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Sample records for plasma nicotine concentration

  1. Cocaine, nicotine, caffeine, and metabolite plasma concentrations in neonates.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, D A; Partridge, J C; Jones, R T; Rowbotham, M C

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the umbilical cord plasma levels of cocaine, nicotine, caffeine, and their metabolites. Thirty-six neonates at risk for prenatal cocaine exposure were prospectively enrolled. Umbilical cord plasma was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy for cocaine, cocaethylene, benzoylecgonine (BZE), nicotine, cotinine, and caffeine. Eighteen neonates were plasma positive for BZE, and 50% of these were also positive for cocaine. Cocaethylene was not found. The maximum plasma cocaine concentration was 88 ng/mL (mean, 39 ng/mL). The maximum plasma BZE concentration was 3880 ng/mL (mean, 844 ng/mL). Among BZE-positive babies, the mean plasma drug levels were as follows: nicotine, 1.8 ng/mL; cotinine, 94 ng/mL; and caffeine, 1205 ng/mL. Among the BZE-negative babies, the mean plasma drug levels were as follows: nicotine, 5.2 ng/mL; cotinine, 97 ng/mL; and caffeine, 1440 ng/mL. These cocaine levels raise the possibility of pharmacological effects of cocaine in the early neonatal period.

  2. MEASURING NICOTINE INTAKE AMONG HIGHLY DEPENDENT ADOLESCENT SMOKERS: COMPARABILITY OF SALIVA AND PLASMA COTININE CONCENTRATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Parzynski, Craig S.; Jaszyna-Gasior, Maria; Franken, Frederick H.; Moolchan, Eric T.

    2008-01-01

    Cotinine is the most common biomarker used to assess nicotine exposure and abstinence. It can be measured in various matrices including saliva, plasma, and urine. Previous research with adults has shown high correlations between saliva and plasma cotinine concentrations. However, research has not examined this relationship in adolescents. Additionally, variability in saliva flow and metabolism across gender, ethnicity, and age may impact the relationship between saliva and plasma cotinine concentration. Our aim was to examine the relationship between saliva and plasma cotinine concentration in a group of nicotine-dependent adolescent smokers. Additionally, we examined these correlations across gender, ethnicity and age. The sample consisted of 66 adolescent smokers (age 15.1 ± 1.3, 63.6% girls, 66.7% European American, CPD 18.3 ± 8.5, FTND 7.1 ± 1.3). Saliva and plasma specimens were collected before the treatment phase of a nicotine replacement therapy trial and analyzed. The relationship between saliva and plasma cotinine concentration was analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficients. We performed a secondary analysis using multiple regression to compare correlations across race, gender and age. Results indicated a positive correlation between saliva cotinine and plasma cotinine concentration (r = .84, p < .001). Differences in correlations across age were significant (t = 3.03, p < .01). Differences across ethnicity approached significance (t = −1.93, p = .058). Future research should seek to further validate saliva-to-plasma cotinine concentration ratios in adolescents as well as characterize saliva-to-plasma concentration differences and their underlying mechanisms. PMID:18199474

  3. Venous plasma nicotine correlates of hormonal effects of tobacco smoking

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yue; Morris, Mark; Ni, Lisong; Guthrie, Sally K.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Gonzalez, Kimberly; McConnell, Daniel S.; Domino, Edward F.

    2010-01-01

    The present study resolves some of the discrepancies in the literature by correlating the effects of tobacco smoking on hormone release with venous plasma nicotine levels. Cortisol, prolactin, and β-endorphin concentrations were measured. Habitual male tobacco users smoked denicotinized (very low nicotine) and average nicotine cigarettes in the A.M. after overnight tobacco abstinence. Several venous blood samples were withdrawn before and during the smoking sessions for subsequent analyses. The increases in plasma nicotine correlated well with plasma cortisol and prolactin levels (correlation coefficients r = 0.66 and 0.53, respectively, p< 0.05). This study quantifies the well known increase in plasma cortisol and prolactin after nicotine postsmoking for about 1 hr with peak plasma levels up to 35 ng/ml. Contrary to most abused drugs which release dopamine and decrease prolactin, nicotine concentration correlated with increased prolactin release. Increases in maximal plasma β-endorphin levels following tobacco smoking were barely statistically significant with insufficient data to obtain a correlation coefficient. PMID:20100507

  4. The Influence of a Mouthpiece-Based Topography Measurement Device on Electronic Cigarette User's Plasma Nicotine Concentration, Heart Rate, and Subjective Effects Under Directed and Ad Libitum Use Conditions.

    PubMed

    Spindle, Tory R; Hiler, Marzena M; Breland, Alison B; Karaoghlanian, Nareg V; Shihadeh, Alan L; Eissenberg, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Electronic cigarettes e-cigarettes aerosolize a liquid solution often containing nicotine. e-cigarette nicotine delivery may be influenced by user puffing behaviors ("puff topography"). E-cigarette puff topography can be recorded using mouthpiece-based computerized systems. The present study sought to examine the extent to which these systems influence e-cigarette nicotine delivery and other e-cigarette associated acute effects under ad libitum use conditions. Plasma nicotine concentration, heart rate, and subjective effects were assessed in 29 experienced e-cigarette users using their preferred e-cigarette battery and liquid (≥12mg/mL nicotine) in two sessions differing only by the presence of a mouthpiece-based device. In both sessions, participants completed a directed e-cigarette use bout (10 puffs, 30-s interpuff interval) and a 90-min ad libitum bout. Puff topography was recorded in the session with the topography mouthpiece. Plasma nicotine, heart rate, and subjective effects, aside from "Did the e-cigarette Taste Good?" were independent of topography measurement (higher mean taste ratings were observed in the no topography condition). Mean (SEM) plasma nicotine concentration following the ad libitum bout was 34.3ng/mL (4.9) in the no topography condition and 35.7ng/mL (4.3) in the topography condition. Longer puff durations, longer interpuff intervals, and larger puff volumes were observed in the ad libitum relative to the directed bout. E-cigarette use significantly increased plasma nicotine concentration and heart rate while suppressing abstinence symptoms. These effects did not differ when a topography mouthpiece was present. Future studies using ad libitum e-cigarette use bouts would facilitate understanding of e-cigarette toxicant yield. No prior study has examined whether mouthpiece-based topography recording devices influence e-cigarette associated nicotine delivery, heart rate, or subjective effects under ad libitum conditions or assessed ad

  5. Prenatal cigarette smoke exposure: Pregnancy outcome and gestational changes in plasma nicotine concentration, hematocrit, and carboxyhemoglobin in a newly standardized rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Svetlana; Hussein, Jabeen; Ariano, Robert E.; Sitar, Daniel S.; Hasan, Shabih U. . E-mail: hasans@ucalgary.ca

    2006-07-15

    Epidemiological studies support an association between perinatal cigarette smoke (CS) exposure and a number of severe pre- and postnatal complications. However, the mechanisms through which CS enhances such risks largely remain unknown. One of the reasons for our inability to discover such mechanisms has been the unavailability of a clinically relevant and physiologically concordant animal model. A number of studies have previously used nicotine (Nic) as surrogate for CS. We sought to (1) establish the amount of CS exposure to achieve plasma Nic concentrations observed among moderate to heavy smokers (20-60 ng/ml) (2) investigate the temporal changes in plasma Nic concentrations, carboxyhemoglobin, and hematocrit with advancing pregnancy, and (3) elucidate the effects of CS exposure on pregnancy outcome. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to various doses of CS or room air (Sham) from days 6 to 21 of gestation. Exposure to 6000 ml/day of CS led to very high plasma Nic concentrations and increased maternal and fetal mortality (P < 0.001). The plasma Nic concentrations remained higher than those observed in moderate smokers until the CS dose was reduced to 1000 ml/day and showed dose-dependent temporal changes with advancing gestational age. Significant increases in carboxyhemoglobin and hematocrit were observed in the CS group as compared with the Sham group (P < 0.001). In addition, prenatally CS exposed fetuses had lower birth weight as compared with the Sham group (P = 0.04). Our current study establishes a newly standardized and physiologically relevant model to investigate the mechanisms of CS-mediated adverse effects during the critical period of fetal development.

  6. Effects of User Puff Topography, Device Voltage, and Liquid Nicotine Concentration on Electronic Cigarette Nicotine Yield: Measurements and Model Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Talih, Soha; Balhas, Zainab; Eissenberg, Thomas; Salman, Rola; Karaoghlanian, Nareg; El Hellani, Ahmad; Baalbaki, Rima; Saliba, Najat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Some electronic cigarette (ECIG) users attain tobacco cigarette–like plasma nicotine concentrations while others do not. Understanding the factors that influence ECIG aerosol nicotine delivery is relevant to regulation, including product labeling and abuse liability. These factors may include user puff topography, ECIG liquid composition, and ECIG design features. This study addresses how these factors can influence ECIG nicotine yield. Methods: Aerosols were machine generated with 1 type of ECIG cartridge (V4L CoolCart) using 5 distinct puff profiles representing a tobacco cigarette smoker (2-s puff duration, 33-ml/s puff velocity), a slow average ECIG user (4 s, 17 ml/s), a fast average user (4 s, 33 ml/s), a slow extreme user (8 s, 17 ml/s), and a fast extreme user (8 s, 33 ml/s). Output voltage (3.3–5.2 V or 3.0–7.5 W) and e-liquid nicotine concentration (18–36 mg/ml labeled concentration) were varied. A theoretical model was also developed to simulate the ECIG aerosol production process and to provide insight into the empirical observations. Results: Nicotine yields from 15 puffs varied by more than 50-fold across conditions. Experienced ECIG user profiles (longer puffs) resulted in higher nicotine yields relative to the tobacco smoker (shorter puffs). Puff velocity had no effect on nicotine yield. Higher nicotine concentration and higher voltages resulted in higher nicotine yields. These results were predicted well by the theoretical model (R 2 = 0.99). Conclusions: Depending on puff conditions and product features, 15 puffs from an ECIG can provide far less or far more nicotine than a single tobacco cigarette. ECIG emissions can be predicted using physical principles, with knowledge of puff topography and a few ECIG device design parameters. PMID:25187061

  7. Age-Related Differences in the Disposition of Nicotine and Metabolites in Rat Brain and Plasma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Studies have evaluated the behavioral and neurochemical impact of nicotine administration in rodents. However, the distribution of nicotine and metabolites in rat brain and plasma as a function of age has not been investigated. This is a significant issue because human adolescents have a greater risk for developing nicotine addiction than adults, and reasons underlying this observation have not been fully determined. Thus, in this present study, we evaluated the impact of the transition from adolescence (postnatal day [PND 40]) to adulthood (PND 90) on nicotine distribution in rats. Methods: PND 40, 60, and 90 rats received a single injection of (−) nicotine (0.8mg/kg, subcutaneously). Liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry was used to measure concentration of nicotine and metabolites in selected biological matrices. Results: Nicotine, cotinine, and nornicotine were detected in rat striata and frontal cortex 30min, 1hr, 2hr, and 4hr after a single administration. These and several additional metabolites (nicotine-1′-oxide, cotinine-N-oxide, norcotinine, and trans-3′-hydroxycotinine) were also detected in plasma at these same timepoints. The mean concentration of nicotine in brain and plasma was lower in PND 40 versus PND 90 rats. In contrast, the mean concentration of nornicotine was higher in the plasma and brain of PND 40 versus PND 90 rats. Conclusions: Nicotine and metabolite distribution differs between adolescent and adult rats. These data suggest that adolescent rats metabolize nicotine to some metabolites faster than adult rats. Further studies are needed to investigate the potential correlation between age, drug distribution, and nicotine addiction. PMID:23737496

  8. Chewing nicotine gum for 3 months: what happens to plasma nicotine levels?

    PubMed Central

    McNabb, M E

    1984-01-01

    Techniques that help patients stop smoking should also reduce their exposure to agents such as nicotine. The mean plasma nicotine levels in 50 subjects while they were still smoking and then while they were chewing pieces of gum containing either 2 or 4 mg of nicotine over a 12-week period of abstinence were 35, 9 and 23 ng/mL (217, 56 and 143 nmol/L) respectively. A small number of subjects given an unlimited supply of gum used 14 to 24 pieces of 4-mg gum daily and had plasma nicotine levels exceeding the levels achieved while smoking. There were no acute symptoms necessitating medical intervention associated with these excessive levels. Side effects were uncommon and usually controllable. When simple dosage rules are followed people who chew nicotine gum for a few months to stop smoking lower their exposure to nicotine. PMID:6478344

  9. Airborne Nicotine Concentrations in the Workplaces of Tobacco Farmers

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Seok-Ju; Park, Sung-Jun; Kim, Byoung-Seok; Lim, Hyun-Sul; Kim, Jik-Su; Kim, In-Shik

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Nicotine is a natural alkaloid and insecticide in tobacco leaves. Green tobacco sickness (GTS) is known as a disease of acute nicotine intoxication among tobacco farmers. Until now, GTS has been recognized globally as a disease that results from nicotine absorption through the skin. However, we assumed that GTS might also result from nicotine inhalation as well as absorption. We aimed to measure the airborne nicotine concentrations in various work environments of Korean tobacco farmers. Methods We measured the nicotine concentrations in the tobacco fields, private curing barns, and joint curing barns of farmers from July to October 2010. All sampling and analyses of airborne nicotine were conducted according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health manual of analytic methods. Results The airborne nicotine concentrations (geometric mean [geometric standard deviation]) in the tobacco field were 83.4 mg/m3 (1.2) in the upper region and 93.3 mg/m3 (1.2) in the lower region. In addition, the nicotine concentration by personal sampling was 150.1 mg/m3. Similarly, the nicotine concentrations in the private curing barn, workers in curing barns, the front yard of the curing barn, and in the joint curing barn were 323.7 mg/m3 (2.0), 121.0 mg/m3 (1.5), 73.7 mg/m3 (1.7), and 610.3 mg/m3 (1.0), respectively. Conclusions The nicotine concentration in the workplaces of tobacco farmers was very high. Future studies should measure the environmental concentration of nicotine that is inhaled by tobacco farmers. PMID:24921017

  10. Racial differences in hair nicotine concentrations among smokers.

    PubMed

    Apelberg, Benjamin J; Hepp, Lisa M; Avila-Tang, Erika; Kim, Sungroul; Madsen, Camille; Ma, Jiemin; Samet, Jonathan M; Breysse, Patrick N

    2012-08-01

    In the United States, race/ethnicity is a strong determinant of tobacco use patterns, biomarkers of tobacco smoke components and metabolites, and likelihood of successful cessation. Although Black smokers tend to smoke fewer cigarettes than White smokers, they have higher cotinine levels and disease risk and lower cessation success. We examined racial differences in hair nicotine concentrations among daily tobacco smokers (n = 103) in Baltimore, Maryland. Participants completed a survey, and hair samples were collected and analyzed for nicotine concentration using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. After adjustment, hair nicotine concentrations among Black smokers were more than 5 times higher than among White smokers (95% CI 3.0, 10.5). Smokers reporting hair treatments other than coloring (bleaching, permanent, or straightening) in the past 12 months had 66% lower (95% CI 32%, 83%) hair nicotine concentrations. Smokers reporting smoking their first cigarette within 30 min of waking had twice the hair nicotine concentrations of those whose time to first cigarette was greater than 30 min after waking (95% CI 1.1, 4.2). For every additional cigarette smoked per day up to 20, mean hair nicotine concentration among all smokers increased by 4% (95% CI -1%, 9%). This study demonstrates that Black smokers have substantially higher hair nicotine levels than White smokers, after controlling for cigarettes smoked per day and other exposure sources. Time to first cigarette, cigarettes smoked per day, and use of hair treatments other than coloring were also associated with hair nicotine concentrations among smokers.

  11. Concentration dependency in nicotine skin penetration flux from aqueous solutions reflects vehicle induced changes in nicotine stratum corneum retention.

    PubMed

    Kuswahyuning, Rina; Roberts, Michael S

    2014-06-01

    This study sought to understand the mechanism by which the steady state flux of nicotine across the human skin from aqueous solutions is markedly decreased at higher nicotine concentrations. Nicotine's steady state flux through human epidermis and its amount in the stratum corneum for a range of aqueous nicotine solutions was determined using Franz diffusion cells, with the nicotine analysed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Nicotine's thermodynamic activity in the various solutions was estimated from its partial vapour pressure and stratum corneum hydration was determined using a corneometer. The amount of nicotine retained in the stratum corneum was estimated from the nicotine amount found in individual stratum corneum tape strips and a D-Squame determined weight for each strip. The observed steady state flux of nicotine across human epidermis was found to show a parabolic dependence on nicotine concentration, with the flux proportional to its thermodynamic activity up to a concentration of 48% w/w. The nicotine retention in the stratum corneum showed a similar dependency on concentration whereas the diffusivity of nicotine in the stratum corneum appeared to be concentration independent. This retention, in turn, could be estimated from the extent of stratum corneum hydration and the nicotine concentration in the applied solution and volume of water in the skin. Nonlinear dependency of nicotine skin flux on its concentration results from a dehydration induced decrease in its stratum corneum retention at higher concentration and not dehydration induced changes nicotine diffusivity in the stratum corneum.

  12. Concentration of Nicotine and Glycols in 27 Electronic Cigarette Formulations.

    PubMed

    Peace, Michelle R; Baird, Tyson R; Smith, Nathaniel; Wolf, Carl E; Poklis, Justin L; Poklis, Alphonse

    2016-07-01

    Personal battery-powered vaporizers or electronic cigarettes were developed to deliver a nicotine vapor such that smokers could simulate smoking tobacco without the inherent pathology of inhaled tobacco smoke. Electronic cigarettes and their e-cigarette liquid formulations are virtually unregulated. These formulations are typically composed of propylene glycol and/or glycerin, flavoring components and an active drug, such as nicotine. Twenty-seven e-cigarette liquid formulations that contain nicotine between 6 and 22 mg/L were acquired within the USA and analyzed by various methods to determine their contents. They were screened by Direct Analysis in Real Time™ Mass Spectrometry (DART-MS). Nicotine was confirmed and quantitated by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, and the glycol composition was confirmed and quantitated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The DART-MS screening method was able to consistently identify the exact mass peaks resulting from the protonated molecular ion of nicotine, glycol and a number of flavor additives within 5 mmu. Nicotine concentrations were determined to range from 45 to 131% of the stated label concentration, with 18 of the 27 have >10% variance. Glycol composition was generally accurate to the product description, with only one exception where the propylene glycol to glycerin percentage ratio was stated as 50:50 and the determined concentration of propylene glycol to glycerin was 81:19 (% v/v). No unlabeled glycols were detected in these formulations.

  13. Concentration of Nicotine and Glycols in 27 Electronic Cigarette Formulations

    PubMed Central

    Peace, Michelle R.; Baird, Tyson R.; Smith, Nathaniel; Wolf, Carl E.; Poklis, Justin L.; Poklis, Alphonse

    2016-01-01

    Personal battery-powered vaporizers or electronic cigarettes were developed to deliver a nicotine vapor such that smokers could simulate smoking tobacco without the inherent pathology of inhaled tobacco smoke. Electronic cigarettes and their e-cigarette liquid formulations are virtually unregulated. These formulations are typically composed of propylene glycol and/or glycerin, flavoring components and an active drug, such as nicotine. Twenty-seven e-cigarette liquid formulations that contain nicotine between 6 and 22 mg/L were acquired within the USA and analyzed by various methods to determine their contents. They were screened by Direct Analysis in Real Time™ Mass Spectrometry (DART-MS). Nicotine was confirmed and quantitated by high-performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry, and the glycol composition was confirmed and quantitated by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. The DART-MS screening method was able to consistently identify the exact mass peaks resulting from the protonated molecular ion of nicotine, glycol and a number of flavor additives within 5 mmu. Nicotine concentrations were determined to range from 45 to 131% of the stated label concentration, with 18 of the 27 have >10% variance. Glycol composition was generally accurate to the product description, with only one exception where the propylene glycol to glycerin percentage ratio was stated as 50:50 and the determined concentration of propylene glycol to glycerin was 81:19 (% v/v). No unlabeled glycols were detected in these formulations. PMID:27165804

  14. Smoking-Relevant Nicotine Concentration Attenuates the Unfolded Protein Response in Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Rahul; Henley, Beverley M.; Henderson, Brandon J.; Indersmitten, Tim; Cohen, Bruce N.; Kim, Charlene H.; McKinney, Sheri; Deshpande, Purnima; Xiao, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective epidemiological studies show an inverse correlation between susceptibility to Parkinson's disease and a person's history of tobacco use. Animal model studies suggest nicotine as a neuroprotective agent and nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChRs) as targets for neuroprotection, but the underlying neuroprotective mechanism(s) are unknown. We cultured mouse ventral midbrain neurons for 3 weeks. Ten to 20% of neurons were dopaminergic (DA), revealed by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity. We evoked mild endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress with tunicamycin (Tu), producing modest increases in the level of nuclear ATF6, phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, nuclear XBP1, and the downstream proapoptotic effector nuclear C/EBP homologous protein. We incubated cultures for 2 weeks with 200 nm nicotine, the approximate steady-state concentration between cigarette smoking or vaping, or during nicotine patch use. Nicotine incubation suppressed Tu-induced ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR). Study of mice with fluorescent nAChR subunits showed that the cultured TH+ neurons displayed α4, α6, and β3 nAChR subunit expression and ACh-evoked currents. Gene expression profile in cultures from TH-eGFP mice showed that the TH+ neurons also express several other genes associated with DA release. Nicotine also upregulated ACh-induced currents in DA neurons by ∼2.5-fold. Thus, nicotine, at a concentration too low to activate an appreciable fraction of plasma membrane nAChRs, induces two sequelae of pharmacological chaperoning in the ER: UPR suppression and nAChR upregulation. Therefore, one mechanism of neuroprotection by nicotine is pharmacological chaperoning, leading to UPR suppression. Measuring this pathway may help in assessing neuroprotection. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Parkinson's disease (PD) cannot yet be cured or prevented. However, many retrospective epidemiological studies reveal that PD is diagnosed less frequently in

  15. Nicotine dose-concentration relationship and pregnancy outcomes in rat: Biologic plausibility and implications for future research

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, Jabeen; Farkas, Svetlana; MacKinnon, Yolanda; Ariano, Robert E.; Sitar, Daniel S.; Hasan, Shabih U. . E-mail: hasans@ucalgary.ca

    2007-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure during pregnancy can lead to profound adverse effects on fetal development. Although CS contains several thousand chemicals, nicotine has been widely used as its surrogate as well as in its own right as a neuroteratogen. The justification for the route and dose of nicotine administration is largely based on inferential data suggesting that nicotine 6 mg/kg/day infused continuously via osmotic mini pumps (OMP) would mimic maternal CS exposure. We provide evidence that 6 mg/kg/day nicotine dose as commonly administered to pregnant rats leads to plasma nicotine concentrations that are 3-10-fold higher than those observed in moderate to heavy smokers and pregnant mothers, respectively. Furthermore, the cumulative daily nicotine dose exceeds by several hundred fold the amount consumed by human heavy smokers. Our study does not support the widely accepted notion that regardless of the nicotine dose, a linear nicotine dose-concentration relationship exists in a steady-state OMP model. We also show that total nicotine clearance increases with advancing pregnancy but no significant change is observed between the 2nd and 3rd trimester. Furthermore, nicotine infusion even at this extremely high dose has little effect on a number of maternal and fetal biologic variables and pregnancy outcome suggesting that CS constituents other than nicotine mediate the fetal growth restriction in infants born to smoking mothers. Our current study has major implications for translational research in developmental toxicology and pharmacotherapy using nicotine replacement treatment as an aid to cessation of cigarette smoking in pregnant mothers.

  16. Comparison of plasma levels of cytokines and in vitro generation of reactive oxygen species after nicotine infusion in nicotine users with normal and impaired renal function.

    PubMed

    Whiss, Per A; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Larsson, Rutger

    2003-05-01

    Several in vitro and animal studies suggest effects of nicotine on the immune system, but little evidence exists regarding the in vivo immunomodulation of nicotine in humans. The increased use of nicotine replacement therapy to aid smoking cessation claims further understanding of how nicotine affects blood leukocytes. This is of particular importance when nicotine therapy is used in diseases associated with alterations of the immune system, such as chronic renal failure. The present study evaluates the acute effects of nicotine infusion (NI) on some immunoregulatory functions in seven healthy subjects and seven patients with renal failure. All subjects were nicotine users and had refrained from using nicotine for 36 h before NI. Blood was collected before, immediately after, and 2 h after NI. Plasma concentrations of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and the cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-10, interferon-gamma and RANTES were measured using specific immunoassays. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP), Ristocetin, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, or collagen was registered in whole blood as luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Except for fMLP, these compounds induce leukocyte ROS generation by platelet mediated mechanisms. NI did not significantly affect the levels of the cytokines and ICAM-1 in any group. The peak and the persistent ROS production, induced by collagen and Ristocetin, was lower at some time points in patients with renal failure as compared to healthy subjects. Also in patients with renal failure, both peak height and persistent ROS generation induced by Ristocetin were reduced immediately after NI. Thus, nicotine inhibits some of the platelet-mediated activation of leukocyte ROS generation, and may be associated with platelet defects in renal failure.

  17. Distribution analysis of airborne nicotine concentrations in hospitality facilities.

    PubMed

    Schorp, Matthias K; Leyden, Donald E

    2002-02-01

    A number of publications report statistical summaries for environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) concentrations. Despite compelling evidence for the data not being normally distributed, these publications typically report the arithmetic mean and standard deviation of the data, thereby losing important information related to the distribution of values contained in the original data. We were interested in the frequency distributions of reported nicotine concentrations in hospitality environments and subjected available data to distribution analyses. The distribution of experimental indoor airborne nicotine concentration data taken from hospitality facilities worldwide was fit to lognormal, Weibull, exponential, Pearson (Type V), logistic, and loglogistic distribution models. Comparison of goodness of fit (GOF) parameters and indications from the literature verified the selection of a lognormal distribution as the overall best model. When individual data were not reported in the literature, statistical summaries of results were used to model sets of lognormally distributed data that are intended to mimic the original data distribution. Grouping the data into various categories led to 31 frequency distributions that were further interpreted. The median values in nonsmoking environments are about half of the median values in smoking sections. When different continents are compared, Asian, European, and North American median values in restaurants are about a factor of three below levels encountered in other hospitality facilities. On a comparison of nicotine concentrations in North American smoking sections and nonsmoking sections, median values are about one-third of the European levels. The results obtained may be used to address issues related to exposure to ETS in the hospitality sector.

  18. Nicotine Concentrations in Electronic Cigarette Refill and Do-It-Yourself Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Barbara; Dang, Michael; Kim, Jisoo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluated the accuracy of nicotine concentration labeling on electronic cigarette refill products. Methods: The nicotine concentration of 71 electronic cigarette refill fluid products and 1 related do-it-yourself (DIY) product was quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography. Quantified data were compared with manufacturers labeled concentrations. Duplicate refill fluid products purchased at different times were evaluated by visual comparison of fluid coloration and quantified nicotine concentration. Results: Thirty-five of the 54 nicotine-containing fluids had quantified nicotine concentrations that deviated by more than ±10% from the manufacturer labels, with 46 of 50 being in excess of labeled values. Refill fluids labeled as 0 nicotine had no detectable nicotine. Of the 5 products that were unlabeled for nicotine concentration, 3 contained no detectable nicotine, whereas the remaining 2 contained nicotine in excess of 100mg/ml and may have been intended for DIY use. Sixteen of the 18 duplicate bottles of refill fluid varied greatly in their nicotine concentrations. One of the 5 companies showed significant improvement in labeling accuracy among the most recently purchased products. Of the 23 total duplicate pairs, 15 of 23 varied in coloration from their mates. Conclusions: Nicotine concentration labeling on electronic cigarette refill products was often inaccurate but showed improvement recently in products from 1 company. To ensure the safety of refill fluids and DIY products, it is necessary to establish quality control guidelines for the manufacturing and labeling and to monitor products longitudinally. PMID:24862971

  19. Motoneuron axon pathfinding errors in zebrafish: Differential effects related to concentration and timing of nicotine exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Menelaou, Evdokia; Paul, Latoya T.; Perera, Surangi N.; Svoboda, Kurt R.

    2015-04-01

    Nicotine exposure during embryonic stages of development can affect many neurodevelopmental processes. In the developing zebrafish, exposure to nicotine was reported to cause axonal pathfinding errors in the later born secondary motoneurons (SMNs). These alterations in SMN axon morphology coincided with muscle degeneration at high nicotine concentrations (15–30 μM). Previous work showed that the paralytic mutant zebrafish known as sofa potato exhibited nicotine-induced effects onto SMN axons at these high concentrations but in the absence of any muscle deficits, indicating that pathfinding errors could occur independent of muscle effects. In this study, we used varying concentrations of nicotine at different developmental windows of exposure to specifically isolate its effects onto subpopulations of motoneuron axons. We found that nicotine exposure can affect SMN axon morphology in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations of nicotine, SMN axons exhibited pathfinding errors, in the absence of any nicotine-induced muscle abnormalities. Moreover, the nicotine exposure paradigms used affected the 3 subpopulations of SMN axons differently, but the dorsal projecting SMN axons were primarily affected. We then identified morphologically distinct pathfinding errors that best described the nicotine-induced effects on dorsal projecting SMN axons. To test whether SMN pathfinding was potentially influenced by alterations in the early born primary motoneuron (PMN), we performed dual labeling studies, where both PMN and SMN axons were simultaneously labeled with antibodies. We show that only a subset of the SMN axon pathfinding errors coincided with abnormal PMN axonal targeting in nicotine-exposed zebrafish. We conclude that nicotine exposure can exert differential effects depending on the levels of nicotine and developmental exposure window. - Highlights: • Embryonic nicotine exposure can specifically affect secondary motoneuron axons in a dose-dependent manner.

  20. Sensitive and simple method for the determination of nicotine and cotinine in human urine, plasma and saliva by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ho-Sang; Kim, Jin-Gu; Shin, Yoon-Jeong; Jee, Sun Ha

    2002-03-25

    A method is proposed for the determination of nicotine and cotinine in human urine, plasma and saliva. Nicotine and cotinine were extracted from alkalinized sample with ethyl ether and concentrated to minimum volume with nitrogen stream. The volatility of nicotine was prevented by the addition of acetic acid to the organic solvent during evaporation. Peak shapes and quantitation of nicotine and cotinine are excellent, with linear calibration curves over a wide range of 1-10,000 ng/ml. The detection limits of nicotine and cotinine are 0.2 ng/ml in urine and 1.0 ng/ml in plasma and saliva. The intra-day precision of nicotine and cotinine in all samples was <5% relative standard deviation (RSD). Urine, plasma and saliva samples of 303 non-smoking and 41 smoking volunteers from a girl's high school in Korea were quantified by the described procedure. As a result, the concentrations of nicotine and cotinine in plasma ranged from 6 to 498 ng/ml and 4 to 96 ng/ml. Otherwise, those of nicotine and cotinine in saliva ranged from 0 to 207 ng/ml and 0 to 42 ng/ml, and those of nicotine and cotinine in urine ranged from 0 to 1,590 ng/ml and 0 to 2,986 ng/ml, respectively. We found that the concentration of cotinine in plasma was successfully predicted from the salivary cotinine concentration by the equation y=2.31x+4.76 (x=the concentration of cotinine in saliva, y=the concentration of cotinine in plasma). The results show that through the accurate determination of cotinine in saliva, the risk of ETS-exposed human can be predicted.

  1. Assessment of nicotine concentration in electronic nicotine delivery system (ENDS) liquids and precision of dosing to aerosol.

    PubMed

    Kosmider, Leon; Sobczak, Andrzej; Szołtysek-Bołdys, Izabela; Prokopowicz, Adam; Skórka, Agnieszka; Abdulafeez, Oluyadi; Koszowski, Bartosz

    2015-01-01

    Global use of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS; also called electronic cigarettes, e-cigarettes) has increased dramatically in recent years. However, due to the limited safety studies and growing concerns on the potential toxicity from long term use of ENDS, many national and international governments have employed regulatory measures to curtail its use. One of the most significant challenges regulators of ENDS encounter is the lack of quality standards to assess ENDS, e-liquid (solution used with ENDS which contain nicotine--a highly toxic and addictive substance), and amount of nicotine delivery to aerosol during ENDS use. Aims of the study were to (1) measure and compare nicotine concentration in e-liquids to values reported by manufacturers on packaging labels; (2) assess the precision of nicotine delivery from tank during aerosol formation. Methods: Nine popular Polish e-liquids (based on the market share data from October 2014) were purchased for the study. The labelled nicotine concentration for the selected e-liquids ranged between 11-25 mg/mL. All e-liquids were aerosolized in the laboratory using a smoking simulation machine (Palaczbot). Each e-liquid was aerosolized in a series of 6 consecutive bouts. A single bout consisted of 15 puffs with the following puff topography: 65 mL puff volume, 2.8 sec. puff duration, and 19 sec. interpuff interval. A total of 90 puffs were generated from each e-liquid. Nicotine content in the e-liquids and the aerosol generated were determined by gas chromatography with thermionic sensitive detection (GC-TSD). For seven of nine analyzed e-liquids, the difference between measured and manufacturer labeled nicotine concentration was less than 10%. Nicotine dose in aerosol per bout ranged between 0.77-1.49 mg (equivalent to one-half the nicotine a smoker inhales from a single combustible cigarette). Our analysis showed the high consistency between the labeled and measured nicotine concentration for popular on the

  2. Occupational secondhand smoke is the main determinant of hair nicotine concentrations in bar and restaurant workers.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Verónica; Erazo, Marcia; Droppelmann, Andrea; Steenland, Kyle; Aceituno, Paulina; Orellana, Cecilia; Acuña, Marisol; Peruga, Armando; Breysse, Patrick N; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the relative contribution of occupational vs. non-occupational secondhand tobacco smoke exposure to overall hair nicotine concentrations in non-smoking bar and restaurant employees. We recruited 76 non-smoking employees from venues that allowed smoking (n=9), had mixed policies (smoking and non-smoking areas, n=13) or were smoke-free (n=2) between April and August 2008 in Santiago, Chile. Employees used personal air nicotine samplers during working and non-working hours for a 24-h period to assess occupational vs. non-occupational secondhand tobacco smoke exposure and hair nicotine concentrations to assess overall secondhand tobacco smoke exposure. Median hair nicotine concentrations were 1.5 ng/mg, interquartile range (IQR) 0.7 to 5.2 ng/mg. Time weighted average personal air nicotine concentrations were higher during working hours (median 9.7, IQR 3.3-25.4 µg/m(3)) compared to non-working hours (1.7, 1.0-3.1 µg/m(3)). Hair nicotine concentration was best predicted by personal air nicotine concentration at working hours. After adjustment, a 2-fold increase in personal air nicotine concentration in working hours was associated with a 42% increase in hair nicotine concentration (95% confidence interval 14-70%). Hair nicotine concentration was not associated with personal air nicotine concentration during non-working hours (non-occupational exposure). Personal air nicotine concentration at working hours was the major determinant of hair nicotine concentrations in non-smoking employees from Santiago, Chile. Secondhand tobacco smoke exposure during working hours is a health hazard for hospitality employees working in venues where smoking is allowed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Occupational secondhand smoke is the main determinant of hair nicotine concentrations in bar and restaurant workers

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Verónica; Erazo, Marcia; Droppelmann, Andrea; Steenland, Kyle; Aceituno, Paulina; Orellana, Cecilia; Acuña, Marisol; Peruga, Armando; Breysse, Patrick N.; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relative contribution of occupational vs. non-occupational secondhand tobacco smoke exposure to overall hair nicotine concentrations in non-smoking bar and restaurant employees. Method We recruited 76 non-smoking employees from venues that allowed smoking (n = 9), had mixed policies (smoking and non-smoking areas, n = 13) or were smoke-free (n = 2) between April and August 2008 in Santiago, Chile. Employees used personal air nicotine samplers during working and non-working hours for a 24-h period to assess occupational vs. non-occupational secondhand tobacco smoke exposure and hair nicotine concentrations to assess overall secondhand tobacco smoke exposure. Results Median hair nicotine concentrations were 1.5 ng/mg, interquartile range (IQR) 0.7 to 5.2 ng/mg. Time weighted average personal air nicotine concentrations were higher during working hours (median 9.7, IQR 3.3-25.4 μg/m3) compared to non-working hours (1.7, 1.0-3.1 μg/m3). Hair nicotine concentration was best predicted by personal air nicotine concentration at working hours. After adjustment, a 2-fold increase in personal air nicotine concentration in working hours was associated with a 42% increase in hair nicotine concentration (95% confidence interval 14-70%). Hair nicotine concentration was not associated with personal air nicotine concentration during non-working hours (non-occupational exposure). Conclusions Personal air nicotine concentration at working hours was the major determinant of hair nicotine concentrations in non-smoking employees from Santiago, Chile. Secondhand tobacco smoke exposure during working hours is a health hazard for hospitality employees working in venues where smoking is allowed. PMID:24813578

  4. Nicotine concentrations in electronic cigarette refill and do-it-yourself fluids.

    PubMed

    Davis, Barbara; Dang, Michael; Kim, Jisoo; Talbot, Prue

    2015-02-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of nicotine concentration labeling on electronic cigarette refill products. The nicotine concentration of 71 electronic cigarette refill fluid products and 1 related do-it-yourself (DIY) product was quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography. Quantified data were compared with manufacturers labeled concentrations. Duplicate refill fluid products purchased at different times were evaluated by visual comparison of fluid coloration and quantified nicotine concentration. Thirty-five of the 54 nicotine-containing fluids had quantified nicotine concentrations that deviated by more than ± 10% from the manufacturer labels, with 46 of 50 being in excess of labeled values. Refill fluids labeled as 0 nicotine had no detectable nicotine. Of the 5 products that were unlabeled for nicotine concentration, 3 contained no detectable nicotine, whereas the remaining 2 contained nicotine in excess of 100mg/ml and may have been intended for DIY use. Sixteen of the 18 duplicate bottles of refill fluid varied greatly in their nicotine concentrations. One of the 5 companies showed significant improvement in labeling accuracy among the most recently purchased products. Of the 23 total duplicate pairs, 15 of 23 varied in coloration from their mates. Nicotine concentration labeling on electronic cigarette refill products was often inaccurate but showed improvement recently in products from 1 company. To ensure the safety of refill fluids and DIY products, it is necessary to establish quality control guidelines for the manufacturing and labeling and to monitor products longitudinally. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Nicotine in high concentration causes contraction of isolated strips of rabbit corpus cavernosum.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoai Bac; Lee, Shin Young; Park, Soo Hyun; Han, Jun Hyun; Lee, Moo Yeol; Myung, Soon Chul

    2015-05-01

    It is well known that cigarette smoke can cause erectile dysfunction by affecting the penile vascular system. However, the exact effects of nicotine on the corpus cavernosum remains poorly understood. Nicotine has been reported to cause relaxation of the corpus cavernosum; it has also been reported to cause both contraction and relaxation. Therefore, high concentrations of nicotine were studied in strips from the rabbit corpus cavernosum to better understand its effects. The proximal penile corpus cavernosal strips from male rabbits weighing approximately 4 kg were used in organ bath studies. Nicotine in high concentrations (10(-5)~10(-4) M) produced dose-dependent contractions of the corpus cavernosal strips. The incubation with 10(-5) M hexamethonium (nicotinic receptor antagonist) significantly inhibited the magnitude of the nicotine associated contractions. The nicotine-induced contractions were not only significantly inhibited by pretreatment with 10(-5) M indomethacin (nonspecific cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and with 10(-6) M NS-398 (selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor), but also with 10(-6) M Y-27632 (Rho kinase inhibitor). Ozagrel (thromboxane A2 synthase inhibitor) and SQ-29548 (highly selective TP receptor antagonist) pretreatments significantly reduced the nicotine-induced contractile amplitude of the strips. High concentrations of nicotine caused contraction of isolated rabbit corpus cavernosal strips. This contraction appeared to be mediated by activation of nicotinic receptors. Rho-kinase and cyclooxygenase pathways, especially cyclooxygenase-2 and thromboxane A2, might play a pivotal role in the mechanism associated with nicotine-induced contraction of the rabbit corpus cavernosum.

  6. Motoneuron axon pathfinding errors in zebrafish: Differential effects related to concentration and timing of nicotine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Menelaou, Evdokia; Paul, Latoya T.; Perera, Surangi N.; Svoboda, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine exposure during embryonic stages of development can affect many neurodevelopmental processes. In the developing zebrafish, exposure to nicotine was reported to cause axonal pathfinding errors in the later born secondary motoneurons (SMN). These alterations in SMN axon morphology coincided with muscle degeneration at high nicotine concentrations (15–30µM). Previous work showed that the paralytic mutant zebrafish known as sofa potato, exhibited nicotine-induced effects onto SMN axons at these high concentrations but in the absence of any muscle deficits, indicating that pathfinding errors could occur independent of muscle effects. In this study, we used varying concentrations of nicotine at different developmental windows of exposure to specifically isolate its effects onto subpopulations of motoneuron axons. We found that nicotine exposure can affect SMN axon morphology in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations of nicotine, SMN axons exhibited pathfinding errors, in the absence of any nicotine-induced muscle abnormalities. Moreover, the nicotine exposure paradigms used affected the 3 subpopulations of SMN axons differently, but the dorsal projecting SMN axons were primarily affected. We then identified morphologically distinct pathfinding errors that best described the nicotine-induced effects on dorsal projecting SMN axons. To test whether SMN pathfinding was potentially influenced by alterations in the early born primary motoneuron (PMN), we performed dual labeling studies, where both PMN and SMN axons were simultaneously labeled with antibodies. We show that only a subset of the SMN axon pathfinding errors coincided with abnormal PMN axonal targeting in nicotine-exposed zebrafish. We conclude that nicotine exposure can exert differential effects depending on the levels of nicotine and developmental exposure window. PMID:25668718

  7. Monitoring nicotine intake from e-cigarettes: measurement of parent drug and metabolites in oral fluid and plasma.

    PubMed

    Papaseit, Esther; Farré, Magí; Graziano, Silvia; Pacifici, Roberta; Pérez-Mañá, Clara; García-Algar, Oscar; Pichini, Simona

    2017-03-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cig) known as electronic nicotine devices recently gained popularity among smokers. Despite many studies investigating their safety and toxicity, few examined the delivery of e-cig-derived nicotine and its metabolites in alternative biological fluids. We performed a randomized, crossover, and controlled clinical trial in nine healthy smokers. Nicotine (NIC), cotinine (COT), and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine (3-HCOT) were measured in plasma and oral fluid by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry after consumption of two consecutive e-cig administrations or two consecutive tobacco cigarettes. NIC and its metabolites were detected both in oral fluid and plasma following both administration conditions. Concentrations in oral fluid resulted various orders of magnitude higher than those observed in plasma. Oral fluid concentration of tobacco cigarette and e-cig-derived NIC peaked at 15 min after each administration and ranged between 1.0 and 1396 μg/L and from 0.3 to 860 μg/L; those of COT between 52.8 and 110 μg/L and from 33.8 to 94.7 μg/L; and those of 3-HCOT between 12.4 and 23.5 μg/L and from 8.5 to 24.4 μg/L. The oral fluid to plasma concentration ratio of both e-cig- and tobacco cigarette-derived NIC peaked at 15 min after both administrations and correlated with oral fluid NIC concentration. The obtained results support the measurement of NIC and metabolites in oral fluid in the assessment of intake after e-cig use and appear to be a suitable alternative to plasma when monitoring nicotine delivery from e-cig for clinical and toxicological studies.

  8. Nicotine at clinically relevant concentrations affects atrial inward rectifier potassium current sensitive to acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Bébarová, Markéta; Matejovič, Peter; Švecová, Olga; Kula, Roman; Šimurdová, Milena; Šimurda, Jiří

    2017-05-01

    Nicotine abuse is associated with variety of diseases including arrhythmias, most often atrial fibrillation (AF). Altered inward rectifier potassium currents including acetylcholine-sensitive current I K(Ach) are known to be related to AF pathogenesis. Since relevant data are missing, we aimed to investigate I K(Ach) changes at clinically relevant concentrations of nicotine. Experiments were performed by the whole cell patch clamp technique at 23 ± 1 °C on isolated rat atrial myocytes. Nicotine was applied at following concentrations: 4, 40 and 400 nM; ethanol at 20 mM (∼0.09%). Nicotine at 40 and 400 nM significantly activated constitutively active component of I K(Ach) with the maximum effect at 40 nM (an increase by ∼100%); similar effect was observed at -110 and -50 mV. Changes at 4 nM nicotine were negligible on average. Coapplication of 40 nM nicotine and 20 mM ethanol (which is also known to activate this current) did not show cumulative effect. In the case of acetylcholine-induced component of I K(Ach), a dual effect of nicotine and its correlation with the current magnitude in control were apparent: the current was increased by nicotine in the cells showing small current in control and vice versa. The effect of 40 and 400 nM nicotine on acetylcholine-induced component of I K(Ach) was significantly different at -110 and -50 mV. We conclude that nicotine at clinically relevant concentrations significantly increased constitutively active component of I K(Ach) and showed a dual effect on its acetylcholine-induced component, similarly as ethanol. Synchronous application of nicotine and ethanol did not cause additive effect.

  9. Layer-specific interference with cholinergic signaling in the prefrontal cortex by smoking concentrations of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Poorthuis, Rogier B; Bloem, Bernard; Verhoog, Matthijs B; Mansvelder, Huibert D

    2013-03-13

    Adolescence is a period in which the developing prefrontal cortex (PFC) is sensitive to maladaptive changes when exposed to nicotine. Nicotine affects PFC function and repeated exposure to nicotine during adolescence impairs attention performance and impulse control during adulthood. Nicotine concentrations experienced by smokers are known to desensitize nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), but the impact thereof on PFC circuits is poorly understood. Here, we investigated how smoking concentrations of nicotine (100-300 nm) interfere with cholinergic signaling in the mouse PFC. nAChR desensitization depends on subunit composition. Since nAChR subunits are differentially expressed across layers of the PFC neuronal network, we hypothesized that cholinergic signaling through nAChRs across layers would suffer differentially from exposure to nicotine. Throughout the PFC, nicotine strongly desensitized responses to ACh in neurons expressing β2* nAChRs, whereas ACh responses mediated by α7 nAChRs were not hampered. The amount of desensitization of β2* nAChR currents depended on neuron type and cortical layer. β2*-mediated responses of interneurons in LII-III and LVI completely desensitized, while cholinergic responses in LV interneurons and LVI pyramidal cells showed less desensitization. This discrepancy depended on α5 subunit expression. Two-photon imaging of neuronal population activity showed that prolonged exposure to nicotine limited cholinergic signaling through β2* nAChRs to deep PFC layers where α5 subunits were expressed. Together, our results demonstrate a layer-dependent decrease in cholinergic activation of the PFC through nAChRs by nicotine. These mechanisms may be one of the first steps leading up to the pathophysiological changes associated with nicotine exposure during adolescence.

  10. Influence of subunit composition on desensitization of neuronal acetylcholine receptors at low concentrations of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Fenster, C P; Rains, M F; Noerager, B; Quick, M W; Lester, R A

    1997-08-01

    The influence of alpha and beta subunits on the properties of nicotine-induced activation and desensitization of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) expressed in Xenopus oocytes was examined. Receptors containing alpha4 subunits were more sensitive to activation by nicotine than alpha3-containing receptors. At low concentrations of nicotine, nAChRs containing beta2 subunits reached near-maximal desensitization more rapidly than beta4-containing receptors. The concentration of nicotine producing half-maximal desensitization was influenced by the particular alpha subunit expressed; similar to results for activation, alpha4-containing receptors were more sensitive to desensitizing levels of nicotine than alpha3-containing receptors. The alpha subunit also influenced the rate of recovery from desensitization; this rate was approximately inversely proportional to the apparent nicotine affinity for the desensitized state. The homomeric alpha7 receptor showed the lowest sensitivity to nicotine for both activation and desensitization; alpha7 nAChRs also demonstrated the fastest desensitization kinetics. These subunit-dependent properties remained in the presence of external calcium, although subtle, receptor subtype-specific effects on both the apparent affinities for activation and desensitization and the desensitization kinetics were noted. These data imply that the subunit composition of various nAChRs determines the degree to which receptors are desensitized and/or activated by tobacco-related levels of nicotine. The subtype-specific balance between receptor activation and desensitization should be considered important when the cellular and behavioral actions of nicotine are interpreted.

  11. Comparison of parental reports of smoking and residential air nicotine concentrations in children.

    PubMed

    Gehring, U; Leaderer, B P; Heinrich, J; Oldenwening, M; Giovannangelo, M E C A; Nordling, E; Merkel, G; Hoek, G; Bellander, T; Brunekreef, B

    2006-11-01

    Using questionnaires to assess children's residential exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) may result in misclassification from recall and response bias. Questionnaire data have frequently been validated against urinary cotinine measurements, but rarely against actual measurements of residential air nicotine. To compare questionnaire reported smoking with air nicotine concentrations in a large population of children and with urinary cotinine levels in a subpopulation; and to assess the potential impact of the symptom status of the children on the agreement between different measures of exposure. The authors assessed residential exposure to ETS in 347 German, 335 Dutch, and 354 Swedish preschool and schoolchildren by questionnaire and air nicotine measurements, and in a subset of 307 German children by urinary cotinine measurements. They then compared the different measures of ETS exposure. In all countries, air nicotine concentrations increased with increasing questionnaire reported smoking in a dose-response fashion. Specificity and negative predictive values of questionnaire reports for nicotine concentrations were excellent. Sensitivity and positive predictive values were moderate to good. Excluding occasional smokers, the overall percentage of homes misclassified was 6.9%, 6.7%, and 5.1% in Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden, respectively. Similar results were found for the agreement of urinary cotinine concentrations with questionnaire reports and air nicotine levels. There was no indication of underreporting by parents of symptomatic children. Despite some misclassification, questionnaire reports are an inexpensive and valid estimate of residential ETS exposure among preschool and school children.

  12. Intravenous and oral suicidal e-liquid poisonings with confirmed nicotine and cotinine concentrations.

    PubMed

    Sommerfeld, Karina; Łukasik-Głębocka, Magdalena; Kulza, Maksymilian; Drużdż, Artur; Panieński, Paweł; Florek, Ewa; Zielińska-Psuja, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    The increasing availability of e-cigarettes is a potential toxicological concern. E-cigarettes appeared on the Polish market in 2006, and since 2009 they have been widely available with a new source of nicotine, the so-called e-liquid. In this paper two cases of suicidal oral and intravenous poisonings with the e-liquid are described. The clinical courses of these poisonings are presented. Nicotine and cotinine concentrations in the patient's blood were determined using high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. In the course of intoxication patient No. 1, classic symptoms of acute nicotine poisoning without convulsions were observed. Nicotine and cotinine concentrations measured in serum were 0.096 and 4.4mg/L, respectively. The case of patient No. 2, admission with no typical symptoms of nicotine poisoning was identified, except unconsciousness and slow respiration. Nicotine and cotinine concentrations in the serum at the time of No. 2 admissions were determined to be 0.8 and 1.3mg/L, respectively. With the increasing number of e-liquid poisonings cases, it should be aware that these products can be a readily available source of poison. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Preliminary results of an examination of electronic cigarette user puff topography: the effect of a mouthpiece-based topography measurement device on plasma nicotine and subjective effects.

    PubMed

    Spindle, Tory R; Breland, Alison B; Karaoghlanian, Nareg V; Shihadeh, Alan L; Eissenberg, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Electronic cigarettes (ECIGs) heat a nicotine-containing solution; the resulting aerosol is inhaled by the user. Nicotine delivery may be affected by users' puffing behavior (puff topography), and little is known about the puff topography of ECIG users. Puff topography can be measured using mouthpiece-based computerized systems. However, the extent to which a mouthpiece influences nicotine delivery and subjective effects in ECIG users is unknown. Plasma nicotine concentration, heart rate, and subjective effects were measured in 13 experienced ECIG users who used their preferred ECIG and liquid (≥ 12 mg/ml nicotine) during 2 sessions (with or without a mouthpiece). In both sessions, participants completed an ECIG use session in which they were instructed to take 10 puffs with 30-second inter-puff intervals. Puff topography was recorded in the mouthpiece condition. Almost all measures of the effects of ECIG use were independent of topography measurement. Collapsed across session, mean plasma nicotine concentration increased by 16.8 ng/ml, and mean heart rate increased by 8.5 bpm (ps < .05). Withdrawal symptoms decreased significantly after ECIG use. Participants reported that the mouthpiece affected awareness and made ECIG use more difficult. Relative to previously reported data for tobacco cigarette smokers using similar topography measurement equipment, ECIG-using participants took larger and longer puffs with lower flow rates. In experienced ECIG users, measuring ECIG topography did not influence ECIG-associated nicotine delivery or most measures of withdrawal suppression. Topography measurement systems will need to account for the low flow rates observed for ECIG users. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Hair nicotine concentration measurement in cats and its relationship to owner-reported environmental tobacco smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Smith, V A; McBrearty, A R; Watson, D G; Mellor, D J; Spence, S; Knottenbelt, C

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the association between hair nicotine concentration in cats and owner-reported exposure to environmental tobacco smoke. Owner questionnaires documented exposure. Nicotine was extracted from hair by sonification in methanol followed by hydrophilic interaction chromatography with mass spectrometry. Relationships between hair nicotine concentration and owner-reported exposure were examined using hypothesis-testing statistics and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The hair nicotine concentration of reportedly exposed cats was significantly higher than unexposed cats and groups of cats with different levels of exposure had significantly different median hair nicotine concentrations corresponding to exposure. A hair nicotine concentration of 0·1 ng/mg had a specificity of 98% (95% confidence interval: 83 to 100) and a sensitivity of 69% (95% confidence interval: 54 to 84) for detecting environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Outdoors access, coat colour, urban or rural environment and length of time living with the owner were not obviously associated with hair nicotine concentration. Feline hair nicotine concentration appears strongly associated with owner-reported environmental tobacco smoke exposure. Feline hair nicotine concentration could therefore be used as a biomarker for tobacco smoke exposure, allowing future studies to assess whether exposed cats have an increased risk of specific diseases. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  15. Determination of nicotine absorption from multiple tobacco products and nicotine gum.

    PubMed

    Digard, Helena; Proctor, Christopher; Kulasekaran, Anuradha; Malmqvist, Ulf; Richter, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    Snus is a smokeless tobacco product traditionally used in Scandinavia and available in pouched or loose forms. The objective of this study was to determine nicotine absorption for current pouched and loose snus products in comparison with a cigarette and an over-the-counter nicotine gum. We conducted an open-label, randomized, 6-way, crossover study involving 20 healthy snus and cigarette users. One of 6 products (2 pouched snus, 2 weights of loose snus, a cigarette, and a nicotine gum) was administered at each of 6 visits. Blood samples were taken at intervals over 120 min and sensory perception assessed by questionnaire. For the 4 smokeless tobacco products and the nicotine gum, blood plasma levels of nicotine were ranked according to total nicotine content as follows: loose snus (27.1 mg nicotine) > pouched snus (14.7 mg nicotine) > loose snus (10.8 mg nicotine) = pouched snus (10.7 mg nicotine) > nicotine gum (4.2 mg nicotine). The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) of nicotine ranged from 26.9 to 13.1 ng.h/ml and 17.9 to 9.1 ng.h/ml, respectively across all the products. Nicotine was absorbed more rapidly from the cigarette but systemic exposure was within the range of the smokeless tobacco products (AUC = 14.8 ng.h/ml; C(max) = 12.8 ng.h/ml). This study has generated new information on comparative nicotine absorption from a cigarette, loose snus, and pouched snus typical of products sold in Scandinavia. The similar nicotine absorption for 1 g portions of loose and pouched snus with approximately 11 mg of nicotine indicate that absorption kinetics were dependent on quantity of tobacco by weight and total nicotine content rather than product form.

  16. Determination of Nicotine Absorption from Multiple Tobacco Products and Nicotine Gum

    PubMed Central

    Digard, Helena; Proctor, Christopher; Kulasekaran, Anuradha; Malmqvist, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Snus is a smokeless tobacco product traditionally used in Scandinavia and available in pouched or loose forms. The objective of this study was to determine nicotine absorption for current pouched and loose snus products in comparison with a cigarette and an over-the-counter nicotine gum. Methods: We conducted an open-label, randomized, 6-way, crossover study involving 20 healthy snus and cigarette users. One of 6 products (2 pouched snus, 2 weights of loose snus, a cigarette, and a nicotine gum) was administered at each of 6 visits. Blood samples were taken at intervals over 120 min and sensory perception assessed by questionnaire. Results: For the 4 smokeless tobacco products and the nicotine gum, blood plasma levels of nicotine were ranked according to total nicotine content as follows: loose snus (27.1 mg nicotine) > pouched snus (14.7 mg nicotine) > loose snus (10.8 mg nicotine) = pouched snus (10.7 mg nicotine) > nicotine gum (4.2 mg nicotine). The area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC) and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of nicotine ranged from 26.9 to 13.1 ng.h/ml and 17.9 to 9.1 ng.h/ml, respectively across all the products. Nicotine was absorbed more rapidly from the cigarette but systemic exposure was within the range of the smokeless tobacco products (AUC = 14.8 ng.h/ml; Cmax = 12.8 ng.h/ml). Conclusions: This study has generated new information on comparative nicotine absorption from a cigarette, loose snus, and pouched snus typical of products sold in Scandinavia. The similar nicotine absorption for 1 g portions of loose and pouched snus with approximately 11 mg of nicotine indicate that absorption kinetics were dependent on quantity of tobacco by weight and total nicotine content rather than product form. PMID:22585541

  17. Preliminary Results of an Examination of Electronic Cigarette User Puff Topography: The Effect of a Mouthpiece-Based Topography Measurement Device on Plasma Nicotine and Subjective Effects

    PubMed Central

    Spindle, Tory R.; Breland, Alison B.; Karaoghlanian, Nareg V.; Shihadeh, Alan L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Electronic cigarettes (ECIGs) heat a nicotine-containing solution; the resulting aerosol is inhaled by the user. Nicotine delivery may be affected by users’ puffing behavior (puff topography), and little is known about the puff topography of ECIG users. Puff topography can be measured using mouthpiece-based computerized systems. However, the extent to which a mouthpiece influences nicotine delivery and subjective effects in ECIG users is unknown. Methods: Plasma nicotine concentration, heart rate, and subjective effects were measured in 13 experienced ECIG users who used their preferred ECIG and liquid (≥12mg/ml nicotine) during 2 sessions (with or without a mouthpiece). In both sessions, participants completed an ECIG use session in which they were instructed to take 10 puffs with 30-second inter-puff intervals. Puff topography was recorded in the mouthpiece condition. Results: Almost all measures of the effects of ECIG use were independent of topography measurement. Collapsed across session, mean plasma nicotine concentration increased by 16.8ng/ml, and mean heart rate increased by 8.5 bpm (ps < .05). Withdrawal symptoms decreased significantly after ECIG use. Participants reported that the mouthpiece affected awareness and made ECIG use more difficult. Relative to previously reported data for tobacco cigarette smokers using similar topography measurement equipment, ECIG-using participants took larger and longer puffs with lower flow rates. Conclusions: In experienced ECIG users, measuring ECIG topography did not influence ECIG-associated nicotine delivery or most measures of withdrawal suppression. Topography measurement systems will need to account for the low flow rates observed for ECIG users. PMID:25239957

  18. Effects of chronic nicotine administration on body weight, food intake and nitric oxide concentration in female and male rats.

    PubMed

    Ijomone, Omamuyovwi Meashack; Olaibi, Olayemi Kafilat; Nwoha, Polycarp Umunna

    2014-09-01

    Nicotine is readily consumed through cigarettes; however it is also easily consumed through the various forms of non-prescription nicotine replacement therapy. It has been shown to possess potential therapeutic value for the management of neurologic and neurodegenerative diseases in the last decade. Hence, this study examined the effects of chronic subcutaneous nicotine administration on food intake and body weight as well as on nitric oxide concentrations and total antioxidant capacity in female and male rats. Nicotine was administered to rats via subcutaneous injections at doses of 0.25, 2 and 4mg/kg body weight for 28 days. Control groups received normal saline; the vehicle for nicotine. Food intake by each group was monitored daily and body weight of the animals was measured twice weekly. At the end of drug administration, blood was obtained from each animal via cardiac puncture for biochemical determination of serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and nitric (NO) concentrations using standard assay kits. Results show significant loss (p<0.05) of body weight in all nicotine treated female rats. In contrast, male rats showed weight gain, though this was significantly lower (p<0.001) in nicotine treated groups compared to control. Nicotine significantly reduced (p<0.001) food consumed in both female and male rats; however dose related changes were observed in only male rats. No significant difference was observed in TAC following nicotine treatments for both female and male rats. Furthermore, only males exhibited changes in NO concentrations following nicotine treatment, as it significantly increased (p<0.01) NO concentrations in all male treated groups. In conclusion, this study has shown that modulation of body weight, food consumption and nitric oxide formation by nicotine is sexually dimorphic. Also, the study suggests that nicotine modulation of food intake and body weight and its modulation of NO may be independent of each other.

  19. Genetic and pharmacokinetic determinants of response to transdermal nicotine in white, black, and Asian nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, D A; St Helen, G; Jacob, P; Tyndale, R F; Benowitz, N L

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to examine genetic, pharmacokinetic, and demographic factors that influence sensitivity to nicotine in never-smokers. Sixty never-smokers, balanced for gender and race (white, black, and Asian), wore 7-mg nicotine skin patches for up to 8 h. Serial plasma nicotine concentrations and subjective and cardiovascular effects were measured, and genetic variation in the CYP2A6 gene, encoding the primary enzyme responsible for nicotine metabolism, was assessed. Nicotine toxicity requiring patch removal developed in nine subjects and was strongly associated with rate of increase and peak concentrations of plasma nicotine. Toxicity and subjective and cardiovascular effects of nicotine were associated with the presence of reduced-function CYP2A6 alleles, presumably reflecting slow nicotine metabolic inactivation. This study has implications for understanding individual differences in responses to nicotine medications, particularly when they are used for treating medical conditions in nonsmokers, and possibly in vulnerability to developing nicotine dependence.

  20. Determinants of hair nicotine concentrations in nonsmoking women and children: a multicountry study of secondhand smoke exposure in homes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungroul; Wipfli, Heather; Navas-Acien, Ana; Dominici, Francesca; Avila-Tang, Erika; Onicescu, Georgiana; Breysse, Patrick; Samet, Jonathan M

    2009-12-01

    The main purpose of this study was to identify and evaluate determinants of hair nicotine concentrations in nonsmoking women and children exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke at home. Hair samples were collected from nonsmoking women (n = 852) and from children (n = 1,017) <11 years of age living in households (n = 1,095) with smokers from 31 countries from July 2005 to October 2006. Participants' ages, activity patterns and socioeconomic characteristics including education and employment status, and hair treatment information were collected. Multilevel linear regression modeling was used to identify the main determinants of hair nicotine concentration measured by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Increased indoor air nicotine concentration at home were associated with increased hair nicotine concentrations in nonsmoking women and children. This association was not changed after controlling for other explanatory variables. After controlling for age, length of exposure, and socioeconomic characteristics, hair nicotine concentrations in nonsmoking children and women were estimated to be increased by 3% and 1%, respectively, for a 1 microg/m(3) increase in air nicotine concentration. The association between children's exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke at home and hair nicotine concentration was stronger among younger children and children with longer exposure at home.

  1. Plasma leptin concentration in donkeys.

    PubMed

    Díez, E; López, I; Pérez, C; Pineda, C; Aguilera-Tejero, E

    2012-01-01

    Donkeys appear to be more predisposed than large breed horses to suffer from hyperlipemia. The reason for that predisposition is unknown but anorexia is a consistent feature of the disease. Leptin, a protein synthesized in fat tissue, is one of the major inhibitors of appetite in mammals. We hypothesized that donkeys could have elevated plasma leptin concentrations compared to horses. Blood samples were obtained from 50 donkeys for measurement of leptin, triglycerides (TGs), glucose, and insulin. Glucose/insulin ratio, modified insulin to glucose ratio, and reciprocal of the square root of insulin were calculated. Based on their body condition score (BCS), donkeys were classified as lean (n = 18), normal (n = 16), or overweight (n = 16). The results were compared with reference values from our laboratory and with a group of horses (n = 25) used as an internal control. Values of both leptin and TGs in donkeys were above the horse reference range and also significantly higher than those of the control horses: leptin (11.2 ± 1.7 versus 5.8 ± 0.5 µg/L, p < 0.05) and TGs (0.93 ± 0.1 versus 0.54 ± 0.1 mmol/L, p < 0.01). Overweight donkeys had leptin (19.3 ± 2.9 µg/L) and TG (1.3 ± 0.2 mmol/L) concentrations that were significantly (p < 0.01) higher than normal (9.4 ± 3.3 µg/L and 0.85 ± 0.1 mmol/L, respectively) and lean (5.5 ± 1.0 µg/L and 0.66 ± 0.1 mmol/L, respectively) donkeys. A significant positive correlation (p < 0.01) was found between BCS and leptin (r = 0.43), TGs (r = 0.46), glucose (r = 0.41), and insulin (r = 0.40). Donkeys have higher plasma leptin concentrations than horses and leptin is correlated with BCS.

  2. Sub-toxic nicotine concentrations affect extracellular matrix and growth factor signaling gene expressions in human osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Marinucci, Lorella; Bodo, Maria; Balloni, Stefania; Locci, Paola; Baroni, Tiziano

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to nicotine and other compounds contained in cigarette smoking affects human health. This study examined the effects of exposure to a single or multiple sub-toxic nicotine concentrations on human osteoblasts. Cell growth and expression of genes involved in bone differentiation, extracellular matrix (ECM) metabolism, and growth factor signaling pathways were investigated in nicotine-treated cells compared to untreated cells. Depending on osteoblast concentration and maturation stages, nicotine differently regulated cell growth. Real-time PCR showed regulated expressions of genes expressed by nicotine-treated osteoblasts compared to untreated cells. Among ECM genes, type I collagen was down-regulated and osteonectin was up-regulated in nicotine-treated osteoblasts; similarly, fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF1) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), two members of FGF signaling system, were discordantly modulated; genes involved in osteoblast maturation and differentiation such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), runt-related transcription factor-2 (RUNX2), and bone sialoprotein (BSP) were over-expressed after drug treatment. Our results show a positive association between nicotine exposure and osteoblast phenotype and illustrate for the first time a mechanism whereby acute or chronic exposure to sub-toxic nicotine concentrations may affect bone formation through the impairment of growth factor signaling system and ECM metabolism.

  3. Nicotine Metabolite Ratio (3-hydroxycotinine/cotinine) in Plasma and Urine by Different Analytical Methods and Laboratories: Implications for Clinical Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Julie-Anne; Novalen, Maria; Jatlow, Peter; Huestis, Marilyn A.; Murphy, Sharon E.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kankaanpää, Aino; Galanti, Laurence; Stefan, Cristiana; George, Tony P.; Benowitz, Neal L.; Lerman, Caryn; Tyndale, Rachel F.

    2015-01-01

    Background The highly genetically variable enzyme CYP2A6 metabolizes nicotine to cotinine (COT) and COT to trans-3′-hydroxycotinine (3HC). The nicotine metabolite ratio (NMR, 3HC/COT) is commonly used as a biomarker of CYP2A6 enzymatic activity, rate of nicotine metabolism, and total nicotine clearance; NMR is associated with numerous smoking phenotypes, including smoking cessation. Our objective was to investigate the impact of different measurement methods, at different sites, on plasma and urinary NMR measures from ad libitum smokers. Methods Plasma (n=35) and urine (n=35) samples were sent to eight different laboratories, which employed similar and different methods of COT and 3HC measurements to derive the NMR. We used Bland-Altman analysis to assess agreement, and Pearson correlations to evaluate associations, between NMR measured by different methods. Results Measures of plasma NMR were in strong agreement between methods according to Bland-Altman analysis (ratios 0.82–1.16) and were highly correlated (all Pearson r>0.96, P<0.0001). Measures of urinary NMR were in relatively weaker agreement (ratios 0.62–1.71) and less strongly correlated (Pearson r values of 0.66–0.98, P<0.0001) between different methods. Plasma and urinary COT and 3HC concentrations, while weaker than NMR, also showed good agreement in plasma, which was better than in urine, as was observed for NMR. Conclusions Plasma is a very reliable biological source for the determination of NMR, robust to differences in these analytical protocols or assessment site. Impact Together this indicates a reduced need for differential interpretation of plasma NMR results based on the approach used, allowing for direct comparison of different studies. PMID:26014804

  4. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of pyridostigmine bromide, nicotine, and their metabolites in rat plasma and urine.

    PubMed

    Abu-Qare, A W; Abou-Donia, M B

    2001-07-01

    This study reports on the development of a rapid and simple method for the determination of the antinerve agent drug pyridostigmine bromide (3-dimethylaminocarbonyloxy-N-methyl pyridinium bromide) (PB), its metabolite N-methyl-3-hydroxypyridinium bromide, nicotine (S-1-methyl-5-(3-pyridyl)-2-pyrrolidine), and its metabolites nornicotine (2-(3-pyridyl)pyrrolidine) and cotinine (S-1-methyl-5-(3-pyridyl)-2-pyrrolidone) in rat plasma and urine. The compounds are extracted and eluted by methanol and acetonitrile using C18 Sep-Pak cartridges and separated using high-performance liquid chromatography by a gradient of methanol, acetonitrile, and water (pH 3.2) at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min in a period of 14 min. UV detection was at 260 nm for nicotine and its metabolites and at 280 nm for PB and its metabolite. The limits of detection ranged between 20 and 70 ng/mL, and the limits of quantitation were 50-100 ng/mL. The average percent recovery of five spiked plasma samples were 85.7 +/- 7.3%, 80.4 +/- 5.8%, 78.9 +/- 5.4%, 76.7 +/- 6.4%, and 79.7 +/- 5.7% and for urine were 85.9 +/- 5.9%, 75.5 +/- 6.9%, 82.6 +/- 7.9%, 73.6 +/- 5.9%, and 77.7 +/- 6.3% for nicotine, nornicotine, cotinine, PB, and N-methyl-3-hydroxypyridinium bromide, respectively. The calibration curves for standard solutions of the compounds of peak areas and concentration are linear for a range between 100 and 1,000 ng/mL. This method is applied in order to analyze the previously mentioned chemicals and metabolites following their oral administration in rats.

  5. Nicotine, cotinine, and trans-3-hydroxycotinine levels in seminal plasma of smokers: effects on sperm parameters.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, R; Altieri, I; Gandini, L; Lenzi, A; Pichini, S; Rosa, M; Zuccaro, P; Dondero, F

    1993-10-01

    Sperm samples from 44 cigarette smokers and 50 nonsmokers attending an infertility clinic were examined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay and HPLC-mass spectrometry for the presence of nicotine (NIC), cotinine (COT), and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine (THOC) in seminal plasma. Smokers were found to have levels of COT and THOC in seminal plasma that were similar to those found in serum. The level of NIC was significantly increased in seminal plasma compared to serum. Total motility of spermatozoa was significantly and negatively correlated to COT and THOC levels in seminal plasma. Forward motility of spermatozoa was correlated only with cotinine semen levels. On the basis of these results, we suggest that the presence of tobacco smoke constituents in seminal plasma could provide a warning of the adverse effects of cigarette smoke on the physiology of reproduction.

