attempted to determine the possibility of multiple inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and helicon plasma sources for large-area processes. Experiments were performed with the one and two coils to measure plasma and electrical parameters, and a circuit simulation was performed to measure the current at each coil in the 2-coil experiment. Based on the result, we could determine the possibility of multiple ICP sources due to a direct change of impedance due to current and saturation of impedance due to the skin-depth effect. However, a helicon plasma source is difficult to adapt to the multiple sources due to the consistent change of real impedance due to mode transition and the low uniformity of the B-field confinement. As a result, it is expected that ICP can be adapted to multiple sources for large-area processes.

  3. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry on the Operating Characteristics of an Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Kimberlin, Adam C.; Perdue, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    Operational characteristics of two separate inductive thrusters with conical theta pinch coils of different cone angles are explored through thrust stand measurements and time- integrated, unfiltered photography. Trends in impulse bit measurements indicate that, in the present experimental configuration, the thruster with the inductive coil possessing a smaller cone angle produced larger values of thrust, in apparent contradiction to results of a previous thruster acceleration model. Areas of greater light intensity in photographs of thruster operation are assumed to qualitatively represent locations of increased current density. Light intensity is generally greater in images of the thruster with the smaller cone angle when compared to those of the thruster with the larger half cone angle for the same operating conditions. The intensity generally decreases in both thrusters for decreasing mass flow rate and capacitor voltage. The location of brightest light intensity shifts upstream for decreasing mass flow rate of propellant and downstream for decreasing applied voltage. Recognizing that there typically exists an optimum ratio of applied electric field to gas pressure with respect to breakdown efficiency, this result may indicate that the optimum ratio was not achieved uniformly over the coil face, leading to non-uniform and incomplete current sheet formation in violation of the model assumption of immediate formation where all the injected propellant is contained in a magnetically-impermeable current sheet.

  4. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry on the Operating Characteristics of a Pulsed Inductive Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Kimberlin, Adam C.

    2012-01-01

    Operational characteristics of two separate inductive thrusters with coils of different cone angles are explored through thrust stand measurements and time-integrated, un- filtered photography. Trends in impulse bit measurements indicate that, in the present experimental configuration, the thruster with the inductive coil possessing a smaller cone angle produced larger values of thrust, in apparent contradiction to results of a previous thruster acceleration model. Areas of greater light intensity in photographs of thruster operation are assumed to qualitatively represent locations of increased current density. Light intensity is generally greater in images of the thruster with the smaller cone angle when compared to those of the thruster with the larger half cone angle for the same operating conditions. The intensity generally decreases in both thrusters for decreasing mass ow rate and capacitor voltage. The location of brightest light intensity shifts upstream for decreasing mass ow rate of propellant and downstream for decreasing applied voltage. Recognizing that there typically exists an optimum ratio of applied electric field to gas pressure with respect to breakdown efficiency, this result may indicate that the optimum ratio was not achieved uniformly over the coil face, leading to non-uniform and incomplete current sheet formation in violation of the model assumption of immediate formation where all the injected propellant is contained in a magnetically-impermeable current sheet.

  5. PREFACE: Third International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Lebedev, Yu

    2010-01-01

    The Third International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'08) organized by St Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, with co-organizers TCPA Foundation, Association EURATOM/IRNRE, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, and the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, at the Black Sea Coast, from 30 June to 5 July 2008. A Special Session on Plasmas for Environmental Issues was co-organised by the Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Lisbon, Portugal and the Laboratory of Plasmas and Energy Conversion, University of Toulouse, France. That puts the beginning of a series in Workshops on Plasmas for Environmental Issues, now as a satellite meeting of the European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics. As the previous issues of this scientific meeting (IWSSPP'05, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 44 (2006) and IWSSPP'06, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 63 (2007)), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 38 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma and materials, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the

  6. A new air-cooled argon/helium-compatible inductively coupled plasma torch.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Hidekazu; Iwai, Takahiro; Kaburaki, Yuki; Kozuma, Tomokazu; Shigeta, Kaori; Okino, Akitoshi

    2014-01-01

    A new inductively coupled plasma (ICP) torch with an air-cooling system has been designed and developed for both argon and helium plasma. The same torch and impedance-matching network could be used to generate stable Ar- and He-ICP. The torch consists of three concentric quartz tubes. The carrier gas, plasma gas, and cooling gas flow through the intervals between each tube. In an experiment, it was found that Ar-ICP could form a stable plasma under the following conditions: RF power of 1 kW, plasma gas flow rate of 11 L min(-1), and cooling gas flow rate of 20 L min(-1). For He-ICP, an input RF power of 2 kW, which is two-times higher than that of a conventional He-ICP, could be constantly applied to the plasma with plasma gas and cooling gas flow rates of 15 and 20 L min(-1), respectively. Using this torch, it is possible to realize lower plasma gas consumption for Ar- and He-ICP and a high-power drive for He-ICP. It has been found that the air-cooling gas stabilizes the shape of the plasma due to the pressure difference between the cooling gas and the plasma gas.

  7. Electromagnetic field distribution calculation in solenoidal inductively coupled plasma using finite difference method

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W. P.; Liu, Y.; Long, Q.; Chen, D. H.; Chen, Y. M.

    2008-10-15

    The electromagnetic field (both E and B fields) is calculated for a solenoidal inductively coupled plasma (ICP) discharge. The model is based on two-dimensional cylindrical coordinates, and the finite difference method is used for solving Maxwell equations in both the radial and axial directions. Through one-turn coil measurements, assuming that the electrical conductivity has a constant value in each cross section of the discharge tube, the calculated E and B fields rise sharply near the tube wall. The nonuniform radial distributions imply that the skin effect plays a significant role in the energy balance of the stable ICP. Damped distributions in the axial direction show that the magnetic flux gradually dissipates into the surrounding space. A finite difference calculation allows prediction of the electrical conductivity and plasma permeability, and the induction coil voltage and plasma current can be calculated, which are verified for correctness.

  8. Initial exploration of scenarios with Internal Transport Barrier in the first NBI-heated L-mode TCV plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piron, Chiara; Sauter, Olivier; Coda, Stefano; Merle, Antoine; Karpushov, Alexander; Pigatto, Leonardo; Bolzonella, Tommaso; Piovesan, Paolo; Vianello, Nicola; TCV Team; EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-10-01

    Fully non-inductive operation of high performance plasmas is one of the main objectives of contemporary Tokamak research. In this perspective, plasmas with Internal Transport Barriers (ITBs) are an attractive scenario, since they can attain a high fraction of bootstrap current. In this work we start exploring ITB scenarios on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV) heated by a newly available 1MW Neutral Beam Injector (NBI). Here we investigate for the first time in this device the impact of the additional NBI power on the performance and stability of L-mode plasmas with ITBs. Results of both experimental data analyses and ASTRA transport simulations are presented. The work examines also the Magneto Hydro-Dynamics (MHD) activity and stability of the explored plasmas. In particular, the role of plasma magnetic equilibrium parameters, such as plasma elongation and triangularity, on the sustainment of these NBI-heated ITB scenarios is discussed.

  9. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 136 - Determination of Metals and Trace Elements in Water and Wastes by Inductively Coupled Plasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Elements in Water and Wastes by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry Method 200.7 C... Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry Method 200.7 1.0Scope and Application 1.1Inductively coupled plasma... in the plasma, aspirate all solutions for 30 seconds after reaching the plasma before...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 136 - Determination of Metals and Trace Elements in Water and Wastes by Inductively Coupled Plasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Elements in Water and Wastes by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry Method 200.7 C... Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry Method 200.7 1.0Scope and Application 1.1Inductively coupled plasma... in the plasma, aspirate all solutions for 30 seconds after reaching the plasma before...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 136 - Determination of Metals and Trace Elements in Water and Wastes by Inductively Coupled Plasma...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Elements in Water and Wastes by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry Method 200.7 C... Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry Method 200.7 1.0Scope and Application 1.1Inductively coupled plasma... in the plasma, aspirate all solutions for 30 seconds after reaching the plasma before...

  12. Langmuir probe study of an inductively coupled magnetic-pole-enhanced helium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younus, Maria; Rehman, N. U.; Shafiq, M.; Naeem, M.; Zaka-ul-Islam, M.; Zakaullah, M.

    2017-03-01

    This study reports the effects of RF power and filling gas pressure variation on the plasma parameters, including the electron number density n e , electron temperature T e , plasma potential V p , skin depth δ, and electron energy probability functions (EEPFs) in a low-pressure inductively coupled helium plasma source with magnetic pole enhancement. An RF compensated Langmuir probe is used to measure these plasma parameters. It is observed that the electron number density increases with both the RF power and the filling gas pressure. Conversely, the electron temperature decreases with increasing RF power and gas pressure. It is also noted that, at low RF powers and gas pressures, the EEPFs are non-Maxwellian, while at RF powers of ≥50 W, they evolve into a Maxwellian distribution. The dependences of the skin depth and plasma potential on the RF power are also studied and show a decreasing trend.

  13. Styrene and methyl methacrylate copolymer synthesized by RF inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z.; Gillon, X.; Diallo, M.; Houssiau, L.; Pireaux, J.-J.

    2011-01-01

    A series of random copolymers of styrene and methyl methacrylate was prepared on a silicon substrate by RF pulsed inductively coupled plasma. The plasma gas phase was investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The physico-chemical characteristics of the deposited copolymer films were analyzed by several surface techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-Transform infrared absorption (FT-IR), Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), etc. OES of the plasma and FT-IR spectra of the films are predictive: plasma emitting a higher relative benzyl radical signal results in the deposition of a more aromatic plasma polymer. The functional thin films can be deposited by selection of the co-monomers.

  14. Inductively-Coupled RF Powered O2 Plasma as a Sterilization Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, S. P.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cruden, B. A.; Meyyappan, M.; Mogul, R.; Khare, B.; Chan, S. L.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Low-temperature or cold plasmas have been shown to be effective for the sterilization of sensitive medical devices and electronic equipment. Low-temperature plasma sterilization procedures possess certain advantages over other protocols such as ethylene oxide, gamma radiation, and heat due to the use of inexpensive reagents, the insignificant environmental impacts and the low energy requirements. In addition, plasmas may also be more efficacious in the removal of robust microorganisms due to their higher chemical reactivity. Together, these attributes render cold plasma sterilization as ideal for the surface decontamination requirements for NASA Planetary Protection. Hence, the work described in this study involves the construction, characterization, and application of an inductively-coupled, RF powered oxygen (O2) plasma.

  15. Sample Preparation Problem Solving for Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry with Liquid Introduction Systems I. Solubility, Chelation, and Memory Effects

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, R. Steven

    2015-01-01

    This tutorial was adapted from the first half of a course presented at the 7th International Conference on Sector Field Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry in 2008 and the 2012 Winter Conference on Plasma Spectrochemistry on sample preparation for liquid introduction systems. Liquid introduction in general and flow injection specifically are the most widely used sample introduction methods for inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Nevertheless, problems persist in determination of analytes that are commonly investigated, as well as in specialty applications for those seldom considered by most analysts. Understanding the chemistry that is common to different groups of analytes permits the development of successful approaches to rinse-out and elimination of memory effects. This understanding also equips the analyst for development of successful elemental analytical approaches in the face of a broad spectrum of matrices and other analytical challenges, whether the sample is solid or liquid. PMID:26321788

  16. Induction therapy alters plasma fibrin clot properties in multiple myeloma patients: association with thromboembolic complications.

    PubMed

    Undas, Anetta; Zubkiewicz-Usnarska, Lidia; Helbig, Grzegorz; Woszczyk, Dariusz; Kozińska, Justyna; Dmoszyńska, Anna; Dębski, Jakub; Podolak-Dawidziak, Maria; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz

    2015-09-01

    Induction therapy in patients with multiple myeloma increases the risk of thromboembolism. We have recently shown that multiple myeloma patients tend to form denser fibrin clots displaying poor lysability. We investigated the effect of induction therapy on fibrin clot properties in multiple myeloma patients. Ex-vivo plasma fibrin clot permeability, turbidity, susceptibility to lysis, thrombin generation, factor VIII and fibrinolytic proteins were compared in 48 multiple myeloma patients prior to and following 3 months of induction therapy, mainly with cyclophosphamide-thalidomide-dexamethasone regimen. Patients on thromboprophylaxis with aspirin or heparins were eligible. A 3-month induction therapy resulted in improved clot properties, that is higher clot permeability, compaction, shorter lag phase and higher final turbidity, along with shorter clot lysis time and higher rate of D-dimer release from fibrin clots than the baseline values. The therapy also resulted in lower thrombin generation, antiplasmin and thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI), but elevated factor VIII. Progressive disease was associated with lower posttreatment clot permeability and lysability. Despite thromboprophylaxis, two patients developed ischemic stroke and 10 had venous thromboembolism. They were characterized by pretreatment lower clot permeability, prolonged clot lysis time, longer lag phase, higher peak thrombin generation, TAFI and plasminogen activator inhibitor -1. Formation of denser plasma fibrin clots with reduced lysability and increased thrombin generation at baseline could predispose to thrombotic complications during induction treatment in multiple myeloma patients. We observed improved fibrin clot properties and thrombin generation in multiple myeloma patients except those with progressive disease.

  17. International Reference Ionosphere: Plasma densities - Status 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawer, K.; Bilitza, D.

    1990-01-01

    An account is given of the changes proposed in 1988 for the International Reference Ionosphere electron density profile, as well as the status of their implementation. The fully analytical profile function under development for the entire ionosphere can be achieved with a linear combination of several LAY functions. Although four LAY functions are required to describe the density features of the middle ionosphere, three LAY functions suffice to reproduce electron densities in both the topside ionosphere and lower ionosphere. Attention is given to the way in which the LAY parameters are computationally derivable from characteristic profile points.

  18. Ignition delay of a pulsed inductively coupled plasma (ICP) in tandem with an auxiliary ICP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Sridhar, Shyam; Donnelly, Vincent M.; Economou, Demetre J.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma ignition delays were observed in a ‘main’ inductively coupled plasma (ICP), in tandem with an ‘auxiliary’ ICP. The Faraday-shielded ICPs were separated by a grounded metal grid. Power (13.56 MHz) to the main ICP was pulsed with a frequency of 1 kHz, while the auxiliary ICP was operated in continuous wave (cw) mode. In chlorine plasmas, ignition delay was observed for duty cycles greater than 60% and, in contrast to expectation, the delay was longer with increasing duty cycle up to ~99.5%. The ignition delay could be varied by changing the auxiliary and/or main ICP power. Langmuir probe measurements provided the temporal evolution of electron temperature, and electron and positive ion densities. These measurements revealed that the plasma was ignited shortly after the decaying positive ion density (n +), in the afterglow of the main ICP, reached the density ({{n}+},\\text{aux} ) prevailing when only the auxiliary ICP was powered. At that time, production of electrons began to dominate their loss in the main ICP, due to hot electron injection from the auxiliary ICP. As a result, {{n}\\text{e}} increased from a value below {{n}\\text{e,\\text{aux}}} , improving inductive power coupling efficiency, further increasing plasma density leading to plasma ignition. Plasma ignition delay occurred when the afterglow of the pulsed plasma was not long enough for the ion density to reach {{n}+},\\text{aux} during the afterglow. Besides Cl2, plasma ignition delays were also observed in other electronegative gases (SF6, CF4/O2 and O2) but not in an electropositive gas (Ar).

  19. Investigation of large-area multicoil inductively coupled plasma sources using three-dimensional fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brcka, Jozef

    2016-07-01

    A multi inductively coupled plasma (ICP) system can be used to maintain the plasma uniformity and increase the area processed by a high-density plasma. This article presents a source in two different configurations. The distributed planar multi ICP (DM-ICP) source comprises individual ICP sources that are not overlapped and produce plasma independently. Mutual coupling of the ICPs may affect the distribution of the produced plasma. The integrated multicoil ICP (IMC-ICP) source consists of four low-inductance ICP antennas that are superimposed in an azimuthal manner. The identical geometry of the ICP coils was assumed in this work. Both configurations have highly asymmetric components. A three-dimensional (3D) plasma model of the multicoil ICP configurations with asymmetric features is used to investigate the plasma characteristics in a large chamber and the operation of the sources in inert and reactive gases. The feasibility of the computational calculation, the speed, and the computational resources of the coupled multiphysics solver are investigated in the framework of a large realistic geometry and complex reaction processes. It was determined that additional variables can be used to control large-area plasmas. Both configurations can form a plasma, that azimuthally moves in a controlled manner, the so-called “sweeping mode” (SM) or “polyphase mode” (PPM), and thus they have the potential for large-area and high-density plasma applications. The operation in the azimuthal mode has the potential to adjust the plasma distribution, the reaction chemistry, and increase or modulate the production of the radicals. The intrinsic asymmetry of the individual coils and their combined operation were investigated within a source assembly primarily in argon and CO gases. Limited investigations were also performed on operation in CH4 gas. The plasma parameters and the resulting chemistry are affected by the geometrical relation between individual antennas. The aim of

  20. Experimental and numerical studies of neutral gas depletion in an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi

    the neutral pressure is reduced due the balance of total pressure with plasma pressure (mainly electron pressure). Neutral gas heating is due to the elastic scattering and charge exchange collisions with ions, which are accelerated by the bulk plasma ambi-polar electrostatic field. The excellent agreement between experiment and simulation, and parametric study reveal that gas heating and pressure balance are the main mechanisms of gas depletion in an inductively coupled plasma. Coupling between plasma and neutral gas was observed by both experiment and simulation. The resulting gas depletion enhances the plasma transport to the surrounding wall, increases the particle loss, and decreases the plasma density.

  1. Numerical and Experimental Investigation on the Attenuation of Electromagnetic Waves in Unmagnetized Plasmas Using Inductively Coupled Plasma Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Min; Xu, Haojun; Wei, Xiaolong; Liang, Hua; Song, Huimin; Sun, Quan; Zhang, Yanhua

    2015-10-01

    The attenuation of electromagnetic (EM) waves in unmagnetized plasma generated by an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) actuator has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. A numerical study is conducted to investigate the propagation of EM waves in multilayer plasma structures which cover a square flat plate. Experimentally, an ICP actuator with dimensions of 20 cm×20 cm×4 cm is designed to produce a steady plasma slab. The attenuation of EM waves in the plasma generated by the ICP actuator is measured by a reflectivity arch test method at incident waves of 2.3 GHz and 10.1 GHz, respectively. A contrastive analysis of calculated and measured results of these incident wave frequencies is presented, which suggests that the experiment accords well with our theory. As expected, the plasma slab generated by the ICP actuator can effectively attenuate the EM waves, which may have great potential application prospects in aircraft stealth. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51276197, 11472306 and 11402301)

  2. Determination of silver in nano-plastic food packaging by microwave digestion coupled with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Q-B; Li, B; Song, H; Wu, H-J

    2011-08-01

    The detection of silver in nano-plastic food packaging by microwave digestion coupled with either inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) or inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was investigated. Microwave digestion was optimised by trialling different acid mixtures. Both ICP-AES and ICP-MS showed good reproducibility, repeatability and recovery. For ICP-AES the limit of detection of the method (LODm) was 25.0 µg g(-1), the limit of detection of the instrument (LODi) was 30.0 ng ml(-1), the linear range was 0.10-10.0 µg ml(-1). The average recoveries for blank samples spiked with silver at 100, 250 and 500 µg g(-1) ranged from 82.53% to 87.60%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were from 1.79% to 8.30%. For ICP-MS analysis the LODm was 0.75 µg g(-1), the LODi was 0.04 ng ml(-1), the linear range was 0.20-500.0 ng ml(-1), the RSDs were 2.26-4.79%, and the recoveries were 78.09-92.72% (spiked concentrations of 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 µg g(-1)). These results indicate that the proposed method could be employed to analyse silver in nano-plastic food packaging.

  3. Multi-element analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy for provenancing of animals at the continental scale.

    PubMed

    Kreitals, Natasha M; Watling, R John

    2014-11-01

    Chemical signatures within the environment vary between regions as a result of climatological, geochemical and anthropogenic influences. These variations are incorporated into the region's geology, soils, water and vegetation; ultimately making their way through the food chain to higher level organisms. Because the variation in chemical signatures between areas is significant, a specific knowledge of differences in elemental distribution patterns between, and within populations, could prove beneficial for provenancing animals or animal related products when applied to indigenous and feral faunal populations. The domestic pig (Sus scrofa domestica) was used as an investigative model to determine the feasibility of using a chemical traceability method for the provenance determination of animal tissue. Samples of pig muscle, tongue, stomach, heart, liver and kidney were collected from known farming areas around Australia. Samples were digested in 1:3 H2O2:HNO3 and their elemental composition determined using solution based Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Pigs from different growing regions in Australia could be distinguished based on the chemical signature of each individual tissue type. Discrimination was possible at a region, state and population level. This investigation demonstrates the potential for multi-element analysis of low genetic variation native and feral species of forensic relevance.

  4. Langmuir Probe Measurements in an Inductively Coupled GEC Reference Cell Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ji, J. S.; Kim, J. S.; Cappelli, M. A.; Sharma, S. P.; Arnold, J. O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of electron number density, electron temperature, and electron energy distribution function (EEDF) using a compensated Langmuir probe have been performed on an inductively (transformer ) coupled Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) reference cell plasma. The plasma source is operated with CH4, CF4, or their mixtures with argon. The effect of independently driving the electrode supporting the wafer on the probe data is studied. In particular, we find that the plasma structure depends on the phase in addition to the magnitude of the power coupled to the electrode relative to that of the transformer coil. The Langmuir probe is translated in a plane parallel to the electrode to investigate the spatial structure of the plasma. The probe data is also compared with fluid model predictions.

  5. Optical diagnostics for a high power, rf-inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogar, N. S.; Keaton, G. L.; Anderson, J. E.; Trkula, M.

    Emission spectroscopy and laser-induced fluorescence have been used to monitor the field and tail-flame regions of a Hull-design inductively coupled plasma. This plasma is used for a variety of syntheses including SiC, TiC, BN, A1N and diamond. Temporally- and spatially-resolved spectra of both pure Ar and Ar/gas mixtures have been studied as a function of RF power, pressure and flow rate. Preliminary data suggest that the system is far from local thermodynamic equilibrium.

  6. Induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifiers for plasma heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong, R. A.

    1988-08-01

    We describe an induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifier that is presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is designed to produce up to 2 MW of average power at a frequency of 250 GHz for plasma heating experiments in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment. In addition, we shall describe a FEL amplifier design for plasma heating of advanced tokamak fusion devices. This system is designed to produce average power levels of about 10 MW at frequencies ranging from 280 to 560 GHz.

  7. Induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifiers for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, R.A.

    1988-08-22

    We describe an induction-linac based free-electron laser amplifier that is presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is designed to produce up to 2 MW of average power at a frequency of 250 GHz for plasma heating experiments in the Microwave Tokamak Experiment. In addition, we shall describe a FEL amplifier design for plasma heating of advanced tokamak fusion devices. This system is designed to produce average power levels of about 10 MW at frequencies ranging form 280 to 560 GHz. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Quantitative bioanalysis of strontium in human serum by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Somarouthu, Srikanth; Ohh, Jayoung; Shaked, Jonathan; Cunico, Robert L; Yakatan, Gerald; Corritori, Suzana; Tami, Joe; Foehr, Erik D

    2015-01-01

    Aim: A bioanalytical method using inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to measure endogenous levels of strontium in human serum was developed and validated. Results & methodology: This article details the experimental procedures used for the method development and validation thus demonstrating the application of the inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry method for quantification of strontium in human serum samples. The assay was validated for specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery and stability. Significant endogenous levels of strontium are present in human serum samples ranging from 19 to 96 ng/ml with a mean of 34.6 ± 15.2 ng/ml (SD). Discussion & conclusion: Calibration procedures and sample pretreatment were simplified for high throughput analysis. The validation demonstrates that the method was sensitive, selective for quantification of strontium (88Sr) and is suitable for routine clinical testing of strontium in human serum samples. PMID:28031925

  9. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Braymen, S.D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present in situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization. 5 figs.

  10. Generation of thorium ions by laser ablation and inductively coupled plasma techniques for optical nuclear spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyan, V. I.; Borisyuk, P. V.; Khalitov, R. R.; Krasavin, A. V.; Lebedinskii, Yu Yu; Palchikov, V. G.; Poteshin, S. S.; Sysoev, A. A.; Yakovlev, V. P.

    2013-10-01

    Single- and double-charged 232Th and 229Th ions were produced by laser ablation of solid-state thorium compounds and by inductively coupled plasma techniques with mass-spectrometry analysis from liquid solutions of thorium. The latter method was found to be more applicable for producing ions of radioactive 229Th for laser experiments when searching for the energy value of the isomeric nuclear transition.

  11. Boron determination in steels by Inductively-Coupled Plasma spectometry (ICP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coedo, A. G.; Lopez, M. T. D.

    1986-01-01

    The sample is treated with 5N H2SO4 followed by concentrated HNO3 and the diluted mixture is filtered. Soluble B is determined in the filtrate by Inductively-Coupled Plasma (ICP) spectrometry after addition HCl and extraction of Fe with ethyl-ether. The residue is fused with Na2CO3 and, after treatment with HCl, the insoluble B is determined by ICP spectrometry as before. The method permits determination of ppm amounts of B in steel.

  12. Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry for Rare Earth Elements Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Man; Hu, Bin; Chen, Beibei; Jiang, Zucheng

    2017-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) merits multielements capability, high sensitivity, good reproducibility, low matrix effect and wide dynamic linear range for rare earth elements (REEs) analysis. But the spectral interference in trace REEs analysis by ICP-OES is a serious problem due to the complicated emission spectra of REEs, which demands some correction technology including interference factor method, derivative spectrum, Kalman filtering algorithm and partial least-squares (PLS) method. Matrix-matching calibration, internal standard, correction factor and sample dilution are usually employed to overcome or decrease the matrix effect. Coupled with various sample introduction techniques, the analytical performance of ICP-OES for REEs analysis would be improved. Compared with conventional pneumatic nebulization (PN), acid effect and matrix effect are decreased to some extent in flow injection ICP-OES, with higher tolerable matrix concentration and better reproducibility. By using electrothermal vaporization as sample introduction system, direct analysis of solid samples by ICP-OES is achieved and the vaporization behavior of refractory REEs with high boiling point, which can easily form involatile carbides in the graphite tube, could be improved by using chemical modifier, such as polytetrafluoroethylene and 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazone. Laser ablation-ICP-OES is suitable for the analysis of both conductive and nonconductive solid samples, with the absolute detection limit of ng-pg level and extremely low sample consumption (0.2 % of that in conventional PN introduction). ICP-OES has been extensively employed for trace REEs analysis in high-purity materials, and environmental and biological samples.

  13. On-line elemental analysis of fossil fuel process streams by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chisholm, W.P.

    1995-06-01

    METC is continuing development of a real-time, multi-element plasma based spectrometer system for application to high temperature and high pressure fossil fuel process streams. Two versions are under consideration for development. One is an Inductively Coupled Plasma system that has been described previously, and the other is a high power microwave system. The ICP torch operates on a mixture of argon and helium with a conventional annular swirl flow plasma gas, no auxiliary gas, and a conventional sample stream injection through the base of the plasma plume. A new, demountable torch design comprising three ceramic sections allows bolts passing the length of the torch to compress a double O-ring seal. This improves the reliability of the torch. The microwave system will use the same data acquisition and reduction components as the ICP system; only the plasma source itself is different. It will operate with a 750-Watt, 2.45 gigahertz microwave generator. The plasma discharge will be contained within a narrow quartz tube one quarter wavelength from a shorted waveguide termination. The plasma source will be observed via fiber optics and a battery of computer controlled monochromators. To extract more information from the raw spectral data, a neural net computer program is being developed. This program will calculate analyte concentrations from data that includes analyte and interferant spectral emission intensity. Matrix effects and spectral overlaps can be treated more effectively by this method than by conventional spectral analysis.

  14. Characterization of radical production mechanism in CHF3 and CF4 inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaping; Zhao, Shuxia; PSEG Team

    2015-09-01

    Inductively coupled fluorocarbon (fc) plasmas are widely used in Si /SiO2 etching industry as they provide active radicals which are reactive to the Si or SiO2 materials. It is well known that CHF3 plasma has relatively low density ratio of F vs. CFx radicals and hence high etching selectivity, as compared with the CF4 , due to the fact that one F is replaced by H in CHF3 molecules and H can abstract F from fluorocarbon radicals to form HF. However, for now, much elaborate details are still missed in the literature. Therefore in this work, a fluid model is used to characterize the radical production components in these two different fc plasmas. The fluid model includes continuity and energy equations for electrons, continuity and momentum equations for ions and continuity equations for radicals. An electromagnetic model is used to calculate the electric field which is generate by coupling coil current and Poisson equation is used to calculate the static field within the plasma. The model predicts the electron density, ion density and radical density of CHF3 plasma. For now the simulations of CF4 plasma are still under construction. We expect to compare the different radical production mechanisms in the CHF3 and CF4 plasma sources in new future.

  15. Sterilization mechanism of nitrogen gas plasma: induction of secondary structural change in protein.

    PubMed

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Higa, Masato; Maeda, Kojiro; Shimizu, Naohiro; Imanishi, Yuichiro; Shintani, Hideharu

    2013-07-01

    The mechanism of action on biomolecules of N₂ gas plasma, a novel sterilization technique, remains unclear. Here, the effect of N₂ gas plasma on protein structure was investigated. BSA, which was used as the model protein, was exposed to N₂ gas plasma generated by short-time high voltage pulses from a static induction thyristor power supply. N₂ gas plasma-treated BSA at 1.5 kilo pulses per second showed evidence of degradation and modification when assessed by Coomassie brilliant blue staining and ultraviolet spectroscopy at 280 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis was used to determine the protein's secondary structure. When the amide I region was analyzed in the infrared spectra according to curve fitting and Fourier self-deconvolution, N₂ gas plasma-treated BSA showed increased α-helix and decreased β-turn content. Because heating decreased α-helix and increased β-sheet content, the structural changes induced by N₂ gas plasma-treatment of BSA were not caused by high temperatures. Thus, the present results suggest that conformational changes induced by N₂ gas plasma are mediated by mechanisms distinct from heat denaturation.

  16. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies of living systems

    SciTech Connect

    Luong, Elise

    1999-05-10

    This dissertation focuses on the development of methods for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies in living systems using inductively coupled plasma single and dual quadrupole mass spectrometers. Sub-nanogram per gram levels of molybdenum (Mo) from human blood plasma are isolated by the use of anion exchange alumina microcolumns. Million-fold more concentrated spectral and matrix interferences such as sodium, chloride, sulfate, phosphate, etc. in the blood constituents are removed from the analyte. The recovery of Mo from the alumina column is 82 ± 5% (n = 5). Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS) is utilized for the quantitative ultra-trace concentration determination of Mo in bovine and human blood samples. The average Mo concentration in reference bovine serum determined by this method is 10.2 ± 0.4 ng/g, while the certified value is 11.5 ± 1.1 ng/g (95% confidence interval). The Mo concentration of one pool of human blood plasma from two healthy male donors is 0.5 ± 0.1 ng/g. The inductively coupled plasma twin quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-TQMS) is used to measure the carbon isotope ratio from non-volatile organic compounds and bio-organic molecules to assess the ability as an alternative analytical method to gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-combustion-IRMS). Trytophan, myoglobin, and β-cyclodextrin are chosen for the study, initial observation of spectral interference of 13C+ with 12C 1H+ comes from the incomplete dissociation of myoglobin and/or β-cyclodextrin.

  17. Plasma Interaction with International Space Station High Voltage Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, John W.

    2002-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is presently being assembled in low-earth orbit (LEO) operating high voltage solar arrays (-160 V max, -140 V typical with respect to the ambient atmosphere). At the station's present altitude, there exists substantial ambient plasma that can interact with the solar arrays. The biasing of an object to an electric potential immersed in plasma creates a plasma "sheath" or non-equilibrium plasma around the object to mask out the electric fields. A positively biased object can collect electrons from the plasma sheath and the sheath will draw a current from the surrounding plasma. This parasitic current can enter the solar cells and effectively "short out" the potential across the cells, reducing the power that can be generated by the panels. Predictions of collected current based on previous high voltage experiments (SAMPIE (Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment), PASP+ (Photovoltaic Array Space Power) were on the order of amperes of current. However, present measurements of parasitic current are on the order of several milliamperes, and the current collection mainly occurs during an "eclipse exit" event, i.e., when the space station comes out of darkness. This collection also has a time scale, t approx. 1000 s, that is much slower than any known plasma interaction time scales. The reason for the discrepancy between predictions and present electron collection is not understood and is under investigation by the PCU (Plasma Contactor Unit) "Tiger" team. This paper will examine the potential structure within and around the solar arrays, and the possible causes and reasons for the electron collection of the array.

  18. Two-Dimensional Analysis of Conical Pulsed Inductive Plasma Thruster Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, A. K.; Polzin, K. A.; Emsellem, G. D.

    2011-01-01

    A model of the maximum achievable exhaust velocity of a conical theta pinch pulsed inductive thruster is presented. A semi-empirical formula relating coil inductance to both axial and radial current sheet location is developed and incorporated into a circuit model coupled to a momentum equation to evaluate the effect of coil geometry on the axial directed kinetic energy of the exhaust. Inductance measurements as a function of the axial and radial displacement of simulated current sheets from four coils of different geometries are t to a two-dimensional expression to allow the calculation of the Lorentz force at any relevant averaged current sheet location. This relation for two-dimensional inductance, along with an estimate of the maximum possible change in gas-dynamic pressure as the current sheet accelerates into downstream propellant, enables the expansion of a one-dimensional circuit model to two dimensions. The results of this two-dimensional model indicate that radial current sheet motion acts to rapidly decouple the current sheet from the driving coil, leading to losses in axial kinetic energy 10-50 times larger than estimations of the maximum available energy in the compressed propellant. The decreased available energy in the compressed propellant as compared to that of other inductive plasma propulsion concepts suggests that a recovery in the directed axial kinetic energy of the exhaust is unlikely, and that radial compression of the current sheet leads to a loss in exhaust velocity for the operating conditions considered here.

  19. Internal Kink Mode Dynamics in High-{beta} NSTX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    J.E. Menard; R.E. Bell; E.D. Fredrickson; D.A. Gates; S.M. Kaye; B.P. LeBlanc; S.S. Medley; W. Park; S.A. Sabbagh; A. Sontag; D. Stutman; K. Tritz; W. Zhu; the NSTX Research Team

    2004-12-22

    Saturated internal kink modes have been observed in many of the highest toroidal beta discharges of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). These modes often cause rotation flattening in the plasma core, can degrade energy confinement, and in some cases contribute to the complete loss of plasma angular momentum and stored energy. Characteristics of the modes are measured using soft X-ray, kinetic profile, and magnetic diagnostics. Toroidal flows approaching Alfvenic speeds, island pressure peaking, and enhanced viscous and diamagnetic effects associated with high-beta may contribute to mode nonlinear stabilization. These saturation mechanisms are investigated for NSTX parameters and compared to experimental data.

  20. Internal Kink Mode Dynamics in High-beta NSTX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    J.E. Menard; R.E. Bell; E.D. Fredrickson; D.A. Gates; S.M. Kaye; B.P. LeBlanc; S.S. Medley; W. Park; S.A. Sabbagh; A. Sontag; D. Stutman; K. Tritz; W. Zhu; the NSTX Research Team

    2004-12-22

    Saturated internal kink modes have been observed in many of the highest toroidal {beta} discharges of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). These modes often cause rotation flattening in the plasma core, can degrade energy confinement, and in some cases contribute to the complete loss of plasma angular momentum and stored energy. Characteristics of the modes are measured using soft X-ray, kinetic profile, and magnetic diagnostics. Toroidal flows approaching Alfvenic speeds, island pressure peaking, and enhanced viscous and diamagnetic effects associated with high-{beta} may contribute to mode nonlinear stabilization. These saturation mechanisms are investigated for NSTX parameters and compared to experimental data.

  1. EPA Method 200.8: Determination of Trace Elements in Waters and Wastes by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAM lists this method for preparation and analysis of aqueous liquid and drinking water samples. This method will determine metal-containing compounds only as the total metal (e.g., total arsenic), inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

  2. Determination of impurities in titanium nitride by slurry introduction axial viewed inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng; Ni, Zheming; Qiu, Deren; Tao, Guangyi; Yang, Pengyuan

    2005-03-01

    A method of slurry nebulization for inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) applied to the analysis of titanium niride(TiN) was reported. The TiN slurry sample was prepared with adding dispersant polyacrylate amine or polyethylene imine for the stabilization and homogenization of suspension, and the amount of additives was optimized. A Babington type cross-flow nebulizer with V-groove was used for nebulization of the slurry for avoidance of blockage from the particles. The stability of slurry was characterized via zeta potential measurement, scanning electron microscope observation, particle size distrbution measurement and signal stability testing. For nm size TiN, calibration curves could be established by aqueous standards and the analytical results were in good accordance with the alkaline fusion method. For μm size TiN, a negative deviation was observed for most of elements and this deviation can be corrected by using Ti intrinsic internal standard method.

  3. Oscillating plasma bubbles. III. Internal electron sources and sinks

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2012-08-15

    An internal electron source has been used to neutralize ions injected from an ambient plasma into a spherical grid. The resultant plasma is termed a plasma 'bubble.' When the electron supply from the filament is reduced, the sheath inside the bubble becomes unstable. The plasma potential of the bubble oscillates near but below the ion plasma frequency. Different modes of oscillations have been observed as well as a subharmonic and multiple harmonics. The frequency increases with ion density and decreases with electron density. The peak amplitude occurs for an optimum current and the instability is quenched at large electron densities. The frequency also increases if Langmuir probes inside the bubble draw electrons. Allowing electrons from the ambient plasma to enter, the bubble changes the frequency dependence on grid voltage. It is concluded that the net space charge density in the sheath determines the oscillation frequency. It is suggested that the sheath instability is caused by ion inertia in an oscillating sheath electric field which is created by ion bunching.

  4. Induction of plasma acetylcholinesterase activity in mice challenged with organophosphorus poisons

    SciTech Connect

    Duysen, Ellen G.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2011-09-01

    The restoration of plasma acetylcholinesterase activity in mice following inhibition by organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents has been attributed to synthesis of new enzyme. It is generally assumed that activity levels return to normal, are stable and do not exceed the normal level. We have observed over the past 10 years that recovery of acetylcholinesterase activity levels in mice treated with organophosphorus agents (OP) exceeds pretreatment levels and remains elevated for up to 2 months. The most dramatic case was in mice treated with tri-cresyl phosphate and tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate, where plasma acetylcholinesterase activity rebounded to a level 250% higher than the pretreatment activity. The present report summarizes our observations on plasma acetylcholinesterase activity in mice treated with chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos oxon, diazinon, tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate, tri-cresyl phosphate, tabun thiocholine, parathion, dichlorvos, and diisopropylfluorophosphate. We have developed a hypothesis to explain the excess acetylcholinesterase activity, based on published observations. We hypothesize that acetylcholinesterase activity is induced when cells undergo apoptosis and that consequently there is a rise in the level of plasma acetylcholinesterase. - Highlights: > Acetylcholinesterase activity is induced by organophosphorus agents. > AChE induction is related to apoptosis. > Induction of AChE activity by OP is independent of BChE.

  5. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Atomic Emission Spectroscopy, and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Dennis D.; Rutzke, Michael A.

    Atomic spectroscopy has played a major role in the development of our current database for mineral nutrients and toxicants in foods. When atomic absorption spectrometers became widely available in the 1960s, the development of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) methods for accurately measuring trace amounts of mineral elements in biological samples paved the way for unprecedented advances in fields as diverse as food analysis, nutrition, biochemistry, and toxicology (1). The application of plasmas as excitation sources for atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) led to the commercial availability of instruments for inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) beginning in the late 1970s. This instrument has further enhanced our ability to measure the mineral composition of foods and other materials rapidly, accurately, and precisely. More recently, plasmas have been joined with mass spectrometers (MS) to form inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer ICP-MS instruments that are capable of measuring mineral elements with extremely low detection limits. These three instrumental methods have largely replaced traditional wet chemistry methods for mineral analysis of foods, although traditional methods for calcium, chloride, iron, and phosphorus remain in use today (see Chap. 12).

  6. Synthesis of Lithium Oxide Composite Nanoparticles with Spinel Structure by Induction Thermal Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, Takuya; Sone, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Manabu; Okamoto, Daisuke; Watanabe, Takayuki

    2015-09-01

    Lithium oxide composite nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by induction thermal plasma. Powder mixtures of Li2CO3 and MnO2were injected into the induction thermal plasma at 20 kW-4MHz operated in different O2gas flow rates. The injected precursors were evaporated immediately in the high temperature region of the plasma and nanoparticles were produced through the quenching process. The particles were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The obtained results indicated that the nanoparticles of LiMn2O4 and LiMnO2 were selectively synthesized by controlling partial pressure of O2 in thermal plasma. Then formation mechanism of Li-based oxide nanoparticles was investigated on the basis of homogenous nucleation rate and thermodynamic consideration. In higher partial pressure of O2, MnO nucleates and Li oxide condense on the nuclei with relatively high condensation rate, resulting in single-phase LiMn2O4 formation. On the other hand, in lower partial pressure of O2, LiMnO2 was obtained due to the lower condensation rate of Li oxide.

  7. Characterization of stationary and pulsed inductively coupled RF discharges for plasma sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gans, T.; Osiac, M.; O'Connell, D.; Kadetov, V. A.; Czarnetzki, U.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Halfmann, H.; Awakowicz, P.

    2005-05-01

    Sterilization of bio-medical materials using radio frequency (RF) excited inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) has been investigated. A double ICP has been developed and studied for homogenous treatment of three-dimensional objects. Sterilization is achieved through a combination of ultraviolet light, ion bombardment and radical treatment. For temperature sensitive materials, the process temperature is a crucial parameter. Pulsing of the plasma reduces the time average heat strain and also provides additional control of the various sterilization mechanisms. Certain aspects of pulsed plasmas are, however, not yet fully understood. Phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy and time resolved ion energy analysis illustrate that a pulsed ICP ignites capacitively before reaching a stable inductive mode. Time resolved investigations of the post-discharge, after switching off the RF power, show that the plasma boundary sheath in front of a substrate does not fully collapse for the case of hydrogen discharges. This is explained by electron heating through super-elastic collisions with vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules.

  8. Analysis of tungsten carbide coatings by infrared laser-induced argon spark with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanický, V.; Otruba, V.; Mermet, J.-M.

    2000-10-01

    Infrared laser ablation was studied for application to the analysis of plasma-sprayed tungsten carbide/cobalt coatings. The potential of the laser induced argon-spark (LINA-Spark™), as a sample introduction device in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry was studied. The use of an IR laser along with defocusing led to laser-induced microplasma-based ablation. The mass ablation rate, represented by the ICP emission intensity per laser beam unit area, exhibited a flat increase in the irradiance range 2-250 GW/cm 2. A low slope (0.5) of this dependence in log-log scale gave evidence of plasma shielding. The steep increase in the measured acoustic signal when focused in front of the sample, i.e. in argon, indicated a breakdown of argon. Consequently, considerably lower ICP emissions were observed within the same range of irradiance. The cobalt/tungsten line intensity ratio in the ICP was practically constant from 1.5 up to at least 250 GW/cm 2. Acceptable precision (R.S.D.<5%) was obtained without internal standardization for irradiance between 2 and 8 GW/cm 2. Optimization of the laser pulse energy, repetition rate, beam focusing and sample displacement during interaction led to the linearization of dependences of signal vs. cobalt percentage, at least up to the highest studied value of 23% Co.

  9. A volume averaged global model for inductively coupled HBr/Ar plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Sang-Young; Kwon, Deuk-Chul; Choi, Heechol; Song, Mi-Young

    2015-09-01

    A global model for inductively coupled HBr/Ar plasma was developed. The model was based on a self-consistent global model had been developed by Kwon et al., and a set of chemical reactions in the HBr/Ar plasma was compiled by surveying theoretical, experimental and evaluative researches. In this model vibrational excitations of bi-atomic molecules and electronic excitations of hydrogen atom were taken into account. Neutralizations by collisions between positive and negative ions were considered with Hakman's approximate formula achieved by fitting of theoretical result. For some reactions that were not supplied from literatures the reaction parameters of Cl2 and HCl were adopted as them Br2 and HBr, respectively. For validation calculation results using this model were compared with experimental results from literatures for various plasma discharge parameters and it showed overall good agreement.

  10. Effect of metastables on a sustaining mechanism in inductively coupled plasma in Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Toshikazu; Makabe, Toshiaki

    2005-12-01

    We numerically predicted the spatial distribution of Ar metastables in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source; this distribution may be an indicator of the behavior of long-lived neutral radicals in a reactive plasma. We investigated the effect of metastables on the sustaining mechanism in ICP in Ar. The predicted two-dimensional profile of Ar metastables agreed reasonably well with experimental results. The transition of the sustaining mechanism from direct ionization to stepwise ionization is found as a function of input power at 50 mTorr. In addition, a strong hysteresis of plasma density is predicted between the increasing and decreasing phases of the input power based on the stepwise ionization of Ar metastables in the ICP.

  11. Measurement of neutral gas temperature in a 13.56 MHz inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jayapalan, Kanesh K.; Chin, Oi Hoong

    2015-04-24

    Measuring the temperature of neutrals in inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) is important as heating of neutral particles will influence plasma characteristics such as the spatial distributions of plasma density and electron temperature. Neutral gas temperatures were deduced using a non-invasive technique that combines gas actinometry, optical emission spectroscopy and simulation which is described here. Argon gas temperature in a 13.56 MHz ICP were found to fall within the range of 500 − 800 K for input power of 140 − 200 W and pressure of 0.05 − 0.2 mbar. Comparing spectrometers with 0.2 nm and 0.5 nm resolution, improved fitting sensitivity was observed for the 0.2 nm resolution.

