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Sample records for plasma lab cgapl

  1. Progress on Langmuir Probe, Data Analysis, Acquisition and Optimization Innovations at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Erin; Frank, John; Azzari, Phil; James, Royce; Hopson, Jordan; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Paolino, Richard; Sandi, Eva; Sherman, Justin; Turk, Jeremy

    2016-10-01

    CGAPL houses four major plasma experiments that span large temperature, density, energy and functionality regimes. Often automation and remote operation of intelligent devices are required in adverse operating environments for digital and analogue systems. Plasma data collected by a multitude of diagnostics and sensors (to include Langmuir probes) over long timescales mandates CGAPL's 40-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system that collects and stores data plus controls CGAPL. The ability to remotely control and operate lab diagnostics then collect and store data through a LabView collective Graphic User Interface (GUI) currently under construction, enable users to remotely control, collect, and store CGAPL experimental data. Innovative solutions to optimize data collection and apparatus command and control, will enhance the ability to run experiments remotely, improve the validity of results, and advance participation in fusion grade diagnostic development. Instrument automation, optimization, and data collection obstacles, solutions, and procedures will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15-16.

  2. Updates on the Optical Emission Spectroscopy and Thomson Scattering Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke-Tinson, Omar; Karama, Jackson; Azzari, Phillip; Royce, James; Page, Eric; Schlank, Carter; Sherman, Justin; Stutzman, Brooke; Zuniga, Jonathan

    2014-10-01

    HPX at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory (CGAPL) have set up spectral probes to verify plasma mode transitions to the W-mode. These optical probes utilize movable filters, and ccd cameras to gather data at selected spectral frequency bands. Raw data collected will be used to measure the plasma's relative density, temperature, structure, and behavior during experiments. Direct measurements of the plasma's properties can be determined through modeling and by comparison with the state transition tables, using Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES). The spectral probes will take advantage of HPX's magnetic field structure to define and measure the plasma's radiation temp as a function of time and space. In addition, the Thomson Scattering (TS) device will measure internal temperature and density data as the HPX plasma transitions through capacitive and inductive modes while developing into helicon plasma. Currently CGAPL is focused on building its laser beam transport and scattered light collection optical systems. Recently, HPX has acquired an Andor ICCD spectrometer for the spectral analysis. Data collected by the TS system will be logged in real time by CGAPL's Data Acquisition (DAQ) system with LabView remote access. Further progress on HPX will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY13.

  3. Particle Probe Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Justin; James, R. W.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. J.; Romano, B.; Zuniga, J.; Schlank, C.; Lopez, M.; Karama, J.; Duke-Tinson, O.; Stutzman, B. S.

    2013-10-01

    Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab(CGAPL) has constructed a Helicon Plasma Experiment. Plasmas will be used in high-temperature and -density diagnostic development for future lab investigations of fusion-grade plasma. Efforts to develop and enhance high temperature and density (1013cm-3 and up) helicon plasmas at low pressures (.01T) reported by Toki et al., continue. HPX will integrate a 32-channel National Instruments DAQ(Data Acquisition) board, designed to digitize data from tests. With LabView as the programing language, CGAPL will take samples at 12bits of precision at 2MS/s to create a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The GUI will control experimental variables (one or several concurrent tests) and monitor systems during data collection. Data collection will be conducted with particle probes, currently under construction. Probes, used to discern the plasma mode transitions, will measure plasma particle velocity, temperature, density and floating potential at different regimes. Once independent triple and mach probes for surface point investigations are installed, a triple probe array to produce a more comprehensive density and surface view will follow. Progress on development of GUI and construction of probes will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY12.

  4. Plasma Physics Lab and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, 1989

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    From the Princeton University Archives: Promotional video about the Plasma Physics Lab and the new Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), with footage of the interior, machines, and scientists at work. This film is discussed in the audiovisual blog of the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library, which holds the archives of Princeton University.

  5. Particle Probe Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Justin; James, R. W.; Lopez, M.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. L.; Schlank, C.; Stutzman, B. S.; Zuniga, J.

    2012-10-01

    A small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) has been constructed at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL) to utilize the reputed high densities at low pressure (.01 T) [1], in high temperature and density diagnostic development for future laboratory investigations. With the initial construction phase complete, HPX has produced its first plasmas. Efforts to develop and enhance the high temperature and density (10^13 cm-3 and higher) helicon plasmas at low pressures (.01 T) reported by Toki, Shinohara, et. al. continue. Currently, particle probes to measure plasmas' temperatures and densities, necessary to discern the plasma mode transitions, are in development. Construction of independent mach and triple probes for single point surface investigations are underway and once installed, they will be followed by a triple probe array to produce a more comprehensive density and surface view. Progress on the construction and findings of these probes on HPX will be reported.

  6. PlasmaLab/Eco-Plasma - The future of complex plasma research in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapek, Christina; Thomas, Hubertus; Huber, Peter; Mohr, Daniel; Hagl, Tanja; Konopka, Uwe; Lipaev, Andrey; Morfill, Gregor; Molotkov, Vladimir

    The next Russian-German cooperation for the investigation of complex plasmas under microgravity conditions on the International Space Station (ISS) is the PlasmaLab/Eco-Plasma project. Here, a new plasma chamber -- the ``Zyflex'' chamber -- is being developed. The chamber is a cylindrical plasma chamber with parallel electrodes and a flexible system geometry. It is designed to extend the accessible plasma parameter range, i.e. neutral gas pressure, plasma density and electron temperature, and also to allow an independent control of the plasma parameters, therefore increasing the experimental quality and expected knowledge gain significantly. With this system it will be possible to reach low neutral gas pressures (which means weak damping of the particle motion) and to generate large, homogeneous 3D particle systems for studies of fundamental phenomena such as phase transitions, dynamics of liquids or phase separation. The Zyflex chamber has already been operated in several parabolic flight campaigns with different configurations during the last years, yielding a promising outlook for its future development. Here, we will present the current status of the project, the technological advancements the Zyflex chamber will offer compared to its predecessors, and the latest scientific results from experiments on ground and in microgravity conditions during parabolic flights. This work and some of the authors are funded by DLR/BMWi (FKZ 50 WP 0700).

  7. PlasmaLab/EkoPlasma - The Future of Complex Plasma Research in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapek, Christina; Fortov, Vladimir; Huber, Peter; Mohr, Daniel; Konopka, Uwe; Lipaev, Andrey; Molotkov, Vladimir; Petrov, Oleg; Zähringer, Erich; Thomas, Hubertus

    2016-07-01

    The PlasmaLab project, a Russian-German cooperation, has the aim to develop a future laboratory for the investigation of complex plasmas under microgravity conditions on the International Space Station (ISS). Within the project, a new plasma chamber, the Zyflex chamber, has been developed and is now being prepared to be launched to the ISS in 2020 as a laboratory setup with the name EkoPlasma (Experiment komplex Plasma). The Zyflex chamber is a large, cylindrical plasma chamber with parallel, rf-driven electrodes and a flexible inner geometry. It is designed to extend the accessible experimental parameter range and to allow an independent control of the plasma parameters, therefore increasing the experimental possibilities and expected knowledge gain significantly. Further, a 3D optical diagnostic will allow for the study of particle dynamics in 3D realtime. Possible future research topics include e.g. phase transitions, the dynamics of liquids, phase separation, or turbulence. The experimental setup will be presented, as well as some preliminary results of experiments on earth and in parabolic flights to visualize the possibilities of this new laboratory. This work and some of the authors are funded by DLR/BMWi (FKZ 50WM1441).

  8. Honeycomblike large area LaB6 plasma source for Multi-Purpose Plasma facility.

    PubMed

    Woo, Hyun-Jong; Chung, Kyu-Sun; You, Hyun-Jong; Lee, Myoung-Jae; Lho, Taihyeop; Choh, Kwon Kook; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Jung, Yong Ho; Lee, Bongju; Yoo, Suk Jae; Kwon, Myeon

    2007-10-01

    A Multi-Purpose Plasma (MP(2)) facility has been renovated from Hanbit mirror device [Kwon et al., Nucl. Fusion 43, 686 (2003)] by adopting the same philosophy of diversified plasma simulator (DiPS) [Chung et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 46, 354 (2006)] by installing two plasma sources: LaB(6) (dc) and helicon (rf) plasma sources; and making three distinct simulators: divertor plasma simulator, space propulsion simulator, and astrophysics simulator. During the first renovation stage, a honeycomblike large area LaB(6) (HLA-LaB(6)) cathode was developed for the divertor plasma simulator to improve the resistance against the thermal shock fragility for large and high density plasma generation. A HLA-LaB(6) cathode is composed of the one inner cathode with 4 in. diameter and the six outer cathodes with 2 in. diameter along with separate graphite heaters. The first plasma is generated with Ar gas and its properties are measured by the electric probes with various discharge currents and magnetic field configurations. Plasma density at the middle of central cell reaches up to 2.6 x 10(12) cm(-3), while the electron temperature remains around 3-3.5 eV at the low discharge current of less than 45 A, and the magnetic field intensity of 870 G. Unique features of electric property of heaters, plasma density profiles, is explained comparing with those of single LaB(6) cathode with 4 in. diameter in DiPS.

  9. Incorporation of the Data Acquisition System with a Small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Stephen; James, R. W.; Page, E. L.; Zuniga, J.; Schlank, C.; Lopez, M.; Sherman, J.; Stutzman, B. S.

    2012-10-01

    At the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), a small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) is being developed to utilize the reputed high densities (10^13 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) [1], in high temperature and density diagnostic development for future laboratory investigations. With first plasmas at hand, HPX is constructing triple and mach particle probes, magnetic probes, and a single point Thompson Scattering system for HPX plasma property investigations. A 32-channel National Instruments Data Acquisition (DAQ) Board capable of sampling at 12 bits of precision at 2 MS/s and running multiple simultaneous experiments is currently under construction. This DAQ System with integrated storage and GUI's will gather and digitize plasma data from the associated diagnostics for further analysis. Progress on the current implementation of the DAQ system will be reported.

  10. Plasma density characterization at SPARC_LAB through Stark broadening of Hydrogen spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippi, F.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma-based acceleration techniques are of great interest for future, compact accelerators due to their high accelerating gradient. Both particle-driven and laser-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration experiments are foreseen at the SPARC_LAB Test Facility (INFN National Laboratories of Frascati, Italy), with the aim to accelerate high-brightness electron beams. In order to optimize the efficiency of the acceleration in the plasma and preserve the quality of the accelerated beam, the knowledge of the plasma electron density is mandatory. The Stark broadening of the Hydrogen spectral lines is one of the candidates used to characterize plasma density. The implementation of this diagnostic for plasma-based experiments at SPARC_LAB is presented.

  11. Lab- and space-based researchers discuss plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.; Yamada, M.

    Plasma physics provides a common language and set of approaches that tie together all scientists who study the acceleration, transport, and loss processes of the plasma state. Some years ago, researchers from the laboratory and space research communities suggested a workshop to bring together the diverse researchers in the respective fields. A series of workshops on the “Interrelationship between Plasma Experiments in the Laboratory and Space” (IPELS) was established, and the third meeting was held July 24-28, 1995, in the beautiful and historic town of Pitlochry in the Scottish Highlands.The conference reestablished the critical point that plasma physics is an important but surprisingly diversified research discipline. Meetings attendees discussed a number of new approaches to plasma research, including novel diagnostic techniques for use in space, such as active antennas and electric field sounding devices. Detailed discussions covered spacecraft-plasma environment interactions, including vehicle charging and neutral gas release; fundamental aspects of industrial application of dusty plasmas and waves in dusty plasmas; a very distinctive phase transition of coulomb crystals (from solid state to liquid state) in dusty plasmas; and terrella experiments to simulate and study chaotic transport in the ionosphere.

  12. Progress in Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on a Small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Royce; Lopez, M.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. L.; Schlank, C.; Sherman, J.; Stutzman, B. S.; Zuniga, J.

    2012-10-01

    At the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), a small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) is being developed to utilize the reputed high densities (10^13 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) [1], for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range and employs an electromagnet to provide the external energy in the plasma's magnetic field to transition from the H-Mode to the Helicon Mode. An acceleration coil, currently under construction, will place the plasma in the vacuum chamber for optical and particle probing. With the initial construction phase complete and first plasmas attained, HPX is constructing triple and mach particle probes, magnetic probes, and a single point 300 W Thompson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel DAQ system capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, magnetic coils, and qualitative observations from the optical and electric diagnostics are to be reported. [4pt] [1] K. Toki, et al., Thin Solid Films 506-507 (2005).

  13. Progress on Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R. W.; Duke-Tinson, O.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. J.; Lopez, M.; Karama, J.; Paolino, R. N.; Schlank, C.; Sherman, J.; Stutzman, B. S.; Crilly, P. B.

    2013-10-01

    At the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), a small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) is being developed to utilize the reputed high densities (1013 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T), for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. We employ a 400 to 1000 Gauss electromagnet that promotes energy conservation in the plasma via external energy production in the magnetic field facilitated by decreased inertial effects, in order to reach the Helicon Mode. With the initial construction phase complete and repeatable plasmas attained, HPX is constructing triple and mach particle probes, magnetic probes, and a single point 300 W Thompson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for HPX plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, Helicon Mode development, magnetic coils, and observations from the optical, particle, and electromagnetic scattering diagnostics will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY12.

  14. LabVIEW software for analyzing Langmuir probe characteristics in magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, S.; Binwal, S.; Kabariya, H.; Karkari, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the methodology for processing Ampere-Volts (I-V) characteristics of the Langmuir probe in magnetized plasma using graphical programming language based on LabVIEW. Computing the plasma parameters from I-V characteristic involves several steps that include signal processing, interpolation, linear and non-linear curve fitting based on physical models, finding the derivatives of the experimental curve and determining the zero-crossing of the probe current as a function of the applied voltage. These operations are practically tedious to perform manually causing systematic errors in output parameters. To overcome this challenge, software is developed to analyze the planar Langmuir probe characteristics in magnetized plasma. The software allows simultaneous display of different plasma parameters that helps to verify the consistency of the analyzed plasma parameters with the standard probe theory. Using this software, plasma parameters are obtained in a linear plasma device and its characteristics are discussed.

  15. Progress on Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Royce; Azzari, Phillip; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Frank, John; Karama, Jackson; Hopson, Jordan; Paolino, Richard; Sandri, Eva; Sherman, Justin; Wright, Erin; Turk, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    The small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), continues to progress toward utilizing the reputed high densities (1013 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) [1] of helicons, for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas (~ 20 - 30 ns) induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. HPX is constructing RF field corrected Langmuir probe raw data will be collected and used to measure the plasma's density, temperature, and potentially the structure and behavior during experiments. Our 2.5 J YAG laser Thomson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system is capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for HPX plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, Helicon Mode development, magnetic coils, and observations from the Thomson Scattering, particle, and electromagnetic scattering diagnostics will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15.

  16. Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Royce; Azzari, Phillip; Crilly, Paul; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Karama, Jackson; Paolino, Richard; Schlank, Carter; Sherman, Justin

    2014-10-01

    The small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), continues to progress toward utilizing the reputed high densities (10 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) of helicons, for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. We employ a 400 to 1000 Gauss electromagnet that promotes energy conservation in the plasma via external energy production in the magnetic field facilitated by decreased inertial effects, in order to reach the Helicon Mode. HPX is completing construction of triple and mach particle probes, magnetic probes, and is designing a single point 300 W Thompson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for HPX plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, Helicon Mode development, magnetic coils, and observations from the optical, particle, and electromagnetic scattering diagnostics will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY13.

  17. Updates to the Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Royce; Azzari, Phil; Crilly, Paul; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Karama, Jackson; Paolino, Richard; Schlank, Carter; Sherman, Justin; Emami, Tooran; Turk, Jeremy

    2016-10-01

    The small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), continues to progress toward utilizing the reputed high densities (1013 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) [1] of helicons, for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas ( 20 - 30 ns) induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. HPX is constructing RF field corrected Langmuir probe raw data will be collected and used to measure the plasma's density, temperature, and potentially the structure and behavior during experiments. Our 2.5 J YAG laser Thomson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system is capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for HPX plasma property investigations are being developed and tested. Progress on the construction of the RF coupling system, Helicon Mode development, and magnetic coils, along with observations from the Thomson Scattering, particle, and electromagnetic scattering diagnostics will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15-16.

  18. Pre-Stage Magnetic Coil to Enhance Helicon Mode Excitation on a Small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlank, Carter; James, Royce; Thayer, Nicholas; Sherman, Justin; Nolan, Stephen; Lopez, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Small helicon plasmas have been employed in various capacities from industry to spacecraft propulsion. At the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), a small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) is being developed to utilize the reputed high density (10^13 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) [1] Helicon Mode Plasmas. HPX will become a high temperature and density diagnostic development test-bed for future laboratory investigations in addition to becoming a tool for future spacecraft propulsion devices. HPX Plasmas are created by imparting directed energy into a Pyrex tube preloaded with Ar gas with fill pressures on the order of 10^4 mTorr utalizing a power supply and matching box can deliver up 250 W of power in a 20 MHz to 100 MHz frequency range. It has been demonstrated [1] that a uniform magnetic field in lower energy level plasmas can facilitate a decrease in inertial effects, which promotes energy conservation within the plasma and provids the necessary external energy in the plasma's magnetic field to reach the Helicon Mode. HPX employes an electromagnet to establish this uniform field. An acceleration coil, currently under construction, will be used to increase the plasma velocity to facilitate partcle and optical probing within the vacuum chamber for experimental analysis. Initial accuracy and calibration measurements of the relative magnetic fields created by both electromagnets will be reported.[0pt][1] K. Toki, et al., Thin Solid Films 506-507 (2005).

  19. A Truck, a Plasma and a Pickle: On the Road with MIT's Traveling Plasma Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul

    2004-11-01

    For the past 12 years MIT's Mr. Magnet community outreach program has brought the excitement of magnetism into New England's local schools. Averaging 60-70 school visits each year, Mr. Magnet has become a popular school assembly choice. Paul Thomas, the program's creator, has recently expanded the program to offer a one-hour lecture on the principles of plasma science, geared toward middle schools and high schools. The behavior of particles of matter and light in a plasma is complex. Rather than attempt to convey a complete understanding of their quantum nature in a single lecture, Paul Thomas focuses on presenting just enough information to excite a student's imagination. Using a glow discharge plasma, an emission spectrometer, and such ubiquitous substances as nail polish remover, local dirt and a pickle, students discover, by experiment, the unique properties of the plasma state. Equal parts teacher and showman, Paul explains the basic science of plasma while engaging students with hands-on experiments. Paul Thomas will showcase some of his plasma experiments ``live on stage.'' He will explain some of the mechanics involved with traveling to schools, and how he succeeds in engaging students in science exploration. His goal is to spark curiosity, which may lead a student to study science in college or pursue science as a career. He hopes also to encourage APS-DPP members who may wish to establish educational outreach programs for their local communities.

  20. Isolation of plasma from whole blood using planar microfilters for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Timothy A; Pizziconi, Vincent

    2005-09-01

    Researchers are actively developing devices for the microanalysis of complex fluids, such as blood. These devices have the potential to revolutionize biological analysis in a manner parallel to the computer chip by providing very high throughput screening of complex samples and massively parallel bioanalytical capabilities. A necessary step performed in clinical chemistry is the isolation of plasma from whole blood, and effective sample preparation techniques are needed for the development of miniaturized clinical diagnostic devices. This study demonstrates the use of passive, operating entirely on capillary action, transverse-flow microfilter devices for the microfluidic isolation of plasma from whole blood. Using these planar microfilters, blood can be controllably fractionated with minimal cell lysis. A characterization of the device performance reveals that plasma filter flux is dependent upon the wall shear rate of blood in the filtration channel, and this result is consistent with macroscale blood filtration using microporous membranes. Also, an innovative microfluidic layout is demonstrated that extends device operation time via capillary action from seconds to minutes. Efficiency of these microfilters is approximately three times higher than the separation efficiencies predicted for microporous membranes under similar conditions. As such, the application of the microscale blood filtration designs used in this study may have broad implications in the design of lab-on-a-chip devices, as well as the field of separation science.

  1. Progress on Pre-Stage Magnetic Coil to Enhance Helicon Mode Excitation and Data Acquisition Software on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Justin; Azzari, Phillip; Crilly, P. B.; Duke-Tinson, Omar; James, Royce W.; Karama, Jackson; Page, E. J.; Schlank, Carter; Zuniga, Jonathan

    2014-10-01

    CGAPL is conducting small investigations in plasma physics and magneto-hydrodynamics buoy positioning. For data management, we are developing capability to analyze/digitize data with a National Instruments Data Acquisition board, 2 MS/s sampling rate (long time scale), and an Express Octopus card, 125 MS/s sampling rate (short scale). Sampling at 12 bits precision, we use LabVIEW as a programing language; GUIs will control variables in 1 or more concurrent runs and monitor of diagnostics. HPX utilizes high density (1013 cm3 up), low pressure (.01 T) Ar gas (fill pressure: on 104 mTorr order). Helicon/W Mode plasmas become a diagnostics test-bed for other investigations and a tool for future spacecraft propulsion devices. Plasmas created by directing energy into gas-filled Pyrex tube; power supply and matching box, up to 250 W power in 20-100 MHz frequencies, provide energy to ignite. Uniform magnetic field needed to reach the W-Mode. We employ an electromagnet to B-field while an acceleration coil positions plasma in vacuum chamber, facilitating analysis. Initial field requirements and accuracy calibration have been completed. Progress on development and implementation of probes and DAQ/GUI system will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY13.

  2. Betatron radiation based diagnostics for plasma wakefield accelerated electron beams at the SPARC_LAB test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpakov, V.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Curcio, A.; Dabagov, S.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Marocchino, A.; Paroli, B.; Pompili, R.; Rossi, A. R.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress with wake-field acceleration has shown a great potential in providing high gradient acceleration fields, while the quality of the beams remains relatively poor. Precise knowledge of the beam size at the exit from the plasma and matching conditions for the externally injected beams are the key for improvement of beam quality. Betatron radiation emitted by the beam during acceleration in the plasma is a powerful tool for the transverse beam size measurement, being also non-intercepting. In this work we report on the technical solutions chosen at SPARC_LAB for such diagnostics tool, along with expected parameters of betatron radiation.

  3. Automation of a remote plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system using LabVIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rajan; Fretwell, John L.; Vaihinger, Jochen; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    1997-08-01

    The remote plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RPCVD) system is an experimental low temperature Si/Si-Ge epitaxy system. This paper describes an integrated hardware/software automation package developed for the RPCVD system. Aspects of the system controlled by the package include pneumatic gas valves, mass flow controllers (MFCs), and a temperature controller. The package was developed on an Apple Quadra 950 platform using LabVIEWTM 3.1 and associated data acquisition and control hardware supplied by National Instruments and other vendors. The software interface allows the user to operate the system through a virtual control panel which displays critical system parameters such as chamber pressure, chamber temperature and gas flow rates, along with the states of the gas valves and the MFCs. The system can also be run in the recipe mode, in which a sequence of steps are read in from an ExcelTM file. A simulation routine scans each recipe for possible errors such as violation of valve interlocks while the recipe is being loaded. All actions, whether in the manual mode or the recipe mode, are recorded in a log file. Finally, since many of the gases used in the RPCVD process are toxic and/or flammable, there is an emphasis on safety in the entire control scheme. A safety monitor routine constantly checks for valve interlocks and pressure-valve interlocks. Upon detecting an illegal state, it automatically takes necessary action to bring the system into a safe state. In addition to these software safety features, there are also hardware interlocks to deal with such situations as power outages.

  4. [Validation of plasma creatinine measurement on UniCel DxC 600 according to LAB GTA 04 recommendation].

    PubMed

    Chianea, Denis; Renard, Christophe; Garcia, Carine; Mbongo, Elvire; Monpeurt, Corine; Vest, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The accreditation process, according to NF EN ISO 15189, implies a prior evaluation of the new reagent on-site for the implementation of each new assay technique. Thus, our new standardized method for determination of creatinine (non compensated method) in plasma or serum on UniCel DxC 600 (Beckman Coulter) has been tested according to LAB GTA 04 protocol. The reagent meets the quality criteria recommended by Valtec protocol, except fidelity with the low concentration standard (50 micromol/L). Besides there is no problem of results transferability with the two other techniques used in the laboratory (Jaffe compensated and enzymatic methods performed on Cobas Integra 800).

  5. Driving Flows in Laboratory Astrophysical Plasma Jets: The Mochi.LabJet Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Evan G.

    Mochi.Labjet is a new experiment at the University of Washington developed to investigate the interaction of shear flows in plasma jets with boundary conditions similar to an accretion disc system. This thesis details the engineering design and first plasmas of the Mochi.Labjet experiment. The experiment required construction of a new three electrode plasma gun with azimuthal symmetric gas injection, two optically-isolated pulsed power supplies for generating and sustaining plasma, and one optically-isolated pulsed power supply for generating a background magnetic field. Optical isolation is achieved with four custom circuits: the TTL-optical transmitter, optical-TTL receiver, optical-relay, and optical-tachometer circuits. First plasmas, during the commissioning phase of the apparatus, show evidence of flared jet structures with significant azimuthal symmetry.

  6. Plasma separation from blood: the 'lab-on-a-chip' approach.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shatanik; Kang, Tae Goo; Chen, Yu; Kim, Sangho

    2009-01-01

    Component analysis of blood is a key diagnostic step in the detection of diseases. The separation of plasma from blood cells is therefore critical for the accuracy of diagnostic tests because cellular fractions can create discrepancies in analysis. The conventional method for separating the cellular fraction from whole blood is by centrifugation, which requires a laboratory infrastructure. In the last decade, intensive research to scale down experimental processes has seen unprecedented advances in microfabrication and related techniques that have led to utilization of the micro-level phenomenon to accomplish a myriad of physicochemical separation processes. Salient features of these devices include small sample size, faster reaction times, precise control of reaction environments, and affordability. Various plasma-separation devices have also been designed based on microfluidic platforms. The challenges associated with these devices are manifold: particle clogging, necessity for sample preparation, flow-rate maintenance, low reproducibility, and optimization of output. Further, quality, reliability, and consistency remain a huge issue with micromedical devices. The present article reviews current developments in the field of plasma separation from blood implementing innovative microtechnologies to achieve high-throughput plasma separation.

  7. Lab-on-CD microfluidic platform for rapid separation and mixing of plasma from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ju-Nan; Li, Bo-Shiun

    2014-08-01

    Traditional clinical methods for separating whole blood into blood cells and cell-free plasma are labor intensive and time consuming. Accordingly, the present study proposes a simple compact disk (CD) microfluidic platform for the rapid separation of plasma from whole human blood and the subsequent mixing of the plasma with a suitable reagent. The performance of three CD microfluidic platforms incorporating square-wave mixing channels with different widths is evaluated both numerically and experimentally. The results show that given an appropriate specification of the microchannel geometry and a CD rotation speed of 2000 rpm, a separation efficiency of 95 % can be achieved within 5 ~ 6 s given a diluted blood sample with a hematocrit concentration of 6 %. Moreover, a mixing efficiency of more than 96 % can be obtained within 5 s given a CD rotation speed of 2200 rpm. The practical feasibility of the proposed device is demonstrated by performing a prothrombin time (PT) test. It is shown that while the time required to perform the PT test using a conventional bench top system is around 15 min, the proposed CD microfluidic platform allows the test to be completed within 1 min.

  8. The BErkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA): A 10 GeV Laser Plasma Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.P.; Duarte, R.; Esarey, E.; Fournier, S.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Lockhart, D.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, C.; Vay, J.-L.; Zimmermann, S.

    2010-06-01

    An overview is presented of the design of a 10 GeV laser plasma accelerator (LPA) that will be driven by a PW-class laser system and of the BELLA Project, which has as its primary goal to build and install the required Ti:sapphire laser system for the acceleration experiments. The basic design of the 10 GeV stage aims at operation in the quasi-linear regime, where the laser excited wakes are largely sinusoidal and offer the possibility of accelerating both electrons and positrons. Simulations show that a 10 GeV electron beam can be generated in a meter scale plasma channel guided LPA operating at a density of about 1017 cm-3 and powered by laser pulses containing 30-40 J of energy in a 50- 200 fs duration pulse, focused to a spotsize of 50-100 micron. The lay-out of the facility and laser system will be presented as well as the progress on building the facility.

  9. Plasma nanotextured polymeric lab-on-a-chip for highly efficient bacteria capture and lysis.

    PubMed

    Tsougeni, K; Papadakis, G; Gianneli, M; Grammoustianou, A; Constantoudis, V; Dupuy, B; Petrou, P S; Kakabakos, S E; Tserepi, A; Gizeli, E; Gogolides, E

    2016-01-07

    We describe the design, fabrication, and successful demonstration of a sample preparation module comprising bacteria cell capture and thermal lysis on-chip with potential applications in food sample pathogen analysis. Plasma nanotexturing of the polymeric substrate allows increase of the surface area of the chip and the antibody binding capacity. Three different anti-Salmonella antibodies were directly and covalently linked to plasma treated chips without any additional linker chemistry or other treatment. Then, the Ab-modified chips were tested for their capacity to bind bacteria in the concentration range of 10(2)-10(8) cells per mL; the module exhibited 100% efficiency in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteria capture for cell suspensions below 10(5) cells per mL (10(4) cells injected with a 100 μL sample volume) and efficiency higher than 50% for 10(7) cells per mL. Moreover, thermal lysis achieved on-chip from as low as 10 captured cells was demonstrated and shown to compare well with off-chip lysis. Excellent selectivity (over 1 : 300) was obtained in a sample containing, in addition to S. Typhimurium and E. coli bacteria.

  10. Ion sources with arc-discharge plasma box driven by directly heated LaB(6) electron emitter or cold cathode.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Alexander A; Davydenko, Vladimir I; Deichuli, Petr P; Shulzhenko, Grigori I; Stupishin, Nikolay V

    2008-02-01

    In the Budker Institute, Novosibirsk, an ion source with arc-discharge plasma box has been developed in the recent years for application in thermonuclear devices for plasma diagnostics. Several modifications of the ion source were provided with extracted current ranging from 1 to 7 A and pulse duration of up to 4 s. Initially, the arc-discharge plasma box with cold cathode was used, with which pulse duration is limited to 2 s by the cathode overheating and sputtering in local arc spots. Recently, a directly heated LaB(6) electron emitter was employed instead, which has extended lifetime compared to the cold cathode. In the paper, characteristics of the beam produced with both arrangements of the plasma box are presented.

  11. High Power LaB6 Plasma Source Performance for the Lockheed Martin Compact Fusion Reactor Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Jonathon

    2016-10-01

    Lockheed Martin's Compact Fusion Reactor (CFR) concept is a linear encapsulated ring cusp. Due to the complex field geometry, plasma injection into the device requires careful consideration. A high power thermionic plasma source (>0.25MW; >10A/cm2) has been developed with consideration to phase space for optimal coupling. We present the performance of the plasma source, comparison with alternative plasma sources, and plasma coupling with the CFR field configuration. ©2016 Lockheed Martin Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Status of the Thomson Scattering System Developed for Diagnostic Testing on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke-Tinson, O.; James, R.; Nolan, S.; Page, E.; Paolino, R.; Romano, B.; Zuniga, J.; Schlank, C.; Lopez, M.; Karama, J.; Sherman, J.; Stutzman, B.

    2013-10-01

    HPX will utilize Electromagnetic Radiation Scattering to make internal plasma temperature and density point measurements. The United States Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory's (CGAPL's) Thompson Scattering single spatial point system employs a 300 W CW YAG laser. We will use the internal temperature and density measurements in conjunction with the particle and spectral probes to track the plasmas transitions through the capacitive and inductive modes to ultimately reach the helicon mode. Once achieved, the system will be invaluable in making plasma quantitative temperature and density observations that will contribute to a comprehensive plasma profile. Most of the efforts thus far have been in the alignment and repair of the laser system. As this stage nears an end, efforts have begun to shift towards installing the aligned Thomson Scattering system (TS) into its permanent location, with mounted collection optics on HPX's top port. HPX will likely employ a polychrometer similar to the ones currently in use by HBTEP at Columbia University, for the spectral analysis of the scattered light. Data collected by the TS system will then be logged in real time by CGAPL's Data Acquisition (DAQ) system currently under construction. Further additions and progress of the TS alignment, installation, and calibration on HPX will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY12.

  13. Advanced LabVIEW Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Eric D.

    1999-06-17

    In the world of computer-based data acquisition and control, the graphical interface program LabVIEW from National Instruments is so ubiquitous that in many ways it has almost become the laboratory standard. To date, there have been approximately fifteen books concerning LabVIEW, but Professor Essick's treatise takes on a completely different tack than all of the previous discussions. In the more standard treatments of the ways and wherefores of LabVIEW such as LabVIEW Graphical Programming: Practical Applications in Instrumentation and Control by Gary W. Johnson (McGraw Hill, NY 1997), the emphasis has been instructing the reader how to program LabVIEW to create a Virtual Instrument (VI) on the computer for interfacing to a particular instruments. LabVIEW is written in "G" a graphical programming language developed by National Instruments. In the past the emphasis has been on training the experimenter to learn "G". Without going into details here, "G" incorporates the usual loops, arithmetic expressions, etc., found in many programming languages, but in an icon (graphical) environment. The net result being that LabVIEW contains all of the standard methods needed for interfacing to instruments, data acquisition, data analysis, graphics, and also methodology to incorporate programs written in other languages into LabVIEW. Historically, according to Professor Essick, he developed a series of experiments for an upper division laboratory course for computer-based instrumentation. His observation was that while many students had the necessary background in computer programming languages, there were students who had virtually no concept about writing a computer program let alone a computer- based interfacing program. Thus the beginnings of a concept for not only teaching computer- based instrumentation techniques, but aiso a method for the beginner to experience writing a com- puter program. Professor Essick saw LabVIEW as the "perfect environment in which to teach

  14. Advanced LabVIEW Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Eric D.

    1999-06-17

    In the world of computer-based data acquisition and control, the graphical interface program LabVIEW from National Instruments is so ubiquitous that in many ways it has almost become the laboratory standard. To date, there have been approximately fifteen books concerning LabVIEW, but Professor Essick's treatise takes on a completely different tack than all of the previous discussions. In the more standard treatments of the ways and wherefores of LabVIEW such as LabVIEW Graphical Programming: Practical Applications in Instrumentation and Control by Gary W. Johnson (McGraw Hill, NY 1997), the emphasis has been instructing the reader how to program LabVIEW to create a Virtual Instrument (VI) on the computer for interfacing to a particular instruments. LabVIEW is written in G a graphical programming language developed by National Instruments. In the past the emphasis has been on training the experimenter to learn G . Without going into details here, G incorporates the usual loops, arithmetic expressions, etc., found in many programming languages, but in an icon (graphical) environment. The net result being that LabVIEW contains all of the standard methods needed for interfacing to instruments, data acquisition, data analysis, graphics, and also methodology to incorporate programs written in other languages into LabVIEW. Historically, according to Professor Essick, he developed a series of experiments for an upper division laboratory course for computer-based instrumentation. His observation was that while many students had the necessary background in computer programming languages, there were students who had virtually no concept about writing a computer program let alone a computer- based interfacing program. Thus the beginnings of a concept for not only teaching computer- based instrumentation techniques, but aiso a method for the beginner to experience writing a com- puter program. Professor Essick saw LabVIEW as the perfect environment in which to teach computer

  15. Tech Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeman, Cheryl A., Bishop, S. William

    1997-01-01

    Describes a seminar where students explore emerging technologies through a series of labs that help boost their technical skills and their confidence in using and managing technology. Discusses charting the course, laboratory logistics, technology tips, and benefits. (JRH)

  16. Labs: 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Igelsrud, Don, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This article presents a variety of topics discussed in this column and at a biology teachers' workshop concerning the quality and value of lab techniques used for teaching high school biology. Topics included are Drosophila salivary glands, sea urchins, innovations, dyes and networking. (CW)

  17. Underwater lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    The University of Southern California's Catalina Marine Science Center (CMSC) has announced plans to build an underwater marine research laboratory near Santa Catalina Island off the California coast. The project, which will take 2 years to build, will be sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The laboratory will be similar in concept to the U.S. Navy Sea Lab III, which was canceled some time ago.The project's purpose is to give divers access to a laboratory without having to surface. The project leader, Andrew Pilmanis, of the University of Southern California, stated recently (Industrial Research and Development, July 1983): “By the nature of the work, scientists require a lot of bottom time, and to do it by scuba isn't practical…. The only way to do that is with saturation diving. Once the diver is saturated with inert gas, whether the individual stays a few days or for months, only one decompression is required.” Divers will typically stay in the laboratory for 7-10 days. The laboratory will initially be placed at a depth of 20 m, later to be refloated and located at depths to 37 m.