  6. Nicotine chewing gum as a substitute for smoking.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, M A; Sutton, S R; Feyerabend, C; Cole, P V; Saloojee, Y

    1977-01-01

    The capacity of nicotine-containing chewing gum to produce plasma nicotine levels comparable to heavy cigarette smoking was tested in 21 subjects. On a fixed schedule of one piece of gum (4 mg nicotine) per hour, the average peak plasma nicotine concentration was 175-7 nmol/l (28-5 ng/ml) compared to 189-3 nmol/l (30-7 ng/ml) obtained from normal ad libitum smoking. Unpleasant side effects were common and in some cases plasma nicotine concentrations were two and even three times as high as with smoking; The chewing gum provided some satisfaction to all but four subjects, but its degree was not related to the concentration of plasma nicotine it produced, neither was there an inverse relation between the plasma nicotine concentration while taking the gum and the subjective sense of missing cigarettesmthis suggests that the capacity of the gum to act as a substitute for smoking is not necessarily related to its capacity to provide nicotine. Flexible dosage dictated by individual needs would probably lower the incidence of side effects and might secure closer approximation to smoking concentrations of plasma nicotine. PMID:322818

  7. Plasma fibrinogen concentration in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Ko, G T; Yeung, V T; Chan, J C; Chow, C C; Li, J K; So, W Y; Tsang, L W; Cockram, C S

    1997-06-01

    Plasma fibrinogen concentration has been shown to be a predictor of major cardiovascular events. Information on plasma fibrinogen amongst Chinese has been scanty. We examined the relationships between plasma fibrinogen concentration and cardiovascular risk factors in 988 chinese subjects who underwent 75 g oral glucose tolerance test for screening for glucose intolerance. The study involved a selected sample with subjects who had an history of gestational diabetes, delivery of big babies (birth weight > or = 4 kg), equivocal plasma glucose concentrations and subjects who were family members of diabetic patients. This was mainly a non-smoking (96.6%), non-drinking (98%) and non-exercising (99%) population of which 87% (n = 855) were female. Among the 988 subjects (age +/- S.D. 36.8 +/- 10.2, range 16-79 years), plasma fibrinogen concentration ranged from 1.40 to 9.90 g/l with a mean of 3.26 +/- 0.93 g/l. On stratification of the subjects into 4 quartiles based on plasma fibrinogen concentrations, we found that increased plasma fibrinogen was associated with older age, higher body mass index (BMI), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), fasting and 2 h plasma glucose (PG), prevalence of diabetes, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and triglyceride (TG) level. After adjustment for age and sex, increased plasma fibrinogen concentration remained associated with higher BMI, systolic BP, 2 h PG and TG level. On multivariate analysis using age, BMI, BP, TG, HbA1c and PG as independent variables, plasma fibrinogen was independently related to plasma TG concentration and HbA1c. With 1 S.D. change in TG concentration and HbA1c, there were 3.7 and 5.2% changes in plasma fibrinogen concentration respectively. These findings emphasize the close relationships between plasma fibrinogen and cardiovascular risk factors, in particular abnormal lipid and glucose metabolism.

  8. High concentration plasma-reduced plateletapheresis concentrates.

    PubMed

    Perseghin, Paolo

    2011-06-01

    Single-donor hyperconcentrated plateletapheresis (dry-platelets) collection has been introduced in the 90's as a part of the newly developed multi-component collection strategy. This approach allowed to safely collect multiple components from a single apheresis donation, i.e. RBC, FFP and/or plateletpheresis units. Dry-platelets are usually resuspended in additive solution to maintain an adequate pH during the storage period until use. Some concern existed about possible higher degrees of platelet activation in dry-platelets units when compared to standard concentration (1.0-1.6 × 10(6)/μL platelets) units and its possible correlation with lower in vivo efficiency and/or survival of the former units. Several authors investigated this specific issue, and dry-platelets units proved to be equally effective than standard concentration plateletpheresis units in recipients. The use of dry-platelets units may reduce (i) the risk of passive infusion of naturally occurring ABO-related hemolytic antibodies when donor O platelets are given to group A, B, or AB recipient, (ii) the risk of TRALI when multiparous donors undergo plateletpheresis. Furthermore, dry-platelet collection may allow for an increased amount of FFP sent to industry. Finally, hyperconcentrated platelet units may be used for "niche" indications, such as intrauterine platelet transfusion or, in case of autologous dry-platelet collection, for further freezing for long term storage in selected patients within onco-hematological settings.

  9. Nicotine and metabolites determination in human plasma by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: a simple approach for solving contamination problem and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Liachenko, Natalia; Boulamery, Audrey; Simon, Nicolas

    2015-10-01

    A quantitative method using ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry is described for simultaneous determination of nicotine and its metabolites (cotinine and trans-3'- hydroxycotinine) in human plasma. Aliquots of 0.25 mL of plasma specimens were used for analysis, and 3 analytes were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction. The main problem was blank plasma contamination with environmental nicotine. Activated charcoal was used to avoid this analytical interference. For optimized chromatographic performance, a basic mobile phase consisting of 0.2% ammonia in water (mobile phase A, pH10.6) and acetonitrile (mobile phase B) was selected. The analytes were separated on a 50 mm × 2.1 mm BEH C18 column, 1.7 μm particle size, and quantified by MS/MS using multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) in positive mode. The chromatographic separation was achieved in 3 min followed by 1.2 min of column equilibration. The calibration curves were linear in the concentration range of 10-1000 ng/mL with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.99. Within-day precisions and between-day precisions (CV, %) were <15 %. The accuracy expressed as bias was within ±15% for all analytes. The recovery values ranged from 50% to 97%. The ions used for quantification of nicotine, cotinine and 3-OH-cotinine were 166.9 > 129.7; 176.9 > 79.7; 192.9 > 79.7 m/z, respectively. The original blank sample preparation solved the problem of contamination in a cost-effective and efficient way. The validated method has been routinely used for analysis of nicotine and metabolites and determination of hydroxycotinine/cotinine metabolic ratio. This biomarker seems to be interesting at predicting response of nicotine patch replacement therapies.

  10. Improved highly sensitive method for determination of nicotine and cotinine in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, M; Yamamoto, T; Kuroiwa, Y; Yokoi, T

    2000-05-26

    A highly sensitive and reliable method for the determination of nicotine and its metabolite cotinine in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography was developed. Nicotine and cotinine were extracted from alkalinized plasma with dichloromethane and the volatility of nicotine was prevented by the addition of conc. HCl to the organic solvent during evaporation. The sensitivity of quantification at 260 nm absorption was improved by using a noise-base clean Uni-3 to 0.2 ng/ml nicotine and 1.0 ng/ml cotinine. The method was validated over linear ranges of 0.2-25.0 ng/ml for nicotine and 1.0-80.0 ng/ml for cotinine. The intra-day precision and accuracy were < or = 15.9% relative standard variation (RSD) and 89.9-103.5% for nicotine and < or = 8.0% RSD and 98.7-103.0% for cotinine. The inter-day precision and accuracy were < or = 17.0% RSD and 94.2-100.9% for nicotine and < or = 8.2% RSD and 98.0-105.1% for cotinine.

  11. Withdrawal from Chronic Nicotine Administration Impairs Contextual Fear Conditioning in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jennifer A.; James, John R.; Siegel, Steven J.; Gould, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of acute nicotine administration (0.09 mg/kg nicotine), chronic nicotine administration (6.3 mg/kg/d nicotine for 14 d), and withdrawal from chronic nicotine administration on fear conditioning in C57BL/6 mice were examined. Mice were trained using two coterminating conditioned stimulus (30 s; 85 dB white noise)– unconditioned stimulus (2 s; 0.57 mA foot shock) pairings and tested 24 h later for contextual and cued fear conditioning. Acute nicotine administration enhanced contextual fear conditioning, chronic nicotine administration had no effect on contextual fear conditioning, and withdrawal from chronic nicotine administration impaired contextual fear conditioning. Plasma nicotine concentrations were similar after acute and chronic treatment and were within the range reported for smokers. During withdrawal, concentrations of nicotine were undetectable. An acute dose of nicotine (0.09 mg/kg) during withdrawal from chronic nicotine treatment reversed withdrawal-associated deficits in contextual fear conditioning. The results suggest that tolerance to the effects of nicotine on contextual fear conditioning develops with chronic nicotine treatment at a physiologically relevant dose, and withdrawal from this chronic nicotine treatment is associated with impairments in contextual fear conditioning. These findings provide a model of how the effects of nicotine on learning may contribute to the development and maintenance of nicotine addiction. PMID:16177040

  12. Nicotine and pathological angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jieun; Cooke, John P

    2012-11-27

    This paper describes the role of endothelial nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) in diseases where pathological angiogenesis plays a role. An extensive review of the literature was performed, focusing on studies that investigated the effect of nicotine upon angiogenesis. Nicotine induces pathological angiogenesis at clinically relevant concentrations (i.e. at tissue and plasma concentrations similar to those of a light to moderate smoker). Nicotine promotes endothelial cell migration, proliferation, survival, tube formation and nitric oxide (NO) production in vitro, mimicking the effect of other angiogenic growth factors. These in vitro findings indicate that there may be an angiogenic component to the pathophysiology of major tobacco related diseases such as carcinoma, atherosclerosis, and age-related macular degeneration. Indeed, nicotine stimulates pathological angiogenesis in pre-clinical models of these disorders. Subsequently, it has been demonstrated that nicotine stimulates nAChRs on the endothelium to induce angiogenic processes, that these nAChRs are largely of the α7 homomeric type, and that there are synergistic interactions between the nAChRs and angiogenic growth factor receptors at the phosphoproteomic and genomic levels. These findings are of potential clinical relevance, and provide mechanistic insights into tobacco-related disease. Furthermore, these findings may lead to novel therapies for diseases characterized by insufficient or inappropriate angiogenesis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Hair nicotine/cotinine concentrations as a method of monitoring exposure to tobacco smoke among infants and adults.

    PubMed

    Tzatzarakis, M N; Vardavas, C I; Terzi, I; Kavalakis, M; Kokkinakis, M; Liesivuori, J; Tsatsakis, A M

    2012-03-01

    In this pilot study, we examined the validity and usefulness of hair nicotine-cotinine evaluation as a biomarker of monitoring exposure to tobacco. Head hair samples were collected from 22 infants (<2 years of age) and 44 adults with different exposures to tobacco (through either active or passive smoking) and analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for nicotine and cotinine. Hair samples were divided into three groups, infants, passive smoker adults and active smoker adults, and into eight subgroups according to the degree of exposure. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.1 ng/mg for nicotine and 0.05 ng/mg for cotinine. Mean recovery was 69.15% for nicotine and 72.08% for cotinine. The within- and between-day precision for cotinine and nicotine was calculated at different concentrations. Moreover, hair nicotine and cotinine concentrations were highly correlated among adult active smokers (R (2) = 0.710, p < 0.001), among adult nonsmokers exposed to secondhand smoke (SHS; R (2) = 0.729, p < 0.001) and among infants (R (2) = 0.538, p = 0.01). Among the infants exposed to SHS from both parents the noted correlations were even stronger (R (2) = 0.835, p = 0.02). The above results identify the use of hair samples as an effective method for assessing exposure to tobacco, with a high association between nicotine and cotinine especially among infants heavily exposed to SHS.

  14. Combined active and passive immunization against nicotine: minimizing monoclonal antibody requirements using a target antibody concentration strategy.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Katherine E; Harris, Andrew C; LeSage, Mark G; Keyler, Dan E; Burroughs, Danielle; Earley, Cathy; Pentel, Paul R

    2011-11-01

    Nicotine vaccines have shown preliminary evidence of efficacy for enhancing smoking cessation rates, but the serum nicotine-specific antibody (NicAb) concentrations produced are highly variable and many subjects do not develop effective levels. As an alternative to vaccination, passive immunization with nicotine-specific monoclonal antibodies could produce more uniform serum NicAb concentrations, but its use is limited by their high cost and shorter elimination half-life. This study investigated supplementing vaccination with monoclonal antibodies in a targeted fashion to increase vaccine efficacy while minimizing the required monoclonal antibody dose. Rats were vaccinated and then given individualized supplemental doses of the nicotine-specific monoclonal antibody Nic311 to achieve a target total serum NicAb concentration known to be effective for blocking locomotor sensitization (LMS) to nicotine. Rats received vaccine, Nic311, both, or neither, followed by 0.3 mg/kg nicotine s.c. for 10 days to produce LMS. Combination immunotherapy completely blocked the development of LMS, while monotherapy with vaccine or Nic311 alone was only minimally effective. Lower brain nicotine levels were associated with reduced locomotor activity averaged over days 7-10. Despite its greater efficacy, combination immunotherapy did not reduce the variability in the resulting total serum NicAb concentrations. Variability in total serum NicAb concentrations was contributed to by both vaccine-generated antibody and by Nic311. These data show that combination immunotherapy, using a Nic311 dose that is by itself only minimally effective, can substantially enhance nicotine vaccine efficacy. However, variability in serum NicAb levels with combination immunotherapy may make translation of this approach challenging.

  15. Plasma concentrations of voriconazole in falcons.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, V; Demiraj, F; Di Somma, A; Bailey, T; Ungemach, F R; Krautwald-Junghanns, M-E

    2007-08-25

    Doses of 12.5 mg voriconazole/kg bodyweight administered every 12 hours by crop gavage to six falcons for 14 days provided peak plasma concentrations of more than 1 microg/ml, but the trough concentrations were lower and sometimes undetectable. Administering the same doses incorporated into meat that was fed to one falcon for seven days and to three falcons for up to 91 days provided similar plasma concentrations.

  16. Plasma lipid concentrations for some Brazilian lizards.

    PubMed

    Gillett, M P; Lima, V L; Costa, J C; Sibrian, A M

    1979-01-01

    1. Plasma concentrations of cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, phospholipids and triglycerides were determined for ten species of Brazilian lizards, Iguana iguana, Tropidurus torquatos and T. semitaeniatus (Iguanidae), Tupinambis teguixin, Ameiva ameiva and Cnemidophorus ocellifer (Teiidae), Mabuya maculata (Scincidae), Hemidactylus mabouia (Gekkonidae), Amphisbaenia vermicularis and Leposternon polystegum (Amphisbaenidae). 2. Considerable inter- and intra-species variations in plasma lipid concentrations were observed. 3. The percentage of total cholesterol esterified and the individual phospholipid composition of plasma were relatively constant for each species. 4. Over 60% of the cholesteryl esters present in plasma from three species each of iguanid and teiid lizards were polyenoic.

  17. Plasma lipid concentrations during episodic occupational stress.

    PubMed

    McCann, B S; Benjamin, G A; Wilkinson, C W; Retzlaff, B M; Russo, J; Knopp, R H

    1999-01-01

    The possibility that stress affects plasma lipid concentrations has been the subject of recent investigation, but the findings are equivocal in nonlaboratory settings. To determine whether psychological stress contributes to variability in plasma lipid concentrations and concomitant changes in health behaviors, the effect of increased work load on plasma lipids and apolipoproteins was examined in 173 lawyers. Plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, and apolipoprotein concentrations were studied during periods of high work load (corresponding to impending tax deadlines) and during periods of usual work load. Self-reports of stress, work load, and time pressure, and cortisol, blood pressure, and heart rate were measured to verify that impending deadlines were associated with increased stress levels. Health behaviors which may affect plasma lipoprotein concentrations, including dietary intake and exercise, were also examined. High work load was accompanied by increases in self-reported work load among lawyers most directly affected by the impending deadlines. Plasma apolipoprotein B and triglycerides increased during periods of high work load (M = 1.9 mg/dL, SD = 10.1 and M = 5.3, SD = 34.4, respectively). No changes in dietary intake and exercise were observed. Psychological stress (high work load) is associated with potentially atherogenic changes in plasma lipid concentrations. While the lipoprotein effect of this short-term work stress is small, the effects of longer-term stress on multiple rise factors including triglycerides and apolipoprotein B could have significance for the development of coronary artery disease.

  18. Plasma catecholamine concentrations associated with cerebral vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Loach, A B; Benedict, C R

    1980-03-01

    Plasma concentrations of adrenaline and noradrenaline were measured sequentially over the immediate post-operative period following clipping of an intracranial aneurysm in 11 patients. Those patients who developed local cerebral vasospasm showed a sustained rise in plasma catecholamines, particularly noradrenaline, whilst those patients who developed generalised cerebral vasospasm showed early peaks of very high concentrations of adrenaline and noradrenaline which preceded radiological evidence of generalized vasospam.

  19. Decreased plasma motilin concentrations in pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Christofides, N D; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R; Borberg, C; Gillmer, M D

    1982-01-01

    Plasma motilin concentrations were measured in 37 women during the second and third trimester of pregnancy and one week after delivery. The mean plasma motilin concentrations, both fasting and after a glucose load and a mixed meal, were significantly (p less than 0.001) reduced during pregnancy, returning to the normal range one week post partum. Pregnancy appears to have a profound inhibitory effect on plasma motilin, and this may in part be responsible for the gastrointestinal hypomotility associated with pregnancy. PMID:6814598

  20. Plasma Glutamine Concentrations in Liver Failure.

    PubMed

    Helling, Gunnel; Wahlin, Staffan; Smedberg, Marie; Pettersson, Linn; Tjäder, Inga; Norberg, Åke; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Higher than normal plasma glutamine concentration at admission to an intensive care unit is associated with an unfavorable outcome. Very high plasma glutamine levels are sometimes seen in both acute and chronic liver failure. We aimed to systematically explore the relation between different types of liver failure and plasma glutamine concentrations. Four different groups of patients were studies; chronic liver failure (n = 40), acute on chronic liver failure (n = 20), acute fulminant liver failure (n = 20), and post-hepatectomy liver failure (n = 20). Child-Pugh and Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores were assessed as indices of liver function. All groups except the chronic liver failure group were followed longitudinally during hospitalisation. Outcomes were recorded up to 48 months after study inclusion. All groups had individuals with very high plasma glutamine concentrations. In the total group of patients (n = 100), severity of liver failure correlated significantly with plasma glutamine concentration, but the correlation was not strong. Liver failure, regardless of severity and course of illness, may be associated with a high plasma glutamine concentration. Further studies are needed to understand whether high glutamine levels should be regarded as a biomarker or as a contributor to symptomatology in liver failure.

  1. Plasma Glutamine Concentrations in Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Helling, Gunnel; Wahlin, Staffan; Smedberg, Marie; Pettersson, Linn; Tjäder, Inga; Norberg, Åke; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Higher than normal plasma glutamine concentration at admission to an intensive care unit is associated with an unfavorable outcome. Very high plasma glutamine levels are sometimes seen in both acute and chronic liver failure. We aimed to systematically explore the relation between different types of liver failure and plasma glutamine concentrations. Methods Four different groups of patients were studies; chronic liver failure (n = 40), acute on chronic liver failure (n = 20), acute fulminant liver failure (n = 20), and post-hepatectomy liver failure (n = 20). Child-Pugh and Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores were assessed as indices of liver function. All groups except the chronic liver failure group were followed longitudinally during hospitalisation. Outcomes were recorded up to 48 months after study inclusion. Results All groups had individuals with very high plasma glutamine concentrations. In the total group of patients (n = 100), severity of liver failure correlated significantly with plasma glutamine concentration, but the correlation was not strong. Conclusion Liver failure, regardless of severity and course of illness, may be associated with a high plasma glutamine concentration. Further studies are needed to understand whether high glutamine levels should be regarded as a biomarker or as a contributor to symptomatology in liver failure. PMID:26938452

  2. Nicotine is Chemotactic for Neutrophils and Enhances Neutrophil Responsiveness to Chemotactic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totti, Noel; McCusker, Kevin T.; Campbell, Edward J.; Griffin, Gail L.; Senior, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophils contribute to chronic bronchitis and pulmonary emphysema associated with cigarette smoking. Nicotine was found to be chemotactic for human neutrophils but not monocytes, with a peak activity at ~ 31 micromolar. In lower concentrations (comparable to those in smokers' plasma), nicotine enhanced the response of neutrophils to two chemotactic peptides. In contrast to most other chemoattractants for neutrophils, however, nicotine did not affect degranulation or superoxide production. Nicotine thus may promote inflammation and consequent lung injury in smokers.

  3. Plasma Efavirenz Concentrations Are Associated With Lipid and Glucose Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Sinxadi, Phumla Zuleika; McIlleron, Helen Margaret; Dave, Joel Alex; Smith, Peter John; Levitt, Naomi Sharlene; Haas, David William; Maartens, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Efavirenz-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been associated with dyslipidemia and dysglycemia, risk factors for cardiovascular disease. However, the pathogenesis is not well understood. We characterized relationships between plasma efavirenz concentrations and lipid and glucose concentrations in HIV-infected South Africans. Participants on efavirenz-based ART were enrolled into a cross-sectional study. The oral glucose tolerance test was performed after an overnight fast, and plasma drawn for mid-dosing interval efavirenz, fasting total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides concentrations. Among 106 participants (77 women), median age was 38 years, median CD4 + T-cell count was 322 cells/μL, median duration on ART was 18 months, and median (interquartile range) efavirenz concentration was 2.23 (1.66 to 4.10) μg/mL. On multivariable analyses (adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and ART duration) doubling of efavirenz concentrations resulted in mean changes in mmol/L (95%CI) of: total cholesterol (0.40 [0.22 to 0.59]), LDL cholesterol (0.19 [0.04 to 0.30]), HDL cholesterol (0.14 [0.07 to 0.20]), triglycerides (0.17 [0.03 to 0.33]), fasting glucose (0.18 [0.03 to 0.33]), and 2-h glucose concentrations (0.33 [0.08 to 0.60]). Among 57 participants with CYP2B6 genotype data, associations between slow metabolizer genotypes and metabolic profiles were generally consistent with those for measured efavirenz concentrations. Higher plasma efavirenz concentrations are associated with higher plasma lipid and glucose concentrations. This may have implications for long-term cardiovascular complications of efavirenz-based ART, particularly among populations with high prevalence of CYP2B6 slow metabolizer genotypes. PMID:26765416

  4. Therapeutic concentrations of varenicline in the presence of nicotine increase action potential firing in human adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Hone, Arik J; Michael McIntosh, J; Rueda-Ruzafa, Lola; Passas, Juan; de Castro-Guerín, Cristina; Blázquez, Jesús; González-Enguita, Carmen; Albillos, Almudena

    2017-01-01

    Varenicline is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonist used to treat nicotine addiction, but a live debate persists concerning its mechanism of action in reducing nicotine consumption. Although initially reported as α4β2 selective, varenicline was subsequently shown to activate other nAChR subtypes implicated in nicotine addiction including α3β4. However, it remains unclear whether activation of α3β4 nAChRs by therapeutically relevant concentrations of varenicline is sufficient to affect the behavior of cells that express this subtype. We used patch-clamp electrophysiology to assess the effects of varenicline on native α3β4* nAChRs (asterisk denotes the possible presence of other subunits) expressed in human adrenal chromaffin cells and compared its effects to those of nicotine. Varenicline and nicotine activated α3β4* nAChRs with EC50 values of 1.8 (1.2-2.7) μM and 19.4 (11.1-33.9) μM, respectively. Stimulation of adrenal chromaffin cells with 10 ms pulses of 300 μM acetylcholine (ACh) in current-clamp mode evoked sodium channel-dependent action potentials (APs). Under these conditions, perfusion of 50 or 100 nM varenicline showed very little effect on AP firing compared to control conditions (ACh stimulation alone), but at higher concentrations (250 nM) varenicline increased the number of APs fired up to 436 ± 150%. These results demonstrate that therapeutic concentrations of varenicline are unlikely to alter AP firing in chromaffin cells. In contrast, nicotine showed no effect on AP firing at any of the concentrations tested (50, 100, 250, and 500 nM). However, perfusion of 50 nM nicotine simultaneously with 100 nM varenicline increased AP firing by 290 ± 104% indicating that exposure to varenicline and nicotine concurrently may alter cellular behavior such as excitability and neurotransmitter release. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  5. Rapid effects of environmental disturbance on rat plasma unesterified fatty acid and tryptophan concentrations and their prevention by antilopolytic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Curzon, G; Knott, P J

    1975-01-01

    1 Changes of plasma unesterified fatty acid (UFA) and tryptophan concentration in group-housed rats following removal of their cage-mates and the effects of antilipolytic drugs on these changes were investigated. 2 Removal of group-housed 24 h fasted rats but not fed rats from cages resulted in increased plasma UFA concentration in the remaining rats which was associated with significant increases of the proportion of free tryptophan but significant falls of total tryptophan concentration. These rapid changes were not associated with brain tryptophan changes. Plasma tyrosine concentration was unaffected. 3 The fall of plasma tryptophan did not appear to be due to passage into red cells as erythrocyte tryptophan concentration remained unchanged. 4 Plasma UFA concentrations correlated positively and significantly with corticosterone concentrations which were also increased following removal of cage-mates. 5 Plasma UFA increases and tryptophan changes in the fasting rats were both prevented by nicotinic acid or propranolol. Corticosterone concentration was increased by nicotinic acid but unaffected by propranolol. 6 The possible importance of these rapid changes of plasma tryptophan and of their prevention by antilipolytic drugs is discussed. PMID:1164595

  6. Pathogen Inactivated Plasma Concentrated: Preparation and Uses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    ultrasound to cold plasma. The ultrasound generates pure ice crystals, which are then removed to leave concentrated plasma. Testing: Porcine parvovirus ...of decontamination, porcine parvovirus (PPV) was selected as a model virus; B19 is the form that infects humans. PPV is an interesting pathogen...that all of the plasma is treated quite uniformly. Porcine Parvovirus Inactivation with Ozone 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0

  7. Solid-phase extraction and HPLC assay of nicotine and cotinine in plasma and brain.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Ralph; Messina, S M; Stokes, C; Salyani, S; Alcalay, N; De Fiebre, N C; De Fiebre, C M

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a simple and reliable assay for nicotine (NIC) and its major metabolite, cotinine (COT), in plasma and brain. A method was developed that uses an extraction method compatible with reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation and ultraviolet (UV) detection. Sequential solid-phase extraction on silica columns followed by extraction using octadecyl (C18) columns resulted in mean percent recovery (n = 5) of 51 +/- 5, 64 +/- 10, and 52 +/- 10% for NIC, COT, and phenylimidazole (PI), respectively, in spiked 1-mL serum samples. Recovery (mean +/- SEM) of the internal standard (PI) from spiked samples of nicotine-injected rats averaged 64.1 +/- 1.5% (n = 138) from plasma, and 20.7+/-0.8% (n = 128) from brain. The limits of detection of NIC in plasma samples were approximately 8 ng per mL, and of COT, 13.6 ng per mL. Further optimization of our extraction method, using slower flow rates and solid-phase extraction on silica columns, followed by C18 column extraction, yielded somewhat better recoveries (38 +/-3%) for 1-mL brain homogenates. Interassay precision (coefficient of variation) was determined on the basis of daily calibrations for 2 months and was found to be 7%, 9%, and 9% for NIC, COT, and PI, respectively, whereas intra-assay variability was 3.9% for both NIC and COT. Limited studies were performed on analytical columns for comparison of retention, resolution, asymmetry, and column capacity. We concluded that a simple two-step solid-phase extraction method, coupled with HPLC separation and UV detection, can be used routinely to measure NIC and COT in biological fluids and tissues.

  8. Doxepin concentrations in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Schomburg, Robert; Remane, Daniela; Fassbender, Klaus; Maurer, Hans H; Spiegel, Jörg

    2011-04-01

    Doxepin--like other antidepressant drugs (ADs)--shows a variable antidepressant effect in clinical practice. The cause for this variability is as yet unclear; however, pharmacokinetic factors such as the variable permeability of doxepin into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), may contribute to the difference in therapeutic efficacy. We measured and correlated the concentration of doxepin and its active metabolite nordoxepin in both the plasma and CSF. Plasma and CSF samples were taken simultaneously from 21 patients who were treated with doxepin due to different clinical indications. The plasma concentration of both doxepin and nordoxepin correlated significantly with the oral dosage of doxepin (doxepin: r = +0.66, p < 0.001; nordoxepin: r = +0.78, p < 0.0001; Spearman's correlation). Furthermore, we found significant correlations between the plasma and CSF concentrations of both doxepin (r = +0.71; p < 0.001; Pearson's correlation) and nordoxepin (r = +0.74; p < 0.001). These highly significant correlations between the plasma and CSF concentrations indicate a constant CSF permeability of doxepin and its active metabolite nordoxepin.

  9. Plasma ascorbic acid concentrations in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Berge, G E; Sund, R B

    2001-08-01

    Using a highly sensitive and selective analytical method and careful stability control, plasma concentrations of ascorbic acid were determined in German Shepherd Dogs, Labrador Retrievers and Siberian Huskies, a total 99 animals. Mean concentration was 35.9 micromol l(-1)(range 18.2-50.7), and no significant variation was observed neither between breeds nor between females and males. These and previous reported data on plasma ascorbic acid levels in dogs are discussed in the light of methodological aspects. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  10. Plasma dimethylglycine, nicotine exposure and risk of low bone mineral density and hip fracture: the Hordaland Health Study.

    PubMed

    Øyen, J; Svingen, G F T; Gjesdal, C G; Tell, G S; Ueland, P M; Lysne, V; Apalset, E M; Meyer, K; Vollset, S E; Nygård, O K

    2015-05-01

    In the large community-based Hordaland Health Study, low plasma dimethylglycine was associated with low bone mineral density in both middle-aged and elderly subjects and to an increased risk of subsequent hip fracture among the elderly. These associations seemed to be particularly strong among subjects exposed to nicotine. Dimethylglycine (DMG) is a product of the choline oxidation pathway and formed from betaine during the folate-independent remethylation of homocysteine (Hcy) to methionine. Elevated plasma DMG levels are associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and inflammation, which in turn are related to osteoporosis. High plasma total Hcy and low plasma choline are associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) and hip fractures, but the role of plasma DMG in bone health is unknown. We studied the associations of plasma DMG with BMD among 5315 participants (46-49 and 71-74 years old) and with hip fracture among 3310 participants (71-74 years old) enrolled in the Hordaland Health Study. In age and sex-adjusted logistic regression models, subjects in the lowest versus highest DMG tertile were more likely to have low BMD (odds ratio [OR] 1.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.43-1.99). The association was stronger in participants exposed compared to those unexposed to nicotine (OR 2.31, 95% CI 1.73-3.07 and OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.16-1.75, respectively, p interaction = 0.008). In the older cohort, Cox regression analyses adjusted for sex showed that low plasma DMG was associated with an increased risk of hip fracture (hazard ratio [HR] 1.70, 95% CI 1.28-2.26). A trend toward an even higher risk was found among women exposed to nicotine (HR 3.41, 95% CI 1.40-8.28). Low plasma DMG was associated with low BMD and increased risk of hip fractures. A potential effect modification by nicotine exposure merits particular attention.

  11. Plasma carnitine concentrations after chronic alcohol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kępka, Alina; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Chojnowska, Sylwia; Płudowski, Paweł; Konarzewska, Emilia; Szulc, Agata; Ladny, Jerzy Robert; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2013-05-31

    Carnitine transports fatty acids from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial matrix, where the fatty acids are oxidized. Chronic alcohol consumption reduces the concentration of carnitine and interferes with oxidative processes occurring in the cell. The assessment of carnitine concentrations in plasma of chronically intoxicated alcohol dependent persons in a 49-day abstinence period. The study included 31 patients (5 women and 27 men) aged from 26 to 60 years (44.6 ± 8.9) and 32 healthy subjects (15 women and 17 men) aged 22-60 years (39.8 ± 9.4). The patients' alcohol dependence ranged from 2 to 30 years (13.6 ± 7.5). Examined subjects consumed 75-700 g of ethanol/day (226.9 ± 151.5). Plasma concentrations of free and total carnitine were measured three times: at the first (T0), 30th (T30) and 49th (T49) day of hospital detoxification. Free (FC) and total (TC) carnitine were determined by the spectrophotometric method. Plasma acylcarnitine (AC) concentration was calculated from the difference between TC and FC; then the AC/FC ratio was calculated. To determine statistically significant differences for related variables, Student's t-test was used. At T0, alcoholics had significantly lower concentration of FC and TC (p < 0.05) in plasma, as compared to the control group. In comparison to controls, at T30, plasma TC and FC (p < 0.01) as well as AC (p < 0.001) were reduced. The lowest concentration of TC, FC and AC (p < 0.001)was found at T49. The ratio of AC/FC at T0 had a tendency to be higher in alcoholics than in the control group (p = 0.05), whereas at T49 it was significantly lower in alcoholics as compared to the control subjects (p < 0.05). Chronic alcohol intoxication causes a plasma deficiency of carnitine. Forty-nine days of abstinence showed a significant decrease in the concentration of TC, FC and AC. Further research is necessary to clarify whether a low level of plasma carnitine after chronic alcohol intoxication is caused by the uptake of blood

  12. Decreased maternal plasma apelin concentrations in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Bortoff, Katherine D; Qiu, Chunfang; Runyon, Scott; Williams, Michelle A; Maitra, Rangan

    2012-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive disorder that complicates 3-7% of pregnancies. The development of preeclampsia has not been completely elucidated and current therapies are not broadly efficacious. The apelinergic system appears to be involved in hypertensive disorders and experimental studies indicate a role of this system in preeclampsia. Thus, an epidemiological evaluation of apelin protein concentration in plasma was conducted in case-control study of pregnant women. Data and maternal plasma samples were collected from pregnant women with confirmed preeclampsia (n = 76) or normotensive controls (n = 79). Concentrations of apelin peptides were blindly measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data were subjected to statistical analyses. Plasma apelin concentrations, measured at delivery, were lower in preeclampsia cases compared with controls (mean ± standard deviation: 0.66 ± 0.29 vs. 0.78 ± 0.31 ng/mL, p = 0.02). After controlling for confounding by maternal age, smoking status, and pre-pregnancy body mass index, odds of preeclampsia were 48% lower for women with high versus low plasma apelin (≥0.73 vs. <0.73 ng/mL) concentrations. Reduced circulating apelin peptides may be associated with preeclampsia. The apelinergic system should be further investigated to elucidate its role in preclampsia and other hypertensive maternal disorders.

  13. Plasma aminotransferase concentrations in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Victor, S; Dickinson, H; Turner, M A

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to generate reference ranges for aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in preterm infants by describing the observed plasma concentration of these enzymes in babies born between 22 and 36 weeks' gestation. A service evaluation was conducted in babies admitted to two large neonatal intensive care units in the UK. 7006 blood samples from 1860 infants admitted to the two units between 2004 and 2008 were included. Extremely premature infants had high plasma enzyme activities when compared to babies at a later corrected gestational age. This may be due to more severe illness immediately after birth.

  14. Factors influencing lopinavir and atazanavir plasma concentration

    PubMed Central

    Stöhr, Wolfgang; Back, David; Dunn, David; Sabin, Caroline; Winston, Alan; Gilson, Richard; Pillay, Deenan; Hill, Teresa; Ainsworth, Jonathan; Gazzard, Brian; Leen, Clifford; Bansi, Loveleen; Fisher, Martin; Orkin, Chloe; Anderson, Jane; Johnson, Margaret; Easterbrook, Philippa; Gibbons, Sara; Khoo, Saye

    2010-01-01

    Background The protease inhibitors lopinavir and atazanavir are both recommended for treatment of HIV-infected patients. Considerable inter-individual variability in plasma concentration has been observed for both drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate which demographic factors and concomitant drugs are associated with lopinavir and atazanavir plasma concentration. Methods Data from the Liverpool TDM (therapeutic drug monitoring) Registry were linked with the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (CHIC) study. For each patient, the first measurement of lopinavir (twice daily) or atazanavir [once daily, ritonavir boosted (/r) or unboosted] plasma concentration was included. Linear regression was used to evaluate the association of dose, gender, age, weight, ethnicity and concomitant antiretroviral drugs or rifabutin with log-transformed drug concentration, adjusted for time since last intake. Results Data from 439 patients on lopinavir (69% 400 mg/r, 31% 533 mg/r; 3% concomitant rifabutin) and 313 on atazanavir (60% 300 mg/r, 32% 400 mg/r, 8% 400 mg) were included. Multivariable models revealed the following predictors for lopinavir concentration: weight (11% decrease per additional 10 kg; P = 0.001); dose (25% increase for 533 mg/r; P = 0.024); and rifabutin (116% increase; P < 0.001). For atazanavir the predictors were dose (compared with 300 mg/r: 40% increase for 400 mg/r, 67% decrease for 400 mg; overall P < 0.001) and efavirenz (32% decrease; P = 0.016) but not tenofovir (P = 0.54). Conclusions This analysis confirms that efavirenz decreases atazanavir concentrations, and there was a negative association of weight and lopinavir concentrations. The strong impact of rifabutin on lopinavir concentration should be studied further. PMID:19897506

  15. Factors influencing lopinavir and atazanavir plasma concentration.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, Wolfgang; Back, David; Dunn, David; Sabin, Caroline; Winston, Alan; Gilson, Richard; Pillay, Deenan; Hill, Teresa; Ainsworth, Jonathan; Gazzard, Brian; Leen, Clifford; Bansi, Loveleen; Fisher, Martin; Orkin, Chloe; Anderson, Jane; Johnson, Margaret; Easterbrook, Philippa; Gibbons, Sara; Khoo, Saye

    2010-01-01

    The protease inhibitors lopinavir and atazanavir are both recommended for treatment of HIV-infected patients. Considerable inter-individual variability in plasma concentration has been observed for both drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate which demographic factors and concomitant drugs are associated with lopinavir and atazanavir plasma concentration. Data from the Liverpool TDM (therapeutic drug monitoring) Registry were linked with the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (CHIC) study. For each patient, the first measurement of lopinavir (twice daily) or atazanavir [once daily, ritonavir boosted (/r) or unboosted] plasma concentration was included. Linear regression was used to evaluate the association of dose, gender, age, weight, ethnicity and concomitant antiretroviral drugs or rifabutin with log-transformed drug concentration, adjusted for time since last intake. Data from 439 patients on lopinavir (69% 400 mg/r, 31% 533 mg/r; 3% concomitant rifabutin) and 313 on atazanavir (60% 300 mg/r, 32% 400 mg/r, 8% 400 mg) were included. Multivariable models revealed the following predictors for lopinavir concentration: weight (11% decrease per additional 10 kg; P = 0.001); dose (25% increase for 533 mg/r; P = 0.024); and rifabutin (116% increase; P < 0.001). For atazanavir the predictors were dose (compared with 300 mg/r: 40% increase for 400 mg/r, 67% decrease for 400 mg; overall P < 0.001) and efavirenz (32% decrease; P = 0.016) but not tenofovir (P = 0.54). This analysis confirms that efavirenz decreases atazanavir concentrations, and there was a negative association of weight and lopinavir concentrations. The strong impact of rifabutin on lopinavir concentration should be studied further.

  16. Nicotine Pharmacokinetics in Rats Is Altered as a Function of Age, Impacting the Interpretation of Animal Model Data

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Evelyn L.; Zhao, Bin; Cui, Jason Z.; Novalen, Maria; Miksys, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Several behavioral studies report that adolescent rats display a preference for nicotine compared with adults. However, age-related pharmacokinetic differences may confound the interpretation of these findings. Thus, differences in pharmacokinetic analyses of nicotine were investigated. Nicotine was administered via acute s.c. (1.0 mg base/kg) or i.v. (0.2 mg base/kg) injection to early adolescent (EA; postnatal day 25) and adult (AD; postnatal day 71) male Wistar rats. Nicotine and its primary metabolite, cotinine, and additional metabolites nornicotine, nicotine-1′-N-oxide, trans-3′-hydroxycotinine, and norcotinine were sampled from 10 minutes to 8 hours (plasma) and 2 to 8 hours (brain) post nicotine and analyzed by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry. Following s.c. nicotine, the EA cohort had lower levels of plasma nicotine, cotinine, and nicotine-1′-N-oxide at multiple time points, resulting in a lower area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) for nicotine (P < 0.001), cotinine (P < 0.01), and nicotine-1′-N-oxide (P < 0.001). Brain levels were also lower for these compounds. In contrast, the EA cohort had higher plasma and brain AUCs (P < 0.001) for the minor metabolite nornicotine. Brain-to-plasma ratios varied for nicotine and its metabolites, and by age. Following i.v. nicotine administration, similar age-related differences were observed, and this route allowed detection of a 1.6-fold-larger volume of distribution and 2-fold higher plasma clearance in the EA cohort compared with the AD cohort. Thus, unlike in humans, there are substantial age differences in nicotine pharmacokinetics such that for a given nicotine dose, adolescent rats will have lower plasma and brain nicotine compared with adults, suggesting that this should be considered when interpreting animal model data. PMID:24980255

  17. [Monitoring plasma antibiotic concentrations in Spanish hospitals].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Grau, Santiago; Marín-Casino, Mónica; Olaechea, Pedro; Sánchez, Miguel; Martín, Estrella; Pujol, Miquel

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring of plasma aminoglycoside and vancomycin concentrations is a measure of good clinical practice in critically ill patients. However, the frequency and application of this practice in Spanish hospitals is unknown. Observational, multicenter study based on a survey designed by the Study Group for Infection in the Critically Ill Patient of the Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica (SEIMC, Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology). The survey was sent to the 221 general hospitals with a more than 150-bed capacity included in the hospital directory. Questions regarding the antibiotics monitored, hospital services involved, systems used to report the results, and levels of intervention were included. Information was recorded from 56 (25.3%) hospitals with a total of 36,886 beds, among which 933 (2.5%) corresponded to critically ill patients. In 47 (83.9%) hospitals, plasma concentrations of one or two antibiotics were determined: vancomycin in 47 (83.9% of the total), amikacin in 41 (73.2%), and gentamicin in 40 (71.2%). Analyses were performed by the following services: Biochemistry in 34%, Pharmacy in 25.5% and Pharmacology in 8.5%. Only 57.4% of services recommended dose adjustments according to the results obtained, using eight different dose adjustment models. In 16% of the hospitals surveyed, monitoring of antibiotic concentrations was not performed in daily practice. There was considerable variation in all phases of the process, especially with regard to adjustment of plasma antibiotic concentrations. Consensus recommendations established by all the Services implicated are required to standardize monitoring of plasma antibiotic concentrations.

  18. Quantification of nicotine, cotinine, trans-3'-hydroxycotinine and varenicline in human plasma by a sensitive and specific UPLC-tandem mass-spectrometry procedure for a clinical study on smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Dobrinas, Maria; Choong, Eva; Noetzli, Muriel; Cornuz, Jacques; Ansermot, Nicolas; Eap, Chin B

    2011-11-15

    A sensitive and specific ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantification of nicotine, its metabolites cotinine and trans-3'-hydroxycotinine and varenicline in human plasma was developed and validated. Sample preparation was realized by solid phase extraction of the target compounds and of the internal standards (nicotine-d4, cotinine-d3, trans-3'-hydroxycotinine-d3 and CP-533,633, a structural analog of varenicline) from 0.5 mL of plasma, using a mixed-mode cation exchange support. Chromatographic separations were performed on a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography column (HILIC BEH 2.1×100 mm, 1.7 μm). A gradient program was used, with a 10 mM ammonium formate buffer pH 3/acetonitrile mobile phase at a flow of 0.4 mL/min. The compounds were detected on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, operated with an electrospray interface in positive ionization mode and quantification was performed using multiple reaction monitoring. Matrix effects were quantitatively evaluated with success, with coefficients of variation inferior to 8%. The procedure was fully validated according to Food and Drug Administration guidelines and to Société Française des Sciences et Techniques Pharmaceutiques. The concentration range was 2-500 ng/mL for nicotine, 1-1000 ng/mL for cotinine, 2-1000 ng/mL for trans-3'-hydroxycotinine and 1-500 ng/mL for varenicline, according to levels usually measured in plasma. Trueness (86.2-113.6%), repeatability (1.9-12.3%) and intermediate precision (4.4-15.9%) were found to be satisfactory, as well as stability in plasma. The procedure was successfully used to quantify nicotine, its metabolites and varenicline in more than 400 plasma samples from participants in a clinical study on smoking cessation.

  19. Flattening plasma corticosterone levels increases the prevalence of serotonergic dorsal raphe neurons inhibitory responses to nicotine in adrenalectomised rats.

    PubMed

    Frías-Domínguez, Carmen; Garduño, Julieta; Hernández, Salvador; Drucker-Colin, René; Mihailescu, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Major depression is characterized by a diminished activity of the brain serotonergic system as well as by the flattening of plasma cortisol levels. Nicotine improves mood in patients with major depression and in experimentally depressed animals by increasing brain serotonin (5-HT), noradrenaline and dopamine levels. The present study was directed to determine if flattening plasma glucocorticoid levels changes nicotine's stimulatory effects upon 5-HT DRN neurons. The experiments were performed in brain slices obtained from rats previously (14 days) adrenalectomised and implanted subcutaneously with one pellet containing 75mg of corticosterone (Adx+CSR rats). Whole cell voltage and current clamp techniques were used to study the activity of immunocitochemically identified 5-HT DRN neurons. Administration of nicotine (1μM) in sham-operated animals produced stimulatory effects in all 5-HT DRN neurons studied. In Adx+CSR rats however, nicotine inhibited 75% of 5-HT DRN neurons and increased the potassium-dependent inward rectifying current. The inhibitory effect of nicotine upon 5-HT DRN neurons was dependent on serotonin release inside the DRN, since it was converted into a stimulatory response by the selective antagonist of 5-HT1A receptors N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY100635, 25nM). Adx+CSR rats also presented an increased function of 5-HT1A autoreceptors, since, in these rats, serotonin (1-10μM) produced a higher increase in the potassium dependent inward rectifying current in comparison with sham-operated animals. Serotonin release inside DRN was mediated by α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors since the selective antagonist of these receptors dihydro-β-erytroidine hydrobromide (DHβE, 100nM) blocked the inhibitory effects of nicotine 5-HT DRN neurons. These data indicate that, in the experimental model of adrenalectomised rats implanted with corticosterone pellets, nicotine increases the function of

  20. Do plasma melatonin concentrations decline with age?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitzer, J. M.; Daniels, J. E.; Duffy, J. F.; Klerman, E. B.; Shanahan, T. L.; Dijk, D. J.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Numerous reports that secretion of the putative sleep-promoting hormone melatonin declines with age have led to suggestions that melatonin replacement therapy be used to treat sleep problems in older patients. We sought to reassess whether the endogenous circadian rhythm of plasma melatonin concentration changes with age in healthy drug-free adults. METHODS: We analyzed the amplitude of plasma melatonin profiles during a constant routine in 34 healthy drug-free older subjects (20 women and 14 men, aged 65 to 81 years) and compared them with 98 healthy drug-free young men (aged 18 to 30 years). RESULTS: We could detect no significant difference between a healthy and drug-free group of older men and women as compared to one of young men in the endogenous circadian amplitude of the plasma melatonin rhythm, as described by mean 24-hour average melatonin concentration (70 pmol/liter vs 73 pmol/liter, P = 0.97), or the duration (9.3 hours vs 9.1 hours, P = 0.43), mean (162 pmol/liter vs 161 pmol/liter, P = 0.63), or integrated area (85,800 pmol x min/liter vs 86,700 pmol x min/liter, P = 0.66) of the nocturnal peak of plasma melatonin. CONCLUSION: These results do not support the hypothesis that reduction of plasma melatonin concentration is a general characteristic of healthy aging. Should melatonin replacement therapy or melatonin supplementation prove to be clinically useful, we recommend that an assessment of endogenous melatonin be carried out before such treatment is used in older patients.

  1. Do plasma melatonin concentrations decline with age?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitzer, J. M.; Daniels, J. E.; Duffy, J. F.; Klerman, E. B.; Shanahan, T. L.; Dijk, D. J.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Numerous reports that secretion of the putative sleep-promoting hormone melatonin declines with age have led to suggestions that melatonin replacement therapy be used to treat sleep problems in older patients. We sought to reassess whether the endogenous circadian rhythm of plasma melatonin concentration changes with age in healthy drug-free adults. METHODS: We analyzed the amplitude of plasma melatonin profiles during a constant routine in 34 healthy drug-free older subjects (20 women and 14 men, aged 65 to 81 years) and compared them with 98 healthy drug-free young men (aged 18 to 30 years). RESULTS: We could detect no significant difference between a healthy and drug-free group of older men and women as compared to one of young men in the endogenous circadian amplitude of the plasma melatonin rhythm, as described by mean 24-hour average melatonin concentration (70 pmol/liter vs 73 pmol/liter, P = 0.97), or the duration (9.3 hours vs 9.1 hours, P = 0.43), mean (162 pmol/liter vs 161 pmol/liter, P = 0.63), or integrated area (85,800 pmol x min/liter vs 86,700 pmol x min/liter, P = 0.66) of the nocturnal peak of plasma melatonin. CONCLUSION: These results do not support the hypothesis that reduction of plasma melatonin concentration is a general characteristic of healthy aging. Should melatonin replacement therapy or melatonin supplementation prove to be clinically useful, we recommend that an assessment of endogenous melatonin be carried out before such treatment is used in older patients.

  2. CSF and plasma vasopressin concentrations in dementia.

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, P S; Hammer, M; Vorstrup, S; Gjerris, F

    1983-01-01

    In 16 patients with primary degenerative dementia mean CSF vasopressin concentration was lower (0.9 +/- 0.1 pg/ml (mean +/- SEM)) than in 28 control patients (1.3 +/- 0.1 (mean +/- SEM)) (p less than 0.01). In 18 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus and potentially reversible dementia mean CSF vasopressin concentration (1.2 pg/ml +/- 0.1 (mean +/- SEM)) was not different from that found in controls. Several of the demented patients had inappropriate plasma vasopressin concentrations suggesting a defect in osmoregulation. These findings encourage further clinical trials of vasopressin in patients with primary degenerative dementia, but it is emphasised that the low CSF vasopressin concentration in these patients might be only a nonspecific phenomenon due to the diffuse loss of cells within the central nervous system. PMID:6644315

  3. Acute clozapine overdose: plasma concentration and outcome.

    PubMed

    Broich, K; Heinrich, S; Marneros, A

    1998-07-01

    Clozapine is a tricyclic dibenzodiazepine derivative that is classified as an "atypical neuroleptic" drug for treatment of psychotic diseases. A 19-year-old schizophrenic female, treated with 400 mg clozapine per day, was admitted to the emergency department after ingestion of 5000 mg (50 x 100 mg tablets) of clozapine. Clozapine plasma level 2.5 hours after ingestion was 3.8 microg/ml (normal range 0.2-0.7 microg/ml) and very high in gastric lavage. Contrary to reported cases with such high plasma concentrations the patient suffered only from somnolence with intermittent periods of agitation and a mild anticholinergic syndrome with sinus tachycardia and slight hypotension. After detoxication with gastric lavage and short-term administration of pyridostigmine she remained stable, and 24 hours after ingestion she was transferred to the psychiatric unit without further sequelae. To prevent late-onset complications she was carefully monitored for five days. The clozapine plasma level 24 hours after the first measurement was normal. This case and others reported in the literature confirm that signs and symptoms after clozapine intoxication are variable and that high plasma levels are not lethal in every case.

  4. Effects of nicotine administration on elemental concentrations in mouse granulosa cells, maturing oocytes and oviduct epithelium studied by X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z; Jin, M; Nilsson, B O; Roomans, G M

    1998-10-01

    A normal maturation of the oocytes is dependent upon, among other things, normally functioning granulosa and corona radiata cells. Analyses performed during human in vitro fertilization programs have revealed that, in smokers, ovarian functions are affected and that smokers have a decreased fertilization rate. Further, animal studies have indicated that nicotine can reach the genital tractus, and that nicotine administration interferes with oocyte maturation, fertilization and early pregnancy. We applied X-ray microanalysis to monitor whether nicotine administration changed the ionic balance of cells in the reproductive tract (granulosa cells, oocytes and oviduct epithelial cells). The animals were given nicotine in the drinking water at a concentration of 108 mumol/l. After 15 days the animals were superovulated, ovaries and oviducts were frozen, and thick cryosections were prepared for energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. In the granulosa cells, the concentrations of Na and Cl increased after nicotine treatment, while the K concentrations decreased resulting in an increased Na/K ratio. The treated oocytes had a higher K concentration and a decreased Na/K ratio compared to the controls. In the epithelial cells of the oviduct, the concentrations of Na and K decreased after nicotine treatment without any changes in the Na/K ratio. Thus, heavy nicotine administration to mice causes significant changes in the ionic composition of the granulosa cells, the ovarian oocytes and the oviduct epithelium.

  5. Plasma prolactin concentrations in lead exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Govoni, S; Battaini, F; Fernicola, C; Castelletti, L; Trabucchi, M

    1987-01-01

    Plasma Prolactin (Prl) Zinc protoporphyrin (Zpp) and blood lead concentrations (PbB) were measured in 76 exposed male workers. All of them were employed in small (not more than 30 persons) pewter factories and were randomly selected from those regularly controlled by the National Health Service, Occupational Health Unit of Brescia (USSL 41). Although all plasma Prl values were within the normal range, the mean value of the subgroup having Zpp and PbB higher than 40 micrograms/dl was significantly higher (+47%) than that observed in the group of workers having Zpp and PbB less than 40 micrograms/dl. The data indicate the possibility of a lead-induced Prl secretion dysfunction, probably mediated by a decrease in dopaminergic inhibitory control.

  6. Association Between Smoking, Nicotine Dependence, and BDNF Val66Met Polymorphism with BDNF Concentrations in Serum

    PubMed Central

    Van der Does, Willem; Elzinga, Bernet M.; Molendijk, Marc L.; Penninx, Brenda W.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nicotine use is associated with the upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in serum. An association between smoking and the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism has also been found. The aim of this study is to examine the levels of serum BDNF in never-smokers, former smokers, and current smokers—with and without nicotine dependence—and to examine the interaction of the polymorphism and smoking status with serum BDNF. Methods: We used baseline serum and gene data of BDNF on 2,088 participants from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) to investigate smoking-BDNF association while controlling for potential confounding variables. Nicotine dependence was assessed with the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND). Results: Smokers with and without nicotine dependence had higher levels of serum BDNF than former and never-smokers. Nicotine dependence and number of cigarettes smoked per day did not add to the prediction of serum BDNF; however, total number of smoking years was a significant predictor of serum BDNF. There was no association of BDNF Val66Met, nor an interaction of this polymorphism and smoking status, with serum BDNF. Conclusions: Current smoking and higher number of smoking years are associated with higher levels of serum BDNF, and this is independent of the BDNF genotype. Nicotine dependence itself is not associated with a further increase or decrease of serum BDNF. Longitudinal investigations that address changes in serum BDNF in incident smokers and/or in quitters may be useful to understand the association of smoking with BDNF. PMID:25183693

  7. Chronic nicotine administration in the drinking water affects the striatal dopamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, K; Ahtee, L

    2000-05-01

    Although tobacco contains a large variety of substances, its addictive properties are most probably due to the reinforcing actions of nicotine that motivates continued tobacco use. Animals and humans self-administer nicotine, a response that appears to involve the mesolimbic dopamine system and to be common to other abused drugs. The present article reviews animal models to administer nicotine chronically. We also describe a new animal model in which nicotine is given to mice in drinking water as their sole source of fluid. This treatment produced nicotine plasma concentrations comparable to or above those found in smokers. We found that mice withdrawn from nicotine were tolerant to the effects of nicotine challenge on striatal dopamine metabolism as well as on body temperature and locomotor activity. Furthermore, 3H-nicotine binding in the cortex and midbrain was significantly increased in mice withdrawn from nicotine. The last part of the article will focus on the effects of this chronic nicotine treatment on striatal dopamine. Dopamine and its metabolites and locomotor activity were increased in the forenoon in mice still drinking nicotine solutions. We also report recent data in which chronic nicotine administration in the drinking water enhanced the effect of dopamine receptor agonist, quinpirole, on striatal metabolism. The animal model described appears to be a relevant method for studying the mechanisms that are thought to be involved in nicotine dependence.

  8. Delivery of nicotine aerosol to mice via a modified electronic cigarette device.

    PubMed

    Lefever, Timothy W; Lee, Youn O K; Kovach, Alexander L; Silinski, Melanie A R; Marusich, Julie A; Thomas, Brian F; Wiley, Jenny L

    2017-03-01

    Although both men and women use e-cigarettes, most preclinical nicotine research has focused on its effects in male rodents following injection. The goals of the present study were to develop an effective e-cigarette nicotine delivery system, to compare results to those obtained after subcutaneous (s.c.) injection, and to examine sex differences in the model. Hypothermia and locomotor suppression were assessed following aerosol exposure or s.c. injection with nicotine in female and male mice. Subsequently, plasma and brain concentrations of nicotine and cotinine were measured. Passive exposure to nicotine aerosol produced concentration-dependent and mecamylamine reversible hypothermic and locomotor suppressant effects in female and male mice, as did s.c. nicotine injection. In plasma and brain, nicotine and cotinine concentrations showed dose/concentration-dependent increases in both sexes following each route of administration. Sex differences in nicotine-induced hypothermia were dependent upon route of administration, with females showing greater hypothermia following aerosol exposure and males showing greater hypothermia following injection. In contrast, when they occurred, sex differences in nicotine and cotinine levels in brain and plasma consistently showed greater concentrations in females than males, regardless of route of administration. In summary, the e-cigarette exposure device described herein was used successfully to deliver pharmacologically active doses of nicotine to female and male mice. Further, plasma nicotine concentrations following exposure were similar to those after s.c. injection with nicotine and within the range observed in human smokers. Future research on vaped products can be strengthened by inclusion of translationally relevant routes of administration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Plasma choline, nicotine exposure, and risk of low bone mineral density and hip fracture: the Hordaland health study.

    PubMed

    Øyen, Jannike; Nygård, Ottar Kjell; Gjesdal, Clara Gram; Ueland, Per Magne; Apalset, Ellen Margrete; Schartum-Hansen, Hall; Vollset, Stein Emil; Meyer, Klaus; Tell, Grethe S

    2014-01-01

    Choline, obtained from diet and formed by biosynthesis, is the immediate precursor of betaine. Animal studies suggest an impact of choline on bone metabolism. We examined the associations of plasma choline and betaine with bone mineral density (BMD), the risk of hip fractures, and possible effect-modification by nicotine exposure. The Hordaland Health Study (1998 to 2000) included 7074 women and men (ages 46 to 49 or 71 to 74 years). In 5315, BMD was measured. The oldest (n = 3311) were followed for hip fractures through 2009. Risk associations were studied by logistic and Cox regression by comparing the lowest and middle tertiles with the highest, as well as trends across tertiles of plasma choline and betaine. In analyses adjusted for sex and age, participants in the lowest (odds ratio [OR] = 2.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.69-2.37) and middle (OR = 1.39, CI 1.17-1.66) tertiles of plasma choline had an increased risk of low BMD (lowest quintile) (p trend < 0.001). Separate analyses for sex and age groups revealed the strongest relations in elderly women (lowest tertile: OR = 2.84, CI 1.95-4.14; middle tertile: OR = 1.80, CI 1.22-2.67, p trend < 0.001), and highest OR among those in the lowest tertile who were exposed to nicotine (OR = 4.56, CI 1.87-11.11). Low plasma choline was also associated with an increased risk of hip fracture in elderly women and men (lowest tertile: hazard ratio [HR] = 1.45, CI 1.08-1.94; middle tertile: HR = 1.13, CI 0.83-1.54, p trend = 0.012). In elderly women, the HR for hip fracture was 1.90 (CI 1.32-2.73) and 1.36 (CI 0.92-1.99) (p trend < 0.001) for lowest and middle tertiles of choline, and the highest HR was found among women in the lowest tertile exposed to nicotine (HR = 2.68, CI 1.16-6.19). Plasma betaine was not related to BMD or hip fracture. Low plasma choline was associated with low BMD in both sexes and increased the risk of hip fracture in elderly women. These

  10. A study of the bovine adrenal chromaffin nicotinic receptor using patch clamp and concentration-jump techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Maconochie, D J; Knight, D E

    1992-01-01

    1. Voltage clamp records have been obtained from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells in the outside-out and whole-cell configurations, in response to step changes of acetylcholine (ACh) concentration. The concentrations used ranged from 50 nM to 20 mM. 2. At high acetylcholine concentrations, the activation and desensitization kinetics of the nicotinic receptor, as observed in outside-out patches, may be described by a model incorporating a single, fast agonist binding step, and relatively slow isomerization to the open state. The affinity of the closed receptor for ACh is 310 microM, the channel opening rate constant is 460 s-1, and the closing rate constant is 29 s-1. 3. Single channel events, observed when nanomolar ACh concentrations are applied to whole cells, have two distinct channel lifetimes: 0.6 ms and 11-15 ms. The variation of the frequencies of the events with ACh concentration, suggests that the short lifetimes are openings of a singly liganded receptor and the longer lifetimes are openings of a doubly liganded receptor. 4. Only a single exponential associated with receptor desensitization is seen with outside-out patches, but two are seen with whole cells. It is postulated that there are two nicotinic receptor types present on adrenal chromaffin cells. 5. The rate of desensitization (9 s-1 and 26 s-1, whole cells; 24 s-1, patches), is fast enough to be significant in determining the open channel lifetime. 6. A sudden increase in current (rebound) is observed when a high concentration of ACh is abruptly removed from outside-out patches. This is evidence for a blocked state. The affinity of the blocking site for ACh is 1400 microM (outside-out patches). 7. The total number of activatable nicotinic channels per whole cell is estimated to be 2600. PMID:1282154

  11. Plasma bupivacaine concentrations following psoas compartment block.

    PubMed

    Odoom, J A; Zuurmond, W W; Sih, I L; Bovill, J; Osterlöf, G; Oosting, H V

    1986-02-01

    Fourteen patients undergoing hip replacement surgery under psoas compartment block combined with general anaesthesia were studied. Group 1 (n = 7) received plain and Group 2 (n = 7) received 0.25% bupivacaine with adrenaline. The mean maximum peak concentrations were 1.93 (SEM 0.46) micrograms/ml and 1.04 (SEM 0.19) micrograms/ml at 10 minutes in groups 1 and 2 respectively. Bupivacaine concentrations were higher at all times in the group which received plain than the group receiving solution containing adrenaline. These differences were statistically significant at 10, 15 (p less than 0.05) and 30 minutes (p less than 0.025). The highest recorded plasma bupivacaine concentration was 4.54 micrograms/ml in one patient receiving plain bupivacaine. No patient developed any signs of toxic symptoms. The duration of analgesia was longer (p less than 0.005) in the group receiving bupivacaine with adrenaline. Bupivacaine 0.25% with adrenaline 1:200 000 is safe for psoas compartment block, and is recommended for hip surgery.

  12. Peripheral administration of CDP-choline, phosphocholine or choline increases plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline concentrations.

    PubMed

    Cansev, M; Ilcol, Y O; Yilmaz, M S; Hamurtekin, E; Ulus, I H

    2008-01-01

    1 Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 200-600 mumol/kg of cytidine-5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) increased plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline concentrations dose- and time-dependently. 2 CDP-choline treatment caused several-fold increases in plasma concentrations of CDP-choline and its metabolites phosphocholine, choline, cytidine monophosphate (CMP) and cytidine. 3 Equivalent doses (200-600 mumol/kg; i.p.) of phosphocholine or choline, but not CMP or cytidine, increased plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline dose-dependently. 4 CDP-choline, phosphocholine and choline (600 mumol/kg; i.p.) augmented the increases in plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline in response to graded haemorrhage. 5 The increases in plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline induced by i.p. 600 mumol/kg of CDP-choline, phosphocholine or choline were abolished by pre-treatment with hexamethonium (15 mg/kg; i.p.), but not atropine (2 mg/kg; i.p.). 6 At 320-32 000 mum concentrations, choline, but not CDP-choline or phosphocholine, evoked catecholamine secretion from perfused adrenal gland. Choline (3200 mum)-induced catecholamine secretion was attenuated by the presence of 1 mum of hexamethonium or mecamylamine, but not atropine, in the perfusion medium. 7 Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of choline (0.5-1.5 mumol) also increased plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline dose- and time-dependently. Pre-treatment with mecamylamine (50 mug; i.c.v.) or hexamethonium (15 mg/kg; i.p.), but not atropine (10 mug; i.c.v.), prevented i.c.v. choline (1.5 mumol)-induced elevations in plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline. 8 It is concluded that i.p. administration of CDP-choline or its cholinergic metabolites phosphocholine and choline increases plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline concentrations by enhancing nicotinic cholinergic neurotransmission in the sympatho-adrenal system. Central choline also activates the sympatho-adrenal system by increasing central nicotinic cholinergic neurotransmission.

  13. Nicotine poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Nicotine is found in: Chewing tobacco Cigarettes E-cigarettes Liquid nicotine Nicotine gum (Nicorette) Nicotine patches (Habitrol, Nicoderm) Pipe tobacco Some insecticides Tobacco leaves Note: This list may not be all-inclusive.

  14. Predictors of plasma zinc concentrations in children with acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Strand, Tor A; Adhikari, Ramesh K; Chandyo, Ram K; Sharma, Pushpa R; Sommerfelt, Halvor

    2004-03-01

    Plasma and serum zinc concentrations are the most widely used markers of zinc status in individual persons and populations. The objective was to identify factors that influence plasma zinc concentrations during acute childhood diarrhea. This was a cross-sectional study of 1757 cases of acute diarrhea in 6-35-mo-old Nepalese children. The association between plasma zinc concentration and several clinical, anthropometric, socioeconomic, and biochemical variables was estimated in simple and multiple linear regression analyses. We observed a reduction in the mean plasma zinc concentration of 0.59 (95% CI: 0.44, 0.74) micro mol/L per degree ( degrees C) increase in axillary temperature. Having dysentery and an elevated plasma C-reactive protein concentration was also independently associated with lower plasma zinc. Children with clinical features of dehydration had higher plasma zinc concentrations than did those who were not dehydrated. Furthermore, a decrease in plasma albumin of 1 g/L was associated with a decrease in plasma zinc of 0.25 (95% CI: 0.21, 0.29) micro mol/L. The plasma albumin concentration confounded the associations between some clinical variables and plasma zinc, but the association between axillary temperature and dehydration on one hand and plasma zinc on the other was not substantially influenced by the albumin concentration. Moreover, the plasma zinc concentration increased with an increase in observed hemolysis. Dehydration, clinical and biochemical indicators of inflammation and hemolysis, and, when possible, plasma albumin concentrations should be taken into account when the plasma zinc concentration is used to estimate zinc status during episodes of diarrhea in childhood.

  15. Electronic Cigarette Nicotine Delivery Can Exceed that of Combustible Cigarettes: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Ramôa, Carolina P.; Hiler, Marzena M.; Spindle, Tory R; Lopez, Alexa A.; Karaoghlanian, Nareg; Lipato, Thokozeni; Breland, Alison B.; Shihadeh, Alan; Eissenberg, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Electronic cigarettes (ECIGs) aerosolize a liquid that usually contains propylene glycol and/or vegetable glycerin, flavorants, and the dependence-producing drug nicotine in various concentrations. This laboratory study examined the relationship between liquid nicotine concentration on plasma nicotine concentration and puffing behavior in experienced ECIG users. Methods Sixteen ECIG-experienced participants used a 3.3-Volt ECIG battery attached to a 1.5-Ohm dual-coil “cartomizer” loaded with 1 ml of a flavored propylene glycol/vegetable glycerin liquid to complete four sessions, at least 2 days apart, that differed by nicotine concentration (0, 8, 18, or 36 mg/ml). In each session, participants completed two 10-puff ECIG use bouts (30-sec puff interval) separated by 60 minutes. Venous blood was sampled to determine plasma nicotine concentration. Puff duration, volume, and average flow rate were measured. Results Immediately after bout 1, mean plasma nicotine concentration was 5.5 ng/ml (SD=7.7) for 0 mg/ml liquid, with significantly (p<0.05) higher mean concentrations observed for the 8 (mean=17.8 ng/ml, SD=14.6), 18 (mean=25.9 ng/ml, SD=17.5), and 36 mg/ml (mean=30.2 ng/ml; SD=20.0) concentrations; a similar pattern was observed for bout 2. For bout 1, at 36 mg/ml, the mean post- minus pre-bout difference was 24.1 ng/ml (SD=18.3). Puff topography data were consistent with previous results and revealed few reliable differences across conditions. Discussion This study demonstrates a relationship between ECIG liquid nicotine concentration and user plasma nicotine concentration in experienced ECIG users. Nicotine delivery from some ECIGs may exceed that of a combustible cigarette. The rationale for this higher level of nicotine delivery is uncertain. PMID:26324250

  16. Comparison of nicotine pharmacokinetics in healthy Japanese male smokers following application of the transdermal nicotine patch and cigarette smoking.

    PubMed

    Sobue, Satoshi; Sekiguchi, Kaneo; Kikkawa, Hironori; Akasaki, Moriaki; Irie, Shin

    2006-05-01

    Transdermal nicotine patch (TNP) contains approximately 16.6 and 24.9 mg of nicotine per 20 and 30 cm2 (TNP-20 and TNP-30). The aims of the study are to investigate linearity of nicotine pharmacokinetics after single application of different strengths of TNP and to directly compare plasma nicotine concentrations with those during cigarette smoking. Twelve healthy Japanese male smokers were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 cohorts consisting of 6 subjects each. Cohort 1 subjects received 1 sheet of TNP-20 (TNP-20x1) in period 1, and 2 sheets of TNP-20 (TNP-20x2) in period 3. Cohort 2 subjects were received 1 sheet of TNP-30 (TNP-30x1) in period 2, and smoked a total of 12 cigarettes at 1 h intervals in period 4. Each TNP was applied to the upper arm for 16 h. After TNP-20x1 or TNP-20x2 treatment in cohort 1, the amount of nicotine delivered from TNP (Dose) was proportional to surface area of TNP. Cmax and AUC of nicotine increased with the surface area (Dose), and tmax, t(1/2), CL/F and percentage of dose excreted in urine were almost the same between both treatments. These suggest the linear pharmacokinetics of nicotine in proportion to the surface area and Dose following single application of TNP in identical subjects. In cohort 2, the plasma nicotine concentrations after TNP-30x1 treatment were approximately half those just before each smoking.

  17. Nicotine intake from electronic cigarettes on initial use and after 4 weeks of regular use.

    PubMed

    Hajek, Peter; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Phillips, Anna; Myers Smith, Katie; West, Oliver; McRobbie, Hayden

    2015-02-01

    Electronic cigarettes (EC) have the potential to generate a substantial public health benefit if there is a switch from smoking to EC use on a population scale. The nicotine delivery from EC is likely to play a major role in their attractiveness to smokers. We assessed nicotine delivery from a first-generation EC and the effect of experience with its use on nicotine intake. Six smokers provided pharmacokinetic (PK) data after their first use of EC and again following 4 weeks of use. The peak nicotine levels were achieved within 5 min of starting the EC use, which suggests that EC may provide nicotine via pulmonary absorption. There were large individual differences in nicotine intake. Compared with the PK profile when using EC for the first time, 4 weeks of practice generated a 24% increase in the peak plasma concentrations (from 4.6 to 5.7 ng/ml; nonsignificant) and a 79% increase in overall nicotine intake (AUC(0 → inf) increased from 115 to 206 ng*min/ml; p < .05). First-generation EC provide faster nicotine absorption than nicotine replacement products, but to compete successfully with conventional cigarettes, EC may need to provide higher doses of nicotine. Nicotine intake from EC can increase with practice, but further studies are needed to confirm this effect. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Plasma tryptophan concentration in depressive illness and mania.

    PubMed

    Peet, M; Moody, J P; Worrall, E P; Walker, P; Naylor, G J

    1976-03-01

    Total and free plasma trytophan levels were measured in depressive and manic patients before and after recovery. No change was found in total or free plasma trytophan concentration on recovery from depressive illness. Free plasma tryptophan levels were higher in recovered manics than in active manics, and a group of four manic patients tested before and after recovery showed a significant increase in free plasma tryptophan concentration on recovery.