  12. Synthesis of Ozone at Atmospheric Pressure by a Quenched Induction-Coupled Plasma Torch

    SciTech Connect

    A. Blutke; B.C. Stratton; D.R. Mikkelsen; J. Vavruska; R. Knight

    1998-01-01

    The technical feasibility of using an induction-coupled plasma (ICP) torch to synthesize ozone at atmospheric pressure is explored. Ozone concentrations up to ~250 ppm were produced using a thermal plasma reactor system based on an ICP torch operating at 2.5 MHz and ~11 kVA with an argon/oxygen mixture as the plasma-forming gas. A gaseous oxygen quench formed ozone by rapid mixing of molecular oxygen with atomic oxygen produced by the torch. The ozone concentration in the reaction chamber was measured by Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy over a wide range of experimental configurations. The geometry of the quench gas flow, the quench flow velocity, and the quench flow rate played important roles in determining the ozone concentration. The ozone concentration was sensitive to the torch RF power, but was insensitive to the torch gas flow rates. These observations are interpreted within the framework of a simple model of ozone synthesis.

  13. Development of a plasma coating system for induction melting zirconium in a graphite crucible

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, E.L.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1993-05-26

    A plasma coating system has been developed for induction melting zirconium at 1900 C using a graphite crucible. This laminated coating system consists of plasma spraying the following materials onto the graphite: (1) molybdenum or tungsten, (2) a 50% blend by weight of the metal powder and calcia-stabilized zirconium oxide, and (3) calcia-stabilized zirconia followed by painting a final coating of nonstabilized zirconia on top of the plasma-sprayed coating system. Zirconium was melted in argon using both laminating systems without any degradation of the graphite crucible and with only a minimal amount of carbon absorption. This novel approach that is being proposed as an alternative method of melting zirconium alloys offers substantial cost savings over the standard practice of electric arc melting using a consumable electrode.

  14. Inductively Coupling Plasma (ICP) Treatment of Propylene (PP) Surface and Adhesion Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yenchun; Fu, Yenpei

    2009-12-01

    Study on increasing the roughness of the polymer substrate surface to enhance the adhesion with the copper layer in an inductively coupling plasma (ICP) process was carried out. The microstructure of the polymer substrate surfaces, which were exposed to different kinds of plasma treatment, was identified by scanning electron microscopy(SEM) analysis, peel strength of the copper coating and water surface contact angle. The adhesion of the substrate was largely enhanced by plasma treatment and the copper deposited coating reached a value of 7.68 kgf/m in verifying the adhesion of the copper coating with polymer material. The quality of the line/space 50/50 μm produced in the laboratory was examined by the pressure cooker test and proved to meet the requirement.

  15. Effect of antenna size on electron kinetics in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2013-10-15

    Spatially resolved measurements of electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) are investigated in inductively coupled plasmas with two planar antenna coils. When the plasma is sustained by the antenna with a diameter of 18 cm, the nonlocal kinetics is preserved in the argon gas pressure range from 2 mTorr to 20 mTorr. However, electron kinetics transit from nonlocal kinetics to local kinetics in discharge sustained by the antenna coil with diameter 34 cm. The results suggest that antenna size as well as chamber length are important parameters for the transition of the electron kinetics. Spatial variations of plasma potential, effective electron temperature, and EEDF in terms of total electron energy scale are also presented.

  16. Simulation and Experimental Measurements of Inductively Coupled CF4 and CF4/Ar Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, D. B.; Bose, D.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cruden, B. A.; Meyyappan, M.; Sharma, S. P.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The recently developed code SEMS (semiconductor equipment modeling software)is applied to the simulation of CF4 and CF4/Ar inductively coupled plasmas (ICP). This work builds upon the earlier nitrogen, transformer coupled plasma (TCP) SEMS research by demonstrating its accuracy for more complex reactive mixtures, moving closer to the realization of a virtual plasma reactor. Attention is given to the etching of and/or formation of carbonaceous films on the quartz dielectric window and diagnostic aperatures. The simulations are validated through comparisons with experimental measurements using FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) and UV absorption spectroscopy for CFx and SiFx neutral radicals, QMS (quadrupole mass spectrometry) for the ions, and Langmuir probe measurements of electron number density and temperature in an ICP GEC reference cell.

  17. Jovian Plasmas Torus Interaction with Europa. Plasma Wake Structure and Effect of Inductive Magnetic Field: 3D Hybrid Kinetic Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J F.; Paterson, W. R.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.; Simpson, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The hybrid kinetic model supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the Europa moon-magnetosphere system with respect to a variable upstream magnetic field and flux or density distributions of plasma and energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical for improving the interpretation of the existing Europa flyby measurements from the Galileo Orbiter mission, and for planning flyby and orbital measurements (including the surface and atmospheric compositions) for future missions. The simulations are based on recent models of the atmosphere of Europa (Cassidy et al., 2007; Shematovich et al., 2005). In contrast to previous approaches with MHD simulations, the hybrid model allows us to fully take into account the finite gyroradius effect and electron pressure, and to correctly estimate the ion velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field (assuming an initial Maxwellian velocity distribution for upstream background ions). Photoionization, electron-impact ionization, charge exchange and collisions between the ions and neutrals are also included in our model. We consider the models with Oþ þ and Sþ þ background plasma, and various betas for background ions and electrons, and pickup electrons. The majority of O2 atmosphere is thermal with an extended non-thermal population (Cassidy et al., 2007). In this paper, we discuss two tasks: (1) the plasma wake structure dependence on the parameters of the upstream plasma and Europa's atmosphere (model I, cases (a) and (b) with a homogeneous Jovian magnetosphere field, an inductive magnetic dipole and high oceanic shell conductivity); and (2) estimation of the possible effect of an induced magnetic field arising from oceanic shell conductivity. This effect was estimated based on the difference between the observed and modeled magnetic fields (model II, case (c) with an inhomogeneous Jovian magnetosphere field, an inductive

  18. Langmuir Probe Distortions and Probe Compensation in an Inductively Coupled Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ji, J. S.; Cappelli, M. A.; Kim, J. S.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, S. P.

    1999-01-01

    In many RF discharges, Langmuir probe measurements are usually made against a background of sinusoidal (and not so sinusoidal) fluctuations in the plasma parameters such as the plasma potential (Vp), the electron number density (ne), and the electron temperature (Te). The compensation of sinusoidal fluctuations in Vp has been extensively studied and is relatively well understood. Less attention has been paid to the possible distortions introduced by small fluctuations in plasma density and/or plasma temperature, which may arise in the sheath and pre-sheath regions of RF discharges. Here, we present the results of a model simulation of probe characteristics subject to fluctuations in both Vp and ne. The modeling of probe distortion due to possible fluctuations in Te is less straightforward. A comparison is presented of calculations with experimental measurements using a compensated and uncompensated Langmuir probe in an inductively coupled GEC reference cell plasma, operating on Ar and Ar/CF4 mixtures. The plasma parameters determined from the compensated probe characteristics are compared to previous measurements of others made in similar discharges, and to our own measurements of the average electron density derived from electrical impedance measurements.

  19. Electron density characterization of inductively-coupled argon plasmas by the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Dogeun; Uhm, Han Sup; Jang, Donggyu; Hur, Min Sup; Suk, Hyyong

    2016-12-01

    Inductively-coupled plasmas (ICP) in the high electron density regime of the order of 1013 cm-3 are generated and their electron density characteristics are investigated by the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) method. In this experiment, the plasma was produced by RF (13.56 MHz) with an applied RF power of 300-550 W and the argon gas pressure was in the range of 0.3-1.1 Torr. We generated the THz wave by focusing a femtosecond laser pulse in air with a DC electric field. As a plasma diagnostic tool, the THz-TDS method is found to successfully provide the plasma density information in the high-density regime, where other available plasma diagnostic tools are very limited. In addition, the analytical model based on the ambipolar diffusion equation is compared with experimental observations to explain the behavior of the electron density in the ICP source, where the plasma density is shown to be related to the applied RF power and gas pressure. The analytical result from the model is found to be in good agreement with the THz-TDS result.

  20. Characterization of Inductively Coupled Plasmas in High Power, High Pressure Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Chieh; Kenney, Jason; Agarwal, Ankur; Nichols, Michael; Rogers, James; Rauf, Shahid

    2015-09-01

    Inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) are widely used in the microelectronic industry for thin film etching. ICPs have typically been operated at low gas pressures (<50 mTorr) and they have been well-characterized in this regime. Several applications requiring high etch rates (e.g., vertical NAND etch) have recently extended the use of ICPs to the high power (>4000 W) and high pressure (>100 mTorr) regime. ICP operation in this high-power, high-pressure regime imposes a tremendous challenge of achieving good plasma uniformity over large substrates. This necessitates a good theoretical understanding of the underlying physics, thorough experimental characterization, and more accurate numerical models for hardware design guidance. In this study, we will focus on the characterization of ICP in the high-power, high-pressure regime. Computational modeling is done using CRTRS, our in-house 2D/3D plasma model. The fluid plasma model is coupled to a circuit model to self-consistently account for the capacitive coupling from the coils that is expected to dominate in this operating regime. Properties of Ar plasma will be discussed and compared with experiments. The impact of critical operating parameters such as ICP power, pressure, flow rate, and current ratio (in multi-coil antenna structures) on plasma characteristics will be examined. Results in relevant processing gases will also be discussed.

  1. On anomalous temporal evolution of gas pressure in inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, B. H.; Chang, H. Y.; You, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Seong, D. J.

    2013-04-01

    The temporal measurement of gas pressure in inductive coupled plasma revealed that there is an interesting anomalous evolution of gas pressure in the early stage of plasma ignition and extinction: a sudden gas pressure change and its relaxation of which time scales are about a few seconds and a few tens of second, respectively, were observed after plasma ignition and extinction. This phenomenon can be understood as a combined result between the neutral heating effect induced by plasma and the pressure relaxation effect for new gas temperature. The temporal measurement of gas temperature by laser Rayleigh scattering and the time dependant calculations for the neutral heating and pressure relaxation are in good agreement with our experimental results. This result and physics behind are expected to provide a new operational perspective of the recent plasma processes of which time is very short, such as a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition/etching, a soft etch for disposal of residual by-products on wafer, and light oxidation process in semiconductor manufacturing.

  2. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  3. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  4. Initial Operation of the Miniaturized Inductively Heated Plasma Generator IPG6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Herdrich, Georg; Laufer, Rene; Koch, Helmut; Gomringer, Chris; Cook, Mike; Schmoke, Jimmy; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2012-10-01

    In close collaboration between the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) at Baylor University, Texas, and the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, two plasma wind tunnel facilities of similar type have been established using the inductively heated plasma source IPG6 which is based on proven IRS designs. The facility at Baylor University (IPG6-B) works at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and a maximum power of 15 kW. A vacuum pump of 160m^3/h in combination with a butterfly valve allows pressure control in a wide range. First experiments have been conducted with Air, O2 and N2 as working gases and volumetric flow rates of up to 14 L/min at pressures of a few 100 Pa, although pressures below 1 Pa are achievable at lower flow rates. The maximum tested electric power so far was 8 kW. Plasma powers and total pressures in the plasma jet have been obtained. In the near future the set up of additional diagnostics, the use of other gases (i.e. H2, He), and the integration of a dust particle accelerator are planned. The intended fields of research are basic investigation in thermo-chemistry and plasma radiation, space plasma environments and high heat fluxes e.g. in fusion devices or during atmospheric entry of spacecraft.

  5. 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics & 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Leopoldo

    2014-05-01

    The International Advisory Committee of the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2010) and the International Advisory Committee of the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2010), together agreed to carry out this combined meeting ICPP-LAWPP-2010 in Santiago de Chile, 8-13 August 2010, on occasion of the Bicentennial of Chilean Independence. The ICPP-LAWPP-2010 was organized by the Thermonuclear Plasma Department of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) as part of the official program within the framework of the Chilean Bicentennial. The event was also a scientific and academic activity of the project ''Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4'', supported by National Scientific and Technological Commission, CONICYT-Chile, under grant ACT-26. The International Congress on Plasma Physics was first held in Nagoya, in 1980, and followed by the Congresses: Gothenburg (1982), Lausanne (1984), Kiev (1987), New Delhi (1989), Innsbruck (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994), Nagoya (1996), Prague (1998), Quebec City (2000), Sydney (2002), Nice (2004), Kiev (2006), and Fukuoka (2008). The purpose of the Congress is to discuss the recent progress and future views in plasma science, including fundamental plasma physics, fusion plasmas, astrophysical plasmas, and plasma applications, and so forth. The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics was first held in 1982 in Cambuquira, Brazil, followed by the Workshops: Medellín (1985), Santiago (1988), Buenos Aires (1990), Mexico City (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994, also combined with ICPP), Caracas (1997), Tandil (1998), La Serena (2000), Sao Pedro (2003), Mexico City (2005), and Caracas (2007). The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics is a communication forum of the achievements of the plasma-physics regional community, fostering collaboration between plasma scientists within the region and elsewhere. The program of the ICPP-LAWPP-2010 included the topics

  6. Controlling VUV photon fluxes in pulsed inductively coupled Ar/Cl2 plasmas and potential applications in plasma etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Peng; Kushner, Mark J.

    2017-02-01

    UV/VUV photon fluxes in plasma materials processing have a variety of effects ranging from producing damage to stimulating synergistic reactions. Although in plasma etching processes, the rate and quality of the feature are typically controlled by the characteristics of the ion flux, to truly optimize these ion and photon driven processes, it is desirable to control the relative fluxes of ions and photons to the wafer. In prior works, it was determined that the ratio of VUV photon to ion fluxes to the substrate in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) sustained in rare gases can be controlled by combinations of pressure and pulse power, while the spectrum of these VUV photons can be tuned by adding additional rare gases to the plasma. In this work, VUV photon and ion fluxes are computationally investigated for Ar/Cl2 ICPs as used in etching of silicon. We found that while the overall ratio of VUV photon flux to ion flux are controlled by pressure and pulse power, by varying the fraction of Cl2 in the mixture, both the ratio of VUV to ion fluxes and the spectrum of VUV photons can be tuned. It was also found that the intensity of VUV emission from Cl(3p 44s) can be independently tuned by controlling wall surface conditions. With this ability to control ratios of ion to photon fluxes, photon stimulated processes, as observed in halogen etching of Si, can be tuned to optimize the shape of the etched features.

  7. Bulk plasma fragmentation in a C{sub 4}F{sub 8} inductively coupled plasma: A hybrid modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Shu-Xia; Zhang, Yu-Ru; Gao, Fei; Wang, You-Nian; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2015-06-28

    A hybrid model is used to investigate the fragmentation of C{sub 4}F{sub 8} inductive discharges. Indeed, the resulting reactive species are crucial for the optimization of the Si-based etching process, since they determine the mechanisms of fluorination, polymerization, and sputtering. In this paper, we present the dissociation degree, the density ratio of F vs. C{sub x}F{sub y} (i.e., fluorocarbon (fc) neutrals), the neutral vs. positive ion density ratio, details on the neutral and ion components, and fractions of various fc neutrals (or ions) in the total fc neutral (or ion) density in a C{sub 4}F{sub 8} inductively coupled plasma source, as well as the effect of pressure and power on these results. To analyze the fragmentation behavior, the electron density and temperature and electron energy probability function (EEPF) are investigated. Moreover, the main electron-impact generation sources for all considered neutrals and ions are determined from the complicated C{sub 4}F{sub 8} reaction set used in the model. The C{sub 4}F{sub 8} plasma fragmentation is explained, taking into account many factors, such as the EEPF characteristics, the dominance of primary and secondary processes, and the thresholds of dissociation and ionization. The simulation results are compared with experiments from literature, and reasonable agreement is obtained. Some discrepancies are observed, which can probably be attributed to the simplified polymer surface kinetics assumed in the model.

  8. Operational characteristics and non-inductive plasmas on NSTX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Dennis

    2016-10-01

    Start-up and ramp-up of NSTX-U plasmas with nearly full solenoid pre-charge required higher loop voltage than on NSTX in agreement with modeling. NSTX-U has operated with a plasma current (Ip) of 0.65 MA at a toroidal field (BT) of 0.63 T for 2s in L-Mode. These plasmas allowed for the initial investigation of error field correction which found a difference between correction during Ip flattop and during ramp-up. Plasma control using feedback on the X-Point locations or the X-point height and outer strike point locations is routinely used. Because an ST does not have a single coil set that controls the inner gap, it was challenging to control the time at which the plasma diverted. A novel approach was used to trade off accuracy on the outer plasma shape to achieve a reproducible inner gap. These control tools allowed study of ELMy H-mode operation at Ip = 1 MA with boronized walls. A major long-term goal for NSTX-U is totally non-inductive operation. The plan calls for initiating the plasma with coaxial helicity injection (CHI) heatied by ECH, then current drive and heating by HHFW and NBI. CHI will be used in the new geometry to demonstrate results comparable to NSTX and provide information to inform plans to upgrade the available voltage from 1.65 to 2 kV next year. Low Ip plasmas will be used to study the dependence of current drive on neutral beam voltage and injection angle. Work Supported by U.S.D.O.E. Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  9. Etch Characteristics of GaN using Inductively Coupled Cl2 Plasma Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosli, Siti Azlina; Aziz, A. Abdul

    2008-05-01

    In this study, the plasma characteristics and GaN etch properties of inductively coupled Cl2/Ar plasmas were investigated. It has shown that the results of a study of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching of gallium nitride by using Cl2/Ar is possible to meet the requirement (anisotropy, high etch rate and high selectivity), simultaneously. We have investigated the etching rate dependency on the percentage of Argon in the gas mixture, the total pressure and DC voltage. We found that using a gas mixture with 20 sccm of Ar, the optimum etch rate of GaN was achieved. The etch rate were found to increase with voltage, attaining a maximum rate 2500 Å/min at -557 V. The addition of an inert gas, Ar is found to barely affect the etch rate. Surface morphology of the etched samples was verified by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. It was found that the etched surface was anisotropic and the smoothness of the etched surface is comparable to that of polished wafer.

  10. Sterilization of beehive material with a double inductively coupled low pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priehn, M.; Denis, B.; Aumeier, P.; Kirchner, W. H.; Awakowicz, P.; Leichert, L. I.

    2016-09-01

    American Foulbrood is a severe, notifiable disease of the honey bee. It is caused by infection of bee larvae with spores of the gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus larvae. Spores of this organism are found in high numbers in an infected hive and are highly resistant to physical and chemical inactivation methods. The procedures to rehabilitate affected apiaries often result in the destruction of beehive material. In this study we assess the suitability of a double inductively coupled low pressure plasma as a non-destructive, yet effective alternative inactivation method for bacterial spores of the model organism Bacillus subtilis on beehive material. Plasma treatment was able to effectively remove spores from wax, which, under protocols currently established in veterinary practice, normally is destroyed by ignition or autoclaved for sterilization. Spores were removed from wooden surfaces with efficacies significantly higher than methods currently used in veterinary practice, such as scorching by flame treatment. In addition, we were able to non-destructively remove spores from the highly delicate honeycomb wax structures, potentially making treatment of beehive material with double inductively coupled low pressure plasma part of a fast and reliable method to rehabilitate infected bee colonies with the potential to re-use honeycombs.

  11. Numerical Modeling and Testing of an Inductively-Driven and High-Energy Pulsed Plasma Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parma, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPTs) are advanced electric space propulsion devices that are characterized by simplicity and robustness. They suffer, however, from low thrust efficiencies. This summer, two approaches to improve the thrust efficiency of PPTs will be investigated through both numerical modeling and experimental testing. The first approach, an inductively-driven PPT, uses a double-ignition circuit to fire two PPTs in succession. This effectively changes the PPTs configuration from an LRC circuit to an LR circuit. The LR circuit is expected to provide better impedance matching and improving the efficiency of the energy transfer to the plasma. An added benefit of the LR circuit is an exponential decay of the current, whereas a traditional PPT s under damped LRC circuit experiences the characteristic "ringing" of its current. The exponential decay may provide improved lifetime and sustained electromagnetic acceleration. The second approach, a high-energy PPT, is a traditional PPT with a variable size capacitor bank. This PPT will be simulated and tested at energy levels between 100 and 450 joules in order to investigate the relationship between efficiency and energy level. Arbitrary Coordinate Hydromagnetic (MACH2) code is used. The MACH2 code, designed by the Center for Plasma Theory and Computation at the Air Force Research Laboratory, has been used to gain insight into a variety of plasma problems, including electric plasma thrusters. The goals for this summer include numerical predictions of performance for both the inductively-driven PPT and high-energy PFT, experimental validation of the numerical models, and numerical optimization of the designs. These goals will be met through numerical and experimental investigation of the PPTs current waveforms, mass loss (or ablation), and impulse bit characteristics.

  12. Inductive pulsed plasma thruster model with time-evolution of energy and state properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Sankaran, K.; Ritchie, A. G.; Reneau, J. P.

    2013-11-01

    A model for pulsed inductive plasma acceleration is presented that consists of a set of circuit equations coupled to both a one-dimensional (1D) equation of motion and an equation governing the partitioning of energy. The latter two equations are obtained for the plasma current sheet by treating it as a single element of finite volume and integrating the governing equations over that volume. The integrated terms are replaced where necessary by physically equivalent approximations that are calculated through the solution of other parts of the governing equation set. The model improves upon previous 1D performance models by permitting the time-evolution of the temperature consistent with the time-varying energy flux into the plasma. The plasma state properties are also more realistically modelled and evolved in time, allowing for the tailoring of the model to different gases that may be chosen as propellants. Computational results for argon propellant are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the model. The model produces a result where efficiency is maximized at a given value of the electrodynamic scaling term known as the dynamic impedance parameter. The scaling of different energy sinks as a function of the dynamic impedance parameter provides insight into the global energy partitioning in these types of accelerators. Results from the present model deviate from the previous version where temperature is selected as an input without regard for the energy that would be deposited to heat the gas to that temperature. Qualitatively and quantitatively, the model predicts specific impulse values that compare favourably with those measured for two separate inductive pulsed plasma thrusters. Efficiency is underpredicted in the regime where data are available, but the trends in the data and simulations follow similar trajectories that appear to be converging towards a predicted peak efficiency as the dynamic impedance parameter is increased.

  13. Tumor microenvironment-derived proteins dominate the plasma proteome response during breast cancer induction and progression.

    PubMed

    Pitteri, Sharon J; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S; Gurley, Kay E; Kennedy, Jacob; Buson, Tina Busald; Chin, Alice; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Qing; Wong, Chee-Hong; Chodosh, Lewis A; Nelson, Peter S; Hanash, Samir M; Kemp, Christopher J

    2011-08-01

    Tumor development relies upon essential contributions from the tumor microenvironment and host immune alterations. These contributions may inform the plasma proteome in a manner that could be exploited for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. In this study, we employed a systems biology approach to characterize the plasma proteome response in the inducible HER2/neu mouse model of breast cancer during tumor induction, progression, and regression. Mass spectrometry data derived from approximately 1.6 million spectra identified protein networks involved in wound healing, microenvironment, and metabolism that coordinately changed during tumor development. The observed alterations developed prior to cancer detection, increased progressively with tumor growth and reverted toward baseline with tumor regression. Gene expression and immunohistochemical analyses suggested that the cancer-associated plasma proteome was derived from transcriptional responses in the noncancerous host tissues as well as the developing tumor. The proteomic signature was distinct from a nonspecific response to inflammation. Overall, the developing tumor simultaneously engaged a number of innate physiologic processes, including wound repair, immune response, coagulation and complement cascades, tissue remodeling, and metabolic homeostasis that were all detectable in plasma. Our findings offer an integrated view of tumor development relevant to plasma-based strategies to detect and diagnose cancer.

  14. A control-oriented self-consistent model of an inductively-coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keville, Bernard; Turner, Miles

    2009-10-01

    An essential first step in the design of real time control algorithms for plasma processes is to determine dynamical relationships between actuator quantities such as gas flow rate set points and plasma states such electron density. An ideal first principles-based, control-oriented model should exhibit the simplicity and computational requirements of an empirical model and, in addition, despite sacrificing first principles detail, capture enough of the essential physics and chemistry of the process in order to provide reasonably accurate qualitative predictions. This presentation describes a control-oriented model of a cylindrical low pressure planar inductive discharge with a stove top antenna. The model consists of equivalent circuit coupled to a global model of the plasma chemistry to produce a self-consistent zero-dimensional model of the discharge. The non-local plasma conductivity and the fields in the plasma are determined from the wave equation and the two-term solution of the Boltzmann equation. Expressions for the antenna impedance and the parameters of the transformer equivalent circuit in terms of the isotropic electron distribution and the geometry of the chamber are presented.

  15. Nitrogen Gas Plasma Generated by a Static Induction Thyristor as a Pulsed Power Supply Inactivates Adenovirus

    PubMed Central

    Sakudo, Akikazu; Toyokawa, Yoichi; Imanishi, Yuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Adenovirus is one of the most important causative agents of iatrogenic infections derived from contaminated medical devices or finger contact. In this study, we investigated whether nitrogen gas plasma, generated by applying a short high-voltage pulse to nitrogen using a static induction thyristor power supply (1.5 kilo pulse per second), exhibited a virucidal effect against adenoviruses. Viral titer was reduced by one log within 0.94 min. Results from detection of viral capsid proteins, hexon and penton, by Western blotting and immunochromatography were unaffected by the plasma treatment. In contrast, analysis using the polymerase chain reaction suggested that plasma treatment damages the viral genomic DNA. Reactive chemical products (hydrogen peroxide, nitrate, and nitrite), ultraviolet light (UV-A) and slight temperature elevations were observed during the operation of the gas plasma device. Viral titer versus intensity of each potential virucidal factor were used to identify the primary mechanism of disinfection of adenovirus. Although exposure to equivalent levels of UV-A or heat treatment did not inactivate adenovirus, treatment with a relatively low concentration of hydrogen peroxide efficiently inactivated the virus. Our results suggest the nitrogen gas plasma generates reactive chemical products that inactivate adenovirus by damaging the viral genomic DNA. PMID:27322066

  16. Methods for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Chan, George C. Y.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2010-08-03

    A method for detecting and correcting inaccurate results in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). ICP-AES analysis is performed across a plurality of selected locations in the plasma on an unknown sample, collecting the light intensity at one or more selected wavelengths of one or more sought-for analytes, creating a first dataset. The first dataset is then calibrated with a calibration dataset creating a calibrated first dataset curve. If the calibrated first dataset curve has a variability along the location within the plasma for a selected wavelength, errors are present. Plasma-related errors are then corrected by diluting the unknown sample and performing the same ICP-AES analysis on the diluted unknown sample creating a calibrated second dataset curve (accounting for the dilution) for the one or more sought-for analytes. The cross-over point of the calibrated dataset curves yields the corrected value (free from plasma related errors) for each sought-for analyte.

  17. Extraction and neutralization of positive and negative ions from a pulsed electronegative inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, D.; el Otell, Z.; Bowden, M. D.; Braithwaite, N. St. J.

    2015-12-01

    Almost electron-free (ion-ion) plasmas can be transiently formed during the afterglow phase of pulsed plasmas in electronegative gases. In ion-ion plasmas, both positive and negative ions can be extracted which makes them advantageous for a number of applications. In this paper, we investigate the extraction and acceleration of positive and negative ion beams from a pulsed inductively coupled plasma in SF6. The plasma is bounded by two electrodes biased synchronously with the discharge modulation. It is shown that when a DC bias voltage is applied during the afterglow phase, positive/negative ions are accelerated in a positive/negative space charge sheath formed in front of one of the electrodes. The energy of extracted ions closely follows the amplitude of the applied bias voltage (25-150 V) and the peak beam current density reaches 2 A m-2. With a view to using the described system as a source of energetic neutral beams for low damage material processing, simultaneous extraction and surface neutralization of positive and negative ions using an extraction electrode with high aspect ratio apertures is investigated.

  18. Inductive Measurement of Plasma Jet Electrical Conductivity (MSFC Center Director's discretionary Fund). Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. W.; Hawk, C. W.; Litchford, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Measurement of plasma jet electrical conductivity has utility in the development of explosively driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy converters as well as magnetic flux compression reaction chambers for nuclear/chemical pulse propulsion and power. Within these types of reactors, the physical parameter of critical importance to underlying MHD processes is the magnetic Reynolds number, the value of which depends upon the product of plasma electrical conductivity and velocity. Therefore, a thorough understanding of MHD phenomena at high magnetic Reynolds number is essential, and methods are needed for the accurate and reliable measurement of electrical conductivity in high-speed plasma jets. It is well known that direct measurements using electrodes suffer from large surface resistance, and an electrodeless technique is desired. To address this need, an inductive probing scheme, originally developed for shock tube studies, has been adapted. In this method, the perturbation of an applied magnetic field by a plasma jet induces a voltage in a search coil, which, in turn, can be used to infer electrical conductivity through the inversion of a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. A 1-in.-diameter probe using a light-gas gun. Exploratory laboratory experiments were carried out using plasma jets expelled from 15-g shaped charges. Measured conductivities were in the range of 4 kS/m for unseeded octol charges and 26 kS/m for seeded octol charges containing 2-percent potassium carbonate by mass.

  19. Computational hydrodynamics and optical performance of inductively-coupled plasma adaptive lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Mortazavi, M.; Urzay, J. Mani, A.

    2015-06-15

    This study addresses the optical performance of a plasma adaptive lens for aero-optical applications by using both axisymmetric and three-dimensional numerical simulations. Plasma adaptive lenses are based on the effects of free electrons on the phase velocity of incident light, which, in theory, can be used as a phase-conjugation mechanism. A closed cylindrical chamber filled with Argon plasma is used as a model lens into which a beam of light is launched. The plasma is sustained by applying a radio-frequency electric current through a coil that envelops the chamber. Four different operating conditions, ranging from low to high powers and induction frequencies, are employed in the simulations. The numerical simulations reveal complex hydrodynamic phenomena related to buoyant and electromagnetic laminar transport, which generate, respectively, large recirculating cells and wall-normal compression stresses in the form of local stagnation-point flows. In the axisymmetric simulations, the plasma motion is coupled with near-wall axial striations in the electron-density field, some of which propagate in the form of low-frequency traveling disturbances adjacent to vortical quadrupoles that are reminiscent of Taylor-Görtler flow structures in centrifugally unstable flows. Although the refractive-index fields obtained from axisymmetric simulations lead to smooth beam wavefronts, they are found to be unstable to azimuthal disturbances in three of the four three-dimensional cases considered. The azimuthal striations are optically detrimental, since they produce high-order angular aberrations that account for most of the beam wavefront error. A fourth case is computed at high input power and high induction frequency, which displays the best optical properties among all the three-dimensional simulations considered. In particular, the increase in induction frequency prevents local thermalization and leads to an axisymmetric distribution of electrons even after introduction of

  20. Computational hydrodynamics and optical performance of inductively-coupled plasma adaptive lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, M.; Urzay, J.; Mani, A.

    2015-06-01

    This study addresses the optical performance of a plasma adaptive lens for aero-optical applications by using both axisymmetric and three-dimensional numerical simulations. Plasma adaptive lenses are based on the effects of free electrons on the phase velocity of incident light, which, in theory, can be used as a phase-conjugation mechanism. A closed cylindrical chamber filled with Argon plasma is used as a model lens into which a beam of light is launched. The plasma is sustained by applying a radio-frequency electric current through a coil that envelops the chamber. Four different operating conditions, ranging from low to high powers and induction frequencies, are employed in the simulations. The numerical simulations reveal complex hydrodynamic phenomena related to buoyant and electromagnetic laminar transport, which generate, respectively, large recirculating cells and wall-normal compression stresses in the form of local stagnation-point flows. In the axisymmetric simulations, the plasma motion is coupled with near-wall axial striations in the electron-density field, some of which propagate in the form of low-frequency traveling disturbances adjacent to vortical quadrupoles that are reminiscent of Taylor-Görtler flow structures in centrifugally unstable flows. Although the refractive-index fields obtained from axisymmetric simulations lead to smooth beam wavefronts, they are found to be unstable to azimuthal disturbances in three of the four three-dimensional cases considered. The azimuthal striations are optically detrimental, since they produce high-order angular aberrations that account for most of the beam wavefront error. A fourth case is computed at high input power and high induction frequency, which displays the best optical properties among all the three-dimensional simulations considered. In particular, the increase in induction frequency prevents local thermalization and leads to an axisymmetric distribution of electrons even after introduction of

  1. Characterization of transmission line effects and ion-ion plasma formation in an inductively coupled plasma etch reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khater, Marwan H.

    2000-10-01

    The plasma and processing uniformity are greatly affected by the gas flow distribution and the source geometry in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etch reactors. However, a reasonably uniform source design, along with uniform gas distribution, does not always guarantee uniform plasma, because transmission line (i.e. standing wave) effects also impact its performance. In this work, we demonstrate that the gas flow distribution can have a major impact on both the plasma density profiles and etch rate uniformity at low pressures where one might expect diffusion to make gas flow distribution less important. We also present an ICP source design with a geometry that enables better control over the field profiles azimuthal symmetry despite transmission line effects. B-dot probe measurements of the free space electromagnetic fields for the new source and a comparably dimensioned standard planar coil showed improved azimuthal symmetry for the new source. We have also developed a three-dimensional electromagnetic model for ICP sources that accounts for current variations along the source length due to standing wave effects. The electromagnetic field profiles obtained from the model showed good agreement with the measured field profiles. Langmuir probe measurements showed that the new ICP source generated high density (1011--1012 cm-3) plasmas at low pressures with significantly improved azimuthal symmetry of power deposition and plasma generation. In addition, polysilicon etch rate profiles on 150 mm wafers also showed improved azimuthal symmetry and uniformity with the new ICP source. The new source was then used to investigate chlorine discharge properties and their spatial profiles in continuous wave (CW) and pulsed operation. Time-resolved Langmuir probe measurements showed that electron-free or "ion-ion" chlorine plasma forms during the afterglow (i.e. power-off) due to electron attachment. Such electron-free plasma can provide both positive and negative ion fluxes to a

  2. Evolution of plasma parameters in an Ar-N2/He inductive plasma source with magnetic pole enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maria, Younus; N, U. Rehman; M, Shafiq; M, Naeem; M, Zaka-Ul-Islam; M, Zakaullah

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic pole enhanced inductively coupled plasmas (MaPE-ICPs) are a promising source for plasma-based etching and have a wide range of material processing applications. In the present study Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy were used to monitor the evolution of plasma parameters in a MaPE-ICP Ar-N2/He mixture plasma. Electron density ({n}{{e}}) and temperature ({T}{{e}}), excitation temperature ({T}{{exc}}), plasma potential ({V}{{p}}), skin depth (δ ) and the evolution of the electron energy probability function (EEPF) are reported as a function of radiofrequency (RF) power, pressure and argon concentration in the mixture. It is observed that {n}{{e}} increases while {T}{{e}} decreases with increase in RF power and argon concentration in the mixture. The emission intensity of the argon line at 750.4 nm is also used to monitor the variation of the ‘high-energy tail’ of the EEPF with RF power and gas pressure. The EEPF has a ‘bi-Maxwellian’ distribution at low RF powers and higher pressure in a pure {{{N}}}2 discharge. However, it evolves into a ‘Maxwellian’ distribution at RF powers greater than 70 W for pure {{{N}}}2, and at 50 W for higher argon concentrations in the mixture. The effect of argon concentration on the temperatures of two electron groups in the ‘bi-Maxwellian’ EEPF is examined. The temperature of the low-energy electron group {T}{{L}} shows a decreasing trend with argon addition until the ‘thermalization’ of the two temperatures occurs, while the temperature of high-energy electrons {T}{{H}} decreases continuously.

  3. Comparison of various interpretation methods of the electric probe measurements in inductively coupled Ar and O{sub 2} plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Woo Seo, Min; Keun Bae, Min; Chung, T. H.

    2014-02-15

    In low-pressure inductively coupled argon and oxygen discharges, the plasma density and electron temperature and the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) were obtained by using a cylindrical electric probe. The plasma densities were determined by various methods to interpret the probe current-voltage characteristic curve: the EEDF integration, the electron saturation current, the ion current at the floating potential, and the orbital-motion-limited (OML) ion current. Quite a good agreement exists between the plasma densities determined by various classical methods. Although the probe technique has some limitation in electronegative plasmas, the plasma densities determined from OML theory compare well with those measured by the ion saturation current at the floating potential in the oxygen discharges. In addition, the EEDFs of inductively coupled Ar and oxygen plasmas are observed to be nearly Maxwellian at the pressure range of 1-40 mTorr.

  4. Preconcentration of heavy metals in urine and quantification by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    López-Artíguez, M; Cameán, A; Repetto, M

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a method for the determination of heavy metals (Co, Ni, Cu, Cd, Pb) in urine by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The method proposed requires purification of the samples with activated charcoal under acidic conditions before preconcentration by complexation with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC). The formed complexes are extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) and the resulting residue is finally digested under acid oxidant conditions. Because of its low detection limit (below 10 micrograms/L), this procedure can be applied conveniently for toxicological diagnostic purposes.

  5. Determination of trace metals in marine biological reference materials by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchemin, D.; McLaren, J.W.; Willie, S.N.; Berman, S.S.

    1988-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for the analysis of two marine biological reference materials (dogfish liver tissue (DOLT-1) and dogfish muscle tissue (DORM-1)). The materials were put into solution by digestion in a nitric acid/hydrogen peroxide mixture. Thirteen elements (Na, Mg, Cr, Fe, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, and Pb) were then determined. Accurate results were obtained by standard additions or isotope dilution techniques for all of these elements in DORM-1 and for all but Cr in DOLT-1.

  6. Optimized condition for etching fused-silica phase gratings with inductively coupled plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shunquan; Zhou, Changhe; Ru, Huayi; Zhang, Yanyan

    2005-07-20

    Polymer deposition is a serious problem associated with the etching of fused silica by use of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) technology, and it usually prevents further etching. We report an optimized etching condition under which no polymer deposition will occur for etching fused silica with ICP technology. Under the optimized etching condition, surfaces of the fabricated fused silica gratings are smooth and clean. Etch rate of fused silica is relatively high, and it demonstrates a linear relation between etched depth and working time. Results of the diffraction of gratings fabricated under the optimized etching condition match theoretical results well.

  7. Statistical evaluation of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric method for routine water quality testing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garbarino, J.R.; Jones, B.E.; Stein, G.P.

    1985-01-01

    In an interlaboratory test, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was compared with flame atomic absorption spectrometry and molecular absorption spectrophotometry for the determination of 17 major and trace elements in 100 filtered natural water samples. No unacceptable biases were detected. The analysis precision of ICP-AES was found to be equal to or better than alternative methods. Known-addition recovery experiments demonstrated that the ICP-AES determinations are accurate to between plus or minus 2 and plus or minus 10 percent; four-fifths of the tests yielded average recoveries of 95-105 percent, with an average relative standard deviation of about 5 percent.

  8. Characterization of silicon isotropic etch by inductively coupled plasma etcher for microneedle array fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Jing; Tay, Francis E. H.; Miao, Jianmin; Sun, Jianbo

    2006-04-01

    This work investigates the isotropic etching properties in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etcher for microneedle arrays fabrication. The effects of process variables including powers, gas and pressure on needle structure generation are characterized by factorial design of experiment (DOE). The experimental responses of vertical etching depth, lateral etching length, ratio of vertical etching depth to lateral etching length and photoresist etching rate are reported. The relevance of the etching variables is also presented. The obtained etching behaviours for microneedle structure generation will be applied to develop recipes to fabricate microneedles in designed dimensions.

  9. Separation of actinides using capillary extraction chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Dominic S; Montoya, Velma M

    2009-08-01

    Trace levels of actinides have been separated on capillary extraction chromatography columns. Detection of the actinides was achieved using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer, which was coupled with the extraction chromatography system. In this study, we compare 30-cm long, 4.6 mm i.d. columns to capillary columns (750 microm i.d.) with lengths from 30 cm up to 150 cm. The columns that were tested were packed with TRU resin. We were able to separate a mixture of five actinides ((232)Th, (238)U, (237)Np, (239)Pu, and (241)Am). This work has application to rapid bioassay as well as automated separations of actinide materials.

  10. Effect of dual frequency rf power in an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ju-Ho; Lee, Ho-Won; Kim, Tae Woo; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-09-01

    Dual frequency inductively coupled plasma discharge is investigated. Dual RF power is applied independently to each antenna (inner and outer coil), and the electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs) are measured using a RF compensated Langmuir probe. As the ratio of low frequency power (Plow) and high frequency power (Phigh) is changed, the variation of EEDF is observed. When Plow is higher than Phigh, the low energy electrons effectively heated compared to the case when Plow is comparable to Phigh. This difference in the shape of the EEDF can be understood by correlation between the driving frequency and the collision frequency.

  11. [Determination of total sulfur in coal by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-yan; Zhang, Yuan-li

    2002-02-01

    A direct method was reported for the determination of total sulfur in coal by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The dissolution conditions of coal samples as well as interference conditions of hydrochloric acid and matrix were studied. The recommended method not only proved to be simple and rapid than traditional gravimetric method but show satisfying precision and accuracy as well. The results of samples are as same as gravimetry. The recoveries are more than 96%, and the relative standard deviation of six samples are less than 3%.

  12. An Environmental Focus Using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry and Ion Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salido, Arthur; Atterholt, Cynthia; Bacon, J. Roger; Butcher, David J.

    2003-01-01

    The Western Carolina University chemistry faculty have developed an environmental focus to their curriculum. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and ion chromatography (IC) have been shown to be useful tools for the determination of elements and ions, respectively. Several novel experiments have been developed monitoring these analytes in environmental samples, including water, pressure-treated wood, and nutritional supplements. In addition, ICP-OES and IC have been used to teach seniors the principles of analytical method development. Lastly, this equipment has been employed extensively in a vigorous research program.

  13. Chemical recoveries of technetium-99 for various procedures using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ihsanullah; East, B.W.

    1993-12-31

    The procedure for the determination of {sup 99}Tc inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was based on the modification of a variety of available separation techniques. Standard Ru and Rh solutions were used for checking decontaminations and instrument response respectively. Technetium-99 and {sup 95m}Tc tracers were applied as yield monitors using ICP-MS and gamma-ray spectrometry respectively. Percent recoveries are reported for a variety of radiochemical separation procedures for water (58-83%), seaweed (10-76%), and for soil matrices (19-79%).

  14. Inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching of III-nitride semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, A. P.; Laskar, M. R.; Rahman, A. A.; Gokhale, M. R.; Bhattacharya, A.

    2013-02-01

    III-Nitride semiconductor materials are resistant to most wet chemical etch processes, and hence the only viable alternative is to use dry etching for device processing. However, the conventional Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) process results in very slow etch-rates because of low reactive ion density, and larger surface damage due to high energy ion bombardment. Using Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) RIE, a very fast etch-rate and smooth morphology is achieved due to independent control of ion density and ion energy. In this paper, we present our results on ICP-RIE of epitaxial III-N materials, namely c-plane and a-plane oriented GaN, AlN, AlxGa1-xN using various chlorine plasma chemistries based on Cl2 and BCl3. We have examined the role of BCl3 deoxidising pre-treatment on the etching of AlGaN alloys.

  15. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurement of isotope ratios in depleted uranium contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Michael D

    2003-09-01

    Laser ablation of pressed soil pellets was examined as a means of direct sample introduction to enable inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) screening of soils for residual depleted uranium (DU) contamination. Differentiation between depleted uranium, an anthropogenic contaminant, and naturally occurring uranium was accomplished on the basis of measured 235U/238U isotope ratios. The amount of sample preparation required for laser ablation is considerably less than that typically required for aqueous sample introduction. The amount of hazardous laboratory waste generated is diminished accordingly. During the present investigation, 235U/238U isotope ratios measured for field samples were in good agreement with those derived from gamma spectrometry measurements. However, substantial compensation was required to mitigate the effects of impaired pulse counting attributed to sample inhomogeneity and sporadic introduction of uranium analyte into the plasma.

  16. Removal of model proteins by means of low-pressure inductively coupled plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kylián, O.; Rauscher, H.; Gilliland, D.; Brétagnol, F.; Rossi, F.

    2008-05-01

    Surgical instruments are intended to come into direct contact with the patients' tissues and thus interact with their first immune defence system. Therefore they have to be cleaned, sterilized and decontaminated, in order to prevent any kind of infections and inflammations or to exclude the possibility of transmission of diseases. From this perspective, the removal of protein residues from their surfaces constitutes new challenges, since certain proteins exhibit high resistance to commonly used sterilization and decontamination techniques and hence are difficult to remove without inducing major damages to the object treated. Therefore new approaches must be developed for that purpose and the application of non-equilibrium plasma discharges represents an interesting option. The possibility to effectively remove model proteins (bovine serum albumin, lysozyme and ubiquitin) from surfaces of different materials (Si wafer, glass, polystyrene and gold) by means of inductively coupled plasma discharges sustained in different argon containing mixtures is demonstrated and discussed in this paper.

  17. Multielement analysis of geologic materials by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, O.D.; Kroneman, R.L.; Capuano, R.M.

    1980-03-01

    Atomic emission spectroscopy using an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source permits the rapid acquisition of multielement geochemical data from a wide variety of geologic materials. Rocks or other solid samples are taken into solution with a four acid digestion procedure and introduced directly into the plasma; fluid samples are acidified or analyzed directly. The entire process is computer-controlled, fully-automated, and requires less than five minutes per sample for quantitative determination of 37 elements. The procedures and instrumentation employed at the ESL for multielement ICP analysis of geologic materials are described and these are intended as a guide for evaluating analytic results reported from this laboratory. The quality of geochemical data can be characterized by precision, limits of quantitative determination, and accuracy. Precision values are a measure of the repeatability of analyses. In general, major element and analyses have precision of better than 5% and trace elements of better than 10% of the amount present. (MHR)

  18. E→H mode transition density and power in two types of inductively coupled plasma configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Du, Yin-chang; Zhang, Xiao; Zheng, Zhe; Liu, Yu; Xu, Liang; Wang, Pi; Cao, Jin-xiang

    2014-07-15

    E → H transition power and density were investigated at various argon pressures in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) in a cylindrical interlaid chamber. The transition power versus the pressure shows a minimum transition power at 4 Pa (ν/ω=1) for argon. Then the transition density hardly changes at low pressures (ν/ω≪1), but it increases clearly when argon pressure exceeds an appropriate value. In addition, both the transition power and transition density are lower in the re-entrant configuration of ICP compared with that in the cylindrical configuration of ICP. The result may be caused from the decrease of stochastic heating in the re-entrant configuration of ICP. This work is useful to understand E → H mode transition and control the transition points in real plasma processes.

  19. Low-frequency, self-sustained oscillations in inductively coupled plasmas used for optical pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Coffer, J.; Encalada, N.; Huang, M.; Camparo, J.