  18. Decisions Shape a Lab (Lab Notes).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Bernajean

    1992-01-01

    Offers questions to guide both initial and ongoing development of a computer writing lab. Discusses ways mobile workstations (consisting of a computer, printer, overhead, and a LCD projection unit) will extend the writing lab. (SR)

  19. Bringing part of the lab to the field: On-site chromium speciation in seawater by electrodeposition of Cr(III)/Cr(VI) on portable coiled-filament assemblies and measurement in the lab by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badiei, Hamid R.; McEnaney, Jennifer; Karanassios, Vassili

    2012-12-01

    A field-deployable electrochemical approach to preconcentration, matrix clean up and selective electrodeposition of Cr(III) and Cr(III) + Cr(VI) in seawater is described. Using portable, battery-operated electrochemical instrumentation, Cr species in seawater were electrodeposited in the field on portable coiled-filament assemblies made from Re. Assemblies with dried residues of Cr(III) or Cr(III) + Cr(VI) on them were transported to the lab for concentration determination by electrothermal, near-torch vaporization (NTV) sample introduction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Electrodeposition offers selective species deposition, preconcentration and matrix clean up from seawater samples. For selective deposition, free Cr(VI) was electrodeposited at - 0.3 V and Cr(III) + Cr(VI) at - 1.6 V (both vs Ag/AgCl). Interestingly, at 0 V (vs Ag/AgCl) and in the absence of an electrodeposition potential only Cr(VI) was spontaneously and selectively adsorbed on the coil and reasons for this are given. Due to preconcentration afforded by electrodeposition, the detection limits obtained after a 60 s electrodeposition at the voltages stated above using buffered (pH = 4.7) artificial seawater spiked with either Cr(III) or Cr(VI) were 20 pg/mL for Cr(III) and 10 pg/mL for Cr(VI). For comparison, the detection limit for Cr obtained by pipetting directly on the coil 5 μL of diluted standard solution was 500 pg/mL, thus it was concluded that electrodeposition offered 40 to 60 fold improvements. Matrix clean up is required due to the high salt content of seawater and this was addressed by simply rinsing the coil with 18.2 MΩ water without any loss of Cr species. Reasons for this are provided. The method was validated in the lab using buffered artificial seawater and it was used in the field for the first time by sampling seawater, buffering it and immediately electrodepositing Cr species on portable assemblies on-site. Electrodeposition in the

  20. D-alpha Probe Investigation on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karama, Jackson; James, Royce; Sherman, Justin; Page, Eric; Schlank, Carter; Stutzman, Brook; Duke-Tenson, Omar; Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory Team

    2013-10-01

    Now that reproducible plasmas have been created on HPX at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory (CGAPL) we are starting to set up a spectral probes to help verify plasma mode transitions to the W-mode. These optical probes will utilize movable filters, ccd cameras and diodes, to gather data at selected spectral frequency bands. Data collected will be used to investigate the plasma's structure and behavior during experiments. The spectral probes will take advantage of HPX's magnetic fields to define and measure the plasma's radiation temp as a function of time. A d-alpha filter will allow for the collection of neutral density fluctuations for different plasma behaviors. In d-alpha mode, the probe may also provide some information on the internal plasma structure and perhaps reveal some global plasma interactions. The spectral probe will add to HPX's data collection capabilities and be used in conjunction with the particle probes, and Thomson Scattering device to create a robust picture of the internal and external plasma parameters on HPX. Progress on the construction of the probe will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY12.

  1. Virtual Reality Lab Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Hrishikesh; Palmer, Timothy A.

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality Lab Assistant (VRLA) demonstration model is aligned for engineering and material science experiments to be performed by undergraduate and graduate students in the course as a pre-lab simulation experience. This will help students to get a preview of how to use the lab equipment and run experiments without using the lab hardware/software equipment. The quality of the time available for laboratory experiments can be significantly improved through the use of virtual reality technology.

  2. Spectrometer Development in Support of Thomson Scattering Investigations for the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandri, Eva; Davies, Richard; Azzari, Phil; Frank, John; Frank, Jackson; James, Royce; Hopson, Jordon; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Paolino, Richard; Sherman, Justin; Wright, Erin; Turk, Jeremy

    2016-10-01

    Now that reproducible plasmas have been created on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory (CGAPL), a high-performance spectrometer utilizing volume-phase-holographic (VPH) grating and a charge coupled device (CCD) camera with a range of 380-1090 nm and resolution of 1024x1024 is being assembled. This spectrometer will collect doppler shifted photons created by exciting the plasma with the first harmonic of a 2.5 J Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 1064 nm. Direct measurements of the plasma's temperature and density will be determined using HPX's Thomson Scattering (TS) system as a single spatial point diagnostic. TS has the capability of determining plasma properties on short time scales and will be used to create a robust picture of the internal plasma parameters. A prototype spectrometer has been constructed to explore the Andor CCD camera's resolution and sensitivity. Concurrently, through intensive study of the high energy TS system, safety protocols and standard operation procedures (SOP) for the Coast Guard's largest and most powerful Laser have been developed. The current status of the TS SOP, diagnostic development, and the collection optic's spectrometer will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15-16.

  3. Computer Lab Configuration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the layout and elements of an effective school computer lab. Includes configuration, storage spaces, cabling and electrical requirements, lighting, furniture, and computer hardware and peripherals. (PKP)

  4. Deciphering Your Lab Report

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests ... for trustworthy health information. Verify Compliance . Produced by Advertisement

  5. Updates on Optical Emission Spectroscopy & Langmuir Probe Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karama, Jackson; Frank, John; Azzari, Phillip; Hopson, Jordan; James, Royce; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Paolino, Richard; Sandri, Eva; Sherman, Justin; Wright, Eva; Turk, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    HPX is developing a to shorter lifetime (20 - 30 ns) more reproducible plasma at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory (CGAPL). Once achieved, spectral and particle probes will help to verify plasma mode transitions to the W-mode. These optical probes utilize movable filters, and ccd cameras to gather data at selected spectral frequency bands. Once corrections for the RF field are in place for the Langmuir probe, raw data will be collected and used to measure the plasma's density, temperature, and potentially the structure and behavior during experiments. Direct measurements of plasma properties can be determined with modeling and by comparison with the state transition tables, both using Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES). The spectral will add to HPX's data collection capabilities and be used in conjunction with the particle probes, and Thomson Scattering device to create a robust picture of the internal and external plasma parameters on HPX. Progress on the implementation of the OES and Langmuir probes will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15.

  6. A Museum Learning Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandiver, Kathleen M.; Bijur, Jon Markowitz; Epstein, Ari W.; Rosenthal, Beryl; Stidsen, Don

    2008-01-01

    The "Learning Lab: The Cell" exhibit was developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Museum and the MIT Center for Environmental Health Sciences (CEHS). Specially designed for middle and high school students, the Learning Lab provides museum visitors of all ages with fascinating insights into how our living cells work. The…

  7. LabSkills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Nick

    2010-01-01

    This article describes LabSkills, a revolutionary teaching tool to improve practical science in schools. LabSkills offers the chance to help improve the exposure that the average Key Stage 5 (age 16-19) student has to practical work. This is a huge area for development being highlighted by universities who are seeing a worryingly growing trend in…

  8. School Science Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schachter, Ron

    2008-01-01

    This article talks about the declining state of many school science laboratories. The author describes how school districts are renovating their science labs to improve student learning. The author also offers tips from those who have already renovated their school science labs.

  9. Physics Labs with Flavor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes my attempts to look deeper into the so-called "shoot for your grade" labs, started in the '90s, when I began applying my teaching experience in Russia to introductory physics labs at the College of Charleston and other higher education institutions in South Carolina. The term "shoot for your grade" became popular among…

  10. Making Real Virtual Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Harry E.; Keller, Edward E.

    2005-01-01

    Francis Bacon began defining scientific methodology in the early 17th century, and secondary school science classes began to implement science labs in the mid-19th century. By the early 20th century, leading educators were suggesting that science labs be used to develop scientific thinking habits in young students, and at the beginning of the 21st…

  11. NOT Another Lab Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ende, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Ask students to name the aspects of science class they enjoy most, and working on labs will undoubtedly be mentioned. What often won't be included, however, is writing lab reports. For many students, the process of exploration and data collection is paramount, while the explanation and analysis of findings often takes a backseat. After all, if…

  12. Lab Report Blues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    For middle school students, writing a formal lab report can be challenging. For middle level teachers, reading students lab reports can be overwhelming. After grading report after report with incomplete procedures, incorrect graphs, and missing conclusions, the author's frustration level was at an all-time high. Ready to try anything, he thought,…

  13. PRIME Lab Radiocarbon Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegonds, D. J.; Mueller, K. A.; Ma, X.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1996-03-01

    The Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) is one of three NSF national facilities for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), and is the only one capable of determining six cosmogenic radionuclides: 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, and 129I. This abstract describes the current status of the radiocarbon analysis program at PRIME Lab.

  14. An innovative high-power constant-current pulsed-arc power-supply for a high-density pulsed-arc-plasma ion-source using a LaB6-filament.

    PubMed

    Ueno, A; Oguri, H; Ikegami, K; Namekawa, Y; Ohkoshi, K; Tokuchi, A

    2010-02-01

    An innovative high-power constant-current (CC) pulsed-arc (PA) power-supply (PS) indispensable for a high-density PA plasma ion-source using a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB(6)) filament was devised by combining a constant-voltage (CV) PA-PS, which is composed of an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) switch, a CV direct-current (dc) PS and a 270 mF capacitor with a CC-PA-PS, which is composed of an IGBT-switch, a CC-dc-PS and a 400 microH inductor, through the inductor. The hybrid-CC-PA-PS succeeded in producing a flat arc-pulse with a peak power of 56 kW (400 A x 140 V) and a duty factor of more than 1.5% (600 micros x 25 Hz) for Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) H(-) ion-source stably. It also succeeded in shortening the 99% rising-time of the arc-pulse-current to about 20 micros and tilting up or down the arc-pulse-current arbitrarily and almost linearly by changing the setting voltage of its CV-dc-PS.

  15. An innovative high-power constant-current pulsed-arc power-supply for a high-density pulsed-arc-plasma ion-source using a LaB6-filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, A.; Oguri, H.; Ikegami, K.; Namekawa, Y.; Ohkoshi, K.; Tokuchi, A.

    2010-02-01

    An innovative high-power constant-current (CC) pulsed-arc (PA) power-supply (PS) indispensable for a high-density PA plasma ion-source using a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) filament was devised by combining a constant-voltage (CV) PA-PS, which is composed of an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) switch, a CV direct-current (dc) PS and a 270 mF capacitor with a CC-PA-PS, which is composed of an IGBT-switch, a CC-dc-PS and a 400 μH inductor, through the inductor. The hybrid-CC-PA-PS succeeded in producing a flat arc-pulse with a peak power of 56 kW (400 A×140 V) and a duty factor of more than 1.5% (600 μs×25 Hz) for Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) H- ion-source stably. It also succeeded in shortening the 99% rising-time of the arc-pulse-current to about 20 μs and tilting up or down the arc-pulse-current arbitrarily and almost linearly by changing the setting voltage of its CV-dc-PS.

  16. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-13

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  17. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  18. GeneLab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Thompson, Terri G.

    2015-01-01

    NASA GeneLab is expected to capture and distribute omics data and experimental and process conditions most relevant to research community in their statistical and theoretical analysis of NASAs omics data.

  19. Plasma Levels of Uric Acid, Urea and Creatinine in Diabetics Who Visit the Clinical Analysis Laboratory (CAn-Lab) at Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Amartey, N.A.A.; Mensah, F.O.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common metabolic diseases worldwide. This metabolic disorder contributes greatly to the significant proportion of the burden of renal damage and dysfunction. The aim of the study was to investigate the renal function of the diabetic patients who visit the Clinical Analysis Laboratory (CAn-Lab) at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Kumasi, Ghana. Materials and Methods: Demographic data as well as medical history were obtained through the administration of a questionnaire. Anthro-pometric measurements were taken and blood samples were analysed for glucose, uric acid, urea and creatinine. Data collected were analysed using SPSS version 16.0. Results: A total of 34 diabetic patients, aged from 40-77 y were recruited, 22 (64.7%) of them were males with mean age of 57.40 ± 11.8 y (±SD), while 12 (35.3%) were females with mean age of 58.17 ± 7.47 y. There was a statistically significant difference between the mean duration of the disease, as the females had longer duration, 12.50 ± 6.95 y, as compared to 7.32 ± 4.48 y in males (p=0.033). The mean plasma creatinine level in the females was 84.17 ± 54.73 μmol/l. In the diabetic population, there was a positive correlation between age and plasma creatinine level, (r=0.375, p=0.029). In the female diabetics, there was a positive correlation between fasting blood sugar (FBS) and the measured metabolic end products (r>0.5, p<0.05), a positive correlation between body mass index (BMI) and uric acid (r=0.576, p=0.005) and a positive correlation between BMI and FBS (r= 0.625, p= 0.030). Conclusion: Our results on the parameters measured; show that the diabetic population was experiencing mild kidney dysfunction, compared to non-diabetic controls. PMID:25859443

  20. LCOGT Imaging Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufts, Joseph R.; Lobdill, Rich; Haldeman, Benjamin J.; Haynes, Rachel; Hawkins, Eric; Burleson, Ben; Jahng, David

    2008-07-01

    The Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) is an ambitious project to build and operate, within 5 years, a worldwide robotic network of 50 0.4, 1, and 2 m telescopes sharing identical instrumentation and optimized for precision photometry of time-varying sources. The telescopes, instrumentation, and software are all developed in house with two 2 m telescopes already installed. The LCOGT Imaging Lab is responsible for assembly and characterization of the network's cameras and instrumentation. In addition to a fully equipped CNC machine shop, two electronics labs, and a future optics lab, the Imaging Lab is designed from the ground up to be a superb environment for bare detectors, precision filters, and assembled instruments. At the heart of the lab is an ISO class 5 cleanroom with full ionization. Surrounding this, the class 7 main lab houses equipment for detector characterization including QE and CTE, and equipment for measuring transmission and reflection of optics. Although the first science cameras installed, two TEC cooled e2v 42-40 deep depletion based units and two CryoTiger cooled Fairchild Imaging CCD486-BI based units, are from outside manufacturers, their 18 position filter wheels and the remainder of the network's science cameras, controllers, and instrumentation will be built in house. Currently being designed, the first generation LCOGT cameras for the network's 1 m telescopes use existing CCD486-BI devices and an in-house controller. Additionally, the controller uses digital signal processing to optimize readout noise vs. speed, and all instrumentation uses embedded microprocessors for communication over ethernet.

  1. The NOAO Data Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, M.; Olsen, K.; Stobie, E. B.; Mighell, K. J.; Norris, P.

    2015-09-01

    We describe the NOAO Data Lab to help community users take advantage of current large surveys and prepare them even larger surveys in the era of LSST. The Data Lab will allow users to efficiently utilize catalogs of billions of objects, combine traditional telescope image and spectral data with external archives, share custom results with collaborators, publish data products to other users, and experiment with analysis toolkits. Specific science cases will be used to develop a prototype framework and tools, allowing us to work directly with scientists from survey teams to ensure development remains focused on scientifically productive tasks.

  2. Canadian ADL Partnership Lab

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-19

    WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Canadian Defense Academy,PO Box 17000 Station Forces ,Kingston ON CANADA K7K 7B4...CMP Canadian ADL Partnership Lab Presentation by CDA Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the... Canadian ADL Partnership Lab 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f

  3. SmallSat Lab

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-05

    CubeSat. Mr. Alvarez worked with four students on the PCB layout for the solar panels and the construction of the 6U CubeSat mockup . Support for Mr...Hull and Mr. Alvarez was $49k including fringe benefits. !! Purchases: During this time period a license for MatLab software and the Princeton...Satellite ToolBox was purchased using funds from this award. This software adds tremendous capability to the SmallSat Lab by enabling students to analyze

  4. A Big Bang Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheider, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The February 2005 issue of The Science Teacher (TST) reminded everyone that by learning how scientists study stars, students gain an understanding of how science measures things that can not be set up in lab, either because they are too big, too far away, or happened in a very distant past. The authors of "How Far are the Stars?" show how the…

  5. Computer Labs: New Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prochaska, Nancy

    1989-01-01

    Describes the use of computer labs in a Texas high school. Highlights include word processing; a study skills course; software programs currently in use by English and English-as-a-Second-Language classes; physical layout, including security considerations and furniture; hardware, including printers; and guidelines for the selection of software.…

  6. Modifying Cookbook Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Robert, L.; Clough, Michael P.; Berg, Craig A.

    2000-01-01

    Modifies an extended lab activity from a cookbook approach for determining the percent mass of water in copper sulfate pentahydrate crystals to one which incorporates students' prior knowledge, engenders active mental struggling with prior knowledge and new experiences, and encourages metacognition. (Contains 12 references.) (ASK)

  7. Materials Lab Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The photo shows one of the waveguide setups in the Electromaganetic Properties Measurements Lab (EPML). This setup is for measuring permittivity and permeability of the materials at the L-band frequencies (1.12-1.7 ghz). The EMPL is in the Elecromagnetics Research Branch at NASA Langley.

  8. Elemental Chem Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franco Mariscal, Antonio Joaquin

    2008-01-01

    This educative material uses the symbols of 45 elements to spell the names of 32 types of laboratory equipment usually found in chemical labs. This teaching material has been divided into three puzzles according to the type of the laboratory equipment: (i) glassware as reaction vessels or containers; (ii) glassware for measuring, addition or…

  9. The Haunted Physics Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepf, Thomas H.

    2004-10-01

    During the Halloween season at Creighton University, our students and the public are treated to a haunted physics laboratory. Visitors to the lab learn physics while having fun as they are confronted with a maze of exhibits that demonstrate optical, electrical, and mechanical phenomena in the context of Halloween.

  10. Serial Dilution Simulation Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keler, Cynthia; Balutis, Tabitha; Bergen, Kim; Laudenslager, Bryanna; Rubino, Deanna

    2010-01-01

    Serial dilution is often a difficult concept for students to understand. In this short dry lab exercise, students perform serial dilutions using seed beads. This exercise helps students gain skill at performing dilutions without using reagents, bacterial cultures, or viral cultures, while being able to visualize the process.

  11. The Crime Lab Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Annamae J.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Crime Lab Project, which takes an economical, hands-on, interdisciplinary approach to studying the career of forensics in the middle or high school classroom. Includes step-by-step student requirements for the investigative procedure, a sample evidence request form, and an assessment rubric. (KHR)

  12. Inside Linden Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Tom

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author provides an overview of Second Life[trademark], or simply SL, which was developed at Linden Lab, a San Francisco-based corporation. SL is an online society within a threee-dimensional virtual world entirely built and owned by its residents, where they can explore, build, socialize and participate in their own economy.…

  13. Labs That Are a Blast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Laura

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities that use a simple homemade apparatus called "the cannon" to demonstrate Newton's Third Law. Reviews the chemistry concepts behind the ignition of the cannon and presents the Momentum Lab and the Projectile Motion Lab. (JRH)

  14. ERLN Lab Compendium Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Compendium is an online database of environmental testing laboratories nationwide. It enables labs to create profiles of their capabilities, so emergency responders can quickly identify a lab that will meet their support needs.

  15. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of soil analysis on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL will attempt to determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of the analytical procedure of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL can determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  17. e-Learning - Physics Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohottala, Hashini

    2014-03-01

    The general student population enrolled in any college level class is highly diverse. An increasing number of ``nontraditional'' students return to college and most of these students follow distance learning degree programs while engaging in their other commitments, work and family. However, those students tend to avoid taking science courses with labs, mostly because of the incapability of remotely completing the lab components in such courses. In order to address this issue, we have come across a method where introductory level physics labs can be taught remotely. In this process a lab kit with the critical lab components that can be easily accessible are conveniently packed into a box and distributed among students at the beginning of the semester. Once the students are given the apparatus they perform the experiments at home and gather data All communications with reference to the lab was done through an interactive user-friendly webpage - Wikispaces (WikiS). Students who create pages on WikiS can submit their lab write-ups, embed videos of the experiments they perform, post pictures and direct questions to the lab instructor. The students who are enrolled in the same lab can interact with each other through WikiS to discuss labs and even get assistance.

  18. Inexpensive DAQ based physics labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Benjamin; Clark, Shane

    2015-11-01

    Quality Data Acquisition (DAQ) based physics labs can be designed using microcontrollers and very low cost sensors with minimal lab equipment. A prototype device with several sensors and documentation for a number of DAQ-based labs is showcased. The device connects to a computer through Bluetooth and uses a simple interface to control the DAQ and display real time graphs, storing the data in .txt and .xls formats. A full device including a larger number of sensors combined with software interface and detailed documentation would provide a high quality physics lab education for minimal cost, for instance in high schools lacking lab equipment or students taking online classes. An entire semester’s lab course could be conducted using a single device with a manufacturing cost of under $20.

  19. ERLN Technical Support for Labs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Response Laboratory Network provides policies and guidance on lab and data requirements, Standardized Analytical Methods, and technical support for water and radiological sampling and analysis

  20. Helioseismology in the Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ethan; Brookhart, Matthew; Clark, Mike; Cooper, Chris; Egedal, Jan; Wallace, John; Weisberg, David; Forest, Cary; MPDX Team

    2014-10-01

    A novel diagnostic technique for measuring plasma flows in the Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX) has been designed and implemented. The technique, inspired by helioseismology, launches ion acoustic waves from the boundary of a spherical (1.5m radius), unmagnetized, spinning plasma and measures the doppler shifted wave at two longitudinal locations of the same latitude. These two measurements yield a line integrated velocity measurement from the source to the receivers. The ion acoustic waves are produced via the mode conversion of a magnetosonic wave excited by a current loop antenna located in the confining cusp field of MPDX. Probe measurements of the electric field in the plasma and the magnetic field fluctuations (Bdot) in the cusp are used to observe the wave and deduce velocities along two chords. This technique is used to measure 10km/s flows and to validate mach probe measurements near the edge of the plasma. The Bdot measurements in the cusp provide the proof-of-concept for a surface array of probes to measure global velocities.

  1. Alternatives to Traditional Labs: a Discovery Lab Based on Analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liff, Mark I.

    2006-12-01

    In search for alternatives to traditional labs, it is worthwhile to turn to the creativity research. Analogy is believed by many to be at the heart of creativity. A discovery lab that requires use of analogy had been developed. A basis of the lab is a re-discovery of Gough-Joule effect of contraction of stretched rubber upon heating. The difficulties of designing an analogybased lab are discussed. The students' reaction to the unusual lab is analyzed. The data suggest that the students need to be provided with the base for analogy use. They also need to be given directions for the search of solution by changing and modification of analogies, and weeding out the misleading ones and selectively retaining productive analogies. This study shows that thought processes of divergent nature--commonly accessible only to experts--can be employed under the discussed conditions by novices as well.

  2. Report from the banding lab

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tautin, J.

    1995-01-01

    Mr. Tautin reported on the seemingly everchanging structure of biological science units within the Interior Department. Current Congressional proposals would either change the name of the Bird Banding Lab's parent agency or make it part of the Geological Survey. The current Congress has not looked favorably on science budgets within the Interior Department, and the Banding Lab's budget is being squeezed ever tighter.

  3. Physics Labs with Flavor II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper was inspired by the numerous requests from "TPT" readers to expand the number of examples of "recurrent study" lab exercises described in my previous paper "Physics Labs with Flavor." I recommend that readers examine it first in order to better understand this one as my attempt here is to be brief. In that paper, one can find details…

  4. Thinking Outside the Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colter, Tabitha

    2017-01-01

    As an undergraduate physics major who spent 2015 deep in a quantum optics lab at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, I knew my 2016 experience with the House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee would be a completely new challenge. I have long had a passion for the bridge of communication between the technical and non-technical worlds but it was only through my AIP Mather internship this summer that I was able to see that passion come to life in the realm of science policy. Suddenly, I went from squeezing political philosophy classes into my packed schedule to witnessing the political process first-hand. I was thrilled to find that the skills of critical thinking and communicating complex issues I have developed throughout my training as a physicist were directly applicable to my work in Congress. Overall, my experience this summer has given me insight into the inner workings of the federal policy process, deepened my appreciation for the work of government employees to keep Congressional members informed on the pressing current issues, and exposed me to a whole range of alternative careers within science. AIP and SPS

  5. Methamphetamine Lab Incidents, 2004-2014

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liderazgo de la DEA Resource Center » Statistics & Facts » Methamphetamine Lab Incidents Methamphetamine Lab Incidents, 2004-2014 NOTE: These maps include all meth incidents, including labs, "dumpsites" or "chemical and glassware" ...

  6. Neutron Transversity at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen; Xiaodong Jiang; Jen-chieh Peng; Lingyan Zhu

    2005-09-07

    Nucleon transversity and single transverse spin asymmetries have been the recent focus of large efforts by both theorists and experimentalists. On-going and planned experiments from HERMES, COMPASS and RHIC are mostly on the proton or the deuteron. Presented here is a planned measurement of the neutron transversity and single target spin asymmetries at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target. Also presented are the results and plans of other neutron transverse spin experiments at Jefferson Lab. Finally, the factorization for semi-inclusive DIS studies at Jefferson Lab is discussed.

  7. State of the Lab 2012

    ScienceCinema

    King, Alex

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King delivers the annual State of the Lab address on Thursday, May 17, 2012, the 65th Anniversary of the founding of The Ames Laboratory. This video contains highlights from the address.

  8. State of the Lab 2012

    SciTech Connect

    King, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King delivers the annual State of the Lab address on Thursday, May 17, 2012, the 65th Anniversary of the founding of The Ames Laboratory. This video contains highlights from the address.

  9. Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Chad R.; Sorgenfrei, Matthew C.; Nehrenz, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed (G-NAT) lab at NASA Ames Research Center provides a flexible, easily accessible platform for developing hardware and software for advanced small spacecraft. A collaboration between the Mission Design Division and the Intelligent Systems Division, the objective of the lab is to provide testing data and general test protocols for advanced sensors, actuators, and processors for CubeSat-class spacecraft. By developing test schemes for advanced components outside of the standard mission lifecycle, the lab is able to help reduce the risk carried by advanced nanosatellite or CubeSat missions. Such missions are often allocated very little time for testing, and too often the test facilities must be custom-built for the needs of the mission at hand. The G-NAT lab helps to eliminate these problems by providing an existing suite of testbeds that combines easily accessible, commercial-offthe- shelf (COTS) processors with a collection of existing sensors and actuators.

  10. The PRIME Lab biomedical program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, George S.; Elmore, David; Rickey, Frank A.; Musameh, Sharif M.; Sharma, Pankaj; Hillegonds, Darren; Coury, Louis; Kissinger, Peter

    2000-10-01

    The biomedical accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) initiative at PRIME Lab including the status of equipment and sample preparation is described. Several biomedical projects are underway involving one or more of the nuclides: 14C, 26Al and 41Ca. Routine production of CaF 2 and graphite is taking place. Finally, the future direction and plans for improvement of the biomedical program at PRIME Lab are discussed.

  11. Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehler, Ted

    2006-12-01

    Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds Coastline Community College has under development several virtual lab simulations and activities that range from biology, to language labs, to virtual discussion environments. Imagine a virtual world that students enter online, by logging onto their computer from home or anywhere they have web access. Upon entering this world they select a personalized identity represented by a digitized character (avatar) that can freely move about, interact with the environment, and communicate with other characters. In these virtual worlds, buildings, gathering places, conference rooms, labs, science rooms, and a variety of other “real world” elements are evident. When characters move about and encounter other people (players) they may freely communicate. They can examine things, manipulate objects, read signs, watch video clips, hear sounds, and jump to other locations. Goals of critical thinking, social interaction, peer collaboration, group support, and enhanced learning can be achieved in surprising new ways with this innovative approach to peer-to-peer communication in a virtual discussion world. In this presentation, short demos will be given of several online learning environments including a virtual biology lab, a marine science module, a Spanish lab, and a virtual discussion world. Coastline College has been a leader in the development of distance learning and media-based education for nearly 30 years and currently offers courses through PDA, Internet, DVD, CD-ROM, TV, and Videoconferencing technologies. Its distance learning program serves over 20,000 students every year. sponsor Jerry Meisner

  12. Jigsaw Cooperative Learning Improves Biology Lab Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colosi, Joseph C.; Zales, Charlotte Rappe

    1998-01-01

    Describes how a jigsaw cooperative learning structure divides lab work in a constructive, efficient way and provides a mechanism for sharing information. Pre-lab lectures are replaced with focused student discussions about the lab exercises. Students become more involved with the lab exercises, take responsibility for their own learning, and are…

  13. A Comparative Study on Real Lab and Simulation Lab in Communication Engineering from Students' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balakrishnan, B.; Woods, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    Over the years, rapid development in computer technology has engendered simulation-based laboratory (lab) in addition to the traditional hands-on (physical) lab. Many higher education institutions adopt simulation lab, replacing some existing physical lab experiments. The creation of new systems for conducting engineering lab activities has raised…

  14. Advanced Physics Lab at TCU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, C. A.

    2009-04-01

    The one semester, one credit hour Modern Physics Lab is viewed as a transition between the structured Physics 1 and 2 labs and junior/senior research. The labs focus on a variety of experiments built around a multichannel analyzer, various alpha, beta and gamma ray detectors and weak radioactive sources. Experiments include radiation safety and detection with a Geiger counter and NaI detector, gamma ray spectroscopy with a germanium detector, beta spectrum, alpha energy loss, gamma ray absorption, Compton effect, nuclear and positron annihilation lifetime, speed of gamma rays. Other experiments include using the analog oscilloscope, x-ray diffraction of diamond and using an SEM/EDX. Error analysis is emphasized throughout. The semester ends with an individual project, often an extension of one of the earlier experiments, and students present their results as a paper and an APS style presentation to the department.

  15. Academic Pipeline and Futures Lab

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    level for summer time programs. The Academic Pipeline will also work with other programs at AFRL and with other universities and organizations to...AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2015-0186 ACADEMIC PIPELINE AND FUTURES LAB Brian D. Rigling Wright State University FEBRUARY 2016...PUBLICATION IN ACCORDANCE WITH ASSIGNED DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT. // Signature// // Signature// KELLY MILLER, Program Manager CHRISTINA

  16. Where Lab Tests Are Performed

    MedlinePlus

    ... labs also vary in complexity, the volume of tests performed, the technology utilized, and the number and type of professionals who conduct the testing . There are important differences among the various testing settings. This information will be useful in ... Proudly sponsored by ... Learn ...

  17. A Lab for All Reasons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin-Jones, Linda L.

    1990-01-01

    Described is a demonstration science laboratory at the University of Florida. Discussed is laboratory design, including instructional space, lab stations, sink areas, safety areas, and a storage and distribution area. The impact of this type of design is cited. Diagrams and photographs are included. (CW)

  18. Biodiversity Lab: Using Local Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillie, Lynn L.

    1997-01-01

    Examining living organisms in one's own backyard is a key first step toward appreciating the scope and importance of biological diversity throughout the world. The goals of this lab are to involve students in exploring the biodiversity around them, appreciating its scope, and asking questions of new organisms that they may never have noticed…

  19. Evaluating E-Labs' Experimentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plaisent, Michel; Maguiraga, Lassana; Bernard, Prosper; Larhrib, Samir

    2004-01-01

    This communication discusses preliminary results on an experimentation of e-Learning with MIS students, mainly in order to cope with the logistics of lab organization. A learning management software was installed which changed completely the learning process, from content to logistics. Students have expressed their satisfaction with the e-Learning…

  20. Safety Equipment in the Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Willard A.S.

    1964-01-01

    Findings of two recent surveys on safety equipment in laboratory facilities are presented. The first survey was a pilot study of emergency shower and eye wash equipment. This study was followed by a more comprehensive random survey of safety equipment in 2,820 labs. Among other findings, the surveys indicate that many plants are underequipped, or…

  1. Fraud strikes top genome lab

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, E.

    1996-11-08

    Francis Collins, head of NIH`s Human Genome Project has informed colleagues that a junior researcher in his lab facke data in five papers co-authored by Collins. This article describes the whole scenario, how it was discovered, and what the reprocussions are.

  2. Research Perspectives at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Kees de Jager

    2005-06-05

    The plans for upgrading the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab to 12 GeV are presented. The research program supporting that upgrade is illustrated with a few selected examples. The instrumentation under design to carry out that research program is discussed.

  3. State of the Lab Address

    ScienceCinema

    King, Alex

    2016-07-12

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  4. A Simple, Successful Capacitor Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, William

    2011-01-01

    Capacitors are a fundamental component of modern electronics. They appear in myriad devices and in an enormous range of sizes. Although our students are taught the function and analysis of capacitors, few have the opportunity to use them in our labs.

  5. Flexible HVAC System for Lab or Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedan, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses an effort to design a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system flexible enough to accommodate an easy conversion of classrooms to laboratories and dry labs to wet labs. The design's energy efficiency and operations and maintenance are examined. (GR)

  6. Updated version of an interim connection space LabPQR for spectral color reproduction: LabLab.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qian; Wan, Xiaoxia; Li, Junfeng; Liang, Jingxing

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new interim connection space (ICS) called LabLab, which is an updated version of LabPQR, to overcome the drawback that the last three dimensions of LabPQR have no definite colorimetric meanings. We extended and improved the method by which the first three dimensions of LabPQR are deduced to obtain an ICS consisting of two sets of CIELAB values under different illuminants, and the reconstructed spectra from LabLab were obtained by minimizing colorimetric errors by means of the computational formula of the CIE-XYZ tristimulus values combined with least-squares best fit. The improvement obtained from the proposed method was tested to compress and reconstruct the reflectance spectra of the 1950 Natural Color System color chips and more than 50,000 ISO SOCS color patches as well as six multispectral images acquired by multispectral image acquisition systems using 1600 glossy Munsell color chips as training samples. The performance was evaluated by the mean values of color differences between the original and reconstructed spectra under the CIE 1931 standard colorimetric observer and the CIE standard illuminants D50, D55, D65, D75, F2, F7, F11, and A as well as five multichip white LED light sources. The mean and maximum values of the root mean square errors between the original and reconstructed spectra were also calculated. The experimental results show that the proposed three LabLab interim connection spaces significantly outperform principal component analysis, LabPQR, XYZLMS, Fairman-Brill, and LabRGB in colorimetric reconstruction accuracy at the cost of slight reduction of spectral reconstruction accuracy and illuminant independence of color differences of the suggested LabLab interim connection spaces outperform other interim connection spaces. In addition, the presented LabLab interim connection spaces could be quite compatible with the extensively used colorimetric management system since each dimension has definite colorimetric

  7. The Development of MSFC Usability Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Yiwei; Richardson, Sally

    2010-01-01

    This conference poster reviews the development of the usability lab at Marshall Space Flight Center. The purpose of the lab was to integrate a fully functioning usability laboratory to provide a resource for future human factor assessments. and to implement preliminary usability testing on a MSFC website to validate the functionality of the lab.

  8. New Features in ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Murray, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) has been working hard on updating its services and interfaces to better support our community's research needs. ADS Labs is a new interface built on the old tried-and-true ADS Abstract Databases, so all of ADS's content is available through it. In this presentation we highlight the new features that have been developed in ADS Labs over the last year: new recommendations, metrics, a citation tool and enhanced fulltext search. ADS Labs has long been providing article-level recommendations based on keyword similarity, co-readership and co-citation analysis of its corpus. We have now introduced personal recommendations, which provide a list of articles to be considered based on a individual user's readership history. A new metrics interface provides a summary of the basic impact indicators for a list of records. These include the total and normalized number of papers, citations, reads, and downloads. Also included are some of the popular indices such as the h, g and i10 index. The citation helper tool allows one to submit a set of records and obtain a list of top 10 papers which cite and/or are cited by papers in the original list (but which are not in it). The process closely resembles the network approach of establishing "friends of friends" via an analysis of the citation network. The full-text search service now covers more than 2.5 million documents, including all the major astronomy journals, as well as physics journals published by Springer, Elsevier, the American Physical Society, the American Geophysical Union, and all of the arXiv eprints. The full-text search interface interface allows users and librarians to dig deep and find words or phrases in the body of the indexed articles. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  9. Injecting Inquiry into Undergraduate Astronomy Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezari, S.; Noel-Storr, J.; Spiegel, D.

    2002-12-01

    We present examples and results of instructors using inquiry-based teaching strategies in the undergraduate astronomy lab at Columbia University. Each instructor integrated varying degrees of inquiry depending on the topic of the lab and their own preferences for this style of instruction. We use student surveys to quantify how well the spectrum of inquiry-based labs, from guided activities to independent investigations, reached our educational goals of building scientific knowledge, skills and attitudes.