  19. Bimodal concentration-response of nicotine involves the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1, and transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channels in mouse trachea and sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kichko, Tatjana I; Lennerz, Jochen; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Babes, Ramona M; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kobal, Gerd; Reeh, Peter W

    2013-11-01

    High concentrations of nicotine, as in the saliva of oral tobacco consumers or in smoking cessation aids, have been shown to sensitize/activate recombinant transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (rTRPV1) and mouse TRPA1 (mTRPA1) channels. By measuring stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release from the isolated mouse trachea, we established a bimodal concentration-response relationship with a threshold below 10 µM (-)-nicotine, a maximum at 100 µM, an apparent nadir between 0.5 and 10 mM, and a renewed increase at 20 mM. The first peak was unchanged in TRPV1/A1 double-null mutants as compared with wild-types and was abolished by specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) inhibitors and by camphor, discovered to act as nicotinic antagonist. The nicotine response at 20 mM was strongly pHe-dependent, - five times greater at pH 9.0 than 7.4, indicating that intracellular permeation of the (uncharged) alkaloid was required to reach the TRPV1/A1 binding sites. The response was strongly reduced in both null mutants, and more so in double-null mutants. Upon measuring calcium transients in nodose/jugular and dorsal root ganglion neurons in response to 100 µM nicotine, 48% of the vagal (but only 14% of the somatic) sensory neurons were activated, the latter very weakly. However, nicotine 20 mM at pH 9.0 repeatedly activated almost every single cultured neuron, partly by releasing intracellular calcium and independent of TRPV1/A1 and nAChRs. In conclusion, in mouse tracheal sensory nerves nAChRs are 200-fold more sensitive to nicotine than TRPV1/A1; they are widely coexpressed with the capsaicin receptor among vagal sensory neurons and twice as abundant as TRPA1. Nicotine is the major stimulant in tobacco, and its sensory impact through nAChRs should not be disregarded.

  20. Plasma magnesium concentration in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Kotlinska-Hasiec, Edyta; Makara-Studzinska, Marta; Czajkowski, Marek; Rzecki, Ziemowit; Olszewski, Krzysztof; Stadnik, Adam; Pilat, Jacek; Rybojad, Beata; Dabrowski, Wojciech

    2017-05-11

    [b]Introduction[/b]. Magnesium (Mg) plays a crucial role in cell physiology and its deficiency may cause many disorders which often require intensive treatment. The aim of this study was to analyse some factors affecting preoperative plasma Mg concentration in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). [b]Materials and method[/b]. Adult patients scheduled for elective CABG with cardio-pulmonary bypass (CPB) under general anaesthesia were studied. Plasma Mg concentration was analysed before surgery in accordance with age, domicile, profession, tobacco smoking and preoperative Mg supplementation. Blood samples were obtained from the radial artery just before the administration of anaesthesia. [b]Results. [/b]150 patients were studied. Mean preoperative plasma Mg concentration was 0.93 ± 0.17 mmol/L; mean concentration in patients - 1.02 ± 0.16; preoperative Mg supplementation was significantly higher than in patients without such supplementation. Moreover, intellectual workers supplemented Mg more frequently and had higher plasma Mg concentration than physical workers. Plasma Mg concentration decreases in elderly patients. Patients living in cities, on average, had the highest plasma Mg concentration. Smokers had significantly lower plasma Mg concentration than non-smokers. [b]Conclusions. [/b]1. Preoperative magnesium supplementation increases its plasma concentration. 2. Intellectual workers frequently supplement magnesium. 3. Smoking cigarettes decreases plasma magnesium concentration.

  1. Nicotine vapor inhalation escalates nicotine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Nicholas W; Whitaker, Annie M; Baynes, Brittni; Abdel, Abdelrahim Y; Weil, Madelyn T; George, Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Humans escalate their cigarette smoking over time, and a major obstacle in the field of pre-clinical nicotine addiction research has been the inability to produce escalated nicotine self-administration in rats. In experiment 1, male Wistar rats were trained to respond for nicotine in 2-hour operant sessions, then exposed to chronic intermittent (12 hours/day) nicotine vapor and repeatedly tested for nicotine self-administration at 8-12 hours of withdrawal. Rats were tested intermittently on days 1, 3 and 5 of the vapor exposure procedure, then tested with nicotine vapor exposure on 6-15 consecutive days. Rats exhibited transient increases in operant nicotine responding during intermittent testing, regardless of vapor condition, and this responding returned to baseline levels upon resumption of consecutive-days testing (i.e. nicotine deprivation effect). Nicotine vapor-exposed rats then escalated nicotine self-administration relative to both their own baseline (∼200% increase) and non-dependent controls (∼3× higher). In experiment 2, rats were exposed or not exposed to chronic intermittent nicotine vapor, then tested for spontaneous and precipitated somatic signs of nicotine withdrawal. Eight hours following removal from nicotine vapor, rats exhibited robust mecamylamine-precipitated somatic signs of withdrawal. There was a strong correlation between nicotine flow rate and air-nicotine concentration, and the air-nicotine concentrations used in experiments 1 and 2 resemble concentrations experienced by human smokers. Collectively, these results suggest that chronic intermittent nicotine vapor inhalation produces somatic and motivational signs of nicotine dependence, the latter of which is evidenced by escalation of nicotine self-administration.

  2. Reevaluating the nicotine delivery kinetics hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Dar, Reuven; Frenk, Hanan

    2007-05-01

    The view of smoking as an addiction to nicotine implies that nicotine is an addictive drug and a primary reinforcer. However, nicotine other than in tobacco does not appear to be very rewarding for smokers. This potential anomaly to the nicotine addiction thesis is resolved by the proposition that the reward associated with smoking depends on "high-nicotine boli." According to the nicotine delivery kinetics hypothesis, smoked nicotine reaches the brain in 5-10 s in high concentrations, which provide reinforcing "hits" of nicotine to the brain. Because of its essential role in the nicotine addiction thesis, this review set out to examine the current empirical basis of the nicotine delivery kinetics hypothesis. We reviewed studies that bear on two questions: First, does nicotine from cigarettes reach the brain significantly faster than from other nicotine delivery devices? Second, is there a relationship between delivery kinetics and any rewarding effects of nicotine? There is little empirical support for the nicotine delivery kinetics hypothesis. Several studies found that arterial nicotine levels associated with smoking are much lower than predicted by the nicotine delivery kinetics thesis and not higher than with other nicotine delivery devices. More importantly, comparisons of nicotine delivery devices with varying speeds of delivery do not suggest any correlation between nicotine delivery profile and subjective reward. This review indicates that the wide endorsement of the nicotine delivery kinetics hypothesis is unjustified. Critical research is required to resolve the anomalies within the nicotine addiction theory of smoking.

  3. Involvement of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate in nicotinic calcium responses in dystrophic myotubes assessed by near-plasma membrane calcium measurement.

    PubMed

    Basset, Olivier; Boittin, François-Xavier; Dorchies, Olivier M; Chatton, Jean-Yves; van Breemen, Cornelis; Ruegg, Urs T

    2004-11-05

    In skeletal muscle cells, plasma membrane depolarization causes a rapid calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum through ryanodine receptors triggering contraction. In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a lethal disease that is caused by the lack of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin, the cytosolic calcium concentration is known to be increased, and this increase may lead to cell necrosis. Here, we used myotubes derived from control and mdx mice, the murine model of DMD, to study the calcium responses induced by nicotinic acetylcholine receptor stimulation. The photoprotein aequorin was expressed in the cytosol or targeted to the plasma membrane as a fusion protein with the synaptosome-associated protein SNAP-25, thus allowing calcium measurements in a restricted area localized just below the plasma membrane. The carbachol-induced calcium responses were 4.5 times bigger in dystrophic myotubes than in control myotubes. Moreover, in dystrophic myotubes the carbachol-mediated calcium responses measured in the subsarcolemmal area were at least 10 times bigger than in the bulk cytosol. The initial calcium responses were due to calcium influx into the cells followed by a fast refilling/release phase from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In addition and unexpectedly, the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor pathway was involved in these calcium signals only in the dystrophic myotubes. This surprising involvement of this calcium release channel in the excitation-contraction coupling could open new ways for understanding exercise-induced calcium increases and downstream muscle degeneration in mdx mice and, therefore, in DMD.

  4. Increased hepatic nicotine elimination after phenobarbital induction in the conscious rat

    SciTech Connect

    Foth, H.; Walther, U.I.; Kahl, G.F. )

    1990-09-15

    Elimination parameters of (14C)nicotine in conscious rats receiving nicotine (0.3 mg/kg) either intravenously or orally were studied. The oral availability of unchanged nicotine, derived by comparison of the respective areas under the concentration vs time curves (AUC), was 89%, indicating low hepatic extraction ratios of about 10%. Pretreatment of rats with phenobarbital (PB) markedly increased hepatic first-pass extraction of nicotine. The oral availability of unchanged nicotine in plasma dropped to 1.4% of the corresponding values obtained from PB-treated rats receiving nicotine iv. After PB pretreatment, the clearance of iv nicotine was increased approximately twofold over controls, much less than the observed more than ninefold increase of hepatic first-pass extraction. It is assumed that extrahepatic metabolism contributed significantly to the rapid removal of nicotine from the plasma. The elimination of cotinine, originating from nicotine administered either po or iv, was significantly increased by PB pretreatment, as determined by the ratio of corresponding AUCs. The pattern of nicotine metabolites in urine also indicated an increase in the rate of cotinine metabolic turnover. The amount of norcotinine in the organic extract of urine paralleled PB microsomal enzyme induction. The ratio between urinary concentrations of the normetabolite and cotinine correlated strongly with the PB-induced state of rat liver. This may be a suitable indicator of PB-inducible hepatic cytochrome P450 isoenzyme(s). Since smoking habits in man are feedback-regulated by nicotine plasma concentrations, a similar increase of nicotine elimination by microsomal enzyme induction in man may be of relevance for tobacco consumption.

  5. SEASONAL VARIATION IN PLASMA SEX STEROID CONCENTRATION IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal variation in plasma sex steroid concentrations is common in mature vertebrates, and is occasionally seen in juvenile animals. In this study, we examine the seasonal pattern of sex hormone concentration in juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) and make...

  6. SEASONAL VARIATION IN PLASMA SEX STEROID CONCENTRATION IN JUVENILE ALLIGATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal variation in plasma sex steroid concentrations is common in mature vertebrates, and is occasionally seen in juvenile animals. In this study, we examine the seasonal pattern of sex hormone concentration in juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) and make...

  7. Doxycycline plasma concentrations in macaws fed a medicate corn diet.

    PubMed

    Prus, S E; Clubb, S L; Flammer, K

    1992-01-01

    A trial was conducted to determine the doxycycline plasma concentrations attained by feeding a medicated corn diet to large psittacine birds. Doxycycline is the preferred drug for the treatment of chlamydiosis in psittacine birds. Healthy macaws were fed a 0.1% doxycycline-medicated corn diet for 45 days, and plasma doxycycline concentrations were determined by microbiological assay on treatment days 3, 15, 30, and 45. Plasma doxycycline concentrations exceeded 1 microgram/ml in 87% of the samples assayed. As blood concentrations of 1 microgram/ml are considered therapeutic, a doxycycline-medicated corn diet may be efficacious in the treatment of chlamydiosis in large psittacine birds.

  8. Nicotine Gum

    MedlinePlus

    Nicotine chewing gum is used to help people stop smoking cigarettes. Nicotine chewing gum should be used together with a ... support groups, counseling, or specific behavioral change techniques. Nicotine gum is in a class of medications called ...

  9. Nicotine Lozenges

    MedlinePlus

    Nicotine lozenges are used to help people stop smoking. Nicotine lozenges are in a class of medications called smoking cessation aids. They work by providing nicotine to your body to decrease the withdrawal symptoms ...

  10. Intracellular accumulation of boceprevir according to plasma concentrations and pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Cusato, Jessica; Allegra, Sarah; De Nicolò, Amedeo; Boglione, Lucio; Fatiguso, Giovanna; Abdi, Adnan Mohamed; Cariti, Giuseppe; Di Perri, Giovanni; D'Avolio, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Boceprevir (BOC) is a directly-acting antiviral agent for the treatment of hepatitis C virus genotype 1 (HCV-1) infection. It is a mixture of two stereoisomers, the inactive R and the active S isomers. No data have previously been published on BOC intracellular accumulation. In this study, BOC isomer concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and plasma were determined. The influence of various single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on plasma and intracellular drug exposure at Week 4 of triple therapy were also evaluated. Plasma and intracellular BOC concentrations were determined at the end of the dosing interval (C(trough)) using a UPLC-MS/MS validated method. Allelic discrimination was performed through real-time PCR. Median plasma concentrations were 65.97 ng/mL for the S isomer and 36.31 ng/mL for the R isomer; the median S/R plasma concentration ratio was 1.66. The median PBMC concentration was 2285.88 ng/mL for the S isomer; the R isomer was undetectable within PBMCs. The median S isomer PBMC/plasma concentration ratio was 28.59. A significant positive correlation was found between plasma and PBMC S isomer concentrations. ABCB1 1236, SLC28A2 124 and IL28B rs12979860 SNPs were associated with the S isomer PBMC/plasma concentration ratio. In regression models, S isomer plasma levels and FokI polymorphism were able to predict S isomer intracellular exposure, whereas SNPs in AKR1, BCRP1 and SLC28A2 predicted the S isomer PBMC/plasma concentration ratio. No similar data regarding BOC pharmacogenetics and pharmacokinetics have been published previously. This study adds a novel and useful overview of the pharmacological properties of this drug.

  11. Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Walley, Susan C; Jenssen, Brian P

    2015-11-01

    Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) are rapidly growing in popularity among youth. ENDS are handheld devices that produce an aerosolized mixture from a solution typically containing concentrated nicotine, flavoring chemicals, and propylene glycol to be inhaled by the user. ENDS are marketed under a variety of names, most commonly electronic cigarettes and e-cigarettes. In 2014, more youth reported using ENDS than any other tobacco product. ENDS pose health risks to both users and nonusers. Nicotine, the major psychoactive ingredient in ENDS solutions, is both highly addictive and toxic. In addition to nicotine, other toxicants, carcinogens, and metal particles have been detected in solutions and aerosols of ENDS. Nonusers are involuntarily exposed to the emissions of these devices with secondhand and thirdhand aerosol. The concentrated and often flavored nicotine in ENDS solutions poses a poisoning risk for young children. Reports of acute nicotine toxicity from US poison control centers have been increasing, with at least 1 child death reported from unintentional exposure to a nicotine-containing ENDS solution. With flavors, design, and marketing that appeal to youth, ENDS threaten to renormalize and glamorize nicotine and tobacco product use. There is a critical need for ENDS regulation, legislative action, and counter promotion to protect youth. ENDS have the potential to addict a new generation of youth to nicotine and reverse more than 50 years of progress in tobacco control.

  12. Nicotine delivery, retention, and pharmacokinetics from various electronic cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    St. Helen, Gideon; Havel, Christopher; Dempsey, Delia; Jacob, Peyton; Benowitz, Neal L.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To measure the systemic retention of nicotine, propylene glycol (PG), and vegetable glycerin (VG) in electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) users, and assess the abuse liability of e-cigarettes by characterizing nicotine pharmacokinetics. Design E-cigarette users recruited over the Internet participated in a 1-day research ward study. Subjects took 15 puffs from their usual brand of e-cigarette. Exhaled breath was trapped in gas-washing bottles and blood was sampled before and several time after use. Setting San Francisco, California, USA. Participants Thirteen healthy, experienced adult e-cigarette users (6 females and 7 males). Measurements Plasma nicotine was analyzed by GC-MS/MS, and nicotine, VG, and PG in e-liquids and gas traps were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Heart rate changes and subjective effects were assessed. Findings E-cigarettes delivered an average of 1.3 (0.9–1.8) mg (mean and 95% CI) of nicotine and 94% of the inhaled dose, 1.2 (0.8–1.7), was systemically retained. Average maximum plasma nicotine concentration (Cmax) was 8.4 (5.4–11.5) ng/mL and time of maximal concentration (Tmax) was 2 to 5 minutes; one participant had Tmax of 30 minutes. 89% and 92% of VG and PG, respectively, was systemically retained. Heart rate increased by an average of 8.0 bpm after 5 minutes. Withdrawal and urge to smoke decreased and the e-cigarettes were described as satisfying. Conclusions E-cigarettes can deliver levels of nicotine that are comparable to or higher than typical tobacco cigarettes, with similar systemic retention. Although the average maximum plasma nicotine concentration in experienced e-cigarettes users appears to be generally lower than what has been reported from tobacco cigarette use, the shape of the pharmacokinetic curve is similar, suggesting addictive potential. PMID:26430813

  13. An oral formulation of nicotine for release and absorption in the colon: its development and pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Green, J T; Evans, B K; Rhodes, J; Thomas, G A O; Ranshaw, C; Feyerabend, C; Russell, M A H

    1999-01-01

    Aims Ulcerative colitis is predominantly a disease of nonsmokers and transdermal nicotine has therapeutic value in active disease; however side-effects are troublesome. The aim of this study was to develop an oral formulation of nicotine which would be slowly released in the colon over 6 h, and to examine its pharmacokinetic profile in 12 healthy volunteers, with measurements of serum nicotine and cotinine, its principal metabolite. Methods Nicotine was combined with a polyacrylic carbomer, Carbopol 974P which was incorporated into 13 different vehicles and their release profiles examined in vitro. The polyglycolized glyceride, Gelucire 50/13, was chosen for subsequent kinetic studies because it consistently produced a suitable release pattern which was linear. Capsules containing 3 mg nicotine, combined with carbomer in Gelucire 50/13, were coated with an acrylic resin Eudragit L; this ensured the capsule would remain intact until the ileum. On 2 separate days, 6 and 15 mg nicotine, contained in 2 and 5 capsules, respectively, were administered to 12 subjects, all nonsmokers, mean age 28 years. Serial blood measurements were taken for 36 h, serum nicotine and cotinine concentrations were measured by gas liquid chromatography. Results There was considerable intersubject variability in the nicotine and cotinine values. Plasma nicotine levels began to rise about 4 h after ingestion of the capsules, corresponding with the oro-caecal transit time. Cmax nicotine values were 2.2 and 5 ng ml−1, obtained 7 h after the ingestion of 6 and 15 mg, respectively, of the formulation. The corresponding Cmax values for cotinine were 37 and 94.4 ng ml−1, occurring after 9–10 h. The mean for elimination half-lives in the 24 studies, including the 6 and 15 mg doses, for nicotine were 4.3±2.7 h and for cotinine 16.8±7.5 h. With 6 mg nicotine-carbomer, only 1 of 12 volunteers had possible side-effects, but with the 15 mg dose 11 out of the 12 reported adverse effects which were

  14. Partition functions and concentrations in plasmas out of thermal equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Andre, P.

    1995-06-01

    Taking into account the disequilibrium between the temperatures (electronic, rotational, vibrational, translational) in a nitrogen-plasma out of thermal equilibrium, different partition function and chemical potential calculation method are described and applied. From the variation of the temperature hypotheses, their influence on the plasma concentration is shown.

  15. Prospective determination of plasma imipenem concentrations in critically ill children.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Eric; Moreillon, Philippe; Cotting, Jacques; Moessinger, Adrien; Bille, Jacques; Décosterd, Laurent; Zanetti, Giorgio; Majcherczyk, Paul; Bugnon, Denis

    2006-07-01

    Plasma imipenem concentrations were measured in 19 critically ill children (median age, 0.8 year; range, 0.02 to 12.9 years). Wide interindividual variations (2 to 4x at peak and >10x at trough concentrations) resulted in unpredictable plasma levels in several children. To avoid subtherapeutic drug levels, we recommend treatment with at least 100 mg/kg of body weight/day of imipenem-cilastatin for critically ill children requiring such therapy.

  16. Prospective Determination of Plasma Imipenem Concentrations in Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Giannoni, Eric; Moreillon, Philippe; Cotting, Jacques; Moessinger, Adrien; Bille, Jacques; Décosterd, Laurent; Zanetti, Giorgio; Majcherczyk, Paul; Bugnon, Denis

    2006-01-01

    Plasma imipenem concentrations were measured in 19 critically ill children (median age, 0.8 year; range, 0.02 to 12.9 years). Wide interindividual variations (2 to 4× at peak and >10× at trough concentrations) resulted in unpredictable plasma levels in several children. To avoid subtherapeutic drug levels, we recommend treatment with at least 100 mg/kg of body weight/day of imipenem-cilastatin for critically ill children requiring such therapy. PMID:16801447

  17. Adenosine strongly potentiates pressor responses to nicotine in rats.

    PubMed Central

    von Borstel, R W; Renshaw, A A; Wurtman, R J

    1984-01-01

    Intravenous infusion of subhypotensive doses of adenosine strongly potentiates the pressor response of anesthetized rats to nicotine. A dose of nicotine (40 micrograms/kg, i.v.), which, given alone, elicits a peak increase in diastolic pressure of approximately equal to 15 mm Hg, increases pressure by approximately equal to 70 mm Hg when arterial plasma adenosine levels have been increased to 2 microM from a basal concentration of approximately equal to 1 microM. The pressor response to cigarette smoke applied to the lungs is also strongly potentiated during infusion of adenosine. Slightly higher adenosine concentrations (approximately equal to 4 microM) attenuate pressor responses to electrical stimulation of preganglionic sympathetic nerves, or to injections of the alpha-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine, but continue to potentiate pressor responses to nicotine. Low doses (0.25-5 micrograms/kg) of the synthetic adenosine receptor agonists 5'-N-cyclopropylcarboxamidoadenosine, 2-chloroadenosine, and N6-L-phenylisopropyladenosine also potentiate pressor responses to nicotine. Caffeine and theophylline (10 mg/kg) block the potentiating effect of adenosine, and also decrease basal responses to nicotine, suggesting that endogenous adenosine might normally potentiate some nicotine responses. The synergism between nicotine and adenosine appears to take place within sympathetic ganglia. PMID:6591207

  18. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function in hippocampal neurons is regulated by the lipid composition of the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Colón-Sáez, José O; Yakel, Jerrel L

    2011-07-01

    The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play an important role in cellular events such as neurotransmitter release, second messenger cascades, cell survival and apoptosis. In addition, they are a therapeutic target for the treatment of neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia, and drugs that potentiate α7 nAChRs through the regulation of desensitization are currently being developed. Recently, these channels were found to be localized into lipid rafts. Here we show that the disruption of lipid rafts in rat primary hippocampal neurons, through cholesterol-scavenging drugs (methyl-β-cyclodextrin) and the enzymatic breakdown of sphingomyelin (sphingomyelinase), results in significant changes in the desensitization kinetics of native and expressed α7 nAChRs. These effects can be prevented by cotreatment with cholesterol and sphingomyelin, and can be mimicked by treatment with cholesterol and sphingomyelin synthesis inhibitors (mevastatin and myriocin, respectively), suggesting that the effects on desensitization kinetics are indeed due to changes in the levels of cholesterol and sphingomyelin in the plasma membrane. These data provide new insights into themechanism of desensitization of α7 nAChRs by providing evidence that the lipid composition of the plasma membrane can modulate the activity of the α7 nAChRs.

  19. Nanomolar concentrations of nicotine and cotinine alter the development of cultured hippocampal neurons via non-acetylcholine receptor-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, T; Cabell, L

    1999-08-01

    We investigated the effects of nicotine and its metabolic byproduct cotinine on survival, differentiation and intracellular Ca2+ levels of cultured E18 rat hippocampal neurons. We used a range of concentrations from 1 nM to 10 microM, most of which are within the likely range of human fetal exposure from maternal smoking. Nicotine did not influence neuron survival or neurite production. However, at all concentrations tested, nicotine significantly increased branching of both axons and dendrites, an effect which was not reversed by co-culturing with alpha-bungarotoxin, which blocks the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that predominate in hippocampal cultures (Alkondon and Albuquerque, 1993; Barrantes et al., 1995b). Cotinine at 100 nM and 1 microM significantly reduced neuron survival and neurite production of surviving neurons, but did not significantly alter axon or dendrite branching. These membrane-permeable compounds may work synergistically in the developing embryo to impair the survival and differentiation of hippocampal neurons via intracellular mechanisms.

  20. Plasma Lipidome Analysis by Liquid Chromatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility of Hypertriglyceridemic Patients on Extended-Release Nicotinic Acid: a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Ferchaud-Roucher, Véronique; Croyal, Mikaël; Moyon, Thomas; Zair, Yassine; Krempf, Michel; Ouguerram, Khadija

    2017-07-28

    Plasma high triacylglycerols and low HDL-C concentration are associated with increased cardiovascular events. Extended-release nicotinic acid (ERN) was shown to reduce plasma triacylglycerols and total cholesterol but also to markedly increase high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C). No data on the effect of ERN on different species of triacylglycerol, cholesteryl ester, and phospholipids are available. In this study, we applied a nontargeted lipidomic approach to investigate the plasma and lipoproteins lipids profile of hypertriglyceridemic patients treated with ERN or a placebo in order to identify new lipids markers associated with this treatment. Eight hypertriglyceridemic patients enrolled in a crossover randomized trial with ERN for 8 weeks and treated with 2 g/day of ERN or a placebo. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) was used in mass spectrometry energy mode (HRMS(E)) combined with ion mobility spectrometry to characterize the plasma and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) lipidome. The accuracy and precision of the method were validated on plasma samples. Compared to placebo, among 155 plasma lipids characterized using UPLC-ESI-HRMS, a multivariate analysis revealed a significant increase of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC 20:5), a significant decrease of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE 16:0/22:3) and sphingomyelin (SM d18:1/22:0) and a decrease of triacylglycerol (TG 16:0/16:1/18:2) after ERN treatment. Analysis of these lipids in lipoproteins showed an increase of LPC (20:5) in HDL, a decrease of PE (16:0/22:3) in HDL and LDL, of SM (d18:1/22:0) in VLDL and LDL and of TG (16:0/16:1/18:2) in VLDL. This lipidomic strategy characterized new specific lipid markers likely to be involved in the effect of ERN on cardiovascular risk opening a new strategy to analyze randomized controlled with this treatment. NCT01216956.

  1. Plasma concentration of topically applied betaxolol in elderly glaucoma patients.

    PubMed

    Vainio-Jylhä, E; Vuori, M L; Pyykkö, K; Huupponen, R

    2001-06-01

    Our aim was to study the concentration of betaxolol in plasma after its topical ocular use during the normal 12 hr dosing interval. Twenty microliters of betaxolol 0.5% solution were applied into both eyes of nine glaucoma patients, and the plasma concentrations of the drug were measured 12 hr thereafter using a radioreceptor assay. The same amount of betaxolol was then applied ocularly, and its concentration in plasma was measured at 5, 10, 15, 30 min and 1, 2, 4 and 8 hr thereafter. The mean (SD) concentration of betaxolol in plasma twelve hr after the first dose was 0.4 (0.2) ng/ml. After the second dose, the patients showed a biphasic concentration vs. time curve, the first peak occurring at 8 (4) min, and the second peak at 210 (132) min; the mean (SD) peak concentrations being 1.1 (0.3) and 2.0 (1.1) ng/ml, respectively. The area under the concentration vs. time curve showed a 4-fold variation among our patients. Topically applied betaxolol was rapidly absorbed into systemic circulation, and concentrations were detectable even at 12 hr. The interindividual variation in the systemic absorption of betaxolol was large.

  2. Postprandial changes in plasma urea and creatinine concentrations in dogs.

    PubMed

    Watson, A D; Church, D B; Fairburn, A J

    1981-11-01

    Changes in plasma urea and creatinine concentrations were compared in 6 dogs fed 3 meals (cooked meat, raw meat, and a soft-moist preparation) in a crossover fashion. Each meal produced changes in urea and creatinine values. Although increased urea values were seen after all meals, the effects on creatinine were varied; concentrations increased after feeding cooked meat, but decreased after consumption of raw meat or soft-moist food. Although the creatinine changes were less pronounced, the variable effect of diet complicates the interpretation of plasma creatinine concentration in evaluating renal function.

  3. Plasma renin activities, angiotensin II concentrations, atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations and cardiopulmonary function values in dogs with severe heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, H; Kitoh, K; Inoue, H; Ohba, Y; Suzuki, F; Sasaki, Y

    2000-04-01

    Relationships among plasma renin activities (PRA), plasma angiotensin II (ATII) concentrations, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) concentrations and cardiopulmonary function values were examined in dogs with ascitic pulmonary heartworm disease and acute- and chronic-vena caval syndrome (CS). PRA, plasma ATII concentration and plasma ANP concentration tended to be higher or were significantly higher in dogs with ascites, acute- and chronic-CS. PRA correlated significantly with plasma ATII concentration, WBC count, ALP activity, plasma concentrations of urea nitrogen, creatinine, sodium, potassium, and chloride, right ventricular endodiastolic pressure and right atrial pressure. Plasma ATII concentration correlated significantly with WBC count, plasma concentrations of urea nitrogen, sodium, and potassium, right ventricular endodiastolic pressure and right atrial pressure. Plasma ANP concentration did not correlate with PRA or ATII concentration, but correlated significantly only with pulmonary arterial pressure.

  4. Effects of niacin source on epinephrine stimulation of plasma nonesterified fatty acid and glucose concentrations, on diet digestibility and on rumen protozoal numbers in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Erickson, P S; Trusk, A M; Murphy, M R

    1990-12-01

    Effects of niacin (nicotinic acid or nicotinamide) supplementation of dairy cow diets on apparent total tract nutrient digestibility, milk yield and milk composition were determined using six mid-lactation Holstein cows in a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square design arranged to test for residual treatment effects. Treatments were control, 12 g/d of nicotinic acid or 12 g/d of nicotinamide. Periods were 14 d long; d 1 to 4 served as an adaptation period before treatment administration commenced (d 5 to 14). Effects of supplemental niacin on plasma nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations and plasma glucose concentrations were tested following saline injection on d 10. Blood was then sampled for 5.5 h at 15-min intervals. On d 13, cows were treated similarly except that epinephrine replaced saline. The area below d-10 curves was subtracted from the area below d-13 curves to serve as an indicator of niacin's effect on plasma NEFA and glucose concentration responses to epinephrine injection. Niacin treatments did not change the area differences for plasma glucose compared to the control treatment; however, there was a trend for niacin to reduce the area difference compared to the control treatment for plasma NEFA. Niacin treatments did not alter dry matter intake, nutrient digestibility, milk yield or composition. Niacin supplementation increased the number of entodinia protozoa in rumen fluid.

  5. Control of exogenous factors affecting plasma homovanillic acid concentration.

    PubMed

    Davidson, M; Giordani, A B; Mohs, R C; Mykytyn, V V; Platt, S; Aryan, Z S; Davis, K L

    1987-04-01

    Measurements of plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) concentrations appear to be a valid research strategy in psychiatric disorders in which a central dopamine (DA) abnormality has been implicated. This study provides guidance about the control of some of the exogenous factors affecting pHVA concentrations. Fasting for 14 hours eliminates the dietary effects on pHVA in healthy human subjects. Changing position, walking for 30 minutes, or smoking two cigarettes has no effect on pHVA concentrations.

  6. Regular physical activity influences plasma ghrelin concentration in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Jürimäe, Jaak; Cicchella, Antonio; Jürimäe, Toivo; Lätt, Evelin; Haljaste, Kaja; Purge, Pritt; Hamra, Jena; von Duvillard, Serge P

    2007-10-01

    We examined the effect of regular physical activity on plasma ghrelin concentration after onset of puberty in girls. In addition, we also examined the association of fasting plasma ghrelin concentration with various plasma biochemical, body composition, and aerobic capacity variables in healthy adolescent girls. Fifty healthy schoolgirls ages 11 to 16 yr were divided either into a physically active (N = 25) or a physically inactive (N = 25) group. The physically active group consisted of swimmers who had trained on an average of 6.2 +/- 2.0 h.wk(-1) for the last 2 yr, whereas the inclusion criterion for the physically inactive group was the participation in physical education classes only. The subjects were matched for age (+/- 1 yr) and body mass index (BMI; +/- 2 kg.m(-2)). Maturation I group (14 matched pairs) included pubertal stages 2 and 3, and maturation II group (11 matched pairs) included pubertal stages 4 and 5. Physically active girls had significantly higher (P < 0.05) mean plasma ghrelin levels than the physically inactive girls (maturation I: 1152.1 +/- 312.9 vs 877.7 +/- 114.8 pg.mL(-1); maturation II: 1084.0 +/- 252.5 vs 793.4 +/- 164.9 pg.mL(-1)). Plasma ghrelin concentration was negatively related to percent body fat, fat mass, peak oxygen consumption per kilogram of body mass, leptin, estradiol, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) (r > -0.298; P < 0.05). Multivariate linear regression analysis to determine the predictors of ghrelin concentration using the variables that were significantly associated with ghrelin concentration demonstrated that plasma IGF-I was the most important predictor of plasma ghrelin concentration (beta = -0.396; P = 0.008). Regular physical activity influences plasma ghrelin concentrations in girls with different pubertal maturation levels. Plasma IGF-I concentration seems to be the main determinant of circulating ghrelin in healthy, normal-weight adolescent girls.

  7. Policy effects of secondhand smoke exposure in public places in the Republic of Korea: evidence from PM2.5 levels and air nicotine concentrations.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Young; Lim, Min Kyung; Yang, Wonho; Yun, E Hwa; Oh, Jin-Kyoung; Jeong, Bo Yoon; Hong, Soon Yeoul; Lee, Do-Hoon; Tamplin, Steve

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure inside selected public places to provide basic data for the development and promotion of smoke-free policies. Between March and May 2009, an SHS exposure survey was conducted. PM2.5 levels and air nicotine concentrations were measured in hospitals (n=5), government buildings (4), restaurants (10) and entertainment venues (10) in Seoul, Republic of Korea, using a common protocol. Field researchers completed an observational questionnaire to document evidence of active smoking (the smell of cigarette smoke, presence of cigarette butts and witnessing people smoking) and administered a questionnaire regarding building characteristics and smoking policy. Indoor PM2.5 levels and air nicotine concentrations were relatively higher in monitoring sites where smoking is not prohibited by law. Entertainment venues had the highest values of PM2.5(μg/m3) and air nicotine concentration(μg/m3), which were 7.6 and 67.9 fold higher than those of hospitals, respectively, where the values were the lowest. When evidence of active smoking was present, the mean PM2.5 level was 104.9 μg/m3, i.e., more than 4-fold the level determined by the World Health Organization for 24-hr exposure (25 μg/m3). Mean indoor air nicotine concentration at monitoring sites with evidence of active smoking was 59-fold higher than at sites without this evidence (2.94 μg/m3 vs. 0.05 μg/m3). The results were similar at all specific monitoring sites except restaurants, where mean indoor PM2.5 levels did not differ at sites with and without active smoking evidence and indoor air nicotine concentrations were higher in sites without evidence of smoking. Nicotine was detected in most of our monitoring sites, including those where smoking is prohibited by law, such as hospitals, demonstrating that enforcement and compliance with current smoke-free policies in Korea is not adequate to protect against SHS exposure.

  8. Factors influencing post-exercise plasma protein carbonyl concentration.

    PubMed

    Wadley, Alex J; Turner, James E; Aldred, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Exercise of sufficient intensity and duration can cause acute oxidative stress. Plasma protein carbonyl (PC) moieties are abundant, chemically stable, and easily detectable markers of oxidative stress that are widely used for the interpretation of exercise-induced changes in redox balance. Despite many studies reporting acute increases in plasma PC concentration in response to exercise, some studies, including those from our own laboratory have shown decreases. This review will discuss the differences between studies reporting increases, decreases, and no change in plasma PC concentration following exercise in humans; highlighting participant physiology (i.e. training status) and study design (i.e. intensity, duration, and novelty of the exercise bout) as the main factors driving the direction of the PC response to exercise. The role of the 20S proteasome system is proposed as a possible mechanism mediating the clearance of plasma PC following exercise. Resting and exercise-induced differences in plasma protein composition and balance between tissues are also discussed. We suggest that exercise may stimulate the clearance of plasma PC present at baseline, whereas simultaneously increasing reactive oxygen species production that facilitates the formation of new PC groups. The balance between these two processes likely explains why some studies have reported no change or even decreases in plasma PC level post-exercise when other biomarkers of oxidative stress (e.g. markers of lipid peroxidation) were elevated. Future studies should determine factors that influence the balance between PC clearance and formation following acute exercise.

  9. Concentration of perfluorinated compounds and cotinine in human foetal organs, placenta, and maternal plasma.

    PubMed

    Mamsen, Linn Salto; Jönsson, Bo A G; Lindh, Christian H; Olesen, Rasmus H; Larsen, Agnete; Ernst, Erik; Kelsey, Thomas W; Andersen, Claus Yding

    2017-10-15

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are bio-accumulative pollutants, and prenatal exposure to PFASs is believed to impact human foetal development and may have long-term adverse health effects later in life. Additionally, maternal cigarette smoking may be associated with PFAS levels. Foetal exposure has previously been estimated from umbilical cord plasma, but the actual concentration in foetal organs has never been measured. The concentrations of 5 PFASs and cotinine - the primary metabolite of nicotine - were measured in human foetuses, placentas, and maternal plasma to evaluate to what extent these compounds were transferred from mother to foetus and to determine if the PFAS concentrations were associated with maternal cigarette smoking. Thirty-nine Danish women who underwent legal termination of pregnancy before gestational week 12 were included; 24 maternal blood samples were obtained together with 34 placental samples and 108 foetal organs. PFASs and cotinine were assayed by liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. In foetal organs, the average concentrations of perfluorooctanesulphonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDa), and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) were 0.6ng/g, 0.2ng/g, 0.1ng/g, 0.1ng/g, and 0.1ng/g, respectively. A significant positive correlation was found between the exposure duration, defined as foetal age, and foetal to maternal ratio for all five PFASs and cotinine. Smokers presented 99ng/g cotinine in plasma, 108ng/g in placenta, and 61ng/g in foetal organs. No correlation between the maternal cotinine concentrations and PFAS concentrations was found. PFASs were transferred from mother to foetus, however, with different efficiencies. The concentrations of PFOS, PFOA, PFNA, PFUnDA, and PFDA in foetal organs were much lower than the maternal concentrations. Furthermore, a significant correlation between the exposure duration and all of the evaluated PFASs

  10. Secondhand smoke exposure and risk following the Irish smoking ban: an assessment of salivary cotinine concentrations in hotel workers and air nicotine levels in bars.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, M; Evans, D S; Hammond, S K; Repace, J L; Byrne, M

    2005-12-01

    To investigate whether the Irish smoking ban has had an impact on secondhand smoke (SHS) exposures for hospitality workers. Before and after the smoking ban a cohort of workers (n = 35) from a sample of city hotels (n = 15) were tested for saliva cotinine concentrations and completed questionnaires. Additionally, a random sample (n = 20) of city centre bars stratified by size (range 400-5000 square feet), were tested for air nicotine concentrations using passive samplers before and after the ban. Salivary cotinine concentrations (ng/ml), duration of self reported exposures to secondhand smoke, air nicotine (microg/cubic metre). Cotinine concentrations reduced by 69%, from 1.6 ng/ml to 0.5 ng/ml median (SD 1.29; p < 0.005). Overall 74% of subjects experienced decreases (range 16-99%), with 60% showing a halving of exposure levels at follow up. Self reported exposure to SHS at work showed a significant reduction from a median 30 hours a week to zero (p < 0.001). There was an 83% reduction in air nicotine concentrations from median 35.5 microg/m3 to 5.95 microg/m3 (p < 0.001). At baseline, three bars (16%) were below the 6.8 microg/m3 air nicotine significant risk level for lung cancer alone; at follow up this increased to 10 (53%). Passive smoking and associated risks were significantly reduced but not totally eliminated. Exposure to SHS is still possible for those working where smoking is still allowed and those working where smoke may migrate from outdoor areas. Further research is required to assess the true extent and magnitude of these exposures.

  11. Lipaemic plasma induces haemolysis in resuspended red cell concentrate.

    PubMed

    Bashir, S; Wiltshire, M; Cardigan, R; Thomas, S

    2013-04-01

    We investigated whether haemolysis in red cells suspended in plasma was affected by the lipid content and/or methylene blue (MB) treatment of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP). We also investigated whether haemolysis was affected by the conditions under which lipaemic plasma was stored. Study 1: Visibly lipaemic (n = 22) or nonlipaemic FFP (n = 24) units were thawed, pooled and split into identical pairs, one of which was MB treated. These units were used to resuspend red cell concentrates (RCC) and tested for haemolysis immediately and after 24 and 48 h of storage at 2-6°C. Study 2: Fresh plasma was aliquoted into 15-ml tubes and stored in one of four ways as follows: room temperature; 2-6°C; frozen and thawed; or twice frozen and thawed. A sample of RCC was resuspended in each of these plasmas and haemolysis measured after 2 h. Study 3: Plasma was divided into 15-ml tubes and stored as in study 2 followed by storage left standing upright in a refrigerator (2-6°C) for 24 h (with the exception of the room temperature sample). Plasma was separated into top, middle and bottom fractions and used to resuspend RCC that were assessed for haemolysis after 2 h. The levels of haemolysis in RCC were immediately greater when suspended in lipaemic plasma (0·70 ± 0·53% v 0·05 ± 0·06% for nonlipaemic plasma), which increased further on subsequent storage for 48 h (1·22 ± 0·40% v 0·15 ± 0·14% for nonlipaemic plasma). This was irrespective of whether plasma was MB treated. Lipaemic plasma stored frozen and then thawed resulted in the greatest haemolysis. In lipaemic plasma stored at 2-6°C, the chylomicron-rich top fraction caused the highest level of haemolysis. Haemolysis in red cells is increased in those suspended in lipaemic plasma and is dependent upon the storage conditions of that plasma prior to suspension. These data are relevant to the choice of plasma used to suspend red cells for neonatal exchange transfusion. © 2012 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2012

  12. A study of the potential confounding effects of diet, caffeine, nicotine and lorazepam on the stability of plasma and urinary homovanillic acid levels in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, C L; McEvoy, J P; Wilson, W H; Narasimhachari, N

    1996-12-15

    Ten men inpatients who met DSM-III-R criteria for schizophrenia participated. On five occasions at least one week apart, each subject had an intravenous line placed at 0730 after an overnight fast. On each occasion blood samples were drawn at 0800 and hourly thereafter through 1200 noon for measurement of plasma homovanillic acid (HVA). Total four-hour urine collections were obtained for measurement of urinary HVA. Subjects received five experimental conditions, in randomized sequence: no intervention, smoking one cigarette per hour, drinking one caffeinated cola per hour, lorazepam 2 mg IV push, or a high monoamine meal. Baseline (0800) plasma HVA measures showed only minor intrinsic variability. The average standard deviation in baseline plasma HVA over five occasions of measurement was low relative to the changes in HVA produced during treatment with antipsychotic medications. The high monoamine meal significantly elevated plasma HVA, with a similar trend for urinary HVA. Neither caffeine, nicotine, nor lorazepam significantly affected plasma or urinary HVA.

  13. Effects of age and sex on olanzapine plasma concentrations.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Ulrike; Marksteiner, Josef; Kemmler, Georg; Saria, Alois; Aichhorn, Wolfgang

    2005-12-01

    Age and sex may influence both efficacy and side effects of second-generation antipsychotics. Women and elderly patients tend to have a higher prevalence for several side effects. Higher plasma levels in these groups of patients may be one reason. We studied the hypothesis that steady-state olanzapine plasma concentrations depend on age and sex. Sixty-seven inpatients on stable olanzapine dose were referred to routine therapeutic drug monitoring of olanzapine. Plasma levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Obtained data were then analyzed by analysis of covariance. Olanzapine plasma levels showed a marked sex difference with significantly higher mean concentrations in female patients (adjusted mean concentrations, 18.5 ng/mL for men and 31.7 ng/mL for women; P = 0.003). On average, the weight-corrected concentration/dose ratios shown by women were 33.5% higher than those shown by men, irrespective of age. Regarding the effect of age, weight-corrected concentration/dose ratios increased by an average of 9.4% per decade of life. All results were adjusted for smoking. Comedication did not significantly influence these results. In conclusion, age and sex are important variables to consider when prescribing olanzapine for women and in the elderly.

  14. Nicotine and tobacco

    MedlinePlus

    Withdrawal from nicotine; Smoking - nicotine addiction and withdrawal; Smokeless tobacco - nicotine addiction; Cigar smoking; Pipe smoking; Smokeless snuff; Tobacco use; Chewing tobacco; Nicotine addiction and tobacco

  15. Use of refractometry for determination of psittacine plasma protein concentration.

    PubMed

    Cray, Carolyn; Rodriguez, Marilyn; Arheart, Kristopher L

    2008-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated both poor and good correlation of total protein concentrations in various avian species using refractometry and biuret methodologies. The purpose of the current study was to compare these 2 techniques of total protein determination using plasma samples from several psittacine species and to determine the effect of cholesterol and other solutes on refractometry results. Total protein concentration in heparinized plasma samples without visible lipemia was analyzed by refractometry and an automated biuret method on a dry reagent analyzer (Ortho 250). Cholesterol, glucose, and uric acid concentrations were measured using the same analyzer. Results were compared using Deming regression analysis, Bland-Altman bias plots, and Spearman's rank correlation. Correlation coefficients (r) for total protein results by refractometry and biuret methods were 0.49 in African grey parrots (n=28), 0.77 in Amazon parrots (20), 0.57 in cockatiels (20), 0.73 in cockatoos (36), 0.86 in conures (20), and 0.93 in macaws (38) (P< or =.01). Cholesterol concentration, but not glucose or uric acid concentrations, was significantly correlated with total protein concentration obtained by refractometry in Amazon parrots, conures, and macaws (n=25 each, P<.05), and trended towards significance in African grey parrots and cockatoos (P=.06). Refractometry can be used to accurately measure total protein concentration in nonlipemic plasma samples from some psittacine species. Method and species-specific reference intervals should be used in the interpretation of total protein values.

  16. Catecholamine-mediated reduction in uterine blood flow after nicotine infusion in the pregnant ewe.

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, R; Brink, G W; Wilkes, M

    1979-01-01

    The effect of nicotine on uterine blood flow, uterine vascular resistance, and plasma catecholamine concentration was studied in chronically catheterized pregnant sheep equipped with electromagnetic flow probes. The systemic administration of nicotine (14--32 micrograms/kg body wt per min) resulted in a 44% reduction in uterine blood flow (P less than 0.001) and a 203% increase in uterine vascular resistance. Both responses were inhibited by pretreatment with the alpha blocker, phentolamine. Arterial plasma concentrations of norepinephrine and epinephrine, measured by a single isotopic radioenzymatic assay, rose (from 117.9 +/- 6.7 to 201.8 +/- 13.3 pg/ml, P less than 0.001; and from 71.6 +/- 4.5 to 124.1 +/- 8.4 pg/ml, P less than 0.001, respectively) during nicotine infusion. The findings suggest that nicotine exerts a deleterious effect on uterine blood flow mediated through the release of catecholamines. PMID:447839

  17. Variations in plasma phytoestrogen concentrations in European adults.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Petra H M; Slimani, Nadia; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Grace, Philip B; Navarro, Carmen; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Touillaud, Marina; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Jenab, Mazda; Kaaks, Rudolf; Linseisen, Jakob; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Dilis, Vardis; Boeing, Heiner; Weikert, Cornelia; Overvad, Kim; Pala, Valeria; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; van Gils, Carla H; Skeie, Guri; Jakszyn, Paula; Hallmans, Goran; Berglund, Goran; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth; Riboli, Elio; Bingham, Sheila A

    2007-05-01

    Dietary phytoestrogens may play a role in chronic disease occurrence. The aim of our study was to assess the variability of plasma concentrations in European populations. We included 15 geographical regions in 9 European countries (Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Spain, Sweden, The Netherlands, and UK) and a 16th region, Oxford, UK, where participants were recruited from among vegans and vegetarians. All subjects were participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Plasma concentrations of 3 isoflavones (daidzein, genistein, and glycitein), 2 metabolites of daidzein [O-desmethylangolensin (O-DMA) and equol] and 2 mammalian lignans (enterodiol and enterolactone) were measured in 1414 participants. We computed geometric means for each region and used multivariate regression analysis to assess the influence of region, adjusted for gender, age, BMI, alcohol intake, smoking status, and laboratory batch. Many subjects had concentrations below the detection limit [0.1 microg/L (0.4 nmol/L)] for glycitein (80%), O-DMA (73%) and equol (62%). Excluding subjects from Oxford, UK, the highest concentrations of isoflavones were in subjects from the Netherlands and Cambridge, UK [2-6 microg/L (7-24 nmol/L); P < 0.05], whereas concentrations for lignans were highest in Denmark [8 microg/L (27 nmol/L); P < 0.05]. Isoflavones varied 8- to 13-fold, whereas lignans varied 4-fold. In the vegetarian/vegan cohort of Oxford, concentrations of isoflavones were 5-50 times higher than in nonvegetarian regions. Region was the most important determinant of plasma concentrations for all 7 phytoestrogens. Despite the fact that plasma concentrations of phytoestrogens in Europe were low compared with Asian populations, they varied substantially among subjects from the 16 different regions.

  18. Prazosin lowers plasma triglyceride concentration in rats: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Reaven, G M; Dall'Aglio, E

    1982-01-01

    Prazosin was administered by intraperitoneal injection (0.3 or 3.0 mg/kg) to normal chow-fed male rats for 14 days. Mean +/- SEM plasma triglyceride levels were lower (p less than 0.001) in the prazosin-treated rats (74 +/- 12 mg/dl and 72 +/- 9 mg/dl) than in saline-injected control rats (115 +/- 11 mg/dl). This effect was associated with commensurate reductions in very low density lipoprotein-triglyceride secretion in prazosin-treated rats. No changes were noted in either plasma total or high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations. In addition, prazosin was capable of reducing by approximately 50% the elevation in plasma triglyceride concentration produced by a high glucose diet in control rats. The mechanism of the observed effect of prazosin on very low density lipoprotein metabolism in the rat remains to be defined.

  19. Measurement of plasma homovanillic acid concentrations in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, R; Powchick, P; Warne, P A; Goldstein, M; McQueeney, R T; Davidson, M

    1990-01-01

    1. Several lines of evidence suggest that abnormalities of central dopaminergic transmission may be involved in the expression of some schizophrenic symptoms. However, elucidation of the role of dopamine (DA) in schizophrenia has eluded investigative efforts partially because no accurate and easily repeatable measure of brain DA activity exists. 2. The development of a technique to measure homovanillic acid in plasma has offered the possibility of performing serial measurements of this major DA metabolite. 3. Assuming that plasma homovanillic acid (PHVA) concentrations is an index of brain DA activity, measurement of PHVA can play a role in elucidating the DA abnormality in schizophrenia. 4. Results to date suggest that plasma homovanillic acid concentrations are lower in chronic schizophrenic patients compared to normal controls, and that PHVA values correlate with schizophrenic symptom severity. 5. In addition, PHVA levels were shown to initially rise and subsequently decline during chronic neuroleptic administration in treatment responsive but not in treatment refractory schizophrenic patients.

  20. Plasma Concentrations of Fentanyl Achieved With Transdermal Application in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Delaski, Kristina M; Gehring, Ronette; Heffron, Brendan T; Negrusz, Adam; Gamble, Kathryn C

    2017-03-01

    Providing appropriate analgesia is an important concern in any species. Fentanyl, a μ-receptor specific opioid, use is common in mammalian species but has been incompletely evaluated for this purpose in avian species. Transdermal fentanyl patches were applied to domestic chickens (n = 10) of varying breeds for 72 hours. Repeated blood samples were collected from the birds to assess time-concentration of fentanyl and norfentanyl in plasma, as assayed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, throughout patch application and for 48 hours after patch removal. Compartmental modeling was used to characterize the elimination profiles. Evaluation as a large bolus, followed by slower elimination rates over the remaining time, best fit the data as a one-compartment open model. Although maximum plasma fentanyl concentrations varied substantially by individual birds, chickens trended into 2 general groups of maximum plasma concentration, clearance, and volume of distribution, which was attributed to absorption variability. For all birds, harmonic mean of elimination half-life was 7.2 ± 3.7 hours and showed less individual variation than the other pharmacokinetic parameters. Because the application of transdermal fentanyl patches in the chickens achieved plasma fentanyl concentrations considered therapeutic in people, this approach could provide an additional analgesic option for avian patients.

  1. Plasma drug concentrations and physiological measures in 'dance party' participants.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Rodney J; Keane, Michael; Felgate, Peter; McCann, Una D; Callaghan, Paul D; White, Jason M

    2006-02-01

    The increasing use of (+/-) 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) in the setting of large dance parties ('raves') and clubs has been the source of some concern, because of potential acute adverse events, and because animal studies suggest that MDMA has the potential to damage brain serotonin (5-HT) neurons. However, it is not yet known whether MDMA, as used in the setting of dance parties, leads to plasma levels of MDMA that are associated with toxicity to 5-HT neurons in animals. The present study sought to address this question. Plasma MDMA concentrations, vital signs, and a variety of blood and urine measures were obtained prior to, and hours after, individuals attended a dance party. After the dance party, subjects were without clinical complaints, had measurable amounts of residual MDMA in plasma, and nearly half of the subjects also tested positive for methamphetamine, another amphetamine analog that has been shown to have 5-HT neurotoxic potential in animals. Plasma concentrations of MDMA did not correlate with self-reported use of 'ecstasy' and, in some subjects, overlapped with those that have been associated with 5-HT neurotoxicity in non-human primates. Additional subjects were likely to have had similar concentrations while at the dance party, when one considers the reported time of drug ingestion and the plasma half-life of MDMA in humans. Hematological and biochemical analyses were generally unremarkable. Moderate increases in blood pressure, heart rate and body temperature were observed in the subjects with the highest MDMA plasma concentrations. These findings are consistent with epidemiological findings that most people who use MDMA at dance parties do not develop serious clinical complications, and suggest that some of these individuals may be at risk for developing MDMA-induced toxicity to brain serotonin neurons.

  2. Environmentally relevant concentrations of nitrate increase plasma testosterone concentrations in female American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Hamlin, Heather J; Edwards, Thea M; McCoy, Jessica; Cruze, Lori; Guillette, Louis J

    2016-11-01

    Anthropogenic nitrogen is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant that is contributing to the degradation of freshwater, estuarine, and coastal ecosystems worldwide. The effects of environmental nitrate, a principal form of nitrogen, on the health of aquatic life is of increasing concern. We exposed female American alligators to three concentrations of nitrate (0.7, 10 and 100mg/L NO3-N) for a duration of five weeks and five months from hatch. We assessed growth, plasma sex steroid and thyroid hormone concentrations, and transcription levels of key genes involved in steroidogenesis (StAR, 3β-HSD, and P450scc) and hepatic clearance (Cyp1a, Cyp3a). Exposure to 100mg/L NO3-N for both five weeks and five months resulted in significantly increased plasma testosterone (T) concentrations compared with alligators in the reference treatment. No differences in 17β-estradiol, progesterone, or thyroid hormones were observed, nor were there differences in alligator weight or the mRNA abundance of steroidogenic or hepatic genes. Plasma and urinary nitrate concentrations increased with increasing nitrate treatment levels, although relative plasma concentrations of nitrate were significantly lower in five month, versus five week old animals, possibly due to improved kidney function in older animals. These results indicate that environmentally relevant concentrations of nitrate can increase circulating concentrations of T in young female alligators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of a Novel Nicotine Inhaler Device: Part 1—Arterial and Venous Pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Hearn, Alex; Redfern, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the United Kingdom, licensed nicotine-containing products can be recommended to reduce the harm associated with smoking. Many smokers find currently available nicotine replacement products unsatisfactory. The arterial and venous pharmacokinetics (PK) of nicotine delivered via a novel inhaler device were determined. Methods: Results are reported for Parts A (N = 18) and C (N = 18) of a 4-part (A–D) Phase I study. Participants (18–55 years, ≥10 cigarettes/day, smoking within 1hr of waking, expired carbon monoxide >10 ppm on screening) orally inhaled 2 single doses of nicotine (2 of 3 dose levels [0.22, 0.45, and 0.67 mg]) (Part A) and repeated hourly doses of 0.67mg nicotine for 12hr (Part C), via the novel device. Arterial and venous PK and tolerability were assessed. Results: In Part A, mean arterial plasma nicotine concentrations at 2min after the start of inhalation were 1.10, 2.06, and 2.59ng/mL for the 0.22, 0.45, and 0.67mg doses, respectively. Mean maximum arterial plasma nicotine concentrations (C max) were 2.11, 3.73, and 4.38ng/mL and mean times to C max were 10.2, 7.3, and 6.5min after the start of inhalation for the 0.22, 0.45, and 0.67mg doses, respectively. In Part C, the mean pre- and postdose venous plasma nicotine concentration increased steadily and fluctuated in the range 8–10mg/mL after 9hr. The novel device was well tolerated; most adverse events were mild. Conclusion: The novel inhaler device delivers nicotine rapidly into the systemic circulation and offers a viable alternative to cigarettes for those finding it difficult to quit the behavioral and sensorial aspects of smoking. PMID:25385878

  4. Plasma concentrations of transthyretin in older Sardinians including centenarians.

    PubMed

    Pasella, Sara; Pinna, Sara; Deiana, Marta; Baralla, Angela; Dore, Simone; Mannu, Andrea; Canu, Elisabetta; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Zinellu, Angelo; Mangoni, Arduino A; Sotgia, Salvatore; Carru, Ciriaco; Deiana, Luca

    2016-02-01

    Plasma concentrations of transthyretin (TTR), a negative acute-phase protein, can be influenced by many factors including aging. Under physiological circumstances, TTR concentrations are very low in the fetus, increase slowly after birth up to the fifth decade and, then, decrease slowly. Some studies have shown sex-related differences up to about 70 years, when the differences disappear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the change in TTR concentrations in healthy males and females aged more than sixty, including numerous centenarians living in Sardinia, a large Italian island located in the Mediterranean Sea. The study sample consisted of 211 healthy subjects grouped by age and sex (male/female ratio: 1:1). Plasma TTR was assessed using a non-competitive enzyme immunoassay (ELISA Assaypro LLC, prealbumin AssayMAX Human ELISA Kit). In subjects aged between 60 and 99 years, plasma TTR concentrations were higher compared to the reference ranges reported by CRM 470. Moreover, unlike other studies, sex-related differences in TTR concentrations were only observed in nonagenarians and centenarians. We hypothesize that there are TTR-related genetic differences between the Sardinian population and other Caucasian ethnic groups. Further studies and a larger sample are needed to confirm our hypothesis.

  5. Plasma mepivacaine concentrations in patients undergoing third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Scarparo, H C; Maia, R N; Filho, Ea Dos Santos; Soares, Ecs; Costa, Fwg; Fonteles, Csr; Bezerra, T P; Ribeiro, T R; Romero, N R

    2016-12-01

    Local anaesthetic-related systemic toxicity mainly results from elevated plasma concentrations of these drugs. We hypothesized that intraoral injection of submaximal doses of mepivacaine does not lead to toxic levels of this drug in blood. This study evaluated the plasma levels of mepivacaine in third molars surgeries. Twenty-one patients were randomly assigned into two groups: group I (two unilateral third molars; submaximal dose of mepivacaine 108 mg with epinephrine 54 μg) and group II (four third molars; submaximal dose of mepivacaine 216 mg with epinephrine 108 μg). Blood samples were collected before anaesthesia, and 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 60, 90 and 120 min after anaesthesia. Individual peak plasma concentrations ranged 0.77-8.31 μg/mL (group I) and from 2.36-7.72 μg/mL (group II). An increase in the average dose of mepivacaine from 1.88 ± 0.12 mg/kg (group I) to 3.35 ± 0.17 mg/kg (group II) increased the mean mepivacaine peak plasma levels from 2.33 ± 0.58 to 4.01 ± 0.69 μg/mL, respectively. Four patients obtained plasma levels of mepivacaine above the threshold for toxicity (5 μg/mL). Toxic levels of mepivacaine are possible, even when a submaximal dose is used. A twofold increase in the dose of mepivacaine caused the mean peak plasma concentration to increase proportionally, indicating that they may be predicted based on the relation of dose per bodyweight. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  6. Platelet activation, adhesion, inflammation, and aggregation potential are altered in the presence of electronic cigarette extracts of variable nicotine concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hom, Sarah; Chen, Li; Wang, Tony; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Yin, Wei; Rubenstein, David A

    2016-11-01

    Tobacco smoke extracts prepared from both mainstream and sidestream smoking have been associated with heightened platelet activation, aggregation, adhesion, and inflammation. Conversely, it has been shown that pure nicotine inhibits similar platelet functions. In this work, we 1) evaluated the effects of e-cigarette extracts on platelet activities and 2) elucidated the differences between the nicotine-dependent and non-nicotine dependent (e.g. fine particulate matter or toxic compounds) effects of tobacco and e-cigarette products on platelet activities. To accomplish these goals, platelets from healthy volunteers (n = 50) were exposed to tobacco smoke extracts, e-cigarette vapor extracts, and pure nicotine and changes in platelet activation, adhesion, aggregation, and inflammation were evaluated, using optical aggregation, flow cytometry, and ELISA methods. Interestingly, the exposure of platelets to e-vapor extracts induced a significant up-regulation in the expression of the pro-inflammatory gC1qR and cC1qR and induced a marked increase in the deposition of C3b as compared with traditional tobacco smoke extracts. Similarly, platelet activation, as measured by a prothrombinase based assay, and platelet aggregation were also significantly enhanced after exposure to e-vapor extracts. Finally, platelet adhesion potential toward fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, and other platelets was also enhanced after exposure to e-cigarette vapor extracts. In the presence of pure nicotine, platelet functions were observed to be inhibited, which further suggests that other constituents of tobacco smoke and electronic vapor can antagonize platelet functions, however, the presence of nicotine in extracts somewhat perpetuated the platelet functional changes in a dose-dependent manner.

  7. Laser system for measuring small changes in plasma tracer concentrations.

    PubMed

    Klaesner, J W; Pou, N A; Parker, R E; Galloway, R L; Roselli, R J

    1996-01-01

    The authors developed a laser-diode system that can be used for on-line optical concentration measurements in physiologic systems. Previous optical systems applied to whole blood have been hampered by artifacts introduced by red blood cells (RBCs). The system introduced here uses a commercially available filter cartridge to separate RBCs from plasma before plasma concentration measurements are made at a single wavelength. The filtering characteristics of the Cellco filter cartridge (#4007-10, German-town, MD) were adequate for use in the on-line measurement system. The response time of the filter cartridge was less than 40 seconds, and the sieving characteristics of the filter for macromolecules were excellent, with filtrate-to-plasma albumin ratios of 0.98 +/- 0.11 for studies in sheep and 0.94 +/- 0.15 for studies in dogs. The 635-nm laser diode system developed was shown to be more sensitive than the spectrophotometer used in previous studies (Klaesner et al., Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 1994; 22, 660-73). The new system was used to measure the product of filtration coefficient (Kfc) and reflection coefficient for albumin (delta f) in an isolated canine lung preparation. The delta fKfc values [mL/(cmH2O.min.100 g dry lung weight)] measured with the laser diode system (0.33 +/- 0.22) compared favorably with the delta fKfc obtained using a spectrophotometer (0.27 +/- 0.20) and with the Kfc obtained using the blood-corrected gravimetric method (0.32 +/- 0.23). Thus, this new optical system was shown to accurately measure plasma concentration changes in whole blood for physiologic levels of Kfc. The same system can be used with different optical tracers and different source wavelengths to make optical plasma concentration measurements for other physiologic applications.

  8. Gastrin concentrations in plasma of cats with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, R E; Marks, S L; Kass, P H; Cowgill, L D

    1998-09-15

    To determine the prevalence of hypergastrinemia in cats with naturally developing chronic renal failure (CRF) and the correlation between gastrin concentration in plasma and severity of CRF. Cohort study. 30 cats with naturally developing CRF and 12 clinically normal control cats. Gastrin concentrations in plasma were determined by double-antibody radioimmunoassay of blood samples obtained from cats after food was withheld 8 hours. Concentrations were compared, using a nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA. 18 cats with CRF had high gastrin concentrations (median, 45 pg/ml; range, < 18 to > 1,333 pg/ml), compared with those for control cats (< 18 pg/ml). Prevalence of hypergastrinemia increased with severity of renal insufficiency. Three of 9 cats with mild CRF, 6 of 11 cats with moderate CRF, and 9 of 10 cats with severe CRF had high gastrin concentrations. Gastrin concentrations were significantly different between control cats and cats with CRF, regardless of disease severity. The potential role of high concentrations of gastrin on gastric hyperacidity, uremic gastritis, bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract, and associated clinical signs of hypergastrinemia (e.g., anorexia and vomiting) may justify use of histamine2-receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors to suppress gastric acid secretion in cats with CRF that have these clinical signs.

  9. A validated method for the determination of nicotine, cotinine, trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, and norcotinine in human plasma using solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Insook; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2006-06-01

    A liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric method for the simultaneous determination of nicotine, cotinine, trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, and norcotinine in human plasma was developed and validated. Analytes and deuterated internal standards were extracted from human plasma using solid-phase extraction and analyzed by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometric detection with selected ion monitoring (SIM). Limits of detection and quantification were 1.0 and 2.5 ng/ml, respectively, for all analytes. Linearity ranged from 2.5 to 500 ng/ml of human plasma using a weighting factor of 1/x; correlation coefficients for the calibration curves were > 0.99. Intra- and inter-assay precision and accuracy were < 15.0%. Recoveries were 108.2-110.8% nicotine, 95.8-108.7% cotinine, 90.5-99.5% trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, and 99.5-109.5% norcotinine. The method was also partially validated in bovine serum, owing to the difficulty of obtaining nicotine-free human plasma for the preparation of calibrators and quality control (QC) samples. This method proved to be robust and accurate for the quantification of nicotine, cotinine, trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, and norcotinine in human plasma collected in clinical studies of acute nicotine effects on brain activity and on the development of neonates of maternal smokers.

  10. Tocopherol isomers in intravenous lipid emulsions and resultant plasma concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gutcher, G R; Lax, A A; Farrell, P M

    1984-01-01

    Conflicting reports exist regarding the relative tocopherol isomer content of Intralipid ranging from 99% as alpha-tocopherol to as much as 90% as gamma-tocopherol. Our direct assay of Intralipid as well as plasma levels measured in premature infants receiving Intralipid confirm the existence of a low alpha, high gamma-tocopherol content and imply the need for alpha-tocopherol supplementation in patients receiving Intralipid, particularly the relatively tocopherol-deficient premature infant. Furthermore, the observation of abnormal erythrocyte hemolysis test values despite "normal" total tocopherol plasma concentrations may be explained by high plasma levels of non-alpha, biologically less active isomers. The quantitation of tocopherol isomers helps explain this discrepancy and suggests the need for future studies of vitamin E status to employ measurements of tocopherol isomers in reporting results.

  11. Plasma concentrations of sucralose in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Sylvetsky, Allison C; Bauman, Viviana; Blau, Jenny E; Garraffo, H Martin; Walter, Peter J; Rother, Kristina I

    2017-01-01

    Sucralose is partially absorbed after oral ingestion, with the majority excreted in the feces. We aimed to measure plasma sucralose concentrations following ingestion of doses reflecting a range of consumption (from one can of diet soda up to multiple sodas over the course of a day) and to compare concentrations in children and adults. Eleven adults (7 females, 4 males) consumed 355 mL water containing 0 mg sucralose (control) or 68, 170, or 250 mg sucralose (equivalent to 1-4 diet sodas). A second group of adults (n=11, 6 females and 5 males) consumed 355 mL Diet Rite Cola™ (68 mg sucralose and 41 mg acesulfame-potassium (ace-K)) or 68 mg sucralose and 41 mg ace-K in seltzer. Beverages were provided at separate visits in randomized order, prior to an oral glucose tolerance test. Eleven children (7 females and 4 males) consumed 0 or 68 mg sucralose in 240 mL water, in an identical study design. Blood was collected before beverage ingestion and serially for 120 min. Sucralose doses (corrected for weight) resulted in similar plasma concentrations in children and adults. Children reached peak concentrations of 145-400 ng/mL after 68 mg (mean 262.3 ± 24.6 ng/mL). Most adults reached similar peak concentrations (200-400 ng/mL after 250 mg (365.6 ± 69.9 ng/mL)) with the exception of two adults (1520 ng/mL and 1557 ng/mL, respectively). Concentrations were comparable whether sucralose was administered in water, combined with ace-K, or in diet soda. Due to their lower body weight and blood volume, children have markedly higher plasma sucralose concentrations after consumption of a typical diet soda, emphasizing the need to determine the clinical implications of sucralose use in children.

  12. Drug concentrations in post-mortem femoral blood compared with therapeutic concentrations in plasma

    PubMed Central

    Launiainen, Terhi; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic drug concentrations measured in plasma are of limited value as reference intervals for interpretation in post-mortem (PM) toxicology. In this study, drug concentration distributions were studied in PM femoral venous blood from 57 903 Finnish autopsy cases representing all causes of death during an 11-year period. Cause-of-death information was obtained from death certificates issued by forensic pathologists. Median, mean, and upper percentile (90th, 95th, 97.5th) concentrations were calculated for 129 drugs. To illustrate how PM median concentrations relate to established therapeutic ranges in plasma, a PM blood/plasma relationship was calculated for each drug. Males represented 75% of the subjects and showed a lower median age (55 yrs) than females (59 yrs). In 43% of these cases, blood alcohol concentration was higher than 0.2‰, and the median was 1.8‰. Sixty-one (47%) of the 129 drugs showed a PM blood/plasma relationship of 1. For 22 drugs (17%), the relationship was <1, and for 46 drugs (35%), the relationship was >1. No marked correlation was found between the PM blood/plasma relationship and the volume of distribution (Vd). For 36 drugs, more than 10% of cases were fatal poisonings attributed to this drug as the main finding. These drug concentration distributions based on a large database provide a helpful reference not only to forensic toxicologists and pathologists but also to clinical pharmacologists in charge of interpreting drug concentrations in PM cases. © 2013 The Authors. Drug Testing and Analysis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23881890

  13. Daily concentrations of air pollution and plasma fibrinogen in London.

    PubMed

    Pekkanen, J; Brunner, E J; Anderson, H R; Tiittanen, P; Atkinson, R W

    2000-12-01

    The reason for the association between air pollution and risk of cardiovascular diseases is unknown. The hypothesis was examined that daily concentrations of air pollution are associated with daily concentrations of fibrinogen, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Data on concentrations of plasma fibrinogen for 4982 male and 2223 female office workers, collected in a cross sectional survey in London between September 1991 and May 1993, were combined with data on concentrations of air pollution during the day of blood sampling and during the 3 preceding days. After adjustment for weather and other confounding factors, an increase in the 24 hour mean NO(2) during the previous day from the 10th to the 90th percentile (61.7 microg/m(3)) was associated with a 1.5% (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.4% to 2.5%) higher fibrinogen concentration. The respective increase for CO (1.6 mg/m(3)) was 1.5% (95% CI 0.5%, 2.5%). These associations tended to be stronger in the warm season (April to September). Significant associations were found for black smoke and particulate matter of diameter 10 microm (PM(10)) only in the warm season. No association with fibrinogen was found for SO(2) or ozone. The short term association between air pollution, possibly from traffic, and risk of cardiovascular events may be at least partly mediated through increased concentrations of plasma fibrinogen, possibly due to an inflammatory reaction caused by air pollution.