    2014-10-28

    We have investigated very low frequency, on the order of one hertz, self-pulsing in alkali-metal inductively-coupled plasmas (i.e., rf-discharge lamps). This self-pulsing has the potential to significantly vary signal-to-noise ratios and (via the ac-Stark shift) resonant frequencies in optically pumped atomic clocks and magnetometers (e.g., the atomic clocks now flying on GPS and Galileo global navigation system satellites). The phenomenon arises from a nonlinear interaction between the atomic physics of radiation trapping and the plasma's electrical nature. To explain the effect, we have developed an evaporation/condensation theory (EC theory) of the self-pulsing phenomenon.

  20. Low-frequency, self-sustained oscillations in inductively coupled plasmas used for optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffer, J.; Encalada, N.; Huang, M.; Camparo, J.

    2014-10-01

    We have investigated very low frequency, on the order of one hertz, self-pulsing in alkali-metal inductively-coupled plasmas (i.e., rf-discharge lamps). This self-pulsing has the potential to significantly vary signal-to-noise ratios and (via the ac-Stark shift) resonant frequencies in optically pumped atomic clocks and magnetometers (e.g., the atomic clocks now flying on GPS and Galileo global navigation system satellites). The phenomenon arises from a nonlinear interaction between the atomic physics of radiation trapping and the plasma's electrical nature. To explain the effect, we have developed an evaporation/condensation theory (EC theory) of the self-pulsing phenomenon.

  1. Control of Internal Transport Barriers in Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panta, Soma; Newman, David; Sanchez, Raul; Terry, Paul

    2016-10-01

    In magnetic confinement fusion devices the best performance often involves some sort of transport barriers to reduce the energy and particle flow from core to edge. Those barriers create gradients in the temperature and density profiles. If gradients in the profiles are too steep that can lead to instabilities and the system collapses. Control of these barriers is therefore an important challenge for fusion devices (burning plasmas). In this work we focus on the dynamics of internal transport barriers. Using a simple 7 field transport model, extensively used for barrier dynamics and control studies, we explore the use of RF heating to control the local gradients and therefore the growth rates and shearing rates for barrier initiation and control in self-heated fusion plasmas. Ion channel barriers can be formed in self-heated plasmas with some NBI heating but electron channel barriers are very sensitive. They can be formed in self-heated plasmas with additional auxiliary heating i.e. NBI and radio-frequency(RF). Using RF heating on both electrons and ions at proper locations, electron channel barriers along with ion channel barriers can be formed and removed demonstrating a control technique. Investigating the role of pellet injection in controlling the barriers is our next goal. Work supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER54741.

  2. Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster Development and Testing at NASA-MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.

    2013-01-01

    THE inductive pulsed plasma thruster (IPPT) is an electrodeless space propulsion device where a capacitor is charged to an initial voltage and then discharged producing a high current pulse through a coil. The field produced by this pulse ionizes propellant, inductively driving current in a plasma located near the face of the coil. Once the plasma is formed it can be accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity by the electromagnetic Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the induced plasma current and the magnetic field produced by the current in the coil. In the present work, we present a summary of the IPPT research and development conducted at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). As a higher-power, still relatively low readiness level system, there are many issues associated with the eventual deployment and use of the IPPT as a primary propulsion system on spacecraft that remain to be addressed. The present program aimed to fabricate and test hardware to explore how these issues could be addressed. The following specific areas were addressed within the program and will be discussed within this paper. a) Conical theta-pinch IPPT geometry thruster configuration. b) Repetition-rate multi-kW thruster pulsing. c) Long-lifetime pulsed gas valve. d) Fast pulsed gas valve driver and controller. e) High-voltage, repetitive capacitor charging power processing unit. During the course of testing, a number of specific tests were conducted, including several that, to our knowledge, have either never been previously conducted (such as multi-KW repetition-rate operation) or have not been performed since the early 1990s (direct IPPT thrust measurements).2 Conical theta-pinch IPPT thrust stand measurements are presented in Fig. 1 while various time-integrated and time

  3. The Relation of Parental Guilt Induction to Child Internalizing Problems When a Caregiver Has a History of Depression.

    PubMed

    Rakow, Aaron; Forehand, Rex; McKee, Laura; Coffelt, Nicole; Champion, Jennifer; Fear, Jessica; Compas, Bruce

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between parental guilt induction and child internalizing problems in families where a caregiver had experienced depression. A total of 107 families, including 146 children (age 9-15), participated. Child-reported parental guilt induction, as well as three more traditionally studied parenting behaviors (warmth/involvement, monitoring, and discipline), were assessed, as was parent-report of child internalizing problem behavior. Linear Mixed Models Analysis indicated parental guilt induction was positively related to child internalizing problems in the context of the remaining three parenting behaviors. Implications of the findings for prevention and intervention parenting programs are considered.

  4. The Relation of Parental Guilt Induction to Child Internalizing Problems When a Caregiver Has a History of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Rakow, Aaron; McKee, Laura; Coffelt, Nicole; Champion, Jennifer; Fear, Jessica; Compas, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between parental guilt induction and child internalizing problems in families where a caregiver had experienced depression. A total of 107 families, including 146 children (age 9–15), participated. Child-reported parental guilt induction, as well as three more traditionally studied parenting behaviors (warmth/involvement, monitoring, and discipline), were assessed, as was parent-report of child internalizing problem behavior. Linear Mixed Models Analysis indicated parental guilt induction was positively related to child internalizing problems in the context of the remaining three parenting behaviors. Implications of the findings for prevention and intervention parenting programs are considered. PMID:20090863

  5. High sensitivity ultra-broad-band absorption spectroscopy of inductively coupled chlorine plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Daniil; Foucher, Mickaël; Campbell, Ewen; Brouard, Mark; Chabert, Pascal; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method to measure the densities of vibrationally excited Cl2(v) molecules in levels up to v  =  3 in pure chlorine inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs). The absorption continuum of Cl2 in the 250-450 nm spectral range is deconvoluted into the individual components originating from the different vibrational levels of the ground state, using a set of ab initio absorption cross sections. It is shown that gas heating at constant pressure is the major depletion mechanism of the Cl2 feedstock in the plasma. In these line-integrated absorption measurements, the absorption by the hot (and therefore rarefied) Cl2 gas in the reactor centre is masked by the cooler (and therefore denser) Cl2 near the walls. These radial gradients in temperature and density make it difficult to assess the degree of vibrational excitation in the centre of the reactor. The observed line-averaged vibrational distributions, when analyzed taking into account the radial temperature gradient, suggest that vibrational and translational degrees of freedom in the plasma are close to local equilibrium. This can be explained by efficient vibrational-translational (VT) relaxation between Cl2 and Cl atoms. Besides the Cl2(v) absorption band, a weak continuum absorption is observed at shorter wavelengths, and is attributed to photodetachment of Cl- negative ions. Thus, line-integrated densities of negative ions in chlorine plasmas can be directly measured using broad-band absorption spectroscopy.

  6. Measuring atomic oxygen densities and electron properties in an Inductively Coupled Plasma for thin film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehan, David; Gibson, Andrew; Booth, Jean-Paul; Wagenaars, Erik

    2016-09-01

    Plasma Enhanced Pulsed Laser Deposition (PE-PLD) is an advanced way of depositing thin films of oxide materials by using a laser to ablate a target, and passing the resulting plasma plume through a background Inductively-Coupled Plasma (ICP), instead of a background gas as is done in traditional PLD. The main advantage of PE-PLD is the control of film stoichiometry via the direct control of the reactive oxygen species in the ICP instead of relying on a neutral gas background. The aim is to deposit zinc oxide films from a zinc metal target and an oxygen ICP. In this work, we characterise the range of compositions of the reactive oxygen species achievable in ICPs; in particular the atomic oxygen density. The density of atomic oxygen has been determined within two ICPs of two different geometries over a range of plasma powers and pressures with the use of Energy Resolved Actinometry (ERA). ERA is a robust diagnostic technique with determines both the dissociation degree and average electron energy by comparing the excitation ratios of two oxygen and one argon transition. Alongside this the electron densities have been determined with the use of a hairpin probe. This work received financial support from the EPSRC, and York-Paris CIRC.

  7. Measurements of relative BCl density in BCl3-containing inductively coupled radio frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleddermann, C. B.; Hebner, G. A.

    1998-04-01

    The relative density of BCl radicals in inductively coupled plasmas has been studied using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and the BCl excited state has been studied using plasma-induced emission (PIE). Measurements were made as a function of input power, pressure, position, and as a function of gas ratio for industry-relevant metal-etch gas mixtures containing BCl3, Cl2, Ar, and N2. LIF was used to measure the ground state BCl population, whereas PIE monitored the BCl A1Π excited state; the LIF and PIE intensities varied differently as the plasma parameters were changed. Between 150 and 400 W input power at 20 mTorr pressure, there was no variation in BCl density, indicating that the dissociation fraction for BCl3 to BCl was constant with power. No significant interactions between BCl3 and Cl2 or Ar were evident in the LIF measurements. However, the BCl density was suppressed by addition of nitrogen to the plasma. The BCl density was radially uniform for all gas mixtures, but axial measurements showed a slight decrease in BCl density near the upper electrode. After running the reactor with a BCl3/N2 mixture, BCl was observed for up to an hour after the discharge was switched to Cl2: this is attributed to buildup of BN films on reactor surfaces and subsequent etching of the film by Cl.

  8. Nanostructure protein repellant amphiphilic copolymer coatings with optimized surface energy by Inductively Excited Low Pressure Plasma.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Sudhir; Pulpytel, Jérome; Ceccone, Giacomo; Lisboa, Patricia; Rossi, François; Kumar, Virendra; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh

    2011-12-06

    Statistically designed amphiphilic copolymer coatings were deposited onto Thermanox, Si wafer, and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) substrates via Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate and diethylene glycol vinyl ether in an Inductively Excited Low Pressure Plasma reactor. Plasma deposited amphiphilic coatings were characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, and Water Contact Angle techniques. The surface energy of the coatings can be adjusted between 12 and 70 mJ/m(2). The roughness of the coatings can be tailored depending on the plasma mode used. A very smooth coating was deposited with a CW (continuous wave) power, whereas a rougher surface with R(a) in the range of 2 to 12 nm was deposited with the PW (pulsed wave) mode. The nanometer scale roughness of amphiphilic PFDA-co-DEGVE coatings was found to be in the range of the size of the two proteins namely BSA and lysozyme used to examine for the antifouling properties of the surfaces. The results show that the statistically designed surfaces, presenting a surface energy around 25 mJ/m(2), present no adhesion with respect to both proteins measured by QCM.

  9. Thorium colloid analysis by single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Degueldre, C; Favarger, P-Y

    2004-04-19

    Thorium colloid analysis in water has been carried out by a single particle mode using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The flash of ions due to the ionisation of a thorium colloidal particle in the plasma torch can be detected and measured in a time scan for (232)Th (+ ) or (248)[ThO] (+ ) according to the sensitivity required by the mass spectrometer. The peaks of the recorded intensity of the MS signal can be analysed as a function of the particle size or fraction of the studied element in the colloid phase. The frequency of the flashes is directly proportional to the concentration of particles in the colloidal suspension. After discussing Th colloid detection, on the basis of the intensity of the ion flashes generated in the plasma torch, tests were performed on thorium dioxide colloidal particles. This feasibility study also describes the experimental conditions and the limitation of the plasma design to detect thorium colloids in a single particle analysis mode down to about 10fg.

  10. High Resolution Studies of the Origins of Polyatomic Ions in Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Jill Wisnewski

    2006-01-01

    The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) is an atmospheric pressure ionization source. Traditionally, the plasma is sampled via a sampler cone. A supersonic jet develops behind the sampler, and this region is pumped down to a pressure of approximately one Torr. A skimmer cone is located inside this zone of silence to transmit ions into the mass spectrometer. The position of the sampler and skimmer cones relative to the initial radiation and normal analytical zones of the plasma is key to optimizing the useful analytical signal [1]. The ICP both atomizes and ionizes the sample. Polyatomic ions form through ion-molecule interactions either in the ICP or during ion extraction [l]. Common polyatomic ions that inhibit analysis include metal oxides (MO+), adducts with argon, the gas most commonly used to make up the plasma, and hydride species. While high resolution devices can separate many analytes from common interferences, this is done at great cost in ion transmission efficiency--a loss of 99% when using high versus low resolution on the same instrument [2]. Simple quadrupole devices, which make up the bulk of ICP-MS instruments in existence, do not present this option. Therefore, if the source of polyatomic interferences can be determined and then manipulated, this could potentially improve the figures of merit on all ICP-MS devices, not just the high resolution devices often utilized to study polyatomic interferences.

  11. Mode transition in CF{sub 4} + Ar inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Gao, Fei; Zhao, Shu-Xia; Li, Xue-Chun; Wang, You-Nian

    2013-12-15

    The E to H mode transitions are studied by a hairpin probe and optical emission spectroscopy in inductively coupled CF{sub 4} + Ar plasmas. Electron density, optical emission intensity of Ar, and the voltage and current are measured during the E to H mode transitions. It is found that the electron density and plasma emission intensity increase continuously at low pressure during the E to H mode transition, while they jump up discontinuously at high pressure. Meanwhile, the transition threshold power and △P (the power interval between E and H mode) increase by increasing the pressure. When the ratio of CF{sub 4} increases, the E to H mode transition happens at higher applied power, and meanwhile, the △P also significantly increases. Besides, the effects of CF{sub 4} gas ratio on the plasma properties and the circuit electrical properties in both pure E and H modes were also investigated. The electron density and plasma emission intensity both decrease upon increasing the ratio of CF{sub 4} at the two modes, due to the stronger electrons loss scheme. The applied voltages at E and H modes both increase as increasing the CF{sub 4} gas ratio, however the applied current at two modes behave just oppositely with the gas ratio.

  12. Investigation of pyrolysis gas chemistry in an inductively coupled plasma facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillson, Corey C.

    The pyrolysis mechanics of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablators (PICA) makes it a valued material for use in thermal protection systems for spacecraft atmospheric re-entry. The present study of the interaction of pyrolysis gases and char with plasma gases in the boundary layer over PICA and its substrate, FiberForm, extends previous work on this topic that has been done in the UVM 30 kW Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Torch Facility. Exposure of these material samples separately to argon, nitrogen, oxygen, air, and carbon dioxide plasmas, and combinations of said test gases provides insight into the evolution of the pyrolysis gases as they react with the different environments. Measurements done to date include time-resolved absolute emission spectroscopy, location-based temperature response, flow characterization of temperature, enthalpy, and enthalpy flux, and more recently, spatially resolved and high-resolution emission spectroscopy, all of which provide measure of the characteristics of the pyrolysis chemistry and material response. Flow characterization tests construct an general knowledge of the test condition temperature, composition, and enthalpy. Tests with relatively inert argon plasmas established a baseline for the pyrolysis gases that leave the material. Key pyrolysis species such as CN Violet bands, NH, OH and Hydrogen Alpha (Hα) lines were seen with relative repeatability in temporal, spectral, and intensity values. Tests with incremental addition, and static mixtures, of reactive plasmas provided a preliminary image of how the gases interacted with atmospheric flows and other pyrolysis gases. Evidence of a temporal relationship between NH and Hα relating to nitrogen addition is seen, as well as a similar relationship between OH and Hα in oxygen based environments. Temperature analysis highlighted the reaction of the material to various flow conditions and displayed the in depth material response to argon and air/argon plasmas. The development

  13. A 5 kA pulsed power supply for inductive and plasma loads in large volume plasma device.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, P K; Singh, S K; Sanyasi, A K; Awasthi, L M; Mattoo, S K

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes 5 kA, 12 ms pulsed power supply for inductive load of Electron Energy Filter (EEF) in large volume plasma device. The power supply is based upon the principle of rapid sourcing of energy from the capacitor bank (2.8 F/200 V) by using a static switch, comprising of ten Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs). A suitable mechanism is developed to ensure equal sharing of current and uniform power distribution during the operation of these IGBTs. Safe commutation of power to the EEF is ensured by the proper optimization of its components and by the introduction of over voltage protection (>6 kV) using an indigenously designed snubber circuit. Various time sequences relevant to different actions of power supply, viz., pulse width control and repetition rate, are realized through optically isolated computer controlled interface.

  14. A 5 kA pulsed power supply for inductive and plasma loads in large volume plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes 5 kA, 12 ms pulsed power supply for inductive load of Electron Energy Filter (EEF) in large volume plasma device. The power supply is based upon the principle of rapid sourcing of energy from the capacitor bank (2.8 F/200 V) by using a static switch, comprising of ten Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs). A suitable mechanism is developed to ensure equal sharing of current and uniform power distribution during the operation of these IGBTs. Safe commutation of power to the EEF is ensured by the proper optimization of its components and by the introduction of over voltage protection (>6 kV) using an indigenously designed snubber circuit. Various time sequences relevant to different actions of power supply, viz., pulse width control and repetition rate, are realized through optically isolated computer controlled interface.

  15. Control of electron energy distribution by the power balance of the combined inductively and capacitively coupled RF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Seok; Lee, Ho-Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2016-09-01

    The control of electron energy probability function (EEPF) is important to control discharge characteristics in materials processing. For example, O radical density increases by changing the EEPF in O2 plasma, which provides high etching efficiency. The effect of the power balance between the capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) and the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) on the EEPF in Ar and O2 plasmas is investigated with a 1d3v (one-dimensional space and three-dimensional velocity domain) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation for the combined inductively and capacitively coupled plasmas. The combined effects of the transverse electromagnetic and the longitudinal electrostatic fields are solved in PIC simulation at the same time. In a pressure range of a few mTorr, high energy electrons (>5 eV) are heated by the capacitive power in the sheath while low energy electrons (<5 eV) are heated by the inductive power in the bulk region. The EEPF has bi-Maxwellian distribution when the CCP power is dominant, but it changes to Maxwellian-like distribution with increasing inductive power. Finally, the EEPF changes to Druyvesteyn-like distribution when the inductive power is dominant.

  16. Viscous effects on motion and heating of electrons in inductively coupled plasma reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; Bose, D.

    1999-10-01

    A transport model is developed for nonlocal effects on motion and heating of electrons in inductively coupled plasma reactors. The model is based on the electron momentum equation derived from the Boltzmann equation, retaining anisotropic stress components which in fact are viscous stresses. The resulting model consists of transport equations for the magnitude of electron velocity oscillation and terms representing energy dissipation due to viscous stresses in the electron energy equation. In this model, electrical current is obtained in a nonlocal manner due to viscous effects, instead of Ohm's law or the electron momentum equation without viscous effects, while nonlocal heating of electrons is represented by the viscous dissipation. Computational results obtained by two-dimensional numerical simulations show that nonlocal determination of electrical current indeed is important, and viscous dissipation becomes an important electron heating mechanism at low pressures. It is suspected that viscous dissipation in inductively coupled plasma reactors in fact represents stochastic heating of electrons, and this possibility is exploited by discussing physical similarities between stochastic heating and energy dissipation due to the stress tensor.

  17. Effect of an Additional, Parallel Capacitor on Pulsed Inductive Plasma Accelerator Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Sivak, Amy D.; Balla, Joseph V.

    2011-01-01

    A model of pulsed inductive plasma thrusters consisting of a set of coupled circuit equations and a one-dimensional momentum equation has been used to study the effects of adding a second, parallel capacitor into the system. The equations were nondimensionalized, permitting the recovery of several already-known scaling parameters and leading to the identification of a parameter that is unique to the particular topology studied. The current rise rate through the inductive acceleration coil was used as a proxy measurement of the effectiveness of inductive propellant ionization since higher rise rates produce stronger, potentially better ionizing electric fields at the coil face. Contour plots representing thruster performance (exhaust velocity and efficiency) and current rise rate in the coil were generated numerically as a function of the scaling parameters. The analysis reveals that when the value of the second capacitor is much less than the first capacitor, the performance of the two-capacitor system approaches that of the single-capacitor system. In addition, as the second capacitor is decreased in value the current rise rate can grow to be twice as great as the rise rate attained in the single capacitor case.

  18. Probabilistic Analysis of International Space Station Plasma Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddell, B.; Alred, J.; Kramer, L.; Mikatarian, R.; Minow, J.; Koontz, S.

    2005-12-01

    To date, the International Space Station (ISS) has been one of the largest objects flown in lower earth orbit (LEO). The ISS utilizes high voltage solar arrays (160V) that are negatively grounded leading to pressurized elements that can float negatively with respect to the plasma. Because laboratory measurements indicate a dielectric breakdown potential difference of 80V, arcing could occur on the ISS structure. To overcome the possibility of arcing and clamp the potential of the structure, two Plasma Contactor Units (PCUs) were designed, built, and flown. Also a limited amount of measurements of the floating potential for the present ISS configuration were made by a Floating Potential Probe (FPP), indicating a minimum potential of -24 Volts at the measurement location. A predictive tool, the ISS Plasma Interaction Model (PIM) has been developed accounting for the solar array electron collection, solar array mast wire and effective conductive area on the structure. The model has been used for predictions of the present ISS configuration. The conductive area has been inferred based on available floating potential measurements. Analysis of FPP and PCU data indicated distribution of the conductive area along the Russian segment of the ISS structure. A significant input to PIM is the plasma environment. The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI 2001) was initially used to obtain plasma temperature and density values. However, IRI provides mean parameters, leading to difficulties in interpretation of on-orbit data, especially at eclipse exit where maximum charging can occur. This limits our predicative capability. Satellite and Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR) data of plasma parameters have also been collected. Approximately 130,000 electron temperature (Te) and density (Ne) pairs for typical ISS eclipse exit conditions have been extracted from the reduced Langmuir probe data flown aboard the NASA DE-2 satellite. Additionally, another 18,000 Te and Ne pairs of ISR data

  19. Experimental measurement of plasma parameters and electron energy distribution in ferrite-core side type Ar/He inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Duksun; Bang, Jin-Young; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2012-10-01

    Spatial distributions of a plasma density and an effective electron temperature (Teff) were studied from the measurement of an electron energy probability function (EEPF) in the side type ferrite-core inductively coupled plasma with an argon-helium mixture. As the helium gas was diluted at the fixed total gas pressure of 5 mTorr in an argon discharge, the distribution of the plasma density was changed from a concave to a flat, and finally became a convex, while all spatial profiles of Teff were the hollow shapes with the helium dilution. This evolution of the plasma uniformity with the helium gas could be explained by the increased energy relaxation length and the changed plasma potential, indicating the transition of the electron kinetics from the local to non-local kinetics. From this result, it is expected that the addition of helium gas could be applied as a method to control the plasma uniformity in a large area plasma processing.

  20. Disentangling plasma interaction and induction signatures at Callisto: The Galileo C10 flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzo, Lucas; Simon, Sven; Feyerabend, Moritz; Motschmann, Uwe

    2016-09-01

    We apply a combination of data analysis and hybrid modeling to study Callisto's interaction with Jupiter's magnetosphere during the Galileo C10 flyby on 17 September 1997. This encounter took place while Callisto was located near the center of Jupiter's current sheet. Therefore, induction in Callisto's subsurface ocean and magnetospheric field line draping around the moon's ionosphere both made nonnegligible contributions to the observed magnetic perturbations. The induction signal during C10 was obscured by plasma currents to a significant degree, in contrast to previously studied Callisto flybys. Our analysis reveals that at large distances to Callisto, its magnetic environment was dominated by field line draping, leading to the formation of Alfvén wings. Closer to the surface and in Callisto's wake, Galileo encountered a quasi-dipolar "core region" that was partially shielded from the plasma interaction and was dominated by the induced field. When exiting this core region, the spacecraft crossed a rotational discontinuity where the magnetic field vector rotated by approximately 50°. The hybrid model is able to quantitatively explain numerous key features of the observed magnetic signatures, especially the transitions between draping- and dipole-dominated regimes along the C10 trajectory. The model also reproduces the electron number density enhancement by 3-4 orders of magnitude detected in Callisto's wake, requiring a substantial ionosphere to surround the moon during C10. For flybys with nonnegligible plasma currents, comprehensive knowledge of the incident flow conditions and properties of Callisto's atmosphere is required to refine existing constraints on the subsurface ocean (conductivity, thickness, and depth) based on magnetic field data. These findings are highly relevant for the upcoming JUpiter ICy moon Explorer (JUICE) mission, which will include multiple Callisto flybys.

  1. Determination of trace rare earth elements in gadolinium aluminate by inductively coupled plasma time of flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhijit; Deb, S. B.; Nagar, B. K.; Saxena, M. K.

    An analytical methodology was developed for the precise quantification of ten trace rare earth elements (REEs), namely, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, and Tm, in gadolinium aluminate (GdAlO3) employing an ultrasonic nebulizer (USN)-desolvating device based inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A microwave digestion procedure was optimized for digesting 100 mg of the refractory oxide using a mixture of sulphuric acid (H2SO4), phosphoric acid (H3PO4) and water (H2O) with 1400 W power, 10 min ramp and 60 min hold time. An USN-desolvating sample introduction system was employed to enhance analyte sensitivities by minimizing their oxide ion formation in the plasma. Studies on the effect of various matrix concentrations on the analyte intensities revealed that precise quantification of the analytes was possible with matrix level of 250 mg L- 1. The possibility of using indium as an internal standard was explored and applied to correct for matrix effect and variation in analyte sensitivity under plasma operating conditions. Individual oxide ion formation yields were determined in matrix matched solution and employed for correcting polyatomic interferences of light REE (LREE) oxide ions on the intensities of middle and heavy rare earth elements (MREEs and HREEs). Recoveries of ≥ 90% were achieved for the analytes employing standard addition technique. Three real samples were analyzed for traces of REEs by the proposed method and cross validated for Eu and Nd by isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). The results show no significant difference in the values at 95% confidence level. The expanded uncertainty (coverage factor 1σ) in the determination of trace REEs in the samples were found to be between 3 and 8%. The instrument detection limits (IDLs) and the method detection limits (MDLs) for the ten REEs lie in the ranges 1-5 ng L- 1 and 7-64 μg kg- 1 respectively.

  2. Deactivation of lipopolysaccharide by Ar and H2 inductively coupled low-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartis, E. A. J.; Barrett, C.; Chung, T.-Y.; Ning, N.; Chu, J.-W.; Graves, D. B.; Seog, J.; Oehrlein, G. S.

    2014-01-01

    Using an inductively coupled plasma system, we study the effects of direct plasma, plasma-generated high-energy photons in the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet (UV/VUV), and radical treatments on lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is a biomolecule found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and a potent stimulator of the immune system composed of polysaccharide and lipid A, which contains six aliphatic chains. LPS film thickness spun on silicon was monitored by ellipsometry while the surface chemistry was characterized before and after treatments by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Additionally, biological activity was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay under (a) a sensitive regime (sub-µM concentrations of LPS) and (b) a bulk regime (above µM concentrations of LPS) after plasma treatments. Direct plasma treatment causes rapid etching and deactivation of LPS in both Ar and H2 feed gases. To examine the effect of UV/VUV photons, a long-pass filter with a cut-off wavelength of 112 nm was placed over the sample. H2 UV/VUV treatment causes material removal and deactivation due to atomic and molecular UV/VUV emission while Ar UV/VUV treatment shows minimal effects as Ar plasma does not emit UV/VUV photons in the transmitted wavelength range explored. Interestingly, radical treatments remove negligible material but cause deactivation. Based on the amphiphilic structure of LPS, we expect a lipid A rich surface layer to form at the air-water interface during sample preparation with polysaccharide layers underneath. XPS shows that H2 plasma treatment under direct and UV/VUV conditions causes oxygen depletion through removal of C-O and O-C = O bonds in the films, which does not occur in Ar treatments. Damage to these groups can remove aliphatic chains that contribute to the pyrogenicity of LPS. Radical treatments from both Ar and H2 plasmas remove aliphatic carbon from the near-surface, demonstrating the important role of neutral species.

  3. Spatial and temporal evolution of negative ions in a pulsed inductively coupled hydrogen plasma source across a magnetic filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nulty, Stuart; Corr, Cormac

    2015-09-01

    Low-temperature electronegative plasmas have important applications in high-energy sources for fusion energy, plasma thrusters and materials processing. Neutral beam injection systems and space thruster technology such as the PEGASUS propulsion system rely on efficiently producing extractable negative ions. In this work we investigate the production of hydrogen negative ions in a pulsed inductively coupled plasma across a magnetic filter. The electron energy distribution function, plasma density and electron temperature are determined using an RF compensated Langmuir probe, and time-resolved laser photo-detachment is used to measure the negative ion fraction. The spatial and temporal evolution of these plasma parameters within the plasma source will be presented. Using a pulsed plasma and a magnetic filter, the electron temperature can be efficiently controlled and a higher density of negative ions compared to electrons can be obtained at certain locations within the source.

  4. Fundamental studies of the plasma extraction and ion beam formation processes in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Hongsen

    1995-02-10

    The fundamental and practical aspects are described for extracting ions from atmospheric pressure plasma sources into an analytical mass spectrometer. Methodologies and basic concepts of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are emphasized in the discussion, including ion source, sampling interface, supersonic expansion, slumming process, ion optics and beam focusing, and vacuum considerations. Some new developments and innovative designs are introduced. The plasma extraction process in ICP-MS was investigated by Langmuir measurements in the region between the skimmer and first ion lens. Electron temperature (Te) is in the range 2000--11000 K and changes with probe position inside an aerosol gas flow. Electron density (ne) is in the range 108--1010 -cm at the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 106--108 cm-3 near the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 106--108 cm-3 downstream further behind the skimmer. Electron density in the beam leaving the skimmer also depends on water loading and on the presence and mass of matrix elements. Axially resolved distributions of electron number-density and electron temperature were obtained to characterize the ion beam at a variety of plasma operating conditions. The electron density dropped by a factor of 101 along the centerline between the sampler and skimmer cones in the first stage and continued to drop by factors of 104--105 downstream of skimmer to the entrance of ion lens. The electron density in the beam expansion behind sampler cone exhibited a 1/z2 intensity fall-off (z is the axial position). An second beam expansion originated from the skimmer entrance, and the beam flow underwent with another 1/z2 fall-off behind the skimmer. Skimmer interactions play an important role in plasma extraction in the ICP-MS instrument.

  5. Measurements of Relative BCl Density in BCl_3-containing Inductively-Coupled rf Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleddermann, C. B.; Hebner, G. A.

    1997-10-01

    The relative density of BCl radicals in inductively-coupled plasmas has been studied using laser induced fluorescence and plasma induced emission. Measurements were made as a function of input power, reactor pressure, position in the reactor, and as a function of gas ratio for metal etch gas mixtures containing BCl_3, Cl_2, Ar, and N_2. The LIF and PIE intensities varied differently as the plasma parameters were changed. Between 150 and 400 W input power, there was no variation in BCl density, indicating that the dissociation fraction for BCl3 to BCl was constant with power. No significant interactions between BCl3 and Cl2 or Ar were evident in the LIF measurements. However, the BCl density decreased with addition of nitrogen. The BCl density was radially uniform for all gas mixtures. After running the reactor with a BCl_3/N2 mixture, BCl was observable for up to an hour after the discharge was switched to Cl_2, attributed to buildup of BN films on reactor surfaces.

  6. Effect of low-damage inductively coupled plasma on shallow nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Fávaro de Oliveira, Felipe; Momenzadeh, S. Ali; Wang, Ya; Denisenko, Andrej; Konuma, Mitsuharu; Markham, Matthew; Edmonds, Andrew M.; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2015-08-17

    Near-surface nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have been successfully employed as atomic-sized magnetic field sensors for external spins over the last years. A key challenge is still to develop a method to bring NV centers at nanometer proximity to the diamond surface while preserving their optical and spin properties. To that aim we present a method of controlled diamond etching with nanometric precision using an oxygen inductively coupled plasma process. Importantly, no traces of plasma-induced damages to the etched surface could be detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and confocal photoluminescence microscopy techniques. In addition, by profiling the depth of NV centers created by 5.0 keV of nitrogen implantation energy, no plasma-induced quenching in their fluorescence could be observed. Moreover, the developed etching process allowed even the channeling tail in their depth distribution to be resolved. Furthermore, treating a {sup 12}C isotopically purified diamond revealed a threefold increase in T{sub 2} times for NV centers with <4 nm of depth (measured by nuclear magnetic resonance signal from protons at the diamond surface) in comparison to the initial oxygen-terminated surface.

  7. Measuring ion velocity distribution functions through high-aspect ratio holes in inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunge, G.; Darnon, M.; Dubois, J.; Bezard, P.; Mourey, O.; Petit-Etienne, C.; Vallier, L.; Despiau-Pujo, E.; Sadeghi, N.

    2016-02-01

    Several issues associated with plasma etching of high aspect ratio structures originate from the ions' bombardment of the sidewalls of the feature. The off normal angle incident ions are primarily due to their temperature at the sheath edge and possibly to charging effects. We have measured the ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) at the wafer surface in an industrial inductively coupled plasma reactor by using multigrid retarding field analyzers (RFA) in front of which we place 400 μm thick capillary plates with holes of 25, 50, and 100 μm diameters. The RFA then probes IVDF at the exit of the holes with Aspect Ratios (AR) of 16, 8, and 4, respectively. The results show that the ion flux dramatically drops with the increase in AR. By comparing the measured IVDF with an analytical model, we concluded that the ion temperature is 0.27 eV in our plasma conditions. The charging effects are also observed and are shown to significantly reduce the ion energy at the bottom of the feature but only with a "minor" effect on the ion flux and the shape of the IVDF.

  8. Erosion behavior of CVD 3C silicon carbide in inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Mitchell R.

    2010-11-01

    An electrostatic, capacitively coupled Planar Ion Flux (PIF) probe has been developed as a sensor for use in high volume reactive ion etch (RIE) chambers. An important factor in the design is the material used for the probe collection area that is exposed to the plasma. For use in inductively coupled plasma chambers, bulk-deposited, 3C silicon carbide (SiC) was chosen. The primary objective of this work was to characterize the erosion behavior of the probe tip throughout repeated cycling for 100 RF hours (RFH). Surface morphology, roughness, and composition were documented at the beginning and end of cycling. In addition, the mass of the probe tip was documented three times throughout the experiment. This was used to calculate the wear rate which averaged ~100 mug/RFH. Although physical and chemical mechanisms were evident, it appears that preferential sputtering at pre-existing surface defects had the greatest influence on the erosion behavior. Additionally, an investigation into the sudden abnormal electrical behavior of the probe yielded the conclusion that the added capacitance of a deposited film reduces the number of data points in the ion saturation region used to fit the experimental data. This results in excessive values for extracted plasma parameters, most notably the electron temperature. However, this is only a temporary condition if the film can be removed.

  9. Metastable CF and CF2 molecules in CF4 inductively-coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Jean-Paul; Corr, Cormac

    2006-02-01

    The radicals CF and CF2, which are important intermediates in fluorocarbon plasma chemistry, both have low-lying metastable levels (4CF at 3.54 eV and 3CF2 at 2.46 eV). Recent calculations (Rozum et al 2006 J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data in press) indicate that electron-impact excitation of the ground-state radicals into these states could be fast. A recent study of inductively-coupled plasmas (ICP) in low-pressure CF4 (Booth et al 2005 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 14 273) indicated the presence of a fast electron-impact induced loss process for ground-state CF and CF2 molecules, which could be attributed to this process. In the current study 4CF and 3CF2 were detected in the afterglow of ICP in pure CF4 at pressures between 3 and 33 mTorr, from their weak forbidden optical emission back to their respective ground-states. From the lifetimes of these optical emission signals, determined as a function of gas pressure, the quenching coefficients at the chamber walls and the metastable destruction rates by gas-phase processes (giving unknown products) were estimated. Another prominent and long-lived feature of the afterglow is strong emission from the d state of C2 molecules: the emitting C2 molecules may be produced by chemiluminescent reactions or by excitation transfer from 3CF2.

  10. Construction of a Compact, Low-Inductance, 100 J Dense Plasma Focus for Yield Optimization Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christopher; Povilus, Alex; Chapman, Steven; Falabella, Steve; Podpaly, Yuri; Shaw, Brian; Liu, Jason; Schmidt, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    A new 100 J mini dense plasma focus (DPF) is constructed to optimize neutron yields for a variety of plasma conditions and anode shapes. The device generates neutrons by leveraging instabilities that occur during a z-pinch in a plasma sheath to accelerate a beam of deuterium ions into a background deuterium gas target. The features that distinguish this miniDPF from previous 100 J devices are a compact, engineered electrode geometry and a low-impedance driver. The driving circuit inductance is minimized by mounting the capacitors close to the back of the anode and cathode < 20 cm away, increasing the breakdown current and yields. The anode can rapidly be changed out to test new designs. The neutron yield and 2D images of the visible light emission are compared to simulations with the hybrid kinetic code LSP which can directly simulate the device and anode designs. Initial studies of the sheath physics and neutron yields for a scaling of discharge voltages and neutral fill pressures are presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Vibrational kinetics in Cl2 and O2 low-pressure inductively-coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Jean-Paul; Foucher, Mickael; Marinov, Daniil; Chabert, Pascal; Annusova, Anna; Guerra, Vasco; Agarwal, Ankur; Rauf, Shahid

    2015-09-01

    Low energy electron interactions with molecules via resonances can cause vibrational excitation (affecting chemical kinetics), electron energy loss and modification of the EEDF. However, with the exception of N2 and H2 plasmas, very little attention has been paid to this subject. We have implemented a novel high-sensitivity ultra-broadband UV absorption bench, allowing spectra to be recorded with noise as low as 2×10-5 over a 250 nm wavelength range, and recording of complete vibronic bands. We applied this to radiofrequency inductively-coupled plasmas in low pressure (5-50 mTorr) pure O2 and pure Cl2. In O2 plasmas we surprisingly observe highly vibrationally excited O2 (v'' up to 18) via B-X Schumann-Runge bands. Cl2 molecules show a broad UV absorption spectrum in the region 250-400 nm, with distinctly different absorption spectra for vibrationally excited molecules. However, only a small fraction of the Cl2 molecules were observed in vibrationally excited states and the vibrational temperature is close to equilibrium with the local gas translational temperature (up to 1000 K), in contrast to O2. We are currently working on global models with vibrational kinetics to explain these results. Work supported by LABEX Plas@par (ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02), and Applied Materials.

  12. The internal magnetic field distribution, and single exponential magnetic resonance free induction decay, in rocks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan; Marble, Andrew E; Colpitts, Bruce G; Balcom, Bruce J

    2005-08-01

    When fluid saturated porous media are subjected to an applied uniform magnetic field, an internal magnetic field, inside the pore space, is induced due to magnetic susceptibility differences between the pore-filling fluid and the solid matrix. The microscopic distribution of the internal magnetic field, and its gradients, was simulated based on the thin-section pore structure of a sedimentary rock. The simulation results were verified experimentally. We show that the 'decay due to diffusion in internal field' magnetic resonance technique may be applied to measure the pore size distribution in partially saturated porous media. For the first time, we have observed that the internal magnetic field and its gradients in porous rocks have a Lorentzian distribution, with an average gradient value of zero. The Lorentzian distribution of internal magnetic field arises from the large susceptibility contrast and an intrinsic disordered pore structure in these porous media. We confirm that the single exponential magnetic resonance free induction decay commonly observed in fluid saturated porous media arises from a Lorentzian internal field distribution. A linear relationship between the magnetic resonance linewidth, and the product of the susceptibility difference in the porous media and the applied magnetic field, is observed through simulation and experiment.

  13. Multiplex bio-assay with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Towards a massively multivariate single-cell technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Scott D.; Ornatsky, Olga; Bandura, Dmitry R.; Baranov, Vladimir I.

    2007-03-01

    Recent progress in the development of massively multiplexed bioanalytical assays using element tags with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection is reviewed. Feasibility results using commercially available secondary immunolabeling reagents for leukemic cell lines are presented. Multiplex analysis of higher order is shown with first generation tag reagents based on functionalized carriers that bind lanthanide ions. DNA quantification using metallointercalation allows for cell enumeration or mitotic state differentiation. In situ hybridization permits the determination of cellular RNA. The results provide a feasibility basis for the development of a multivariate assay tool for individual cell analysis based on inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in a cytometer configuration.

  14. Simulation and experimental studies on plasma temperature, flow velocity, and injector diameter effects for an inductively coupled plasma.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Helmut; Murtazin, Ayrat; Groh, Sebastian; Niemax, Kay; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2011-12-15

    An inductively coupled plasma (ICP) is analyzed by means of experiments and numerical simulation. Important plasma properties are analyzed, namely, the effective temperature inside the central channel and the mean flow velocity inside the plasma. Furthermore, the effect of torches with different injector diameters is studied by the model. The temperature inside the central channel is determined from the end-on collected line-to-background ratio in dependence of the injector gas flow rates. Within the limits of 3% deviation, the results of the simulation and the experiments are in good agreement in the range of flow rates relevant for the analysis of relatively large droplets, i.e., ∼50 μm. The deviation increases for higher gas flow rates but stays below 6% for all flow rates studied. The velocity of the gas inside the coil region was determined by side-on analyte emission measurements with single monodisperse droplet introduction and by the analysis of the injector gas path lines in the simulation. In the downstream region significantly higher velocities were found than in the upstream region in both the simulation and the experiment. The quantitative values show good agreement in the downstream region. In the upstream region, deviations were found in the absolute values which can be attributed to the flow conditions in that region and because the methods used for velocity determination are not fully consistent. Eddy structures are found in the simulated flow lines. These affect strongly the way taken by the path lines of the injector gas and they can explain the very long analytical signals found in the experiments at low flow rates. Simulations were performed for different injector diameters in order to find conditions where good analyte transport and optimum signals can be expected. The results clearly show the existence of a transition flow rate which marks the lower limit for effective analyte transport conditions through the plasma. A rule

  15. Interlaboratory evaluation of trace element determination in workplace air filter samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry†‡

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Stanley A.; Brisson, Michael J.; Howe, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is becoming more widely used for trace elemental analysis in the occupational hygiene field, and consequently new ICP-MS international standard procedures have been promulgated by ASTM International and ISO. However, there is a dearth of interlaboratory performance data for this analytical methodology. In an effort to fill this data void, an interlaboratory evaluation of ICP-MS for determining trace elements in workplace air samples was conducted, towards fulfillment of method validation requirements for international voluntary consensus standard test methods. The study was performed in accordance with applicable statistical procedures for investigating interlaboratory precision. The evaluation was carried out using certified 37-mm diameter mixed-cellulose ester (MCE) filters that were fortified with 21 elements of concern in occupational hygiene. Elements were spiked at levels ranging from 0.025 to 10 μg filter−1, with three different filter loadings denoted “Low”, “Medium” and “High”. Participating laboratories were recruited from a pool of over fifty invitees; ultimately twenty laboratories from Europe, North America and Asia submitted results. Triplicates of each certified filter with elemental contents at three different levels, plus media blanks spiked with reagent, were conveyed to each volunteer laboratory. Each participant was also provided a copy of the test method which each participant was asked to follow; spiking levels were unknown to the participants. The laboratories were requested to prepare the filters by one of three sample preparation procedures, i.e., hotplate digestion, microwave digestion or hot block extraction, which were described in the test method. Participants were then asked to analyze aliquots of the prepared samples by ICP-MS, and to report their data in units of μg filter−1. Most interlaboratory precision estimates were acceptable for medium- and high

  16. Automation of preparation of nonmetallic samples for analysis by atomic absorption and inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittmann, A.; Willay, G.

    1986-01-01

    For a rapid preparation of solutions intended for analysis by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry or atomic absorption spectrometry, an automatic device called Plasmasol was developed. This apparatus used the property of nonwettability of glassy C to fuse the sample in an appropriate flux. The sample-flux mixture is placed in a composite crucible, then heated at high temperature, swirled until full dissolution is achieved, and then poured into a water-filled beaker. After acid addition, dissolution of the melt, and filling to the mark, the solution is ready for analysis. The analytical results obtained, either for oxide samples or for prereduced iron ores show that the solutions prepared with this device are undistinguished from those obtained by manual dissolutions done by acid digestion or by high temperature fusion. Preparation reproducibility and analytical tests illustrate the performance of Plasmasol.

  17. Kinetic analysis of negative power deposition in inductive low pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Negative power deposition in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) is investigated by means of an analytical model which couples Boltzmann’s equation and the quasi-stationary Maxwell’s equations. Exploiting standard Hilbert space methods an explicit solution for both, the electric field and the distribution function of the electrons for a bounded discharge configuration subject to an unsymmetrical excitation is found for the first time. The model is applied to a low pressure ICP discharge. In this context particularly the anomalous skin effect and the effect of phase mixing is discussed. The analytical solution is compared with results from electromagnetic full wave particle in cell simulations. Excellent agreement between the analytical and the numerical results is found.

  18. Anisotropic Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} waveguide etching using inductively coupled plasma etching

    SciTech Connect

    Muttalib, Muhammad Firdaus A. Chen, Ruiqi Y.; Pearce, Stuart J.; Charlton, Martin D. B.

    2014-07-01

    Smooth and vertical sidewall profiles are required to create low loss rib and ridge waveguides for integrated optical device and solid state laser applications. In this work, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching processes are developed to produce high quality low loss tantalum pentoxide (Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}) waveguides. A mixture of C{sub 4}F{sub 8} and O{sub 2} gas are used in combination with chromium (Cr) hard mask for this purpose. In this paper, the authors make a detailed investigation of the etch process parameter window. Effects of process parameters such as ICP power, platen power, gas flow, and chamber pressure on etch rate and sidewall slope angle are investigated. Chamber pressure is found to be a particularly important factor, which can be used to tune the sidewall slope angle and so prevent undercut.

  19. [Study on the determination of trace elements in bitter almond by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Wei; Xie, Hua-Lin; Nie, Xi-Du

    2013-05-01

    Samples of bitter almond were digested by microwave digestion, and trace elements amounts of B, Na, Mg, Al, P, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Mo, Cd, Ba and Pb in sample solutions were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). HNO3 + H2O2 was used to achieve the complete decomposition of the organic matrix in a closed-vessel microwave oven. The working parameters of the instrument were optimized. The result showed that the relative standard deviation (RSD) was less than 4.79% for all the elements, and the recovery was 90.00%-109.30% by adding standard recovery experiment. This method was simple, sensitive and precise and can perform simultaneo multi-elements determination for bitter almond, which could satisfy the sample examination request and provide scientific rationale for determining inorganic elements in bitter almond.