  10. MatLab Script and Functional Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    MatLab Script and Functional Programming: MatLab is one of the most widely used very high level programming languages for scientific and engineering computations. It is very user-friendly and needs practically no formal programming knowledge. Presented here are MatLab programming aspects and not just the MatLab commands for scientists and engineers who do not have formal programming training and also have no significant time to spare for learning programming to solve their real world problems. Specifically provided are programs for visualization. The MatLab seminar covers the functional and script programming aspect of MatLab language. Specific expectations are: a) Recognize MatLab commands, script and function. b) Create, and run a MatLab function. c) Read, recognize, and describe MatLab syntax. d) Recognize decisions, loops and matrix operators. e) Evaluate scope among multiple files, and multiple functions within a file. f) Declare, define and use scalar variables, vectors and matrices.

  11. Curricular Adaptations in Introductory Physics Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W.; Ewell, Mary; Moore, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    When curricular materials are disseminated to new sites, there can be a tension between fidelity to the original intent of the developers and adaptation to local needs. In this case study we look at a lab activity that was initially developed for an introductory physics for the life sciences (IPLS) course at the University of Maryland, then implemented at George Mason University with significant adaptations. The goals of the two implementations were overlapping, but also differed in ways that are reflected in the two versions of the lab. We compare student lab report data from the two sites to examine the impacts of the adaptation on how students engaged with the lab.

  12. Inkjet printed structures for smart lab-on-chip systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckert, E.; Eberhardt, R.; Pabst, Oliver; Kemper, Falk; Shu, Zhe; Tünnermann, Andreas; Perelaer, Jolke; Schubert, Ulrich; Becker, Holger

    2013-03-01

    Inkjet printing is a digital printing technique that is capable of depositing not only inks, but functional materials onto different substrates in an additive way. In this paper, applications of inkjet printed structures for microfluidic lab-on-chip systems are discussed. Such systems are promising for different chemical or biochemical analysis tasks carried out at the Point-of-Care level and therefore due to cost reasons are often fabricated from polymers. The paper discusses inkjetprinted wiring structures and electroactive polymer (EAP) actuators for use in microfluidic lab-on-chip systems. Silver and gold wirings are shown that are fabricated by printing metal nanoparticle inks onto polymer substrates. After printing the structures are sintered using argon plasma sintering, a low-temperature sintering process that is compatible with polymer substrates. The wirings consist of several electrode like structures and contact pads and feature minimum structure sizes of approximately 70 μm. They can be used for electrodes, fluid presence detectors and localized ohmic heaters in lab-on-chip systems. Based on that an all inkjet-printed EAP actuator then is discussed. Membrane-type bending actuators generate deflections of approximately 5 μm when being driven at a resonance frequency of 1.8 kHz with 110 V. Derived from that and assuming passive valves on-chip pumping rates in the range of 0.5 ml/min can be estimated.

  13. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2013-03-01

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  14. Jefferson Lab's Trim Card II

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Allison; Sarin Philip; C. Higgins; Edward Martin; William Merz

    2005-05-01

    Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) uses Trim Card I power supplies to drive approximately 1900 correction magnets. These trim cards have had a long and illustrious service record. However, some of the employed technology is now obsolete, making it difficult to maintain the system and retain adequate spares. The Trim Card II is being developed to act as a transparent replacement for its aging predecessor. A modular approach has been taken in its development to facilitate the substitution of sections for future improvements and maintenance. The resulting design has been divided into a motherboard and 7 daughter cards which has also allowed for parallel development. The Trim Card II utilizes modern technologies such as a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and a microprocessor to embed trim card controls and diagnostics. These reprogrammable devices also provide the versatility to incorporate future requirements.

  15. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    ScienceCinema

    Minitti, Mike; Woods Mike

    2016-07-12

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  16. Z Machine at Sandia Labs

    SciTech Connect

    2007-10-17

    Sandia Labs' Z machine is the largest laboratory source of x-rays in the world. For the few nanoseconds of a Z Machine test, its electrical output equals the output of 50x the electrical generating stations of all the power plants on earth. The Z Machine complex encompasses an area roughly the size of a major college basketball arena. Originally created to validate nuclear weapons models, the Z Machine is also considered a "dark horse" in the race for viable fusion energy production. After the famous "arcs and sparks" photo of Z (a photo no longer possible after its refurbishment), this is a fast-motion video of workers completing Z's recent refurbishment.

  17. Space Science Lab at PARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelaz, Michael W.; Blake, M.; Clavier, D.; Whitworth, C.; Cline, J. D.

    2006-12-01

    Native American, Hispanic, African American, and other underrepresented high school students in rural Western North Carolina have unprecedented opportunity as researchers in the Space Science Lab to conduct visible and radio observations of the Sun. The program involves 90 students over a three year period. The students conduct their own research and also interact with scientists around the world. The primary goal is to reach students who otherwise would not have this opportunity and motivate them to develop the critical thinking skills necessary for objective scientific inquiry. Students develop skills in electronics, computer sciences, astronomy, physics and earth sciences. Equally important is the hope that the students will become interested in pursuing careers in research or other science-related areas. The program objectives are aligned with the North Carolina Standard Course of Study for grades 9-12 in the areas of Earth/Environmental Science, Physical Science and Physics. The first group of 27 students spent a week in the Space Science Lab located on the campus of the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) during the Summer 2006. Students constructed their own JOVE radio telescopes that they took home to continue their observations. They share their results during four follow-up sessions throughout the school year. The students also have Internet access to radio telescopes and solar monitoring equipment at PARI. We expect their enthusiasm for science will increase by experiencing research investigations that are fun and relevant to their understanding of the world around them. We gratefully acknowledge support from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Student Science Enrichment Program.

  18. External-injection Experiment at SPARC_LAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, A. R.; Bacci, A.; Belleveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Gallo, A.; Gatti, G.; Maroli, C.; Mostacci, A.; Petrillo, V.; Serafini, L.; Tomassini, P.; Vaccarezza, C.

    At the SPARC_LAB facility of INFN-LNF we are installing two transport lines for ultra-short electron bunches and an ultra- intense laser pulses, generated by the SPARC photo-injector and by the FLAME laser in a synchronized fashion at the tens of f s level, to co-propagate inside a hydrogen filled glass capillary, in order to perform acceleration of the electron bunch by a plasma wave driven by the laser pulse. The main aim of this experiment is to demonstrate that a high brightness electron beam can be accelerated by a plasma wave without any significant degradation of its quality. Motivations of the technical choices made and expected performances are reported.

  19. Nonproliferation through international lab-to-lab technology cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlop, W H

    1998-09-10

    Lab-to- Lab activities are currently with the FSU, that experience is leading to important and productive interactions with other countries and regions, most significantly, China and the Middle East. In contrast to the Cold War years, when most technologies developed at LLNL were solely for the US national defense efforts and therefore classified, many of NAI's new technologies and tools are unclassified and designed for use in a multilateral security environment. PPAC is the proliferation "Prevention" element of NAI's four-element "Prevention-Reversal-Response-Avoid Surprise" program. We direct some twenty different projects. which have realized about a factor of ten growth in the last four years.

  20. Berkeley Lab 2nd Grader Outreach

    ScienceCinema

    Scoggins, Jackie; Louie, Virginia

    2016-07-12

    The Berkeley Lab IT Department sponsored a community outreach program aimed at teaching young children about computers and networks. Second graders from LeConte Elementary School joined Lab IT Staff for a day of in-depth exercises and fun.

  1. Fred Keller and the Flex Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Beverly

    The Flex Lab at Santa Fe Community College, in New Mexico, is a self-paced, computer-assisted training center that allows students to accommodate college credit courses into their schedules. The Lab offers courses in introductory computers, keyboarding, and various computer programs and emphasizes several features of the Personalized System of…

  2. Extracurricular Science Labs for STEM Talent Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hausamann, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, a growing lack of engineers, natural scientists, information technology experts, and mathematicians has been noted, especially in Europe. Corresponding to the need to attract young people to science and technology, numerous extracurricular science labs ("out-of-school labs") have been established, especially in…

  3. Multigenre Lab Reports: Connecting Literacy and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochwerger, Leonora; Peterson, Shelley Stagg; Calovini, Theresa

    2006-01-01

    The development of communication skills is a key component in any science program. However, students do not see the connections between writing and science. In particular, students lack the enthusiasm when the time comes to write lab reports. Students say that they do not see why they should have to write dry, boring lab reports following an…

  4. Traditional Labs + New Questions = Improved Student Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezba, Richard J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents three typical lab activities involving the breathing rate of fish, the behavior of electromagnets, and tests for water hardness to demonstrate how labs can be modified to teach process skills. Discusses how basic concepts about experimentation are developed and ways of generating and improving science experiments. Includes a laboratory…

  5. Latest results from FROST at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, Barry G.

    2014-06-01

    The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of a polarized photon beam incident on a polarized target in meson photoproduction experiments. At Jefferson Lab, a program of such measurements has made use of the Jefferson Lab FROzen Spin Target (FROST). An overview of preliminary results are presented.

  6. Berkeley Lab 2nd Grader Outreach

    SciTech Connect

    Scoggins, Jackie; Louie, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    The Berkeley Lab IT Department sponsored a community outreach program aimed at teaching young children about computers and networks. Second graders from LeConte Elementary School joined Lab IT Staff for a day of in-depth exercises and fun.

  7. California State University, Northridge: Hybrid Lab Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE, 2014

    2014-01-01

    California State University, Northridge's Hybrid Lab course model targets high failure rate, multisection, gateway courses in which prerequisite knowledge is a key to success. The Hybrid Lab course model components incorporate interventions and practices that have proven successful at CSUN and other campuses in supporting students, particularly…

  8. Magnetic Viscous Drag for Friction Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffney, Chris; Catching, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The typical friction lab performed in introductory mechanics courses is usually not the favorite of either the student or the instructor. The measurements are not all that easy to make, and reproducibility is usually a troublesome issue. This paper describes the augmentation of such a friction lab with a study of the viscous drag on a magnet…

  9. Science Action Labs Part 1: Sciencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shevick, Ed; Adams, Linda, Ed.

    This book contains innovative hands-on science laboratory activities that teach basic scientific method skills and are designed to be used directly with 4th- through 9th-grade students. The background materials and instructions included in each activity are written for students to work together in teams. Lab titles are: observation lab,…

  10. The DVCS program at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Niccolai, Silvia

    2014-06-01

    Recent promising results, obtained at Jefferson Lab, on cross sections and asymmetries for DVCS and their link to the Generalized Parton Distributions are the focus of this paper. The extensive experimental program to measure DVCS with the 12-GeV-upgraded CEBAF in three experimental Halls (A, B, C) of Jefferson Lab, will also be presented.

  11. Innovation - A view from the Lab

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA Ag Lab in Peoria helps bridge the gap between agricultural producers and commercial manufacturers. In 2015, the Ag Lab, officially known as the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research (NCAUR), is celebrating 75 years of research in Peoria. T...

  12. Hydrogel Beads: The New Slime Lab?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockway, Debra; Libera, Matthew; Welner, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    Creating slime fascinates students. Unfortunately, though intrigue is at its peak, the educational aspect of this activity is often minimal. This article describes a chemistry lab that closely relates to the slime lab and allows high school students to explore the concepts of chemical bonding, properties, and replacement reactions. It involves the…

  13. SPARC_LAB present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrario, M.; Alesini, D.; Anania, M.; Bacci, A.; Bellaveglia, M.; Bogdanov, O.; Boni, R.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Dabagov, S. B.; De Martinis, C.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Dosselli, U.; Drago, A.; Esposito, A.; Faccini, R.; Gallo, A.; Gambaccini, M.; Gatti, C.; Gatti, G.; Ghigo, A.; Giulietti, D.; Ligidov, A.; Londrillo, P.; Lupi, S.; Mostacci, A.; Pace, E.; Palumbo, L.; Petrillo, V.; Pompili, R.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Spataro, B.; Tomassini, P.; Turchetti, G.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Dattoli, G.; Di Palma, E.; Giannessi, L.; Petralia, A.; Ronsivalle, C.; Spassovsky, I.; Surrenti, V.; Gizzi, L.; Labate, L.; Levato, T.; Rau, J. V.

    2013-08-01

    A new facility named SPARC_LAB has been recently launched at the INFN National Laboratories in Frascati, merging the potentialities of the former projects SPARC and PLASMONX. We describe in this paper the status and the future perspectives at the SPARC_LAB facility.

  14. Uses of Labs and Learning Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Blink, Clare

    2009-01-01

    How can an IT department transform traditional computer labs given the resource limits of a university setting? Before engaging a redesign team, conduct some groundwork and initial research to help guide design and resource decisions. When the author and her colleagues considered modifying the lab spaces at Cornell, they initially engaged in…

  15. Supercharging Lessons with a Virtual Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Jefferson; Vincent, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The authors describes their experiences incorporating the virtual lab into a simple circuit lesson during an energy unit in a sixth-grade class. The lesson included a hands-on group experiment using wire, batteries, and light bulbs to make a circuit and an online simulation, using a virtual lab. Class discussions, student inquiries, and the study…

  16. Lab-on-a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Labs on chips are manufactured in many shapes and sizes and can be used for numerous applications, from medical tests to water quality monitoring to detecting the signatures of life on other planets. The eight holes on this chip are actually ports that can be filled with fluids or chemicals. Tiny valves control the chemical processes by mixing fluids that move in the tiny channels that look like lines, connecting the ports. Scientists at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama designed this chip to grow biological crystals on the International Space Station. Through this research, they discovered that this technology is ideally suited for solving the challenges of the Vision for Space Exploration. For example, thousands of chips the size of dimes could be loaded on a Martian rover looking for biosignatures of past or present life. Other types of chips could be placed in handheld devices used to monitor microbes in water or to quickly conduct medical tests on astronauts. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  17. Jefferson Lab's Distributed Data Acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Trent Allison; Thomas Powers

    2006-05-01

    Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) occasionally experiences fast intermittent beam instabilities that are difficult to isolate and result in downtime. The Distributed Data Acquisition (Dist DAQ) system is being developed to detect and quickly locate such instabilities. It will consist of multiple Ethernet based data acquisition chassis distributed throughout the seven-eights of a mile CEBAF site. Each chassis will monitor various control system signals that are only available locally and/or monitored by systems with small bandwidths that cannot identify fast transients. The chassis will collect data at rates up to 40 Msps in circular buffers that can be frozen and unrolled after an event trigger. These triggers will be derived from signals such as periodic timers or accelerator faults and be distributed via a custom fiber optic event trigger network. This triggering scheme will allow all the data acquisition chassis to be triggered simultaneously and provide a snapshot of relevant CEBAF control signals. The data will then be automatically analyzed for frequency content and transients to determine if and where instabilities exist.

  18. Experiences with lab-centric instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titterton, Nathaniel; Lewis, Colleen M.; Clancy, Michael J.

    2010-06-01

    Lab-centric instruction emphasizes supervised, hands-on activities by substituting lab for lecture time. It combines a multitude of pedagogical techniques into the format of an extended, structured closed lab. We discuss the range of benefits for students, including increased staff interaction, frequent and varied self-assessments, integrated collaborative activities, and a systematic sequence of activities that gradually increases in difficulty. Instructors also benefit from a deeper window into student progress and understanding. We follow with discussion of our experiences in courses at U.C. Berkeley, and using data from some of these investigate the effects of lab-centric instruction on student learning, procrastination, and course pacing. We observe that the lab-centric format helped students on exams but hurt them on extended programming assignments, counter to our hypothesis. Additionally, we see no difference in self-ratings of procrastination and limited differences in ratings of course pace. We do find evidence that the students who choose to attend lab-centric courses are different in several important ways from students who choose to attend the same course in a non-lab-centric format.

  19. Integrating Robotic Observatories into Astronomy Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruch, Gerald T.

    2015-01-01

    The University of St. Thomas (UST) and a consortium of five local schools is using the UST Robotic Observatory, housing a 17' telescope, to develop labs and image processing tools that allow easy integration of observational labs into existing introductory astronomy curriculum. Our lab design removes the burden of equipment ownership by sharing access to a common resource and removes the burden of data processing by automating processing tasks that are not relevant to the learning objectives.Each laboratory exercise takes place over two lab periods. During period one, students design and submit observation requests via the lab website. Between periods, the telescope automatically acquires the data and our image processing pipeline produces data ready for student analysis. During period two, the students retrieve their data from the website and perform the analysis. The first lab, 'Weighing Jupiter,' was successfully implemented at UST and several of our partner schools. We are currently developing a second lab to measure the age of and distance to a globular cluster.

  20. Developing a Focused Reading Lab for L2 Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoller, Fredericka L.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a model reading lab design for advanced English for Academic Purposes students and describes the four major instructional components of the lab as well as the logistics of running a lab. (44 references) (Author/CK)

  1. Teachers' Perspectives on Online Virtual Labs vs. Hands-On Labs in High School Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Teresa M.

    This study of online science teachers' opinions addressed the use of virtual labs in online courses. A growing number of schools use virtual labs that must meet mandated laboratory standards to ensure they provide learning experiences comparable to hands-on labs, which are an integral part of science curricula. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine teachers' perceptions of the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs. The theoretical foundation was constructivism, as labs provide student-centered activities for problem solving, inquiry, and exploration of phenomena. The research questions focused on experienced teachers' perceptions of the quality of virtual vs. hands-on labs. Data were collected through survey questions derived from the lab objectives of The Next Generation Science Standards . Eighteen teachers rated the degree of importance of each objective and also rated how they felt virtual labs met these objectives; these ratings were reported using descriptive statistics. Responses to open-ended questions were few and served to illustrate the numerical results. Many teachers stated that virtual labs are valuable supplements but could not completely replace hands-on experiences. Studies on the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs are limited despite widespread use. Comprehensive studies will ensure that online students have equal access to quality labs. School districts need to define lab requirements, and colleges need to specify the lab experience they require. This study has potential to inspire positive social change by assisting science educators, including those in the local school district, in evaluating and selecting courseware designed to promote higher order thinking skills, real-world problem solving, and development of strong inquiry skills, thereby improving science instruction for all high school students.

  2. Operational experience on the generation and control of high brightness electron bunch trains at SPARC-LAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostacci, A.; Alesini, D.; Anania, M. P.; Bacci, A.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagioni, A.; Cardelli, F.; Castellano, Michele; Chiadroni, Enrica; Cianchi, Alessandro; Croia, M.; Di Giovenale, Domenico; Di Pirro, Giampiero; Ferrario, Massimo; Filippi, Francesco; Gallo, Alessandro; Gatti, Giancarlo; Giribono, Anna; Innocenti, L.; Marocchino, A.; Petrarca, M.; Piersanti, L.; Pioli, S.; Pompili, Riccardo; Romeo, Stefano; Rossi, Andrea Renato; Shpakov, V.; Scifo, J.; Vaccarezza, Cristina; Villa, Fabio; Weiwei, L.

    2015-05-01

    Sub-picosecond, high-brightness electron bunch trains are routinely produced at SPARC-LAB via the velocity bunching technique. Such bunch trains can be used to drive multi-color Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and plasma wake field accelerators. In this paper we present recent results at SPARC-LAB on the generation of such beams, highlighting the key points of our scheme. We will discuss also the on-going machine upgrades to allow driving FELs with plasma accelerated beams or with short electron pulses at an increased energy.

  3. Thanatology for Everyone: Developmental Labs and Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Walter E.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    In an effort to "treat" the growing death concerns of many medical staffs, an experiential death and dying lab was created. Its evolution to meet changing needs is discussed, as well as future potential for work in this area. (Author)

  4. The Language Lab: Renaissance or Extinction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froehlich, Jurgen

    1982-01-01

    Discusses ways to combine technological innovations in the areas of visual aids and computers with existing language lab equipment in order to motivate students in the area of second language learning. (EKN)

  5. Microspectroscopy At Beamline 73 MAX-lab

    SciTech Connect

    Engdahl, Anders

    2010-02-03

    Presentation of some projects at the infrared microspectroscopy experimental station at beamline 73 MAX-lab. Among the subjects are found identification of organic residues in fossil material and examination of the chemistry in an old oak wood wreck.

  6. Administrator Helps Students Discover Lab Day

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden visited the Langdon Elementary School in Washington to support National Lab Day. Bolden, a veteran of four space shuttle flights, spoke with the fifth graders abou...

  7. Laboratory Professionals: Who's Who in the Lab

    MedlinePlus

    ... in one particular area, such as in clinical chemistry, immunology, molecular pathology, microbiology, or blood bank /transfusion ... certain areas of the lab, such as clinical chemistry, and may be certified by the BOC or ...

  8. Developing an Advanced Lab course from scratch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalak, Rudi

    2012-10-01

    A few years ago the Alpha group in APS organized faculty with interests in advanced lab courses in physics. At the University of Wyoming, we re-launched an advanced lab course after doing more than 15 years without one. Our majors had to take an electronic course in the Electrical Engineering department to get familiar with any kind of electronic equipment. Now we are in the fourth teaching session of the advanced Modern Physics lab and we will expand the course into a two-term course beginning spring 2013. Forty-five majors have gone through our labs, We developed an oral exam tradition, which is now beginning to lend our department upper level outcome assessment credibility for campus wide assessment.

  9. Merging lab, drug data boosts disease management.

    PubMed

    2000-02-01

    Merging lab and pharmacy data can benefit disease management. Integrating lab data with other data sets gave Blue Cross Blue Shield of Southeast Michigan a way to focus its diabetes disease management program, assess the effectiveness of therapy, and profile physicians. Learn how the plan's experience in data integration can apply to hospital systems and why pursuing a partner in such a project might be a wise move.

  10. PLC Support Software at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    P. Chevtsov; S. Higgins; S. Schaffner; D. Seidman

    2002-10-01

    Several Automation Direct (DirectNet) Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) have been integrated into the accelerator control system at Jefferson Lab. The integration is based on new software that consists of three main parts: a PLC driver with a state machine control block, a device support module, and a common serial driver. The components of new software and experience gained with the use of this software for beam dump systems at Jefferson Lab are presented.

  11. Supplemental Guidelines, JCE Lab-Experiment Manuscripts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-05-01

    These guidelines supplement the Guide to Submissions (published in J. Chem. Educ. 2000, 77, 29-30 and at http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Authors/ Guidelines.html or available on request from the JCE editorial office). Manuscripts that describe laboratory experiments should first follow the Guide to Submissions and then apply these Supplemental Guidelines. Rationale JCE receives many submissions that describe laboratory experiments. The broad range of experiments readers can find each month is one of our most important features. These supplemental guidelines have been designed to make published laboratory experiments as useful as possible to readers. They are based on four fundamental ideas:

    • peer review of a lab-experiment manuscript should be based to a large degree on the written and technology-based materials used by students in the laboratory, not just on a description of those materials;
    • JCE should print the information a reader needs to decide whether to try to use the experiment; this includes information about possible safety hazards;
    • readers who decide to use a lab should be able to adapt it to their circumstances quickly and easily;
    • detailed information, including student materials, should be available to adopters of an experiment in a format that is modifiable and easily adapted for use by faculty, students, and support staff.
    To support these goals we require that a manuscript that describes a laboratory experiment must consist of a Lab Summary and Lab Documentation. (Each of these is described in detail below.) If, after peer review, a lab-experiment manuscript is published, only the Lab Summary will be printed in JCE. The Abstract, the Lab Summary, and all Lab Documentation will be published via JCE Online. Lab Documentation is placed on the Web as PDF files that can be displayed and printed by Acrobat Reader, and as Word or Word Perfect files that can be edited by those who adopt a lab. Those without Web

  12. RoboLab and virtual environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giarratano, Joseph C.

    1994-01-01

    A useful adjunct to the manned space station would be a self-contained free-flying laboratory (RoboLab). This laboratory would have a robot operated under telepresence from the space station or ground. Long duration experiments aboard RoboLab could be performed by astronauts or scientists using telepresence to operate equipment and perform experiments. Operating the lab by telepresence would eliminate the need for life support such as food, water and air. The robot would be capable of motion in three dimensions, have binocular vision TV cameras, and two arms with manipulators to simulate hands. The robot would move along a two-dimensional grid and have a rotating, telescoping periscope section for extension in the third dimension. The remote operator would wear a virtual reality type headset to allow the superposition of computer displays over the real-time video of the lab. The operators would wear exoskeleton type arms to facilitate the movement of objects and equipment operation. The combination of video displays, motion, and the exoskeleton arms would provide a high degree of telepresence, especially for novice users such as scientists doing short-term experiments. The RoboLab could be resupplied and samples removed on other space shuttle flights. A self-contained RoboLab module would be designed to fit within the cargo bay of the space shuttle. Different modules could be designed for specific applications, i.e., crystal-growing, medicine, life sciences, chemistry, etc. This paper describes a RoboLab simulation using virtual reality (VR). VR provides an ideal simulation of telepresence before the actual robot and laboratory modules are constructed. The easy simulation of different telepresence designs will produce a highly optimum design before construction rather than the more expensive and time consuming hardware changes afterwards.

  13. Assessing Usage and Maximizing Finance Lab Impact: A Case Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noguera, Magdy; Budden, Michael Craig; Silva, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey conducted to assess students' usage and perceptions of a finance lab. Finance labs differ from simple computer labs as they typically contain data boards, streaming market quotes, terminals and software that allow for real-time financial analyses. Despite the fact that such labs represent significant and…

  14. ESA SnowLab project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesmann, Andreas; Caduff, Rafael; Frey, Othmar; Werner, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Retrieval of the snow water equivalaent (SWE) from passive microwave observations dates back over three decades to initial studies made using the first operational radiometers in space. However, coarse spatial resolution (25 km) is an acknowledged limitation for the application of passive microwave measurements. The natural variability of snow cover itself is also notable; properties such as stratigraphy and snow microstructure change both spatially and over time, affecting the microwave signature. To overcome this deficit, the satellite mission COld REgions Hydrology High-resolution Observatory (CoReH2O) was proposed to the European Space Agency (ESA) in 2005 in response to the call for Earth Explorer 7 candidate missions. CoReH2O was a dual frequency (X- and Ku-band) SAR mission aimed to provide maps of SWE over land and snow accumulation on glaciers at a spatial resolution of 200 to 500 meters with an unprecedented accuracy. Within the frame of preparatory studies for CoReH2O Phase A, ESA undertook several research initiatives from 2009 to 2013 to study the mission concept and capabilities of the proposed sensor. These studies provided a wealth of information on emission and backscattering signatures of natural snow cover, which can be exploited to study new potential mission concepts for retrieval of snow cover properties and other elements of the cryosphere. Currently data related to multi-frequency, multi-polarisation, multitemporal of active and passive microwave measurements are still not available. In addition, new methods related to e.g. tomography are currently under development and need to be tested with real data. Also, the potential of interferometric and polarimetric measurements of the snow cover and its possible impact for novel mission/retrieval concepts must be assessed. . The objective of the SnowLab activity is to fill this gap and complement these datasets from earlier campaigns by acquiring a comprehensive multi-frequency, multi

  15. Improving the Quality of Lab Reports by Using Them as Lab Instructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haagen-Schuetzenhoefer, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Lab exercises are quite popular in teaching science. Teachers have numerous goals in mind when teaching science laboratories. Nevertheless, empirical research draws a heterogeneous picture of the benefits of lab work. Research has shown that it does not necessarily contribute to the enhancement of practical abilities or content knowledge. Lab…

  16. Lab safety, Part 2. Safety in the lab: practices and predictions.

    PubMed

    Maher, L

    1996-09-01

    Precautions related to bloodborne pathogens, and the handling of specimens and waste are among the chief concerns of laboratorians today. Find out how your lab stacks up and how safety will impact tomorrow's lab workers in the conclusion to MLO's latest survey.

  17. Do Online Labs Work? An Assessment of an Online Lab on Cell Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilman, Sharon L.

    2006-01-01

    Some studies show students successfully learning science through online courses. This study compared students doing an online and in-class lab exercise on cell division. Online students performed slightly but significantly better on a follow-up content quiz, however, about half those expressed a strong preference for in-class lab work.

  18. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-01-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an…

  19. eComLab: remote laboratory platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontual, Murillo; Melkonyan, Arsen; Gampe, Andreas; Huang, Grant; Akopian, David

    2011-06-01

    Hands-on experiments with electronic devices have been recognized as an important element in the field of engineering to help students get familiar with theoretical concepts and practical tasks. The continuing increase the student number, costly laboratory equipment, and laboratory maintenance slow down the physical lab efficiency. As information technology continues to evolve, the Internet has become a common media in modern education. Internetbased remote laboratory can solve a lot of restrictions, providing hands-on training as they can be flexible in time and the same equipment can be shared between different students. This article describes an on-going remote hands-on experimental radio modulation, network and mobile applications lab project "eComLab". Its main component is a remote laboratory infrastructure and server management system featuring various online media familiar with modern students, such as chat rooms and video streaming.

  20. Environment monitoring using LabVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Hawtree, J.

    1995-01-01

    A system has been developed for electronically recording and monitoring temperature, humidity, and other environmental variables at the Silicon Detector Facility located in Lab D. The data is collected by LabVIEW software, which runs in the background on an Apple Macintosh. The software is completely portable between Macintosh, MS Windows, and Sun platforms. The hardware includes a Macintosh with 8 MB of RAM; an external ADC-1 analog-to-digital converter that uses a serial port; LabVIEW software; temperature sensors; humidity sensors; and other voltage/current sensing devices. ADC values are converted to ASCII strings and entered into files which are read over Ethernet. Advantages include automatic logging, automatic recovery after power interruptions, and the availability of stand-alone applications for other locations with inexpensive software and hardware.

  1. Vista and Pemex in LAB deal

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, G.D.L.

    1993-01-20

    Vista Chemical (Houston) and Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex; Mexico City) have firmed up their long-negotiated plans for Pemex to supply feedstock for a linear alkylbenzene (LAB) plant that Vista will build in Mexico (CW, Sept. 16, 1992 p. 8). Specifically, the two companies have signed an agreement of understanding to pursue negotiations and finalize agreements. The plant would cost $250 million, produce 260 million-330 million lbs/year of LAB, and create about 200 permanent jobs. Final agreements, including a site selection, are expected to be completed by midyear. Vista expects startup in 1996, and is considering forming aj oint venture with a Mexican partner.

  2. Laboratory Accreditation Bureau (L-A-B)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-28

    2011 EMDQ Workshop • Arlington, VA Laboratory Accreditation Bureau (L-A-B) Recognized by: Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704...2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Laboratory Accreditation Bureau (L-A-B) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Laboratory Accreditation Bureau

  3. Magnetic Viscous Drag for Friction Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, Chris; Catching, Adam

    2016-09-01

    The typical friction lab performed in introductory mechanics courses is usually not the favorite of either the student or the instructor. The measurements are not all that easy to make, and reproducibility is usually a troublesome issue. This paper describes the augmentation of such a friction lab with a study of the viscous drag on a magnet sliding down a conducting ramp, e.g., an aluminum ramp (Fig. 1). The measurements are simple and quite reproducible, and it appears to readily catch the interest of students.

  4. Computational Labs Using VPython Complement Conventional Labs in Online and Regular Physics Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.

    2009-03-01

    Fairmont State University has developed online physics classes for the high-school teaching certificate based on the text book Matter and Interaction by Chabay and Sherwood. This lead to using computational VPython labs also in the traditional class room setting to complement conventional labs. The computational modeling process has proven to provide an excellent basis for the subsequent conventional lab and allows for a concrete experience of the difference between behavior according to a model and realistic behavior. Observations in the regular class room setting feed back into the development of the online classes.

  5. Surfactant Adsorption: A Revised Physical Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresler, Marc R.; Hagen, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Many physical chemistry lab courses include an experiment in which students measure surface tension as a function of surfactant concentration. In the traditional experiment, the data are fit to the Gibbs isotherm to determine the molar area for the surfactant, and the critical micelle concentration is used to calculate the Gibbs energy of micelle…

  6. A New Twist on Torque Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, W. Brian

    2014-01-01

    The traditional introductory-level meterstick-balancing lab assumes that students already know what torque is and that they readily identify it as a physical quantity of interest. We propose a modified version of this activity in which students qualitatively and quantitatively measure the amount of force required to keep the meterstick level. The…

  7. Berkeley Lab's Cool Your School Program

    ScienceCinema

    Ivan Berry

    2016-07-12

    Cool Your School is a series of 6th-grade, classroom-based, science activities rooted in Berkeley Lab's cool-surface and cool materials research and aligned with California science content standards. The activities are designed to build knowledge, stimulate curiosity, and carry the conversation about human-induced climate change, and what can be done about it, into the community.

  8. Computer Labs Report to the Holodeck

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2011-01-01

    In many ways, specialized computer labs are the black holes of IT organizations. Budgets, equipment, employees--even space itself--are sucked in. Given a choice, many IT shops would engage warp drive and escape their gravitational pull forever. While Captain Kirk might have looked to Scotty for a fix to the problem, colleges and universities are…

  9. Berkeley Lab's Cool Your School Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan Berry

    2012-07-30

    Cool Your School is a series of 6th-grade, classroom-based, science activities rooted in Berkeley Lab's cool-surface and cool materials research and aligned with California science content standards. The activities are designed to build knowledge, stimulate curiosity, and carry the conversation about human-induced climate change, and what can be done about it, into the community.

  10. Special Report: Hazardous Wastes in Academic Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Howard J.

    1986-01-01

    Topics and issues related to toxic wastes in academic laboratories are addressed, pointing out that colleges/universities are making efforts to dispose of hazardous wastes safely to comply with tougher federal regulations. University sites on the Environmental Protection Agency Superfund National Priorities List, costs, and use of lab packs are…

  11. World's Tallest Barometer, an Educational Lab Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    The barometer has been around since the early 1640's when Italian scientists Berte inadvertently made a water barometer and Torricelli purposely made a mercury barometer. A water barometer has the problem of high vapor pressure, so that it does not maintain a good vacuum above the water column unless continually vacuum pumped. The high density of mercury and its low vapor pressure allows a mercury barometer to be a compact and accurate lab apparatus. The newly being built barometer at Portland State University's Maseeh College of Engineering atrium makes use of doubly distilled synthetic vacuum pump oil as the working fluid. The fluid has a specific gravity of 0.83 and very low vapor pressure. The nominal height of this barometer is expected to be 12.4m. This barometer will be used in the Civil Engineering Fluids Lab as a lab apparatus and the reservoir has the capability of being pressurized or depressurized artificially, so that the fluid column can be manipulated and measured by the lab students. With the placement of the tall barometer in the atrium of the Engineering Building, the barometer will be visible to the public and to touring student groups.

  12. From Computer Lab to Technology Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwood, Sandra

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of integrating technology into elementary school classrooms focuses on teacher training that is based on a three-year plan developed at an elementary school in Marathon, New York. Describes the role of a technology teacher who facilitates technology integration by running the computer lab, offering workshops, and developing inservice…

  13. Medical Lab Technician. Post Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Bruce; And Others

    Intended to provide a model for organizing vocational instructional content, this curriculum guide consists of information pertinent to conducting a postsecondary level course for training medical lab technicians. While the guide is primarily oriented towards the classroom, whether as a primary resource or as a supplement to other teaching…

  14. Pilot Plants Enhance Brazosport Lab Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, James

    1986-01-01

    Describes an experiential lab program for a two-year college's chemical technology program. Discusses student experiences in six miniature pilot plants that represent the essential instrumentation and chemical processes found in the chemical industry. Recognizes the industries that helped implement the program. (TW)

  15. Lab-on a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Helen Cole, the project manager for the Lab-on-a-Chip Applications Development program, and Lisa Monaco, the project scientist for the program, insert a lab on a chip into the Caliper 42 which is specialized equipment that controls processes on commercial chips to support development of lab-on-a-chip applications. The system has special microscopes and imaging systems, so scientists can process and study different types of fluid, chemical, and medical tests conducted on chips. For example, researchers have examined fluorescent bacteria as it flows through the chips' fluid channels or microfluidic capillaries. Researchers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have been studying how the lab-on-a-chip technology can be used for microbial detection, water quality monitoring, and detecting biosignatures of past or present life on Mars. The Marshall Center team is also collaborating with scientists at other NASA centers and at universities to develop custom chip designs for not only space applications, but for many Earth applications, such as for detecting deadly microbes in heating and air systems. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  16. A Natural Selection Lab for Environmental Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiero, Brad; Mackie, Steve

    1997-01-01

    Presents a lab that investigates the evolution of genetic resistance, the importance of genetic variability in the process of adaptation, and the ecological and economic consequences of pesticide use. Allows students to investigate the relationship between population size, genetic variability, and adaptability. Appendices contain the genetic card…

  17. Nonverbal Communication and Writing Lab Tutorials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claywell, Gina

    Writing labs should utilize the knowledge gained from a variety of fields to enhance further their programs, particularly with regard to the study of nonverbal communication. Regardless of the sincerity and importance of the tutor's suggestions, nonverbal messages often are sent to the student which undermine the session. Various channels of…

  18. Ames Lab 101: Single Crystal Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Schlagel, Deborah

    2013-09-27

    Ames Laboratory scientist Deborah Schlagel talks about the Lab's research in growing single crystals of various metals and alloys. The single crystal samples are vital to researchers' understanding of the characteristics of a materials and what gives these materials their particular properties.