  14. Social regulation of plasma estradiol concentration in a female anuran.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Kathleen S; Wilczynski, Walter

    2006-06-01

    The behavior of an individual within a social aggregation profoundly influences behavior and physiology of other animals within the aggregation in such a way that these social interactions can enhance reproductive success, survival and fitness. This phenomenon is particularly important during the breeding season when males and female must synchronize their reproductive efforts. We examined whether exposure to conspecific social cues can elevate sex steroid levels, specifically estradiol and androgens, in female túngara frogs (Physalaemus pustulosus). We compared plasma estradiol and androgen concentrations in wild-caught females before and after exposure to either natural mate choruses or random tones. After exposure to mate choruses for 10 consecutive nights, estradiol concentrations were significantly elevated whereas there was no significant elevation in estradiol concentrations in the group of females exposed to random tones for 10 nights. Plasma androgen concentrations were not significantly changed after exposure to either natural mate choruses or random tones for 10 consecutive nights. Social modulation of estradiol concentrations may be important in maintaining a female's reproductive state while males are chorusing. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate social regulation of estradiol concentration in female anurans.

  15. A study of plasma bicalutamide concentrations in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Ito, Fumio; Goya, Nobuyuki; Nakazawa, Hayakazu; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Keiko; Kubo, Kazuo; Kihara, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Bicalutamide is an anti-androgen that is used worldwide to treat prostate cancer (CaP). However, there are no data on blood bicalutamide concentrations in hemodialysis (HD) patients with CaP. Therefore, we investigated the plasma levels of bicalutamide during the peridialysis period in this population. The study group included 5 HD patients with CaP who had been treated with bicalutamide (80 mg/day) for at least 3 months. Blood samples were taken during and between HD sessions and the plasma concentrations of the active R enantiomer (R-bicalutamide) were assessed using an HPLC assay. The plasma R-bicalutamide levels on the non-dialysis day were measured in 2 patients (patients 1 and 2) immediately before dosing and 8 and 24 h after dosing. These levels were 18,730, 19,090 and 19,420 ng/ml (patient 1), and 4,522, 4,581, and 5,296 ng/ml (patient 2), respectively. The mean plasma levels of R-bicalutamide in all 5 subjects just before HD, and 2 and 4 h after the start of HD were 8,726, 9,354 and 10,068 ng/ml, respectively. These results show that bicalutamide does not accumulate and is not diluted in the blood circulation of HD patients when given at the normal dosage used in the general population. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Epilepsy and the concentrations of plasma amino acids in humans.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, R J; Laird, H; Lippincott, S E; Walson, P

    1983-01-01

    We have examined the correlation between the presence of epilepsy in humans, and plasma amino acid levels. Subjects were divided into those having pure generalized tonic-clonic seizures (grand mal group), those having generalized tonic-clonic seizures plus other types of epilepsy (mixed group), and those suffering from epilepsies other than grand mal (no grand mal group). Compared to non-epileptic controls, the grand mal group had significantly higher fasting plasma levels of aspartate (100% increase) and glutamate (380% increase) but significant decreases were seen with phenylalanine (?23%), lysine (?27%), and tryptophan (?30%). The no grand mal group showed similar changes except for lysine. The mixed group showed elevations in glutamate, but decreases only in cysteine and methionine. In response to a high protein meal, plasma levels of alanine, cysteine and methionine rose significantly less for the no grand mal group compared to the control group. Increases in aspartate and glutamate concentrations strongly correlated with the prescription of phenytoin. However, the concentrations of these amino acids were not significantly correlated with the actual plasma levels of phenytoin.

  17. Measuring tobacco smoke exposure: quantifying nicotine/cotinine concentration in biological samples by colorimetry, chromatography and immunoassay methods.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Preeti

    2004-04-01

    Procedures to assess tobacco smoke exposure are reviewed and biomarkers used for determining the smoking status of an individual are compared. Methods used to extract these biomarkers from saliva, urine, and blood and the advantages and disadvantages of the assays are discussed. Finally, the procedures used to measure the levels of cortisol, a stress hormone speculated to be linked to nicotine metabolism, are discussed.

  18. Mass spectrometer for measurements of relative ion concentrations in plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suszcynsky, David M.; D'Angelo, Nicola; Merlino, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    A mass spectrometer which can be used to measure relative ion concentrations in a multiion component plasma has been designed for use in a strong (1-4-kG) uniform magnetic field. The spectrometer features an acceleration region which accelerates thermal ions through a series of three tantalum electrodes at a 30 deg angle to the B field, and a collection region in which ions are selectively collected, depending on the size of their gyroradii, by a cylindrical collector. Relative ion concentrations are determined from measurements of the collector current as a function of accelerating voltage. Results obtained using this instrument in a Q-machine device operated with a two-ion (Cs+/K+) component plasma are presented.

  19. Plasma Polychlorinated Biphenyl Concentrations and Immune Function in Postmenopausal Women☆

    PubMed Central

    Spector, June T.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Sheppard, Lianne; Sjodin, Andreas; Wener, Mark H.; Wood, Brent; McTiernan, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Background Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure has been associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in several studies, and the immune system is a potential mediator. Objectives We analyzed associations of plasma PCBs with immune function measures. We hypothesized that higher plasma PCB concentrations are associated with lower immune function cross-sectionally, and that increases in PCB concentrations over a one year period are associated with decreases in immune function. Methods Plasma PCB concentrations and immune function [natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity and PHA-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation (PHA-TLP)] were measured at baseline and one year in 109 postmenopausal overweight women participating in an exercise intervention study in the Seattle, Washington (USA) area. Mixed models, with adjustment for body mass index and other potential confounders, were used to estimate associations of PCBs with immune function cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Results Associations of PCBs with immune function measures differed across groups of PCBs (e.g., medium- and high-chlorinated and dioxin-like [mono-ortho substituted]) and by the time frame for the comparison (cross-sectional vs. longitudinal). Higher concentrations of medium- and high-chlorinated PCBs were associated with higher PHA-TLP cross-sectionally but not longitudinally. The mean decrease in 0.5 μg/mL PHA-TLP per 50.0 pmol/g-lipid increase in dioxin-like PCBs over one year was 51.6 (95% confidence interval 2.7, 100.5; P=0.039). There was no association between plasma PCBs and NK cytotoxicity. Conclusions These results do not provide strong evidence of impaired cellular immunity from PCB exposure. Larger longitudinal studies with greater variability in PCB exposures are needed to further examine temporal associations of PCBs with immune function. PMID:24721136

  20. Plasma leptin concentrations and esophageal hypomotility in obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Côté-Daigneault, Justin; Poitras, Pierre; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Bouin, Mickael

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although esophageal hypomotility is prevalent in obese patients, its cause remains unknown. Leptin, a hormone derived from adipose tissue, may be involved in this phenomenon because it has been shown to decrease gastric and intestinal motility in animals. It has been hypothesized that elevated plasma leptin concentration is a risk factor for esophageal dysmotility in obese patients. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether plasma leptin concentrations are higher in obese patients with esophageal hypomotility than in obese patients with a normal motility profile. METHOD: Fasting plasma leptin concentration (assessed by radioimmuoassay) was measured in all patients who were included in a study protocol investigating esophageal manometry before bariatric surgery. The patients completed standardized surveys regarding epidemiological data, upper gastrointestinal symptoms, medical history and medication(s). Basal levels of leptin, as well as corrected leptin scores adjusted for sex and body mass index, were compared in patients with and without esophageal dysmotility. RESULTS: Nine patients without dysmotility and eight with dysmotility were included. Both groups were comparable with regard to age (42±9 versus 38±9 years), sex (78% versus 75% women) and body mass index (49±10 kg/m2 versus 42±7 kg/m2). There were no significant differences regarding medication(s) and comorbidities between the two groups. When compared with normal predicted values, the corrected leptin scores were 30% higher in patients with dysmotility than in the control group with normal motility (P≤0.05). CONCLUSION: Obese patients with esophageal dysmotility exhibited elevated plasma leptin concentrations, suggesting a role for leptin in promoting esophageal hypomotility. PMID:25706575

  1. HPLC analysis of K-48 concentration in plasma.

    PubMed

    Kalász, H; Hasan, M Y; Sheen, R; Kuca, K; Petroianu, G; Ludányi, K; Gergely, A; Tekes, K

    2006-07-01

    K-48 is a new oxime-type compound to be used as an enzyme reactivator in the treatment of exposure to organophosphorous compounds. Plasma concentration of K-48 can be determined using reversed-phase HPLC. Analysis using octyl silica stationary phase and ultraviolet-absorbance detection is fast and simple. K-48 displays a relatively high dose-normalized area under the curve as compared to pralidoxime, which might be beneficial for an antidote. After i.m. administration of 50 mumol K-48, the time course of the concentration can be approximated by a straight line between 15 and 120 min meaning the elimination follows zero-order kinetics.

  2. The determination of nicotinic acid in plasma by mixed-mode liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry following ion exchange solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Mallett, D N; Dayal, S; Dear, G J; Pateman, A J

    2006-05-03

    An assay for nicotinic acid in plasma samples has been developed using ion exchange solid phase extraction in 96-well format followed by mixed-mode ion exchange/reversed-phase liquid chromatography with positive ion tandem mass spectrometry detection. The assay avoids the need for time-consuming derivatisation procedures or involatile ion-pair chromatography reagents. The assay is linear over the wide range 0.05-20 microg/mL, based on a 100 microL sample (correlation coefficient>0.99). The assay is accurate and precise (bias and coefficient of variation<18%) over this calibration range.

  3. Nicotine stereoisomers and cotinine stimulate prostaglandin E2 but inhibit thromboxane B2 and leukotriene E4 synthesis in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Saareks, V; Mucha, I; Sievi, E; Vapaatalo, H; Riutta, A

    1998-07-17

    The effects of (-)-nicotine (0.0005-500 microM), (+)-nicotine (0.0005-50 microM) and (-)-cotinine (0.0005-500 microM) on arachidonic acid metabolism were investigated in Ca2+ ionophore A23187 (calcimycin)-stimulated human whole blood in vitro. (-)-Nicotine and (-)-cotinine stimulated prostaglandin E2 but inhibited thromboxane B2 synthesis, as has been observed previously in A23187-stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes and platelet-rich plasma [Saareks, V., Riutta, A., Mucha, I., Alanko, J., Vapaatalo, H., 1993. Nicotine and cotinine modulate eicosanoid production in human leukocytes and platelet rich plasma. Eur. J. Pharmacol., 248, 345-349.]. (+)-Nicotine also stimulated prostaglandin E2 but inhibited thromboxane B2 synthesis. High concentrations of (-)-nicotine and (-)-cotinine and even nanomolar concentrations of (+)-nicotine inhibited leukotriene E4 synthesis. These results indicate that (-)-nicotine and (-)-cotinine stimulate cyclooxygenase but inhibit thromboxane synthase and 5-lipoxygenase in whole blood in vitro. (+)-Nicotine is capable of affecting in the same direction as well.

  4. Nicotine dependence and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Salín-Pascual, Rafael J; Alcocer-Castillejos, Natasha V; Alejo-Galarza, Gabriel

    2003-01-01

    , concentration, and memory. Finally there are several strategies to deal with nicotine dependence, Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT), which are nicotine chewing-gum, transdermal nicotine patches, and nicotine inhalators device. Also some antidepressants like bupropion has shown to be effective in smoking cessation treatment. To know more about nicotine phenomenon would be important, because that will allow a more mature perspective about the damage and beneficial effects of that substance.

  5. Denicotinized versus average nicotine tobacco cigarette smoking differentially releases striatal dopamine.

    PubMed

    Domino, Edward F; Ni, Lisong; Domino, Joseph S; Yang, Wendy; Evans, Catherine; Guthrie, Sally; Wang, Heng; Koeppe, Robert A; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2013-01-01

    Nicotine has long been recognized as a necessary but insufficient component of tobacco cigarettes to maintain a psychophysiological need to smoke. This study examined venous plasma concentrations effects of nicotine in cigarette smoking after overnight abstinence to release striatal dopamine (DA). Twenty-two male smokers smoked either denicotinized (denic) or average nicotine (nic) cigarettes under single blind conditions. Each was given [(11)C]raclopride and scanned in a positron emission tomography (PET) facility. Smoking either denic or nic cigarettes released striatal DA. Denic cigarette smoking released DA primarily in the right striatum, whereas nic cigarette smoking released DA in both striata, but especially in the left. Increases in venous plasma nicotine concentrations correlated positively with increased DA release in the left caudate nucleus. Smoking denic cigarettes reduced craving as much as smoking nic cigarettes. Craving reduction after nic tobacco smoking correlated with increases in plasma nicotine. Nonnicotine factors in tobacco smoking produce important right brain effects. Nicotine is a pharmacological factor during tobacco smoking that releases bilateral striatal DA, but more in the left brain.

  6. Denicotinized Versus Average Nicotine Tobacco Cigarette Smoking Differentially Releases Striatal Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wendy; Evans, Catherine; Guthrie, Sally; Wang, Heng; Koeppe, Robert A.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nicotine has long been recognized as a necessary but insufficient component of tobacco cigarettes to maintain a psychophysiological need to smoke. This study examined venous plasma concentrations effects of nicotine in cigarette smoking after overnight abstinence to release striatal dopamine (DA). Methods: Twenty-two male smokers smoked either denicotinized (denic) or average nicotine (nic) cigarettes under single blind conditions. Each was given [11C]raclopride and scanned in a positron emission tomography (PET) facility. Results: Smoking either denic or nic cigarettes released striatal DA. Denic cigarette smoking released DA primarily in the right striatum, whereas nic cigarette smoking released DA in both striata, but especially in the left. Increases in venous plasma nicotine concentrations correlated positively with increased DA release in the left caudate nucleus. Smoking denic cigarettes reduced craving as much as smoking nic cigarettes. Craving reduction after nic tobacco smoking correlated with increases in plasma nicotine. Conclusions: Nonnicotine factors in tobacco smoking produce important right brain effects. Nicotine is a pharmacological factor during tobacco smoking that releases bilateral striatal DA, but more in the left brain. PMID:22491891

  7. A randomised, crossover study on an electronic vapour product, a nicotine inhalator and a conventional cigarette. Part A: Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Walele, Tanvir; Sharma, Girish; Savioz, Rebecca; Martin, Claire; Williams, Josie

    2016-02-01

    The pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of nicotine delivered by an Electronic Vapour Product (EVP) was characterised in a 2-part study in smokers. The study was designed as a randomised, controlled, four-way crossover trial. Part 1 compared an unflavoured e-liquid (UF2.0%) and a flavoured e-liquid (FL2.0%) to a conventional cigarette (CC; JPS Silver King Size, 0.6 mg) and a licensed nicotine inhalator (Nicorette(®); 15 mg). Part 2 compared e-liquids with increasing nicotine concentrations (0%, 0.4%, 0.9%, 2.0%). Subjects used each different product for a daily use session. In Part 1, maximum plasma nicotine concentration (Cmax) for UF2.0%, FL2.0%, Nicorette(®) and CC was 3.6, 2.5, 2.5 and 21.2 ng/mL, respectively. The time to maximum plasma nicotine concentration (Tmax) was longer for the EVP (UF2.0%, 9.0 min; FL2.0%, 10.0 min) and the nicotine inhalator (13.0 min) compared to CC (3.0 min). In Part 2, EVP with 0%, 0.4%, 0.9% and 2.0% nicotine produced Cmax values of 0.6, 1.0, 1.9 and 3.6 ng/mL, respectively. At the maximum nicotine concentration of 2% as prescribed by the European Tobacco Directive, the EVP achieved nicotine delivery that was comparable to the inhalator. EVPs thus offer a potential alternative to nicotine inhalator devices for those finding it difficult to quit smoking.

  8. Tolerance to repeated nicotine administration on performance, subjective, and physiological responses in nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Heishman, S J; Henningfield, J E

    2000-10-01

    When administered acutely to nonsmokers, nicotine's effects on performance are inconsistent, perhaps because of suboptimal dosing or initial dysphoria that could interfere with performance. The purpose of this study was to determine if a range of nicotine doses administered for 8 days to nonsmokers would enhance psychomotor and cognitive abilities and to document the development of nicotine tolerance or sensitization. Twelve male volunteers, who reported ever smoking five cigarettes or less, participated in 8 consecutive experimental days in which they were administered four doses of nicotine polacrilex gum each day in this order: 0, 2, 4, and 8 mg. Performance, subjective, and physiological measures were assessed before and after each dose. Plasma nicotine concentration ranged from 6.9 to 11.5 ng/ml following the 8 mg dose. Nicotine increased rate of responding and decreased response time on working memory (digit recall); however, accuracy was impaired. Nicotine also decreased accuracy on visual scanning and attention (two-letter search), and the 8 mg dose impaired gross motor coordination (circular lights). Tolerance did not develop to the performance impairing effects of nicotine. Nicotine produced dose-related increases in ratings of dysphoria and negative mood, including tension, anxiety, nervousness, turning of stomach, and sedation. Tolerance developed to some, but not all, of these aversive effects. Tolerance also was not observed to the increased cardiovascular measures. Although tolerance developed to some of the aversive effects of nicotine, performance enhancement was not observed. These data do not support the hypothesis that nicotine-induced performance enhancement contributes to the reinforcing effects of tobacco use during the early stages of dependence development.

  9. Plasma polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations and immune function in postmenopausal women

    SciTech Connect

    Spector, June T.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Sheppard, Lianne; Sjoedin, Andreas; Wener, Mark H.; Wood, Brent; and others

    2014-05-01

    Background: Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure has been associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in several studies, and the immune system is a potential mediator. Objectives: We analyzed associations of plasma PCBs with immune function measures. We hypothesized that higher plasma PCB concentrations are associated with lower immune function cross-sectionally, and that increases in PCB concentrations over a one year period are associated with decreases in immune function. Methods: Plasma PCB concentrations and immune function [natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity and PHA-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation (PHA-TLP)] were measured at baseline and one year in 109 postmenopausal overweight women participating in an exercise intervention study in the Seattle, Washington (USA) area. Mixed models, with adjustment for body mass index and other potential confounders, were used to estimate associations of PCBs with immune function cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Results: Associations of PCBs with immune function measures differed across groups of PCBs (e.g., medium- and high-chlorinated and dioxin-like [mono-ortho-substituted]) and by the time frame for the comparison (cross-sectional vs. longitudinal). Higher concentrations of medium- and high-chlorinated PCBs were associated with higher PHA-TLP cross-sectionally but not longitudinally. The mean decrease in 0.5 µg/mL PHA-TLP/50.0 pmol/g-lipid increase in dioxin-like PCBs over one year was 51.6 (95% confidence interval 2.7, 100.5; P=0.039). There was no association between plasma PCBs and NK cytotoxicity. Conclusions: These results do not provide strong evidence of impaired cellular immunity from PCB exposure. Larger longitudinal studies with greater variability in PCB exposures are needed to further examine temporal associations of PCBs with immune function. - Highlights: • Plasma PCBs and immune function were measured in 109 women at baseline and one year. • Immune measures included T lymphocyte proliferation

  10. Plasma concentrations of coffee polyphenols and plasma biomarkers of diabetes risk in healthy Japanese women

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A H; Tan, L 'B; Hiramatsu, N; Ishisaka, A; Alfonso, H; Tanaka, A; Uemura, N; Fujiwara, Y; Takechi, R

    2016-01-01

    Coffee consumption has been reported to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in experimental and epidemiological studies. This anti-diabetic effect of coffee may be attributed to its high content in polyphenols especially caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid. However, the association between plasma coffee polyphenols and diabetic risks has never been investigated in the literature. In this study, fasting plasma samples were collected from 57 generally healthy females aged 38–73 (mean 52, s.d. 8) years recruited in Himeji, Japan. The concentrations of plasma coffee polyphenols were determined by liquid chromatography coupled with mass tandem spectrometer. Diabetes biomarkers in the plasma/serum samples were analysed by a commercial diagnostic laboratory. Statistical associations were assessed using Spearman's correlation coefficients. The results showed that plasma chlorogenic acid exhibited negative associations with fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin and C-reactive protein, whereas plasma total coffee polyphenol and plasma caffeic acid were weakly associated with these biomarkers. Our preliminary data support previous findings that coffee polyphenols have anti-diabetic effects but further replications with large samples of both genders are recommended. PMID:27270110

  11. Plasma concentrations of coffee polyphenols and plasma biomarkers of diabetes risk in healthy Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Lee, A H; Tan, L 'b; Hiramatsu, N; Ishisaka, A; Alfonso, H; Tanaka, A; Uemura, N; Fujiwara, Y; Takechi, R

    2016-06-06

    Coffee consumption has been reported to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in experimental and epidemiological studies. This anti-diabetic effect of coffee may be attributed to its high content in polyphenols especially caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid. However, the association between plasma coffee polyphenols and diabetic risks has never been investigated in the literature. In this study, fasting plasma samples were collected from 57 generally healthy females aged 38-73 (mean 52, s.d. 8) years recruited in Himeji, Japan. The concentrations of plasma coffee polyphenols were determined by liquid chromatography coupled with mass tandem spectrometer. Diabetes biomarkers in the plasma/serum samples were analysed by a commercial diagnostic laboratory. Statistical associations were assessed using Spearman's correlation coefficients. The results showed that plasma chlorogenic acid exhibited negative associations with fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin and C-reactive protein, whereas plasma total coffee polyphenol and plasma caffeic acid were weakly associated with these biomarkers. Our preliminary data support previous findings that coffee polyphenols have anti-diabetic effects but further replications with large samples of both genders are recommended.

  12. A convenient method to measure blood-plasma concentration ratio using routine plasma collection in in vivo pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Berezhkovskiy, Leonid M; Zhang, Xiaolin; Cheong, Jonathan

    2011-12-01

    A practical time-saving method of determination of equilibrium blood-plasma concentration ratio is described. The method is based on the analysis of compound plasma concentrations in regular blood sample and the blood sample diluted with blank plasma. Since only plasma concentrations are analyzed, the method can be conveniently applied in routine pharmacokinetic studies with minimal additional work for obtaining blood-plasma ratio. The method can also be easily used in in vitro experiment. The results obtained by suggested method are in good agreement with that obtained by common in vitro measurements of blood-plasma ratio.

  13. Combination induction plasma tube and current concentrator for introducing a sample into a plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hull, Donald E.; Bieniewski, Thomas M.

    1988-01-01

    An induction plasma tube in combination with a current concentrator. The rent concentrator has a substantially cylindrical body having an open end and a partially closed end which defines an aperture. A first slot extends the longitudinal length of the cylindrical body and a second slot extends radially outward from the aperture. Together the first and second slots form a single L-shaped slot. The current concentrator is disposed within a volume bounded by an induction coil substantially along the axis thereof, and when power is applied to the induction coil a concentrated current is induced within the current concentrator aperture. The concentrator is moveable relative to the coil along the longitudinal axis of the coil to control the amount of current which is concentrated at the aperture.

  14. Nicotine pharmacokinetic profiles of the Tobacco Heating System 2.2, cigarettes and nicotine gum in Japanese smokers.

    PubMed

    Brossard, Patrick; Weitkunat, Rolf; Poux, Valerie; Lama, Nicola; Haziza, Christelle; Picavet, Patrick; Baker, Gizelle; Lüdicke, Frank

    2017-10-01

    Two open-label randomized cross-over studies in Japanese smokers investigated the single-use nicotine pharmacokinetic profile of the Tobacco Heating System (THS) 2.2, cigarettes (CC) and nicotine replacement therapy (Gum). In each study, one on the regular and one on the menthol variants of the THS and CC, both using Gum as reference, 62 subjects were randomized to four sequences: Sequence 1: THS - CC (n = 22); Sequence 2: CC - THS (n = 22); Sequence 3: THS - Gum (n = 9); Sequence 4: Gum - THS (n = 9). Plasma nicotine concentrations were measured in 16 blood samples collected over 24 h after single use. Maximal nicotine concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve from start of product use to time of last quantifiable concentration (AUC0-last) were similar between THS and CC in both studies, with ratios varying from 88 to 104% for Cmax and from 96 to 98% for AUC0-last. Urge-to-smoke total scores were comparable between THS and CC. The THS nicotine pharmacokinetic profile was close to CC, with similar levels of urge-to-smoke. This suggests that THS can satisfy smokers and be a viable alternative to cigarettes for adult smokers who want to continue using tobacco. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The nicotinic acid receptor--a new mechanism for an old drug.

    PubMed

    Karpe, Fredrik; Frayn, Keith N

    2004-06-05

    Non-esterified fatty acids in plasma originate from adipose tissue. Delivery of fatty acids to the liver provides the substrate for VLDL triglycerides. Insulin-sensitive organs, overburdened by high concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids, may develop resistance to insulin action. In addition, insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells may be impaired by long-standing elevation of concentrations of non-esterified fatty acid in plasma. Normally, such concentrations fluctuate over the day depending on the transient suppression of lipolysis from adipose tissue by insulin released after meals. Diurnal concentrations of non-esterified fatty acid are often elevated in obesity, in particular in male-pattern upper-body fat accumulation. Nicotinic acid is the only drug that primarily lowers concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids and thereby lowers VLDL triglycerides. Nicotinic acid, or its analogues, seems to alleviate insulin resistance in the short-term whereas, paradoxically, the long-term effect is often the opposite. Suppression of lipolysis by nicotinic acid gives rise to a prominent rebound and the degree to which this occurs might explain this paradox. The exact cellular mechanism by which nicotinic acid exerts its antilipolytic effects has not been known until the recent discovery of a distinct G-protein coupled receptor. Nicotinic acid is a high affinity ligand, but the endogenous ligand is still unknown. Recently, Tina Rubic and colleagues (Biochem Pharmacol 2004; 67: 411-19) proposed a mechanism in which nicotinic acid stimulates cholesterol mobilisation from macrophages, thereby providing a potential link between regression of atherosclerosis and use of nicotinic acid. Research on signalling through the nicotinic acid receptor might give rise to novel and more effective methods to interfere with fatty-acid metabolism, with insulin resistance, hyperlipidaemia, and atherosclerosis as target diseases.

  16. Factors affecting plasma aluminum concentrations in nonexposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    House, R.A. )

    1992-10-01

    In this study, the distribution and determinants of plasma aluminum concentrations were examined in 71 office employees not occupationally exposed to aluminum. The samples were analyzed by Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy and were found to be log normally distributed. After using the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) recommended procedure for removal of likely aberrant values, the 95th percentile value was 198 nmol/L (90% CI:165-238); when those using antacids were also excluded, the 95th percentile value fell to 175 nmol/L (90% CI:147-208). Multiple regression analysis indicated that the factors most predictive of log plasma aluminum were the batch in which the sample was analyzed and the use of antacids containing aluminum. The statistical significance of the batch variable likely indicates the well-recognized problem of contamination in sampling and analyzing aluminum.35 references.

  17. Factors affecting plasma aluminum concentrations in nonexposed workers.

    PubMed

    House, R A

    1992-10-01

    In this study, the distribution and determinants of plasma aluminum concentrations were examined in 71 office employees not occupationally exposed to aluminum. The samples were analyzed by Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy and were found to be log normally distributed. After using the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) recommended procedure for removal of likely aberrant values, the 95th percentile value was 198 nmol/L (90% CI:165-238); when those using antacids were also excluded, the 95th percentile value fell to 175 nmol/L (90% CI:147-208). Multiple regression analysis indicated that the factors most predictive of log plasma aluminum were the batch in which the sample was analyzed and the use of antacids containing aluminum. The statistical significance of the batch variable likely indicates the well-recognized problem of contamination in sampling and analyzing aluminum.

  18. Plasma carnitine concentrations in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Shintaro; Yasuhara, Kiyomitsu; Nakamura, Katsutoshi; Miyoshi, Yutaka; Sakai, Akira

    2004-02-01

    Carnitine is an essential cofactor for fatty acid (FA) metabolism, the predominant source of ATP in the normal aerobic heart. During myocardial ischemia, FA metabolism is impaired and tissue carnitine levels are depleted. Since the heart cannot synthesize carnitine, plasma carnitine could play an important role in maintaining myocardial carnitine levels during reperfusion. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of abnormal plasma carnitine concentrations in open heart surgery. Blood samples were obtained from eleven patients before, immediately after, and two hours after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Total and free carnitine levels were significantly reduced immediately after CPB (p<0.01) and remained depressed until two hours after CPB (p<0.01 vs. pre CPB), while acyl carnitine levels were unchanged over the course of this study. These depressed free carnitine levels might affect cardiac metabolism in the heart after open heart surgery. Carnitine supplement might be a useful adjunct in the therapy after open heart surgery.

  19. Nicotine inhibits the in vitro production of interleukin 2 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha by human mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Madretsma, G S; Donze, G J; van Dijk, A P; Tak, C J; Wilson, J H; Zijlstra, F J

    1996-10-01

    Smoking protects against ulcerative colitis (UC), and treatment with nicotine patches has a beneficial symptomatic effect in patients with UC. To find an explanation for this response to nicotine in UC, we assessed the effects of nicotine on cytokine production by mononuclear cells (MNC). MNC were isolated from peripheral blood from healthy volunteers. Non-adherent MNC were preincubated with varying concentrations of nicotine or prednisolone for 24 h followed by addition of phytohemagglutinin (10 micrograms/ml). The concentrations of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) in the supernatants were determined by ELISA. Nicotine as well as prednisolone caused a significant inhibition of IL-2 and TNF alpha production. The maximum inhibition caused by nicotine was about 50% of that caused by prednisolone and was reached at concentrations equivalent to nicotine levels measured in plasma of smokers. These results indicate that nicotine exerts its immunoregulatory role through modulation of the cytokine production by non-adherent mononuclear cells.

  20. Plasma oxytocin concentrations following MDMA or intranasal oxytocin in humans.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Francis, Sunday M; Lee, Royce; de Wit, Harriet; Jacob, Suma

    2014-08-01

    MDMA (±3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 'ecstasy') is reportedly used recreationally because it increases feelings of sociability and interpersonal closeness. Prior work suggests that the pro-social effects of MDMA may be mediated by release of oxytocin. A direct examination of plasma levels of oxytocin after acute doses of oxytocin and MDMA, in the same individuals, would provide further evidence for the idea that MDMA produces its pro-social effects by increasing oxytocin. Fourteen healthy MDMA users participated in a 4-session, double-blind study in which they received oral MDMA (0.75 and 1.5mg/kg), intranasal oxytocin (20IU or 40IU), and placebo. Plasma oxytocin concentrations, as well as cardiovascular and subjective effects were assessed before and at several time points after drug administration. MDMA (1.5mg/kg only) increased plasma oxytocin levels to a mean peak of 83.7pg/ml at approximately 90-120min, compared to 18.6pg/ml after placebo. Intranasal oxytocin (40IU, but not 20IU) increased plasma oxytocin levels to 48.0pg/ml, 30-60min after nasal spray administration. MDMA dose-dependently increased heart rate, blood pressure, feelings of euphoria (e.g., 'High' and 'Like Drug'), and feelings of sociability, whereas oxytocin had no cardiovascular or subjective effects. The subjective and cardiovascular responses to MDMA were not related to plasma oxytocin levels, although the N was small for this analysis. Future studies examining the effects of oxytocin antagonists on responses to MDMA will help to determine the mechanism by which MDMA produces pro-social effects.

  1. Plasma oxytocin concentrations following MDMA or intranasal oxytocin in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Matthew G.; Francis, Sunday M.; Lee, Royce; de Wit, Harriet; Jacob, Suma

    2014-01-01

    MDMA (±3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, ‘ecstasy’) is reportedly used recreationally because it increases feelings of sociability and interpersonal closeness. Prior work suggests that the pro-social effects of MDMA may be mediated by release of oxytocin. A direct examination of plasma levels of oxytocin after acute doses of oxytocin and MDMA, in the same individuals, would provide further evidence for the idea that MDMA produces its prosocial effects by increasing oxytocin. Fourteen healthy MDMA users participated in a 4-session, double-blind study in which they received oral MDMA (0.75 and 1.5 mg/kg), intranasal oxytocin (20 IU or 40 IU), and placebo. Plasma oxytocin concentrations, as well as cardiovascular and subjective effects were assessed before and at several time points after drug administration. MDMA (1.5 mg/kg only) increased plasma oxytocin levels to a mean peak of 83.7 pg/ml at approximately 90–120 minutes, compared to 18.6 pg/ml after placebo. Intranasal oxytocin (40 IU, but not 20 IU) increased plasma oxytocin levels to 48.0 pg/ml, 30–60 min after nasal spray administration. MDMA dose-dependently increased heart rate, blood pressure, feelings of euphoria (e.g., ‘High’ and ‘Like Drug’), and feelings of sociability, whereas oxytocin had no cardiovascular or subjective effects. The subjective and cardiovascular responses to MDMA were not related to plasma oxytocin levels, although the N was small for this analysis. Future studies examining the effects of oxytocin antagonists on responses to MDMA will help to determine the mechanism by which MDMA produces pro-social effects. PMID:24882155

  2. Effects of administration of glucocorticoids and feeding status on plasma leptin concentrations in dogs.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Naohito; Takasu, Masaki; Ohba, Yasunori; Maeda, Sadatoshi; Kitoh, Katsuya; Ohtsuka, Yoshihiko; Honjo, Tsutomu; Saito, Masayuki; Kitagawa, Hitoshi

    2006-02-01

    To investigate effects of short- and long- term administration of glucocorticoids, feeding status, and serum concentrations of insulin and cortisol on plasma leptin concentrations in dogs. 20 nonobese dogs. For experiment 1, plasma leptin concentrations and serum concentrations of insulin and cortisol were monitored for 24 hours in 4 dogs administered dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg, IV) or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution for fed and nonfed conditions. For experiment 2, 11 dogs were administered prednisolone (1 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h for 56 days [7 dogs] and 2 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h for 28 days [4 dogs]) and 5 dogs served as control dogs. Plasma leptin and serum insulin concentrations were monitored weekly. For experiment 1, dexamethasone injection with the fed condition drastically increased plasma leptin concentrations. Furthermore, injection of saline solution with the fed condition increased plasma leptin concentrations. These increases in plasma leptin concentrations correlated with increases in serum insulin concentrations. Dexamethasone injection with the nonfed condition increased plasma leptin concentrations slightly but continuously. Injection of saline solution with the nonfed condition did not alter plasma leptin concentrations. For experiment 2, prednisolone administration at either dosage and duration did not alter plasma leptin concentrations in any dogs. Dexamethasone injection and feeding increased plasma leptin concentrations in dogs. In addition, dexamethasone administration enhanced the effect of feeding on increases in plasma leptin concentrations. Daily oral administration of prednisolone (1 or 2 mg/kg) did not affect plasma leptin concentrations in dogs.

  3. Oxidative mechanisms contributing to the developmental neurotoxicity of nicotine and chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Dan; Seidler, Frederic J.; Slotkin, Theodore A. . E-mail: t.slotkin@duke.edu

    2005-08-01

    Nicotine and chlorpyrifos are developmental neurotoxicants that, despite their differences in structure and mechanism of action, share many aspects for damage to the developing brain. Both are thought to generate oxidative radicals; in the current study, we evaluated their ability to produce lipid peroxidation in two in vitro models of neural cell development (PC12 and SH-SY5Y cells) and for nicotine, with treatment of adolescent rats in vivo. Nicotine and chlorpyrifos, in concentrations relevant to human exposures, elicited an increase in thiobarbituric-acid-reactive species (TBARS) in undifferentiated cells, an effect that was prevented by addition of the antioxidant, Vitamin E. Initiating differentiation with nerve growth factor, which enhances nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression, increased the TBARS response to nicotine but not chlorpyrifos, suggesting that the two agents act by different originating mechanisms to converge on the endpoint of oxidative damage. Furthermore, nicotine protected the cells from oxidative damage evoked by chlorpyrifos and similarly blocked the antimitotic effect of chlorpyrifos. Treatment of adolescent rats with nicotine elicited increases in TBARS in multiple brain regions when given in doses that simulate plasma nicotine concentrations found in smokers or at one-tenth the dose. Our results indicate that nicotine and chlorpyrifos elicit oxidative damage to developing neural cells both in vitro and in vivo, a mechanism that explains some of the neurodevelopmental endpoints that are common to the two agents. The balance between neuroprotectant and neurotoxicant actions of nicotine may be particularly important in situations where exposure to tobacco smoke is combined with other prooxidant insults.

  4. Nicotine potentiates proatherogenic effects of oxLDL by stimulating and upregulating macrophage CD36 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming-Sheng; Chadipiralla, Kiranmai; Mendez, Armando J; Jaimes, Edgar A; Silverstein, Roy L; Webster, Keith; Raij, Leopoldo

    2013-08-15

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. CD36 mediates oxidized LDL (oxLDL) uptake and contributes to macrophage foam cell formation. We investigated a role for the CD36 pathway in nicotine-induced activation of macrophages and foam cell formation in vitro and in vivo. Nicotine in the same plasma concentration range found in smokers increased the CD36(+)/CD14(+) cell population in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, increased CD36 expression of human THP1 macrophages, and increased macrophage production of reactive oxygen species, PKCδ phosphorylation, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) expression. Nicotine-induced CD36 expression was suppressed by antioxidants and by specific PKCδ and PPARγ inhibitors, implicating mechanistic roles for these intermediates. Nicotine synergized with oxLDL to increase macrophage expression of CD36 and cytokines TNF-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-6, and CXCL9, all of which were prevented by CD36 small interfering (si)RNA. Incubation with oxLDL (50 μg/ml) for 72 h resulted in lipid deposition in macrophages and foam cell formation. Preincubation with nicotine further increased oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation and foam cell formation, which was also prevented by CD36 siRNA. Treatment of apoE-/- mice with nicotine markedly exacerbated inflammatory monocyte levels and atherosclerotic plaque accumulation, effects that were not seen in CD36-/- apoE-/- mice. Our results show that physiological levels of nicotine increase CD36 expression in macrophages, a pathway that may account at least in part for the known proinflammatory and proatherogenic properties of nicotine. These results identify such enhanced CD36 expression as a novel nicotine-mediated pathway that may constitute an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis in smokers. The results also suggest that exacerbated atherogenesis by this pathway may be an adverse side effect of extended use

  5. Effects of running the Bostom Marathon on plasma concentrations of large neutral amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Wurtman, R. J.; Lopez G-Coviella, I.; Blusztajn, J. K.; Vacanti, C. A.; Logue, M.; During, M.; Caballero, B.; Maher, T. J.; Evoniuk, G.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma large neutral amino acid concentrations were measured in thirty-seven subjects before and after completing the Boston Marathon. Concentrations of tyrosine, phenylalanine, and methionine increased, as did their 'plasma ratios' (i.e., the ratio of each amino acid's concentration to the summed plasma concentrations of the other large neutral amino acids which compete with it for brain uptake). No changes were noted in the plasma concentrations of tryptophan, leucine, isoleucine, nor valine; however, the 'plasma ratios' of valine, leucine, and isoleucine all decreased. These changes in plasma amino acid patterns may influence neurotransmitter synthesis.

  6. Effects of running the Bostom Marathon on plasma concentrations of large neutral amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Wurtman, R. J.; Lopez G-Coviella, I.; Blusztajn, J. K.; Vacanti, C. A.; Logue, M.; During, M.; Caballero, B.; Maher, T. J.; Evoniuk, G.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma large neutral amino acid concentrations were measured in thirty-seven subjects before and after completing the Boston Marathon. Concentrations of tyrosine, phenylalanine, and methionine increased, as did their 'plasma ratios' (i.e., the ratio of each amino acid's concentration to the summed plasma concentrations of the other large neutral amino acids which compete with it for brain uptake). No changes were noted in the plasma concentrations of tryptophan, leucine, isoleucine, nor valine; however, the 'plasma ratios' of valine, leucine, and isoleucine all decreased. These changes in plasma amino acid patterns may influence neurotransmitter synthesis.

  7. Relationship between Plasma Albumin Concentration and Plasma Volume in 5 Inbred Rat Strains.

    PubMed

    Rose, Rajiv; Klemcke, Harold G

    2015-09-01

    Using the Evans Blue procedure, we previously found strain-related differences in plasma volumes in 5 inbred rat strains. Because albumin binds strongly with Evans blue, this protein is important in the Evans blue method of plasma volume determination. Therefore, we speculated that interstrain differences in plasma albumin concentration (PAC) could distort calculated plasma volumes. To address this concern, we used ELISA techniques to measure PAC in these inbred rat strains. In study A, the blood volume was measured by using Evans blue dye, and albumin was measured at the start of hemorrhage. In study B, blood volume was not measured, and albumin was measured twice, near the start and end of hemorrhage (approximately 14 min apart). Neither study revealed any interstrain differences in PAC, which decreased after hemorrhage in all 5 strains. No correlation was found between PAC and plasma volume, survival time, blood lactate, or blood base excess. Percentage changes in PAC during hemorrhage were greater in salt-sensitive compared with Lewis rats. Moreover, these percentage changes were associated with survival time in Fawn hooded hypertensive rats. Our data show that the plasma volumes we measured previously were not misrepresented due to variations in PAC.

  8. Plasma digoxin concentrations and urinary excretion during a 'simpler' regimen of infant digitalization.

    PubMed Central

    Savage, M O; Hibble, A G; Pickering, D

    1975-01-01

    We have measured the plasma concentrations in sick neonates and infants being administered digoxin by a safer regimen. In the presence of normal renal function the plasma concentrations appear to be satisfactory. PMID:1103751

  9. Approaches to modeling of plasmas containing impurity at arbitrary concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokar, Mikhail Z.

    2016-02-01

    A new approximate method to modeling of two-ion-species plasmas with arbitrary concentration of impurity is developed. It based on the usage of equations for the electron density and the ratio of the ion species densities as new dependent variables. In contrast to motion equations for the ion mass velocities used normally, those for the new variables have a singularity at the Debye sheath only, as in the case of a one species plasma. Computations for the most critical situations of weak and intermediate friction between species due to Coulomb collisions reproduce nearly perfectly the results got by solving the original equations, however within a calculation time reduced by a factor of 102-103. In the case of strong friction, where ions’ velocities are very close each other, the normal procedure does not converge at all, but the new one, being precise in this limit, operates very reliably. Calculations are done for conditions typical in the linear device PSI-2, with deuterium plasmas seeded by neon impurity. For fixed electron and ion temperatures a critical density of impurity atoms is found, at which the electron density grows without limits. Such a catastrophic behavior does not occur if the electron and ion heat balances are taken into account to calculate the temperature profiles self-consistently.

  10. Midazolam plasma concentration after anesthesia premedication in clinical routine - an observational study : Midazolam plasma concentration after anesthesia premedication.

    PubMed

    Steiner, C; Steurer, M P; Mueller, D; Zueger, M; Dullenkopf, A

    2016-10-24

    Midazolam is commonly used as a pre-anesthesia anxiolytic. It`s elimination may not be fast enough for short procedures. In orally premedicated patients we obtained midazolam plasma concentrations at the end of surgical procedures and compared those to concentrations at anesthesia induction. The study was conducted prospectively with consent of the local ethics committee (Ethikkomission Kanton Thurgau, Switzerland) and carried out with written informed consent of each patient. Female patients aged 20 to 60 years undergoing elective procedures with general anesthesia were included, and were divided in two groups according to the planned surgical time: group S (<30 min) and group L (90-120 min), respectively. All patients received 7.5 mg Midazolam po as premedication. Blood samples were drawn at anesthesia induction, and at the end of surgery. Data were compared with t-test (independent samples; significance level p <0.05). Twenty-five patients per group were included. Four patients were excluded from analysis, since midazolam was not detectable in any samples. Time of premedication to the 1st blood sample was not statistically different between groups, neither were Midazolam plasma levels at this time point (p = 0.94). None of the patients from group L (n = 24), but five patients in group S (n = 22) did have a higher plasma level of Midazolam at the end of the case compared to the beginning. The elimination half-life of oral Midazolam can lead to higher plasma levels at the end of a short procedure compared to those at induction of anesthesia. German Clinical Trials Register (Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien), DRKS00005429 ; date of registration 3(rd) January 2014.

  11. Plasma Concentrations of Hepcidin in Anemic Zimbabwean Infants

    PubMed Central

    Mupfudze, Tatenda G.; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J.; Rukobo, Sandra; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Humphrey, Jean H.; Prendergast, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Anemia in infancy is a global public health problem. We evaluated the relative contributions of iron deficiency and inflammation to infant anemia. Methods We measured plasma hepcidin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), alpha-1-acid glycoprotein and C-reactive protein (CRP) by ELISA on archived plasma from 289 HIV-unexposed anemic or non-anemic Zimbabwean infants at ages 3mo, 6mo and 12mo. Among anemic infants, we determined the proportion with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) and anemia of inflammation (AI). We undertook regression analyses of plasma hepcidin and anemia status, adjusting for sex, age and birthweight. Results Anemic infants at 3mo were more stunted and had higher CRP (median 0.45 vs 0.21mg/L; P = 0.037) and hepcidin (median 14.7 vs 9.7ng/mL; P = 0.022) than non-anemic infants, but similar levels of ferritin and sTfR; 11% infants had IDA and 15% had AI. Anemic infants at 6mo had higher hepcidin (median 7.9 vs 4.5ng/mL; P = 0.016) and CRP (median 2.33 vs 0.32mg/L; P<0.001), but lower ferritin (median 13.2 vs 25.1μg/L; P<0.001) than non-anemic infants; 56% infants had IDA and 12% had AI. Anemic infants at 12mo had lower ferritin (median 3.2 vs 22.2μg/L; P<0.001) and hepcidin (median 0.9 vs 1.9ng/mL; P = 0.019), but similar CRP levels; 48% infants had IDA and 8% had AI. Comparing anemic with non-anemic infants, plasma hepcidin was 568% higher, 405% higher and 64% lower at 3mo, 6mo and 12mo, respectively, after adjusting for sex and birthweight (all p<0.01). Plasma hepcidin declined significantly with age among anemic but not non-anemic infants. Girls had 61% higher hepcidin than boys, after adjusting for age, anemia and birthweight (p<0.001). Conclusion Anemia is driven partly by inflammation early in infancy, and by iron deficiency later in infancy, with plasma hepcidin concentrations reflecting the relative contribution of each. However, there is need to better characterize the drivers of hepcidin during infancy in developing

  12. Relationship between trough plasma and epithelial lining fluid concentrations of voriconazole in lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Heng, Siow-Chin; Snell, Gregory I; Levvey, Bronwyn; Keating, Dominic; Westall, Glen P; Williams, Trevor J; Whitford, Helen; Nation, Roger L; Slavin, Monica A; Morrissey, Orla; Kong, David C M

    2013-09-01

    Trough (predose) voriconazole concentrations in plasma and pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of lung transplant recipients receiving oral voriconazole preemptive treatment were determined. The mean (± standard deviation [SD]) ELF/plasma ratio was 12.5 ± 6.3. A strong positive linear relationship was noted between trough plasma and ELF voriconazole concentrations (r(2) = 0.87), suggesting the feasibility of using trough plasma voriconazole concentration as a surrogate to estimate the corresponding concentration in ELF of lung transplant recipients.

  13. Plasma and salivary amoxicillin concentrations and effect against oral microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Baglie, S; Del Ruenis, A P Bortolo; Motta, R H Lopes; Baglie, R C Catelli; Franco, G C Nobre; Franco, L M; Rosalen, P L; Silva, P; Groppo, F C

    2007-10-01

    Plasma and salivary amoxicillin (AMO) concentrations were quantified following a single oral dose (875 mg) of two formulations of AMO (Amoxicillin-EMS Sigma Pharma and Amoxil BD 875 mg). In addition, the effect of amoxicillin against oral microorganisms was accessed. The open, randomized, two-period crossover study was carried out in 20 volunteers. Saliva and blood samples were collected at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 h after drug administration, and quantified using HPLC-ESI-MS and HPLC, respectively. Streptococci counts, anaerobe counts and total microorganism counts were obtained. No differences were observed between formulations (p > 0.05) in the plasma and salivary AMO concentrations and the pharmacokinetic parameters (C(max), t(max), AUC(0-8), and AUC(0-infinity)) also showed no statistically significant differences between formulations (p > 0.05). Microorganism counts for the two formulations at all sampling times did not differ (p > 0.05) but all microorganism counts at 60 min post-dose showed a significant decrease (p < 0.05). Amoxicillin was effective in reducing oral microorganism levels up to 12 h post-dose.

  14. Technical pitfalls in measurement of venous plasma NH3 concentration.

    PubMed

    Gerron, G G; Ansley, J D; Isaacs, J W; Kutner, M H; Rudman, D

    1976-05-01

    Measurement of venous plasma NH3 in normal subjects by the ion-exchange method of Forman [Clin. Chem. 10, 497 (1964)] in a hospital clinical laboratory gave a mean value of 640 mug/liter (range, 300-1320 mug/liter; intraassay, intra-individual, and inter-individual coefficients of variation, 8, 47, and 47%, respectively). The following conditions adversely affect the reproducibility of the test: pollution of laboratory atmosphere and glassware by NH3-containing detergents; smoking by patient or analyst; delay, turbulence, or use of heparin lock in venipuncture; delay or warming of plasma above degrees C before mixing it with resin; and delay in colorimetric analysis of resin eluate. When these sources of error were eliminated, the mean value for normals was reduced to 330 mug/liter, the range was narrowed to 220-470 mug/liter, and the above-mentioned CV's were 5, 16, and 17%, respectively. With the precautions cited, furthermore, the intra-assay and intra-individual CV's for fasting NH3 concentration in cirrhotic patients were similarly reduced. An NH3 tolerance test was done by administering a standard dose of NH4Cl to patients and measuring venous plasma NH3 at 0, 15, 30, 60, and 90 min; the NH3 tolerance was quantified from the area under the curve relating concentration to time (mug - min/liter). As measured in the clinical laboratory, NH3 tolerance of cirrhotic patients showed intra-assay and intra-individual CV's of 50 to 90%. When the tolerance tests were repeated in the same subjects with the laboratory precautions listed above, these CV's were reduced to 8-15%.

  15. Nicotine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Ian; Dani, John A.; De Biasi, Mariella

    2015-01-01

    An aversive abstinence syndrome manifests 4–24 h following cessation of chronic use of nicotine-containing products. Symptoms peak on approximately the 3rd day and taper off over the course of the following 3–4 weeks. While the severity of withdrawal symptoms is largely determined by how nicotine is consumed, certain short nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been shown to predispose individuals to consume larger amounts of nicotine more frequently—as well as to more severe symptoms of withdrawal when trying to quit. Additionally, rodent behavioral models and transgenic mouse models have revealed that specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits, cellular components, and neuronal circuits are critical to the expression of withdrawal symptoms. Consequently, by continuing to map neuronal circuits and nAChR subpopulations that underlie the nicotine withdrawal syndrome—and by continuing to enumerate genes that predispose carriers to nicotine addiction and exacerbated withdrawal symptoms—it will be possible to pursue personalized therapeutics that more effectively treat nicotine addiction. PMID:25638335

  16. Electronic cigarettes and nicotine clinical pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Megan J; Hoffman, Allison C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the available literature evaluating electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) nicotine clinical pharmacology in order to understand the potential impact of e-cigarettes on individual users, nicotine dependence and public health. Methods Literature searches were conducted between 1 October 2012 and 30 September 2013 using key terms in five electronic databases. Studies were included in the review if they were in English and publicly available; non-clinical studies, conference abstracts and studies exclusively measuring nicotine content in e-cigarette cartridges were excluded from the review. Results Nicotine yields from automated smoking machines suggest that e-cigarettes deliver less nicotine per puff than traditional cigarettes, and clinical studies indicate that e-cigarettes deliver only modest nicotine concentrations to the inexperienced e-cigarette user. However, current e-cigarette smokers are able to achieve systemic nicotine and/or cotinine concentrations similar to those produced from traditional cigarettes. Therefore, user experience is critically important for nicotine exposure, and may contribute to the products’ ability to support and maintain nicotine dependence. Conclusions Knowledge about e-cigarette nicotine pharmacology remains limited. Because a user's e-cigarette experience may significantly impact nicotine delivery, future nicotine pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies should be conducted in experienced users to accurately assess the products’ impact on public health. PMID:24732160

  17. Seasonal variation in plasma thyroid hormone concentrations in coastal versus inland populations of juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis): influence of plasma iodide concentrations.

    PubMed

    Boggs, Ashley S P; Hamlin, Heather J; Lowers, Russell H; Guillette, Louis J

    2011-12-01

    Thyroid hormones, essential for normal growth and health, are associated with changes in temperature, photoperiod, and reproduction. Iodide, a necessary element for thyroid hormone production, varies in diet, and is more abundant in estuarine environments, which could alter thyroid hormone variation. However, associations between thyroid hormone concentrations in animals from marine versus freshwater environments, which could become more pertinent with rising sea levels associated with global climate change, are not well studied. To determine the importance of dietary iodide in seasonal variation of plasma thyroid hormone concentrations, we analyzed seasonal variation of plasma thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)) concentrations in juvenile alligators from an estuarine habitat (Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge; MI) and a freshwater habitat (Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge; LW) and compared these results to plasma inorganic iodide (PII) concentrations. Alligators from MI did not display seasonal variation in plasma T(4), but exhibited a seasonal pattern in plasma T(3) concentrations similar to alligators from LW. Plasma thyroid hormone concentrations were consistently higher at MI than at LW. PII concentrations were correlated with plasma T(4) and T(3) concentrations in juvenile alligators from LW but not MI. The data on plasma T(4) and T(3) concentrations suggest altered iodide metabolism in estuarine alligators. Differences in thyroid hormone concentrations between the populations could be due to differences in dietary iodide, which need to be further evaluated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. EXTENDED STORAGE OF PLATELET-RICH PLASMA PREPARED PLATELET CONCENTRATES IN PLASMA OR PLASMALYTE

    PubMed Central

    Slichter, Sherrill J.; Bolgiano, Doug; Corson, Jill; Jones, Mary Kay; Christoffel, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Background Using bacterial detection or pathogen reduction, extended platelet storage may be licensed if platelet viability is maintained. FDA's post-storage platelet acceptance guidelines are that autologous stored platelet recoveries and survivals should be ≥66% and ≥58%, respectively, of each donor's fresh platelet data. Study Design And Methods Non-leukoreduced platelet concentrates were prepared from whole blood donations. Autologous platelet concentrates from 62 subjects were stored in 100% plasma (n=44) or 20% plasma/80% Plasmalyte (n=18), an acetate based, non-glucose containing crystalloid solution previously used for platelet storage.(1-3) Fresh platelets were obtained on the day the donor's stored platelets were to be transfused. The fresh and stored platelets were alternately radiolabeled with either 51Chromium or 111Indium, and in vitro measurements were performed on the stored platelets. Results FDA's platelet recovery criterion was met for 7 days of plasma storage, but platelet survivals maintained viability for only 6 days. Plasmalyte stored platelets did not meet either acceptance criteria after 6 days of storage. After 7 days of storage, platelet recoveries averaged 43 ± 4% and 30 ± 4% and survivals 4.1 ± 0.4 days and 2.0 ± 0.2 days for plasma and Plasmalyte-stored platelets, respectively (p=0.03 for recoveries and p<0.001 for survivals). Post-storage platelet recoveries correlated with the commonly-used in vitro platelet quality measurements of HSR and Annexin V binding, while survivals correlated with ESC, morphology score, and pH. Conclusion There is a progressive decrease in recoveries and survivals of plasma stored platelets over time. Platelet viability is better maintained in plasma than Plasmalyte. PMID:20456703

  19. Evaluation of plasma inflammatory cytokine concentrations in racing sled dogs.

    PubMed

    von Pfeil, Dirsko J F; Cummings, Bethany P; Loftus, John P; Levine, Corri B; Mann, Sabine; Downey, Robert L; Griffitts, Caroline; Wakshlag, Joseph J

    2015-12-01

    In human athletes significant changes in cytokine concentrations secondary to exercise have been observed. This prospective study evaluated the effect of a multi-day stage sled dog race on plasma concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and interleukin-10 (IL-10). Samples from 20 dogs were harvested prior to and on days 2 and 8 of an 8-day race. Exercise resulted in significantly decreased TNF-α and IL-8 as well as increases of MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-10 concentrations (P-value between 0.01 and < 0.0001 for all parameters). The proportion of values for IL-2 that were below the detection limit increased from 40% on day 0 to 75% on day 2 and decreased on day 8 to 40% (P = 0.04). Racing sled dogs show cytokine-concentration changes that are different from those in humans.

  20. Evaluation of plasma inflammatory cytokine concentrations in racing sled dogs

    PubMed Central

    von Pfeil, Dirsko J. F.; Cummings, Bethany P.; Loftus, John P.; Levine, Corri B.; Mann, Sabine; Downey, Robert L.; Griffitts, Caroline; Wakshlag, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    In human athletes significant changes in cytokine concentrations secondary to exercise have been observed. This prospective study evaluated the effect of a multi-day stage sled dog race on plasma concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and interleukin-10 (IL-10). Samples from 20 dogs were harvested prior to and on days 2 and 8 of an 8-day race. Exercise resulted in significantly decreased TNF-α and IL-8 as well as increases of MCP-1, IL-6, and IL-10 concentrations (P-value between 0.01 and < 0.0001 for all parameters). The proportion of values for IL-2 that were below the detection limit increased from 40% on day 0 to 75% on day 2 and decreased on day 8 to 40% (P = 0.04). Racing sled dogs show cytokine-concentration changes that are different from those in humans. PMID:26663920

  1. Plasma concentration of ascorbic Acid and some hematological parameters in tobacco snuffers among the igbos of southeastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ureme, So; Njoku, Ou; Ejezie, Fe; Ibeh, Bo; Ikekpazu, E; Mba, Mj

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco snuffing, like cigarette smoking, is known to be a common habit among the adults of Igbo communities in Nigeria. In view of the various pharmacological actions of nicotine and other additive constituents of tobacco snuff, there is growing concern that ascorbic acid, which is a vital antioxidant, and blood cell production or morphology may be affected. To investigate the possible effects of prolonged use of tobacco snuff on plasma ascorbic acid concentrations and some hematological parameters. Fifty adults of Igbo extraction (35 males and 15 females) residents in and around Enugu metropolis, who have been snuffing tobacco for 6 years and above, were recruited for the study, after they gave informed consent. Also, 50 apparently healthy, age-matched persons (25 males, 25 females), who do not smoke or take tobacco snuff, served as controls. Spectrophotometric method was adopted for ascorbic acid determination while hematological profiles were assessed by Bain method. The results showed no significant difference in the measured parameters relative to the controls AA (P=0.08); Hb (P=0.19); PCV (P=0.10); RC (P=0.06); PC (P=0.20); WBC (P=0.09). The results of the study suggest that tobacco snuff inhalation may not adversely affect plasma ascorbic acid concentration and hematological parameters in adult humans. The study, however, has not concluded that tobacco snuffing is totally wholesome.

  2. Plasma Concentration of Ascorbic Acid and Some Hematological Parameters in Tobacco Snuffers Among the Igbos of Southeastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ureme, SO; Njoku, OU; Ejezie, FE; Ibeh, BO; Ikekpazu, E; Mba, MJ

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tobacco snuffing, like cigarette smoking, is known to be a common habit among the adults of Igbo communities in Nigeria. In view of the various pharmacological actions of nicotine and other additive constituents of tobacco snuff, there is growing concern that ascorbic acid, which is a vital antioxidant, and blood cell production or morphology may be affected. Objective: To investigate the possible effects of prolonged use of tobacco snuff on plasma ascorbic acid concentrations and some hematological parameters. Materials and Methods: Fifty adults of Igbo extraction (35 males and 15 females) residents in and around Enugu metropolis, who have been snuffing tobacco for 6 years and above, were recruited for the study, after they gave informed consent. Also, 50 apparently healthy, age-matched persons (25 males, 25 females), who do not smoke or take tobacco snuff, served as controls. Spectrophotometric method was adopted for ascorbic acid determination while hematological profiles were assessed by Bain method. Results: The results showed no significant difference in the measured parameters relative to the controls AA (P=0.08); Hb (P=0.19); PCV (P=0.10); RC (P=0.06); PC (P=0.20); WBC (P=0.09). Conclusion: The results of the study suggest that tobacco snuff inhalation may not adversely affect plasma ascorbic acid concentration and hematological parameters in adult humans. The study, however, has not concluded that tobacco snuffing is totally wholesome. PMID:23209991

  3. Elevated Plasma Homocysteine Concentration in Opium-Addicted Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Masoomi, Mohammad; Azdaki, Nahid; Shahouzehi, Beydolah

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the triggering role of both opium use and elevated plasma homocysteine level for progressing atherosclerosis and, therefore, appearing coronary heart disease has been clearly determined, no study are available with respect to the relation between these to risk profiles. In the present study and for the first time, we hypothesized that the opium addiction can be potentially correlated with elevated homocysteine concentration. Methods 217 persons (103 opium-addicted and 114 non-addicted) were randomly selected from the Kerman Coronary Artery Disease Risk Study (KERCADRS), Iran, as a population-based, epidemiological prospective study. In all participants, an enzyme immunoassay kit was used to measure homocysteine in serum samples. Findings The serum level of homocysteine was significantly higher in the opium-addicted ones compared to non-addicted individuals (11.49 ± 7.45 vs. 8.02 ± 3.87 μmol/l) (P < 0.001). In this regard, 21.3% of the opium users and only 3.2% of the non-users had homocysteine concentration > 15 μmol/l (P < 0.001). On the other hand, individuals addicted to opiates exhibited significantly elevated odds of having homocysteine level higher than 15 [odds ratio (OR) = 8.244, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 3.117-21.806]. Multivariable linear regression model showed that the opium addiction could strongly predict elevated homocysteine level in the study individuals [beta = 3.524, standard error (SE) = 0.852] (P < 0.001). Conclusion Opium consumption can be strongly accompanied with the elevation of plasma homocysteine concentration, and thus opium addiction can exhibit elevated odds of having hyperhomocysteinemia. PMID:26885351

  4. Pharmacokinetics of nicotine in rats after multiple-cigarette smoke exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Rotenberg, K.S.; Adir, J.

    1983-06-15

    The pharmacokinetics of nicotine and its major metabolites was evaluated in male rats after multiple-cigarette smoke exposure. A smoke-exposure apparatus was used to deliver cigarette smoke to the exposure chamber. The rats were exposed to smoke from a single cigarette every 8 hr for 14 days and to the smoke of a cigarette spiked with radiolabeled nicotine on the 15th day. Blood and urine samples were collected at timed intervals during the 10-min smoke-exposure period of the last cigarette and up to 48 hr thereafter. Nicotine, cotinine, and other polar metabolites were separated by thin-layer chromatography and quantified by liquid scintillation counting. The data were analyzed by computer fitting, and the derived pharmacokinetic parameters were compared to those observed after a single iv injection of nicotine and after a single-cigarette smoke exposure. The results indicated that the amount of nicotine absorbed from multiple-cigarette smoke was approximately 10-fold greater than that absorbed from a single cigarette. Also, unlike the single-cigarette smoke exposure experiment, nicotine plasma levels did not decay monotonically but increased after the 5th hr, and high plasma concentrations persisted for 30 hr. The rate and extent of the formation of cotinine, the major metabolite of nicotine, were decreased as compared with their values following a single-cigarette smoke exposure. It was concluded that nicotine or a constituent of tobacco smoke inhibits the formation of cotinine and may affect the biotransformation of other metabolites. Urinary excretion tended to support the conclusions that the pharmacokinetic parameters of nicotine and its metabolites were altered upon multiple as compared to single dose exposure.

  5. Plasma Cannabinoid Concentrations during Dronabinol Pharmacotherapy for Cannabis Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Milman, Garry; Bergamaschi, Mateus M.; Lee, Dayong; Mendu, Damodara R.; Barnes, Allan J.; Vandrey, Ryan; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, high-dose oral synthetic delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) was shown to alleviate cannabis withdrawal symptoms. The present data describe cannabinoid pharmacokinetics in chronic daily cannabis smokers who received high-dose oral THC pharmacotherapy and later, a smoked cannabis challenge. Methods 11 daily cannabis smokers received 0, 30, 60, or 120 mg/day THC for four 5-day medication sessions, each separated by 9-days of ad-libitum cannabis smoking. On the 5th day, participants were challenged with smoking one 5.9% THC cigarette. Plasma collected on the 1st and 5th days was quantified by GC-GC-MS for THC, 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH). Linear ranges (ng/mL) were 0.5–100 for THC, 1–50 11-OH-THC, and 0.5–200 THCCOOH. Results During placebo dosing, THC, 11-OH-THC and THCCOOH concentrations consistently decreased, while all cannabinoids increased dose-dependently during active dronabinol administration. THC increase over time was not significant after any dose, 11-OH-THC increased significantly during 60 and 120 mg/day doses, and THCCOOH increased significantly only during the 120 mg/day dose. THC and 11-OH-THC, and THCCOOH concentrations peaked within 0.25 h after cannabis smoking, except after 120 mg/day THC when THCCOOH peaked 0.5 h before smoking. Conclusions The significant withdrawal effects noted during placebo dronabinol administration were supported by significant plasma THC and 11-OH-THC concentration decreases. During active dronabinol dosing, significant dose-dependent increases in THC and 11-OH-THC concentrations support withdrawal symptom suppression. THC concentrations after cannabis smoking were only distinguishable from oral THC doses for 1 h, too short a period to feasibly identify cannabis relapse. THCCOOH/THC ratios were higher 14 h after overnight oral dronabinol abstinence, but cannot distinguish oral THC dosing from smoked cannabis intake. PMID:24067260

  6. Plasma IL-8 concentrations are increased in dogs with spirocercosis.

    PubMed

    Dvir, E; Mellanby, R J; Kjelgaard-Hansen, M; Schoeman, J P

    2012-11-23

    The nematode Spirocerca lupi (S. lupi) induces sarcoma in the dog oesophagus in about 25% of cases. The aim of this study was to compare the differences in the cytokine milieu between dogs with neoplastic (n=29) and non-neoplastic disease (n=49) and age- and gender-matched healthy controls (n=25). We measured IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-18, GM-CSF and MCP-1 in a specific canine multiplex immunoassay kit. Cytokine concentrations were compared between the different groups using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn's test. Only IL-8 and IL-18 showed significant differences in their plasma concentration among the three groups. Kruskal-Wallis test revealed a significant (p=0.001) difference in IL-8 concentration between the neoplastic group (634pg/ml), the non-neoplastic (429 pg/ml) and the control groups (150 pg/ml). Post-test analysis revealed a significance difference between the two S. lupi groups and the control group (p<0.01). The highest IL-18 concentration was found in the non-neoplastic group (53 pg/ml), followed by the control group (46 pg/ml) and finally the neoplastic group (33 pg/ml). IL-18 concentrations were significantly higher in the non-neoplastic group than in the neoplastic group (p=0.05). The increased IL-8 in the spirocercosis groups is consistent with the neutrophilic infiltrate in spirocercosis lesions and in those of other inflammatory-induced neoplasias such as Barret's oesophagus and Helicobacter gastritis. IL-18 showed negative regulatory effect in several worm infections and it is possible that it plays the same role in spirocercosis, allowing the worm to evade the host response and to induce neoplastic transformation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Antibiotic aerosolization: tissue and plasma oxytetracycline concentrations in turkey poults.

    PubMed

    Van Alstine, W G; Dyer, D C

    1985-01-01

    Oxytetracycline hydrochloride (OTC) was delivered by aerosol to healthy 3-week-old turkeys. Trachea, lung, and plasma were evaluated for OTC levels at 1, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 hours after aerosol exposure. In Expt. 1, 15 poults in a modified Horsfall unit were exposed to 1 g OTC/m3 of air using a DeVilbiss ultrasonic nebulizer. In Expt. 2, 25,000 poults in a commercial confinement unit were exposed to 0.075 g of OTC/m3 of air using a Fogmaster fogger. In each case, initially high tracheal and lung OTC concentrations were obtained. OTC levels in the trachea fell to less than 1 microgram/g between 4 and 8 hours postexposure. Plasma OTC levels remained low throughout both experiments. Oxytetracycline was still detectable in room air 60 min after aerosol exposure and before ventilation was restored. This method of administration may have promise for use in respiratory infections, but additional studies are needed to further define the use of aerosol therapy in poultry production units.

  8. [Concentration of elements in plasma of patients with essential hypertension].

    PubMed

    Goch, Aleksander

    2005-10-01

    Disturbances in macro- and microelements composition may play a significant role in the development of essential hypertension. The aim of the study was to estimate main and trace elements concentration in plasma of hypertensive patients. The study involved 150 subjects, aged 33-60 years, who were allotted into 2 groups: I--50 clinically healthy subjects (controls), II--100 patients with arterial hypertension. Age and sex ratio were similar in the examined groups. Those subjected to the study were not administered any drugs at least 3 months prior to the determination of macro- and microelements. Determinations of trace elements Ca, F, Na, K, Mg, Fe, Zn, Cu, Ni, Mo, Al, Cd, Fb, Mu, Se, Cr, Co, Li, V, B, Ba, were performed with atomic emission spectrometer with plasmic excitation (ICP MS Philips PU). In group II in comparison to group I (controls) higher values of Fe, Pb, Al, Cd, Co, B i Ba were observed, as well as higher Zn/Cu ratio; but lower values of Cu and lower Ca/Pb, Ca/Al, Zn/Fe, Se/Fe, Zn/Al, Zn/Cd, Se/Pb, Se/Al, Se/Cd ratio. Increase of prooxidative and decrease,of antioxidative elements in plasma may significantly contribute to the essential hypertension pathogenesis probably through oxidative stress development.

  9. Vaccination against nicotine alters the distribution of nicotine delivered via cigarette smoke inhalation to rats

    PubMed Central

    Pravetoni, M; Keyler, DE; Raleigh, MD; Harris, AC; LeSage, MG; Mattson, CK; Pettersson, S; Pentel, PR

    2011-01-01

    Preclinical models of nicotine vaccine pharmacology have relied on i.v. or s.c. administration of nicotine. Models using cigarette smoke inhalation might more accurately simulate nicotine exposure in smokers. Nicotine vaccine effects were examined in rats using two cigarette smoke exposure models: a 10 minute nose-only exposure (NSE) producing serum nicotine levels equivalent to the nicotine boost from 1 cigarette in a smoker, and a two hour whole-body exposure (WBE) producing serum nicotine levels similar to those associated with regular midday smoking. Vaccination prior to 10 min smoke NSE reduced nicotine distribution to brain by 90%, comparable to its effect on nicotine administered i.v. Vaccination prior to 2 hr smoke WBE reduced nicotine distribution to brain by 35%. The nicotine concentration in broncheoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid obtained after 2 hr WBE was increased by 230% in vaccinated rats but was also increased in rats passively immunized with a nicotine-specific monoclonal antibody, and so was likely due to transfer of antibody from serum rather than local production at the pulmonary mucosa. Nicotine-specific IgA was not detectable in BAL fluid, but titers in serum were appreciable at 21–25% of the IgG titer and could contribute to vaccine efficacy. Both vaccination and passive immunization are effective in reducing nicotine distribution to brain in rats when nicotine is delivered via inhaled cigarette smoke. These data validate results previously obtained in rodents for nicotine vaccines using i.v. or s.c. nicotine dosing and provide a quantitative method for studying aspects of nicotine exposure which are unique to cigarette smoke inhalation. PMID:21333633

  10. Nicotine therapy for ulcerative colitis: a review of rationale, mechanisms, pharmacology, and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Sandborn, W J

    1999-05-01

    Smoking is protective against developing ulcerative colitis. Nicotine may be the cause of this protective effect. Controlled trials have demonstrated efficacy of transdermal nicotine for active ulcerative colitis. Side effects observed with transdermal nicotine include contact dermatitis, nausea, and lightheadedness. Topical administration of nicotine to the colon reduces nicotine blood concentrations and side effects, and may be of clinical benefit.