  20. Assessment of the analytical capabilities of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, H.E.; Garbarino, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    A thorough assessment of the analytical capabilities of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was conducted for selected analytes of importance in water quality applications and hydrologic research. A multielement calibration curve technique was designed to produce accurate and precise results in analysis times of approximately one minute. The suite of elements included Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, V, and Zn. The effects of sample matrix composition on the accuracy of the determinations showed that matrix elements (such as Na, Ca, Mg, and K) that may be present in natural water samples at concentration levels greater than 50 mg/L resulted in as much as a 10% suppression in ion current for analyte elements. Operational detection limits are presented.

  1. Single and Multi-Pulse Low-Energy Conical Theta Pinch Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, A. K.; Martin, A. K.; Polzin, K. A.; Kimberlin, A. C.; Eskridge, R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Impulse bits produced by conical theta-pinch inductive pulsed plasma thrusters possessing cone angles of 20deg, 38deg, and 60deg, were quantified for 500J/pulse operation by direct measurement using a hanging-pendulum thrust stand. All three cone angles were tested in single-pulse mode, with the 38deg model producing the highest impulse bits at roughly 1 mN-s operating on both argon and xenon propellants. A capacitor charging system, assembled to support repetitively-pulsed thruster operation, permitted testing of the 38deg thruster at a repetition-rate of 5 Hz at power levels of 0.9, 1.6, and 2.5 kW. The average thrust measured during multiple-pulse operation exceeded the value obtained when the single-pulse impulse bit is multiplied by the repetition rate.

  2. Accurate determination of silver nanoparticles in animal tissues by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veverková, Lenka; Hradilová, Šárka; Milde, David; Panáček, Aleš; Skopalová, Jana; Kvítek, Libor; Petrželová, Kamila; Zbořil, Radek

    2014-12-01

    This study examined recoveries of silver determination in animal tissues after wet digestion by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The composition of the mineralization mixture for microwave assisted digestion was optimized and the best recoveries were obtained for mineralization with HNO3 and addition of HCl promptly after digestion. The optimization was performed on model samples of chicken meat spiked with silver nanoparticles and a solution of ionic silver. Basic calculations of theoretical distribution of Ag among various silver-containing species were implemented and the results showed that most of the silver is in the form of soluble complexes AgCl2- and AgCl32 - for the optimized composition of the mineralization mixture. Three animal tissue certified reference materials were then analyzed to verify the trueness and precision of the results.

  3. Determination of mercury in fish samples by slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Ming-Jyh; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen; Li, Yi-Ching

    1997-06-01

    Ultrasonic slurry sampling electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (USS-ETV-ICP-MS) has been applied to the determination of mercury in several fish samples. The effects of instrument operating conditions and slurry preparation on the ion signals are reported. Palladium was used as modifier to delay the vaporization of mercury in this study. As the vaporization behavior of mercury in fish slurry and aqueous solution is quite different, the standard addition method was used for the determination of mercury in reference materials. The detection limit of mercury estimated from the standard addition curve was in the range 0.002-0.004 μg g -1 for different samples. This method has been applied to the determination of mercury in dogfish muscle reference material (DORM-1 and DORM-2) and dogfish liver reference material (DOLT-1). Accuracy was better than 4% and precision was better than 7% with the USS-ETV-ICP-MS method.

  4. Neutralization efficiency estimation in a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vozniy, O. V.; Yeom, G. Y.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the optimal conditions of neutral beam generation to maintain a high degree of neutralization and focusing during beam energy variation for a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma with a three-grid ion beam acceleration system. The neutral beam energy distribution was estimated by measuring the energy profiles of ions that 'survived' the neutralization after reflection. The energy measurements of the primary and reflected ions showed narrow distribution functions, each with only one peak. At higher beam energies, both the ratio of the ion energy loss to the primary energy and the degree of energy divergence decreased, confirming the precise alignment of the neutral beam. The neutralization efficiency of the neutral beam source with a three-grid acceleration system was found to be affected mainly by the beam angle divergence rather than by the particle translation energy.

  5. Inductively Coupled Plasma: Fundamental Particle Investigations with Laser Ablation and Applications in Magnetic Sector Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Saetveit, Nathan Joe

    2008-01-01

    Particle size effects and elemental fractionation in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are investigated with nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation, differential mobility analysis, and magnetic sector ICP-MS. Laser pulse width was found to have a significant influence on the LA particle size distribution and the elemental composition of the aerosol and thus fractionation. Emission from individual particles from solution nebulization, glass, and a pressed powder pellet are observed with high speed digital photography. The presence of intact particles in an ICP is shown to be a likely source of fractionation. A technique for the online detection of stimulated elemental release from neural tissue using magnetic sector ICP-MS is described. Detection limits of 1 μg L-1 or better were found for P, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn in a 60 μL injection in a physiological saline matrix.

  6. [Study on the determination of 14 inorganic elements in coffee by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Nie, Xi-Du; Fu, Liang

    2013-07-01

    Samples of coffee were digested by microwave digestion, and inorganic elements amounts of Na, Mg, P, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Mo and Pb in sample solutions were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). HNO3 + H2O2 was used to achieve the complete decomposition of the organic matrix in a closed-vessel microwave oven. The working parameters of the instrument were optimized. The results showed that the relative standard deviation (RSD) was less than 3.84% for all the elements, and the recovery was found to be 92.00% -106.52% by adding standard recovery experiment. This method was simple, sensitive and precise and can perform simultaneous multi-elements determination of coffee, which could satisfy the sample examination request and provide scientific rationale for determining inorganic elements of coffee.

  7. Inductively coupled plasma etching of HgCdTe IRFPAs detectors at cryogenic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Y.; Ye, Z. H.; Sun, C. H.; Zhang, S.; Hu, X. N.; Ding, R. J.; He, L.

    2016-05-01

    To fabricate various advanced structures with HgCdTe material, the Inductively Coupled Plasma enhanced Reactive Ion Etching system is indispensable. However, due to low damage threshold and complicated behaviors of mercury in HgCdTe, the lattice damage and induced electrical conversion is very common. According to the diffusion model during etching period, the mercury interstitials, however, may not diffuse deep into the material at cryogenic temperature. In this report, ICP etching of HgCdTe at cryogenic temperature was implemented. The etching system with cryogenic assembly is provided by Oxford Instrument. The sample table was cooled down to 123K with liquid nitrogen. The mask of SiO2 with a contact layer of ZnS functioned well at this temperature. The selectivity and etching velocity maintained the same as reported in the etching of room temperature. Smooth and clean surfaces and profiles were achieved with an optimized recipe.

  8. Induction thermal plasma synthesis of lithium oxide composite nanoparticles with a spinel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Hirotaka; Kageyama, Takuya; Tanaka, Manabu; Okamoto, Daisuke; Watanabe, Takayuki

    2016-07-01

    Li-Mn composite oxide nanoparticles are synthesized using an induction thermal plasma, and the formation mechanism is investigated on the basis of the homogenous nucleation rate and thermodynamic considerations. Under a high O2 partial pressure, MnO crystals nucleate and Li oxide condenses on MnO nuclei at a relatively high rate, forming LiMn2O4 in a single phase. On the other hand, under a low partial pressure of O2, LiMnO2 is obtained owing to the low condensation rate of Li oxide. This study presents the successful selective synthesis of LiMn2O4 nanoparticles by controlling the partial pressure of O2.

  9. Reaction Simulation and Experiment of a Cl2/Ar Inductively Coupled Plasma for Etching of Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jie; Liu, Xuan; Yang, Yi; Song, Yixu; Ren, Tianling

    2014-05-01

    As the key feature size keeps shrinking down, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) has been widely used for etching. In this study, a commercial ICP etcher filled with Cl2/Ar mixture was simulated. The simulation was based on a commercial software CFD-ACE+, which is a multi-module solver. For the simulation part, CFD-ACE module was used for reactor scale and CFD-TOPO module was used for feature scale simulation. We have reached a reasonable agreement between the simulative and experimental results. Specifically, the different causes of sidewall bowing and microtrenching were discussed. We also analyzed the causes of special profile as trench width scaling down. Moreover, the agreement validates correctness of the chemistry mechanism, so it can be used as guidance for the process designing and manufacturing equipment improvement.

  10. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometric determination of minerals in catfish frame.

    PubMed

    Losso, Jack N; Munene, Cate N; Moody, Michael W

    2003-10-01

    The concentration of 14 major and trace elements in catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) frames was determined and analyzed for differences. Three frames were obtained each week for five consecutive weeks in the spring and the fall of 2000. The frames were freed of remaining flesh, dried, treated by microwave dissolution technique and the minerals determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The mean calcium concentration (mg/kg, dry basis) in the spring (140400) was not significantly (P > 0.05) different from that in fall (167000). Among the heavy metals (Cd, Pb, and Al) the concentration of Cd varied significantly (P < 0.05) from week to week but not from season to season. The concentration of all the above-mentioned heavy metals did not exceed the critical level for human consumption.

  11. Pulsed radio-frequency discharge inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for oxide analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weifeng; Yin, Zhibin; Hang, Wei; Li, Bin; Huang, Benli

    2016-08-01

    A direct solid sampling technique has been developed based on a pulsed radio-frequency discharge (RFD) in mixture of N2 and Ar environment at atmospheric pressure. With an averaged input power of 65 W, a crater with the diameter of 80 μm and depth of 50 μm can be formed on sample surface after discharge for 1 min, suggesting the feasibility of the pulsed RFD for sampling nonconductive solids. Combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), this technique allows to measure elemental composition of solids directly with relative standard deviation (RSD) of ~ 20%. Capability of quantitative analysis was demonstrated by the use of soil standards and artificial standards. Good calibration linearity and limits of detection (LODs) in range of 10- 8-10- 9 g/g were achieved for most elements.

  12. Separation of actinides using capillary extraction chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Dominic S

    2008-01-01

    Trace levels of actinides have been separated on extraction chromatography columns. Detection of the actinides was achieved using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS), which was coupled with the extraction chromatography system. In this study we compare 30 cm long, 4.6 mm ID columns to capillary columns (750 {micro}m ID) with lengths from 30 cm up to 150 cm. The columns that were tested were packed with TRU resin. We were able to separate a mixture of five actinides ({sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}pU, {sup 241}Am). This work has application to rapid bioassay as well as for automated separations of actinide materials.

  13. Development of analytical methods for multiplex bio-assay with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ornatsky, Olga I; Kinach, Robert; Bandura, Dmitry R; Lou, Xudong; Tanner, Scott D; Baranov, Vladimir I; Nitz, Mark; Winnik, Mitchell A

    2008-01-01

    Advances in the development of highly multiplexed bio-analytical assays with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection are discussed. Use of novel reagents specifically designed for immunological methods utilizing elemental analysis is presented. The major steps of method development, including selection of elements for tags, validation of tagged reagents, and examples of multiplexed assays, are considered in detail. The paper further describes experimental protocols for elemental tagging of antibodies, immunostaining of live and fixed human leukemia cells, and preparation of samples for ICP-MS analysis. Quantitative analysis of surface antigens on model cell lines using a cocktail of seven lanthanide labeled antibodies demonstrated high specificity and concordance with conventional immunophenotyping.

  14. Stable isotope dilution analysis of hydrologic samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garbarino, J.R.; Taylor, H.E.

    1987-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is employed in the determination of Ni, Cu, Sr, Cd, Ba, Ti, and Pb in nonsaline, natural water samples by stable isotope dilution analysis. Hydrologic samples were directly analyzed without any unusual pretreatment. Interference effects related to overlapping isobars, formation of metal oxide and multiply charged ions, and matrix composition were identified and suitable methods of correction evaluated. A comparability study snowed that single-element isotope dilution analysis was only marginally better than sequential multielement isotope dilution analysis. Accuracy and precision of the single-element method were determined on the basis of results obtained for standard reference materials. The instrumental technique was shown to be ideally suited for programs associated with certification of standard reference materials.

  15. Multi-elemental analysis of aqueous geological samples by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todorov, Todor I.; Wolf, Ruth E.; Adams, Monique

    2014-01-01

    Typically, 27 major, minor, and trace elements are determined in natural waters, acid mine drainage, extraction fluids, and leachates of geological and environmental samples by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). At the discretion of the analyst, additional elements may be determined after suitable method modifications and performance data are established. Samples are preserved in 1–2 percent nitric acid (HNO3) at sample collection or as soon as possible after collection. The aqueous samples are aspirated into the ICP-OES discharge, where the elemental emission signals are measured simultaneously for 27 elements. Calibration is performed with a series of matrix-matched, multi-element solution standards.

  16. Effect of the electron energy distribution on total energy loss with argon in inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, June Young; Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-01-15

    The total energy lost per electron-ion pair lost ε{sub T} is investigated with the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The EEDFs are measured at various argon powers in RF inductively coupled plasma, and the EEDFs show a depleted distribution (a discontinuity occurring at the minimum argon excitation threshold energy level) with the bulk temperature and the tail temperature. The total energy loss per electron-ion pair lost ε{sub T} is calculated from a power balance model with the Maxwellian EEDFs and the depleted EEDFs and then compared with the measured ε{sub T} from the floating probe. It is concluded that the small population of the depleted high energy electrons dramatically increases the collisional energy loss, and the calculated ε{sub T} from the depleted EEDFs has a value that is similar to the measured ε{sub T}.

  17. Radionuclide detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: A comparison of atomic and radiation detection method

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.R.; Wyse, E.J.; Koppenaal, D.W.

    1991-04-01

    Radionuclide detection by mass spectrometric techniques offers inherent advantages over conventional radiation detection methods. Since radionuclides decay at variable rates (half-lives) and via various nuclear transformations (i.e. emission of alpha, beta, and/or gamma radiation) their determination via radiation detection depends not only on decay systematics but also on detector technology. Radionuclide detection by direct atom measurement, however, is dependent only on technique sensitivity and is indifferent to decay mode. Evaluation of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) indicates this method to be superior conventional radiation detection techniques for many radionuclides. This work discusses factors which influence detection by both methods. Illustrative applications of ICP/MS to the ultra-trace determination of several radionuclides, including {sup 129}I, are presented. 20 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. HPLC with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometric detection for the analysis of inositol phosphates.

    PubMed

    Amaro, Rosa; Escalona, Andrés; Murillo, Miguel

    2004-10-01

    The use of inductively coupled plasma optimal emission spectroscopy as a detector for the high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of inositol phosphates is studied. It is found that separation of different inositol phosphates with a mobile phase consisting of tetraethylammonium (0.14%, w/v), methanol (5%, v/v), and formic acid (0.18%, w/v) may be obtained on a PRP-1 column with an analysis time of 18 min. In addition, high specificity and sensitivity of the detection system used permits detection of the inositol phosphates from bi- to hexaphosphate free from interference of other chromatographic peaks, which could be from the sample or mobile phase. Additionally, it is possible to use less sample because of the high sensitivity of the detection system.

  19. Automated standardization technique for an inductively-coupled plasma emission spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garbarino, J.R.; Taylor, H.E.

    1982-01-01

    The manifold assembly subsystem described permits real-time computer-controlled standardization and quality control of a commercial inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. The manifold assembly consists of a branch-structured glass manifold, a series of microcomputer-controlled solenoid valves, and a reservoir for each standard. Automated standardization involves selective actuation of each solenoid valve that permits a specific mixed standard solution to be pumped to the nebulizer of the spectrometer. Quality control is based on the evaluation of results obtained for a mixed standard containing 17 analytes, that is measured periodically with unknown samples. An inaccurate standard evaluation triggers restandardization of the instrument according to a predetermined protocol. Interaction of the computer-controlled manifold assembly hardware with the spectrometer system is outlined. Evaluation of the automated standardization system with respect to reliability, simplicity, flexibility, and efficiency is compared to the manual procedure. ?? 1982.

  20. Determination of metals in composite diet samples by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Lisa Jo; Morgan, Jeffrey N; Fernando, Reshan; Pellizzari, Edo D; Akinbo, Olujide

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the applicability of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) techniques for determination of metals in composite diets. Aluminum, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, manganese, nickel, vanadium, and zinc were determined by this method. Atmospheric pressure microwave digestion was used to solubilize analytes in homogenized composite diet samples, and this procedure was followed by ICP-MS analysis. Recovery of certified elements from standard reference materials ranged from 92 to 119% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 0.4-1.9%. Recovery of elements from fortified composite diet samples ranged from 75 to 129% with RSDs of 0-11.3%. Limits of detection ranged from 1 to 1700 ng/g; high values were due to significant amounts of certain elements naturally present in composite diets. Results of this study demonstrate that low-resolution quadrupole-based ICP-MS provides precise and accurate measurements of the elements tested in composite diet samples.

  1. Measurement of lanthanum and technetium in uranium fuels by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, K.; Crane, P.; Cummings, D.; Krsul, J.; McKnight, R.

    1999-06-10

    An important parameter in characterizing an irradiated nuclear fuel is determining the amount of uranium fissioned. By determining the amount of uranium fissioned in the fuel a burnup performance parameter can be calculated, and the amount of fission products left in the fuel can be predicted. The quantity of uranium fissioned can be calculated from the amount of lanthanum and technetium present in the fuel. Lanthanum and technetium were measured in irradiated fuel samples using an Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) instrument and separation equipment located in a shielded glove-box. A discussion of the method, interferences, detection limits, quality control and a comparison to other work will be presented.

  2. Atlas of Atomic Spectral Lines of Neptunium Emitted by Inductively Coupled Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    DeKalb, E.L. and Edelson, M. C.

    1987-08-01

    Optical emission spectra from high-purity Np-237 were generated with a glovebox-enclosed inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. Spectra covering the 230-700 nm wavelength range are presented along with general commentary on the methodology used in collecting the data. The Ames Laboratory Nuclear Safeguards and Security Program has been charged with the task of developing optical spectroscopic methods to analyze the composition of spent nuclear fuels. Such materials are highly radioactive even after prolonged 'cooling' and are chemically complex. Neptunium (Np) is a highly toxic by-product of nuclear power generation and is found, in low abundance, in spent nuclear fuels. This atlas of the optical emission spectrum of Np, as produced by an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectroscopic source, is part of a general survey of the ICP emission spectra of the actinide elements. The ICP emission spectrum of the actinides originates almost exclusively from the electronic relaxation of excited, singly ionized species. Spectral data on the Np ion emission spectrum (i.e., the Np II spectrum) have been reported by Tomkins and Fred [1] and Haaland [2]. Tomkins and Fred excited the Np II spectrum with a Cu spark discharge and identified 114 Np lines in the 265.5 - 436.3 nm spectral range. Haaland, who corrected some spectral line misidentifications in the work of Tomkins and Fred, utilized an enclosed Au spark discharge to excite the Np II spectrum and reported 203 Np lines within the 265.4 - 461.0 nm wavelength range.

  3. Analysis of non-equilibrium phenomena in inductively coupled plasma generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Lani, A.; Panesi, M.

    2016-07-01

    This work addresses the modeling of non-equilibrium phenomena in inductively coupled plasma discharges. In the proposed computational model, the electromagnetic induction equation is solved together with the set of Navier-Stokes equations in order to compute the electromagnetic and flow fields, accounting for their mutual interaction. Semi-classical statistical thermodynamics is used to determine the plasma thermodynamic properties, while transport properties are obtained from kinetic principles, with the method of Chapman and Enskog. Particle ambipolar diffusive fluxes are found by solving the Stefan-Maxwell equations with a simple iterative method. Two physico-mathematical formulations are used to model the chemical reaction processes: (1) A Local Thermodynamics Equilibrium (LTE) formulation and (2) a thermo-chemical non-equilibrium (TCNEQ) formulation. In the TCNEQ model, thermal non-equilibrium between the translational energy mode of the gas and the vibrational energy mode of individual molecules is accounted for. The electronic states of the chemical species are assumed in equilibrium with the vibrational temperature, whereas the rotational energy mode is assumed to be equilibrated with translation. Three different physical models are used to account for the coupling of chemistry and energy transfer processes. Numerical simulations obtained with the LTE and TCNEQ formulations are used to characterize the extent of non-equilibrium of the flow inside the Plasmatron facility at the von Karman Institute. Each model was tested using different kinetic mechanisms to assess the sensitivity of the results to variations in the reaction parameters. A comparison of temperatures and composition profiles at the outlet of the torch demonstrates that the flow is in non-equilibrium for operating conditions characterized by pressures below 30 000 Pa, frequency 0.37 MHz, input power 80 kW, and mass flow 8 g/s.

  4. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer warning diagnosis procedure using blank solution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartoros, Christine; Salin, Eric D.

    1998-05-01

    Lines available while running a blank solution were used to monitor the analytical performance of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) system in real time. Using H and Ar lines and their signal-to-background ratios (SBRs), simple rules in the form of a prediction table were developed by inspection of the data. These rules could be used for predicting changes in radio-frequency power, carrier gas flow rates, and sample introduction rate. The performance of the prediction table was good but not excellent. Another set of rules in the form of a decision tree was developed in an automated fashion using the C4.5 induction engine. The performance of the decision tree was superior to that of the prediction table. It appears that blank spectral information can be used to predict with over 90% accuracy when an ICP-AES is breaking down. However this is not as definitive at identifying the exact fault as some more exhaustive approaches involving the use of standard solutions.

  5. Calculation of the non-inductive current profile in high-performance NSTX plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Fredrickson, E.; Gates, D.; Kaye, S.; Menard, J.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Le Blanc, B. P.; Kugel, H.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Yuh, H.

    2011-03-01

    The constituents of the current profile have been computed for a wide range of high-performance plasmas in NSTX (Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557); these include cases designed to maximize the non-inductive fraction, pulse length, toroidal-β or stored energy. In the absence of low-frequency MHD activity, good agreement is found between the reconstructed current profile and that predicted by summing the independently calculated inductive, pressure-driven and neutral beam currents, without the need to invoke any anomalous beam ion diffusion. Exceptions occur, for instance, when there are toroidal Alfvén eigenmode avalanches or coupled m/n = 1/1 + 2/1 kink-tearing modes. In these cases, the addition of a spatially and temporally dependent fast-ion diffusivity can reduce the core beam current drive, restoring agreement between the reconstructed profile and the summed constituents, as well as bringing better agreement between the simulated and measured neutron emission rate. An upper bound on the fast-ion diffusivity of ~0.5-1 m2 s-1 is found in 'MHD-free' discharges, based on the neutron emission, the time rate of change in the neutron signal when a neutral beam is stepped and reconstructed on-axis current density.

  6. Calculation of the Non-Inductive Current Profile in High-Performance NSTX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhardt, S P; Gates, D; Kaye, S; Menard, J; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Le Blanc, B P; Kugel, H; Sabbagh, S A

    2011-02-09

    The constituents of the current profile have been computed for a wide range of high-performance plasmas in NSTX [M. Ono, et al., Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]; these include cases designed to maximize the non-inductive fraction, pulse length, toroidal-β, or stored energy. In the absence of low-frequency MHD activity, good agreement is found between the reconstructed current profile and that predicted by summing the independently calculated inductive, pressure-driven, and neutral beam currents, without the need to invoke any anomalous beam ion diffusion. Exceptions occur, for instance, when there are toroidal Alfven eigenmode avalanches or coupled m/n=1/1+2/1 kink-tearing modes. In these cases, the addition of a spatially and temporally dependent fast ion diffusivity can reduce the core beam current drive, restoring agreement between the reconstructed profile and the summed constituents, as well as bringing better agreement between the simulated and measured neutron emission rate. An upper bound on the fast ion diffusivity of ~0.5-1 m2/sec is found in “MHD-free” discharges, based on the neutron emission, time rate of change of the neutron signal when a neutral beam is stepped, and reconstructed on-axis current density.

  7. Modeling Approach and Analysis of the Structural Parameters of an Inductively Coupled Plasma Etcher Based on a Regression Orthogonal Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jia; Zhu, Yu; Ji, Linhong

    2012-12-01

    The geometry of an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etcher is usually considered to be an important factor for determining both plasma and process uniformity over a large wafer. During the past few decades, these parameters were determined by the “trial and error" method, resulting in wastes of time and funds. In this paper, a new approach of regression orthogonal design with plasma simulation experiments is proposed to investigate the sensitivity of the structural parameters on the uniformity of plasma characteristics. The tool for simulating plasma is CFD-ACE+, which is commercial multi-physical modeling software that has been proven to be accurate for plasma simulation. The simulated experimental results are analyzed to get a regression equation on three structural parameters. Through this equation, engineers can compute the uniformity of the electron number density rapidly without modeling by CFD-ACE+. An optimization performed at the end produces good results.

  8. Modeling of inductively coupled plasma SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2}/Ar plasma discharge: Effect of O{sub 2} on the plasma kinetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Pateau, Amand; Rhallabi, Ahmed Fernandez, Marie-Claude; Boufnichel, Mohamed; Roqueta, Fabrice

    2014-03-15

    A global model has been developed for low-pressure, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2}/Ar mixtures. This model is based on a set of mass balance equations for all the considered species, coupled with the discharge power balance equation and the charge neutrality condition. The present study is an extension of the kinetic global model previously developed for SF{sub 6}/Ar ICP plasma discharges [Lallement et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 18, 025001 (2009)]. It is focused on the study of the impact of the O{sub 2} addition to the SF{sub 6}/Ar gas mixture on the plasma kinetic properties. The simulation results show that the electron density increases with the %O{sub 2}, which is due to the decrease of the plasma electronegativity, while the electron temperature is almost constant in our pressure range. The density evolutions of atomic fluorine and oxygen versus %O{sub 2} have been analyzed. Those atomic radicals play an important role in the silicon etching process. The atomic fluorine density increases from 0 up to 40% O{sub 2} where it reaches a maximum. This is due to the enhancement of the SF{sub 6} dissociation processes and the production of fluorine through the reactions between SF{sub x} and O. This trend is experimentally confirmed. On the other hand, the simulation results show that O(3p) is the preponderant atomic oxygen. Its density increases with %O{sub 2} until reaching a maximum at almost 40% O{sub 2}. Over this value, its diminution with O{sub 2}% can be justified by the high increase in the loss frequency of O(3p) by electronic impact in comparison to its production frequency by electronic impact with O{sub 2}.

  9. Investigation of a measure of robustness in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makonnen, Yoseif; Beauchemin, Diane

    2015-01-01

    In industrial/commercial settings where operators often have minimal expertise in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry (MS), there is a prevalent need for a response factor indicating robust plasma conditions, which is analogous to the Mg II/Mg I ratio in ICP optical emission spectrometry (OES), whereby a Mg II/Mg I ratio of 10 constitutes robust conditions. While minimizing the oxide ratio usually corresponds to robust conditions, there is no specific target value that is widely accepted as indicating robust conditions. Furthermore, tuning for low oxide ratios does not necessarily guarantee minimal matrix effects, as they really address polyatomic interferences. From experiments, conducted in parallel for both MS and OES, there were some element pairs of similar mass and very different ionization potential that were exploited for such a purpose, the rationale being that, if these elements were ionized to the same extent, then that could be indicative of a robust plasma. The Be II/Li I intensity ratio was directly related to the Mg II/Mg I ratio in OES. Moreover, the 9Be+/7Li+ ratio was inversely related to the CeO+/Ce+ and LaO+/La+ oxide ratios in MS. The effects of different matrices (i.e. 0.01-0.1 M Na) were also investigated and compared to a conventional argon plasma optimized for maximum sensitivity. The suppression effect of these matrices was significantly reduced, if not eliminated in the case of 0.01 M Na, when the 9Be+/7Li+ ratio was around 0.30 on the Varian 820 MS instrument. Moreover, a very similar ratio (0.28) increased robustness to the same extent on a completely different ICP-MS instrument (PerkinElmer NEXION). Much greater robustness was achieved using a mixed-gas plasma with nitrogen in the outer gas and either nitrogen or hydrogen as a sheathing gas, as the 9Be+/7Li+ ratio was then around 1.70. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on using a simple analyte intensity ratio, 9Be+/7Li+, to gauge plasma robustness.

  10. Controlling the relative rates of adlayer formation and removal during etching in inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Nicholas Colvin Masi

    Laser desorption (LD) of the adlayer coupled with laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and plasma induced emission (PIE) of desorbed adsorbates is used to investigate the relative rates of chlorination and sputtering during the etching of Si in inductively coupled Cl2-Ar plasmas. Such an analysis is a two-fold process: surface analysis and plasma characterization. Surface analysis of Si etching using LD-LIF and LD-PIE techniques combined with etch rate measurements have revealed that the coverage of SiCl2 and etch rate increases and coverage of Si decreases abruptly for a chlorine fraction of 75% and ion energy of 80 eV. The precise Cl2 fraction for which these abrupt changes occur increases with an increase in ion energy. These changes may be caused by local chemisorption-induced reconstruction of Si <100>. Furthermore, the chlorination and sputtering rates are increased by ˜ an order of magnitude as the plasma is changed from Ar-dominant to Cl-dominant. Characterization of the plasma included determination of the dominant ion in Cl2 plasmas using LIF and a Langmuir probe and measurement of the absolute densities of Cl2, Cl, Cl+, and At + in Cl2-Ar discharges using optical emission actinometry. These studies reveal that Cl+ is the dominant positive ion in the H-mode and the dissociation of Cl2 to Cl increases with an increase in Ar fraction due to an increase in electron temperature. Furthermore, for powers exceeding 600 W, the neutral to ion flux ratio is strongly dependent on Cl2 fraction and is attributed mostly to the decrease in Cl density. Such dependence of the flux ratio on Cl2 fraction is significant in controlling chlorination and sputtering rates not only for Si etching, but for etching other key technological materials. ICP O2 discharges were also studied for low-kappa polymeric etch applications. These studies reveal that the electron temperature is weakly dependent on rf power and O2 dissociation is low (˜2%) at the maximum rf power density of 5.7 Wcm

  11. Plasma Hazards and Acceptance for International Space Station Extravehicular Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Extravehicular activity(EVA) is accepted by NASA and other space faring agencies as a necessary risk in order to build and maintain a safe and efficient laboratory in space. EVAs are used for standard construction and as contingency operations to repair critical equipment for vehicle sustainability and safety of the entire crew in the habitable volume. There are many hazards that are assessed for even the most mundane EVA for astronauts, and the vast majority of these are adequately controlled per the rules of the International Space Station Program. The need for EVA repair and construction has driven acceptance of a possible catastrophic hazard to the EVA crewmember which cannot currently be controlled adequately. That hazard is electrical shock from the very environment in which they work. This paper describes the environment, causes and contributors to the shock of EVA crewmembers attributed to the ionospheric plasma environment in low Earth orbit. It will detail the hazard history, and acceptance process for the risk associated with these hazards that give assurance to a safe EVA. In addition to the hazard acceptance process this paper will explore other factors that go into the decision to accept a risk including criticality of task, hardware design and capability, and the probability of hazard occurrence. Also included will be the required interaction between organizations at NASA(EVA Office, Environments, Engineering, Mission Operations, Safety) in order to build and eventually gain adequate acceptance rationale for a hazard of this kind. During the course of the discussion, all current methods of mitigating the hazard will be identified. This paper will capture the history of the plasma hazard analysis and processes used by the International Space Station Program to formally assess and qualify the risk. The paper will discuss steps that have been taken to identify and perform required analysis of the floating potential shock hazard from the ISS environment

  12. Atmospheric inductively coupled Ar/H2 plasmas jet for low-temperature deposition of Cu Thin Film on Polyimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Peng; Zheng, Wei; Meng, Yuedong; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2013-09-01

    For fabrication of future flexible electronic devices and depositing Cu thin films on polyimide substrate at low temperature, an atmospheric inductively coupled plasma jet driven by a 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) power is developed. In previous studies, we found that by adding a fractional amount of H2 gas into Ar plasma, quality of Cu film was significantly improved. But under air atmosphere, the oxidization of deposited film is inevitable. So we developed the technology in nitrogen atmosphere. We invested the plasma jet properties of Ar plasma in air, Ar/ H2 plasma in air and Ar/ H2 plasma in nitrogen atmosphere, to discuss the effect of adding H2 to Ar plasma and nitrogen background on plasma properties. The plasma gas temperature diagnoses and chemical reaction research during deposition were performed by OES. The plasma jet non-equilibrium numeral simulations were also carried out for thermal and transport properties during deposition. The effects on Cu films quality were studied by means of XPS and SEM. All the plasma properties and the results of Cu film would give us an insight on the mechanism and the possibility of improving the process.

  13. PREFACE: 3rd International Workshop on Infrared Plasma Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, P. B.; Röpcke, Jürgen; Hempel, Frank

    2009-07-01

    the scientific committee felt that this time it would be useful to emphasise new spectroscopic developments as well as covering applications. This might serve as a guide as to where the subject of infrared spectroscopy in combination with plasma sources might be heading in the future i.e. to emphasize pure infrared spectroscopy developments. The first invited lecture (G Guelachvili and N Picque) and the last invited lecture (F K Tittel, Y Bakhirkin, R Curl, A Kosterev, R Lewicki, D Thomasz and S So) were chosen to set the scene and realise this objective. The second (R Engeln, R Zijlmans, S Welzel, O Gabriel, J-P van Helden, J Röpcke and D Schram) and third (X Aubert, C Lazzaroni, D Marinov, O Guaitella, S Welzel, A Pipa, J Röpcke and A Rousseau) invited talks focussed on the application of the IR laser techniques with particular emphasis on the role of surfaces in plasmas and the relevance of plasma surface interactions. Surface plasma interactions did not feature strongly in the two earlier meetings and so this topic too, along with the emphasis on novel infrared spectroscopy techniques, represents a new direction for the conference. Paul B Davies and Jürgen Röpcke International Scientific Committee P B Davies, Cambridge, UK: Chair J Röpcke, Greifswald, Germany: Co-Chair R Engeln, Eindhoven, Netherlands G Hancock, Oxford, U K M Hori, Nagoya, Japan H Linnartz, Leiden, Netherlands R Martini, New York, USA J Meichsner, Greifswald, Germany A Rousseau, Paris, France Local Organizing Committee J Röpcke (INP: Chair) F Hempel (INP: Secretary) J Meichsner (IfP, University of Greifswald) N Lang (INP) L Glawe (INP) C Krcka (INP) B Lindemann (INP) Conference photograph

  14. Method for reducing peak phase current and decreasing staring time for an internal combustion engine having an induction machine

    DOEpatents

    Amey, David L.; Degner, Michael W.

    2002-01-01

    A method for reducing the starting time and reducing the peak phase currents for an internal combustion engine that is started using an induction machine starter/alternator. The starting time is reduced by pre-fluxing the induction machine and the peak phase currents are reduced by reducing the flux current command after a predetermined period of time has elapsed and concurrent to the application of the torque current command. The method of the present invention also provides a strategy for anticipating the start command for an internal combustion engine and determines a start strategy based on the start command and the operating state of the internal combustion engine.

  15. Surface hardening of VT-22 alloy by inductively coupled plasma nitriding and magnetron deposition of TiN films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharkov, Maxim M.; Kaziev, Andrey V.; Tumarkin, Alexander V.; Drobinin, Vyacheslav E.; Stepanova, Tatiana V.; Pisarev, Alexander A.

    2017-01-01

    The surface of VT-22 Russian grade titanium alloy samples was modified by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) nitriding followed by magnetron deposition of TiN coatings. Different operating conditions of ICP nitriding and magnetron deposition were considered. The microhardness depth profiles were measured for samples after nitriding. The performance of TiN coatings was examined with a scratch tester.

  16. Comparative Sulfur Analysis Using Thermal Combustion or Inductively Coupled Plasma Methodology and Mineral Composition of Common Livestock Feedstuffs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to compare the ability of thermal combustion (CNS) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) to measure the total sulfur (S) content in plant-, animal-, and mineral-based feedstuffs commonly fed to livestock. Analyses of a wide range of feedstuffs by CNS and ICP for total ...

  17. ISOTOPE DILUTION ANALYSIS OF BROMATE IN DRINKING WATER MATRIXES BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRIC DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromate is a disinfection byproduct in drinking water which is formed during the ozonation of source water containing bromide. This paper described the analysis of bromate via ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The separation of bromate from interfer...

  18. Rapid and sensitive determination of tellurium in soil and plant samples by sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guosheng; Zheng, Jian; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we report a rapid and highly sensitive analytical method for the determination of tellurium in soil and plant samples using sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS). Soil and plant samples were digested using Aqua regia. After appropriate dilution, Te in soil and plant samples was directly analyzed without any separation and preconcentration. This simple sample preparation approach avoided to a maximum extent any contamination and loss of Te prior to the analysis. The developed analytical method was validated by the analysis of soil/sediment and plant reference materials. Satisfactory detection limits of 0.17 ng g(-1) for soil and 0.02 ng g(-1) for plant samples were achieved, which meant that the developed method was applicable to studying the soil-to-plant transfer factor of Te. Our work represents for the first time that data on the soil-to-plant transfer factor of Te were obtained for Japanese samples which can be used for the estimation of internal radiation dose of radioactive tellurium due to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

  19. Determination of (107)Pd in Pd Recovered by Laser-Induced Photoreduction with Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Asai, Shiho; Yomogida, Takumi; Saeki, Morihisa; Ohba, Hironori; Hanzawa, Yukiko; Horita, Takuma; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-20

    Safety evaluation of a radioactive waste repository requires credible activity estimates confirmed by actual measurements. A long-lived radionuclide, (107)Pd, which can be found in radioactive wastes, is one of the difficult-to-measure nuclides and results in a deficit in experimentally determined contents. In this study, a precipitation-based separation method has been developed for the determination of (107)Pd with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The photoreduction induced by pulsed laser irradiation at 355 nm provides short-time and one-step recovery of Pd. The proposed method was verified by applying it to a spent nuclear fuel sample. To recover Pd efficiently, a natural Pd standard was employed as the Pd carrier. Taking advantage of the absence of (102)Pd in spent nuclear fuel, (102)Pd in the Pd carrier was utilized as the internal standard. The chemical yield of Pd was about 90% with virtually no impurities, allowing accurate quantification of (107)Pd. The amount of (107)Pd in the Pd precipitate was 17.3 ± 0.7 ng, equivalent to 239 ± 9 ng per mg of (238)U in the sample.

  20. Provenance determination of oriental porcelain using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Bartle, Emma K; Watling, R John

    2007-03-01

    The sale of fraudulent oriental ceramics constitutes a large proportion of the illegal artifact and antique trade and threatens to undermine the legitimate international market. The sophistication and skill of forgers has reached a level where, using traditional appraisal by eye and hand, even the most experienced specialist is often unable to distinguish between a genuine and fraudulent piece. In addition, current provenancing techniques such as energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry and thermoluminescence (TL) dating can result in significant damage to the artifact itself. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), a relatively nondestructive analytical technique, has been used for the provenance determination of materials based on geographical origin. The technique requires the production of a laser crater, c. 100 microm in diameter, which is essentially invisible to the naked eye. Debris from this crater is analyzed using ICP-MS, with the results forming the basis of the provenance establishment protocol. Chinese, Japanese, and English porcelain shards have been analyzed using this protocol and generic isotopic distribution patterns have been produced that enable the provenance establishment of porcelain artifacts to their country of production. Minor variations between elemental fingerprints of artifacts produced in the same country also indicate that it may be possible to further provenance oriental ceramics to a specific production region or kiln site.

  1. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric method for the determination of dissolved trace elements in natural water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garbarino, J.R.; Taylor, Howard E.

    1996-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry method was developed for the determination of dissolved Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sr, Tl, U, V, and Zn in natural waters. Detection limits are generally in the 50-100 picogram per milliliter (pg/mL) range, with the exception of As which is in the 1 microgram per liter (ug/L) range. Interferences associated with spectral overlap from concomitant isotopes or molecular ions and sample matrix composition have been identified. Procedures for interference correction and reduction related to isotope selection, instrumental operating conditions, and mathematical data processing techniques are described. Internal standards are used to minimize instrumental drift. The average analytical precision attainable for 5 times the detection limit is about 16 percent. The accuracy of the method was tested using a series of U.S. Geological Survey Standard Reference Water Standards (SWRS), National Research Council Canada Riverine Water Standard, and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Trace Elements in Water Standards. Average accuracies range from 90 to 110 percent of the published mean values.

  2. Comparison of selenium determination in liver samples by atomic absorption spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Miksa, Irina Rudik; Buckley, Carol L; Carpenter, Nancy P; Poppenga, Robert H

    2005-07-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element that is often deficient in the natural diets of domestic animal species. The measurement of Se in whole blood or liver is the most accurate way to assess Se status for diagnostic purposes. This study was conducted to compare hydride generation atomic absorption spectroscopy (HG-AAS) with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the detection and quantification of Se in liver samples. Sample digestion was accomplished with magnesium nitrate and nitric acid for HG-AAS and ICP-MS, respectively. The ICP-MS detection was optimized for 82Se with yttrium used as the internal standard and resulted in a method detection limit of 0.12 microg/g. Selenium was quantified by both methods in 310 samples from a variety of species that were submitted to the Toxicology Laboratory at New Bolton Center (Kennett Square, PA) for routine diagnostic testing. Paired measurements for each sample were evaluated by a mean difference plot method. Limits of agreement were used to describe the maximum differences likely to occur between the 2 methods. Results suggest that under the specified conditions ICP-MS can be reliably used in place of AAS for quantitation of tissue Se at or below 2 microg/g to differentiate between adequate and deficient liver Se concentrations.

  3. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric determination of 27 trace elements in table salts after coprecipitation with indium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Kagaya, Shigehiro; Mizuno, Toshiyuki; Tohda, Koji

    2009-07-15

    The coprecipitation method using indium phosphate as a new coprecipitant has been developed for the separation of trace elements in table salts prior to their determination using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Indium phosphate could quantitatively coprecipitate 27 trace elements, namely, Be, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Sc, Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu, in a table salt solution at pH 10. The rapid coprecipitation technique, in which complete recovery of the precipitate was not required in the precipitate-separation process, was completely applicable, and, therefore, the operation for the coprecipitation was quite simple. The coprecipitated elements could be determined accurately and precisely by ICP-AES using indium as an internal standard element after dissolution of the precipitate with 5 mL of 1 mol L(-1) nitric acid. The detection limits (three times the standard deviation of the blank values, n=10) ranged from 0.001 microg (Lu) to 0.11 microg (Zn) in 300 mL of a 10% (w/v) table salt solution. The method proposed here could be applied to the analyses of commercially available table salts.

  4. Multielemental inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry analysis of nickeliferous minerals.

    PubMed

    Abad-Peña, Elizabet; Larrea-Marín, María Teresa; Villanueva-Tagle, Margarita Edelia; Pomares-Alfonso, Mario Simeón

    2014-06-01

    An inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry method for the quantitative simultaneous determination of Al, Ca, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P and Zn in Cuban laterite and serpentine minerals has been developed. Additionally, V and Ti can be quantitatively determined in laterite mineral; Li, Sr, and Zr can be detected in both mineral types and Pb can be detected just in laterite mineral. The microwave-assisted total acid digestion of samples was achieved with HCl+HNO3+HF and HNO3+HClO4+HF acid mixtures for laterite and serpentine samples, respectively. In non-robust plasma operating conditions, the matrix effect characteristics of the laterite sample were dictated by the principal component Fe; while the character of the Mg principal component matrix effect was some how modified by the concomitants Fe and Ni in serpentine sample. The selection of robust conditions decreased the matrix effect. Additionally, the simulation of the matrix samples by introducing the principal component Fe or Mg, correspondingly, in calibration dissolutions was needed to overcome completely the matrix effect over the analysis accuracy. Precision of analysis was very near or lower than 10% for most elements, except Sr (15%) in L-1; and K (15%) and Li (15%) in SNi sample. Accuracy of analysis was around or lowers than 10% for most elements, except K (15%), Na (19%), P (19%) and V (19%) in L-1 sample; and Ca (14%) and P (20%) in SNi sample.

  5. Inductively-coupled plasmas in pure chlorine: comparison experiments/HPEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Jean-Paul; Sirse, Nishant; Azamoum, Yasmina; Chabert, Pascal

    2012-10-01

    Inductively-coupled plasmas in chlorine-based gas mixtures are widely used for etching of nanometric features in silicon for CMOS device manufacture. This system is also of considerable fundamental interest as an archetype of strongly electronegative plasmas in a simple gas, for which reliable techniques exist to measure the densities of all key species. As such, it is an ideal test-bed for comparison of simulations to experiment. We have developed a technique based on two-photon Laser-Induced Fluorescence to determine the absolute Cl atom density. The Cl surface recombination coefficient was determined from time-resolved measurements in the afterglow. Electron densities were determined by microwave hairpin resonator and EEDF's were measured by Langmuir probe. Whereas the HPEM results were in good agreement at lower pressures (below 10mTorr), electron densities are increasingly underestimated at higher pressures. The gas temperature was measured by Doppler-resolved Infra-red Laser Absorption spectroscopy of Ar metastable atoms (with a small fraction Ar added). At higher pressures the gas temperature was considerably underestimated by the model. The concomitant overestimation of the gas density is a major reason for the disagreement between model and experiment.

  6. Pulsed, Inductively Generated, Streaming Plasma Ion Source for Heavy Ion Fusion Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Steven C. Glidden; Howard D Sanders; John B. Greenly; Daniel L. Dongwoo

    2006-04-28

    This report describes a compact, high current density, pulsed ion source, based on electrodeless, inductively driven gas breakdown, developed to meet the requirements on normalized emittance, current density, uniformity and pulse duration for an ion injector in a heavy-ion fusion driver. The plasma source produces >10 μs pulse of Argon plasma with ion current densities >100 mA/cm2 at 30 cm from the source and with strongly axially directed ion energy of about 80 eV, and sub-eV transverse temperature. The source has good reproducibility and spatial uniformity. Control of the current density during the pulse has been demonstrated with a novel modulator coil method which allows attenuation of the ion current density without significantly affecting the beam quality. This project was carried out in two phases. Phase 1 used source configurations adapted from light ion sources to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept. In Phase 2 the performance of the source was enhanced and quantified in greater detail, a modulator for controlling the pulse shape was developed, and experiments were conducted with the ions accelerated to >40 kV.

  7. Ion Clouds in the Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch: A Closer Look through Computations.

    PubMed

    Aghaei, Maryam; Lindner, Helmut; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2016-08-16

    We have computationally investigated the introduction of copper elemental particles in an inductively coupled plasma torch connected to a sampling cone, including for the first time the ionization of the sample. The sample is inserted as liquid particles, which are followed inside the entire torch, i.e., from the injector inlet up to the ionization and reaching the sampler. The spatial position of the ion clouds inside the torch as well as detailed information on the copper species fluxes at the position of the sampler orifice and the exhausts of the torch are provided. The effect of on- and off-axis injection is studied. We clearly show that the ion clouds of on-axis injected material are located closer to the sampler with less radial diffusion. This guarantees a higher transport efficiency through the sampler cone. Moreover, our model reveals the optimum ranges of applied power and flow rates, which ensure the proper position of ion clouds inside the torch, i.e., close enough to the sampler to increase the fraction that can enter the mass spectrometer and with minimum loss of material toward the exhausts as well as a sufficiently high plasma temperature for efficient ionization.

  8. Some Temperature Effects on AISI-304 Nitriding in an Inductively Coupled RF Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Valencia-Alvarado, R.; Barocio, S. R.; Mercado-Cabrera, A.; Pena-Eguiluz, R.; Munoz-Castro, A. E.; Piedad-Beneitez, A. de la; Rosa-Vazquez, J. de la; Lopez-Callejas, R.; Godoy-Cabrera, O. G.

    2006-12-04

    Some recent results obtained from nitriding AISI 304 stainless steel samples, 1.2 cm in diameter and 0.5 cm thick are reported here in the case of an 85% hydrogen and 15% nitrogen mixture work gas. The process was carried out from 300 to 400 W for (13.56 MHz) inductively coupled plasma within a 60 cm long pyrex glass tube 3.5 cm in diameter where the samples were biased up to -300 V with respect to earth. The resulting hardness appears to be a function of the substrate temperature which varied from 200 deg. C at a 0 V bias to 550 deg. C at -300 V. The plasma density at 400 W reached 3x1010 cm-3 with a 4 eV electron temperature. Prior to nitriding, all the samples were polished with 0.05 {mu}m diamond paste, leading to a 30 nm average roughness (Ra). After nitriding at -300 V, the Ra rose until {approx}400 nm while hardness values of 1500 HV under 300 g loads were measured. X ray diffraction indicates that the extended phase amplitude ({gamma}N), Fe and Cr nitride depends on the substrate temperature.

  9. Preparation of Nanocomposite GDC/LSCF Cathode Material for IT-SOFC by Induction Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yan; Almeida, Veronica Alexandra B.; Gitzhofer, François

    2011-01-01

    Homogeneous mixtures of Ce0.8Gd0.2O1.9 (GDC) and La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 (LSCF) nanopowders were successfully synthesized using induction plasma by axial injection of a solution. The resulting nanocomposite powders consisted of two kinds of nanopowders with different mass ratio of GDC/LSCF, such as 3/7 and 6/4. The morphological features, crystallinity, and the phases of the synthesized powders were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), local energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis, and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The nanopowders are almost globular in shape with a diameter smaller than 100 nm and their BET specific areas are around 20 m2 g-1. The GDC and LSCF phases are well distributed in the nanopowders. In addition, suspensions, made with the as-synthesized composite nanopowders and ethanol, were used to deposit cathode coatings using suspension plasma spray (SPS). Micro-nanostructures of the coatings are discussed. The coatings are homogeneous and porous (51% porosity) with cauliflower structures.

  10. Determination of additives in PVC material by UV laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmerlin, M.; Mermet, J. M.; Bertucci, M.; Zydowicz, P.

    1997-04-01

    UV laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-AES) has been applied to the direct determination of additives in solid poly(vinyl chloride) materials. A Nd:YAG laser, operating at its fourth harmonic (266 nm), was used with a beam masking device, in the most reproducible conditions, to introduce solid particles into the plasma torch of a simultaneous ICP-AES system. Emphasis was placed on both precision and accuracy in the analysis of PVC materials by LA-ICP-AES. A series of six in-house PVC reference materials was prepared by incorporating several additives in increasing concentrations. Three alternative methods were evaluated to certify the amount of incorporated elements: ICP-AES with sample dissolution, NAA and XRF. Satisfactory results and good agreement were obtained for seven elements (Al, Ca, Cd, Mg, Sb, Sn and Ti) among the ten incorporated. Sample homogeneity appeared to be satisfactory, and calibration graphs obtained by LA-ICP-AES for several elements are presented. Finally, the performance of the technique in terms of repeatability (1.6-5%), reproducibility (2-5%), and limits of detection was investigated.

  11. Neutral Gas Temperature Estimates in an Inductively Coupled CF4 Plasma by Fitting Diatomic Emission Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Meyyappan, M.

    2001-01-01

    This work examines the accuracy of plasma neutral temperature estimates by fitting the rotational band envelope of different diatomic species in emission. Experiments are performed in an inductively coupled CF4 plasma generated in a Gaseous Electronics Conference reference cell. Visible and ultraviolet emission spectra are collected at a power of 300 W (approximately 0.7 W/cc) and pressure of 30 mtorr. The emission bands of several molecules (CF, CN, C2, CO, and SiF) are fit simultaneously for rotational and vibrational temperatures and compared. Four different rotational temperatures are obtained: 1250 K for CF and CN, 1600 K for CO, 1800 K for C2, and 2300 K for SiF. The vibrational temperatures obtained vary from 1750-5950 K, with the higher vibrational temperatures generally corresponding to the lower rotational temperatures. These results suggest that the different species have achieved different degrees of equilibration between the rotational and vibrational modes and may not be equilibrated with the translational temperatures. The different temperatures are also related to the likelihood that the species are produced by ion bombardment of the surface, with etch products like SiF, CO, and C2 having higher temperatures than species expected to have formed in the gas phase.

  12. Sensitive sandwich immunoassay based on single particle mode inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Xing, Zhi; Lv, Yi; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2010-11-15

    A sensitive sandwich type immunoassay has been proposed with the detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in a single particle mode (time resolved analysis). The signal induced by the flash of ions ((197)Au(+)) due to the ionization of single Au-nanoparticle (Au-NP) label in the plasma torch can be measured by the mass spectrometer. The frequency of the transient signals is proportional to the concentration of Au-NPs labels. Characteristics of the signals obtained from Au-NPs of 20, 45 and 80 nm in diameters were discussed. The analytical figures for the determination of Au-labeled IgG using ICP-MS in conventional integral mode and single particle mode were compared in detail. Rabbit-anti-human IgG was used as a model analyte in the sandwich immunoassay. A detection limit (3 σ) of 0.1 ng mL(-1) was obtained for rabbit-anti-human IgG after immunoreactions, with a linear range of 0.3-10 ng mL(-1) and a RSD of 8.1% (2.0 ng mL(-1)). Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to spiked rabbit-anti-human IgG samples and rabbit-anti-human serum samples. The method resulted to be a highly sensitive ICP-MS based sandwich type immunoassay.

  13. Matrix effects during phosphorus determination with quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kovacevic, Miroslav; Goessler, Walter; Mikac, Nevenka; Veber, Marjan

    2005-09-01

    A quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer was evaluated for use in the detection of phosphorus. The influences of nitric acid and methanol (simulating the composition of a sample solution after nitric acid digestion) on phosphorus determination were studied using two different measuring methods at different plasma conditions: detection of phosphorus ions at m/z 31 and detection of phosphorus oxide ions at m/z 47. The existence of polyatomic interferences at m/z 31 and 47 was explored. Nitric acid and methanol are shown to be the sources of polyatomic ions and therefore cause poorer detection limits. Better detection limits were achieved in such matrices when phosphorus was detected as 31P+. The presence of methanol improves the system sensitivity towards phosphorus sevenfold; however, this positive effect is hindered by the high background signal due to carbon-based polyatomic ions. For samples with an organic matrix an appropriate mineralization procedure should be applied (high excess of nitric acid and high temperature) to quantitatively oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide, which is easily removed from the sample, in order to achieve correct results.

  14. Multivariate statistical characterization of the tolerance of argon inductively coupled plasmas to organic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Molinero, A.; Castillo, J. R.; Chamorro, P.; Muniozguren, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The tolerance of Argon-inductively coupled plasmas to the introduction of organic solvents, defined by Matsunaga's parameter and by "limiting aspiration rate", has been correlated with their nature by statistical methods. The main physical variables of solvents obtained from the technical literature were used as independent variables to perform principal component analysis (PCA) and factorial discriminant analysis (FDA). Thus the variables which had the greatest influence on heat exchange nebulization and transport processes were determined. Organic solvents were classified into different groups characterized by their tolerance in plasma operation. In the PCA study, the second principal component was the most significative to differentiate between the tolerance of solvents and it showed a high correlation with surface tension, viscosity and heat of vaporization. Scores of the organic solvents belonging to the same class can be adjusted to straight lines and their positions in the plane (expressed as ordinates in the origin) as well as the slope values are characteristics of organic solvent groups. The results of FDA confirms those obtained with PCA. Multivariable regression was applied to obtain predictive equations of the limiting aspiration rate for organic solvents, in terms of their main physical variables.

  15. Nonlinear kinetic effects in inductively coupled plasmas via particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froese, Aaron; Smolyakov, Andrei; Sydorenko, Dmytro

    2007-11-01

    Kinetic effects in inductively coupled plasmas due to thermal motion of particles modified by self-consistent magnetic fields are studied using a particle-in-cell code. In the low pressure, low frequency regime, electron mean free paths are large relative to device size and the trajectories are strongly curved by the induced rf magnetic field. Analytic linear theories are unable to recover effects accumulated along each nonlinear path. Therefore, the simulated ICP is made progressively more complex to find the source of observed plasma behaviours. With only thermal motion modifying the wave-particle interaction, nonlocal behaviour becomes dominant at low frequencies, causing an anomalous skin effect with increased skin depth and power absorption and decreased ponderomotive force. However, when influenced by magnetic fields, the nonlocal effects are suppressed at large wave amplitudes due to nonlinear trapping. A mechanism is proposed for this low frequency restoration of local behaviour. Finally, a low rate of electron-neutral collisions is found to counteract the nonlinear behaviour, and hence reinforces nonlocal behaviour.

  16. Anisotropic etching of amorphous perfluoropolymer films in oxygen-based inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Takao; Akagi, Takanori; Ichiki, Takanori

    2009-01-01

    An amorphous perfluoropolymer, "Cytop™" (Asahi Glass Co., Ltd.), is a preferable material for the fabrication of micro total analysis system devices because of its superior optical transparency over a wide wavelength range and low refractive index of 1.34, which is almost the same as that of water, as well as excellent chemical stability. To establish the precise microfabrication technology for this unique resin, the dry etching of the amorphous perfluoropolymer in Ar/O2 low-pressure inductively coupled plasma has been studied. A relatively high etch rate of approximately 6.3 μm/min at maximum and highly anisotropic etched features was attained. Plasma measurements by a single Langmuir probe technique and actinometry revealed that etching is dominated by ion-assisted surface desorption above a 10% O2 mixing ratio, whereas the supply of active oxygen species is the rate-limiting process below 10%. Moreover, angled x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements of an etched trench pattern revealed that a high anisotropy is attributed to the formation of a carbon-rich sidewall protection layer.

  17. Vacuum Inductive Store/Pulse Compression Experiments on a High Power Accelerator Using Plasma Opening Switches.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-31

    1975). 12. G. Cooperstein, J.J. Condon, and J.R. Boller, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. 10, 961 (1973). 13. C. W. Mendel, Jr., D. M. Zagar , G. S . Mills, S ...REPORT NUNSER 7. AUTNOR11(4j S . CONTRACT ORt GRANT NU-MERt.) R. A. Meger,* R. J1. Commusso,* G. Cooperstein, and Shyke A. Goldstein* 9. PERFORMING...1982 IEEE International Conf. on Plasma Sci., Ottawa, Canada, IEEE cat. no. 82-CH-1770-7 (1982), p. 154. 7. C. W. Mendel, Jr. and S . A. Goldstein, J

  18. Calibration graphs for Ti, Ta and Nb in sintered tungsten carbide by infrared laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanický, V; Otruba, V; Mermet, J M

    2001-12-01

    Infrared laser ablation (IR-LA) has been studied as a sample introduction technique for the analysis of sintered cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide materials by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Fractionation of cobalt was observed. Linearity of calibration plots was verified at least up to 15% Ti, 8% Ta, and 3% Nb. Above 1% (m/m) Ti, Ta, and Nb, the repeatability of results was better than 3% R.S.D. The relative uncertainty at the centroid of the calibration line was in the range from +/- 3% to +/- 4% for Ti, Ta, and Nb with internal standardization by tungsten and up to +/- 5% without internal standardization. The limits of detection were 0.004% Ti, 0.001% Ta, and 0.004% Nb. Elimination of the cemented hardmetal dissolution procedure is the main advantage of this method.

  19. Strategies for the analysis of coal by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kleiber, L; Fink, H; Niessner, R; Panne, U

    2002-09-01

    The potential of laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was investigated for the inorganic characterization of different coal samples pressed into pellets. Reference analysis was performed by microwave-assisted digestion of the ground samples followed by ICP-MS analysis of the resulting solutions. Two different laser ablation sampling procedures were compared. For continuous sampling, three sites of the pellet were sampled for approximately one minute, whereas for sequential sampling 15 sites were sampled for two seconds, respectively. The qualitative results of the two procedures were equivalent, but continuous sampling allowed faster analysis and better precision (RSD about 10%) than sequential sampling (RSD 10-20%). Different normalization procedures with internal and extrinsic standards were investigated and allowed a quantitative determination of Al, Ti, Zn, Ni, and V with measurement uncertainties below 10% and Fe, Si, and Sn with measurement uncertainties below 20%.

  20. Determination of rare earth elements in environmental matrices by sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Riondato, J; Vanhaecke, F; Moens, L; Dams, R

    2001-07-01

    In the framework of an international certification campaign, sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (sector-field ICP-MS) was used for the accurate determination of the rare earth elements in five candidate reference materials: aquatic plant, calcareous soil, mussel tissue, river sediment, and tuna muscle. All samples were taken into solution by use of microwave-assisted or mixed microwave-assisted / open beaker acid digestion. Subsequently, the samples were appropriately diluted and subjected to ICP-MS analysis. Except for Sc, all the elements involved were determined at low mass resolution (R = 300). For Sc, application of a higher resolution setting (R = 3,000) was required to separate the analyte signal from those of several molecular ions which gave rise to spectral overlap at low mass resolution. Some of the heavier REE can also suffer from spectral overlap attributed to the occurrence of oxide ions (MO+) of the lighter REE and Ba. This spectral overlap could be successfully overcome by mathematical correction. Matrix effects were overcome by use of two carefully selected internal standards, such that external calibration could be used. On each occasion, a geological reference material was analyzed as a quality-control sample and the reliability of all results obtained was additionally checked by means of chondrite normalization. For tuna muscle the content of all REE was below the limit of detection. For calcareous soil and river sediment, low to sub microg g(-1) values were observed, whereas the REE content of aquatic plant and mussel tissue was considerably lower (low to sub ng g(-1)). Overall, the results obtained were in excellent agreement with the average values, calculated on the basis of all "accepted" values, obtained in different laboratories using different techniques.

  1. Computational Validation of a Two-Dimensional Semi-Empirical Model for Inductive Coupling in a Conical Pulsed Inductive Plasma Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2011-01-01

    A two-dimensional semi-empirical model of pulsed inductive thrust efficiency is developed to predict the effect of such a geometry on thrust efficiency. The model includes electromagnetic and gas-dynamic forces but excludes energy conversion from radial motion to axial motion, with the intention of characterizing thrust efficiency loss mechanisms that result from a conical versus a at inductive coil geometry. The range of conical pulsed inductive thruster geometries to which this model can be applied is explored with the use of finite element analysis. A semi-empirical relation for inductance as a function of current sheet radial and axial position is the limiting feature of the model, restricting the applicability as a function of half cone angle to a range from ten degrees to about 60 degrees. The model is nondimensionalized, yielding a set of dimensionless performance scaling parameters. Results of the model indicate that radial current sheet motion changes the axial dynamic impedance parameter at which thrust efficiency is maximized. This shift indicates that when radial current sheet motion is permitted in the model longer characteristic circuit timescales are more efficient, which can be attributed to a lower current sheet axial velocity as the plasma more rapidly decouples from the coil through radial motion. Thrust efficiency is shown to increase monotonically for decreasing values of the radial dynamic impedance parameter. This trend indicates that to maximize the radial decoupling timescale should be long compared to the characteristic circuit timescale.

  2. Ionosphere Plasma State Determination in Low Earth Orbit from International Space Station Plasma Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    A plasma diagnostic package is deployed on the International Space Station (ISS). The system - a Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) - is used by NASA to monitor the electrical floating potential of the vehicle to assure astronaut safety during extravehicular activity. However, data from the unit also reflects the ionosphere state and seems to represent an unutilized scientific resource in the form of an archive of scientific plasma state data. The unit comprises a Floating Potential probe and two Langmuir probes. There is also an unused but active plasma impedance probe. The data, at one second cadence, are collected, typically for a two week period surrounding extravehicular activity events. Data is also collected any time a visiting vehicle docks with ISS and also when any large solar events occur. The telemetry system is unusual because the package is mounted on a television camera stanchion and its data is impressed on a video signal that is transmitted to the ground and streamed by internet to two off center laboratory locations. The data quality has in the past been challenged by weaknesses in the integrated ground station and distribution systems. These issues, since mid-2010, have been largely resolved and the ground stations have been upgraded. Downstream data reduction has been developed using physics based modeling of the electron and ion collecting character in the plasma. Recursive algorithms determine plasma density and temperature from the raw Langmuir probe current voltage sweeps and this is made available in real time for situational awareness. The purpose of this paper is to describe and record the algorithm for data reduction and to show that the Floating probe and Langmuir probes are capable of providing long term plasma state measurement in the ionosphere. Geophysical features such as the Appleton anomaly and high latitude modulation at the edge of the Auroral zones are regularly observed in the nearly circular, 51 deg inclined, 400 km

  3. Summary of the 2012 Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster Development and Testing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, K. A.; Martin, A. K.; Eskridge, R. H.; Kimberlin, A. C.; Addona, B. M.; Devineni, A. P.; Dugal-Whitehead, N. R.; Hallock, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Inductive pulsed plasma thrusters are spacecraft propulsion devices in which energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. While these devices have shown promise for operation at high efficiency on a range of propellants, many technical issues remain before they can be used in flight applications. A conical theta-pinch thruster geometry was fabricated and tested to investigate potential improvements in propellant utilization relative to more common, flat-plate planar coil designs. A capacitor charging system is used to permit repetitive discharging of thrusters at multiple cycles per second, with successful testing accomplished at a repetition-rate of 5 Hz at power levels of 0.9, 1.6, and 2.5 kW. The conical theta-pinch thruster geometry was tested at cone angles of 20deg, 38deg, and 60deg, with single-pulse operation at 500 J/pulse and repetitionrate operation with the 38deg model quantified through direct thrust measurement using a hanging pendulum thrust stand. A long-lifetime valve was designed and fabricated, and initial testing was performed to measure the valve response and quantify the leak rate at beginning-of-life. Subscale design and testing of a capacitor charging system required for operation on a spacecraft is reported, providing insights into the types of components needed in the circuit topology employed. On a spacecraft, this system would accept as input a lower voltage from the spacecraft DC bus and boost the output to the high voltage required to charge the capacitors of the thruster.

  4. Depolymerization of the waste polymers in municipal solid waste streams using induction-coupled plasma technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guddeti, Ravikishan Reddy

    2000-10-01

    A significant, valuable percentage of today's municipal solid waste stream consists of polymeric materials, for which almost no economic recycling technology currently exists. This polymeric waste is incinerated, landfilled or recycled via downgraded usage. Thermal plasma treatment is a potentially viable means of recycling these materials by converting them back into monomers or into other useful compounds. The technical, laboratory scale, feasibility of using an induction-coupled RF plasma [ICP] heated reactor for this purpose has been demonstrated in the present study. Polyethylene [PE], polypropylene [PP] and polyethylene terephthalate [PET], the model polymers chosen for the study, were injected axially through the center of an ICP torch. 68% of PE, 78% of PP and 75% of PET were converted into gaseous products. Ethylene and propylene were the primary gaseous products of decomposition of the former two polymers and acetylene was the primary product of the depolymerization of PET. The amount of propylene obtained in PE depolymerization was significantly higher than anticipated and was believed to be due to beta-scission reactions occurring at the high plasma temperatures. Statistical design of experiments was used to determine the influence of individual variables. Analysis of results showed that plasma plate power, central gas flow rate, probe gas flow rate, powder feed rate and the interaction between the quench gas flow rate and power input were the key process parameters affecting the yield of monomer in the product gas stream. Depolymerization of a PE + PP mixture yielded concentrations of propylene and ethylene close to those predicted from weighting the concentrations of products from the individual polymers. 75.5 wt.% of the mixture was converted into monomers. TEM analysis of the carbon residues collected from different locations of the reactor indicated the formation of some novel carbon structures, including carbon nanotubes. The presence of these

  5. Resonant laser ablation of metals detected by atomic emission in a microwave plasma and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Danielle; Stchur, Peter; Hou, Xiandeng; Yang, Karl X; Zhou, Jack; Michel, Robert G

    2005-12-01

    It has been shown that an increase in sensitivity and selectivity of detection of an analyte can be achieved by tuning the ablation laser wavelength to match that of a resonant gas-phase transition of that analyte. This has been termed resonant laser ablation (RLA). For a pulsed tunable nanosecond laser, the data presented here illustrate the resonant enhancement effect in pure copper and aluminum samples, chromium oxide thin films, and for trace molybdenum in stainless steel samples, and indicate two main characteristics of the RLA phenomenon. The first is that there is an increase in the number of atoms ablated from the surface. The second is that the bandwidth of the wavelength dependence of the ablation is on the order of 1 nm. The effect was found to be virtually identical whether the atoms were detected by use of a microwave-induced plasma with atomic emission detection, by an inductively coupled plasma with mass spectrometric detection, or by observation of the number of laser pulses required to penetrate through thin films. The data indicate that a distinct ablation laser wavelength dependence exists, probably initiated via resonant radiation trapping, and accompanied by collisional broadening. Desorption contributions through radiation trapping are substantiated by changes in crater morphology as a function of wavelength and by the relatively broad linewidth of the ablation laser wavelength scans, compared to gas-phase excitation spectra. Also, other experiments with thin films demonstrate the existence of a distinct laser-material interaction and suggest that a combination of desorption induced by electronic transition (DIET) with resonant radiation trapping could assist in the enhancement of desorption yields. These results were obtained by a detailed inspection of the effect of the wavelength of the ablation laser over a narrow range of energy densities that lie between the threshold of laser-induced desorption of species and the usual analytical

  6. Inductively coupled plasma -- Atomic emission spectroscopy glove box assembly system at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, J.H.; McCarthy, K.M.; Tamul, N.R.

    1999-12-17

    The inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy [ICP/AES (ICP)] system for elemental analyses in support of vitrification processing was first installed in 1986. The initial instrument was a Jobin Yvon (JY) Model JY-70 ICP that consisted of sequential and simultaneous spectrometers for analysis of nonradioactive samples as radioactive surrogates. The JY-70 ICP continued supporting nonradioactive testing during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) using the full-scale melter with ``cold'' (nonradioactive) testing campaigns. As a result, the need for another system was identified to allow for the analysis of radioactive samples. The Mass Spec (Spectrometry) Lab was established for the installation of the modified ICP system for handling radioactive samples. The conceptual setup of another ICP was predicated on the use of a hood to allow ease of accessibility of the torch, nebulizer, and spray chamber, and the minimization of air flow paths. However, reconsideration of the radioactive sample dose rate and contamination levels led to the configuration of the glovebox system with a common transfer interface box for the ICP and the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) glovebox assemblies. As a result, a simultaneous Model JY-50P ICP with glovebox was installed in 1990 as a first generation ICP glovebox system. This was one of the first ICP glovebox assemblies connected with an ICP-MS glovebox system. Since the economics of processing high-level radioactive waste (HLW) required the availability of an instrument to operate 24 hours a day throughout the year without any downtime, a second generation ICP glovebox assembly was designed, manufactured, and installed in 1995 using a Model JY-46P ICP. These two ICP glovebox systems continue to support vitrification of the HLW into canisters for storage. The ICP systems have been instrumental in monitoring vitrification batch processing. To date, remote sample preparation and

  7. Tantalum carbide etch characterization in inductively coupled Ar/Cl{sub 2}/HBr plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, H.; Rauf, S.; Luckowski, E.; Ventzek, P. L. G.

    2006-09-15

    The etching properties of tantalum carbide (TaC) in inductively coupled Ar/HBr/Cl{sub 2} plasmas are investigated in this article. Both etching experiments on patterned and blanket wafers and an integrated plasma equipment-feature scale computational model are utilized in this investigation. Results show that TaC etching is adequately described by the classical reactive ion etching mechanism, whereby etching occurs due to the synergistic effect of Cl or Br atoms and energetic ions. TaC etches faster in the presence of Cl relative to Br. The TaC etch rate is small in gas mixtures containing 5% of Cl{sub 2} or HBr and 95% of Ar, and it increases considerably as Cl{sub 2} or HBr concentration is increased. Although this etch rate increase is partially due to the availability of more Cl or Br, the chemical nature of chlorine (Cl{sub 2}{sup +},Cl{sup +}) or bromine (Br{sup +}) ions also plays a strong role. The TaC etch rate increases little if Cl{sub 2} or HBr fraction in Ar/Cl{sub 2} or Ar/HBr gas mixture, respectively, is increased beyond 25%. The TaC etch rate increases with rf bias power under all conditions. Scanning electron micrographs of TaC films etched using a patterned mask show that TaC sidewalls are tapered at about 77 deg. {+-}3 deg. and the angle does not change appreciably with gas mixture or rf bias power. It is determined that an angle dependent ion etching yield captures well the observed trends in TaC sidewall slope.

  8. The effect of pre-evaporation on ion distributions in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shulan; Beauchemin, Diane

    2006-02-01

    The connecting tube (2 or 5-mm i. d., 11-cm long) between the spray chamber and the torch was heated (to 400 °C) to investigate the effect of pre-evaporation on the distribution of ions in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Axial and radial profiles of analyte ions (Al +, V +, Cr +, Ni +, Zn +, Mn +, Zn +, As +, Se +, Mo +, Cd +, Sb +, La +, Pb +) in 1% HNO 3 as well as some polyatomic ions (LaO +, ArO +, ArN +, CO 2+) were simultaneously obtained on a time-of-flight ICP-MS instrument. Upon heating the connecting tube, the optimal axial position of all elements shifted closer to the load coil. Without the heated tube, 3.5 mm was the compromise axial position for multielemental analysis, which was optimal for 6 analytes. With the heated tube, this position became 1.5 mm, which was then optimal for 9 of the 14 analytes. Furthermore, the radial profiles, which were wide with a plateau in their middle without heating, became significantly narrower and Gaussian-like with a heated tube. This narrowing, which was most important for the 5-mm tube, slightly (by a factor of two at the most) yet significantly (at the 95% confidence level) improved the sensitivity of all elements but Mn upon optimisation of the axial position for compromise multi-element analysis. Furthermore, a concurrent decrease in the standard deviation of the blank was significant at the 95% confidence level for 9 of the 14 analytes. For most of the analytes, this translated into a two-fold to up to an order of magnitude improvement in detection limit, which is commensurate with a reduction of noise resulting from the smaller droplets entering the plasma after traversing the pre-evaporation tube.

  9. Electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements in a ring-shaped inductively coupled air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaolong, Wei; Haojun, Xu; Min, Lin; Chen, Su; Jianhai, Li

    2015-05-28

    An aerocraft with the surface, inlet and radome covered large-area inductive coupled plasma (ICP) can attenuate its radar echo effectively. The shape, thickness, and electron density (N{sub e}) distribution of ICP are critical to electromagnetic wave attenuation. In the paper, an air all-quartz ICP generator in size of 20 × 20 × 7 cm{sup 3} without magnetic confinement is designed. The discharge results show that the ICP is amorphous in E-mode and ring-shaped in H-mode. The structure of ICP stratifies into core region and edge halo in H-mode, and its width and thickness changes from power and pressure. Such phenomena are explained by the distribution of RF magnetic field, the diffusion of negative ions plasma and the variation of skin depth. In addition, the theoretical analysis shows that the N{sub e} achieves nearly uniform within the electronegative core and sharply steepens in the edge. The N{sub e} of core region is diagnosed by microwave interferometer under varied conditions (pressure in range of 10–50 Pa, power in 300–700 W). Furthermore, the electromagnetic wave attenuation measurements were carried out with the air ICP in the frequencies of 4–5 GHz. The results show that the interspaced ICP is still effective to wave attenuation, and the wave attenuation increases with the power and pressure. The measured attenuation is approximately in accordance with the calculation data of finite-different time-domain simulations.

  10. Induction plasma sprayed Sr and Mg doped nano hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti for bone implant.

    PubMed

    Roy, Mangal; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we report fabrication of strontium (Sr) and magnesium (Mg) doped hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on commercially pure titanium (Cp-Ti) substrates using inductively coupled radio frequency (RF) plasma spray. HA powder was doped with 1 wt % Sr (Sr-HA) and 1 wt % Mg (Mg-HA), heat treated at 800°C for 6 h and then used for plasma spray coating. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) analysis indicated that the coatings were primarily composed of phase pure crystalline HA. When compared to undoped HA coating, physical properties such as microstructure, grain size, and adhesive bond strength of the doped HA coatings did not change significantly. Microstructure of the coatings showed coherency in the structure with an average grain size of 200-280 μm HA particles, where each of the HA grains consisted of 20-30 nm sized particles. An average adhesive bond strength of 17 MPa ensured sufficient mechanical strength of the coatings. A chemistry dependent improvement in bone cell-coating interaction was noticed for doped coatings although it had minimal effect on physical properties of the coatings. In vitro cell-materials interactions using human fetal osteoblasts (hFOB) showed better cell attachment and proliferation on Sr-HA coatings compared to HA or Mg-HA coatings. Presence of Sr in the coating also stimulated hFOB cell differentiation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression. Improvement in bioactivity of Sr doped HA coatings on Ti without compromising its mechanical properties makes it an excellent material of choice for coated implant.

  11. Non-invasive in situ plasma monitoring of reactive gases using the floating harmonic method for inductively coupled plasma etching application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. H.; Kim, M. J.; Yoon, Y. S.

    2013-04-15

    The floating harmonic method was developed for in situ plasma diagnostics of allowing real time measurement of electron temperature (T{sub e}) and ion flux (J{sub ion}) without contamination of the probe from surface modification by reactive species. In this study, this novel non-invasive diagnostic system was studied to characterize inductively coupled plasma of reactive gases monitoring T{sub e} and J{sub ion} for investigating the optimum plasma etching conditions and controlling of the real-time plasma surface reaction in the range of 200-900 W source power, 10-100 W bias power, and 3-15 mTorr chamber pressure, respectively.

  12. A Plasma Rocket Demonstration on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petro, A.

    2002-01-01

    in the development of a magneto-plasma rocket for several years. This type of rocket could be used in the future to propel interplanetary spacecraft. One feature of this concept is the ability to vary its specific impulse so that it can be operated in a mode that maximizes propellant efficiency or a mode that maximizes thrust. For this reason the system is called the Variable Specific Impulse Magneto-plasma Rocket or VASIMR. This ability to vary specific impulse and thrust will allow for optimum low thrust interplanetary trajectories and results in shorter trip times than is possible with fixed specific impulse systems while preserving adequate payload margins. demonstrations are envisioned. A ground-based experiment of a low-power VASIMR prototype rocket is currently underway at the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory. The next step is a proposal to build and fly a 25-kilowatt VASIMR rocket as an external payload on the International Space Station. This experiment will provide an opportunity to demonstrate the performance of the rocket in space and measure the induced environment. The experiment will also utilize the space station for its intended purpose as a laboratory with vacuum conditions that cannot be matched by any laboratory on Earth. propulsion on the space station. An electric propulsion system like VASIMR, if provided with sufficient electrical power, could provide continuous drag force compensation for the space station. Drag compensation would eliminate the need for reboosting the station, an operation that will consume about 60 metric tons of propellant in a ten-year period. In contrast, an electric propulsion system would require very little propellant. In fact, a system like VASIMR can use waste hydrogen from the station's life support system as its propellant. This waste hydrogen is otherwise dumped overboard. Continuous drag compensation would also improve the microgravity conditions on the station. So electric propulsion can reduce propellant

  13. Speciation of chromium in waste water using ion chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zuliang; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravendra

    2007-04-30

    Ion chromatography (IC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was systematically investigated for determining the speciation of chromium in environmental samples. Firstly, the stability of complexes formed by Cr(III) with various aminopolycarboxylic acids was studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The results showed that [Cr(EDTA)](-) was stable in solution. Secondly, various mobile phases were examined to separate Cl(-) from chromium species by IC to avoid Cl(-) interference. The separation of [Cr(EDTA)](-) and Cr(VI) was achieved on a new anion-exchange column (G3154A/102) using a mobile phase containing 20mM NH(4)NO(3) and 10mM NH(4)H(2)PO(4) at pH 7.0 without Cl(-) interference. Detection limits for chromium species were below 0.2 microg/L with a direct injection of sample and without prior removal of interferences from the matrix. Finally, the proposed method was used for the determination of chromium species in contaminated waters.

  14. Isotope ratio analysis of individual sub-micrometer plutonium particles with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki; Suzuki, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Lee, Chi-Gyu; Kimura, Takaumi

    2010-12-15

    Information on plutonium isotope ratios in individual particles is of great importance for nuclear safeguards, nuclear forensics and so on. Although secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is successfully utilized for the analysis of individual uranium particles, the isobaric interference of americium-241 to plutonium-241 makes difficult to obtain accurate isotope ratios in individual plutonium particles. In the present work, an analytical technique by a combination of chemical separation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is developed and applied to isotope ratio analysis of individual sub-micrometer plutonium particles. The ICP-MS results for individual plutonium particles prepared from a standard reference material (NBL SRM-947) indicate that the use of a desolvation system for sample introduction improves the precision of isotope ratios. In addition, the accuracy of the (241)Pu/(239)Pu isotope ratio is much improved, owing to the chemical separation of plutonium and americium. In conclusion, the performance of the proposed ICP-MS technique is sufficient for the analysis of individual plutonium particles.

  15. Plutonium determination in seawater by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: A review.

    PubMed

    Cao, Liguo; Bu, Wenting; Zheng, Jian; Pan, Shaoming; Wang, Zhongtang; Uchida, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Knowing the concentration and isotopic ratio of Pu in seawater is of critical importance for assessing Pu contamination and investigating oceanic processes. In recent decades, the concentration of (239+240)Pu in seawater, particularly for surface seawater, has presented an exponential decreasing trend with time; thus determination of Pu in seawater has become a challenge nowadays. Here, we have summarized and critically discussed a variety of reported analytical methods for Pu determination in seawater sample based on inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analytical technique for rapid ultra-trace detection of Pu. Generally, pretreatments for seawater sample include co-precipitation, valence adjustment and chemical separation and purification procedures, all of which are comprehensively reviewed. Overall, the selected anion-exchange, extraction resins and operation condition are important for decontamination of interference from matrix elements and achieving satisfactory chemical yields. In addition, other mass spectrometric and radiometric detections are briefly addressed and compared with the focus on assessing ICP-MS. Finally, we discuss some issues and prospects in determination and application of Pu isotopes in seawater samples for future research.

  16. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry imaging of metals in experimental and clinical Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Boaru, Sorina Georgiana; Merle, Uta; Uerlings, Ricarda; Zimmermann, Astrid; Flechtenmacher, Christa; Willheim, Claudia; Eder, Elisabeth; Ferenci, Peter; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the liver does not properly release copper into bile, resulting in prominent copper accumulation in various tissues. Affected patients suffer from hepatic disorders and severe neurological defects. Experimental studies in mutant mice in which the copper-transporting ATPase gene (Atp7b) is disrupted revealed a drastic, time-dependent accumulation of hepatic copper that is accompanied by formation of regenerative nodes resembling cirrhosis. Therefore, these mice represent an excellent exploratory model for Wilson's disease. However, the precise time course in hepatic copper accumulation and its impact on other trace metals within the liver is yet poorly understood. We have recently established novel laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry protocols allowing quantitative metal imaging in human and murine liver tissue with high sensitivity, spatial resolution, specificity and quantification ability. By use of these techniques, we here aimed to comparatively analyse hepatic metal content in wild-type and Atp7b deficient mice during ageing. We demonstrate that the age-dependent accumulation of hepatic copper is strictly associated with a simultaneous increase in iron and zinc, while the intrahepatic concentration and distribution of other metals or metalloids is not affected. The same findings were obtained in well-defined human liver samples that were obtained from patients suffering from Wilson's disease. We conclude that in Wilson's disease the imbalances of hepatic copper during ageing are closely correlated with alterations in intrahepatic iron and zinc content.

  17. Inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometric determination of cadmium, copper, iron, lead, manganese and zinc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma atomic fluorescence spectrometric method is described for the determination of six elements in a variety of geological materials. Sixteen reference materials are analysed by this technique to demonstrate its use in geochemical exploration. Samples are decomposed with nitric, hydrofluoric and hydrochloric acids, and the residue dissolved in hydrochloric acid and diluted to volume. The elements are determined in two groups based on compatibility of instrument operating conditions and consideration of crustal abundance levels. Cadmium, Cu, Pb and Zn are determined as a group in the 50-ml sample solution under one set of instrument conditions with the use of scatter correction. Limitations of the scatter correction technique used with the fluorescence instrument are discussed. Iron and Mn are determined together using another set of instrumental conditions on a 1-50 dilution of the sample solution without the use of scatter correction. The ranges of concentration (??g g-1) of these elements in the sample that can be determined are: Cd, 0.3-500; Cu, 0.4-500; Fe, 85-250 000; Mn, 45-100 000; Pb, 5-10 000; and Zn, 0.4-300. The precision of the method is usually less than 5% relative standard deviation (RSD) over a wide concentration range and acceptable accuracy is shown by the agreement between values obtained and those recommended for the reference materials.

  18. 200-mm-diameter neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma etcher and silicon etching

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Tomohiro; Nukaga, Osamu; Ueki, Shinji; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Inamoto, Yoshimasa; Ohtake, Hiroto; Samukawa, Seiji

    2010-09-15

    The authors developed a neutral beam source consisting of a 200-mm-diameter inductively coupled plasma etcher and a graphite neutralization aperture plate based on the design of a neutral beam source that Samukawa et al. [Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., Part 2 40, L779 (2001)] developed. They measured flux and energy of neutral particles, ions, and photons using a silicon wafer with a thermocouple and a Faraday cup and calculated the neutralization efficiency. An Ar neutral beam flux of more than 1 mA/cm{sup 2} in equivalent current density and a neutralization efficiency of more than 99% were obtained. The spatial uniformity of the neutral beam flux was within {+-}6% within a 100 mm diameter. Silicon etching using a F{sub 2}-based neutral beam was done at an etch rate of about 47 nm/min, while Cl{sub 2}-based neutral beam realized completely no undercut. The uniformity of etch rate was less than {+-}5% within the area. The etch rate increased by applying bias power to the neutralization aperture plate, which shows that accelerated neutral beam was successfully obtained. These results indicate that the neutral beam source is scalable, making it possible to obtain a large-diameter and uniform neutral beam, which is inevitable for application to mass production.

  19. The survival of gunshot residues in cremated bone: an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Amadasi, Alberto; Merli, Daniele; Brandone, Alberto; Poppa, Pasquale; Gibelli, Daniele; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2013-07-01

    Gunshot residue (GSR) has been sought and demonstrated on many types of material and with many techniques. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) could be a useful method on difficult substrates, but a systematic study on burnt material has never been performed. Hence, this study aims at evaluating the usefulness and reliability of this method on burnt samples. Sixteen adult bovine ribs (eight with soft tissues, eight totally skeletonized) were shot using two kinds of projectile (both 9 mm full metal-jacketed or unjacketed). Then, every sample was led to complete calcination in an electric oven. The area of the gunshot entrance wound was swabbed and analyzed by ICP-OES; the results were also correlated with a previously published parallel study by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with an SEM-energy dispersive X-ray analyzer. ICP-OES proved to be very sensitive and reliable even on degraded material and can be an appropriate nondestructive method for detecting residues on difficult and delicate substrates such as burnt bone.

  20. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry imaging of metals in experimental and clinical Wilson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Boaru, Sorina Georgiana; Merle, Uta; Uerlings, Ricarda; Zimmermann, Astrid; Flechtenmacher, Christa; Willheim, Claudia; Eder, Elisabeth; Ferenci, Peter; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the liver does not properly release copper into bile, resulting in prominent copper accumulation in various tissues. Affected patients suffer from hepatic disorders and severe neurological defects. Experimental studies in mutant mice in which the copper-transporting ATPase gene (Atp7b) is disrupted revealed a drastic, time-dependent accumulation of hepatic copper that is accompanied by formation of regenerative nodes resembling cirrhosis. Therefore, these mice represent an excellent exploratory model for Wilson's disease. However, the precise time course in hepatic copper accumulation and its impact on other trace metals within the liver is yet poorly understood. We have recently established novel laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry protocols allowing quantitative metal imaging in human and murine liver tissue with high sensitivity, spatial resolution, specificity and quantification ability. By use of these techniques, we here aimed to comparatively analyse hepatic metal content in wild-type and Atp7b deficient mice during ageing. We demonstrate that the age-dependent accumulation of hepatic copper is strictly associated with a simultaneous increase in iron and zinc, while the intrahepatic concentration and distribution of other metals or metalloids is not affected. The same findings were obtained in well-defined human liver samples that were obtained from patients suffering from Wilson's disease. We conclude that in Wilson's disease the imbalances of hepatic copper during ageing are closely correlated with alterations in intrahepatic iron and zinc content. PMID:25704483

  1. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer with laser ablation metal ions release detection in the human mouth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueerova, Hana; Dostalova, Tatjana; Prochazkova, J.

    2002-06-01

    Presence of more dental alloys in oral cavity often causes pathological symptoms. Due to various and multi-faced symptomatology, they tend to be a source of significant problems not only for the patient but also for the dentist. Metal ions released from alloys can cause subjective and objective symptoms in mouth. The aim of this study was detection of metal elements presence in saliva. There were 4 groups of examined persons: with intact teeth (15 individuals) with metallic restorations, pathological currents 5-30 (mu) A, multi-faced subjective symptomatology and uncharacteristic objective diagnosis (32 patients), with metallic restorations and no subjective symptoms (14 persons) and with metallic restorations, without pathological currents and with problems related to galvanism (13 patients). Presence of 14 metal elements was checked by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer with laser ablation. Nd:YAG laser detector was used. There were significant differences in content of silver, gold and mercury between persons with intact teeth and other three groups. There were no differences found between subjects with and without galvanic currents, and presence of subjective and objective symptoms.

  2. Growth Mechanisms of Inductively-Coupled Plasma Torch Synthesized Silicon Nanowires and their associated photoluminescence properties.

    PubMed

    Agati, M; Amiard, G; Le Borgne, V; Castrucci, P; Dolbec, R; De Crescenzi, M; El Khakani, M A; Boninelli, S

    2016-11-22

    Ultra-thin Silicon Nanowires (SiNWs) were produced by means of an industrial inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) based process. Two families of SiNWs have been identified, namely long SiNWs (up to 2-3 micron in length) and shorter ones (~100 nm). SiNWs were found to consist of a Si core (with diameter as thin as 2 nm) and a silica shell, of which the thickness varies from 5 to 20 nm. By combining advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, we demonstrate that the growth of the long SiNWs occurred via the Oxide Assisted Growth (OAG) mechanism, while the Vapor Liquid Solid (VLS) mechanism is responsible for the growth of shorter ones. Energy filtered TEM analyses revealed, in some cases, the existence of chapelet-like Si nanocrystals embedded in an otherwise silica nanowire. Such nanostructures are believed to result from the exposure of some OAG SiNWs to high temperatures prevailing inside the reactor. Finally, the intense photoluminescence (PL) of these ICP-grown SiNWs in the 620-950 nm spectral range is a clear indication of the occurrence of quantum confinement. Such a PL emission is in accordance with the TEM results which revealed that the size of nanostructures are indeed below the exciton Bohr radius of silicon.

  3. Bioimaging of metals by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Becker, J Sabine; Zoriy, Miroslav; Matusch, Andreas; Wu, Bei; Salber, Dagmar; Palm, Christoph; Becker, J Susanne

    2010-01-01

    The distribution analysis of (essential, beneficial, or toxic) metals (e.g., Cu, Fe, Zn, Pb, and others), metalloids, and non-metals in biological tissues is of key interest in life science. Over the past few years, the development and application of several imaging mass spectrometric techniques has been rapidly growing in biology and medicine. Especially, in brain research metalloproteins are in the focus of targeted therapy approaches of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, or stroke, or tumor growth. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) using double-focusing sector field (LA-ICP-SFMS) or quadrupole-based mass spectrometers (LA-ICP-QMS) has been successfully applied as a powerful imaging (mapping) technique to produce quantitative images of detailed regionally specific element distributions in thin tissue sections of human or rodent brain. Imaging LA-ICP-QMS was also applied to investigate metal distributions in plant and animal sections to study, for example, the uptake and transport of nutrient and toxic elements or environmental contamination. The combination of imaging LA-ICP-MS of metals with proteomic studies using biomolecular mass spectrometry identifies metal-containing proteins and also phosphoproteins. Metal-containing proteins were imaged in a two-dimensional gel after electrophoretic separation of proteins (SDS or Blue Native PAGE). Recent progress in LA-ICP-MS imaging as a stand-alone technique and in combination with MALDI/ESI-MS for selected life science applications is summarized.

  4. Simultaneous multielemental analysis of some environmental and biological samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hee, S.S.Q.; Boyle, J.R.

    1988-05-15

    The Parr bomb technique is found to be the preferred acid digestion method for multielemental analysis by simultaneous inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) when compared with microwave and hot plate methods for many environmental and biological specimens, but especially for the latter. One digestion alone often did not produce quantitative results compared with a sequential digestion scheme. The digestions were then refined to be as similar as possible for the various substrates studied. The interference of carbon on As and Se had to be corrected at less than or equal to 3000 ..mu..g of C/mL in the analysis solution, and thus the C content had to be monitored to assess the efficiency of the digestions and to determine if interelemental correction for C presence was required. The C correction was adequate in the range 3000-10,000 ..mu..g of C/ml. The use of modified k values was demonstrated to provide accuracy and had to be used for ICP-AES spectrometers where background corrections were performed first for fixed channels. The results on Cincinnati soils and feces of Cincinnati children showed that Si and Ti were possible tracer elements for soil ingestion by the children.

  5. Determination of total iodine in foods and dietary supplements using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Darryl; Zywicki, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A method was developed and validated for the determination of total iodine in a wide variety of food products and dietary supplements. The method involves a unique sample digestion with a KOH solution in an oven or by using an open-vessel microwave system. After digestion, a stabilizer is added and the solution is taken to volume, then filtered and analyzed either directly or after dilution. The amount of iodine is determined with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The method was validated by experiments to determine its precision, accuracy, linearity, specificity, ruggedness, and robustness. The LOQ of this method is 25-50 microg/kg. The method demonstrated an average RSD of 2.27% during analysis of milk powder and 4.30% during analysis of a dietary supplement tablet reference material. The accuracy of the method as determined with these same reference materials was 100 and 94.2%, respectively. The method has been used successfully on commodity foods, processed foods, dairy products, pet food, infant formula, animal feed, mineral premixes, and a variety of dietary supplements.

  6. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) Applications in Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Chahrour, Osama; Malone, John

    2016-12-12

    Recent advances in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) hyphenated to different separation techniques have promoted it as a valuable tool in protein/peptide quantification. These emerging ICP-MS applications allow absolute quantification by measuring specific elemental responses. One approach quantifies elements already present in the structure of the target peptide (e.g. phosphorus and sulphur) as natural tags. Quantification of these natural tags allows the elucidation of the degree of protein phosphorylation in addition to absolute protein quantification. A separate approach is based on utilising bi-functional labelling substances (those containing ICP-MS detectable elements), that form a covalent chemical bond with the protein thus creating analogs which are detectable by ICP-MS. Based on the previously established stoichiometries of the labelling reagents, quantification can be achieved. This technique is very useful for the design of precise multiplexed quantitation schemes to address the challenges of biomarker screening and discovery. This review discusses the capabilities and different strategies to implement ICP-MS in the field of quantitative proteomics.

  7. Determination of technetium-99 in aqueous samples by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Beals, D.M.

    1992-09-01

    An isotope dilution/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric method (ID/ICP-MS) for measuring the concentration of technetium-99 in aqueous samples was developed at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). The procedure is faster than radiometric techniques, is also less subject to interferences, and has equal or better detection limits. It is currently being used to measure the concentration of {sup 99}Tc in samples of Savannah River water collected in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site. In this method, one liter samples of water are spiked with {sup 97}Tc. After equilibration, the technetium is extracted from the sample with a chromatographic resin. Interfering elements, molybdenum and ruthenium, are either not retained by the resin or are washed off with dilute nitric acid. The technetium is then eluted with more concentrated nitric acid, and the {sup 99}Tc/{sup 97}Tc ratio in the eluant is measured with an ICP-MS. The {sup 99}Tc concentration in the original sample is calculated from the {sup 99}Tc/{sup 97}Tc ratio. The chemical recovery of the extraction procedure is greater than 90%. The detection limit of the instrument, taken as three times the background counts at m/z = 99, is 0.6 part per trillion (ppt). The detection limit of the procedure, taken as three times the standard deviation of several reagent blank analyses, is 0.33 pCi/L.

  8. Determination of technetium-99 in aqueous samples by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Beals, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    An isotope dilution/inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric method (ID/ICP-MS) for measuring the concentration of technetium-99 in aqueous samples was developed at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). The procedure is faster than radiometric techniques, is also less subject to interferences, and has equal or better detection limits. It is currently being used to measure the concentration of {sup 99}Tc in samples of Savannah River water collected in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site. In this method, one liter samples of water are spiked with {sup 97}Tc. After equilibration, the technetium is extracted from the sample with a chromatographic resin. Interfering elements, molybdenum and ruthenium, are either not retained by the resin or are washed off with dilute nitric acid. The technetium is then eluted with more concentrated nitric acid, and the {sup 99}Tc/{sup 97}Tc ratio in the eluant is measured with an ICP-MS. The {sup 99}Tc concentration in the original sample is calculated from the {sup 99}Tc/{sup 97}Tc ratio. The chemical recovery of the extraction procedure is greater than 90%. The detection limit of the instrument, taken as three times the background counts at m/z = 99, is 0.6 part per trillion (ppt). The detection limit of the procedure, taken as three times the standard deviation of several reagent blank analyses, is 0.33 pCi/L.

  9. In situ determination of the static inductance and resistance of a plasma focus capacitor bank.

    PubMed

    Saw, S H; Lee, S; Roy, F; Chong, P L; Vengadeswaran, V; Sidik, A S M; Leong, Y W; Singh, A

    2010-05-01

    The static (unloaded) electrical parameters of a capacitor bank are of utmost importance for the purpose of modeling the system as a whole when the capacitor bank is discharged into its dynamic electromagnetic load. Using a physical short circuit across the electromagnetic load is usually technically difficult and is unnecessary. The discharge can be operated at the highest pressure permissible in order to minimize current sheet motion, thus simulating zero dynamic load, to enable bank parameters, static inductance L(0), and resistance r(0) to be obtained using lightly damped sinusoid equations given the bank capacitance C(0). However, for a plasma focus, even at the highest permissible pressure it is found that there is significant residual motion, so that the assumption of a zero dynamic load introduces unacceptable errors into the determination of the circuit parameters. To overcome this problem, the Lee model code is used to fit the computed current trace to the measured current waveform. Hence the dynamics is incorporated into the solution and the capacitor bank parameters are computed using the Lee model code, and more accurate static bank parameters are obtained.

  10. Using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for calibration transfer between environmental CRMs.

    PubMed

    Turk, G C; Yu, L L; Salit, M L; Guthrie, W F

    2001-06-01

    Multielement analyses of environmental reference materials have been performed using existing certified reference materials (CRMs) as calibration standards for inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The analyses have been performed using a high-performance methodology that results in comparison measurement uncertainties that are significantly less than the uncertainties of the certified values of the calibration CRM. Consequently, the determined values have uncertainties that are very nearly equivalent to the uncertainties of the calibration CRM. Several uses of this calibration transfer are proposed, including, re-certification measurements of replacement CRMs, establishing traceability of one CRM to another, and demonstrating the equivalence of two CRMs. RM 8704, a river sediment, was analyzed using SRM 2704, Buffalo River Sediment, as the calibration standard. SRM 1632c, Trace Elements in Bituminous Coal, which is a replacement for SRM 1632b, was analyzed using SRM 1632b as the standard. SRM 1635, Trace Elements in Subbituminous Coal, was also analyzed using SRM 1632b as the standard.

  11. Fundamental and methodological investigations for the improvement of elemental analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass soectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, Christopher Hysjulien

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation describes a variety of studies meant to improve the analytical performance of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation (LA) ICP-MS. The emission behavior of individual droplets and LA generated particles in an ICP is studied using a high-speed, high frame rate digital camera. Phenomena are observed during the ablation of silicate glass that would cause elemental fractionation during analysis by ICP-MS. Preliminary work for ICP torch developments specifically tailored for the improvement of LA sample introduction are presented. An abnormal scarcity of metal-argon polyatomic ions (MAr{sup +}) is observed during ICP-MS analysis. Evidence shows that MAr{sup +} ions are dissociated by collisions with background gas in a shockwave near the tip of the skimmer cone. Method development towards the improvement of LA-ICP-MS for environmental monitoring is described. A method is developed to trap small particles in a collodion matrix and analyze each particle individually by LA-ICP-MS.

  12. Testing of Diode-Clamping in an Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toftul, Alexandra; Polzin, Kurt A.; Martin, Adam K.; Hudgins, Jerry L.

    2014-01-01

    Testing of a 5.5 kV silicon (Si) diode and 5.8 kV prototype silicon carbide (SiC) diode in an inductive pulsed plasma thruster (IPPT) circuit was performed to obtain a comparison of the resulting circuit recapture efficiency,eta(sub r), defined as the percentage of the initial charge energy remaining on the capacitor bank after the diode interrupts the current. The diode was placed in a pulsed circuit in series with a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) switch, and the voltages across different components and current waveforms were collected over a range of capacitor charge voltages. Reverse recovery parameters, including turn-off time and peak reverse recovery current, were measured and capacitor voltage waveforms were used to determine the recapture efficiency for each case. The Si fast recovery diode in the circuit was shown to yield a recapture efficiency of up to 20% for the conditions tested, while the SiC diode further increased recapture efficiency to nearly 30%. The data presented show that fast recovery diodes operate on a timescale that permits them to clamp the discharge quickly after the first half cycle, supporting the idea that diode-clamping in IPPT circuit reduces energy dissipation that occurs after the first half cycle

  13. Direct solid sampling of fire assay beads by spark ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoven, R. L.; Nam, Sang-Ho; Montaser, Akbar; Doughten, M. W.; Dorrzapf, A. F.

    1995-06-01

    A spark-based, solid-sampling cell is described for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The cell is devised for the direct sampling of gold and silver beads produced by the classical lead fire assay procedure. The sampler produces a solid aerosol composed of submicron-sized vapor condensates and small (< 2 μm) spherules. In contrast to solution nebulization, the mass spectrum for spark-ICP-MS is relatively free of interfering metal oxide, polyatomic, and multiply-charged ions. The measurement precision is 3% RSD for Pt, Pd, and Rh preconcentrated into fire assay beads, but is 6% RSD for Ir due to its heterogeneous distribution in a silver bead. Detection limits determined for Pt, Pd, Rh, and Ir in fire assay beads range from 0.6 μg/g (Pt) to 1.2 μg/g (Pd). Calibration curves for these elements are linear up to the highest concentration in the bead studied (2000 μg/g). The quantitative potential of the method is evaluated using the South African Reference Material (SARM-7) geologic standard.

  14. Slurry nebulization for the analysis of gypsum and cement by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McCrindle, Robert I; Marjanovic, Ljiljana

    2002-12-01

    The usual form of presentation for a sample to be analyzed by an inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer is in the form of a liquid. For the analysis of solids, this involves a dissolution step and in the case of complex matrices this may be long and difficult. Should it be possible to analyse the sample without prior dissolution, then the problems associated with obtaining a solution would be resolved. A method for analyzing samples is to make use of slurry nebulization. Samples with complex matrices, such as cement and gypsum were selected and analysed as in the form of a slurry. Using different concentrations of a certified reference materials, calibration curves were obtained, from which the unknown samples could be determined directly. Use of aqueous solutions for calibration was also investigated. The method was evaluated using other reference materials or results obtained by an independent laboratory using different technique for the analysis. The slurry method was found to be accurate and precise.

  15. Growth Mechanisms of Inductively-Coupled Plasma Torch Synthesized Silicon Nanowires and their associated photoluminescence properties

    PubMed Central

    Agati, M.; Amiard, G.; Le Borgne, V.; Castrucci, P.; Dolbec, R.; De Crescenzi, M.; El Khakani, M. A.; Boninelli, S.

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-thin Silicon Nanowires (SiNWs) were produced by means of an industrial inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) based process. Two families of SiNWs have been identified, namely long SiNWs (up to 2–3 micron in length) and shorter ones (~100 nm). SiNWs were found to consist of a Si core (with diameter as thin as 2 nm) and a silica shell, of which the thickness varies from 5 to 20 nm. By combining advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, we demonstrate that the growth of the long SiNWs occurred via the Oxide Assisted Growth (OAG) mechanism, while the Vapor Liquid Solid (VLS) mechanism is responsible for the growth of shorter ones. Energy filtered TEM analyses revealed, in some cases, the existence of chapelet-like Si nanocrystals embedded in an otherwise silica nanowire. Such nanostructures are believed to result from the exposure of some OAG SiNWs to high temperatures prevailing inside the reactor. Finally, the intense photoluminescence (PL) of these ICP-grown SiNWs in the 620–950 nm spectral range is a clear indication of the occurrence of quantum confinement. Such a PL emission is in accordance with the TEM results which revealed that the size of nanostructures are indeed below the exciton Bohr radius of silicon. PMID:27874057

  16. Aerosol emission monitoring in the production of silicon carbide nanoparticles by induction plasma synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Drew; Leparoux, Marc; Jaeggi, Christian; Buha, Jelena; Pui, David Y. H.; Wang, Jing

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the synthesis of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles in a prototype inductively coupled thermal plasma reactor and other supporting processes, such as the handling of precursor material, the collection of nanoparticles, and the cleaning of equipment, were monitored for particle emissions and potential worker exposure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of engineering controls and best practice guidelines developed for the production and handling of nanoparticles, identify processes which result in a nanoparticle release, characterize these releases, and suggest possible administrative or engineering controls which may eliminate or control the exposure source. No particle release was detected during the synthesis and collection of SiC nanoparticles and the cleaning of the reactor. This was attributed to most of these processes occurring in closed systems operated at slight underpressure. Other tasks occurring in more open spaces, such as the disconnection of a filter assembly from the reactor system and the use of compressed air for the cleaning of filters where synthesized SiC nanoparticles were collected, resulted in releases of submicrometer particles with a mode size of 170-180 nm. Observation of filter samples under scanning electron microscope confirmed that the particles were agglomerates of SiC nanoparticles.

  17. Characterization of microconcentric nebulizer uptake rates for capillary electrophoresis inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanes, Enrique G.; Miller-Ihli, Nancy J.

    2003-05-01

    There is demonstrated interest in combining capillary electrophoresis (CE) with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for speciation determinations. When self-aspirating nebulizers are used for this application, it is important to offset the suction effect to avoid degradation of the separation. In this study, sample uptake rates for three microconcentric nebulizers of the same model, in combination with a cyclonic spray chamber, were characterized and compared for future utilization in CE-ICP-MS interfaces. The specific model studied was a MicroMist with a nominal uptake rate of 100 μl/min at 1 l/min argon gas flow rate per the manufacturer's specifications. Sample uptake rates at various nebulizer gas flows were measured by aspirating water from a weighed container and calculating the uptake rate in microliter per minute. The nebulizers studied provided good reproducibility from day to day, but a comparison of the different nebulizers reflected a significant difference in performance. A characteristic observed during the study was that uptake rates decreased with increasing nebulizer gas flow. This can be used for sample introduction for CE-ICP-MS. Interestingly, very different performance was observed when comparing the three different nebulizers of the same model. Uptake rates showed strong dependence on argon gas flow rates and the dimensions of the sample uptake tubing.

  18. Growth Mechanisms of Inductively-Coupled Plasma Torch Synthesized Silicon Nanowires and their associated photoluminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agati, M.; Amiard, G.; Le Borgne, V.; Castrucci, P.; Dolbec, R.; de Crescenzi, M.; El Khakani, M. A.; Boninelli, S.

    2016-11-01

    Ultra-thin Silicon Nanowires (SiNWs) were produced by means of an industrial inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) based process. Two families of SiNWs have been identified, namely long SiNWs (up to 2–3 micron in length) and shorter ones (~100 nm). SiNWs were found to consist of a Si core (with diameter as thin as 2 nm) and a silica shell, of which the thickness varies from 5 to 20 nm. By combining advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, we demonstrate that the growth of the long SiNWs occurred via the Oxide Assisted Growth (OAG) mechanism, while the Vapor Liquid Solid (VLS) mechanism is responsible for the growth of shorter ones. Energy filtered TEM analyses revealed, in some cases, the existence of chapelet-like Si nanocrystals embedded in an otherwise silica nanowire. Such nanostructures are believed to result from the exposure of some OAG SiNWs to high temperatures prevailing inside the reactor. Finally, the intense photoluminescence (PL) of these ICP-grown SiNWs in the 620–950 nm spectral range is a clear indication of the occurrence of quantum confinement. Such a PL emission is in accordance with the TEM results which revealed that the size of nanostructures are indeed below the exciton Bohr radius of silicon.

  19. Rapidly removing grinding damage layer on fused silica by inductively coupled plasma processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Heng; Zhou, Lin; Xie, Xuhui; Shi, Baolu; Xiong, Haobin

    2016-10-01

    During the conventional optical shaping process of fused silica, lapping is generally used to remove grinding damage layer. But this process is of low efficiency, it cannot meet the demand of large aperture optical components. Therefore, Inductively Coupled Plasma Processing (ICPP) was proposed to remove grinding damage layer instead of lapping. ICPP is a non-contact, deterministic figuring technology performed at atmospheric pressure. The process benefits from its ability to simultaneously remove sub-surface damage (SSD) while imparting the desired figure to the surface with high material remove rate. The removing damage capability of ICPP has preliminarily been confirmed on medium size optical surfaces made of fused silica, meanwhile serious edge warping was found. This paper focused on edge effect and a technique has been designed to compensate for these difficulties. Then it was demonstrated on a large aperture fused silica mirror (Long320mm×Wide370mm×High50mm), the removal depth was 30.2μm and removal rate got 6.6mm3/min. The results indicate that ICPP can rapidly remove damage layer on the fused silica induced by the previous grinding process and edge effect is effective controlled.

  20. Separation Of Uranium And Plutonium Isotopes For Measurement By Multi Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Martinelli, R E; Hamilton, T F; Williams, R W; Kehl, S R

    2009-03-29

    Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopes in coral soils, contaminated by nuclear weapons testing in the northern Marshall Islands, were isolated by ion-exchange chromatography and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The soil samples were spiked with {sup 233}U and {sup 242}Pu tracers, dissolved in minerals acids, and U and Pu isotopes isolated and purified on commercially available ion-exchange columns. The ion-exchange technique employed a TEVA{reg_sign} column coupled to a UTEVA{reg_sign} column. U and Pu isotope fractions were then further isolated using separate elution schemes, and the purified fractions containing U and Pu isotopes analyzed sequentially using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MCICP-MS). High precision measurements of {sup 234}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 236}U/{sup 235}U, and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu in soil samples were attained using the described methodology and instrumentation, and provide a basis for conducting more detailed assessments of the behavior and transfer of uranium and plutonium in the environment.

  1. Laser-ablation sampling for inductively coupled plasma distance-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W.; Dennis, Elise; Ray, Steven J.; Enke, Christie G.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma distance-of-flight mass spectrometer (ICP-DOFMS) has been coupled with laser-ablation (LA) sample introduction for the elemental analysis of solids. ICP-DOFMS is well suited for the analysis of laser-generated aerosols because it offers both high-speed mass analysis and simultaneous multi-elemental detection. Here, we evaluate the analytical performance of the LA-ICP-DOFMS instrument, equipped with a microchannel plate-based imaging detector, for the measurement of steady-state LA signals, as well as transient signals produced from single LA events. Steady-state detection limits are 1 mg g1, and absolute single-pulse LA detection limits are 200 fg for uranium; the system is shown capable of performing time-resolved single-pulse LA analysis. By leveraging the benefits of simultaneous multi-elemental detection, we also attain a good shot-to-shot reproducibility of 6% relative standard deviation (RSD) and isotope-ratio precision of 0.3% RSD with a 10 s integration time.

  2. Comparison of sample preservation methods for clinical trace element analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bornhorst, Joshua A; Hunt, John W; Urry, Francis M; McMillin, Gwen A

    2005-04-01

    The effects of chemical additives and storage temperatures on measurement of 16 trace elements in urine by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were evaluated. A 24-hour urine specimen was supplemented with concentrations of the elements. Aliquots containing 1 of 4 chemical additives were stored at 3 different temperatures in sealed polypropylene containers. Elemental concentrations were determined by ICP-MS for the resulting samples after 1, 2, 8, and 65 days of storage. Initial element concentrations measured within 8 hours of specimen preparation were consistent with expected concentrations (except for aluminum). For most elements, preservation and storage conditions yielded consistent measured concentrations throughout the experiment. Notable exceptions were for aluminum (general rise over time) and mercury (general decrease over time). Adding boric acid and potassium pyrosulfate resulted in sample contamination; elemental contamination was concentration-dependent for both. Although little microbial contamination was observed during the experiment, refrigeration of samples is recommended to curtail bacterial growth in nonsterile specimens. In light of these results, refrigerated urine storage without the use of chemical additives is an effective preservation method for ICP-MS analysis of many trace elements.

  3. Determination of vanadium by reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bednar, A J

    2009-04-30

    Recent advances in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) have included the addition of interference reduction technologies, such as collision and reaction cells, to improve its detection capability for certain elements that suffer from polyatomic interferences. The principle behind reaction cell (RC)-ICP-MS is to remove a particular polyatomic interference by dissociation or formation of a different polyatomic species that no longer interferes with the analyte of interest. However, some interferences cannot be removed by commonly reported reaction gases, such as hydrogen, oxygen, or methane, necessitating using more reactive and hazardous gases, such as ammonia. The current study investigates oxygen as a reaction gas in RC-ICP-MS to specifically react with vanadium analyte ions, rather than the interferents, to produce a polyatomic analyte species and thereby provide a way to analyze for vanadium in complex environmental matrices. The technique has been tested on a series of river water, tap water, and synthetic laboratory samples, and shown to be successful in vanadium analyses in high chloride and sulfate matrices. The zinc isobaric interference on the new vanadium oxide analyte at m/z 67 is also investigated, and can be corrected by using a standard mathematical correction equation. The results of this study further increase the utility of RC-ICP-MS analytical techniques for complex environmental matrices.

  4. Studies of selenium and xenon in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bricker, Tonya

    1994-07-27

    Since its development, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been a widely used analytical technique. ICP-MS offers low detection limits, easy determination of isotope ratios, and simple mass spectra from analyte elements. ICP-MS has been successfully employed for many applications including geological, environmental, biological, metallurgical, food, medical, and industrial. One specific application important to many areas of study involves elemental speciation by using ICP-MS as an element specific detector interfaced to liquid chromatography. Elemental speciation information is important and cannot be obtained by atomic spectrometric methods alone which measure only the total concentration of the element present. Part 1 of this study describes the speciation of selenium in human serum by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and detection by ICP-MS. Although ICP-MS has been widely sued, room for improvement still exists. Difficulties in ICP-MS include noise in the background, matrix effects, clogging of the sampling orifice with deposited solids, and spectral interference caused by polyatomic ions. Previous work has shown that the addition of xenon into the central channel of the ICP decreases polyatomic ion levels. In Part 2 of this work, a fundamental study involving the measurement of the excitation temperature is carried out to further understand xenon`s role in the reduction of polyatomic ions. 155 refs.

  5. Scandium analysis in silicon-containing minerals by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitty-Léveillé, Laurence; Drouin, Elisabeth; Constantin, Marc; Bazin, Claude; Larivière, Dominic

    2016-04-01

    This article reports on the development of a new method for the accurate and precise determination of the amount of scandium, Sc, in silicon-containing minerals, based on the use of tandem quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS). The tandem quadrupole instrument enables new mass filtering configurations, which can reduce polyatomic interferences during the determination of Sc in mineral matrices. He and O2 were used and compared as collision and reaction gases for the removal of interferences at m/z 45 and 61. Using helium gas was ineffective to overcome all of the spectral interferences observed at m/z 45 and particularly for Si-based interferences. However, conversion of Sc+ ions into ScO+ ions (after bombardment with O2 in the octopole reaction system coupled with the use of the instrument in MS/MS mass-shift mode) provided interference-free conditions and sufficiently low limits of detection, down to 3 ng L- 1, to accurately detect Sc. The accuracy of the proposed methodology was assessed by analyzing five different reference materials (BX-N, OKA-2, NIM-L, SY-3 and GH).

  6. A tightly coupled non-equilibrium model for inductively coupled radio-frequency plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Munafò, A. Alfuhaid, S. A. Panesi, M.; Cambier, J.-L.

    2015-10-07

    The objective of the present work is the development of a tightly coupled magneto-hydrodynamic model for inductively coupled radio-frequency plasmas. Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) effects are described based on a hybrid State-to-State approach. A multi-temperature formulation is used to account for thermal non-equilibrium between translation of heavy-particles and vibration of molecules. Excited electronic states of atoms are instead treated as separate pseudo-species, allowing for non-Boltzmann distributions of their populations. Free-electrons are assumed Maxwellian at their own temperature. The governing equations for the electro-magnetic field and the gas properties (e.g., chemical composition and temperatures) are written as a coupled system of time-dependent conservation laws. Steady-state solutions are obtained by means of an implicit Finite Volume method. The results obtained in both LTE and NLTE conditions over a broad spectrum of operating conditions demonstrate the robustness of the proposed coupled numerical method. The analysis of chemical composition and temperature distributions along the torch radius shows that: (i) the use of the LTE assumption may lead to an inaccurate prediction of the thermo-chemical state of the gas, and (ii) non-equilibrium phenomena play a significant role close the walls, due to the combined effects of Ohmic heating and macroscopic gradients.

  7. Atomic Mineral Characteristics of Indonesian Osteoporosis by High-Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Zairin; Sumitro, Sutiman Bambang; Hidayat, Mohammad; Rahim, Agus Hadian; Sabarudin, Akhmad; Umemura, Tomonari

    2012-01-01

    Clinical research indicates that negative calcium balance is associated with low bone mass, rapid bone loss, and high fracture rates. However, some studies revealed that not only calcium is involved in bone strengthening as risk factor of fracture osteoporosis. Thus, in this report, the difference of metallic and nonmetallic elements in osteoporosis and normal bones was studied by high-resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS). The influence of these elements on bone metabolic processes is also discussed. Inclusion criteria of bone samples consist of postmenopausal woman, trabecular bone fracture, normal and osteoporosis BMD value, and no history of previous disease. The results showed that the concentration of B, Al, S, V, Co, Mo, Te, Ba, La, Ni, As, and Ca/P ratio is higher in osteoporosis than normal. These atomic minerals have negative role to imbalance between bone resorption and bone formation activity. Conversely, concentrations of Na, Mg, P, K, Ca, Cr, Pd, Ag, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Pb, and Se are lower in osteoporosis than in normal bones. Among these atoms, known to have important roles in bone structure, we found involvement of atomic mineral and calcium which are considerable to contribute to osteoporotic phenomena. PMID:22654598

  8. Analysis of fertilizers for major, micro, and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. B., Jr.

    The concentrations of nine elements (B, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P, and Zn) in 34 Magruder Fertilizer Standards were determined by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) emission spectroscopy, and the results compared favorably with the known concentrations for all the elements. In addition to these nine fertilizer elements, six others (AI, Cd, Cr, Na, Ni, and Pb) were determined in the same analysis, although results could only be compared to similar analyses made by two other laboratories employing ICP. All 15 elements were also determined in 12 spent acids used to manufacture liquid fertilizer and analysis results compared among the three laboratories. Analysis by ICP spectroscopy of fertilizer materials with wide ranges of elemental contents was found to be a rapid analysis technique which can give comparable results with those obtained by the more laborious AOAC procedures as well as the opportunity to determine other than only the important fertilizer elements. Collaborative study is recommended for ICP determination of the elements of importance in fertilizers for adaptation of the ICP technique by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists.

  9. Profiling metals in Cordyceps sinensis by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xin; Hu, Hankun; Zheng, Baogeng; Arslan, Zikri; Huang, Hung-Chung; Mao, Weidong; Liu, Yi-Ming

    2017-01-28

    Cordyceps sinensis (C. sinensis) is a natural product that has diverse nutritional and medicinal values. Since the availability of natural C. sinensis becomes limited its authentication and quality control is of high significance. Herein we report on profiling of metals in C. sinensis by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The analysis reveals that C. sinensis contains a wide array of essential elements, including P, Mg, Zn, Cu, Fe, etc. Toxic metals detected are Cd, Pb, and As. In all five samples analyzed Pb contents are below 2.0 ppm. Arsenic level in C. sinensis caterpillar is significantly higher than that in its mycelium and varies from 3.0 to 32 ppm likely due to soil contamination. It's for the first time demonstrated in this work that clustering analysis on the proposed metal profiles consisting of 24 elements is very useful to identify "abnormal" C. sinensis samples, thus adding another dimension to the effective means for authentication and quality assessment of this highly demanded previous natural product.

  10. Reactivity and analytical performance of oxygen as cell gas in inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgilio, Alex; Amais, Renata S.; Amaral, Clarice D. B.; Fialho, Lucimar L.; Schiavo, Daniela; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.

    2016-12-01

    The reactivity and analytical performance of O2 as cell gas in inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry was investigated. Selected analytes in a wide mass range were divided in three groups according to their reactivity: G1 represents elements with high oxygen affinity (Ce, La, P, Sc, Ti, and Y), G2 contains elements that may partially react with oxygen (As, Ba, Mo, Si, Sr, and V), and G3 comprises elements expected to be less reactive towards oxygen (Al, Bi, Cu, Mg, Pb, and Pd). On-mass and mass-shift modes were evaluated by monitoring atomic and metal oxide ions, respectively. Analytical signal profiles, oxide percentages, sensitivities and limits of detection for oxygen flow rates varying from 0.1 to 1.0 mL min- 1 were also studied. Group 1 elements plus As and V presented better sensitivities and LODs when measuring oxides, which were the major species for all flow rates evaluated. Molybdenum and Si oxides presented intermediate behavior and MoO fraction was up to 47% and limit of detection was the same as that obtained in on-mass mode. For others G2 and G3 elements, on-mass mode presented higher sensitivity and better LODs, with estimated oxide contents lower than 10%. In most cases, increasing oxygen flow rates led to lower sensitivities and worse LODs.

  11. [Determination of blue ballpoint pen ink by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Ma, Dong; Shen, Min; Luo, Yi-wen; Bo, Jun; Xu, Che; Zhuo, Xian-yi

    2010-10-01

    To establish an identification method for the forensic analysis of blue ballpoint ink by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), 95 kinds of blue ballpoint pen from different manufacturers were detected. These blue ballpoint pens were classified into 34 groups according to their metal element components, among which, 26 groups can be directly distinguished according to the types of metal element components contained in the ballpoint pen, the other groups can be distinguished by different element response ratios. Meanwhile the examination result on the papers showed that the papers have no impact on the ink handwriting analysis. Experimental results showed that the method's reproducibility is good and precision is less than 10%. This method has better identification ability than traditional identification technology for questioned document. Eighty eight kinds of blue ballpoint pen out of the total 95 selected kinds can be distinguished with this method. The established method is simple, rapid, with good precision, and almost has no damage to the sample. It is particularly suitable for the demand of identification of blue ballpoint pen in forensic science.

  12. Oxygen bomb combustion of biological samples for inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Gilberto B.; Carrilho, Elma Neide V. M.; Oliveira, Camila V.; Nogueira, Ana Rita A.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.

    2002-12-01

    A rapid sample preparation method is proposed for decomposition of milk powder, corn bran, bovine and fish tissues, containing certified contents of the analytes. The procedure involves sample combustion in a commercial stainless steel oxygen bomb operating at 25 bar. Most of the samples were decomposed within 5 min. Diluted nitric acid or water-soluble tertiary amines 10% v/v were used as absorption solutions. Calcium, Cu, K, Mg, Na, P, S and Zn were recovered with the bomb washings and determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Ethanol mixed with paraffin was used as a combustion aid to allow complete combustion. A cooling step prior releasing of the bomb valve was employed to increase the efficiency of sample combustion. Iodine was also determined in milk samples spiked with potassium iodide to evaluate the volatilization and collection of iodine in amine CFA-C medium and the feasibility of its determination by ICP-OES with axial view configuration. Most of the element recoveries in the samples were between 91 and 105% and the certified and found contents exhibited a fair agreement at a 95% confidence level.

  13. Heteroepitaxial growth of wafer scale highly oriented graphene using inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Libo; Xu, Hai; Li, Linjun; Yang, Yang; Fu, Qiang; Bao, Xinhe; Loh, Kian Ping

    2016-06-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene on Cu has attracted much attention because of its industrial scalability. Herein, we report inductively coupled plasma-assisted CVD of epitaxially grown graphene on (111)-textured Cu film alloyed with a small amount of Ni, where large area high quality graphene film can be grown in less than 5 min at 800 °C, thus affording industrial scalability. The epitaxially grown graphene films on (111)-textured Cu contain grains which are predominantly aligned with the Cu lattice and about 10% of 30°-rotated grains (anti-grains). Such graphene films are exclusively monolayer and possess good electrical conductivity, high carrier mobility, and room temperature quantum Hall effect. Magnetoresistance measurements reveal that the reduction of the grain sizes from 150 nm to 50 nm produce increasing Anderson localization and the appearance of a transport gap. Owing to the presence of grain boundaries in these anti-grains, epitaxially grown graphene films possess n-type characteristics and exhibit ultra-high sensitivity to adsorbates.

  14. Determination of cobalamins using capillary electrophoresis inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, S. A.; Miller-Ihli, N. J.

    2000-12-01

    The determination of cobalamins using capillary electrophoresis inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CE-ICP-MS) was investigated. Both capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) modes of operation were studied. The optimal separation of four cobalamin species (cyanocobalamin, hydroxocobalamin, methylcobalamin, and 5'-deoxyadenosylcobalamin) and a potentially harmful corrinoid analogue (cobinamide dicyanide) was obtained using CZE at a pH of 2.5. Both 20 mM phosphate and 20 mM formate buffers were used with success, although the formate buffer provided improved resolution. The CZE-ICP-MS method was used to quantify cyanocobalamin in a vitamin supplement and the analytical results were in good agreement (±5%) with values obtained by ICP-MS for total Co levels. The solution detection limits for cobalamins using CZE-ICP-MS were approximately 50 ng/ml. MEKC was found to be useful for the screening of vitamin preparations because it provided a rapid means of distinguishing cyanocobalamin (the form most commonly used in vitamin preparations) from free cobalt. The separation of free cobalt and cyanocobalamin using MEKC was achieved in less than 10 min.

  15. Element fingerprinting of marine organisms by dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cubadda, Francesco; Raggi, Andrea; Coni, Ettore

    2006-02-01

    A method for the determination of sixteen elements (Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, Sn, V, Zn) in seafood by dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-DRC-MS) is presented. A preliminary study of polyatomic interferences was carried out in relation to the chemical composition of marine organisms belonging to different taxa. Acid effects and other matrix effects in marine organisms submitted to closed-vessel microwave digestion were investigated as well. Ammonia was the reactive gas used in the DRC to remove polyatomic ions interfering with 27Al, 52Cr, 56Fe and 51V. Optimal conditions for the simultaneous determination of analytes were identified in order to develop a fast multielement method. A suite of real samples (mussels and various fish species) were used during method development along with three certified reference materials: BCR CRM 278R (mussel tissue), BCR CRM 422 (cod muscle) and DORM-2 (dogfish muscle). The proposed analytical approach can be used in conjunction with suitable chemometric procedures to address quality and safety issues in aquaculture and fisheries. As an example, a case study is described in which mussels from three farming sites in the Venice Lagoon were distinguished by multivariate analysis of element fingerprints.

  16. Spark ablation-inductively coupled plasma spectrometry for analysis of geologic materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golightly, D.W.; Montaser, A.; Smith, B.L.; Dorrzapf, A.F.

    1989-01-01

    Spark ablation-inductively coupled plasma (SA-ICP) spectrometry is applied to the measurement of hafnium-zirconium ratios in zircons and to the determination of cerium, cobalt, iron, lead, nickel and phosphorus in ferromanganese nodules. Six operating parameters used for the high-voltage spark and argon-ICP combination are established by sequential simplex optimization of both signal-to-background ratio and signal-to-noise ratio. The time-dependences of the atomic emission signals of analytes and matrix elements ablated from a finely pulverized sample embedded in a pressed disk of copper demonstrate selective sampling by the spark. Concentration ratios of hafnium to zirconium in zircons are measured with a precision of 4% (relative standard deviation, RSD). For ferromanganese nodules, spectral measurements based on intensity ratios of analyte line to the Mn(II) 257.610 nm line provide precisions of analysis in the range from 7 to 14% RSD. The accuracy of analysis depends on use of standard additions of the reference material USGS Nod P-1, and an independent measurement of the Mn concentration. ?? 1989.

  17. Comparison of femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for uranium isotopic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Havrilla, George Joseph; McIntosh, Kathryn Gallagher; Judge, Elizabeth; Dirmyer, Matthew R.; Campbell, Keri; Gonzalez, Jhanis J.

    2016-10-20

    Feasibility tests were conducted using femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for rapid uranium isotopic measurements. The samples used in this study consisted of a range of pg quantities of known 235/238 U solutions as dried spot residues of 300 pL drops on silicon substrates. The samples spanned the following enrichments of 235U: 0.5, 1.5, 2, 3, and 15.1%. In this direct comparison using these particular samples both pulse durations demonstrated near equivalent data can be produced on either system with respect to accuracy and precision. There is no question that either LA-ICP-MS method offers the potential for rapid, accurate and precise isotopic measurements of U10Mo materials whether DU, LEU or HEU. The LA-ICP-MS equipment used for this work is commercially available. The program is in the process of validating this work for large samples using center samples strips from Y-12 MP-1 LEU-Mo Casting #1.

  18. Determination of metals in marine species by microwave digestion and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Karl X.; Swami, Kamal

    2007-10-01

    A microwave digestion method suitable for determination of multiple elements in marine species was developed, with the use of cold vapor atomic spectrometry for the detection of Hg, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for all of the other elements. An optimized reagent mixture composed of 2 ml of HNO 3, 2 ml of H 2O 2 and 0.3 ml of HF used in microwave digestion of about 0.15 g (dry weight) of sample was found to give the best overall recoveries of metals in two standard reference materials. In the oyster tissue standard reference material (SRM 1566b), recoveries of Na, Al, K, V, Co, Zn, Se, Sr, Ag, Cd, Ni, and Pb were between 90% and 110%; Mg, Mn, Fe, Cu, As, and Ba recoveries were between 85% and 90%; Hg recovery was 81%; and Ca recovery was 64%. In a dogfish certified reference material (DORM-2), the recoveries of Al, Cr, Mn, Se, and Hg were between 90% and 110%; Ni, Cu, Zn, and As recoveries were about 85%; and Fe recovery was 112%. Method detection limits of the elements were established. Metal concentrations in flounder, scup, and blue crab samples collected from coastal locations around Long Island and in the Hudson River estuary were determined.

  19. Sulfur analysis by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giner Martínez-Sierra, J.; Galilea San Blas, O.; Marchante Gayón, J. M.; García Alonso, J. I.

    2015-06-01

    In recent years the number of applications of sulfur (S) analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as detector has increased significantly. In this article we describe in some depth the application of ICP-MS for S analysis with emphasis placed on the sulfur-specific detection by hyphenated techniques such as LC, GC, CE and LA coupled on-line to ICP-MS. The different approaches available for sulfur isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS are also detailed. Particular attention has been paid to the quantification of peptides/proteins and the analysis of metallopeptides/metalloproteins via sulfur by LC-ICP-MS. Likewise, the speciation analysis of metal-based pharmaceuticals and metallodrugs and non-metal selective detection of pharmaceuticals via S are highlighted. Labeling procedures for metabolic applications are also included. Finally, the measurement of natural variations in S isotope composition with multicollector ICP-MS instruments is also covered in this review.

  20. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: An emerging method for analysis of long-lived radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, R.R.; Noyce, J.R.; Lardy, M.M.

    1993-12-31

    Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a relatively new technique that can analyze for most of the elements in the periodic table at parts per billion (ng/mL) to parts per trillion (pg/mL). Already in use several years for trace analysis of stable isotopes, ICP-MS is becoming a powerful, complementary method to the counting of decay radiations for the analysis of radionuclides. Most radionuclides with half-lives longer than approximately 1x10{sup 3} years can be quantitatively detected on ICP-MS instruments that have an electrothermal vaporization unit for the injection of sample aliquants. Radionuclides with half-lives greater than approximately 1x10{sup 4} years can be measured routinely with greater sensitivity and more quickly by ICP-MS than by radiation counting. Examples from the literature of applying ICP-MS to radionuclides are the bioassay of uranium in urine, measurement of {sup 237}Np in soil and silt, and analysis for {sup 99}Tc in sea water, seaweed, and marine sediment. This paper discusses the instrumentation, advantages and limitations, and present and potential applications of ICP-MS for radionuclide measurements.

  1. Determination of selenium urinary metabolites by high temperature liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Terol, A; Ardini, F; Basso, A; Grotti, M

    2015-02-06

    The coupling of high temperature liquid chromatography (HTLC) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) for the determination of selenium metabolites in urine samples is reported for the first time. In order to achieve "ICPMS-friendly" chromatographic conditions, the retention on a graphite stationary phase of the major selenium urinary metabolites using only plain water with 2% methanol as the mobile phase was investigated. Under the optimal conditions (T=80°C, Ql=1.2 mL min(-1)), methyl 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-1-seleno-β-d-galactopyranoside (selenosugar 1), methyl 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-1-seleno-β-d-glucosopyranoside (selenosugar 2) and trimethylselenonium ion were efficiently separated in less than 7 min, without any interferences due to other common selenium species (selenite, selenate, selenocystine and selenomethionine) or detectable effect of the urine matrix. The limits of detection were 0.3-0.5 ng Se mL(-1), and the precision of the analytical procedure was better than 3% (RSD%, n=5). The HTLC-ICPMS method was applied to the analysis of urine samples from two volunteers before and after ingestion of Brazil nuts or selenium supplements. The developed procedure proved to be adequate for the analytical task, providing results consistent with previous studies.

  2. Inductively coupled plasma-MS in drug development: bioanalytical aspects and applications.

    PubMed

    van Heuveln, Fred; Meijering, Henri; Wieling, Jaap

    2012-08-01

    The vast majority of today's modern bioanalytical methods for pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and immunogenicity purposes are based on LC-MS/MS and immunoanalytical approaches. Indeed, these methodologies are suitable for a wide range of molecules from small to large. For a smaller but not insignificant group of compounds, LC-MS/MS is not suitable - or in some cases much less suitable - as a reliable bioanalytical methodology, and inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-MS is a more appropriate methodology. ICP-MS is one of these less widely used techniques in drug development. This methodology is predominantly used for elemental bioanalysis for pharmacokinetics, for imaging purposes, for mass-balance, food-effect and biomarker studies. In addition, in the last couple of years an increasing number of applications has been published, where ICP-MS and its various hyphenations (LC-ICP-MS, CE-ICP-MS) have been used for speciation/metabolism and proteomics studies. Here, the analytical potential, the quantitative bioanalytical aspects, the various modes of operation and the challenges of the application of ICP-MS in life sciences applications are given. This includes an overview of recent applications in this area in scientific literature, the various hyphenation possibilities and their application areas and the analysis of the various sample matrices applicable to these fields. It also provides a brief outlook of where the potential of this technique lies in the future of regulated bioanalysis and drug development.

  3. Optimization of the operating conditions of solid sampling electrothermal vaporization coupled to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for the sensitive direct analysis of powdered rice.

    PubMed

    Sadiq, Nausheen; Beauchemin, Diane

    2014-12-03

    Two different approaches were used to improve the capabilities of solid sampling (SS) electrothermal vaporization (ETV) coupled to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) for the direct analysis of powdered rice. Firstly, a cooling step immediately before and after the vaporization step in the ETV temperature program resulted in a much sharper analyte signal peak. Secondly, point-by-point internal standardization with an Ar emission line significantly improved the linearity of calibration curves obtained with an increasing amount of rice flour certified reference material (CRM). Under the optimized conditions, detection limits ranged from 0.01 to 6ngg(-1) in the solid, depending on the element and wavelength selected. The method was validated through the quantitative analysis of corn bran and wheat flour CRMs. Application of the method to the multi-elemental analysis of 4-mg aliquots of real organic long grain rice (white and brown) also gave results for Al, As, Co, Cu, Fe, Mg, Se, Pb and Zn in agreement with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry following acid digestion of 0.2-g aliquots. As the analysis takes roughly 5min per sample (2.5min for grinding, 0.5-1min for weighing a 4-mg aliquot and 87s for the ETV program), this approach shows great promise for fast screening of food samples.

  4. Comparison of tunable bandpass reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with conventional inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of heavy metals in whole blood and urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, David E.; Neubauer, Kenneth R.; Eckdahl, Steven J.; Butz, John A.; Burritt, Mary F.

    2004-09-01

    A Dynamic Reaction Cell™ inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (DRC-ICP-MS) was evaluated for the determination of arsenic, lead, cadmium, mercury, and thallium in urine and whole blood. Reaction cell conditions were evaluated for suppression of ArCl + and CaCl + polyatomic interferences. The reaction gas was 5% hydrogen in argon. Lead, cadmium, mercury, and thallium were determined with the reaction cell vented. Mixture of 2.5% t-butanol, 0.5% HCl, and 2 mg Au/l plus Ga, Rh, and Bi internal standards was used to dilute whole blood and urine. Calibration was achieved using aqueous acidic standards spiked into urine matrix. Urine and whole blood addition calibration curves were nearly identical for all five elements. DRC-ICP-MS detection limits were equivalent or better than conventional ICP-MS. Within run coefficients of variation (CV's) were nearly the same for DRC-ICP-MS and conventional ICP-MS for National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) SRM 2670 and BioRad Lyphochek Urine Metals Control. DRC-ICP-MS within run CV's for As, Pb, Cd, and Hg were 1.9%, 4%, 1.7%, and 1.7%, respectively, for NIST 2670 and 2.9%, 1.8%, 3.4%, 1.7%, and 1.0% for BioRad urine. BioRad Lyphochek Whole Blood control concentrations and CV's were: 78 μg/l (3.8%), 284 μg/l (0.52%), and 544 μg/l (0.9%). With the exception of mercury day-to-day CV's for certified whole blood and urine controls were less than 4% on both the DRC-ICP-MS and conventional ICP-MS.

  5. Simulation for Large-Area, Inductively-Coupled Plasma Systems Using an Ar/Cl2 Gas Mixture.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seon-Geun; Lee, Young-Jun; Jeon, Jae-Hong; Kim, Young-Jin; Seo, Jong-Hyun; Choe, Hee-Hwan

    2015-11-01

    As research and development of high-performance devices are becoming increasingly important in the flat panel display industry, new structures and processes are essential to improve the performance of the TFT backplane. Also, high-density plasma systems are needed for new device fabrications. Chlorine-based, inductively-coupled plasma systems are widely used for highly-selective, anisotropic etching of polysilicon layers. In this paper, a plasma simulation for a large-area ICP system (8th glass size and 9 planar antenna set) was conducted using Ar/Cl2 gas. Transport models and Maxwell Equations were applied to calculate the plasma parameters such as electron density, electron temperature and electric potential. In addition, the spatial distribution of ions such as Ar+, Cl2+, Cl-, Cl+ were investigated respectively.