  19. A Successful Individualized Writing Lab Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Michael A.

    1993-01-01

    Describes and evaluates the effectiveness of an individualized Writing Lab module, developed to prepare students enrolled in Savannah State College's Developmental Studies English Fundamentals classes for the post-Collegiate Placement Examination. The module uses instructor-authored, computer-assisted instruction to provide immediate feedback on…

  20. A New Take on Student Lab Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazzard, Edmund

    2014-01-01

    The written lab report--a concise and accurate accounting of an experiment, including a summary of the procedure, presentation of the results, reasoned analysis, and thoughtful explanation--is essential to the scientific endeavor and a key expression and product of inquiry. Generally, however, students and teachers dislike these reports, the…

  1. Unconventional lab ideas for Introductory Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Doug

    2001-10-01

    A collection of ideas recently developed for a group of advanced undergraduates in introductory Astronomy courses will be discussed. These ideas represent a departure from more traditional lab topics and include use of the Internet, leading discussions with political overtones, applications to current NASA missions and SETI research.

  2. Gapminder: An AP Human Geography Lab Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    This lesson is designed as a lab assignment for Advanced Placement (AP) Human Geography students wherein they use the popular Gapminder web site to compare levels of development in countries from different world regions. For this lesson, it is important for the teacher to practice with Gapminder before giving the assignment to students. (Contains…

  3. Integrating Language Lab Materials into Advanced Russian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allar, Gregory

    1986-01-01

    Describes the use of language lab materials supplied by the pedagogical journal "Russkij Jazyk Za Rubezom" in an advanced Russian-language class. Each week students were given a relevant picture and vocabulary list prior to listening to a taped story. The story was used as the basis for conversation. (LMO)

  4. Ames Lab 101: Single Crystal Growth

    ScienceCinema

    Schlagel, Deborah

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory scientist Deborah Schlagel talks about the Lab's research in growing single crystals of various metals and alloys. The single crystal samples are vital to researchers' understanding of the characteristics of a materials and what gives these materials their particular properties.

  5. Apples and Arias in the Language Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leamon, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    Describes a French teacher's efforts to substitute interactive video/computer technologies for textbook materials. She designed special language-lab events to introduce eighth graders to the vocabulary of animals, colors, simple adjectives, fruits, flowers, and natural landscapes and to cultural artifacts, such as paintings, arias, poems, and…

  6. Encouraging Creativity in the Science Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyster, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Although science is a creative endeavor (NRC 1996, p. 46), many students think they are not encouraged--or even allowed--to be creative in the laboratory. When students think there is only one correct way to do a lab, their creativity is inhibited. Park and Seung (2008) argue for the importance of creativity in science classrooms and for the…

  7. EPA Mobile Lab Screens Austin Residents Soil

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (April 15, 2015) Scientists from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) used a mobile lab facility to screen soil samples from Austin residences recently. Participants were able to bring soil from their garden or yard and have it as

  8. A "Language Lab" for Architectural Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Arch; And Others

    This paper discusses a "language lab" strategy in which traditional studio learning may be supplemented by language lessons using computer graphics techniques to teach architectural grammar, a body of elements and principles that govern the design of buildings belonging to a particular architectural theory or style. Two methods of…

  9. Technology Rich Biology Labs: Effects of Misconceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuech, Robert; Zogg, Gregory; Zeeman, Stephan; Johnson, Mark

    This paper describes a study conducted on the lab sections of the general biology course for non-science majors at the University of New England, and reports findings of student misconceptions about photosynthesis and the mass/carbon uptake during plant growth. The current study placed high technology analytic tools in the hands of introductory…

  10. How Do New Teachers Choose New Labs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMeo, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Forty-eight new secondary science teachers participated in a study that required a listing, discussion, and application of criteria to rank three chemistry laboratory procedures. The three similar lab procedures involved synthesis of a compound from its elements. The top criteria noted by teachers focused on procedural issues (i.e., timeliness,…

  11. The Hidden Costs of Wireless Computer Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Una

    2005-01-01

    Various elementary schools and middle schools across the U.S. have purchased one or more mobile laboratories. Although the wireless labs have provided more classroom computing, teachers and technology aides still have mixed views about their cost-benefit ratio. This is because the proliferation of viruses and spyware has dramatically increased…

  12. Every Day Is National Lab Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen

    2010-01-01

    President Barack Obama recently issued a call for increased hands-on learning in U.S. schools in an address at the National Academy of Sciences. Obama concluded that the future of the United States depends on one's ability to encourage young people to "create, and build, and invent." In this article, the author discusses National Lab Day (NLD)…

  13. Electronics Lab Instructors' Approaches to Troubleshooting Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2017-01-01

    In this exploratory qualitative study, we describe instructors' self-reported practices for teaching and assessing students' ability to troubleshoot in electronics lab courses. We collected audio data from interviews with 20 electronics instructors from 18 institutions that varied by size, selectivity, and other factors. In addition to describing…

  14. Designing Inquiry-Oriented Science Lab Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Mr. Smith and Ms. D'Amico are two veteran science teachers in a well-performing school district. Both teachers use weekly lab exercises and experiments as formative assessments. In their middle school classrooms, children are engaged and eager to learn. As students walk into Mr. Smith's classroom, a prescribed, step-by-step procedure of the day's…

  15. NASA GeneLab Concept of Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Terri; Gibbs, Kristina; Rask, Jon; Coughlan, Joseph; Smith, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    NASA's GeneLab aims to greatly increase the number of scientists that are using data from space biology investigations on board ISS, emphasizing a systems biology approach to the science. When completed, GeneLab will provide the integrated software and hardware infrastructure, analytical tools and reference datasets for an assortment of model organisms. GeneLab will also provide an environment for scientists to collaborate thereby increasing the possibility for data to be reused for future experimentation. To maximize the value of data from life science experiments performed in space and to make the most advantageous use of the remaining ISS research window, GeneLab will apply an open access approach to conducting spaceflight experiments by generating, and sharing the datasets derived from these biological studies in space.Onboard the ISS, a wide variety of model organisms will be studied and returned to Earth for analysis. Laboratories on the ground will analyze these samples and provide genomic, transcriptomic, metabolomic and proteomic data. Upon receipt, NASA will conduct data quality control tasks and format raw data returned from the omics centers into standardized, annotated information sets that can be readily searched and linked to spaceflight metadata. Once prepared, the biological datasets, as well as any analysis completed, will be made public through the GeneLab Space Bioinformatics System webb as edportal. These efforts will support a collaborative research environment for spaceflight studies that will closely resemble environments created by the Department of Energy (DOE), National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and other institutions in additional areas of study, such as cancer and environmental biology. The results will allow for comparative analyses that will help scientists around the world take a major leap forward in understanding the effect of microgravity, radiation, and other aspects of the space environment on model organisms

  16. Awakening interest in the natural sciences - BASF's Kids' Labs.

    PubMed

    Lang, Cinthia

    2012-01-01

    At BASF's Ludwigshafen headquarters, kids and young adults in grades 1-13 can learn about chemistry in the Kids' Labs. Different programs exist for different levels of knowledge. In the two 'Hands-on Lab H(2)O & Co.' Kids' Labs, students from grades 1-6 explore the secrets of chemistry. BASF Kids' Labs have now been set up in over 30 countries. In Switzerland alone, almost 2,000 students have taken part in the 'Water Loves Chemistry' Kids' Lab since it was started in 2011. In Alsace, 600 students have participated to date. In the Teens' Lab 'Xplore Middle School', middle school students explore five different programs with the themes 'substance labyrinth', 'nutrition', 'coffee, caffeine & co.', 'cosmetics' and 'energy'. Biotechnological methods are the focus of the Teens' Lab 'Xplore Biotech' for students taking basic and advanced biology courses. In the 'Xplore High School' Teens' Lab, chemistry teachers present their own experimental lab instruction for students in basic and advanced chemistry courses. The Virtual Lab has been expanding the offerings of the BASF Kids' Labs since 2011. The online lab was developed by the company for the International Year Of Chemistry and gives kids and young adults the opportunity to do interactive experiments outside of the lab.

  17. The Portable Usability Testing Lab: A Flexible Research Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Michael E.; And Others

    A group of faculty at the University of Georgia obtained funding for a research and development facility called the Learning and Performance Support Laboratory (LPSL). One of the LPSL's primary needs was obtaining a portable usability lab for software testing, so the facility obtained the "Luggage Lab 2000." The lab is transportable to…

  18. Student Plagiarism and Faculty Responsibility in Undergraduate Engineering Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parameswaran, Ashvin; Devi, Poornima

    2006-01-01

    In undergraduate engineering labs, lab reports are routinely copied. By ignoring this form of plagiarism, teaching assistants and lab technicians neglect their role responsibility. By designing courses that facilitate it, however inadvertently, professors neglect their causal responsibility. Using the case of one university, we show via interviews…

  19. Effectiveness of a Lab Manual Delivered on CD-ROM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brickman, Peggy; Ketter, Catherine A. Teare; Pereira, Monica

    2005-01-01

    Although electronic instructional media are becoming increasingly prevalent in science classrooms, their worth remains unproven. Here, student perceptions and performance using CD-ROM delivery of lab materials are assessed. Numerous learning barriers that produced lower lab grades for students using a CD-ROM lab manual in comparison to a print…

  20. Behind the Scenes at Berkeley Lab - The Mechanical Fabrication Facility

    ScienceCinema

    Wells, Russell; Chavez, Pete; Davis, Curtis; Bentley, Brian

    2016-07-12

    Part of the Behind the Scenes series at Berkeley Lab, this video highlights the lab's mechanical fabrication facility and its exceptional ability to produce unique tools essential to the lab's scientific mission. Through a combination of skilled craftsmanship and precision equipment, machinists and engineers work with scientists to create exactly what's needed - whether it's measured in microns or meters.

  1. Revising Geology Labs To Explicitly Use the Scientific Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannula, Kimberly A.

    2003-01-01

    Proposes that content- or skill-based labs can be revised to explicitly involve the scientific method by asking students to propose hypotheses before making observations. Students' self-assessment showed they felt that they learned a great deal from this style of labs and found the labs to be fun; however, students felt that they learned little…

  2. Lab-on-a-Chip Multiplex Assays.

    PubMed

    Peter, Harald; Wienke, Julia; Bier, Frank F

    2017-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip multiplex assays allow a rapid identification of multiple parameters in an automated manner. Here we describe a lab-based preparation followed by a rapid and fully automated DNA microarray hybridization and readout in less than 10 min using the Fraunhofer in vitro diagnostics (ivD) platform to enable rapid identification of bacterial species and detection of antibiotic resistance. The use of DNA microarrays allows a fast adaptation of new biomarkers enabling the identification of different genes as well as single-nucleotide-polymorphisms (SNPs) within these genes. In this protocol we describe a DNA microarray developed for identification of Staphylococcus aureus and the mecA resistance gene.

  3. Expert system for scheduling simulation lab sessions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, Chet

    1990-01-01

    Implementation and results of an expert system used for scheduling session requests for the Systems Engineering Simulator (SES) laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) are discussed. Weekly session requests are received from astronaut crew trainers, procedures developers, engineering assessment personnel, software developers, and various others who wish to access the computers, scene generators, and other simulation equipment available to them in the SES lab. The expert system under discussion is comprised of a data acquisition portion - two Pascal programs run on a personal computer - and a CLIPS program installed on a minicomputer. A brief introduction to the SES lab and its scheduling background is given. A general overview of the system is provided, followed by a detailed description of the constraint-reduction process and of the scheduler itself. Results from a ten-week trial period using this approach are discussed. Finally, a summary of the expert system's strengths and shortcomings are provided.

  4. Jefferson Lab Data Acquisition Run Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Vardan Gyurjyan; Carl Timmer; David Abbott; William Heyes; Edward Jastrzembski; David Lawrence; Elliott Wolin

    2004-10-01

    A general overview of the Jefferson Lab data acquisition run control system is presented. This run control system is designed to operate the configuration, control, and monitoring of all Jefferson Lab experiments. It controls data-taking activities by coordinating the operation of DAQ sub-systems, online software components and third-party software such as external slow control systems. The main, unique feature which sets this system apart from conventional systems is its incorporation of intelligent agent concepts. Intelligent agents are autonomous programs which interact with each other through certain protocols on a peer-to-peer level. In this case, the protocols and standards used come from the domain-independent Foundation for Intelligent Physical Agents (FIPA), and the implementation used is the Java Agent Development Framework (JADE). A lightweight, XML/RDF-based language was developed to standardize the description of the run control system for configuration purposes.

  5. The U.S. Lab is rotated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Laboratory Destiny is about to undergo rotation in its workstand. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research.

  6. The U.S. Lab is rotated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker checks the U.S. Laboratory Destiny as it rotates. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research.

  7. The U.S. Lab is rotated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, a worker controls the rotation of the U.S. Laboratory Destiny. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research.

  8. Commerce Lab: Mission analysis. Payload integration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives of the commerce lab mission analysis and payload integration study are discussed. A mission model which accommodates commercial users and provides a basic data base for future mission planning is described. The data bases developed under this study include: (1) user requirements; (2) apparatus capabilities and availabilities; and (3) carrier capabilities. These data bases are synthesized in a trades and analysis phase along with the STS flight opportunities. Optimum missions are identified.

  9. Jefferson Lab Science: Present and Future

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Robert D.

    2015-02-12

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. Furthermore, this facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  10. Overview of Nuclear Physics at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, Robert D.

    2013-08-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. This facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  11. Setting new sights for standards lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2008-03-01

    It may be best known as the home of the world's first atomic clock, which led to a new definition of the second. But the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), which develops and maintains the country's measurement standards, was in fact founded in 1900 to promote links between science and commerce. That tradition, which saw staff at the lab also inventing radar, early computers and modern network packet switching, is something that John Pethica - NPL's new chief scientist - is keen to build on.

  12. Berkeley's Advanced Labs for Undergraduate Astronomy Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiles, C.

    1998-12-01

    We currently offer three advanced laboratory courses for undergraduate majors: optical, IR, and radio. These courses contain both intellectual and practical content; in this talk we focus on the radio lab as a representative example. The first half of the semester concentrates on fundamentals of microwave electronics and radio astronomy techniques in four formal laboratory exercises which emphasize hands-on use of microwave devices, laboratory instruments, and computer-controlled data taking. The second half of the course emphasizes astronomy, using a horn with ~ 1 m(2) aperture to map the HI in the Galaxy and a two-element interferometer composed of ~ 1 m diameter dishes on a ~ 10 m baseline to measure accurate positions of radio sources and accurate diameters for the Sun and Moon. These experiments and observations offer ideal opportunities for teaching coordinates, time, rotation matrices, data reduction techniques, least squares, signal processing, image processing, Fourier transforms, and laboratory and astronomical instrumentation. The students can't get along without using computers as actually used by astronomers. We stay away from packaged software such as IRAF, which are ``black boxes''; rather, students learn far more by writing their own software, usually for the first time. They use the IDL language to take and reduce data and prepare them for the lab reports. We insist on quality reports---including tables, postscript graphs and images, correct grammar, spelling, and all the rest---and we strongly urge (successfully!) the students to use LATEX. The other two lab courses have the same emphasis: the guiding spirit is to place the students in a real-life research-like situation. There is too much to do, so students perform the work in small groups of 3 or 4 and groups are encouraged to share their knowledge. Lab reports are written individually. These courses are very demanding, requiring an average of 20 hours per week from the students (and probably

  13. Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences: Accelerating Scientific Discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, John A

    2008-12-12

    Scientists today rely on advances in computer science, mathematics, and computational science, as well as large-scale computing and networking facilities, to increase our understanding of ourselves, our planet, and our universe. Berkeley Lab's Computing Sciences organization researches, develops, and deploys new tools and technologies to meet these needs and to advance research in such areas as global climate change, combustion, fusion energy, nanotechnology, biology, and astrophysics.

  14. Scaled-Up Nonequilibrium Air Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    electrode pairs will be tested to increase the plasma volume. In addition, thermionic cathodes (LaCrO3, LaB6) will be examined to enhance the electron...measure the cathode fall in the glow discharge regime. Current density, electric field strength and other important plasma parameters will be...thermal nonequilibrium, and together with electrical discharge characteristics, estimating the electron density and reduced electric field strength (E/N

  15. Nonlocal Boltzmann theory of plasma channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, S. S.; Melendez, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The mathematical framework for the Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL) code NUTS is developed. This code is designed to study the evolution of an electron beam generated plasma channel at all pressures. The Boltzmann treatment of the secondary electrons presented include all inertial, nonlocal, electric and magnetic effects, as well as effects of atomic collisions. Field equations are advanced simultaneously and self-consistently with the evolving plasma currents.

  16. The NASA Langley Isolator Dynamics Research Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Troy F.; Balla, Robert J.; Baurle, Robert A.; Humphreys, William M.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2010-01-01

    The Isolator Dynamics Research Lab (IDRL) is under construction at the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. A unique test apparatus is being fabricated to support both wall and in-stream measurements for investigating the internal flow of a dual-mode scramjet isolator model. The test section is 24 inches long with a 1-inch by 2-inch cross sectional area and is supplied with unheated, dry air through a Mach 2.5 converging-diverging nozzle. The test section is being fabricated with two sets (glass and metallic) of interchangeable sidewalls to support flow visualization and laser-based measurement techniques as well as static pressure, wall temperature, and high frequency pressure measurements. During 2010, a CFD code validation experiment will be conducted in the lab in support of NASA s Fundamental Aerodynamics Program. This paper describes the mechanical design of the Isolator Dynamics Research Lab test apparatus and presents a summary of the measurement techniques planned for investigating the internal flow field of a scramjet isolator model.

  17. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-12-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an alternative or supplement to these traditional hands-on labs. However, physics professors may be very hesitant to give up the hands-on labs, which have been such a central part of their courses, for a more cost and time-saving virtual alternative. Thus, it is important to investigate how the learning from these virtual experiences compares to that acquired through a hands-on experience. This study evaluated a comprehensive set of virtual labs for introductory level college physics courses and compared them to a hands-on physics lab experience. Each of the virtual labs contains everything a student needs to conduct a physics laboratory experiment, including: objectives, background theory, 3D simulation, brief video, data collection tools, pre- and postlab questions, and postlab quiz. This research was conducted with 224 students from two large universities and investigated the learning that occurred with students using the virtual labs either in a lab setting or as a supplement to hands-on labs versus a control group of students using the traditional hands-on labs only. Findings from both university settings showed the virtual labs to be as effective as the traditional hands-on physics labs.

  18. E-Labs - Learning with Authentic Data

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, Marjorie G.; Wayne, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    the success teachers have had providing an opportunity for students to: • Organize and conduct authentic research. • Experience the environment of scientific collaborations. • Possibly make real contributions to a burgeoning scientific field. We've created projects that are problem-based, student driven and technology dependent. Students reach beyond classroom walls to explore data with other students and experts and share results, publishing original work to a worldwide audience. Students can discover and extend the research of other students, modeling the processes of modern, large-scale research projects. From start to finish e-Labs are student-led, teacher-guided projects. Students need only a Web browser to access computing techniques employed by professional researchers. A Project Map with milestones allows students to set the research plan rather than follow a step-by-step process common in other online projects. Most importantly, e-Labs build the learning experience around the students' own questions and let them use the very tools that scientists use. Students contribute to and access shared data, most derived from professional research databases. They use common analysis tools, store their work and use metadata to discover, replicate and confirm the research of others. This is where real scientific collaboration begins. Using online tools, students correspond with other research groups, post comments and questions, prepare summary reports, and in general participate in the part of scientific research that is often left out of classroom experiments. Teaching tools such as student and teacher logbooks, pre- and post-tests and an assessment rubric aligned with learner outcomes help teachers guide student work. Constraints on interface designs and administrative tools such as registration databases give teachers the "one-stop-shopping" they seek for multiple e-Labs. Teaching and administrative tools also allow us to track usage and assess the impact on

  19. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Foster, J.S. Jr.

    1958-03-11

    This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

  20. Microbes to Biomes at Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-28

    Microbes are the Earth's most abundant and diverse form of life. Berkeley Lab's Microbes to Biomes initiative -- which will take advantage of research expertise at the Joint Genome Institute, Advanced Light Source, Molecular Foundry, and the new computational science facility -- is designed to explore and reveal the interactions of microbes with one another and with their environment. Microbes power our planet’s biogeochemical cycles, provide nutrients to our plants, purify our water and are integral components in keeping the human body free of disease and may hold the key to the Earth’s future.

  1. Quark Hadron Duality - Recent Jefferson Lab Results

    SciTech Connect

    Niculescu, Maria Ioana

    2016-08-01

    The duality between the partonic and hadronic descriptions of electron--nucleon scattering is a remarkable feature of nuclear interactions. When averaged over appropriate energy intervals the cross section at low energy which is dominated by nucleon resonances resembles the smooth behavior expected from perturbative QCD. Recent Jefferson Lab results indicate that quark-hadron duality is present in a variety of observables, not just the proton F2 structure function. An overview of recent results, especially local quark-hadron duality on the neutron, are presented here.

  2. DOSAR/CalLab Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Bogard, J.S.

    2000-03-01

    The Life Sciences Division (LSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long record of radiation dosimetry research, primarily using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and the Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Program Calibration Laboratory (CalLab), referred to formerly as the Radiation Calibration Laboratory. These facilities have been used by a broad segment of the research community to perform a variety of experiments in areas including, but not limited to, radiobiology, radiation dosimeter and instrumentation development and calibration, and the testing of materials in a variety of radiation environments.

  3. Painless dental laser - Keith Murry in lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    NASA inventor Keith Murray checks out laser technology that promises to make painless dental lasers affordable for dentists and their patients. Developed at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va., the dual-wavelength laser can be electronically switched between the two laser frequencies important to dentists. Co-inventors of the technology are Murray, Norman Barnes, also of Langley, and Ralph Hutcheson of Scientific Materials Corp., Bozeman, Montana. The technology was originally developed for studies of atmospheric wind change. Photographed in building 1202, laser lab.

  4. Phoenix Carries Soil to Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the lander's Robotic Arm scoop positioned over the Wet Chemistry Lab delivery funnel on Sol 29, the 29th Martian day after landing, or June 24, 2008. The soil will be delivered to the instrument on Sol 30.

    This image has been enhanced to brighten the scene.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. Microbes to Biomes at Berkeley Lab

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Microbes are the Earth's most abundant and diverse form of life. Berkeley Lab's Microbes to Biomes initiative -- which will take advantage of research expertise at the Joint Genome Institute, Advanced Light Source, Molecular Foundry, and the new computational science facility -- is designed to explore and reveal the interactions of microbes with one another and with their environment. Microbes power our planet’s biogeochemical cycles, provide nutrients to our plants, purify our water and are integral components in keeping the human body free of disease and may hold the key to the Earth’s future.

  6. Physiology Lab Demonstration: Glomerular Filtration Rate in a Rat.

    PubMed

    Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Jespersen, Brian; Shade, Robert

    2015-07-26

    Measurements of glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and the fractional excretion of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) are critical in assessing renal function in health and disease. GFR is measured as the steady state renal clearance of inulin which is filtered at the glomerulus, but not secreted or reabsorbed along the nephron. The fractional excretion of Na and K can be determined from the concentration of Na and K in plasma and urine. The renal clearance of inulin can be demonstrated in an anesthetized animal which has catheters in the femoral artery, femoral vein and bladder. The equipment and supplies used for this procedure are those commonly available in a research core facility, and thus makes this procedure a practical means for measuring renal function. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate the procedures required to perform a lab demonstration in which renal function is assessed before and after a diuretic drug. The presented technique can be utilized to assess renal function in rat models of renal disease.

  7. Coupling between electron plasma waves in laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, M. J.; Lal, A.; Clayton, C. E.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.; Johnston, T. W.

    1996-05-01

    A Lagrangian fluid model (cold plasma, fixed ions) is developed for analyzing the coupling between electron plasma waves. This model shows that a small wave number electron plasma wave (ω2,k2) will strongly affect a large wave number electron plasma wave (ω1,k1), transferring its energy into daughter waves or sidebands at (ω1+nω2,k1+nk2) in the lab frame. The accuracy of the model is checked via particle-in-cell simulations, which confirm that the energy in the mode at (ω1,k1) can be completely transferred to the sidebands at (ω1+nω2,k1+nk2) by the presence of the electron plasma mode at (ω2,k2). Conclusive experimental evidence for the generation of daughter waves via this coupling is then presented using time- and wave number-resolved spectra of the light from a probe laser coherently Thomson scattered by the electron plasma waves generated by the interaction of a two-frequency CO2 laser with a plasma.

  8. The Mysterious Death: An HPLC Lab Experiment. An Undergraduate Forensic Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beussman, Douglas J.

    2007-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) laboratory experiment based on the separation of four prescription drugs (disopyramide, lidocaine, procainamide, and quinidine) is presented. The experiment is set within the forensic science context of the discovery of a patient's mysterious death where a drug overdose is suspected. Each lab group…

  9. WetLab-2: Wet Lab RNA SmartCycler Providing PCR Capability on ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, Macarena; Schonfeld, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The WetLab-2 system will provide sample preparation and qRT-PCR analysis on-board the ISS, a capability to enable using the ISS as a real laboratory. The system will be validated on SpX-7, and is planned for its first PI use on SpX-9.

  10. The Design of NetSecLab: A Small Competition-Based Network Security Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, C. P.; Uluagac, A. S.; Fairbanks, K. D.; Copeland, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a competition-style of exercise to teach system and network security and to reinforce themes taught in class. The exercise, called NetSecLab, is conducted on a closed network with student-formed teams, each with their own Linux system to defend and from which to launch attacks. Students are expected to learn how to: 1) install…

  11. OpenLabNotes--An Electronic Laboratory Notebook Extension for OpenLabFramework.

    PubMed

    List, Markus; Franz, Michael; Tan, Qihua; Mollenhauer, Jan; Baumbach, Jan

    2015-10-06

    Electronic laboratory notebooks (ELNs) are more accessible and reliable than their paper based alternatives and thus find widespread adoption. While a large number of commercial products is available, small- to mid-sized laboratories can often not afford the costs or are concerned about the longevity of the providers. Turning towards free alternatives, however, raises questions about data protection, which are not sufficiently addressed by available solutions. To serve as legal documents, ELNs must prevent scientific fraud through technical means such as digital signatures. It would also be advantageous if an ELN was integrated with a laboratory information management system to allow for a comprehensive documentation of experimental work including the location of samples that were used in a particular experiment. Here, we present OpenLabNotes, which adds state-of-the-art ELN capabilities to OpenLabFramework, a powerful and flexible laboratory information management system. In contrast to comparable solutions, it allows to protect the intellectual property of its users by offering data protection with digital signatures. OpenLabNotes effectively closes the gap between research documentation and sample management, thus making Open-LabFramework more attractive for laboratories that seek to increase productivity through electronic data management.

  12. MarsLab: A HEDS Lander Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, M. H.; McKay, C.; Connolly, J.

    2000-01-01

    Recognizing that the human exploration of Mars will be a science-focused enterprise, the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) program set out three years ago to develop a mix of science and technology Lander payloads as a first step toward a human mission. With three experiments ready for flight and four more in development, the HEDS Mars program has the capability to stage missions with considerable impact. This presentation describes one such mission design by no means unique. Ambitious in scope, it encompasses elements of all seven HEDS payloads in a configuration with a uniquely HEDS character. Pragmatically, a subset of these elements could be selected for existing small Lander platforms. Bristling with scientific experiments, technology demonstrations, and outreach elements, MarsLab represents a prototype of a manned science station or scientific outpost. A cartoon overview of MarsLab defines its major elements, explained more fully in the sections that follow. The concept is endorsed by PI's of the various HEDS payloads, details of which are presented elsewhere at this workshop.

  13. A Bernoulli's Law Lab in a Bottle:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Guerra; Plaisted, Aaron; Smith, Michael

    2004-03-01

    Bernoulli's law is a fundamental relationship in fluid dynamics, which is covered in most introductory physics classes. The concept is used to explain many important phenomena from fluid flow in pipes to aircraft flight. In an effort to help demonstrate the way in which Bernoulli's law is often applied in fluid dynamics, we have developed a laboratory exercise that employs a common physics lab motion sensor to measure the time it takes water to drain out of an inverted plastic seltzer bottle. Using a series of bottle caps with different sized holes drilled in them, students can easily measure the drain time for systems with different parameters. With the simple data analysis capabilities provided with the sensor students can attain good agreement between experiment and theory. This simple lab gives students an example of how Bernoulli's equation, the continuity equation (conservation of mass), and a few fundamental equations of kinematics can be combined to predict the behavior of a fluid dynamic system. In addition, a closer look at the data also provides an opportunity to discuss some of the subtleties of the system.

  14. PC/104 Embedded IOCs at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jianxun Yan, Trent Allison, Sue Witherspoon, Anthony Cuffe

    2009-10-01

    Jefferson Lab has developed embedded IOCs based on PC/104 single board computers (SBC) for low level control systems. The PC/104 IOCs run EPICS on top of the RTEMS operating system. Two types of control system configurations are used in different applications, PC/104 SBC with commercial PC/104 I/O cards and PC/104 SBC with custom designed FPGA-based boards. RTEMS was built with CEXP shell to run on the PC/104 SBC. CEXP shell provides the function of dynamic object loading, which is similar to the widely used VxWorks operating system. Standard software configurations were setup for PC/104 IOC application development to provide a familiar format for new projects as well as ease the conversion of applications from VME based IOCs to PC/104 IOCs. Many new projects at Jefferson Lab are going to employ PC/104 SBCs as IOCs and some applications have already been running them for accelerator operations. The PC/104 - RTEMS IOC provides a free open source Real-Time Operating System (RTOS), low cost/maintenance, easily installed/ configured, flexible, and reliable solution for accelerator control and 12GeV Upgrade projects.

  15. On my association with Bell Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondhi, M. Mohan

    2001-05-01

    I joined the Acoustics Research department at Bell Labs in 1962, just eight days before AT&T launched the first communications satellite, Telstar. During the 39 years between 1962 and my retirement in 2001, I worked on several problems related in one way or another to the processing of speech signals. Schroeder and Flanagan are presenting talks from a broad perspective in this session, so I will confine this talk to just my own contributions and collaborations for some of the topics on which I worked, e.g., echo cancellation, inverse problems in acoustics, speech analysis, synthesis, and recognition. I will tell you about one of these contributions that fortunately turned out to yield considerable profits to AT&T. To give you a flavor of the spirit of free inquiry at Bell Labs during that period, I will tell you about the contribution that I am most proud of (which was supported for several years even though it had no monetary value). And I will also mention the contribution that is most often cited of all my papers (which was in collaboration with two mathematicians, and had nothing at all to do with acoustics).

  16. Applied plasma physics at Marquette University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tharp, T. D.

    2016-10-01

    A new applied plasma physics laboratory is currently under construction at Marquette University. With emphases on both physics and engineering, our lab seeks to give undergraduates an opportunity to contribute to world-class research. Initially, our work will focus on the development of non-neutral plasma diagnostics for use on the ALPHA antimatter experiment at CERN. As our effort grows, we will also be seeking collaborative opportunities to involve students in industry and the quasineutral plasma research community. A description of planned research activities will be presented.

  17. Diamond Research Overview and a Model for Lab Experiments Using Oxyacetylene Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Rustum

    1996-01-01

    High pressure synthetic diamonds have now been a commercial product for over 40 years. Russian scientists invented the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process 30 years ago, while the Japanese followed 10 years later and the U.S. was introduced to it 10 years after that. The new syntheses focus is on liquid and solid phase approaches. There are three CVD processes: microwave plasma, hot filament, and oxy-acetylene torch. The oxy-acetylene torch is an excellent materials synthesis lab experiment, emphasizing the simplicity of the science.

  18. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. BEVATRON SHIELDING - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  19. The interventional cardiologist as cath lab team leader.

    PubMed

    Blankenship, James C; Feldman, Barry; Ranaweera, Priyantha; Dent, John; Huang, Xiaoyan; Singer, Sara

    2015-06-01

    Interventional cardiologists act as leaders every time they step into a catheterization laboratory (cath lab), but leadership training is rarely included in cardiology training programs. Cath lab physicians should cultivate and practice effective leadership skills. Specifically, (1) before each procedure assess whether the cath lab team is prepared; (2) delegate authority to trainees and team members when appropriate; (3) use every procedure to improve the performance of team members through teaching, coaching, and mentorship; (4) debrief the team after adverse events; (5) develop the traits, styles, and skills associated with successful leadership; and (6) provide team training for the cath lab team.

  20. Stream piracy in the Black Hills: A geomorphology lab exercise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaprowski, B.J.; Evenson, E.B.; Epstein, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    The Black Hills of South Dakota exhibits many fine examples of stream piracy that are very suitable for teaching geomorphology lab exercises. This lab goes beyond standard topographic map interpretation by using geologic maps, well logs, gravel provenance and other types of data to teach students about stream piracy. Using a step-by-step method in which the lab exercises ramp up in difficulty, students hone their skills in deductive reasoning and data assimilation. The first exercises deal with the identification of stream piracy at a variety of spatial scales and the lab culminates with an exercise on landscape evolution and drainage rearrangement.

  1. The History of Science and Technology at Bell Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, David

    2008-03-01

    Over the last 80 years, Bell Labs has been one of the most scientifically and technologically productive research labs in the world. Inventions such as the transistor, laser, cell phone, solar cell, negative feedback amplifier, communications satellite and many others were made there. Scientific breakthroughs such as discovery of the Big Bang, the wave nature of the electron, electron localization and the fractional quantum hall effect were also made there making Bell Labs almost unique in terms of large impacts in both science and technology. In my talk, I will discuss the history of the lab, talk about the present and give some suggestions for how I see it evolving into the future.

  2. Collaborative Environments to Support Professional Communities: A Living Lab Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffers, Hans; Budweg, Steffen; Ruland, Rudolf; Kristensen, Kjetil

    The living labs approach within ECOSPACE focuses on early user community building and active user involvement in the process of developing, testing and evaluating new collaboration concepts and tools. This paper reports about implementing and evaluating the living labs approach to facilitate innovation in collaborative work environments to enhance professional communities. The living lab approach is considered as a strategy for innovation, change and adoption. The perspective of socio-technical systems is used to understand and explain the change-catalyzing role of the living lab approach.

  3. EPICS Channel Access Server for LabVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, Alexander P.

    2016-10-01

    It can be challenging to interface National Instruments LabVIEW (http://www.ni.com/labview/) with EPICS (http://www.aps.anl.gov/epics/). Such interface is required when an instrument control program was developed in LabVIEW but it also has to be part of global control system. This is frequently useful in big accelerator facilities. The Channel Access Server is written in LabVIEW, so it works on any hardware/software platform where LabVIEW is available. It provides full server functionality, so any EPICS client can communicate with it.

  4. EarthLabs Meet Sister Corita Kent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quartini, E.; Ellins, K. K.; Cavitte, M. G.; Thirumalai, K.; Ledley, T. S.; Haddad, N.; Lynds, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthLabs project provides a framework to enhance high school students' climate literacy and awareness of climate change. The project provides climate science curriculum and teacher professional development, followed by research on students' learning as teachers implement EarthLabs climate modules in the classroom. The professional development targets high school teachers whose professional growth is structured around exposure to current climate science research, data observation collection and analysis. During summer workshops in Texas and Mississippi, teachers work through the laboratories, experiments, and hand-on activities developed for their students. In summer 2013, three graduate students from the University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics with expertise in climate science participated in two weeklong workshops. The graduate students partnered with exemplary teacher leaders to provide scientific content and lead the EarthLabs learning activities. As an experiment, we integrated a visit to the Blanton Museum and an associated activity in order to motivate participants to think creatively, as well as analytically, about science. This exercise was inspired by the work and educational philosophy of Sister Corita Kent. During the visit to the Blanton Museum, we steered participants towards specific works of art pre-selected to emphasize aspects of the climate of Texas and to draw participants' attention to ways in which artists convey different concepts. For example, artists use of color, lines, and symbols conjure emotional responses to imagery in the viewer. The second part of the exercise asked participants to choose a climate message and to convey this through a collage. We encouraged participants to combine their experience at the museum with examples of Sister Corita Kent's artwork. We gave them simple guidelines for the project based on techniques and teaching of Sister Corita Kent. Evaluation results reveal that participants enjoyed the

  5. Extreme-temperature lab on a chip for optogalvanic spectroscopy of ultra small samples - key components and a first integration attempt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, Martin; Khaji, Zahra; Klintberg, Lena; Persson, Anders; Sturesson, Peter; Söderberg Breivik, Johan; Thornell, Greger

    2016-10-01

    This is a short summary of the authors’ recent R&D on valves, combustors, plasma sources, and pressure and temperature sensors, realized in high-temperature co-fired ceramics, and an account for the first attempt to monolithically integrate them to form a lab on a chip for sample administration, preparation and analysis, as a stage in optogalvanic spectroscopy.