  11. Decrease in pyridoxal-5'-phosphate concentration and increase in pyridoxal concentration in rat plasma by 4'-O-methylpyridoxine administration.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Yoshimura, Teruki; Johno, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Mika; Sasaki, Keiko; Wada, Keiji

    2015-07-01

    Food poisoning from Ginkgo biloba seeds can cause epilepsy because of a decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations in the brain. We previously demonstrated that 4'-O-methylpyridoxine (MPN) is responsible for this observed toxicity of G biloba seeds; however, the mechanism for the decrease in GABA and plasma concentration profile of MPN has not been clarified. Our hypothesis is that MPN induces a decrease in vitamin B6 concentrations, resulting in a decrease in GABA concentration. This study aimed to characterize the plasma concentration profile of MPN and intrinsic vitamin B6 concentrations (pyridoxal [PL], PL-5'-phosphate [PLP], and 4-pyridoxic acid) using a rat model. Plasma concentrations of B6 vitamers after intravenous MPN administration (5 mg/kg) were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography with a fluorescence detector. The half-life of MPN (0.91 ± 0.05 hours) was shorter in rats than the previously reported value in humans. We found a significant decrease in the plasma concentration of PLP, an active form of vitamin B6, after MPN administration. We also observed an increase in plasma PL and 4-pyridoxic acid concentrations; the increase in PL concentration may be caused by either metabolism of MPN to PL or by MPN-mediated inhibition of PL kinase. The present study is the first in vivo study showing relatively rapid elimination of MPN in rats and a decrease in plasma PLP concentration caused by MPN. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of three products of cigarette smoke (cyanide, thiocyanate and nicotine) on the concentration-response curves of 5-hydroxytryptamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine in the isolated human umbilical veins and arteries.

    PubMed

    Tunçel, N; Aydin, Y; Tikiz, H

    1994-02-01

    The effect of cyanide (10(-7) M), thiocyanate (10(-4) M) and nicotine (10(-7) M) on the concentration-response curves of 5-hydroxytryptamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine were investigated in human isolated umbilical arteries and veins. Cyanide significantly affected the responses of arterial strips to 5-hydroxytryptamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine: It caused significant leftward shifts of the 5-hydroxytryptamine concentration-response curves and significantly potentiated the contractile effects of norepinephrine and epinephrine in the case of norepinephrine, and epinephrine concentration reached 10(-6) and 10(-7) M respectively in the bath medium. Cyanide did not show any significant effect on the concentration-response curves of 5-hydroxytryptamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine in veins. Nicotine interacted with the response of adrenergic agonists both in arteries and veins; in arteries it potentiates the contractile response of epinephrine; in veins, it inhibited the dilatory responses of norepinephrine and potentiated the contractile effect of high concentration of epinephrine (10(-6) M). Thiocyanate did not cause any difference on any cumulative concentration-response curves either on the vessels. However, none of these individual effects of cyanide and nicotine were observed when the cyanide, thiocyanate and nicotine were added in combination in the isolated organ bath medium.

  13. The effect of concurrent aspirin upon plasma concentrations of tenoxicam.

    PubMed Central

    Day, R O; Paull, P D; Lam, S; Swanson, B R; Williams, K M; Wade, D N

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of chronic, high-dose aspirin therapy upon the disposition of a single dose and multiple doses of tenoxicam was examined in normal volunteers. 2. Aspirin caused a 24% drop in the t1/2 (P less than 0.005), a 49% rise in the volume of distribution (P less than 0.0003) and a 98% increase in the clearance (P less than 0.0001) of tenoxicam after a single dose of the tenoxicam. 3. Steady-state concentrations of tenoxicam decreased significantly from 10.4 +/- 1.5 to 4.5 +/- 1.6 micrograms ml-1 in the presence of chronic, high-dose aspirin treatment. 4. Tenoxicam percentage free measured in plasma from a normal volunteer was 0.56 +/- 0.05% over the tenoxicam concentration range 1-20 micrograms ml-1 and rose to 1.24 +/- 0.07% in the presence of aspirin 150 micrograms ml-1. 5. The effect of aspirin upon the disposition of tenoxicam was consistent with a competitive protein binding interaction. PMID:3190995

  14. In vitro human epidermal permeation of nicotine from electronic cigarette refill liquids and implications for dermal exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Frasch, H Frederick; Barbero, Ana M

    2016-12-07

    Nicotine plus flavorings in a propylene glycol (PG) vehicle are the components of electronic cigarette liquids (e-liquids), which are vaporized and inhaled by the user. Dermal exposure to nicotine and e-liquids may occur among workers in mixing and filling of e-cigarettes in the manufacturing process. Inadvertent skin contact among consumers is also a concern. In vitro nicotine permeation studies using heat-separated human epidermis were performed with surrogate and two commercial e-liquids, neat and aqueous nicotine donor formulations. Steady-state fluxes (Jss), and lag times (tlag) were measured for each formulation. In addition, transient (4 h) exposure and finite dose (1-10 μl/cm(2)) experiments were undertaken using one commercial e-liquid. Average Jss (μg/cm(2)/h) from formulations were: nicotine in PG (24 mg/ml): 3.97; commercial e-liquid containing menthol (25 mg/ml nicotine): 10.2; commercial e-liquid containing limonene (25 mg/ml nicotine): 23.7; neat nicotine: 175. E-liquid lag times ranged from 5 to 10 h. Absorbed fraction of nicotine from finite doses was ≈0.3 at 48 h. The data were applied to transient exposure and finite dose dermal exposure assessment models and to a simple pharmacokinetic model. Three illustrative exposure scenarios demonstrate use of the data to predict systemic uptake and plasma concentrations from dermal exposure. The data demonstrate the potential for significant nicotine absorption through skin contact with e-cigarette refill solutions and the neat nicotine used to mix them.Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology advance online publication, 7 December 2016; doi:10.1038/jes.2016.68.

  15. Drug-dependent behaviors and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressions in Caenorhabditis elegans following chronic nicotine exposure.

    PubMed

    Polli, Joseph R; Dobbins, Dorothy L; Kobet, Robert A; Farwell, Mary A; Zhang, Baohong; Lee, Myon-Hee; Pan, Xiaoping

    2015-03-01

    Nicotine, the major psychoactive compound in tobacco, targets nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and results in drug dependence. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans' (C. elegans) genome encodes conserved and extensive nicotinic receptor subunits, representing a useful system to investigate nicotine-induced nAChR expressions in the context of drug dependence. However, the in vivo expression pattern of nAChR genes under chronic nicotine exposure has not been fully investigated. To define the role of nAChR genes involved in nicotine-induced locomotion changes and the development of tolerance to these effects, we characterized the locomotion behavior combining the use of two systems: the Worm Tracker hardware and the WormLab software. Our results indicate that the combined system is an advantageous alternative to define drug-dependent locomotion behavior in C. elegans. Chronic (24-h dosing) nicotine exposure at 6.17 and 61.7μM induced nicotine-dependent behaviors, including drug stimulation, tolerance/adaption, and withdrawal responses. Specifically, the movement speed of naïve worms on nicotine-containing environments was significantly higher than on nicotine-free environments, suggesting locomotion stimulation by nicotine. In contrast, the 24-h 6.17μM nicotine-treated worms exhibited significantly higher speeds on nicotine-free plates than on nicotine-containing plates. Furthermore significantly increased locomotion behavior during nicotine cessation was observed in worms treated with a higher nicotine concentration of 61.7μM. The relatively low locomotion speed of nicotine-treated worms on nicotine-containing environments also indicates adaption/tolerance of worms to nicotine following chronic nicotine exposure. In addition, this study provides useful information regarding the comprehensive in vivo expression profile of the 28 "core" nAChRs following different dosages of chronic nicotine treatments. Eleven genes (lev-1, acr-6, acr-7, acr-11, lev-8, acr

  16. Passive immunization with a nicotine-specific monoclonal antibody decreases brain nicotine levels but does not precipitate withdrawal in nicotine-dependent rats

    PubMed Central

    Roiko, Samuel A.; Harris, Andrew C.; LeSage, Mark G.; Keyler, Daniel E.; Pentel, Paul R.

    2009-01-01

    Vaccination against nicotine is under investigation as a treatment for tobacco dependence. Passive immunization with nicotine-specific antibodies represents a complementary strategy to vaccination. A potential adverse effect of passive immunization in nicotine-dependent individuals is that it may lead to a rapid reduction in brain nicotine levels and trigger withdrawal. The goal of this study was to determine if passive immunization with the nicotine-specific monoclonal antibody Nic311 precipitated withdrawal in nicotine-dependent rats as measured by increases in brain reward thresholds and somatic signs. Another cohort of rats was used to measure brain nicotine levels after Nic311 administration. Nic311 30, 80 or 240 mg/kg reduced brain nicotine concentrations by 45, 83 or 92% compared to controls. None of these Nic311 doses precipitated withdrawal measured at intervals up to 72 hours following antibody administration. Administration of the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine precipitated a robust nicotine withdrawal syndrome. Therefore, a substantial, but not complete, acute reduction in brain nicotine levels following passive immunization was not sufficient to precipitate nicotine withdrawal in nicotine-dependent rats. The Nic311 doses used have been shown to attenuate the behavioral effects of nicotine, suggesting that the use of passive immunization to treat nicotine addiction is not likely to precipitate withdrawal. PMID:19393688

  17. Dolutegravir and elvitegravir plasma concentrations following cessation of drug intake.

    PubMed

    Elliot, Emilie; Amara, Alieu; Jackson, Akil; Moyle, Graeme; Else, Laura; Khoo, Saye; Back, David; Owen, Andrew; Boffito, Marta

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate dolutegravir and elvitegravir/cobicistat pharmacokinetics in HIV-negative volunteers up to 10 days after drug cessation. Healthy volunteers received 50 mg of dolutegravir once-daily for 10 days, then underwent a 9 day wash-out period, and then received elvitegravir/cobicistat as part of Stribild(®) (245 mg of tenofovir, 200 mg of emtricitabine, 150 mg of elvitegravir and 150 mg of cobicistat) for 10 days. Serial pharmacokinetic (PK) sampling occurred prior to the final dose of each course and at regular intervals for up to 216 h (10 days) after drug cessation. Concentrations were determined by LC-MS/MS, and PK parameters were illustrated as geometric mean and 90% CI. Seventeen volunteers completed the study. For dolutegravir, plasma terminal elimination t1/2 to the last measurable concentration (within 216 h) was longer than its t1/2 within the dosing interval (0-24 h): 14.3 h (12.9-15.7 h) versus 23.1 h (19.7-26.6 h); conversely, the terminal elimination t1/2 for elvitegravir was lower than its t1/2 within the dosing interval (0-24 h): 10.8 h (9.7-13.0 h) versus 5.2 h (4.7-6.1 h). Dolutegravir concentrations were above the protein-adjusted (PA) IC90 (64 ng/mL) in 100% of subjects after 36 and 48 h and in 94% after 60 and 72 h. All subjects had detectable dolutegravir concentrations at 96 h, a mean of 23.5% above the IC90. Elvitegravir concentrations were above the PA IC95 (45 ng/mL) in 100% of subjects at 24 h, 65% at 36 h but 0% after 48 h. Our data show marked differences in the elimination rates of dolutegravir and elvitegravir following treatment interruption, which is likely to impact the extent to which drug doses can be delayed or missed. They suggest that clinical differences may emerge in patients who have suboptimal adherence. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Effect of gaseous ammonia on nicotine sorption

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, A.M.; Singer, B.C.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    2002-06-01

    Nicotine is a major constituent of environmental tobacco smoke. Sorptive interactions of nicotine with indoor surfaces can substantially alter indoor concentrations. The phenomenon is poorly understood, including whether sorption is fully reversible or partially irreversible. They hypothesize that acid-base chemistry on indoor surfaces might contribute to the apparent irreversibility of nicotine sorption under some circumstances. Specifically, they suggest that nicotine may become protonated on surfaces, markedly reducing its vapor pressure. If so, subsequent exposure of the surface to gaseous ammonia, a common base, could raise the surface pH, causing deprotonation and desorption of nicotine from surfaces. A series of experiments was conducted to explore the effect of ammonia on nicotine sorption to and reemission from surfaces. The results indicate that, under some conditions, exposure to gaseous ammonia can substantially increase the rate of desorption of previously sorbed nicotine from common indoor surface materials.

  19. Seasonal variation in plasma thyroxine concentrations in juvenile alligators (Alligators mississippiensis) from three Florida Lakes.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Dieldrich S; Milnes, Matthew R; Bryan, Teresa A; Gunderson, Mark P; Tubbs, Christopher; Woodward, Allan R; Guillette, Louis J

    2005-05-01

    Circulating concentrations of thyroxine (T(4)) vary seasonally in many vertebrates. This study examined the seasonal variation in plasma concentrations of T(4) in juvenile American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) from three populations in central Florida, USA. One site, Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge, is considered a reference site whereas the other two lakes, Lake Apopka and Orange Lake, are significantly impacted by human activity. Juvenile American alligators ranging from 75-150 cm in total length were hand-captured at night from November 2000-April 2002. Plasma thyroxine concentrations were analyzed using a radioimmunoassay (RIA) previously validated for alligator plasma. Juvenile American alligators display seasonal variation in circulating T(4) concentrations. Plasma T(4) concentrations decrease from August/September to November and then begin a slow rise until April, at which point they plateau. Sex of juveniles influenced plasma concentrations of T(4) in some months but did not appear to alter the pattern in seasonal variation. The pattern we observed in plasma T(4) concentrations is not directly related to an environmental factor such as ambient temperature but is similar to that seen in plasma sex steroid concentrations during the reproductive cycle of adult alligators. Although the pattern and plasma concentration of T(4) exhibits significant variation among the three lakes studied, the pattern in seasonal variation appears similar. Comparing the seasonal pattern in plasma T(4) with plasma concentrations of sex steroids (testosterone and estradiol-17beta) or corticosterone could provide important information on the peripubescent life stage of the American alligator.

  20. Copper deficiency in sheep: an assessment of relationship between concentrations of copper in serum and plasma.

    PubMed

    Laven, Ra; Smith, Sl

    2008-12-01

    To assess the relationship between concentrations of copper in serum and plasma in sheep. Concentrations of Cu were measured in paired serum and heparinised plasma samples collected from 110 sheep in nine flocks. Linear regression was used to evaluate whether flock or gender had a significant effect on the association between concentrations of Cu in serum and plasma. The individual results for concentrations of Cu in serum were then compared with those from plasma, using correlation and limits of agreement plotting. Concentrations of Cu in serum ranged from 7.3 to 22 (mean 14.0) micromol/L, while concentrations in plasma ranged from 9 to 27 (mean 16.3) micromol/L. On average, concentrations of Cu in serum were 2.3 micromol/L lower than in plasma. Over the range of values seen in this study, concentrations of Cu in plasma and serum were significantly correlated (r=0.89), and mean concentrations in serum were 87% of those in plasma. There was no effect of flock or gender on the relationship between concentrations of Cu in serum and plasma. Despite the significant correlation, there was marked variability between individual samples in the proportion of Cu that was lost during clotting, with the 95% limits of agreement for serum Cu ranging from 70 to 104% of the plasma concentration. As in cattle, the individual variability in the loss of Cu during clotting in sheep is too great for concentration of Cu in serum to be used as a substitute for that in plasma. When assessing the blood Cu pool as part of the diagnosis of Cu-responsive disease in sheep, the concentration of Cu in plasma should be measured in preference to that of serum. We suggest that a range of 4.5 to 9 micromol/L in plasma be used to define marginal Cu status in sheep.

  1. Effect of Menthol on Nicotine Pharmacokinetics in Rats After Cigarette Smoke Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The effect of menthol on nicotine disposition is important in understanding smoking behaviors among different racial groups. The present study was to evaluate whether menthol affects the pharmacokinetics of nicotine after cigarette smoke inhalation. Methods: Rats were exposed to mainstream smoke from either a nonmentholated or mentholated cigarette (1 puff/min for 10 min) using a smoke inhalation apparatus. For the multiple-cigarette smoke inhalation, rats received the smoke from either nonmentholated or mentholated cigarette (10 puffs) every 12 hr for a total of 17 cigarettes. Serial blood samples were collected during the 10-min inhalation phase for the single-cigarette smoke or the 17th cigarette inhalation and for 30 hr thereafter. Nicotine and its major metabolite cotinine were assayed by radioimmunoassay methods. Results: Following single-cigarette smoke inhalation, mentholated cigarettes significantly decreased the mean peak concentrations of nicotine in plasma (Cmax) from 27.1 to 9.61 ng/ml and the total area under the plasma concentration–time curves (AUC) from 977 to 391 ng min/ml as compared with those after nonmentholated cigarette smoke inhalation. Cmax and AUC values for cotinine were also significantly reduced by menthol. Similarly after multiple smoke inhalation, Cmax, AUC, and the mean average steady-state plasma concentration of nicotine as well as cotinine were significantly lower in mentholated cigarette inhalation. Interestingly, there was a significant increase in the cotinine to nicotine AUC ratio from 13.8 for the nonmentholated to 21.1 for the mentholated cigarette. Conclusions: These results suggest that menthol in mentholated cigarettes can substantially decrease the absorption and/or increase the clearance of nicotine. PMID:22311961

  2. Association of plasma concentration of 4β-hydroxycholesterol with CYP3A5 polymorphism and plasma concentration of indoxyl sulfate in stable kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yosuke; Itoh, Hiroki; Fujioka, Takashi; Sato, Fuminori; Kawasaki, Kanako; Sato, Yukie; Sato, Yuhki; Ohno, Keiko; Mimata, Hiromitsu; Kishino, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have shown that renal failure decreases CYP3A activity and that uremic toxins may play a role via transcriptional or translational modifications of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes and direct inhibition of P450-mediated metabolism. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between CYP3A activity (using plasma concentration of 4β-hydroxycholesterol as a biomarker) and clinical characteristics including plasma concentrations of indoxyl sulfate (3-INDS) and indole-3-acetic acid (3-IAA) in stable kidney transplant recipients. Forty-five Japanese kidney transplant recipients who underwent transplantation more than 90 days prior to the study were included. Morning blood samples were collected and plasma concentrations of 4β-hydroxycholesterol, 3-INDS, and 3-IAA were measured. Plasma concentrations of 4β-hydroxycholesterol were 57.1 ± 11.2, 42.1 ± 11.8, and 34.5 ± 7.3 ng/ml in recipients with CYP3A5*1/*1 (n = 5), *1/*3 (n = 15), and *3/*3 (n = 25) genotypes, respectively, with significant differences between three genotypes. A significant correlation was observed between plasma concentrations of 4β-hydroxycholesterol and 3-INDS but not 3-IAA. Multiple regression analysis identified the number of CYP3A5*3 alleles in genotype, plasma concentration of 3-INDS, and body weight as independent variables associated with plasma concentration of 4β-hydroxycholesterol. In conclusion, these results suggest that CYP3A5 polymorphism and plasma concentration of 3-INDS may account for the interindividual variability of CYP3A activity, and that plasma concentration of 3-INDS may partially explain the gap in CYP3A activity that cannot be explained by genetic contribution in patients with renal failure.

  3. Nicotine behavioral pharmacology: clues from planarians

    PubMed Central

    Rawls, Scott M.; Patil, Tanvi; Tallarida, Christopher S.; Baron, Steven; Kim, Myongji; Song, Kevin; Ward, Sara; Raffa, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nicotine is one of the world’s most addictive substances and the primary reason that humans inhale tobacco smoke. The pharmacological effects of nicotine can be investigated in planarians, aquatic flatworms that possess an integrated neural network including cephalic ganglia that some consider the earliest “brain” and spinal cord. Here, we tested the hypothesis that nicotine exposure elicits mammalian-like behaviors in planarians. Methods Planarian motility and stereotypy (C-shape hyperkinesias) were quantified following acute nicotine exposure. During repeated nicotine exposure, we investigated the presence of withdrawal, tolerance, behavioral sensitization, and environmental place conditioning. Results Acute nicotine exposure increased stereotypical activity and elicited biphasic effects on motility. A low concentration (0.01 mM) increased motility whereas higher concentrations (0.3 – 10 mM) elicited the opposite effect. Planarians exposed to nicotine (0.03 mM) for 60 min and then tested in water displayed reduced motility that was not observed during exposure to water, acute nicotine, or continuous nicotine. Nicotine-treated planarians withdrawn from the drug for 3 days before being challenged with nicotine displayed behavioral sensitization at low concentrations (0.1, 0.3 mM) but tolerance at higher concentrations (1, 3 mM). Planarians conditioned with nicotine in the ambient light (non-preferred environment) displayed a reduction in their natural preference for a dark environment. Conclusions The present results suggest nicotine elicits mammalian-like effects in planarians, including decreased motility and increased stereotypy following acute administration and abstinence-induced withdrawal, behavioral sensitization, tolerance, and place conditioning during repeated exposure. PMID:21530106

  4. Metabolomics analysis reveals elevation of 3-indoxyl sulfate in plasma and brain during chemically-induced acute kidney injury in mice: Investigation of nicotinic acid receptor agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Zgoda-Pols, Joanna R.; Chowdhury, Swapan; Wirth, Mark; Milburn, Michael V.; Alexander, Danny C.; Alton, Kevin B.

    2011-08-15

    An investigative renal toxicity study using metabolomics was conducted with a potent nicotinic acid receptor (NAR) agonist, SCH 900424. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques were used to identify small molecule biomarkers of acute kidney injury (AKI) that could aid in a better mechanistic understanding of SCH 900424-induced AKI in mice. The metabolomics study revealed 3-indoxyl sulfate (3IS) as a more sensitive marker of SCH 900424-induced renal toxicity than creatinine or urea. An LC-MS assay for quantitative determination of 3IS in mouse matrices was also developed. Following treatment with SCH 900424, 3IS levels were markedly increased in murine plasma and brain, thereby potentially contributing to renal- and central nervous system (CNS)-related rapid onset of toxicities. Furthermore, significant decrease in urinary excretion of 3IS in those animals due to compromised renal function may be associated with the elevation of 3IS in plasma and brain. These data suggest that 3IS has a potential to be a marker of renal and CNS toxicities during chemically-induced AKI in mice. In addition, based on the metabolomic analysis other statistically significant plasma markers including p-cresol-sulfate and tryptophan catabolites (kynurenate, kynurenine, 3-indole-lactate) might be of toxicological importance but have not been studied in detail. This comprehensive approach that includes untargeted metabolomic and targeted bioanalytical sample analyses could be used to investigate toxicity of other compounds that pose preclinical or clinical development challenges in a pharmaceutical discovery and development. - Research Highlights: > Nicotinic acid receptor agonist, SCH 900424, caused acute kidney injury in mice. > MS-based metabolomics was conducted to identify potential small molecule markers of renal toxicity. > 3-indoxyl-sulfate was found to be as a more sensitive marker of renal toxicity than creatinine

  5. Doping concentration evaluation using plasma propagation models in plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Dushyant; Prasad, B.; George, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is a high dose-rate implantation process technique in the area of semiconductor device fabrication used to fabricate various device structures like shallow junction, silicon on insulators and in the processing of flat panel display materials, trench doping, etc. The basic mechanism of ions source and their acceleration in PIII technique is different from that of the conventional ion-implantation. In this, the target is immersed in a plasma source and the implantation is done by accelerating the ions with a negative pulse bias voltage, applied to the target. The dynamics of ion transport and the implantation is different from line-of-sight implantation. In this paper, the doping of individual ions (Ar, He and N), in a collisionless PIII system is studied analytically when a negative pulse of 10 kV is applied to the target. The net ion doping concentration in one pulse duration has also been computed during the propagation of plasma sheaths.

  6. Interactions of nucleoside analogs, caffeine, and nicotine with human concentrative nucleoside transporters 1 and 2 stably produced in a transport-defective human cell line.

    PubMed

    Lang, Thack T; Young, James D; Cass, Carol E

    2004-04-01

    Pharmacologically important drugs were examined as potential inhibitors or permeants of human concentrative nucleoside transporters 1 (hCNT1)- and 2 (hCNT2)-producing stable transfectants by assessing their abilities to inhibit uridine transport. hCNT1 exhibited high affinities for uridine analogs (5-fluorouridine, 2'-deoxyuridine, 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine, and 5-fluoro-5'-deoxyuridine) with K(i) values of 22 to 33 microM, whereas hCNT2 exhibited moderate affinities for 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine, high affinities for 2'-deoxyuridine and 5-fluorouridine, and low affinity for 5-fluoro-5'-deoxyuridine. The uridine analogs were transported at 2-fold higher rates (at 10 microM) by hCNT1 than by hCNT2. Enantiomeric configuration and the 3'-hydroxyl group of the ribose ring were important determinants for interaction with hCNTs, whereas the 2'-hydroxyl group was less important. Both transporters bound N(6)-(p-aminobenzyl)adenosine with affinities similar to those of adenosine (K(i) = 28-39 microM). Other adenosine receptor ligands, including caffeine, bound better to hCNT1 than to hCNT2 (K(i) = 46 versus 103 microM, respectively), whereas 2-chloroadenosine bound better to hCNT2 than to hCNT1 (K(i) = 37 and 101 microM, respectively). There was a greater than 3-fold difference in binding affinities between hCNT1 and hCNT2 for nicotine (K(i) = 63 versus 227 microM). However, direct measurements of nicotine and caffeine uptake rates (10 microM) failed to demonstrate mediated uptake by either transporter. Although hCNT1 bound several adenosine analogs relatively well, it did not transport 2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (cladribine) or 2-fluoro-9-beta-d-arabinofuranosyladenine (fludarabine), whereas hCNT2 transported both, albeit with low activities. The results indicated that although hCNT1 and hCNT2 possess some overlap in transport of several uridine and adenosine analogs, they also exhibit distinct differences in capacity to interact with some adenosine receptor ligands

  7. Nicotine delivery and subjective effects of Swedish portion snus compared with 4 mg nicotine polacrilex chewing gum.

    PubMed

    Lunell, Erik; Curvall, Margareta

    2011-07-01

    Snus availability has been claimed to have contributed to the low rates of smoking among Swedish men and made possible the transfer to a less harmful form of nicotine dependence. Fourteen cigarette smokers were randomly assigned to 2 types of 1 g Swedish portion snus and 4 mg nicotine polacrilex (NP) chewing gum in open-label, single-dose crossover study. Nicotine delivery and pharmacokinetics were estimated, and self-reports of subjective effects were obtained using Visual Analogue Scales (VASs). Extracted dose from the NP gum averaged 2.56 mg compared with 2.12 and 2.18 mg, respectively, for Swedish portion snus. This resulted in a slightly larger area under the curve (AUC) for the NP chewing gum. The rise of the nicotine plasma concentration was faster for Swedish snus. Median T(max) was shorter, 30 min for snus compared with 45 min for the NP gum. The lower C(max) of NP gum compared with the snus products in spite of larger AUC may be explained by slower absorption from the chewing gum. The faster absorption of nicotine from Swedish portion snus was mirrored in a higher VAS score for "head rush." Craving/urges to smoke decreased similarly for all treatments. Salivation and throat burn were rated higher for the 4 mg NP gum compared with both types of snus. Swedish snus produced higher maximum blood nicotine concentration in shorter time and with a quicker onset of "head rush" compared with 4 mg NP chewing gum in spite of a smaller extracted dose. The quicker onset of "head rush" and supposedly higher satisfaction from snus may partly explain the widespread use of snus for stopping smoking in Sweden.

  8. Atazanavir increases the plasma concentrations of 1200 mg raltegravir dose.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajesh; East, Lilly; Larson, Patrick; Valiathan, Chandni; Deschamps, Kathleen; Luk, Julie Ann; Bethel-Brown, Crystal; Manthos, Helen; Brejda, John; Gartner, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Raltegravir is a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitor currently marketed at a dose of 400 mg twice-daily (b.i.d.). Raltegravir 1200 mg once-daily (q.d.) (investigational q.d. formulation of 2 × 600 mg tablets; q.d. RAL) was found to be generally well tolerated and non-inferior to the marketed 400 mg b.i.d. dose at 48 weeks in a phase 3 trial. Since raltegravir is eliminated mainly by metabolism via a uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1-mediated glucuronidation pathway, co-administration of UGT1A1 inhibitors may increase the plasma levels of q.d. RAL. To assess this potential, the drug interaction of 1200 mg raltegravir using atazanavir, a known UGT1A1 inhibitor, was studied. An open-label, randomized, 2-period, fixed-sequence phase 1 study was performed in adult healthy male and female (non-childbearing potential) subjects ≥ 19 and ≤ 55 years of age, with a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 18.5 and ≤ 32.0 kg/m(2) . Subjects (n = 14) received a single oral dose of 1200 mg raltegravir in period 1. After a washout period of at least 7 days, the subjects received oral doses of 400 mg atazanavir q.d. for 9 consecutive days, with a single oral dose of 1200 mg raltegravir co-administered on day 7 of period 2. Serial blood samples were collected for 72 h following raltegravir dosing and analysed using a validated bioanalytical method to quantify raltegravir plasma concentrations. Co-administration with atazanavir yielded GMRs (90% CIs) for raltegravir AUC0-∞ , Cmax and C24 of 1.67 (1.34, 2.10), 1.16 (1.01, 1.33) and 1.26 (1.08, 1.46), respectively. There was no effect of raltegravir on serum total bilirubin. In contrast, atazanavir increased the mean bilirubin by up to 200%, an effect that was preserved in the atazanavir/raltegravir treatment group. Administration of single q.d. RAL alone and co-administered with multiple oral doses of atazanavir were generally well tolerated in healthy subjects. The results show that

  9. Lutein supplementation increases breast milk and plasma lutein concentrations in lactating women and infant plasma concentrations but does not affect other carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Christina L; Oliver, Jeffery S; Renzi, Lisa M; Marriage, Barbara J

    2014-08-01

    Lutein is a carotenoid that varies in breast milk depending on maternal intake. Data are lacking with regard to the effect of dietary lutein supplementation on breast milk lutein concentration during lactation and subsequent plasma lutein concentration in breast-fed infants. This study was conducted to determine the impact of lutein supplementation in the breast milk and plasma of lactating women and in the plasma of breast-fed infants 2-3 mo postpartum. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in the infant brain and the major carotenoid found in the retina of the eye. Eighty-nine lactating women 4-6 wk postpartum were randomly assigned to be administered either 0 mg/d of lutein (placebo), 6 mg/d of lutein (low-dose), or 12 mg/d of lutein (high-dose). The supplements were consumed for 6 wk while mothers followed their usual diets. Breast milk carotenoids were measured weekly by HPLC, and maternal plasma carotenoid concentrations were measured at the beginning and end of the study. Infant plasma carotenoid concentrations were assessed at the end of the study. No significant differences were found between dietary lutein + zeaxanthin intake and carotenoid concentrations in breast milk and plasma or body mass index at baseline. Total lutein + zeaxanthin concentrations were greater in the low- and high-dose-supplemented groups than in the placebo group in breast milk (140% and 250%, respectively; P < 0.0001), maternal plasma (170% and 250%, respectively; P < 0.0001), and infant plasma (180% and 330%, respectively; P < 0.05). Lutein supplementation did not affect other carotenoids in lactating women or their infants. Lactating women are highly responsive to lutein supplementation, which affects plasma lutein concentrations in the infant. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01747668.

  10. Lutein Supplementation Increases Breast Milk and Plasma Lutein Concentrations in Lactating Women and Infant Plasma Concentrations but Does Not Affect Other Carotenoids123

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Christina L.; Oliver, Jeffery S.; Renzi, Lisa M.; Marriage, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Lutein is a carotenoid that varies in breast milk depending on maternal intake. Data are lacking with regard to the effect of dietary lutein supplementation on breast milk lutein concentration during lactation and subsequent plasma lutein concentration in breast-fed infants. This study was conducted to determine the impact of lutein supplementation in the breast milk and plasma of lactating women and in the plasma of breast-fed infants 2–3 mo postpartum. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in the infant brain and the major carotenoid found in the retina of the eye. Eighty-nine lactating women 4–6 wk postpartum were randomly assigned to be administered either 0 mg/d of lutein (placebo), 6 mg/d of lutein (low-dose), or 12 mg/d of lutein (high-dose). The supplements were consumed for 6 wk while mothers followed their usual diets. Breast milk carotenoids were measured weekly by HPLC, and maternal plasma carotenoid concentrations were measured at the beginning and end of the study. Infant plasma carotenoid concentrations were assessed at the end of the study. No significant differences were found between dietary lutein + zeaxanthin intake and carotenoid concentrations in breast milk and plasma or body mass index at baseline. Total lutein + zeaxanthin concentrations were greater in the low- and high-dose–supplemented groups than in the placebo group in breast milk (140% and 250%, respectively; P < 0.0001), maternal plasma (170% and 250%, respectively; P < 0.0001), and infant plasma (180% and 330%, respectively; P < 0.05). Lutein supplementation did not affect other carotenoids in lactating women or their infants. Lactating women are highly responsive to lutein supplementation, which affects plasma lutein concentrations in the infant. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01747668. PMID:24899160

  11. Plasma noradrenaline concentration and blood pressure in essential hypertension, phaeochromocytoma and depression.

    PubMed

    Louis, W J; Doyle, A E; Anavekar, S N

    1975-06-01

    1. Mean plasma noradrenaline concentration was elevated in forty-four patients with established essential hypertension. Eighteen of the hypertensive patients had resting plasma noradrenaline concentrations in the normal range. 2. Patients with endogenous depression had higher mean plasma noradrenaline concentrations but significantly lower blood pressure than patients with essential hypertension. 3. Patients with phaeochromocytoma had plasma noradrenaline concentrations twenty-eight times greater than those found in essential hypertension, but blood pressures were less than 20% higher. 4. It is concluded that excess of sympathetic drive only partly explains the level of the blood pressure in essential hypertension.

  12. Inhibition of neutrophil and monocyte defensive functions by nicotine.

    PubMed

    Pabst, M J; Pabst, K M; Collier, J A; Coleman, T C; Lemons-Prince, M L; Godat, M S; Waring, M B; Babu, J P

    1995-12-01

    To learn more about the effects of smokeless tobacco on the defensive functions of neutrophils, we studied the influence of nicotine on these cells in vitro, looking at their bactericidal activity against oral pathogens, and at their ability to produce microbicidal reactive oxygen species (oxygen radicals). Exposure of human blood neutrophils to nicotine (0.01% to 0.1%) inhibited their ability to kill Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Although these concentrations of nicotine are high, such concentrations are relevant to phagocytes in the gingival sulcus, because smokeless tobacco contains 0.5% to 3.5% nicotine by dry weight. Nicotine had no such inhibitory effect when the killing assay was performed in an anaerobic environment, implying that nicotine preferentially affected oxygen-dependent killing mechanisms. To further investigate the effects of nicotine on production of oxygen radicals, neutrophils were primed with lipopolysaccharide and triggered with f-met-leu-phe or phorbol ester in the presence of nicotine. Nicotine inhibited production of superoxide anion (measured by reduction of cytochrome c) and hydrogen peroxide (measured by oxidation of phenol red). Nicotine inhibition of superoxide production was reversible by washing away the nicotine. By observing that nicotine inhibited the reduction of cytochrome c by reagent potassium superoxide, we determined that nicotine directly absorbed superoxide. In addition, by examining nicotine inhibition of the uptake of oxygen by neutrophils, we determined that nicotine also interfered with the production of oxygen radicals by these cells. Nicotine also inhibited production of superoxide and interleukin-1 beta by monocytes. Nicotine did not affect the viability of neutrophils and monocytes, as determined by their ability to exclude trypan blue dye. Inhibition of the aerobic antimicrobial functions of neutrophils and monocytes by nicotine may alter the microbial

  13. Nicotine kinetics in zebra finches in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Miksys, Sharon; Cappendijk, Susanne L T; Perry, William M; Zhao, Bin; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2013-06-01

    Nicotine enhances cognitive performance, and in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), which is a well-established model of cognition, the effects of nicotine on song production have been reported. Nicotine and cotinine plasma levels were assessed in vivo after subcutaneous injection of 0.18 mg/kg nicotine, a dose that elicits changes in song production. The half-life of nicotine elimination was 33 minutes, and levels were undetectable by 4 hours. Average plasma nicotine over 2 hours was 32 ng/ml, similar to levels seen in human smokers and rat models of nicotine behavior. Nicotine brain levels were 30 and 14 ng/g 1 and 2 hours after treatment. To understand the potential for drug interactions and the regulation of nicotine metabolism in zebra finches, we characterized in vitro nicotine metabolism and the hepatic enzyme involved. In humans, cytochrome P450 2A6 metabolizes nicotine to cotinine, and CYP2A-like activity and protein have been reported in some birds. Zebra finch liver microsomes metabolized nicotine and bupropion (a CYP2B substrate) but not coumarin (a CYP2A substrate). Nicotine was metabolized to cotinine with a Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)) of 96 µM and a V(max) of 56 pmol/min per milligram. Nicotine and bupropion metabolism was inhibited by C-8-xanthate (a specific CYP2B inhibitor) but not by CYP2A-specific inhibitors, and hepatic levels of CYP2B-like but not CYP2A-like proteins correlated with nicotine (r = 0.52; P = 0.04) and bupropion metabolism (r = 0.81; P < 0.001), suggesting CYP2B-mediation of nicotine metabolism as seen in rats. These results will facilitate further investigation of nicotine's effects in zebra finches.

  14. Nicotine Induces the Up-regulation of the α7-Nicotinic Receptor (α7-nAChR) in Human Squamous Cell Lung Cancer Cells via the Sp1/GATA Protein Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kathleen C.; Perry, Haley E.; Lau, Jamie K.; Jones, Dennie V.; Pulliam, Joseph F.; Thornhill, Brent A.; Crabtree, Clayton M.; Luo, Haitao; Chen, Yi. Charlie; Dasgupta, Piyali

    2013-01-01

    Nicotine, the addictive component of cigarettes, promotes lung cancer proliferation via the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) subtype. The present manuscript explores the effect of nicotine exposure on α7-nAChR levels in squamous cell carcinoma of the lung (SCC-L) in vitro and in vivo. Nicotine (at concentrations present in the plasma of average smokers) increased α7-nAChR levels in human SCC-L cell lines. Nicotine-induced up-regulation of α7-nAChR was confirmed in vivo by chicken chorioallantoic membrane models. We also observed that the levels of α7-nAChR in human SCC-L tumors (isolated from patients who are active smokers) correlated with their smoking history. Nicotine increased the levels of α7-nAChR mRNA and α7-nAChR transcription in human SCC-L cell lines and SCC-L tumors. Nicotine-induced up-regulation of α7-nAChR required GATA4 and GATA6. ChIP assays showed that nicotine induced the binding of GATA4 or GATA6 to Sp1 on the α7-nAChR promoter, thereby inducing its transcription and increasing its levels in human SCC-L. Our data are clinically relevant because SCC-L patients smoked for decades before being diagnosed with cancer. It may be envisaged that continuous exposure to nicotine (in such SCC-L patients) causes up-regulation of α7-nAChRs, which facilitates tumor growth and progression. Our results will also be relevant to many SCC-L patients exposed to nicotine via second-hand smoke, electronic cigarettes, and patches or gums to quit smoking. PMID:24089524

  15. Decreased plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor concentrations during military training.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Go; Tokuno, Shinichi; Nibuya, Masashi; Ishida, Toru; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Mukai, Yasuo; Mitani, Keiji; Tsumatori, Gentaro; Scott, Daniel; Shimizu, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    Decreased concentrations of plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and serum BDNF have been proposed to be a state marker of depression and a biological indicator of loaded psychosocial stress. Stress evaluations of participants in military mission are critically important and appropriate objective biological parameters that evaluate stress are needed. In military circumstances, there are several problems to adopt plasma BDNF concentration as a stress biomarker. First, in addition to psychosocial stress, military missions inevitably involve physical exercise that increases plasma BDNF concentrations. Second, most participants in the mission do not have adequate quality or quantity of sleep, and sleep deprivation has also been reported to increase plasma BDNF concentration. We evaluated plasma BDNF concentrations in 52 participants on a 9-week military mission. The present study revealed that plasma BDNF concentration significantly decreased despite elevated serum enzymes that escaped from muscle and decreased quantity and quality of sleep, as detected by a wearable watch-type sensor. In addition, we observed a significant decrease in plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) during the mission. VEGF is also neurotrophic and its expression in the brain has been reported to be up-regulated by antidepressive treatments and down-regulated by stress. This is the first report of decreased plasma VEGF concentrations by stress. We conclude that decreased plasma concentrations of neurotrophins can be candidates for mental stress indicators in actual stressful environments that include physical exercise and limited sleep.

  16. Intracellular CD3+ T Lymphocyte Teriflunomide Concentration Is Poorly Correlated with and Has Greater Variability Than Unbound Plasma Teriflunomide Concentration.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Ashley M; Moghaddami, Mahin; Foster, David J R; Proudman, Susanna M; Upton, Richard N; Wiese, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    Leflunomide's active metabolite teriflunomide inhibits dihydro-oroate dehydrogenase, an enzyme essential to proliferation of T lymphocytes. As teriflunomide must reach the target site to have this effect, this study assessed the distribution of teriflunomide into T lymphocytes, as intracellular concentrations may be a superior response biomarker to plasma concentrations. CD3 MicroBeads (Miltenyi Biotec, Bergisch Gladbach, Germany) were used to extract CD3(+) T cells from the peripheral blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were taking a stable dose of leflunomide. Unbound plasma and intra-CD3(+) T cell teriflunomide concentrations were quantified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Concentration (log transformed) and partition differences were assessed through paired Student t tests. Sixteen patients provided plasma steady-state teriflunomide samples, and eight provided a sample 6-12 weeks later. At time-point one, the geometric mean teriflunomide concentration (range) in CD3(+) T cells was 18.12 μg/L (6.15-42.26 μg/L) compared with 69.75 μg/L (32.89-263.1 μg/L) unbound in plasma (P < 0.001). The mean partition coefficient (range) for unbound plasma teriflunomide into CD3(+) T cells was 0.295 (0.092-0.632), which was significantly different from unity (P < 0.001). The median (range) change in teriflunomide concentration between the two time points was 14% (-10% to 40%) in unbound plasma and -29% (-69 to 138%) for CD3(+) T cells. Because teriflunomide concentrations in CD3(+) T cells were lower and displayed a higher intraindividual variability than the unbound plasma concentrations, its applicability as a therapeutic drug-monitoring marker may be limited. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. Urinary strong ion difference is a major determinant of plasma chloride concentration changes in postoperative patients

    PubMed Central

    Masevicius, Fabio Daniel; Vazquez, Alejandro Risso; Enrico, Carolina; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2013-01-01

    Objective To show that alterations in the plasma chloride concentration ([Cl-]plasma) during the postoperative period are largely dependent on the urinary strong ion difference ([SID]urine=[Na+]urine+[K+]urine-[Cl-]urine) and not on differences in fluid therapy. Methods Measurements were performed at intensive care unit admission and 24 hours later in a total of 148 postoperative patients. Patients were assigned into one of three groups according to the change in [Cl-]plasma at the 24 hours time point: increased [Cl-]plasma (n=39), decreased [Cl-]plasma (n=56) or unchanged [Cl-]plasma (n=53). Results On admission, the increased [Cl-]plasma group had a lower [Cl-]plasma (105±5 versus 109±4 and 106±3mmol/L, p<0.05), a higher plasma anion gap concentration ([AG]plasma) and a higher strong ion gap concentration ([SIG]). After 24 hours, the increased [Cl-]plasma group showed a higher [Cl-]plasma (111±4 versus 104±4 and 107±3mmol/L, p<0.05) and lower [AG]plasma and [SIG]. The volume and [SID] of administered fluids were similar between groups except that the [SID]urine was higher (38±37 versus 18±22 and 23±18mmol/L, p<0.05) in the increased [Cl-]plasma group at the 24 hours time point. A multiple linear regression analysis showed that the [Cl-]plasma on admission and [SID]urine were independent predictors of the variation in [Cl-]plasma 24 hours later. Conclusions Changes in [Cl-]plasma during the first postoperative day were largely related to [SID]urine and [Cl-]plasma on admission and not to the characteristics of the infused fluids. Therefore, decreasing [SID]urine could be a major mechanism for preventing the development of saline-induced hyperchloremia. PMID:24213082

  18. Seasonal variation in plasma free normetanephrine concentrations: implications for biochemical diagnosis of pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Pamporaki, Christina; Bursztyn, Michael; Reimann, Manja; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Bornstein, Stefan R; Sweep, Fred C G J; Timmers, Henri; Lenders, Jacques W M; Eisenhofer, Graeme

    2014-03-01

    Higher plasma concentrations of catecholamines in winter than in summer have been established, but whether this impacts the plasma concentrations of metanephrines used for the diagnosis of pheochromocytoma is unknown. In this study, we examined seasonal variations in the plasma concentrations of metanephrines, the impact of this on diagnostic test performance and the influences of forearm warming ('arterialization' of venous blood) on blood flow and measured concentrations. The measurements of the plasma concentrations of metanephrines were recorded from 4052 patients tested for pheochromocytoma at two clinical centers. Among these patients, 107 had tumors. An additional 26 volunteers were enrolled for the measurements of plasma metanephrines and forearm blood flow before and after forearm warming. There was no seasonal variation in the plasma concentrations of metanephrines among patients with pheochromocytoma, whereas among those without tumors, the plasma concentrations of normetanephrine were higher (P<0.0001) in winter than in summer. Lowest concentrations of normetanephrine were measured in July, with those recorded from December to April being more than 21% higher (P<0.0001). These differences resulted in a twofold higher (P=0.0012) prevalence of false-positive elevations of normetanephrine concentrations in winter than in summer, associated with a drop in overall diagnostic specificity from 96% in summer to 92% in winter (P=0.0010). Forearm warming increased blood flow and lowered (P=0.0020) plasma normetanephrine concentrations. The plasma concentrations of normetanephrine are subject to seasonal variation with a resulting higher prevalence of false-positive results in winter than in summer. Lowered plasma concentrations of normetanephrine with forearm warming suggest an effect of temperature. These results have implications for considerations of temperature to minimize false-positive results.

  19. Nicotine replacement therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... nicotine replacement product, even for a short time. Alternative Names Smoking cessation - nicotine replacement; Tobacco - nicotine replacement therapy References American Cancer Society. Guide to quitting smoking. Last revised February ...

  20. Nicotine Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Nicotine oral inhalation is used to help people stop smoking. Nicotine oral inhalation should be used together with a ... support groups, counseling, or specific behavioral change techniques. Nicotine inhalation is in a class of medications called ...

  1. Increase in plasma cortisol concentrations in ewes fed oestrogenic subterranean clover.

    PubMed

    Tang, B Y; Adams, N R; Sawyer, G J

    1979-11-01

    Pen-feeding oestrogenic clover to ewes increased their plasma cortisol concentration by the third day. This was not due to any change in the variation of cortisol concentration with time of day. Ovulation rate was not affected during the experiment as judged by the levels of plasma progesterone and laparoscopy. The plasma cortisol concentration of ewes also rose within three days of their being placed on oestrogenic clover pasture. During the next 21 days, their mean plasma cortisol was increased by 58 per cent. A previous history of clover disease did not affect this response.

  2. Sex-selective hippocampal alterations after adolescent nicotine administration: effects on neurospecific proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zengjun; Seidler, Frederic J; Tate, Charlotte A; Garcia, Stephanie J; Slikker, William; Slotkin, Theodore A

    2003-12-01

    Nicotine is a neuroteratogen that targets cell development and synaptic function into adolescence, when smoking typically commences. We used a rat model of adolescent nicotine exposure to characterize the types of cells involved in hippocampal alterations. Nicotine was given to adolescent rats by minipump infusions from postnatal day (PN) 30 to PN47.5, using a dose rate (6 mg/kg/day) that replicates the plasma nicotine levels found in smokers. We examined specific neuronal and astrocyte proteins in the posttreatment period (PN50, PN60), when deficits in neurotransmission first appear: glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker for astrocytes; neurofilament 68-kDa protein (NF68), which is concentrated in the neuronal perikaryon and proximal neurites; and neurofilament 200-kDa protein (NF200), which is found in axonal projections distal to the perikaryon. Adolescent nicotine treatment evoked a significant decrease across all three markers, with the effect restricted to females and showing intensification between PN50 and PN60. These changes correspond to the sex-selectivity and temporal course over which other biomarkers indicate hippocampal cell damage and alterations in synaptic function. We conclude that administration of nicotine to adolescent rats alters neuroproteins in the female hippocampus during withdrawal, effects that could contribute to neurobehavioral deficits.

  3. Effects of smoking and nicotine on human prostacyclin and thromboxane production in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Toivanen, J; Ylikorkala, O; Viinikka, L

    1986-02-01

    We studied the effects of smoking and nicotine on the production of proaggregatory thromboxane A2 (TxA2), antiaggregatory prostacyclin (epoprostenol, PGI2), and on lipid peroxidation in vivo and in vitro. In the in vivo study, serum concentrations of thromboxane B2 (TxB2), a stable metabolite of TxA2, increased immediately after smoking three cigarettes but not after smoking the equivalent amount of tobacco in a pipe, whereas serum lipid peroxide values did not change in either group. In vitro, nicotine (2 X 10(-3) mol/liter) inhibited pulmonary TxB2 production by 70% and simultaneously stimulated the production of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha, a stable metabolite of PGI2, by 40%, which suggest that nicotine does not exert its effect at the cyclooxygenase level. During aggregation in platelet-rich plasma, TxB2 production was inhibited by 53% with 2 X 10(-3) mol/liter of nicotine, and during whole blood clotting the inhibition was 34% with 2 X 10(-4) mol/liter of nicotine. Thus the rise in cigarette smokers' serum TxB2 was probably caused by some constituent of cigarette smoke other than nicotine. The increased production of TxA2 following cigarette smoking may provide one explanation for the increased incidence of atherosclerosis and its complications in cigarette smokers.

  4. Stress-induced changes in corticosteroid metabolism. [plasma and urine concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacker, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    Because plasma and urine corticosteroid concentrations are influenced by several factors in addition to adrenal cortex secretion, the effect of stress on all of these factors was determined in order to interpret the plasma and urine concentrations. Progress on the investigation is reported.

  5. Stress-induced changes in corticosteroid metabolism. [plasma and urine concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacker, M. M.

    1975-01-01

    Because plasma and urine corticosteroid concentrations are influenced by several factors in addition to adrenal cortex secretion, the effect of stress on all of these factors was determined in order to interpret the plasma and urine concentrations. Progress on the investigation is reported.

  6. Plasma nitrendipine concentrations in elderly hypertensive patients after single and multiple dosing.

    PubMed Central

    Crome, P; Baksi, A; MacMahon, D; Pandita-Gunawardena, N D; Edwards, J; Marley, J

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-three elderly hypertensive subjects received nitrendipine 10mg daily by mouth for 8 days. Plasma nitrendipine concentrations were measured after the first and last dose. There was no significant difference in plasma concentrations at any time point between the two days nor in derived pharmacokinetic measurements. Drug accumulation was not observed. PMID:3179170

  7. Venlafaxine and O-desmethylvenlafaxine concentrations in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Paulzen, Michael; Groppe, Sarah; Tauber, Simone C; Veselinovic, Tanja; Hiemke, Christoph; Gründer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether drug concentrations of venlafaxine and its metabolite O-desmethylvenlafaxine in plasma can be considered as a surrogate marker of concentrations in brain/cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). For therapeutic drug monitoring purposes, plasma and CSF concentrations of venlafaxine and O-desmethylvenlafaxine were measured between November 2011 and August 2013 in 16 depressive inpatients (ICD-10 diagnoses) who were treated with daily doses of venlafaxine extended release (dose range, 75-225 mg). Daily doses were correlated with plasma and CSF levels. The correlation between venlafaxine, O-desmethylvenlafaxine, and the active moiety (AM) in plasma and CSF was calculated. Venlafaxine in plasma (P = .005) and CSF (P = .023) correlated significantly with the daily dose, while O-desmethylvenlafaxine and the active moiety (AM = venlafaxine + O-desmethylvenlafaxine) did not. The correlation between venlafaxine, O-desmethylvenlafaxine, and the AM in plasma and CSF was highly significant (P < .001). The calculated CSF/plasma ratio was 0.74 for venlafaxine, 0.88 for O-desmethylvenlafaxine, and 0.84 for the AM. Venlafaxine and O-desmethylvenlafaxine were found to penetrate well into CSF in patients, which indicated good availability of the drug in the brain, although the findings on CSF concentrations do not allow calculation of concentrations at the target structure within the brain. CSF/plasma ratios for venlafaxine and its metabolite were high probably due to low plasma protein binding. The poor correlation of dose to concentrations in body fluids and the highly significant correlation of plasma to CSF concentrations indicate that plasma concentration is a much better marker of drug concentration in brain than the dose. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  8. Differential Responses of Plasma Adropin Concentrations To Dietary Glucose or Fructose Consumption In Humans.

    PubMed

    Butler, Andrew A; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Siebert, Emily A; Medici, Valentina; Stanhope, Kimber L; Havel, Peter J

    2015-10-05

    Adropin is a peptide hormone encoded by the Energy Homeostasis Associated (ENHO) gene whose physiological role in humans remains incompletely defined. Here we investigated the impact of dietary interventions that affect systemic glucose and lipid metabolism on plasma adropin concentrations in humans. Consumption of glucose or fructose as 25% of daily energy requirements (E) differentially affected plasma adropin concentrations (P < 0.005) irrespective of duration, sex or age. Glucose consumption reduced plasma adropin from 3.55 ± 0.26 to 3.28 ± 0.23 ng/ml (N = 42). Fructose consumption increased plasma adropin from 3.63 ± 0.29 to 3.93 ± 0.34 ng/ml (N = 45). Consumption of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) as 25% E had no effect (3.43 ± 0.32 versus 3.39 ± 0.24 ng/ml, N = 26). Overall, the effect of glucose, HFCS and fructose on circulating adropin concentrations were similar to those observed on postprandial plasma triglyceride concentrations. Furthermore, increases in plasma adropin levels with fructose intake were most robust in individuals exhibiting hypertriglyceridemia. Individuals with low plasma adropin concentrations also exhibited rapid increases in plasma levels following consumption of breakfasts supplemented with lipids. These are the first results linking plasma adropin levels with dietary sugar intake in humans, with the impact of fructose consumption linked to systemic triglyceride metabolism. In addition, dietary fat intake may also increase circulating adropin concentrations.

  9. Elevated plasma and urinary concentrations of green tea catechins associated with improved plasma lipid profile in healthy Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Takechi, Ryusuke; Alfonso, Helman; Hiramatsu, Naoko; Ishisaka, Akari; Tanaka, Akira; Tan, La'Belle; Lee, Andy H

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated green tea catechins in plasma and urine and chronic disease biomarkers. We hypothesized that plasma and urinary concentration of green tea catechins are associated with cardiovascular disease and diabetes biomarkers. First void urine and fasting plasma samples were collected from 57 generally healthy females aged 38 to 73 years (mean, 52 ± 8 years) recruited in Himeji, Japan. The concentrations of plasma and urinary green tea catechins were determined by liquid chromatography coupled with mass tandem spectrometer. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, insulin, glycated hemoglobin, and C-reactive protein in plasma/serum samples were analyzed by a commercial diagnostic laboratory. Statistical associations were assessed using Spearman correlation coefficients. The results showed weak associations between plasma total catechin and triglyceride (r = -0.30) and LDL cholesterol (r = -0.28), whereas plasma (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, (-)-epigallocatechin, (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate, and (-)-epicatechin exhibited weak to moderate associations with triglyceride or LDL cholesterol, but little associations with HDL cholesterol, body fat, and body mass index were evident. Urinary total catechin was weakly associated with triglyceride (r = -0.19) and LDL cholesterol (r = -0.15), whereas urinary (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (r = -0.33), (-)-epigallocatechin (r = -0.23), and (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (r = -0.33) had weak to moderate correlations with triglyceride and similarly with body fat and body mass index. Both plasma (r = -0.24) and urinary (r = -0.24) total catechin, as well as individual catechins, were weakly associated with glycated hemoglobin. Plasma total and individual catechins were weakly to moderately associated with C-reactive protein, but not the case for urinary catechins. In conclusion, we found weak to moderate associations between plasma and urinary green tea

  10. Seminal plasma hormone concentration after oral application of progesterone.

    PubMed

    Feuring, M; Bertsch, T; Tran, B M; Rossol-Haseroth, K; Losel, R; Tillmann, H C; Schultz, A; Weigel, M; Wehling, M

    2002-02-01

    Previous studies have revealed beneficial in vitro effects of progesterone on sperm function. The aim of this pilot study was to prove if orally given micronized progesterone leads to elevations in progesterone and/or 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone levels in seminal plasma, since higher seminal plasma levels of these hormones could possibly have a beneficial effect on sperm function as seen in in vitro investigations. Multiple application of micronized progesterone given over 4 days (daily dose 400 mg) to 6 healthy subjects resulted in elevated seminal plasma levels of progesterone (10.90 +/- 9.02 nmol/l vs. 1.43 +/- 0.56 nmol/l, p = 0.04) and 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (3.09 +/- 1.72 nmol/l vs. 1.62 +/- 1.26 nmol/l, p = 0.04) whereas no significant difference could be found in testosterone levels (34.82 +/- 13.00 vs. 30.91 +/- 8.56 nmol/l, p = 0.43). In contrast, androstendione levels in seminal plasma were reduced (2.68 1.28 nmol/l vs. 3.65 +/- 1.36 nmol/l, p = 0.01). Although micronized progesterone is rapidly metabolized, oral application resulted in pronounced elevations of progesterone and 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone in seminal plasma. Further studies will show if oral application of micronized progesterone can induce beneficial effects on sperm function such as those seen in in vitro investigations.

  11. Concentrations in plasma clozapine levels in schizophrenic and schizoaffective patients.

    PubMed

    Iglesias García, Celso; Iglesias Alonso, Ana; Bobes, Julio

    2017-08-22

    There is great variability in plasma levels of clozapine. The objective of this study is to know the characteristics of patients treated with clozapine and the relationship between them and the variability of plasma levels. Descriptive, cross-sectional study of all patients currently treated with clozapine in a Psychiatric Service with a diagnosis of schizophrenic psychosis or schizoaffective disorder. The present study assessed physical situation, psychopathology and functionality of the patients and explored the associations and correlations between clinical variables and plasma levels. We studied 39 patients, predominantly men, with negative and depressive symptoms and cardiovascular risk factors (metabolic syndrome and smoking). Significant variability in dose and even greater in clozapine levels were observed. The levels of clozapine at equal doses/kg of body weight were higher in non-smokers, they had positive correlation with BMI and negative correlation with systolic BP, disruptive behaviors and number of cigarettes consumed. Plasma level monitoring clozapine is an important tool to avoid clozapine plasma levels monitoring and minimize undesirable clinical situations (metabolic syndrome, sedation, negative symptoms and functional impairment). It is also important to control the effects of a smoking habit for optimum drug bioavailability. Copyright © 2017 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Nicotine metabolic rate predicts successful smoking cessation with transdermal nicotine: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Schnoll, Robert A; Patterson, Freda; Wileyto, E Paul; Tyndale, Rachel F; Benowitz, Neal; Lerman, Caryn

    2009-03-01

    Transdermal nicotine is widely used for smoking cessation, but only approximately 20% of smokers quit successfully with this medication. Interindividual variability in nicotine metabolism rate may influence treatment response. This study sought to validate, and extend in a larger sample, our previous finding that the ratio of plasma nicotine metabolites 3'-hydroxycotinine (3-HC)/cotinine, a measure of nicotine metabolism rate, predicts response to nicotine patch. A sample of 568 smokers was enrolled in a study that provided counseling and 8-weeks of 21 mg nicotine patch. Pretreatment 3-HC/cotinine ratio was examined as a predictor of 7-day point prevalence abstinence, verified with breath carbon monoxide (CO), 8 weeks after the quit date. Controlling for sex, race, age, and nicotine dependence, smokers in the upper 3 quartiles of 3-HC/cotinine ratio (faster metabolizers) were approximately 50% less likely to be abstinent vs. smokers in the first quartile (slow metabolizers; 28% vs. 42%; OR=.54 [95% CI:.36-.82], p=.003). Among abstainers, plasma nicotine levels (assessed 1 week after treatment began) decreased linearly across the 3-HC/cotinine ratio (beta=-3.38, t[355]=-3.09, p<.05). These data support the value of the 3-HC/cotinine ratio as a biomarker to predict success with transdermal nicotine for smoking cessation.

  13. Nicotine exposure in adolescence alters the response of serotonin systems to nicotine administered subsequently in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Seidler, Frederic J

    2009-01-01

    Developmental nicotine exposure produces lasting changes in serotonin (5-HT) function. We gave nicotine to adolescent rats (postnatal days, PD, 30-47), simulating plasma levels in smokers, and then examined the subsequent effects of nicotine given again in young adulthood (PD 90-107), focusing on 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2) receptors and the 5-HT transporter during nicotine treatment (PD 105) and withdrawal (PD 110, 120, 130), and long-term changes (PD 180). Adolescent nicotine exposure by itself evoked long-term elevations in cerebrocortical binding parameters in males that emerged in young adulthood. Nicotine given in adulthood produced transient elevations in 5-HT receptor expression in both males and females during withdrawal, and persistent upregulation in the male cerebral cortex. In contrast, females showed decrements in cerebrocortical 5-HT receptors by PD 180. Adolescent nicotine exposure altered the responses to nicotine given in adulthood, sensitizing the initial effects and changing both the withdrawal response and long-term actions. Our results thus provide mechanistic evidence that nicotine exposure, during the period in which nearly all smokers begin to use tobacco, reprograms the future response of 5-HT systems to nicotine.

  14. Nicotine blood levels and short-term smoking reduction with an electronic nicotine delivery system.

    PubMed

    Nides, Mitchell A; Leischow, Scott J; Bhatter, Meghna; Simmons, Michael

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate nicotine delivery from the NJOY® King Bold Electronic Nicotine Delivery System (ENDS) and its short-term potential for smoking reduction or cessation. One week of ad libitum use was followed by measurements of plasma nicotine, heart rate, and craving and withdrawal after 12 hours of nicotine abstinence in 25 adult smokers not interested in quitting. After 5 minutes of use, blood nicotine levels increased by a mean of 3.5 ng/mL (p < .001), heart rate increased, and craving was reduced by 55%. Cigarettes per day were reduced by 39% during the test week, and perceptions of use for reduction or cessation were positive. The NJOY® King Bold ENDS delivers nicotine and led to short-term smoking reduction.

  15. [Transferrin concentration in seminal plasma in testicular varicocele with various sperm concentrations and various forms of azoospermia].

    PubMed

    Sigg, C; Brüngger, A; Rakosi, T

    1994-01-01

    Seminal plasma transferrin concentrations were measured in semen samples from 424 men attending a fertility unit. There was a clear positive correlation between seminal plasma transferrin concentration and sperm density: transferrin concentrations decrease with decreasing sperm density and are lowest in patients with azoospermia and those who have undergone vasectomy. The differences between the various groups in sperm density are highly significant, but individual data counts also vary widely. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that in polyzoospermia the seminal plasma transferrin concentration is increased, suggesting primary tubular hyperactivity. No correlations with other seminal parameters or hormonal values were found. Seminal plasma transferrin concentrations in normozoospermia and in varicocele testis or in cases with increased numbers of immature germ cells in the ejaculate were not significantly different. This may be interpreted as indicative of intact secretory activity of Sertoli cells in both varicocele and increased desquamation of immature germ cells. The absence of correlation with any of several important spermatological parameters and our inability to differentiate between azoospermia caused by obstruction and by tubular impairment indicate that seminal plasma transferrin is not a useful marker for Sertoli cell function or for seminiferous tubular dysfunction.

  16. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are modulated by zinc.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Gómez, Elizabeth; García-Colunga, Jesús

    2009-01-01

    It is known that zinc modulates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Here, we studied the effects of zinc on neuronal alpha4beta4 nAChRs, expressed in Xenopus oocytes and activated by nicotine. Membrane ion currents elicited by nicotine (10 nM to 100 microM) were enhanced by zinc (100 microM). Maximal zinc potentiation of the nicotine-activated current (2530%) occurred at 50 nM nicotine, and potentiation gradually decreased as the nicotine concentration increased. The EC(50) and IC(50) for the nicotine-activated current were 639 nM and 14.7 microM nicotine, respectively. Both parameters decreased in the presence of zinc to 160 nM and 4.6 microM, respectively, probably due to an increase of sensitivity of nAChRs for nicotine. We used different concentrations and durations of exposure to nicotine, due to desensitization of nAChRs directly depends on both these factors. With 500 nM nicotine and 20 min washing periods between nicotine applications, zinc potentiation remained constant, 901% for 2 min and 813% for 20 min of nicotine exposure. With continuous application of nicotine, zinc potentiation decreased as the time of nicotine exposure increased, 721% for 2 min and 254% for 48 min of nicotine exposure. Our results indicate that zinc-potentiating effects on alpha4beta4 nAChRs strongly depend on both concentration and time of exposure to nicotine, suggesting that zinc potentiation depends on the degree of desensitization.

  17. Dietary salt influences postprandial plasma sodium concentration and systolic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Suckling, Rebecca J; He, Feng J; Markandu, Nirmala D; MacGregor, Graham A

    2012-02-01

    The plasma sodium concentration has a direct effect on blood pressure in addition to its effects on extracellular volume regulated through changes in the endothelium. The mechanism for elevated blood pressure seen with habitually increased salt intake is unclear, especially the effect of salt in a single meal on plasma sodium concentration and blood pressure. To resolve this we compared the effect of soup with or without 6 g of salt (an amount similar to that in a single meal) on the plasma sodium concentration and blood pressure in 10 normotensive volunteers using a randomized, crossover design. The plasma sodium concentration was significantly increased by 3.13±0.75 mmol/l with salted compared with unsalted soup. Blood pressure increased in volunteers ingesting soup with added salt, and there was a significant positive correlation between plasma sodium concentration and systolic blood pressure. A 1-mmol/l increase in plasma sodium was associated with a 1.91-mm Hg increase in systolic blood pressure by linear regression. Thus, changes in plasma sodium concentration occur each time a meal containing salt is consumed. A potential mechanism for the changes in blood pressure seen with salt intake may be through its effects on plasma sodium concentration.

  18. Comparative changes in plasma protein concentration, hematocrit and plasma volume during exercise, bedrest and + Gz acceleration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Beaumont, W.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of experiments which indicate that under conditions of a constant red cell volume the proportional changes in hematocrit and plasma volume during exercise are never equal. On the basis of direct measurements and calculated changes of plasma volume it is concluded that during maximal exercise there is a small loss of protein from the plasma. It is clear that changes in content of blood constituents can only be evaluated correctly after determination of changes in plasma volume.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral mecamylamine - development of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist cognitive challenge test using modelling and simulation.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Jimenez, Ricardo; Baakman, Anne Catrien; Stevens, Jasper; Goulooze, Sebastiaan C; Hart, Ellen P; Rissmann, Robert; van Gerven, Joop Ma; Groeneveld, Geert Jan

    2017-02-01

    A pharmacologic challenge model with a nicotinic antagonist could be an important tool not only to understand the complex role of the nicotinic cholinergic system in cognition, but also to develop novel compounds acting on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The objective was to develop a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) model using nonlinear mixed effects (NLME) methods to quantitate the pharmacokinetics of three oral mecamylamine doses (10, 20 and 30 mg) and correlate the plasma concentrations to the pharmacodynamic effects on a cognitive and neurophysiologic battery of tests in healthy subjects. A one-compartment linear kinetic model best described the plasma concentrations of mecamylamine. Mecamylamine's estimated clearance was 0.28 ± 0.015 L min(-1). The peripheral volume of distribution (291 ± 5.15 L) was directly related to total body weight. Mecamylamine impaired the accuracy and increased the reaction time in tests evaluating short term working memory with a steep increase in the concentration-effect relationship at plasma concentrations below 100 μg L(-1). On the other hand, mecamylamine induced a decrease in performance of tests evaluating visual and fine motor coordination at higher plasma concentrations (EC50 97 μg L(-1)). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased exponentially after a plasma mecamylamine concentration of 80 μg L(-1), a known effect previously poorly studied in healthy subjects. The developed mecamylamine PKPD model was used to quantify the effects of nicotinic blockade in a set of neurophysiological tests in humans with the goal to provide insight into the physiology and pharmacology of the nicotinic system in humans and the possibility to optimize future trials that use mecamylamine as a pharmacological challenge.

  20. [The influence of smoking on plasma non-enzymatic antioxidant concentrations in active smokers (preliminary report)].

    PubMed

    Szołtysek-Bołdys, Izabela; Sobczak, Andrzej; Król, Dorota

    2006-01-01

    Tobacco smoke contains many reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause oxidative stress. Crucial role in defending the organism against ROS play vitamins E and A. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of tobacco smoke on concentration of main ingredients of these vitamins alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocopherol, as well as retinol. The study population consisted of 104 healthy males between the age of 34 and 45 years. Survey questionnaire and determination of plasma cotinine concentration were used to divide the group into smokers (62 males) and non-smokers (42 males). The arbitrary threshold value of plasma cotinine concentration was set to 15 ng/ml. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to estimate the plasma concentration of alpha- and gamma-tocopherol, retinol and cotinine. Within the smoking part of the study population a significantly lower (by 12.5%) concentration of alpha-tocopherol, and non-significantly higher (by 15.7%) concentration of gamma-tocopherol was ascertained, when compared to the plasma concentration of those compounds in the non-smoking group. Practically no difference in concentration of retinol was found between the two studied groups. In order to determine the magnitude of interdependency between the extensiveness of exposure to tobacco smoke and the concentration of analyzed antioxidants, correlations between their plasma concentrations and plasma concentration of cotinine were investigated. A significant, moderate and negative correlation of alpha-tocopherol versus cotinin was determined, in the smoking group as well as in the entire study population (r = -0.291 and r = - 0,317, respectively). Other relationship: gamma-tocopherol versus cotinine and retinol versus cotinine did not show any correlation. The obtained results suggest that tobacco smoke weakens the organism's antioxidant barrier by decreasing the concentration of plasma alpha-tocopherol, while not influencing significantly the plasma

  1. Transdermal Nicotine : A Review of its Pharmacodynamic and Pharmacokinetic Properties, and Therapeutic Efficacy as an Aid to Smoking Cessation.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Katharine J; Buckley, Micaela M; Faulds, Diana

    1992-09-01

    neuromuscular junction) and central nervous system (CNS). The actions of nicotine in the CNS are thought to be important in the development of addiction. Nicotine has multiple effects in the brain and activates several neurochemical pathways, one of the most relevant probably being the enhancement of mesolimbic dopaminergic function. Additional central actions lead to increases in arousal, attention and reaction time, and decreases in anxiety and stress reactions. Peripheral effects observed following administration of nicotine include increases in some cardiac variables (heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac output and coronary blood flow), changes in endocrine and metabolic function, cutaneous and systemic vasoconstriction, and a decrease in muscular tone. Some of these effects may be mediated via central mechanisms while others are due to stimulation of the sympatho-adrenal system. Nicotine also appears to be involved in the regulation of bodyweight, possibly by increasing metabolism and energy expenditure. The pharmacodynamic effects of nicotine derived from transdermal administration appear similar to, or less pronounced than those observed following smoking. Transdermal systems are designed to deliver nicotine at a more constant rate than other forms of administration, thus achieving more stable plasma nicotine concentrations during the application period. Application of the patch results in a dose proportional increase in plasma nicotine concentrations, although an initial delay of 0.25 to 4 hours may be observed prior to detection of nicotine in the plasma. The site of application does not appear to markedly affect the absorption of nicotine. The bioavailability of transdermal nicotine is approximately 80%, which maybe due to the loss of nicotine from the edges of the system. Steady-state concentrations of plasma nicotine of 10 to 23 μg/L are achieved within 2 to 4 days of repeated application, and are approximately half those seen after ad libitum smoking over 15 hours

  2. The effect of interval versus continuous exercise on plasma leptin and ghrelin concentration in young trotters.

    PubMed

    Kowalik, S; Kedzierski, W

    2011-01-01

    The effect of interval vs. continuous exercise on plasma leptin and ghrelin concentration in young Standardbred horses was studied. The experiment was conducted on 27 trotters, in the age between 2 and 3 years. They were divided into two groups according to the type of exercise. Blood samples were collected through jugular venipuncture in the following experimental conditions: at rest, immediately after exercise and 30 minutes after the end of the effort. Plasma leptin and ghrelin concentrations were determined using RIA tests. The continuous exercise induced an increase in plasma leptin concentration whereas the interval type of exercise did not influence the level of this hormone (3.47 +/- 0.78 vs. 4.07 +/- 0.94 and 2.31 +/- 0.15 vs. 2.36 +/- 0.21 ng/mL, respectively). The plasma ghrelin concentration measured after the continuous exercise, significantly increased (720 +/- 27.4 vs. 814 +/- 13.8; p < or = 0.05) whereas concentration of this hormone assessed after the interval exercise, significantly dropped (982 +/- 56.5 vs. 842 +/- 35.6 pg/mL; p < or = 0.05). The changes in plasma ghrelin concentration measured after the end of the effort correlated inversely with blood lactic acid concentration. In conclusion, the obtained results showed that medium-intensive type of exercise, such as trot, interval or continuous, slightly affected plasma leptin level but significantly affected plasma ghrelin concentration in young Standardbred trotters.