  6. A Plasma Rocket Demonstration on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Andrew J.

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center has been engaged in the development of a magneto-plasma rocket for several years. This type of rocket could be used in the future to propel interplanetary spacecraft. One feature of this concept is the ability to vary its specific impulse so that it can be operated in a mode that maximizes propellant efficiency or a mode that maximizes thrust. For this reason the system is called the Variable Specific Impulse Magneto-plasma Rocket or VASIMR. This ability to vary specific impulse and thrust will allow for optimum low thrust interplanetary trajectories and results in shorter trip times than is possible with fixed specific impulse systems while preserving adequate payload margins. In the development of the VASIMR technology, a series of ground-based experiments and space demonstrations are envisioned. A ground-based experiment of a low-power VASIMR prototype rocket is currently underway at the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory. The next step is a proposal to build and fly a 25-kilowatt VASIMR rocket as an external payload on the International Space Station. This experiment will provide an opportunity to demonstrate the performance of the rocket in space and measure the induced environment. The experiment will also utilize the space station for its intended purpose as a laboratory with vacuum conditions that cannot be matched by any laboratory on Earth. The VASIMR experiment will also blaze the trail for the wider application of advanced electric propulsion on the space station. An electric propulsion system like VASIMR, if provided with sufficient electrical power, could provide continuous drag force compensation for the space station. Drag compensation would eliminate the need for reboosting the station, an operation that will consume about 60 metric tons of propellant in a ten-year period. In contrast, an electric propulsion system would require very little propellant. In fact, a system

  7. A hybrid model in inductively coupled plasma discharges with bias source: Description of model and experimental validation in Ar discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, De-Qi; Liu, Wei; Liu, Yong-Xin; Gao, Fei; Wang, You-Nian

    2015-09-01

    Traditional fluid simulation and Particle-in-Cell/Monte-Carlo collision (PIC/MCC) are very time consuming in inductively coupled plasma. In this work, a hybrid model, i.e. global model coupled bidirectional with parallel Monte-Carlo collision (MCC) sheath model, is developed to investigate inductively coupled plasma discharge with bias source. The global model is applied to calculate plasma density in bulk plasma. The sheath model is performed to consistently calculate the electric field, ion kinetic and the sheath thickness above the bias electrode. Moreover, specific numbers of ions are tracked and ultimately ion energy distribution functions (IEDFs) incident into bias electrode are obtained from MCC module. It is found that as the bias amplitude increases, the energy width of both IEDFs becomes wider, and the total outlines of IEDFs move towards higher energy. The results from the model are validated by experimental measurement and a qualitative agreement is obtained. The advantage of this model is that plasma density, ion flux and IEDF, which are widely concerned in the actual process, could be obtained within an hour. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (Grant No. 11205025 and 11335004) and (Grant No.11405018), the Important National Science and Technology Specific Project (Grant No. 2011ZX02403-001).

  8. Spatially resolved measurement of Ar excited species in magnetized inductively coupled plasma using multi-port optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yun-Gi; Ha, Chang-Seung; Han, Moon-Ki; Seo, Kwon-Sang; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Hae June; Lee, Ho-Jun; Koo, Il Gyo; Lee, Soojin; Seong, Hyo-Seong

    2013-09-01

    Optical emission spectrometry (OES), which is the spectral analysis of the light emanating from plasma, is probably the most widely used method for monitoring and diagnosis of plasma processes. This technique has the advantage of being external to the reactor and vacuum system. However, the OES method is limited to measure spatial distribution of species accurately. In this work, multi-port optical emission spectroscopy system was developed to improve the space-resolved ability. This multi-port OES system consists of Si wafers, optical fibers, prisms and windows. The Si wafers are used for making the same condition while this device is put in the etching or deposition reactor. The emission light from plasma is collected and transferred through the optical fibers. The spatial distribution of Ar excited species is measured using this device in inductively coupled plasma with and without external axial magnetic field. The off-axis density profile of electron, Ar ion and excited species are appeared in weakly magnetized inductively coupled plasma. Also the emission intensity was changed in this experimental condition. Two-dimensional simulation was studied to verify this experimental result. This was supported by SEMES cooperative research project.

  9. Radical kinetics in an inductively-coupled plasma in CF4

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, J.P.; Abada, H.; Chabert, P.; Graves, D.B.

    2004-12-01

    Radiofrequency discharges in low pressure fluorocarbon gases are used for anisotropic and selective etching of dielectric materials (SiO2 and derivatives), a key step in the manufacture of integrated circuits. Plasmas in these gases are capable not only of etching, but also of depositing fluorocarbon films, depending on a number of factors including the ion bombardment energy, the gas composition and the surface temperature: this behavior is indeed responsible for etch selectivity between materials and plays a role in achieving the desired etched feature profiles. Free radical species, such as CFx and fluorine atoms, play important but complex roles in these processes. We have used laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), with time and space resolution in pulsed plasmas, to elucidate the kinetics of CF and CF2 radicals, elucidating their creation, destruction and transport mechanisms within the reactor. Whereas more complex gas mixtures are used in industrial processes, study of the relatively simple system of a pure CF4 plasma is more appropriate for the study of mechanisms. Previously the technique was applied to the study of single-frequency capacitively-coupled 'reactive ion etching' reactors, where the substrate (placed on the powered electrode) is always bombarded with high-energy CF{sub x}{sup +} ions. In this case it was found that the major source of CFx free radicals was neutralization, dissociation and backscattering of these incident ions, rather than direct dissociation of the feedstock gas. Subsequently, an inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) in pure CF4 was studied. This system has a higher plasma density, leading to higher gas dissociation, whereas the energy of ions striking the reactor surfaces is much lower (in the absence of additional RF biasing). The LIF technique also allows the gas temperature to be measured with good spatial and temporal resolution. This showed large gas temperature gradients within the ICP reactor, which must be taken into account

  10. Methane dissociation process in inductively coupled Ar/H2/CH4 plasma for graphene nano-flakes production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, Antaryami; Lanfant, Briac; Asfaha, Mehari; Leparoux, Marc

    2017-02-01

    The role of hydrogen and methane dissociation process in induction plasma synthesis of graphene nano-flakes (GNF) is studied by the optical emission spectroscopy of Ar/H2/CH4 plasma. The condensation of C2 species formed due to methane decomposition produces GNF, which depends on pressure. Electron impact and dehydrogenation processes dissociate methane, which promotes and hinders the GNF production, respectively. The effect of hydrogen is insignificant on quality, size and morphology of the GNF. The CH4 flow rate has no influence on particle temperature but has effect on cooling rate at the point of nucleation and, therefore, on production rate and thickness of GNF.

  11. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry as an element-specific detector for field-flow fractionation particle separation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Howard E.; Garbarino, John R.; Murphy, Deirdre M.; Beckett, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer was used for the quantitative measurement of trace elements In specific,submicrometer size-fraction particulates, separated by sedimentation field-flow fractionation. Fractions were collected from the eluent of the field-flow fractionation centrifuge and nebulized, with a Babington-type pneumatic nebulizer, into an argon inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer. Measured Ion currents were used to quantify the major, minor, and trace element composition of the size-separated colloidal (< 1-microm diameter) particulates. The composition of surface-water suspended matter collected from the Yarra and Darling rivers in Australia is presented to illustrate the usefulness of this tool for characterizing environmental materials. An adsorption experiment was performed using cadmium lon to demonstrate the utility for studying the processes of trace metal-suspended sediment interactions and contaminant transport in natural aquatic systems.

  12. Transport of ionized metal atoms in high-power pulsed magnetron discharges assisted by inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinidis, S.; Dauchot, J.P.; Ganciu, M.; Hecq, M.

    2006-01-09

    Transporting metallic ions from the magnetron cathode to the substrate is essential for an efficient thin-film deposition process. This letter examines how inductively coupled plasma superimposed onto a high-power pulsed magnetron discharge can influence the mobility of titanium ions. To this effect, time-resolved optical emission and absorption spectrometry are conducted and the current at the substrate is measured. With this new hybrid technique, ions are found to reach the substrate in two successive waves. Metal ions, only present in the second wave, are found to accelerate proportionally to the power supplied to the inductively coupled plasma. All the measurements in this study are made at 10 and 30 mTorr, with 10 {mu}s long pulses at the magnetron cathode.

  13. Determination of arsenic in gold by flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with matrix removal by reductive precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becotte-Haigh, Paul; Tyson, Julian F.; Denoyer, Eric; Hinds, Michael W.

    1996-12-01

    Arsenic was determined in gold by flow injection hydride generation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry following a batch mode reductive precipitation removal of the interfering gold matrix. A solution of potassium iodide, L-ascorbic acid, and hydrochloric acid was used as the reluctant. The recovery of gold by precipitation and filtration was 99 ± 3%. The detection limit for arsenic in gold was 55 ng g -1 in the solid. The concentration of arsenic that was determined in the Royal Canadian Mint gold sample FAU-10 was 29.7 μg g -1 in the solid; this value was indistinguishable, with 95% confidence, from values determined at the Royal Canadian Mint by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry and by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The standard deviation for four replicate determinations of the arsenic in FAU-10 was 0.972 μg g -1 in the solid.

  14. Fractionation analysis of manganese in Turkish hazelnuts (Corylus avellana L.) by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Erdemir, Umran Seven; Gucer, Seref

    2014-11-05

    In this study, an analytical fractionation scheme based on water, diethyl ether, n-hexane, and methanol extractions has been developed to identify manganese-bound fractions. Additionally, in vitro simulated gastric and intestinal digestion, n-octanol extraction, and activated carbon adsorption were used to interpret the manganese-bound structures in hazelnuts in terms of bioaccessibility. The total content of manganese in the samples was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry after microwave-assisted digestion, and additional validation was performed using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Water fractions were further evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for the identification of water-soluble manganese fractions in hazelnut samples. The limits of detection and quantification were 3.6 and 12.0 μg L(-1), respectively, based on peak height.

  15. Saturation Ion Current Densities in Inductively Coupled Hydrogen Plasma Produced by Large-Power Radio Frequency Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Songbai; Lei, Guangjiu; Bi, Zhenhua; Ghomi, H.; Yang, Size; Liu, Dongping

    2016-09-01

    An experimental investigation of the saturation ion current densities (Jions) in hydrogen inductively coupled plasma (ICP) produced by a large-power (2-32 kW) radio frequency (RF) generator is reported, then some reasonable explanations are given out. With the increase of RF power, the experimental results show three stages: in the first stage (2-14 kW), the electron temperature will rise with the increase of RF power in the ICP, thus, the Jions increases continually as the electron temperature rises in the ICP. In the second stage (14-20 kW), as some H- ions lead to the mutual neutralization (MN), the slope of Jions variation firstly decreases then increases. In the third stage (20-32 kW), both the electronic detachment (ED) and the associative detachment (AD) in the ICP result in the destruction of H- ions, therefore, the increased amplitude of the Jions in the third stage is weaker than the one in the first stage. In addition, with the equivalent transformer model, we successfully explain that the Jions at different radial locations in ICP has the same rule. Finally, it is found that the Jions has nothing to do with the outer/inner puffing gas pressure ratio, which is attributed to the high-speed movement of hydrogen molecules. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2011GB108011 and 2010GB103001), the Major International (Regional) Project Cooperation and Exchanges of China (No. 11320101005) and the Startup Fund from Fuzhou University (No. 510071)

  16. Determination of rare earth and concomitant elements in magnesium alloys by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fariñas, Juan C; Rucandio, Isabel; Pomares-Alfonso, Mario S; Villanueva-Tagle, Margarita E; Larrea, María T

    2016-07-01

    An Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, In, Mn, Ni, Si, Sr, Y, Zn, Zr and rare earth elements (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu) in magnesium alloys, including the new rare earth elements-alloyed magnesium, has been developed. Robust conditions have been established as nebulizer argon flow rate of 0.5mLmin(-1) and RF incident power of 1500W, in which matrix effects were significantly reduced around 10%. Three acid digestion procedures were performed at 110°C in closed PFA vessels heated in an oven, in closed TFM vessels heated in a microwave furnace, and in open polypropylene tubes with reflux caps heated in a graphite block. The three digestion procedures are suitable to put into solution the magnesium alloys samples. From the most sensitive lines, one analytical line with lack or low spectral interferences has been selected for each element. Mg, Rh and Sc have been studied as internal standards. Among them, Rh was selected as the best one by using Rh I 343.488nm and Rh II 249.078nm lines as a function of the analytical lines. The trueness and precision have been established by using the Certified Reference Material BCS 316, as well as by means of recovery studies. Quantification limits were between 0.1 and 9mgkg(-1) for Lu and Pr, respectively, in a 2gL(-1) magnesium matrix solution. The method developed has been applied to the commercial alloys AM60, AZ80, ZK30, AJ62, WE54 and AE44.

  17. Comparison of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and colorimetric determination of total and extractable phosphorus in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Krasimir; Zaprjanova, Penka; Petkova, Milena; Stefanova, Violeta; Kmetov, Veselin; Georgieva, Deyana; Angelova, Violina

    2012-05-01

    The most widely used method for determination of total phosphorus in soils is perchloric acid digestion, followed by a colorimetric assay to measure the concentration of P in solution. The first part of this study compares an alternative digestion method, using aqua regia (ISO 11466 and EPA Method 3052), with perchloric acid digestion procedure, and also compares inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) with colorimetry for the measurement of P on the basis of five internationally certified standard soils and 20 real-life soils with widely different extractability of phosphorus. The phosphorus concentration was determined by means of the reduced phosphomolybdenum blue and ICP-MS. The relationship between methods has been examined statistically. Good agreement of the results from colorimetry and ICP-MS was established for all certified soils. The microwave-assisted digestion with aqua regia was comparable, both in precision and accuracy, with the hot plate aqua regia method. The phosphorus concentration found with the HF + HClO4 digestion method was in good agreement with the certified mean values, while the superiority in extracting phosphorus, when compared to other methods, was obvious. Soil testing for plant-available phosphorus in Bulgaria and many European countries is most commonly conducted using acid Ca-lactate extraction (Egner-Riehm test) and alkaline sodium bicarbonate extraction (BDS ISO 11263:2002), based on Olsen test, followed by a colorimetric assay to measure the concentration of P in solution. The second part of this study reports the differences between Egner-Riehm test and BDS ISO 11263:2002 measured colorimetrically and by ICP-MS. Fifty soils were selected from South Bulgaria to represent a wide range of soil properties. It was established that ICP-MS consistently yielded significantly higher P concentrations than the colorimetric method in both extraction tests, and the relative differences were greatest in soils with lower P

  18. Online tuning of impedance matching circuit for long pulse inductively coupled plasma source operation--an alternate approach.

    PubMed

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M; Kraus, W; Gahlaut, A; Bansal, G; Chakraborty, A

    2014-01-01

    Impedance matching circuit between radio frequency (RF) generator and the plasma load, placed between them, determines the RF power transfer from RF generator to the plasma load. The impedance of plasma load depends on the plasma parameters through skin depth and plasma conductivity or resistivity. Therefore, for long pulse operation of inductively coupled plasmas, particularly for high power (∼100 kW or more) where plasma load condition may vary due to different reasons (e.g., pressure, power, and thermal), online tuning of impedance matching circuit is necessary through feedback. In fusion grade ion source operation, such online methodology through feedback is not present but offline remote tuning by adjusting the matching circuit capacitors and tuning the driving frequency of the RF generator between the ion source operation pulses is envisaged. The present model is an approach for remote impedance tuning methodology for long pulse operation and corresponding online impedance matching algorithm based on RF coil antenna current measurement or coil antenna calorimetric measurement may be useful in this regard.

  19. Neutral gas density depletion due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance in an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Tynan, George R.; Cattolica, Robert

    2007-02-01

    The spatial distribution of neutral gas temperature and total pressure have been measured for pure N2, He/5%N2 and Ar/5%N2 in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor, and a significant rise in the neutral gas temperature has been observed. When thermal transpiration is used to correct total pressure measurements, the total pressure remains constant regardless of the plasma condition. Neutral pressure is depleted due to the pressure balance when the plasma pressure (mainly electron pressure) becomes comparable to the neutral pressure in high density plasma. Since the neutral gas follows the ideal gas law, the neutral gas density profile was obtained from the neutral gas temperature and the corrected neutral pressure measurements. The results show that the neutral gas density at the centre of the plasma chamber (factor of 2-4 ×) decreases significantly in the presence of a plasma discharge. Significant spatial variation in neutral gas uniformity occurs in such plasmas due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance.

  20. Online tuning of impedance matching circuit for long pulse inductively coupled plasma source operation—An alternate approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M. Chakraborty, A.; Kraus, W.; Gahlaut, A.; Bansal, G.

    2014-01-15

    Impedance matching circuit between radio frequency (RF) generator and the plasma load, placed between them, determines the RF power transfer from RF generator to the plasma load. The impedance of plasma load depends on the plasma parameters through skin depth and plasma conductivity or resistivity. Therefore, for long pulse operation of inductively coupled plasmas, particularly for high power (∼100 kW or more) where plasma load condition may vary due to different reasons (e.g., pressure, power, and thermal), online tuning of impedance matching circuit is necessary through feedback. In fusion grade ion source operation, such online methodology through feedback is not present but offline remote tuning by adjusting the matching circuit capacitors and tuning the driving frequency of the RF generator between the ion source operation pulses is envisaged. The present model is an approach for remote impedance tuning methodology for long pulse operation and corresponding online impedance matching algorithm based on RF coil antenna current measurement or coil antenna calorimetric measurement may be useful in this regard.

  1. Investigations into the origins of polyatomic ions in inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Sally M.

    2010-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) is an elemental analytical instrument capable of determining nearly all elements in the periodic table at limits of detection in the parts per quadrillion and with a linear analytical range over 8-10 orders of magnitude. Three concentric quartz tubes make up the plasma torch. Argon gas is spiraled through the outer tube and generates the plasma powered by a looped load coil operating at 27.1 or 40.6 MHz. The argon flow of the middle channel is used to keep the plasma above the innermost tube through which solid or aqueous sample is carried in a third argon stream. A sample is progressively desolvated, atomized and ionized. The torch is operated at atmospheric pressure. To reach the reduced pressures of mass spectrometers, ions are extracted through a series of two, approximately one millimeter wide, circular apertures set in water cooled metal cones. The space between the cones is evacuated to approximately one torr. The space behind the second cone is pumped down to, or near to, the pressure needed for the mass spectrometer (MS). The first cone, called the sampler, is placed directly in the plasma plume and its position is adjusted to the point where atomic ions are most abundant. The hot plasma gas expands through the sampler orifice and in this expansion is placed the second cone, called the skimmer. After the skimmer traditional MS designs are employed, i.e. quadrupoles, magnetic sectors, time-of-flight. ICP-MS is the leading trace element analysis technique. One of its weaknesses are polyatomic ions. This dissertation has added to the fundamental understanding of some of these polyatomic ions, their origins and behavior. Although mainly continuing the work of others, certain novel approaches have been introduced here. Chapter 2 includes the first reported efforts to include high temperature corrections to the partition functions of the polyatomic ions in ICP-MS. This and other objections to preceeding

  2. Method 200.7: Determination of Metals and Trace Elements in Water and Wastes by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAM lists this method for preparation and analysis of aqueous liquid and drinking water samples. This method will determine metal-containing compounds as the total metal (e.g., total arsenic), using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

  3. MICROSCALE FLOW INJECTION AND MICROBORE HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATORGRAPHY COUPLED WITH INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY VIA A HIGH-EFFICIENCY NEBULIZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A high-effeciency nebulizer has been used for coupling microscale flow injection and microbore high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The microscale flow injection system was configured to minimize band broadening between...

  4. Documenting utility of paddlefish otoliths for quantification of metals using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, James M.; Schaffler, James J.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE The otoliths of the inner ear of fishes record the environment of their surrounding water throughout their life. For paddlefish (Polyodon spathula), otoliths have not been routinely used by scientists since their detriments were outlined in the early 1940s. We sought to determine if paddlefish otoliths were useful for resolving elemental information contained within. METHODS Adult paddlefish were collected from two wild, self-sustaining populations in Oklahoma reservoirs in the Arkansas River basin. Juveniles were obtained from a hatchery in the Red River basin of Oklahoma. Otoliths were removed and laser ablation, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to quantify eight elements (Li, Mg, Mn, Rb, Sr, Y, Ba, and Pb) along the core and edge portions, which were analyzed for differences between otolith regions and among paddlefish sources. RESULTS Differences were found among samples for six of the eight elements examined. Otoliths from Red River basin paddlefish born in a hatchery had significantly lower amounts of Mg and Mn, but higher levels of Rb than otoliths from wild paddlefish in the Arkansas River basin. Concentrations of Y, Sr, and Ba were reduced on the edges of adult paddlefish from both reservoirs compared with the cores. CONCLUSIONS This research shows the utility of using an ICP-MS analysis of paddlefish otoliths. Future research that seeks to determine sources of paddlefish production, such as which reservoir tributaries are most important for reproduction or what proportion of the population is composed of wild versus hatchery-produced individuals, appears promising. Published in 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Multielemental analyses of environmental and geological samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xiaowen.

    1993-01-01

    The technique of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been applied to determine trace elements in environmental (drinking water and tree rings) and geological (soil) samples. Most of this monograph is focused on analysis in these samples of rare-earth elements and lead, which have lower detection limits in ICP-MS than in other analytical techniques. A brief history of ICP-MS and discussions of fundamental principles of the instrument, interferences of the method, and common analytical protocols are provided. The application of the technique to four projects is described: (1) Quantitative analysis of rare-earth elements in individual tree rings of fire-scarred trees was performed. The result showed that the concentrations of La, Pr, and Nd are highest in the ring corresponding to the fire year. (2) Lead pollution in drinking water from New York City was investigated by measuring lead concentration and the isotope ratio of [sup 206]Pb/[sup 207]Pb in drinking water samples and in the suspected polluting sources. It was found that lead in drinking water mainly comes from lead pipe and plumbing materials containing high concentrations of lead. In addition, optimization of the operating parameters and enhancement of lead signal were also discussed in the chapter. (3) Lead concentration in soil and in annual-growth rings of trees from streets in Brookyln, New York were analyzed. The change of lead concentration in the rings from 1952 to 1991 correlates with the consumption of lead in gasoline in the United States during the same period. The study showed that tree rings can be used as an indirect historical indicator of environmental changes during the tree's lifetime. (4) Rare-earth-element ratios in archaeological tree samples were measured to determine the original locations of the samples. In Appendix I, application of proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) to analysis of wood samples is briefly discussed.

  6. Photochemical vapor generation of lead for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Hualing; Zhang, Ningning; Gong, Zhenbin; Li, Weifeng; Hang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Photochemical vapor generation (PCVG) of lead was successfully achieved with a simplified and convenient system, in which only low molecular weight organic acid and a high-efficiency photochemical reactor were needed. The reactor was used to generate lead volatile species when a solution of lead containing a small amount of low molecular weight organic acid was pumped through. Several factors, including the concentration of acetic acid, the concentration of hydrochloride acid, and the irradiation time of UV light were optimized. Under the optimal conditions, including the addition of 0.90% (v/v) acetic acid and 0.03% (v/v) hydrochloride acid, and irradiation time of 28 s, intense and repeatable signal of lead volatile species was successfully obtained and identified with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). In addition, the effects from inorganic anions and transition metal ions, including Cl-, NO3-, SO42 -, Cu2 +, Fe3 +, Co2 + and Ni2 +, were investigated, which suggests that their suppression to the PCVG of lead was in the order of Cl- < SO42 - < NO3- for anions and Ni2 +, Co2 + < Fe3 + < Cu2 + for transition metal ions. Under optimized conditions, relative standard derivation (RSD) of 4.4% was achieved from replicate measurements (n = 5) of a standard solution of 0.1 μg L- 1 lead. And, the limit of quantitation (LOQ, 10σ) of 0.012 μg L- 1 lead was obtained using this method and the method blank could be easily controlled down to 0.023 μg L- 1. To validate applicability of this method, it was also employed for the determination of lead in tap water, rain water and lake water.

  7. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for analysis of pellets of plant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Marcos S.; Schenk, Emily R.; Santos, Dário; Krug, Francisco José; Almirall, José R.

    An evaluation of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (LAICP OES) for the direct analysis of pelleted plant material is reported. Ground leaves of orange citrus, soy and sugarcane were comminuted using a high-speed ball mill, pressed into pellets and sampled directly with laser ablation and analyzed by ICP OES. The limits of detection (LODs) for the method ranged from as low as 0.1 mg kg- 1 for Zn to as high as 94 mg kg- 1 for K but were generally below 6 mg kg- 1 for most of the elements of interest. A certified reference material consisting of a similar matrix (NIST SRM 1547 peach leaves) was used to check the accuracy of the calibration and the reported method resulted in an average bias of ~ 5% for all the elements of interest. The precision for the reported method ranged from as low as 4% relative standard deviation (RSD) for Mn to as high as 17% RSD for Zn but averaged ~ 6.5% RSD for all the elements (n = 10). The proposed method was tested for the determination of Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and B, and the results were in good agreement with those obtained for the corresponding acid digests by ICP-OES, no differences being observed by applying a paired t-test at the 95% confidence level. The reported direct solid sampling method provides a fast alternative to acid digestion that results in similar and appropriate analytical figures of merit with regard to sensitivity, accuracy and precision for plant material analysis.

  8. Delta34S measurements of sulfur by multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Clough, Robert; Evans, Peter; Catterick, Tim; Evans, E Hywel

    2006-09-01

    An accurate and precise method for the determination of delta34S measurements by multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry has been developed. Full uncertainty budgets, taking into consideration all the uncertainties of the measurement process, have been calculated. The technique was evaluated by comparing measured values with a range of isotopically enriched sulfur solutions prepared by gravimetric addition of a 34S spike. The gravimetric and measured results exhibited a correlation of R2 >0.999. Repeat measurements were also made after adding Na (up to 420 microg g(-1)) and Ca (up to 400 microg g(-1)) salts to the sulfur standard. No significant deviations in the delta34S values were observed. The Russell correction expression (Ingle, C.; Sharp, B.; Horstwood, M.; Parrish, R.; Lewis, D. J. J. Anal. At. Spectrom. 2003, 18, 219) was used to correct for mass bias on the 34S/32S isotope amount ratio from the mass bias observed for the 30Si/28Si isotope amount ratio. Consistent compensation for instrumental mass bias was achieved. Resolution of the measured delta34S values was better than 1 per thousand after consideration of all uncertainty components. The technique was evaluated for practical applications by measurement of delta34S for a range of mineral waters by pneumatic nebulization sample introduction and the analysis of genuine and counterfeit pharmaceuticals using both laser ablation sample introduction and liquid chromatography. For the former two cases polyatomic interferences were resolved by operating the MC-ICPMS in medium resolution, while for the chromatographic analyses polyatomic interferences were minimized by the use of a membrane desolvator, allowing the instrument to be operated at a resolution of 400.

  9. Determination of iodine and bromine compounds in foodstuffs by CE-inductively coupled plasma MS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Huan; Wang, Kai-en; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen

    2007-11-01

    A CE-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (CE-ICP-MS) method for iodine and bromine speciation analysis is described. Samples containing ionic iodine (I(-) and IO(3)(-)) and bromine (Br(-) and BrO(3)(-)) species are subjected to electrophoretic separation before injection into the microconcentric nebulizer (CEI-100). The separation has been achieved in a 50 cm length x 75 microm id fused-silica capillary. The electrophoretic buffer used is 10 mmol/L Tris (pH 8.0), while the applied voltage is set at -8 kV. Detection limits are 1 and 20-50 ng/mL for various I and Br compounds, respectively, based on peak height. The RSD of the peak areas for seven injections of 0.1 microg/mL I(-), IO(3)(-) and 1 microg/mL Br(-), BrO(3)(-) mixture is in the range of 3-5%. This method has been applied to determine various iodine and bromine species in NIST SRM 1573a Tomato Leaves reference material and a salt and seaweed samples obtained locally. A microwave-assisted extraction method is used for the extraction of these compounds. Over 87% of the total iodine and 83% of the total bromine are extracted using a 10% m/v tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) solution in a focused microwave field within a period of 10 min. The spike recoveries are in the range of 94-105% for all the determinations. The major species of iodine and bromine in tomato leaves, salt, and seaweed are Br(-), IO(3)(-), I(-), and Br(-), respectively.

  10. Detecting nanoparticulate silver using single-particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mitrano, Denise M; Lesher, Emily K; Bednar, Anthony; Monserud, Jon; Higgins, Christopher P; Ranville, James F

    2012-01-01

    The environmental prevalence of engineered nanomaterials, particularly nanoparticulate silver (AgNP), is expected to increase substantially. The ubiquitous use of commercial products containing AgNP may result in their release to the environment, and the potential for ecological effects is unknown. Detecting engineered nanomaterials is one of the greatest challenges in quantifying their risks. Thus, it is imperative to develop techniques capable of measuring and characterizing exposures, while dealing with the innate difficulties of nanomaterial detection in environmental samples, such as low-engineered nanomaterial concentrations, aggregation, and complex matrices. Here the authors demonstrate the use of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, operated in a single-particle counting mode (SP-ICP-MS), to detect and quantify AgNP. In the present study, two AgNP products were measured by SP-ICP-MS, including one of precisely manufactured size and shape, as well as a commercial AgNP-containing health food product. Serial dilutions, filtration, and acidification were applied to confirm that the method detected particles. Differentiation of dissolved and particulate silver (Ag) is a feature of the technique. Analysis of two wastewater samples demonstrated the applicability of SP-ICP-MS at nanograms per liter Ag concentrations. In this pilot study, AgNP was found at 100 to 200 ng/L in the presence of 50 to 500 ng/L dissolved Ag. The method provides the analytical capability to monitor Ag and other metal and metal oxide nanoparticles in fate, transport, stability, and toxicity studies using a commonly available laboratory instrument. Rapid throughput and element specificity are additional benefits of SP-ICP-MS as a measurement tool for metal and metal oxide engineered nanoparticles.

  11. Gunshot residue testing in suicides: Part II: Analysis by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Molina, D Kimberley; Castorena, Joe L; Martinez, Michael; Garcia, James; DiMaio, Vincent J M

    2007-09-01

    Several different methods can be employed to test for gunshot residue (GSR) on a decedent's hands, including scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray (SEM/EDX) and inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). In part I of this 2-part series, GSR results performed by SEM/EDX in undisputed cases of suicidal handgun wounds were studied. In part II, the same population was studied, deceased persons with undisputed suicidal handgun wounds, but GSR testing was performed using ICP-AES. A total of 102 cases were studied and analyzed for caliber of weapon, proximity of wound, and the results of the GSR testing. This study found that 50% of cases where the deceased was known to have fired a handgun immediately prior to death had positive GSR results by ICP/AES, which did not differ from the results of GSR testing by SEM/EDX. Since only 50% of cases where the person is known to have fired a weapon were positive for GSR by either method, this test should not be relied upon to determine whether someone has discharged a firearm and is not useful as a determining factor of whether or not a wound is self-inflicted or non-self-inflicted. While a positive GSR result may be of use, a negative result is not helpful in the medical examiner setting as a negative result indicates that either a person fired a weapon prior to death or a person did not fire a weapon prior to death.

  12. Acquisition of a High-resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer for Cosmochemical and Geochemical Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauretta, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    The primary goal of our research in this program is to develop new techniques for the analysis of volatile trace elements in very small samples using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in preparation for samples returned by the Stardust mission. The instrument that will serve as the basis of our experiments is the ELEMENT2 high-resolution ICP-MS. We have spent the past year designing the laboratory to house this instrument as well as space to store and prepare samples returned by the Stardust mission. Unfortunately, the location that we had initially selected for the instrument turned out to be insufficient for our needs. This was determined almost eight months into the first year of our funding cycle, after extensive work including the production of engineering drawings. However, during this time the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory was selected to lead Phoenix, the first Mars Scout mission. As a result of this award LPL purchased a new, 50,000 square foot building. We have acquired 1400 square feet of laboratory space in this new facility. Four-hundred square feet will be used for a class-100 clean room. This area is designated for storage and preparation of extraterrestrial materials. The additional 1000 square feet will house the ELEMENT2 ICP-MS and peripheral devices. This is an enormous amount of space for this instrument, but it provides plenty of room for expansion in the future. The ICP-MS and the clean room facilities have been purchased. The instrument has been delivered. The startup time for this instrument is relatively short and we expect to be collecting our first data by mid-summer.

  13. Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer – Operational Performance Report

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew Watrous; Anthony Appelhans; Robert Hague; John Olson; Tracy Houghton

    2013-06-01

    The INL made an assessment of the commercially available inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometers (ICPMS) for actinide analysis; emphasizing low detection limits for plutonium. INL scientists subsequently determined if plutonium was present on a swipe, at a 10 million atom decision level. This report describes the evaluation of ICPMS instruments and the operational testing of a new process for the dissolution, separation and analysis via ICPMS of swipes for plutonium and uranium. The swipe dissolution, plutonium and uranium isolation, separation and purification are wet chemistry methods following established procedures. The ICPMS is a commercially available multi-collector magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes five ion counting detectors operating simultaneously. The instrument includes a sample introduction system allowing for sample volumes of < 1 mL to be reproducibly injected into the instrument with minimal waste of the sample solution, while maximizing the useable signal. The performance of the instrument was measured using SRM 996 (244Pu spike) at concentrations of 12 parts per quadrillion (ppq, fg/mL) and with SRM 4350B Columbia River Sediment samples spiked onto swipes at the 10 million atom level. The measured limit of detection (LOD, defined as 3s) for 239Pu is 310,000 atoms based upon the instrument blank data. The limit of quantification (LOQ defined as 10 s) for 239Pu is 105,000 atoms. The measured limit of detection for 239Pu from the SRM 4350B spiked onto a swipe was 2.7 million atoms with the limit of quantification being 9.0 million atoms.

  14. Development of a model for characterizing pneumatically generated primary aerosols for inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Msimanga, N.D.G.

    1992-01-01

    The study of aerosols plays a key role in the development of analytical atomic spectroscopy. While work has been carried out with Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) to improve transport efficiency, analyte signal, limits of detection, and to reduce matrix interferences, little study has focused on sample introduction processes. This study has focused on the characterization and optimization of pneumatic nebulizers used for liquid sample introduction to the ICP. Pneumatic nebulization is the most common means of sample introduction in atomic spectrometry. The pneumatic nebulizers most commonly used today for ICP spectrometry are the cross-flow type or all-glass concentric nebulizers. Aerosols undergo certain processes after the primary formation process before reaching the atomizer, the secondary and tertiary stages. In this work all three stages were looked at, focusing on the primary aerosols. The primary aerosol is the first stage in the formation of the aerosols and takes place at the tip of the nebulizer, as the liquid stream is shattered by the gas flow. The drop size diameters of primary aerosols were measured using a Fraunhofer Laser Diffraction instrument. The Sauter mean diameter (D3.2), which describes the volume of the aerosol with a given surface area, was determined for nebulizers at spray chambers operated under a variety of conditions. The characterization and optimization of sample introduction involved a study of aerosol technology, a study of different instruments for measuring the mean drop size, a description of the instrument, and the influence of some parameters on the D3.2. An empirical model summarizing the characteristics of the primary aerosols is proposed. Modeling is carried out using nonlinear software. The data for modelling were acquired using water, n-butanol, and methanol as the liquid solvents. The model was tested on data obtained from nebulizers with different cross-sectional areas.

  15. Recent developments in inductively coupled plasma source magnetic sector multiple collector mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Halliday, A.N.; Lee, Der-Chuen; Christensen, J.C.; Jones, C.E.; Hall, C.M.; Yi, Wen; Teagle, D.; Walder, A.J.; Freedman, P.A.

    1994-11-01

    This paper describes advances in isotopic measurements that have been made with an inductively coupled plasma source magnetic sector multiple collector mass spectrometer and presents results of new experiments aimed at further evaluating the instrument`s capability. It is shown using standard solutions that trace element ratios such as Rb/Sr can be measured precisely without isotope dilution by comparison with reference solutions of known composition. Similarly, using a new wide flight tube, Pb isotopic compositions and U/Pb ratios can be accurately measured simultaneously without isotope dilution. The effects of deliberately inducing changes in the running conditions (RF power) are shown to be significant for measuring trace element ratios but not for mass bias and interference corrected isotopic compositions. Finally, it is demonstrated that precise and accurate isotopic compositions of elements as refractory as W can be determined relatively easily by solution nebulization and even by direct laser ablation of complex silicates. Isobaric interferences in such experiments are negligible. These experiments serve to highlight the remarkable potential that this new field offers for hitherto difficult isotopic measurements in nuclear, earth, environmental and medical sciences. Isotopic measurements can be made that are reproducible at high precision through a range of running conditions, even in the presence of isobaric interferences. The ability to correct for mass discrimination accurately using a second element of similar mass, the very high sensitivity for elements that are otherwise difficult to ionize, the demonstrated capability for laser ablation work and the ability to measure through a wide mass range simultaneously give this instrument major advantages over other more traditional techniques of isotopic measurement.

  16. Analysis of Plant Leaves Using Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry: Use of Carbon to Compensate for Matrix Effects.

    PubMed

    Chirinos, José; Oropeza, Dayana; González, Jhanis; Zorba, Vassilia; Russo, Richard E

    2017-04-01

    Direct solid sampling by laser ablation into an inductively coupled plasma synchronous vertical dual view optical emission spectroscope (LA-SVDV-ICP-OES) was used for the elemental analysis of nutrient elements Ca, B, Mn, Mg, K, and Zn and essential (non-metallic) elements P and S in plant materials. The samples were mixed with paraffin as a binder, an approach that provides better cohesion of the particles in the pellets in addition to supplying carbon to serve as an internal standard (atomic line C I 193.027 nm) as a way to compensate for matrix effects, and/or variations in the ablation process. Precision was in the range of 1-8% relative standard deviation (RSD) with limit of detection in the range of 0.4-1 mg/kg(-1) and 25-640 mg/kg(-1) for metallic and non-metallic elements, respectively.

  17. Comparative analysis of barium titanate thin films dry etching using inductively coupled plasmas by different fluorine-based mixture gas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the inductively coupled plasma etching technique was applied to etch the barium titanate thin film. A comparative study of etch characteristics of the barium titanate thin film has been investigated in fluorine-based (CF4/O2, C4F8/O2 and SF6/O2) plasmas. The etch rates were measured using focused ion beam in order to ensure the accuracy of measurement. The surface morphology of etched barium titanate thin film was characterized by atomic force microscope. The chemical state of the etched surfaces was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. According to the experimental result, we monitored that a higher barium titanate thin film etch rate was achieved with SF6/O2 due to minimum amount of necessary ion energy and its higher volatility of etching byproducts as compared with CF4/O2 and C4F8/O2. Low-volatile C-F compound etching byproducts from C4F8/O2 were observed on the etched surface and resulted in the reduction of etch rate. As a result, the barium titanate films can be effectively etched by the plasma with the composition of SF6/O2, which has an etch rate of over than 46.7 nm/min at RF power/inductively coupled plasma (ICP) power of 150/1,000 W under gas pressure of 7.5 mTorr with a better surface morphology. PMID:25278821

  18. Influence of Discharge Parameters on Tuned Substrate Self-Bias in an Radio-Frequency Inductively Coupled Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhenfeng; Sun, Jingchao; Wang, Younian

    2005-12-01

    The tuned substrate self-bias in an rf inductively coupled plasma source is controlled by means of varying the impedance of an external LC network inserted between the substrate and the ground. The influencing parameters such as the substrate axial position, different coupling coils and inserted resistance are experimentally studied. To get a better understanding of the experimental results, the axial distributions of the plasma density, electron temperature and plasma potential are measured with an rf compensated Langmuir probe; the coil rf peak-to-peak voltage is measured with a high voltage probe. As in the case of changing discharge power, it is found that continuity, instability and bi-stability of the tuned substrate bias can be obtained by means of changing the substrate axial position in the plasma source or the inserted resistance. Additionally, continuity can not transit directly into bi-stability, but evolves via instability. The inductance of the coupling coil has a substantial effect on the magnitude and the property of the tuned substrate bias.

  19. Comparative measurements of mineral elements in milk powders with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lei, W Q; El Haddad, J; Motto-Ros, V; Gilon-Delepine, N; Stankova, A; Ma, Q L; Bai, X S; Zheng, L J; Zeng, H P; Yu, J

    2011-07-01

    Mineral elements contained in commercially available milk powders, including seven infant formulae and one adult milk, were analyzed with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The purpose of this work was, through a direct comparison of the analytical results, to provide an assessment of the performance of LIBS, and especially of the procedure of calibration-free LIBS (CF-LIBS), to deal with organic compounds such as milk powders. In our experiments, the matrix effect was clearly observed affecting the analytical results each time laser ablation was employed for sampling. Such effect was in addition directly observed by determining the physical parameters of the plasmas induced on the different samples. The CF-LIBS procedure was implemented to deduce the concentrations of Mg and K with Ca as the internal reference element. Quantitative analytical results with CF-LIBS were validated with ICP-AES measurements and nominal concentrations specified for commercial milks. The obtained good results with the CF-LIBS procedure demonstrate its capacity to take into account the difference in physical parameters of the plasma in the calculation of the concentrations of mineral elements, which allows a significant reduction of the matrix effect related to laser ablation. We finally discuss the way to optimize the implementation of the CF-LIBS procedure for the analysis of mineral elements in organic materials.

  20. Dynamic control of substrate bias for highly c-axis textured thin ferromagnetic CoCrTa film in inductively coupled plasma-assisted sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Okimura, Kunio; Oyanagi, Junya

    2005-01-01

    This study shows highly c-axis textured thin ferromagnetic Co-based alloy (CoCrTa) film growth in inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-assisted sputtering with an internal coil with an insulated surface. Dynamic control of the substrate bias achieved highly c-axis textured CoCrTa film with a thickness of 70 nm in 3 min depositions on a Si substrate. The prepared film showed a smooth, dense surface consisting of small crystal grains. The film had a perpendicular magnetic coercivity of 1030 Oe and coercive squareness of 0.36. ICP-assisted sputtering with an internal coil with an insulated surface enabled higher-density ({>=}1.0x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}) plasma with lower space potential ({<=}30 V) compared to ICP-assisted sputtering with bare coil systems. Therefore, the proposed bias control is quite effective for textured growth of thinner Co layers via the effect of a high flux of ions with proper energies. This method can be a candidate for the deposition technique of c-axis textured films as perpendicular magnetic recording media.

  1. The response of the inductively coupled argon plasma to solvent plasma load: spatially resolved maps of electron density obtained from the intensity of one argon line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, D. G. J.; Blades, M. W.

    1994-12-01

    A survey of spatially resolved electron number density ( ne) in the tail cone of the inductively coupled argon plasma (ICAP) is presented: all of the results of the survey have been radially inverted by numerical, asymmetric Abel inversion. The survey extends over the entire volume of the plasma beyond the exit of the ICAP torch; It extends over distances of z = 5-25 mm downstream from the induction coil, and over radial distances of ± 8 mm from the discharge axis. The survey also explores a range of inner argon flow rates ( QIN), solvent plasma load ( Qspl) and r.f. power: moreover, it explores loading by water, methanol and chloroform. Throughout the survey, ne was determined from the intensity of one, optically thin argon line, by a method which assumes that the atomic state distribution function (ASDF) for argon lies close to local thermal equilibrium (LTE). The validity of this assumption is reviewed. Also examined are the discrepancies between ne from this method and ne from Stark broadening measurements. With the error taken into account, the results of the survey reveal how time averaged values of ne in the ICAP respond over an extensive, previously unexplored range of experimental parameters. Moreover, the spatial information lends insight into how the thermal conditions and the transport of energy respond. Overall, the response may be described in terms of energy consumption along the axial channel and thermal pinch within the induction region. The predominating effect depends on the solvent plasma load, the solvent composition, the robustness of the discharge, and the distribution of solvent material over the argon stream.

  2. The induction of water to the inlet air as a means of internal cooling in aircraft-engine cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, Addison M; Krsek, Alois, Jr; Jones, Anthony W

    1943-01-01

    Report presents the results of investigations conducted on a full-scale air-cooled aircraft-engine cylinder of 202-cubic inch displacement to determine the effects of internal cooling by water induction on the maximum permissible power and output of an internal-combustion engine. For a range of fuel-air and water-fuel ratios, the engine inlet pressure was increased until knock was detected aurally, the power was then decreased 7 percent holding the ratios constant. The data indicated that water was a very effective internal coolant, permitting large increases in engine power as limited by either knock or by cylinder temperatures.

  3. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry with a twin quadrupole instrument using laser ablation sample introduction and monodisperse dried microparticulate injection

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Lloyd A.

    1996-10-17

    The focus of this dissertation is the use of a twin quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) for the simultaneous detection of two m/z values. The twin quadrupole ICP-MS is used with laser ablation sample introduction in both the steady state (10 Hz) and single pulse modes. Steady state signals are highly correlated and the majority of flicker noise cancels when the ratio is calculated. Using a copper sample, the isotope ratio 63Cu+/65Cu+ is measured with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 0.26%. Transient signals for single laser pulses are also obtained. Copper isotope ratio measurements for several laser pulses are measured with an RSD of 0.85%. Laser ablation (LA) is used with steel samples to assess the ability of the twin quadrupole ICP-MS to eliminate flicker noise of minor components of steel samples. Isotopic and internal standard ratios are measured in the first part of this work. The isotope ratio 52Cr+/53Cr+ (Cr present at 1.31 %) can be measured with an RSD of 0.06 % to 0.1 %. For internal standard elements, RSDs improve from 1.9 % in the Cr+ signal to 0.12% for the ratio of 51V+ to 52Cr+. In the second part of this work, one mass spectrometer is scanned while the second channel measures an individual m/z value. When the ratio of these two signals is calculated, the peak shapes in the mass spectrum are improved significantly. Pulses of analyte and matrix ions from individual drops are measured simultaneously using the twin quadrupole ICP-MS with monodisperse dried microparticulate injection (MDMI). At modest Pb concentrations (500 ppm), a shoulder on the leading edge of the Li+ signal becomes apparent. Space charge effects are consistent with the disturbances seen.

  4. Plasma membrane Toll-like receptor activation increases bacterial uptake but abrogates endosomal Lactobacillus acidophilus induction of interferon-β.

    PubMed

    Boye, Louise; Welsby, Iain; Lund, Lisbeth Drozd; Goriely, Stanislas; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2016-11-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus induces a potent interferon-β (IFN-β) response in dendritic cells (DCs) by a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) -dependent mechanism, in turn leading to strong interleukin-12 (IL-12) production. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of different types of endocytosis in the L. acidophilus-induced IFN-β and IL-12 responses and how TLR2 or TLR4 ligation by lipopolysaccharide and Pam3/4CSK4 influenced endocytosis of L. acidophilus and the induced IFN-β and IL-12 production. Lactobacillus acidophilus was endocytosed by constitutive macropinocytosis taking place in the immature cells as well as by spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) -dependent phagocytosis but without involvement of plasma membrane TLR2. Stimulation with TLR2 or TLR4 ligands increased macropinocytosis in a Syk-independent manner. As a consequence, incubation of DCs with TLR ligands before incubation with L. acidophilus enhanced the uptake of the bacteria. However, in these experimental conditions, induction of IFN-β and IL-12 was strongly inhibited. As L. acidophilus-induced IFN-β depends on endocytosis and endosomal degradation before signalling and as TLR stimulation from the plasma membrane leading to increased macropinocytosis abrogates IFN-β induction we conclude that plasma membrane TLR stimulation leading to increased macropinocytosis decreases endosomal induction of IFN-β and speculate that this is due to competition between compartments for molecules involved in the signal pathways. In summary, endosomal signalling by L. acidophilus that leads to IFN-β and IL-12 production is inhibited by TLR stimulation from the plasma membrane.

  5. Diagnosing pure-electron plasmas with internal particle flux probes.

    PubMed

    Kremer, J P; Pedersen, T Sunn; Marksteiner, Q; Lefrancois, R G; Hahn, M

    2007-01-01

    Techniques for measuring local plasma potential, density, and temperature of pure-electron plasmas using emissive and Langmuir probes are described. The plasma potential is measured as the least negative potential at which a hot tungsten filament emits electrons. Temperature is measured, as is commonly done in quasineutral plasmas, through the interpretation of a Langmuir probe current-voltage characteristic. Due to the lack of ion-saturation current, the density must also be measured through the interpretation of this characteristic thereby greatly complicating the measurement. Measurements are further complicated by low densities, low cross field transport rates, and large flows typical of pure-electron plasmas. This article describes the use of these techniques on pure-electron plasmas in the Columbia Non-neutral Torus (CNT) stellarator. Measured values for present baseline experimental parameters in CNT are phi(p)=-200+/-2 V, T(e)=4+/-1 eV, and n(e) on the order of 10(12) m(-3) in the interior.

  6. Understanding the dynamics of the inductive plasma formation and its application to create doublet shaped plasma in the TCV tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Joyeeta; Coda, Stefano; Duval, Basil Paul; Galperti, Cristian; Moret, Jean-Marc; Reimerdes, Holger

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of the plasma formation in TCV are revisited with the goal of improving reliability and developing new scenarios such as the creation of doublet configurations. A database for the plasma formation scenarios in TCV reveals that 15% of the attempts to form a plasma fail during the burn-through phase. Plasma formation dynamics are greatly affected by the difference between programmed and obtained plasma current ramp rates that can lead to oscillations in IP when the IP feedback control is activated. This mismatch in IP also propagates into the radial position control. Failed burn-throughs occur when the Ohmic heating power is insufficient either since IP rises too slow or due to a combined effect of the IP feedback oscillations and a regularly occurring MHD instability. Several strategies to improve the present plasma formation scenario have been implemented. Based on the improved understanding of the plasma formation dynamics, a strategy has been developed to create and control a doublet configuration by merging of two droplet-shaped plasma requiring simultaneous breakdown at two locations.

  7. Staphylococcal enterotoxin type A internal deletion mutants: serological activity and induction of T-cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, T O; Hufnagle, W O; Betley, M J

    1993-01-01

    Previous findings indicate that the N-terminal region of staphylococcal enterotoxin type A (SEA) is required for its ability to induce T-cell proliferation. To better localize internal peptides of SEA that are important for induction of murine T-cell proliferation, SEA mutants that had internal deletions in their N-terminal third were constructed. A series of unique restriction enzyme sites were first engineered into sea; only one of these changes resulted in an amino acid substitution (the aspartic acid residue at position 60 of mature SEA was changed to a glycine [D60G]). Because the D60G substitution had no discernible effect on serological or biological activity, the sea allele encoding this mutant SEA was used to construct a panel of mutant SEAs lacking residues 3 to 17, 19 to 23, 24 to 28, 29 to 49, 50 to 55, 56 to 59, 61 to 73, 68 to 74, or 74 to 85. Recombinant plasmids with the desired mutations were constructed in Escherichia coli and transferred to Staphylococcus aureus. Staphylococcal culture supernatants containing the mutant SEAs were examined. Western immunoblot analysis with polyclonal anti-SEA antiserum revealed that each of the recombinant S. aureus strains produced a mutant SEA of the predicted size. All the mutant SEAs exhibited increased sensitivity to monkey stomach lavage fluid in vitro, which is consistent with these mutants having conformations unlike that of wild-type SEA or the SEA D60G mutant. In general, deletion of internal peptides had a deleterious effect on the ability to induce T-cell proliferation; only SEA mutants lacking either residues 3 to 17 or 56 to 59 consistently produced a statistically significant increase in the incorporation of [3H]thymidine. In the course of this work, two monoclonal antibodies that had different requirements for binding to SEA in Western blots were identified. The epitope for one monoclonal antibody was contained within residues 108 to 230 of mature SEA. Binding of the other monoclonal antibody to

  8. PLASMA-2013: International Conference on Research and Applications of Plasmas (Warsaw, Poland, 2-6 September 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadowski, Marek J.

    2014-05-01

    The PLASMA-2013 International Conference on Research and Applications of Plasmas was held in Warsaw (Poland) from 2 to 6 September 2013. The conference was organized by the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, under the auspices of the Polish Physical Society. The scope of the PLASMA conferences, which have been organized every two years since 1993, covers almost all issues of plasma physics and fusion research as well as selected problems of plasma technology. The PLASMA-2013 conference topics included: •Elementary processes and general plasma physics. •Plasmas in tokamaks and stellarators (magnetic confinement fusion). •Plasmas generated by laser beams and inertial confinement fusion. •Plasmas produced by Z-pinch and plasma-focus discharges. •Low-temperature plasma physics. •Space plasmas and laboratory astrophysics. •Plasma diagnostic methods and applications of plasmas. This conference was designed not only for plasma researchers and engineers, but also for students from all over the world, in particular for those from Central and Eastern Europe. Almost 140 participants had the opportunity to hear 9 general lectures, 11 topical talks and 26 oral presentations, as well as to see and discuss around 120 posters. From about 140 contributions, after the preparation of about 100 papers and the peer review process, only 74 papers have been accepted for publication in this topical issue. Acknowledgments Acting on behalf of the International Scientific Committee I would like to express our thanks to all the invited speakers and all the participants of the PLASMA-2013 conference for their numerous contributions. In particular, I wish to thank all of the authors of papers submitted for publication in this topical issue of Physica Scripta . Particular thanks are due to all of the reviewers for their valuable reports and comments, which helped to improve the quality of many of the papers. International Scientific Committee Marek J Sadowski, NCBJ

  9. Evaluation of the analytical capability of NIR femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Takafumi; Kon, Yoshiaki

    2008-03-01

    A laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric (LA-ICPMS) technique utilizing a titanium-sapphire (TiS) femtosecond laser (fs-laser) has been developed for elemental and isotopic analysis. The signal intensity profile, depth of the ablation pit and level of elemental fractionation were investigated in order to evaluate the analytical capability of the present fs-laser ablation-ICPMS technique. The signal intensity profile of (57)Fe, obtained from iron sulfide (FeS(2)), demonstrated that the resulting signal intensity of (57)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation was almost 4-times higher than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation under a similar energy fluence (5 J/cm(2)). In fs-laser ablation, there is no significant difference in a depth of the ablation pit between glass and zircon material, while in ArF laser ablation, the resulting crater depth on the zircon crystal was almost half the level than that obtained for glass material. Both the thermal-induced and particle size-related elemental fractionations, which have been thought to be main sources of analytical error in the LA-ICPMS analysis, were measured on a Harvard 91500 zircon crystal. The resulting fractionation indexes on the (206)Pb/(238)U (f(Pb/U)) and (238)U/(232)Th (f(U/Th)) ratios obtained by the present fs-laser ablation system were significantly smaller than those obtained by a conventional ArF excimer laser ablation system, demonstrative of smaller elemental fractionation. Using the present fs-laser ablation technique, the time profile of the signal intensity of (56)Fe and the isotopic ratios ((57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe) have been measured on a natural pyrite (FeS(2)) sample. Repeatability in signal intensity of (56)Fe achieved by the fs-laser ablation system was significantly better than that obtained by ArF excimer laser ablation. Moreover, the resulting precision in (57)Fe/(54)Fe and (56)Fe/(54)Fe ratio measurements could be improved by the fs-laser ablation system

  10. Liquid sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and mass spectrometry - Critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bings, N. H.; Orlandini von Niessen, J. O.; Schaper, J. N.

    2014-10-01

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) can be considered as the most important tools in inorganic analytical chemistry. Huge progress has been made since the first analytical applications of the ICP. More stable RF generators, improved spectrometers and detection systems were designed along with the achievements gained from advanced microelectronics, leading to overall greatly improved analytical performance of such instruments. In contrast, for the vast majority of cases liquid sample introduction is still based on the pneumatic principle as described in the late 19th century. High flow pneumatic nebulizers typically demand the use of spray chambers as “aerosol filters” in order to match the prerequisites of an ICP. By this, only a small fraction of the nebulized sample actually contributes to the measured signal. Hence, the development of micronebulizers was brought forward. Those systems produce fine aerosols at low sample uptake rates, but they are even more prone for blocking or clogging than conventional systems in the case of solutions containing a significant amount of total dissolved solids (TDS). Despite the high number of publications devoted to liquid sample introduction, it is still considered the Achilles' heel of atomic spectrometry and it is well accepted, that the technology used for liquid sample introduction is still far from ideal, even when applying state-of-the-art systems. Therefore, this review is devoted to offer an update on developments in the field liquid sample introduction that had been reported until the year 2013. The most recent and noteworthy contributions to this field are discussed, trends are highlighted and future directions are outlined. The first part of this review provides a brief overview on theoretical considerations regarding conventional pneumatic nebulization, the fundamentals on aerosol generation and discusses characteristics of aerosols ideally suited

  11. Novel Imprinted Polymer for the Preconcentration of Cadmium with Determination by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Vedat; Yilmaz, Hayriye; Arslan, Zikri; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    A novel Cd(II)-imprinted polymer was prepared with chemical immobilization approach by using N-methacryloyl-L-histidine as a vinylated chelating agent for on-line solid phase extraction of Cd(II) for determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Cd(II)-monomer complex was synthesized and copolymerized via bulk polymerization method in the presence of ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate cross-linker. The resulting polymer was leached with 1.0 mol L(-1) HNO3 to generate the cavities in the polymer for Cd(II) ions. The experimental conditions, including load pH, solution flow rate, and eluent concentration for effective sorption of Cd(II) were optimized using a minicolumn of the imprinted polymer. A volume of 5.0 mL sample 5 μg L(-1) Cd(II) solution at pH 6.5 was loaded onto the column at 2.0 mL min(-1) by using a sequential injection system (FIALab 3200) followed by elution with 1.0 mL of 0.75 mol L(-1) HNO3. The relative selectivity coefficients of the imprinted polymer for Cd(II) were 38.5, 3.5, 3.0, 2.5 and 6.0 in the presence of Cu(II), Ni(II), Zn(II), Co(II) and Pb(II), respectively. Computational calculations revealed that the selectivity of the imprinted polymer was mediated by the stability of Cd(II)-N-methacryloyl-L-histidine complex which was far more stable than those of commonly used monomers, such as 4-vinyl pyridine, methacrylic acid and vinylimidazole. The detection limit (3s) and relative standard deviation (%) were found to be 0.004 μg L(-1) and 3.2%, respectively. The method was validated by analysis of seawater certified reference material (CASS-4) and successfully applied to the determination of Cd(II) in coastal seawater and estuarine water samples.

  12. Controlled Dissolution of Surface Layers for Elemental Analysis by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lorge, Susan Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Determining the composition of thin layers is increasingly important for a variety of industrial materials such as adhesives, coatings and microelectronics. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES), glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are some of the techniques that are currently employed for the direct analysis of the sample surface. Although these techniques do not suffer from the contamination problems that often plague sample dissolution studies, they do require matrix matched standards for quantification. Often, these standards are not readily available. Despite the costs of clean hoods, Teflon pipette tips and bottles, and pure acids, partial sample dissolution is the primary method used in the semiconductor industry to quantify surface impurities. Specifically, vapor phase decomposition (VPD) coupled to ICP-MS or total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) provides elemental information from the top most surface layers at detection sensitivities in the 107-1010atoms/cm2 range. The ability to quantify with standard solutions is a main advantage of these techniques. Li and Houk applied a VPD-like technique to steel. The signal ratio of trace element to matrix element was used for quantification. Although controlled dissolution concentrations determined for some of the dissolved elements agreed with the certified values, concentrations determined for refractory elements (Ti, Nb and Ta) were too low. LA-ICP-MS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements indicated that carbide grains distributed throughout the matrix were high in these refractory elements. These elements dissolved at a slower rate than the matrix element, Fe. If the analyte element is not removed at a rate similar to the matrix element a true

  13. Investigation of lanthanum-strontium-cobalt ferrites using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Óvári, Mihály; Tarsoly, Gergely; Németh, Zoltán; Mihucz, Victor G.; Záray, Gyula

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, suitability of laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) for characterization of the purity and homogeneity of lanthanum-strontium-cobalt ferrite (LSCF) ceramic microsamples with general formula La1 - xSrxFe0.025Co0.975O3 (0.00 ≤ x ≤ 0.50) was studied through determination of their Sr:La ratios as well as Sr content either in depth or line profiling mode. The Sr content of the LSCF samples expressed as weight percent ranged between 5.8% and 9.7% in the case of wet chemical ICP-MS analysis, while theoretical values varied from 5.5% to 9.4%. In the case of LA-ICP-MS, relative standard deviation of the La-normalized Sr intensities was sufficient to characterize the homogeneity of the studied samples. Major and trace element (Mn, Ni, Cu, Mg, Al, Ba) concentrations could be detected at medium resolution of the applied sector field ICP-MS instrument after microwave-assisted acid digestion. For depth and line profiling, a successful approach consisted of the normalization of intensities of Sr, Fe and Co with the corresponding La counts. For the determination of the elemental ratios of La and Sr, the methods involving LA were in good agreement with theoretical values by standardization to an in-house standard corresponding to the LSCF sample having the highest x value (i.e., 0.50) checked by wet chemical ICP-MS measurements. Thus, assessment of fine scale doping of synthesized perovskite type of microsamples could be achieved by the proposed LA-ICP-MS based on a novel calibration approach applying an in-house perovskite standard. Therefore, LA-ICP-MS can be recommended for quality control of perovskite-based products. In memoriam Attila Vértes (1934-2011), full professor of the Institute of Chemistry, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary.

  14. {sup 99}Tc bioassay by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, L.A.

    1998-05-01

    A means of analyzing {sup 99}Tc in urine by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been developed. Historically, {sup 99}Tc analysis was based on the radiometric detection of the 293 keV E{sub Max} beta decay product by liquid scintillation or gas flow proportional counting. In a urine matrix, the analysis of{sup 99}Tc is plagued with many difficulties using conventional radiometric methods. Difficulties originate during chemical separation due to the volatile nature of Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} or during radiation detection due to color or chemical quenching. A separation scheme for {sup 99}Tc detection by ICP-MS is given and is proven to be a sensitive and robust analytical alternative. A comparison of methods using radiometric and mass quantitation of {sup 99}Tc has been conducted in water, artificial urine, and real urine matrices at activity levels between 700 and 2,200 dpm/L. Liquid scintillation results based on an external standard quench correction and a quench curve correction method are compared to results obtained by ICP-MS. Each method produced accurate results, however the precision of the ICP-MS results is superior to that of liquid scintillation results. Limits of detection (LOD) for ICP-MS and liquid scintillation detection are 14.67 and 203.4 dpm/L, respectively, in a real urine matrix. In order to determine the basis for the increased precision of the ICP-MS results, the detection sensitivity for each method is derived and measured. The detection sensitivity for the {sup 99}Tc isotope by ICP-MS is 2.175 x 10{sup {minus}7} {+-} 8.990 x 10{sup {minus}9} and by liquid scintillation is 7.434 x 10{sup {minus}14} {+-} 7.461 x 10{sup {minus}15}. A difference by seven orders of magnitude between the two detection systems allows ICP-MS samples to be analyzed for a period of 15 s compared to 3,600 s by liquid scintillation counting with a lower LOD.

  15. Ultracentrifugation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for metal-protein equilibrium studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnquist, Isaac J.; Holcombe, James A.

    2012-10-01

    The coupling of separation by preparative ultracentrifugation and metal detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been explored for metal-protein equilibrium determinations. This study characterizes the stoichiometry as well as apparent (Kapp) and intrinsic (Kint) binding affinities of the metal-protein association for a model protein. In particular, the affinity of Cu2 + for the high affinity binding site in bovine serum albumin (BSA) is determined. Once equilibrium is established between Cu2 + and BSA, preparative ultracentrifugation moves the metalloprotein away from the meniscus, leaving unbound equilibrium copper in the protein free solution. Since the initial (total) concentrations of purified BSA and Cu2 + can be determined, the free copper concentration at equilibrium can also be determined by taking a small aliquot above the sedimenting boundary for analysis using ICP-MS. This analysis allows for the determination of free Cu2 + ion, which is identical to the equilibrium concentration prior to ultracentrifugation. From these data Kapp and Kint were determined at two different conditions, 100 mM Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) at pH 9.53 and pH 7.93. log Kapp values of 17.6 and 14.6 were determined at pH 9.53 and pH 7.93, respectively. Furthermore, pH-independent log Kint values of - 1.43 and - 1.04 were determined at pH 9.53 and 7.93, respectively. While the log Kint at pH 9.53 was in good agreement with literature values obtained from alternative methods, Kint at pH 7.93 was about 2.5 × larger than previously reported. BSA undergoes a structural rearrangement between pH 7-9, and the generally accepted pH-dependency of protein tertiary structure may be responsible for the variations in the "intrinsic" binding constant. The Cu-BSA binding affinity was also monitored in 100 mM Tris 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution at pH 7.93 in order to determine the effect of a denaturant on metal binding. Results for both log

  16. Identification of organically associated trace elements in wood and coal by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Richaud, R; Lazaro, M J; Lachas, H; Miller, B B; Herod, A A; Dugwell, D R; Kandiyoti, R

    2000-01-01

    1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) was used to extract samples of wood (forest residue) and coal; the extracts were analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) using two different sample preparation methods, in order to identify trace elements associated with the organic part of the samples. A sample of fly ash was similarly extracted and analysed in order to assess the behaviour of the mineral matter contained within the wood and coal samples. 32% of the biomass was extracted at the higher temperature and 12% at room temperature while only 12% of the coal was extracted at the higher temperature and 3% at room temperature. Less than 2% of the ash dissolved at the higher temperature. Size exclusion chromatograms of the extracts indicated the presence of significant amounts of large molecular mass materials (>1000 mu) in the biomass and coal extracts but not in the ash extract. Trace element analyses were carried out using ICP-MS on the acid digests prepared by 'wet ashing' and microwave extraction. Sixteen elements (As, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ga, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, V and Zn) were quantified, in the samples before extraction, in the extracts and in the residues. Concentrations of trace elements in the original biomass sample were lower than in the coal sample while the concentrations in the ash sample were the highest. The major trace elements in the NMP extracts were Ba, Cu, Mn and Zn from the forest residue; Ba, Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn from the coal; Cu and Zn from the ash. These elements are believed to be associated with the organic extracts from the forest residue and coal, and also from the ash. Be and Sb were not quantified in the extracts because they were present at too low concentrations; up to 40% of Mn was extracted from the biomass sample at 202 degrees C, while Se was totally extracted from the ash sample. For the forest residue, approximately 7% (at room temperature) and 45% (at 202 degrees C) of the total trace elements studied were

  17. Selective killing of ovarian cancer cells through induction of apoptosis by nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Iseki, Sachiko; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Kondo, Hiroki; Hori, Masaru; Nakamura, Kae; Hayashi, Moemi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Kano, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-12

    Two independent ovarian cancer cell lines and fibroblast controls were treated with nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). Most ovarian cancer cells were detached from the culture dish by continuous plasma treatment to a single spot on the dish. Next, the plasma source was applied over the whole dish using a robot arm. In vitro cell proliferation assays showed that plasma treatments significantly decreased proliferation rates of ovarian cancer cells compared to fibroblast cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis showed that plasma treatment of ovarian cancer cells induced apoptosis. NEAPP could be a promising tool for therapy for ovarian cancers.

  18. Modulations of the plasma uniformity by low frequency sources in a large-area dual frequency inductively coupled plasma based on fluid simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Yu-Ru; Li, Xue-Chun; Wang, You-Nian

    2015-05-15

    As the wafer size increases, dual frequency (DF) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) sources have been proposed as an effective method to achieve large-area uniform plasma processing. A two-dimensional (2D) self-consistent fluid model, combined with an electromagnetic module, has been employed to investigate the influence of the low frequency (LF) source on the plasma radial uniformity in an argon DF discharge. When the DF antenna current is fixed at 10 A, the bulk plasma density decreases significantly with the LF due to the less efficient heating, and the best radial uniformity is obtained at 3.39 MHz. As the LF decreases to 2.26 MHz, the plasma density is characterized by an edge-high profile, and meanwhile the maximum of the electron temperature appears below the outer two-turn coil. Moreover, the axial ion flux at 3.39 MHz is rather uniform in the center region except at the radial edge of the substrate, where a higher ion flux is observed. When the inner five-turn coil frequency is fixed at 2.26 MHz, the plasma density profiles shift from edge-high over uniform to center-high as the LF coil current increases from 6 A to 18 A, and the best plasma uniformity is obtained at 14 A. In addition, the maximum of the electron temperature becomes lower with a second peak appears at the radial position of r = 9 cm at 18 A.

  19. Inductively-coupled plasmas in pure Cl, Oand mixtures: measurements of atoms, ClxOyand electron densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucher, Mickaël; Carbone, Emile; Booth, Jean-Paul; Chabert, Pascal; LPP-Plasmas froids Team

    2014-10-01

    Inductively-coupled plasmas in Cl/O (often with HBr) are widely used in the microelectronics industry for the etching of silicon CMOS gates. Many simulations describing these plasmas (global and 2-dimensional fluid models such as HPEM) have been developed but experimental validation is sparse. This paper addresses this gap with a large quantity of experimental data in plasmas of Cl, Oand their mixtures. The plasma is excited by a 4-turn planar coil powered at 13.56 MHz through a dielectric window, and contained in a cylindrical anodized aluminium reactor (55 cm diameter, 10 cm high). Electron densities were measured with a microwave hairpin resonator. In all cases the electron density passes through a maximum with pressure. The ground-state O and Cl atom density was measured by Two-Photon Absorption Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) combined with specific absolute calibration techniques. Broad-band absorption spectroscopy was used to measure the density of Cland vibrationally excited Omolecules, excited state Cl atoms and a range of oxychlorides products. To our knowledge this is the first time that these oxychloride densities and vibrationally excited molecules have been measured in low-pressure plasmas.

  20. Electron energy distributions and electron impact source functions in Ar/N{sub 2} inductively coupled plasmas using pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    Logue, Michael D. Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-01-28

    In plasma materials processing, such as plasma etching, control of the time-averaged electron energy distributions (EEDs) in the plasma allows for control of the time-averaged electron impact source functions of reactive species in the plasma and their fluxes to surfaces. One potential method for refining the control of EEDs is through the use of pulsed power. Inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) are attractive for using pulsed power in this manner because the EEDs are dominantly controlled by the ICP power as opposed to the bias power applied to the substrate. In this paper, we discuss results from a computational investigation of EEDs and electron impact source functions in low pressure (5–50 mTorr) ICPs sustained in Ar/N{sub 2} for various duty cycles. We find there is an ability to control EEDs, and thus source functions, by pulsing the ICP power, with the greatest variability of the EEDs located within the skin depth of the electromagnetic field. The transit time of hot electrons produced in the skin depth at the onset of pulse power produces a delay in the response of the EEDs as a function of distance from the coils. The choice of ICP pressure has a large impact on the dynamics of the EEDs, whereas duty cycle has a small influence on time-averaged EEDs and source functions.

  1. Three-coil inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source with individually controlled coil currents supplied from a single power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorf, Leonid; Rauf, Shahid; Liu, Jonathan; Kenney, Jason; Lane, Steven; Nguyen, Andrew; Ramaswamy, Kartik; Collins, Ken

    2013-09-01

    As requirements on plasma uniformity get more stringent in the semiconductor industry, an ICP source with 3 coils becomes warranted. Designing a power distribution/50 Ω-tuning network (PDN) that delivers the power from a single generator to 3 coils is complicated, due to inductive coupling between the coils, and between coils and plasma. Our PDN comprises several capacitors, including 2 variable ones, C1,2, connected in parallel to 2 coils. A set of equations for coils/plasma currents was solved over a wide parameter space to determine practical values/ranges for all capacitors. It was shown that by moving along a pre-determined programming path in C1,2 space, one can attain various coil current ratios (CCR) without crossing resonance curves. The latter causes coil current reversal, which may result in plasma instabilities and affect uniformity. Based on modeling results, the PDN was built and tested using a specially made 3-coil source. A wide range of CCR was achieved by varying C1,2, including maxima or minima in any 2 coils. With slight adjustments (to account for parasitics and actual plasma coupling), the model correctly predicted experimentally observed CCR for each tested C1,2 pair. Likewise, the theoretical resonance structure was reproduced experimentally with good agreement.

  2. Inductively-coupled plasmas in pure O2: measurements of densities of O atoms, electrons and vibrationally excited Omolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucher, Mickaël; Carbone, Emile; Booth, Jean-Paul; Chabert, Pascal; LPP-Plasmas froids Team

    2014-10-01

    Inductively-coupled plasmas containing O2 (pure or mixtures) are widely used in materials processing. Various simulations have been developed but experimental validation is still sparse. We present here a comprehensive data set for O2 plasmas over a wide range of pressure and RF power to address this need. The plasma is excited with a 4-turn planar coil through a dielectric window at 13.56 MHz in an anodized aluminium reactor. The electron density was measured with a microwave resonator hairpin probe. It increases continuously with RF power, but with pressure it passes through a broad maximum around 40 mTorr. Ground-state O atom densities were determined using Two-Photon Absorption Laser-Induced Fluorescence combined with absolute calibration using Xe TALIF. The atom density increases with gas pressure, but with RF power it first increases but progressively saturates tot about 20% of the initial (no plasma) gas density. A novel high-sensitivity ultra-broad-band absorption spectroscopy setup allowed O2 molecules to be detected in high vibrational states (up to v = 18) via the Schumann-Runge bands. Molecular Ovibrational temperatures up to 12,000 K were observed, whereas the rotational temperature did not exceed 500 K. This indicates that electron-impact pumping of vibrational levels is important, whereas V-T transfer is slow. These processes must be included to accurately model the O2 plasma system.

  3. CONFERENCE DESCRIPTION Theory of Fusion Plasmas: Varenna-Lausanne International Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbet, X.; Sauter, O.

    2010-12-01

    The Joint Varenna-Lausanne international workshop on Theory of Fusion Plasmas takes place every other year in a place particularly favourable for informal and in-depth discussions. Invited and contributed papers present state-of-the-art research in theoretical plasma physics, covering all domains relevant to fusion plasmas. This workshop always welcomes a fruitful mix of experienced researchers and students, to allow a better understanding of the key theoretical physics models and applications. Theoretical issues related to burning plasmas Anomalous Transport (Turbulence, Coherent Structures, Microinstabilities) RF Heating and Current Drive Macroinstabilities Plasma-Edge Physics and Divertors Fast particles instabilities Further details: http://Varenna-Lausanne.epfl.ch The conference is organized by: Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Association EURATOM - Confédération Suisse 'Piero Caldirola' International Centre for the Promotion of Science and International School of Plasma Physics Istituto di Fisica del Plasma del CNR, Milano Editors: X Garbet (CEA, Cadarache, France) and O Sauter (CRPP-EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland)

  4. The effect of dielectric top lids on materials processing in a low frequency inductively coupled plasma (LF-ICP) reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, J. W. M.; Chan, C. S.; Xu, L.; Xu, S.

    2014-08-01

    The advent of the plasma revolution began in the 1970's with the exploitation of plasma sources for anisotropic etching and processing of materials. In recent years, plasma processing has gained popularity, with research institutions adopting projects in the field and industries implementing dry processing in their production lines. The advantages of utilizing plasma sources would be uniform processing over a large exposed surface area, and the reduction of toxic emissions. This leads to reduced costs borne by manufacturers which could be passed down as consumer savings, and a reduction in negative environmental impacts. Yet, one constraint that plagues the industry would be the control of contaminants in a plasma reactor which becomes evident when reactions are conducted in a clean vacuum environment. In this work, amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films were grown on glass substrates in a low frequency inductively coupled plasma (LF-ICP) reactor with a top lid made of quartz. Even though the chamber was kept at high vacuum ( 10-4 Pa), it was evident through secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and Fourier-transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) that oxygen contaminants were present. With the aid of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) the contaminant species were identified. The design of the LF-ICP reactor was then modified to incorporate an Alumina (Al2O3) lid. Results indicate that there were reduced amounts of contaminants present in the reactor, and that an added benefit of increased power transfer to the plasma, improving deposition rate of thin films was realized. The results of this study is conclusive in showing that Al2O3 is a good alternative as a top-lid of an LF-ICP reactor, and offers industries a solution in improving quality and rate of growth of thin films.

  5. Uncertainty Estimation of Metals and Semimetals Determination in Wastewater by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, J. R.; Villa-Soares, S. M.; Stellato, T. B.; Silva, T. B. S. C.; Faustino, M. G.; Monteiro, L. R.; Pires, M. A. F.; Cotrim, M. E. B.

    2016-07-01

    The measurement uncertainty is a parameter that represents the dispersion of the results obtained by a method of analysis. The estimation of measurement uncertainty in the determination of metals and semimetals is important to compare the results with limits defined by environmental legislation and conclude if the analytes are meeting the requirements. Therefore, the aim of this paper is present all the steps followed to estimate the uncertainty of the determination of amount of metals and semimetals in wastewater by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). Measurement uncertainty obtained was between 4.6 and 12.2% in the concentration range of mg.L-1.

  6. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy: a computer controlled, scanning monochromator system for the rapid determination of the elements

    SciTech Connect

    Floyd, M.A.

    1980-03-01

    A computer controlled, scanning monochromator system specifically designed for the rapid, sequential determination of the elements is described. The monochromator is combined with an inductively coupled plasma excitation source so that elements at major, minor, trace, and ultratrace levels may be determined, in sequence, without changing experimental parameters other than the spectral line observed. A number of distinctive features not found in previously described versions are incorporated into the system here described. Performance characteristics of the entire system and several analytical applications are discussed.

  7. Measurement of low radioactivity background in a high voltage cable by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vacri, M. L. di; Nisi, S.; Balata, M.

    2013-08-08

    The measurement of naturally occurring low level radioactivity background in a high voltage (HV) cable by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR ICP MS) is presented in this work. The measurements were performed at the Chemistry Service of the Gran Sasso National Laboratory. The contributions to the radioactive background coming from the different components of the heterogeneous material were separated. Based on the mass fraction of the cable, the whole contamination was calculated. The HR ICP MS results were cross-checked by gamma ray spectroscopy analysis that was performed at the low background facility STELLA (Sub Terranean Low Level Assay) of the LNGS underground lab using HPGe detectors.

  8. Differentiation of colloidal and dissolved silica: Analytical separation using spectrophotometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis-Russ, A.; Ranville, J.; Kashuba, A.T.

    1991-01-01

    A method is described that differentiates between solutions containing silica-dominated colloids and solutions that are essentially free of colloids. Suspensions of tuff particles were treated to remove colloids by centrifugation, filtration or both. Agreement of silica concentrations determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and by a spectrophotometric method was taken as an indication of colloid-free solutions. For two tuffs, centrifugation was effective for removing colloids. For the third, highly altered tuff, filtration was more effective for removing colloids.

  9. A critical review of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for geoanalysis, geochemistry and hydrology, Part 1. Analytical performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brenner, I.B.; Taylor, H.E.

    1992-01-01

    Present-day inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) instrumentation is described briefly. Emphasis is placed on performance characteristics for geoanalysis, geochemistry, and hydrology. Applications where ICP-MS would be indispensable are indicated. Determination of geochemically diagnostic trace elements (such as the rare earth elements [REE], U and Th), of isotope ratios for fingerprinting, tracer and other geo-isotope applications, and benchmark isotope dilution determinations are considered to be typical priority applications for ICP-MS. It is concluded that ICP-MS furnishes unique geoanalytical and environmental data that are not readily provided by conventional spectroscopic (emission and absorption) techniques.

  10. About a possibility of increasing the adhesion strength between mineral glass and polymeric binder under radio-frequency induction plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miftakhov, I. S.; Trofimov, A. V.; Nagmutdinova, A. I.; Voznesensky, E. F.; Sharifullin, F. S.; Krasina, I. V.; Rakhmatullina, G. R.

    2017-01-01

    The paper investigated influences of radio-frequency induction plasma treatment on the surface of sheet mineral glasses for household purpose. Discussion for casting the most suitable treatment modes and theirs substantiation is shown. During the investigation the most productive plasma treatment modes for applied binders have been found. It is shown that the durability of adhesive joints between mineral glass and polymeric binder under low-temperature plasma treatment increase to 65%.

  11. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma dynamic reaction cell mass spectrometry for the multi-element analysis of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resano, M.; García-Ruiz, E.; Vanhaecke, F.

    2005-11-01

    In this work, the potential of laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for the fast analysis of polymers has been explored. Different real-life samples (polyethylene shopping bags, an acrylonitrile butadiene styrene material and various plastic bricks) as well as several reference materials (VDA 001 to 004, Cd in polyethylene) have been selected for the study. Two polyethylene reference materials (ERM-EC 680 and 681), for which a reference or indicative value for the most relevant metals is available, have proved their suitability as standards for calibration. Special attention has been paid to the difficulties expected for the determination of Cr at the μg g - 1 level in this kind of materials, due to the interference of ArC + ions on the most abundant isotopes of Cr. The use of ammonia as a reaction gas in a dynamic reaction cell is shown to alleviate this problem, resulting in a limit of detection of 0.15 μg g - 1 for this element, while limiting only modestly the possibilities of the technique for simultaneous multi-element analysis. In this regard, As is the analyte most seriously affected by the use of ammonia, and its determination has to be carried out in vented mode, at the expense of measuring time. In all cases studied, accurate results could be obtained for elements ranging in content from the sub-μg g - 1 level to tens of thousands of μg g - 1 . However, the use of an element of known concentration as internal standard may be needed for materials with a matrix significantly different from that of the standard (polyethylene in this work). Precision ranged between 5% and 10% RSD for elements found at the 10 μg g - 1 level or higher, while this value could deteriorate to 20% for analytes found at the sub-μg g - 1 level. Overall, the technique evaluated presents many advantages for the fast and accurate multi-element analysis of these materials, avoiding laborious digestion procedures and minimizing the risk of analyte losses due

  12. Determination of trace elements in biodiesel and vegetable oil by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry following alcohol dilution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, Eduardo S.; de Loos-Vollebregt, Margaretha T. C.; Curtius, Adilson J.; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2011-09-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Na, P, S and Zn in biodiesels and vegetable oils by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) has been developed. The method - based on the use of an ICP-OES instrument outfitted with a spectrometer in Paschen-Runge mount, equipped with linear charge coupled device detectors monitoring the entire spectrum from 130 to 770 nm - offers a high sample throughput as sample preparation is limited to dilution with alcohol, while all elements of interest are determined simultaneously. Ethanol is only suitable in the context of biodiesel analysis, whereas dilution with 1-propanol also allows application of the method, without any additional modification, to analysis of vegetable oils. As a result, the dilution with 1-propanol is preferable. Sample introduction was carried out with pneumatic nebulization and spectral interferences from carbon-containing compounds were reduced by cooling the cyclonic spray chamber to - 5 °C. The remaining spectral interferences in the low-UV region were efficiently corrected for by the background correction system offered in the software of the ICP-OES instrument used. Calibration was carried out against inorganic standards diluted in ethanol or 1-propanol, while Y was used as an internal standard, correcting for non-spectral interference and sensitivity drift. The accuracy of the method was verified through the analysis of the NIST SRMs 2772 and 2773 biodiesel reference materials. Additionally, as for most of the target elements only indicative concentration values are available for these reference materials, recovery tests have been performed using inorganic and organic standards. The results obtained were in good agreement with the values found on the certificate for both ethanol and 1-propanol sample dilution, while the recoveries were between 87 and 116% for biodiesel and between 95 and 106% for vegetable oils. The measurement precision expressed

  13. Analytical procedures for the determination of selected trace elements in peat and plant samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krachler, Michael; Mohl, Carola; Emons, Hendrik; Shotyk, William

    2002-08-01

    A simple, robust and reliable analytical procedure for the determination of 15 elements, namely Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Ag, Cd, Ba, Tl, Th and U in peat and plant materials by inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) was developed. Powdered sample aliquots of approximately 220 mg were dissolved with various acid mixtures in a microwave heated high-pressure autoclave capable to digest 40 samples simultaneously. The selection of appropriate amounts of digestion acids (nitric acid, hydrofluoric acid or tetrafluoroboric acid) was crucial to obtain accurate results. The optimized acid mixture for digestion of plant and peat samples consisted of 3 ml HNO 3 and 0.1 ml HBF 4. An ultrasonic nebulizer with an additional membrane desolvation unit was found beneficial for the determination of Co, Ni, Ag, Tl, Th and U, allowing to aspirate a dry sample aerosol into the ICP-QMS. A pneumatic cross flow nebulizer served as sample introduction device for the other elements. Internal standardization was achieved with 103Rh for all elements, except for Th whose ICP-QMS signals were corrected by 103Rh and 185Re. Quality control was ascertained by analysis of the certified plant reference material GBW 07602 Bush Branches and Leaves. In almost all cases HNO 3 alone could not fully liberate the analytes of interest from the peat or plant matrix, probably because of the silicates present. After adding small amounts (0.05-0.1 ml) of either HF or HBF 4 to the digestion mixture, concentrations quantified by ICP-QMS generally increased significantly, in the case of Rb up to 80%. Further increasing the volumes of HF or HBF 4 in turn, resulted in a loss of recoveries of almost all elements, some of which amounted to approximately 60%. The successful analytical procedures were applied to the determination of two bulk peat materials. In general, good agreement between the found concentrations and results from an inter-laboratory trial or from instrumental

  14. International Microgravity Plasma Facility IMPF: A Multi-User Modular Research Facility for Complex Plasma Research on ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seurig, R.; Burfeindt, J.; Castegini, R.; Griethe, W.; Hofmann, P.

    2002-01-01

    On March 03, 2001, the PKE-Nefedov plasma experiment was successfully put into operation on board ISS. This complex plasma experiment is the predecessor for the semi-autonomous multi-user facility IMPF (International Microgravity Plasma Facility) to be flown in 2006 with an expected operational lifetime of 10 years. IMPF is envisioned to be an international research facility for investigators in the field of multi-component plasmas containing ions, electrons, and charged microparticles. This research filed is often referred to as "complex plasmas". The actual location of IMPF on ISS is not decided yet; potential infrastructure under consideration are EXPRESS Rack, Standard Interface Rack SIR, European Drawer Rack EDR, or a to be designed custom rack infrastructure on the Russian Segment. The actual development status of the DLR funded Pre-phase B Study for IMPF will be presented. For this phase, IMPF was assumed to be integrated in an EXPRESS Rack requiring four middeck lockers with two 4-PU ISIS drawers for accommodation. Technical and operational challenges, like a 240 Mbytes/sec continuous experimental data stream for 60 minutes, will be addressed. The project was funded by the German Space Agency (DLR) and was performed in close cooperation with scientists from the Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestical Physics in Munich, Germany.

  15. Determination of Rare Earth Elements in Green River Shale By Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Using a Desolvating Nebulizer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, F.; Clarke, D.; Moody, S.

    2014-12-01

    In this work, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is applied to a geological sample for the determination of rare earth elements (REEs) using a specialized nebulizer system. The low flow desolvating nebulizer has been shown to decrease metal oxide formation which leads to a reduction in mass spectral interferences. Traditional nebulizers and spray chambers may be suitable for similar sample types, but reduction of water vapor loading to the plasma can improve REE detection limits for quadrupole-based ICP-MS. The Green River formation holds the largest oil shale deposits in the world and understanding the elemental composition of these samples is important in its study. A certified reference material, USGS Green River Shale (SGR-1), was microwave digested prior to analysis, and recoveries of REEs compared to historical values are discussed.

  16. Measurements of Ion Energy and Ion Flux Distributions in Inductively Coupled Plasmas in CF4/O2/Ar Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; Kim, J. S.; Cappelli, M. A.; Sharma, Surendra; Partridge, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We report mass spectrometric studies of energy distributions and absolute concentrations of ions generated in CF4/O2/Ar inductively coupled rf plasmas. The ions were collected through a 100 mm orifice in the grounded and water cooled lower electrode in a GEC cell configuration. The measurements were made at gas pressures in the 10-50 mTorr range and rf coil power in the 100-300 W range. The observed ions are CF3(+), CF2(+), CF(+), C(+), F(+), COF(+), CO(+), O2(+), and O(+). The relative abundance of these ions varies with pressure and rf power. The energy distribution and absolute concentrations are correlated with electron number density and floating plasma potential measured by a compensated Langmuir probe.

  17. Multielemental analysis of prehistoric animal teeth by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Galiova, Michaela; Kaiser, Jozef; Fortes, Francisco J.; Novotny, Karel; Malina, Radomir; Prokes, Lubomir; Hrdlicka, Ales; Vaculovic, Tomas; Nyvltova Fisakova, Miriam; Svoboda, Jiri; Kanicky, Viktor; Laserna, Javier J.

    2010-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser ablation (LA) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry (MS) were utilized for microspatial analyses of a prehistoric bear (Ursus arctos) tooth dentine. The distribution of selected trace elements (Sr, Ba, Fe) was measured on a 26 mmx15 mm large and 3 mm thick transverse cross section of a canine tooth. The Na and Mg content together with the distribution of matrix elements (Ca, P) was also monitored within this area. The depth of the LIBS craters was measured with an optical profilometer. As shown, both LIBS and LA-ICP-MS can be successfully used for the fast, spatially resolved analysis of prehistoric teeth samples. In addition to microchemical analysis, the sample hardness was calculated using LIBS plasma ionic-to-atomic line intensity ratios of Mg (or Ca). To validate the sample hardness calculations, the hardness was also measured with a Vickers microhardness tester.

  18. Induction thermal plasma process modifies the physicochemical properties of materials used for carbon nanotube production, influencing their cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Alinejad, Yasaman; Faucheux, Nathalie; Soucy, Gervais

    2013-11-01

    The effect of radio frequency induction thermal plasma (RFITP) process on the cytotoxicity of materials used for single-walled carbon nanotube production remains unknown. In this study, the influence of RFITP process on physicochemical and cytotoxic properties of commercial Co, Ni, Y₂O₃, Mo catalysts and carbon black was investigated. The cytotoxic assays (MTS, LDH, neutral red, TUNEL) revealed the strongest effect of commercial Co on murine Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts affecting their viability in a dose-dependent manner within 24 h. The cells contained also less actin stress fibres. Although RFITP affects the properties of each catalyst (size, morphology, chemistry), only cytotoxicity of Ni catalyst was increased. The plasma-treated Ni induced apoptosis. Comparing Ni particles before and after RFITP process with commercial nanoparticles of Ni revealed that the particles with similar surface area have different cytotoxicities. Interestingly, the observed toxicity of the catalysts was not mainly due to the release of ions.

  19. Development and evaluation of high resolution quadrupole mass analyzer and an inductively coupled plasma-Mach disk

    SciTech Connect

    Amad, Ma'an Hazem

    1999-12-10

    By definition a plasma is an electrically conducting gaseous mixture containing a significant concentration of cations and electrons. The Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) is an electrodeless discharge in a gas at atmospheric pressure. This discharge is an excellent one for vaporizing, atomizing, and ionizing elements. The early development of the ICP began in 1942 by Babat and then by Reed in the early 1960s. This was then followed by the pioneering work of Fassel and coworkers in the late 1960s. Commercial ICP spectrometers were introduced in the mid 1970s. A major breakthrough in the area of ICP took place in the early 1980s when the ICP was shown to be an excellent ion source for mass spectrometry.

  20. Effect of surface temperature on plasma-surface interactions in an inductively coupled modified gaseous electronics conference reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Baosuo; Joseph, Eric A.; Sant, Sanket P.; Liu Yonghua; Radhakrishnan, Arun; Overzet, Lawrence J.; Goeckner, Matthew J.

    2005-11-15

    The effect of wall temperature, from 50 to 200 deg. C, on gas phase chemistry and substrate etching rates has been studied in inductively coupled CF{sub 4} plasma under two distinctive initial wall conditions, namely 'clean' and 'seasoned'. During plasma etching, we found that the gas phase chemistry exhibits a weak dependence on the initial wall cleanliness when the wall is either cold (50 deg. C) or hot (200 deg. C). In the mid-temperature range, the wall cleanliness can strongly affect gas phase chemistry. The study of temperature dependence of the fluorocarbon film deposition on the substrate indicates that ion-assisted incorporation, direct ion incorporation and ion-assisted desorption are the major factors determining film growth and removal. Ion-assisted incorporation and desorption are surface-temperature-dependent, while direct ion incorporation is independent of the surface temperature.