  6. Nucleon Form Factors - A Jefferson Lab Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    John Arrington, Kees de Jager, Charles F. Perdrisat

    2011-06-01

    The charge and magnetization distributions of the proton and neutron are encoded in their elastic electromagnetic form factors, which can be measured in elastic electron--nucleon scattering. By measuring the form factors, we probe the spatial distribution of the proton charge and magnetization, providing the most direct connection to the spatial distribution of quarks inside the proton. For decades, the form factors were probed through measurements of unpolarized elastic electron scattering, but by the 1980s, progress slowed dramatically due to the intrinsic limitations of the unpolarized measurements. Early measurements at several laboratories demonstrated the feasibility and power of measurements using polarization degrees of freedom to probe the spatial structure of the nucleon. A program of polarization measurements at Jefferson Lab led to a renaissance in the field of study, and significant new insight into the structure of matter.

  7. Characterization of Tri-lab Tantalum Plate.

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, Thomas E.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Deibler, Lisa Anne; Chen, Shu-Rong; Michael, Joseph R.

    2014-09-01

    This report provides a detailed characterization Tri-lab Tantalum (Ta) plate jointly purchased from HCStark Inc. by Sandia, Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Data in this report was compiled from series of material and properties characterization experiments carried out at Sandia (SNL) and Los Alamos (LANL) Laboratories through a leveraged effort funded by the C2 campaign. Results include microstructure characterization detailing the crystallographic texture of the material and an increase in grain size near the end of the rolled plate. Mechanical properties evaluations include, compression cylinder, sub-scale tension specimen, micohardness and instrumented indentation testing. The plate was found to have vastly superior uniformity when compare with previously characterized wrought Ta material. Small but measurable variations in microstructure and properties were noted at the end, and at the top and bottom edges of the plate.

  8. Wuenscher Examines Sky lab Experiment Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Hans F. Wuenscher, assistant director for Advanced Space Projects Engineering Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), examined the facility to be used by Skylab astronauts in performing a number of experiments in material science and manufacturing in space. The equipment shown here is a duplicate of the M512 Experiment hardware flown in the Multiple Docking Adapter section of the Sky lab. This equipment, itself an experiment, was be used for conducting 5 other experiments in the round vacuum chamber. Inside was a cavity which held the M518 Multipurpose Electric Furnace, a facility which was used for conducting other experiments. In all, a total of 17 experiments were conducted using this facility and furnace.

  9. Smartphones as portable oscilloscopes for physics labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forinash, Kyle; Wisman, Raymond F.

    2012-04-01

    Given that today's smartphones are mobile and have more computing power and means to measure the external world than early PCs, they may also revolutionize data collection, both in structured physics laboratory settings and in less predictable situations, outside the classroom. Several examples using the internal sensors available in a smartphone were presented in earlier papers in this column.1, 2 But data collection is not limited only to the phone's internal sensors since most also have a headphone port for connecting an external microphone and speakers. This port can be used to connect to external equipment in much the same way as the game port on the early Apple II was used in school labs. Below is an illustration using the headphone port to receive data from an external circuit: smartphones as a portable oscilloscope using commercially available hardware and applications.

  10. Making the Case for Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Franz

    2011-05-01

    This chapter is a personal account of the initial planning and competition for a new laboratory, which eventually became known as the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, with the official nickname "Jefferson Lab." The period covered starts as far back as 1964, with the introduction of quarks, and extends up to the late 1980s after the initial team was assembled, the superconducting design was in place, and construction was well underway. I describe some of the major experiments that were proposed to justify the laboratory, reflect on the present status of those initially proposed experiments, and very briefly outline some of the new ideas that emerged after the laboratory was constructed. The science is presented in a simple manner intended for a lay audience, with some of the ideas illustrated by cartoons that were often used in popular lectures given during this period.

  11. Toward Better Physics Labs for Future Biologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannini, John; Moore, Kim; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a set of laboratories and hands on activities to accompany a new two-semester interdisciplinary physics course that has been successfully developed and tested in two small test classes of students at the University of Maryland, College Park (UMD) in 2012-2013, and is currently being used on a wider scale. We have designed the laboratories to be taken accompanying a reformed course in the student's second year, with calculus, biology, and chemistry as prerequisites. This permits the laboratories to include significant content on physics relevant to cellular scales, from chemical interactions to random motion and charge screening in fluids. One major focus of the laboratories is to introduce the students to research-grade equipment and modern physics analysis tools in contexts relevant to biology, while maintaining the pedagogically valuable open-ended laboratory structure of reformed laboratories. Lab development procedures along with some preliminary student results from these two small test classes are discussed.

  12. Nucleon spin structure at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Angela Biselli

    2011-10-01

    In the past decade an extensive experimental program to measure the spin structure of the nucleon has been carried out in the three halls at Jefferson Lab. Using a longitudinally polarized beam scattering off longitudinally or transversely polarized 3He, NH3 and ND3 targets, the double spin asymmetries A|| and A[perpendicular] were measured, providing data of impressively high precision that gives a better understanding of the structure of the nucleon in the deep inelastic scattering and the valence quarks regions. The virtual photon asymmetries A1,2 and polarized structure functions g1,2 were also extracted for the proton, neutron and deuteron over large kinematic ranges, allowing the extraction of first moments and the testing of sum rules and duality.

  13. Making the Case for Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, Franz

    2011-06-01

    This chapter is a personal account of the initial planning and competition for a new laboratory, which eventually became known as the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, with the official nickname "Jefferson Lab." The period covered starts as far back as 1964, with the introduction of quarks, and extends up to the late 1980s after the initial team was assembled, the superconducting design was in place, and construction was well underway. I describe some of the major experiments that were proposed to justify the laboratory, reflect on the present status of those initially proposed experiments, and very briefly outline some of the new ideas that emerged after the laboratory was constructed. The science is presented in a simple manner intended for a lay audience, with some of the ideas illustrated by cartoons that were often used in popular lectures given during this period.

  14. Transversity and SIDIS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jen-Chieh Peng; Jian-Ping Chen; Xiaodong Jiang; Lingyan Zhu

    2005-02-01

    Remarkable progress in the study of spin-dependent structure functions has been made since the discovery of the ''proton spin puzzle'' in the late 1980's. Very active spin-physics programs have been pursued at many facilities including SLAC, CERN, HERA, JLab, and RHIC. In recent years, new experimental tools such as semi-inclusive polarized DIS, polarized proton-proton collision, and deeply exclusive reactions have been employed to address various aspects of the proton spin. In this paper, we present the plans at the Jefferson Lab to use the semi-inclusive DIS (SIDIS) reactions to measure various unpolarized and polarized nucleon parton distribution and fragmentation functions. In addition, the prospect of probing the flavor structure of the kaon fragmentation function is discussed.

  15. The Jefferson Lab frozen spin target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, C. D.; Brock, J.; Carlin, C.; Comer, S. A.; Kashy, D.; McAndrew, J.; Meekins, D. G.; Pasyuk, E.; Pierce, J. J.; Seely, M. L.

    2012-08-01

    A frozen spin polarized target, constructed at Jefferson Lab for use inside a large acceptance spectrometer, is described. The target has been utilized for photoproduction measurements with polarized tagged photons of both longitudinal and circular polarization. Protons in TEMPO-doped butanol were dynamically polarized to approximately 90% outside the spectrometer at 5 T and 200-300 mK. Photoproduction data were acquired with the target inside the spectrometer at a frozen-spin temperature of approximately 30 mK with the polarization maintained by a thin, superconducting coil installed inside the target cryostat. A 0.56 T solenoid was used for longitudinal target polarization and a 0.50 T dipole for transverse polarization. Spin-lattice relaxation times as high as 4000 h were observed. We also report polarization results for deuterated propanediol doped with the trityl radical OX063.

  16. The SPARC_LAB Thomson source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccarezza, C.; Alesini, D.; Anania, M. P.; Bacci, A.; Biagioni, A.; Bisesto, F.; Bellaveglia, M.; Cardarelli, P.; Cardelli, F.; Cianchi, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Croia, M.; Curcio, A.; Delogu, P.; Giovenale, D. Di; Domenico, G. Di; Pirro, G. Di; Drebot, I.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Gallo, A.; Galletti, M.; Gambaccini, M.; Giribono, A.; Golosio, B.; Li, W.; Mostacci, A.; Oliva, P.; Palmer, D.; Petrillo, V.; Petrarca, M.; Pioli, S.; Piersanti, L.; Pompili, R.; Romeo, S.; Rossi, A. R.; Scifo, J.; Serafini, L.; Suliman, G.; Villa, F.

    2016-09-01

    The SPARC_LAB Thomson source is a compact X-ray source based on the Thomson backscattering process presently under its second phase of commissioning at the LNF. The electron beam energy ranges between 30 and 150 MeV, the electrons collide head-on with the Ti:Sapphire FLAME laser pulse the energy of which ranges between 1 and 5 J with pulse lengths in the 25 fs-10 ps range, this provides an X-ray energy tunability in the range of 20-500 keV, with the further capability to generate strongly non-linear phenomena and to drive diffusion processes due to multiple and plural scattering effects. The experimental results of the obtained X-ray radiation are presented.

  17. The Jefferson Lab Frozen Spin Target

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Keith, James Brock, Christopher Carlin, Sara Comer, David Kashy, Josephine McAndrew, David Meekins, Eugene Pasyuk, Joshua Pierce, Mikell Seely

    2012-08-01

    A frozen spin polarized target, constructed at Jefferson Lab for use inside a large acceptance spectrometer, is described. The target has been utilized for photoproduction measurements with polarized tagged photons of both longitudinal and circular polarization. Protons in TEMPO-doped butanol were dynamically polarized to approximately 90% outside the spectrometer at 5 T and 200-300 mK. Photoproduction data were acquired with the target inside the spectrometer at a frozen-spin temperature of approximately 30 mK with the polarization maintained by a thin, superconducting coil installed inside the target cryostat. A 0.56 T solenoid was used for longitudinal target polarization and a 0.50 T dipole for transverse polarization. Spin relaxation times as high as 4000 hours were observed. We also report polarization results for deuterated propanediol doped with the trityl radical OX063.

  18. The Jefferson Lab High Power Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Boyce

    2006-01-01

    Jefferson Lab has designed, built and operated two high average power free-electron lasers (FEL) using superconducting RF (SRF) technology and energy recovery techniques. Between 1999-2001 Jefferson Lab operated the IR Demo FEL. This device produced over 2 kW in the mid-infrared, in addition to producing world record average powers in the visible (50 W), ultraviolet (10 W) and terahertz range (50 W) for tunable, short-pulse (< ps) light. This FEL was the first high power demonstration of an accelerator configuration that is being exploited for a number of new accelerator-driven light source facilities that are currently under design or construction. The driver accelerator for the IR Demo FEL uses an Energy Recovered Linac (ERL) configuration that improves the energy efficiency and lowers both the capital and operating cost of such devices by recovering most of the power in the spent electron beam after optical power is extracted from the beam. The IR Demo FEL was de-commissioned in late 2001 for an upgraded FEL for extending the IR power to over 10 kW and the ultraviolet power to over 1 kW. The FEL Upgrade achieved 10 kW of average power in the mid-IR (6 microns) in July of 2004, and its IR operation currently is being extended down to 1 micron. In addition, we have demonstrated the capability of on/off cycling and recovering over a megawatt of electron beam power without diminishing machine performance. A complementary UV FEL will come on-line within the next year. This paper presents a summary of the FEL characteristics, user community accomplishments with the IR Demo, and planned user experiments.

  19. Lab-on a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Labs on chips are manufactured in many shapes and sizes and can be used for numerous applications, from medical tests to water quality monitoring to detecting the signatures of life on other planets. The eight holes on this chip are actually ports that can be filled with fluids or chemicals. Tiny valves control the chemical processes by mixing fluids that move in the tiny channels that look like lines, connecting the ports. Scientists at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama designed this chip to grow biological crystals on the International Space Station (ISS). Through this research, they discovered that this technology is ideally suited for solving the challenges of the Vision for Space Exploration. For example, thousands of chips the size of dimes could be loaded on a Martian rover looking for biosignatures of past or present life. Other types of chips could be placed in handheld devices used to monitor microbes in water or to quickly conduct medical tests on astronauts. The portable, handheld Lab-on-a Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS) made its debut flight aboard Discovery during the STS-116 mission launched December 9, 2006. The system allowed crew members to monitor their environment for problematic contaminants such as yeast, mold, and even E.coli, and salmonella. Once LOCAD-PTS reached the ISS, the Marshall team continued to manage the experiment, monitoring the study from a console in the Payload Operations Center at MSFC. The results of these studies will help NASA researchers refine the technology for future Moon and Mars missions. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  20. Cosmic plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to experimental and theoretical approaches to plasma physics, plasma phenomena in laboratory and space, field and particle aspects of plasmas, the present state of the classical theory, boundary conditions and circuit dependence, and cosmology. Electric currents in space plasmas are considered, taking into account dualism in physics, particle-related phenomena in plasma physics, magnetic field lines, filaments, local plasma properties and the circuit, electric double layers, field-aligned currents as 'cables', an expanding circuit, different types of plasma regions, the cellular structure of space, and the fine structure of active plasma regions. Other topics discussed are related to circuits, the theory of cosmic plasmas, the origin of the solar system, the coexistence of matter and antimatter, annihilation as a source of energy, the Hubble expansion in a Euclidean space, and a model for the evolution of the Metagalaxy.

  1. The External-Injection experiment at the SPARC_LAB facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Andrea R.; Bacci, Alberto; Belleveglia, Marco; Chiadroni, Enrica; Cianchi, Alessandro; Di Pirro, Giampiero; Ferrario, Massimo; Gallo, Alessandro; Gatti, Giancarlo; Maroli, Cesare; Mostacci, Andrea; Petrillo, Vittoria; Serafini, Luca; Tomassini, Paolo; Vaccarezza, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    At the SPARC_LAB facility of INFN-LNF we are installing a transport lines for ultra-short electron bunches and another for ultra-intense laser pulses, generated by the SPARC photo-injector and by the FLAME laser in a synchronized fashion at the tens of fs level, to co-propagate inside a hydrogen filled glass capillary, in order to perform acceleration of the electron bunch by a plasma wave driven by the laser pulse. The main aim of this experiment is to demonstrate that a high brightness electron beam can be accelerated by a plasma wave without any significant degradation of its quality. Motivations of the technical choices are made and expected performances are reported.

  2. A new approach to standardize multicenter studies: mobile lab technology for the German Environmental Specimen Bank.

    PubMed

    Lermen, Dominik; Schmitt, Daniel; Bartel-Steinbach, Martina; Schröter-Kermani, Christa; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; von Briesen, Hagen; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Technical progress has simplified tasks in lab diagnosis and improved quality of test results. Errors occurring during the pre-analytical phase have more negative impact on the quality of test results than errors encountered during the total analytical process. Different infrastructures of sampling sites can highly influence the quality of samples and therewith of analytical results. Annually the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) collects, characterizes, and stores blood, plasma, and urine samples of 120-150 volunteers each on four different sampling sites in Germany. Overarching goal is to investigate the exposure to environmental pollutants of non-occupational exposed young adults combining human biomonitoring with questionnaire data. We investigated the requirements of the study and the possibility to realize a highly standardized sampling procedure on a mobile platform in order to increase the required quality of the pre-analytical phase. The results lead to the development of a mobile epidemiologic laboratory (epiLab) in the project "Labor der Zukunft" (future's lab technology). This laboratory includes a 14.7 m(2) reception area to record medical history and exposure-relevant behavior, a 21.1 m(2) examination room to record dental fillings and for blood withdrawal, a 15.5 m(2) biological safety level 2 laboratory to process and analyze samples on site including a 2.8 m(2) personnel lock and a 3.6 m2 cryofacility to immediately freeze samples. Frozen samples can be transferred to their final destination within the vehicle without breaking the cold chain. To our knowledge, we herewith describe for the first time the implementation of a biological safety laboratory (BSL) 2 lab and an epidemiologic unit on a single mobile platform. Since 2013 we have been collecting up to 15.000 individual human samples annually under highly standardized conditions using the mobile laboratory. Characterized and free of alterations they are kept ready for retrospective

  3. Being a Clinical Psychologist at the Lab School of Baltimore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    Each day, seeking to address the never ending challenge of helping students with learning disabilities, the author's Baltimore Lab School and Lab School of Washington (LSW) colleagues remember a similar situation in the past and they try to recall what Sally Smith taught them. Smith taught the author a lot in his seven years of working with…

  4. Incorporating a Career Planning Lab into a Managerial Communications Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Gary L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes how a small business school, as part of a strategic planning initiative to improve career services, added a self-directed career planning lab to an existing managerial communication course. The lab concept and the learning design are innovative because they met a student need without creating additional time demands on the…

  5. Development and Implementation of a Lab Course for Introductory Astronomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrady, Nate; Rice, Emily

    2008-01-01

    The typical "Astro 101" lecture-based course is passive, and adding well-designed learner-centered labs allows students to experience science as a pattern of thought. In this article, we present an approach to developing an introductory lab course. Identification of goals and student outcomes, particularly skills, and process and attitudinal…

  6. Engineering Students' Experiences from Physics Group Work in Learning Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellingsaeter, Magnus Strøm

    2014-01-01

    Background: This paper presents a case study from a physics course at a Norwegian university college, investigating key aspects of a group-work project, so-called learning labs, from the participating students' perspective. Purpose: In order to develop these learning labs further, the students' perspective is important. Which aspects are essential…

  7. Implementation of Siemens USS protocol into LabVIEW.

    PubMed

    Hosek, P; Diblik, M

    2011-10-01

    This article gives basic overview of the USS protocol as a communication interface to drive Siemens frequency inverters. It presents our implementation of this protocol into LabVIEW, as there was permanent demand from the community of the users to have native LabVIEW implementation of the USS protocol. It also states encountered problems and their solutions.

  8. Time Trials--An AP Physics Challenge Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David

    2009-01-01

    I have come to the conclusion that for high school physics classroom and laboratory experiences, simpler is better! In this paper I describe a very simple and effective lab experience that my AP students have thoroughly enjoyed year after year. I call this lab exercise "Time Trials." The experiment is simple in design and it is a lot of fun for…

  9. A Computer Lab that Students Use but Never See

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    North Carolina State University may never build another computer lab. Instead the university has installed racks of equipment in windowless rooms where students and professors never go. This article describes a project called the Virtual Computing Lab. Users enter it remotely from their own computers in dormitory rooms or libraries. They get all…

  10. LIVING LAB: User-Driven Innovation for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liedtke, Christa; Welfens, Maria Jolanta; Rohn, Holger; Nordmann, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to summarize and discuss the results from the LIVING LAB design study, a project within the 7th Framework Programme of the European Union. The aim of this project was to develop the conceptual design of the LIVING LAB Research Infrastructure that will be used to research human interaction with, and stimulate…

  11. The Technology Teaching Lab: Meeting the ISTE Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucci, Terri Teal

    2003-01-01

    Assessed whether preservice teachers could reach the expectations of the ISTE Profile Standards for Professional Performance through participation in technology teaching labs (2-hour labs running concurrently with preservice methods blocks), noting types of technology infusion used to meet the standards and students' perceived ability following…

  12. What is the purpose of undergraduate physics labs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sams, William; Paesler, Michael; Chafin, Cliff

    2011-10-01

    In recent years, enrollment in undergraduate physics courses at NC State has grown significantly, especially in introductory physics. Since most of these courses involve a laboratory component, the increased enrollment is leading to a shortage of laboratory space. Starting this spring NC State will implement kit labs in calculus-based mechanics labs. These kits will make it possible for students to have laboratory experiences outside of the standard lab rooms, decreasing space demands. During the implementation the kit labs will be evaluated with an instrument developed for this purpose. This paper discusses the first step of designing this instrument, determining what the specific goals and purposes of the labs are. Literature reviews have led to focus on three primary areas where students should make gains during lab: content knowledge, scientific process, and affect. Physics faculty members were surveyed to identify specific areas considered important for our labs. Using results from our survey and published literature we have developed a specific set of goals for our labs, and we are using this to guide the development of our assessment instrument.

  13. The Multisensory Sound Lab: Sounds You Can See and Feel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederman, Norman; Hendricks, Paula

    1994-01-01

    A multisensory sound lab has been developed at the Model Secondary School for the Deaf (District of Columbia). A special floor allows vibrations to be felt, and a spectrum analyzer displays frequencies and harmonics visually. The lab is used for science education, auditory training, speech therapy, music and dance instruction, and relaxation…

  14. Online Writing Labs as Sites for Community Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Jaclyn Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the Community Writing and Education Station (CWEST), a community engagement project that partners a community adult basic literacy program with a university writing lab. The author argues that the community and university partners, the Lafayette Adult Resource Academy (LARA) and the Purdue Writing Lab, offer positive…

  15. Letters Home as an Alternative to Lab Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, W. Brian

    2014-01-01

    The traditional lab report is known to create several pedagogical shortcomings in the introductory physics course, particularly with regard to promoting student engagement and encouraging quality writing. This paper discusses the use of a "letter home" written to a non-physicist as an alternative to lab reports that creates a more…

  16. Networking Labs in the Online Environment: Indicators for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahoud, Hilmi A.; Krichen, Jack P.

    2010-01-01

    Several techniques have been used to provide hands-on educational experiences to online learners, including remote labs, simulation software, and virtual labs, which offer a more structured environment, including simulations and scheduled asynchronous access to physical resources. This exploratory study investigated how these methods can be used…

  17. Macromolecules Inquiry: Transformation of a Standard Biochemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unsworth, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Identification of macromolecules in food is a standard introductory high school biology lab. The intent of this article is to describe the conversion of this standard cookbook lab into an inquiry investigation. Instead of verifying the macromolecules found in food, students use their knowledge of the macromolecules in food to determine the…

  18. Genomics Education in Practice: Evaluation of a Mobile Lab Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Mil, Marc H. W.; Boerwinkel, Dirk Jan; Buizer-Voskamp, Jacobine E.; Speksnijder, Annelies; Waarlo, Arend Jan

    2010-01-01

    Dutch genomics research centers have developed the "DNA labs on the road" to bridge the gap between modern genomics research practice and secondary-school curriculum in the Netherlands. These mobile DNA labs offer upper-secondary students the opportunity to experience genomics research through experiments with laboratory equipment that…

  19. Hooked on Inquiry: History Labs in the Methods Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Linda Sargent

    2012-01-01

    Methods courses provide a rich opportunity to unpack what it means to "learn history by doing history." To help explain what "doing history" means, the author has created history labs to walk teacher candidates through the historical process. Each lab poses a historical problem, requires analysis of primary and secondary…

  20. A Concept-Oriented Custom Lab Manual for Astronomy 101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrady, Nate; Rice, Emily L.

    2016-01-01

    Astronomy 101 students are typically non-science majors fulfilling a general education requirement in the physical sciences. Many schools require that students complete a lab component with the course in order to meet the graduation requirement. The introductory astronomy course curriculum varies widely between instructors, and as such there is no agreed-upon standard set of topics or skills for lab activities. This is very challenging for the busy, heavily-loaded faculty member who needs a range of lab activities for their students. We have developed a collection of 40 concept-oriented activities for Astro 101 lab courses across a wide range of topics. The labs are designed to develop foundational skills and deep conceptual understanding in a hands-on, collaborative, learner-centered environment. They emphasize simple, inexpensive equipment to focus attention on key concepts rather than complicated apparatus, and to ease implementation for instructors working with limited resources. Instructors select only those labs that match their own course content, sequence the topics to align with their curriculum, and provide a fully custom lab manual to their students. Students, in turn, need only pay for labs they will use, keeping the materials affordable. On the web, see mccradyricelabs.com for more information.

  1. The Living Labs: Innovation in Real-Life Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawk, Nathan; Bartle, Gamin; Romine, Martha

    2012-01-01

    The living lab (LL) is an open innovation ecosystem serving to provide opportunities for local stakeholders to practice research and to experiment with meaningful improvements for cities and other organizations. Living labs aim at involving the user as a cocreator. In this article the relationship between the LLs and a variety of stakeholders is…

  2. A guide to mentoring undergraduates in the lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukeman, Philip S.

    2013-11-01

    Mentoring undergraduates in a research laboratory requires a different set of skills and approaches than for other lab members. However, if a mentor -- be it a faculty member, postdoc or graduate student -- can adopt these methods, it can lead to a significantly improved lab experience for everyone involved.

  3. THIRD LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (SECOND FLOOR OF BUILDING) SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    THIRD LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (SECOND FLOOR OF BUILDING) SHOWING MISSILE TUBE. VIEW FACING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. OVERVIEW OF FOURTH LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (ROOFTOP LEVEL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF FOURTH LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (ROOFTOP LEVEL OF BUILDING) SHOWING TOP OF MISSILE TUBE. VIEW FACING WEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. VIEW OF SECOND LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB WITH MISSILE TUBE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SECOND LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB WITH MISSILE TUBE WITH HATCH ON LEFT AND CONTROL PANEL ON RIGHT. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. OBLIQUE VIEW OF MISSILE LAB WITH CRANE SHOWING SOUTHEAST AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF MISSILE LAB WITH CRANE SHOWING SOUTHEAST AND SOUTHWEST SIDES. VIEW FACING NORTH/NORTHWEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. OBLIQUE VIEW OF MISSILE LAB WITH CRANE SHOWING SOUTHWEST AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF MISSILE LAB WITH CRANE SHOWING SOUTHWEST AND NORTHWEST SIDES. VIEW FACING EAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. Evaluating Computer Lab Modules for Large Biology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichinger, David C.; And Others

    This paper describes the first phase of a study to investigate students' evaluations of computer laboratory modules in a university-level, non-majors biology course. The National Science Foundation-funded project has two primary goals: (1) to develop programmable, multifunctional Bio LabStations for data collection and analysis, lab extensions,…

  9. Spectroscopic measurements of plasma emission light for plasma-based acceleration experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippi, F.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced particle accelerators are based on the excitation of large amplitude plasma waves driven by either electron or laser beams. Future experiments scheduled at the SPARC_LAB test facility aim to demonstrate the acceleration of high brightness electron beams through the so-called resonant Plasma Wakefield Acceleration scheme in which a train of electron bunches (drivers) resonantly excites wakefields into a preformed hydrogen plasma; the last bunch (witness) injected at the proper accelerating phase gains energy from the wake. The quality of the accelerated beam depends strongly on plasma density and its distribution along the acceleration length. The measurements of plasma density of the order of 1016-1017 cm-3 can be performed with spectroscopic measurements of the plasma-emitted light. The measured density distribution for hydrogen filled capillary discharge with both Balmer alpha and Balmer beta lines and shot-to-shot variation are here reported.

  10. Exploring Lab Tests Over Utilization Patterns Using Health Analytics Methods.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Mohamed; Zabani, Ibrahim; Khalid, Parwaiz

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare resources are over utilized contributing more to the growing costs of care. Although laboratory testing is essential, yet it can be expensive and excessive. King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Saudi Arabia studied lab tests utilization patterns using health analytics methods. The objective was to identify patterns of utilizing lab tests and to develop recommendations to control over utilization. Three over utilization patterns were identified; using expensive tests for many patients as routine, unnecessarily repeating lab test and a combined one. Two recommendations were suggested; a user approach, modifying user behavior through orientation about the impact of over utilization on the cost effectiveness of healthcare, and a system approach, implementing system alerts to help physicians check the results and identify the date of the last lab tests done with information about appropriate frequency of ordering such lab test and medically significant intervals at which such test should be repeated.

  11. The work smart standards process at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, James R.; Prior, Sandra; Hanson, Eric; Morgan, Barbara

    1997-02-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has developed a set of Work Smart Standards for the Lab. The effort incorporated the Lab's performance-based contract into the Necessary and Sufficient (N&S) Standards identification process of the DOE. A rigorous protocol identified hazards in the workplace and standards that provide adequate protection of workers, public, and the environment at reasonable cost. The intensive process was a joint effort between the Lab and DOE and it required trained teams of knowledgeable experts in three fields: 1.) actual required work conditions at Jefferson Lab; 2.) laws, regulations, DOE directives and performance-based contracts; and 3.) Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S), Rad Con, and QA. The criteria for selection of the teams, the database designed and used for the process, and lessons learned are discussed.

  12. An Evaluation of Two Hands-On Lab Styles for Plant Biodiversity in Undergraduate Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basey, John M.; Maines, Anastasia P.; Francis, Clinton D.; Melbourne, Brett

    2014-01-01

    We compared learning cycle and expository formats for teaching about plant biodiversity in an inquiry-oriented university biology lab class (n = 465). Both formats had preparatory lab activities, a hands-on lab, and a postlab with reflection and argumentation. Learning was assessed with a lab report, a practical quiz in lab, and a multiple-choice…

  13. Distributed Energy Communications & Controls, Lab Activities - Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Rizy, D Tom

    2010-01-01

    The purpose is to develop controls for inverter-based renewable and non-renewable distributed energy systems to provide local voltage, power and power quality support for loads and the power grid. The objectives are to (1) develop adaptive controls for inverter-based distributed energy (DE) systems when there are multiple inverters on the same feeder and (2) determine the impact of high penetration high seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) air conditioning (A/C) units on power systems during sub-transmission faults which can result in an A/C compressor motor stall and assess how inverter-based DE can help to mitigate the stall event. The Distributed Energy Communications & Controls Laboratory (DECC) is a unique facility for studying dynamic voltage, active power (P), non-active power (Q) and power factor control from inverter-based renewable distributed energy (DE) resources. Conventionally, inverter-based DE systems have been designed to provide constant, close to unity power factor and thus not provide any voltage support. The DECC Lab interfaces with the ORNL campus distribution system to provide actual power system testing of the controls approach. Using mathematical software tools and the DECC Lab environment, we are developing and testing local, autonomous and adaptive controls for local voltage control and P & Q control for inverter-based DE. We successfully tested our active and non-active power (P,Q) controls at the DECC laboratory along with voltage regulation controls. The new PQ control along with current limiter controls has been tested on our existing inverter test system. We have tested both non-adaptive and adaptive control modes for the PQ control. We have completed several technical papers on the approaches and results. Electric power distribution systems are experiencing outages due to a phenomenon known as fault induced delayed voltage recovery (FIDVR) due to air conditioning (A/C) compressor motor stall. Local voltage collapse from FIDVR is

  14. Learning by Viewing - Nobel Labs 360

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2013-01-01

    First of all, my thanks to the Nobel Lindau Foundation for their inspiration and leadership in sharing the excitement of scientific discovery with the public and with future scientists! I have had the pleasure of participating twice in the Lindau meetings, and recently worked with the Nobel Labs 360 project to show how we are building the world's greatest telescope yet, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). For the future, I see the greatest challenges for all the sciences in continued public outreach and inspiration. Outreach, so the public knows why we are doing what we are doing, and what difference it makes for them today and in the long-term future. Who knows what our destiny may be? It could be glorious, or not, depending on how we all behave. Inspiration, so that the most creative and inquisitive minds can pursue the scientific and engineering discoveries that are at the heart of so much of human prosperity, health, and progress. And, of course, national and local security depend on those discoveries too; scientists have been working with "the government" throughout recorded history. For the Lindau Nobel experiment, we have a truly abundant supply of knowledge and excitement, through the interactions of young scientists with the Nobelists, and through the lectures and the video recordings we can now share with the whole world across the Internet. But the challenge is always to draw attention! With 7 billion inhabitants on Earth, trying to earn a living and have some fun, there are plenty of competing opportunities and demands on us all. So what will draw attention to our efforts at Lindau? These days, word of mouth has become word of (computer) mouse, and ideas propagate as viruses ( or memes) across the Internet according to the interests of the participants. So our challenge is to find and match those interests, so that the efforts of our scientists, photographers, moviemakers, and writers are rewarded by our public. The world changes every day, so there

  15. Seeing an Old Lab in a New Light: Transforming a Traditional Optics Lab into Full Guided Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maley, Tim; Stoll, Will; Demir, Kadir

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the authors' experiences transforming a "cookbook" lab into an inquiry-based investigation and the powerful effect the inquiry-oriented lab had on our students' understanding of lenses. We found the inquiry-oriented approach led to richer interactions between students as well as a deeper conceptual…

  16. Designing virtual science labs for the Islamic Academy of Delaware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlZahrani, Nada Saeed

    Science education is a basic part of the curriculum in modern day classrooms. Instructional approaches to science education can take many forms but hands-on application of theory via science laboratory activities for the learner is common. Not all schools have the resources to provide the laboratory environment necessary for hands-on application of science theory. Some settings rely on technology to provide a virtual laboratory experience instead. The Islamic Academy of Delaware (IAD), a typical community-based organization, was formed to support and meet the essential needs of the Muslim community of Delaware. IAD provides science education as part of the overall curriculum, but cannot provide laboratory activities as part of the science program. Virtual science labs may be a successful model for students at IAD. This study was conducted to investigate the potential of implementing virtual science labs at IAD and to develop an implementation plan for integrating the virtual labs. The literature has shown us that the lab experience is a valuable part of the science curriculum (NBPTS, 2013, Wolf, 2010, National Research Council, 1997 & 2012). The National Research Council (2012) stressed the inclusion of laboratory investigations in the science curriculum. The literature also supports the use of virtual labs as an effective substitute for classroom labs (Babateen, 2011; National Science Teachers Association, 2008). Pyatt and Simms (2011) found evidence that virtual labs were as good, if not better than physical lab experiences in some respects. Although not identical in experience to a live lab, the virtual lab has been shown to provide the student with an effective laboratory experience in situations where the live lab is not possible. The results of the IAD teacher interviews indicate that the teachers are well-prepared for, and supportive of, the implementation of virtual labs to improve the science education curriculum. The investigator believes that with the

  17. Distributed Energy Communications & Controls, Lab Activities - Synopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Rizy, D Tom

    2010-01-01

    Electric power distribution systems are experiencing outages due to a phenomenon known as fault induced delayed voltage recovery (FIDVR) due to air conditioning (A/C) compressor motor stall. Local voltage collapse from FIDVR is occurring in part because modern air-conditioner and heat pump compressor motors are much more susceptible to stalling during a voltage sag or dip than older motors. These motors can stall in less than three cycles (0.05 s) when a fault, for example, on the sub-transmission system, causes voltage on the distribution system to sag to 70% or less of nominal. We completed a new test system for A/C compressor motor stall testing at the DECC Lab. The A/C Stall test system is being used to characterize when and how compressor motors stall under low voltage and high compressor pressure conditions. However, instead of using air conditioners, we are using high efficiency heat pumps. We have gathered A/C stall characterization data for both sustained and momentary voltage sags of the test heat pump. At low enough voltage, the heat pump stalls (compressor motor stops and draws 5-6 times normal current in trying to restart) due to low inertia and low torque of the motor. For the momentary sag, we are using a fast acting contactor/switch to quickly switch from nominal to the sagged voltage in cycles.

  18. Beamline Insertions Manager at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael C.

    2015-09-01

    The beam viewer system at Jefferson Lab provides operators and beam physicists with qualitative and quantitative information on the transverse electron beam properties. There are over 140 beam viewers installed on the 12 GeV CEBAF accelerator. This paper describes an upgrade consisting of replacing the EPICS-based system tasked with managing all viewers with a mixed system utilizing EPICS and high-level software. Most devices, particularly the beam viewers, cannot be safely inserted into the beam line during high-current beam operations. Software is partly responsible for protecting the machine from untimely insertions. The multiplicity of beam-blocking and beam-vulnerable devices motivates us to try a data-driven approach. The beamline insertions application components are centrally managed and configured through an object-oriented software framework created for this purpose. A rules-based engine tracks the configuration and status of every device, along with the beam status of the machine segment containing the device. The application uses this information to decide on which device actions are allowed at any given time.