  3. Plasma adiponectin concentration is associated with skeletal muscle insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation, and low plasma concentration precedes a decrease in whole-body insulin sensitivity in humans.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Norbert; Vozarova, Barbora; Funahashi, Tohru; Matsuzawa, Yuji; Weyer, Christian; Lindsay, Robert S; Youngren, Jack F; Havel, Peter J; Pratley, Richard E; Bogardus, Clifton; Tataranni, P Antonio

    2002-06-01

    Adiponectin, the most abundant adipose-specific protein, has been found to be negatively associated with degree of adiposity and positively associated with insulin sensitivity in Pima Indians and other populations. Moreover, adiponectin administration to rodents has been shown to increase insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR) and also increase whole-body insulin sensitivity. To further characterize the relationship between plasma adiponectin concentration and insulin sensitivity in humans, we examined 1) the cross-sectional association between plasma adiponectin concentration and skeletal muscle IR tyrosine phosphorylation and 2) the prospective effect of plasma adiponectin concentration at baseline on change in insulin sensitivity. Fasting plasma adiponectin concentration, body composition (hydrodensitometry or dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), insulin sensitivity (insulin-stimulated glucose disposal, hyperinsulinemic clamp), and glucose tolerance (75-g oral glucose tolerance test) were measured in 55 Pima Indians (47 men and 8 women, aged 31 +/- 8 years, body fat 29 +/- 8% [mean +/- SD]; 50 with normal glucose tolerance, 3 with impaired glucose tolerance, and 2 with diabetes). Group 1 (19 subjects) underwent skeletal muscle biopsies for the measurement of basal and insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the IR (stimulated by 100 nmol/l insulin). The fold increase after insulin stimulation was calculated as the ratio between maximal and basal phosphorylation. Group 2 (38 subjects) had follow-up measurements of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Cross-sectionally, plasma adiponectin concentration was positively associated with insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (r = 0.58, P < 0.0001) and negatively associated with percent body fat (r = -0.62, P < 0.0001) in the whole group. In group 1 plasma adiponectin was negatively associated with the basal (r = -0.65, P = 0.003) and positively associated with the fold increase in IR

  4. Late reproductive analysis in rat male offspring exposed to nicotine during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Spooner, M; Paccola, C C; Neves, F M O; de Oliva, S U; Miraglia, S M

    2016-03-01

    We previously observed that nicotine, administered to rats (Wistar) during pregnancy and lactation periods, provokes, in the progeny, late morphofunctional alterations in Leydig cell, body weight increase in adulthood (90 days post partum, dpp) as well as seminiferous epithelium injury. Aiming to investigate whether the spermatogenic damage previously observed in adult progenies from pregnant and lactating nicotine-exposed rat dams are maintained or whether it is worsened in older rats, we analyzed the morphological testicular alterations after up to two complete periods of spermatogenesis (53 days each), spermatic parameters, and sperm DNA fragmentation. Pregnant and lactating rats were nicotine-exposed (2 mg/kg/day) through an osmotic minipump implanted on the first day of pregnancy and replaced after birth. Absolute Control (no minipump) and Sham Control (minipump without nicotine) groups were established. The offspring were killed at 90, 143, and 196 dpp. Significant alterations in morphometric and stereological testicular parameters, such as concentration of sperm number, daily sperm production, and plasma and intratesticular levels of cholesterol and testosterone were not observed in nicotine-exposed rats. Testicular histopathological analysis showed small intraepithelial vacuolization and an accentuated germ cell desquamation in exposed rats. However, the offspring from nicotine-exposed dams exhibited higher frequency of morphologically abnormal spermatozoa and lower sperm motility in comparison with control groups. In addition, nicotine-exposed groups showed a significant reduction in sperm mitochondrial activity and an increased sperm DNA fragmentation (Comet assay). These results indicate a late reproductive damage in the male progeny caused by maternal nicotine exposure, related to the decrease in sperm quality.

  5. Nicotine alters mucin rheological properties

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Eric Y.; Sun, Albert; Chen, Chi-Shuo; Mintz, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco smoke exposure, the major cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), instigates a dysfunctional clearance of thick obstructive mucus. However, the mechanism underlying the formation of abnormally viscous mucus remains elusive. We investigated whether nicotine can directly alter the rheological properties of mucin by examining its physicochemical interactions with human airway mucin gels secreted from A549 lung epithelial cells. Swelling kinetics and multiple particle tracking were utilized to assess mucin gel viscosity change when exposed to nicotine. Herein we show that nicotine (≤50 nM) significantly hindered postexocytotic swelling and hydration of released mucins, leading to higher viscosity, possibly by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Moreover, the close association of nicotine and mucins allows airway mucus to function as a reservoir for prolonged nicotine release, leading to correlated pathogenic effects. Our results provide a novel explanation for the maltransport of poorly hydrated mucus in smokers. More importantly, this study further indicates that even low-concentration nicotine can profoundly increase mucus viscosity and thus highlights the health risks of secondhand smoke exposure. PMID:24838753

  6. Plasma prion protein concentration and progression of Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Christian; Becker, Harry; Peter, Christoph; Lange, Katharina; Friede, Tim; Zerr, Inga

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objective: Recently, PrPc has been linked to AD pathogenesis. Second, a relation of PrPc plasma levels with cognitive status and decline of healthy elderly subjects has been reported. Therefore, we hypothesized baseline plasma levels of PrPc to be associated with AD progression in cognitive and functional domains. Materials and Methods: AD patients (n = 84) were included into an observational study at time of diagnosis. Baseline plasma PrPc levels were determined. Decline was assessed annually (mean follow-up time 3 years) with the aid of different standardized tests (MMSE, iADL, bADL, GDS, UPDRSIII). Multiple regression analyses were used to uncover potential associations between decline and PrPc levels. Results: No association of PrPc and decline could be established. Presence of diabetes mellitus was linked to slower deterioration. Intake of neuroleptic drugs or memantine was associated with faster progression. Conclusion: Plasma PrPc at baseline could not be shown to be related to AD progression in this study. An interesting association of diabetes mellitus and decline warrants further investigation. PMID:24549099

  7. Measurement of nicotine in household dust

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sungroul Aung, Ther; Berkeley, Emily; Diette, Gregory B.; Breysse, Patrick N.

    2008-11-15

    An analytical method of measuring nicotine in house dust was optimized and associations among three secondhand smoking exposure markers were evaluated, i.e., nicotine concentrations of both house dust and indoor air, and the self-reported number of cigarettes smoked daily in a household. We obtained seven house dust samples from self-reported nonsmoking homes and 30 samples from smoking homes along with the information on indoor air nicotine concentrations and the number of cigarettes smoked daily from an asthma cohort study conducted by the Johns Hopkins Center for Childhood Asthma in the Urban Environment. House dust nicotine was analyzed by isotope dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Using our optimized method, the median concentration of nicotine in the dust of self-reported nonsmoking homes was 11.7 ng/mg while that of smoking homes was 43.4 ng/mg. We found a substantially positive association (r=0.67, P<0.0001) between house dust nicotine concentrations and the numbers of cigarettes smoked daily. Optimized analytical methods showed a feasibility to detect nicotine in house dust. Our results indicated that the measurement of nicotine in house dust can be used potentially as a marker of longer term SHS exposure.

  8. Plasma concentration of parasite DNA as a measure of disease severity in falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Imwong, Mallika; Woodrow, Charles J; Hendriksen, Ilse C E; Veenemans, Jacobien; Verhoef, Hans; Faiz, M Abul; Mohanty, Sanjib; Mishra, Saroj; Mtove, George; Gesase, Samwel; Seni, Amir; Chhaganlal, Kajal D; Day, Nicholas P J; Dondorp, Arjen M; White, Nicholas J

    2015-04-01

    In malaria-endemic areas, Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia is common in apparently healthy children and severe malaria is commonly misdiagnosed in patients with incidental parasitemia. We assessed whether the plasma Plasmodium falciparum DNA concentration is a useful datum for distinguishing uncomplicated from severe malaria in African children and Asian adults. P. falciparum DNA concentrations were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 224 African children (111 with uncomplicated malaria and 113 with severe malaria) and 211 Asian adults (100 with uncomplicated malaria and 111 with severe malaria) presenting with acute falciparum malaria. The diagnostic accuracy of plasma P. falciparum DNA concentrations in identifying severe malaria was 0.834 for children and 0.788 for adults, similar to that of plasma P. falciparum HRP2 levels and substantially superior to that of parasite densities (P < .0001). The diagnostic accuracy of plasma P. falciparum DNA concentrations plus plasma P. falciparum HRP2 concentrations was significantly greater than that of plasma P. falciparum HRP2 concentrations alone (0.904 for children [P = .004] and 0.847 for adults [P = .003]). Quantitative real-time PCR measurement of parasite DNA in plasma is a useful method for diagnosing severe falciparum malaria on fresh or archived plasma samples.

  9. The Effect of Nicotine on HPA Axis Activity in Females is Modulated by the FKBP5 Genotype.

    PubMed

    Koopmann, Anne; Bez, Jennifer; Lemenager, Tagrid; Hermann, Derik; Dinter, Christina; Reinhard, Iris; Schuster, Rilana; Wiedemann, Klaus; Winterer, Georg; Kiefer, Falk

    2016-05-01

    Tobacco smoking modulates activity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and is used to cope with stress, especially by females. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1360780, linked to FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP5), has been shown to affect HPA axis functioning, and has thus been suggested as a promising candidate for indicating vulnerability to stress-related disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between nicotine consumption and rs1360780 on cortisol plasma levels in females. A total of 296 female smokers (assessed by the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence; FTND) were genotyped for the SNP rs1360780. We measured participants' cortisol plasma concentration in blood plasma collected 3 h after standardized tobacco smoking exposure. In the 36 TT-homozygotes, we found a significant negative correlation between the FTND sum score and cortisol plasma concentrations. Using linear regression analysis, we found that the FTND sum score accounted for 12.4% of the variance of cortisol plasma levels. This association was not detected in C-allele carriers. Our results suggest that nicotine is an important confounder in the modulation of HPA axis activity by FKBP5. In light of these findings, future studies on FKBP5 should seek to include data on nicotine consumption as a covariate.

  10. Is plasma urotensin II concentration an indicator of myocardial damage in patients with acute coronary syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Babińska, Magdalena; Holecki, Michał; Prochaczek, Fryderyk; Owczarek, Aleksander; Kokocińska, Danuta; Więcek, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Urotensin II (UII) is a vasoactive peptide secreted by endothelial cells. Increased plasma UII concentration was observed in patients with heart failure, liver cirrhosis, diabetic nephropathy and renal insufficiency. In patients with myocardial infarction both increased and decreased plasma UII concentrations were demonstrated. The aim of this study was to analyze whether plasma UII concentration reflects the severity of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Material and methods One hundred and forty-nine consecutive patients with ACS, without age limit, were enrolled in the study. In all patients plasma concentration of creatinine, creatine kinase isoenzyme MB (CK-MB), troponin C, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro BNP), and UII were assessed, and echocardiography was performed in order to assess the degree of left ventricular hypertrophy, ejection fraction (EF) and mass (LVM). Results In patients with the highest risk (TIMI 5-7) plasma UII concentration was significantly lower than in those with low risk (TIMI 1-2): 2.61±1.47 ng/ml vs. 3.60±2.20 ng/ml. Significantly lower plasma UII concentration was found in patients with increased concentration of troponin C (2.60±1.52 ng/ml vs. 3.41±2.09 ng/ml). There was a significant negative correlation between plasma UII concentration and TIMI score or concentration of troponin C, but not CK-MB. Borderline correlation between plasma UII and ejection fraction (R = 0.157; p=0.063) or NT-proBNP (R = − 0.156; p=0.058) was found. Conclusions Decreased plasma urotensin II concentration in patients with ACS could be associated with more severe injury of myocardium. PMID:22851999

  11. A single-step extraction method for the determination of nicotine and cotinine in Jordanian smokers' blood and urine samples by RP-HPLC and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Massadeh, Adnan M; Gharaibeh, Ahmad A; Omari, Khaled W

    2009-02-01

    A simple, rapid, reliable, and low cost one-step extraction method is developed and validated for the determination of nicotine and cotinine in human plasma and urine in smokers using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The run times are 16 and 10 min for HPLC and GC-MS, respectively. The method is validated over a wide linear range of 1-5000 ng/mL with correlation coefficients being consistently greater than 0.9985. The criteria considered for validation are: limit of quantitation, linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery, specificity, and selectivity. This study is aimed to estimate the nicotine and cotinine in Jordanian smokers' blood and urine samples; to study the relationship between the concentration of nicotine in urine and plasma samples; and to investigate the effect of pH on the extraction of nicotine and cotinine in urine samples. In the presented study, one hundred blood and urine samples are collected from eighty smokers and twenty nonsmokers. Samples are taken from the same volunteer at the same time after each volunteer fills in a questionnaire. Results of nicotine concentrations in smokers' plasma are in the range of 181-3702 ng/mL with an average of 1263.1 ng/mL, whereas nicotine in urine samples is in the range of 1364-1972 ng/mL, with an average of 1618 ng/mL. Cotinine concentrations in smokers' plasma are in the range of 21-4420 ng/mL with an average of 379.4 ng/mL, whereas cotinine in urine is in the range of 6-3946 ng/mL with an average of 865 ng/mL. Statistical analysis indicates highly significant differences in nicotine and cotinine concentrations in smoker samples compared with nonsmoker samples (p<0.05).

  12. Short-term treatment with transdermal nicotine affects the function of canine saphenous veins.

    PubMed

    Clouse, W D; Rud, K S; Hurt, R D; Miller, V M

    2000-01-01

    Experiments were designed to determine the effects of nicotine treatment on the functions of saphenous veins used for coronary artery bypass grafts in dogs. Dogs received either no treatment or transdermal nicotine for 5 weeks at doses of 11 mg, 22 mg or 44 mg/day. Saphenous veins were removed and suspended for the measurement of isometric force in organ chambers. Endothelium was removed mechanically from some rings. N(G)-mono-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA; 10(-4) M) was used to inhibit the production of nitric oxide. Contractions to alpha2-adrenergic stimulation were decreased in veins from dogs treated with a 22-mg/day dose of transdermal nicotine. In addition, endothelium-dependent relaxations to adenosine-diphosphate (10(-8)-10(-4) M) and the calcium ionophore A23,187 (10(-8)-10(-6) M) were decreased in veins from dogs with a 22-mg/day dose and increased in veins from dogs treated with a 44-mg/day dose. These relaxations were inhibited by L-NMMA. Plasma concentrations of oxidized products of nitric oxide were decreased only in dogs treated with 22 mg/day of nicotine. The relaxation of rings without endothelium (direct response on the smooth muscle) to nitric oxide were not altered by nicotine treatment. These results suggest that the short-term treatment of dogs with intermediate (22 mg/day) but not low (11 mg/day) or high (44 mg/day) doses of transdermal nicotine decreases the endothelial function of veins used for coronary artery bypass grafts. Therefore, changes in plasma products of nitric oxide and endothelium-dependent relaxations mediated by nitric oxide are related to the dose of nicotine treatment.

  13. Plasma soluble (pro)renin receptor is independent of plasma renin, prorenin, and aldosterone concentrations but is affected by ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Geneviève; Blanchard, Anne; Curis, Emmanuel; Bergerot, Damien; Chambon, Yann; Hirose, Takuo; Caumont-Prim, Aurore; Tabard, Sylvie Brailly; Baron, Stéphanie; Frank, Michael; Totsune, Kazuhito; Azizi, Michel

    2014-02-01

    A soluble (pro)renin receptor (sPRR) circulates in plasma and is able to bind renin and prorenin. It is not known whether plasma sPRR concentrations vary with the activity of the renin-angiotensin system. We measured plasma sPRR, renin, prorenin, and aldosterone concentrations in 121 white and 9 black healthy subjects, 40 patients with diabetes mellitus, 41 hypertensive patients with or without renin-angiotensin system blockers, 9 patients with primary aldosteronism, and 10 patients with Gitelman syndrome. Median physiological plasma sPRR concentration was 23.5 ng/mL (interquartile range, 20.9-26.5) under usual uncontrolled sodium diet. sPRR concentration in healthy subjects, unlike renin and prorenin, did not display circadian variation or dependence on age, sex, posture, or hormonal status. sPRR concentrations were ≈25% lower in black than in white subjects, whereas renin concentrations were ≈40% lower. Patients with diabetes mellitus (average renin-high prorenin levels) and with hypertension only (average renin-average prorenin levels) had sPRR concentrations similar to healthy subjects. Renin-angiotensin system blockade was associated with increase of sPRR concentration by ≈12%. sPRR in patients with primary aldosteronism (low renin-low prorenin) and Gitelman syndrome (high renin-high prorenin) were similar and ≈10% higher than in healthy subjects. There was no correlation between sPRR and renin or prorenin. In conclusion, our results show that plasma sPRR concentrations are dependent on ethnicity and independent of renin, prorenin, and aldosterone concentrations in healthy subjects and in patients with contrasted degrees of renin-angiotensin system activity.

  14. Active-site concentrations of chemicals - are they a better predictor of effect than plasma/organ/tissue concentrations?

    PubMed

    Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta

    2010-03-01

    Active-site concentrations can be defined as the concentrations of unbound, pharmacologically active substances at the site of action. In contrast, the total concentrations of the drug in plasma/organ/tissue also include the protein- or tissue-bound molecules that are pharmacologically inactive. Plasma and whole tissue concentrations are used as predictors of effects and side effects because of their ease of sampling, while the concentrations of unbound drug in tissue are more difficult to measure. However, with the introduction of microdialysis and subsequently developed techniques, it has become possible to test the free drug hypothesis. The brain is an interesting organ in this regard because of the presence of the blood-brain barrier with its tight junctions and active efflux and influx transporters. We have proposed that research into brain drug delivery be divided into three main areas: the rate of delivery (PS, CL(in)), the extent of delivery (K(p,uu)) and the non-specific affinity of the drug to brain tissue, described by the volume of distribution of unbound drug in the brain (V(u,brain)). In this way, the concentration of unbound drug at the target site can be estimated from the total brain concentration and the plasma concentration after measuring the fraction of unbound drug. Results so far fully support the theory that active site concentrations are the best predictors when active transport is present. However, there is an urgent need to collect more relevant data for predicting active site concentrations in tissues with active transporters in their plasma membranes.

  15. Variable aromatase inhibitor plasma concentrations do not correlate with circulating estrogen concentrations in post-menopausal breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Daniel L; Speth, Kelly A; Kidwell, Kelley M; Gersch, Christina L; Desta, Zeruesenay; Storniolo, Anna Maria; Stearns, Vered; Skaar, Todd C; Hayes, Daniel F; Henry, N Lynn; Rae, James M

    2017-06-22

    The aromatase inhibitors (AI) exemestane (EXE), letrozole (LET), and anastrozole suppress estrogen biosynthesis, and are effective treatments for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer. Prior work suggests that anastrozole blood concentrations are associated with the magnitude of estrogen suppression. The objective of this study was to determine whether the magnitude of estrogen suppression, as determined by plasma estradiol (E2) concentrations, in EXE or LET treated patients is associated with plasma AI concentrations. Five hundred post-menopausal women with ER-positive breast cancer were enrolled in the prospective Exemestane and Letrozole Pharmacogenetic (ELPh) Study conducted by the COnsortium on BReast cancer phArmacogomics (COBRA) and randomly assigned to either drug. Estrogen concentrations were measured at baseline and after 3 months of AI treatment and drug concentrations were measured after 1 or 3 months. EXE or LET concentrations were compared with 3-month E2 concentration or the change from baseline to 3 months using several complementary statistical procedures. Four-hundred patients with on-treatment E2 and AI concentrations were evaluable (EXE n = 200, LET n = 200). Thirty (7.6%) patients (EXE n = 13, LET n = 17) had 3-month E2 concentrations above the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) (median: 4.75; range: 1.42-63.8 pg/mL). EXE and LET concentrations were not associated with on-treatment E2 concentrations or changes in E2 concentrations from baseline (all p > 0.05). Steady-state plasma AI concentrations do not explain variability in E2 suppression in post-menopausal women receiving EXE or LET therapy, in contrast with prior evidence in anastrozole treated patients.

  16. Plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations and outcomes after acute intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Du, Quan; Yu, Wen-Hua; Dong, Xiao-Qiao; Yang, Ding-Bo; Shen, Yong-Feng; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Li; Du, Yuan-Feng; Zhang, Zu-Yong; Zhu, Qiang; Che, Zhi-Hao; Liu, Qun-Jie

    2014-11-01

    Higher plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations have been associated with poor outcome of severe traumatic brain injury. We further investigated the relationships between plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations and clinical outcomes in patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage. Plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations of 128 consecutive patients and 128 sex- and gender-matched healthy subjects were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We assessed their relationships with disease severity and clinical outcomes including 1-week mortality, 6-month mortality and unfavorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale score>2). Plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations were substantially higher in patients than in healthy controls. Plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations were positively associated with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores and hematoma volume using a multivariate linear regression. It emerged as an independent predictor for clinical outcomes of patients using a forward stepwise logistic regression. ROC curves identified the predictive values of plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations, and found its predictive value was similar to NIHSS scores and hematoma volumes. However, it just numerically added the predictive values of NIHSS score and hematoma volume. Increased plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations are associated with disease severity and clinical outcome after acute intracerebral hemorrhage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Decreased plasma isoleucine concentrations after upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Dejong, C H; Meijerink, W J; van Berlo, C L; Deutz, N E; Soeters, P B

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A decrease in arterial isoleucine values after intragastric blood administration in pigs has been observed. This contrasted with increased values of most other amino acids, ammonia, and urea. After an isonitrogenous control meal in these pigs all amino acids including isoleucine increased, and urea increased to a lesser extent, suggesting a relation between the arterial isoleucine decrease and uraemia after gastrointestinal haemorrhage. METHODS: To extend these findings to humans, plasma amino acids were determined after gastrointestinal haemorrhage in patients with peptic ulcers (n = 9) or oesophageal varices induced by liver cirrhosis (n = 4) and compared with preoperative patients (n = 106). RESULTS: After gastrointestinal haemorrhage, isoleucine decreased in all patients by more than 60% and normalised within 48 hours. Most other amino acids increased and also normalised within 48 hours. Uraemia occurred in both groups, hyperammonaemia was seen in patients with liver cirrhosis. CONCLUSIONS: These results confirm previous findings in animals and healthy volunteers that plasma isoleucine decreases after simulated upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. This supports the hypothesis that the absence of isoleucine in blood protein causes decreased plasma isoleucine values after gastrointestinal haemorrhage, and may be a contributory factor to uraemia and hyperammonaemia in patients with normal and impaired liver function, respectively. Intravenous isoleucine administration after gastrointestinal haemorrhage could be beneficial and will be the subject of further research. PMID:8881800

  18. Negative symptoms in nondeficit syndrome respond to neuroleptic treatment with changes in plasma homovanillic acid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, E; Kanba, S; Koshikawa, H; Nibuya, M; Yagi, G; Asai, M

    1996-05-01

    Deficit syndrome (DS) in schizophrenia is characterized by serious, chronic, and primary negative symptoms. We investigated differences in response to neuroleptic treatment between 8 DS patients and 6 nondeficit syndrome (NDS) patients who had the selective dopamine-D2 receptor blocker bromperidol added to their neuroleptic regimens. First, 9 mg/d was administered for 4 weeks, followed by 18 mg/d for another 4 weeks. Plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) and plasma bromperidol concentrations were measured, and psychiatric symptoms were scored. In the NDS patients, both positive and negative symptoms improved. However, only the positive symptom scores changed in the DS patients. On day 4, pHVA concentrations of the NDS patients alone were significantly elevated. Plasma bromperidol concentrations did not differ between the groups. These results suggest that bromperidol exerts different effects on negative symptoms and pHVA concentrations between NDS and DS patients, effects that are unrelated to plasma bromperidol concentrations.

  19. Negative symptoms in nondeficit syndrome respond to neuroleptic treatment with changes in plasma homovanillic acid concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, E; Kanba, S; Koshikawa, H; Nibuya, M; Yagi, G; Asai, M

    1996-01-01

    Deficit syndrome (DS) in schizophrenia is characterized by serious, chronic, and primary negative symptoms. We investigated differences in response to neuroleptic treatment between 8 DS patients and 6 nondeficit syndrome (NDS) patients who had the selective dopamine-D2 receptor blocker bromperidol added to their neuroleptic regimens. First, 9 mg/d was administered for 4 weeks, followed by 18 mg/d for another 4 weeks. Plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) and plasma bromperidol concentrations were measured, and psychiatric symptoms were scored. In the NDS patients, both positive and negative symptoms improved. However, only the positive symptom scores changed in the DS patients. On day 4, pHVA concentrations of the NDS patients alone were significantly elevated. Plasma bromperidol concentrations did not differ between the groups. These results suggest that bromperidol exerts different effects on negative symptoms and pHVA concentrations between NDS and DS patients, effects that are unrelated to plasma bromperidol concentrations. PMID:8935328

  20. Plasma lactate concentrations in free-ranging moose (Alces alces) immobilized with etorphine.

    PubMed

    Haga, Henning A; Wenger, Sandra; Hvarnes, Silje; Os, Oystein; Rolandsen, Christer M; Solberg, Erling J

    2009-11-01

    To investigate plasma lactate concentrations of etorphine-immobilized moose in relation to environmental, temporal and physiological parameters. Prospective clinical study. Fourteen female and five male moose (Alces alces), estimated age range 1-7 years. The moose were darted from a helicopter with 7.5 mg etorphine per animal using projectile syringes and a dart gun. Once immobilized, the moose were approached, a venous blood sample was obtained and vital signs including pulse oximetry were recorded. Diprenorphine was administered to reverse the effects of etorphine. Timing of events, ambient temperature and snow depth were recorded. Blood samples were cooled and centrifuged before plasma was harvested and frozen. The plasma was thawed later and lactate analysed. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and regression analysis. All animals recovered uneventfully and were alive 12 weeks after immobilization. Mean +/- SD plasma lactate was found to be 9.2 +/- 2.1 mmol L(-1). Plasma lactate concentrations were related positively to snow depth and negatively to time from induction of immobilization to blood sampling. The model that best described the variability in plasma lactate concentrations used induction time (time from firing the dart to the moose being immobilized). The second best model included induction time and snow depth. Plasma lactate concentrations in these etorphine-immobilized moose were in the range reported for other immobilized wild ruminants. Decreasing induction time, which may be related to a more profound etorphine effect, and increasing snow depth possibly may increase plasma lactate concentrations in etorphine-immobilized moose.

  1. Tacrolimus-induced elevation in plasma triglyceride concentrations after administration to renal transplant patients is partially due to a decrease in lipoprotein lipase activity and plasma concentrations.

    PubMed

    Tory, Rita; Sachs-Barrable, Kristina; Goshko, Caylee-Britt; Hill, John S; Wasan, Kishor M

    2009-07-15

    Hyperlipidemia is a frequent and persistent complication in solid organ transplant recipients, leading to the high occurrence of cardiovascular disease in this patient population. Lipid abnormalities including increased total cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol have been reported frequently in transplantation patients and a variety of immunosuppressive therapies seem to be one of the main factors that influence posttransplant lipidemic profiles. For many years, tacrolimus (TAC) has been used as an immunosuppressive drug in transplantation. The aim of our investigation was to determine the effect of TAC administration on the plasma lipid profile and some key regulatory proteins of plasma lipid metabolism including cholesterol ester transfer protein, hepatic lipase and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within renal transplant patients. Twenty-five renal transplant patients were recruited and received TAC therapy, of which nine of these patients were treated with statin therapy for dyslipidemia. The effects of TAC on plasma total cholesterol, TG, HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, cholesterol ester transfer protein, hepatic lipase and LPL concentration and activity were determined from patients plasma samples collected before the transplant surgery (baseline), and weekly for four consecutive weeks after surgery and TAC administration. We observed that TAC significantly increases plasma TG concentrations and reduces LPL plasma concentration and activity in renal transplant patients, independent of any lipid lowering drug treatment patients received. Taken together, these findings suggest that the reduction in LPL activity, partly due to the decrease of plasma LPL concentration after TAC administration may be an explanation for hypertriglyceridemia observed in patients administered TAC.

  2. Clozapine and norclozapine concentrations in serum and plasma samples from schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Jesús; Paz, Eduardo; Tutor, J Carlos

    2008-02-01

    At present, the determination of steady-state trough serum/plasma concentrations of clozapine is considered a useful tool for the clinical management of schizophrenic patients treated with this drug. In a previously published study, it was indicated that only plasma should be used to avoid a significant underestimation of clozapine and norclozapine concentrations; however, a formal evaluation of this topic has still not been made, and a consensus on the use of plasma or serum for therapeutic clozapine monitoring may be desirable. Paired samples of serum and plasma (K3EDTA solution contained in Vacutainer tubes) were obtained from 40 schizophrenic patients, and clozapine and norclozapine concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. For the parent drug and its metabolite, serum concentrations were higher than in plasma (approximately 7%), although the correction of plasma concentrations in function of hematocrit values reduced this difference to 3%. High correlation coefficients were found between the serum and uncorrected or corrected plasma clozapine concentrations (r = 0.996, P < 0.001), with clinically acceptable differences between the means and standard error of the estimate and consequently with transferability of the results. The clozapine and norclozapine concentrations in five lithium heparin-containing plasma samples (371.9 +/- 226.7 ng/mL and 217.9 +/- 113.1 ng/mL) were analogous to the corresponding hematocrit-corrected EDTA-containing plasma values (374.4 +/- 225.4 ng/mL and 223.5 +/- 115.2 ng/mL), with correlation coefficients of r > or = 0.998 (P < 0.001). Serum or plasma samples may be used for the therapeutic monitoring of clozapine, and no practical advantages have been found with regard to the stability of the drug or imprecision obtained by using either type of biological matrix.

  3. Glycine and ammonia plasma concentrations during sedation with remifentanil in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Marie-Pierre; Minville, Vincent; Asehnoune, Karim; Bridoux, Delphine; Poggi-Bach, Joséphine; Duranteau, Jacques; Benhamou, Dan

    2007-07-01

    To investigate glycine and ammonia plasma concentrations during a 72-h remifentanil infusion and the relationship between glycine concentration and remifentanil infusion rate. A prospective open-label observational clinical trial in a trauma and a neurosurgical intensive care unit in a university teaching hospital. Nine consecutive patients requiring sedation and ventilatory support for at least 72 h. One was excluded due to acute cardiac failure. Patients were sedated with remifentanil and propofol. Glycine and ammonia plasma concentrations were measured every 12 h during an intravenous remifentanil infusion performed over 72 h, and 24 h after the end of the infusion. Cumulative remifentanil dose and rate of infusion were recorded for each patient. Clinical and biological signs of glycine toxicity were evaluated. Glycine and ammonia plasma concentrations did not exceed the toxic threshold at any time. Plasma glycine concentration measured at the end of remifentanil infusion was significantly correlated with the mean weighted rate of remifentanil infusion and with the cumulative remifentanil dose. A correlation between plasma glycine concentration and creatinine clearance at the end of remifentanil infusion was also documented. Plasma glycine concentration was correlated with the remifentanil cumulative dose and the infusion rate and did not reach the toxic threshold. As glycine concentration was also correlated with creatinine clearance and because remifentanil was the only source of exogenous glycine, additional data are necessary to ascertain the safety of remifentanil infusion in ICU patients.

  4. PLASMA ADIPONECTIN CONCENTRATIONS IN NON PREGNANT, NORMAL PREGNANCY AND OVERWEIGHT PREGNANT WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    Nien, Jyh Kae; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Romero, Roberto; Erez, Offer; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Gotsch, Francesca; Pineles, Beth L.; Gomez, Ricardo; Edwin, Samuel; Mazor, Moshe; Espinoza, Jimmy; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2008-01-01

    Aims Adiponectin is an adipokine that has anti-diabetic, anti-atherogenic, anti-inflammatory and angiogenic properties. This hormone has been implicated in both the physiological adaptation to normal pregnancy and obstetrical complications. The aims of this study were to determine normal maternal plasma concentrations of adiponectin throughout gestation and to explore the relationships between plasma adiponectin concentration, pregnancy, and maternal overweight. Study design A cross-sectional study was designed to include normal pregnant women (normal weight and overweight; 11–42 weeks of gestation), and non-pregnant women. Plasma adiponectin concentration was determined by immunoassay. Non-parametric statistics were used for analysis. Results (1) Adiponectin was detectable in the plasma of all patients; (2) there was no significant difference in the median adiponectin concentrations between pregnant and non-pregnant women; (3) plasma adiponectin concentrations were negatively correlated with gestational age only among normal weight pregnant women; and (4) overweight patients had significantly lower adiponectin concentrations than normal weight women. Conclusion Consistent with the increased insulin resistance and weight gain that occur in pregnancy, adiponectin concentrations were negatively correlated with gestational age. The results of this study and the nomogram herein presented can serve as the basis to explore the relationship between adiponectin and pregnancy complications and facilitate the clinical use of this important adipokine. Condensation Plasma adiponectin concentrations decrease with advancing gestational age only in nonobese women. PMID:17919116

  5. Nicotine, carbon monoxide, and carcinogen exposure after a single use of a water pipe.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Peyton; Abu Raddaha, Ahmad H; Dempsey, Delia; Havel, Christopher; Peng, Margaret; Yu, Lisa; Benowitz, Neal L

    2011-11-01

    Smoking tobacco preparations in a water pipe (hookah) is widespread in many places of the world, including the United States, where it is especially popular among young people. Many perceive water pipe smoking to be less hazardous than cigarette smoking. We studied systemic absorption of nicotine, carbon monoxide, and carcinogens from one water pipe smoking session. Sixteen subjects smoked a water pipe on a clinical research ward. Expired carbon monoxide and carboxyhemoglobin were measured, plasma samples were analyzed for nicotine concentrations, and urine samples were analyzed for the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolite biomarker concentrations. We found substantial increases in plasma nicotine concentrations, comparable to cigarette smoking, and increases in carbon monoxide levels that are much higher than those typically observed from cigarette smoking, as previously published. Urinary excretion of NNAL and PAH biomarkers increased significantly following water pipe smoking. Absorption of nicotine in amounts comparable to cigarette smoking indicates a potential for addiction, and absorption of significant amounts of carcinogens raise concerns of cancer risk in people who smoke tobacco products in water pipes. Our data contribute to an understanding of the health impact of water pipe use. © 2011 AACR.

  6. Kinetics of brain nicotine accumulation in dependent and nondependent smokers assessed with PET and cigarettes containing 11C-nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jed E.; Mukhin, Alexey G.; Lokitz, Stephen J.; Turkington, Timothy G.; Herskovic, Joseph; Behm, Frederique M.; Garg, Sudha; Garg, Pradeep K.

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is a chronic, relapsing disorder that constitutes one of the primary preventable causes of death in developed countries. Two of the popular hypotheses to explain the development and maintenance of strong nicotine dependence in cigarette smokers posit (i) a rapid brain nicotine accumulation during cigarette smoking and/or (ii) puff-associated spikes in brain nicotine concentration. To address these hypotheses, we investigated the dynamics of nicotine accumulation in the smoker's brain during actual cigarette smoking using PET with 3-s temporal resolution and 11C-nicotine loaded into cigarettes. The results of the study, performed in 13 dependent smokers (DS) and 10 nondependent smokers (NDS), suggest that puff-associated spikes in the brain nicotine concentration do not occur during habitual cigarette smoking. Despite the presence of a puff-associated oscillation in the rate of nicotine accumulation, brain nicotine concentration gradually increases during cigarette smoking. The results further suggest that DS have a slower process of brain nicotine accumulation than NDS because they have slower nicotine washout from the lungs and that DS have a tendency to compensate for their slower rate of brain nicotine accumulation compared with NDS by inhaling a larger volume of smoke. For these reasons, smokers’ dependence on cigarette smoking, or the resistance of NDS to becoming dependent, cannot be explained solely by a faster brain nicotine accumulation. PMID:20212132

  7. Differential effects of nicotine treatment and ethanol self-administration on CYP2A6, CYP2B6 and nicotine pharmacokinetics in African green monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, C S; Miksys, S; Palmour, R M; Tyndale, R F

    2012-12-01

    In primates, nicotine is metabolically inactivated in the liver by CYP2A6 and possibly CYP2B6. Changes in the levels of these two enzymes may affect nicotine pharmacokinetics and influence smoking behaviors. This study investigated the independent and combined effects of ethanol self-administration and nicotine treatment (0.5 mg/kg b.i.d. s.c.) on hepatic CYP2A6 and CYP2B6 levels (mRNA, protein, and enzymatic activity), in vitro nicotine metabolism, and in vivo nicotine pharmacokinetics in monkeys. CYP2A6 mRNA and protein levels and in vitro coumarin (selective CYP2A6 substrate) and nicotine metabolism were decreased by nicotine treatment but unaffected by ethanol. CYP2B6 protein levels and in vitro bupropion (selective CYP2B6 substrate) metabolism were increased by ethanol but unaffected by nicotine treatment; CYP2B6 mRNA levels were unaltered by either treatment. Combined ethanol and nicotine exposure decreased CYP2A6 mRNA and protein levels, as well as in vitro coumarin and nicotine metabolism, and increased CYP2B6 protein levels and in vitro bupropion metabolism, with no change in CYP2B6 mRNA levels. Chronic nicotine resulted in higher nicotine plasma levels achieved after nicotine administration, consistent with decreased CYP2A6. Ethanol alone, or combined with nicotine, resulted in lower nicotine plasma levels by a mechanism independent of the change in these enzymes. Thus, nicotine can decrease hepatic CYP2A6, reducing the metabolism of its substrates, including nicotine, whereas ethanol can increase hepatic CYP2B6, increasing the metabolism of CYP2B6 substrates. In vivo nicotine pharmacokinetics are differentially affected by ethanol and nicotine, but when both drugs are used in combination the effect more closely resembles ethanol alone.

  8. Nicotine stimulates angiogenesis and promotes tumor growth and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Heeschen, C; Jang, J J; Weis, M; Pathak, A; Kaji, S; Hu, R S; Tsao, P S; Johnson, F L; Cooke, J P

    2001-07-01

    We provide anatomic and functional evidence that nicotine induces angiogenesis. We also show that nicotine accelerates the growth of tumor and atheroma in association with increased neovascularization. Nicotine increased endothelial-cell growth and tube formation in vitro, and accelerated fibrovascular growth in vivo. In a mouse model of hind-limb ischemia, nicotine increased capillary and collateral growth, and enhanced tissue perfusion. In mouse models of lung cancer and atherosclerosis, we found that nicotine enhanced lesion growth in association with an increase in lesion vascularity. These effects of nicotine were mediated through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors at nicotine concentrations that are pathophysiologically relevant. The endothelial production of nitric oxide, prostacyclin and vascular endothelial growth factor might have a role in these effects.

  9. An investigation into the effect and mechanisms of action of nicotine in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Sykes, A P; Brampton, C; Klee, S; Chander, C L; Whelan, C; Parsons, M E

    2000-07-01

    To determine the effect of nicotine on colonic inflammation in the trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS) model of inflammatory bowel disease in comparison with sulphasalazine. Male Wistar rats were used for the in-vivo and ex-vivo studies. In-vitro studies were performed using human leukemia peripheral blood monocyte cells (THP-1 cells) grown in continuous culture. Rats were given access to either nicotine (5 or 100 microg/mL) or sulphasalazine (375 microg/mL) in their drinking water for 10 or 2 days respectively before and 3 days after TNBS administration. THP-1 cells were treated with nicotine (10(-14) to 10(-11) M) for 2 h before and after stimulation with 3 microg/mL lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Inflammation in the TNBS model was assessed by measuring the tissue myeloperoxidase activity, leukotriene B4 concentration, inducible nitric oxide protein expression, the ex-vivo production of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), macroscopic damage score, plasma corticosterone levels and by a qualitative histological evolution. The effect of nicotine on TNFalpha production in LPS stimulated THP-1 monocyte cells in-vitro was also determined. Statistical comparisons were made using the Mann-Whitney U-test for the macroscopic damage score and an ANOVA for all other parameters. TNBS treated rats given access to 100 microg/mL nicotine in their drinking water had a marked reduction in several of the markers of inflammation compared to control TNBS treated rats, but a greater reduction was found at 5 microg/mL nicotine or 375 microg/mL sulphasalazine, the latter producing comparable reductions in inflammation to the low dose nicotine. Nicotine also caused a significant reduction in TNFalpha release from THP-1 cells. Nicotine reduced inflammation in the TNBS model of colonic damage confirming the use of nicotine in IBD although the choice of dose requires further investigation. The mechanism of action of nicotine does not involve increased corticosterone levels, but may be a

  10. Effect of In Vivo Nicotine Exposure on Chlorpyrifos Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sookwang; Poet, Torka S.; Smith, Jordan N.; Busby-Hjerpe, Andrea L.; Timchalk, Charles

    2010-03-30

    Routine use of tobacco products may modify physiological and metabolic functions, including drug metabolizing enzymes, which may impact the pharmacokinetics of environmental contaminants. Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphorus (OP) insecticide that is bioactivated to chlorpyrifos-oxon, and manifests its neurotoxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of repeated nicotine exposure on the pharmacokinetics of chlorpyrifos (CPF) and its major metabolite, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) in blood and urine and also to determine the impact on cholinesterase (ChE) activity in plasma and brain. Animals were exposed to 7-daily doses of either 1 mg nicotine/kg or saline (sc), and to either a single oral dose of 35 mg CPF/kg or a repeated dose of 5 mg CPF/kg/day for 7 days. Groups of rats were then sacrificed at multiple time-points after receiving the last dose of CPF. Repeated nicotine and CPF exposures resulted in enhanced metabolism of CPF to TCPy, as evidenced by increases in the measured TCPy concentration and AUC in blood. However, there was no significant difference in the amount of TCPy (free or total) excreted in the urine. The extent of brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition was reduced due to nicotine co-exposure consistent with an increase in CYP450-mediated dearylation (detoxification) versus desulfuration. It was of interest to note that the impact of nicotine co-exposure was experimentally observed only after repeated CPF doses. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic model simulations of CPF-oxon concentrations in blood and brain were predicted to be lower in nicotine treated groups, which were simulated by increasing the dearylation Vmax based upon previously conducted in vitro metabolism studies. These results were consistent with the experimental data. The current study demonstrated that repeated nicotine exposure could alter CPF metabolism in vivo, further modulating brain AChE inhibition.

  11. Effects of rice bran oil on plasma lipid concentrations, lipoprotein composition, and glucose dynamics in mares.

    PubMed

    Frank, N; Andrews, F M; Elliott, S B; Lew, J; Boston, R C

    2005-11-01

    Plasma lipid concentrations, lipoprotein composition, and glucose dynamics were measured and compared between mares fed diets containing added water, corn oil (CO), refined rice bran oil (RR), or crude rice bran oil (CR) to test the hypothesis that rice bran oil lowers plasma lipid concentrations, alters lipoprotein composition, and improves insulin sensitivity in mares. Eight healthy adult mares received a basal diet fed at 1.5 times the DE requirement for maintenance and each of the four treatments according to a repeated 4 x 4 Latin square design consisting of four 5-wk feeding periods. Blood samples were collected for lipid analysis after mares were deprived of feed overnight at 0 and 5 wk. Glucose dynamics were assessed at 0 and 4 wk in fed mares by combined intravenous glucose-insulin tolerance tests. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured, and estimated values of insulin sensitivity (SI), glucose effectiveness, and net insulin response were obtained using the minimal model. Mean BW increased (P = 0.014) by 29 kg (range = 10 to 50 kg) over 5 wk. Mean plasma concentrations of NEFA, triglyceride (TG), and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) decreased (P < 0.001) by 55, 30, and 39%, respectively, and plasma high-density lipoprotein and total cholesterol (TC) concentrations increased (P < 0.001) by 15 and 12%, respectively, over 5 wk. Changes in plasma NEFA (r = 0.58; P < 0.001) and TC (r = 0.44; P = 0.013) concentrations were positively correlated with weight gain over 5 wk. Lipid components of VLDL decreased (P < 0.001) in abundance over 5 wk, whereas the relative protein content of VLDL increased by 39% (P < 0.001). Addition of oil to the basal diet instead of water lowered plasma NEFA and TG concentrations further (P = 0.002 and 0.020, respectively) and increased plasma TC concentrations by a greater magnitude (P = 0.072). However, only plasma TG concentrations and VLDL free cholesterol content were affected (P = 0.024 and 0.009, respectively

  12. The QT interval: a predictor of the plasma and myocardial concentrations of amiodarone.

    PubMed Central

    Debbas, N M; du Cailar, C; Bexton, R S; Demaille, J G; Camm, A J; Puech, P

    1984-01-01

    A study was performed to assess whether plasma and myocardial concentrations of amiodarone correlated with changes on the surface electrocardiogram. Nine patients--seven with angina and two with paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia--were treated with oral amiodarone (200-400 mg daily) for at least nine months before undergoing cardiac surgery. QT intervals were measured from lead II of the surface electrocardiograms recorded before amiodarone treatment and immediately before surgery. Patients with prominent U waves after taking amiodarone were excluded from the study. Plasma and myocardial samples were collected at the beginning of the surgical procedure for estimating plasma and myocardial concentrations using the high performance liquid chromatographic technique. Amiodarone caused a significant lengthening of the QTc interval. There was a good correlation between plasma and myocardial concentrations, and both correlated well with the percentage increase in the QTc interval. Although there was a strong correlation between the dosage given (mg/kg/day) and both plasma and myocardial concentrations, the correlation with the percentage increase in the QTc interval was weaker but still highly significant. Despite previous reports to the contrary, the findings indicate that the plasma concentration of amiodarone does correlate well with the myocardial concentration. The degree of lengthening of the QTc interval may be used clinically to estimate the myocardial concentration of amiodarone. PMID:6696809

  13. High plasma uric acid concentration: causes and consequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    High plasma uric acid (UA) is a precipitating factor for gout and renal calculi as well as a strong risk factor for Metabolic Syndrome and cardiovascular disease. The main causes for higher plasma UA are either lower excretion, higher synthesis or both. Higher waist circumference and the BMI are associated with higher insulin resistance and leptin production, and both reduce uric acid excretion. The synthesis of fatty acids (tryglicerides) in the liver is associated with the de novo synthesis of purine, accelerating UA production. The role played by diet on hyperuricemia has not yet been fully clarified, but high intake of fructose-rich industrialized food and high alcohol intake (particularly beer) seem to influence uricemia. It is not known whether UA would be a causal factor or an antioxidant protective response. Most authors do not consider the UA as a risk factor, but presenting antioxidant function. UA contributes to > 50% of the antioxidant capacity of the blood. There is still no consensus if UA is a protective or a risk factor, however, it seems that acute elevation is a protective factor, whereas chronic elevation a risk for disease. PMID:22475652

  14. The effect of estrogens on plasma ghrelin concentrations in women.

    PubMed

    Dafopoulos, K; Chalvatzas, N; Kosmas, G; Kallitsaris, A; Pournaras, S; Messinis, I E

    2010-02-01

    Data regarding the possible effects of estrogen on ghrelin secretion in humans are limited and contradictory. To investigate the effect of estradiol (E2) on ghrelin levels in normal pre- and post-menopausal women. A total of 21 women divided into 3 groups, i.e.13 normally cycling women (no.=7, group 1 and no.=6, group 2) and 8 post-menopausal women (group 3). Women of group 1 received increasing doses of E2 through skin patches from cycle days 3 to 5. Women of group 2, underwent total abdominal hysterectomy plus bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH+BSO) on cycle day 3. Women of group 3 received po increasing doses of E2 valerate for 15 days. Acylated ghrelin and E2 were measured in all blood samples. In group 1, plasma ghrelin levels did not show any significant changes for the week following cycle day 3. In group 2, ghrelin levels were similar before and after TAH+BSO and remained stable during the first 7 post-operative days. In group 3, no significant changes in plasma ghrelin levels were seen during the 15 days of E2 administration. The present study demonstrates for the first time that ghrelin values were not affected either by exogenous short-term estrogen administration to pre- and post-menopausal women or following ovariectomy in pre-menopausal women. It is suggested that ovarian hormones are not involved in the regulation of ghrelin secretion in women.

  15. Plasma IL-5 concentration and subclinical carotid atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Angela; McLeod, Olga; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Gertow, Karl; Sennblad, Bengt; Baldassarre, Damiano; Veglia, Fabrizio; Deleskog, Anna; Persson, Jonas; Leander, Karin; Gigante, Bruna; Kauhanen, Jussi; Rauramaa, Rainer; Smit, Andries J.; Mannarino, Elmo; Giral, Philippe; Gustafsson, Sven; Söderberg, Stefan; Öhrvik, John; Humphries, Steve E.; Tremoli, Elena; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Objective Genetic variants robustly associated with coronary artery disease were reported in the vicinity of the interleukin (IL)-5 locus, and animal studies suggested a protective role for IL-5 in atherosclerosis. Therefore, we set this work to explore IL-5 as a plasma biomarker for early subclinical atherosclerosis, as determined by measures of baseline severity and change over time of carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT). Methods We used biobank and databases of IMPROVE, a large European prospective cohort study of high-risk individuals (n = 3534) free of clinically overt cardiovascular disease at enrollment, in whom composite and segment-specific measures of cIMT were recorded at baseline and after 15 and 30 months. IL-5 was measured with an immunoassay in plasma samples taken at baseline. Results IL-5 levels were lower in women than in men, lower in the South than in North of Europe, and showed positive correlations with most established risk factors. IL-5 showed significant inverse relationships with cIMT change over time in the common carotid segment in women, but no significant relationships to baseline cIMT in either men or women. Conclusions Our results suggest that IL-5 may be part of protective mechanisms operating in early atherosclerosis, at least in women. However, the relationships are weak and whereas IL-5 has been proposed as a potential molecular target to treat allergies, it is difficult to envisage such a scenario in coronary artery disease. PMID:25587992

  16. On the relationship between plasma concentrations of drugs and outcome of stroke studies in laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Curry, S H

    2001-06-01

    In assessing plasma concentrations of drugs in relation to neuroprotective effect, emphasis should be placed on measured or calculated concentrations during the window of opportunity for effect, rather than at the end of the experiment. Unbound (plasma free) concentrations should be especially considered as should brain penetration to the stroked area. Problem-solving exercises should include post hoc assessment of dosing residues and proof of exposure. The shape of the graph of response versus concentration in plasma is very steep, giving the impression of an all-or-none effect. Although higher doses lead to greater effects, attempts to statistically correlate plasma level and infarct size are likely to be unsuccessful. There is strong evidence that the pharmacokinetic properties of drugs are affected by the physiological consequences of ischemia.

  17. Plasma adiponectin concentration is strongly associated with VLDL-TG catabolism in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, A; Tchernof, A; Lamarche, B; Piché, M E; Weisnagel, J; Bergeron, J; Lemieux, S

    2011-04-01

    To investigate associations between plasma adiponectin concentration and very-low density lipoprotein-triglyceride (VLDL-TG) secretion and catabolism in postmenopausal women. This cross-sectional study included 30 postmenopausal women. Plasma adiponectin concentration was measured by ELISA. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by a 2-h euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-hour plasma glucose (2hPG) were measured during an oral glucose tolerance test. The calculation of VLDL-TG fractional catabolic rate (FCR) and VLDL-TG total secretion rate (TSR) were based on the monoexponential decrease of TG-[²H₅] glycerol values obtained following the administration of a ²H₅-glycerol bolus. Plasma adiponectin concentration was negatively associated with VLDL-TG TSR (r=-0.50; p=0.005) and positively associated with VLDL-TG FCR (r=0.54; p<0.002). This latter association remained significant after further adjustments for insulin sensitivity, visceral adipose tissue, HDL-C, FPG and 2hPG concentrations. In a multivariate model including adiponectin, insulin sensitivity and 2hPG, plasma adiponectin level was the strongest correlate of VLDL-TG FCR. Elevated plasma adiponectin concentration is associated with a favourable VLDL-TG metabolism. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of factors important in modeling plasma concentrations of tetracycline hydrochloride administered in water in swine.

    PubMed

    Mason, Sharon E; Almond, Glen W; Riviere, Jim E; Baynes, Ronald E

    2012-10-01

    To model the plasma tetracycline concentrations in swine (Sus scrofa domestica) treated with medication administered in water and determine the factors that contribute to the most accurate predictions of measured plasma drug concentrations. Plasma tetracycline concentrations measured in blood samples from 3 populations of swine. Data from previous studies provided plasma tetracycline concentrations that were measured in blood samples collected from 1 swine population at 0, 4, 8, 12, 24, 32, 48, 56, 72, 80, 96, and 104 hours and from 2 swine populations at 0, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours hours during administration of tetracycline hydrochloride dissolved in water. A 1-compartment pharmacostatistical model was used to analyze 5 potential covariate schemes and determine factors most important in predicting the plasma concentrations of tetracycline in swine. 2 models most accurately predicted the tetracycline plasma concentrations in the 3 populations of swine. Factors of importance were body weight or age of pig, ambient temperature, concentration of tetracycline in water, and water use per unit of time. The factors found to be of importance, combined with knowledge of the individual pharmacokinetic and chemical properties of medications currently approved for administration in water, may be useful in more prudent administration of approved medications administered to swine. Factors found to be important in pharmacostatistical models may allow prediction of plasma concentrations of tetracycline or other commonly used medications administered in water. The ability to predict in vivo concentrations of medication in a population of food animals can be combined with bacterial minimum inhibitory concentrations to decrease the risk of developing antimicrobial resistance.

  19. Seasonal changes in concentrations of plasma hormones in the male ring dove (Streptopelia risoria).

    PubMed

    Lea, R W; Sharp, P J; Klandorf, H; Harvey, S; Dunn, I C; Vowles, D M

    1986-03-01

    Seasonal changes in concentrations of plasma LH, prolactin, thyroxine (T4), GH and corticosterone were measured in captive male ring doves exposed to natural lighting at latitude 56 degrees N. Plasma LH levels decreased steeply in autumn when the daylength fell below about 12.5 h but increased in November as the birds became short-day refractory. In comparison with plasma LH concentrations in a group of short-day refractory birds exposed to 6 h light/day from the winter solstice, plasma LH levels in birds exposed to natural lighting increased further in spring after the natural daylength reached about 12.5 h. There were no seasonal changes in plasma prolactin concentrations and plasma T4 concentrations were at their highest during December, January and February, the coldest months of the year. The seasonal fall in plasma LH levels in September was associated with a transitory increase in plasma T4, a transitory decrease in plasma corticosterone and a sustained increase in plasma GH. It is suggested that in the ring dove, short-day refractoriness develops rapidly in November to allow the bird to breed when the opportunity arises, during the winter and early spring. The annual breeding cycle is synchronized by a short-day induced regression of the reproductive system in the autumn, the primary function of which may be to enable the birds to meet the energy requirements for the annual moult. The changes in plasma T4, corticosterone and especially of GH at this time of year are probably concerned with the control of moult or the associated changes in energy requirements.

  20. In vitro effects of nicotine on sperm motility and bio-functional flow cytometry sperm parameters.

    PubMed

    Condorelli, R A; La Vignera, S; Giacone, F; Iacoviello, L; Vicari, E; Mongioi', L; Calogero, A E

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to evaluate the effects of nicotine on sperm motility and on non-conventional sperm parameters in vitro. Capacitated spermatozoa isolated from 10 normozoospermic, healthy, non-smoker men were evaluated. Spermatozoa were exposed to increasing concentrations of nicotine (0, 1, 10, and 100 ng/ml) for 3 and 24 hours. Progressive motility and the following non-conventional sperm parameters, evaluated by flow cytometry, were assessed: mitochondrial membrane potential, viability, phosphatidylserine externalization, late apoptosis, degree of chromatin compactness, and DNA fragmentation. Nicotine suppressed, in a concentration-dependent manner, sperm progressive motility starting from the lowest concentration used (1 ng/ml). Similarly, it reduced the percentage of viable spermatozoa and increased the number of spermatozoa in late apoptosis, with altered chromatin compactness, or DNA fragmentation already after 3 hours of incubation. These effects were observed at a concentration similar (100 ng/ml) to that found in the seminal plasma of smokers (70 ng/ml), with the exception of the effects on sperm DNA fragmentation whose significant effect was detected also at a lower concentration (10 ng/ml). Nicotine may be regarded as a noxious component of cigarette smoke on the male reproductive function.

  1. Monitoring imatinib plasma concentrations in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Darlize Hübner; Wagner, Sandrine Comparsi; dos Santos, Tamyris Vianna; Lizot, Lilian de Lima Feltraco; Antunes, Marina Venzon; Capra, Marcelo; Linden, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Imatinib has proved to be effective in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia, but plasma levels above 1,000 ng/mL must be achieved to optimize activity. Therapeutic drug monitoring of imatinib is useful for patients that do not present clinical response. There are several analytical methods to measure imatinib in biosamples, which are mainly based on liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric or diode array spectrophotometric detection. The former is preferred due to its lower cost and wider availability. The present manuscript presents a review of the clinical and analytical aspects of the therapeutic drug monitoring of imatinib in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. The review includes references published over the last 10 years. There is evidence that the monitoring of plasmatic levels of imatinib is an useful alternative, especially considering the wide pharmacokinetic variability of this drug. PMID:23049322

  2. The influence of puff characteristics, nicotine dependence, and rate of nicotine metabolism on daily nicotine exposure in African American smokers

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Kathryn C.; Dempsey, Delia A.; St.Helen, Gideon; Delucchi, Kevin; Benowitz, Neal L.

    2016-01-01

    Background African American (AA) smokers experience greater tobacco-related disease burden than Whites, despite smoking fewer cigarettes per day (CPD). Understanding factors that influence daily nicotine intake in AA smokers is an important step towards decreasing tobacco-related health disparities. One factor of interest is smoking topography, or the study of puffing behavior. Aims: 1) To create a model using puff characteristics, nicotine dependence, and nicotine metabolism to predict daily nicotine exposure, and 2) to compare puff characteristics and nicotine intake from two cigarettes smoked at different times to ensure the reliability of the puff characteristics included in our model. Methods 60 AA smokers smoked their preferred brand of cigarette at two time points through a topography device. Plasma nicotine, expired CO, and changes in subjective measures were measured before and after each cigarette. Total nicotine equivalents (TNE) was measured from 24-hour urine collected during ad lib smoking. Results In a model predicting daily nicotine exposure, total puff volume, CPD, sex, and menthol status were significant predictors, (R2= .44, p < .001). Total puff volume was significantly greater and inter-puff intervals were significantly shorter after ad lib smoking compared to the first cigarette of the day, but puffing behaviors for both cigarettes were highly correlated (r range= .69–.89, p <.001) within-subjects. Conclusion This is the first study, to our knowledge, to show that puff characteristics of individual cigarettes are predictive of daily nicotine intake. Impact These findings enhance our understanding of the relationship between smoking behavior and nicotine intake in AA smokers. PMID:27030603

  3. Pasteurized, monoclonal antibody factor VIII concentrate: establishing a new standard for purity and viral safety of plasma-derived concentrates.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J C

    2000-03-01

    A factor VIII concentrate (Monoclate-P) manufactured using a combination of pasteurization and immunoaffinity chromatography has been chosen to compare and contrast manufacturing aspects of plasma-derived factor VIII concentrates. Pasteurization is a virucidal method with a long safety record in clinical practice, while immuno-affinity chromatography selectively isolates and purifies the procoagulant protein of factor VIII, and partitions potential viral contaminants and nonessential proteins to the unbound fraction. The complete Monoclate-P production process reduces human immunodeficiency virus by > or = 10.5 log10, Sindbis (a model for hepatitis C virus) by > or = 6.5 log10, and murine encephalomyocarditis virus (a non-enveloped model virus) by 7.1 log10. The viral safety of Monoclate-P has been further demonstrated in clinical studies in patients not previously treated with blood or plasma-derived products. Additionally, the manufacture of Monoclate-P includes careful donor screening and plasma testing for antibodies to syphilis and human immunodeficiency, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C viruses to enhance source plasma safety. Combined with donor selection and plasma testing, multiple viral reduction steps effectively eliminate both lipid-enveloped viruses (e.g. human immunodeficiency, hepatitis B and C) and non-lipid-enveloped viruses (e.g. hepatitis A). In addition, polymerase chain reaction-based nucleic acid detection tests for hepatitis B and C viruses and for human immunodeficiency virus-1 have been introduced as part of an investigational new drug mechanism.

  4. [Nicotinic acid: an unjustly neglected remedy].

    PubMed

    Zák, A; Zeman, M; Vecka, M; Tvrzická, E

    2006-01-01

    In human organism, the administration of nicotinic acid (niacin) leads to two types of effects. Within the physiological range (approximately = 20 mg/day), niacin has a vitamin-like role as pellagra preventing factor. The pharmacological dosage (approximately 0,5-4,5 g/day) substantially influences the plasma lipid and lipoprotein concentrations: decreases VLDL and LDL concentrations, changes the profile of LDL subfractions towards the larger particles as well as particles with lower density; it also profoundly increases the concentration of HDL-C in consequence of elevated concentration of HDL2 subfraction. Niacin as the only hypolipidemic drug reduces the lipoprotein(a) concentration. The hypolipidemic mechanism of niacin is different from that of other hypolipidemic drugs. On the basis of clinically controlled trials (both interventional epidemiological and angiographical), which satisfy the criteria of evidence-based medicine, it is possible to conclude that niacin falls unambiguously into the class of hypolipidemic drugs with proven beneficial effect not only on cardiovascular mortality and morbidity, but also on total mortality. Therefore, niacin should have an indisputable role in the pharmacological control of dyslipidemias. With the respect of basic mechanism (inhibition of the lipolysis of adipose tissue) with subsequent decrease in the concentration of free fatty acids and their flux to liver, niacin fulfils the criteria for pathogenetic treatment of atherogenic dyslipidemia in metabolic syndrome. The prerequisite condition for the niacin treatment is the respect for serious adverse effects and possible health hazards of administration (skin flush, hepatotoxicity and deterioration of glucose homeostasis). Recently discovered extrahypolipidemic effects of niacin (antioxidative activity, facilitation of reverse cholesterol transport, activation of PPAR-gamma, antithrombotic effects) and the introduction of drug forms with sustained (extended resp.) release

  5. Plasma and gingival crevicular fluid phenytoin concentrations as risk factors for gingival overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Güncü, Güliz N; Caglayan, Feriha; Dinçel, Aysun; Bozkurt, Atilla; Saygi, Serap; Karabulut, Erdem

    2006-12-01

    Gingival enlargement is one of the side effects associated with the administration of phenytoin. The mechanism by which phenytoin induces gingival enlargement is not well understood. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between plasma and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) phenytoin concentrations and the degree of gingival overgrowth in patients with similar gingival and plaque indices and also to determine the risk factors for gingival enlargement. Eighteen patients taking phenytoin in regular doses > or =6 months prior to the investigation participated in the study. Gingival enlargement was evaluated with two indices to score vertical and horizontal overgrowth. The gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI), gingival bleeding time index (GBTI), probing depth (PD), and clinical attachment level (CAL) were also evaluated. GCF and plasma phenytoin concentrations were determined by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). There was no significant difference between responders and non-responders for PD, CAL, PI, GI, and GBTI. Phenytoin was detected in all of the GCF and plasma samples using the HPLC analysis method. The mean concentration of phenytoin in GCF was significantly greater than the concentration of phenytoin in plasma. No significant difference was observed for the concentration of GCF phenytoin between responders and non-responders. However, the concentration of plasma phenytoin was significantly higher in responders than non-responders. This study showed that plasma phenytoin level appeared to be a risk factor for phenytoin-induced gingival overgrowth.

  6. Nicotine potentiates proatherogenic effects of oxLDL by stimulating and upregulating macrophage CD36 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chadipiralla, Kiranmai; Mendez, Armando J.; Jaimes, Edgar A.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Webster, Keith; Raij, Leopoldo

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. CD36 mediates oxidized LDL (oxLDL) uptake and contributes to macrophage foam cell formation. We investigated a role for the CD36 pathway in nicotine-induced activation of macrophages and foam cell formation in vitro and in vivo. Nicotine in the same plasma concentration range found in smokers increased the CD36+/CD14+ cell population in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, increased CD36 expression of human THP1 macrophages, and increased macrophage production of reactive oxygen species, PKCδ phosphorylation, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) expression. Nicotine-induced CD36 expression was suppressed by antioxidants and by specific PKCδ and PPARγ inhibitors, implicating mechanistic roles for these intermediates. Nicotine synergized with oxLDL to increase macrophage expression of CD36 and cytokines TNF-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, IL-6, and CXCL9, all of which were prevented by CD36 small interfering (si)RNA. Incubation with oxLDL (50 μg/ml) for 72 h resulted in lipid deposition in macrophages and foam cell formation. Preincubation with nicotine further increased oxLDL-induced lipid accumulation and foam cell formation, which was also prevented by CD36 siRNA. Treatment of apoE−/− mice with nicotine markedly exacerbated inflammatory monocyte levels and atherosclerotic plaque accumulation, effects that were not seen in CD36−/− apoE−/− mice. Our results show that physiological levels of nicotine increase CD36 expression in macrophages, a pathway that may account at least in part for the known proinflammatory and proatherogenic properties of nicotine. These results identify such enhanced CD36 expression as a novel nicotine-mediated pathway that may constitute an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis in smokers. The results also suggest that exacerbated atherogenesis by this pathway may be an adverse side effect of

  7. Concentration of platelets and growth factors in platelet-rich plasma from Goettingen minipigs.

    PubMed

    Jungbluth, Pascal; Grassmann, Jan-Peter; Thelen, Simon; Wild, Michael; Sager, Martin; Windolf, Joachim; Hakimi, Mohssen

    2014-01-01

    In minipigs little is known about the concentration of growth factors in plasma, despite their major role in several patho-physiological processes such as healing of fractures. This prompted us to study the concentration of platelets and selected growth factors in plasma and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) preparation of sixteen Goettingen minipigs. Platelet concentrations increased significantly in PRP in comparison to native blood plasma. Generally, significant increase in the concentration of all growth factors tested was observed in the PRP in comparison to the corresponding plasma or serum. Five of the plasma samples examined contained detectable levels of bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP-2) whereas eleven of the plasma or serum samples contained minimal amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-bb) respectively. On the other hand variable concentrations of bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP-7) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) were measured in all plasma samples. In contrast, all PRP samples contained significantly increased amounts of growth factors. The level of BMP-2, BMP-7, TGF-β1, VEGF and PDGF-bb increased by 17.6, 1.5, 7.1, 7.2 and 103.3 fold, in comparison to the corresponding non-enriched preparations. Moreover significant positive correlations were found between platelet count and the concentrations of BMP-2 (r=0.62, p<0.001), TGF-β1 (r=0.85, p<0.001), VEGF (r=0.46, p<0.01) and PDGF-bb (r=0.9, p<0.001). Our results demonstrate that selected growth factors are present in the platelet-rich plasma of minipigs which might thus serve as a source of autologous growth factors.

  8. Differential Responses of Plasma Adropin Concentrations To Dietary Glucose or Fructose Consumption In Humans

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Andrew A.; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Siebert, Emily A.; Medici, Valentina; Stanhope, Kimber L.; Havel, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Adropin is a peptide hormone encoded by the Energy Homeostasis Associated (ENHO) gene whose physiological role in humans remains incompletely defined. Here we investigated the impact of dietary interventions that affect systemic glucose and lipid metabolism on plasma adropin concentrations in humans. Consumption of glucose or fructose as 25% of daily energy requirements (E) differentially affected plasma adropin concentrations (P < 0.005) irrespective of duration, sex or age. Glucose consumption reduced plasma adropin from 3.55 ± 0.26 to 3.28 ± 0.23 ng/ml (N = 42). Fructose consumption increased plasma adropin from 3.63 ± 0.29 to 3.93 ± 0.34 ng/ml (N = 45). Consumption of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) as 25% E had no effect (3.43 ± 0.32 versus 3.39 ± 0.24 ng/ml, N = 26). Overall, the effect of glucose, HFCS and fructose on circulating adropin concentrations were similar to those observed on postprandial plasma triglyceride concentrations. Furthermore, increases in plasma adropin levels with fructose intake were most robust in individuals exhibiting hypertriglyceridemia. Individuals with low plasma adropin concentrations also exhibited rapid increases in plasma levels following consumption of breakfasts supplemented with lipids. These are the first results linking plasma adropin levels with dietary sugar intake in humans, with the impact of fructose consumption linked to systemic triglyceride metabolism. In addition, dietary fat intake may also increase circulating adropin concentrations. PMID:26435060

  9. Concentration of platelets and growth factors in platelet-rich plasma from Goettingen minipigs

    PubMed Central

    Jungbluth, Pascal; Grassmann, Jan-Peter; Thelen, Simon; Wild, Michael; Sager, Martin; Windolf, Joachim; Hakimi, Mohssen

    2014-01-01

    In minipigs little is known about the concentration of growth factors in plasma, despite their major role in several patho-physiological processes such as healing of fractures. This prompted us to study the concentration of platelets and selected growth factors in plasma and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) preparation of sixteen Goettingen minipigs. Platelet concentrations increased significantly in PRP in comparison to native blood plasma. Generally, significant increase in the concentration of all growth factors tested was observed in the PRP in comparison to the corresponding plasma or serum. Five of the plasma samples examined contained detectable levels of bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP-2) whereas eleven of the plasma or serum samples contained minimal amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-bb) respectively. On the other hand variable concentrations of bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP-7) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) were measured in all plasma samples. In contrast, all PRP samples contained significantly increased amounts of growth factors. The level of BMP-2, BMP-7, TGF-β1, VEGF and PDGF-bb increased by 17.6, 1.5, 7.1, 7.2 and 103.3 fold, in comparison to the corresponding non-enriched preparations. Moreover significant positive correlations were found between platelet count and the concentrations of BMP-2 (r=0.62, p<0.001), TGF-β1 (r=0.85, p<0.001), VEGF (r=0.46, p<0.01) and PDGF-bb (r=0.9, p<0.001). Our results demonstrate that selected growth factors are present in the platelet-rich plasma of minipigs which might thus serve as a source of autologous growth factors. PMID:26504722

  10. Platelet-rich plasma releasate differently stimulates cellular commitment toward the chondrogenic lineage according to concentration

    PubMed Central

    Matsiko, Amos; Tomazette, Marcel RP; Rocha, Wanessa KR; Cordeiro-Spinetti, Eric; Levingstone, Tanya J; Farina, Marcos; O’Brien, Fergal J; El-Cheikh, Marcia C; Balduino, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma has been used to treat articular cartilage defects, with the expectations of anabolic and anti-inflammatory effects. However, its role on cellular chondrogenic or fibrogenic commitment is still a controversy. Herein, the role of platelet-rich plasma releasate, the product obtained following platelet-rich plasma activation, on cellular commitment toward the chondrogenic lineage was evaluated in vitro. Human nasoseptal chondrogenic cells and human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells were used as cell types already committed to the chondrogenic lineage and undifferentiated cells, respectively, as different concentrations of platelet-rich plasma releasate were tested in comparison to commonly used fetal bovine serum. Low concentration of platelet-rich plasma releasate (2.5%) presented similar effects on cellular growth compared to 10% fetal bovine serum, for both cell types. In a three-dimensional culture system, platelet-rich plasma releasate alone did not induce full nasoseptal chondrogenic cells cartilage-like pellet formation. Nonetheless, platelet-rich plasma releasate played a significant role on cell commitment as high-passage nasoseptal chondrogenic cells only originated cartilage-like pellets when expanded in the presence of platelet-rich plasma releasate rather than fetal bovine serum. Histological analyses and measurements of pellet area demonstrated that even low concentrations of platelet-rich plasma releasate were enough to prevent nasoseptal chondrogenic cells from losing their chondrogenic potential due to in vitro expansion thereby promoting their recommitment. Low concentration of platelet-rich plasma releasate supplemented in chondrogenic medium also increased the chondrogenic potential of mesenchymal stromal cells seeded on collagen-hyaluronic acid scaffolds, as observed by an increase in chondrogenic-related gene expression, sulfated glycosaminoglycan production, and compressive modulus following in vitro culture. On the

  11. Coronary Artery Vitamin D Receptor Expression and Plasma Concentrations of Vitamin D: Their Association with Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Schnatz, Peter F.; Nudy, Matthew; O’Sullivan, David M.; Jiang, Xuezhi; Cline, J. Mark; Kaplan, Jay R.; Clarkson, Thomas B.; Appt, Susan E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze coronary artery vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression, plasma concentration of vitamin D3 [25OHD3], and their relationship with coronary artery atherosclerosis. Methods Premenopausal cynomolgus monkeys were fed atherogenic diets containing the equivalent of 1,000 IU/day of 25OHD3. Protein was derived from casein-lactalbumin (C/L, n=10), soy protein isolate (soy, n=10), or a combination (n=19). After 32 months consuming the diets, each monkey underwent surgical menopause. After 32 post-menopausal months, coronary atherosclerosis was measured in the left circumflex artery (LCX) and left anterior descending artery (LAD). VDR expression was determined for the LAD and 25OHD3 concentrations were assessed. Results Both the cross-sectional area of atherosclerotic plaques (mm2) and plaque thickness (mm) in the LCX as well as the LAD were analyzed in these monkeys. Those with higher plasma 25OHD3 concentrations and higher VDR were compared to those with higher plasma 25OHD3 concentrations and lower VDR. Significantly smaller plaque sizes were noted with higher plasma 25OHD3 concentrations and higher VDR. For the LCX, there was also a significantly lower plaque size (both plaque thickness and cross sectional area) in those with higher VDR and lower 25OHD3 concentrations versus those with lower quantities of VDR and higher plasma concentrations of 25OHD3, p=0.040 and p=0.009, respectively. Conclusions Cynomolgus monkeys with higher quantities of VDR have significantly less atherosclerosis than those with lower quantities of VDR and higher plasma 25OHD3 concentrations. If these findings translate to human beings, it might explain why some individuals with higher plasma concentrations of 25OHD3 have more coronary artery atherosclerosis. PMID:22617336

  12. Plasma concentration of vitamin C in dogs with a portosystemic shunt.

    PubMed

    Hishiyama, Nobuya; Kayanuma, Hideki; Matsui, Tohru; Yano, Hideo; Suganuma, Tsunenori; Funaba, Masayuki; Fujise, Hiroshi

    2006-10-01

    Most mammals, including dogs, synthesize vitamin C in the liver. We measured the plasma concentration of vitamin C to assess the body vitamin C status in 15 dogs with a portosystemic shunt (PSS). The plasma biochemical parameters indicated liver abnormalities in all the dogs. In contrast, the plasma concentration of vitamin C ranged from 2.21 to 9.03 mg/L in the 15 dogs and was below the reference range (3.2 to 8.9 mg/L) in only 2 dogs. These findings suggest that vitamin C status is not impaired in dogs with PSS.

  13. The effect of plasma antithrombin concentration on thrombin generation and fibrin gel structure.

    PubMed

    Elgue, G; Sanchez, J; Fatah, K; Olsson, P; Blombäck, B

    1994-07-15

    Congenital deficiency of antithrombin (AT) is associated with thrombotic events and AT consumption occurs in some severe disorders and after treatment with heparin. The aim of this study was to investigate whether variations in the level of plasma AT modify thrombin generation and the fibrin formation process after the intrinsic coagulation mechanism is triggered. Normal plasma was depleted of AT by immunoadsorption on CNBr-Sepharose coupled with the anti-AT-IgG fraction of antiserum. The AT-depleted plasma was reconstituted with AT (between 0.3 and 1.5 AT units per ml). Thrombin generation was measured as the development of thrombin-antithrombin complexes (TAT). The lag phase preceding fibrin formation depended on the concentration of AT. The short lag phase was seen in completely AT-depleted plasma and the long in plasma with 1.5 AT units per ml. TAT generation, determined in parallel consecutive samples, showed that the rate at which thrombin was generated was inverse to the AT concentration in plasma. The network structure of hydrated fibrin gels in the clotted plasma was studied by measuring the wavelength dependence of gel turbidity. The mass/length ratio value, -i.e. the thickness of fiber strands and porosity of the gel increased with increasing AT concentrations. It is concluded that plasma AT regulates the rate of prothrombin-thrombin conversion, the clotting time and the consequently network structure of the fibrin gel.

  14. Plasma lactate concentrations in septic peritonitis: A retrospective study of 83 dogs (2007-2012).

    PubMed

    Cortellini, Stefano; Seth, Mayank; Kellett-Gregory, Lindsay M

    2015-01-01

    To determine if absolute plasma lactate concentration or lactate clearance in dogs with septic peritonitis is associated with morbidity or mortality. Retrospective cohort study from 2007 to 2012. University teaching hospital. Eighty-three dogs with septic peritonitis were included. Patients had at least 1 plasma lactate measurement during the course of the hospitalization. Sixty-four percent of the patients survived to discharge, 22% were euthanized, and 14% died during hospitalization. Plasma lactate concentration >2.5 mmol/L on admission (29% of the patients) was associated with mortality (P = 0.001). Median admission plasma lactate concentration (n = 81) was significantly different between nonsurvivors (2.5 mmol/L, range 0.5-8.4) and survivors (1.4 mmol/L, range 0.5-9.7; P = 0.007). Admission plasma lactate concentration >4 mmol/L yielded a sensitivity of 36% and a specificity of 92% for nonsurvival. The inability to normalize plasma lactate concentration within 6 hours of admission (n = 10/24) yielded a sensitivity of 76% and specificity of 100% for nonsurvival. Postoperative hyperlactatemia (plasma lactate concentration >2 mmol/L; n = 18/76) had a sensitivity of 46% and specificity of 88% for nonsurvival. Persistent postoperative hyperlactatemia (n = 11/18) had a sensitivity of 92% and a specificity of 100% for nonsurvival. Lactate clearance less than 21% at 6 hours (n = 20) had a sensitivity of 54% and specificity of 91% for nonsurvival. Lactate clearance less than 42% at 12 hours (n = 18) had a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 100% for nonsurvival. Admission plasma lactate concentration and lactate clearance were good prognostic indicators in dogs with septic peritonitis. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  15. Independent effects of apolipoprotein AV and apolipoprotein CIII on plasma triglyceride concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Baroukh, Nadine N.; Bauge, Eric; Akiyama, Jennifer; Chang, Jessie; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Rubin, Edward M.; Fruchart, Jamila; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-08-15

    Both the apolipoprotein A5 and C3 genes have repeatedly been shown to play an important role in determining plasma triglyceride concentrations in humans and mice. In mice, transgenic and knockout experiments indicate that plasma triglyceride levels are negatively and positively correlated with APOA5 and APOC3 expression, respectively. In humans, common polymorphisms in both genes have also been associated with plasma triglyceride concentrations. The evolutionary relationship among these two apolipoprotein genes and their close proximity on human chromosome 11q23 have largely precluded the determination of their relative contribution to altered Both the apolipoprotein A5 and C3 genes have repeatedly been shown to play an important role in determining plasma triglyceride concentrations in humans and mice. In mice, transgenic and knockout experiments indicate that plasma triglyceride levels are negatively and positively correlated with APOA5 and APOC3 expression, respectively. In humans, common polymorphisms in both genes have also been associated with plasma triglyceride concentrations. The evolutionary relationship among these two apolipoprotein genes and their close proximity on human chromosome 11q23 have largely precluded the determination of their relative contribution to altered triglycerides. To overcome these confounding factors and address their relationship, we generated independent lines of mice that either over-expressed (''double transgenic'') or completely lacked (''double knockout'') both apolipoprotein genes. We report that both ''double transgenic'' and ''double knockout'' mice display intermedia tetriglyceride concentrations compared to over-expression or deletion of either gene alone. Furthermore, we find that human ApoAV plasma protein levels in the ''double transgenic'' mice are approximately 500-fold lower than human ApoCIII levels, supporting ApoAV is a potent triglyceride modulator despite its low concentration. Together, these data indicate

  16. Circadian Rhythm of Plasma Aldosterone Concentration in Patients with Primary Aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Kem, David C.; Weinberger, Myron H.; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso; Kramer, Norman J.; Lerman, Robert; Furuyama, Shunsuke; Nugent, Charles A.

    1973-01-01

    Plasma aldosterone, cortisol, and renin activity were measured in nine recumbent patients with hyperaldosteronism, including seven with adenomas, one with idiopathic hyperplasia, and one with glucocorticoid suppressible hyperplasia. All had peak values of plasma aldosterone concentration from 3 a.m. to noon and lowest values at 6 p.m. or midnight. This rhythm was similar to the circadian pattern of plasma cortisol in the same patients. When these data were normalized to eliminate the wide variation in ranges of plasma aldosterone and cortisol between individuals, there was an excellent correlation (r = + 0.87, P < 0.005) between the two hormones. In contrast, plasma aldosterone concentrations did not correlate with plasma renin activity before or after normalization of data. Short term suppression of ACTH by administration of dexamethasone eliminated the circadian variation of plasma aldosterone in both patients with hyperplasia and in four of five patients with adenomas, while it markedly altered the rhythm in the fifth. Similar doses of dexamethasone were administered to four normal subjects and did not flatten the circadian rhythm of plasma aldosterone. These data suggest that patients with primary aldosteronism have a circadian rhythm of plasma aldosterone mediated by changes in ACTH. PMID:4353776

  17. Thermodynamic analysis of the plasma production of ferroniobium from a loparite concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, A. A.; Kirpichev, D. E.; Nikolaev, A. V.; Tsvetkov, Yu. V.

    2013-11-01

    The possibility of pyrometallurgical processing of a loparite concentrate at a temperature of 2000-4000 K and a pressure of 0.1 MPa is thermodynamically studied using the TERRA software package. It is found that the niobium concentration in the concentrate almost doubles during plasma heating as a result of thermal decomposition and the precipitation of rare-earth metals into a gas phase. Crude niobium can be extracted from the thermally decomposed concentrate by carbothermic or aluminothermic reduction. After plasma-arc vacuum refining, crude niobium can be used for making commercial ferroniobium. The calculated energy consumed for the plasma production of ferroniobium from the loparite concentrate by carbothermic or aluminothermic reduction under adiabatic conditions is 46.6 or 79.0 GJ/(t ferroniobium), respectively. The energy consumption can even be increased severalfold, and the implementation of the process remains economically efficient at the existing market price of ferroniobium.

  18. Nicotine and cotinine up-regulate vascular endothelial growth factor expression in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Conklin, Brian S; Zhao, Weidong; Zhong, Dian-Sheng; Chen, Changyi

    2002-02-01

    Cigarette smoking is an important risk factor for both vascular disease and various forms of cancer. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial-specific mitogen that is normally expressed only in low levels in normal arteries but may be involved in the progression of both vascular disease and cancer. Some clinical evidence suggests that cigarette smoking may increase plasma VEGF levels, but there is a lack of basic science studies investigating this possibility. We show here, using an intact porcine common carotid artery perfusion culture model, that nicotine and cotinine, the major product of nicotine metabolism, cause a significant increase in endothelial cell VEGF expression. VEGF mRNA levels were compared between groups using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, whereas protein level changes were demonstrated with Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Our results showed significant increases in endothelial cell VEGF mRNA and protein levels because of nicotine and cotinine at concentrations representative of plasma concentrations seen in habitual smokers. VEGF immunostaining also paralleled these results. These findings may give a clue as to the mechanisms by which nicotine and cotinine from cigarette smoking increase vascular disease progression and tumor growth and metastasis.

  19. Age-related increases in plasma phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide concentrations in control subjects and patients with hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, M; Oikawa, S; Hayasaka, K; Sekikawa, A; Nagashima, T; Toyota, T; Miyazawa, T

    2000-06-01

    The basal lipid peroxide concentration in the plasma of patients with hyperlipidemia may be related to atherosclerosis. Quantitative determination of lipid peroxides in the plasma is an important step in the overall evaluation of the biochemical processes leading to oxidative injury. Unfortunately, the currently available methods for lipid peroxidation lack specificity and sensitivity. Hyperlipidemic patients (44 males and 50 females), ages 12-82 years (mean +/- SE, 53 +/- 2.3 years for males, 58 +/- 2.0 years for females, and 56 +/- 14 years for total cases), and normolipidemic volunteers (controls, 32 males and 15 females), ages 13-90 years (49 +/- 4 years for males, 65 +/- 4 years for females, and 55 +/- 24 years for total cases), were recruited in the present study. Plasma phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide (PCOOH) was determined by chemiluminescence-HPLC (CL-HPLC). Plasma PCOOH concentrations increased with age in both controls and hyperlipidemic patients. However, the mean plasma PCOOH concentration in patients with hyperlipidemia (331 +/- 19 nmol/L; n = 94) was significantly (P <0.001) higher than in the controls (160 +/- 65 nmol/L; n = 47). Plasma PCOOH concentrations were similar in three hyperlipidemic phenotypes: hypercholesterolemia (IIa), hypertriglyceridemia (IV), and combined hyperlipidemia (IIb). The mean plasma PCOOH in patients with treatment-induced normalized plasma lipids was 202 +/- 17 nmol/L. There was no significant correlation between plasma PCOOH concentration and total cholesterol, triglycerides, or phospholipids in hyperlipidemic patients. For all subjects, there was a significantly positive correlation between plasma PCOOH and each lipid (total cholesterol, P = 0.0002; triglycerides, P = 0.0137; and phospholipids, P <0.0001). Analysis of fatty acids composition of plasma phosphatidylcholine showed significantly low concentrations of n-6 fatty acids moieties (linoleic acid and arachidonic acid) in patients compared with controls. Our

  20. Depression of plasma luteinizing hormone concentration in quail by the anticholinesterase insecticide parathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Clarke, R.N.; Ottinger, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    1. To examine the effects of parathion on basal plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration, male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) were orally intubated with 0, 5 or 10 mg/kg parathion and sacrificed after 4, 8 and 24 hr.2. At the 5 mg/kg dose, plasma LH levels were reduced at 4 and 8 hr, but returned to control values by 24 hr. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity was substantially reduced by 10 mg/kg parathion (52, 75 and 37% inhibition at 4, 8 and 24 hr, respectively) and plasma LH concentration remained depressed through the 24-hr period.3. These findings suggest that the organophosphorus insecticide parathion may alter plasma LH concentration in a manner which might impair reproductive activity, and provide indirect evidence for a cholinergic component in the regulation of LH secretion in quail.

  1. Depression of plasma luteinizing hormone concentration in quail by the anticholinesterase insecticide parathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Clarke, R.N.; Ottinger, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    To examine the effects of parathion on basal plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) concentration, male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) were orally intubated with 0, 5 or 10 mg/kg parathion and sacrificed after 4, 8 and 24 hr. At the 5 mg/kg dose, plasma LH levels were reduced at 4 and 8 hr, but returned to control values by 24 hr. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity was substantially reduced by 10 mg/kg parathion (52, 75 and 37% inhibition at 4, 8 and 24 hr, respectively) and plasma LH concentration remained depressed through the 24-hr period. These findings suggest that the organophosphorus insecticide parathion may alter plasma LH concentration in a manner which might impair reproductive activity, and provide indirect evidence for a cholinergic component in the regulation of LH secretion in quail.

  2. Natriuretic peptides in cetaceans: identification, molecular characterization and changes in plasma concentration after landing.

    PubMed

    Naka, Tadaomi; Katsumata, Etsuko; Sasaki, Kazuki; Minamino, Naoto; Yoshioka, Motoi; Takei, Yoshio

    2007-06-01

    Dolphins are aquatic animals free from gravity, and this may have imposed significant changes in their cardiovascular status and its hormonal regulation compared with terrestrial animals. This study molecularly characterized two major cardiovascular hormones, atrial and B-type natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) and measured their changes in dolphin plasma concentrations in relation to the cardiovascular status of the animal. We initially identified ANP and BNP in three species of dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens, Phocoenoides dalli and Tursiops truncatus). ANP precursors are highly conserved in most mammals, but dolphin BNP precursors were more variable. In molecular phylogenetic analyses, dolphin ANP and BNP precursors grouped with those of artiodactyls, particularly to the camel peptides. The chromatographic characterization of tissue and plasma molecular forms using specific radioimmunoassays showed that the predominant ANP and BNP in the atrium are prohormone and mature peptide, respectively, whereas mature ANP and BNP are circulating in the dolphin blood. A mass spectrometric analysis showed that atrial BNP consists of 26 amino acids, rather than the 32-amino-acid form detected in other mammals. Finally, changes in plasma ANP and BNP concentrations were examined in captive bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) after their pool was drained. Plasma ANP and BNP concentrations did not change after landing, unlike terrestrial mammals. Plasma angiotensin II and cortisol concentrations did not change either, showing minor stress after landing. Since landed dolphins show a different cardiovascular status on land than terrestrial mammals, plasma ANP and BNP concentrations seem to reflect the cardiovascular status characteristic of dolphins.

  3. Plasma pyrimethamine concentrations during long-term treatment for cerebral toxoplasmosis in patients with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Klinker, H; Langmann, P; Richter, E

    1996-01-01

    Steady-state plasma pyrimethamine levels were measured by gas chromatography. The specimens were taken from 74 adults with advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection receiving pyrimethamine-containing drugs for prophylaxis or curative therapy of reactivated cerebral toxoplasmosis. During an overall treatment period of 1,049 months, 1,012 plasma samples were investigated. Pyrimethamine concentrations could be evaluated in 904 plasma samples. The weekly dosage of pyrimethamine ranged from 25 to 1,400 mg; one patient with severe diarrhea received 2,100 mg/week. Steady-state plasma pyrimethamine concentrations were achieved after 12 to 20 days. Pyrimethamine concentrations evidently increased with the weekly dosage given. Mean concentrations were 253 +/- 151 ng/ml with 50 mg of pyrimethamine per week, 471 +/- 214 ng/ml with 100 mg of pyrimethamine per week, 1,893 +/- 1,182 ng/ml with 350 mg of pyrimethamine per week and 3,369 +/- 1,726 ng/ml with 1,050 mg of pyrimethamine per week. A widespread interpatient range was found for every dosage. With the simultaneous use of enzyme-inducing comedication, the plasma pyrimethamine levels decreased in several patients. Mild chronic liver disease did not influence plasma pyrimethamine concentrations. To avoid ineffective therapy or severe side effects, monitoring of pyrimethamine could be useful in patients receiving enzyme-inducing comedications and in patients with severe diarrhea or poor compliance. PMID:8807051

  4. Hostility differentiates the brain metabolic effects of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Fallon, James H; Keator, David B; Mbogori, James; Turner, Jessica; Potkin, Steven G

    2004-01-01

    The brain mechanisms underlying the cause of nicotine dependence are unknown, however, hostility traits are associated with increased susceptibility to nicotine dependence. We used FDG PET to measure brain metabolic response to nicotine administered by patch while the subject performed the Bushman aggression task in 86 high- and low-hostility subjects. Low-hostility trait subjects demonstrated no significant change in brain metabolic response to nicotine. In marked contrast, high-hostility non-smokers subjects demonstrated dramatic metabolic changes to low dose (3.5 mg patch) as did high-hostility smokers to high dose nicotine (21 mg patch) throughout the brain bilaterally (p<0.025). Correlational analyses demonstrated greater metabolic changes in response to nicotine in subjects with greatest hostility trait measures. The observed differences were not a consequence of plasma nicotine or cotinine levels. These metabolic changes were not observed when subjects performed a sustained attentional task (continuous performance task; CPT). Behaviorally, high-hostility subjects had higher ratings of anger, impatience, irritability and nervousness, and lower ratings of happiness, relaxation and curiosity than low-hostility subjects. Smokers had significantly greater scores on impatience and restlessness than non-smokers. This PET study demonstrates a conspicuous lack of the brain metabolic response to nicotine in low-hostility non-smokers in contrast to a dramatic brain response to nicotine in high hostility subjects. This biological difference in brain metabolic response to nicotine between high and low hostility trait subjects may explain differences in susceptibility to nicotine dependence.

  5. Comparison of the Pharmacokinetics of Nicotine Following Single and Ad Libitum Use of a Tobacco Heating System or Combustible Cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Picavet, Patrick; Haziza, Christelle; Lama, Nicola; Weitkunat, Rolf; Lüdicke, Frank

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to compare the pharmacokinetics of nicotine between the heat-not-burn Tobacco Heating System 2.1 (THS 2.1) and combustible cigarettes (CCs). We also examined whether the subjective urge to smoke was associated with the pharmacokinetics of nicotine. This open-label, randomized, two-period, two-sequence crossover study conducted in 28 healthy smokers assessed the pharmacokinetics of nicotine after single and ad libitum use of the THS 2.1 or CCs. During the 7-day confinement period, blood samples were drawn for pharmacokinetic analysis. Subjective effects related to THS 2.1 or CC use were assessed using the Questionnaire of Smoking Urges (QSU-Brief). The nicotine delivery rate was similar with the THS 2.1 and CCs after single and ad libitum use. The time to the maximum nicotine concentration was 8 minutes after single use of the THS 2.1 and CCs. The time to the peak concentration following ad libitum use was similar between the THS 2.1 and CCs. The maximum plasma nicotine concentration after single use of the THS 2.1 was 8.4 ng/mL, 70.3% of that obtained with CCs. A transient reduction from baseline in the urge to smoke of 40% was observed 15 minutes after the single use of both the THS 2.1 and CCs. The mean QSU-Brief total scores following single and ad libitum use were similar for the THS 2.1 and CCs. These results suggest that the THS 2.1 effectively delivers nicotine and achieves similar pharmacokinetic profiles to CCs. The THS 2.1 also reduced the urge to smoke similarly to CCs. Reducing exposure to toxicants and safer delivery of nicotine are among the strategies that may reduce the harm of smoking-related diseases. In the present study, we investigated the pharmacokinetics of nicotine and their effects on the urge to smoke using the THS 2.1. It was developed to replicate the ritual of smoking as closely as possible by providing nicotine in a way that mimics CC smoking, but limits pyrolysis and combustion by heating tobacco at a much lower temperature

  6. Plasma concentrations of testosterone and nandrolone in racing and nonracing intact male horses.

    PubMed

    Soma, L R; Uboh, C E; You, Y; Guan, F; McDonnell, S

    2012-04-01

    Pennsylvania (PA) State Racing Commissions regulate the endogenous androgenic steroid, testosterone (TES), in racing intact males (RIM) by quantification of TES in post-race samples. Post-race plasma samples (2209) collected between March 2008 and November 2010 were analyzed for TES, nandrolone (NAN), and other anabolic steroids (ABS). Of the 2209 plasma samples, 2098 had quantifiable TES ≥ 25 pg/mL. Plasma (mean ± SD) concentrations of TES and NAN in RIM were 329.2 ± 266.4 and 96.0 ± 67.8 pg/mL, respectively. Only 64.6% of RIM had quantifiable concentration of NAN, and there was no relationship between TES and NAN. Plasma TES concentrations were significantly (P < 0.0001) higher during the months of April, May, June, July, and August. A significantly higher (P < 0.006) plasma TES was observed in Thoroughbred (TB) (347.6 ± 288.5 pg/mL) vs. that in Standardbred (STB) (315.4 ± 247.7 pg/mL). Plasma concentrations of TES from breeding stallions (BS) were 601.6 ± 356.5 pg/mL. Statistically significant (P < 0.0001) lower plasma concentrations of the two steroids were observed in RIM horses. Based on quantile distribution of TES in the RIM and BS populations, 99.5% were at or below 1546.1 and 1778.0 pg/mL, respectively. Based on this population of RIM, the suggested upper threshold plasma concentration of endogenous TES in horses competing in PA should remain at 2000 pg/mL. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Retinol, carotenoids, and tocopherols in the milk of lactating adolescents and relationships with plasma concentrations.

    PubMed

    de Azeredo, Vilma B; Trugo, Nadia M F

    2008-02-01

    We determined the concentrations of retinol, carotenoids, and tocopherols in breast milk of adolescents and evaluated their associations with plasma levels and with maternal characteristics (period of lactation, body mass index, age of menarche, and years postmenarche). This was a single cross-sectional survey of retinol, carotenoid, and tocopherol composition of milk and plasma of lactating adolescent mothers (n = 72; 30-120 d postpartum) attending public daycare clinics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Milk and plasma components were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Nutrient concentrations (micromoles per liter, mean +/- SE) in plasma and milk were, respectively, retinol 2.1 +/- 0.5 and 0.62 +/- 0.44, beta-carotene 0.18 +/- 0.19 and 0.016 +/- 0.017, alpha-carotene 0.05 +/- 0.04 and 0.0035 +/- 0.002, lutein plus zeaxanthin 0.15 +/- 0.11 and 0.025 +/- 0.024, lycopene 0.1 +/- 0.11 and 0.016 +/- 0.025, alpha-tocopherol 10.8 +/- 5.3 and 2.7 +/- 1.8, gamma-tocopherol 2.6 +/- 2.3 and 0.37 +/- 0.15. The milk/plasma molar ratios of retinol and tocopherols were two times higher than those of carotenoids. Significant correlations (P < 0.001) between milk and plasma nutrient levels were observed for beta-carotene (r = 0.41), alpha-carotene (r = 0.60), and lutein plus zeaxanthin (r = 0.57), but not for lycopene, retinol, and tocopherols. Nutrient concentrations in plasma and in milk were not associated with the maternal characteristics investigated. Concentrations of the nutrients studied, especially retinol and alpha-tocopherol, in mature milk of lactating adolescents were, in general, lower than in milk of adult lactating women. Milk concentrations were associated with plasma concentrations only for beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, and lutein plus zeaxanthin.

  8. Temporal plasma vitamin concentrations are altered by fat-soluble vitamin administration in suckling pigs.

    PubMed

    Jang, Y D; Ma, J Y; Monegue, J S; Monegue, H J; Stuart, R L; Lindemann, M D

    2015-11-01

    Piglets are born with purportedly low plasma vitamin D levels. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of fat-soluble vitamin administration, primarily vitamin D, by different administration routes on plasma vitamin concentrations in suckling pigs. A total of 45 pigs from 5 litters were allotted at birth to 3 treatments within each litter. Pigs were administered 400 IU of α-tocopherol, 40,000 IU of retinyl palmitate, and 40,000 IU of vitamin D at d 1 of age either orally or by i.m. injection and compared with control pigs with no supplemental vitamin administration. Blood samples were collected at d 0 (initial), 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 14, and 20 after administration. Plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25OHD), α-tocopherol, retinyl palmitate, and retinol concentrations were analyzed. Except for retinol, the effects of treatment, day, and day × treatment interaction ( < 0.01) were observed on plasma vitamin concentrations. Plasma concentrations of 25OHD and α-tocopherol increased immediately regardless of administration routes to peak at d 2 and 1 after administration, respectively. Plasma retinyl palmitate concentrations increased only with the injection treatment, with the peak at d 1 after administration. Plasma concentrations of 25OHD in both administration treatments and α-tocopherol in the injection treatment were maintained at greater levels than those in the control treatment until d 20 after administration. With regard to the pharmacokinetic parameters for plasma 25OHD concentrations, the injection treatment had greater elimination half-life ( < 0.01), maximum plasma concentrations ( < 0.05), and all area under the curve parameters ( < 0.01) but a lower elimination rate constant ( < 0.01) than the oral treatment. Relative bioavailability of oral administration compared with injection administration was 55.26%. These results indicate that plasma status of 25OHD,α-tocopherol, and retinyl palmitate are differentially changed between types of

  9. Measurement of plasma cell-free DNA concentrations in dogs with sepsis, trauma, and neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Letendre, Jo-Annie; Goggs, Robert

    2017-05-01

    To determine if cell-free DNA (cfDNA) was identifiable in canine plasma, to evaluate 3 techniques for the measurement of plasma cfDNA concentrations in dogs presented to an emergency service, and to compare the plasma cfDNA concentrations of healthy dogs to those with sepsis, trauma, and neoplasia. Retrospective study of banked canine plasma samples collected between May 2014 and December 2014. Dogs presented to the emergency service of a university veterinary teaching hospital. Plasma cfDNA was measured on residual plasma samples obtained from 15 dogs with sepsis, 15 dogs with moderate-severe trauma, 15 dogs diagnosed with a sarcoma. Plasma cfDNA was also measured in 15 healthy dogs. None. Assay linearity, repeatability, and reproducibility were evaluated. Quantification of cfDNA was performed in duplicate on diluted citrated plasma and following DNA purification using 2 fluorescence assays (SYBR-Gold; Quant-iT) and by ultraviolet absorbance spectroscopy. Fluorescence intensities (FIs) were converted to cfDNA concentrations using standard curves. Median FI values and cfDNA concentrations were compared to healthy controls using the Kruskal-Wallis test, with adjustment for multiple comparisons. Alpha was set at 0.05. Both assays had excellent linearity, and acceptable repeatability and reproducibility. Compared to controls, plasma cfDNA concentrations were significantly increased in dogs with sepsis or moderate-severe trauma with both assays (P ≤ 0.003). Dogs with neoplasia had significantly increased cfDNA concentrations with the Quant-iT assay only (P = 0.003). When measurements were performed on purified DNA, only dogs with moderate-severe trauma had significantly increased cfDNA concentrations (P < 0.001; SYBR-Gold assay). cfDNA can be readily identified in canine plasma using 2 fluorescence assays. DNA extraction offers no advantage over direct measurement. Compared to healthy controls, dogs with sepsis or moderate-severe trauma have significantly increased

  10. Nicotine delivery, tolerability and reduction of smoking urge in smokers following short-term use of one brand of electronic cigarettes.

    PubMed

    D'Ruiz, Carl D; Graff, Donald W; Yan, X Sherwin

    2015-09-30

    This randomized, partially single-blinded, 6-period crossover clinical study of adult smokers compared the nicotine pharmacokinetics, impacts on smoking urge and tolerability of various formulations of one brand of e-cigarettes with that of a tobacco cigarette. Five e-cigarettes with different e-liquid formulations containing 1.6 % and 2.4 % nicotine and a conventional tobacco cigarette were randomized among 24 subjects under two exposure sessions consisting of a 30-min controlled and a one-hour ad lib use period to assess plasma nicotine levels, impacts on smoking urge and adverse events. The 30-min controlled use session comprised an intensive use of the e-cigarettes with a total of 50 puffs taken every 30 s for comparison to a single conventional cigarette having a typical machine-measured nicotine yield (~0.8 mg). Ad lib product use conditions provided insight into more naturalistic product use behaviors and their accompanying smoking urge reductions. Adverse events (AEs) were assessed by the Principal Investigator. Significant (p < 0.05) increases in plasma nicotine concentrations occurred within 10 min of controlled e-cigarette use and significant (p < 0.001) reductions from baseline smoking urge were observed within 5 min. E-cigarette and cigarette nicotine plasma levels were comparable for up to one hour of use. After both sessions (90 min), nicotine exposure was the highest for the cigarette, with all e-cigarettes showing 23 % to 53 % lower plasma concentrations. During controlled use, peak reduction in smoking urge for e-cigs occurred later than for the cigarette. After completion of both sessions, significant smoking urge reduction persisted for most of the tested e-cigarettes, albeit at levels lower than that provided by the tobacco cigarette. Nicotine content, vehicle differences, and the presence of menthol did not significantly affect smoking urge reduction by the e-cigarettes. No subjects were discontinued due to AEs. The most frequently

  11. A simple, fast, and sensitive method for the measurement of serum nicotine, cotinine, and nornicotine by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chao; Kosewick, Justin; Wang, Sihe

    2013-08-01

    The measurement of nicotine and its metabolites has been used to monitor tobacco use. A high-sensitivity method (<1 ng/mL) is necessary for the measurement in serum or plasma to differentiate nonsmokers from passive smokers. Here, we report a novel LC-MS/MS method to quantify nicotine, cotinine, and nornicotine in serum with high sensitivity. Sample preparation involved only protein precipitation, followed by online turbulent flow extraction and analysis on a porous graphitic carbon column in alkaline conditions. The chromatography time was 4 min. No significant matrix effects or interference were observed. The lower limit of quantification was 0.36, 0.32, and 0.38 ng/mL for nicotine, cotinine, and nornicotine, respectively, while accuracy was 91.6-117.1%. No carryover was observed up to a concentration of 48 , 550, and 48 ng/mL for nicotine, cotinine, and nornicotine, respectively. Total CV was <6.5%. The measurement of nicotine and cotinine was compared with an independent LC-MS/MS method and concordant results were obtained. In conclusion, this new method was simple, fast, sensitive, and accurate. It was validated to measure nicotine, cotinine, and nornicotine in serum for monitoring tobacco use.

  12. Genetic Factors for Enhancement of Nicotine Levels in Cultivated Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bingwu; Lewis, Ramsey S.; Shi, Junli; Song, Zhongbang; Gao, Yulong; Li, Wenzheng; Chen, Hongxia; Qu, Rongda

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine has practical applications relating to smoking cessation devices and alternative nicotine products. Genetic manipulation for increasing nicotine content in cultivated tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) may be of value for industrial purposes, including the possibility of enhancing the efficiency of nicotine extraction. Biotechnological approaches have been evaluated in connection with this objective, but field-based results are few. Here, we report characterization of two genes encoding basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs), NtMYC2a and NtMYC2b from tobacco. Overexpression of NtMYC2a increased leaf nicotine levels in T1 transgenic lines approximately 2.3-fold in greenhouse-grown plants of tobacco cultivar ‘NC 95′. Subsequent field testing of T2 and T3 generations of transgenic NtMYC2a overexpression lines showed nicotine concentrations were 76% and 58% higher than control lines, respectively. These results demonstrated that the increased nicotine trait was stably inherited to the T2 and T3 generations, indicating the important role that NtMYC2a plays in regulating nicotine accumulation in N. tabacum and the great potential of NtMYC2a overexpression in tobacco plants for industrial nicotine production. Collected data in this study also indicated a negative feedback inhibition of nicotine biosynthesis. Further enhancement of nicotine accumulation in tobacco leaf may require modification of the processes of nicotine transport and deposition. PMID:26626731

  13. Plasma cortisol and glucose concentrations in the striped mullet ( Mugil cephalus L.) subjected to intense handling stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wanshu

    1992-03-01

    The plasma cortisol and glucose concentrations were determined in mature female striped mullet ( Mugil cephalus L.) subjected to short term intense handling stress. The results indicated that plasma cortisol levels reached a peak 20 min after stress and declined gradually afterwards. The highest concentration of plasma glucose was observed 30 min after stress. The present study showed that the rise of plasma glucose was associated with the plasma cortisol levels.

  14. Moringa Oleifera leaf extract increases plasma antioxidant status associated with reduced plasma malondialdehyde concentration without hypoglycemia in fasting healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ngamukote, Sathaporn; Khannongpho, Teerawat; Siriwatanapaiboon, Marent; Sirikwanpong, Sukrit; Dahlan, Winai; Adisakwattana, Sirichai

    2016-12-29

    To investigate the effect of Moringa Oleifera leaf extract (MOLE) on plasma glucose concentration and antioxidant status in healthy volunteers. A randomized crossover design was used in this study. Healthy volunteers were randomly assigned to receive either 200 mL of warm water (10 cases) or 200 mL of MOLE (500 mg dried extract, 10 cases). Blood samples were drawn at 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min for measuring fasting plasma glucose (FPG), ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and malondialdehyde (MDA). FPG concentration was not signifificantly different between warm water and MOLE. The consumption of MOLE acutely improved both FRAP and TEAC, with increases after 30 min of 30 μmol/L FeSO4 equivalents and 0.18 μmol/L Trolox equivalents, respectively. The change in MDA level from baseline was signifificantly lowered after the ingestion of MOLE at 30, 60, and 90 min. In addition, FRAP level was negatively correlated with plasma MDA level after an intake of MOLE. MOLE increased plasma antioxidant capacity without hypoglycemia in human. The consumption of MOLE may reduce the risk factors associated with chronic degenerative diseases.

  15. Impact of hemolysis during sample collection: how different is drug concentration in hemolyzed plasma from that of normal plasma?

    PubMed

    Tan, Aimin; Gagné, Sébastien; Lévesque, Isabelle A; Lachance, Sylvain; Boudreau, Nadine; Lévesque, Ann

    2012-07-15

    Hemolysis is a common phenomenon in clinical studies. Despite the growing interest in hemolysis matrix effect, how hemolysis impacts the representability of hemolyzed plasma samples was rarely evaluated. The purpose of this research is to perform such an evaluation by theoretical consideration and experiment. A formula for estimating the impact is proposed, which includes the degree of hemolysis and the drug's red blood cell (RBC): plasma concentration ratio. The impact of hemolysis on the representability of hemolyzed plasma samples is compound-dependant. Given the same degree of hemolysis, the stronger a drug binds to RBCs, the more significant the impact of hemolysis. For a drug with high affinity to RBCs, the results of hemolyzed plasma samples may not be useful even though they are accurate. There is an overall agreement between theoretical predication and experimental results. Among the ten different drug compounds tested, only methazolamide, which binds strongly to RBCs, showed significant change in plasma concentration due to hemolysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Adolescent nicotine administration alters serotonin receptors and cell signaling mediated through adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Seidler, F J; Cousins, M M; Slikker, W; Slotkin, T A

    2002-10-04

    Nicotine is a neuroteratogen that targets synaptic function during critical developmental stages and recent studies indicate that CNS vulnerability extends into adolescence, the age at which smoking typically commences. We administered nicotine to adolescent rats via continuous minipump infusions from PN30 to PN47.5, using 6 mg/kg/day, a dose rate that replicates the plasma nicotine levels found in smokers, and examined 5HT receptors and related cell signaling during nicotine administration (PN45) and in the post-treatment period (PN50, 60, 75). Adolescent nicotine decreased 5HT(2) receptor binding in brain regions containing 5HT projections (hippocampus and cerebral cortex), with selectivity for females in the cerebral cortex; regions containing 5HT cell bodies showed either an increase (midbrain in males) or no change (brainstem). In contrast, there were no significant changes in 5HT(1A) receptors; however, the ability of the receptors to signal through adenylyl cyclase (AC) showed a switch from stimulatory to inhibitory effects in females during the post-treatment period. There were also transient alterations in AC responses to beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation, as well as pronounced induction of the AC response to the non-receptor-mediated stimulant, forskolin. Our results indicate that adolescent nicotine exposure alters the concentrations and functions of postsynaptic 5HT receptors in a manner commensurate with impaired 5HT synaptic function. The direction of change, emergence of defects after the cessation of nicotine administration, and sex-preference for effects in females, all support a relationship of impaired 5HT function to the higher incidence of depression seen in adolescent smokers.

  17. Effects of feed on plasma leptin and ghrelin concentrations in crib-biting horses.

    PubMed

    Hemmann, Karin E; Koho, Ninna M; Vainio, Outi M; Raekallio, Marja R

    2013-10-01

    The reason why some horses begin an oral stereotypy such as crib-biting is not known. The aim of this study was to measure ghrelin and leptin concentrations in plasma concentrations to determine whether there is a link to crib-biting in horses. Plasma samples (n=3) were collected for plasma leptin and ghrelin assay before and during the morning first feeding in the usual environments of 15 horses with stereotypic crib-biting and 15 matched controls. The crib-biting intensity was scored in three 5-min phases, and a subgroup of verified crib-biters (n=8) was defined as horses that were seen to crib-bite during this study. Plasma leptin concentration (mean and 95% confidence interval [CI]) was lower in horses observed to crib-bite before and after feeding of concentrates (1.2, CI 0.8-1.7 ng/mL and 1.0, CI 0.6-1.7) than in non-crib-biters (2.3, CI 1.6-3.4 and 2.3, CI 1.6-3.4 ng/mL, respectively) and correlated negatively with crib-biting intensity. Crib-biting intensity was significantly higher shortly after feeding than before or 30 min later. Plasma ghrelin concentration was significantly higher before feeding concentrate than before hay feeding or after the concentrate, but did not differ between groups. There was a significant negative correlation between body composition score and plasma ghrelin concentration. These findings suggest that leptin concentrations may be associated with crib-biting behaviour in horses.

  18. Modulation of Intestinal Barrier and Bacterial Endotoxin Production Contributes to the Beneficial Effect of Nicotinic Acid on Alcohol-Induced Endotoxemia and Hepatic Inflammation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wei; Li, Qiong; Zhang, Wenliang; Sun, Qian; Sun, Xinguo; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption causes nicotinic acid deficiency. The present study was undertaken to determine whether dietary nicotinic acid supplementation provides beneficial effects on alcohol-induced endotoxin signaling and the possible mechanisms at the gut-liver axis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pair-fed the Lieber-DeCarli liquid diets containing ethanol or isocaloric maltose dextrin for eight weeks, with or without dietary supplementation with 750 mg/liter nicotinic acid. Chronic alcohol feeding elevated the plasma endotoxin level and activated hepatic endotoxin signaling cascade, which were attenuated by nicotinic acid supplementation. Alcohol consumption remarkably decreased the mRNA levels of claudin-1, claudin-5, and ZO-1 in the distal intestine, whereas nicotinic acid significantly up-regulated these genes. The concentrations of endotoxin, ethanol, and acetaldehyde in the intestinal contents were increased by alcohol exposure, and niacin supplementation reduced the intestinal endotoxin and acetaldehyde levels. Nicotinic acid supplementation upregulated the intestinal genes involved in aldehyde detoxification via transcriptional regulation. These results demonstrate that modulation of the intestinal barrier function and bacterial endotoxin production accounts for the inhibitory effects of nicotinic acid on alcohol-induced endotoxemia and hepatic inflammation. PMID:26501337

  19. Modulation of Intestinal Barrier and Bacterial Endotoxin Production Contributes to the Beneficial Effect of Nicotinic Acid on Alcohol-Induced Endotoxemia and Hepatic Inflammation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei; Li, Qiong; Zhang, Wenliang; Sun, Qian; Sun, Xinguo; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2015-10-16

    Alcohol consumption causes nicotinic acid deficiency. The present study was undertaken to determine whether dietary nicotinic acid supplementation provides beneficial effects on alcohol-induced endotoxin signaling and the possible mechanisms at the gut-liver axis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pair-fed the Lieber-DeCarli liquid diets containing ethanol or isocaloric maltose dextrin for eight weeks, with or without dietary supplementation with 750 mg/liter nicotinic acid. Chronic alcohol feeding elevated the plasma endotoxin level and activated hepatic endotoxin signaling cascade, which were attenuated by nicotinic acid supplementation. Alcohol consumption remarkably decreased the mRNA levels of claudin-1, claudin-5, and ZO-1 in the distal intestine, whereas nicotinic acid significantly up-regulated these genes. The concentrations of endotoxin, ethanol, and acetaldehyde in the intestinal contents were increased by alcohol exposure, and niacin supplementation reduced the intestinal endotoxin and acetaldehyde levels. Nicotinic acid supplementation upregulated the intestinal genes involved in aldehyde detoxification via transcriptional regulation. These results demonstrate that modulation of the intestinal barrier function and bacterial endotoxin production accounts for the inhibitory effects of nicotinic acid on alcohol-induced endotoxemia and hepatic inflammation.

  20. Alteration in contractile G-protein coupled receptor expression by moist snus and nicotine in rat cerebral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, Hardip; Xu Cangbao; Edvinsson, Lars

    2011-04-15

    The cardiovascular risk for users of use of Swedish snus/American snuff (moist tobacco) has been debated for a long time. The present study was designed to examine the effects of water- or lipid-soluble (DMSO-soluble) snus and nicotine, the most important substance in tobacco, on the expression of vasocontractile G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), such as endothelin ET{sub B}, serotonin 5-HT{sub 1B}, and thromboxane A{sub 2} TP receptors, in rat cerebral arteries. Studies show that these vasocontractile GPCR show alterations by lipid-soluble cigarette smoke particles via activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). However, the effects of moist tobacco on the expression of GPCR are less studied. Rat middle cerebral arteries were isolated and organ cultured in serum-free medium for 24 h in the presence of water-soluble snus (WSS), DMSO-soluble snus (DSS), or nicotine. The dose of snus and nicotine was kept at plasma level of snus users (25 ng nicotine/ml). A high dose (250 ng nicotine/ml) was also included due to the previous results showing alteration in the GPCR expression by nicotine at this concentration. Contractile responses to the ET{sub B} receptor agonist sarafotoxin 6c, 5-HT{sub 1B} receptor agonist 5-carboxamidotryptamine, and TP receptor agonist U46619 were investigated by a sensitive myograph. The expression of ET{sub B}, 5-HT{sub 1B}, and TP receptors was studied at mRNA and protein levels using quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Organ culture with WSS or DSS (25 ng nicotine/ml) lowered the 5-HT{sub 1B} receptor-mediated contraction. Furthermore, DSS shifted the TP receptor-mediated contraction curve left-wards with a stronger contraction. High dose of nicotine (250 ng nicotine/ml) increased the ET{sub B} receptor-mediated contraction. The combined 5-HT{sub 1B} and 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor-mediated contraction was increased, and both the 5-CT and TxA2 induced contractions were left-ward shifted by WSS, DSS, or

  1. Insulin resistance is not related to plasma homocysteine concentration in healthy premenapausal women.

    PubMed

    Tanrikulu-Kiliç, F; Bekpinar, S; Unlüçerçi, Y; Orhan, Y

    2006-01-01

    This study was performed to test whether plasma homocysteine concentrations are related to insulin resistance in healthy premenopausal women. For this purpose, the relationship between insulin resistance (as assessed by HOMA index) and fasting plasma homocysteine level was determined in 83 healthy volunteers. The results indicated that homocysteine concentrations did not vary as a function of HOMA index (r = -0.147). Plasma homocysteine concentrations also did not vary as a function of other parameters of insulin resistance such as HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, which they correlated inversely with body mass index (BMI). Furthermore, when individuals were classified according to quartiles of insulin resistance (HOMA index), plasma homocysteine concentrations from the lowest to the highest quartiles were not significantly different. On the other hand, the HOMA index correlated significantly with triglyceride concentrations (r = 0.377, p< 0.001), HDL-cholesterol (r = -0.310, p< 0.01) and BMI (r = 0.468, p< 0.001). These results suggest that plasma homocysteine concentrations are not related to insulin resistance and/or metabolic abnormalities associated with it in premenopausal women.

  2. Amino acid concentrations in plasma and erythrocytes in aregeneratory and haemolytic anaemias.

    PubMed

    Seip, M; Lindemann, R; Gjesdahl, P; Gjessing, L R

    1975-10-01

    The concentrations of unbound amino acids in erythrocytes and in plasma from 7 normal individuals, 11 patients with various types of aregeneratory anaemia, and 4 patients with hereditary haemolytic anaemias were determined on a Technicon Amino Acid Analyzer (Perry et al 1970). Most amino acids were normally found in higher concentrations in plasma than intracellularly. Cystine, methionine and trypotophan were almost exclusively present in plasma. Aspartic acid, however, was mainly found in erythrocytes, and glutathione only in erythrocytes. Glutamic acid and ornithine were more concentrated in the cells, while glycine and asparagine showed approximately the same concentrations in erythrocytes as in plasma. In the patients, plasma amino acids showed little deviations from normal, but in the erythrocytes there were striking changes. Erythrocyte glutamic acid concentrations were moderately to markedly elevated in all patients studied, and glycine concentrations in 13 out of 15 patients. In addition, the following amino acids were increased intracellularly in more than one patient: glutamine (8 patients), serine (7), asparagine (5), threonine (4), taurine (3), alanine (2), valine (2), ornithine (2), lysine (2), citrulline (2). Aspartic acid was decreased in erythrocytes from 4 patients with aregeneratory and 1 with haemolytic anaemia.

  3. The prognostic value of plasma nesfatin-1 concentrations in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang-Qun; Chou, Xiao-Min; Ji, Wen-Jian; Yang, Xiao-Gang; Lan, Luo-Xin; Sheng, Yan-Jun; Shen, Yang-Fang; Li, Jian-Rong; Huang, Guo-Zhong; Yu, Wen-Hua; Dong, Xiao-Qiao; Du, Quan; Yang, Ding-Bo; Zhang, Zu-Yong; Wang, Hao; Shen, Yong-Feng; Jiang, Li

    2016-07-01

    Nesfatin-1 is related to inflammation. Its increased circulating concentrations are associated with the severity and prognosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage. In-hospital major adverse events (IMAEs), including acute traumatic coagulopathy, progressive hemorrhagic injury and posttraumatic cerebral infarction, are correlated with mortality after traumatic brain injury (TBI). The present study was designed to investigate the changes of plasma nesfatin-1 concentrations and further assess its association with inflammation, trauma severity, in-hospital mortality and IMAEs following TBI. We measured plasma nesfatin-1 concentrations of 100 severe TBI patients and 100 controls. Progressive hemorrhagic injury and posttraumatic cerebral infarction were diagnosed based on a follow-up computerized tomography scan. Acute traumatic coagulopathy was identified according to a coagulation test. Plasma nesfatin-1 concentrations were significantly higher in patients than in controls and associated highly with Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores and plasma C-reactive protein concentrations. Nesfatin-1 was indicated as an independent predictor for in-hospital mortality and IMAEs. In accordance with area under receiver operating characteristic curve, its predictive value was similar to GCS scores. Increased plasma nesfatin-1 concentrations are associated closely with inflammation, trauma severity and clinical outcomes, indicating that nesfatin-1 might be involved in inflammation and become a good prognostic biomarker following TBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Circadian and postprandial variation in plasma citrulline concentration in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Julien M; Giron, Celine; Concordet, Didier; Dossin, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate circadian and postprandial variations in plasma citrulline concentration in healthy dogs. 8 healthy Beagles. Blood samples were collected from dogs after 12 hours of food withholding (0 hours; 8:00 am) and then every 2 hours for 12 hours (until 8:00 pm) and again at 24 hours (8:00 am the next day). The same protocol was repeated, with the only difference being that a meal was given immediately after the 0-hour sample collection point. Plasma citrulline concentration was measured by ion exchange chromatography. No significant difference in plasma citrulline concentration was identified among measurement points when food was withheld. Mean ± SD plasma citrulline concentration at 4 hours (72.2 ± 12.7 μmol/L) and 24 hours (56.1 ± 12.5 μmol/L) after dogs were fed was significantly different from that at 0 hours (64.4 ± 12.7 μmol/L). Plasma citrulline concentration had no circadian variation in unfed dogs but increased significantly in fed dogs 4 hours after a meal. Therefore, food should be withheld from dogs for 8 to 12 hours before blood sample collection for measurement of citrulline concentration.

  5. Plasma concentrations of fluticasone propionate and budesonide following inhalation: effect of induced bronchoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Kevin J; Tattersfield, Anne E; Tang, Yufei; Wu, Kai; Lewis, Sarah; Hochhaus, Gunther; Harrison, Tim W

    2007-01-01

    What is already known about this subject All inhaled corticosteroids are absorbed into the systemic circulation and hence have the potential to cause adverse systemic effects. Plasma drug concentrations following inhalation of 1000 µg fluticasone are considerably lower in people with airflow obstruction than in healthy volunteers but this is not the case for budesonide. What this study adds This is the first study to determine whether changes in airflow obstruction within an individual affect the systemic absorption of inhaled fluticasone and budesonide; Plasma concentrations of fluticasone and, to a lesser extent, those of budesonide were lower when the drugs were inhaled following induced bronchoconstriction; The lower plasma concentrations of corticosteroids seen when the drugs were inhaled following induced bronchoconstriction is likely to reflect variations that will occur with fluctuations in airway caliber in asthma. Aims To determine whether and to what extent bronchoconstriction affects plasma concentrations of fluticasone and budesonide following inhalation. Methods Twenty people with mild asthma inhaled 1000 µg fluticasone (Accuhaler®) plus 800 µg budesonide (Turbohaler®) on two visits. On one occasion, prior to drug inhalation, FEV1 was decreased by at least 25% using inhaled methacholine. Plasma drug concentrations were measured for each drug over 5 h and area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC(0,5 h)) compared between visits. Results The mean difference in FEV1 prior to drug inhalation on the 2 days was 33%. AUC(0,5 h) values for fluticasone and budesonide were lower by a median of 60% (IQR 36–75) and 29% (IQR 2–44), respectively, when administered following bronchoconstriction; the reduction was greater for fluticasone than for budesonide, P = 0.007. Conclusions The lower plasma concentrations of fluticasone and, to a lesser extent, budesonide seen when the drugs were inhaled following induced bronchoconstriction, is likely to

  6. Plasma steroid concentrations and male phallus size in juvenile alligators from seven Florida lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guillette, L.J.; Woodward, A.R.; Crain, D.A.; Pickford, D.B.; Rooney, A.A.; Percival, H.F.

    1999-01-01

    Neonatal and juvenile alligators from contaminated Lake Apopka in central Florida exhibit abnormal plasma sex steroid concentrations as well as morphological abnormalities of the gonad and phallus. This study addresses whether similar abnormalities occur in juvenile alligators inhabiting six other lakes in Florida. For analysis, animals were partitioned into two subsets, animals 40-79 cm total length (1-3 years old) and juveniles 80-130 cm total length (3-7 years old). Plasma testosterone (T) concentrations were lower in small males from lakes Apopka, Griffin, and Jessup than from Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). Similar differences were observed in the larger juveniles, with males from lakes Jessup, Apopka, and Okeechobee having lower plasma T concentrations than Lake Woodruff males. Plasma estradiol-17?? (E2) concentrations were significantly elevated in larger juvenile males from Lake Apopka compared to Lake Woodruff NWR. When compared to small juvenile females from Lake Woodruff NWR, females from lakes Griffin, Apopka, Orange, and Okeechobee had elevated plasma E2 concentrations. Phallus size was significantly smaller in males from lakes Griffin and Apopka when compared to males from Lake Woodruff NWR. An association existed between body size and phallus size on all lakes except Lake Apopka and between phallus size and plasma T concentration on all lakes except lakes Apopka and Orange. Multiple regression analysis, with body size and plasma T concentration as independent covariables, explained the majority of the variation in phallus size on all lakes. These data suggest that the differences in sex steroids and phallus size observed in alligators from Lake Apopka are not limited to that lake, nor to one with a history of a major pesticide spill. Further work examining the relationship of sex steroids and phallus size with specific biotic and abiotic factors, such as antiandrogenic or estrogenic contaminants, is needed.

  7. Fruit and vegetable intakes in relation to plasma nutrient concentrations in women in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Frankenfeld, Cara L.; Lampe, Johanna W.; Shannon, Jackilen; Gao, Dao L.; Li, Wenjin; Ray, Roberta M.; Chen, Chu; King, Irena B.; Thomas, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the validity of fruit and vegetable intake, using three classification schemes, as it relates to plasma carotenoid and vitamin C concentrations among Chinese women. Design Intakes were calculated from an interviewer-administered food frequency questionnaire. Fruits and vegetables, botanical groups, and high-nutrient groups were evaluated. These three classification schemes were compared with plasma carotenoid and vitamin C concentrations from blood drawn within one week of questionnaire completion. Setting Shanghai, China Subjects Participants (n=2031) were drawn from women who participated in a case-control study of diet and breast diseases nested within a randomized trial of breast self-examination among textile workers (n=266,064) Results Fruit intake was significantly (p<0.05) and positively associated with plasma concentrations of α-tocopherol, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, α-carotene, β-carotene, retinyl palmitate, and vitamin C. Fruit intake was inversely associated with γ-tocopherol and lutein+zeaxanthin concentrations. Vegetable consumption was significantly and positively associated with γ-tocopherol, and β-cryptoxanthin concentrations. Each botanical and high-nutrient group was also significantly associated with particular plasma nutrient concentrations. Fruit and vegetable intake and most plasma nutrient concentrations were significantly associated with season of interview. Conclusions These results suggest that the manner in which fruits and vegetables are grouped provides different plasma nutrient exposure information, which may be an important consideration when testing and generating hypotheses regarding disease risk in relation to diet. Interview season should be considered when evaluating associations of reported intake and plasma nutrients with disease outcomes. PMID:21729475

  8. Zinc and magnesium concentrations in plasma and red blood cells in patients on digitalis medication

    SciTech Connect

    Zumkley, H.; Bertram, H.P.; Vetter, H.; Zidek, W.; Wessels, F.

    1981-06-01

    Determinations of zinc, sodium, potassium and magnesium in plasma and red blood cells (RBC) were performed in 31 controls and 63 patients treated with digitalis. In digitalized patients Na and Zn concentrations in RBC were significantly increased, whereas the intraerythrocyte Mg concentration was only slightly elevated. Plasma concentrations of all investigated electrolytes as well as of Zn remained within the normal range. There was a close relationship between the increase of Na and Zn content in RBC indicating alterations in transmembrane transport mechanisms induced by digitalis therapy.

  9. Plasma corticosterone and thyroxine concentrations during chronic ingestion of crude oil in mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Eastin, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    1. Blood samples were collected from mallard ducks after 6, 12, and 18 weeks of dietary exposure to mash containing 0.015%, 0.150%, and 1.500% crude oil.2. Plasma corticosterone concentrations in ducks fed mash containing 0.150% or 1.500% Alaskan Prudhoe Bay crude oil were uniformly depressed when compared to values in untreated control birds.3. Plasma thyroxine concentration was not altered in ducks chronically exposed to crude oil.4. The observed alteration in corticosterone concentration could reduce tolerance to temperature and dietary fluctuations in the environment.

  10. High-Performance Liquid-Chromatographic Analysis of Plasma Iohexol Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Schwertner, Harvey A; Weld, Kyle J

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a high-performance liquid-chromatographic (HPLC) method using photodiode array detection and isocratic conditions was developed for the analysis of plasma iohexol concentrations. Plasma proteins were precipitated with 1:1 volume of plasma and acetonitrile-ethanol-water (60:38.4:1.6, v/v/v). Iohexol concentrations in the supernatant phase were analyzed on a Waters Symmetry C-18 reversed-phase column under isocratic conditions at 245 nm. The extraction recoveries of iohexol from plasma were >95% and the plasma iohexol calibration curves were linear (R(2) ≥ 0.9998) from 10 to 1500 µg/mL. The within-day coefficients of variation (CVs) at plasma iohexol concentrations of 100, 375, 750 and 1500 µg/mL were 5.1, 3.5, 1.3 and 2.5%, respectively; the between-day CVs at 100, 375, 750 and 1500 µg/mL were 8.6, 4.2, 4.0 and 3.7%, respectively. The day-to-day accuracies of the method at plasma iohexol concentrations of 50, 100, 375, 750 and 1500 µg/mL were 89.0, 99.4, 108.4, 103.6 and 101.2%, respectively (n = 5). The lower limit of plasma iohexol quantitation was 10 µg/mL and no interferences >9 µg/mL were found in over 75 pre-dose porcine plasma samples. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by determining the glomerular filtration rates of iohexol in the porcine (Sus scrofa) model.

  11. Plasma Retinol Concentration Is Mainly Driven by Transthyretin in Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Stanislas; Landrier, Jean-François; Astier, Julien; Cado, Sylvie; Sallette, Jérôme; Serveaux, Marianne; Burtey, Stéphane; Cohen, Julien; Tournier, Charlène; Tourniaire, Franck; Darmon, Patrice

    2017-07-06

    Micronutrients deficiencies in hemodialysis patients are due to low dietary intakes and intradialytic losses for hydrophilic micronutrients. Conversely, lipophilic nondialyzable compounds might accumulate because of a lack of elimination through renal metabolism or dialysis. Other compounds have complex metabolism: their concentration is not explained by these phenomenons. The aim of this study was to report plasma concentrations of lipophilic micronutrients in hemodialysis patients and to analyze if these concentrations were predictive of mortality. The design was monocentric observational longitudinal study. A total of 123 hemodialysis patients included in this observational study. Plasma concentration of lipophilic micronutrients retinol and its two co-transporters transthyretin and retinol-binding protein 4, tocopherol, and carotenoids (α-carotene and β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein, and zeaxanthin), and all factors associated with 1-year mortality. Within the 123 patients of the study, median age (interquartile range) was 77.5 (69.5-84.5) years and 58.5% were male. Median retinol plasma concentration was 4.07 (2.65-5.51) μmol/L, and 91.9% of patient had high plasma retinol concentrations. In monovariate analysis, retinol levels were inversely correlated with mortality (hazard ratio = 0.57 [0.45-0.72]; P < .001). This effect remained significant after adjustment with several parameters. Nevertheless, the correlation between retinol and mortality disappeared as soon as transthyretin was added in the statistical model, suggesting an effect of transthyretin as confusing bias. Median tocopherol plasma concentration was 34.8 (28.3-42.9) μmol/L and 72.4% of patients had high plasma tocopherol concentration. Neither tocopherol plasma levels nor carotenoids concentrations were correlated with death in multivariate analysis. In hemodialysis patients, the correlation between retinol plasma concentration and mortality represents the nutritional

  12. Role of ouabain-like compound in the regulation of plasma aldosterone concentration in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Goto, A; Hui, C; Omata, M

    1996-01-01

    A major biologically active Na,K-ATPase inhibitor in the mammalian circulation may be ouabain-like compound(OLC). We developed a population of immunized rats against ouabain to block the actions of circulating OLC. To investigate the roles of OLC in the regulation of aldosterone secretion and/or production, we measured plasma aldosterone concentration after a week of low salt diet. No significant changes in serum Na and K concentrations were observed in immune rats. The plasma aldosterone concentration was significantly decreased by 30% in 17 immune rats as compared with 11 control rats(control: 455 +/- 53, immune: 315 +/- 21 pg/mL, p < 0.05). These data indicate that chronic blockade of the circulating OLC significantly decreases plasma aldosterone concentration during salt depletion and suggest that endogenous OLC may play an important role in the regulation of aldosterone secretion and/or production.

  13. Plasma cortisol concentrations following cortisone infusion in dogs before and after treatment with cortisone acetate.

    PubMed

    Church, D B; Emslie, D R; Watson, A D

    1999-10-01

    To evaluate effects of iatrogenic hyperadrenocorticism on plasma cortisol concentrations produced by an infusion of hydrocortisone in dogs. Plasma cortisol concentrations were measured regularly during a 6 h infusion of hydrocortisone sodium succinate at two dose rates. The infusions were performed before and after treatment for 30 d with oral cortisone acetate at 10 mg/kg/24 h, divided thrice daily. Adrenal activity during the experimental period was assessed by weekly ACTH stimulation tests. Both infusion rates produced lower plasma cortisol concentrations after treatment for 30 d with cortisone. Prior exposure to high concentrations of glucocorticoids may result in accelerated metabolism of glucocorticoids administered subsequently. This may necessitate increased dosages when using glucocorticoids to support inadequate adrenal function.

  14. The effect of feeding canola meal on concentrations of plasma amino acids.

    PubMed

    Martineau, R; Ouellet, D R; Lapierre, H

    2014-03-01

    An initial meta-analysis on isonitrogenous experiments where a protein source was replaced by canola meal (CM) showed that CM feeding increased yields of milk and milk protein and apparent N efficiency. The objective of the current study was to determine if these responses were related to increased changes in plasma AA concentrations. Although only half of the experiments of the initial meta-analysis reported concentrations of plasma AA and could be used in the current meta-analysis, lactational responses to CM feeding were similar to those reported previously. In the current meta-analysis, CM feeding increased plasma concentrations of total AA, total essential AA (EAA) and all individual EAA, but decreased concentrations of blood and milk urea-N. The current meta-analysis suggests that CM feeding increased the absorption of EAA, which would be responsible for the increased milk protein secretion and the increased apparent N efficiency.

  15. Effects of hemorrhagic hypotension on tyrosine concentrations in rat spinal cord and plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Maher, T. J.; Roberts, C. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Tyrosine is the precursor for catecholamine neurotransmitters. When catecholamine-containing neurons are physiologically active (as sympathoadrenal cells are in hypotension), tyrosine administration increases catecholamine synthesis and release. Since hypotension can alter plasma amino acid composition, the effects of an acute hypotensive insult on tyrosine concentrations in plasma and spinal cord were examined. Rats were cannulated and bled until the systolic blood pressure was 50 mmHg, or were kept normotensive for 1 h. Tyrosine and other large neutral amino acids (LNAA) known to compete with tyrosine for brain uptake were assayed in plasma and spinal cord. The rate at which intra-arterial (H-3)tyrosine disappeared from the plasma was also estimated in hemorrhaged and control rats. In plasma of hemorrhaged animals, both the tyrosine concentration and the tyrosine/LNAA ratio was elevated; moreover, the disappearance of (H-3)tyrosine was slowed. Tyrosine concentrations also increased in spinal cords of hemorrhaged-hypotensive rats when compared to normotensive controls. Changes in plasma amino acid patterns may thus influence spinal cord concentrations of amino acid precursors for neurotransmitters during the stress of hemorrhagic shock.

  16. Effect of in vivo nicotine exposure on chlorpyrifos pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soo Kwang; Poet, Torka S.; Smith, Jordan N.; Busby-Hjerpe, Andrea L.; Timchalk, Charles

    2010-03-30

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is one of the most studied and widely used broad spectrum organophosphorus (OP) insecticides. The neurotoxicity of CPF results from inhibition of cholinesterase (ChE) by its metabolite, chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPF-oxon), which subsequently leads to cholinergic hyperstimulation. The routine consumption of alcoholic beverages and tobacco products will modify a number of metabolic and physiological processes which may impact the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of other xenobiotics including pesticides. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of repeated ethanol and nicotine co-exposure on in vivo CPF pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The major CPF metabolite, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) in blood and urine along with changes in plasma and brain AChE activities were measured in male Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats. Animals were repeatedly treated with either saline or ethanol (1 g/kg/day, po) and nicotine (1 mg/kg/day, sc) in addition to CPF (1 or 5 mg/kg/day, po) for 7 days. Rats were sacrificed at times from 1 to 24 hr post-last dosing of CPF. There were apparent differences in blood TCPy pharmacokinetics following ethanol and nicotine pretreatments in both CPF dose groups, which showed higher TCPy peak concentrations and increased blood TCPy AUC in ethanol and nicotine groups over CPF-only (~1.8- and 3.8-fold at 1 and 5 mg CPF doses, respectively). Brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities from both ethanol and nicotine-treated groups showed substantially less inhibition following repeated 5 mg CPF/kg dosing compared to CPF-only controls (96 ± 13 and 66 ± 7% of naïve at 4 hr post-last CPF dosing, respectively). Inhibition of brain AChE activities was minimal in both 1 mg CPF/kg/day dosing groups, but a similar trend indicating less inhibition following ethanol/nicotine pretreatment was apparent. No differences were observed in plasma ChE activities due to the combined alcohol and nicotine treatments. In vitro, CPF

  17. Escalating doses of transdermal nicotine in heavy smokers: effects on smoking behavior and craving.

    PubMed

    Selby, Peter; Andriash, Katherine; Zawertailo, Laurie; Persad, Desmond; Zack, Martin; Busto, Usoa E

    2013-10-01

    Fixed-dose nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is efficacious for smoking cessation in the general population of smokers. However, it is less effective in populations with psychiatric comorbidities and/or severe tobacco dependence where the percent nicotine replacement is suboptimal. The objective of this pilot study was to determine the effectiveness of nicotine patch dose titration in response to continued smoking in heavily dependent smokers with psychiatric comorbidity. In a single-arm, open-label study adult smokers (mean cigarettes per day, 25.4 ± 13.4; range, 14-43; n = 12) willing to quit were treated with escalating doses of transdermal nicotine and brief counseling intervention if they continued to smoke over a 9-week treatment period. Plasma nicotine and cotinine, along with expired carbon monoxide levels, and the subjective effects of smoking, urge to smoke, demand elasticity, and mood symptoms were also assessed. The mean NRT dose was 32.7 (SD, 16.4) mg/d (range, 7-56 mg/d). Smokers reported significant reductions in both cigarettes per day (mean decrease, 18.4 ± 11.5) confirmed by expired carbon monoxide (mean decrease, 13.5 ± 13.0) with no significant changes in plasma nicotine concentrations during the course of NRT dose titration. There were significant effects on the subjective effects of smoking and measures of smoking behavior. Most commonly reported adverse events were respiratory infections, skin irritation at patch site, nausea, and sleep disturbances, which were generally mild and transient. Titrating doses of NRT to effect with brief intervention hold promise as an effective clinical strategy to assist heavily dependent psychiatrically ill smokers to change their smoking behavior.

  18. Motility of liquid stored ram spermatozoa is altered by dilution rate independent of seminal plasma concentration.

    PubMed

    Mata-Campuzano, M; Soleilhavoup, C; Tsikis, G; Martinez-Pastor, F; de Graaf, S P; Druart, X

    2015-11-01

    The fertility after use of liquid stored ram semen following cervical AI rapidly decreases if semen is stored beyond 12h. The dilution of seminal plasma is often cited as a key contributor to the diminished motility and fertility of ram spermatozoa subjected to liquid preservation. Two experiments were conducted to assess the effect of spermatozoa concentration (i.e. dilution rate) and percentage of seminal plasma on the motility and viability of liquid stored ram spermatozoa. In Experiment 1, semen was diluted to one of seven concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 1.4×10(9)spermatozoa/ml with milk and assessed for motility after 3 or 24h of storage at 15°C. In Experiment 2, semen was collected and washed to remove seminal plasma before re-dilution to 0.2-1.4×10(9)spermatozoa/ml with milk containing 0%, 20% or 40% (final v/v ratio) seminal plasma and assessed for viability and motility after 3 or 24h of storage at 15°C. Whereas motility was not affected by spermatozoa concentration after 3h of storage, the proportion of progressive spermatozoa decreased after 24h of storage when spermatozoa concentration was greater than 1.0×10(9)spermatozoa/ml. The duration of preservation and the spermatozoa concentration affected spermatozoa motility but had no impact on spermatozoa viability. This negative effect of greater spermatozoa concentrations on motility was independent of the presence and the concentration of seminal plasma. The seminal plasma at both concentrations (20% and 40%) had a protective effect on spermatozoa motility after 24h of storage. These findings have the potential to improve the efficiency of cervical AI with liquid stored ram semen.