  19. BOREAS TE-1 SSA Soil Lab Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor); Nerbas, Tim; Anderson, Darwin

    2000-01-01

    This data set was collected by TE-1 to provide a set of soil properties for BOREAS investigators in the SSA. The soil samples were collected at sets of soil pits in 1993 and 1994. Each set of soil pits was in the vicinity of one of the five flux towers in the BOREAS SSA. The collected soil samples were sent to a lab, where the major soil properties were determined. These properties include, but are not limited to, soil horizon; dry soil color; pH; bulk density; total, organic, and inorganic carbon; electric conductivity; cation exchange capacity; exchangeable sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and hydrogen; water content at 0.01, 0.033, and 1.5 MPascals; nitrogen; phosphorus; particle size distribution; texture; pH of the mineral soil and of the organic soil; extractable acid; and sulfur. The data are stored in tabular ASCII text files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  20. In-lab three-dimensional printing

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Roland; Conlisk, Noel; Davies, Jamie A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of the microscope in 1590 by Zacharias Janssenby and Hans Lippershey gave the world a new way of visualizing details of morphogenesis and development. More recent improvements in this technology including confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical projection tomography (OPT) have enhanced the quality of the resultant image. These technologies also allow a representation to be made of a developing tissue’s three-dimensional (3-D) form. With all these techniques however, the image is delivered on a flat two-dimensional (2-D) screen. 3-D printing represents an exciting potential to reproduce the image not simply on a flat screen, but in a physical, palpable three-dimensional structure. Here we explore the scope that this holds for exploring and interacting with the structure of a developing organ in an entirely novel way. As well as being useful for visualization, 3-D printers are capable of rapidly and cost-effectively producing custom-made structures for use within the laboratory. We here describe the advantages of producing hardware for a tissue culture system using an inexpensive in-lab printer. PMID:22652907

  1. Gravitational Wave Detection in the Introductory Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burko, Lior M.

    2017-01-01

    Great physics breakthroughs are rarely included in the introductory physics course. General relativity and binary black hole coalescence are no different, and can be included in the introductory course only in a very limited sense. However, we can design activities that directly involve the detection of GW150914, the designation of the Gravitation Wave signal detected on September 14, 2015, thereby engage the students in this exciting discovery directly. The activities naturally do not include the construction of a detector or the detection of gravitational waves. Instead, we design it to include analysis of the data from GW150914, which includes some interesting analysis activities for students of the introductory course. The same activities can be assigned either as a laboratory exercise or as a computational project for the same population of students. The analysis tools used here are simple and available to the intended student population. It does not include the sophisticated analysis tools, which were used by LIGO to carefully analyze the detected signal. However, these simple tools are sufficient to allow the student to get important results. We have successfully assigned this lab project for students of the introductory course with calculus at Georgia Gwinnett College.

  2. The NOAO Data Lab virtual storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Matthew J.; Fitzpatrick, Michael J.; Norris, Patrick; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Olsen, Knut; Stobie, Elizabeth B.; Ridgway, Stephen T.; Bolton, Adam S.; Saha, Abhijit; Huang, Lijuan W.

    2016-07-01

    Collaborative research/computing environments are essential for working with the next generations of large astronomical data sets. A key component of them is a distributed storage system to enable data hosting, sharing, and publication. VOSpace1 is a lightweight interface providing network access to arbitrary backend storage solutions and endorsed by the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA). Although similar APIs exist, such as Amazon S3, WebDav, and Dropbox, VOSpace is designed to be protocol agnostic, focusing on data control operations, and supports asynchronous and third-party data transfers, thereby minimizing unnecessary data transfers. It also allows arbitrary computations to be triggered as a result of a transfer operation: for example, a file can be automatically ingested into a database when put into an active directory or a data reduction task, such as Sextractor, can be run on it. In this paper, we shall describe the VOSpace implementations that we have developed for the NOAO Data Lab. These offer both dedicated remote storage, accessible as a local file system via FUSE, and a local VOSpace service to easily enable data synchronization.

  3. Jefferson Lab: New opportunities in hadronic physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2014-11-11

    Jefferson Lab (JLab) is a fundamental research laboratory located in Newport News (Virginia-USA) whose primary mission is to explore the fundamental nature of confined states of quarks and gluons. It consists of a high-intensity electron accelerator based on continuous wave superconducting radio frequency technology and a sophisticated array of particle detectors. The design features and excellent performance of the accelerator made it possible to plan an upgrade in energy from 6 to 12 GeV without substantially altering the construction scheme of the accelerator. The program includes the construction of major new experimental facilities for the existing three Halls, A, B, C and the construction of the new experimental Hall D. The research program that motivated the upgrade in energy includes: the study of the nucleon 'tomography' through the study of generalized parton distribution functions (GPDs) and transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs), the study of exotics and hybrid mesons to explore the nature of the quarks confinement, precision test of the Standard Model through parity-violating electron scattering experiments. Major highlights of the program at 6 GeV will be presented as well as an overview of the 12 GeV physics program.

  4. Smart communication with LabView

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iov, Cǎtǎlin J.; Diaconu, Bogdan; Hnatiuc, Mihaela

    2016-12-01

    The population alarm systems do not represent a new concept. Since hundreds of years ago the man used either smoke signals generated from certain upper locations, visible from long distance, getting through acoustic systems placed on high buildings, until now when mass-media channels extended the possibilities by the television and radio. However, either one of those mentioned above requested the individual to be located at the alarming moment in the area of action of the alarm. Otherwise, the message has no efficiency. This limitation is currently solved by additional communication channels such as the internet and the mobile networks. Messages are now able to be sent to the mobile screen, and the user can reply to messages either by using the short message service (SMS) or by emailing to someone, to a server, to a center. From the general pattern of alarming the population on certain events, the medical applications represent a very important field. Messages are sent from the patient to a central medical center and back to the patient. This paper focuses on the value that virtual tools developed with LabVIEW brings to us.

  5. National Labs and Nuclear Emergency Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budil, Kimberly

    2015-04-01

    The DOE national laboratories, and in particular the three NNSA national security laboratories, have long supported a broad suite of national nuclear security missions for the U.S. government. The capabilities, infrastructure and base of expertise developed to support the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile have been applied to such challenges as stemming nuclear proliferation, understanding the nuclear capabilities of adversaries, and assessing and countering nuclear threats including essential support to nuclear emergency response. This talk will discuss the programs that are underway at the laboratories and the essential role that science and technology plays therein. Nuclear scientists provide expertise, fundamental understanding of nuclear materials, processes and signatures, and tools and technologies to aid in the identification and mitigation of nuclear threats as well as consequence management. This talk will also discuss the importance of direct engagement with the response community, which helps to shape research priorities and to enable development of useful tools and techniques for responders working in the field. National Labs and Nuclear Emergency Response.

  6. Di-hadron production at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Anefalos Pereira, Sergio; et. al.,

    2014-10-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) has been used extensively in recent years as an important testing ground for QCD. Studies so far have concentrated on better determination of parton distribution functions, distinguishing between the quark and antiquark contributions, and understanding the fragmentation of quarks into hadrons. Hadron pair (di-hadron) SIDIS provides information on the nucleon structure and hadronization dynamics that complement single hadron SIDIS. Di-hadrons allow the study of low- and high-twist distribution functions and Dihadron Fragmentation Functions (DiFF). Together with the twist-2 PDFs ( f1, g1, h1), the Higher Twist (HT) e and hL functions are very interesting because they offer insights into the physics of the largely unexplored quark-gluon correlations, which provide access into the dynamics inside hadrons. The CLAS spectrometer, installed in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab, has collected data using the CEBAF 6 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam on longitudinally polarized solid NH3 targets. Preliminary results on di-hadron beam-, target- and double-spin asymmetries will be presented.

  7. Space-plasma campaign on UCLA's Large Plasma Device (LAPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koepke, M. E.; Finnegan, S. M.; Knudsen, D. J.; Vincena, S.

    2007-05-01

    Knudsen [JGR, 1996] describes a potential role for stationary Alfvén (StA) waves in auroral arcs' frequency dependence. Magnetized plasmas are predicted to support electromagnetic perturbations that are static in a fixed frame if there is uniform background plasma convection. These stationary waves should not be confused with standing waves that oscillate in time with a fixed, spatially varying envelope. Stationary waves have no time variation in the fixed frame. In the drifting frame, there is an apparent time dependence as plasma convects past fixed electromagnetic structures. We describe early results from an experimental campaign to reproduce in the lab the basic conditions necessary for the creation of StA waves, namely quasi-steady-state convection across magnetic field-aligned current channels. We show that an off-axis, fixed channel of electron current (and depleted density) is created in the Large Plasma Device Upgrade (LAPD) at UCLA, using a small, heated, oxide-coated electrode at one plasma-column end and we show that the larger plasma column rotates about its cylindrical axis from a radial electric field imposed by a special termination electrode on the same end. Initial experimentation with plasma-rotation-inducing termination electrodes began in May 2006 in the West Virginia Q Machine, leading to two designs that, in January 2007, were tested in LAPD. The radial profile of azimuthal velocity was consistent with predictions of rigid-body rotation. Current-channel experiments in LAPD, in August 2006, showed that inertial Alfvén waves could be concentrated in an off-axis channel of electron current and depleted plasma density. These experimental results will be presented and discussed. This research is supported by DOE and NSF.

  8. ChromPlot for MicroChemLab

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Patrick R.

    2001-12-19

    The software entitled "ChromPlot for MicroChemLab" is used to collect, display, and save data from the Sandia National Laboratories chemical analysis system dubbed MicroChemLab. Sensor data is streamed from a MicroChemLab unit into a computer thru RS-232 in a manner that is not amenable to plotting. Also, there is no direct way to start and stop the unit as is. This software rearranges the data into something that can be easily plotted in real-time then save the data into a text file. In addition, this software provides the users a means to start and stop the hardware. This software was written specifically for MicroChemLab. MicroChemLab data is delivered at 6- 7 pts/sec/channel in a two-channel system for 1-2 min. This code is written around that premise. It is written for Pentium or higher machines running Windows 9x/Me/NT/2000/XP. This software was not developed under the BMS CRADA; it is software we use in the lab for our own testing. Bristol Meyers Squibb (BMS) will use this software for testing an online process monitor based on MicroChemLab. They have not indicated their interest in marketing our device or the software.

  9. Can Direct Measurement Videos Inspire Lab-like Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonk, M.; Bohacek, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Hands-on labs can offer students a rare opportunity to confront the laws of physics first hand and to gain experience using science practices. As such, hands-on labs are an important learning tool which have played a foundational role in science education since the time of Galileo. But labs also have features that make them difficult to implement in practice. They are often time consuming for the instructor to plan and setup, time consuming for students to perform, expensive to implement, and fraught with potential missteps that can send confused students into a spiral of misunderstanding. Our Direct Measurement Video team is working to create several series' of videos with an interface that allows students to interact with them in a way that (we hope) will start to feel lab-like, but with fewer of the impediments that tend to undermine lab-learning in the real world. We hope that lab-like videos will soon provide a needed complement to traditional hands-on labs in science classrooms across the nation. In this talk, I will present our vision of the pedagogical possibilities of video and highlight our progress toward the goal. This work is supported by NSF TUES award #1245268

  10. Plasma production for electron acceleration by resonant plasma wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Croia, M.; Curcio, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G. P.; Filippi, F.; Ghigo, A.; Lollo, V.; Pella, S.; Pompili, R.; Romeo, S.; Ferrario, M.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique known nowadays, able to provide very high accelerating fields (10-100 GV/m), enabling acceleration of electrons to GeV energy in few centimeter. However, the quality of the electron bunches accelerated with this technique is still not comparable with that of conventional accelerators (large energy spread, low repetition rate, and large emittance); radiofrequency-based accelerators, in fact, are limited in accelerating field (10-100 MV/m) requiring therefore hundred of meters of distances to reach the GeV energies, but can provide very bright electron bunches. To combine high brightness electron bunches from conventional accelerators and high accelerating fields reachable with plasmas could be a good compromise allowing to further accelerate high brightness electron bunches coming from LINAC while preserving electron beam quality. Following the idea of plasma wave resonant excitation driven by a train of short bunches, we have started to study the requirements in terms of plasma for SPARC_LAB (Ferrario et al., 2013 [1]). In particular here we focus on hydrogen plasma discharge, and in particular on the theoretical and numerical estimates of the ionization process which are very useful to design the discharge circuit and to evaluate the current needed to be supplied to the gas in order to have full ionization. Eventually, the current supplied to the gas simulated will be compared to that measured experimentally.

  11. Dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Winske, D.; Keinigs, R.; Lemons, D.

    1996-05-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of dusty plasmas at the Laboratory. While dusty plasmas are found in space in galactic clouds, planetary rings, and cometary tails, and as contaminants in plasma enhanced fabrication of microelectronics, many of their properties are only partially understood. Our work has involved both theoretical analysis and self-consistent plasma simulations to understand basic properties of dusty plasmas related to equilibrium, stability, and transport. Such an understanding can improve the control and elimination of plasma dust in industrial applications and may be important in the study of planetary rings and comet dust tails. We have applied our techniques to the study of charging, dynamics, and coagulation of contaminants in plasma processing reactors for industrial etching and deposition processes and to instabilities in planetary rings and other space plasma environments. The work performed in this project has application to plasma kinetics, transport, and other classical elementary processes in plasmas as well as to plasma waves, oscillations, and instabilities.

  12. An update on Lab Rover: A hospital material transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattaboni, Paul

    1994-01-01

    The development of a hospital material transporter, 'Lab Rover', is described. Conventional material transport now utilizes people power, push carts, pneumatic tubes and tracked vehicles. Hospitals are faced with enormous pressure to reduce operating costs. Cyberotics, Inc. developed an Autonomous Intelligent Vehicle (AIV). This battery operated service robot was designed specifically for health care institutions. Applications for the AIV include distribution of clinical lab samples, pharmacy drugs, administrative records, x-ray distribution, meal tray delivery, and certain emergency room applications. The first AIV was installed at Lahey Clinic in Burlington, Mass. Lab Rover was beta tested for one year and has been 'on line' for an additional 2 years.

  13. Perspectives on Industrial Innovation from Agilent, HP, and Bell Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenhorst, James

    2014-03-01

    Innovation is the life blood of technology companies. I will give perspectives gleaned from a career in research and development at Bell Labs, HP Labs, and Agilent Labs, from the point of view of an individual contributor and a manager. Physicists bring a unique set of skills to the corporate environment, including a desire to understand the fundamentals, a solid foundation in physical principles, expertise in applied mathematics, and most importantly, an attitude: namely, that hard problems can be solved by breaking them into manageable pieces. In my experience, hiring managers in industry seldom explicitly search for physicists, but they want people with those skills.

  14. GeoLab: A Geological Workstation for Future Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cynthia; Calaway, Michael; Bell, Mary Sue; Li, Zheng; Tong, Shuo; Zhong, Ye; Dahiwala, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    The GeoLab glovebox was, until November 2012, fully integrated into NASA's Deep Space Habitat (DSH) Analog Testbed. The conceptual design for GeoLab came from several sources, including current research instruments (Microgravity Science Glovebox) used on the International Space Station, existing Astromaterials Curation Laboratory hardware and clean room procedures, and mission scenarios developed for earlier programs. GeoLab allowed NASA scientists to test science operations related to contained sample examination during simulated exploration missions. The team demonstrated science operations that enhance theThe GeoLab glovebox was, until November 2012, fully integrated into NASA's Deep Space Habitat (DSH) Analog Testbed. The conceptual design for GeoLab came from several sources, including current research instruments (Microgravity Science Glovebox) used on the International Space Station, existing Astromaterials Curation Laboratory hardware and clean room procedures, and mission scenarios developed for earlier programs. GeoLab allowed NASA scientists to test science operations related to contained sample examination during simulated exploration missions. The team demonstrated science operations that enhance the early scientific returns from future missions and ensure that the best samples are selected for Earth return. The facility was also designed to foster the development of instrument technology. Since 2009, when GeoLab design and construction began, the GeoLab team [a group of scientists from the Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office within the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate at JSC] has progressively developed and reconfigured the GeoLab hardware and software interfaces and developed test objectives, which were to 1) determine requirements and strategies for sample handling and prioritization for geological operations on other planetary surfaces, 2) assess the scientific contribution of selective in-situ sample

  15. Fabrication and laser patterning of polystyrene optical oxygen sensor films for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    PubMed

    Grist, S M; Oyunerdene, N; Flueckiger, J; Kim, J; Wong, P C; Chrostowski, L; Cheung, K C

    2014-11-21

    We present a novel and simple method for patterning oxygen-sensitive polystyrene thin films and demonstrate its potential for integration with microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices. Optical oxygen sensing films composed of polystyrene with an embedded luminescent oxygen-sensitive dye present a convenient option for the measurement of oxygen levels in microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip devices; however, patterning and integrating the films with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices has proven difficult due to a residue after dry etch patterning that inhibits subsequent PDMS bonding. Our new method uses mask-less laser ablation by a commercial laser ablation system to define the outline of the structures and subsequent bulk film removal by aqueous lift-off. Because the bulk film is peeled or lifted off of the substrate rather than etched, the process is compatible with standard PDMS plasma bonding. We used ToF-SIMS analysis to investigate how laser ablation facilitates this fabrication process as well as why dry etching polystyrene inhibits PDMS plasma bonding. The results of this analysis showed evidence of chemical species formed during the laser ablation and dry etching processes that can produce these effects. Our new method's mask-less nature, simplicity, speed, and compatibility with PDMS bonding make it ideally suited for single-use lab-on-a-chip applications. To demonstrate the method's compatibility with PDMS microfluidics, we also present a demonstration of the sensors' integration into a microfluidic oxygen gradient generator device.

  16. High Current, High Density Arc Plasma as a New Source for WiPAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waleffe, Roger; Endrizzi, Doug; Myers, Rachel; Wallace, John; Clark, Mike; Forest, Cary; WiPAL Team

    2016-10-01

    The Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Lab (WiPAL) has installed a new array of nineteen plasma sources (plasma guns) on its 3 m diameter, spherical vacuum vessel. Each gun is a cylindrical, molybdenum, washer-stabilized, arc plasma source. During discharge, the guns are maintained at 1.2 kA across 100 V for 10 ms by the gun power supply establishing a high density plasma. Each plasma source is fired independently allowing for adjustable plasma parameters, with densities varying between 1018 -1019 m-3 and electron temperatures of 5-15 eV. Measurements were characterized using a 16 tip Langmuir probe. The plasma source will be used as a background plasma for the magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), the Terrestrial Reconnection Experiment (TREX), and as the plasma source for a magnetic mirror experiment. Temperature, density, and confinement results will be presented. This work is supported by the DoE and the NSF.

  17. Advanced Propulsion Physics Lab: Eagleworks Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scogin, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    Eagleworks Laboratory is an advanced propulsions physics laboratory with two primary investigations currently underway. The first is a Quantum Vacuum Plasma Thruster (QVPT or Q-thrusters), an advanced electric propulsion technology in the development and demonstration phase. The second investigation is in Warp Field Interferometry (WFI). This is an investigation of Dr. Harold "Sonny" White's theoretical physics models for warp field equations using optical experiments in the Electro Optical laboratory (EOL) at Johnson Space Center. These investigations are pursuing technology necessary to enable human exploration of the solar system and beyond.

  18. Performance and Architecture Lab Modeling Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-19

    Analytical application performance models are critical for diagnosing performance-limiting resources, optimizing systems, and designing machines. Creating models, however, is difficult. Furthermore, models are frequently expressed in forms that are hard to distribute and validate. The Performance and Architecture Lab Modeling tool, or Palm, is a modeling tool designed to make application modeling easier. Palm provides a source code modeling annotation language. Not only does the modeling language divide the modeling task into sub problems, it formally links an application's source code with its model. This link is important because a model's purpose is to capture application behavior. Furthermore, this link makes it possible to define rules for generating models according to source code organization. Palm generates hierarchical models according to well-defined rules. Given an application, a set of annotations, and a representative execution environment, Palm will generate the same model. A generated model is a an executable program whose constituent parts directly correspond to the modeled application. Palm generates models by combining top-down (human-provided) semantic insight with bottom-up static and dynamic analysis. A model's hierarchy is defined by static and dynamic source code structure. Because Palm coordinates models and source code, Palm's models are 'first-class' and reproducible. Palm automates common modeling tasks. For instance, Palm incorporates measurements to focus attention, represent constant behavior, and validate models. Palm's workflow is as follows. The workflow's input is source code annotated with Palm modeling annotations. The most important annotation models an instance of a block of code. Given annotated source code, the Palm Compiler produces executables and the Palm Monitor collects a representative performance profile. The Palm Generator synthesizes a model based on the static and dynamic mapping of annotations to program behavior

  19. Petabyte Class Storage at Jefferson Lab (CEBAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Rita; Davis, Mark

    1996-01-01

    By 1997, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will collect over one Terabyte of raw information per day of Accelerator operation from three concurrently operating Experimental Halls. When post-processing is included, roughly 250 TB of raw and formatted experimental data will be generated each year. By the year 2000, a total of one Petabyte will be stored on-line. Critical to the experimental program at Jefferson Lab (JLab) is the networking and computational capability to collect, store, retrieve, and reconstruct data on this scale. The design criteria include support of a raw data stream of 10-12 MB/second from Experimental Hall B, which will operate the CEBAF (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility) Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). Keeping up with this data stream implies design strategies that provide storage guarantees during accelerator operation, minimize the number of times data is buffered allow seamless access to specific data sets for the researcher, synchronize data retrievals with the scheduling of postprocessing calculations on the data reconstruction CPU farms, as well as support the site capability to perform data reconstruction and reduction at the same overall rate at which new data is being collected. The current implementation employs state-of-the-art StorageTek Redwood tape drives and robotics library integrated with the Open Storage Manager (OSM) Hierarchical Storage Management software (Computer Associates, International), the use of Fibre Channel RAID disks dual-ported between Sun Microsystems SMP servers, and a network-based interface to a 10,000 SPECint92 data processing CPU farm. Issues of efficiency, scalability, and manageability will become critical to meet the year 2000 requirements for a Petabyte of near-line storage interfaced to over 30,000 SPECint92 of data processing power.

  20. Link Analysis in the Mission Planning Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, Jessica A.; Cervantes, Benjamin W.; Daugherty, Sarah C.; Arroyo, Felipe; Mago, Divyang

    2011-01-01

    The legacy communications link analysis software currently used at Wallops Flight Facility involves processes that are different for command destruct, radar, and telemetry. There is a clear advantage to developing an easy-to-use tool that combines all the processes in one application. Link Analysis in the Mission Planning Lab (MPL) uses custom software and algorithms integrated with Analytical Graphics Inc. Satellite Toolkit (AGI STK). The MPL link analysis tool uses pre/post-mission data to conduct a dynamic link analysis between ground assets and the launch vehicle. Just as the legacy methods do, the MPL link analysis tool calculates signal strength and signal- to-noise according to the accepted processes for command destruct, radar, and telemetry assets. Graphs and other custom data are generated rapidly in formats for reports and presentations. STK is used for analysis as well as to depict plume angles and antenna gain patterns in 3D. The MPL has developed two interfaces with the STK software (see figure). The first interface is an HTML utility, which was developed in Visual Basic to enhance analysis for plume modeling and to offer a more user friendly, flexible tool. A graphical user interface (GUI) written in MATLAB (see figure upper right-hand corner) is also used to quickly depict link budget information for multiple ground assets. This new method yields a dramatic decrease in the time it takes to provide launch managers with the required link budgets to make critical pre-mission decisions. The software code used for these two custom utilities is a product of NASA's MPL.

  1. More Soil Delivered to Phoenix Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image, taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager, documents the delivery of a soil sample from the 'Snow White' trench to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory. A small pile of soil is visible on the lower edge of the second cell from the top.This deck-mounted lab is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA).

    The delivery was made on Sept. 12, 2008, which was Sol 107 (the 107th Martian day) of the mission, which landed on May 25, 2008.

    The Wet Chemistry Laboratory mixes Martian soil with an aqueous solution from Earth as part of a process to identify soluble nutrients and other chemicals in the soil. Preliminary analysis of this soil confirms that it is alkaline, and composed of salts and other chemicals such as perchlorate, sodium, magnesium, chloride and potassium. This data validates prior results from that same location, said JPL's Michael Hecht, the lead scientist for MECA.

    In the coming days, the Phoenix team will also fill the final four of eight single-use ovens on another soil-analysis instrument, the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer, or TEGA. The team's strategy is to deliver as many samples as possible before the power produced by Phoenix's solar panels declines due to the end of the Martian summer.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  2. Multiplex genomic walking: Integration of the wet lab and computer lab into a single prototyping environment

    SciTech Connect

    Gillevet, P.M.

    1993-12-31

    The authors are presently sequencing the entire genome of Mycoplasma capricolum, one of the smallest of free living organisms by a Multiplex Genomic Walking strategy. This technique involves the repetitive hybridization of sequencing membranes with oligonucleotide probes to acquire sequence data in discrete steps along the genome. The technique allows one to walk a genome in a directed manner eliminating the problems associated with random shotgun assembly. Furthermore, the repetitive stripping and hybridization process is relatively simple to reproduce and has the potential to be easily automated. The Genetic Data Environment (GDE), an X Windows based Graphic User Interface has allowed the seamless integration of a core multiple sequence editor with pre-existing external sequence analysis programs and internally developed programs into a single prototypic environment. This system has facilitated linkage of the 9 Harvard Genome Lab`s internal database and automated data control systems into one Graphic User Interface which can handle the archiving and analysis of both random fluorescent sequencing data and genomic walking data from the Mycoplasma project. Finally, it has facilitated the integration of the Genomic sequence data into a PROLOG database environment for the comparative analysis of Mycoplasma capricolum and other organisms.

  3. Quantitative analysis of lab-to-lab variability in Caco-2 permeability assays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Bong; Zgair, Atheer; Taha, Dhiaa A; Zang, Xiaowei; Kagan, Leonid; Kim, Tae Hwan; Kim, Min Gi; Yun, Hwi-Yeol; Fischer, Peter M; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2017-01-12

    In this study, Caco-2 permeability results from different laboratories were compared. Six different sets of apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) values reported in the literature were compared to experimental Papp obtained in our laboratory. The differences were assessed by determining the root mean square error (RMSE) values between the datasets, which reached levels as high as 0.581 for the training set compounds, i.e. ten compounds with known effective human permeability (Peff). The consequences of these differences in Papp for prediction of oral drug absorption were demonstrated by introducing the Papp into the absorption and pharmacokinetics simulation software application GastroPlus™ for prediction of the fraction absorbed (Fa) in humans using calibrated "user-defined permeability models". The RMSE were calculated to assess the differences between the simulated Fa and experimental values reported in the literature. The RMSE for Fa simulated with the permeability model calibrated using experimental Papp from our laboratory was 0.128. When the calibration was performed using Papp from literature datasets, the RMSE values for Fa were higher in all cases except one. This study shows quantitative lab-to-lab variability of Caco-2 permeability results and the potential consequences this can have in the use of these results for predicting intestinal absorption of drugs.

  4. The Earth is our lab: Ten years of geoscience school lab in Potsdam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaus Küppers, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Starting in 2004, a geoscientific school lab for senior high school students was developed in the historical "Großer Refraktor" premises on the Telegraphenberg in Potsdam. Based on a one-day course architecture, laboratory days were developed covering singular themes: - Magnetic field of the Earth - Geographical Information Systems and geodata - Gravity field of the Earth - Geodynamics: seismology and seismics - Geoscience math - Geodata Brandenburg (Geological mapping with aerophotographs, remote sensing, underground data processing) With a focus on geophysical methodologies, course days generally focused on the field work around the Telegraphenberg site while introducing into the art of handling original professional equipment. Field data were afterwards compiled, analysed and interpreted in the group. Single days could be combined as clusters of up to one week and were bookable for national and international groups of max. 25 students. The courses were taught by active scientists with the assistance of student guides as the larger groups had to be split up. The paper gives an overview over the development history of the school lab and explains the course contents, the teaching methods and several employed escorting measures. Possible impact on the professional career decisions of the students is discussed.

  5. a Spectroscopy Based P-Chem Lab, Including a Detailed Text and Lab Manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muenter, John

    2015-06-01

    Rochester's second semester physical chemistry lab course is based on spectroscopy experiments and follows a full semester of quantum mechanics lectures. The laboratory course is fully separate from the traditional physical chemistry course and has its own lectures. The lab course is constructed to achieve three major goals: provide a detailed knowledge of the instrumentation that acquires data, establish a good understanding of how that data is analyzed, and give students a familiarity with spectroscopic techniques and quantum mechanical models. Instrumentation is emphasized by using common components to construct different experiments. Microwave, modulation and detection components are used for both OCS pure rotation and ESR experiments. Optical components, a monochromator, and PMT detectors are used in a HeNe laser induced fluorescence experiment on I2 {(J. Chem. Ed. 73, 576 (1996)) and a photoluminescence experiment on pyrene {(J. Chem. Ed. 73, 580 (1996)). OCS is studied in both the microwave and infrared regions, and the C=S stretching vibration is identified through microwave intensity measurements. Lecture notes and laboratory instructions are combined in an exhaustive text of more than 400 pages, containing 325 figures, 285 equations and numerous MathCad data analysis programs. This text can be downloaded as a 10 Mbyte pdf file at chem.rochester.edu/˜muenter/CHEM232Manual.

  6. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. CENTRAL SUPPORT COLUMN EXTENDING THROUGH CRANES AND ROOF SUPPORT TRUSS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. GENERATOR MOTORS OPPOSITE SWITCHGEAR RACKS, MECHANIC SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SWITCHGEAR, MECHANICAL SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. CABLE RACEWAYS, CATWALK, AND WINDOWS OF OFFICE-AND-SHOPS SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. ROOF BLOCKS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. REMNANTS OF HYDRAULIC FIXTURES, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SWITCHGEAR AND POWER GENERATOR MOTORS, MECHANICAL SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. PUMP MOUNTS, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STUB OF BEAMLINE EXITING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STAIRWAY FROM MAIN FLOOR OF 51A TO SECOND FLOOR EXTERIOR EXIT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SWITCHGEAR AND POWER GENERATOR MOTORS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. GENERATOR ROOM, MECHANICAL SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. Commerce Lab - A program of commercial flight opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, J.; Atkins, H. L.; Williams, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Commerce Lab is conceived as an adjunct to the National Space Transportation System (NSTS) by providing a focal point for commercial missions which could utilize existing NSTS carrier and resource capabilities for on-orbit experimentation in the microgravity sciences. In this context, the Commerce Lab program provides mission planning for private sector involvement in the space program, in general, and the commercial exploitation of the microgravity environment for materials processing research and development. It is expected that Commerce Lab will provide a logical transition between currently planned NSTS missions and future microgravity science and commercial R&D missions centered around the Space Station. The present study identifies candidate Commerce Lab flight experiments and their development status and projects a mission traffic model that can be used in commercial mission planning.

  19. 13. BUILDING NO. 445, PHYSICS LAB (FORMERLY GUN BAG LOADING), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. BUILDING NO. 445, PHYSICS LAB (FORMERLY GUN BAG LOADING), VIEW NORTH AT SOUTH END OF BUILDING. - Picatinny Arsenal, 400 Area, Gun Bag Loading District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  20. Berkeley Lab: A Place of Wonder, Spring 2006

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-01

    Video produced in early 2006. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab has been a leader in science and engineering research for more than 75 years. The Lab conducts a wide range of scientific research with key efforts in fundamental studies of the universe, quantitative biology, nanoscience, new energy systems and environmental solutions, and the use of computing as a tool for discovery. Located on a 200 acre site in the hills above the University of California's Berkeley campus, adjacent to the San Francisco Bay, Berkeley Lab holds the distinction of being the oldest of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Laboratories. Eleven Nobel laureates are associated with Berkeley Lab. It is managed by the University of California.

  1. Ames Lab 101: Danny Shechtman Returns to the Ames Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Shechtman, Danny

    2012-01-01

    Danny Shechtman, Ames Laboratory Scientist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2011, returned to the Ames Lab on February 14, 2012. During this time, the Nobel Laureate met with the press as well as ISU students.

  2. Improving physician practice efficiency by learning lab test ordering pattern.

    PubMed

    Cai, Peng; Cao, Feng; Ni, Yuan; Shen, Weijia; Zheng, Tao

    2013-01-01

    The system of electronic medical records (EMR) has been widely used in physician practice. In China, physicians have the time pressure to provide care to many patients in a short period. Improving practice efficiency is a promising direction to mitigate this predicament. During the encounter, ordering lab test is one of the most frequent actions in EMR system. In this paper, our motivation is to save physician's time by providing lab test ordering list to facilitate physician practice. To this end, we developed weight based multi-label classification framework to learn to order lab test for the current encounter according to the historical EMR. Particularly, we propose to learn the physician-specific lab test ordering pattern as different physicians may have different practice behavior on the same population. Experimental results on the real data set demonstrate that physician-specific models can outperform the baseline.

  3. Theme: Land Laboratories--Urban Settings, Liability, Natural Resources Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whaley, David, Ed.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Includes "With a Little Imagination"; "From Fallow to Fertile"; "Operating a School Enterprise in Agriculture"; "Using a Nontraditional Greenhouse to Enhance Lab Instruction"; "Risk Management for Liability in Operating Land Laboratories"; "Working Land and Water Laboratory for Natural…

  4. DETAIL VIEW OF TESTING EQUIPMENT, REMOTE MANIPULATOR SYSTEM LAB, ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF TESTING EQUIPMENT, REMOTE MANIPULATOR SYSTEM LAB, ROOM NO. 1N4, FACING SOUTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  5. Ion engine neutralizer erosion in lab and space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuharski, R. A.; Mandell, M. J.; Gardner, B. M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present calculations of neutralizer erosion due to both of these sources, including the difference between lab and space environments, and compare the results with laboratory test data.

  6. Effects of reducing scaffolding in an undergraduate electronics lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halstead, Evan

    2016-07-01

    Design and scientific investigation are recognized as key components of undergraduate physics laboratory curricula. In light of this, many successful lab programs have been developed to train students to develop these abilities, and students in these programs have been shown to exhibit a higher transfer rate of scientific abilities to new situations. This paper describes data from students in an electronics class for physics majors, in which steps were removed from traditional "cookbook" lab guides in order to give students the opportunity to design circuits. Post-lab quizzes were given to investigate how this later affected the students' ability to determine the function of circuits they hadn't seen before. Results are compared with post-lab quiz results from students who were given complete explicit procedures, and no statistically significant difference between the two groups is found. Possible explanations for the null effect and recommended future research directions are provided.

  7. BASEMENT, A view looking west in Room 8 at lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BASEMENT, A view looking west in Room 8 at lab counters and various machines - Department of Energy, Mound Facility, Hydrolysis House Building (HH Building), One Mound Road, Miamisburg, Montgomery County, OH

  8. NASA Glenn Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL) Icing Facility Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    This oral presentation is an update to the Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL) engine ice testing. It provides a summary of the modifications done to the facility and recently completed calibrations and test program.

  9. 18. NBS SUIT LAB. OVERALL VIEW. ALL WORK TABLES WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. NBS SUIT LAB. OVERALL VIEW. ALL WORK TABLES WITH MISCELLANEOUS SUIT COMPONENTS AND SUPPLIES. TERRY WEST TO LEFT, AND PAUL DUMBACHER TO RIGHT. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  10. 4. VIEW SOUTHWEST COMPONENTS TEST LAB TEST BAY DETAIL SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW SOUTHWEST COMPONENTS TEST LAB TEST BAY DETAIL SHOWING EMERGENCY SHOWER, AND EYEWASH, AND OBSERVATION WINDOW. STORAGE TANKS ON ROOF. - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  11. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. WALL AND WINDOW OVERLOOKING MAGNET ROOM, SECOND STORY OFFICE-AND-SHOPS SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. MAGNET OF BEAMLINE, EXITING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. END OF BEAMLINE LEAVING SHIELDING, MAGNET COILS IN EPOXY, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. BEVATRON IN CENTER OF MAGNET ROOM - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. ENTRANCE TO STAIRWAY TO TUNNEL UNDER MAIN FLOOR OF MAGNET ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. SIDE OF MAGNET OF BEAMLINE EXITING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. FLOOR AND CEILING OF MAGNET ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. 21. NBS SUIT LAB. THREE GLOVES, HELMET, AND SCREW DRIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. NBS SUIT LAB. THREE GLOVES, HELMET, AND SCREW DRIVER TORQUE WRENCH FOR ASSEMBLY AND REPAIR OF BOTH. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  19. 4. INTERIOR VIEW OF CHEMISTRY LAB LOOKING SOUTHEAST; NOTE FUME ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INTERIOR VIEW OF CHEMISTRY LAB LOOKING SOUTHEAST; NOTE FUME EXHAUST HOOD AT LEFT & ORIGINAL CEILING FIXTURE - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-1033, North side of South Tenth Avenue, Block 10, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  20. VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, OF CHEMISTRY LAB, LOCATED ON MEZZANINE ABOVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW, LOOKING NORTHEAST, OF CHEMISTRY LAB, LOCATED ON MEZZANINE ABOVE AND EAST OF FLOTATION CELLS. MAIN USE WAS SAMPLE ANALYSIS TO DETERMINE OPTIMUM REAGENT MIXES AND QUANTITIES. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  1. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STAIRWAY FROM MAIN FLOOR TO SECOND FLOOR OF MECHANICAL WINE, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-087). March 2005. GENERATOR PIT AREA, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-012). March 2005. PASSAGEWAY UNDER QUADRANT AND DIFFUSION PUMPS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection XBD200503-00117-089). March 2005. GENERATOR PIT AREA, CONCRETE FOUNDATION FOR EQUIPMENT MOUNTS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-054). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR ENTERING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-006). March 2005. JACKBOLTS BETWEEN MAGNET AND MAGNET FOUNDATION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-158). March 2005. CONNECTION OF MAGNET ROOM CRANE TO OUTER TRACK, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-050). March 2005. DIFFUSION PUMPS UNDER WEST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-106). March 2005. SOUTH FAN, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  10. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-052). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  11. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-110). March 2005. SOUTH FAN FROM MEZZANINE, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-066). March 2005. LOCAL INJECTOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-026). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, LOOKING TOWARD EAST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-004). March 2005. ENTRY TO IGLOO, ILLUSTRATING THICKNESS OF IGLOO WALL, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-027). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-005). March 2005. PASSAGEWAY UNDER SOUTHEAST QUADRANT, AIR DUCT OPENINGS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-107). March 2005. NORTH FAN, FAN ROOM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-015). March 2005. INTERIOR WALL OF MAGNET INSIDE CENTER OF BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  19. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-108). March 2005. FAN ROOM WITH STAIR TO FILTER BANKS, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-047). March 2005. AREA OF MAGNET REMOVAL, NORTHEAST QUADRANT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-082). June 2005. CEILING AND CRANE OF BUILDING 51A, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  2. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-043). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, PLUNGING MECHANISM, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-077). March 2005. STUB OF SUPERHILAC BEAM, ENTERING SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-143). March 2005. BUILDING 51A, EXTERIOR WALL, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Looking northwest, first floor, South Wing, Paleontology Lab. The quarry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking northwest, first floor, South Wing, Paleontology Lab. The quarry wall can be seen through the window - Quarry Visitor Center, U.S. Highway 40, 8 miles north of Jensen, Jensen, Uintah County, UT

  6. Environmental Response Laboratory Network (ERLN) Public Labs Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Outlines goals for participation in the Environmental Response Laboratory Network, and FAQs. They play an integral role in a coordinated and operational system of labs capable of efficiently and effectively responding to incidents.

  7. 6. View of interior, EPA Farm Lab Building 1506 milking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View of interior, EPA Farm Lab Building 15-06 milking area, facing northwest - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Laboratory Building, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  8. 7. View of interior, EPA Farm Lab Building 1506 milk ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View of interior, EPA Farm Lab Building 15-06 milk room, facing west - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Laboratory Building, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  9. 1. View of EPA Farm Lab Building 1506, facing south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of EPA Farm Lab Building 15-06, facing south - Nevada Test Site, Environmental Protection Agency Farm, Laboratory Building, Area 15, Yucca Flat, 10-2 Road near Circle Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  10. Ames Lab 101: Danny Shechtman Returns to the Ames Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    Shechtman, Danny

    2016-07-12

    Danny Shechtman, Ames Laboratory Scientist and winner of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2011, returned to the Ames Lab on February 14, 2012. During this time, the Nobel Laureate met with the press as well as ISU students.

  11. Blowing Bubbles: An Interdisciplinary Science and Mathematics Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallings, Lynn; Wimpey, Kim

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a bubble activity to teach about the nature of molecules, surface tension, light waves, and color. Explains how to make the bubble solution and includes a lab worksheet with answers to the questions. (YDS)

  12. Looking North into Lab Metallurgy Testing Area and Enrichment Motor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking North into Lab Metallurgy Testing Area and Enrichment Motor within Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  13. Interview With Stuart Lee, Lead Scientist, Cardiovascular Lab

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Josh Byerly talks with Stuart Lee, one of the lead scientists for the Cardiovascular Lab at the Johnson Space Center where scientists are studying the effects of long-du...

  14. After the Lab: Learning Begins when Cleanup Starts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gooding, Julia; Metz, Bill

    2011-01-01

    Having students design their own methods regarding data collection during a lab may help them formulate appropriate investigative procedures. The authors use a modified gallery walk to develop science skills. (Contains 3 figures.)

  15. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Hazards in a Photography Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houk, Cliff; Hart, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Described are case studies illustrating chemical hazards in a photography lab due to compounds containing cyanide. Suggestions for preventing problems including proper procedures, housekeeping, facilities, and ventilation are considered. (RH)

  16. Using "Dialogue" Labs in a Community-College Physics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uretsky, Jack L.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a community-college curriculum that incorporates Socratic Dialogue Inducing (SDI) laboratories into a new calculus-based preengineering physics sequence. SDI allows for group discussion labs that emphasize the concepts being taught in the lectures. (ZWH)

  17. Development of Unified Lab Test Result Master for Multiple Facilities.

    PubMed

    Kume, Naoto; Suzuki, Kenji; Kobayashi, Shinji; Araki, Kenji; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    A clinical study requires massive amounts of of lab test data, especially for rare diseases. Before creating a protocol, the hypothesis if the protocol will work with enough amount of patients' dataset has to be proved. However, a single facility, such as a university hospital, often faces a lack of number of patients for specific target diseases. Even if collecting datasets from several facilities, there is no active master table that can merge lab test results between the facility datasets. Therefore, the authors develop a unified lab test result master. Because test master standards such as JLAC10 and LOINC are provided from a viewpoint of academic classification of laboratory medicine, the classification does not fit clinical classification, which doctors understand with a mind-set of establishing a clinical study protocol. The authors establish a method to unify masters using an active lab test result master from two university hospitals.

  18. Lab Creates 'Fake Vomit' To Test Space Trash Bag

    NASA Video Gallery

    After answering the question of how the space potty works, astronaut Mike Massimino now visits a NASA lab where chemists have been working hard to develop a next-generation trash bag for future exp...

  19. Production of Resonances Using CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Kei

    2015-07-01

    Measurements of hadronic resonances produced in photoproduction reactions at Jefferson Lab are shown and discussed. Emphasis is placed on the production of the excited hyperon states Sigma(1385), Lambda(1405), and Lambda(1520). Some future prospects for the upcoming Jefferson Lab 12 GeV era are given, where the CLAS12 and GlueX detectors will see unprecedented amounts of data using electromagnetic probes and further our knowledge of hadronic resonances.

  20. Status of the AFRL/RW Bio-Sensors Lab

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-28

    it flies like a dragonfly ) yet long, butterfly-like antennae (first observed about the time Tom Daniel, Sanjay Sane, and Mark Willis were showing...labs, all in academia, doing work similar to the work the BioSensors Lab is being set up to do, have been visited around the world : Dr Holger Krapp’s...instrumentation across several insects, as well as give insight into the design principles and applications of ocelli in the insect world . When

  1. LabNet: Toward a community of practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruopp, Richard

    1993-03-01

    It is common currency that science education in America isn't working well enough. We are failing to excite the curiosity of young minds in the great questions of the physical universe. LabNet—a prototype teacher-support project developed by TERC, and funded by the National Science Foundation, is dedicated to addressing this issue. The first three year phase of LabNet began in January 1989 and ended in mid-1992. During that time, some 562 high school teachers of physics in 37 states were involved. Three interconnected threads are woven through the fabric of LabNet. The first, and most vivid, is the use of projects to enhance students' science learning. LabNet's second thread is building a community of practice among LabNet teachers. The third thread woven into LabNet is promoting the use of new technologies in science teaching and learning. The most notable use of new technology in the LabNet project is telecommunications—computer-to-computer communication via telephone lines. A dedicated network has been created and made available to all participants. As the first national network designed for high school teachers of physical science, the LabNetwork is a dynamic medium for building and sustaining a community of practice for physics teachers separated by many thousands of miles. In recommendations directed at teachers, scientists, and particularly the National Science Foundation, steps are outlined that can be taken to strengthen the community and the teaching of science in both the secondary and elementary grades.

  2. Human Engineering Modeling and Performance Lab Study Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    The HEMAP (Human Engineering Modeling and Performance) Lab is a joint effort between the Industrial and Human Engineering group and the KAVE (Kennedy Advanced Visualiations Environment) group. The lab consists of sixteen camera system that is used to capture human motions and operational tasks, through te use of a Velcro suit equipped with sensors, and then simulate these tasks in an ergonomic software package know as Jac, The Jack software is able to identify the potential risk hazards.

  3. OPTO-22 DRIVER. OPTO-22 Driver for LabView

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.W.

    1991-01-28

    OPTO-22 DRIVER consists of a set of LabVIEW (National Instruments, Austin, TX) virtual instruments (VIs) that handle low-level communications with signal conditioning equipment by Opto-22 (Huntington Beach, CA). The OPTOMUX protocol is support, which requires the use of a serial port and supports multidrop communications. With this package, users can connect hundreds of Opto-22 modules to their LabVIEW system and access all features of the hardware, including analog and digital input and outputs.

  4. Commerce Lab: Mission analysis and payload integration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The needs of an aggressive commercial microgravity program are identified, space missions are defined, and infrastructural issues are identified and analyzed. A commercial laboratory, commerce lab, is conceived to be one or more an array of carriers which would fly aboard the space shuttle and accommodate microgravity science experiment payloads. Commerce lab is seen as a logical transition between currently planned space shuttle missions and future microgravity missions centered around the space station.

  5. LabTalk/2: a middleware approach to HIS integration.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, A M; Giuse, D A

    1995-01-01

    LabTalk/2 is an intelligent interface between a legacy order-entry system and a legacy laboratory information system. Unlike other interfaces, LabTalk/2 does more than just transform data from one format to another; it transforms the manner in which data is processed. Utilizing the "middleware" concept, it sits independently between the two systems, decoupling their maintenance needs. Implementation has been successful.

  6. VIEW OF THIRD LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (SECOND FLOOR OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THIRD LEVEL OF MISSILE LAB (SECOND FLOOR OF BUILDING) SHOWING MISSILE TUBE IN CENTER WITH OPEN HATCH AT RIGHT. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island Polaris Missile Lab & U.S. Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine Training Center, Between Lexington Boulvevard and the sea plane ramps on the southwest side of Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. A Case Study of a High School Fab Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Jennifer E.

    This dissertation examines making and design-based STEM education in a formal makerspace. It focuses on how the design and implementation of a Fab Lab learning environment and curriculum affect how instructors and students see themselves engaging in science, and how the Fab Lab relates to the social sorting practices that already take place at North High School. While there is research examining design-based STEM education in informal and formal learning environments, we know little about how K-12 teachers define STEM in making activities when no university or museum partnership exists. This study sought to help fill this gap in the research literature. This case study of a formal makerspace followed instructors and students in one introductory Fab Lab course for one semester. Additional observations of an introductory woodworking course helped build the case and set it into the school context, and provided supplementary material to better understand the similarities and differences between the Fab Lab course and a more traditional design-based learning course. Using evidence from observational field notes, participant interviews, course materials, and student work, I found that the North Fab Lab relies on artifacts and rhetoric symbolic of science and STEM to set itself apart from other design-based courses at North High School. Secondly, the North Fab Lab instructors and students were unable to explain how what they were doing in the Fab Lab was science, and instead relied on vague and unsupported claims related to interdisciplinary STEM practices and dated descriptions of science. Lastly, the design and implementation of the Fab Lab learning environment and curriculum and its separation from North High School's low tech, design-based courses effectively reinforced social sorting practices and cultural assumptions about student work and intelligence.

  8. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice.

    PubMed

    Bugaj, T J; Nikendei, C

    2016-01-01

    Today, skills laboratories or "skills labs", i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that allows the repeated, anxiety- and risk-free practice of targeted skills. In this selective literature review, the first section is devoted to (I) the development and dissemination of the skills lab concept. There follows (II) an outline of the underlying idea and (III) an analysis of key efficacy factors. Thereafter, (IV) the training method's effectiveness and transference are illuminated, before (V) the use of student tutors, in the sense of peer-assisted-learning, in skills labs is discussed separately. Finally, (VI) the efficiency of the skills lab concept is analyzed, followed by an outlook on future developments and trends in the field of skills lab training.

  9. Future{at}Labs.Prosperity Game{trademark}

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.F.; Boyack, K.W.; Berman, M.

    1996-10-01

    Prosperity Games{trademark} are an outgrowth and adaptation of move/countermove and seminar War Games, Prosperity Games{trademark} are simulations that explore complex issues in a variety of areas including economics, politics, sociology, environment, education, and research. These issues can be examined from a variety of perspectives ranging from global, macroeconomic and geopolitical viewpoint down to the details of customer/supplier/market interactions specific industries. All Prosperity Games{trademark} are unique in that both the game format and the player contributions vary from game to game. This report documents the Future{at}Labs.Prosperity Game{trademark} conducted under the sponsorship of the Industry Advisory Boards of the national labs, the national labs, Lockheed Martin Corporation, and the University of California. Players were drawn from all stakeholders involved including government, industry, labs, and academia. The primary objectives of this game were to: (1) explore ways to optimize the role of the multidisciplinary labs in serving national missions and needs; (2) explore ways to increase collaboration and partnerships among government, laboratories, universities, and industry; and (3) create a network of partnership champions to promote findings and policy options. The deliberations and recommendations of these players provided valuable insights as to the views of this diverse group of decision makers concerning the future of the labs.

  10. Hybrid Reality Lab Capabilities - Video 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Francisco J.; Noyes, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Our Hybrid Reality and Advanced Operations Lab is developing incredibly realistic and immersive systems that could be used to provide training, support engineering analysis, and augment data collection for various human performance metrics at NASA. To get a better understanding of what Hybrid Reality is, let's go through the two most commonly known types of immersive realities: Virtual Reality, and Augmented Reality. Virtual Reality creates immersive scenes that are completely made up of digital information. This technology has been used to train astronauts at NASA, used during teleoperation of remote assets (arms, rovers, robots, etc.) and other activities. One challenge with Virtual Reality is that if you are using it for real time-applications (like landing an airplane) then the information used to create the virtual scenes can be old (i.e. visualized long after physical objects moved in the scene) and not accurate enough to land the airplane safely. This is where Augmented Reality comes in. Augmented Reality takes real-time environment information (from a camera, or see through window, and places digitally created information into the scene so that it matches with the video/glass information). Augmented Reality enhances real environment information collected with a live sensor or viewport (e.g. camera, window, etc.) with the information-rich visualization provided by Virtual Reality. Hybrid Reality takes Augmented Reality even further, by creating a higher level of immersion where interactivity can take place. Hybrid Reality takes Virtual Reality objects and a trackable, physical representation of those objects, places them in the same coordinate system, and allows people to interact with both objects' representations (virtual and physical) simultaneously. After a short period of adjustment, the individuals begin to interact with all the objects in the scene as if they were real-life objects. The ability to physically touch and interact with digitally created

  11. Seeing an Old Lab in a New Light: Transforming a Traditional Optics Lab into Full Guided Inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maley, Tim; Stoll, Will; Demir, Kadir

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes the authors' experiences transforming a "cookbook" lab into an inquiry-based investigation and the powerful effect the inquiry-oriented lab had on our students' understanding of lenses. We found the inquiry-oriented approach led to richer interactions between students as well as a deeper conceptual understanding of how images are formed. We observed engaged students participating in scientific discourse full of hypothesizing, modeling, and argumentation based on evidence.

  12. Status report on Jefferson Lab`s high-power infrared free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, C.L.

    1997-10-01

    Jefferson Lab is building a free-electron laser to produce tunable, continuous-wave (cw), kW-level light at 3-6 {mu}m wavelength. A superconducting accelerator will drive the laser, and a transport lattice will recirculate the beam back through the accelerator for energy recovery. Space charge in the injector and coherent synchrotron radiation in magnetic bends will be present, and the machine is instrumented to study these phenomena during commissioning. The wiggler and optical cavity are conventional; however, significant analysis and testing was needed to ensure mirror heating at 1 kW of outcoupled power would not impede performance. The FEL is being installed in its own facility, and installation will be finished in Fall 1997. This paper surveys the machine, the status of its construction, and plans for its commissioning.

  13. Plasma in the Synthesis of Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laub, Taylor; Gentile, Charles; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2011-10-01

    Development of nanotechnology, specifically the production of carbon nanotubes, may be integral to innovation in an array of fields, from textiles to electronics. The structure of carbon nanotubes affords for the creation of materials with exceptional strength and conductivity. At present, scientists rely on ``cut-and-try'' methods to perfect the plasma synthesis, leaving an interface gap between plasma and material sciences. As a result, methods of producing carbon nanotubes are expensive and length is difficult to standardize. Therefore, the development of a method to produce carbon nanotubes efficiently and in uniform sizes is of great interest. To elucidate the role of plasma in the synthesis of nanoparticles, Princeton Plasma Physics Lab is developing a Plasma-Based Nano Laboratory (PBNL). The PBNL houses an Electron Diffusion Gauge Experiment (EDGE) as well as a Nanotube Arc Discharge Experiment (NADE) with the purpose of investigating plasma-nanoparticle interaction. The NADE studies the ability to control the diameter and length of nanotube formation through a set of experimental parameters. In addition, the potential to increase nanotube length will be studied. PPPL's expertise on plasma science could be critically valuable to the successful development of highly efficient and low cost plasma-based techniques, which have the potential to increase accessibility of nanotubes, and propel further innovation rooted in nanotechnology.

  14. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  15. Unmatter Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2015-11-01

    ``Unmatter Plasma'' is a novel form of plasma, exclusively made of matter and its antimatter counterpart. An experiment (2015) on matter-antimatter plasma [or unmatter plasma] was recently successful at the Astra Gemini laser facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxford, United Kingdom. The experiment that was made has produced electron-positron plasma. The positron is the antimatter of the electron, having an opposite charge of the electron, but the other properties are the same. Unmatter is considered as a combination of matter and antimatter. For example electron-positron is a type of unmatter. We coined the word ``unmatter'' (2004) that means neither matter nor antimatter, but something in between. Besides matter and antimatter there may exist unmatter (as a new form of matter) in accordance with the neutrosophy theory that between an entity and its opposite there exist intermediate entities.

  16. PLASMA ENERGIZATION

    DOEpatents

    Furth, H.P.; Chambers, E.S.

    1962-03-01

    BS>A method is given for ion cyclotron resonance heatthg of a magnetically confined plasma by an applied radio-frequency field. In accordance with the invention, the radiofrequency energy is transferred to the plasma without the usual attendent self-shielding effect of plasma polarlzatlon, whereby the energy transfer is accomplished with superior efficiency. More explicitly, the invention includes means for applying a radio-frequency electric field radially to an end of a plasma column confined in a magnetic mirror field configuration. The radio-frequency field propagates hydromagnetic waves axially through the column with the waves diminishing in an intermediate region of the column at ion cyclotron resonance with the fleld frequency. In such region the wave energy is converted by viscous damping to rotational energy of the plasma ions. (AEC)

  17. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1961-08-22

    A device is described for establishing and maintaining a high-energy, rotational plasma for use as a fast discharge capacitor. A disc-shaped, current- conducting plasma is formed in an axinl magnetic field and a crossed electric field, thereby creating rotational kinetic enengy in the plasma. Such energy stored in the rotation of the plasma disc is substantial and is convertible tc electrical energy by generator action in an output line electrically coupled to the plasma volume. Means are then provided for discharging the electrical energy into an external circuit coupled to the output line to produce a very large pulse having an extremely rapid rise time in the waveform thereof. (AE C)

  18. The College of Charleston's 400-Student Observational Lab Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    True, C. M.

    2006-06-01

    For over thirty years the College of Charleston has been teaching a year-long introductory astronomy course incorporating a mandatory 3 hour lab. Despite our location in a very light polluted, coastal, high humidity, and often cloudy metropolitan area we have emphasized observational activities as much as possible. To accommodate our population of between 300-400 students per semester, we have 28 8-inch Celestron Telescopes and 25 GPS capable 8-inch Meade LX-200 telescopes. Finally, we have a 16 DFM adjacent to our rooftop observing decks. For indoor activities we have access to 42 computers running a variety of astronomy education software. Some of the computer activities are based on the Starry Night software (Backyard and Pro), the CLEA software from Gettysburg College, and Spectrum Explorer from Boston University. Additionally, we have labs involving cratering, eclipses and phases, coordinate systems with celestial globes, the inverse square law, spectroscopy and spectral classification, as well as others. In this presentation we will discuss the difficulties in managing a program of this size. We have approximately 14 lab sections a week. The lab manager's task involves coordinating 8-10 lab instructors and the same number of undergraduate teaching assistants as well as trying to maintain a coherent experience between the labs and lecture sections. Our lab manuals are produced locally with yearly updates. Samples from the manuals will be available. This program has been developed by a large number of College of Charleston astronomy faculty, including Don Drost, Bob Dukes, Chris Fragile, Tim Giblin, Jon Hakkila, Bill Kubinec, Lee Lindner, Jim Neff, Laura Penny, Al Rainis, Terry Richardson, and D. J. Williams, as well as adjunct and visiting faculty Bill Baird, Kevin Bourque, Ethan Denault, Kwayera Davis, Francie Halter, and Alan Johnson. Part of this work has been funded by NSF DUE grants to the College of Charleston.

  19. Design of Inquiry-Oriented Science Labs: Impacts on Students' Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baseya, J. M.; Francis, C. D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Changes in lab style can lead to differences in learning. Two inquiry-oriented lab styles are guided inquiry (GI) and problem-based (PB). Students' attitudes towards lab are important to consider when choosing between GI and PB styles during curriculum design. Purpose: We examined the degree to which lab experiences are explained by a…

  20. The Influence of Tablet PCs on Students' Use of Multiple Representations in Lab Reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guelman, Clarisa Bercovich; De Leone, Charles; Price, Edward

    2009-11-01

    This study examined how different tools influenced students' use of representations in the Physics laboratory. In one section of a lab course, every student had a Tablet PC that served as a digital-ink based lab notebook. Students could seamlessly create hand-drawn graphics and equations, and write lab reports on the same computer used for data acquisition, simulation, and analysis. In another lab section, students used traditional printed lab guides, kept paper notebooks, and then wrote lab reports on regular laptops. Analysis of the lab reports showed differences between the sections' use of multiple representations, including an increased use of diagrams and equations by the Tablet users.

  1. Plasma universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.

    1986-01-01

    Traditionally the views on the cosmic environent have been based on observations in the visual octave of the electromagnetic spectrum, during the last half-century supplemented by infrared and radio observations. Space research has opened the full spectrum. Of special importance are the X-ray-gamma-ray regions, in which a number of unexpected phenomena have been discovered. Radiations in these regions are likely to originate mainly from magnetised cosmic plasmas. Such a medium may also emit synchrotron radiation which is observable in the radio region. If a model of the universe is based on the plasma phenomena mentioned it is found that the plasma universe is drastically different from the traditional visual universe. Information about the plasma universe can also be obtained by extrapolation of laboratory experiments and magnetospheric in situ measurements of plasmas. This approach is possible because it is likely that the basic properties of plasmas are the same everywhere. In order to test the usefulness of the plasma universe model it is applied to cosmogony. Such an approach seems to be rather successful. For example, the complicated structure of the Saturnian C ring can be accounted for. It is possible to reconstruct certain phenomena 4 to 5 billions of years ago with an accuracy of better than 1%.

  2. LabRGB: evaluation of the weighting factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaya, Fumio; Ohta, Noboru

    2010-01-01

    Spectral distribution can be written as a linear combination of eigenvectors and the eigenvectors method gives the least estimation error, but eigenvectors depend on a sample selection of population and encoding values have no physical meaning. Recently reported LabPQR [1] is to convey physical values, but still is dependent on a sample selection of population. Thus, LabRGB [2] was proposed in 2007. LabRGB is to provide "sample selection of population" free spectral encoding/decoding methods. LabRGB consists of six unique trigonometric base functions and physically meaningful encoding values. LabRGB was applied to the real multispectral images and showed almost equal performance to traditional orthogonal eigenvector method in spectral estimation, and even better performance in colorimetric estimation. In this paper, the weighting factors of the base functions were examined in terms of their possible ranges. The numerical values are obtained by using a linear programming technique, and the results are also confirmed by using the Monte Carlo method. The results indicate that the possible ranges of six scores for six base functions are well within -80 to 80. The ranges thus obtained give a good clue for explicitly defining the bit depths of respective scores for the future applications and standardization.

  3. Lab-on-a-chip pathogen sensors for food safety.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol; Kim, Bumsang

    2012-01-01

    There have been a number of cases of foodborne illness among humans that are caused by pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium, etc. The current practices to detect such pathogenic agents are cell culturing, immunoassays, or polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). These methods are essentially laboratory-based methods that are not at all real-time and thus unavailable for early-monitoring of such pathogens. They are also very difficult to implement in the field. Lab-on-a-chip biosensors, however, have a strong potential to be used in the field since they can be miniaturized and automated; they are also potentially fast and very sensitive. These lab-on-a-chip biosensors can detect pathogens in farms, packaging/processing facilities, delivery/distribution systems, and at the consumer level. There are still several issues to be resolved before applying these lab-on-a-chip sensors to field applications, including the pre-treatment of a sample, proper storage of reagents, full integration into a battery-powered system, and demonstration of very high sensitivity, which are addressed in this review article. Several different types of lab-on-a-chip biosensors, including immunoassay- and PCR-based, have been developed and tested for detecting foodborne pathogens. Their assay performance, including detection limit and assay time, are also summarized. Finally, the use of optical fibers or optical waveguide is discussed as a means to improve the portability and sensitivity of lab-on-a-chip pathogen sensors.

  4. Teaching from Data -- Climate Labs at Columbia and Barnard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfirman, S.; Hays, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Since 1995 Columbia and Barnard have offered Earth's Environmental Systems: Climate to undergraduate environmental majors. Both lecture and laboratory resources are available on line. In collaboration with Lamont- Doherty Earth Observatory, the twelve labs engage students in exploring global databases to learn about earth processes. Evaluations of the course as well as exit surveys of senior majors, indicate that the laboratories help students learn how to extract meaning from data and to better understand the research experience. Using classical data such as the Mauna Loa carbon dioxide concentrations, the Vostok record, the atmospheric Earth Radiation Budget Experience, and the Levitus World Ocean Atlas, the laboratories are designed with both structured exercises and open-ended questions. For example, the "Modern Atmospheric CO2 Record" lab has students compare the Mauna Loa data with records from the South Pole and Barrow, and then examine seasonal variations in global primary productivity to understand seasonal and interhemispheric differences. This information is then set in the context of projections from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Development of the Earth Environmental Systems sequence (Climate, Solid Earth, and Life) was supported by NSF and Columbia to establish a firm foundation for environmental majors. The Climate course is taught both fall and spring semesters by a team of professors. Challenges over the years include consistently augmenting the computer-based labs with hands-on elements, and student difficulty in writing lab reports when the lab is open-ended.

  5. Documentation generator application for MatLab source codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niton, B.; Pozniak, K. T.; Romaniuk, R. S.

    2011-06-01

    The UML, which is a complex system modeling and description technology, has recently been expanding its uses in the field of formalization and algorithmic approach to such systems like multiprocessor photonic, optoelectronic and advanced electronics carriers; distributed, multichannel measurement systems; optical networks, industrial electronics, novel R&D solutions. The paper describes a realization of an application for documenting MatLab source codes. There are presented own novel solution based on Doxygen program which is available on the free license, with accessible source code. The used supporting tools for parser building were Bison and Flex. There are presented the practical results of the documentation generator. The program was applied for exemplary MatLab codes. The documentation generator application is used for design of large optoelectronic and electronic measurement and control systems. The paper consists of three parts which describe the following components of the documentation generator for photonic and electronic systems: concept, MatLab application and VHDL application. This is part two which describes the MatLab application. MatLab is used for description of the measured phenomena.

  6. Assessing the therapeutic potential of lab-made hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Milad; Grimm, Andrew A; Willenbring, Holger

    2016-07-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has potential as a bridge or even alternative to whole-organ liver transplantation. Because donor livers are scarce, realizing this potential requires the development of alternative cell sources. To be therapeutically effective, surrogate hepatocytes must replicate the complex function and ability to proliferate of primary human hepatocytes. Ideally, they are also autologous to eliminate the need for immune suppression, which can have severe side effects and may not be sufficient to prevent rejection long term. In the past decade, several methods have been developed to generate hepatocytes from other readily and safely accessible somatic cells. These lab-made hepatocytes show promise in animal models of liver diseases, supporting the feasibility of autologous liver cell therapies. Here, we review recent preclinical studies exemplifying different types of lab-made hepatocytes that can potentially be used in autologous liver cell therapies. To define the therapeutic efficacy of current lab-made hepatocytes, we compare them to primary human hepatocytes, focusing on engraftment efficiency and posttransplant proliferation and function. In addition to summarizing published results, we discuss animal models and assays effective in assessing therapeutic efficacy. This analysis underscores the therapeutic potential of current lab-made hepatocytes, but also highlights deficiencies and uncertainties that need to be addressed in future studies aimed at developing liver cell therapies with lab-made hepatocytes. (Hepatology 2016;64:287-294).

  7. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bugaj, T. J.; Nikendei, C.

    2016-01-01

    Today, skills laboratories or “skills labs”, i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that allows the repeated, anxiety- and risk-free practice of targeted skills. In this selective literature review, the first section is devoted to (I) the development and dissemination of the skills lab concept. There follows (II) an outline of the underlying idea and (III) an analysis of key efficacy factors. Thereafter, (IV) the training method’s effectiveness and transference are illuminated, before (V) the use of student tutors, in the sense of peer-assisted-learning, in skills labs is discussed separately. Finally, (VI) the efficiency of the skills lab concept is analyzed, followed by an outlook on future developments and trends in the field of skills lab training. PMID:27579363

  8. Transforming the advanced lab: Part I - Learning goals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwickl, Benjamin; Finkelstein, Noah; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2012-02-01

    Within the physics education research community relatively little attention has been given to laboratory courses, especially at the upper-division undergraduate level. As part of transforming our senior-level Optics and Modern Physics Lab at the University of Colorado Boulder we are developing learning goals, revising curricula, and creating assessments. In this paper, we report on the establishment of our learning goals and a surrounding framework that have emerged from discussions with a wide variety of faculty, from a review of the literature on labs, and from identifying the goals of existing lab courses. Our goals go beyond those of specific physics content and apparatus, allowing instructors to personalize them to their contexts. We report on four broad themes and associated learning goals: Modeling (math-physics-data connection, statistical error analysis, systematic error, modeling of engineered "black boxes"), Design (of experiments, apparatus, programs, troubleshooting), Communication, and Technical Lab Skills (computer-aided data analysis, LabVIEW, test and measurement equipment).

  9. Symptoms experienced by law enforcement personnel during methamphetamine lab investigations.

    PubMed

    Witter, Roxana Z; Martyny, John W; Mueller, Kathryn; Gottschall, Bibi; Newman, Lee S

    2007-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine if law enforcement personnel experience symptoms associated with methamphetamine lab investigation and to assess those factors that may result in more symptoms. A total of 258 standardized, self-administered surveys were distributed to law enforcement personnel attending national/regional training classes, between June 2004-February 2005. Ninety-three percent of the surveys were returned and used to determine symptoms experienced while investigating clandestine methamphetamine labs, as well as the job duties of the respondent and the personal protective equipment used. More than 70% of respondents reported headaches, central nervous system symptoms, respiratory symptoms, sore throat, and other symptoms. Unadjusted and adjusted risk of symptoms was higher for those who investigated more than 30 labs. Other significant risk factors included time spent in the lab, phase of investigation, presence of active chemical processes, and coexistent disease. Respirator use was not independently associated with the likelihood of reporting symptoms. It was concluded that methamphetamine lab investigation is positively associated with symptom reporting in a high percentage of law enforcement personnel involved in these tasks. For most individuals, the reported symptoms were transitory and diminished in a short time, but some individuals reported needing to seek medical attention with symptoms that persisted.

  10. Smoky Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2006-10-01

    The mesosphere contains nanometer-sized smoke particles that have formed in the vapor trails of meteors and that are thought to be the condensation nuclei for noctilucent clouds. Laboratory dusty plasmas often have the dust particles in a layer at the lower sheath boundary. We examine the possibility of creating in a double-plasma device a smoky plasma in which the particles would be sufficiently small to fill the plasma nearly uniformly while being sufficiently large to exhibit multiple charge states that would distinguish the smoky plasma from one containing heavy negative ions. For example, nanometer sized atomic clusters of Ag (4 nm radius, 10,000 atoms) can be generated in an oven with an inert gas that carries the particles into the plasma chamber. These particles will become charged negatively with about 8 electrons and will then be electrostatically contained by the presheath electric field The confining electric force will also be greater than the ion drag force that could otherwise create a void in the smoke particle density distribution. This plasma would make possible, for example, experiments on the coupling of electrostatic waves to fluid turbulence by the neutral drag force. An acoustic wave propagating in smoky plasma will exert different drag forces on electrons, ions, and smoke particles thus creating a charge-separation electric field that can be measured by potential probes. This coupling may be the origin of electrostatic fluctuations seen by rocket-borne electric field probes in the mesosphere. Supported by the NSF/DOE Plasma Science Initiative.

  11. Using Plasma Physics to Enhance the High School Physics Curriculu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, J.; Buck, M.; Gekelman, W.; Buck, R.; Spahn, C.; Walker, C.; Layton, W.

    2001-10-01

    Faculty and student members of the Los Angeles Physics Teachers Alliance Group (LAPTAG) have constructed a plasma machine on the ULCA. Dr. Gekelman, the faculty advisor, provides information and materials on plasma physics via the Web and lectures to high school faculty and students. Faculty members then transfer the information to students at their respective schools and schedule time for experiments on the machine. A lab manual and curricular materials suitable for high school students is being developed using a lab based, discovery approach. The manual is available as a pdf document on the LAPTAG website (http://coke.physics.ucla.edu/laptag/plasma_exp.dir/laptag_plasma.htm). Introducing plasma physics into the high school curriculum provides a 20th century application of classical physics concepts that support and motivate student interest in physics. Students from LAPTAG schools use state-of-the-art computers, software, and equipment to perform developed labs and to design experiments of their own. Collaboration exists between students and faculty from different schools and the university. Learning physics concepts takes place in the context of a "science community" that realistically demonstrates the scientific process to students.

  12. A New Approach to Standardize Multicenter Studies: Mobile Lab Technology for the German Environmental Specimen Bank

    PubMed Central

    Lermen, Dominik; Schmitt, Daniel; Bartel-Steinbach, Martina; Schröter-Kermani, Christa; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; von Briesen, Hagen; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Technical progress has simplified tasks in lab diagnosis and improved quality of test results. Errors occurring during the pre-analytical phase have more negative impact on the quality of test results than errors encountered during the total analytical process. Different infrastructures of sampling sites can highly influence the quality of samples and therewith of analytical results. Annually the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) collects, characterizes, and stores blood, plasma, and urine samples of 120–150 volunteers each on four different sampling sites in Germany. Overarching goal is to investigate the exposure to environmental pollutants of non-occupational exposed young adults combining human biomonitoring with questionnaire data. We investigated the requirements of the study and the possibility to realize a highly standardized sampling procedure on a mobile platform in order to increase the required quality of the pre-analytical phase. The results lead to the development of a mobile epidemiologic laboratory (epiLab) in the project “Labor der Zukunft” (future’s lab technology). This laboratory includes a 14.7 m2 reception area to record medical history and exposure-relevant behavior, a 21.1 m2 examination room to record dental fillings and for blood withdrawal, a 15.5 m2 biological safety level 2 laboratory to process and analyze samples on site including a 2.8 m2 personnel lock and a 3.6 m2 cryofacility to immediately freeze samples. Frozen samples can be transferred to their final destination within the vehicle without breaking the cold chain. To our knowledge, we herewith describe for the first time the implementation of a biological safety laboratory (BSL) 2 lab and an epidemiologic unit on a single mobile platform. Since 2013 we have been collecting up to 15.000 individual human samples annually under highly standardized conditions using the mobile laboratory. Characterized and free of alterations they are kept ready for retrospective

  13. RiskLab - a joint Teaching Lab on Hazard and Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruffini, Mi.; Baruffini, Mo.; Thuering, M.