  19. Cellular nicotinic receptor desensitization correlates with nicotine-induced acute behavioral tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Susan E; Vann, Robert E; Britton, Angela F; O'Connell, Mary M; James, John R; Rosecrans, John A

    2007-05-01

    Individuals vary in their susceptibility to nicotine addiction. However, there is little evidence that behavioral sensitivity to nicotine is dependent upon the functional state of nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChRs). This study aims to determine the relationship between in vivo behavioral desensitization and in vitro desensitization of nAChR function. Male Sprague-Dawley rats trained to discriminate nicotine were tested for development of acute behavioral tolerance. The rats were injected with nicotine (0.4 mg/kg free base, s.c.), tested for nicotine discrimination for 2 min, then injected with the same dose of nicotine 90, 180, and 270 min after the first injection and tested for nicotine discrimination after each injection. Susceptibility of nAChRs of individual rats to desensitization was assessed by use of the (86)Rb(+) efflux assay using synaptosomes prepared from the "thalamus," which included the hypothalamus and midbrain as well as the thalamic nuclei. To desensitize nAChRs, synaptsosomes were superfused with low concentrations of nicotine (5, 10, 20, and 30 nM) before stimulation of (86)Rb(+) efflux with nicotine (10 muM). The slopes of the behavioral desensitization were plotted as a function of the decline of nicotine-stimulated (86)Rb(+) efflux after in vitro desensitization. A significant correlation was observed between the in vitro desensitization of thalamic (86)Rb(+) efflux and the extent of behavioral desensitization of individual rats. These findings are consistent with the idea that production of acute behavioral tolerance by nicotine is related to its ability to induce nAChR desensitization at the cellular level.

  20. Impact of Whole-Blood Processing Conditions on Plasma and Serum Concentrations of Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Eun; Kim, Jong-Wan; Han, Bok-Ghee; Shin, So-Youn

    2016-02-01

    Pre-analytical variations in plasma and serum samples can occur because of variability in whole-blood processing procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of delayed separation of whole blood on the plasma and serum concentrations of cytokines. The concentrations of 16 cytokines were measured in plasma and serum samples when the centrifugation of whole blood at room temperature was delayed for 4, 6, 24, or 48 h, and the values were compared with those observed after separation within 2 h of whole-blood collection. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was also performed for cytokines to determine whether cytokine levels in plasma and serum samples can be used to assess delayed separation of whole blood. Plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) and serum concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), and MIP-1β increased significantly (>2-fold) when separation was delayed at room temperature for 24 h. The concentrations of 6 of these cytokines (all except serum IL-1β and IL-6) demonstrated high diagnostic performance (area under the ROC curve >0.8) for delayed separation of whole blood. Furthermore, these cytokine concentrations typically exhibited high sensitivity and specificity at each optimal cutoff point. Conversely, IL-17A was stable in both plasma and serum samples, even when whole-blood centrifugation was delayed at room temperature for 48 h. This study shows that certain cytokines (IL-1β, GM-CSF, sCD40L, IL-8, MIP-1α, and MIP-1β) could be used for assessing the quality of plasma or serum samples.

  1. Changes in plasma leptin concentration during different types of exercises performed by horses.

    PubMed

    Kędzierski, W

    2014-09-01

    Leptin is a tissue-derivative adipokine that regulates appetite, food intake and energy expenditure. It is still not clear how exercise affects plasma leptin concentration in horses. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of exercise intensity and duration on plasma leptin levels in working horses. A total of 38 horses were prospectively included in the study and grouped according to the type of exercise they performed: dressage (six stallions, group D), jumping (12 stallions, group J), race (12 Thoroughbred horses, six stallions and six mares, group R) and harness (10 light draft stallions, group H). Blood samples were taken both before and after routine exercise (immediately after the exercise, 30 min and 24 h after). Blood lactic acid (LA) and plasma concentration of leptin, cortisol, uric acid, triacylglycerols, glycerol and free fatty acids were determined. Immediately after exercise, group R had the highest level of LA, whereas groups D and J had the lowest levels. A significant increase in plasma leptin concentration was stated only in group H in samples taken immediately after the end of the exercise period and 30 min after the exercise period, as compared with the values obtained at rest. A significant increase in plasma cortisol concentration was found immediately after the end of the exercise period in groups R and H. Leptin exercise-to-rest ratio was significantly correlated with cortisol exercise-to-rest ratio (r=0.64; P<0.001). The increase in plasma leptin concentration in exercised horses was related to the increased plasma cortisol concentration and took place only during long-lasting exercise, which was not intensive.

  2. Effects of a smoking ban on clozapine plasma concentrations in a nonsecure psychiatric unit

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Siobhan H.; Taylor, David M.; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; Flanagan, Robert; MacCabe, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tobacco smoke is known to affect plasma levels of some drugs, including the antipsychotic clozapine. The effects of suddenly stopping smoking on patients who take clozapine can be severe, as plasma concentrations are expected to rapidly rise, potentially leading to toxicity. A ban on smoking at South London and the Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (SLaM) was implemented in 2014, and this was expected to affect the plasma concentrations of clozapine for inpatients at the time. This study aimed to determine whether plasma concentrations of clozapine were affected, and additionally, in line with observations from other authors, whether levels of reported violence would also be affected. Methods: The smoking habits of all patients at SLaM who smoked and were prescribed clozapine were recorded both before and after the ban. The Glasgow Antipsychotic Side Effect Scale for Clozapine (GASS-C) scale was used to evaluate side-effect burden. Clozapine doses and plasma concentrations were also collected. Results: In total, 31 patients were included in this study. The mean clozapine dose before the ban was 502 mg/day, and this did not change significantly after the ban. Similarly, there were no significant changes in clozapine or norclozapine plasma concentrations, or in GASS-C scores. There was no change in the amount of tobacco patients reported smoking before or after the ban. A modest but statistically significant reduction in violent incidences was observed. Conclusions: Our data suggest that a ban on smoking for patients taking clozapine on open wards at inpatient hospital sites had little impact on clozapine plasma concentrations, because patients continued to smoke tobacco if allowed to leave. Smoking bans may result in a reduction in violent incidences. PMID:28255437

  3. Carbohydrate supplementation and alterations in neutrophils, and plasma cortisol and myoglobin concentration after intense exercise.

    PubMed

    Peake, Jonathan; Wilson, Gary; Mackinnon, Laurel; Coombes, Jeff S

    2005-03-01

    The present study examined the effect of carbohydrate supplementation on changes in neutrophil counts, and the plasma concentrations of cortisol and myoglobin after intense exercise. Eight well-trained male runners ran on a treadmill for 1 h at 85% maximal oxygen uptake on two separate occasions. In a double-blind cross-over design, subjects consumed either 750 ml of a 10% carbohydrate (CHO) drink or a placebo drink on each occasion. The order of the trials was counter-balanced. Blood was drawn immediately before and after exercise, and 1 h after exercise. Immediately after exercise, neutrophil counts (CHO, 49%; placebo, 65%; P<0.05), plasma concentrations of glucose (CHO, 43%; P<0.05), lactate (CHO, 130%; placebo, 130%; P<0.01), cortisol (CHO, 100%; placebo, 161%; P<0.01), myoglobin (CHO, 194%; placebo, 342%; P<0.01) all increased significantly. One hour post-exercise, plasma myoglobin concentration (CHO, 331%; placebo, 482%; P<0.01) and neutrophil count (CHO, 151%; placebo, 230% P<0.01) both increased further above baseline. CHO significantly attenuated plasma myoglobin concentration and the neutrophil count after exercise (P<0.01), but did not affect plasma cortisol concentration. The effects of CHO on plasma myoglobin concentration may be due to alterations in cytokine synthesis, insulin responses or myoglobin clearance rates from the bloodstream during exercise. Plasma cortisol responses to CHO during exercise may depend on the intensity of exercise, or the amount of CHO consumed. Lastly, cortisol appears to play a minor role in the mobilisation of neutrophils after intense exercise.

  4. Leptin and calorie intake among different nicotine dependent groups.

    PubMed

    Suhaimi, Muhammad Zulhusni; Sanip, Zulkefli; Jan, Hamid Jan; Yusoff, Harmy Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to nicotine via tobacco smoking may influence leptin release and decrease food intake among smokers. However, the effect of nicotine exposure on leptin and food intake among different nicotine dependent groups is unclear. We aimed to measure leptin and calorie intake among different nicotine dependent groups. Cross-sectional study. Research department in school of medical sciences. Subjects were selected by purposive (non-probability) sampling and categorized as having low, moderate and high nicotine dependency based on the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) score. Diet was recorded by interview. Anthropometry, blood pressure, body composition, lipid profile, and physical activity level were measured accordingly. Fasting serum leptin was measured using a commercial ELISA kit. Nicotine dependency, 24-hour diet, clinical anthropometric and clinical measurements. In 107 Malay male smokers leptin concentration was inversely correlated with nicotine dependence. However, body weight, smoking period, blood pressure, body composition, lipid profile and physical activity level were not significantly different among low, moderately and highly dependent smoking groups. Leptin concentration and total calorie intake were also not significantly different among these groups. Leptin concentration was inversely correlated with nicotine dependence, but leptin concentration and total calorie intake status were not significantly different among our different nicotine dependency subjects. Purposive sampling for subject recruitment and inaccurate information in the self-administered questionnaire.

  5. Effect of carnitine supplement to the dam on plasma carnitine concentration in the sucking foal.

    PubMed

    Benamou, A E; Harris, R C

    1993-01-01

    The changes in carnitine in plasma and milk during the first 3 months of lactation were studied in 14 broodmares and their foals. Six of the mares (Group S) were given a supplement of 10 g carnitine split between the morning and evening feeds, starting 2 weeks before birth. At birth the plasma carnitine concentration in Group S mares was about twice that in Group NS mares (no supplement). In both groups the concentration initially declined in the days after birth. Whilst this trend was reversed in Group S mares, the concentration in Group NS mares remained at a reduced level for the remainder of the study. Milk concentrations declined continuously over the monitoring period in both groups. There was no apparent relationship between milk and plasma concentrations. Despite this the milk concentration tended to be higher in Group S than in Group NS mares although differences were not significant. There was an immediate drop in the plasma concentration in foals after birth which was reversed in foals of Group S mares but not in those of Group NS mares. There were no apparent side effects of carnitine supplementation.

  6. A mixed fruit and vegetable concentrate increases plasma antioxidant vitamins and folate and lowers plasma homocysteine in men.

    PubMed

    Samman, Samir; Sivarajah, Gayathri; Man, June C; Ahmad, Ziaul I; Petocz, Peter; Caterson, Ian D

    2003-07-01

    Fruit and vegetable consumption is inversely associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of supplementation with dehydrated juice concentrates from mixed fruit and vegetables on selected plasma vitamins and antioxidant status. We assessed CHD risk by measuring the concentrations of homocysteine, lipids, lipoproteins, glucose and insulin. Men were recruited to participate in a randomized double-blind, crossover trial with 2 periods of 6 wk, separated by a 3-wk wash-out period. Supplementation with the encapsulated mixed extract (Juice Plus) was compared with physically similar placebo capsules. Thirty-two men (13 smokers, 19 nonsmokers) completed the study with a mean compliance of 88%. Compared with placebo, supplementation increased the concentrations of plasma beta-carotene (0.24 +/- 0.15 vs. 1.12 +/- 0.70 micro mol/L; mean +/- SD; P < 0.0001), retinol (1.87 +/- 0.33 vs. 2.00 +/- 0.43 micro mol/L; P < 0.05), alpha-tocopherol (16.8 +/- 7.3 vs. 19.3 +/- 6.8 micro mol/L; P < 0.01), ascorbic acid (72.1 +/- 19.4 vs. 84.1 +/- 13.5 micro mol/L; P < 0.002) and folic acid (24.5 +/- 10.0 vs. 44.9 +/- 16.9 nmol/L; P < 0.0001). Plasma homocysteine was reduced (8.2 +/- 1.5 vs. 7.6 +/- 1.1; P < 0.05) and inversely related (r = -0.40, P < 0.001) with serum folate concentrations. Plasma vitamin C was positively correlated with the resistance of LDL to oxidation (r = 0.26, P < 0.05) and the plasma ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) tended to be greater after supplementation than after the placebo period (1125.5 +/- 144.1 vs. 1180.3 +/- 158.1 micro mol/L; P < 0.065). Plasma glucose, insulin and lipid concentrations were unaffected. Responses of smokers and nonsmokers did not differ. In the absence of dietary modification, supplementation with a fruit and vegetable concentrate produced responses consistent with a reduction in CHD risk.

  7. Increased plasma proline concentrations are associated with sarcopenia in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Kenji; Nakamura, Marie; Adachi, Yusuke; Imaizumi, Akira; Hakamada, Tomomi; Abe, Yasuko; Kaneko, Eiji; Takahashi, Soiciro; Shimokado, Kentaro

    2017-01-01

    Metabolome analyses have shown that plasma amino acid profiles reflect various pathological conditions, such as cancer and diabetes mellitus. It remains unclear, however, whether plasma amino acid profiles change in patients with sarcopenia. This study therefore aimed to investigate whether sarcopenia-specific changes occur in plasma amino acid profiles. A total of 153 community-dwelling and seven institutionalized elderly individuals (56 men, 104 women; mean age, 77.7±7.0 years) were recruited for this cross-sectional analysis. We performed a comprehensive geriatric assessment, which included an evaluation of hand grip strength, gait speed, muscle mass and blood chemistry, including the concentration of 18 amino acids. Twenty-eight of the 160 participants met the criteria for sarcopenia established by the Asian Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People. Univariate analysis revealed associations between the presence of sarcopenia and a higher plasma concentration of proline and glutamine, lower concentrations of histidine and tryptophan. Multivariable analysis revealed that a higher concentration of proline was the only variable independently associated with sarcopenia. The plasma concentration of proline may be useful for understanding the underlying pathophysiology of sarcopenia.

  8. Comparison of digoxin concentration in plastic serum tubes with clot activator and heparinized plasma tubes.

    PubMed

    Dukić, Lora; Simundić, Ana-Maria; Malogorski, Davorin

    2014-01-01

    Sample type recommended by the manufacturer for the digoxin Abbott assay is either serum collected in glass tubes or plasma (sodium heparin, lithium heparin, citrate, EDTA or oxalate as anticoagulant) collected in plastic tubes. In our hospital samples are collected in plastic tubes. Our hypothesis was that the serum sample collected in plastic serum tube can be used interchangeably with plasma sample for measurement of digoxin concentration. Our aim was verification of plastic serum tubes for determination of digoxin concentration. Concentration of digoxin was determined simultaneously in 26 venous blood plasma (plastic Vacuette, LH Lithium heparin) and serum (plastic Vacuette, Z Serum Clot activator; both Greiner Bio-One GmbH, Kremsmünster, Austria) samples, on Abbott AxSYM analyzer using the original Abbott Digoxin III assay (Abbott, Wiesbaden, Germany). Tube comparability was assessed using the Passing Bablok regression and Bland-Altman plot. Serum and plasma digoxin concentrations are comparable. Passing Bablok intercept (0.08 [95% CI = -0.10 to 0.20]) and slope (0.99 [95% CI = 0.92 to 1.11]) showed there is no constant or proportional error. Blood samples drawn in plastic serum tubes and plastic plasma tubes can be interchangeably used for determination of digoxin concentration.

  9. Antibiotic treatment of acute salpingitis. A study of plasma concentrations of two tetracyclines (doxycycline and lymecycline).

    PubMed

    Forslin, L; Danielson, D; Kjellander, J; Falk, V

    1982-01-01

    A group of 782 patients with a diagnosis of acute salpingitis (a few of the patients because of other infection in the pelvis) were treated with the recommended oral dose of doxycycline (200 mg the first day and 100 mg once daily for at least the following 9-12 days) in combination with 1 g benzyl penicillin and 0.6 g procaine penicillin twice daily intramuscularly for 5-7 days. The plasma concentrations of doxycycline were determined on the third day of treatment before the next dose was given. In 26.5% of the patients the concentrations were below 1 microgram/ml plasma, considered as the minimum therapeutic level. The dose of doxycycline was increased to 200 mg a day in these patients and the plasma concentrations increased accordingly. In another group of 80 patients, 40 were treated with the standard doxycycline dose, and the other 40 patients with the standard lymecycline dose (300 mg twice a day). The plasma concentrations, determined before the dose on the third day, were below 1 microgram/ml in 35% of the patients treated with doxycycline, and in 5% of those treated with lymecycline. Since acute salpingitis in most cases is a serious complication to a lower genital tract infection, often a sexually transmitted disease caused by tetracycline-sensitive organisms, the importance of achieving and determining the therapeutic plasma concentrations of tetracyclines is stressed.

  10. Effect of thyroid hormone on concentrations of plasma calcitonin in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Klandorf, H; Boyce, C S; Holt, S B; Iqbal, M; Killefer, J; Peterson, R A; Deaver, D R

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine the effect of thyroidectomy (Tx), and thyroid hormone (T3/T4) treatment on concentrations of plasma CT in chicks. In addition, the turnover of CT in Tx- and T3/T4-treated chicks was estimated using a novel nonradioactive salmon CT preparation. One-week-old broiler chicks (Gallus domesticus) (n = 75) were divided into three groups. Group I was sham-injected daily (i.m. saline), Group II was injected with 50 micrograms/day of T3/T4 while Group III was injected with the goitrogen, methimazole, (150 mg/kg BW per day) for 8 weeks. Chicks (8-9 weeks old) were implanted with catheters in the brachial wing vein and administered ruthenium-labeled salmon CT. Blood samples were collected at 30 s, 1, 2, 4, 8, 20 min, and 3 h after injection. Results showed that concentrations of plasma CT were decreased in T3/T4-injected birds. There was no significant effect of methimazole on circulating concentrations of plasma CT. The half-life of CT was significantly increased (P < 0.05) in both T3/T4-injected (n = 6; 1.34 +/- 0.16 min) and goitrogen-treated birds (n = 2; 5.81 +/- 2.83 min) compared to controls (n = 7; 54 +/- 3 s) The results demonstrate that changes in concentrations of plasma thyroid hormones can significantly affect concentrations of plasma CT.

  11. Postprandial changes in plasma acylcarnitine concentrations as markers of fatty acid flux in overweight and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Roman, Maria A.; Sweetman, Lawrence; Valdez, Maressa J.; Parks, Elizabeth J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study determined whether reductions in postprandial plasma FFA flux would lead to reductions in plasma acylcarnitine (AC) concentrations. Materials/Methods Plasma AC were measured by LC-MS/MS in the fasting state and over 6h after a high-fat (50% energy) meal was fed to 16 overweight and obese subjects with a wide range of insulin sensitivities. Body composition was measured by DEXA, insulin sensitivity by FSIVGTT, substrate oxidation by indirect calorimetry, blood metabolite and hormone concentrations biochemically, and fatty acid flux by using stable isotope tracers. Results Lean body mass (LBM) and fasting fat oxidation correlated positively (r > 0.522, P<0.05), while glucose oxidation correlated negatively (r < −0.551, P <0.04) with fasting AC. Postprandially, plasma glucose, insulin, and TG concentrations increased, and FFA concentrations decreased significantly. The responses of plasma AC species depended on chain length and saturation, with C14:0, C16:0, and C18:0 remaining unchanged, and unsaturated species (e.g., C14:1, C14:2) falling significantly (21–46%, P < 0.03). Post-meal nadir AC concentrations were positively associated with LBM, postprandial fatty acid flux and FFA concentrations (r > 0.515, P < 0.05). By contrast, nadir AC correlated negatively with insulin sensitivity and spillover of meal-derived fatty acids (r < −0.528, P < 0.04). Conclusions Conditions that impact fatty acid flux contribute to the control of postprandial plasma AC concentrations. These data underscore the need for a better understanding of postprandial fatty acid oxidation and dietary fat delivery in the setting of adipose insulin resistance to determine how postprandial lipemia contributes to chronic disease risk. PMID:21820684

  12. A Phenomenological Model for Circadian and Sleep Allostatic Modulation of Plasma Cortisol Concentration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-25

    decreased morning awakening salivary cortisol . Psychoneuroendo- crinology 29: 1184–1191, 2004. 2. Balbo M, Leproult R, Van Cauter E. Impact of sleep and...A phenomenological model for circadian and sleep allostatic modulation of plasma cortisol concentration David Thorsley,1 Rachel Leproult,2,3 Karine...2012 Thorsley D, Leproult R, Spiegel K, Reifman J. A phenomenological model for circadian and sleep allostatic modulation of plasma cortisol

  13. Plasma aldosterone and sweat sodium concentrations after exercise and heat acclimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, C. R.; Convertino, V. A.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between plasma aldosterone levels and sweat sodium excretion after chronic exercise and heat acclimation was investigated, using subjects exercised, at 40 C and 45 percent humidity, for 2 h/day on ten consecutive days at 45 percent of their maximal oxygen uptake. The data indicate that, following heat acclimation, plasma aldosterone concentrations decrease, and that the eccrine gland responsiveness to aldosterone, as represented by sweat sodium reabsorption, may be augmented through exercise and heat acclimation.

  14. Optimized preparation method of platelet-concentrated plasma and noncoagulating platelet-derived factor concentrates: maximization of platelet concentration and removal of fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Araki, Jun; Jona, Masahiro; Eto, Hitomi; Aoi, Noriyuki; Kato, Harunosuke; Suga, Hirotaka; Doi, Kentaro; Yatomi, Yutaka; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2012-03-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been clinically used as an easily prepared growth factor cocktail that can promote wound healing, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling. However, the therapeutic effects of PRP are still controversial, due partly to the lack of optimized and standardized preparation protocols. We used whole blood (WB) samples to optimize the preparation protocols for PRP, white blood cell-containing (W-PRP), platelet-concentrated plasma (PCP), and noncoagulating platelet-derived factor concentrate (PFC). PRP and W-PRP were most efficiently collected by 10 min centrifugation in a 15-mL conical tube at 230-270 g and 70 g, respectively. To prepare PCP, platelets were precipitated by centrifugation of PRP at >2300 g, 90% of supernatant plasma was removed, and the platelets were resuspended. For preparation of noncoagulating PFC, the supernatant was replaced with one-tenth volume of saline, followed by platelet activation with thrombin. Platelet (before activation) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB (after activation) concentrations in PCP were approximately 20 times greater than those in WB, whereas PFC contained a 20-times greater concentration of platelets before platelet activation and a 50-times greater concentration of PDGF-BB without formation of a fibrin gel after platelet activation than WB. Surprisingly, total PDGF-BB content in the PFC was twice that of activated WB, which suggested that a substantial portion of the PDGF-BB became trapped in the fibrin glue, and replacement of plasma with saline is crucial for maximization of platelet-derived factors. As an anticoagulant, ethylene di-amine tetra-acetic acid disodium inhibited platelet aggregation more efficiently than acid citrate dextrose solution, resulting in higher nonaggregated platelet yield and final PDGF-BB content. These results increase our understanding of how to optimize and standardize preparation of platelet-derived factors at maximum concentrations.

  15. Optimized Preparation Method of Platelet-Concentrated Plasma and Noncoagulating Platelet-Derived Factor Concentrates: Maximization of Platelet Concentration and Removal of Fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Jun; Jona, Masahiro; Eto, Hitomi; Aoi, Noriyuki; Kato, Harunosuke; Suga, Hirotaka; Doi, Kentaro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been clinically used as an easily prepared growth factor cocktail that can promote wound healing, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling. However, the therapeutic effects of PRP are still controversial, due partly to the lack of optimized and standardized preparation protocols. We used whole blood (WB) samples to optimize the preparation protocols for PRP, white blood cell-containing (W-PRP), platelet-concentrated plasma (PCP), and noncoagulating platelet-derived factor concentrate (PFC). PRP and W-PRP were most efficiently collected by 10 min centrifugation in a 15-mL conical tube at 230–270 g and 70 g, respectively. To prepare PCP, platelets were precipitated by centrifugation of PRP at >2300 g, 90% of supernatant plasma was removed, and the platelets were resuspended. For preparation of noncoagulating PFC, the supernatant was replaced with one-tenth volume of saline, followed by platelet activation with thrombin. Platelet (before activation) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB (after activation) concentrations in PCP were approximately 20 times greater than those in WB, whereas PFC contained a 20-times greater concentration of platelets before platelet activation and a 50-times greater concentration of PDGF-BB without formation of a fibrin gel after platelet activation than WB. Surprisingly, total PDGF-BB content in the PFC was twice that of activated WB, which suggested that a substantial portion of the PDGF-BB became trapped in the fibrin glue, and replacement of plasma with saline is crucial for maximization of platelet-derived factors. As an anticoagulant, ethylene di-amine tetra-acetic acid disodium inhibited platelet aggregation more efficiently than acid citrate dextrose solution, resulting in higher nonaggregated platelet yield and final PDGF-BB content. These results increase our understanding of how to optimize and standardize preparation of platelet-derived factors at maximum concentrations. PMID

  16. Assessment of plasma ammonia and glutamine concentrations in urea cycle disorders.

    PubMed

    Serrano, M; Ormazábal, A; Vilaseca, M A; Lambruschini, N; Garcia-Romero, R; Meavilla, S; Perez-Dueñas, B; Pineda, M; Garcia-Cazorla, A; Campistol, J; Artuch, R

    2011-06-01

    To analyze the association between ammonia and glutamine used for metabolic control in inherited urea cycle disorders (UCD) in a large series of patients. Paired plasma amino acid-ammonia data from 26 UCD patients were analyzed (n=921). Increased plasma glutamine values were consistently observed in UCD patients, despite normal plasma ammonia concentrations, especially for mitochondrial UCD. Further therapeutic efforts are probably needed to control increased glutamine values, considering their potentially neurotoxic effect. Copyright © 2011 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Determining Concentrations and Temperatures in Semiconductor Manufacturing Plasmas via Submillimeter Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helal, Yaser H.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Ewing, Paul R.; Agarwal, Ankur; Craver, Barry; Stout, Phillip J.; Armacost, Michael D.

    2016-06-01

    Plasmas used in the manufacturing processes of semiconductors are similar in pressure and temperature to plasmas used in studying the spectroscopy of astrophysical species. Likewise, the developed technology in submillimeter absorption spectroscopy can be used for the study of industrial plasmas and for monitoring manufacturing processes. An advantage of submillimeter absorption spectroscopy is that it can be used to determine absolute concentrations and temperatures of plasma species without the need for intrusive probes. A continuous wave, 500 - 750 GHz absorption spectrometer was developed for the purpose of being used as a remote sensor of gas and plasma species. An important part of this work was the optical design to match the geometry of existing plasma reactors in the manufacturing industry. A software fitting routine was developed to simultaneously fit for the background and absorption signal, solving for concentration, rotational temperature, and translational temperature. Examples of measurements made on inductively coupled plasmas will be demonstrated. We would like to thank the Texas Analog Center of Excellence/Semiconductor Research Corporation (TxACE/SRC) and Applied Materials for their support of this work.

  18. Nicotine decreases the activity of glutamate transporter type 3.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hea-Jo; Lim, Young-Jin; Zuo, Zhiyi; Hur, Wonseok; Do, Sang-Hwan

    2014-02-10

    Nicotine, the main ingredient of tobacco, elicits seizures in animal models and cigarette smoking is regarded as a behavioral risk factor associated with epilepsy or seizures. In the hippocampus, the origin of nicotine-induced seizures, most glutamate uptake could be performed primarily by excitatory amino acid transporter type 3 (EAAT3). An association between temporal lobe epilepsy and EAAT3 downregulation has been reported. Therefore, we hypothesized that nicotine may elicit seizures through the attenuation of EAAT3 activity. We investigated chronic nicotine exposure (72 h) cause reduction of the activity of EAAT3 in a Xenopus oocyte expression system using a two-electrode voltage clamp. The roles of protein kinase C (PKC) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) were also determined. Nicotine (0.001-1 μM) resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in EAAT3 activity with maximal inhibition at nicotine concentrations of 0.03 μM or higher and at an exposure time of 72 h. Vmax on the glutamate response was significantly reduced in the nicotine group (0.03 μM for 72 h), but the Km value of EAAT3 for glutamate was not altered. When nicotine-exposed oocytes (0.03 μM for 72 h) were pretreated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA, a PKC activator), the nicotine-induced reduction in EAAT3 activity was abolished. PKC inhibitors (staurosporine, chelerythrine, and calphostin C) significantly reduced basal EAAT3 activity, but there were no significant differences among the PKC inhibitors, nicotine, and PKC inhibitors+nicotine groups. Similar response patterns were observed among PI3K inhibitors (wortmannin and LY294002), nicotine, and PI3K inhibitors+nicotine. In conclusion, this study suggests that nicotine decreases EAAT3 activity, and that this inhibition seems to be dependent on PKC and PI3K. Our results may provide an additional mechanism for nicotine-induced seizure.

  19. Effect of dietary fat source on lipoprotein composition and plasma lipid concentrations in pigs.

    PubMed

    Faidley, T D; Luhman, C M; Galloway, S T; Foley, M K; Beitz, D C

    1990-10-01

    Most studies of the effects of dietary fat sources on plasma lipid components have used diets with extreme fat compositions; the current study was designed to more nearly mimic human dietary fat intake. Young growing pigs were fed diets containing either 20 or 40% of energy as soy oil, beef tallow or a 50/50 blend of soy oil and tallow. Different dietary fats did not affect concentrations of cholesterol, triacylglycerol or protein in plasma or major lipoprotein fractions. The concentration of phospholipid was less in plasma and in very low density lipoproteins with soy oil feeding than with tallow feeding. The weight percentage of cholesteryl ester in the low density lipoprotein fraction tended to be greater with 40% than with 20% tallow and tended to be less with 40% than with 20% soy oil. Phospholipid as a weight percentage of low density lipoprotein was least in pigs fed soy oil. Tallow feeding increased the percentage of myristic, palmitic, palmitoleic and oleic acids in plasma, relative to both other groups. Soy oil feeding increased the percentage of linoleic and linolenic acids. These moderate diets were not hypercholesterolemic, but they did alter plasma fatty acid composition and phospholipid concentrations in plasma and very low density lipoprotein.

  20. Plasma Oxytocin Concentration during Pregnancy is associated with Development of Postpartum Depression

    PubMed Central

    Skrundz, Marta; Bolten, Margarete; Nast, Irina; Hellhammer, Dirk H; Meinlschmidt, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) affects up to 19% of all women after parturition. The non-apeptide oxytocin (OXT) is involved in adjustment to pregnancy, maternal behavior, and bonding. Our aim was to examine the possible association between plasma OXT during pregnancy and the development of PPD symptoms. A total of 74 healthy, pregnant women were included in this prospective study. During the third trimester of pregnancy and within 2 weeks after parturition, PPD symptoms were assessed using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Blood samples for plasma OXT assessment were collected in the third trimester. Following the literature, participants with postpartum EPDS scores of 10 or more were regarded as being at risk for PPD development (rPPD group). In a logistic regression analysis, plasma OXT was included as a potential predictor for being at risk for PPD. Results were controlled for prepartal EPDS score, sociodemographic and birth-outcome variables. Plasma OXT concentration in mid-pregnancy significantly predicted PPD symptoms at 2 weeks postpartum. Compared with the no-risk-for-PPD group, the rPPD group was characterized by lower plasma OXT concentrations. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show an association between prepartal plasma OXT concentration and postpartal symptoms of PPD in humans. Assuming a causal relationship, enhancing OXT release during pregnancy could serve as a potential target in prepartum PPD prevention, and help to minimize adverse effects of PPD on the mother–child relationship. PMID:21562482

  1. Pathogen inactivation and removal methods for plasma-derived clotting factor concentrates.

    PubMed

    Klamroth, Robert; Gröner, Albrecht; Simon, Toby L

    2014-05-01

    Pathogen safety is crucial for plasma-derived clotting factor concentrates used in the treatment of bleeding disorders. Plasma, the starting material for these products, is collected by plasmapheresis (source plasma) or derived from whole blood donations (recovered plasma). The primary measures regarding pathogen safety are selection of healthy donors donating in centers with appropriate epidemiologic data for the main blood-transmissible viruses, screening donations for the absence of relevant infectious blood-borne viruses, and release of plasma pools for further processing only if they are nonreactive for serologic markers and nucleic acids for these viruses. Despite this testing, pathogen inactivation and/or removal during the manufacturing process of plasma-derived clotting factor concentrates is required to ensure prevention of transmission of infectious agents. Historically, hepatitis viruses and human immunodeficiency virus have posed the greatest threat to patients receiving plasma-derived therapy for treatment of hemophilia or von Willebrand disease. Over the past 30 years, dedicated virus inactivation and removal steps have been integrated into factor concentrate production processes, essentially eliminating transmission of these viruses. Manufacturing steps used in the purification of factor concentrates have also proved to be successful in reducing potential prion infectivity. In this review, current techniques for inactivation and removal of pathogens from factor concentrates are discussed. Ideally, production processes should involve a combination of complementary steps for pathogen inactivation and/or removal to ensure product safety. Finally, potential batch-to-batch contamination is avoided by stringent cleaning and sanitization methods as part of the manufacturing process.

  2. Correlation of paired toxic plasma and saliva paracetamol concentrations following deliberate self-poisoning with paracetamol.

    PubMed

    Soderstrom, Jessamine H; Fatovich, Daniel M; Mandelt, Christine; Vasikaran, Sam; McCoubrie, David L; Daly, Frank F; Burrows, Sally A

    2012-07-01

    • Paracetamol is commonly used in deliberate self poisoning (DSP) and this requires blood sampling to refine risk assessment. If saliva concentrations agreed with plasma concentrations, then this could support the development of non-invasive testing. Our pilot work supports this hypothesis, but was largely confined to nontoxic concentrations. • We found agreement between the indications for treatment of paracetamol DSP based on plasma and saliva paracetamol concentrations. Saliva may hold promise as a non-invasive method to risk stratify paracetamol poisoning. Paracetamol is commonly used in deliberate self poisoning (DSP) and requires blood sampling to refine risk assessment. We aimed to test the agreement between plasma and saliva paracetamol concentrations in the toxic range in DSP. Contemporaneous paired plasma and saliva paracetamol concentrations were measured. Saliva was collected using a Sarstedt Salivette® device and the concentration was measured using a colorimetric method. Fifty-six patients (44, 78% female) median age 26 years (IQR 20-41) were enrolled. The median reported paracetamol ingestion was 10 g (IQR 6-14). Specimens were collected at a median of 4 h (IQR 4-5.3) post ingestion. The median plasma and saliva paracetamol concentrations were 29 mg l(-1) (IQR 8-110) and 38 mg l(-1) (IQR 10-105) respectively [mean difference 8 mg l(-1) , 95% confidence interval (CI) 2, 14]. Lin's concordance correlation was 0.97 (95% CI 0.96, 0.98). There were 15 patients who were treated with N-acetylcysteine. Their median reported paracetamol ingestion was 14 g (IQR 10-23) and samples were collected at a median of 4 h post ingestion. The median plasma and saliva paracetamol concentrations were 167 mg l(-1) (IQR 110-200) and 170 mg l(-1) (IQR 103-210) respectively (mean difference 15 mg l(-1) , 95% CI -4, 35). Lin's concordance correlation was 0.94 (95% CI 0.88, 0.99). No patient needing treatment would have been missed using saliva concentrations only. The

  3. Dietary predictors and plasma concentrations of perfluorinated alkyl acids in a Singapore population.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Su, Jin; van Dam, Rob M; Prem, Kiesha; Hoong, Joey Y S; Zou, Li; Lu, Yonghai; Ong, Choon Nam

    2017-03-01

    Perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs), a family of man-made organofluorinated compounds, have drawn much attention due to their ubiquitous existence in the environment and their bioaccumulation potential. Here, we examined the plasma concentrations of thirteen PFAAs in a healthy population (N = 270) in Singapore, and investigated the association between major food groups and plasma PFAA concentrations. We detected eight types of PFAAs in more than 75% of all samples (N = 270), and their median concentrations ranged from 0.05 to 8.34 ng mL(-1). Age- and gender-related differences were observed for the three dominant PFAAs, i.e., perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctanoate acid (PFOA), with concentrations being higher in men and older adults. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that fish, shellfish, red meat and poultry were associated with increased PFAAs concentrations in plasma, whereas grains and soy products showed inverse associations with PFAAs. Further, significant correlations were observed between various long-chain PFAAs and plasma concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids, suggesting seafood was a significant source of these PFAAs, within this population. Future studies on diet exposure to PFAAs are encouraged to focus more on the effects on diet pattern.

  4. Increased plasma concentrations of tumour markers in the absence of neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Trapé, Jaume; Filella, Xavier; Alsina-Donadeu, Montse; Juan-Pereira, Lluïsa; Bosch-Ferrer, Ángels; Rigo-Bonnin, Raül

    2011-10-01

    Tumour markers are a very heterogeneous group of molecules that are generally found in very small concentrations in the plasma and serum of healthy individuals. In the process of neoplastic differentiation the cell can synthesize, release, or induce synthesis of other cells, thus increasing their concentration in plasma and serum. These substances may also increase their plasma concentration in patients without cancer due to processes that increase the release or reduce catabolism, and so give rise to false positives. An understanding of the main physiopathological processes that increase the concentrations of these substances could improve our interpretation of tumour markers and their clinical application. In this study we review the physiopathological processes that may increase the plasma concentrations of tumour markers. We performed a bibliography review in PubMed, searching for causes of false positives for the following tumour markers: α-Fetoprotein, CA 125, CA 15-3, CA 19-9, CA 72-4, carcinoembryonic antigen, CYFRA 21-1, squamous cell carcinoma, prostatic specific antigen, β(2)-microglobulin, choriogonadotropin (β chain), chromogranin A, neuron specific enolase, HER2-neu, progastrin releasing peptide, S-100, and thyroglobulin. The results favour the use of tests which can identify pathological processes that may increase tumour marker concentrations.

  5. Effects of cholestyramine and colestipol on the plasma concentrations of propranolol.

    PubMed Central

    Hibbard, D M; Peters, J R; Hunninghake, D B

    1984-01-01

    The effect of equivalent hypolipidaemic doses of cholestyramine (8 g) or colestipol (10 g) on the plasma concentrations of propranolol and 4'-hydroxypropranolol was studied in 12 normal volunteers following the oral administration of 120 mg of normal release propranolol tablets. When two doses of either cholestyramine or colestipol were administered prior to the propranolol, the peak plasma concentrations and area under the curve for both propranolol and the metabolite 4'-hydroxypropranolol were reduced significantly (P less than 0.05). We conclude that the drug interaction between cholestyramine or colestipol and propranolol leads to significant reductions in plasma concentrations of propranolol and 4'-hydroxypropranolol which may cause a clinically diminished effect for a given dosage. Therefore, patients should be observed when either of these resins are added to or deleted from a therapeutic regimen. PMID:6487473

  6. Plasma Concentrations of Digoxin after Oral Administration in the Fasting and Postprandial State

    PubMed Central

    White, R. J.; Chamberlain, D. A.; Howard, M.; Smith, T. W.

    1971-01-01

    After the oral administration of 0·5 mg of digoxin in tablet form to fasting subjects peak plasma levels were reached in 30 to 60 minutes. Levels then fell to reach a plateau at six to eight hours. When the same dose was given after food the peak plasma concentrations were significantly lower, but the concentrations reached in samples obtained from two to eight hours after the dose did not differ appreciably from corresponding samples obtained in the fasting experiments. In a four-week cross-over study of 21 patients on maintenance therapy, digoxin taken regularly in the fasting state produced plasma concentrations similar to those obtained when the drug was taken after meals. The rapid appearance of digoxin in the blood suggests that the oral route of administration is adequate for most patients who require rapid digitalization, and the timing of maintenance dosage in relation to meals is unimportant. PMID:5100372

  7. Power law relation between particle concentrations and their sizes in the blood plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichenko, M. N.; Chaikov, L. L.; Zaritskii, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    This work is devoted to the investigation of sizes and concentrations of particles in blood plasma by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Blood plasma contains many different proteins and their aggregates, microparticles and vesicles. Their sizes, concentrations and shapes can give information about donor's health. Our DLS study of blood plasma reveals unexpected dependence: with increasing of the particle sizes r (from 1 nm up to 1 μm), their concentrations decrease as r-4 (almost by 12 orders). We found also that such dependence was repeated for model solution of fibrinogen and thrombin with power coefficient is -3,6. We believe that this relation is a fundamental law of nature that shows interaction of proteins (and other substances) in biological liquids.

  8. Plasma concentrations of adrenomedullin and atrial and brain natriuretic peptides in patients with adrenal pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Shi, Lei; Zhou, Pang-Hu; Zhang, Xiao-Bin

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate any changes in the plasma concentrations of adrenomedullin (ADM), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in patients with adrenal pheochromocytoma (PC). The plasma concentrations of the three peptides were measured in 45 healthy control individuals and 90 untreated patients with PC, who consisted of 20 normotensive patients, 30 borderline hypertensive patients and 40 hypertensive patients. After 4 weeks of effective antihypertensive therapy for hypertensive PC patients, the concentrations of ADM, ANP and BNP were measured again, and laparoscopic adrenalectomy was then performed for all PC patients with values that were measured 2 weeks later. The plasma concentrations of the three peptides were significantly increased in the borderline hypertensive and hypertensive patients compared with the concentrations in control individuals and normotensive patients. In addition, there were significant differences between the levels of ADM, ANP and BNP in the borderline and hypertensive groups. The plasma ADM concentration was not associated with the blood urea nitrogen levels, serum creatinine levels or glomerular filtration rate, but was correlated with the serum epinephrine, serum norepinephrine and urine vanillylmandelic acid levels. In addition, the ADM concentration was associated with the systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular mass index and plasma concentrations of ANP and BNP in the hypertensive patients with PC. After 4 weeks of antihypertensive treatment, the values of the three peptides in the hypertensive patients with PC were not significantly changed. As expected, the values in borderline and hypertensive groups were significantly decreased 2 weeks subsequent to surgery, whereas there were no significant changes in the normotensive group. ADM may participate, along with ANP and BNP, in the mechanisms that counteract further elevation

  9. Antifungal use and therapeutic monitoring of plasma concentrations of itraconazole in heart and lung transplantation patients.

    PubMed

    Brett, Jonathan; Chong, OiFong; Graham, Garry G; Ray, John E; Marriott, Deborah; Williams, Kenneth M; Day, Richard O

    2013-02-01

    The prophylactic use of itraconazole has dramatically reduced the incidence of fungal infections in patients after solid-organ transplantation. To further reduce this incidence, it has been suggested that plasma concentrations of itraconazole be monitored and maintained above a putative minimum target concentration of 500 ng/mL. A retrospective audit was undertaken of patients who had had a heart or lung transplant over a 14-month period (between January 1, 2010 and March 31, 2011). The itraconazole prophylaxis regimen (dose, time of last dose, time of blood collection) and plasma concentrations were recorded together with the use of concomitant antacid medication. Details of breakthrough fungal infections were documented. Eighty-four heart or lung organ transplantations were undertaken in the study period; 57 were treated prophylactically with itraconazole. Plasma concentrations of itraconazole were monitored in 56% (n = 32) of these cases. Considerable interpatient (range, 50-2000 ng/mL) and intrapatient variability in plasma concentrations was observed. The putative target was not achieved consistently in the majority of cases. All patients were taking a proton pump inhibitor. Six of the cohort developed an invasive fungal infection. None of the 3 patients for whom plasma concentrations were monitored was above the target concentration. Further clinical studies, involving monitoring of the active metabolite and attention to the importance of the stereoisomers of itraconazole, may give better insight into the appropriateness of the currently suggested minimum target concentration, whose validity remains uncertain. Formulations with improved absorption characteristics could reduce the variability of absorption with the goal of further reducing the incidence of infrequent, but life-threatening, invasive fungal infections.

  10. Endocannabinoids concentrations in plasma associated with feed efficiency and carcass composition of beef steers.

    PubMed

    Artegoitia, V M; Foote, A P; Lewis, R M; King, D A; Shackelford, S D; Wheeler, T L; Freetly, H C

    2016-12-01

    Endocannabinoids, including anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), are a class of endogenous lipid mediators that activate cannabinoids receptors and may be involved in the control of feed intake and energy metabolism. The objective of this study was to quantify AEA and 2-AG in plasma and identify possible associations with production traits and carcass composition in finishing beef steers. Individual DMI and BW gain were measured on 140 Angus-sired steers for 105 d on a finishing ration. Blood samples were collected on d 84 of the experiment, which was 40 d before slaughter. Variables were analyzed using Pearson CORR procedure of SAS. Mean endocannabinoid concentrations in plasma were 4.48 ± 1.82 ng/mL and 0.44 ± 0.24 ng/mL for AEA and 2-AG, respectively. The AEA concentration was positively correlated with G:F ratio ( = 0.20; = 0.02), indicating that more efficient animals had greater AEA plasma concentrations. In addition, AEA concentration tended to be negatively correlated with the 12th rib fat thickness ( = -0.17; = 0.07); but no correlation was found with USDA-calculated yield grade ( = -0.14; = 0.11), or marbling score ( = 0.05; = 0.54). The concentration of 2-AG was positively correlated with AEA ( = 0.21; = 0.01); however, 2-AG concentration was not correlated with parameters of feed efficiency or carcass composition. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report plasma concentration of endocannabinoids in steers. These results provide evidence that plasma concentration of a key endocannabinoid, AEA, was favorably correlated with feed efficiency and fat thickness in finishing steers.

  11. Plasma and skin blister fluid concentrations of trimethoprim following its oral administration.

    PubMed

    Klimowicz, A; Nowak, A; Kadyków, M

    1988-01-01

    Plasma and skin blister fluid concentration-time curves following a single oral dose of trimethoprim have been evaluated. Skin blisters were produced by the cantharides technique, using patches with cantharidin ointment. Trimethoprim concentrations in plasma following multiple doses of 200 mg were also determined. The maximal concentration in plasma after a single oral dose of 400 mg trimethoprim was 3.95 +/- 1.08 mg/l, and it was observed after 2 h, whereas in skin blister fluid the level was 2.21 +/- 0.62 mg/l, and it was delayed for up to 6 h. This means that a certain time is required for drug transfer from the capillaries via the basal membrane into blister fluid. Penetration of the drug into blister fluid, defined as the ratio of the areas under the trimethoprim level time curve in skin blister fluid to that of plasma, was 0.826 +/- 0.096. The steady-state concentration of trimethoprim in plasma during routine treatment with 200-mg doses ranged between 2 and 3.5 mg/l.

  12. Variations in plasma motilin, somatostatin, and pancreatic polypeptide concentrations and the interdigestive myoelectric complex in dog.

    PubMed

    Poitras, P; Lemoyne, M; Tasse, D; Trudel, L; Yamada, T; Taylor, I L

    1985-12-01

    We have looked at the plasma concentrations of motilin, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), and somatostatin (STS) during the various phases of the interdigestive motor complex (IDMC) in dogs. As expected, motilin cyclical increase was always associated with the phase III of the IDMC. Statistical analysis of PP variations revealed a significant rise 10 min before duodenal phase III; however, in individual animals, this relationship was inconsistent. Although a dose-related increase in PP blood levels was induced by administration of synthetic canine motilin (0-200 ng kg-1 iv), fasting plasma levels of PP were not correlated with the concentrations of circulating endogenous motilin. After truncal vagotomy, while motilin release and the intestinal motility pattern remained unaltered, the phase III associated cyclical increases of PP disappeared. Infusion of physiological amounts of PP (1 microgram kg-1 h-1 for 3 h) mimicking the postprandial release failed to reproduce a fed pattern type of intestinal motility and of motilin secretion. No statistical correlation could be established between STS plasma levels and the motor activity of the intestine. STS plasma levels were not correlated with circulating concentrations of motilin and the exogenous administration of physiological doses of synthetic canine motilin failed to modify STS plasma levels. Morphine (200 micrograms kg-1 iv) stimulated only the release of motilin. These data suggest that the role played by circulating concentrations of PP and STS in the control of the IDMC in dog is at most minimal.

  13. Concentrations of danofloxacin 18% solution in plasma, milk and tissues after subcutaneous injection in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Mestorino, N; Marchetti, M L; Turic, E; Pesoa, J; Errecalde, J

    2009-04-01

    Danofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone developed for use in veterinary medicine. Its concentrations and pharmacokinetic profile in plasma, milk and tissues of lactating dairy cows were determined, and its milk withdrawal time (WT) calculated. Twenty-one dairy cows received a single subcutaneous administration of 18% mesylate danofloxacin salt (6 mgkg(-1)). Plasma and milk samples were obtained at different times until 48 h. Groups of three animals were sacrificed at different post-administration times and tissue samples (mammary gland, uterus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, colon and mesenteric lymph nodes) obtained. Danofloxacin concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. The milk WT was calculated by the Time to Safe Concentration method (Software WTM 1.4, EMEA). Danofloxacin was rapidly absorbed and its distribution from plasma to all sampled tissues and milk was extensive. Milk and tissues concentrations were several times above those found in plasma. Plasma area under the curve (AUCp) was 9.69 microghmL(-1) and its elimination half life (T(beta)(1/2)) was 12.53 h. AUC values for the various tissues and milk greatly exceeded AUCp. T(beta)(1/2) from milk and tissues ranged between 4.57 and 21.91 h and the milk withdrawal time was 73.48 h. The reported results support the potential use of danofloxacin in the treatment of mastitis and other infections in milk cows with 3 days of withdrawal.

  14. Urine measurement indicates the plasma brain natriuretic peptide concentration during optimization of heart failure treatment.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Robert G; Jaarsma, Tiny; Waldréus, Nana; Linssen, Gerard C M

    2016-01-01

    To assess the correlation between the amino-terminal pro-hormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentration in blood and urine during a period when actively adjusting the treatment of heart failure (HF). Plasma and urine analyses of NT-proBNP were compared in 51 patients on admission to and discharge from a nurse-led outpatient clinic where HF treatment was optimized. The median time between the two measurements was 42 days. Correlations were analyzed using linear regression, where R(2) is the degree of variability in the plasma NT-proBNP concentration that can be accounted for by the urinary NT-proBNP. There was a statistically significant linear relationship between the urine and plasma concentrations of NT-proBNP on both occasions, but R(2) varied greatly depending on how the data were presented. The correlation between the raw data showed an R(2) of only 30%, and it almost doubled upon logarithm transformation, which shows that the variability (error) was concentration-dependent. Correction of the urinary NT-proBNP for urinary creatinine further increased R(2) for the logarithm-transformed correlation to 68% on admission and 76% on discharge. The highest R(2) (77%) was obtained when the relative changes in urinary NT-proBNP/creatinine between admission and discharge were compared with the corresponding relative changes in the plasma concentration. The sensitivity and specificity of the urine in indicating plasma concentration changes > 10% were 82% and 86%, respectively. Relative changes in plasma NT-proBNP could be reliably estimated from urine samples during a period of optimization of HF treatment.

  15. The establish of the HPLC method to examine the plasma concentration of lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue-Ping; Zhao, Yao-Dong; Cheng, Zhi; Zhao, Ning Min; Li, Hao

    2015-05-01

    To establish the HPLC method to examine plasma concentration of lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine. This study set chlorzoxazone as the internal standard, chromatographic column was Column C18 (200×4.6mm, 5um) of DIKMA company, the mobile phase was methanol, water and trifluoroacetic acid, with rate of 40: 60: 0.0005, at a flow rate of 1 mllmin(-1), the detected wavelength was 240 nm. The plasma concentrations of lamotrigine was 0.5-50ug•mL(-1), the standard curve was excellent for Y=0.5511C-0.5669, r=0.9940, average recovery was 91.40%; The plasma concentrations of oxcarbazepine was 0.5-50ugmL-1, the standard curve was good for Y=0.4026C-0.5895, r=0.9925, and the average recovery was 89.59%; The three plasma concentrations of lamotrigine were respectively 25μg•mL(-1), 10 μg•mL(-1) and 2μg•mL(-1) and its five parallel sample for injection RSD were respectively 4.01%, 6.15% and 4.64%; The three plasma concentration of oxcarbazepine were 25μg•mL(-1)-1(-1), 10μg•mL(-1)-1(-1) and 2μg•mL(-1)-1(-1), and its five parallel sample for injection RSD were respectively 3.05%, 4.27% and 9.01%. This method was easy to operate, high recovery and high precision, and was applicable to the clinical detection for plasma concentration of lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine.

  16. Relationship between craving and plasma leptin concentrations in patients with cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Martinotti, Giovanni; Montemitro, Chiara; Baroni, Gaia; Andreoli, Sara; Alimonti, Flaminia; Di Nicola, Marco; Tonioni, Federico; Leggio, Lorenzo; di Giannantonio, Massimo; Janiri, Luigi

    2017-08-05

    There is robust evidence indicating an overlap between neurobiological circuitry and pathways that regulate addictions and those that regulate appetite and food intake. Rodent work suggests a role of the appetitive peptide leptin in cocaine-seeking behaviours. The goal of this study was to investigate the possible relationship between plasma leptin concentrations and cocaine craving and use in patients seeking treatment for cocaine dependence. Patients (N=43) with a DSM-IV diagnosis of cocaine dependence were studied before starting detoxification (baseline; T0) and then again 14days after (T1; only those patients who abstained from cocaine during the study). Blood samples for plasma leptin concentrations were collected and cocaine craving was assessed using the Brief Cocaine Craving Questionnaire (Brief-CCQ). Food craving was also assessed using a food Visual Analogue Scale (f-VAS). Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) was used to evaluate impulsivity. Plasma leptin concentrations at T0 significantly correlated with baseline Brief-CCQ scores (r=0.34, p<0.05). Furthermore, plasma leptin concentrations at T1 significantly correlated with the baseline amount of cocaine used (r=0.5, p<0.05). There were no significant correlations between plasma leptin concentrations and f-VAS scores either at T0 or T1 (p's>0.05). The present study suggests a potential relationship between plasma leptin concentrations and cocaine craving and use. Future mechanistic studies are needed to determine whether manipulations of leptin signalling may lead to novel pharmacological approaches to treat cocaine addiction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Concentrations of thiocyanate and goitrin in human plasma, their precursor concentrations in brassica vegetables, and associated potential risk for hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Felker, Peter; Bunch, Ronald; Leung, Angela M

    2016-04-01

    Brassica vegetables are common components of the diet and have beneficial as well as potentially adverse health effects. Following enzymatic breakdown, some glucosinolates in brassica vegetables produce sulforaphane, phenethyl, and indolylic isothiocyanates that possess anticarcinogenic activity. In contrast, progoitrin and indolylic glucosinolates degrade to goitrin and thiocyanate, respectively, and may decrease thyroid hormone production. Radioiodine uptake to the thyroid is inhibited by 194 μmol of goitrin, but not by 77 μmol of goitrin. Collards, Brussels sprouts, and some Russian kale (Brassica napus) contain sufficient goitrin to potentially decrease iodine uptake by the thyroid. However, turnip tops, commercial broccoli, broccoli rabe, and kale belonging to Brassica oleracae contain less than 10 μmol of goitrin per 100-g serving and can be considered of minimal risk. Using sulforaphane plasma levels following glucoraphanin ingestion as a surrogate for thiocyanate plasma concentrations after indole glucosinolate ingestion, the maximum thiocyanate contribution from indole glucosinolate degradation is estimated to be 10 μM, which is significantly lower than background plasma thiocyanate concentrations (40-69 μM). Thiocyanate generated from consumption of indole glucosinolate can be assumed to have minimal adverse risks for thyroid health. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Concentrations of thiocyanate and goitrin in human plasma, their precursor concentrations in brassica vegetables, and associated potential risk for hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Bunch, Ronald; Leung, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Brassica vegetables are common components of the diet and have beneficial as well as potentially adverse health effects. Following enzymatic breakdown, some glucosinolates in brassica vegetables produce sulforaphane, phenethyl, and indolylic isothiocyanates that possess anticarcinogenic activity. In contrast, progoitrin and indolylic glucosinolates degrade to goitrin and thiocyanate, respectively, and may decrease thyroid hormone production. Radioiodine uptake to the thyroid is inhibited by 194 μmol of goitrin, but not by 77 μmol of goitrin. Collards, Brussels sprouts, and some Russian kale (Brassica napus) contain sufficient goitrin to potentially decrease iodine uptake by the thyroid. However, turnip tops, commercial broccoli, broccoli rabe, and kale belonging to Brassica oleracae contain less than 10 μmol of goitrin per 100-g serving and can be considered of minimal risk. Using sulforaphane plasma levels following glucoraphanin ingestion as a surrogate for thiocyanate plasma concentrations after indole glucosinolate ingestion, the maximum thiocyanate contribution from indole glucosinolate degradation is estimated to be 10 μM, which is significantly lower than background plasma thiocyanate concentrations (40–69 μM). Thiocyanate generated from consumption of indole glucosinolate can be assumed to have minimal adverse risks for thyroid health. PMID:26946249

  19. Detoxification and elimination of nicotine by nectar-feeding birds.

    PubMed

    Lerch-Henning, S; Du Rand, E E; Nicolson, S W

    2017-05-01

    Many dilute nectars consumed by bird pollinators contain secondary metabolites, potentially toxic chemicals produced by plants as defences against herbivores. Consequently, nectar-feeding birds are challenged not only by frequent water excess, but also by the toxin content of their diet. High water turnover, however, could be advantageous to nectar consumers by enabling them to excrete secondary metabolites or their transformation products more easily. We investigated how the alkaloid nicotine, naturally present in nectar of Nicotiana species, influences osmoregulation in white-bellied sunbirds Cinnyris talatala and Cape white-eyes Zosterops virens. We also examined the metabolic fate of nicotine in these two species to shed more light on the post-ingestive mechanisms that allow nectar-feeding birds to tolerate nectar nicotine. A high concentration of nicotine (50 µM) decreased cloacal fluid output and increased its osmolality in both species, due to reduced food intake that led to dehydration. White-eyes excreted a higher proportion of the ingested nicotine-containing diet than sunbirds. However, sugar concentration did not affect nicotine detoxification and elimination. Both species metabolised nicotine, excreting very little unchanged nicotine. Cape white-eyes mainly metabolised nicotine through the cotinine metabolic pathway, with norcotinine being the most abundant metabolite in the excreta, while white-bellied sunbirds excreted mainly nornicotine. Both species also utilized phase II conjugation reactions to detoxify nicotine, with Cape white-eyes depending more on the mercapturic acid pathway to detoxify nicotine than white-bellied sunbirds. We found that sunbirds and white-eyes, despite having a similar nicotine tolerance, responded differently and used different nicotine-derived metabolites to excrete nicotine.

  20. Low unesterified:esterified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plasma concentration ratio is associated with bipolar disorder episodes, and omega-3 plasma concentrations are altered by treatment

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Erika FH; Reider, Aubrey; Singh, Gagan; Gelenberg, Alan J; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Omega (n)-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are molecular modulators of neurotransmission and inflammation. We hypothesized that plasma concentrations of n-3 PUFA would be lower and of n-6 PUFA higher in subjects with bipolar disorder (BD) compared to healthy controls (HC), and would correlate with symptom severity in subjects with BD, and that effective treatment would correlate with increased n-3 but lower n-6 PUFA levels. Additionally, we explored clinical correlations and group differences in plasma levels of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Methods This observational, parallel group study compared biomarkers between HC (n = 31), and symptomatic subjects with BD (n = 27) when ill and after symptomatic recovery (follow-up). Plasma concentrations of five PUFA [linoleic acid (LA), arachidonic acid (AA), alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)], of two saturated fatty acids (palmitic acid and stearic acid) and of two monounsaturated fatty acids (palmitoleic acid, oleic acid) were measured in esterified (E) and unesterified (UE) forms. Calculated ratios included UE:E for the five PUFA, ratios of n-3 PUFA (DHA:ALA, EPA:ALA, EPA:DHA), and the ratio of n-6:n-3 AA:EPA. Comparisons of plasma fatty acid levels and ratios between BD and HC groups were made with Student t-tests, between the BD group at baseline and follow-up using paired t-tests. Comparison of categorical variables was performed using Chi-square tests. Pearson’s r was used for bivariate correlations with clinical variables, including depressive and manic symptoms, current panic attacks, and psychosis. Results UE EPA was lower in BD than HC, with a large effect size (Cohen’s d = 0.86, p < 0.002), however, it was not statistically significant after correction for multiple comparisons. No statistically significant difference was seen in any plasma PUFA concentration between BD and HC after Bonferroni correction for 40

  1. Low unesterified:esterified eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plasma concentration ratio is associated with bipolar disorder episodes, and omega-3 plasma concentrations are altered by treatment.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Erika Fh; Reider, Aubrey; Singh, Gagan; Gelenberg, Alan J; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2015-11-01

    Omega (n)-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are molecular modulators of neurotransmission and inflammation. We hypothesized that plasma concentrations of n-3 PUFAs would be lower and those of n-6 PUFAs higher in subjects with bipolar disorder (BD) compared to healthy controls (HCs), and would correlate with symptom severity in subjects with BD, and that effective treatment would correlate with increased n-3 but lower n-6 PUFA levels. Additionally, we explored clinical correlations and group differences in plasma levels of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. This observational, parallel group study compared biomarkers between HCs (n = 31) and symptomatic subjects with BD (n = 27) when ill and after symptomatic recovery (follow-up). Plasma concentrations of five PUFAs [linoleic acid (LA), arachidonic acid (AA), alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)], two saturated fatty acids (palmitic acid and stearic acid) and two monounsaturated fatty acids (palmitoleic acid and oleic acid) were measured in esterified (E) and unesterified (UE) forms. Calculated ratios included UE:E for the five PUFAs, ratios of n-3 PUFAs (DHA:ALA, EPA:ALA and EPA:DHA), and the ratio of n-6:n-3 AA:EPA. Comparisons of plasma fatty acid levels and ratios between BD and HC groups were made with Student t-tests, and between the BD group at baseline and follow-up using paired t-tests. Comparison of categorical variables was performed using chi-square tests. Pearson's r was used for bivariate correlations with clinical variables, including depressive and manic symptoms, current panic attacks, and psychosis. UE EPA was lower in subjects with BD than in HCs, with a large effect size (Cohen's d = 0.86, p < 0.002); however, it was not statistically significant after correction for multiple comparisons. No statistically significant difference was seen in any plasma PUFA concentration between the BD and HC groups after Bonferroni correction

  2. Plasma concentrations of the enantiomers of halofantrine and its main metabolite in malaria patients.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, F; Gillotin, C; Basco, L K; Bouchaud, O; Aubry, A F; Wainer, I W; Le Bras, J; Farinotti, R

    1994-01-01

    The plasma concentrations of the enantiomers of halofantrine and its N-desbutyl metabolite in six patients with malaria were measured after oral administration of 3 x 750 mg doses of micronised, racemic halofantrine hydrochloride given at 6-hour intervals. Significant differences were observed between the plasma concentrations of the enantiomers both of halofantrine and its N-monodesbutyl metabolite. AUC(0)84h values were higher for (+)halofantrine (9917 micrograms.ml-1.h) than for (-)-halofantrine (6127 micrograms.ml-1.h). The clinical significance of these observations is not known. The isomers have equipotent activity in vitro but their relative toxicity has not yet been assessed.

  3. Oral vitamin B12 supplementation reduces plasma total homocysteine concentration in women in India.

    PubMed

    Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Lubree, Himangi G; Thuse, Nileema V; Ramdas, Lalita V; Deshpande, Swapna S; Deshpande, Vaishali U; Deshpande, Jyoti A; Uradey, Bhagyashree S; Ganpule, Anjali A; Naik, Sadanand S; Joshi, Niranjan P; Farrant, Hannah; Refsum, Helga

    2007-01-01

    People in India have a high prevalence of low vitamin B12 status and high plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations. In a proof of principle trial, we studied the effect of oral vitamin B12 (500 microg) and/or 100 g cooked green leafy vegetables (GLV) every alternate day in a 2x2 factorial design over a 6-week period. Forty-two non-pregnant vegetarian women (age 20-50 years) were randomly allocated to four study groups. Clinical measurements were made at the beginning and at the end of the study, and blood samples were collected before, and 2 and 6 weeks after commencement of intervention. Forty women completed the trial. Twenty-six women had low vitamin B12 status (<150 pmol/L) and 24 had hyperhomocysteinemia (>15 micromol/L). GLV supplementation did not alter plasma folate or tHcy. Vitamin B12 supplementation increased plasma vitamin B12 concentration (125 to 215 pmol/L, p <0.05) and reduced tHcy concentration (18.0 to 13.0 micromol/L, p <0.05) within first 2 weeks, both of which remained stable for the next 4 weeks. Plasma vitamin B12 and tHcy concentrations did not change in those who did not receive vitamin B12, and there was no change in plasma folate concentration in any of the groups. Blood haemoglobin concentration increased marginally within first two weeks in those women who received vitamin B12 (by 3 g/L, p <0.05) and the number of women with macrocytosis decreased from 2 to zero. There was no change in vibration sensory threshold during the period of the study. High-dose per oral vitamin B12 supplementation significantly reduced plasma tHcy within 2 weeks but did not achieve normal plasma tHcy concentration even after 6 weeks. People in India have a high prevalence of low vitamin B12 status and high plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations.

  4. Depression and IL-6 blood plasma concentrations in advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Colleen M; Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Breitbart, William

    2008-01-01

    The authors explored the relationship between depression and interleukin-6 (IL-6) blood plasma concentrations among advanced-stage cancer patients. Seventy-three patients with advanced cancer were rated on depression with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and gave blood to be assayed for blood plasma concentration of IL-6. Initial results found no correlation between depression and IL-6. Subsequent analyses found that among those whose blood was drawn within 48 hours of interview completion, depression and IL-6 were highly correlated. Future studies focusing on the relationship between immune functioning and depression must be particularly vigilant regarding methodological issues.

  5. Relationship between reproductive success and male plasma vitellogenin concentrations in cunner, Tautogolabrus adspersus.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Lesley J; Gutjahr-Gobell, Ruth E; Horowitz, Doranne Borsay; Denslow, Nancy D; Chow, Marjorie C; Zaroogian, Gerald E

    2003-01-01

    The gene for vitellogenin, an egg yolk protein precursor, is usually silent in male fish but can be induced by estrogen exposure. For this reason, vitellogenin production in male fish has become a widely used indicator of exposure to exogenous estrogens or estrogen mimics in the aquatic environment. The utility of this indicator to predict impacts on fish reproductive success is unclear because information on the relationship between male plasma vitellogenin and reproductive end points in male and female fish is limited. In the research reported in this article, we investigated whether the presence of male plasma vitellogenin is a reliable indicator of decreased reproductive success in mature fish. Adult and sexually mature male and female cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus) were exposed to 17ss-estradiol, ethynylestradiol, or estrone, three steroidal estrogens that elicit the vitellogenic response. Data were gathered and pooled on egg production, egg viability, egg fertility, sperm motility, and male plasma vitellogenin concentrations. All males, including two with plasma vitellogenin levels exceeding 300 mg/mL, produced motile sperm. Neither percent fertile eggs nor percent viable eggs produced by reproductively active fish demonstrated a significant correlation with male plasma vitellogenin concentrations. Male gonadosomatic index and average daily egg production by females showed significant, but weak, negative correlation with male plasma vitellogenin concentrations. Results suggest that male plasma vitellogenin expression is not a reliable indicator of male reproductive dysfunction in adult cunner exposed to estrogens for 2-8 weeks during their reproductive season, at least in relation to capacity to produce motile sperm or fertilize eggs. Male plasma vitellogenin expression may serve as an indicator of reduced female reproductive function caused by estrogen exposure. PMID:12515685

  6. Pathogen inactivation treatment of plasma and platelet concentrates and their predicted functionality in massive transfusion protocols.

    PubMed

    Arbaeen, Ahmad F; Schubert, Peter; Serrano, Katherine; Carter, Cedric J; Culibrk, Brankica; Devine, Dana V

    2017-05-01

    Trauma transfusion packages for hemorrhage control consist of red blood cells, plasma, and platelets at a set ratio. Although pathogen reduction improves the transfusion safety of platelet and plasma units, there is an associated reduction in quality. This study aimed to investigate the impact of riboflavin/ultraviolet light-treated plasma or platelets in transfusion trauma packages composed of red blood cell, plasma, and platelet units in a ratio of 1:1:1 in vitro by modeling transfusion scenarios for trauma patients and assessing function by rotational thromboelastometry. Pathogen-reduced or untreated plasma and buffy coat platelet concentrate units produced in plasma were used in different combinations with red blood cells in trauma transfusion packages. After reconstitution of these packages with hemodiluted blood, the hemostatic functionality was analyzed by rotational thromboelastometry. Hemostatic profiles of pathogen-inactivated buffy coat platelet concentrate and plasma indicated decreased activity compared with their respective controls. Reconstitution of hemodiluted blood (hematocrit = 20%) with packages that contained treated or nontreated components resulted in increased alpha and maximum clot firmness and enhanced clot-formation time. Simulating transfusion scenarios based on 30% blood replacement with a transfusion trauma package resulted in a nonsignificant difference in rotational thromboelastometry parameters between packages containing treated and nontreated blood components (p ≥ 0.05). Effects of pathogen inactivation treatment were evident when the trauma package percentage was 50% or greater and contained both pathogen inactivation-treated plasma and buffy coat platelet concentrate. Rotational thromboelastometry investigations suggest that there is relatively little impact of pathogen inactivation treatment on whole blood clot formation unless large amounts of treated components are used. © 2017 AABB.

  7. Fatigue and plasma cytokine concentrations at rest and during exercise in patients with sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Baydur, Ahmet; Alavy, Bahram; Nawathe, Amar; Liu, Shanshan; Louie, Stan; Sharma, Om Prakash

    2011-07-01

    Patients with sarcoidosis exhibit exercise intolerance-related fatigue and increased levels of circulating proinflammatory cytokines at rest. Exercise may result in increased plasma cytokine levels (PCLs) in healthy adults, but such a relationship has not been studied in sarcoidosis patients. To assess relationship of fatigue in sarcoidosis with PCLs at rest and with cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). We assessed lung function, CPET data, multidimensional fatigue inventory, plasma tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) concentrations before, immediately after, and 4-6 h following CPET in 22 sarcoidosis patients (13 receiving immunomodulatory drugs) and 22 controls. Patients exhibited greater fatigue, reduced cardiorespiratory function, higher Medical Research Council (MRC) scores and higher plasma TNF-α concentrations than controls at all times. Plasma IL-1β levels did not differ between cohorts. Patients exhibited a 28% increase (statistically not significant) in TNF-α level immediately post exercise. Plasma IL-β concentrations did not change among cohorts. Treated patients exhibited higher MRC and physical fatigue scores and lower breathing reserve, but no differences in cardiorespiratory function or PCLs compared to untreated patients. In treated patients, pre-exercise plasma IL-1β correlated with physical fatigue, reduced motivation and total fatigue; TNF-α levels only correlated with general fatigue score. Treated sarcoidosis patients exhibit a relation between physical fatigue, reduced motivation and total fatigue and pre-exercise plasma IL-1β concentrations. Acute exercise does not increase PCLs. Whether the reduced MRC score and physical fatigue in treated patients is related to the therapy or to the underlying inflammatory process is difficult to determine. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Brain CYP2B induction can decrease nicotine levels in the brain.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Kristine L P; Lê, Anh Dzung; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2017-09-01

    Nicotine can be metabolized by the enzyme CYP2B; brain CYP2B is higher in rats and monkeys treated with nicotine, and in human smokers. A 7-day nicotine treatment increased CYP2B expression in rat brain but not liver, and decreased the behavioral response and brain levels (ex vivo) to the CYP2B substrate propofol. However, the effect of CYP2B induction on the time course and levels of circulating brain nicotine in vivo has not been demonstrated. Using brain microdialysis, nicotine levels following a subcutaneous nicotine injection were measured on day one and after a 7-day