    2009-04-01

    In the future natural disasters are expected to increase due to climatic changes that strongly affect environmental, social and economical systems. For this reason and because of the limited resources, governments require analytical risk analysis for a better mitigation planning. Risk analysis is a process to determine the nature and extent of risk by estimating potential hazards and evaluating existing conditions of vulnerability that could pose a potential threat or harm to people, property, livelihoods and environment. This process has become a generally accepted approach for the assessment of cost-benefit scenarios; originating from technical risks it is being applied to natural hazards for several years now in Switzerland. Starting from these premises "Risk Lab", a joint collaboration between the Institute of Earth Sciences of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland and the Institute for Economic Research of the University of Lugano, has been started in 2006, aiming to become a competence centre about Risk Analysis and Evaluation. The main issue studied by the lab concerns the topic "What security at what price?" and the activities follow the philosophy of the integral risk management as proposed by PLANAT, that defines the process as a cycle that contains different and interrelated phases. The final aim is to change the population and technician idea about risk from "defending against danger" to "being aware of risks" through a proper academic course specially addressed to young people. In fact the most important activity of the laboratory consists in a degree course, offered both to Engineering and Architecture students of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland and Economy Students of the University of Lugano. The course is structured in two main parts: an introductive, theoretical part, composed by class lessons, where the main aspects of natural hazards, risk perception and evaluation and risk management are presented

  14. Lab on a chip technologies for algae detection: a review.

    PubMed

    Schaap, Allison; Rohrlack, Thomas; Bellouard, Yves

    2012-08-01

    Over the last few decades, lab on a chip technologies have emerged as powerful tools for high-accuracy diagnosis with minute quantities of liquid and as tools for exploring cell properties in general. In this paper, we present a review of the current status of this technology in the context of algae detection and monitoring. We start with an overview of the detection methods currently used for algae monitoring, followed by a review of lab on a chip devices for algae detection and classification, and then discuss a case study based on our own research activities. We conclude with a discussion on future challenges and motivations for algae-oriented lab on a chip technologies.

  15. Lab-on-a-chip technologies for stem cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Peter; Sticker, Drago; Charwat, Verena; Kasper, Cornelia; Lepperdinger, Günter

    2014-05-01

    The combination of microfabrication-based technologies with cell biology has laid the foundation for the development of advanced in vitro diagnostic systems capable of analyzing cell cultures under physiologically relevant conditions. In the present review, we address recent lab-on-a-chip developments for stem cell analysis. We highlight in particular the tangible advantages of microfluidic devices to overcome most of the challenges associated with stem cell identification, expansion and differentiation, with the greatest advantage being that lab-on-a-chip technology allows for the precise regulation of culturing conditions, while simultaneously monitoring relevant parameters using embedded sensory systems. State-of-the-art lab-on-a-chip platforms for in vitro assessment of stem cell cultures are presented and their potential future applications discussed.

  16. Bethune-Cookman University STEM Research Lab. DOE Renovation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Herbert W.

    2012-03-31

    DOE funding was used to renovate 4,500 square feet of aging laboratories and classrooms that support science, engineering, and mathematics disciplines (specifically environmental science, and computer engineering). The expansion of the labs was needed to support robotics and environmental science research, and to better accommodate a wide variety of teaching situations. The renovated space includes a robotics laboratory, two multi-use labs, safe spaces for the storage of instrumentation, modern ventilation equipment, and other “smart” learning venues. The renovated areas feature technologies that are environmentally friendly with reduced energy costs. A campus showcase, the laboratories are a reflection of the University’s commitment to the environment and research as a tool for teaching. As anticipated, the labs facilitate the exploration of emerging technologies that are compatible with local and regional economic plans.

  17. Promoting Metacognition in Introductory Calculus-based Physics Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grennell, Drew; Boudreaux, Andrew

    2010-10-01

    In the Western Washington University physics department, a project is underway to develop research-based laboratory curriculum for the introductory calculus-based course. Instructional goals not only include supporting students' conceptual understanding and reasoning ability, but also providing students with opportunities to engage in metacognition. For the latter, our approach has been to scaffold reflective thinking with guided questions. Specific instructional strategies include analysis of alternate reasoning presented in fictitious dialogues and comparison of students' initial ideas with their lab group's final, consensus understanding. Assessment of student metacognition includes pre- and post- course data from selected questions on the CLASS survey, analysis of written lab worksheets, and student opinion surveys. CLASS results are similar to a traditional physics course and analysis of lab sheets show that students struggle to engage in a metacognitive process. Future directions include video studies, as well as use of additional written assessments adapted from educational psychology.

  18. The U.S. Lab is moved to weigh stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Lab Destiny comes to rest on the weigh stand. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research.

  19. The U.S. Lab is moved to weigh stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This closeup shows the U.S. Lab Destiny being lifted by an overhead crane to move it to a weigh stand. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research.

  20. The U.S. Lab is moved to weigh stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Suspended under an overhead crane, the U.S. Lab Destiny nears the weigh stand at left. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research.

  1. The U.S. Lab is moved to weigh stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, the U.S. Lab Destiny is lowered toward the weigh stand below. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research.

  2. The U.S. Lab is moved to weigh stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Workers in the Space Station Processing Facility watch as the U.S. Lab Destiny, lifted by an overhead crane, glides through the air to a weigh stand. A component of the International Space Station, Destiny is scheduled to fly on mission STS-98 in early 2001. During the mission, the crew will install the Lab during a series of three space walks. The STS-98 mission will provide the station with science research facilities and expand its power, life support and control capabilities. The U.S. Lab module continues a long tradition of microgravity materials research, first conducted by Skylab and later Shuttle and Spacelab missions. Destiny is expected to be a major feature in future research, providing facilities for biotechnology, fluid physics, combustion, and life sciences research.

  3. Plasma Rain

    NASA Video Gallery

    On April 19, 2010 AIA observed one of the largest prominence eruptions in years. The huge structure erupts, but a great deal of the plasma (hundreds of millions of tons) is unable to escape the gra...

  4. Plasma Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center has developed two solvent-free precision cleaning techniques: plasma cleaning and supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2), that has equal performance, cost parity, and no environmental liability, as compared to existing solvent cleaning methods.

  5. eCAT: Online electronic lab notebook for scientific research

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background eCAT is an electronic lab notebook (ELN) developed by Axiope Limited. It is the first online ELN, the first ELN to be developed in close collaboration with lab scientists, and the first ELN to be targeted at researchers in non-commercial institutions. eCAT was developed in response to feedback from users of a predecessor product. By late 2006 the basic concept had been clarified: a highly scalable web-based collaboration tool that possessed the basic capabilities of commercial ELNs, i.e. a permissions system, controlled sharing, an audit trail, electronic signature and search, and a front end that looked like the electronic counterpart to a paper notebook. Results During the development of the beta version feedback was incorporated from many groups including the FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research, Uppsala University, Children's Hospital Boston, Alex Swarbrick's lab at the Garvan Institute in Sydney and Martin Spitaler at Imperial College. More than 100 individuals and groups worldwide then participated in the beta testing between September 2008 and June 2009. The generally positive response is reflected in the following quote about how one lab is making use of eCAT: "Everyone uses it as an electronic notebook, so they can compile the diverse collections of data that we generate as biologists, such as images and spreadsheets. We use to it to take minutes of meetings. We also use it to manage our common stocks of antibodies, plasmids and so on. Finally, perhaps the most important feature for us is the ability to link records, reagents and experiments." Conclusion By developing eCAT in close collaboration with lab scientists, Axiope has come up with a practical and easy-to-use product that meets the need of scientists to manage, store and share data online. eCAT is already being perceived as a product that labs can continue to use as their data management and sharing grows in scale and complexity. PMID:20334629

  6. First results on GlioLab/GlioSat Precursors Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelletti, Chantal; Notarangelo, Angelo; Demoss, Darrin; Carella, Massimo

    2012-07-01

    Since 2009 GAUSS group is involved in a joint collaboration with Morehead State University (MSU) Space Science Center and IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza (CSS) research labs with the aim to design a biomedical project in order to investigate if the combined effects of microgravity conditions and ionizing radiation increase or decrease the survival rate of cancer cells. The biological sample consists of Glioblastoma cancer cell line ANGM-CSS. Glioblastoma is a kind of cancer that can be treated after surgery only by radiotherapy using ionizing radiation. This treatment, anyway, results in a very low survival rate. This project uses different university space platforms: a CubeLab, named GlioLab, on board the International Space Station and the university microsatellite UniSat-5 designed by GAUSS. In addition a GlioLab/GlioSat precursor experiment has already flown two times with the Space Shuttle during the missions STS-134 and STS-135. The phase 0 or the precursor of GlioLab uses a COTS system, named Liquid Mixing Apparatus (LMA), to board the biological samples inside the Space Shuttle for thirty day . The LMA allows to board liquids inside a vial but is not equipped with environment control system. After landing the samples were investigated by researchers at CSS in Italy and at MSU in Kentucky. This paper deals with the experimental set up and the results obtained during the STS-134 and STS-135 missions and with the new evidences on the behavior of this kind of cancer. In particular the results obtained on the DNA analysis give a confirmation of the original idea of GLioLab/Gliosat project justifying the development of the two systems.

  7. Non-Equilibrium Magnetohydrodynamic Behavior of Plasmas having Complex, Evolving Morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Bellan, Paul M.

    2014-03-13

    Our main activity has been doing lab experiments where plasmas having morphology and behavior similar to solar and astrophysical plasmas are produced and studied. The solar experiment is mounted on one end of a large vacuum chamber while the astrophysical jet experiment is mounted on the other end. Diagnostics are shared between the two experiments. The solar experiment produces arched plasma loops that behave very much like solar corona loops. The astrophysical jet experiment produces plasma jets that are very much like astrophysical jets. We have also done work on plasma waves, including general wave dispersions, and specific properties of kinetic Alfven waves and of whistler waves.

  8. Wavelength Shifters and Interactions of EDTA with Acrylic & LAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Yuvraj; SNO+ Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The SNO + experiment, an upgrade to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, will use linear alkyl-benzene (LAB) liquid scintillator to probe new physics, including 0 νββ decay. Event detection efficiency is heavily affected by radioactive backgrounds, two sources being Rn-222 and Po-210 daughters, some of which has become embedded in the SNO + acrylic vessel after years underground. The leading candidate for polonium leaching is Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Before deployment on-site, EDTA's effects on the mechanical integrity of acrylic must be determined. It also must not be soluble in LAB or must be removed before scintillator fill of the vessel, as its presence would result in reduced light yield due to scattering. It was found that EDTA had negligible effects on the Young's Modulus of acrylic. EDTA is also slightly soluble in LAB, but can be completely removed by rinsing with water. Additionally, the study of the light yield and alpha/beta timing profiles of two wavelength shifters - bisMSB and perylene - is critical to determining which should be added to the 0 νββ isotope (tellurium) LAB cocktail. Small-scale results hint that perylene might be better, but this is being confirmed with larger-scale tests. The SNO + experiment, an upgrade to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, will use linear alkyl-benzene (LAB) liquid scintillator to probe new physics, including 0 νββ decay. Event detection efficiency is heavily affected by radioactive backgrounds, two sources being Rn-222 and Po-210 daughters, some of which has become embedded in the SNO + acrylic vessel after years underground. The leading candidate for polonium leaching is Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Before deployment on-site, EDTA's effects on the mechanical integrity of acrylic must be determined. It also must not be soluble in LAB or must be removed before scintillator fill of the vessel, as its presence would result in reduced light yield due to scattering. It was found that EDTA

  9. Examination of mobile phones in a university forensic lab environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luttenberger, Silas; Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this article is to show forensic investigation methods for mobile phones to students in a university forensic lab environment. Students have to learn the usefulness of forensic procedures to ensure evidence collection, evidence preservation, forensic analysis, and reporting. Open source tools as well as commercial forensic tools for forensic investigation of modern mobile (smart) phones are used. It is demonstrated how important data stored in the mobile device are investigated. Different scenarios of investigations are presented that are well-suited for forensics lab work in university.

  10. Remembering the early days of the Met Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Met Lab was set up by the war-time Manhattan District, US Corp of Engineers to (i) find a system using normal uranium in which a chain reaction would occur; (ii) to show that if such a chain reaction did occur, it would be possible to separate plutonium chemically from the uranium matrix and the fission products formed in the chain reactions; and (iii) to prepare plans for the large-scale production of plutonium. Chemistry Section C-1 of the Met Lab was assigned the responsibility for developing separation methods for plutonium production on the industrial scale. This report describes some aspects of daily life in Section C-1.

  11. Innovative Use of a Classroom Response System During Physics Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walgren, Jay

    2011-01-01

    More and more physics instructors are making use of personal/classroom response systems or "clickers." The use of clickers to engage students with multiple-choice questions during lecture and available instructor resources for clickers have been well documented in this journal.1-4 Newer-generation clickers, which I refer to as classroom response systems (CRS), have evolved to accept numeric answers (such as 9.81) instead of just single "multiple-choice" entries (Fig. 1). This advancement is available from most major clicker companies and allows for a greater variety of engaging questions during lecture. In addition, these new "numeric ready" clickers are marketed to be used for student assessments. During a test or quiz, students' answers are entered into their clicker instead of on paper or Scantron® and immediately absorbed by wireless connection into a computer for grading and analysis. I recognize the usefulness and benefit these new-generation CRSs provide for many instructors. However, I do not use my CRS in either of the aforementioned activities. Instead, I use it in an unconventional way. I use the CRS to electronically capture students' lab data as they are performing a physics lab (Fig. 2). I set up the clickers as if I were going to use them for a test, but instead of entering answers to a test, my students enter lab data as they collect it. In this paper I discuss my use of a classroom response system during physics laboratory and three benefits that result: 1) Students are encouraged to "take ownership of" and "have integrity with" their physics lab data. 2) Students' measuring and unit conversion deficiencies are identified immediately during the lab. 3) The process of grading students' labs is simplified because the results of each student's lab calculations can be pre-calculated for the instructor using a spreadsheet. My use of clickers during lab can be implemented with most clicker systems available to instructors today. The CRS I use is the e

  12. Giant Electromagnet Move at Brookhaven Lab, June 22, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-22

    On Saturday, June 22, 2013, a 50-foot-wide, circular electromagnet began its 3,200-mile land and sea voyage from Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York to a new home at Fermilab in Illinois. There, scientists will use it to study the properties of muons, subatomic particles that live only 2.2 millionths of a second, and the results could open the door to new realms of particle physics. In the first part of the move, Emmert International and a team of Fermilab and Brookhaven Lab scientists and engineers transported the electromagnet across the Brookhaven Lab site to a staging area by its main gate.

  13. NASA Dryden: Flight Loads Lab Capabilities and Mass Properties Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, David Michael; Bakalyar, John A.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation covers the basic capabilities of the Dryden Flight Loads Lab. It also covers in detail the mass properties capabilities of the loads lab, focusing on the recent mass properties testing of the X-48B, and the recent tests of the Dynamic Inertia Measurement method (DIMM). Presentation focuses on the test methods and issues discovered during the mass properties testing of the X-48B leading to the requirement of new instrumentation on all conventional mass properties testing. Presentation also focuses on development of DIMM for replacement of conventional mass properties tests.

  14. Commerce lab: Mission analysis and payload integration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Conceived as one or more arrays of carriers which would fly aboard space shuttle, Commerce Lab can provide a point of focus for implementing a series of shuttle flights, co-sponsored by NASA and U.S. domestic concerns, for performing materials processing in research and pre-commercial investigations. As an orbiting facility for testing, developing, and implementing hardware and procedures, Commerce Lab can enhance space station development and hasten space platform production capability. Tasks considered include: (1) synthesis of user requirements and identification of common element and voids; (2) definition of performance and infrastructure requirement and alternative approaches; and (3) carrier, mission model, and infrastructure development.

  15. Integrated multi-color illumination source for lab-on-a-chip fluorescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakariya, Abdullah J.; Mulla, Eshaq

    2015-08-01

    We propose an integrated microfluidic optical system device design for a monolithic integration of blood plasma analysis in a single step using microfluidic channels on a tri wavelength LED source emitting wavelengths in ultraviolet, infrared and visible. The device is a miniature disposable Lab-on-a-Chip as small as 6x 1.5mm with a blood plasma reservoir volume of 2μl providing instantaneous results. The device is fabricated using minimal lithographic fabrication steps and consists of a microfluidic Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer on top of a quantum well (QW) structure. The PDMS layer has three 100μm thick microfluidic channels connected to the 2μl reservoir where the blood plasma is injected. The three microfluidic channels pass over the QW substrate which is micro fabricated to produce three LEDs that emit light in three different wavelengths on a single structure. The LEDs emit light in UV, infrared and visible and can be controlled individually for specific plasma testing or can emit light simultaneously depending on the application. To operate the device, first current is injected into the LEDs to turn on light emission. Light travels within the LED structure and at the same time light is emitted through the surface. Light can be either collected from the top of the device or the output facets by focusing the channels output on a spectrometer to collect the spectra of the device and analyze the output. The device is compact in size and provides fast, low power consumption and cost effective point of care devices with minimal heat output.

  16. Court upholds whistleblower's firing over plasma tests.

    PubMed

    1999-09-03

    The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has upheld the firing of a lab technician from [name removed] Corp. over an injunction she filed regarding protocols for blood plasma testing. The technician claimed that blood plasma from outside vendors was contaminated by saline and should be screened using total protein tests. This test can help prevent false negatives for HIV and hepatitis that may result from saline contamination. The technician accused [name removed] of falsely representing the plasma as safe to the Federal government. The court held that [name removed] did not misrepresent itself because it complied with all required regulations and could represent their products as safe. Further, the court held the technician's firing was not improper because her whistleblowing "verges on being frivolous", and therefore was not protected conduct under the False Claims Act.

  17. Welding arc plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  18. On non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jets and plasma bullet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xinpei

    2012-10-01

    Because of the enhanced plasma chemistry, atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasmas (APNPs) have been widely studied for several emerging applications such as biomedical applications. For the biomedical applications, plasma jet devices, which generate plasma in open space (surrounding air) rather than in confined discharge gaps only, have lots of advantages over the traditional dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) devices. For example, it can be used for root canal disinfection, which can't be realized by the traditional plasma device. On the other hand, currently, the working gases of most of the plasma jet devices are noble gases or the mixtures of the noble gases with small amount of O2, or air. If ambient air is used as the working gas, several serious difficulties are encountered in the plasma generation process. Amongst these are high gas temperatures and disrupting instabilities. In this presentation, firstly, a brief review of the different cold plasma jets developed to date is presented. Secondly, several different plasma jet devices developed in our lab are reported. The effects of various parameters on the plasma jets are discussed. Finally, one of the most interesting phenomena of APNP-Js, the plasma bullet is discussed and its behavior is described. References: [1] X. Lu, M. Laroussi, V. Puech, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 21, 034005 (2012); [2] Y. Xian, X. Lu, S. Wu, P. Chu, and Y. Pan, Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 123702 (2012); [3] X. Pei, X. Lu, J. Liu, D. Liu, Y. Yang, K. Ostrikov, P. Chu, and Y. Pan, J. Phys. D 45, 165205 (2012).

  19. Learning with Multiple Representations: Extending Multimedia Learning beyond the Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eilam, Billie; Poyas, Yael

    2008-01-01

    The present study extended multimedia learning principles beyond the lab to an ecologically valid setting (homework). Eighteen information cards were used to perform three homework tasks. The control group students learned from single representation (SR) cards that presented all information as printed text. The multiple representation (MR) group…

  20. A Series of Computational Neuroscience Labs Increases Comfort with MATLAB.

    PubMed

    Nichols, David F

    2015-01-01

    Computational simulations allow for a low-cost, reliable means to demonstrate complex and often times inaccessible concepts to undergraduates. However, students without prior computer programming training may find working with code-based simulations to be intimidating and distracting. A series of computational neuroscience labs involving the Hodgkin-Huxley equations, an Integrate-and-Fire model, and a Hopfield Memory network were used in an undergraduate neuroscience laboratory component of an introductory level course. Using short focused surveys before and after each lab, student comfort levels were shown to increase drastically from a majority of students being uncomfortable or with neutral feelings about working in the MATLAB environment to a vast majority of students being comfortable working in the environment. Though change was reported within each lab, a series of labs was necessary in order to establish a lasting high level of comfort. Comfort working with code is important as a first step in acquiring computational skills that are required to address many questions within neuroscience.

  1. 14. BUILDING NO. 445, PHYSICS LAB (FORMERLY GUN BAG LOADING), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. BUILDING NO. 445, PHYSICS LAB (FORMERLY GUN BAG LOADING), LOOKING EAST AT SOUTHWEST END OF BUILDING. HVAC EQUIPMENT LOCATED OUTDOORS IN FOREGROUND. DUCTS CONDUCT HOT OR COLD AIR INDOORS. ROUND PIPES ARE INSULATED STEAM LINES. BUILDING NO. 448, ORDNANCE FACILITY, IN BACKGROUND. - Picatinny Arsenal, 400 Area, Gun Bag Loading District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  2. 16. BUILDING NO. 445, PHYSICS LAB (FORMERLY GUN BAG LOADING), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. BUILDING NO. 445, PHYSICS LAB (FORMERLY GUN BAG LOADING), INTERIOR, SECOND LEVEL. LOOKING UP AT POWDER AND DISTRIBUTION TUBES. ELEVATOR SHAFT ON LEFT. - Picatinny Arsenal, 400 Area, Gun Bag Loading District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  3. 10. BUILDING NO. 445, PHYSICS LAB (FORMERLY GUN BAG LOADING), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. BUILDING NO. 445, PHYSICS LAB (FORMERLY GUN BAG LOADING), LOOKING AT SOUTHEAST CORNER. BUILDING NO. 332, CHANGE HOUSE, IN RIGHT BACKGROUND; BUILDING NO. 445-F, MAGAZINE, IN LEFT BACKGROUND. - Picatinny Arsenal, 400 Area, Gun Bag Loading District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  4. 15. BUILDING NO. 445, PHYSICS LAB (FORMERLY GUN BAG LOADING), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. BUILDING NO. 445, PHYSICS LAB (FORMERLY GUN BAG LOADING), INTERIOR, FOURTH LEVEL. POWDER HOPPER AT TOP OF ELEVATOR SHAFT. POWDER DISTRIBUTED FROM HERE TO LOADING ROOMS BY TUBES. - Picatinny Arsenal, 400 Area, Gun Bag Loading District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  5. Modelling the Landing of a Plane in a Calculus Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morante, Antonio; Vallejo, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    We exhibit a simple model of a plane landing that involves only basic concepts of differential calculus, so it is suitable for a first-year calculus lab. We use the computer algebra system Maxima and the interactive geometry software GeoGebra to do the computations and graphics. (Contains 5 figures and 1 note.)

  6. LabNet: Toward a Community of Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruopp, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Describes the LabNet project that has three interrelated goals: (1) encouraging the use of student projects to enhance science learning, (2) building a professional community of practice among high school science teachers, and (3) exploiting the potential of today's new technologies. (PR)

  7. Choosing Equipment and Setting Policies in Radio and Television Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Mary Strom

    To assist broadcast educators who frequently find themselves short on information when they make arguments for equipment purchases or advocate policies for radio or television labs, a survey was conducted of educators at 278 schools with broadcast programs. Replies were received from 108 educators in radio programs and 112 in television programs.…

  8. Monitoring the Geneseo Nuclear Structure Lab with VISION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicklaw, R.; Padalino, S.; McLean, J.

    2002-10-01

    VISION (Virtual Instrument System Information) is a LabVIEW based program designed to monitor a 2 MV Van de Graaff accelerator in the Geneseo Nuclear Structure Laboratory (GNSL). The purpose of the system is to monitor and notify the user of potentially critical situations in the lab. Main parameters of interest are the water coolant temperatures in the diffusion pumps, pressures within the vacuum chambers, and Van de Graaff operational parameters. LabVIEW reads these values and then displays them on monitors located throughout the laboratory. The user can set alarm limits on the relevant parameters, and when exceeded notifies the user verbally and visually. Recent additions to the VISION program include the water level sensor, calibration of the pressure readings, a web server application, and data logging. The VISION system is Internet accessible ^1, data from the main screen is displayed over the web for remote monitoring of the accelerator. Another useful monitoring tool is the data logger, which writes acquired data to a formatted text document at specified intervals. A future goal for VISION is to not only monitor, but to control aspects of the GNSL with LabVIEW. ^1 Webpage accessible at: http://s69n144.sci.geneseo.edu/vision.htm * Research funded in part by the United States Department of Energy

  9. Integration of MSFC Usability Lab with Usability Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Yiwei; Richardson, Sally

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Stage Analysis Branch, human factors engineering plays an important role in relating humans to the systems of hardware and structure designs of the new launch vehicle. While many branches are involved in the technical aspects of creating a launch vehicle, human factors connects humans to the scientific systems with the goal of improving operational performance and safety while reducing operational error and damage to the hardware. Human factors engineers use physical and computerized models to visualize possible areas for improvements to ensure human accessibility to components requiring maintenance and that the necessary maintenance activities can be accomplished with minimal risks to human and hardware. Many methods of testing are used to fulfill this goal, such as physical mockups, computerized visualization, and usability testing. In this analysis, a usability test is conducted to test how usable a website is to users who are and are not familiar with it. The testing is performed using participants and Morae software to record and analyze the results. This analysis will be a preliminary test of the usability lab in preparation for use in new spacecraft programs, NASA Enterprise, or other NASA websites. The usability lab project is divided into two parts: integration of the usability lab and a preliminary test of the usability lab.

  10. Dancing Around My Technology Classroom Box (My Second RET Lab)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Terry

    2010-01-01

    The laboratory the author had been assigned for his RET (Research Experience for Teachers) at Vanderbilt University is new and different from the one he had previously experienced. This summer he was assigned to the Microfluidics and Lab-on-a-chip laboratory to help research dielectrophoresis. As this is an emerging technology, there was not a lot…

  11. Engaging with science: High school students in summer lab internships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bequette, Marjorie Bullitt

    Years of research and rhetoric have suggested that students should be given the opportunity to work with practicing scientists as a way to develop more sophisticated ideas about the nature of science, yet little research about these experiences exists. This project uses a case study approach to examine the experience of eight high school students working part-time during one summer as research assistants in biomedical laboratories. The students completed small research studies under the supervision of scientist-mentors. This dissertation explores questions related to how these students learned to work in a lab, in what ways they grew to understand this scientific context, and how their own relationships with science changed. The goal of looking at these young adults' summer experiences in science labs is to make suggestions for three settings: programs like this one, where high school students work closely with scientists in lab settings; other programs where scientists and students work together; and science education more generally. Analysis of pre- and post-interviews with students, and extensive observations of their laboratory work, suggests that students develop new ideas about the culture of science and the day-to-day workings of the labs. These ideas hold potential power for the students, and other participants in both similar and different educational settings, as they prepare for lives as scientifically engaged adults.

  12. Miniaturized Lab-on-a-Disc (miniLOAD).

    PubMed

    Glass, Nick R; Shilton, Richie J; Chan, Peggy P Y; Friend, James R; Yeo, Leslie Y

    2012-06-25

    A miniaturized centrifugal microfluidic platform for lab-on-a-chip applications is presented. Unlike its macroscopic Lab-on-a-CD counterpart, the miniature Lab-on-a-Disc (miniLOAD) device does not require moving parts to drive rotation of the disc, is inexpensive, disposable, and significantly smaller, comprising a 10-mm-diameter SU-8 disc fabricated through two-step photolithography. The disc is driven to rotate using surface acoustic wave irradiation incident upon a fluid coupling layer from a pair of offset, opposing single-phase unidirectional transducers patterned on a lithium niobate substrate. The irradiation causes azimuthally oriented acoustic streaming with sufficient intensity to rotate the disc at several thousand revolutions per minute. In this first proof-of-concept, the capability of the miniLOAD platform to drive capillary-based valving and mixing in microfluidic structures on a disc similar to much larger Lab-on-a-CD devices is shown. In addition, the ability to concentrate aqueous particle suspensions at radial positions in a channel in the disc dependent on the particles' size is demonstrated. To the best of our knowledge, the miniLOAD concept is the first centrifugal microfluidic platform small enough to be self-contained in a handheld device.

  13. Teaching Mathematics in the PC Lab--The Students' Viewpoints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Karsten; Kohler, Anke

    2013-01-01

    The Matrix Algebra portion of the intermediate mathematics course at the Schmalkalden University Faculty of Business and Economics has been moved from a traditional classroom setting to a technology-based setting in the PC lab. A Computer Algebra System license was acquired that also allows its use on the students' own PCs. A survey was carried…

  14. Pair spectrometer hodoscope for Hall D at Jefferson Lab

    DOE PAGES

    Barbosa, Fernando J.; Hutton, Charles L.; Sitnikov, Alexandre; ...

    2015-09-21

    We present the design of the pair spectrometer hodoscope fabricated at Jefferson Lab and installed in the experimental Hall D. The hodoscope consists of thin scintillator tiles; the light from each tile is collected using wave-length shifting fibers and detected using a Hamamatsu silicon photomultiplier. Light collection was measured using relativistic electrons produced in the tagger area of the experimental Hall B.

  15. Online Writing Labs (OWLs): A Taxonomy of Options and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Muriel; Pemberton, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Offers an overview and schema for understanding frequently used network technologies available for Online Writing Labs (OWLs)--electronic mail, gopher, World Wide Web, newsgroups, synchronous chat systems, and automated file retrieval systems. Considers ways writing centers' choices among these technologies are impacted by user access, network…

  16. The Word Processing Lab in the Business Writing Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbour, Dennis H.

    1988-01-01

    Asserts that the advantages of word processing for business writing classes are clear. Even though a teacher confronts giving up some lecture or discussion time, the hour spent in the lab frees students from tedious recopying, provides the teacher with professional-looking papers, and permits time for more writing assignments. (RAE)

  17. GloLab: Creating a Global Internet-Accessible Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maziewski, A.; Dobrogowski, W.; Zablotskii, V.

    2007-01-01

    We suggest the creation of a Global Web Laboratory (we call it "GloLab") for scientific purposes and teaching experiments online. In this article, we discuss the main principles and problems of building such a global Internet-laboratory. An example of a current working laboratory for teaching magnetism experiments online is also discussed.

  18. Chop Saw SUCCESS!: "Crash Proofing" a Metalworking Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domermuth, David

    2004-01-01

    The Technology Department at Appalachian State University runs a metals lab to introduce students to basic metalworking processes. Many of the students have never worked with metal before. The class objectives call for teaching students metal properties, processing, and design problem solving. The average student is a 20-year-old junior whom…

  19. Applied Physics Lab Kennedy Space Center: Recent Contributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, Stan; Youngquist, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The mission of the Applied Physics Lab is: (1) Develop and deliver novel sensors and devices to support KSC mission operations. (2) Analyze operational issues and recommend or deliver practical solutions. (3) Apply physics to the resolution of long term space flight issues that affect space port operation on Earth or on other planets.

  20. Quantitative Comparisons to Promote Inquiry in the Introductory Physics Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, N. G.; Bonn, D. A.

    2015-09-01

    In a recent report, the American Association of Physics Teachers has developed an updated set of recommendations for curriculum of undergraduate physics labs. This document focuses on six major themes: constructing knowledge, modeling, designing experiments, developing technical and practical laboratory skills, analyzing and visualizing data, and communicating physics. These themes all tie together as a set of practical skills in scientific measurement, analysis, and experimentation. In addition to teaching students how to use these skills, it is important for students to know when to use them so that they can use them autonomously. This requires, especially in the case of analytical skills, high levels of inquiry behaviors to reflect on data and iterate measurements, which students rarely do in lab experiments. Often, they perform lab experiments in a plug-and-chug frame, procedurally completing each activity with little to no sensemaking. An emphasis on obtaining true theoretical values or agreement on individual measurements also reinforces inauthentic behaviors such as retroactively inflating measurement uncertainties. This paper aims to offer a relatively simple pedagogical framework for engaging students authentically in experimentation and inquiry in physics labs.

  1. 19. NBS SUIT LAB. STORAGE SHELF WITH LIQUID COOLING VENTILATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. NBS SUIT LAB. STORAGE SHELF WITH LIQUID COOLING VENTILATION GARMENT (LCVG), SUIT GLOVES, WAIST INSERTS, UPPER AND LOWER ARMS (LEFT, FROM TOP TO BOTTOM), LOWER TORSO ASSEMBLIES (LTA) (MIDDLE RIGHT TO LOWER RIGHT). - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  2. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STAIRWAY BETWEEN MAIN FLOOR OF MAGNET ROOM AND SECOND FLOOR OF OFFICE-AND-SHOP SECTION, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  3. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. STAIRWAY FROM MAIN FLOOR OF MAGNET ROOM TO TOP OF OUTER LAYER OF CONCRETE SHIELDING, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  4. Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original negative located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection). March 2005. TOP OF BEVATRON, BUILDING 51 ROOF TRUSS, AND CENTRAL RING TRACK FOR MAGNET ROOM CRANE, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  5. Quantitative Comparisons to Promote Inquiry in the Introductory Physics Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, N. G.; Bonn, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    In a recent report, the American Association of Physics Teachers has developed an updated set of recommendations for curriculum of undergraduate physics labs. This document focuses on six major themes: constructing knowledge, modeling, designing experiments, developing technical and practical laboratory skills, analyzing and visualizing data, and…

  6. Competencies for Information Professionals in Learning Labs and Makerspaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Kyungwon; Abbas, June

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of libraries and museums provide transformative learning spaces, often called "Learning Labs" and "Makerspaces." These spaces invite users to explore traditional and digital media, interact with mentors and peers, and engage in creative projects. For these spaces and programs to be sustainable, it is…

  7. Student's Lab Assignments in PDE Course with MAPLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponidi, B. Alhadi

    Computer-aided software has been used intensively in many mathematics courses, especially in computational subjects, to solve initial value and boundary value problems in Partial Differential Equations (PDE). Many software packages were used in student lab assignments such as FORTRAN, PASCAL, MATLAB, MATHEMATICA, and MAPLE in order to accelerate…

  8. The MUPET Lab: Computer Assisted Management of Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Thomas D.

    Project Computer-Assisted Instructional Management (C-AIM) is being pilot tested on third grade mathematics students in the Jonesboro Public schools (Jonesboro, Arkansas). Each elementary building operates a MUPET Lab equipped with at least six Commodore Model 4016/4032 microcomputers, one Commodore Model 4040 dual disc drive, and one Commodore…

  9. 45. BUILDING NO. 462, CHEMISTRY LAB (FORMERLY TRACER LOADING BUILDING), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. BUILDING NO. 462, CHEMISTRY LAB (FORMERLY TRACER LOADING BUILDING), VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST AT WEST SIDE. BUILDING NO. 462-B, GENERAL PURPOSE MAGAZINE, AT LEFT. - Picatinny Arsenal, 400 Area, Gun Bag Loading District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  10. 360 Video Tour of 3D Printing Labs at LLNL

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-08-24

    Additive manufacturing is changing the way the world thinks about manufacturing and design. And here at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, it’s changing the way our scientists approach research and development. Today we’ll look around three of the additive manufacturing research labs on the Lawrence Livermore campus.

  11. Developing Nontraditional Biology Labs to Challenge Students & Enhance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherif, Abour H.; Siuda, JoElla E.; Movahedzadeh, Farahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory experience and skills are not only essential for success in science studies, but are the most exciting and rewarding aspects of science for students. As a result, many biology teachers have become critical of the efficacy of cookbook-type laboratory activities as well as the purposes, practices, and learning outcomes of lab experiments…

  12. A Lab Experience to Illustrate the Physicochemical Principles of Detergency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poce-Fatou, J. A.; Bethencourt-Nunez, M.; Moreno, C.; Pinto-Ganfornina, J. J.; Moreno-Dorado, F. J.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a lab experience to study detergency from a physicochemical point of view intended for undergraduate students. By means of a simple experimental device, we analyze the influence of the surfactant concentration in both distilled water and tap water. Our method is based on the measurement of diffuse reflectances of polyester…

  13. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-009). March 2005. OPENINGS OF AIR DUCTS INTO PASSAGEWAY UNDER SOUTHEAST QUADRANT, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  14. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-046). March 2005. ROOF SHIELDING BLOCK AND I-BEAM SUPPORT CONSTRUCTION, CENTER OF BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  15. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-031). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT, WITH COVER OPEN, LOOKING TOWARD CENTER IGLOO, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  16. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200506-00198-08). June 2005. DUCTWORK BETWEEN FAN ROOM AND PASSAGEWAY UNDER BEVATRON, SOUTH SIDE OF ROOM 10, MAIN FLOOR, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  17. Photocopy of photograph (digital image maintained in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image maintained in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-176). March 2005. CENTRAL COLUMN SUPPORT TO ROOF SHOWING CRANES CENTER SUPPORT TRACK, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  18. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-139). March 2005. TOP OF BEVATRON, INCLUDING WOOD STAIRWAY FROM OUTER EDGE OF SHIELDING TO TOP OF ROOF BLOCK SHIELDING - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  19. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-049). March 2005. TUNNEL ENTRY FROM MAIN FLOOR OF MAGNET ROOM INTO CENTER OF BEVATRON, BENEATH SOUTHWEST QUADRANT - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  20. Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (digital image located in LBNL Photo Lab Collection, XBD200503-00117-034). March 2005. MOUSE AT EAST TANGENT WITH COVER CLOSED, LOOKING TOWARD CENTER IGLOO, BEVATRON - University of California Radiation Laboratory, Bevatron, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA