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Sample records for plasma research experiment

  1. Lab- and space-based researchers discuss plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.; Yamada, M.

    Plasma physics provides a common language and set of approaches that tie together all scientists who study the acceleration, transport, and loss processes of the plasma state. Some years ago, researchers from the laboratory and space research communities suggested a workshop to bring together the diverse researchers in the respective fields. A series of workshops on the “Interrelationship between Plasma Experiments in the Laboratory and Space” (IPELS) was established, and the third meeting was held July 24-28, 1995, in the beautiful and historic town of Pitlochry in the Scottish Highlands.The conference reestablished the critical point that plasma physics is an important but surprisingly diversified research discipline. Meetings attendees discussed a number of new approaches to plasma research, including novel diagnostic techniques for use in space, such as active antennas and electric field sounding devices. Detailed discussions covered spacecraft-plasma environment interactions, including vehicle charging and neutral gas release; fundamental aspects of industrial application of dusty plasmas and waves in dusty plasmas; a very distinctive phase transition of coulomb crystals (from solid state to liquid state) in dusty plasmas; and terrella experiments to simulate and study chaotic transport in the ionosphere.

  2. ECR plasma thruster research - Preliminary theory and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sercel, Joel C.; Fitzgerald, Dennis J.

    1989-01-01

    A preliminary theory of the operation of the electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) plasma thruster is described along with an outline of recent experiments. This work is presented to communicate the status of an ongoing research effort directed at developing a unified theory to quantitatively describe the operation of the ECR plasma thruster. The theory is presented as a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations and boundary conditions which describe the plasma density, velocity, and electron temperature. Diagnostic tools developed to measure plasma conditions in the existing research device are described.

  3. Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai N

    2013-06-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  4. Plasma contactor research - 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchholtz, Brett; Williams, John D.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1992-01-01

    A report describing the operating principles of hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors emitting or collecting electrons from an ambient plasma is summarized. Preliminary experiments conducted to determine the noise generated by these plasma contactors in the emission-current return line and in the plasma near it are described. These noise data are measured as current fluctuations in the return line and to the Langmuir probe and then analyzed using a fast Fourier transform technique. The spectral compositions of the data are characterized using power spectral density plots which are examined to identify possible noise source(s) and production mechanism(s). The precautions taken in the construction and calibration of the instrumentation to assure adequate frequency response are described. Experimental results show that line-current noise levels are typically 2 percent of the electron current being emitted or collected. However, noise levels increase to as much as 20 percent of the electron current at a few electron-collection operating conditions. The frequencies associated with most of the noise were harmonics of the 60 Hz input to system power supplies. Plasma noise had characteristics similar in magnitude and frequency to those for the return-line noise, but they contained additional features at frequencies considered to be related to ion-acoustic instabilities. Also discussed is a new probe positioning system built to facilitate future plasma-contractor research.

  5. Study of energetic particle dynamics in Harbin Dipole eXperiment (HDX) on Space Plasma Environment Research Facility (SPERF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhibin, W.; Xiao, Q.; Wang, X.; Xiao, C.; Zheng, J.; E, P.; Ji, H.; Ding, W.; Lu, Q.; Ren, Y.; Mao, A.

    2015-12-01

    Zhibin Wang1, Qingmei Xiao1, Xiaogang Wang1, Chijie Xiao2, Jinxing Zheng3, Peng E1, Hantao Ji1,5, Weixing Ding4, Quaming Lu6, Y. Ren1,5, Aohua Mao11 Laboratory for Space Environment and Physical Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China 150001 2 State Key Lab of Nuclear Physics & Technology, and School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, China 100871 3ASIPP, Hefei, China, 230031 4University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 90095 5Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 6University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China, 230026 A new terrella device for laboratory studies of space physics relevant to the inner magnetospheric plasmas, Harbin Dipole eXperiment (HDX), is scheduled to be built at Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT), China. HDX is one of two essential parts of Space Plasma Environment Research Facility (SPERF), which is a major national research facility for space physics studies. HDX is designed to provide a laboratory experimental platform to reproduce the earth's magnetospheric structure for investigations on the mechanism of acceleration/loss and wave-particle interaction of energetic particles in radiation belt, and on the influence of magnetic storms on the inner magnetosphere. It can be operated together with Harbin Reconnection eXperiment (HRX), which is another part of SPERF, to study the fundamental processes during interactions between solar wind and Earth's magnetosphere. In this presentation, the scientific goals and experimental plans for HDX, together with the means applied to generate the plasma with desired parameters, including multiple plasma sources and different kinds of coils with specific functions, as well as advanced diagnostics designed to be equipped to the facility for multi-functions, are reviewed. Three typical scenarios of HDX with operations of various coils and plasma sources to study specific physical processes in space plasmas will also be

  6. Space plasma physics research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, Richard H.; Horwitz, James L.

    1993-01-01

    During the course of this grant, work was performed on a variety of topics and there were a number of significant accomplishments. A summary of these accomplishments is included. The topics studied include empirical model data base, data reduction for archiving, semikinetic modeling of low energy plasma in the inner terrestrial magnetosphere and ionosphere, O(+) outflows, equatorial plasma trough, and plasma wave ray-tracing studies. A list of publications and presentations which have resulted from this research is also included.

  7. Plasma accelerator experiments in Yugoslavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purić, J.; Astashynski, V. M.; Kuraica, M. M.; Dojčinovié, I. P.

    2002-12-01

    An overview is given of the results obtained in the Plasma Accelerator Experiments in Belgrade, using quasi-stationary high current plasma accelerators constructed within the framework of the Yugoslavia-Belarus Joint Project. So far, the following plasma accelerators have been realized: Magnetoplasma Compressor type (MPC); MPC Yu type; one stage Erosive Plasma Dynamic System (EPDS) and, in final stage of construction two stage Quasi-Stationary High Current Plasma Accelerator (QHPA).

  8. Hard X-ray and Particle Beams Research on 1.7 MA Z-pinch and Laser Plasma Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Ishor; Kantsyrev, Victor; Safronova, Alla; Esaulov, Andrey; Nishio, Mineyuki; Shlyaptseva, Veronica; Keim, Steven; Weller, Michael; Stafford, Austin; Petkov, Emil; Schultz, Kimberly; Cooper, Matthew; PPDL Team

    2013-10-01

    Studies of hard x-ray (HXR) emission, electron and ion beam generation in z-pinch and laser plasmas are important for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and development of HXR sources from K-shell and L-shell radiation. The characteristics of HXR and particle beams produced by implosions of planar wire arrays, nested and single cylindrical wire arrays, and X-pinches were analyzed on 100 ns UNR Zebra generator with current up to 1.7 MA. In addition, the comparison of characteristics of HXR and electron beams on Zebra and 350 fs UNR Leopard laser experiments with foils has been performed. The diagnostics include Faraday cups, HXR diodes, different x-ray spectrometers and imaging systems, and ion mass spectrometer using the technique of Thomson parabola. Future work on HXRs and particle beams in HED plasmas is discussed. This work was supported by the DOE/NNSA Cooperative agreement DE-NA0001984 and in part by DE-FC52-06NA27616. This work was also supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Basic Research Award # HDTRA1-13-1-0033, to University of Nevada, Reno.

  9. Laser-Plasma Interaction Experiments and Diagnostics at NRL (Naval Research Laboratory).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-11

    Hooker, and S. Knight in Rutherford Laboratory Report RL-82-039 (1982). 38. J. Grun, M.l. Emery, M.J. Herbst, E.A. McLean, S.P. Obenschain, B.H. Ripin...HUNTSVILLE RESEARCH & ENGR. CTR. OICY ATTN ERNEST BAUER 4800 BRADFORD DRIVE OICY ATTN HANS WOLFARD HUNTSVILLE, AL 35807 OICY ATTN JOEL BENGSTON ATTN... BARON OICY ATTN RAY L. LEADABRAND OICY ATTN G. CARPENTER 0ICY ATTN G. PRICE OICY ATTN J. PETERSON OICY ATTN R. HAKE, JR. OICY ATTN V. GONZALES OICY

  10. Plasma contactor research, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John D.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    Emissive and Langmuir probes were used to measure plasma potential profiles, plasma densities, electron energy distributions, and plasma noise levels near a hollow cathode-based plasma contactor emitting electrons. The effects of electron emission current (100 to 1500 mA) and contactor flowrate (2 to 10 sccm (Xenon)) on these data are examined. Retarding potential analyzer (RPA) measurements showing that high energy ions generally stream from a contactor along with the electrons being emitted are also presented, and a mechanism by which this occurs is postulated. This mechanism, which involves a high rate of ionization induced between electrons and atoms flowing together from the hollow cathode orifice, results in a region of high positive space charge and high positive potential. Langmuir and RPA probe data suggests that both electrons and ions expand spherically from this potential hill region. In addition to experimental observations, a simple one-dimensional model which describes the electron emission process and predicts the phenomena just mentioned is presented and is shown to agree qualitatively with these observations. Experimental results of the first stage of bilateral cooperation with the Italian Institute of Interplanetary Space Physics (IFSI CNR) are presented. Sharp, well-defined double layers were observed downstream of a contactor collecting electrons from an ambient plasma created in the IFSI Facility. The voltage drop across these double layers was observed to increase with the current drawn from the ambient plasma. This observation, which was not as clear in previous IFSI tests conducted at higher neutral pressures, is in agreement with previous experimental observations made at both Colorado State University and NASA Lewis Research Center. Greater double layer voltage drops, multiple double layers, and higher noise levels in the region near the double layers were also observed when a magnetic field was imposed and oriented perpendicular to the

  11. A SPHERICAL PLASMA DYNAMO EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, E. J.; Reuter, K.; Forest, C. B.

    2009-07-20

    We propose a plasma experiment to be used to investigate fundamental properties of astrophysical dynamos. The highly conducting, fast-flowing plasma will allow experimenters to explore systems with magnetic Reynolds numbers an order of magnitude larger than those accessible with liquid-metal experiments. The plasma is confined using a ring-cusp strategy and subject to a toroidal differentially rotating outer boundary condition. As proof of principle, we present magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the proposed experiment. When a von Karman-type boundary condition is specified, and the magnetic Reynolds number is large enough, dynamo action is observed. At different values of the magnetic Prandtl and Reynolds numbers the simulations demonstrate either laminar or turbulent dynamo action.

  12. Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, M.J.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Hast, C.; Li, S.Z.; Litos, M.; Walz, D.; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; Muggli, P.; Pinkerton, S.; Shi, Y.; /Southern California U.

    2011-08-19

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to {approx}20{micro}m long and focused to {approx}10{micro}m wide. The intense fields of the FACET bunches will be used to field ionize neutral lithium or cesium vapor produced in a heat pipe oven. Previous experiments at the SLAC FFTB facility demonstrated 50GeV/m gradients in an 85cm field ionized lithium plasma where the interaction distance was limited by head erosion. Simulations indicate the lower ionization potential of cesium will decrease the rate of head erosion and increase single stage performance. The initial experimental program will compare the performance of lithium and cesium plasma sources with single and double bunches. Later experiments will investigate improved performance with a pre-ionized cesium plasma. The status of the experiments and expected performance are reviewed. The FACET Facility is being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The facility will begin commissioning in summer 2011 and conduct an experimental program over the coming five years to study electron and positron beam driven plasma acceleration with strong wake loading in the non-linear regime. The FACET experiments aim to demonstrate high-gradient acceleration of electron and positron beams with high efficiency and negligible emittance growth.

  13. Experimental Plasma Research project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    1980-09-01

    This report contains descriptions of the activities supported by the Experimental Plasma Research Branch of APP. The individual project summaries were prepared by the principal investigators and include objectives and milestones for each project. The projects are arranged in six research categories: Plasma Properties; Plasma Heating; Plasma Diagnostics; Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics; Advanced Superconducting Materials; and the Fusion Plasma Research Facility (FPRF). Each category is introduced with a statement of objectives and recent progress and followed by descriptions of individual projects. An overall budget summary is provided at the beginning of the report.

  14. Experiments on TFTR supershot plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Bell, M.; Janos, A.; Kaye, S.; Kilpatrick, S.; Manos, D.; Mansfield, D.; Mueller, D.; Owens, K; Timberlake, J.; Pitcher, C.S.; Snipes, J.

    1992-05-01

    Improvements to the TFTR limiter have extended the threshold for carbon blooms (an uncontrolled massive influx of carbon) to greater than 32 MW for 1 sec so that blooms seldom occur in present TFTR Supershot experiments. As a result of the progression from strong blooms to modest blooms to no blooms, improvements in confinement could be correlated with the occurrence of a carbon bloom in the plasma which immediately preceded the supershot. It is speculated that the carbon influx during a carbon bloom results in a limiter surface which has a slightly reduced self=sputtering yield for subsequent discharge. The influence on the supershot plasma seems similar to phenomena obtained by conditioning with lithium pellets.

  15. Space plasma contractor research, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John D.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    Results of experiments conducted on hollow cathode-based plasma contractors are reported. Specific tests in which attempts were made to vary plasma conditions in the simulated ionospheric plasma are described. Experimental results showing the effects of contractor flowrate and ion collecting surface size on contactor performance and contactor plasma plume geometry are presented. In addition to this work, one-dimensional solutions to spherical and cylindircal space-charge limited double-sheath problems are developed. A technique is proposed that can be used to apply these solutions to the problem of current flow through elongated double-sheaths that separate two cold plasmas. Two conference papers which describe the essential features of the plasma contacting process and present data that should facilitate calibration of comprehensive numerical models of the plasma contacting process are also included.

  16. Plasma theory and simulation research

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    Our research group uses both theory and simulation as tools in order to increase the understanding of instabilities, heating, diffusion, transport and other phenomena in plasmas. We also work on the improvement of simulation, both theoretically and practically. Our focus has been more and more on the plasma edge (the sheath''), interactions with boundaries, leading to simulations of whole devices (someday a numerical tokamak).

  17. A Physics Exploratory Experiment on Plasma Liner Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Siemon, Richard E.; Turchi, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Momentum flux for imploding a target plasma in magnetized target fusion (MTF) may be delivered by an array of plasma guns launching plasma jets that would merge to form an imploding plasma shell (liner). In this paper, we examine what would be a worthwhile experiment to do in order to explore the dynamics of merging plasma jets to form a plasma liner as a first step in establishing an experimental database for plasma-jets driven magnetized target fusion (PJETS-MTF). Using past experience in fusion energy research as a model, we envisage a four-phase program to advance the art of PJETS-MTF to fusion breakeven Q is approximately 1). The experiment (PLX (Plasma Liner Physics Exploratory Experiment)) described in this paper serves as Phase I of this four-phase program. The logic underlying the selection of the experimental parameters is presented. The experiment consists of using twelve plasma guns arranged in a circle, launching plasma jets towards the center of a vacuum chamber. The velocity of the plasma jets chosen is 200 km/s, and each jet is to carry a mass of 0.2 mg - 0.4 mg. A candidate plasma accelerator for launching these jets consists of a coaxial plasma gun of the Marshall type.

  18. Nonequilibrium Plasma Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Unfiltered Image Sequences of the Plasma Jet and CDBD Emission Acquired with a 5 ns Gated ICCD Camera. (b) Normalized Intensity from Displacement Current...measurements. A 15-ns-rise-time high-voltage stacked MOSFET switch was used to apply 6 kV to the electrodes for pulse durations of 250 ns at a 100- Hz...streamers were recorded using an intensified CCD camera. The camera gate was set to 20 ns and delayed with respect to the overvoltage peak by 20-ns

  19. Research in plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Three aspects of barium ion cloud dynamics are discussed. First, the effect of the ratio of ion cloud conductivity to background ionospheric conductivity on the motion of barium ion clouds is investigated and compared with observations of barium ion clouds. This study led to the suggestion that the conjugate ionosphere participates in the dynamics of barium ion clouds. Second, analytic work on the deformation of ion clouds is presented. Third, a linearized stability theory was extended to include the effect of the finite extent of an ion cloud, as well as the effect of the ratio of ion cloud to ionospheric conductivities. The stability properties of a plasma with contra-streaming ion beams parallel to a magnetic field are investigated. The results are interpreted in terms of parameters appropriate for collisionless shock waves. It is found that this particular instability can be operative only if the up-stream Alfven Mach number exceeds 5.5.

  20. Electrodynamic plasma motor/generator experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, James E.

    1987-01-01

    The Plasma Motor/Generator Proof of Function (PMG/POF) experiment, a low-cost payload for flight aboard the Shuttle Orbiter using the Hitchhiker G carrier, is discussed. The primary objective of this experiment is to verify that hollow cathode plasma sources can couple electric currents from either end of a long wire moving through the space plasma in LEO into and through that plasma to produce a PMG circuit. The support structure and the electrical components of the experiment are described. The experimental operation is discussed, including the calibration, experimental measurements, and follow-on missions.

  1. Using the Tritium Plasma Experiment to evaluate ITER PFC safety

    SciTech Connect

    Longhurst, G.R.; Anderl, R.A.; Bartlit, J.R.; Causey, R.A.; Haines, J.R.

    1993-07-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment was assembled at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore to investigate interactions between dense plasmas at low energies and plasma-facing component materials. This apparatus has the unique capability of replicating plasma conditions in a tokamak divertor with particle flux densities of 2 {times} 10{sup 19} ions/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s and a plasma temperature of about 15 eV using a plasma that includes tritium. With the closure of the Tritium Research Laboratory at Livermore, the experiment was moved to the Tritium Systems Test Assembly facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. An experimental program has been initiated there using the Tritium Plasma Experiment to examine safety issues related to tritium in plasma-facing components, particularly the ITER divertor. Those issues include tritium retention and release characteristics, tritium permeation rates and transient times to coolant streams, surface modification and erosion by the plasma, the effects of thermal loads and cycling, and particulate production. A considerable lack of data exists in these areas for many of the materials, especially beryllium, being considered for use in ITER. Not only will basic material behavior with respect to safety issues in the divertor environment be examined, but innovative techniques for optimizing performance with respect to tritium safety by material modification and process control will be investigated. Supplementary experiments will be carried out at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory to expand and clarify results obtained on the Tritium Plasma Experiment.

  2. Space plasma research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Four basic areas were covered: development of analysis techniques and software and numerical simulations; data analysis and interpretation; spacecraft sheath studies; and laboratory studies. The important details were documented in terms of either appropriate software documentation or publication in referred publication, conference proceeding and technical reports. The major accomplishments are summarized, followed by a chronological listing of the publications and presentations which resulted from the research.

  3. [Plasma properties research: Task 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The principal research activities of the Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Division relate to magnetic fusion plasma physics. In addition, there is a modest amount of work in closely related areas, including space plasma physics, fluid dynamics, and dynamical systems. Members of the Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Division maintain close contacts with fusion researchers in the US and abroad. Some of the work of the Division is clearly directed towards ITER and TPX, while other problems relate to the broader development of fusion plasma physics and to the support of other issues arising in the many experimental programs. Topics of some note in the last year that are discussed in this report are: Application of sophisticated statistical techniques to tokamak data reduction, including time series analysis of TFTR fluctuation data and spline analysis of profile data. Continuing development of edge plasma and divertor modelling, including initial ergodic divertor studies. Analysis of energetic fusion products losses from TFTR plasmas. Examination of anomalous transport in dynamical systems induced by chaotic-like Hamiltonian motion. Numerical simulation of the development of singular MHD equilibria. Exploration of the validity of moment expansions of kinetic equations for weakly collisional systems. Studies of RF- and ripple-induced helium ash removal. Ballooning mode studies in fluids and rotating stars. Studies in dynamical systems, including explosive instabilities, development of chaos, and motion of collisionless particles in a domain with overlapping islands.

  4. [Plasma properties research: Task 3

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The principal research activities of the Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Division relate to magnetic fusion plasma physics. In addition, there is a modest amount of work in closely related areas, including space plasma physics, fluid dynamics, and dynamical systems. Members of the Magneto-Fluid Dynamics Division maintain close contacts with fusion researchers in the US and abroad. Some of the work of the Division is clearly directed towards ITER and TPX, while other problems relate to the broader development of fusion plasma physics and to the support of other issues arising in the many experimental programs. Topics of some note in the last year that are discussed in this report are: Application of sophisticated statistical techniques to tokamak data reduction, including time series analysis of TFTR fluctuation data and spline analysis of profile data. Continuing development of edge plasma and divertor modelling, including initial ergodic divertor studies. Analysis of energetic fusion products losses from TFTR plasmas. Examination of anomalous transport in dynamical systems induced by chaotic-like Hamiltonian motion. Numerical simulation of the development of singular MHD equilibria. Exploration of the validity of moment expansions of kinetic equations for weakly collisional systems. Studies of RF- and ripple-induced helium ash removal. Ballooning mode studies in fluids and rotating stars. Studies in dynamical systems, including explosive instabilities, development of chaos, and motion of collisionless particles in a domain with overlapping islands.

  5. Research briefing on contemporary problems in plasma science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    An overview is presented of the broad perspective of all plasma science. Detailed discussions are given of scientific opportunities in various subdisciplines of plasma science. The first subdiscipline to be discussed is the area where the contemporary applications of plasma science are the most widespread, low temperature plasma science. Opportunities for new research and technology development that have emerged as byproducts of research in magnetic and inertial fusion are then highlighted. Then follows a discussion of new opportunities in ultrafast plasma science opened up by recent developments in laser and particle beam technology. Next, research that uses smaller scale facilities is discussed, first discussing non-neutral plasmas, and then the area of basic plasma experiments. Discussions of analytic theory and computational plasma physics and of space and astrophysical plasma physics are then presented.

  6. How can laboratory plasma experiments contribute to space and &astrophysics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, M.

    Plasma physics plays key role in a wide range of phenomena in the universe, from laboratory plasmas to the magnetosphere, the solar corona, and to the tenuous interstellar and intergalactic gas. Despite the huge difference in physical scales, there are striking similarities in plasma behavior of laboratory and space plasmas. Similar plasma physics problems have been investigated independently by both laboratory plasma physicists and astrophysicists. Since 1991, cross fertilization has been increased among laboratory plasma physicists and space physicists through meeting such as IPELS [Interrelationship between Plasma Experiments in the Laboratory and Space] meeting. The advances in laboratory plasma physics, along with the recent surge of astronomical data from satellites, make this moment ripe for research collaboration to further advance plasma physics and to obtain new understanding of key space and astrophysical phenomena. The recent NRC review of astronomy and astrophysics notes the benefit that can accrue from stronger connection to plasma physics. The present talk discusses how laboratory plasma studies can contribute to the fundamental understandings of the space and astrophysical phenomena by covering common key physics topics such as magnetic reconnection, dynamos, angular momentum transport, ion heating, and magnetic self-organization. In particular, it has recently been recognized that "physics -issue- dedicated" laboratory experiments can contribute significantly to the understanding of the fundamental physics for space-astrophysical phenomena since they can create fundamental physics processes in controlled manner and provide well-correlated plasma parameters at multiple plasma locations simultaneously. Such dedicated experiments not only can bring about better understanding of the fundamental physics processes but also can lead to findings of new physics principles as well as new ideas for fusion plasma confinement. Several dedicated experiments have

  7. Hot ion plasma heating experiments in SUMMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.; Lauver, M. R.; Patch, R. W.; Posta, S. J.; Snyder, A.; Englert, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Initial results are presented for the hot-ion plasma heating experiments conducted in the new SUMMA (superconducting magnetic mirror apparatus) at NASA Lewis Research Center. A discharge is formed by applying a radially inward dc electric field between cylindrical anodes and hallow cathodes located at the peak of the mirrors. Data were obtained at midplane magnetic field strengths from 1.0 to 3.5 tesla. Charge-exchange neutral particle energy analyzer data were reduced to ion temperatures using a plasma model that included a Maxwellian energy distribution superimposed on an azimuthal drift, finite ion orbits, and radial variations in density and electric field. The best ion temperatures in a helium plasma were 5 keV and in hydrogen the H2(+) and H(+) ions were 1.2 keV and 1 keV respectively. Optical spectroscopy line broadening measurements yielded ion temperatures about 50 percent higher than the charge-exchange neutral particle analyzer results. Spectroscopically obtained electron temperature ranged from 3 to 30 eV. Ion temperature was found to scale roughly linearly with the ratio of power input-to-magnetic field strength, P/B.

  8. Magnetized laboratory plasma jets: experiment and simulation.

    PubMed

    Schrafel, Peter; Bell, Kate; Greenly, John; Seyler, Charles; Kusse, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Experiments involving radial foils on a 1 MA, 100 ns current driver can be used to study the ablation of thin foils and liners, produce extreme conditions relevant to laboratory astrophysics, and aid in computational code validation. This research focuses on the initial ablation phase of a 20 μm Al foil (8111 alloy), in a radial configuration, driven by Cornell University's COBRA pulsed power generator. In these experiments ablated surface plasma (ASP) on the top side of the foil and a strongly collimated axial plasma jet are observed developing midway through the current rise. With experimental and computational results this work gives a detailed description of the role of the ASP in the formation of the plasma jet with and without an applied axial magnetic field. This ∼1 T field is applied by a Helmholtz-coil pair driven by a slow, 150 μs current pulse and penetrates the load hardware before arrival of the COBRA pulse. Several effects of the applied magnetic field are observed: (1) without the field extreme-ultraviolet emission from the ASP shows considerable azimuthal asymmetry while with the field the ASP develops azimuthal motion that reduces this asymmetry, (2) this azimuthal motion slows the development of the jet when the field is applied, and (3) with the magnetic field the jet becomes less collimated and has a density minimum (hollowing) on the axis. PERSEUS, an XMHD code, has qualitatively and quantitatively reproduced all these experimental observations. The differences between this XMHD and an MHD code without a Hall current and inertial effects are discussed. In addition the PERSEUS results describe effects we were not able to resolve experimentally and suggest a line of future experiments with better diagnostics.

  9. Statistical Physics Experiments Using Dusty Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goree, John

    2016-10-01

    Compared to other areas of physics research, Statistical Physics is heavily dominated by theory, with comparatively little experiment. One reason for the lack of experiments is the impracticality of tracking of individual atoms and molecules within a substance. Thus, there is a need for a different kind of experimental system, one where individual particles not only move stochastically as they collide with one another, but also are large enough to allow tracking. A dusty plasma can meet this need. A dusty plasma is a partially ionized gas containing small particles of solid matter. These micron-size particles gain thousands of electronic charges by collecting more electrons than ions. Their motions are dominated by Coulomb collisions with neighboring particles. In this so-called strongly coupled plasma, the dust particles self-organize in much the same way as atoms in a liquid or solid. Unlike atoms, however, these particles are large and slow, so that they can be tracked easily by video microscopy. Advantages of dusty plasma for experimental statistical physics research include particle tracking, lack of frictional contact with solid surfaces, and avoidance of overdamped motion. Moreover, the motion of a collection of dust particles can mimic an equilibrium system with a Maxwellian velocity distribution, even though the dust particles themselves are not truly in thermal equilibrium. Nonequilibrium statistical physics can be studied by applying gradients, for example by imposing a shear flow. In this talk I will review some of our recent experiments with shear flow. First, we performed the first experimental test to verify the Fluctuation Theorem for a shear flow, showing that brief violations of the Second Law of Thermodynamics occur with the predicted probabilities, for a small system. Second, we discovered a skewness of a shear-stress distribution in a shear flow. This skewness is a phenomenon that likely has wide applicability in nonequilibrium steady states

  10. Plasma MRI Experiments at UW-Madison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, K.; Clark, M.; Desangles, V.; Siller, R.; Wallace, J.; Weisberg, D.; Forest, C. B.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments for driving Keplerian-like flow profiles on both the Plasma Couette Experiment Upgrade (PCX-U) and the Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory (WiPAL) user facility are described. Instead of driving flow at the boundaries, as is typical in many liquid metal Couette experiments, a global drive is implemented. A large radial current is drawn across a small axial field generating torque across the whole profile. This global electrically driven flow is capable of producing profiles similar to Keplerian flow. PCX-U has been purposely constructed for MRI experiments, while similar experiments on the WiPAL device show the versatility of the user facility and provide a larger plasma volume. Numerical calculations show the predicted parameter spaces for exciting the MRI in these plasmas and the equilibrium flow profiles expected. In both devices, relevant MRI parameters appear to be within reach of typical operating characteristics.

  11. Magnetized plasma jets in experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrafel, Peter; Greenly, John; Gourdain, Pierre; Seyler, Charles; Blesener, Kate; Kusse, Bruce

    2013-10-01

    This research focuses on the initial ablation phase of a thing (20 micron) Al foil driven on the 1 MA-in-100 ns COBRA through a 5 mm diameter cathode in a radial configuration. In these experiments, ablated surface plasma (ASP) on the top of the foil and a strongly collimated axial plasma jet can be observed developing midway through current-rise. Our goal is to establish the relationship between the ASP and the jet. These jets are of interest for their potential relevance to astrophysical phenomena. An independently pulsed 200 μF capacitor bank with a Helmholtz coil pair allows for the imposition of a slow (150 μs) and strong (~1 T) axial magnetic field on the experiment. Application of this field eliminates significant azimuthal asymmetry in extreme ultraviolet emission of the ASP. This asymmetry is likely a current filamentation instability. Laser-backlit shadowgraphy and interferometry confirm that the jet-hollowing is correlated with the application of the axial magnetic field. Visible spectroscopic measurements show a doppler shift consistent with an azimuthal velocity in the ASP caused by the applied B-field. Computational simulations with the XMHD code PERSEUS qualitatively agree with the experimental results.

  12. Hollow cathode-based plasma contactor experiments for electrodynamic tether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    The role plasma contactors play in effective electrodynamic tether operation is discussed. Hollow cathodes and hollow cathode-based plasma sources have been identified as leading candidates for the electrodynamic tether plasma contactor. Present experimental efforts to evaluate the suitability of these devices as plasma contactors are reviewed. This research includes the definition of preliminary plasma contactor designs, and the characterization of their operation as electron collectors from a simulated space plasma. The discovery of an 'ignited mode' regime of high contactor efficiency and low impedance is discussed, as well as is the application of recent models of the plasma coupling process to contactor operation. Results indicate that ampere-level electron currents can be exchanged between hollow cathode-based plasma contactors and a dilute plasma in this regime. A discussion of design considerations for plasma contactors is given which includes expressions defining the total mass flow rate and power requirements of plasma contactors operating in both the cathodic and anodic regimes, and correlation of this to the tether current. Finally, future ground and spaceflight experiments are proposed to resolve critical issues of plasma contactor operation.

  13. PlasmaLab/EkoPlasma - The Future of Complex Plasma Research in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapek, Christina; Fortov, Vladimir; Huber, Peter; Mohr, Daniel; Konopka, Uwe; Lipaev, Andrey; Molotkov, Vladimir; Petrov, Oleg; Zähringer, Erich; Thomas, Hubertus

    2016-07-01

    The PlasmaLab project, a Russian-German cooperation, has the aim to develop a future laboratory for the investigation of complex plasmas under microgravity conditions on the International Space Station (ISS). Within the project, a new plasma chamber, the Zyflex chamber, has been developed and is now being prepared to be launched to the ISS in 2020 as a laboratory setup with the name EkoPlasma (Experiment komplex Plasma). The Zyflex chamber is a large, cylindrical plasma chamber with parallel, rf-driven electrodes and a flexible inner geometry. It is designed to extend the accessible experimental parameter range and to allow an independent control of the plasma parameters, therefore increasing the experimental possibilities and expected knowledge gain significantly. Further, a 3D optical diagnostic will allow for the study of particle dynamics in 3D realtime. Possible future research topics include e.g. phase transitions, the dynamics of liquids, phase separation, or turbulence. The experimental setup will be presented, as well as some preliminary results of experiments on earth and in parabolic flights to visualize the possibilities of this new laboratory. This work and some of the authors are funded by DLR/BMWi (FKZ 50WM1441).

  14. Plasma flow switch experiment on Procyon

    SciTech Connect

    Benage, J.F. Jr.; Bowers, R.; Peterson, D.

    1995-09-01

    This report presents the results obtained from a series of plasma flow switch experiments done on the Procyon explosive pulse power generator. These experiments involved switching into a fixed inductance dummy load and also into a dynamic implosion load. The results indicated that the switch did fairly well at switching current into the load, but the results for the implosion are more ambiguous. The results are compared to calculations and the implications for future plasma flow switch work are discussed.

  15. High confinement and high density with stationary plasma energy and strong edge radiation cooling in the upgraded Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR-94)

    SciTech Connect

    Messiaen, A.M.; Ongena, J.; Unterberg, B.; Boedo, J.; Fuchs, G.; Jaspers, R.; Konen, L.; Koslowski, H.R.; Mank, G.; Rapp, J.; Samm, U.; Vandenplas, P.E.; Van Oost, G.; Van Wassenhove, G.; Waidmann, G.; Weynants, R.R.; Wolf, G.H.; Bertschinger, G.; Bonheure, G.; Brix, M.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Finken, K.H.; Giesen, B.; Hillis, D.; Hutteman, P.; Koch, R.; Kramer-Flecken, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Mertens, P.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Sauer, M.; Schweer, B.; Schwelberger, J.; Telesca, G.; Tokar, M.Z.; Uhlemann, R.; Vervier, M.; Winter, J. ||||

    1997-05-01

    An overview of the results obtained so far for the radiative I-mode regime on the upgraded Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR-94) [{ital Proceedings of the 16th IEEE Symposium on Fusion Engineering} (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Piscataway, NJ, 1995), Vol. 1, p. 470] is given. This regime is obtained under quasistationary conditions with edge neon seeding in a pumped limiter tokamak with circular cross section. It combines high confinement and high {beta} (up to a normalized beta, {beta}{sub n}=2) with low edge q values (down to q{sub a}=2.8) and high density even above the Greenwald limit together with dominant edge radiative heat exhaust, and therefore shows promise for the future of fusion research. Bulk and edge properties of these discharges are described, and a detailed account is given of the energy and particle confinement and their scaling. Energy confinement scales linearly with density as for the nonsaturated Ohmic Neo-Alcator scaling, but the usual degradation with total power remains. No deleterious effects of the neon seeding on fusion reactivity and plasma stability have been observed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Plasma-Pulse-Acceleration Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    W. Pucher, Testing a new Type of Circuit Breaker for HVDC , Direct Current, Feb. 1966, pp. 3 - 6 /10/ D. Kind, E. Marx, K. Mollenhoff, J. Salge... breakers /4, 5/, exploding wires /6/, plasma jet tubes /7/, and high pressure radiation sources /8/. In particular current limiting circuit breakers ...length, radius, shaping, material to be evaporated etc.). Here it is possible to transfer design criteria from current-limiting circuit breakers and

  17. Plasma crystals: experiments and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piel, A.

    2017-01-01

    Dusty plasmas are a well accessible system to study crystallization of charged-particle systems at room temperature. The large mass compared to atomic particles dramatically slows down the particle velocities. The high transparency of the system allows to trace simultaneously the motion of all particles with quasi-atomic resolution. After a brief overview, the progress in this field is exemplified by studies of spherical three-dimensional plasma crystals, the so-called Yukawa balls. The static structure and eigenmodes are explained in simple terms. It is shown that shielding modifies the expansion of a Yukawa ball from a self-similar explosion to a continuous ablation process that starts at the surface. The experimental progress with three-dimensional diagnostics and laser heating and sophisticated methods for visualising the order inside the shell structure are described. Together with quantifying the diffusion coefficient these investigations reveal the details of the solid-liquid phase transition. Besides thermodynamic aspects, the liquid phase of dusty plasmas also gives access to hydrodynamic phenomena at the individual particle scale.

  18. Conceptual design of Dipole Research Experiment (DREX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qingmei, XIAO; Zhibin, WANG; Xiaogang, WANG; Chijie, XIAO; Xiaoyi, YANG; Jinxing, ZHENG

    2017-03-01

    A new terrella-like device for laboratory simulation of inner magnetosphere plasmas, Dipole Research Experiment, is scheduled to be built at the Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT), China, as a major state scientific research facility for space physics studies. It is designed to provide a ground experimental platform to reproduce the inner magnetosphere to simulate the processes of trapping, acceleration, and transport of energetic charged particles restrained in a dipole magnetic field configuration. The scaling relation of hydromagnetism between the laboratory plasma of the device and the geomagnetosphere plasma is applied to resemble geospace processes in the Dipole Research Experiment plasma. Multiple plasma sources, different kinds of coils with specific functions, and advanced diagnostics are designed to be equipped in the facility for multi-functions. The motivation, design criteria for the Dipole Research Experiment experiments and the means applied to generate the plasma of desired parameters in the laboratory are also described. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11505040, 11261140326 and 11405038), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Nos. 2016M591518, 2015M570283) and Project Supported by Natural Scientific Research Innovation Foundation in Harbin Institute of Technology (No. 2017008).

  19. Argonne Plasma Engineering Experiment (APEX) Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.H.; Balka, L.J.; Kulovitz, E.E.; Magill, S.R.; McGhee, D.G.; Moretti, A.; Praeg, W.F.

    1981-03-01

    The Argonne Plasma Engineering Experiment (APEX) Tokamak was designed to provide hot plasmas for reactor-relevant experiments with rf heating (current drive) and plasma wall experiments, principally in-situ low-Z wall coating and maintenance. The device, sized to produce energetic plasmas at minimum cost, is small (R = 51 cm, r = 15 cm) but capable of high currents (100 kA) and long pulse durations (100 ms). A design using an iron central core with no return legs, pure tension tapewound toroidal field coils, digital radial position control, and UHV vacuum technology was used. Diagnostics include monochrometers, x-ray detectors, and a microwave interferometer and radiometer for density and temperature measurements. Stable 100 ms shots were produced with electron temperatures in the range 500 to 1000 eV. Initial results included studies of thermal desorption and recoating of wall materials.

  20. Experiences of Collaborative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahneman, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The author's personal history of the research that led to his recognition in economics is described, focusing on the process of collaboration and on the experience of controversy. The author's collaboration with Amos Tversky dealt with 3 major topics: judgment under uncertainty, decision making, and framing effects. A subsequent collaboration,…

  1. Laboratory Plasma Astrophysics Research with Intense Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takabe, Hideaki; Kato, Tsunehiko; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Sakawa, Yuichi

    2008-12-01

    Large scale laser facilities mainly constructed for fusion research can be used to produce high-energy-density plasmas like the interior of stars and planets. They can be also used to reproduce the extreme phenomena of explosion and high Mach number flow in mimic scale in laboratory. With advanced diagnostic technique, we can study the physics of plasma phenomena expected to control a variety of phenomena in Universe. The subjects studied so far are reviewed, for example, in [1], [2]. The project to promote the laboratory astrophysics with Gekko XII laser facility has been initiated from April 1st this year as a project of our institute. It consists of four sub-projects. They are 1. Physics of collisionless shock and particle acceleration, 2. Physics of Non LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) photo-ionized plasma, 3. Physics of planets and meteor impact, 4. Development of superconducting Terahertz device. I will briefly explain what the laser astrophysics means and introduce what are the targets of our project. Regarding the first sub-project, we have carried out hydrodynamic and PIC simulation to design the experiments with intense laser. We clarified the physical mechanism of generation of the magnetic field in non-magnetized plasma and the collsionless shock formation caused by the ion orbit modifications by the magnetic fields generated as the result of plasma instability. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  2. Research Status of IEC Experiments at NASA Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris; Hrbud, Ivana; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of IEC (Inertial Electrostatic Confinement) research and experiments at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Topics covered include: apparatus involvement, iec schematics, iec plasma images, iec deuterium experiments, thomson scattering, detector options and experiment results.

  3. Magnetic Flux Compression Experiments Using Plasma Armatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. W.; Hawk, C. W.; Litchford, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic flux compression reaction chambers offer considerable promise for controlling the plasma flow associated with various micronuclear/chemical pulse propulsion and power schemes, primarily because they avoid thermalization with wall structures and permit multicycle operation modes. The major physical effects of concern are the diffusion of magnetic flux into the rapidly expanding plasma cloud and the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at the plasma surface, both of which can severely degrade reactor efficiency and lead to plasma-wall impact. A physical parameter of critical importance to these underlying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes is the magnetic Reynolds number (R(sub m), the value of which depends upon the product of plasma electrical conductivity and velocity. Efficient flux compression requires R(sub m) less than 1, and a thorough understanding of MHD phenomena at high magnetic Reynolds numbers is essential to the reliable design and operation of practical reactors. As a means of improving this understanding, a simplified laboratory experiment has been constructed in which the plasma jet ejected from an ablative pulse plasma gun is used to investigate plasma armature interaction with magnetic fields. As a prelude to intensive study, exploratory experiments were carried out to quantify the magnetic Reynolds number characteristics of the plasma jet source. Jet velocity was deduced from time-of-flight measurements using optical probes, and electrical conductivity was measured using an inductive probing technique. Using air at 27-inHg vacuum, measured velocities approached 4.5 km/s and measured conductivities were in the range of 30 to 40 kS/m.

  4. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  5. Results from Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.Z.; Clarke, C.I.; England, R.J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Jobe, R.K.; Litos, M.D.; Walz, D.R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Tochitsky, S.; Adli, E.; /U. Oslo

    2011-12-13

    We report initial results of the Plasma Wakefield Acceleration (PWFA) Experiments performed at FACET - Facility for Advanced aCcelertor Experimental Tests at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. At FACET a 23 GeV electron beam with 1.8 x 10{sup 10} electrons is compressed to 20 {mu}m longitudinally and focused down to 10 {mu}m x 10 {mu}m transverse spot size for user driven experiments. Construction of the FACET facility completed in May 2011 with a first run of user assisted commissioning throughout the summer. The first PWFA experiments will use single electron bunches combined with a high density lithium plasma to produce accelerating gradients > 10 GeV/m benchmarking the FACET beam and the newly installed experimental hardware. Future plans for further study of plasma wakefield acceleration will be reviewed. The experimental hardware and operation of the plasma heat-pipe oven have been successfully commissioned. Plasma wakefield acceleration was not observed because the electron bunch density was insufficient to ionize the lithium vapor. The remaining commissioning time in summer 2011 will be dedicated to delivering the FACET design parameters for the experimental programs which will begin in early 2012. PWFA experiments require the shorter bunches and smaller transverse sizes to create the plasma and drive large amplitude wakefields. Low emittance and high energy will minimize head erosion which was found to be a limiting factor in acceleration distance and energy gain. We will run the PWFA experiments with the design single bunch conditions in early 2012. Future PWFA experiments at FACET are discussed in [5][6] and include drive and witness bunch production for high energy beam manipulation, ramped bunch to optimize tranformer ratio, field-ionized cesium plasma, preionized plasmas, positron acceleration, etc.. We will install a notch collimator for two-bunch operation as well as new beam diagnostics such as the X-band TCAV [7] to resolve the two bunches

  6. Experiments on laser-produced plasmas and laser plasma- wall interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Quan

    2001-06-01

    The study of the interaction of laser-produced plasmas with a secondary wall has both practical and theoretical significance. The laser-produced plasmas are sources of highly-charged ions, fast electrons, as well as continuum and monochromatic x-ray radiation. Intense x-ray radiation also results when a nanosecond laser-produced plasma collides with a secondary wall positioned close to the target. The study of this interaction is essential to understand the laser-produced plasma expansion, shock wave formation, recombination, collisional excitation and many other transition processes. The laser plasma-wall interaction experiment has been carried out with laser pulses with vastly different time scales. In nanosecond experiment, the plasma-wall interaction was studied with varying target-wall distance. We conclude that the isothermal plasma expansion followed by the shock wave formation near the wall surface contributes to the intense x-ray radiation. We also have done some preliminary research in the femtosecond regime. We claim that the shock wave formation that plays an important role in nanosecond experiment does not play the same role in femtosecond one. We suggest that a femtosecond laser-produced plasma could be an efficient fast electron and monochromatic x- ray source. We also provide some suggestions and predictions for further investigations.

  7. Research by retrieving experiments.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2007-06-01

    Newton did not discover that apples fall: the information was available prior to his gravitational hypothesis. Hypotheses can be tested not only by performing experiments but also by retrieving experiments from the literature (via PubMed, for example). Here I show how disconnected facts from known data, if properly connected, can generate novel predictions testable in turn by other published data. With examples from cell cycle, aging, cancer and other fields of biology and medicine, I discuss how new knowledge was and will be derived from old information. Millions of experiments have been already performed to test unrelated hypotheses and the results of those experiments are available to 'test' your hypotheses too. But most data (99% by some estimates) remain unpublished, because they were negative, seemed of low priority, or did not fit the story. Yet for other investigators those data may be valuable. The well-known story of Franklin and Watson is a case in point. By making preliminary data widely available, 'data-owners' will benefit most, receiving the credit for otherwise unused results. If posted (pre-published) on searchable databases, these data may fuel thousands of projects without the need for repetitive experiments. Enormous 'pre-published' databases coupled with Google-like search engines can change the structure of scientific research, and shrinking funding will make this inevitable.

  8. Diagnostics for the plasma liner experiment.

    PubMed

    Lynn, A G; Merritt, E; Gilmore, M; Hsu, S C; Witherspoon, F D; Cassibry, J T

    2010-10-01

    The goal of the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) is to explore and demonstrate the feasibility of forming imploding spherical "plasma liners" via merging high Mach number plasma jets to reach peak liner pressures of ∼0.1 Mbar using ∼1.5 MJ of initial stored energy. Such a system would provide HED plasmas for a variety of fundamental HEDLP, laboratory astrophysics, and materials science studies, as well as a platform for experimental validation of rad-hydro and rad-MHD simulations. It could also prove attractive as a potential standoff driver for magnetoinertial fusion. Predicted parameters from jet formation to liner stagnation cover a large range of plasma density and temperature, varying from n(i)∼10(16) cm(-3), T(e)≈T(i)∼1 eV at the plasma gun mouth to n(i)>10(19) cm(-3), T(e)≈T(i)∼0.5 keV at stagnation. This presents a challenging problem for the plasma diagnostics suite which will be discussed.

  9. Diagnostics for the Plasma Liner Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, A. G.; Merritt, E.; Gilmore, M.; Hsu, S. C.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Cassibry, J. T.

    2010-10-15

    The goal of the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) is to explore and demonstrate the feasibility of forming imploding spherical ''plasma liners'' via merging high Mach number plasma jets to reach peak liner pressures of {approx}0.1 Mbar using {approx}1.5 MJ of initial stored energy. Such a system would provide HED plasmas for a variety of fundamental HEDLP, laboratory astrophysics, and materials science studies, as well as a platform for experimental validation of rad-hydro and rad-MHD simulations. It could also prove attractive as a potential standoff driver for magnetoinertial fusion. Predicted parameters from jet formation to liner stagnation cover a large range of plasma density and temperature, varying from n{sub i}{approx}10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}, T{sub e}{approx_equal}T{sub i}{approx}1 eV at the plasma gun mouth to n{sub i}>10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, T{sub e}{approx_equal}T{sub i}{approx}0.5 keV at stagnation. This presents a challenging problem for the plasma diagnostics suite which will be discussed.

  10. Plasma Guns for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witherspoon, F. D.; Bomgardner, R.; Case, A.; Messer, S. J.; Brockington, S.; Wu, L.; Elton, R.; Hsu, S. C.; Cassibry, J. T.; Gilmore, M. A.

    2009-11-01

    A spherical array of minirailgun plasma accelerators is planned for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) to be located at LANL. The plasma liner would be formed via merging of 30 dense, high Mach number plasma jets (n˜10^16-17 cm-3, M˜10--35, v˜50--70 km/s, rjet˜5 cm) in a spherically convergent geometry. Small parallel-plate railguns are being developed for this purpose due to their reduced system complexity and cost, with each gun planned to operate at ˜300 kA peak current, and launching up to ˜8000 μg of high-Z plasma using a ˜50 kJ pfn. We describe experimental development of the minirailguns and their current and projected performance. Fast operating repetitive gas valves have recently been added to allow injection of high density gases including helium, argon, and (eventually) xenon. We will present the latest test results with the high-Z gases, and discuss future plans for augmenting the rails, optimizing the nozzle configuration, preionizing the injected gas, and configuring the pulse forming networks with the capacitors available to the program.

  11. Dusty Plasma Experiments Using an Electrodynamic Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F.; Abbas, M. M.; Suess, S. T.; Venturini, C. C.; Comfort, R. H.

    2000-01-01

    Knowledge of the formation, distribution, physical, chemical and optical characteristics of interstellar, interplanetary, and planetary dust grains provide valuable information about many issues dealing with the origin and formation of the solar system bodies, interplanetary and interstellar environments as well as various industrial processes. Understanding the microphysics of individual grains and their interaction with the surrounding environment is key to properly model various conditions and interpret existing data. The theory and models of individual dust grains are well developed for environments that vary from dense planetary atmospheres to dusty plasmas to diffuse environments such is interplanetary space. However, experimental investigations of individual dust grains in equilibrium are less common, perhaps due to the difficult of these experiments. Laboratory measurements of dust grains have primarily measured ensemble properties or transient properties of single grains. A technique developed in the 1950's for ion spectroscopy, known as a quadrupole trap or 'Paul Trap', has recently been used to investigate single micron-sized dust grains. This scaled ion trap called an electrodynamic balance has been used for atmospheric aerosol research. A description of this technique is provided. Recent results from experiments to investigate the equilibrium potential of dust grains exposed to far ultraviolet light or to -,in electron or ion beam are presented. This laboratory technique ]ends itself to many applications that relate to planetary atmospheres, heliospheric environments, pre-stellar and pre-planetary conditions, and industrial settings. Several planned experimental approaches are presented. Potential experiments to investigate the interaction of multiple dust grains using an electrodynamic balance are proposed.

  12. SPDE: Solar Plasma Diagnostic Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Marilyn E.

    1995-01-01

    The physics of the Solar corona is studied through the use of high resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy and high resolution ultraviolet imagery. The investigation includes the development and application of a flight instrument, first flown in May, 1992 on NASA sounding rocket 36.048. A second flight, NASA founding rocket 36.123, took place on 25 April 1994. Both flights were successful in recording new observations relevant to the investigation. The effort in this contract covers completion of the modifications to the existing rocket payload, its reflight, and the preliminary day reduction and analysis. Experience gained from flight 36.048 led us to plan several payload design modifications. These were made to improve the sensitivity balance between the UV and EUV spectrographs, to improve the scattered light rejection in the spectrographs, to protect the visible light rejection filter for the Normal Incidence X-ray Imager instrument (NIXI), and to prepare one new multilayer mirror coating to the NIXI. We also investigated the addition of a brassboard CCD camera to the payload to test it as a possible replacement for the Eastman type 101-07 film used by the SPDE instruments. This camera was included in the experimeter's data package for the Project Initiation Conference for the flight of NASA Mission 36.123, held in January, 1994, but for programmatic reasons was deleted from the final payload configuration. The payload was shipped to the White Sands Missile Range on schedule in early April. The launch and successful recovery took place on 25 April, in coordination with the Yohkoh satellite and a supporting ground-based observing campaign.

  13. SPDE: Solar Plasma Diagnostic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruner, Marilyn E.

    1995-09-01

    The physics of the Solar corona is studied through the use of high resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy and high resolution ultraviolet imagery. The investigation includes the development and application of a flight instrument, first flown in May, 1992 on NASA sounding rocket 36.048. A second flight, NASA founding rocket 36.123, took place on 25 April 1994. Both flights were successful in recording new observations relevant to the investigation. The effort in this contract covers completion of the modifications to the existing rocket payload, its reflight, and the preliminary day reduction and analysis. Experience gained from flight 36.048 led us to plan several payload design modifications. These were made to improve the sensitivity balance between the UV and EUV spectrographs, to improve the scattered light rejection in the spectrographs, to protect the visible light rejection filter for the Normal Incidence X-ray Imager instrument (NIXI), and to prepare one new multilayer mirror coating to the NIXI. We also investigated the addition of a brassboard CCD camera to the payload to test it as a possible replacement for the Eastman type 101-07 film used by the SPDE instruments. This camera was included in the experimeter's data package for the Project Initiation Conference for the flight of NASA Mission 36.123, held in January, 1994, but for programmatic reasons was deleted from the final payload configuration. The payload was shipped to the White Sands Missile Range on schedule in early April. The launch and successful recovery took place on 25 April, in coordination with the Yohkoh satellite and a supporting ground-based observing campaign.

  14. Magnetic Nozzle and Plasma Detachment Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, Gregory; Dobson, Chris; Jones, Jonathan; Martin, Adam; Bengtson, Roger D.; Briezman, Boris; Arefiev, Alexey; Cassibry, Jason; Shuttpelz, Branwen; Deline, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    High power plasma propulsion can move large payloads for orbit transfer (such as the ISS), lunar missions, and beyond with large savings in fuel consumption owing to the high specific impulse. At high power, lifetime of the thruster becomes an issue. Electrodeless devices with magnetically guided plasma offer the advantage of long life since magnetic fields confine the plasma radially and keep it from impacting the material surfaces. For decades, concerns have been raised about the plasma remaining attached to the magnetic field and returning to the vehicle along the closed magnetic field lines. Recent analysis suggests that this may not be an issue of the magnetic field is properly shaped in the nozzle region and the plasma has sufficient energy density to stretch the magnetic field downstream. An experiment was performed to test the theory regarding the Magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) detachment scenario. Data from this experiment will be presented. The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) being developed by the Ad Astra Rocket Company uses a magnetic nozzle as described above. The VASIMR is also a leading candidate for exploiting an electric propulsion test platform being considered for the ISS.

  15. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-09-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, indicates that there are more-than-two stable points in a given condition, and it has been considered to one of the most important topics in fundamental physics. Recently, the hysteresis of plasma has become a focus of research because stable plasma operation is very important for fusion reactors, bio-medical plasmas, and industrial plasmas for nano-device fabrication process. Interestingly, the bi-stability characteristics of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop have been observed in inductive discharge plasmas Because hysteresis study in such plasmas can provide a universal understanding of plasma physics, many researchers have attempted experimental and theoretical studies. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics. This research was partially supported by Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science.

  16. Plasma Wave Observations during Ion Gun Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-20

    Spacecraft Charging by Magnetospheric Plasma , Progress in Aeronautics and Astronautics , Vol. 47, ed. A. Rosen, IAA, pp. 15-30 (1976). 3. H. C. Koons, P. F...AIAA 75-92 (January 20-22, 1975). 2. D. A. McPherson and W. R. Schober, " Spacecraft Charging at High Altitudes: The SCATHA Satellite Program," in...on the AF/NASI P78-2 (SCATHA) satellite were conducted with a plasma /ion source in the inner magnetosphere . These experiments were monitored with

  17. Lightweight Portable Plasma Medical Device - Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    poultry , eggs, tomato and papaya using non-thermal plasma. (Corpus Christi, TX: Sigma Xi 12th Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium, 2013). 100...Guadalupe Vidal, Kim Pham, Magesh Thiyagarajan. Effective deactivation of Bacillus cereus and Salmonella Typhimurium in chicken poultry , eggs, tomato and...Typhimurium in chicken poultry , eggs, tomato and papaya using non-thermal plasma. (Corpus Christi, TX: Sigma Xi 12th Annual Undergraduate Research

  18. Plasma focus experiments powered by explosive generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, B. L.; Caird, R. S.; Erickson, D. J.; Fowler, C. M.; Garn, W. B.; Kruse, H. W.; King, J. C.; Bartram, D. E.; Kruse, P. J.

    1983-03-01

    The plasma focus project began as an effort to develop an intense, pulsed, expendable neutron radiographic source. Since previous efforts to power a plasma focus with explosive generators were successful, we proposed to couple plate generators to a coaxial-geometry plasma focus to achieve this goal. Utilizing a small capacitor bank and a selected set of diagnostics, the explosive experiments were successfully conducted with maximum currents of 1.5 MA to 2.4 MA. A maximum neutron yield of approx. 3 x 10 (11) (DD) neutrons was achieved at the 2.4 MA level. Since the neutron yield did scale as a power of the maximum delivered current, and the neutron-producing source region was small, this approach is an attractive option to achieve a neutron radiographic source. The need for a reliable open-circuiting switch at several megamperes has resulted in postponement of the project.

  19. Fusion ignition research experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dale Meade

    2000-07-18

    Understanding the properties of high gain (alpha-dominated) fusion plasmas in an advanced toroidal configuration is the largest remaining open issue that must be addressed to provide the scientific foundation for an attractive magnetic fusion reactor. The critical parts of this science can be obtained in a compact high field tokamak which is also likely to provide the fastest and least expensive path to understanding alpha-dominated plasmas in advanced toroidal systems.

  20. Plasma Position Diagnostics for the Ignitor Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzicaroli, G.; Alladio, F.; Bombarda, F.; Licciulli, A.; Fersini, M.; Diso, D.; Paulicelli, E.

    2007-11-01

    Prototype coils of the electromagnetic diagnostics for the Ignitor experiment have been manufactured adopting innovative methods to improve the ceramic insulator resilience to neutron and gamma radiation. Thus, real time plasma position measurements should be possible over a broader range of high performance plasma regimes with D-D and D-T fuel. An alternative method is under study to provide the necessary spatial information also at the highest parameters that the Ignitor experiment can achieve (BT˜13 T, Ip˜11 MA, neutron yield˜3x10^19 n/s), where the electromagnetic diagnostics may fail. The new instrument is based on the diffraction and detection of the soft X-ray radiation emitted at the plasma edge. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors are considered as the best candidates to provide signals with high counting rates (>1 MHz) and high S/N ratios, to be used by the control systemootnotetextD. Pacella, et al, Nucl. Instr. Meth. A 508, 414 (2003). A curved Multilayer Mirror placed inside one of the equatorial ports will diffract the radiation onto a properly shielded GEM detector that is located outside the machine vacuum and not in direct view of the plasma.

  1. Space plasma contactor research, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Paul J.

    1988-01-01

    A simple model describing the process of electron collection from a low pressure ambient plasma in the absence of magnetic field and contactor velocity effects is presented. Experimental measurments of the plasma surrounding the contactor are used to demonstrate that a double-sheath generally develops and separates the ambient plasma from a higher density, anode plasma located adjacent to the contactor. Agreement between the predictions of the model and experimental measurements obtained at the electron collection current levels ranging to 1 A suggests the surface area at the ambient plasma boundary of the double-sheath is equal to the electron current being collected divided by the ambient plasma random electron current density; the surface area of the higher density anode plasma boundary of the double-sheath is equal to the ion current being emitted across this boundary divided by the ion current density required to sustain a stable sheath; and the voltage drop across the sheath is determined by the requirement that the ion and electron currents counterflowing across the boundaries be at space-charge limited levels. The efficiency of contactor operation is shown to improve when significant ionization and excitation is induced by electrons that stream from the ambient plasma through the double-sheath and collide with neutral atoms being supplied through the hollow cathode.

  2. Alpha-particle Measurements Needed for Burning Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth M. Young

    2001-09-26

    The next major step in magnetic fusion studies will be the construction of a burning plasma (BP) experiment where the goals will be to achieve and understand the plasma behavior with the internal heating provided by fusion-generated alpha particles. Two devices with these physics goals have been proposed: the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE). Extensive conceptual design work for the instrumentation to try to meet the physics demands has been done for these devices, especially ITER. This article provides a new look at the measurements specifically important for understanding the physics aspects of the alpha particles taking into account two significant events. The first is the completion of physics experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with deuterium-tritium fueling with the first chances to study alpha physics and the second is the realization that relatively compact plasmas, making use of advanced tokamak plasma concepts, are the most probable route to burning plasmas and ultimately a fusion reactor.

  3. Laboratory plasma physics experiments using merging supersonic plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.; Dunn, J. P.; Brockington, S.; Case, A.; Gilmore, M.; Lynn, A. G.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2015-04-01

    We describe a laboratory plasma physics experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory that uses two merging supersonic plasma jets formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns. The jets can be formed using any atomic species or mixture available in a compressed-gas bottle and have the following nominal initial parameters at the railgun nozzle exit: ne ≈ ni ~ 10¹⁶ cm⁻³, Te ≈ Ti ≈ 1.4 eV, Vjet ≈ 30–100 km/s, mean charge $\\bar{Z}$ ≈ 1, sonic Mach number Ms ≡ Vjet/Cs > 10, jet diameter = 5 cm, and jet length ≈ 20 cm. Experiments to date have focused on the study of merging-jet dynamics and the shocks that form as a result of the interaction, in both collisional and collisionless regimes with respect to the inter-jet classical ion mean free path, and with and without an applied magnetic field. However, many other studies are also possible, as discussed in this paper.

  4. Laboratory plasma physics experiments using merging supersonic plasma jets

    DOE PAGES

    Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; ...

    2015-04-01

    We describe a laboratory plasma physics experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory that uses two merging supersonic plasma jets formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven railguns. The jets can be formed using any atomic species or mixture available in a compressed-gas bottle and have the following nominal initial parameters at the railgun nozzle exit: ne ≈ ni ~ 10¹⁶ cm⁻³, Te ≈ Ti ≈ 1.4 eV, Vjet ≈ 30–100 km/s, mean chargemore » $$\\bar{Z}$$ ≈ 1, sonic Mach number Ms ≡ Vjet/Cs > 10, jet diameter = 5 cm, and jet length ≈ 20 cm. Experiments to date have focused on the study of merging-jet dynamics and the shocks that form as a result of the interaction, in both collisional and collisionless regimes with respect to the inter-jet classical ion mean free path, and with and without an applied magnetic field. However, many other studies are also possible, as discussed in this paper.« less

  5. Telescience operations with the solar array module plasma interaction experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wald, Lawrence W.; Bibyk, Irene K.

    1995-01-01

    The Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment (SAMPIE) is a flight experiment that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62) in March 1994, as part of the OAST-2 mission. The overall objective of SAMPIE was to determine the adverse environmental interactions within the space plasma of low earth orbit (LEO) on modern solar cells and space power system materials which are artificially biased to high positive and negative direct current (DC) voltages. The two environmental interactions of interest included high voltage arcing from the samples to the space plasma and parasitic current losses. High voltage arcing can cause physical damage to power system materials and shorten expected hardware life. parasitic current losses can reduce power system efficiency because electric currents generated in a power system drain into the surrounding plasma via parasitic resistance. The flight electronics included two programmable high voltage DC power supplies to bias the experiment samples, instruments to measure the surrounding plasma environment in the STS cargo bay, and the on-board data acquisition system (DAS). The DAS provided in-flight experiment control, data storage, and communications through the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Hitchhiker flight avionics to the GSFC Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). The DAS and the SAMPIE POCC computer systems were designed for telescience operations; this paper will focus on the experiences of the SAMPIE team regarding telescience development and operations from the GSFC POCC during STS-62. The SAMPIE conceptual development, hardware design, and system verification testing were accomplished at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). SAMPIE was developed under the In-Space Technology Experiment Program (IN-STEP), which sponsors NASA, industry, and university flight experiments designed to enable and enhance space flight technology. The IN-STEP Program is sponsored by the Office of Space Access and Technology (OSAT).

  6. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-10-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics.

  7. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-10-20

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics.

  8. Effect of Electron Energy Distribution on the Hysteresis of Plasma Discharge: Theory, Experiment, and Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Hysteresis, which is the history dependence of physical systems, is one of the most important topics in physics. Interestingly, bi-stability of plasma with a huge hysteresis loop has been observed in inductive plasma discharges. Despite long plasma research, how this plasma hysteresis occurs remains an unresolved question in plasma physics. Here, we report theory, experiment, and modeling of the hysteresis. It was found experimentally and theoretically that evolution of the electron energy distribution (EED) makes a strong plasma hysteresis. In Ramsauer and non-Ramsauer gas experiments, it was revealed that the plasma hysteresis is observed only at high pressure Ramsauer gas where the EED deviates considerably from a Maxwellian shape. This hysteresis was presented in the plasma balance model where the EED is considered. Because electrons in plasmas are usually not in a thermal equilibrium, this EED-effect can be regarded as a universal phenomenon in plasma physics. PMID:26482650

  9. Megajoule Dense Plasma Focus Solid Target Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podpaly, Y. A.; Falabella, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Shaw, B. H.; Cooper, C. M.; Chapman, S.; Bennett, N.; Sipe, N.; Olson, R.; Schmidt, A. E.

    2016-10-01

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) devices are plasma sources that can produce significant neutron yields from beam into gas interactions. Yield increases, up to approximately a factor of five, have been observed previously on DPFs using solid targets, such as CD2 and D2O ice. In this work, we report on deuterium solid-target experiments at the Gemini DPF. A rotatable target holder and baffle arrangement were installed in the Gemini device which allowed four targets to be deployed sequentially without breaking vacuum. Solid targets of titanium deuteride were installed and systematically studied at a variety of fill pressures, bias voltages, and target positions. Target holder design, experimental results, and comparison to simulations will be presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Status and future of the tritium plasma experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Causey, R.A.; Buchenauer, D.; Taylor, D.; Harbin, W.; Anderl, B.

    1995-10-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) has been recently upgraded and relocated at the Tritium System Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The first tritium plasma in the upgraded system was achieved on May 11, 1995. TPE is a unique facility devoted to experiments on the migration and retention of tritium in fusion reactor materials. This facility is now capable of delivering 100 to 200 eV tritons at a level of 1 A/cm{sup 2} to a 5 mm diameter sample, similar to that expected for the divertor of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). An aggressive research plan has been established, and experiments are expected to begin in June of 1995. 4 figs.

  11. Intense ion beam generation, plasma radiation source and plasma opening switch research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, D. A.; Coleman, M. D.; Qi, N.; Similon, P. L.; Sudan, R. N.

    1989-04-01

    This report describes research on intense ion beam diodes, plasma opening switches and dense z-pinch plasma radiators. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to map the electrostatic potential profile in a plasma-prefilled magnetically insulated ion diode. In a simple planar diode, the measured profile is inconsistent with the electrons being confined in a sheath near the cathode by the magnetic field. Rather, the profile implies the presence of electrons throughout the accelerating gap. A theoretical model of the penetration of current and magnetic field into a plasma, and of the current-driven effective collision frequency has been developed. The snowplow action of the rising magnetic field causes a steep rise in the plasma density at the leading edge. The subsequent multistreaming of the ions caused by ion reflection at the current layer could lead to ion heating through collective effects. The two-dimensional electron flow in the plasma cathode vacuum gap is also treated. Dense z-pinch plasma radiation source experiments have been initiated on the LION accelerator using gas puff and fine wire loads. The x-pinch was found to be a more effective way to generate soft x-rays than a single wire pinch or a gas puff implosion. Plasma opening switch experiments being initiated, and plasma anode ion diode development work being terminated are also briefly described.

  12. Calibration of the ISEE plasma composition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baugher, C. R.; Olsen, R. C.; Reasoner, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Plasma Composition experiment on the ISEE-1 satellite was designed to measure ions from 1 to 16 amu, at energies from near zero to 16 keV. The two nearly identical flight instruments were calibrated by means of preflight laboratory tests and in-flight data comparisons. This document presents most of the details of those efforts, with special emphasis on the low energy (0 to 100 eV) portion of the instrument response. The analysis of the instrument includes a ray-tracing calculation, which follows an ensemble of test particles through the detector.

  13. Plasma Experiment for Planetary Exploration (PEPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. T.; Nordholt, J. E.; Burch, J. L.; McComas, D. J.; Bowman, R. P.; Abeyta, R. A.; Alexander, J.; Baldonado, J.; Barker, P.; Black, R. K.; Booker, T. L.; Casey, P. J.; Cope, L.; Crary, F. J.; Cravens, J. P.; Funsten, H. O.; Goldstein, R.; Guerrero, D. R.; Hahn, S. F.; Hanley, J. J.; Henneke, B. P.; Horton, E. F.; Lawrence, D. J.; McCabe, K. P.; Reisenfeld, D.; Salazar, R. P.; Shappirio, M.; Storms, S. A.; Urdiales, C.; Waite, J. H.

    2007-04-01

    The Plasma Experiment for Planetary Exploration (PEPE) flown on Deep Space 1 combines an ion mass spectrometer and an electron spectrometer in a single, low-resource instrument. Among its novel features PEPE incorporates an electrostatically swept field-of-view and a linear electric field time-of-flight mass spectrometer. A significant amount of effort went into developing six novel technologies that helped reduce instrument mass to 5.5 kg and average power to 9.6 W. PEPE’s performance was demonstrated successfully by extensive measurements made in the solar wind and during the DS1 encounter with Comet 19P/Borrelly in September 2001.

  14. DHS Research Experience Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatachalam, V

    2008-10-24

    I learned a great deal during my summer internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). I plan to continue a career in research, and I feel that my experience at LLNL has been formative. I was exposed to a new area of research, as part of the Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) group, and I had the opportunity to work on projects that I would not have been able to work on anywhere else. The projects both involved the use of a novel mass spectrometer that was developed at LLNL, so I would not have been able to do this research at any other facility. The first project that Zachary and I worked on involved using SPAMS to detect pesticides. The ability to rapidly detect pesticides in a variety of matrices is applicable to many fields including public health, homeland security, and environmental protection. Real-time, or near real-time, detection of potentially harmful or toxic chemical agents can offer significant advantages in the protection of public health from accidental or intentional releases of harmful pesticides, and can help to monitor the environmental effects of controlled releases of pesticides for pest control purposes. The use of organophosphate neurotoxins by terrorists is a possibility that has been described; this is a legitimate threat, considering the ease of access, toxicity, and relatively low cost of these substances. Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) has successfully been used to identify a wide array of chemical compounds, including drugs, high explosives, biological materials, and chemical warfare agent simulants. Much of this groundbreaking work was carried out by our group at LLNL. In our work, we had the chance to show that SPAMS fulfills a demonstrated need for a method of carrying out real-time pesticide detection with minimal sample preparation. We did this by using a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer to obtain spectra of five different pesticides. Pesticide samples were chosen to

  15. Neon photoionized plasma experiment at Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayes, D. C.; Mancini, R. C.; Bailey, J. E.; Loisel, G. P.; Rochau, G. A.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss an experimental effort to study the atomic kinetics in neon photoionized plasmas via K-shell line absorption spectroscopy. The experiment employs the intense x-ray flux emitted at the collapse of a Z-pinch to heat and backlight a photoionized plasma contained within a cm-scale gas cell placed at various distances from the Z-pinch and filled with neon gas pressures in the range from 3.5 to 30 torr. The experimental platform affords an order of magnitude range in the ionization parameter characterizing the photoionized plasma from about 3 to 80 erg*cm/s. An x-ray crystal spectrometer capable of collecting both time-integrated and time-gated spectra is used to collect absorption spectra. A suite of IDL programs has been developed to process the experimental data to produce transmission spectra. The spectra show line absorption by several ionization stages of neon, including Be-, Li-, He-, and H-like ions. Analysis of these spectra yields ion areal-densities and charge state distributions, which can be compared with results from atomic kinetics codes. In addition, the electron temperature is extracted from level population ratios of nearby energy levels in Li- and Be-like ions, which can be used to test heating models of photoionized plasmas. This work was sponsored in part by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Grant DE-FG52-09NA29551, DOE Office of Science Grant DE-SC0014451, and the Z Facility Fundamental Science Program of SNL.

  16. Interactive Plasma Physics Education Using Data from Fusion Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon, Brisa; Davis, Bill; Zwicker, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    The Internet Plasma Physics Education Experience (IPPEX) website was created in 1996 to give users access to data from plasma and fusion experiments. Interactive material on electricity, magnetism, matter, and energy was presented to generate interest and prepare users to understand data from a fusion experiment. Initially, users were allowed to analyze real-time and archival data from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) experiment. IPPEX won numerous awards for its novel approach of allowing users to participate in ongoing research. However, the latest revisions of IPPEX were in 2001 and the interactive material is no longer functional on modern browsers. Also, access to real-time data was lost when TFTR was shut down. The interactive material on IPPEX is being rewritten in ActionScript3.0, and real-time and archival data from the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) will be made available to users. New tools like EFIT animations, fast cameras, and plots of important plasma parameters will be included along with an existing Java-based ``virtual tokamak.'' Screenshots from the upgraded website and future directions will be presented.

  17. Experiments with laser driven plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolai, Philippe

    2008-04-01

    Laboratory studies can address issues relevant to astrophysics^1 and in some cases improve our understanding of the physical processes that occur in astrophysical objects. So issues related to the jet propagation and collimation over considerable distance and their interactions with surrounding media have begun to be addressed these last years. Laboratory plasmas and astrophysical objects have different length, time and density scales. However, the typical velocities are the same, of a few hundred km/s and the similarity criteria^2 can be applied to scale the laboratory jets to astrophysical conditions. In this presentation, we use a method of jet formation^3 which allows to launch a very fast jet having a velocity around 400 km/s by using a relatively small laser energy, of the order of 100 J. The jet has a Mach number greater than 10, a length of a few mm, and a radius of a few tenths of mm. The interaction of these jets with a gas puff has been recently studied in an experiment carried out at the PALS laser facility. Varying gas pressure and composition, we show that the nature of interaction zone changes from a quasi adiabatic outflow to a strongly radiatively cooling jet. The use of various diagnostics, allows to relate the x-ray emission to the density map of the interaction zone. Already observed in astrophysical objets for strongly different time and space scales, these structures are interpreted in our laboratory experiment by using a semi-analytical model and 2D radiation hydrodynamic simulations. [1] B. Remington et al, Rev. Mod. Phys. 78, 755 (2007) [2] D. Ryutov et al, Phys . Plasmas 8, 1804 (2001) [3] Ph. Nicolai et al, Phys. Plasmas 13, 062701 (2007)

  18. Research Experiences for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rettig, Terrence W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are six programs at different colleges and universities which provide research opportunities for undergraduate students in physics, astronomy, marine biology, meteorology, and anthropology. Background, features, and accomplishments of the programs are discussed. (CW)

  19. Plasma Shock Wave Modification Experiments in a Temperature Compensated Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vine, Frances J.; Mankowski, John J.; Saeks, Richard E.; Chow, Alan S.

    2003-01-01

    A number of researchers have observed that the intensity of a shock wave is reduced when it passes through a weakly ionized plasma. While there is little doubt that the intensity of a shock is reduced when it propagates through a weakly ionized plasma, the major question associated with the research is whether the reduction in shock wave intensity is due to the plasma or the concomitant heating of the flow by the plasma generator. The goal of this paper is to describe a temperature compensated experiment in a "large" diameter shock tube with an external heating source, used to control the temperature in the shock tube independently of the plasma density.

  20. Numerical Experiments In Strongly Coupled Complex (Dusty) Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, L. J.; Ivlev A.; Hubertus M. T.; Morfill, G. E.

    2010-07-01

    Complex (dusty) plasma is a suspension of micron-sized charged dust particles in a weakly ionized plasma with electrons, ions, and neutral atoms or molecules. Therein, dust particles acquire a few thousand electron charges by absorbing surrounding electrons and ions, and consequently interact with each other via a dynamically screened Coulomb potential while undergoing Brownian motion due primarily to frequent collisions with the neutral molecules. When the interaction potential energy between charged dust particles significantly exceeds their kinetic energy, they become strongly coupled and can form ordered structures comprising liquid and solid states. Since the motion of charged dust particles in complex (dusty) plasmas can be directly observed in real time by using a video camera, such systems have been generally regarded as a promising model system to study many phenomena occurring in solids, liquids and other strongly-coupled systems at the kinetic level, such as phase transitions, transport processes, and collective dynamics. Complex plasma physics has now grown into a mature research field with a very broad range of interdisciplinary facets. In addition to usual experimental and theoretical study, computer simulation in complex plasma plays an important role in bridging experimental observations and theories and in understanding many interesting phenomena observed in laboratory. The present talk will focus on a class of computer simulations that are usually non-equilibrium ones with external perturbation and that mimic the real complex plasma experiments (i. e., numerical experiment). The simulation method, i. e., the so-called Brownian Dynamics methods, will be firstly reviewed and then examples, such as simulations of heat transfer and shock wave propagation, will be present.

  1. Intervention research: GAO experiences.

    PubMed

    Grasso, P G

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes tools of program evaluation that may prove useful in conducting research on occupational health and safety interventions. It presents examples of three studies conducted by the U.S. General Accounting Office that illustrate a variety of techniques for collecting and analyzing data on program interventions, including analysis of extant data, synthesis of results of existing studies, and combining data from administrative files with survey results. At the same time, it stresses the importance and difficulty of constructing an adequate "theory" of how the intervention is expected to affect outcomes, both for guiding data collection and for allowing adequate interpretation of results.

  2. Plasma gun pellet acceleration modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kincaid, R.W.; Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    Modifications to the electrothermal plasma gun SIRENS have been completed to allow for acceleration experiments using plastic pellets. Modifications have been implemented to the 1-D, time dependent code ODIN to include pellet friction, momentum, and kinetic energy with options of variable barrel length. The code results in the new version, POSEIDON, compare favorably with experimental data and with code results from ODIN. Predicted values show an increased pellet velocity along the barrel length, achieving 2 km/s exit velocity. Measured velocity, at three locations along the barrel length, showed good correlation with predicted values. The code has also been used to investigate the effectiveness of longer pulse length on pellet velocity using simulated ramp up and down currents with flat top, and triangular current pulses with early and late peaking. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Research in solar plasma theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhoven, Gerard

    1992-01-01

    The main thrust and significance of our research results are presented. The topics covered include: (1) coronal structure and dynamics; (2) coronal heating; (3) filament formation; and (4) flare energy release.

  4. Fundamental Complex Plasma Research on Ground and under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Hubertus; Fortov, Vladimir; Thoma, Markus; Pustylnik, Mikhail; Lipaev, Andrey; Morfill, Gregor; Molotkov, Vladimir; Usachev, Alexander; Nosenko, Vladimir; Fink, Martin; Petrov, Oleg; Rubin-Zuzic, Milenko

    2016-07-01

    Complex (dusty) plasma is plasma containing small solid particles in the sub-mm range. Those "dust" particles are highly charged due to the collection of electrons and ions and they interact electrostatically. Depending on the charge, density, and kinetic temperature of the particles, the interaction may be strong leading to collective effects and the emergence of liquid or solid behavior. In that sense complex plasmas are perfect model systems for the investigation of fundamental processes in classical condensed matter physics since their constituent mesoscopic particles are individually observable and can be regarded as classically interacting "proxy atoms". The term "complex plasmas" is widely used in the literature to distinguish dusty plasmas composed of a weakly ionized gas and charged microparticles specially "designed" for investigations in classical condensed matter, from naturally occurring systems. Gravity influences the complex plasma, the microparticles sediment and stable systems can only be achieved through counteracting gravity with other volume forces, e.g. electric or thermophoretic force. This allows producing two-dimensional - monolayer - systems, or three-dimensional systems under stress. Only under weightlessness conditions, large and homogeneous 3D systems can be formed. Although phenomena in classical condensed matter physics are in the forefront of complex plasma research the basic know-how gained from experiments, theory and numerical simulations can be of importance for the understanding of naturally occurring dusty plasmas in space. Thus, in this presentation I will show recent work on complex plasmas from the ground and first results from the PK-4 facility onboard the International Space Station ISS. Acknowledgements: We would like to acknowledge the joint ESA-ROSCOSMOS Experiment «Plasma Kristall-4» onboard the International Space Station ISS. This work is partly supported by DLR grant 50WM1441/ 50WM1442 and by the Russian Science

  5. Plasma flow switch experiments on the Pegasus facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J.C. Jr.; Anderson, B.; Bartsch, R.R.; Bowers, R.; Findley, C.; Greene, A.; Kruse, H.; Oona, H.; Parker, J.V.; Peterson, D.; Sandoval, G. ); Lee, P.H.Y. ); Turchi, P. )

    1991-01-01

    Plasma flow switch experiments conducted on Pegasus have shown that a conducting layer of plasma shunts the load slot preventing efficient switching of current to the load. This effect is seen computationally. The magnitude of the effect depends on the specific parameters of the switch plasma and current level. Computations have also shown that a plasma boundary layer trap'' would effectively remove enough plasma from the inner conductor of the power flow channel so that efficient switching would occur. This plasma trap has been successfully demonstrated when used with a static load. It has not yet been tested with an imploding load. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  6. The Plasma Interaction Experiment (PIX) description and test program. [electrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignaczak, L. R.; Haley, F. A.; Domino, E. J.; Culp, D. H.; Shaker, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    The plasma interaction experiment (PIX) is a battery powered preprogrammed auxiliary payload on the LANDSAT-C launch. This experiment is part of a larger program to investigate space plasma interactions with spacecraft surfaces and components. The varying plasma densities encountered during available telemetry coverage periods are deemed sufficient to determine first order interactions between the space plasma environment and the biased experimental surfaces. The specific objectives of the PIX flight experiment are to measure the plasma coupling current and the negative voltage breakdown characteristics of a solar array segment and a gold plated steel disk. Measurements will be made over a range of surface voltages up to plus or minus kilovolt. The orbital environment will provide a range of plasma densities. The experimental surfaces will be voltage biased in a preprogrammed step sequence to optimize the data returned for each plasma region and for the available telemetry coverage.

  7. Complex Plasma Research Under Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Osamu

    2008-09-07

    Complex plasma research under extreme conditions is described. The extreme conditions include low-dimensionality for self-organized structures of dust particles, dust magnetization in high magnetic field, criticality in phase transition, and cryogenic environment for Coulomb crystals and dust dynamics.

  8. From laboratory plasma experiments to space plasma experiments with `CubeSat' nano-satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Christine

    2016-09-01

    `CubeSat' nano-satellites provide low-cost access to space. SP3 laboratory's involvement in the European Union `QB50' `CubeSat' project [www.qb50.eu] which will launch into space 50 `CubeSats' from 27 Countries to study the ionosphere and the lower thermosphere will be presented. The Chi Kung laboratory plasma experiment and the Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype can be tailored to investigate expanding magnetized plasma physics relevant to space physics (solar corona, Earth's aurora, adiabatic expansion and polytropic studies). Chi Kung is also used as a plasma wind tunnel for ground-based calibration of the University College London QB50 Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer. Space qualification of the three Australian QB50 `CubeSats' (June 2016) is carried out in the WOMBAT XL space simulation chamber. The QB50 satellites have attitude control but altitude control is not a requirement. SP3 is developing end-to-end miniaturised radiofrequency plasma propulsion systems (such as the Pocket Rocket and the MiniHel thrusters with power and propellant sub-systems) for future `CubeSat' missions.

  9. Adventures in Laser Produced Plasma Research

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M

    2006-01-13

    In the UK the study of laser produced plasmas and their applications began in the universities and evolved to a current system where the research is mainly carried out at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Central Laser Facility ( CLF) which is provided to support the universities. My own research work has been closely tied to this evolution and in this review I describe the history with particular reference to my participation in it.

  10. Airborne Research Experience for Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, V. B.; Albertson, R.; Smith, S.; Stockman, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Airborne Research Experience for Educators (AREE) Program, conducted by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center Office of Education in partnership with the AERO Institute, NASA Teaching From Space Program, and California State University Fullerton, is a complete end-to-end residential research experience in airborne remote sensing and atmospheric science. The 2009 program engaged ten secondary educators who specialize in science, technology, engineering or mathematics in a 6-week Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) offered through NSERC. Educators participated in collection of in-flight remote sensor data during flights aboard the NASA DC-8 as well as in-situ research on atmospheric chemistry (bovine emissions of methane); algal blooms (remote sensing to determine location and degree of blooms for further in-situ analysis); and crop classification (exploration of how drought conditions in Central California have impacted almond and cotton crops). AREE represents a unique model of the STEM teacher-as-researcher professional development experience because it asks educators to participate in a research experience and then translate their experiences into classroom practice through the design, implementation, and evaluation of instructional materials that emphasize the scientific research process, inquiry-based investigations, and manipulation of real data. Each AREE Master Educator drafted a Curriculum Brief, Teachers Guide, and accompanying resources for a topic in their teaching assignment Currently, most professional development programs offer either a research experience OR a curriculum development experience. The dual nature of the AREE model engaged educators in both experiences. Educators’ content and pedagogical knowledge of STEM was increased through the review of pertinent research articles during the first week, attendance at lectures and workshops during the second week, and participation in the airborne and in-situ research studies, data

  11. The Burning Plasma Experiment conventional facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Commander, J.C.

    1991-12-01

    The Burning Program Plasma Experiment (BPX) is phased to start construction of conventional facilities in July 1994, in conjunction with the conclusion of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project. This paper deals with the conceptual design of the BPX Conventional Facilities, for which Functional and Operational Requirements (F&ORs) were developed. Existing TFTR buildings and utilities will be adapted and used to satisfy the BPX Project F&ORs to the maximum extent possible. However, new conventional facilities will be required to support the BPX project. These facilities include: The BPX building; Site improvements and utilities; the Field Coil Power Conversion (FCPC) building; the TFTR modifications; the Motor Generation (MG) building; Liquid Nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) building; and the associated Instrumentation and Control (I&C) systems. The BPX building will provide for safe and efficient shielding, housing, operation, handling, maintenance and decontamination of the BPX and its support systems. Site improvements and utilities will feature a utility tunnel which will provide a space for utility services--including pulse power duct banks and liquid nitrogen coolant lines. The FCPC building will house eight additional power supplied for the Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The MG building will house the two MG sets larger than the existing TFTR MG sets. This paper also addresses the conventional facility cost estimating methodology and the rationale for the construction schedule developed. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The Burning Plasma Experiment conventional facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Commander, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Burning Program Plasma Experiment (BPX) is phased to start construction of conventional facilities in July 1994, in conjunction with the conclusion of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) project. This paper deals with the conceptual design of the BPX Conventional Facilities, for which Functional and Operational Requirements (F ORs) were developed. Existing TFTR buildings and utilities will be adapted and used to satisfy the BPX Project F ORs to the maximum extent possible. However, new conventional facilities will be required to support the BPX project. These facilities include: The BPX building; Site improvements and utilities; the Field Coil Power Conversion (FCPC) building; the TFTR modifications; the Motor Generation (MG) building; Liquid Nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) building; and the associated Instrumentation and Control (I C) systems. The BPX building will provide for safe and efficient shielding, housing, operation, handling, maintenance and decontamination of the BPX and its support systems. Site improvements and utilities will feature a utility tunnel which will provide a space for utility services--including pulse power duct banks and liquid nitrogen coolant lines. The FCPC building will house eight additional power supplied for the Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The MG building will house the two MG sets larger than the existing TFTR MG sets. This paper also addresses the conventional facility cost estimating methodology and the rationale for the construction schedule developed. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Researchers build a secure plasma prison

    SciTech Connect

    Glanz, J.

    1995-07-28

    Research groups at Princeton University`s Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and at the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics in San Diego have made a major breakthrough. By tailoring the magnetic fields with unprecedented finesse, they appear to have tamed the plasma instabilities that rattle and tear the fragile magnetic cage, allowing particles to leak out and limiting a tokamak`s performance. In the process they increased the central density of the plasma by as much as threefold and reduced the particle leakage by a factor of 50.

  14. Developing Effective Undergraduate Research Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Michael; Ilie, Carolina C.

    2011-03-01

    Undergraduate research is a valuable educational tool for students pursuing a degree in physics, but these experiences can become problematic and ineffective if not handled properly. Undergraduate research should be planned as an immersive learning experience in which the student has the opportunity to develop his/her skills in accordance with their interests. Effective undergraduate research experiences are marked by clear, measurable objectives and frequent student-professor collaboration. These objectives should reflect the long and short-term goals of the individual undergraduates, with a heightened focus on developing research skills for future use. 1. Seymour, E., Hunter, A.-B., Laursen, S. L. and DeAntoni, T. (2004), ``Establishing the benefits of research experiences for undergraduates in the sciences: First findings from a three-year study''. Science Education, 88: 493--534. 2. Behar-Horenstein, Linda S., Johnson, Melissa L. ``Enticing Students to Enter Into Undergraduate Research: The Instrumentality of an Undergraduate Course.'' Journal of College Science Teaching 39.3 (2010): 62-70.

  15. PlasmaLab/Eco-Plasma - The future of complex plasma research in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapek, Christina; Thomas, Hubertus; Huber, Peter; Mohr, Daniel; Hagl, Tanja; Konopka, Uwe; Lipaev, Andrey; Morfill, Gregor; Molotkov, Vladimir

    The next Russian-German cooperation for the investigation of complex plasmas under microgravity conditions on the International Space Station (ISS) is the PlasmaLab/Eco-Plasma project. Here, a new plasma chamber -- the ``Zyflex'' chamber -- is being developed. The chamber is a cylindrical plasma chamber with parallel electrodes and a flexible system geometry. It is designed to extend the accessible plasma parameter range, i.e. neutral gas pressure, plasma density and electron temperature, and also to allow an independent control of the plasma parameters, therefore increasing the experimental quality and expected knowledge gain significantly. With this system it will be possible to reach low neutral gas pressures (which means weak damping of the particle motion) and to generate large, homogeneous 3D particle systems for studies of fundamental phenomena such as phase transitions, dynamics of liquids or phase separation. The Zyflex chamber has already been operated in several parabolic flight campaigns with different configurations during the last years, yielding a promising outlook for its future development. Here, we will present the current status of the project, the technological advancements the Zyflex chamber will offer compared to its predecessors, and the latest scientific results from experiments on ground and in microgravity conditions during parabolic flights. This work and some of the authors are funded by DLR/BMWi (FKZ 50 WP 0700).

  16. International Microgravity Plasma Facility IMPF: A Multi-User Modular Research Facility for Complex Plasma Research on ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seurig, R.; Burfeindt, J.; Castegini, R.; Griethe, W.; Hofmann, P.

    2002-01-01

    On March 03, 2001, the PKE-Nefedov plasma experiment was successfully put into operation on board ISS. This complex plasma experiment is the predecessor for the semi-autonomous multi-user facility IMPF (International Microgravity Plasma Facility) to be flown in 2006 with an expected operational lifetime of 10 years. IMPF is envisioned to be an international research facility for investigators in the field of multi-component plasmas containing ions, electrons, and charged microparticles. This research filed is often referred to as "complex plasmas". The actual location of IMPF on ISS is not decided yet; potential infrastructure under consideration are EXPRESS Rack, Standard Interface Rack SIR, European Drawer Rack EDR, or a to be designed custom rack infrastructure on the Russian Segment. The actual development status of the DLR funded Pre-phase B Study for IMPF will be presented. For this phase, IMPF was assumed to be integrated in an EXPRESS Rack requiring four middeck lockers with two 4-PU ISIS drawers for accommodation. Technical and operational challenges, like a 240 Mbytes/sec continuous experimental data stream for 60 minutes, will be addressed. The project was funded by the German Space Agency (DLR) and was performed in close cooperation with scientists from the Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestical Physics in Munich, Germany.

  17. Plasma Jet Motion Across the Geomagnetic Field in the ``North Star'' Active Geophysical Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, B. G.; Zetzer, J. I.; Podgorny, I. M.; Sobyanin, D. B.; Meng, C.-I.; Erlandson, R. E.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Pfaff, R. F.; Lynch, K. A.

    2003-01-01

    The active geophysical rocket experiment ``North Star'' was carried out in the auroral ionosphere on January 22, 1999, at the Poker Flat Research Range (Alaska, USA) using the American research rocket Black Brant XII with explosive plasma generators on board. Separable modules with scientific equipment were located at distances of from 170 to 1595 m from the plasma source. The experiment continued the series of the Russian-American joint experiments started by the ``Fluxus'' experiment in 1997. Two injections of aluminum plasma across the magnetic field were conducted in the ``North Star'' experiment. They were different, since in the first injection a neutral gas cloud was formed in order to increase the plasma ionization due to the interaction of neutrals of the jet and cloud. The first and second injections were conducted at heights of 360 and 280 km, respectively. The measurements have shown that the charged particle density was two orders of magnitude higher in the experiment with the gas release. The magnetic field in the first injection was completely expelled by the dense plasma of the jet. The displacement of the magnetic field in the second injection was negligible. The plasma jet velocity in both injections decreased gradually due to its interaction with the geomagnetic field. One of the most interesting results of the experiment was the conservation of high plasma density during the propagation of the divergent jet to considerable distances. This fact can be explained by the action of the critical ionization velocity mechanism.

  18. Experiments and Theory of Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P. K.

    2011-11-29

    The purpose of this paper is to present the most important theoretical and experimental discoveries that have been made in the area of dusty plasma physics. We describe the physics and observations of the well celebrated dust acoustic wave (DAW) and the dust ion-acoustic wave (DIAW) in dusty plasmas with weakly coupled dust grains, as well as the dust Coulomb crystal and dust lattice oscillations (DLOs) in dusty plasmas with strongly coupled dust grains. In dusty plasmas, the dust charge fluctuation is a dynamical variable, which provides a novel collisionless damping of the DA and DIA waves. The latter and the DLOs are excited by external sources, which are here discussed. Besides the Debye-Hueckel short-range repulsive force between like charged dust grains, there are novel attractive forces (e.g. due to dipole-dipole dust particle interactions, overlapping Debye spheres, ion focusing and ion wakefields, dipole magnetic moments etc.), which provide unique possibilities for attracting charged dust particles of similar polarity. The dust particle attraction is responsible for the formation of dust Coulomb crystals in laboratory dusty plasmas, as well as for the formation of planets and large astrophysical bodies in the Milky Way galaxy and in interstellar media. Furthermore, the nonlinear DAW, DIAW, and DLOs also appear in the form of solitary and shock waves, the physics and observations of which are briefly discussed. Finally, we discuss possible applications of dust-in-plasmas and dusty plasmas in laboratory and space.

  19. Plasma-materials interactions during rf experiments in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.A.; Bernabei, S.; Budny, R.; Chu, T.K.; Colestock, P.; Hinnov, E.; Hooke, W.; Hosea, J.; Hwang, D.; Jobes, F.

    1984-09-01

    Plasma-materials interactions studied in recent ICRF heating and lower hybrid current drive experiments are reviewed. The microscopic processes responsible for impurity generation are discussed. In ICRF experiments, improvements in machine operation and in antenna and feedthrough design have allowed efficient plasma heating at RF powers up to 3 MW. No significant loss of energy from the plasma core due to impurity radiation occurs. Lower hybrid current drive results in the generation and maintenance of hundreds of kiloamperes of plasma current carried by suprathermal electrons. The loss of these electrons and their role in impurity generation are assessed. Methods to avoid this problem are evaluated.

  20. Pinch Related Research At Institute For Plasma Research, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyam, Anurag

    2006-01-01

    Several pinch related experiment, their drivers and related diagnostics are being developed in our laboratory. The first set of experiments is to investigate various aspects of magnetized target fusion (MTF/MAGO). To drive the liner, in Z or theta pinch configuration, a 1.2 MJ, 3.6 MA capacitor bank is developed. For liner diagnostics flash radiography, VISAR and pyrometery are being developed. To produce magnetized (target) plasma a 120 kJ, 3 MA and several other banks are developed. Hot magnetized Plasma will be diagnosed by optical schlieren, interferometery and X-Ray spectrometry. A terra-watt system consisting of a Marx bank and water line delivering 800 kA at 1.6 MV will be commissioned, soon. The device will be used to study different pinch (wire array) configurations for production of electro-magnetic radiations. Smaller pulsed power systems, consisting of 1MV/500 kV Marx bank/tesla transformer and than water or solid state (cables) pulse forming network (coax) are also being developed for capillary discharge and other experiments. Two plasma foci experiments are also being conducted. The effort is produce a repetitively operating compact plasma focus.

  1. Pinch Related Research At Institute For Plasma Research, India

    SciTech Connect

    Shyam, Anurag

    2006-01-05

    Several pinch related experiment, their drivers and related diagnostics are being developed in our laboratory. The first set of experiments is to investigate various aspects of magnetized target fusion (MTF/MAGO). To drive the liner, in Z or theta pinch configuration, a 1.2 MJ, 3.6 MA capacitor bank is developed. For liner diagnostics flash radiography, VISAR and pyrometery are being developed. To produce magnetized (target) plasma a 120 kJ, 3 MA and several other banks are developed. Hot magnetized Plasma will be diagnosed by optical schlieren, interferometery and X-Ray spectrometry. A terra-watt system consisting of a Marx bank and water line delivering 800 kA at 1.6 MV will be commissioned, soon. The device will be used to study different pinch (wire array) configurations for production of electro-magnetic radiations. Smaller pulsed power systems, consisting of 1MV/500 kV Marx bank/tesla transformer and than water or solid state (cables) pulse forming network (coax) are also being developed for capillary discharge and other experiments. Two plasma foci experiments are also being conducted. The effort is produce a repetitively operating compact plasma focus.

  2. Designing Effective Undergraduate Research Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severson, S.

    2010-12-01

    I present a model for designing student research internships that is informed by the best practices of the Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) Professional Development Program. The dual strands of the CfAO education program include: the preparation of early-career scientists and engineers in effective teaching; and changing the learning experiences of students (e.g., undergraduate interns) through inquiry-based "teaching laboratories." This paper will focus on the carry-over of these ideas into the design of laboratory research internships such as the CfAO Mainland internship program as well as NSF REU (Research Experiences for Undergraduates) and senior-thesis or "capstone" research programs. Key ideas in maximizing student learning outcomes and generating productive research during internships include: defining explicit content, scientific process, and attitudinal goals for the project; assessment of student prior knowledge and experience, then following up with formative assessment throughout the project; setting reasonable goals with timetables and addressing motivation; and giving students ownership of the research by implementing aspects of the inquiry process within the internship.

  3. Experiments on the Propagation of Plasma Filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Noam; Egedal, Jan; Fox, Will; Le, Ari; Porkolab, Miklos

    2008-07-04

    We investigate experimentally the motion and structure of isolated plasma filaments propagating through neutral gas. Plasma filaments, or 'blobs,' arise from turbulent fluctuations in a range of plasmas. Our experimental geometry is toroidally symmetric, and the blobs expand to a larger major radius under the influence of a vertical electric field. The electric field, which is caused by {nabla}B and curvature drifts in a 1/R magnetic field, is limited by collisional damping on the neutral gas. The blob's electrostatic potential structure and the resulting ExB flow field give rise to a vortex pair and a mushroom shape, which are consistent with nonlinear plasma simulations. We observe experimentally this characteristic mushroom shape for the first time. We also find that the blob propagation velocity is inversely proportional to the neutral density and decreases with time as the blob cools.

  4. Cryogenics Research and Engineering Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toro Medina, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    Energy efficient storage, transfer and use of cryogens and cryogenic propellants on Earth and in space have a direct impact on NASA, government and commercial programs. Research and development on thermal insulation, propellant servicing, cryogenic components, material properties and sensing technologies provides industry, government and research institutions with the cross-cutting technologies to manage low-temperature applications. Under the direction of the Cryogenic Testing Lab at Kennedy Space Center, the work experience acquired allowed me to perform research, testing, design and analysis of current and future cryogenic technologies to be applied in several projects.

  5. The INAF/IAPS Plasma Chamber for ionospheric simulation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego, Piero

    2016-04-01

    The plasma chamber is particularly suitable to perform studies for the following applications: - plasma compatibility and functional tests on payloads envisioned to operate in the ionosphere (e.g. sensors onboard satellites, exposed to the external plasma environment); - calibration/testing of plasma diagnostic sensors; - characterization and compatibility tests on components for space applications (e.g. optical elements, harness, satellite paints, photo-voltaic cells, etc.); - experiments on satellite charging in a space plasma environment; - tests on active experiments which use ion, electron or plasma sources (ion thrusters, hollow cathodes, field effect emitters, plasma contactors, etc.); - possible studies relevant to fundamental space plasma physics. The facility consists of a large volume vacuum tank (a cylinder of length 4.5 m and diameter 1.7 m) equipped with a Kaufman type plasma source, operating with Argon gas, capable to generate a plasma beam with parameters (i.e. density and electron temperature) close to the values encountered in the ionosphere at F layer altitudes. The plasma beam (A+ ions and electrons) is accelerated into the chamber at a velocity that reproduces the relative motion between an orbiting satellite and the ionosphere (≈ 8 km/s). This feature, in particular, allows laboratory simulations of the actual compression and depletion phenomena which take place in the ram and wake regions around satellites moving through the ionosphere. The reproduced plasma environment is monitored using Langmuir Probes (LP) and Retarding Potential Analyzers (RPA). These sensors can be automatically moved within the experimental space using a sled mechanism. Such a feature allows the acquisition of the plasma parameters all around the space payload installed into the chamber for testing. The facility is currently in use to test the payloads of CSES satellite (Chinese Seismic Electromagnetic Satellite) devoted to plasma parameters and electric field

  6. Spectroscopic imaging diagnostics for burning plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Suliman, G.; Tritz, K.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Kaita, R.; Johnson, D.; Soukhanovskii, V.; May, M. J.

    2005-02-01

    Spectroscopic imaging of plasma emission profiles from a few electron volts to tens of kilo-electron volts enables basic diagnostics in present day tokamaks. For the more difficult burning plasma conditions, light extraction and detection techniques, as well as instrument designs need to be investigated. As an alternative to light extraction with reflective optics, we discuss normal incidence, transmissive-diffractive optics (e.g., transmission gratings), which might withstand plasma exposure with less degradation of optical properties. Metallic multilayer reflectors are also of interest for light extraction. Although a shift of the diffraction peak might occur, instrument designs that accommodate such shifts are possible. As imaging detectors we consider "optical" arrays based on conversion of the short-wavelength light into visible light followed by transport of the visible signal with hollow lightguides. The proposed approaches to light extraction and detection could enable radiation resistant diagnostics.

  7. Spectroscopic imaging diagnostics for burning plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Suliman, G.; Tritz, K.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Kaita, R.; Johnson, D.; Soukhanovskii, V.; May, M.J.

    2005-02-01

    Spectroscopic imaging of plasma emission profiles from a few electron volts to tens of kilo-electron volts enables basic diagnostics in present day tokamaks. For the more difficult burning plasma conditions, light extraction and detection techniques, as well as instrument designs need to be investigated. As an alternative to light extraction with reflective optics, we discuss normal incidence, transmissive-diffractive optics (e.g., transmission gratings), which might withstand plasma exposure with less degradation of optical properties. Metallic multilayer reflectors are also of interest for light extraction. Although a shift of the diffraction peak might occur, instrument designs that accommodate such shifts are possible. As imaging detectors we consider 'optical' arrays based on conversion of the short-wavelength light into visible light followed by transport of the visible signal with hollow lightguides. The proposed approaches to light extraction and detection could enable radiation resistant diagnostics.

  8. Diagnosis in Complex Plasmas for Microgravity Experiments (PK-3 plus)

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazuo; Hayashi, Yasuaki; Thomas, Hubertus M.; Morfill, Gregor E.; Ivlev, Alexei V.; Adachi, Satoshi

    2008-09-07

    Microgravity gives the complex (dusty) plasmas, where dust particles are embedded in complete charge neutral region of bulk plasma. The dust clouds as an uncompressed strongly coupled Coulomb system correspond to atomic model with several physical phenomena, crystallization, phase transition, and so on. As the phenomena tightly connect to plasma states, it is significant to understand plasma parameters such as electron density and temperature. The present work shows the electron density in the setup for microgravity experiments currently onboard on the International Space Station.

  9. Progress toward positron-electron pair plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stenson, E. V.; Stanja, J.; Hergenhahn, U.; Saitoh, H.; Niemann, H.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Marx, G. H.; Schweikhard, L.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M.; Hugenschmidt, C.

    2015-06-29

    Electron-positron plasmas have been of theoretical interest for decades, due to the unique plasma physics that arises from all charged particles having precisely identical mass. It is only recently, though, that developments in non-neutral plasma physics (both in linear and toroidal geometries) and in the flux of sources for cold positrons have brought the goal of conducting electron-positron pair plasma experiments within reach. The APEX/PAX collaboration is working on a number of projects in parallel toward that goal; this paper provides an overview of recent, current, and upcoming activities.

  10. The ISPM unified radio and plasma wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. G.; Caldwell, J.; Deconchy, Y.; Deschanciaux, C.; Ebbett, R.; Epstein, G.; Groetz, K.; Harvey, C. C.; Hoang, S.; Howard, R.

    1983-01-01

    Hardware for the International Solar Polar Mission (ISPM) Unified Radio and Plasma (URAP) wave experiment is presented. The URAP determines direction and polarization of distant radio sources for remote sensing of the heliosphere, and studies local wave phenomena which determine the transport coefficients of the ambient plasma. Electric and magnetic field antennas and preamplifiers; the electromagnetic compatibility plan and grounding; radio astronomy and plasma frequency receivers; a fast Fourier transformation data processing unit waveform analyzer; dc voltage measurements; a fast envelope sampler for the solar wind, and plasmas near Jupiter; a sounder; and a power converter are described.

  11. Electron cyclotron plasma startup in the GDT experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovlev, D. V.; Shalashov, A. G.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Solomakhin, A. L.; Savkin, V. Ya.; Bagryansky, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on a new plasma startup scenario in the gas dynamic trap (GDT) magnetic mirror device. The primary 5 MW neutral beam injection (NBI) plasma heating system fires into a sufficiently dense plasma target (‘seed plasma’), which is commonly supplied by an arc plasma generator. In the reported experiments, a different approach to seed plasma generation is explored. One of the channels of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating system is used to ionize the neutral gas and build up the density of plasma to a level suitable for NBI capture. After a short transition of approximately 1 ms the discharge becomes essentially similar to a standard one initiated by the plasma gun. This paper presents the discharge scenario and experimental data on the seed plasma evolution during ECRH, along with the dependencies on incident microwave power, magnetic configuration and pressure of a neutral gas. The characteristics of the consequent high-power NBI discharge are studied and differences from the conventional scenario are discussed. A theoretical model describing the ECR breakdown and the seed plasma accumulation in a large-scale mirror trap is developed on the basis of the GDT experiment.

  12. The Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment and Plasma Source Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chappell, C. R.; Chandler, M. O.; Fields, S. A.; Pollock, C. J.; Reasoner, D. L.; Young, D. T.; Burch, J. L.; Eaker, N.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; McComas, D. J.; Nordholdt, J. E.; Thomsen, M. F.; Berthelier, J. J.; Robson, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) and the Plasma Source Instrument (PSI) have been developed in response to the requirements of the ISTP Program for three-dimensional (3D) plasma composition measurements capable of tracking the circulation of low-energy (0-500 eV) plasma through the polar magnetosphere. This plasma is composed of penetrating magnetosheath and escaping ionospheric components. It is in part lost to the downstream solar wind and in part recirculated within the magnetosphere, participating in the formation of the diamagnetic hot plasma sheet and ring current plasma populations. Significant obstacles which have previously made this task impossible include the low density and energy of the outflowing ionospheric plasma plume and the positive spacecraft floating potentials which exclude the lowest-energy plasma from detection on ordinary spacecraft. Based on a unique combination of focusing electrostatic ion optics and time of flight detection and mass analysis, TIDE provides the sensitivity (seven apertures of about 1 cm squared effective area each) and angular resolution (6 x 18 degrees) required for this purpose. PSI produces a low energy plasma locally at the POLAR spacecraft that provides the ion current required to balance the photoelectron current, along with a low temperature electron population, regulating the spacecraft potential slightly positive relative to the space plasma. TIDE/PSI will: (a) measure the density and flow fields of the solar and terrestrial plasmas within the high polar cap and magnetospheric lobes; (b) quantify the extent to which ionospheric and solar ions are recirculated within the distant magnetotail neutral sheet or lost to the distant tail and solar wind; (c) investigate the mass-dependent degree energization of these plasmas by measuring their thermodynamic properties; (d) investigate the relative roles of ionosphere and solar wind as sources of plasma to the plasma sheet and ring current.

  13. Contoured-gap coaxial guns for imploding plasma liner experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witherspoon, F. D.; Case, A.; Brockington, S.; Cassibry, J. T.; Hsu, S. C.

    2014-10-01

    Arrays of supersonic, high momentum flux plasma jets can be used as standoff compression drivers for generating spherically imploding plasma liners for driving magneto-inertial fusion, hence the name plasma-jet-driven MIF (PJMIF). HyperV developed linear plasma jets for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL where two guns were successfully tested. Further development at HyperV resulted in achieving the PLX goal of 8000 μg at 50 km/s. Prior work on contoured-gap coaxial guns demonstrated an approach to control the blowby instability and achieved substantial performance improvements. For future plasma liner experiments we propose to use contoured-gap coaxial guns with small Minirailgun injectors. We will describe such a gun for a 60-gun plasma liner experiment. Discussion topics will include impurity control, plasma jet symmetry and topology (esp. related to uniformity and compactness), velocity capability, and techniques planned for achieving gun efficiency of >50% using tailored impedance matched pulse forming networks. Mach2 and UAH SPH code simulations will be included. Work supported by US DOE DE-FG02-05ER54810.

  14. Plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Barletta, B. |; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, P.

    1993-04-01

    We intend to carry out a series of plasma lens experiments at the Final Focus Test Beam facility at SLAC. These experiments will be the first to study the focusing of particle beams by plasma focusing devices in the parameter regime of interest for high energy colliders, and is expected to lead to plasma lens designs capable of unprecedented spot sizes. Plasma focusing of positron beams will be attempted for the first time. We will study the effects of lens aberrations due to various lens imperfections. Several approaches will be applied to create the plasma required including laser ionization and beam ionization of a working gas. At an increased bunch population of 2.5 {times} 10{sup 10}, tunneling ionization of a gas target by an electron beam -- an effect which has never been observed before -- should be significant. The compactness of our device should prove to be of interest for applications at the SLC and the next generation linear colliders.

  15. Status of Magnetic Nozzle and Plasma Detachment Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chavers, D. Gregory; Dobson, Chris; Jones, Jonathan; Lee, Michael; Martin, Adam; Gregory, Judith; Cecil, Jim; Bengtson, Roger D.; Breizman, Boris; Arefiev, Alexey; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Squire, Jared; Glover, Tim; McCaskill, Greg; Cassibry, Jason; Li Zhongmin

    2006-01-20

    High power plasma propulsion can move large payloads for orbit transfer, lunar missions, and beyond with large savings in fuel consumption owing to the high specific impulse. At high power, lifetime of the thruster becomes an issue. Electrodeless devices with magnetically guided plasma offer the advantage of long life since magnetic fields confine the plasma radially and keep it from impacting the material surfaces. For decades, concerns have been raised about the plasma remaining attached to the magnetic field and returning to the vehicle along the closed magnetic field lines. Recent analysis suggests that this may not be an issue if the magnetic field is properly shaped in the nozzle region and the plasma has sufficient energy density to stretch the magnetic field downstream. An experiment is being performed to test the theory regarding the MHD detachment scenario. The status of that experiment will be discussed in this paper.

  16. Particle Probe Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Justin; James, R. W.; Lopez, M.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. L.; Schlank, C.; Stutzman, B. S.; Zuniga, J.

    2012-10-01

    A small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) has been constructed at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL) to utilize the reputed high densities at low pressure (.01 T) [1], in high temperature and density diagnostic development for future laboratory investigations. With the initial construction phase complete, HPX has produced its first plasmas. Efforts to develop and enhance the high temperature and density (10^13 cm-3 and higher) helicon plasmas at low pressures (.01 T) reported by Toki, Shinohara, et. al. continue. Currently, particle probes to measure plasmas' temperatures and densities, necessary to discern the plasma mode transitions, are in development. Construction of independent mach and triple probes for single point surface investigations are underway and once installed, they will be followed by a triple probe array to produce a more comprehensive density and surface view. Progress on the construction and findings of these probes on HPX will be reported.

  17. Compact collimated fiber optic array diagnostic for railgun plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V; Solberg, J; Ferriera, T; Tully, L; Stephan, P

    2008-10-02

    We have developed and tested a compact collimated sixteen channel fiber optic array diagnostic for studying the light emission of railgun armature plasmas with {approx}mm spatial and sub-{micro}s temporal resolution. The design and operational details of the diagnostic are described. Plasma velocities, oscillation, and dimension data from the diagnostic for the Livermore Fixed Hybrid Armature experiment are presented and compared with 1-D simulations. The techniques and principles discussed allow the extension of the diagnostic to other railgun and related dense plasma experiments.

  18. Plasma gasification of carbonaceous wastes: thermodynamic analysis and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messerle, V. E.; Mosse, A. L.; Ustimenko, A. B.

    2016-07-01

    Thermodynamic calculations of the plasma gasification process of carbonaceous wastes in air and steam ambient were carried out. A maximum yield of synthesis gas in such processes is predicted to be achieved at a temperature of 1600 K. On a specially developed plasma facility, plasma gasification experiments were performed for carbonaceous wastes. From the organic mass of carbonaceous waste and from its mineral mass, respectively, a high-calorific syngas and a neutral slag consisting predominantly of ferric carbide, calcium monosilicate, silica and iron, were obtained. A comparison between the experiment and the calculations has shown a good consistency between the data.

  19. Plasma Jog Experiments on MRX in Collaboration with MMS team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Masaaki; Yoo, Jongsoo; Tharp, Tim; Ji, Hantao; Lawrence, Eric

    2011-10-01

    In the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX), a multi-probe mock-up system is utilized to investigate the fine structure of the diffusion region of the reconnection layer and to identify data signatures which indicate the nearby presence of a reconnection neutral sheet. The reconnection layer is swept through the probe system in controlled speeds of 0.01-0.2 of the Alfvén velocity. This situation is very similar to the space measurements in which the current sheet moves with respect to satellites as expected in the Magnetosphere Multi-scale Satellite (MMS) cluster configuration. The main objectives of the proposed joint research are (1) to compare basic properties of the reconnection regions in the neutral sheet of space and laboratory plasmas, (2) to study their roles in the process of magnetic reconnection, and (3) to measure fine scale profiles of the thin electron diffusion layer. A series of the first results from the experimental campaign are presented.

  20. Initial Plasma Experiment in the Levitated Ring Trap RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, H.; Yoshida, Z.; Ogawa, Y.; Morikawa, J.; Watanabe, S.; Yano, Y.; Suzuki, J.

    2006-10-01

    Studies on toroidal flowing plasma have started in a superconductor levitated coil device, Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) [1]. RT-1 generates a magnetosphere-like dipole magnetic field configuration that enables various kinds of experiments related to flowing plasmas. The main purpose of the Ring Trap Experiment is to explore a new high-b relaxation state of plasmas predicted by two-fluid relaxation theory of flowing plasmas [2]. Magnetic surface configuration of RT-1 also enables stable pure-magnetic trap of non-neutral plasmas [3], which is potentially suitable for the confinement of charged particles including anti-matters. As an initial experiment, hydrogen plasma is produced by electron cyclotron heating using 8.2GHz microwave generated by a klystron with the maximum power of 100kW for 1s pulse operation. The high-Tc superconductor (Bi-2223) ring with a total coil current of 250kAT is magnetically levitated in a vacuum chamber using a PID feedback control system. The field strength in the trap region is 0.03T to 0.3T. Diagnostics for the RT-1 experiment includes spectroscopy, soft X-ray pulse-height analysis with Si (Li) detector, magnetic probes, and Langmuir probes for edge plasma measurement. The initial experimental results and basic plasma parameters of RT-1 will be presented in the meeting. 1. Z. Yoshida et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 1, 008 (2006). 2. Z. Yoshida and S. M. Mahajan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 095001 (2002). 3. Z. Yoshida, et al., in Nonneutral Plasma Physics III, IV.

  1. 3-D plasma boundary and plasma wall interaction research at UW-Madison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Oliver; Akerson, Adrian; Bader, Aaron; Barbui, Tullio; Effenberg, Florian; Flesch, Kurt; Frerichs, Heinke; Green, Jonathan; Hinson, Edward; Kremeyer, Thierry; Norval, Ryan; Stephey, Laurie; Waters, Ian; Winters, Victoria

    2016-10-01

    The necessity of considering 3-D effects on the plasma boundary and plasma wall interaction (PWI) in tokamaks, stellarators and reversed field pinches has been highlighted by abundant experimental and numerical results in the recent past. Prominent examples with 3-D boundary situations are numerous: ELM controlled H-modes by RMP fields in tokamaks, research on boundary plasmas and PWI in stellarators in general, quasi-helical states in RFPs, asymmetric fueling situations, and structural and wall elements which are not aligned with the magnetic guiding fields. A systematic approach is being taken at UW-Madison to establish a targeted experimental basis for identifying the most significant effects for plasma edge transport and resulting PWI in such 3-D plasma boundary situations. We deploy advanced 3-D modeling using the EMC3-EIRENE, ERO and MCI codes in combination with laboratory experiments at UW-Madison to investigate the relevance of 3-D effects in large scale devices with a concerted approach on DIII-D, NSTX-U, and Wendelstein 7-X. Highlights of experimental results from the on-site laboratory activities at UW-Madison and the large scale facilities are presented and interlinks will be discussed. This work was supported by US DOE DE-SC0013911, DE-SC00012315 and DE-SC00014210.

  2. A large volume uniform plasma generator for the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Min; Li Xiaoping; Xie Kai; Liu Donglin; Liu Yanming

    2013-01-15

    A large volume uniform plasma generator is proposed for the experiments of electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation in plasma, to reproduce a 'black out' phenomenon with long duration in an environment of the ordinary laboratory. The plasma generator achieves a controllable approximate uniform plasma in volume of 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 180 mm without the magnetic confinement. The plasma is produced by the glow discharge, and the special discharge structure is built to bring a steady approximate uniform plasma environment in the electromagnetic wave propagation path without any other barriers. In addition, the electron density and luminosity distributions of plasma under different discharge conditions were diagnosed and experimentally investigated. Both the electron density and the plasma uniformity are directly proportional to the input power and in roughly reverse proportion to the gas pressure in the chamber. Furthermore, the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma are conducted in this plasma generator. Blackout phenomena at GPS signal are observed under this system and the measured attenuation curve is of reasonable agreement with the theoretical one, which suggests the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Lightweight Portable Plasma Medical Device - Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    polymer films used in biomedical applications such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and poly-L-lactide (PLLA) samples continuously for several...such as surface treatment of polymers , biomedical and environmental applications where OES act as a key diagnostic for investigating the plasma...low gas temperature of the plasma jet and its suitability for biomedical applications and surface treatment of bio- polymers . The plasma jet was tested

  4. Comparing simulation of plasma turbulence with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, David W.; Bravenec, Ronald V.; Dorland, William; Beer, Michael A.; Hammett, G. W.; McKee, George R.; Fonck, Raymond J.; Murakami, Masanori; Burrell, Keith H.; Jackson, Gary L.; Staebler, Gary M.

    2002-01-01

    The direct quantitative correspondence between theoretical predictions and the measured plasma fluctuations and transport is tested by performing nonlinear gyro-Landau-fluid simulations with the GRYFFIN (or ITG) code [W. Dorland and G. W. Hammett, Phys. Fluids B 5, 812 (1993); M. A. Beer and G. W. Hammett, Phys. Plasmas 3, 4046 (1996)]. In an L-mode reference discharge in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)], which has relatively large fluctuations and transport, the turbulence is dominated by ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes. Trapped electron modes and impurity drift waves also play a role. Density fluctuations are measured by beam emission spectroscopy [R. J. Fonck, P. A. Duperrex, and S. F. Paul, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 61, 3487 (1990)]. Experimental fluxes and corresponding diffusivities are analyzed by the TRANSP code [R. J. Hawryluk, in Physics of Plasmas Close to Thermonuclear Conditions, edited by B. Coppi, G. G. Leotta, D. Pfirsch, R. Pozzoli, and E. Sindoni (Pergamon, Oxford, 1980), Vol. 1, p. 19]. The shape of the simulated wave number spectrum is close to the measured one. The simulated ion thermal transport, corrected for E×B low shear, exceeds the experimental value by a factor of 1.5 to 2.0. The simulation overestimates the density fluctuation level by an even larger factor. On the other hand, the simulation underestimates the electron thermal transport, which may be accounted for by modes that are not accessible to the simulation or to the BES measurement.

  5. Transport studies in fusion plasmas: Perturbative experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cardozo, N.J.L.

    1996-03-01

    By subjecting a plasma in steady state to small perturbations and measuring the response, it is possible to determine elements of the matrix of transport coefficients. Experimentally this is difficult, and results are mainly limited to transport driven by the pressure and temperature gradients. Importantly, off-diagonal elements in the transport matrix appear to be important. This has also implications for the interpretation of the so-called `power balance` diffusivity, determined from the steady state fluxes and gradients. Experimental techniques, analysis techniques, basic formulas, etc., are briefly reviewed. Experimental results are summarized. The fundamental question whether the fluxes are linear functions of the gradients or not is discussed. 31 refs.

  6. The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, R. C.; Hendrix, M. K.; Fox, J. C.; Thomas, D. J.; Nicholson, J.

    1986-01-01

    The hardware and software of NASA's proposed Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) are described. The OARE is to provide aerodynamic acceleration measurements along the Orbiter's principal axis in the free-molecular flow-flight regime at orbital attitude and in the transition regime during reentry. Models considering the effects of electromagnetic effects, solar radiation pressure, orbiter mass attraction, gravity gradient, orbital centripetal acceleration, out-of-orbital-plane effects, orbiter angular velocity, structural noise, mass expulsion signal sources, crew motion, and bias on acceleration are examined. The experiment contains an electrostatically balanced cylindrical proofmass accelerometer sensor with three orthogonal sensing axis outputs. The components and functions of the experimental calibration system and signal processor and control subsystem are analyzed. The development of the OARE software is discussed. The experimental equipment will be enclosed in a cover assembly that will be mounted in the Orbiter close to the center of gravity.

  7. Scaled Laboratory Collisionless Shock Experiments in the Large Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. E.; Schaeffer, D.; Everson, E.; Bondarenko, A.; Winske, D.; Constantin, C.; Niemann, C.

    2013-12-01

    Collisionless shocks in space plasmas have been investigated since the fifties and are typically studied via in-situ satellite observations, which are limited due to the large structure of collisionless shocks in space environments relative to the satellite observation platform. Scaled, repeatable experiments in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA provide a test bed for studying collisionless shocks in the laboratory, where questions of ion and electron heating and acceleration can be addressed and examined in detail. The experiments are performed by ablating a graphite or plastic target using the Raptor kilojoule-class laser facility at UCLA. The laser provides an on-target energy in the range of 100-500 J that drives a super-Alfvénic (MA > 1) debris plasma across a background magnetic field (200-800 G) into the ambient, magnetized LAPD plasma. Typical plasma parameters in the LAPD consist of a H+ or He+ ambient plasma with a core column (diameter > 20 cm ) density ni ~ 1013 cm-3 and electron temperature Te ~ 10 eV embedded in a larger plasma discharge (diameter ~ 80 cm) of density ni ~ 1012 cm-3 and Te ~ 5 eV. The ambient ion temperature is Ti ~ 1 eV. Experimental results from the latest collisionless shock campaign will be presented and compared with two dimensional hybrid simulations of the experiment. Fielded diagnostics include Thomson scattering, ion spectroscopy, magnetic flux probes, Langmuir probes, and microwave reflectometry.

  8. Research on Orbital Plasma Electrodynamics (ROPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, Devrie S.

    1998-01-01

    This final report summarizes some of the important scientific contributions to the Research on Orbital Plasma Electrodynamics (ROPE) investigation, to the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) mission, and to NASA that resulted from the work carried out under this contract at Carmel Research Center. These include Dr. Intriligator's participation in the PIT for the TSS-1R simulations and flight, her participation in ROPE team meetings and IWG meetings, her scientific analyses, and her writing and submitting technical papers to scientific journals. The scientific analyses concentrated on the characterization of energetic ions and their possible relation to pickup ion effects, correlation of particle and other effects (e.g., magnetic field, satellite surface), and collaboration with theorists including with ROPE co-investigators. In addition, scientific analyses were carried out of the effects due to satellite gas releases.

  9. A 1D (radial) Plasma Jet Propagation Study for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. R.; Bogatu, I. N.; Galkin, S. A.; Kim, J. S.; Welch, D. R.; Thoma, C.; Golovkin, I.; Macfarlane, J. J.; Case, A.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Cassibry, J. T.; Awe, T. J.; Hsu, S. C.

    2011-10-01

    The Plasma Liner Experiment will explore the formation of imploding spherical ``plasma liners'' that reach peak pressures of 0.1 Mbar upon stagnation. The liners will be formed through the merging of dense, high velocity plasma jets (n ~1017 cm-3, T ~3 eV, v ~50 km/s) in a spherically convergent geometry. The focus of this 1D (radial) study is argon plasma jet evolution during propagation from the rail gun source to the jet merging radius. The study utilizes the Large Scale Plasma (LSP) PIC code with atomic physics included through the use of a non-Local Thermal Equilibrium (NLTE) Equation of State (EOS) table. We will present scenarios for expected 1D (radial) plasma jet evolution, from upon exiting the PLX rail gun to reaching the jet merging radius. The importance of radiation cooling early in the simulation is highlighted. Work supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-05ER54835.

  10. Spectroscopic measurements of plasma emission light for plasma-based acceleration experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippi, F.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced particle accelerators are based on the excitation of large amplitude plasma waves driven by either electron or laser beams. Future experiments scheduled at the SPARC_LAB test facility aim to demonstrate the acceleration of high brightness electron beams through the so-called resonant Plasma Wakefield Acceleration scheme in which a train of electron bunches (drivers) resonantly excites wakefields into a preformed hydrogen plasma; the last bunch (witness) injected at the proper accelerating phase gains energy from the wake. The quality of the accelerated beam depends strongly on plasma density and its distribution along the acceleration length. The measurements of plasma density of the order of 1016-1017 cm-3 can be performed with spectroscopic measurements of the plasma-emitted light. The measured density distribution for hydrogen filled capillary discharge with both Balmer alpha and Balmer beta lines and shot-to-shot variation are here reported.

  11. Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) electrodynamic tether experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossi, Mario D.

    1995-01-01

    The Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) flight of June 26, 1993 has been the most sophisticated and most successful mission that has been carried out thus far with an electrodynamic tether. Three papers from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Washington, DC concerned with the PMG, submitted at the Fourth International Space Conference on Tethers in Space, in Washington, DC, in April 1995, are contained in this document. The three papers are (1) Electromagnetic interactions between the PMG tether and the magneto-ionic medium of the Ionosphere; (2) Tether-current-voltage characteristics, as determined by the Hollow Cathode Operation Modes; and (3) Hawaii-Hilo ground observations on the occasion for the PMG flight of June 23, 1993.

  12. Early flavor experiences: research update.

    PubMed

    Mennella, J A; Beauchamp, G K

    1998-07-01

    Anyone who has observed infants for any period of time can testify to the intense activity occurring in and around their mouths--the primary site for learning in the first few months of life. Before they are even able to crawl, infants have learned much about their new sensory world. Though recent research we have begun to explore the impact of these early experiences on infants' acceptance of solid foods and how they explore objects in their environment. We have also begun to focus on the sensory experiences of the formula-fed infant, in particular, how their responses to particular formulas, which are extremely unpalatable to older children and adults, change during infancy. This is a relatively new and exciting area of study, with much research yet to be done. It is clear, however, that infants are not passive receptacles for flavored foods. Parents who offer a variety of foods will provide both a nutritious, well-balanced diet, as well as an opportunity for their children's own personal preferences to develop.

  13. Laboratory plasma interactions experiments: Results and implications to future space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Philip

    1986-01-01

    The experimental results discussed show the significance of the effects caused by spacecraft plasma interactions, in particular the generation of Electromagnetic Interference. As the experimental results show, the magnitude of the adverse effects induced by Plasma Interactions (PI) will be more significant for spacecraft of the next century. Therefore, research is needed to control possible adverse effects. Several techniques to control the selected PI effects are discussed. Tests, in the form of flight experiments, are needed to validate these proposed ideas.

  14. Tritium Plasma Experiment Upgrade for Fusion Tritium and Nuclear Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Taylor, Chase N.; Kolasinski, Robert D.; Buchenauer, Dean A.

    2015-11-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) is a unique high-flux linear plasma device that can handle beryllium, tritium, and neutron-irradiated plasma facing materials, and is the only existing device dedicated to directly study tritium retention and permeation in neutron-irradiated materials [M. Shimada et.al., Rev. Sci. Instru. 82 (2011) 083503 and and M. Shimada, et.al., Nucl. Fusion 55 (2015) 013008]. Recently the TPE has undergone major upgrades in its electrical and control systems. New DC power supplies and a new control center enable remote plasma operations from outside of the contamination area for tritium, minimizing the possible exposure risk with tritium and beryllium. We discuss the electrical upgrade, enhanced operational safety, improved plasma performance, and development of tritium plasma-driven permeation and optical spectrometer system. This upgrade not only improves operational safety of the worker, but also enhances plasma performance to better simulate extreme plasma-material conditions expected in ITER, Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF), and Demonstration reactor (DEMO). This work was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under the DOE Idaho Field Office contract number DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  15. Shuttle wave experiments. [space plasma investigations: design and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1976-01-01

    Wave experiments on shuttle are needed to verify dispersion relations, to study nonlinear and exotic phenomena, to support other plasma experiments, and to test engineering designs. Techniques based on coherent detection and bistatic geometry are described. New instrumentation required to provide modules for a variety of missions and to incorporate advanced signal processing and control techniques is discussed. An experiment for Z to 0 coupling is included.

  16. Plasma-Filled Rod-Pinch Diode for HEDLP Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Andrew; Weber, Bruce; Swanekamp, Stephen; Schumer, Joseph; Pereira, Nino; Seely, John; Mosher, David

    2016-10-01

    This poster describes recent progress on research into using the plasma-filled rod-pinch (PFRP) at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) for warm dense matter (WDM) studies. The objective of this project is to utilize the PFRP diode and associated diagnostics to experimentally quantify the pressure, temperature, and ionization state via independent measurements in WDM comprised of ionized high-Z materials (tungsten). Previous experiments and preliminary results show that the parameters of the PFRP plasma are approximately Z = 17 , ρm = 0.7 g/cm3, T = 30 eV, P = 16 Mb, and Γ = 35 . The experiments and simulations currently underway will allow for more accurate determination of these parameters, which will contribute to an enhanced understanding of these high-Z materials in a WDM state. To achieve this objective, new diagnostics are being developed and current diagnostics are being refined, experiments are being performed, and numerical modeling is being carried out. This project will refine a new technique for producing WDM that can be replicated on pulsed power generators at several US universities and government laboratories, provide data for benchmarking numerical analysis codes, and develop diagnostics that should prove useful on many other WDM sources. This work was supported under the Department of Energy Office of Science Project DE-SC0014331.

  17. Solar Array Module Plasma Interaction Experiment (SAMPIE): Technical requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillard, G. Barry; Ferguson, Dale C.

    1992-01-01

    The Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment (SAMPIE) is a NASA shuttle space flight experiment scheduled for launch in early 1994. The SAMPIE experiment will investigate plasma interactions of high voltage space power systems in low earth orbit. Solar cell modules, representing several technologies, will be biased to high voltages to characterize both arcing and plasma current collection. Other solar modules, specially modified in accordance with current theories of arcing and breakdown, will demonstrate the possibility of arc suppression. Finally, several test modules will be included to study the basic nature of these interactions. The science and technology goals for the project are defined in the Technical Requirements Document (TRD) which is presented here.

  18. Analysis of Next-Step Burning Plasma Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardin, S.; Kessel, C.; Meade, D.; Rutherford, P.; Pletzer, A.; Neumeyer, C.

    2001-10-01

    We present comparison studies of candidate next-step burning plasma experiments. A new systems-level code, BPSC, has been developed to find optimal designs for a particular design concept subject to a given set of engineering and physics constraints. We have applied this to liquid Nitrogen cooled compact devices of either the ST concept, where the poloidal field (PF) coils link the toroidal field (TF) coil, or the high-field tokamak concept, where the PF and TF coils are unlinked. For the latter class, we show that the FIRE* design is near optimal for an inductively driven burning plasma experiment with Q = 10 and pulse length exceeding two current redistribution times. We also present MHD and TSC transport analysis of the FIRE* design and compare this with other proposed burning plasma experiments. It is further shown that LHCD can reduce the consequences of neoclassical tearing modes in FIRE-class devices through reduction of delta-prime.

  19. Trends in laser-plasma-instability experiments for laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.P. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1991-06-06

    Laser-plasma instability experiments for laser fusion have followed three developments. These are advances in the technology and design of experiments, advances in diagnostics, and evolution of the design of high-gain targets. This paper traces the history of these three topics and discusses their present state. Today one is substantially able to produce controlled plasma conditions and to diagnose specific instabilities within such plasmas. Experiments today address issues that will matter for future laser facilities. Such facilities will irradiate targets with {approx}1 MJ of visible or UV light pulses that are tens of nanoseconds in duration, very likely with a high degree of spatial and temporal incoherence. 58 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Development of high energy pulsed plasma simulator for plasma-lithium trench experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Soonwook

    To simulate detrimental events in a tokamak and provide a test-stand for a liquid lithium infused trench (LiMIT) device, a pulsed plasma source utilizing a theta pinch in conjunction with a coaxial plasma accelerator has been developed. An overall objective of the project is to develop a compact device that can produce 100 MW/m2 to 1 GW/m2 of plasma heat flux (a typical heat flux level in a major fusion device) in ~ 100 mus (≤ 0.1 MJ/m2) for a liquid lithium plasma facing component research. The existing theta pinch device, DEVeX, was built and operated for study on lithium vapor shielding effect. However, a typical plasma energy of 3 - 4 kJ/m2 is too low to study an interaction of plasma and plasma facing components in fusion devices. No or little preionized plasma, ringing of magnetic field, collisions of high energy particles with background gas have been reported as the main issues. Therefore, DEVeX is reconfigured to mitigate these issues. The new device is mainly composed of a plasma gun for a preionization source, a theta pinch for heating, and guiding magnets for a better plasma transportation. Each component will be driven by capacitor banks and controlled by high voltage / current switches. Several diagnostics including triple Langmuir probe, calorimeter, optical emission measurement, Rogowski coil, flux loop, and fast ionization gauge are used to characterize the new device. A coaxial plasma gun is manufactured and installed in the previous theta pinch chamber. The plasma gun is equipped with 500 uF capacitor and a gas puff valve. The increase of the plasma velocity with the plasma gun capacitor voltage is consistent with the theoretical predictions and the velocity is located between the snowplow model and the weak - coupling limit. Plasma energies measured with the calorimeter ranges from 0.02 - 0.065 MJ/m2 and increases with the voltage at the capacitor bank. A cross-check between the plasma energy measured with the calorimeter and the triple probe

  1. CO2 Laser Beat-Wave Experiment in an Unmagnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Hwang, David; Horton, Robert; Hong, Sean; Evans, Russell

    2012-10-01

    The ability to remotely generate plasma current in dense plasmas is a basic yet important investigation in experimental plasma physics and fusion energy research. It is even more advantageous if the wave penetration is independent of the electron acceleration process. Plasma current can be generated through beat-wave mixing process by launching two intense electromagnetic waves (φ>>φpe) into plasma. The beat wave formation process can be efficient if the difference frequency of the two pump waves is matched to a local resonant frequency of the medium, i.e. in this case the local plasma frequency. Beat wave can accelerate plasma electrons via quasi-linear Landau process, which has been demonstrated in a low-density plasma using microwaves.footnotetextRogers, J. H. and Hwang, D. Q., Phys. Rev. Lett. v68 p3877 (1992). The CO2 lasers provide the high tunability for the wave-particle interaction experiment at a variety of plasma densities with plasma frequency in THz range. Two sections of Lumonics TEA CO2 lasers have been modified to serve as the two pump wave sources with peak power over 100MW. The development of the tunable CO2 lasers, a high-density plasma target source and diagnostics system will be presented. The initial results of unbalanced beat-wave experiment using one high-power pulsed and one low-power CW CO2 lasers will be presented and discussed using the independent plasma source to control the φpe of the interaction region. This work is supported by U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-FG02-10ER55083.

  2. Plasma-wall interaction data needs critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    The Division of Development and Technology has sponsored a four day US-Japan workshop ''Plasma-Wall Interaction Data Needs Critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)'', held at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California on June 24 to 27, 1985. The workshop, which brought together fifty scientists and engineers from the United States, Japan, Germany, and Canada, considered the plasma-material interaction and high heat flux (PMI/HHF) issues for the next generation of magnetic fusion energy devices, the Burning Core Experiment (BCX). Materials options were ranked, and a strategy for future PMI/HHF research was formulated. The foundation for international collaboration and coordination of this research was also established. This volume contains the last three of the five technical sessions. The first of the three is on plasma materials interaction issues, the second is on research facilities and the third is from smaller working group meetings on graphite, beryllium, advanced materials and future collaborations.

  3. High Power Pulsed Plasma MHD Experiments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-30

    Associates Incorporated ARE A a WORK UNIT NUM11ERS 26046 Eden Landing Road Hayward, California 94545 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS It. REPORT...Associates Incorporated 26046 Eden Landing Road Hayward, California 94545 Accession For Telephone: 415/785-8080 NTIS GRA&I g DTIC TAB 0 Unannounced...this report was sponsored by the Office of Naval Research Contract N00014-81-C-0045 under the direction of Dr. Bobby Junker and we gratefully

  4. Experiments on planar plasma flow switches at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Benage, J.F. Jr.; Wysocki, F.J.; Bowers, R.; Oona, H.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have performed a series of experiments on the Colt facility at Los Alamos to study the performance of plasma flow switches and to understand the important physics issues which affect that performance. These experiments were done in planar geometry on a small machine to allow for better diagnostic access and a higher repetition rate. The Colt facility is a capacitor bank which stores 300 kJ at maximum charge and produced a peak current of 1.1 MA in 2.0 microseconds for these experiments. The diagnostics used for these experiments included an array of b-dot probes, visible framing pictures, visible spectroscopy, and laser interferometry. Characteristics of the switch are determined from spatial and temporal profiles of the magnetic field and the spatial profile and temperature of the switch plasma. Here the authors present results from experiments for a variety of switch conditions.

  5. Experimental and theoretical research in applied plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Porkolab, M.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: fusion theory and computations; theory of thermonuclear plasmas; user service center; high poloidal beta studies on PBX-M; fast ECE fluctuation diagnostic for balloning mode studies; x-ray imaging diagnostic; millimeter/submillimeter-wave fusion ion diagnostics; small scale turbulence and nonlinear dynamics in plasmas; plasma turbulence and transport; phase contrast interferometer diagnostic for long wavelength fluctuations in DIII-D; and charged and neutral fusion production for fusio plasmas.

  6. A structured architecture for advanced plasma control experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Penaflor, B.G.; Ferron, J.R.; Walker, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    Recent new and improved plasma control regimes have evolved from enhancements to the systems responsible for managing the plasma configuration on the DIII-D tokamak. The collection of hardware and software components designed for this purpose is known at DIII-D as the Plasma Control System or PCS. Several new user requirements have contributed to the rapid growth of the PCS. Experiments involving digital control of the plasma vertical position have resulted in the addition of new high performance processors to operate in real-time. Recent studies in plasma disruptions involving the use of neural network based software have resulted in an increase in the number of input diagnostic signals sampled. Better methods for estimating the plasma shape and position have brought about numerous software changes and the addition of several new code modules. Furthermore, requests for performing multivariable control and feedback on the current profile are continuing to add to the demands being placed on the PCS. To support all of these demands has required a structured yet flexible hardware and software architecture for maintaining existing capabilities and easily adding new ones. This architecture along with a general overview of the DIII-D Plasma Control System is described. In addition, the latest improvements to the PCS are presented.

  7. Plasma Rotation Control Experiment in a Strongly Diverging Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaka, Kenichiro; Furuta, Kanshi; Yoshimura, Shinji; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    2016-10-01

    It has been recognized that the plasma rotation affects the plasma flow structure along the magnetic field line. However, the effect of plasma rotation on structure formation in a strongly diverging magnetic field with magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions has not been fully understood, so far. Understanding the flow structure formation in an ion-unmagnetized plasma is essential to control ion streamline detachment from the magnetic field line and also necessary to study the astrophysical phenomena in laboratory. In order to clarify the effect of plasma rotation in a diverging magnetic field, we have performed the plasma rotation control experiment in the HYPER-II device at Kyushu Univ., Japan. A set of cylindrical electrode was utilized to control the radial electric field, and the profile of azimuthal E × B rotation has been changed. We present the experimental results on the electron density pileup and the flow reversal appeared in the rotating plasma. This study was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 16K05633.

  8. Particle Probe Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Justin; James, R. W.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. J.; Romano, B.; Zuniga, J.; Schlank, C.; Lopez, M.; Karama, J.; Duke-Tinson, O.; Stutzman, B. S.

    2013-10-01

    Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab(CGAPL) has constructed a Helicon Plasma Experiment. Plasmas will be used in high-temperature and -density diagnostic development for future lab investigations of fusion-grade plasma. Efforts to develop and enhance high temperature and density (1013cm-3 and up) helicon plasmas at low pressures (.01T) reported by Toki et al., continue. HPX will integrate a 32-channel National Instruments DAQ(Data Acquisition) board, designed to digitize data from tests. With LabView as the programing language, CGAPL will take samples at 12bits of precision at 2MS/s to create a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The GUI will control experimental variables (one or several concurrent tests) and monitor systems during data collection. Data collection will be conducted with particle probes, currently under construction. Probes, used to discern the plasma mode transitions, will measure plasma particle velocity, temperature, density and floating potential at different regimes. Once independent triple and mach probes for surface point investigations are installed, a triple probe array to produce a more comprehensive density and surface view will follow. Progress on development of GUI and construction of probes will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY12.

  9. Experiment and simulation on one-dimensional plasma photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lin; Ouyang, Ji-Ting

    2014-10-15

    The transmission characteristics of microwaves passing through one-dimensional plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) have been investigated by experiment and simulation. The PPCs were formed by a series of discharge tubes filled with argon at 5 Torr that the plasma density in tubes can be varied by adjusting the discharge current. The transmittance of X-band microwaves through the crystal structure was measured under different discharge currents and geometrical parameters. The finite-different time-domain method was employed to analyze the detailed properties of the microwaves propagation. The results show that there exist bandgaps when the plasma is turned on. The properties of bandgaps depend on the plasma density and the geometrical parameters of the PPCs structure. The PPCs can perform as dynamical band-stop filter to control the transmission of microwaves within a wide frequency range.

  10. Combining the Strong Drive Regime with Evaporative Cooling to Control Plasma Parameters in the ALPHA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruth, Celeste; Fajans, Joel; Alpha Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    To make antihydrogen at the ALPHA experiment at CERN, we need to produce antiproton and positron plasmas with consistent plasma parameters. We developed a technique that allows us to eliminate initial variations in the density and the number of particles by combining evaporative cooling and the strong drive regime. The strong drive regime is a non-neutral plasma regime driven by a rotating electric field, where the drive frequency synchronizes with the plasma rotation frequency; this controls the density. Evaporative cooling is a space-charge dominated effect where a potential well is completely filled with the space charge of a plasma and one side is lowered, which sets the on-axis potential. For cold non-neutral plasmas, the density and on-axis potential give a unique solution to the plasma parameters, so we want to simultaneously combine these two techniques. Experimental results using electron plasmas show this combination of techniques does an excellent job at producing plasmas with the same number of particles and densities from a wide range of initial conditions. Special thanks to the United States Department of Energy and to the ALPHA collaboration for supporting this research.

  11. Plasma flow switch and foil implosion experiments on Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J.C.; Bartsch, R.R.; Benage, J.R.; Forman, P.R.; Gribble, R.F.; Ladish, J.S.; Oona, H.; Parker, J.V.; Scudder, D.W.; Shlachter, J.S.; Wysocki, F.J.

    1993-07-01

    Pegasus II is the upgraded version of Pegasus, a pulsed power machine used in the Los Alamos AGEX (Above Ground EXperiments) program. A goal of the program is to produce an intense (> 100 TW) source of soft x-rays from the thermalization of the kinetic energy of a 1 to 10 MJ plasma implosion. The radiation pulse should have a maximum duration of several 10`s of nanoseconds and will be used in the study of fusion conditions and material properties. The radiating plasma source will be generated by the thermalization of the kinetic energy of an imploding cylindrical, thin, metallic foil. This paper addresses experiments done on a capacitor bank to develop a switch (plasma flow switch) to switch the bank current into the load at peak current. This allows efficient coupling of bank energy into foil kinetic energy.

  12. Plasma flow switch and foil implosion experiments on Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J.C.; Bartsch, R.R.; Benage, J.R.; Forman, P.R.; Gribble, R.F.; Ladish, J.S.; Oona, H.; Parker, J.V.; Scudder, D.W.; Shlachter, J.S.; Wysocki, F.J.

    1993-01-01

    Pegasus II is the upgraded version of Pegasus, a pulsed power machine used in the Los Alamos AGEX (Above Ground EXperiments) program. A goal of the program is to produce an intense (> 100 TW) source of soft x-rays from the thermalization of the kinetic energy of a 1 to 10 MJ plasma implosion. The radiation pulse should have a maximum duration of several 10's of nanoseconds and will be used in the study of fusion conditions and material properties. The radiating plasma source will be generated by the thermalization of the kinetic energy of an imploding cylindrical, thin, metallic foil. This paper addresses experiments done on a capacitor bank to develop a switch (plasma flow switch) to switch the bank current into the load at peak current. This allows efficient coupling of bank energy into foil kinetic energy.

  13. Simulation studies of plasma lens experiments at Daresbury laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanahoe, K.; Mete, O.; Xia, G.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jones, J.; Smith, J.

    2016-03-01

    Experiments are planned to study plasma lensing using the VELA and CLARA Front End accelerators at Daresbury Laboratory. This paper presents results of 2-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the proposed experiments. The variation in focusing strength and emittance growth with beam and plasma parameters are studied in the overdense (plasma density much greater than bunch density) regime for the VELA beam. The effect of spherical and longitudinal aberrations on the beam emittance was estimated through numerical and theoretical studies. Simulation results show that a focusing strength equivalent to a magnetic field gradient of 10 T m-1 can be achieved using VELA, and a gradient of 247 T m-1 can be achieved using CLARA Front End.

  14. First Laser-Plasma Interaction and Hohlraum Experiments on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E L; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Jones, O S; Schein, J; Froula, D; Divol, L; Campbell, K; Schneider, M S; McDonald, J W; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A J

    2005-06-17

    Recently the first hohlraum experiments have been performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) designs. The effects of laser beam smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) and polarization smoothing (PS) on the beam propagation in long scale gas-filled pipes has been studied at plasma scales as found in indirect drive gas filled ignition hohlraum designs. The long scale gas-filled target experiments have shown propagation over 7 mm of dense plasma without filamentation and beam break up when using full laser smoothing. Vacuum hohlraums have been irradiated with laser powers up to 6 TW, 1-9 ns pulse lengths and energies up to 17 kJ to activate several diagnostics, to study the hohlraum radiation temperature scaling with the laser power and hohlraum size, and to make contact with hohlraum experiments performed at the NOVA and Omega laser facilities. Subsequently, novel long laser pulse hohlraum experiments have tested models of hohlraum plasma filling and long pulse hohlraum radiation production. The validity of the plasma filling assessment in analytical models and in LASNEX calculations has been proven for the first time. The comparison of these results with modeling will be discussed.

  15. Web life: The Internet Plasma Physics Education Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    An educational outreach site maintained by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in the US, IPPEX features several interactive, game-like tools (applets) for exploring the physics of fusion, the doughnut-shaped "tokamak" reactors used in fusion experiments around the world, and related topics.

  16. Research in space science and technology. [including X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckley, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    Progress in various space flight research programs is reported. Emphasis is placed on X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics. Topics covered include: infrared astronomy, long base line interferometry, geological spectroscopy, space life science experiments, atmospheric physics, and space based materials and structures research. Analysis of galactic and extra-galactic X-ray data from the Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-3) and HEAO-A and interplanetary plasma data for Mariner 10, Explorers 47 and 50, and Solrad is discussed.

  17. Synergy Between Experiments and Simulations in Laser and Beam-Driven Plasma Acceleration and Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Warren B.

    2015-11-01

    Computer simulations have been an integral part of plasma physics research since the early 1960s. Initially, they provided the ability to confirm and test linear and nonlinear theories in one-dimension. As simulation capabilities and computational power improved, then simulations were also used to test new ideas and applications of plasmas in multi-dimensions. As progress continued, simulations were also used to model experiments. Today computer simulations of plasmas are ubiquitously used to test new theories, understand complicated nonlinear phenomenon, model the full temporal and spatial scale of experiments, simulate parameters beyond the reach of current experiments, and test the performance of new devices before large capital expenditures are made to build them. In this talk I review the progress in simulations in a particular area of plasma physics: plasma based acceleration (PBA). In PBA a short laser pulse or particle beam propagates through long regions of plasma creating plasma wave wakefields on which electrons or positrons surf to high energies. In some cases the wakefields are highly nonlinear, involve three-dimensional effects, and the trajectories of plasma particles cross making it essential that fully kinetic and three-dimensional models are used. I will show how particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations were initially used to propose the basic idea of PBA in one dimension. I will review some of the dramatic progress in the experimental demonstration of PBA and show how this progress was dramatically helped by a synergy between experiments and full-scale multi-dimensional PIC simulations. This will include a review of how the capability of PIC simulation tools has improved. I will also touch on some recent progress on improvements to PIC simulations of PBA and discuss how these improvements may push the synergy further towards real time steering of experiments and start to end modeling of key components of a future linear collider or XFEL based on PBA

  18. Partnership in Undergraduate Research Experience

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Practical laboratory and work experience has been helpful in reinforcing the undergraduate educational experience. With limited resources, individual organizations may struggle to give a student a well rounded opportunity. Most undergraduates work within internships or cooperative educational fram...

  19. Light Weight Portable Plasma Medical Device - Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    acting on the objective lens. Great care was taken to position the objective lens together with the plasma chamber precisely in the line of sight...pressure as that of the chamber pressure in order to avoid differential pressures acting on the objective lens. Great care was taken to position the...Mohid, in Experimental micromachining of silicon with Nd-YAG laser, Malaysia , 2011 (Trans Tech Publications), p. 244. 5 P. G. Ashmore, Photochemistry

  20. Lightweight Portable Plasma Medical Device - Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    oxides (NOx) are produced through N2 and O2 reactions [62, 63]. The production of NOx species is mainly dependent on the oxygen (O2) concentration...Federal, $812,594.00. Thiyagarajan, Magesh (Principal), "Plasma Assisted Microbial Decontamination for Food Product Processing Industries...processes and products including processing and preservation of food items such as 86 vegetables, fruits and packaged foods , medical devices and

  1. Design Experiments in Educational Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Paul; Confrey, Jere; diSessa, Andrea; Lehrer, Richard; Schauble, Leona

    2003-01-01

    Indicates the range of purposes and variety of settings in which design experiments have been conducted, delineating five crosscutting features that collectively differentiate design experiments from other methodologies. Clarifies what is involved in preparing for and carrying out a design experiment and in conducting a retrospective analysis of…

  2. Development of a plasma driven permeation experiment for TPE

    DOE PAGES

    Buchenauer, Dean; Kolasinski, Robert; Shimada, Masa; ...

    2014-04-18

    Experiments on retention of hydrogen isotopes (including tritium) at temperatures less than 800 ?C have been carried out in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory [1,2]. To provide a direct measurement of plasma driven permeation in plasma facing materials at temperatures reaching 1000 ?C, a new TPE membrane holder has been built to hold test specimens (=1 mm in thickness) at high temperature while measuring tritium permeating through the membrane from the plasma facing side. This measurement is accomplished by employing a carrier gas that transports the permeating tritium from the backside of the membrane to ionmore » chambers giving a direct measurement of the plasma driven tritium permeation rate. Isolation of the membrane cooling and sweep gases from TPE’s vacuum chamber has been demonstrated by sealing tests performed up to 1000 ?C of a membrane holder design that provides easy change out of membrane specimens between tests. Simulations of the helium carrier gas which transports tritium to the ion chamber indicate a very small pressure drop (~700 Pa) with good flow uniformity (at 1000 sccm). Thermal transport simulations indicate that temperatures up to 1000 ?C are expected at the highest TPE fluxes.« less

  3. Development of a plasma driven permeation experiment for TPE

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean; Kolasinski, Robert; Shimada, Masa; Donovan, David; Youchison, Dennis; Merrill, Brad

    2014-04-18

    Experiments on retention of hydrogen isotopes (including tritium) at temperatures less than 800 ?C have been carried out in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory [1,2]. To provide a direct measurement of plasma driven permeation in plasma facing materials at temperatures reaching 1000 ?C, a new TPE membrane holder has been built to hold test specimens (=1 mm in thickness) at high temperature while measuring tritium permeating through the membrane from the plasma facing side. This measurement is accomplished by employing a carrier gas that transports the permeating tritium from the backside of the membrane to ion chambers giving a direct measurement of the plasma driven tritium permeation rate. Isolation of the membrane cooling and sweep gases from TPE’s vacuum chamber has been demonstrated by sealing tests performed up to 1000 ?C of a membrane holder design that provides easy change out of membrane specimens between tests. Simulations of the helium carrier gas which transports tritium to the ion chamber indicate a very small pressure drop (~700 Pa) with good flow uniformity (at 1000 sccm). Thermal transport simulations indicate that temperatures up to 1000 ?C are expected at the highest TPE fluxes.

  4. Freak waves in negative-ion plasmas: an experiment revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourakis, Ioannis; Elkamash, Ibrahem; Reville, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Extreme events in the form of rogue waves (freak waves) occur widely in the open sea. These are space- and time-localised excitations, which appear unexpectedly and are characterised by a significant amplitude. Beyond ocean dynamics, the mechanisms underlying rogue wave formation are now being investigated in various physical contexts, including materials science, nonlinear optics and plasma physics, to mention but a few. We have undertaken an investigation, from first principles, of the occurrence of rogue waves associated with the propagation of electrostatic wavepackets in plasmas. Motivated by recent experimental considerations involving freak waves in negative-ion plasmas (NIP), we have addresed the occurrence of freak waves in NIP from first principles. An extended range of plasma parameter values was identified, where freak wave formation is possible, in terms of relevant plasma parameters. Our results extend -and partly contradict- the underlying assumptions in the interpretation of the aforementioned experiment, where a critical plasma configuration was considered and a Gardner equation approach was adopted. This work was supported from CPP/QUB funding. One of us (I. Elkamash) acknowledges financial support by an Egyptian Government fellowship.

  5. Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) - parameters and potentials for fusion plasma-wall interaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Masashi Shimada; Robert D. Kolasinski; J. Phillip Sharpe; Rion A. Causey

    2011-08-01

    The Tritium plasma experiment (TPE) is a unique facility devoted to experiments on the behavior of deuterium/tritium in toxic (e.g. beryllium) and radioactive materials for fusion plasma-wall interaction (PWI) studies. A Langmuir probe was added to the system to characterize the plasma conditions in TPE. With this new diagnostic, we found the achievable electron temperature ranged from 5.0 to 10.0 eV, the electron density varied from 5.0 x 10{sup 16} to 2.5 x 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}, and the ion flux density varied between 5.0 x 10{sup 20} to 2.5 x 10{sup 22} m{sup -2}s{sup -1} along the centerline of the plasma. A comparison of these plasma parameters with the conditions expected for the plasma facing components (PFCs) in ITER shows that TPE is capable of achieving most (approximately 800 m{sup 2} of 850 m{sup 2} total PFCs area) of the expected ion flux density and electron density conditions.

  6. Tritium plasma experiment: Parameters and potentials for fusion plasma-wall interaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Masashi; Sharpe, J. Phillip; Kolasinski, Robert D.; Causey, Rion A.

    2011-08-15

    The tritium plasma experiment (TPE) is a unique facility devoted to experiments on the behavior of deuterium/tritium in toxic (e.g., beryllium) and radioactive materials for fusion plasma-wall interaction studies. A Langmuir probe was added to the system to characterize the plasma conditions in TPE. With this new diagnostic, we found the achievable electron temperature ranged from 5.0 to 10.0 eV, the electron density varied from 5.0 x 10{sup 16} to 2.5 x 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}, and the ion flux density varied between 5.0 x 10{sup 20} to 2.5 x 10{sup 22} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} along the centerline of the plasma. A comparison of these plasma parameters with the conditions expected for the plasma facing components (PFCs) in ITER shows that TPE is capable of achieving most ({approx}800 m{sup 2} of 850 m{sup 2} total PFCs area) of the expected ion flux density and electron density conditions.

  7. Progress in Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on a Small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Royce; Lopez, M.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. L.; Schlank, C.; Sherman, J.; Stutzman, B. S.; Zuniga, J.

    2012-10-01

    At the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), a small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) is being developed to utilize the reputed high densities (10^13 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) [1], for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range and employs an electromagnet to provide the external energy in the plasma's magnetic field to transition from the H-Mode to the Helicon Mode. An acceleration coil, currently under construction, will place the plasma in the vacuum chamber for optical and particle probing. With the initial construction phase complete and first plasmas attained, HPX is constructing triple and mach particle probes, magnetic probes, and a single point 300 W Thompson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel DAQ system capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, magnetic coils, and qualitative observations from the optical and electric diagnostics are to be reported. [4pt] [1] K. Toki, et al., Thin Solid Films 506-507 (2005).

  8. Plasma Physics Research at an Undergraduate Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padalino, Stephen

    2007-11-01

    Undergraduate research experiences have motivated many physics majors to continue their studies at the graduate level. The Department of Physics and Astronomy at SUNY Geneseo, a primarily undergraduate institution, recognizes this simple reality and is committed to ensuring research opportunities are available to interested majors beginning as early as their freshman year. Every year for more than a decade, as many as two dozen students and 8 faculty members have worked on projects related to high energy density physics and inertial confinement fusion during the summer months and the academic year. By working with their research sponsors, it has been possible to identify an impressive number of projects suitable for an institution such as Geneseo. These projects tend to be hands-on and require teamwork and innovation to be successful. They also take advantage of in-house capabilities such as the 2 MV tandem pelletron accelerator, a scanning electron microscope, a duoplasmatron ion deposition system and a 64 processor computing cluster. The end products of their efforts are utilized at the sponsoring facilities in support of nationally recognized programs. In this talk, I will discuss a number of these projects and point out what made them attractive and appropriate for an institution like Geneseo, the direct and indirect benefits of the research opportunities for the students and faculty, and how the national programs benefited from the cost-effective use of undergraduate research. In addition, I will discuss the importance of exposure for both students and faculty mentors to the larger scientific community through posters presentations at annual meetings such as the DPP and DNP. Finally, I will address the need for even greater research opportunities for undergraduate students in the future and the importance of establishing longer ``educational pipelines'' to satisfy the ever growing need for top-tier scientists and engineers in industry, academia and the

  9. Stark broadening data for stellar plasma research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijević, M. S.

    Results of an effort to provide to astrophysicists and physicists an as much as possible complete set of Stark broadening parameters needed for stellar opacity calculations, stellar atmosphere modelling, abundance determinations and diagnostics of different plasmas in astrophysics, physics and plasma technology, are presented. Stark broadening has been considered within the semiclassical perturbation, and the modified semiempirical approaches.

  10. The plasma dynamics of hypersonic spacecraft: Applications of laboratory simulations and active in situ experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, N. H.; Samir, Uri

    1986-01-01

    Attempts to gain an understanding of spacecraft plasma dynamics via experimental investigation of the interaction between artificially synthesized, collisionless, flowing plasmas and laboratory test bodies date back to the early 1960's. In the past 25 years, a number of researchers have succeeded in simulating certain limited aspects of the complex spacecraft-space plasma interaction reasonably well. Theoretical treatments have also provided limited models of the phenomena. Several active experiments were recently conducted from the space shuttle that specifically attempted to observe the Orbiter-ionospheric interaction. These experiments have contributed greatly to an appreciation for the complexity of spacecraft-space plasma interaction but, so far, have answered few questions. Therefore, even though the plasma dynamics of hypersonic spacecraft is fundamental to space technology, it remains largely an open issue. A brief overview is provided of the primary results from previous ground-based experimental investigations and the preliminary results of investigations conducted on the STS-3 and Spacelab 2 missions. In addition, several, as yet unexplained, aspects of the spacecraft-space plasma interaction are suggested for future research.

  11. Research on atmospheric pressure plasma processing sewage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gui-cai; Na, Yan-xiang; Dong, Xiao-long; Sun, Xiao-liang

    2013-08-01

    The water pollution has become more and more serious with the industrial progress and social development, so it become a worldwide leading environmental management problem to human survival and personal health, therefore, countries are looking for the best solution. Generally speaking, in this paper the work has the following main achievements and innovation: (1) Developed a new plasma device--Plasma Water Bed. (2) At atmospheric pressure condition, use oxygen, nitrogen, argon and helium as work gas respectively, use fiber spectrometer to atmospheric pressure plasma discharge the emission spectrum of measurement, due to the different work gas producing active particle is different, so can understand discharge, different particle activity, in the treatment of wastewater, has the different degradation effects. (3) Methyl violet solution treatment by plasma water bed. Using plasma drafting make active particles and waste leachate role, observe the decolorization, measurement of ammonia nitrogen removal.

  12. New advances in thermal plasma research. [in upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, C. R.; Baugher, C. R.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent measurements obtained of the cold or thermal plasma of the earth's magnetosphere, which is believed to originate in the ionosphere, are reviewed. Consideration is given to the results of ATS 6 measurements which indicated unexpectedly high plasma temperatures and varied pitch-angle distributions, and the data from the low-energy plasma experiments on board GEOS 1 and 2 and ISEE 1, which were intended to clarify the ATS 6 results. These later measurements of ion composition, plasma energy and plasma distribution are noted to have confirmed earlier data and discovered new plasma components (D(+) or He(+2)), an intermixing of cold ionospheric plasma and hot magnetospheric plasma, the ordering of the plasma by the magnetic field rather than the ram direction in the outer magnetosphere, and wave phenomena. Questions remaining concerning the temperature and composition distributions of the plasmasphere and plasma trough, the relative densities of the cold and warmer components of the magnetosphere, plasma energization mechanisms, and the relative mix of the various plasma distributions are indicated.

  13. Research experiments at Hangar L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Research assistant Trisha Bruno performs an analysis on potato samples at Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research she is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship.

  14. Research experiments at Hangar L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Research scientist Greg Goins monitors radish growth under a sulfur-microwave light at Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research he is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long- duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship.

  15. Experience Effect in E-Learning Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bing; Xu, WenXia; Ge, Jun

    This study is a productivity review on the literature gleaned from SSCI, SCIE databases concerning experience in E-Learning research. The result indicates that the number of literature productions on experience effect in ELearning research is still growing from 2005. The main research development country is Croatia, and from the analysis of the publication year, the number of papers is increasing to the peaking in 2010. And the main source title is British Journal of Educational Technology. In addition the subject area concentrated on Education & Educational Research. Moreover the research focuses on are mainly survey research and empirical research, in order to explore experience effect in E-Learning research. Also the limitations and future research of these research were discussed, so that the direction for further research work can be exploited

  16. Recent Data Research Activities on Basic Plasma Research in Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jung-Sik; Song, Mi-Young; Kwon, Deuk-Chul; Chang, Won-Seok

    2011-05-11

    Since the characteristics of plasmas depend strongly on the interactions between plasma particles such as electron, ion, and neutrals, a well-established atomic and molecular database is needed to understand and produce various types of plasma. Thus, here the work conducted at the Data Center for Plasma Properties over last 5 years on the systematic synthesis and assessment of fundamental knowledge on low-energy electron interactions with plasma processing gases is briefly summarized and discussed. This work mostly emphasis on the electron interaction processes.

  17. Commercialization of Plasma-Assisted Technologies: The Indian Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, P. I.

    The paper describes an initiative by the Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), India in establishing links with the Indian industry for developing and commercialising advanced plasma-based industrial technologies. This has culminated in the creation of a self-financing technology development, incubation, demonstration and delivery facility. A business plan for converting the knowledge base to commercially viable technologies conceived technology as a product and the industry as the market and addressed issues like resistance to new technologies, the key role of entrepreneur, thrust areas and the necessity of technology incubation and delivery. Success of this strategy is discussed in a few case studies. We conclude by identifying the cost, environmental, strategic and techno-economic aspects, which would be the prime drivers for plasma-assisted manufacturing technology in India.

  18. Progress on Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Royce; Azzari, Phillip; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Frank, John; Karama, Jackson; Hopson, Jordan; Paolino, Richard; Sandri, Eva; Sherman, Justin; Wright, Erin; Turk, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    The small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), continues to progress toward utilizing the reputed high densities (1013 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) [1] of helicons, for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas (~ 20 - 30 ns) induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. HPX is constructing RF field corrected Langmuir probe raw data will be collected and used to measure the plasma's density, temperature, and potentially the structure and behavior during experiments. Our 2.5 J YAG laser Thomson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system is capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for HPX plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, Helicon Mode development, magnetic coils, and observations from the Thomson Scattering, particle, and electromagnetic scattering diagnostics will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15.

  19. Updates to the Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Royce; Azzari, Phil; Crilly, Paul; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Karama, Jackson; Paolino, Richard; Schlank, Carter; Sherman, Justin; Emami, Tooran; Turk, Jeremy

    2016-10-01

    The small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), continues to progress toward utilizing the reputed high densities (1013 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) [1] of helicons, for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas ( 20 - 30 ns) induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. HPX is constructing RF field corrected Langmuir probe raw data will be collected and used to measure the plasma's density, temperature, and potentially the structure and behavior during experiments. Our 2.5 J YAG laser Thomson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system is capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for HPX plasma property investigations are being developed and tested. Progress on the construction of the RF coupling system, Helicon Mode development, and magnetic coils, along with observations from the Thomson Scattering, particle, and electromagnetic scattering diagnostics will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15-16.

  20. Development of a non-ideal plasma target for non-linear beam plasma interaction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katagiri, K.; Nishinomiya, S.; Niinou, T.; Kaneko, J.; Hasegawa, J.; Ogawa, M.; Oguri, Y.

    2007-07-01

    A shock-driven plasma target was developed to examine non-linear interactions between low-energy heavy ions and cold-dense plasmas. MD calculations predicted that beam-plasma coupling constant γ˜0.1 must be achieved to observe the non-linearity, which corresponds to the plasma coupling constant Γ≈0.2 for projectiles of vproj≈10 keV/u and q≈2. One-dimensional numerical estimations using SESAME equation of state showed that a shock wave propagating in 5-Torr H2 gas with 47 km/s must be produced to satisfy Γ≈0.2. Utilizing an electromagnetic shock tube with a peak current of 50 kA and a current rise time of 800 ns, we achieved a shock speed of 45 km/s. The electron density distribution of the shock-produced plasma along the beam axis was measured by a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. From this measurement we confirmed that the electron density was over 1017 cm-3 and the homogeneity was acceptable during several hundred nanoseconds. The electron temperature was also determined by optical spectroscopic measurements. The Coulomb coupling constant was evaluated using these experimental data to investigate feasibility of the beam-plasma interaction experiments.

  1. Progress on Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R. W.; Duke-Tinson, O.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. J.; Lopez, M.; Karama, J.; Paolino, R. N.; Schlank, C.; Sherman, J.; Stutzman, B. S.; Crilly, P. B.

    2013-10-01

    At the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), a small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) is being developed to utilize the reputed high densities (1013 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T), for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. We employ a 400 to 1000 Gauss electromagnet that promotes energy conservation in the plasma via external energy production in the magnetic field facilitated by decreased inertial effects, in order to reach the Helicon Mode. With the initial construction phase complete and repeatable plasmas attained, HPX is constructing triple and mach particle probes, magnetic probes, and a single point 300 W Thompson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for HPX plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, Helicon Mode development, magnetic coils, and observations from the optical, particle, and electromagnetic scattering diagnostics will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY12.

  2. Plasma medicine—current state of research and medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltmann, K.-D.; von Woedtke, Th

    2017-01-01

    Plasma medicine means the direct application of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) on or in the human body for therapeutic purposes. Further, the field interacts strongly with results gained for biological decontamination. Experimental research as well as first practical application is realized using two basic principles of CAP sources: dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) and atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJ). Originating from the fundamental insights that the biological effects of CAP are most probably caused by changes of the liquid environment of cells, and are dominated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS), basic mechanisms of biological plasma activity are identified. It was demonstrated that there is no increased risk of cold plasma application and, above all, there are no indications for genotoxic effects. The most important biological effects of cold atmospheric pressure plasma were identified: (1) inactivation of a broad spectrum of microorganisms including multidrug resistant ones; (2) stimulation of cell proliferation and tissue regeneration with lower plasma treatment intensity (treatment time); (3) inactivation of cells by initialization of programmed cell death (apoptosis) with higher plasma treatment intensity (treatment time). In recent years, the main focus of clinical applications was in the field of wound healing and treatment of infective skin diseases. First CAP sources are CE-certified as medical devices now which is the main precondition to start the introduction of plasma medicine into clinical reality. Plasma application in dentistry and, above all, CAP use for cancer treatment are becoming more and more important research fields in plasma medicine. A further in-depth knowledge of control and adaptation of plasma parameters and plasma geometries is needed to obtain suitable and reliable plasma sources for the different therapeutic indications and to open up new fields of medical application.

  3. Plasma Simulation for the SHIP Experiment at GDT

    SciTech Connect

    Anikeev, A.V.; Bagryansky, P.A.; Collatz, S.; Noack, K

    2005-01-15

    The concept of the Synthesized Hot Ion Plasmoid (SHIP) experiment at the gas dynamic trap (GDT) facility of the Budker Institute Novosibirsk was presented at the 29{sup th} EPS Conference. During the last year several numerical simulations were made by means of the Integrated Transport Code System (ITCS) to determine the best experimental scenario for getting high plasma parameters. This contribution presents important results of the recent numerical simulations of SHIP by means of the ITCS modules.

  4. Research experiments at Hangar L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Visiting scientist Cheryl Frazier monitors a prototype composting machine in Hangar L at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The research she is performing is one of many studies at the Biological Sciences Branch in the Spaceport Engineering and Technology Directorate at Kennedy Space Center. The branch's operations and research areas include life sciences Space Shuttle payloads, bioregenerative life-support for long-duration spaceflight and environmental/ecological stewardship.

  5. The Tordo 1 polar cusp barium plasma injection experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Jeffries, R. A.; Roach, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    In January 1975, two barium plasma injection experiments were carried out with rockets launched into the upper atmosphere where field lines from the dayside cusp region intersect the ionosphere. The Tordo 1 experiment took place near the beginning of a worldwide magnetic storm. It became a polar cap experiment almost immediately as convection perpendicular to the magnetic field moved the fluorescent plasma jet away from the cusp across the polar cap in an antisunward direction. Convection across the polar cap with an average velocity of more than 1 km/s was observed for nearly 40 min until the barium flux tubes encountered large electron fields associated with a poleward bulge of the auroral oval near Greenland. Prior to the encounter with the aurora near Greenland there is evidence of upward acceleration of the barium ions while they were in the polar cap. The three-dimensional observations of the plasma orientation and motion give an insight into convection from the cusp region across the polar cap, the orientation of the polar cap magnetic field lines out to several earth radii, the causes of polar cap magnetic perturbations, and parallel acceleration processes.

  6. Supersonic gas jets for laser-plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    Schmid, K; Veisz, L

    2012-05-01

    We present an in-depth analysis of De Laval nozzles, which are ideal for gas jet generation in a wide variety of experiments. Scaling behavior of parameters especially relevant to laser-plasma experiments as jet collimation, sharpness of the jet edges and Mach number of the resulting jet is studied and several scaling laws are given. Special attention is paid to the problem of the generation of microscopic supersonic jets with diameters as small as 150 μm. In this regime, boundary layers dominate the flow formation and have to be included in the analysis.

  7. Experiments on Negative Ion Plasmas in a Q-Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Tao

    Three experiments on negative ion plasmas in the University of Iowa Q-machine IQ-2 are described in this thesis. In the Lower-Hybrid wave experiment, the low-frequency (ion-ion mode) waves are excited, waves propagate at a right angle to the magnetic field. The wave frequencies increase as the negative ion concentration increases, in agreement with the dispersion relation obtained from fluid theory. In the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability experiment, the negative ions have a generally destabilizing effect on the instability driven by a relative drift between ions in adjacent layers. However, for large negative ion concentrations, enhanced radial diffusion associated with the Kelvin-Helmholtz oscillations tends to have a stabilizing effect due to a "mixing" of ion flows in adjacent layer. In the diffusion experiment, the K^ {+} ions experience a displacement across the magnetic filed on the order of their gyroradius upon collision with a negative ion, leading to an enhancement in the rate of cross-field diffusion over that expected in the ordinary K^{+}/electron plasma.

  8. Research on Orbital Plasma: Electrodynamics (ROPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samir, Uri; Fontheim, Ernest G.

    2000-01-01

    Enhancements of the temperature of electrons in spacecraft plasma wakes have been reported for numerous cases and this phenomenon has been discussed both empirically and theoretically. However, very few measurements seem to have been made of the ion temperature within plasma wakes-possibly because the great majority of ion measurements were focussed on obtaining geophysical parameters and, hence, were confined to the region ahead of the spacecraft. Recently, however, an enhancement of the temperature of ions was discovered in data obtained in the wake of the Space Shuttle during the Spacelab-2 mission. At the time of that publication, this was the only known observation of this type. Herein, we report an additional case of ion temperature enhancement in a plasma wake. The data were taken during the Tethered Satellite System Reflight mission (TSS-1R) in the wake of the tethered satellite during passive (no current flow) operations. The measurements were obtained with the Differential Ion Flux Probe, or DIFP.

  9. Lightweight Portable Plasma Medical Device - Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Guadalupe Vidal, Kim Pham, Magesh Thiyagarajan. Effective deactivation of Bacillus cereus and Salmonella Typhimurium in chicken poultry , eggs...Pham, Magesh Thiyagarajan. Effective deactivation of Bacillus cereus and Salmonella Typhimurium in chicken poultry , eggs, tomato and papaya using non...Bacillus cereus and Salmonella Typhimurium in chicken 81 poultry , eggs, tomato and papaya. (Galveston, TX: 10th Annual Pathways Research

  10. Magnetospheric radio and plasma wave research - 1987-1990

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, W.S. )

    1991-01-01

    This review covers research performed in the area of magnetospheric plasma waves and wave-particle interactions as well as magnetospheric radio emissions. The report focuses on the near-completion of the discovery phase of radio and plasma wave phenomena in the planetary magnetospheres with the successful completion of the Voyager 2 encounters of Neptune and Uranus. Consideration is given to the advances made in detailed studies and theoretical investigations of radio and plasma wave phenomena in the terrestrial magnetosphere or in magnetospheric plasmas in general.

  11. Studies of dynamic processes related to active experiments in space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Peter M.; Neubert, Torsten

    1992-01-01

    This is the final report for grant NAGw-2055, 'Studies of Dynamic Processes Related to Active Experiments in Space Plasmas', covering research performed at the University of Michigan. The grant was awarded to study: (1) theoretical and data analysis of data from the CHARGE-2 rocket experiment (1keV; 1-46 mA electron beam ejections) and the Spacelab-2 shuttle experiment (1keV; 100 mA); (2) studies of the interaction of an electron beam, emitted from an ionospheric platform, with the ambient neutral atmosphere and plasma by means of a newly developed computer simulation model, relating model predictions with CHARGE-2 observations of return currents observed during electron beam emissions; and (3) development of a self-consistent model for the charge distribution on a moving conducting tether in a magnetized plasma and for the potential structure in the plasma surrounding the tether. Our main results include: (1) the computer code developed for the interaction of electrons beams with the neutral atmosphere and plasma is able to model observed return fluxes to the CHARGE-2 sounding rocket payload; and (2) a 3-D electromagnetic and relativistic particle simulation code was developed.

  12. Initial experiments of RF gas plasma source for heavy ionfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, L.; Hall, R.; Molvik, A.W.; Chacon-Golcher, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Leung, K.N.; Reijonen, J.

    2002-05-22

    The Source Injector Program for the US Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is currently exploring the feasibility of using RF gas plasma sources for a HIF driver. This source technology is presently the leading candidate for the multiple aperture concept, in which bright millimeter size beamlets are extracted and accelerated electrostatically up to 1 MeV before the beamlets are allowed to merge and form 1 A beams. Initial experiments have successfully demonstrated simultaneously high current density, {approx} 100 mA/cm{sup 2} and fast turn on, {approx} 1 {micro}s. These experiments were also used to explore operating ranges for pressure and RF power. Results from these experiments are presented as well as progress and plans for the next set of experiments for these sources.

  13. Modeling of Spherical Torus Plasmas for Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    R. Kaita; S. Jardin; B. Jones; C. Kessel; R. Majeski; J. Spaleta; R. Woolley; L. Zakharo; B. Nelson; M. Ulrickson

    2002-01-29

    Liquid metal walls have the potential to solve first-wall problems for fusion reactors, such as heat load and erosion of dry walls, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. In the near term, such walls can serve as the basis for schemes to stabilize magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. Furthermore, the low recycling characteristics of lithium walls can be used for particle control. Liquid lithium experiments have already begun in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U). Plasmas limited with a toroidally localized limiter have been investigated, and experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter are in progress. A liquid surface module (LSM) has been proposed for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In this larger ST, plasma currents are in excess of 1 MA and a typical discharge radius is about 68 cm. The primary motivation for the LSM is particle control, and options for mounting it on the horizontal midplane or in the divertor region are under consideration. A key consideration is the magnitude of the eddy currents at the location of a liquid lithium surface. During plasma start up and disruptions, the force due to such currents and the magnetic field can force a conducting liquid off of the surface behind it. The Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) has been used to estimate the magnitude of this effect. This program is a two dimensional, time dependent, free boundary simulation code that solves the MHD equations for an axisymmetric toroidal plasma. From calculations that match actual ST equilibria, the eddy current densities can be determined at the locations of the liquid lithium. Initial results have shown that the effects could be significant, and ways of explicitly treating toroidally local structures are under investigation.

  14. Experimental characterization of a coaxial plasma accelerator for a colliding plasma experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wiechula, J.; Hock, C.; Iberler, M.; Manegold, T.; Schönlein, A.; Jacoby, J.

    2015-04-15

    We report experimental results of a single coaxial plasma accelerator in preparation for a colliding plasma experiment. The utilized device consisted of a coaxial pair of electrodes, accelerating the plasma due to J×B forces. A pulse forming network, composed of three capacitors connected in parallel, with a total capacitance of 27 μF was set up. A thyratron allowed to switch the maximum applied voltage of 9 kV. Under these conditions, the pulsed currents reached peak values of about 103 kA. The measurements were performed in a small vacuum chamber with a neutral-gas prefill at gas pressures between 10 Pa and 14 000 Pa. A gas mixture of ArH{sub 2} with 2.8% H{sub 2} served as the discharge medium. H{sub 2} was chosen in order to observe the broadening of the H{sub β} emission line and thus estimate the electron density. The electron density for a single plasma accelerator reached peak values on the order of 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3}. Electrical parameters, inter alia inductance and resistance, were determined for the LCR circuit during the plasma acceleration as well as in a short circuit case. Depending on the applied voltage, the inductance and resistance reached values ranging from 194 nH to 216 nH and 13 mΩ to 23 mΩ, respectively. Furthermore, the plasma velocity was measured using a fast CCD camera. Plasma velocities of 2 km/s up to 17 km/s were observed, the magnitude being highly correlated with gas pressure and applied voltage.

  15. Current status of IMS plasma wave research. [International Magnetospheric Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. R.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with a review of the status of magnetospheric plasma wave science as a result of the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS). The presence of an international effort has supported the development and completion of the numerous magnetospheric science spacecraft launched during the IMS, including GEOS, ISEE, and EXOS B. Ground-based VLF observations are considered along with coordinated ground-based and satellite observations. During the IMS, plasma wave research using satellite data has covered a wide range of subjects. Attention is given to magnetospheric electrostatic emissions, magnetospheric electromagnetic plasma waves, continuum radiation, auroral kilometric radiation, auroral zone plasma waves, plasma waves in the magnetosheath and near the mangetopause, and plasma waves at the bow shock.

  16. Ion Heating Experiments in a Supersonic Plasma Flow for an Advanced Plasma Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Akira; Hosokawa, Yohei; Hatanaka, Motoi; Yagai, Tsuyoshi; Tobari, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Kunihiko; Inutake, Masaaki

    2003-10-01

    In the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) project in NASA, the combined system of the ion cyclotron heating and the magnetic nozzle is proposed to control a ratio od specific impulse to thrust at constant power. By now, few attempt of a direct ion heating for fast flowing plasma by waves has been done. Ion heating in a fast flowing plasma might be difficult because of the short transit time for ions to pass through a heating region only once and the modification of ion cyclotron resonance due to the effect of Doppler shift. Ion heating experiments are performed in a fast flowing plasma produced by Magneto-Plasma-Dynamic Arcjet (MPDA) operated with an externally-applied magnetic field. RF waves with an ion cyclotron range of frequency is excited by a pair of loop antennas or a helical antenna. An increase of plasma stored energy measured by a diamagnetic loop coil is observed when the waves are excited with various azimuthal mode numbers in several magnetic nozzle configurations. It is most effective to heat ions to excite the waves with an azimuthal mode number of m=±1. Dispersion relations of the propagating wave are obtained and compared with theoretical ones.

  17. Development of Low Pressure High Density Plasmas on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Royce; Azzari, Phillip; Crilly, Paul; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Karama, Jackson; Paolino, Richard; Schlank, Carter; Sherman, Justin

    2014-10-01

    The small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), continues to progress toward utilizing the reputed high densities (10 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) of helicons, for eventual high temperature and density diagnostic development in future laboratory investigations. HPX is designed to create repeatedly stable plasmas induced by an RF frequency in the 10 to 70 MHz range. We employ a 400 to 1000 Gauss electromagnet that promotes energy conservation in the plasma via external energy production in the magnetic field facilitated by decreased inertial effects, in order to reach the Helicon Mode. HPX is completing construction of triple and mach particle probes, magnetic probes, and is designing a single point 300 W Thompson Scattering system backed by a 32-channel Data Acquisition (DAQ) system capable 12 bits of sampling precision at 2 MS/s for HPX plasma property investigations. Progress on the development of the RF coupling system, Helicon Mode development, magnetic coils, and observations from the optical, particle, and electromagnetic scattering diagnostics will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY13.

  18. Academic Factors that Affect Undergraduate Research Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taraban, Roman; Logue, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate research experiences are considered an essential component in college curricula, and there is an ideological push to provide these experiences to all students. However, it is not clear whether engagement in research is better suited for higher ability undergraduates late in their programs or for all undergraduates and whether…

  19. Designing Effective Research Experiences for Undergraduates (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones Whyte, P.; Dalbotten, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    The undergraduate research experience has been recognized as a valuable component of preparation for graduate study. As competition for spaces in graduate schools become more keen students benefit from a formal introduction to the life of a scholar. Over the last twenty years a model of preparing students for graduate study with the research experience as the base has been refined at the University of Minnesota. The experience includes assignment with a faculty member and a series of seminars that support the experience. The seminars cover topics to include academic writing, scholarly literature review, writing of the abstract, research subject protection protocols, GRE test preparation, opportunities to interact with graduate student, preparing the graduate school application, and preparation of a poster to demonstrate the results of the research. The next phase of the process is to determine the role of the undergraduate research experience in the graduate school admission process.

  20. Swirling Annular Flow Experiments with Application to Plasma Torches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, L. E.; Settles, G. S.; Miller, J. D.

    2001-11-01

    Swirling flows have many applications such as combustors and cyclone separators. Here, a turbulent swirling annular cold-flow experiment is conducted in order to gain insight into conditions within a plasma cutting torch. Compressed air is forced through six circumferentially-spaced holes that impart tangential velocity to the flow at the annulus inlet. The flow subsequently traverses an annulus of L/D1 =1.8 before exiting through a sonic nozzle. The annulus (created by a cylindrical cathode in the center of the actual plasma torch) is viewable through an outer plexiglass cylinder in our 11:1 scaled-up cold-flow apparatus. Surface oil-flow visualization and laser sheet imaging are employed to investigate the annular flowfield at a Reynolds number of about 1000 based on gap width D2-D1. Results of these experiments, leading to a physical model of the flowfield, are shown. These results are helpful in understanding and improving the fluid-dynamic behavior of actual plasma torches, widely used to cut sheet metal in manufacturing. Supported by Hypertherm Inc.

  1. TRW plasma wave experiment for the IMP-H mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Virobik, P. F.; Scarf, F. L.

    1973-01-01

    The IMP-H plasma wave experiment is designed to extend knowledge of wave-particle interactions in the disturbed cislunar region, the distant geomagnetic tail, the upstream solar wind, and the flanks of the magnetosheath-shock interface. It is expected to identify plasma instabilities, study particle acceleration and heating at collisionless shocks and other discontinuities, analyze turbulent conductivity and field line merging, and provide new information on dissipation processes for suprathermal particles. Instrumentation for the plasma wave experiment is designed to measure local electric and magnetic field oscillations over the frequency range 10 Hz to 100 kHz. A 24 inch electric dipole, a 7 inch diameter air core search coil, and the associated preamplifiers are mounted on a spacecraft counterweight boom. The frequency range of 10 Hz to 100 kHz for both E and B is processed using an eight-channel spectrum analyzer located in the instrument main-body package (a standard IMP trapezoidal module, 3 inches high). Electric fields as small as 10-100 microvolts/meter and magnetic signals as small as 1-3 milligamma will be detected.

  2. The language of 'experience' in nursing research.

    PubMed

    Allen, David; Cloyes, Kristin

    2005-06-01

    This paper is an analysis of how the signifier 'experience' is used in nursing research. We identify a set of issues we believe accompany the use of experience but are rarely addressed. These issues are embedded in a spectrum that includes ontological commitments, visions of the person/self and its relation to 'society', understandings of research methodology and the politics of nursing. We argue that a poststructuralist understanding of the language of experience in research opens up additional ways to analyze the relationship between the conduct of nursing research and cultural/political commitments.

  3. Constituting Information Technology Research: The Experience of IT Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pham, Binh; Bruce, Christine; Stoodley, Ian

    2005-01-01

    The collective consciousness of effective groups of researchers is characterized by shared understandings of their research object or territory. In this study, we adopted a phenomenographic approach to investigate information technology (IT) research, and its objects and territories, as they are constituted in the experience of IT researchers.…

  4. Los Alamos research in nozzle based coaxial plasma thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuer, Jay; Schoenberg, Kurt; Gerwin, Richard; Henins, Ivars; Moses, Ronald, Jr.; Wurden, Glen

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: research approach; perspectives on efficient magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) operation; NASA and DOE supported research in ideal magnetohydrodynamic plasma acceleration and flow, electrode phenomena, and magnetic nozzles; and future research directions and plans.

  5. Researching the experience of kidney cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K

    2002-09-01

    The author's personal experience as a kidney cancer patient, researcher and founder of a kidney cancer support group forms the basis for consideration of the challenges involved in researching patients' experiences. The researcher needs to understand the variability of those experiences in both clinical and psychological-emotional terms, and in relation to the personal, familial and social contexts of the patient. It is also essential to define the purpose of the research and to show how an understanding of personal experiences of cancer can be used to enhance the quality of care for cancer patients. The research encounter with a patient is also in some respects a therapeutic encounter requiring a considerable degree of sensitivity on the part of the researcher. The person-centred approach of Carl Rogers is of value in supporting such an encounter.

  6. High Performance Plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Gates; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; J. Bialek; T. Bigelow; M. Bitter; P. Bonoli; D. Darrow; P. Efthimion; J. Ferron; E. Fredrickson; L. Grisham; J. Hosea; D. Johnson; R. Kaita; S. Kaye; S. Kubota; H. Kugel; B. LeBlanc; R. Maingi; J. Manickam; T.K. Mau; R.J. Maqueda; E. Mazzucato; J. Menard; D. Mueller; B. Nelson; N. Nishino; M. Ono; F. Paoletti; S. Paul; Y-K.M. Peng; C.K. Phillips; R. Raman; P. Ryan; S.A. Sabbagh; M. Schaffer; C.H. Skinner; D. Stutman; D. Swain; E. Synakowski; Y. Takase; J. Wilgen; J.R. Wilson; W. Zhu; S. Zweben; A. Bers; M. Carter; B. Deng; C. Domier; E. Doyle; M. Finkenthal; K. Hill; T. Jarboe; S. Jardin; H. Ji; L. Lao; K.C. Lee; N. Luhmann; R. Majeski; H. Park; T. Peebles; R.I. Pinsker; G. Porter; A. Ram; M. Rensink; T. Rognlien; D. Stotler; B. Stratton; G. Taylor; W. Wampler; G.A. Wurden; X.Q. Xu; L. Zeng; and the NSTX Team

    2001-07-10

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has produced toroidal plasmas at low aspect ratio (A = R/a = 0.86 m/0.68 m approximately equal to 1.3, where R is the major radius and a is the minor radius of the torus) with plasma currents of 1.4 MA. The rapid development of the machine has led to very exciting physics results during the first full year of physics operation. Pulse lengths in excess of 0.5 sec have been obtained with inductive current drive. Up to 4 MW of High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating power has been applied with 6 MW planned. Using only 2 MW of HHFW heating power clear evidence of electron heating is seen with HHFW, as observed by the multi-point Thomson scattering diagnostic. A noninductive current drive concept known as Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) has driven 260 kA of toroidal current. Neutral-beam heating power of 5 MW has been injected. Plasmas with beta toroidal (= 2 mu(subscript ''0'')

    /B(superscript ''2'') = a measure of magnetic confinement efficiency ) of 22% have been achieved, as calculated using the EFIT equilibrium reconstruction code. Beta-limiting phenomena have been observed, and the maximum beta toroidal scales with I(subscript ''p'')/aB(subscript ''t''). High frequency (>MHz) magnetic fluctuations have been observed. High-confinement mode plasmas are observed with confinement times of >100 msec. Beam-heated plasmas show energy confinement times in excess of those predicted by empirical scaling expressions. Ion temperatures in excess of 2.0 keV have been measured, and power balance suggests that the power loss from the ions to the electrons may exceed the calculated classical input power to the ions.

  7. The Skylab barium plasma injection experiments. I - Convection observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Davis, T. N.; Peek, H. M.

    1976-01-01

    Two barium-plasma injection experiments were carried out during magnetically active periods in conjunction with the Skylab 3 mission. The high-explosive shaped charges were launched near dawn on November 27 and December 4, 1973, UT. In both cases, the AE index was near 400 gammas, and extensive pulsating auroras covered the sky. The first experiment, Skylab Alpha, occurred in the waning phase of a 1000-gamma substorm, and the second, Skylab Beta, occurred in the expansive phase of an 800-gamma substorm. In both, the convection was generally magnetically eastward, with 100-km-level electric fields near 40 mV/m. However, in the Alpha experiment the observed orientation of the barium flux tube fit theoretical field lines having no parallel current, but the Beta flux-tube orientation indicated a substantial upward parallel sheet current.

  8. Volumetric-driven flows on the Plasma Couette Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Ken; Clark, M. M.; Lynn, J.; Siller, R.; Tabbutt, M.; Wallace, J.; Xu, Y.; Forest, C. B.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments for driving Keplerian-like flow profiles with the goal of exciting the magnetorotational instability (MRI) on the Plasma Couette Experiment Upgrade (PCX-U) are described. Instead of driving flow at the boundaries as is typical in many liquid metal Couette experiments, a global drive is implemented. A large (20+ A) radial current is drawn across a small (1-3 G) axial field generating torque across the whole profile. This volumetric-driven flow (VDF) is capable of producing profiles similar to Keplerian flow with Alfvén Mach numbers of order unity-ideal for MRI studies. Experimental measurements will be compared to numerical calculations that show that at sufficiently high magnetic and fluid Reynolds numbers, VDF can drive the MRI. This work is supported by the NSF.

  9. Doctoral Students' Experience of Information Technology Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Christine; Stoodley, Ian; Pham, Binh

    2009-01-01

    As part of their journey of learning to research, doctoral candidates need to become members of their research community. In part, this involves coming to be aware of their field in ways that are shared amongst longer-term members of the research community. One aspect of candidates' experience we need to understand, therefore, involves how they…

  10. Evaluation of a BSW Research Experience: Improving Student Research Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, Ellen E.; Hughes, Anne; Bowden, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the experience of 24 BSW students in a faculty-mentored undergraduate research experience (URE) over the course of 1 academic year. In particular, we sought to better understand students' self-perceived sense of competency across 15 specific research skills. In addition, we examined the URE's impact on students' knowledge…

  11. SUMMA hot-ion plasma heating research at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinmann, J. J.; Patch, R. W.; Lauver, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    The SUMMA superconducting magnetic mirror facility and the associated hot-ion plasma research were described. SUMMA is characterized by intense magnetic fields and a large-diameter working bore (41 cm diameter) with room-temperature access. The goal of the plasma research program is to produce steady-state plasmas of fusion reactor densities and temperatures (but not confinement times). The program includes electrode development to produce a hot, dense, large-volume, steady-state plasma and diagnostics development to document the plasma properties. SUMMA and its hot-ion plasma are ideally suited to develop advanced plasma diagnostics methods. Two such methods whose requirements are well matched to SUMMA are: (1) heavy ion beam probing to measure plasma space potential; and (2) submillimeter wavelength laser Thomson scattering to measure local ion temperature.

  12. On 45 Years of Space Plasma Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, M. C.

    2011-12-01

    After 47 years of immersion in space physics, I have many stories to tell, some of which are not suitable for all audiences and will remain untold today. But after a few such tales, I will recount the most satisfying research I have done and then outline a new book I am working on entitled "The Earth's Electric Field". I also will outline five sources of electric fields: thunderstorms, motions of the atmosphere, the solar wind, the magnetosphere, and wave phenomena. The most satisfying work I have published involves proof that the Earth was hit by a comet in 1908, studies of the long-lasting meteor trail during Leonids1998/9, and results of barium/TMA releases. On the human side, the most satisfying work has been with Cornell students, both undergraduate and graduate. Although many books have been written on the Earth's magnetic field, to my knowledge, none have been written on the electric field. This is not surprising since Gauss first noted that the Earth is a giant magnet hundreds of years ago. The first evidence of an electric field in the atmosphere was provided by Ben Franklin with his kite/thunderstorm experiments. We began considering the possibility of an electric field in space about 50 years ago, using the motion of auroral patches. Then, in the 1960s, Forrest Mozer and Ulf Fahleson showed that the electric field could be measured using rockets and, eventually, satellites. Luckily, I was Forrest's second student and Ulf was in Berkeley for a year, so I was in the perfect place for a graduate student. Thus began the quest for knowledge of the Earth's electric field, which continues today.

  13. Task toward a Realization of Commercial Tokamak Fusion Plants in 2050 -The Role of ITER and the Succeeding Developments- 3.Fusion Plasma Research toward Fusion Power Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Yutaka; Shimada, Michiya; Miura, Yukitoshi; Ogawa, Yuichi

    This section discusses fusion plasma research that needs to be carried out to develop fusion power plants. Burning plasma, in which self-heating by energetic alph aparticles plays an essential role, should be recognized as autonomous system. This is quite different from present plasma experiments, suggesting a possibility to yield some qualitative changes in fusion plasma research. Research with ITER is strongly expected to contribute to this burning plasma physics. In addition, plasma performance in steady-state and at high beta is very important in fusion power plants from the engineering and economical viewpoints. Plasma parameters expected for fusion power plants are discussed, and present status of experimental research is reviewed. Research in devices other than ITER with unique features would be instrumental for exploring high performance plasmas. A necessity of research complementary to ITER plasma is discussed.

  14. Gas-injection experiments on a dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Barnouin, O.; Javedani, J.; Del Medico, S.; Miley, G.H.; Bromley, B.

    1994-12-31

    Rockford Technology Associates, Inc. (RTA) has been doing experiments on the Dense Plasma focus (DPF) device at the Fusion Studies Laboratory of the University of Illinois. This DPF consists of four racks of five 2-{mu}F capacitors whose charge is switched onto the inner electrode of a plasma focus by four Trigatron spark gaps. The stored energy is 12.5 kJ at 25 kV. The bank is usually discharged in a static fill of H{sub 2} at {approx} 6 torr. Preliminary experiments aimed at exploring the potential of the DPF device as a magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster and as an x-ray source for lithography have investigated various alternative ways of injecting gas between the electrodes. One of those approaches consists of injecting gas from the tip of the inner electrode at a steady rate. In this operation, the DPF chamber pressure was held constant by running the vacuum pump at full throttle. This operation simulated simultaneous pulsed injection at the base insulator and electrode tip. Hydrogen was fed through a 1/16th-inch hole at a flow rate of {approx} 90 cm/s. Pulsing was then performed at 23 kV, and the corresponding variations of the current were observed using a Rogowski coil. It is found that the plasma collapses into a pinch at the same time as in conventional experiments using a static fill. The singularity in the current waveform is slightly smaller with tip injection, but its size and shape are easily reproducible. Further details and comparison of this operation with conventional pulsing will be presented.

  15. The AMPTE/CCE Hot-Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, E. G.; Ghielmetti, A.; Hertzberg, E.; Battel, S. J.; Altwegg-von Burg, K.; Balsiger, H.

    1985-05-01

    The Hot-Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) on the AMPTE-CCE spacecraft consists of an energetic ions-mass spectrometer and an electron background-environment monitor (EBEM). The mass spectrometer covers the entire mass per charge range from below 1 to greater than 150 amu/e and the energy per charge range from 0 eV/e (spacecraft potential) to 17 keV/e. The EBEM measures electrons between 50 eV and 25 keV in eight broad energy bands. The ion and electron data are processed into color spectrogram formats for the data pool.

  16. The AMPTE/CCE Hot-Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, E. G.; Ghielmetti, A.; Hertzberg, E.; Battel, S. J.; Altwegg-Von Burg, K.; Balsiger, H.

    1985-01-01

    The Hot-Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) on the AMPTE-CCE spacecraft consists of an energetic ions-mass spectrometer and an electron background-environment monitor (EBEM). The mass spectrometer covers the entire mass per charge range from below 1 to greater than 150 amu/e and the energy per charge range from 0 eV/e (spacecraft potential) to 17 keV/e. The EBEM measures electrons between 50 eV and 25 keV in eight broad energy bands. The ion and electron data are processed into color spectrogram formats for the data pool.

  17. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Researchers perform tests at Kennedy Space Center. New facilities for such research will be provided at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  18. Relaunch of the Interactive Plasma Physics Educational Experience (IPPEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, A.; Rusaitis, L.; Zwicker, A.; Stotler, D. P.

    2015-11-01

    In the late 1990's PPPL's Science Education Department developed an innovative online site called the Interactive Plasma Physics Educational Experience (IPPEX). It featured (among other modules) two Java based applications which simulated tokamak physics: A steady state tokamak (SST) and a time dependent tokamak (TDT). The physics underlying the SST and the TDT are based on the ASPECT code which is a global power balance code developed to evaluate the performance of fusion reactor designs. We have relaunched the IPPEX site with updated modules and functionalities: The site itself is now dynamic on all platforms. The graphic design of the site has been modified to current standards. The virtual tokamak programming has been redone in Javascript, taking advantage of the speed and compactness of the code. The GUI of the tokamak has been completely redesigned, including more intuitive representations of changes in the plasma, e.g., particles moving along magnetic field lines. The use of GPU accelerated computation provides accurate and smooth visual representations of the plasma. We will present the current version of IPPEX as well near term plans of incorporating real time NSTX-U data into the simulation.

  19. Flowing dusty plasma experiments: generation of flow and measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-12-01

    A variety of experimental techniques for the generation of subsonic/supersonic dust fluid flows and means of measuring such flow velocities are presented. The experiments have been carried out in a \\Pi -shaped dusty plasma experimental device with micron size kaolin/melamine formaldehyde particles embedded in a background of argon plasma created by a direct current glow discharge. A stationary dust cloud is formed over the cathode region by precisely balancing the pumping speed and gas flow rate. A flow of dust particles/fluid is generated by additional gas injection from a single or dual locations or by altering the dust confining potential. The flow velocity is then estimated by three different techniques, namely, by super particle identification code, particle image velocimetry analysis and the excitation of dust acoustic waves. The results obtained from these three different techniques along with their merits and demerits are discussed. An estimation of the neutral drag force responsible for the generation as well as the attenuation of the dust fluid flow is made. These techniques can be usefully employed in laboratory devices to investigate linear and non-linear collective excitations in a flowing dusty plasma.

  20. OBSERVATIONS OF THERMAL FLARE PLASMA WITH THE EUV VARIABILITY EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Harry P.; Doschek, George A.; Mariska, John T.

    2013-06-20

    One of the defining characteristics of a solar flare is the impulsive formation of very high temperature plasma. The properties of the thermal emission are not well understood, however, and the analysis of solar flare observations is often predicated on the assumption that the flare plasma is isothermal. The EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory provides spectrally resolved observations of emission lines that span a wide range of temperatures (e.g., Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and allow for thermal flare plasma to be studied in detail. In this paper we describe a method for computing the differential emission measure distribution in a flare using EVE observations and apply it to several representative events. We find that in all phases of the flare the differential emission measure distribution is broad. Comparisons of EVE spectra with calculations based on parameters derived from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites soft X-ray fluxes indicate that the isothermal approximation is generally a poor representation of the thermal structure of a flare.

  1. THz Radiation Generation via Laser Plasma Interaction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yugami, Noboru; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2008-12-01

    Recently radiation generation from the interaction between laser and plasma is studied. Terahertz radiation from photo-conductive antenna which is based on semiconductor technology is widely used, The power is in the order of nano-watt level so that it is hard to use for application. On the other hand, terahertz radiation from laser plasma interaction is much higher than that of semiconductor technology. In our experiments, we have studied by use DARC (dc to ac radiation converter) mechanism by using YAG laser with nano-second pulse duration. DARC is novel radiation source using the interaction between laser-created ionization front and static electric field. The frequency of radiation is determined by both plasma density of ionization front and the geometry of DARC structure. We observed radiation pulse of frequency of 1.2 THz and pulse duration of 2 ps with ZnSe crystal as media detected by EO (electro-optics) sampling technique. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  2. LHCD experiments in high performance plasmas in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekedahl, A.; Baranov, Y.; Dobbing, J. A.; Fischer, B.; Goniche, M.; Gormezano, C.; Romero, J. A.; Schild, P.; Söldner, F. X.; Challis, C. D.; Sips, A. C. C.; Tubbing, B.

    1997-04-01

    Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) has been used for current profile shaping in the shear optimisation experiments in 1996/97 in JET. PLH≲3MW has been applied in the initial current ramp-up in order to control the internal inductance. An internal transport barrier with improved central electron confinement has been produced in this phase with LHCD alone. This has resulted in a peaking of the electron temperature profile and Te0 above 10keV at ne0⩽1.5×1019 m-3. The profile of the LH driven current, as determined by hard X-ray mesurements, is peaked at approximately mid-radius in these conditions. Good coupling of the LH waves has been obtained by the use of a near gas feed. This method reduces the risk of plasma-launcher interaction, since the launcher can be positioned in the shadow of the poloidal limiters. A reflection coefficient of 5% has been maintained at a plasma-launcher distance of 8 cm and PLH=5 MW has been coupled to divertor plasmas in L-mode with this method.

  3. Magnetic helicity balance in the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stallard, B. W.; Hooper, E. B.; Woodruff, S.; Bulmer, R. H.; Hill, D. N.; McLean, H. S.; Wood, R. D.

    2003-07-01

    The magnetic helicity balance between the helicity input injected by a magnetized coaxial gun, the rate-of-change in plasma helicity content, and helicity dissipation in electrode sheaths and Ohmic losses have been examined in the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment (SSPX) [E. B. Hooper, L. D. Pearlstein, and R. H. Bulmer, Nucl. Fusion 39, 863 (1999)]. Helicity is treated as a flux function in the mean-field approximation, allowing separation of helicity drive and losses between closed and open field volumes. For nearly sustained spheromak plasmas with low fluctuations, helicity balance analysis implies a decreasing transport of helicity from the gun input into the spheromak core at higher spheromak electron temperature. Long pulse discharges with continuously increasing helicity and larger fluctuations show higher helicity coupling from the edge to the spheromak core. The magnitude of the sheath voltage drop, inferred from cathode heating and a current threshold dependence of the gun voltage, shows that sheath losses are important and reduce the helicity injection efficiency in SSPX.

  4. Final Technical Report on DOE Grant for Modeling of Plasma Rotation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K. C.

    2009-07-09

    This is the final technical report on the Modeling of Plasma Rotation in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-02ER54679. The research subjects, technical abstracts, and publications where details of the research results can be found are reported here.

  5. A research program in magnetogasdynamics utilizing hypervelocity coaxial plasma generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spight, C.

    1976-01-01

    A broadly-gauged research program in magnetogasdynamics utilizing hypervelocity coaxial plasma generators is presented. A complete hypervelocity coaxial plasma generator facility was assembled and tested. Significant progress was made in the direction of understanding the important processes in the interaction of hypervelocity MGD flow with transverse applied fields. It is now proposed to utilize the accumulated experimental capability and theoretical analysis in application to the analysis and design parameterization of pulsed magnetogasdynamic direct energy convertor configurations.

  6. ISEE-1 data reduction and analysis plasma composition experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartsson, W.; Sharp, R. D.

    1985-03-01

    The plasma composition experiment covers energies from OeV to 17 keV/e and has a mass-per-charge range from less than 1 to about 150 amu. Measurements were made from the inner ring current region to the plasma sheet, magnetotail lobes, and the magnetopause boundary layers and beyond. Possibly the most significant results from the experiment are those related to energetic (0+) ions of terrestrial origin. These ions are found in every region of the magnetosphere reached by the spacecraft and can have energy and pitch-angle distributions that are similar to those traditionally associated with protons of solar wind origin. The (0+) ions are commonly the most numerous ions in the 0.1 - 17 keV/e energy range and are often a substantial part of the ion population at large distances as well, especially during geomagnetically disturbed conditions. An overview of results obtained for the (0+) and other ions with energies in the 0.1 - 17 keV/e range in the magnetosphere is given.

  7. ISEE-1 data reduction and analysis plasma composition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, W.; Sharp, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    The plasma composition experiment covers energies from OeV to 17 keV/e and has a mass-per-charge range from less than 1 to about 150 amu. Measurements were made from the inner ring current region to the plasma sheet, magnetotail lobes, and the magnetopause boundary layers and beyond. Possibly the most significant results from the experiment are those related to energetic (0+) ions of terrestrial origin. These ions are found in every region of the magnetosphere reached by the spacecraft and can have energy and pitch-angle distributions that are similar to those traditionally associated with protons of solar wind origin. The (0+) ions are commonly the most numerous ions in the 0.1 - 17 keV/e energy range and are often a substantial part of the ion population at large distances as well, especially during geomagnetically disturbed conditions. An overview of results obtained for the (0+) and other ions with energies in the 0.1 - 17 keV/e range in the magnetosphere is given.

  8. Embodied Experience in Educational Practice and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bengtsson, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The intention of this article is to make an educational analysis of Merleau-Ponty's theory of experience in order to see what it implicates for educational practice as well as educational research. In this way, we can attain an understanding what embodied experience might mean both in schools and other educational settings and in researching…

  9. Faculty Experiences in a Research Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Courtney M.; Kozlowski, Kelly A.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines the experiences of faculty in a research learning community developed to support new faculty in increasing scholarly productivity. A phenomenological, qualitative inquiry was used to portray the lived experiences of faculty within a learning community. Several themes were found including: accountability, belonging,…

  10. Reflection on Lived Experience in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnacle, Robyn

    2004-01-01

    While debate about the meaning of hermeneutics and phenomenology for educational research continues, the notion of lived experience, and its application to reflective practice, has become a feature of much that goes by the name of phenomenological within this area. The prevalence of the lived experience model can be attributed in large part to the…

  11. Advanced electric propulsion and space plasma contactor research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    A series of experiments performed on an 8 cm dia. ring cusp magnetic field ion thruster are described. The results show the effects of anode and cathode position and size, ring cusp axial location and discharge chamber length on plasma ion energy cost and extracted ion fraction. Thruster performance is shown to be improved substantially when optimum values of these parameters are used. Investigations into the basic plasma phenomena associated with the process of plasma contacting are described. The results show the process of electron collection from a background plasma to a hollow cathode plasma contactor exhibits a higher impedance than the process of electron emission from the hollow cathode. The importance of having cold ions present to facilitate the plasma contacting process is shown. Results of experiments into the behavior of hollow cathodes operating at high interelectrode pressures (up to approx. 100 Torr) on nitrogen and ammonia are presented. They suggest that diffuse emission from the insert of a hollow cathode can be sustained at high interelectrode pressures if the cathode is made of non-conducting material and the cathode internal pressure is reduced by evacuating the cathode interior. A theoretical model of discharge chamber operation developed for inert gas thrusters is extended so it can be used to evaluste the performance of mercury ion thrusters. Predictions of the model are compared to experimental results obtained on two 30 cm dia. thrusters.

  12. Plasma kinetic effects on interfacial mix in settings relevant to inertial confinement fusion and laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Bergen, B.; Bowers, K. J.; Vold, E. L.; Molvig, K.; Fernández, J. C.; Bang, W.; Bradley, P. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Hamilton, C. E.; Palaniyappan, S.; Santiago Cordoba, M. A.; Hegelich, B. M.; Dyer, G.; Roycroft, R.

    2015-11-01

    Mixing of high-Z/low-Z interfaces in dense plasma media is a problem of importance for understanding mix in inertial confinement fusion experiments and recent experiments at the LANL Trident facility. In this presentation, we apply the VPIC particle-in-cell code with a binary collision model to explore kinetic effects of the atomic mixing. Comparisons are made to published analytic theory and hybrid modeling results and conditions are identified under which plasma kinetic behavior may lead to anomalously rapid atomic mixing. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Funding provided by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  13. Developing a plasma focus research training system for the fusion energy age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.

    2014-08-01

    The 3 kJ UNU/ICTP Plasma Focus Facility is the most significant device associated with the AAAPT (Asian African Association for Plasma Training). In original and modified/upgraded form it has trained generations of plasma focus (PF) researchers internationally, producing many PhD theses and peer-reviewed papers. The Lee Model code was developed for the design of this PF. This code has evolved to cover all PF machines for design, interpretation and optimization, for derivation of radiation scaling laws; and to provide insights into yield scaling limitations, radiative collapse, speed-enhanced and current-stepped PF variants. As example of fresh perspectives derivable from this code, this paper presents new results on energy transfers of the axial and radial phases of generalized PF devices. As the world moves inexorably towards the Fusion Energy Age it becomes ever more important to train plasma fusion researchers. A recent workshop in Nepal shows that demand for such training continues. Even commercial project development consultants are showing interest. We propose that the AAAPT-proven research package be upgraded, by modernizing the small PF for extreme modes of operation, switchable from the typical strong-focus mode to a slow-mode which barely pinches, thus producing a larger, more uniform plasma stream with superior deposition properties. Such a small device would be cost-effective and easily duplicated, and have the versatility of a range of experiments from intense multi-radiation generation and target damage studies to superior advanced-materials deposition. The complementary code is used to reference experiments up to the largest existing machine. This is ideal for studying machine limitations and scaling laws and to suggest new experiments. Such a modernized versatile PF machine complemented by the universally versatile code would extend the utility of the PF experience; so that AAAPT continues to provide leadership in pulsed plasma research training in

  14. Research on Orbital Plasma-Electrodynamics (ROPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Wright, K.

    1994-01-01

    Since the development of probe theory by Langmuir and Blodgett, the problem of current collection by a charged spherically or cylindrically symmetric body has been investigated by a number of authors. This paper overviews the development of a fully three-dimensional particle simulation code which can be used to understand the physics of current collection in three dimensions and can be used to analyze data resulting from the future tethered satellite system (TSS). According to the TSS configurations, two types of particle simulation models were constructed: a simple particle simulation (SIPS) and a super particle simulation (SUPS). The models study the electron transient response and its asymptotic behavior around a three dimensional, highly biased satellite. The potential distribution surrounding the satellite is determined by solving Laplace's equation in the SIPS model and by solving Poisson's equation in the SUPS model. Thus, the potential distribution in space is independent of the density distribution of the particles in the SUPS model but it does depend on the density distribution of the particles in the SUPS model. The evolution of the potential distribution in the SUPS model is described. When the spherical satellite is charged to a highly positive potential and immersed in a plasma with a uniform magnetic field, the formation of an electron torus in the equatorial plane (the plane in perpendicular to the magnetic field) and elongation of the torus along the magnetic field are found in both the SIPS and the SUPS models but the shape of the torus is different. The areas of high potential that exist in the polar regions in the SUPS model exaggerate the elongation of the electron torus along the magnetic field. The current collected by the satellite for different magentic field strengths is investigated in both models. Due to the nonlinear effects present in SUPS, the oscillating phenomenon of the current collection curve during the first 10 plasma periods

  15. Medicinal herb research: serum pharmacological method and plasma pharmacological method.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jinwen; Wang, Dongsheng; He, Rong; Zhu, Huibin; Wang, Yuhong; He, Shilin

    2010-01-01

    Serum pharmacological method has generally been used in herb studies. However, preparation of test serum for ex vivo experiment is an intricate process: besides pretreatment (heat or chemicals), it involves the proteolytic cascades of coagulation along with fibrinolysis, complement and kinin systems, as well as platelet and leukocyte activation resulting in release reactions. These processes deviate serum sample components away from the original in vivo state, and possibly also have effects on the absorbed herbal components and their downstream effectors in blood. The conclusions drawn from serum pharmacological method are at least partially uncertain in its validity. These processes can be avoided by anticoagulation. Compared to those of the serum, constituents of plasma are better reflectors of the in vivo physiological/pathological state and medicinal herb-induced changes. Therefore, we have advocated the adoption of plasma pharmacological method in ex vivo experiments of herb studies. Recent studies including our work demonstrated that the constituents and biological activities are partially different between absorbed medicinal herbs in plasma and serum. This review summarizes the experimental evidence supporting the feasibility of plasma pharmacological method and discusses the reasons and facts that flaw the serum pharmacological method. But serum pharmacological method can be used if anticoagulants interfere with experiments. It should be emphasized that the domination between plasma and serum pharmacological methods is different depending on the usage. Indeed, the pros and cons of both methods as well as the appropriate choices of coagulants in different ex vivo experimental settings remain to be further elucidated.

  16. Participatory Action Research Experiences for Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sample McMeeking, L. B.; Weinberg, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    Research experiences for undergraduates (REU) have been shown to be effective in improving undergraduate students' personal/professional development, ability to synthesize knowledge, improvement in research skills, professional advancement, and career choice. Adding to the literature on REU programs, a new conceptual model situating REU within a context of participatory action research (PAR) is presented and compared with data from a PAR-based coastal climate research experience that took place in Summer 2012. The purpose of the interdisciplinary Participatory Action Research Experiences for Undergraduates (PAREU) model is to act as an additional year to traditional, lab-based REU where undergraduate science students, social science experts, and community members collaborate to develop research with the goal of enacting change. The benefits to traditional REU's are well established and include increased content knowledge, better research skills, changes in attitudes, and greater career awareness gained by students. Additional positive outcomes are expected from undergraduate researchers (UR) who participate in PAREU, including the ability to better communicate with non-scientists. With highly politicized aspects of science, such as climate change, this becomes especially important for future scientists. Further, they will be able to articulate the relevance of science research to society, which is an important skill, especially given the funding climate where agencies require broader impacts statements. Making science relevant may also benefit URs who wish to apply their science research. Finally, URs will gain social science research skills by apprenticing in a research project that includes science and social science research components, which enables them to participate in future education and outreach. The model also positively impacts community members by elevating their voices within and outside the community, particularly in areas severely underserved

  17. Electric Field Double Probe Measurements for Ionospheric Space Plasma Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.

    1999-01-01

    Double probes represent a well-proven technique for gathering high quality DC and AC electric field measurements in a variety of space plasma regimes including the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and mesosphere. Such experiments have been successfully flown on a variety of spacecraft including sounding rockets and satellites. Typical instrument designs involve a series of trades, depending on the science objectives, type of platform (e.g., spinning or 3-axis stabilized), expected plasma regime where the measurements will be made, available telemetry, budget, etc. In general, ionospheric DC electric field instruments that achieve accuracies of 0.1 mV/m or better, place spherical sensors at large distances (10m or more) from the spacecraft body in order to extend well beyond the spacecraft wake and sheath and to achieve large signal-to-noise ratios for DC and long wavelength measurements. Additional sets of sensors inboard of the primary, outermost sensors provide useful additional information, both for diagnostics of the plasma contact potentials, which particularly enhance the DC electric field measurements on non-spinning spacecraft, and for wavelength and phase velocity measurements that use the spaced receiver or "interferometer" technique. Accurate attitude knowledge enables B times V contributions to be subtracted from the measured potentials, and permits the measured components to be rotated into meaningful geophysical reference frames. We review the measurement technique for both DC and wave electric field measurements in the ionosphere discussing recent advances involving high resolution burst memories, multiple baseline double probes, new sensor surface materials, biasing techniques, and other considerations.

  18. Cryogenic heat loads analysis from SST-1 plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairagi, N.; Tanna, V. L.; Pradhan, S.

    2017-02-01

    Cryogenic heat load analysis is an important aspect for stable operation of Tokamaks employing large scale superconducting magnets. Steady State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) at IPR is equipped with superconducting magnets system (SCMS) comprising sixteen numbers of modified ‘D’ shaped toroidal field (TF) and nine poloidal field (PF) superconducting coils which are wound using NbTi/Cu based cable-in conduit conductor (CICC). SST-1 magnets operation has flexibility to cool either in two-phase with sub-cooling, two-phase without sub-cooling or single phase (supercritical) helium using a dedicated 1.3 kW helium refrigerator cum liquefier (HRL). Here, we report gross heat losses for integrated TF superconducting magnets of SST-1 during the plasma campaign using cryogenic helium supply/return thermodynamic data from cryoplant. Heat loads mainly comprising of steady state as well as transient loads are smoothly absorbed by SST-1 cryogenic helium plant during plasma experiments. The corresponding heat produced in the coils is totally released to the helium flowing through the TF coils, which in turn is dumped into liquid helium stored in main control Dewar. These results are very useful reference for heat loss analysis for TF as well as PF coils and provides database for future operation of SST-1 machine.

  19. Comparing MHD simulations of RFP plasmas to RELAX experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollam, K. J.; den Hartog, D. J.; Jacobson, C. M.; Sauppe, J. P.; Masamune, S.; Sanpei, A.

    2015-11-01

    Standard reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas provide a nonlinear dynamical system as a validation domain for numerical MHD simulation codes, which can be applied to general toroidal confinement scenarios including tokamaks. Using the NIMROD code, we calculate linear stability and simulate the nonlinear evolution of plasmas similar to those in the RELAX RFP experiment, whose relatively modest Lundquist numbers of order 104 make the simulations tractable given present computing resources. The chosen RELAX cases cover a broad range of RFP reversal parameters and have also been previously simulated with the MIPS code (N. Mizuguchi et al., TH/P3-26, IAEA FEC, 2012). Experimental diagnostics that can be used for validation purposes include Thomson scattering for electron temperature, interferometry for electron density, SXR imaging, and external and internal magnetic probes. RELAX's small aspect ratio (~ 2) motivates a comparison study using toroidal and cylindrical geometries in NIMROD. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE and NSF and by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

  20. Scientific Reports of Plasma Medicine and its Mechanism for Therapy in Plasma Bioscience Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eun Ha

    2015-09-01

    Scientific reports of plasma medicine and its basic mechanism for therapy will be introduced, especially, performed in Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Korea. We have investigated enhanced anticancer effect of monocytes and macrophages activated by nonthermal plasma which act as immune-modulator on these immune cells. Further, we investigated the action of the nanosecond pulsed plasma activated media (NPPAM) on the lung cancer cells and its DNA oxidation pathway. We observed OD induced apoptosis on melanocytes G361 cancer cells through DNA damage signaling cascade. We also studied DNA oxidation by extracting DNA from treated cancer cell and analyzed the effects of OD/OH/D2O2/H2O2 on protein modification and oxidation. Additionally, we attempted molecular docking approaches to check the action of D2O2 on the apoptosis related genes.

  1. Modeling and experiments on differential pumping in linear plasma generators operating at high gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Eck, H. J. N. van; Koppers, W. R.; Rooij, G. J. van; Goedheer, W. J.; Cardozo, N. J. Lopes; Kleyn, A. W.; Engeln, R.; Schram, D. C.

    2009-03-15

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method was used to investigate the efficiency of differential pumping in linear plasma generators operating at high gas flows. Skimmers are used to separate the neutrals from the plasma beam, which is guided from the source to the target by a strong axial magnetic field. In this way, the neutrals are prevented to reach the target region. The neutral flux to the target must be lower than the plasma flux to enable ITER relevant plasma-surface interaction (PSI) studies. It is therefore essential to control the neutral gas dynamics. The DSMC method was used to model the expansion of a hot gas in a low pressure vessel where a small discrepancy in shock position was found between the simulations and a well-established empirical formula. Two stage differential pumping was modeled and applied in the linear plasma devices Pilot-PSI and PLEXIS. In Pilot-PSI a factor of 4.5 pressure reduction for H{sub 2} has been demonstrated. Both simulations and experiments showed that the optimum skimmer position depends on the position of the shock and therefore shifts for different gas parameters. The shape of the skimmer has to be designed such that it has a minimum impact on the shock structure. A too large angle between the skimmer and the forward direction of the gas flow leads to an influence on the expansion structure. A pressure increase in front of the skimmer is formed and the flow of the plasma beam becomes obstructed. It has been shown that a skimmer with an angle around 53 deg. gives the best performance. The use of skimmers is implemented in the design of the large linear plasma generator Magnum-PSI. Here, a three stage differentially pumped vacuum system is used to reach low enough neutral pressures near the target, opening a door to PSI research in the ITER relevant regime.

  2. Plasma flow switch experiments on Pegasus-II

    SciTech Connect

    Shlachter, J.S.; Bartsch, R.R.; Benage, J.F.

    1994-12-31

    Pegasus-II, a 4.3 MJ capacitor bank facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, has a current rise time of 5 {mu}s and requires the use of a fast ({approx} 500 ns) opening switch with long conduction time for some applications. Development of plasma flow opening switches (PFS), based on the design of the Shiva Star experiments, has been conducted during the last year. The PFS for these experiments consisted of two components: an annular aluminum conductor bridging the gap between the coaxial conductors in the Pegasus-II power-flow channel and an annular mylar foil located 6.3 mm downstream of the aluminum. The authors have investigated assemblies with 1/r{sup 2} mass distributions, designed to produce planar motion down the power flow channel. The total mass of the PFS assembly has been varied as has the construction of the aluminum component. The downstream load in the load slot was either a high inductance, 1-cm radius non-imploding pipe or a cylindrical, 12.7-mg pure aluminum imploding foil with 5-cm radius. Experiments have been conducted both with and without a trap region in the downstream inner conductor; the trap is one mechanism for preventing PFS material from entering the load slot.

  3. Convex crystal x-ray spectrometer for laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    May, M.; Heeter, R.; Emig, J.

    2004-10-01

    Measuring time and space-resolved spectra is important for understanding Hohlraum and Halfraum plasmas. Experiments at the OMEGA laser have used the Nova TSPEC which was not optimized for the OMEGA diagnostic space envelope or for the needed spectroscopic coverage and resolution. An improved multipurpose spectrometer snout, the MSPEC, has been constructed and fielded on OMEGA. The MSPEC provides the maximal internal volume for mounting crystals without any beam interferences at either 2x or 3x magnification. The RAP crystal is in a convex mounting geometry bent to a 20 cm radius of curvature. The spectral resolution, E/dE, is about 200 at 2.5 keV. The spectral coverage is 2 to 4.5 keV. The MSPEC can record four separate spectra on the framing camera at time intervals of up to several ns. The spectrometer design and initial field-test performance will be presented and compared to that of the TSPEC.

  4. Across the Arctic Teachers Experience Field Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnick, W. K.; Warburton, J.; Wiggins, H. V.; Marshall, S. A.; Darby, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    From studying snow geese on the North Slope of Alaska to sediment coring aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy in the Arctic Ocean, K-12 teachers embark on scientific expeditions as part of a program that strives to make science in the Arctic a "virtual" reality. In the past two years, seventeen K-12 teachers have participated in Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating (TREC), a program that pairs teachers with researchers to improve science education through arctic field experiences. TREC builds on the scientific and cultural opportunities of the Arctic, linking research and education through topics that naturally engage students and the wider public. TREC includes expeditions as diverse as studying plants at Toolik Field Station, a research facility located 150 miles above the Arctic Circle; climate change studies in Norway's Svalbard archipelago; studying rivers in Siberia; or a trans-arctic expedition aboard the USCGC Healy collecting an integrated geophysical data set. Funded by the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs, TREC offers educators experiences in scientific inquiry while encouraging the public and students to become active participants in the scientific inquiry by engaging them virtually in arctic research. TREC uses online outreach elements to convey the research experience to a broad audience. While in remote field locations, teachers and researchers interact with students and the public through online seminars and live calls from the field, online journals with accompanying photos, and online bulletin boards. Since the program's inception in 2004, numerous visitors have posted questions or interacted with teachers, researchers, and students through the TREC website (http://www.arcus.org/trec). TREC teachers are required to transfer their experience of research and current science into their classroom through the development of relevant activities and resources. Teachers and researchers are encouraged to participate

  5. Active experiments in space in conjunction with Skylab. [barium plasma injection experiment and magnetic storm of March 7, 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two papers are presented which relate to the Skylab barium shaped charge experiments. The first describes the L=6.6 OOSIK barium plasma injection experiment and magnetic storm of March 7, 1972. Rocket payload, instrumentation, data reduction methods, geophysical environment at the time of the experiment, and results are given. The second paper presents the observation of an auroral Birkeland current which developed from the distortion of a barium plasma jet during the above experiment.

  6. Translational Research and Plasma Proteomic in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Santini, Annamaria Chiara; Giovane, Giancarlo; Auletta, Adelaide; Di Carlo, Angelina; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Cito, Letizia; Astarita, Carlo; Giordano, Antonio; Alfano, Roberto; Feola, Antonia; Di Domenico, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Proteomics is a recent field of research in molecular biology that can help in the fight against cancer through the search for biomarkers that can detect this disease in the early stages of its development. Proteomic is a speedily growing technology, also thanks to the development of even more sensitive and fast mass spectrometry analysis. Although this technique is the most widespread for the discovery of new cancer biomarkers, it still suffers of a poor sensitivity and insufficient reproducibility, essentially due to the tumor heterogeneity. Common technical shortcomings include limitations in the sensitivity of detecting low abundant biomarkers and possible systematic biases in the observed data. Current research attempts are trying to develop high-resolution proteomic instrumentation for high-throughput monitoring of protein changes that occur in cancer. In this review, we describe the basic features of the proteomic tools which have proven to be useful in cancer research, showing their advantages and disadvantages. The application of these proteomic tools could provide early biomarkers detection in various cancer types and could improve the understanding the mechanisms of tumor growth and dissemination.

  7. MACH2 modeling of LANL plasma-flow-switch experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wysocki, F.J.

    1994-12-31

    The plasma-flow opening-switch (PFS) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory as part of the Athena Program. The present goal is to switch 10--20 MA of current into a cylindrical-foil implosion load in 300--400 ns. Primary drivers currently in use include the Pegasus-II capacitor bank which delivers 8--10 MA to the PFS in 3--4 {mu}s and the Procyon explosively-driven flux-compression generator which delivers 15--18 MA in 2--3 {mu}s. A series of experiments using Pegasus-II and Procyon have characterized the PFS performance for a variety of experimental conditions. Issues examined with Pegasus-II include switch-mass (50-mg vs. 100-mg), switch fabrication (wire-array vs. graded-thickness-foil), current level (7 MA vs. 10 MA), presence or absence of a plasma trap, and static load vs. implosion load. Procyon has been used to characterize a PFS with a 1/r aerial-mass-density profile (as opposed to the Pegasus-II 1/r{sup 2} profile). The MACH2 two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic code has been used to model these experiments and comparison of simulation data to the experimental data has been made. This includes direct comparison of data from an array of B-dot probes present on all tests (19--23 probes), direct comparison of x-ray yield and power for those tests with implosion loads, and qualitative comparison to framing and streak data. The agreement between simulation data and experimental data is reasonably good.

  8. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated June 22, 1988: 'A dwarf wheat variety known as Yecoro Rojo flourishes in KSC's Biomass Production Chamber. Researchers are gathering information on the crop's ability to produce food, water and oxygen, and then remove carbon dioxide. The confined quarters associated with space travel require researchers to focus on smaller plants that yield proportionately large amounts of biomass. This wheat crop takes about 85 days to grow before harvest.' Plant experiments such as this are the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  9. Research on radiation characteristic of plasma antenna through FDTD method.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianming; Fang, Jingjing; Lu, Qiuyuan; Liu, Fan

    2014-01-01

    The radiation characteristic of plasma antenna is investigated by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) approach in this paper. Through using FDTD method, we study the propagation of electromagnetic wave in free space in stretched coordinate. And the iterative equations of Maxwell equation are derived. In order to validate the correctness of this method, we simulate the process of electromagnetic wave propagating in free space. Results show that electromagnetic wave spreads out around the signal source and can be absorbed by the perfectly matched layer (PML). Otherwise, we study the propagation of electromagnetic wave in plasma by using the Boltzmann-Maxwell theory. In order to verify this theory, the whole process of electromagnetic wave propagating in plasma under one-dimension case is simulated. Results show that Boltzmann-Maxwell theory can be used to explain the phenomenon of electromagnetic wave propagating in plasma. Finally, the two-dimensional simulation model of plasma antenna is established under the cylindrical coordinate. And the near-field and far-field radiation pattern of plasma antenna are obtained. The experiments show that the variation of electron density can introduce the change of radiation characteristic.

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements on plasma science experiments at PPPL

    SciTech Connect

    Koepke, Mark

    2011-12-20

    Collaborative research between WVU and PPPL was carried out at WVU for the purpose of incorporating the sophisticated diagnostic technique known as laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) in the Paul-Trap Simulation Experiment (PTSX) at PPPL. WVU assembled a LIF system at WVU, transported it to PPPL, helped make LIF experiments on the PTSX device, participated in PTSX science, and trained PPPL staff in LIF techniques. In summary, WVU refurbished a non-operational LIF system being loaned from University of Maryland to PPPL and, by doing so, provided PPPL with additional diagnostic capability for its PTSX device and other General Plasma Science experiments. WVU students, staff, and faculty will visit PPPL to collaborate on PTSX experiments in the future.

  11. Flight research experiments on ride quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, I. D.; Kuhlthau, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    The results and analysis of several flight research experiments in ride quality are described. These tests were carried out aboard the NASA Flight Research Center, JetStar Aircraft equipped with the General Purpose Airborne Simulator; and aboard a specially instrumented Boeing 747 flown in actual commercial flight. The data was analyzed to determine appropriate models for subjective reaction to the motion environment. Specifically, vertical and transverse acceleration inputs and aircraft bank angle were studied along with duration of exposure.

  12. Present status of plasma-wall interactions research and materials development activities in the US

    SciTech Connect

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-08-01

    It is well known in the fusion engineering community that the plasma confinement performance in magnetic fusion devices is strongly affected by edge-plasma interactions with surface components. These plasma-material interactions (PMI) include fuel particle recycling and impurity generation both during normal and off-normal operation. To understand and then to control PMI effects, considerable effort has been made, particularly over the last decade in US, supported by Department of Energy, Division of Development and Technology. Also, because plasma-facing components are generally expected to receive significant amount of heat due to plasma bombardment and run-away electrons, materials must tolerate high-heat fluxes (HHF). The HHF-component research has been conducted in parallel with PMI research. One strong motivation for these research activities is that DT-burning experiments are currently planned in the Tokamak Test Fusion Reactor (TFTR) in early 1990s. Several different but mutually complementary approaches have been taken in the PMI+HHF research. The first approach is to conduct PMI experiments using toroidal fusion devices such as TFTR. The second one is to simulate elemental processes involved in PMI using ion beams and electron beams, etc. The last one but not least is to use non-tokamak plasma facilities. Along with these laboratory activities, new materials have been developed and evaluated from the PMI+HHF point of view. In this paper, several major PMI+HHF research facilities in US and their activities are briefly reviewed. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Transition of the BELLA PW laser system towards a collaborative research facility in laser plasma science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, Csaba; Evans, Dave; Gonsalves, Anthony J.; Kirkpatrick, Mark; Magana, Art; Mannino, Greg; Mao, Hann-Shin; Nakamura, Kei; Riley, Joe R.; Steinke, Sven; Sipla, Tyler; Syversrud, Don; Ybarrolaza, Nathan; Leemans, Wim P.

    2017-03-01

    The advancement of Laser-Plasma Accelerators (LPA) requires systematic studies with ever increasing precision and reproducibility. A key component of such a research endeavor is a facility that provides reliable, well characterized laser sources, flexible target systems, and comprehensive diagnostics of the laser pulses, the interaction region, and the produced electron beams. The Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA), a PW laser facility, now routinely provides high quality focused laser pulses for high precision experiments. A description of the commissioning process, the layout of the laser systems, the major components of the laser and radiation protection systems, and a summary of early results are given. Further scientific plans and highlights of operational experience that serve as the basis for transition to a collaborative research facility in high-peak power laser-plasma interaction research are reviewed.

  14. A candidate's experience doing research during training.

    PubMed

    Hadge, Luke

    2012-10-01

    A psychoanalytic candidate explores his experience of participating in a research project at his institute during his training. The candidate has been a member of Sabrina Cherry's prospective study of psychoanalytic practice and professional development conducted at the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research. While much as been written about candidacy from numerous perspectives, there is little in the literature about how being engaged in research affects a candidate's overall training experience. In particular, attention is paid to understanding the benefits, synergies, conflicts, and tensions in combining research with such aspects of analytic training as the training analysis, control cases, supervision, classes, and institute life. A parallel is drawn between the listening and interpretive skills learned in order to practice analysis and the method of textual analysis employed in the research project. The author believes that his research training and the impact of the specific research topic have enriched and deepened his analytic training, while at the same time revealing certain anxieties in integrating research with the development of his analytic skills and identity.

  15. Research Experiences in Community College Science Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauregard, A.

    2011-12-01

    The benefits of student access to scientific research opportunities and the use of data in curriculum and student inquiry-driven approaches to teaching as effective tools in science instruction are compelling (i.e., Ledley, et al., 2008; Gawel & Greengrove, 2005; Macdonald, et al., 2005; Harnik & Ross. 2003). Unfortunately, these experiences are traditionally limited at community colleges due to heavy faculty teaching loads, a focus on teaching over research, and scarce departmental funds. Without such hands-on learning activities, instructors may find it difficult to stimulate excitement about science in their students, who are typically non-major and nontraditional. I present two different approaches for effectively incorporating research into the community college setting that each rely on partnerships with other institutions. The first of these is a more traditional approach for providing research experiences to undergraduate students, though such experiences are limited at community colleges, and involves student interns working on a research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Specifically, students participate in a water quality assessment study of two local bayous. Students work on different aspects of the project, including water sample collection, bio-assay incubation experiments, water quality sample analysis, and collection and identification of phytoplankton. Over the past four years, nine community college students, as well as two undergraduate students and four graduate students from the local four-year university have participated in this research project. Aligning student and faculty research provides community college students with the unique opportunity to participate in the process of active science and contribute to "real" scientific research. Because students are working in a local watershed, these field experiences provide a valuable "place-based" educational opportunity. The second approach links cutting-edge oceanographic

  16. Small satellite attitude determination during plasma brake deorbiting experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, Osama; Selkäinaho, Jorma; Soken, Halil Ersin; Kallio, Esa; Visala, Arto

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a study on attitude estimation during the Plasma Brake Experiment (PBE) onboard a small satellite. The PBE demands that the satellite be spun at a very high angular velocity, up to 200 deg/s, to deploy the tether using centrifugal force. The spin controller, based on purely magnetic actuation, and the PBE demands accurate attitude estimation for the successful execution of the experiment. The biases are important to be estimated onboard small satellites due to the closely integrated systems and relatively higher interference experienced by the sensors. However, bias estimation is even more important for PBE due to the presence of a high voltage unit, onboard the satellite, that is used to charge the tether and can be the source of interference. The attitude and the biases, when estimated simultaneously, results in an augmented state vector that poses a challenge to the proper tuning of process noise. The adaptation of process noise covariance has, therefore, been studied and analysed for the challenging PBE. It has been observed that adapting the process noise covariance improves the estimation accuracy during the spin-up phase. Therefore, it is very important to use adaptive process noise covariance estimation.

  17. Plasma wave experiment for the ISEE-3 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarf, F. L.

    1983-01-01

    Sensitive, high resolution plasma probes for analysis of the distribution functions and plasma wave instruments for measurements of electromagnetic and electrostatic wave modes are commonly flown together to provide information on plasma instabilities and wave particle interactions. Analysis of the data for the ISEE 3 mission is provided.

  18. Results from D-T Experiments on TFTR and Implications for Achieving an Ignited Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J. and the TFTR Group

    1998-07-14

    Progress in the performance of tokamak devices has enabled not only the production of significant bursts of fusion energy from deuterium-tritium plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Joint European Torus (JET) but, more importantly, the initial study of the physics of burning magnetically confined plasmas. As a result of the worldwide research on tokamaks, the scientific and technical issues for achieving an ignited plasma are better understood and the remaining questions more clearly defined. The principal research topics which have been studied on TFTR are transport, magnetohydrodynamic stability, and energetic particle confinement. The integration of separate solutions to problems in each of these research areas has also been of major interest. Although significant advances, such as the reduction of turbulent transport by means of internal transport barriers, identification of the theoretically predicted bootstrap current, and the study of the confinement of energetic fusion alpha-particles have been made, interesting and important scientific and technical issues remain for achieving a magnetic fusion energy reactor. In this paper, the implications of the TFTR experiments for overcoming these remaining issues will be discussed.

  19. Results from D-T experiments on TFTR and implications for achieving an ignited plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Blanchard, W.; Batha, S.

    1998-07-01

    Progress in the performance of tokamak devices has enable not only the production of significant bursts of fusion energy from deuterium-tritium plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Joint European Torus (JET) but, more importantly, the initial study of the physics of burning magnetically confined plasmas. As a result of the worldwide research on tokamaks, the scientific and technical issues for achieving an ignited plasma are better understood and the remaining questions more clearly defined. The principal research topics which have been studied on TFTR are transport, magnetohydrodynamic stability, and energetic particle confinement. The integration of separate solutions to problems in each of these research areas has also been of major interest. Although significant advances, such as the reduction of turbulent transport by means of internal transport barriers, identification of the theoretically predicted bootstrap current, and the study of the confinement of energetic fusion alpha-particles have been made, interesting and important scientific and technical issues remain. In this paper, the implications for the TFTR experiments for overcoming these remaining issues will be discussed.

  20. Experiments with Plasmas Produced by Potassium-Seeded Cyanogen Oxygen Flames for Study of Radio Transmission at Simulated Reentry Vehicle Plasma Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Paul W.; Gooderum, Paul B.

    1961-01-01

    A method for the chemical production of an ionized gas stream for application to radio transmission studies is described. Involved is the combustion of gaseous cyanogen and oxygen with the addition of vaporized potassium in some cases to further increase the ionization. Experiments are described in which a 3-inch-diameter subsonic free jet at atmospheric pressure is used, and the results are presented. The plasma obtained by using this method is sufficient to simulate plasma conditions expected for reentering hypersonic vehicles. The unseeded plasma stream temperature is indicated to be about 4,200 K, with the degree of ionization indicated to be that expected from thermal equilibrium considerations. Measurements of radio-signal loss due to the unseeded flame plasma are presented for microwaves of 8 to 20 kmc transmitted through the stream and for a dipole transmitting model of 219.5 mc immersed in the stream. Favorable comparison of these results with the simple plane-wave signal-attenuation theory was obtained. In the case of a 9.4-kmc microwave signal of 30-kw peak power, the preliminary indication is that the plasma characteristics were not changed due to this strong signal. Comparison of a simplified concept of radio-signal attenuation due to plasmas is made with some hypersonic reentry vehicle signal-loss data. Other areas of plasma research using this method for the transmission problem are indicated.

  1. International Research Students' Experiences in Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeoh, Joanne Sin Wei; Terry, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    The flow of international students to study in Australia increases each year. It is a challenge for students to study abroad in a different sociocultural environment, especially for postgraduate research students, as they experience numerous difficulties in an unfamiliar and vastly different study environment. A study aimed to investigate the…

  2. Systems Analysis of a Compact Next Step Burning Plasma Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    S.C. Jardin; C.E. Kessel; D. Meade; C. Neumeyer

    2002-02-06

    A new burning plasma systems code (BPSC) has been developed for analysis of a next step compact burning plasma experiment with copper-alloy magnet technology. We consider two classes of configurations: Type A, with the toroidal field (TF) coils and ohmic heating (OH) coils unlinked, and Type B, with the TF and OH coils linked. We obtain curves of the minimizing major radius as a function of aspect ratio R(A) for each configuration type for typical parameters. These curves represent, to first order, cost minimizing curves, assuming that device cost is a function of major radius. The Type B curves always lie below the Type A curves for the same physics parameters, indicating that they lead to a more compact design. This follows from that fact that a high fraction of the inner region, r < R-a, contains electrical conductor material. However, the fact that the Type A OH and TF magnets are not linked presents fewer engineering challenges and should lead to a more reliable design. Both the Type A and Type B curves have a minimum in major radius R at a minimizing aspect ratio A typically above 2.8 and at high values of magnetic field B above 10 T. The minimizing A occurs at larger values for longer pulse and higher performance devices. The larger A and higher B design points also have the feature that the ratio of the discharge time to the current redistribution time is largest so that steady-state operation can be more realistically prototyped. A sensitivity study is presented for the baseline Type A configuration showing the dependence of the results on the parameters held fixed for the minimization study.

  3. Absorption spectroscopy of a laboratory photoionized plasma experiment at Z

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, I. M.; Durmaz, T.; Mancini, R. C.; Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.

    2014-03-15

    The Z facility at the Sandia National Laboratories is the most energetic terrestrial source of X-rays and provides an opportunity to produce photoionized plasmas in a relatively well characterised radiation environment. We use detailed atomic-kinetic and spectral simulations to analyze the absorption spectra of a photoionized neon plasma driven by the x-ray flux from a z-pinch. The broadband x-ray flux both photoionizes and backlights the plasma. In particular, we focus on extracting the charge state distribution of the plasma and the characteristics of the radiation field driving the plasma in order to estimate the ionisation parameter.

  4. The Microgravity Research Experiments (MICREX) Data Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, C. A.; Jones, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    An electronic data base identifying over 800 fluids and materials processing experiments performed in a low-gravity environment has been created at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The compilation, called MICREX (MICrogravity Research Experiments) was designed to document all such experimental efforts performed (1) on U.S. manned space vehicles, (2) on payloads deployed from U.S. manned space vehicles, and (3) on all domestic and international sounding rockets (excluding those of China and the former U.S.S.R.). Data available on most experiments include (1) principal and co-investigator (2) low-gravity mission, (3) processing facility, (4) experimental objectives and results, (5) identifying key words, (6) sample materials, (7) applications of the processed materials/research area, (8) experiment descriptive publications, and (9) contacts for more information concerning the experiment. This technical memorandum (1) summarizes the historical interest in reduced-gravity fluid dynamics, (2) describes the importance of a low-gravity fluids and materials processing data base, (4) describes thE MICREX data base format and computational World Wide Web access procedures, and (5) documents (in hard-copy form) the descriptions of the first 600 fluids and materials processing experiments entered into MICREX.

  5. Public Data Set: H-mode Plasmas at Very Low Aspect Ratio on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, Kathreen E.; Bongard, Michael W.; Barr, Jayson L.; Bodner, Grant M.; Burke, Marcus G.; Fonck, Raymond J.; Kriete, David M.; Perry, Justin M.; Reusch, Joshua A.; Schlossberg, David J.

    2016-09-30

    This data set contains openly-documented, machine readable digital research data corresponding to figures published in K.E. Thome et al., 'H-mode Plasmas at Very Low Aspect Ratio on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment,' Nucl. Fusion 57, 022018 (2017).

  6. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated October 8, 1991: 'Plant researchers Lisa Ruffe and Neil Yorio prepare to harvest a crop of Waldann's Green Lettuce from KSC's Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). KSC researchers have grown several different crops in the BPC to determine which plants will better produce food, water and oxygen on long-duration space missions.' Their work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  7. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated October 8, 1991: 'Plant researchers Neil Yorio and Lisa Ruffe prepare to harvest a crop of Waldann's Green Lettuce from KSC's Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). KSC researchers have grown several different crops in the BPC to determine which plants will better produce food, water and oxygen on long-duration space missions.' Their work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  8. Research of surface plasma resonance optical fiber hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Zhonghua; Guo, Xiaowei; Chen, Dejun; Dai, Zhiyong; Peng, Zengshou; Liu, Yongzhi

    2008-12-01

    An optical fiber hydrogen sensor based on the measuring principle of surface plasma resonance is introduced. The structure of the hydrogen-sensitive head which is coated with Pd-Ag alloy film on the surface of the etched optical fiber is investigated theoretically. When hydrogen gas is absorbed into the Pd thin layer of the sensing head, the Pd hydride is formed and then the refraction index of the etched optical fiber surface will be changed with different hydrogen gas concentration. The surface plasma wave is stimulated by the light wave in optical fiber and the surface plasma resonance occurs between the thin metal layer and the medium surface of hydrogen gas. The Pd-Ag alloy film thickness versus the sensitivity of hydrogen sensing head is analyzed and optimized via the numerical method. The sensing head which is based on surface plasma resonance is manufactured and used in the experiment system of hydrogen gas detecting, and the experiment results demonstrate that the detecting system has high sensitivity with the hydrogen concentration in the range of 0%-4%, the accuracy, resolution and response time are respectively 5%, 0.1% and 30s. This sensor structure can be applied to detecting the low concentration of hydrogen gas.

  9. Los Alamos NEP research in advanced plasma thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenberg, Kurt; Gerwin, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Research was initiated in advanced plasma thrusters that capitalizes on lab capabilities in plasma science and technology. The goal of the program was to examine the scaling issues of magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster performance in support of NASA's MPD thruster development program. The objective was to address multi-megawatt, large scale, quasi-steady state MPD thruster performance. Results to date include a new quasi-steady state operating regime which was obtained at space exploration initiative relevant power levels, that enables direct coaxial gun-MPD comparisons of thruster physics and performance. The radiative losses are neglible. Operation with an applied axial magnetic field shows the same operational stability and exhaust plume uniformity benefits seen in MPD thrusters. Observed gun impedance is in close agreement with the magnetic Bernoulli model predictions. Spatial and temporal measurements of magnetic field, electric field, plasma density, electron temperature, and ion/neutral energy distribution are underway. Model applications to advanced mission logistics are also underway.

  10. ITER research plan of plasma-wall interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, M.; Pitts, R.; Loarte, A.; Campbell, D. J.; Sugihara, M.; Mukhovatov, V.; Kukushkin, A.; Chuyanov, V.

    2009-06-01

    This paper describes an important part of ITER Research Plan, on plasma-wall interaction (PWI). In order to maximize the flexibility of the machine during the initial operation (H and D phases), CFC will be used for the targets. Tungsten will be used for the other plasma-facing components of the divertor. In order to minimize the tritium retention, tungsten will fully cover the divertor targets before the DT phase. Extrapolation of heat loads on plasma-facing components (PFCs) during disruption and ELMs to ITER parameters indicates serious consequences of these phenomena. Therefore schemes for prediction and mitigation or avoidance of these phenomena need to be developed during construction and demonstrated in the early phase of ITER operation. T-retention and dust have important impacts on safety. Therefore the methods of measurement and removal of tritium and dust must be developed during construction and demonstrated in the early phase of ITER operation.

  11. Instrumentation of Reentry Plasma Experiments on Trail-Blazer II Rocket A21.220-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-07-31

    June 1974 BLAZER II ROCKET A21. 220-1 9. PIF~~GOG REPORT NUMBER 7. &TMORCO) J. Spencer Rocbefort L. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUNIIEN(sJ Raimundas Sukys F19628...Fnittei) AFCRL-TR-74-0385 ( INSTRUMENTATION OF REENTRY PLASMA EXPERIMENTS ON TRAILBLAZER II ROCKET A21. 220-1 J. Spencer Rochefort Raimundas Sukys ...J.S. Rochefort, L. J. O’Connor, C.H. Price, Jr., and R, Sukys , "Data Transmission and ’I rajectory Determining Devices For Research Rockets and

  12. The Plasma Interaction Experiment /PIX/ - Description and flight qualification test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignaczak, L. R.; Haley, F. A.; Domino, E. J.; Culp, D. H.; Shaker, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Plasma Interaction Experiment (PIX) is a battery powered preprogrammed auxiliary payload on the Landsat-C launch. This experiment is part of a larger program to investigate space plasma interactions with spacecraft surfaces and components. The varying plasma densities encountered during available telemetry coverage periods are deemed sufficient to determine first order interactions between the space plasma environment and the biased experimental surfaces. The specific objectives of the PIX flight experiment are to measure the plasma coupling current and the negative voltage breakdown characteristics of a solar array segment and a gold plated steel disk. Measurements will be made over a range of surface voltages up to plus or minus 1 kilovolt. The orbital environment will provide a range of plasma densities. The experimental surfaces will be voltage-biased in a preprogrammed step sequence to optimize the data returned for each plasma region and for the available telemetry coverage.

  13. Measurements of Plasma Expansion due to Background Gas in the Electron Diffusion Gauge Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle A. Morrison; Stephen F. Paul; Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-08-11

    The expansion of pure electron plasmas due to collisions with background neutral gas atoms in the Electron Diffusion Gauge (EDG) experiment device is observed. Measurements of plasma expansion with the new, phosphor-screen density diagnostic suggest that the expansion rates measured previously were observed during the plasma's relaxation to quasi-thermal-equilibrium, making it even more remarkable that they scale classically with pressure. Measurements of the on-axis, parallel plasma temperature evolution support the conclusion.

  14. Megagauss field generation for high-energy-density plasma science experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Rovang, Dean Curtis; Struve, Kenneth William; Porter, John Larry Jr.

    2008-10-01

    There is a need to generate magnetic fields both above and below 1 megagauss (100 T) with compact generators for laser-plasma experiments in the Beamlet and Petawatt test chambers for focused research on fundamental properties of high energy density magnetic plasmas. Some of the important topics that could be addressed with such a capability are magnetic field diffusion, particle confinement, plasma instabilities, spectroscopic diagnostic development, material properties, flux compression, and alternate confinement schemes, all of which could directly support experiments on Z. This report summarizes a two-month study to develop preliminary designs of magnetic field generators for three design regimes. These are, (1) a design for a relatively low-field (10 to 50 T), compact generator for modest volumes (1 to 10 cm3), (2) a high-field (50 to 200 T) design for smaller volumes (10 to 100 mm3), and (3) an extreme field (greater than 600 T) design that uses flux compression. These designs rely on existing Sandia pulsed-power expertise and equipment, and address issues of magnetic field scaling with capacitor bank design and field inductance, vacuum interface, and trade-offs between inductance and coil designs.

  15. A capstone research experience for physics majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, David

    2013-03-01

    Dickinson College is a small liberal arts college with a thriving physics program. For years, one of the key features of our program has been a year-long senior research project that was required for each student. Unfortunately, as our number of majors increased, it became more and more difficult to supervise such a large number of senior research projects. To deal with this growing challenge, we developed a capstone research experience that involves a larger number of students working together on an independent group project. In this talk I will give a broad overview of our new senior research model and provide a few examples of projects that have been carried out over the past few years. I will also briefly describe the positive and negative aspects of this model from the perspective of faculty and students.

  16. Convex Crystal X-ray Spectrometer for Laser Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    May, M; Heeter, R; Emig, J

    2004-04-15

    Measuring time and space-resolved spectra is important for understanding Hohlraum and Halfraum plasmas. Experiments at the OMEGA laser have used the Nova TSPEC which was not optimized for the OMEGA diagnostic space envelope or for the needed spectroscopic coverage and resolution. An improved multipurpose spectrometer snout, the MSPEC, has been constructed and fielded on OMEGA. The MSPEC provides the maximal internal volume for mounting crystals without any beam interferences at either 2x or 3x magnification. The RAP crystal is in a convex mounting geometry bent to a 20 cm radius of curvature. The spectral resolution, E/dE, is about 200 at 2.5 keV. The spectral coverage is 2 to 4.5 keV. The MSPEC can record four separate spectra on the framing camera at time intervals of up to several ns. The spectrometer design and initial field-test performance will be presented and compared to that of the TSPEC. Work supported by U. S. DoE/UC LLNL contract W-7405-ENG-48

  17. Laser Plasma Instability Experiments with KrF Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    L. Phillips, A. J. Schmitt, J. D. Sethain, R . K. McCrory, W. Seka, C. Verdon, J. P. Knauer, B. B. Afeyan, H. T . Powell, Physics of Plasmas, 5, 5...Physics of Plasmas. 8 R . Betti, K. Anderson, J. Knauer, T . J. B. Collins, R . L. McCrory, R . W. McKenty, S. Skupsky, Physics of Plasmas, 12, 4, 042703...2005). 9 W. L. Kruer, The Physics of Laser Plasma Interactions (Addison-Wesley, Boulder, 1988). 10 J. M. McMahon, R . P. Burns, T . H. DeRieux, R

  18. Swashzone Fellowships: a 6-month research experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raubenheimer, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Swashzone Fellowships funded by the CAREER program were designed to provide sufficient time for undergraduates with little knowledge of ocean processes and minimal prior research experience to participate in observational nearshore oceanographic studies. The fellows learned background material, developed hypotheses, planned field experiments, designed sensor arrays, tested and debugged instrumentation, collected and analyzed data, and communicated the results through oral and written presentations. The program funded 12 undergraduate student fellows (4 male and 8 female), with backgrounds in math (3 students), physics (4), geology (1), and environmental sciences (4). Preference was given to applicants who had not taken oceanography classes and who were unsure of career plans. All the students presented their results at department seminars, and most presented their results at a professional conference (eg, AGU or Ocean Sciences). The results often were incorporated in peer-reviewed manuscripts. Evaluations conducted following the fellowships and again several years after each fellowship indicated that many of the students pursued STEM careers: 5 are pursuing PhD degrees, including bio-mathematics, physics, atmospheric physics, and ocean physics; 2 are employed at environmental engineering and consulting firms; 4 are employed as research technicians at WHOI; and 1 is a lawyer (currently being considered as a clerk for the Supreme Court). Many of the students were excited to learn about the range of oceanographic career options, including engineering and technical staff, as well as science research. The graduating seniors expressed their appreciation for the fellowship opportunity, stating that there were few science positions available to students without significant prior research experience. Several students noted that the fellowships were critical to their later employment and to their decisions to pursue careers in science. In particular, the students noted

  19. The Electron and ion Plasma Experiment for Fast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, C. W.; McFadden, J. P.; Turin, P.; Curtis, D. W.; Magoncelli, A.

    2001-08-01

    The ion and electron plasma experiment on the Fast Auroral Snapshot satellite (FAST) is designed to measure pitch-angle distributions of suprathermal auroral electrons and ions with high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, good energy and angular resolution, and exceptional time resolution. These measurements support the primary scientific goal of the FAST mission to understand the physical processes responsible for auroral particle acceleration and heating, and associated wave-particle interactions. The instrument includes a complement of 8 pairs of `Top Hat' electrostatic analyzer heads with microchannel plate (MCP) electron multipliers and discrete anodes to provide angle resolved measurements. The analyzers are packaged in four instrument stacks, each containing four analyzers. These four stacks are equally spaced around the spacecraft spin plane. Analyzers mounted on opposite sides of the spacecraft operate in pairs such that their individual 180° fields of view combine to give an unobstructed 360° field of view in the spin plane. The earth's magnetic field is within a few degrees of the spin plane during most auroral crossings, so the time resolution for pitch-angle distribution measurements is independent of the spacecraft spin period. Two analyzer pairs serve as electron and ion spectrometers that obtain distributions of 48 energies at 32 angles every 78 ms. Their standard energy ranges are 4 eV to 32 keV for electrons and 3 eV to 24 keV for ions. These sensors also have deflection plates that can track the magnetic field direction within 10° of the spin plane to resolve narrow, magnetic field-aligned beams of electrons and ions. The remaining six analyzer pairs collectively function as an electron spectrograph, resolving distributions with 16 contiguous pitch-angle bins and a selectable trade-off of energy and time resolution. Two examples of possible operating modes are a maximum time resolution mode with 16 angles and 6 energies every 1.63 ms, or a

  20. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Adli, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P. N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A. A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K. V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V. A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms 12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy ( 15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  1. Electron beam-plasma interaction experiments with the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, S.M.; Lee, M.C.; Moriarty, D.T.; Riddolls, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    The laboratory investigation of electron beam-plasma interactions is motivated by the recent space shuttle experiments. Interesting but puzzling phenomena were observed in the shuttle experiments such as the bulk heating of background ionospheric plasmas by the injected electron beams and the excitation of plasma waves in the frequency range of ELF waves. The plasma machine, the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) can generate a large magnetized plasma with the electron plasma frequency greater than the electron gyrofrequency by a factor of 3--5 similar to the plasma condition in the ionosphere. Short pulses of electron beams are injected into the VTF plasmas in order to simulate the beam injection from spacecrafts in the ionosphere. A Langmuir probe installed at a bottom port of VTF monitors the spatial variation of electron beams emitted from LaB6 filaments. An energy analyzer has been used to determine the particle energy distribution in the VTF plasmas. Several mechanisms will be tested as potential causes of the bulk heating of background plasmas by the injected electron beams as seen in the space shuttle experiments. It is speculated that the observed ELF emissions result from the excitation of purely growing modes detected by the space shuttle-borne detectors. Results of the laboratory experiments will be reported to corroborate this speculation.

  2. Advanced electric propulsion and space plasma contactor research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, Paul J.

    1987-01-01

    A theory of the plasma contacting process is described and experimental results obtained using three different hollow cathode-based plasma contactors are presented. The existence of a sheath across which the bulk of the voltage drop associated with the contacting process occurs is demonstrated. Test results are shown to agree with a model of a spherical, space-charge-limited double sheath. The concept of ignited mode contactor operation is discussed, which is shown to enhance contactor efficiency when it is collecting electrons. An investigation of the potentials in the plasma plumes downstream of contactors operating at typical conditions is presented. Results of tests performed on hollow cathodes operating at high interelectrode pressures (up to about 1000 Torr) on ammonia are presented and criteria that are necessary to ensure that the cathode will operate properly in this regime are presented. These results suggest that high pressure hollow cathode operation is difficult to achieve and that special care must be taken to assure that the electron emission region remains diffuse and attached to the low work function insert. Experiments conducted to verify results obtained previously using a ring cusp ion source equipped with a moveable anode are described and test results are reported. A theoretical study of hollow cathode operation at high electron emission currents is presented. Preliminary experiments using the constrained sheath optics concept to achieve ion extraction under conditions of high beam current density, low net accelerating voltage and well columniated beamlet formation are discussed.

  3. Texas Experimental Tokamak, a plasma research facility: Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, A.J.

    1995-08-01

    In the year just past, the authors made major progress in understanding turbulence and transport in both core and edge. Development of the capability for turbulence measurements throughout the poloidal cross section and intelligent consideration of the observed asymmetries, played a critical role in this work. In their confinement studies, a limited plasma with strong, H-mode-like characteristics serendipitously appeared and received extensive study though a diverted H-mode remains elusive. In the plasma edge, they appear to be close to isolating a turbulence drive mechanism. These are major advances of benefit to the community at large, and they followed from incremental improvements in diagnostics, in the interpretation of the diagnostics, and in TEXT itself. Their general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The work here demonstrates a continuing dedication to the problems of plasma transport which continue to plague the community and are an impediment to the design of future devices. They expect to show here that they approach this problem consistently, systematically, and effectively.

  4. Investigation of iron opacity experiment plasma gradients with synthetic data analyses.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, T; Bailey, J E; Rochau, G A; Hansen, S B; Mancini, R C; MacFarlane, J J; Golovkin, I

    2012-10-01

    Experiments have been performed at Sandia National Laboratories Z-facility to validate iron opacity models relevant to the solar convection/radiation zone boundary. Sample conditions were measured by mixing Mg with the Fe and using Mg K-shell line transmission spectra, assuming that the plasma was uniform. We develop a spectral model that accounts for hypothetical gradients, and compute synthetic spectra to quantitatively evaluate the plasma gradient size that can be diagnosed. Two sample designs are investigated, assuming linear temperature and density gradients. First, Mg uniformly mixed with Fe enables temperature gradients greater than 10% to be detected. The second design uses Mg mixed into one side and Al mixed into the other side of the sample in an attempt to more accurately infer the sample gradient. Both temperature and density gradients as small as a few percent can be detected with this design. Experiments have successfully recorded spectra with the second design. In future research, the spectral model will be used to place bounds on gradients that exist in Z opacity experiments.

  5. Plasma skin resurfacing: personal experience and long-term results.

    PubMed

    Bentkover, Stuart H

    2012-05-01

    This article presents a comprehensive clinical approach to plasma resurfacing for skin regeneration. Plasma technology, preoperative protocols, resurfacing technique, postoperative care, clinical outcomes, evidence-based results, and appropriate candidates for this procedure are discussed. Specific penetration depth and specific laser energy measurements are provided. Nitrogen plasma skin regeneration is a skin-resurfacing technique that offers excellent improvement of mild to moderate skin wrinkles and overall skin rejuvenation. It also provides excellent improvement in uniformity of skin color and texture in patients with hyperpigmentation with Fitzpatrick skin types 1 through 4.

  6. UCLA/FNPL Underdense Plasma Lens Experiment: Results and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M C; Badakov, H; Rosenzweig, J B; Travish, G; Fliller, R; Kazakevich, G M; Piot, P; Santucci, J; Li, J; Tikhoplav, R

    2006-08-04

    Focusing of a 15 MeV, 16 nC electron bunch by a gaussian underdense plasma lens operated just beyond the threshold of the underdense condition has been demonstrated. The strong 1.9 cm focal length plasma lens focused both transverse directions simultaneously and reduced the minimum area of the beam spot by a factor of 23. Analysis of the beam envelope evolution observed near the beam waist shows that the spherical aberrations of this underdense lens are lower than those of an overdense plasma lens, as predicted by theory. Time resolved measurements of the focused electron bunch are also reported and compared to simulations.

  7. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated August 14, 1995: 'KSC plant physiologist Dr. Gary Stutte (right) and Cheryl Mackowiak harvest potatoes grown in the Biomass Production Chamber of the Controlled Enviornment Life Support System (CELSS in Hangar L at Cape Canaveral Air Station. During a 418-day 'human rated' experiment, potato crops grown in the chamber provided the equivalent of a continuous supply of the oxygen for one astronaut, along with 55 percent of that long-duration space flight crew member's caloric food requirements and enough purified water for four astronauts while absorbing their expelled carbon dioxide. The experiment provided data that will help demonstarte the feasibility of the CELSS operating as a bioregenerative life support system for lunar and deep-space missions that can operate independently without the need to carry consumables such as air, water and food, while not requiring the expendable air and water system filters necessary on today's human-piloted spacecraft.' Their work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  8. Research and the planned Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Original photo and caption dated August 14, 1995: 'KSC plant physiologist Dr. Gary Stutte harvests a potato grown in the Biomass Production Chamber of the Controlled environment Life Support system (CELSS) in Hangar L at Cape Canaveral Air Station. During a 418-day 'human rated' experiment, potato crops grown in the chamber provided the equivalent of a continuous supply of the oxygen for one astronaut, along with 55 percent of that long-duration space flight crew member's caloric food requirements and enough purified water for four astronauts while absorbing their expelled carbon dioxide. The experiment provided data that will help demonstarte the feasibility of the CELSS operating as a bioregenerative life support system for lunar and deep-space missions that can operate independently without the need to carry consumables such as air, water and food, while not requiring the expendable air and water system filters necessary on today's human-piloted spacecraft.' His work is an example of the type of life sciences research that will be conducted at the Space Experiment Research Procession Laboratory (SERPL). The SERPL is a planned 100,000-square-foot laboratory that will provide expanded and upgraded facilities for hosting International Space Station experiment processing. In addition, it will provide better support for other biological and life sciences payload processing at KSC. It will serve as a magnet facility for a planned 400-acre Space Station Commerce Park.

  9. Plasma-filled applied B ion diode experiments using a plasma opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, T.J. )

    1994-12-15

    In order for a plasma opening switch (POS) to open quickly and transfer power efficiently from an inductively charged vacuum transmission line to an applied B ion diode, the load impedance of the ion diode may be required to have an initial low impedance phase. A plasma-filled diode has such an impedance history. To test the effect of a plasma-filled diode on POS-diode coupling, a drifting plasma was introduced from the cathode side of an applied B ion diode operated on the LION accelerator (1.5 MV, 4 [Omega], 40 ns) at Cornell University. This plasma readily crossed the 2.1 T magnetic insulation field of the diode, and resulted in both increased diode electrical power, and an increased ability of the ion beam to remove material from a target. The plasma did not appear to have a noticeable effect on local beam steering angle.

  10. Plasma-filled applied B ion diode experiments using a plasma opening switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renk, T. J.

    1994-12-01

    In order for a plasma opening switch (POS) to open quickly and transfer power efficiently from an inductively charged vacuum transmission line to an applied B ion diode, the load impedance of the ion diode may be required to have an initial low impedance phase. A plasma-filled diode has such an impedance history. To test the effect of a plasma-filled diode on POS-diode coupling, a drifting plasma was introduced from the cathode side of an applied B ion diode operated on the LION accelerator (1.5 MV, 4 Ohm, 40 ns) at Cornell University. This plasma readily crossed the 2.1 T magnetic insulation field of the diode, and resulted in both increased diode electrical power, and an increased ability of the ion beam to remove material from a target. The plasma did not appear to have a noticeable effect on local beam steering angle.

  11. Experiments With Radiatively Cooled Supersonic Plasma Jets Generated in Conical Wire Array Z-Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S. V.; Ampleford, D. J.; Bland, S. N.; Chittenden, J. P.; Ciardi, A.; Naz, N.; Haines, M. G.; Frank, A.; Blackman, E.; Gardiner, T.

    2002-12-01

    We present results of astrophysically relevant experiments where highly supersonic plasma jets are generated via conically convergent plasma flows in a conical wire array Z-pinch. Stagnation of plasma flow on the axis of symmetry forms a standing conical shock effectively collimating the flow in the axial direction. This scenario is essentially similar to that discussed by Canto and collaborators [1] as a purely hydrodynamic mechanism for jet formation in astrophysical systems. Experiments using different materials (Al, Fe and W) show that a hypersonic (M ~ 20), well-collimated jet is generated when the radiative cooling rate of the plasma is significant.

  12. Characterization of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chung, J; Lee, K D; Seo, D C; Nam, Y U; Choi, M C

    2010-10-01

    Within the scope of long term research on imaging diagnostics for steady-state plasmas and understanding of edge plasma physics through diagnostics with conventional spectroscopic methods, we have constructed a linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device named Research on Advanced Plasma Imaging and Dynamics (RAPID). It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. Here, a 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state hydrogen, helium, and argon plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). In order to achieve the highest possible plasma performance within the limited input parameters, wall conditioning experiments were carried out. Chamber bake-out was achieved with heating coils that were wound covering the vessel, and long-pulse electron cyclotron heating discharge cleaning was also followed after 4 days of bake-out. A uniform bake-out temperature (150 °C) was achieved by wrapping the vessel in high temperature thermal insulation textile and by controlling the heating coil current using a digital control system. The partial pressure changes were observed using a residual gas analyzer, and a total system pressure of 5×10(-8) Torr was finally reached. Diagnostic systems including a millimeter-wave interferometer, a high resolution survey spectrometer, a Langmuir probe, and an ultrasoft x-ray detector were used to provide the evidence that the plasma performance was improved as we desired. In this work, we present characterization of the RAPID device for various system conditions and configurations.

  13. Characterization of a linear device developed for research on advanced plasma imaging and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J.; Lee, K. D.; Seo, D. C.; Nam, Y. U.; Choi, M. C.

    2010-10-15

    Within the scope of long term research on imaging diagnostics for steady-state plasmas and understanding of edge plasma physics through diagnostics with conventional spectroscopic methods, we have constructed a linear electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma device named Research on Advanced Plasma Imaging and Dynamics (RAPID). It has a variety of axial magnetic field profiles provided by eight water-cooled magnetic coils and two dc power supplies. The positions of the magnetic coils are freely adjustable along the axial direction and the power supplies can be operated with many combinations of electrical wiring to the coils. Here, a 6 kW 2.45 GHz magnetron is used to produce steady-state hydrogen, helium, and argon plasmas with central magnetic fields of 875 and/or 437.5 G (second harmonic). In order to achieve the highest possible plasma performance within the limited input parameters, wall conditioning experiments were carried out. Chamber bake-out was achieved with heating coils that were wound covering the vessel, and long-pulse electron cyclotron heating discharge cleaning was also followed after 4 days of bake-out. A uniform bake-out temperature (150 deg. C) was achieved by wrapping the vessel in high temperature thermal insulation textile and by controlling the heating coil current using a digital control system. The partial pressure changes were observed using a residual gas analyzer, and a total system pressure of 5x10{sup -8} Torr was finally reached. Diagnostic systems including a millimeter-wave interferometer, a high resolution survey spectrometer, a Langmuir probe, and an ultrasoft x-ray detector were used to provide the evidence that the plasma performance was improved as we desired. In this work, we present characterization of the RAPID device for various system conditions and configurations.

  14. Plasma wave experiment for the ISEE-3 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarf, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of data from a scientific instrument designed to study solar wind and plasma wave phenomena on the ISEE-3 mission is presented. The performance of work on the data analysis phase is summarized.

  15. Ion cyclotron heating experiments in magnetosphere plasma device RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Mushiake, T.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2015-12-01

    The ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating with 3 MHz and ˜10 kW is being prepared in RT-1. The operation regime for electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating is surveyed as the target plasmas. ECRH with 8.2 GHz and ˜50 kW produces the plasmas with high energy electrons in the range of a few ten keV, but the ions still remain cold at a few ten eV. Ion heating is expected to access high ion beta state and to change the aspect of plasma confinement theoretically. The ICRF heating is applied to the target plasma as an auxiliary heating. The preliminary result of ICRF heating is reported.

  16. Ion cyclotron heating experiments in magnetosphere plasma device RT-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiura, M. Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Mushiake, T.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2015-12-10

    The ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating with 3 MHz and ∼10 kW is being prepared in RT-1. The operation regime for electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating is surveyed as the target plasmas. ECRH with 8.2 GHz and ∼50 kW produces the plasmas with high energy electrons in the range of a few ten keV, but the ions still remain cold at a few ten eV. Ion heating is expected to access high ion beta state and to change the aspect of plasma confinement theoretically. The ICRF heating is applied to the target plasma as an auxiliary heating. The preliminary result of ICRF heating is reported.

  17. Laboratory-scale uranium RF plasma confinement experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted using 80 kW and 1.2 MW RF induction heater facilities to aid in developing the technology necessary for designing a self-critical fissioning uranium plasma core reactor. Pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into argon-confined, steady-state, RF-heated plasmas in different uranium plasma confinement tests to investigate the characteristics of plamas core nuclear reactors. The objectives were: (1) to confine as high a density of uranium vapor as possible within the plasma while simultaneously minimizing the uranium compound wall deposition; (2) to develop and test materials and handling techniques suitable for use with high-temperature, high-pressure gaseous UF6; and (3) to develop complementary diagnostic instrumentation and measurement techniques to characterize the uranium plasma and residue deposited on the test chamber components. In all tests, the plasma was a fluid-mechanically-confined vortex-type contained within a fused-silica cylindrical test chamber. The test chamber peripheral wall was 5.7 cm ID by 10 cm long.

  18. Experiments on a current-toggled plasma-opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Savage, M.E.; Zagar, D.M.; Simpson, W.W.; Grasser, T.W.; Quintenz, J.P. )

    1992-04-15

    Plasma-opening switches have been used to improve pulsed-power wave shapes for over a decade. These switches have used the inertia of the plasma to hold the switch closed. This results in conflicting requirements when long hold-off time and fast opening are required, and also results in variation in opening current due to variation in initial plasma fill. The current-toggled plasma-opening switch attempts to overcome these problems by using external magnetic fields rather than inertia to control the plasma conductor. Data will be presented showing several features of the operation of this switch. These data will be compared to models used to design the switch. The comparisons indicate that the mass can be measured approximately from fast coil data and that the slow coil flux does set the opening level of the current. They also indicate that the opening current is somewhat dependent upon plasma mass, and that the design of the field coils that provide the control fields must be done more carefully to provide a switch that opens satisfactorily.

  19. Electron beam injection experiments - The beam-plasma discharge at low pressures and magnetic field strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, W.; Leinbach, H.; Kellogg, P.; Monson, S.; Hallinan, T.; Garriott, O. K.; Konradi, A.; Mccoy, J.; Daly, P.; Baker, B.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes electron beam injection experiments which clarify observational results obtained in rocket flights. A column of enhanced density plasma, exceeding the density expected from ionization by primary beam electrons, was observed in a large vacuum system at low magnetic fields (1 to 1.5 G) and low ambient pressures (10 to the minus 6 to 10 to the minus 5 torr). The peak luminosity of the discharge was about 10 times that of the beam alone, and the radius increased by a factor of three. In the absence of the discharge, RF emission is observed at 1.1 to 1.2 times the cyclotron frequency, and a strong band of RF noise with upper frequency cutoff at about the cyclotron frequency is observed in the discharge mode, along with higher frequency noise at or near the plasma frequency. The onset of the plasma discharge is critically dependent on beam current. The described results agree with observations obtained at much higher densities and magnetic fields in fusion research studies.

  20. Baseline geoenvironmental experiments for in-situ soil transformation by plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, J.R.; Mayne, P.W.

    1995-12-31

    The advent of the nontransferred plasma arc torch has implicated a range of in-situ geoenvironmental applications that can revolutionize methods of ground modification and field remediation of contaminated sites. With reverse polarity nontransferred arc type plasma torches, temperatures of 4,000 C to 7,000 C can be directed at specific targets of contaminated soil or waste. At these extreme temperatures, all organic materials within the soil undergo pyrolysis, while the bulk composition is transformed into a magma that subsequently cools to form a vitrified mass resembling volcanic obsidian or a dense partially crystalline material resembling microcrystalline igneous rock. Simulations of in-situ transformation of soil have been conducted using both 100-kW and 240-kW torches to alter clay, silty sand, and sand in chamber tests. Although these materials are primarily composed of silica and alumina oxides having melting temperatures of 1,100 C to 1,600 C, the formation of a spheroidal magma core occurred within the first five minutes of exposure to the plasma flame. Experiments were conducted to quantify the improved engineering properties that occur after transformation and to demonstrate the relative effects of power level, water content, and soil type on the size and strength of the altered material. The ongoing research also serves as a baseline study for further experimentation that will focus on the in-situ remediation of soils with varied contaminants.

  1. Engaging Students in Authentic Astronomy Research Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuck, Timothy; Boocks, C.; Coogan, N.; Culbertson, E.; Davis, J.; Reinsel, N.; Saathoff, I.; Sampsell, D.; Yashinski, N.

    2010-05-01

    According to the National Science Standards science is something you do, not something that is done to you. The presentation explores citizen science projects such as GalaxyZoo and Citizen Sky-epsilon Aurigae, a search for young stellar objects, asteroid hunting with the International Astronomical Search Collaboration, a Cepheid variable study, and a local light pollution project; all taking place at the Oil City Area Sr. High School in Northwestern Pennsylvania. Students will be presenting their research and discuss the value of these real science experiences.

  2. Review of upconverted Nd-glass laser plasma experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Manes, K.R.

    1982-05-01

    Systematic scaling experiments aimed at deducing the dependence of laser-plasma interaction phenomena on target plasma material and target irradiation history have been underway in laboratories all over the world in recent years. During 1980 and 1981 the Livermore program undertook to measure the laser light absorption of high and low Z plasmas and the partition of the absorbed energy amongst the thermal and suprathermal electron populations as a function of both laser intensity and wavelength. Simulations suggested that short wavelength laser light would couple more efficiently than longer wavelengths to target plasmas. Shorter wavelength heating of higher electron plasma densities would, it was felt, lead to laser-plasma interactions freer of anomalous absorption processes. The following sections review LLNL experiments designed to test these hypotheses.

  3. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R. P.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-04-08

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β~10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict a stronger flux compression and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.

  4. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J. Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Town, R. P. J.

    2015-04-15

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β ∼ 10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell simulations predict a stronger flux compression and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.

  5. Driving Flows in Laboratory Astrophysical Plasma Jets: The Mochi.LabJet Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Evan G.

    Mochi.Labjet is a new experiment at the University of Washington developed to investigate the interaction of shear flows in plasma jets with boundary conditions similar to an accretion disc system. This thesis details the engineering design and first plasmas of the Mochi.Labjet experiment. The experiment required construction of a new three electrode plasma gun with azimuthal symmetric gas injection, two optically-isolated pulsed power supplies for generating and sustaining plasma, and one optically-isolated pulsed power supply for generating a background magnetic field. Optical isolation is achieved with four custom circuits: the TTL-optical transmitter, optical-TTL receiver, optical-relay, and optical-tachometer circuits. First plasmas, during the commissioning phase of the apparatus, show evidence of flared jet structures with significant azimuthal symmetry.

  6. Experiment and Results on Plasma Etching of SRF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Janardan; Im, Do; Peshl, J.; Vuskovic, Leposova; Popovic, Svetozar; Valente, Anne-Marie; Phillips, H. Lawrence

    2015-09-01

    The inner surfaces of SRF cavities are currently chemically treated (etched or electropolished) to achieve the state of the art RF performance. We designed an apparatus and developed a method for plasma etching of the inner surface for SRF cavities. The process parameters (pressure, power, gas concentration, diameter and shape of the inner electrode, temperature and positive dc bias at inner electrode) are optimized for cylindrical geometry. The etch rate non-uniformity has been overcome by simultaneous translation of the gas point-of-entry and the inner electrode during the processing. A single cell SRF cavity has been centrifugally barrel polished, chemically etched and RF tested to establish a baseline performance. This cavity is plasma etched and RF tested afterwards. The effect of plasma etching on the RF performance of this cavity will be presented and discussed.

  7. Plasma Chamber and First Wall of the Ignitor Experiment^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cucchiaro, A.; Coppi, B.; Bianchi, A.; Lucca, F.

    2005-10-01

    The new designs of the Plasma Chamber (PC) and of the First Wall (FW) system are based on updated scenarios for vertical plasma disruption (VDE) as well as estimates for the maximum thermal wall loadings at ignition. The PC wall thickness has been optimized to reduce the deformation during the worst disruption event without sacrificing the dimensions of the plasma column. A non linear dynamic analysis of the PC has been performed on a 360^o model of it, taking into account possible toroidal asymmetries of the halo current. Radial EM loads obtained by scaling JET measurements have been also considered. The low-cycle fatigue analysis confirms that the PC is able to meet a lifetime of few thousand cycles for the most extreme combinations of magnetic fields and plasma currents. The FW, made of Molybdenum (TZM) tiles covering the entire inner surface of the PC, has been designed to withstand thermal and EM loads, both under normal operating conditions and in case of disruption. Detailed elasto-plastic structural analyses of the most (EM) loaded tile-carriers show that these are compatible with the adopted fabrication requirements. ^*Sponsored in part by ENEA of Italy and by the U.S. DOE.

  8. Plasma wave experiment for the ISEE-3 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarf, F. L.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of data from a scientific instrument designed to study solar wind and plasma wave phenomena on the ISEE-3 Mission is provided. Work on the data analysis phase of the contract from 1 October 1982 through 30 March 1983 is summarized.

  9. Slowing of magnetic reconnection concurrent with weakening plasma inflows and increasing collisionality in strongly-driven laser-plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M.  J.; Li, C.  K.; Fox, W.; Zylstra, A.  B.; Stoeckl, C.; Séguin, F.  H.; Frenje, J.  A.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-05-20

    An evolution of magnetic reconnection behavior, from fast jets to the slowing of reconnection and the establishment of a stable current sheet, has been observed in strongly-driven, β ≲ 20 laser-produced plasma experiments. This process has been inferred to occur alongside a slowing of plasma inflows carrying the oppositely-directed magnetic fields as well as the evolution of plasma conditions from collisionless to collisional. High-resolution proton radiography has revealed unprecedented detail of the forced interaction of magnetic fields and super-Alfvénic electron jets (Vjet~ 20VA) ejected from the reconnection region, indicating that two-fluid or collisionless magnetic reconnection occurs early in time. The absence of jets and the persistence of strong, stable magnetic fields at late times indicates that the reconnection process slows down, while plasma flows stagnate and plasma conditions evolve to a cooler, denser, more collisional state. These results demonstrate that powerful initial plasma flows are not sufficient to force a complete reconnection of magnetic fields, even in the strongly-driven regime.

  10. Slowing of magnetic reconnection concurrent with weakening plasma inflows and increasing collisionality in strongly-driven laser-plasma experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Rosenberg, M.  J.; Li, C.  K.; Fox, W.; ...

    2015-05-20

    An evolution of magnetic reconnection behavior, from fast jets to the slowing of reconnection and the establishment of a stable current sheet, has been observed in strongly-driven, β ≲ 20 laser-produced plasma experiments. This process has been inferred to occur alongside a slowing of plasma inflows carrying the oppositely-directed magnetic fields as well as the evolution of plasma conditions from collisionless to collisional. High-resolution proton radiography has revealed unprecedented detail of the forced interaction of magnetic fields and super-Alfvénic electron jets (Vjet~ 20VA) ejected from the reconnection region, indicating that two-fluid or collisionless magnetic reconnection occurs early in time. Themore » absence of jets and the persistence of strong, stable magnetic fields at late times indicates that the reconnection process slows down, while plasma flows stagnate and plasma conditions evolve to a cooler, denser, more collisional state. These results demonstrate that powerful initial plasma flows are not sufficient to force a complete reconnection of magnetic fields, even in the strongly-driven regime.« less

  11. Experiments with an rf dusty plasma and an external plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Ticos, C. M.

    2010-12-14

    A plasma jet produced in a coaxial plasma gun was aimed at a cloud of dust particles levitated in the sheath of a radio-frequency (rf) plasma produced between two parallel-plate electrodes. A high-speed camera with a side-view on the dust cloud was used to track the dust particles. Several cases of dust motion could be observed. When the jet was parallel with the horizontal electrodes of the rf plasma the dust particles were either pushed out of the trapping region by the plasma jet or were only perturbed from their equilibrium position, oscillating with a frequency of the order of a few kHz. In the first case the trajectory of the dust particles followed the curvature of the sheath. In the second case, when the jet was fired at a small angle with the horizontal electrodes the dust particles hit the bottom electrode and ricocheted back into the sheath. Finally, another situation was observed when the jet perturbed the rf plasma and its sheath and the whole dust crystal fell to the electrode.

  12. High temperature UF6 RF plasma experiments applicable to uranium plasma core reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was conducted using a 1.2 MW RF induction heater facility to aid in developing the technology necessary for designing a self critical fissioning uranium plasma core reactor. Pure, high temperature uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon fluid mechanically confined, steady state, RF heated plasma while employing different exhaust systems and diagnostic techniques to simulate and investigate some potential characteristics of uranium plasma core nuclear reactors. The development of techniques and equipment for fluid mechanical confinement of RF heated uranium plasmas with a high density of uranium vapor within the plasma, while simultaneously minimizing deposition of uranium and uranium compounds on the test chamber peripheral wall, endwall surfaces, and primary exhaust ducts, is discussed. The material tests and handling techniques suitable for use with high temperature, high pressure, gaseous UF6 are described and the development of complementary diagnostic instrumentation and measurement techniques to characterize the uranium plasma, effluent exhaust gases, and residue deposited on the test chamber and exhaust system components is reported.

  13. Experiments with an rf dusty plasma and an external plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticoş, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    A plasma jet produced in a coaxial plasma gun was aimed at a cloud of dust particles levitated in the sheath of a radio-frequency (rf) plasma produced between two parallel-plate electrodes. A high-speed camera with a side-view on the dust cloud was used to track the dust particles. Several cases of dust motion could be observed. When the jet was parallel with the horizontal electrodes of the rf plasma the dust particles were either pushed out of the trapping region by the plasma jet or were only perturbed from their equilibrium position, oscillating with a frequency of the order of a few kHz. In the first case the trajectory of the dust particles followed the curvature of the sheath. In the second case, when the jet was fired at a small angle with the horizontal electrodes the dust particles hit the bottom electrode and ricocheted back into the sheath. Finally, another situation was observed when the jet perturbed the rf plasma and its sheath and the whole dust crystal fell to the electrode.

  14. Dusty Plasma Experimental (DPEx) device for complex plasma experiments with flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2015-11-01

    A versatile table-top dusty plasma experimental device to study flow induced excitations of linear and nonlinear waves/structures in a complex plasma is presented. In this Π-shaped apparatus, a DC glow discharge plasma is produced between a disc shaped anode and a grounded long cathode tray by applying a high voltage DC in the background of a neutral gas (argon) and subsequently a dusty plasma is created by introducing micron sized dust particles that get charged and levitated in the sheath region. A flow of the dust particles is induced in a controlled manner by adjusting the pumping speed and the gas flow rate into the device. A full characterisation of the plasma, using Langmuir and emissive probe data, and that of the dusty plasma using particle tracking data with the help of an idl based (super) Particle Identification and Tracking (sPIT) code is reported. Experimental results on the variation of the dust flow velocity as a function of the neutral pressure and the gas flow rate are given. The neutral drag force acting on the particles and the Epstein coefficient are estimated from the initial acceleration of the particles. The potential experimental capabilities of the device for conducting fundamental studies of flow induced instabilities are discussed.

  15. Electrons precipitation stimulated by plasma jets injection in FLUXUS and NORTH STAR active rocket experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, B.; Erlandson, R.; Lynch, K.; Meng, C.; Podgorny, I.; Pfaff, R.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.; Sobyanin, D.; Zetzer, J.

    In Russian-American active rocket experiments FLUXUS (49? N, 47? E, 1997) and NORTH STAR (70? N, 148? W, 1999) high-velocity plasma jets were injected along and across the geomagnetic field respectively. In the both experiments high- density plasma jets pushed out the magnetic field. Later, when the magnetic field penetrated into the plasma jet, plasma was polarized and E=-VxB/c electric field was registered. As a result, Alfvén waves, carrying the field-aligned currents, propagate along the magnetic field lines. If the current density is rather high, the field-aligned electric fields can appear, and electrons would be accelerated along the magnetic field lines. Electron fluxes with energy from several eV to 2 keV were revealed in the both experiments. During NORTH STAR experiment electron fluxes caused by auroral precipitation were also registered

  16. An enhancement of plasma density by neutral gas injection observed in SEPAC Spacelab-1 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Obayashi, T.; Kubota, S.; Roberts, W. T.; Reasoner, D. L.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Williamson, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    An enhancement of plasma density observed during a neutral gas injection in Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators by the Space Shuttle/Spacelab-1 is presented. When a plume of nitrogen gas was injected from the orbiter into space, a large amount of plasma was detected by an onboard plasma probe. The observed density often increased beyond the background plasma density and was strongly dependent on the attitude of the orbiter with respect to the velocity vector. This effect has been explained by a collisional interaction between the injected gas molecules and the ionospheric ions relatively drifting at the orbital speed.

  17. Experiences with remote collaborations in fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G.A.; Davis, S.; Barnes, D.

    1998-03-01

    The magnetic fusion research community has considerable experience in placing remote collaboration tools in the hands of real user. The ability to remotely view operations and to control selected instrumentation and analysis tasks has been demonstrated. University of Wisconsin scientists making turbulence measurements on TFTR: (1) were provided with a remote control room from which they could operate their diagnostic, while keeping in close contact with their colleagues in Princeton. LLNL has assembled a remote control room in Livermore in support of a large, long term collaboration on the DIII-D tokamak in San Diego. (2) From the same control room, a joint team of MIT and LLNL scientists has conducted full functional operation of the Alcator C-Mod tokamak located 3,000 miles away in Cambridge Massachusetts. (3) These early efforts have been highly successful, but are only the first steps needed to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a complete facilities on line environment. These efforts have provided a proof of principle for the collaboratory concept and they have also pointed out shortcomings in current generation tools and approaches. Current experiences and future directions will be discussed.

  18. Collaborative Research: Experimental and Theoretical Study of the Plasma Physics of Antihydrogen Generation and Trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Robicheaux, Francis

    2013-03-29

    Ever since Dirac predicted the existence of antimatter in 1928, it has excited our collective imagination. Seventy-four years later, two collaborations at CERN, ATHENA and ATRAP, created the first slow antihydrogen. This was a stunning achievement, but the most important antimatter experiments require trapped, not just slow, antihydrogen. The velocity, magnetic moment, and internal energy and state of the antihydrogen depend strongly on how it is formed. To trap antihydrogen, physicists face two broad challenges: (1) Understanding the behavior of the positron and antiprotons plasmas from which the antihydrogen is synthesized; and (2) Understanding the atomic processes by which positrons and antiprotons recombine. Recombination lies on the boundary between atomic and plasma physics, and cannot be studied properly without employing tools from both fields. The proposed collaborative research campaign will address both of these challenges. The collaboration members have unique experience in the relevant fields of experimental and theoretical non-neutral plasma physics, numerical modeling, nonlinear dynamics and atomic physics. This expertise is not found elsewhere amongst antihydrogen researchers. The collaboration members have strong ties already, and seek to formalize them with this proposal. Three of the four PIs are members of the ALPHA collaboration, an international collaboration formed by most of the principal members of the ATHENA collaboration.

  19. Research on plasma-puff initiation of high Coulomb transfer switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, Demetrius D.; Han, Kwang S.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma-puff triggering mechanism based on hypocycloidal pinch geometry was investigated to determine the optimal operating conditions for an azimuthally uniform surface flashover which initiates plasma-puff under wide ranges of fill gas pressures of Ar, He and N2. Research is presented and resulting conference papers are attached. These papers include 'Characteristics of Plasma-Puff Trigger for an Inverse-Pinch Plasma Switch'; 'Ultra-High-Power Plasma Switch INPUTS for Pulse Power Systems'; 'Characteristics of Switching Plasma in an Inverse-Pinch Switch'; 'Comparative Study of INPIStron and Spark Gap'; and 'INPIStron Switched Pulsed Power for Dense Plasma Pinches.'

  20. Plasma wave experiment for the ISEE-3 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarf, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Results of analyses of data received from a scientific instrument designed to study solar wind and plasma wave phenomena on the ISEE-3 mission are discussed in two papers prepared for publication. A study of plasma wave levels in and interplanetary magnetic field orientation preceding observations of interplanetary shocks by the satellite infers that quasi-parallel, interplanetary shocks are preceded by foreshocks whose presence is not obviously attributable to scattering of ion beams generated at quasi-perpendicular zones of these interplanetary shocks. Investigations of whistler mode turbulence in the disturbed solar wind resulted in various indirect lines of evidence indicating that these whistler waves are generated propagating at large angles to the local interplanetary field, a fact which helps identify possible free energy sources for their growth.

  1. High power microwave source for a plasma wakefield experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafir, G.; Shlapakovski, A.; Siman-Tov, M.; Bliokh, Yu.; Leopold, J. G.; Gleizer, S.; Gad, R.; Rostov, V. V.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2017-01-01

    The results of the generation of a high-power microwave (˜550 MW, 0.5 ns, ˜9.6 GHz) beam and feasibility of wakefield-excitation with this beam in under-dense plasma are presented. The microwave beam is generated by a backward wave oscillator (BWO) operating in the superradiance regime. The BWO is driven by a high-current electron beam (˜250 keV, ˜1.5 kA, ˜5 ns) propagating through a slow-wave structure in a guiding magnetic field of 2.5 T. The microwave beam is focused at the desired location by a dielectric lens. Experimentally obtained parameters of the microwave beam at its waist are used for numerical simulations, the results of which demonstrate the formation of a bubble in the plasma that has almost 100% electron density modulation and longitudinal and transverse electric fields of several kV/cm.

  2. Drift waves and chaos in a LAPTAG plasma physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Birge-Lee, Henry; Wise, Joe; Katz, Cami; Wolman, Ben; Baker, Bob; Marmie, Ken; Patankar, Vedang; Bridges, Gabriel; Buckley-Bonanno, Samuel; Buckley, Susan; Ge, Andrew; Thomas, Sam

    2016-02-01

    In a project involving an alliance between universities and high schools, a magnetized plasma column with a steep pressure gradient was established in an experimental device. A two-dimensional probe measured fluctuations in the plasma column in a plane transverse to the background magnetic field. Correlation techniques determined that the fluctuations were that of electrostatic drift waves. The time series data were used to generate the Bandt-Pompe entropy and Jensen-Shannon complexity for the data. These quantities, when plotted against one another, revealed that a combination of drift waves and other background fluctuations were a deterministically chaotic system. Our analysis can be used to tell the difference between deterministic chaos and random noise, making it a potentially useful technique in nonlinear dynamics.

  3. The effect of artificial gravity on plasma and tissue lipids in rats: The Cosmos 936 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, I.; Praslička, M.; Tigranyan, R. A.

    Plasma and tissue lipids in male SPF Wistar rats flown for 18.5 days aboard the Cosmos 936 biosatellite were analyzed. One group of rats was subjected to artificial gravity by use of a centrifuge during the flight. An experiment simulating known space flight factors other than weightlessness was done on Earth. An increase of total cholesterol in plasma, of nonesterified fatty acids in plasma and brown adipose tissue, of triacylglycerols in plasma, liver, thymus and bone marrow was noted several hours after biosatellite landing. Smaller changes were observed in the terrestrial control experiment. With the exception of triacylglycerol accumulation in bone marrow, these increases disappeared 25 days after biosatellite landing. Exposing the rats aboard the biosatellite to artificial gravity was beneficial in the sense that such exposure inhibited the phospholipid and triacylglycerol increase in plasma and inhibited the increase of triacylglycerol in liver and especially in bone marrow.

  4. Incorporation of the Data Acquisition System with a Small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Stephen; James, R. W.; Page, E. L.; Zuniga, J.; Schlank, C.; Lopez, M.; Sherman, J.; Stutzman, B. S.

    2012-10-01

    At the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL), a small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) is being developed to utilize the reputed high densities (10^13 cm-3 and higher) at low pressure (.01 T) [1], in high temperature and density diagnostic development for future laboratory investigations. With first plasmas at hand, HPX is constructing triple and mach particle probes, magnetic probes, and a single point Thompson Scattering system for HPX plasma property investigations. A 32-channel National Instruments Data Acquisition (DAQ) Board capable of sampling at 12 bits of precision at 2 MS/s and running multiple simultaneous experiments is currently under construction. This DAQ System with integrated storage and GUI's will gather and digitize plasma data from the associated diagnostics for further analysis. Progress on the current implementation of the DAQ system will be reported.

  5. Radiation hydrodynamic simulation of a photoionised plasma experiment at the Z facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, I. M.; Durmaz, T.; Mancini, R. C.; Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.

    2011-11-01

    New, high spectral resolution X-ray observations from astrophysical photoionised plasmas have been recorded in recent years by the Chandra and XMM-Newton orbiting telescopes. These observations provide a wealth of detailed information and have motivated new efforts at developing a detailed understanding of the atomic kinetics and radiation physics of photoionised plasmas. The Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories is a powerful source of X-rays that enables us to produce and study photoionised plasmas in the laboratory under well characterised conditions. We discuss a series of radiation-hydrodynamic simulations to help understand the X-ray environment, plasma hydrodynamics and atomic kinetics in experiments where a collapsing wire array at Z is used as an ionising source of radiation to create a photoionised plasma. The numerical simulations are used to investigate the role that the key experimental parameters have on the photoionised plasma characteristics.

  6. Simulation of ionization effects for high-density positron drivers in future plasma wakefield experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, D.L.; Dimitrov, D.A.; Cary, J.R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2003-05-12

    The plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) concept has been proposed as a potential energy doubler for present or future electron-positron colliders. Recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that the self-fields of the required electron beam driver can tunnel ionize neutral Li, leading to plasma wake dynamics differing significantly from that of a preionized plasma. It has also been shown, for the case of a preionized plasma, that the plasma wake of a positron driver differs strongly from that of an electron driver. We will present new PIC simulations, using the OOPIC code, showing the effects of tunneling ionization on the plasma wake generated by high-density positron drivers. The results will be compared to previous work on electron drivers with tunneling ionization and positron drivers without ionization. Parameters relevant to the energy doubler and the upcoming E-164x experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center will be considered.

  7. Radar observations of field-aligned plasma propagations associated with nasa's PMG experiment. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    NASA's Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) tethered satellite mission was launched in June 1993 to verify the ability of hollow cathode plasma sources to couple electric currents from an electrodynamic tether into the ambient ionospheric plasma. This large-scale coupling process resulted in turbulent plasma signatures associated with the orbiting plasma generator, which propagated over great distances along the earth's geomagnetic field lines. VHF radars in Hilo, Hawaii and Jicamarca, Peru recorded observations of these field-aligned disturbances as part of the experiment. Based on analysis of these radar observations and tracking data of PMG's orbit, the effective propagation velocity of these traveling plasma waveforms was calculated to be of the order of 1000 meters per second. Detection of these disturbances, associated with PMG's passage overhead, supports the existence of a phantom current loop allowing current flow along the magnetic field lines of the earth and into the lower ionosphere from either end of an electrodynamic tether.

  8. Radar observations of field-aligned plasma propagations associated with NASA's PMG experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Darren M.

    1994-09-01

    NASA's Plasma Motor Generator (PMG) tethered satellite mission was launched in June 1993 to verify the ability of hollow cathode plasma sources to couple electric currents from an electrodynamic tether into the ambient ionospheric plasma. This large-scale coupling process resulted in turbulent plasma signatures associated with the orbiting plasma generator, which propagated over great distances along the earth's geomagnetic field lines. VHF radars in Hilo, Hawaii and Jicamarca, Peru recorded observations of these field-aligned disturbances as part of the experiment. Based on analysis of these radar observations and tracking data of PMG's orbit, the effective propagation velocity of these traveling plasma waveforms was calculated to be of the order of 1000 meters per second. Detection of these disturbances, associated with PMG's passage overhead, supports the existence of a phantom current loop allowing current flow along the magnetic field lines of the earth and into the lower ionosphere from either end of an electrodynamic tether.

  9. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in dusty plasma experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Avinash, K.; Sen, A.

    2015-08-15

    The stability of a stratified dust cloud levitated in an anodic plasma is studied in the weakly and strongly coupled dust regimes. It is shown that the cloud is predominantly unstable to a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability driven by a component of the ambient gravity in a direction opposite to the direction of dust density stratification in the cloud. The elasticity of the strongly coupled dust is shown to set a threshold for the RT instability, which is consistent with experimental observations.

  10. Restrike Particle Beam Experiments on a Dense Plasma Focus.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-30

    soft Xray spectrometer should enable the formation of a fairly complete picture of the plasma phenomena as well as that of the beams for input into the...SSNTD are insensitive to light, electrons or Xrays 2) Record is virtually permanent 3) Direct measurement of fast particles is possible and (detection...detectors. The bands are delimited by Ross balanced filtering technique. This technique uses the fact that the stopping power for xrays has 3narp edges at

  11. High Performance Plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    time as determined by magnetic analysis using the EFIT code [11] plotted against two conventional tokamak scaling relations, ITER89P and ITER98y2...injected. Plasmas with βt (=2µ0<p>/B 2 = a measure of magnetic confinement efficiency) of 22% have been achieved, as calculated using the EFIT ...efficiency) of 22% have been achieved, as calculated using the EFIT equilibrium reconstruction code. â limiting phenomena have been observed, and the

  12. High Magnetic field generation for laser-plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, B B; Froula, D H; Davis, P F; Ross, J S; Fulkerson, S; Bower, J; Satariano, J; Price, D; Glenzer, S H

    2006-05-01

    An electromagnetic solenoid was developed to study the effect of magnetic fields on electron thermal transport in laser plasmas. The solenoid, which is driven by a pulsed power system suppling 30 kJ, achieves magnetic fields of 13 T. The field strength was measured on the solenoid axis with a magnetic probe and optical Zeeman splitting. The measurements agree well with analytical estimates. A method for optimizing the solenoid design to achieve magnetic fields exceeding 20 T is presented.

  13. Results from the Ucla/fnpl Underdense Plasma Lens Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M. C.; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Travish, G.; Edwards, H.; Fuller, R.; Kazakevich, G. M.; Piot, P.; Santucci, J.; Li, J.; Tikhoplav, R.

    2007-09-01

    A gaussian underdense plasma lens with peak density 5 × 1012 cm-3 and a full width half maximum (FWHM) length of 2.2 cm has been used to focus a relativistic electron beam. This plasma lens is equivalent in strength to a quadrupole magnet with a 150 T/m field gradient. The lens focused a 15 MeV, 16 nC electron beam with initial dimensions σx,y ≈ 650 μm and σz ≈ 6.5 mm onto an optical transition radiation (OTR) screen ~2 cm downstream of the lens. The average transverse area of the plasma focused electron beam was typically demagnified by a factor of 23. The evolution of the beam envelope in the area near the beam waist was measured for both round beams and asymmetric beams with x:y aspect ratios as large as 1:5. The light from the OTR screen in the round beam case was also imaged into a streak camera in order to directly measure the correlation between z and σr within the beam.

  14. Results from the Ucla/fnpl Underdense Plasma Lens Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M. C.; Badakov, H.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Travish, G.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.; Kazakevich, G. M.; Piot, P.; Santucci, J.; Li, J.; Tikhoplav, R.

    A gaussian underdense plasma lens with peak density 5 × 1012 cm-3 and a full width half maximum (FWHM) length of 2.2 cm has been used to focus a relativistic electron beam. This plasma lens is equivalent in strength to a quadrupole magnet with a 150 T/m field gradient. The lens focused a 15 MeV, 16 nC electron beam with initial dimensions σx,y ≈ 650 μm and σz ≈ 6.5 mm onto an optical transition radiation (OTR) screen ~2 cm downstream of the lens. The average transverse area of the plasma focused electron beam was typically demagnified by a factor of 23. The evolution of the beam envelope in the area near the beam waist was measured for both round beams and asymmetric beams with x:y aspect ratios as large as 1:5. The light from the OTR screen in the round beam case was also imaged into a streak camera in order to directly measure the correlation between z and σr within the beam.

  15. My Rewarding Summer Research Experience at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aviles, Andres

    2007-01-01

    My summer research experience at the Kennedy Space Center has been a truly rewarding one. As an electrical engineering student at the University of South Florida, I was blessed with a beneficial opportunity to gain valuable knowledge in my career, and also apply it through working at NASA. One of my inspirations in becoming an engineer is to work at NASA someday, and I was very excited and honored to have this opportunity. My goal in this internship was to strengthen my preparation in becoming an engineer by learning new material, acquiring skills by practicing what I learned, and discovering the expectations of engineering work at NASA. Through this summer research, I was able to learn new computer programs and perform various tasks that gave me experience and skills as an engineer. My primary job was to conduct work on the Constellation Test article, which is a simulation model of the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) tanking system. This is a prototype of a launch facility and an Ares I Vehicle, which God willing will transport astronauts to the moon. Construction of the CLV is in progress and a test launch is anticipated for 2010. Moreover, the Test Article serves as a demonstration too, training test bed, and may be expanded for new simulation of launch system elements, which could be applied to real life operations. The test article is operated and run by a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), which is a digital computer that is used to control all forms of machinery such as those in manufacturing buildings and other industries. PLCs are different than other computers because of the physical protection they have against damaging environmental conditions that would destroy other computers. Also, PLCs are equipped with lots of input and output connections that allow extensive amounts of commands to be executed, which would normally require many computers to do. Therefore, PLCs are small, rugged, and extremely powerful tools that may continue to be employed at NASA

  16. Experiments on the interaction of heavy ions with dense plasma at GSI-Darmstadt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöckl, C.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.; Geißel, M.; Roth, M.; Wetzler, H.; Seelig, W.; Iwase, O.; Spiller, P.; Bock, R.; Süß, W.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    One of the main objectives of the experimental plasma physics activities at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) are the interaction processes of heavy ions with dense ionized matter. Gas-discharge plasma targets were used for energy loss and charge state measurements in a regime of electron density and temperature up to 10 19 cm -3 and 20 eV, respectively. An improved model of the charge exchange processes in fully ionized hydrogen plasma, taking into account multiple excited electronic configurations which subsequently ionize, has removed the discrepancies of previous theoretical descriptions. The energy loss of the ion beam in partially ionized plasmas such as argon was found to agree very well with our simple theoretical model based on the modified Bethe-Bloch theory. A new setup with a 100 J/5 GW Nd-glass laser now provides access to density ranges up to 10 21 cm -3 and temperatures of up to 100 eV. First results of interaction experiments with laser-produced plasma are presented. To fully exploit the experimental possibilities of the new laser-plasma setup both improved charge state detection systems and better plasma diagnostics are indispensable. Present developments and future possibilities in these fields are presented. This paper summarizes the following contributions: Interaction of heavy-ion beams with laser plasma by C. Stöckl et al. Energy Loss of Heavy Ions in a laser-produced plasma by M. Roth et al. Charge state measurements of heavy ions passing a laser produced plasma with high time resolution by W. Süß et al. Plasma diagnostics for laser-produced plasma by O. Iwase et al. Future possibilities of plasma diagnostics at GSI by M. Geißel et al.

  17. Plasma Diagnostics for Plasma Polymer Coatings Used in Fabrication of Thin Wall CH Shells for Direct Drive OMEGA Cryogenic Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, P.; Nikroo, A.; Czechowicz, D.; Dicken, M.

    2002-11-01

    High aspect ratio CH shells, 1 μm thick, 9001 μm diameter, are crucial for the success of the cryogenic direct drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the OMEGA laser facility at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). Plasma polymer coatings are currently used in fabrication of such shells, which can be made substantially stronger by altering parameters. High strength is important for inherently fragile high aspect ratio shells. The plasma characteristics used in the deposition process were studied in order to determine a correlation between the plasma parameters and the strength of shells. Several plasma processing parameters such as deposition pressure, power and relative and absolute gas flow rates were varied. The plasma was studied using several techniques such as optical emission spectroscopy, Langmuir probe diagnostics, and mass spectrometry. These diagnostic results were then correlated with direct measurements of the target strength (burst testing and buckle testing) and permeability to determine the ideal parameters for creating the strongest and most permeable ICF targets.

  18. Uncovering Students' Preconceptions of Undergraduate Research Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adedokun, Omolola A.; Burgess, Wilella D.

    2011-01-01

    Like all learners, undergraduate research interns bring to their research internships a variety of initial ideas, opinions, expectations, beliefs and attitudes about research internships. However, there is little published research on students' preconceptions about research internships and the relationships of these preconceptions to actual…

  19. Progress towards high performance plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    2005-01-01

    The major objective of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is to understand basic toroidal confinement physics at low aspect ratio and high T in order to advance the spherical torus (ST) concept. In order to do this, NSTX utilizes up to 7.5MW of neutral beam injection, up to 6MW of high harmonic fast waves (HHFWs), and it operates with plasma currents up to 1.5MA and elongations of up to 2.6 at a toroidal field up to 0.45 T. New facility, and diagnostic and modelling capabilities developed over the past two years have enabled the NSTX research team to make significant progress towards establishing this physics basis for future ST devices. Improvements in plasma control have led to more routine operation at high elongation and high T (up to 40%) lasting for many energy confinement times. T can be limited by either internal or external modes. The installation of an active error field (EF) correction coil pair has expanded the operating regime at low density and has allowed for initial resonant EF amplification experiments. The determination of the confinement and transport properties of NSTX plasmas has benefitted greatly from the implementation of higher spatial resolution kinetic diagnostics. The parametric variation of confinement is similar to that at conventional aspect ratio but with values enhanced relative to those determined from conventional aspect ratio scalings and with a BT dependence. The transport is highly dependent on details of both the flow and magnetic shear. Core turbulence was measured for the first time in an ST through correlation reflectometry. Non-inductive start-up has been explored using PF-only and transient co-axial helicity injection techniques, resulting in up to 140 kA of toroidal current generated by the latter technique. Calculated bootstrap and beam-driven currents have sustained up to 60% of the flat-top plasma current in NBI discharges. Studies of HHFW absorption have indicated parametric decay of the wave and

  20. Progress towards high performance plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S. M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Bernabei, S; Bialek, J.; Biewer, T.; Blanchard, W.; Boedo, J.; Bush, C.; Carter, M. D.; Choe, W.; Crocker, N.; Darrow, D. S.; Davis, W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Diem, S.; Ferron, J.; Field, A.; Foley, J.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gates, D. A.; Gibney, T.; Harvey, R.; Hatcher, R. E.; Heidbrink, W.; Hill, K.; Hosea, J. C.; Jarboe, T. R.; Johnson, D. W.; Kaita, R.; Kessel, C.; Kubota, S.; Kugel, H. W.; Lawson, J.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lee, K. C.; Levinton, F.; Maingi, R.; Manickam, J.; Maqueda, R.; Marsala, R.; Mastrovito, D.; Mau, T. K.; Medley, S. S.; Menard, J.; Meyer, H.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mueller, D.; Munsat, T.; Nelson, B. A.; Neumeyer, C.; Nishino, N.; Ono, M.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Paul, S.; Peebles, T.; Peng, M.; Phillips, C.; Pigarov, A.; Pinsker, R.; Ram, A.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Raman, R.; Rasmussen, D.; Redi, M.; Rensink, M.; Rewoldt, G; Robinson, J.; Roney, P.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ruskov, E; Ryan, P.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Schneider, H.; Skinner, C. H.; Smith, D. R.; Sontag, A.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stevenson, T.; Stotler, D.; Stratton, B.; Stutman, D.; Swain, D.; Synakowski, E.; Takase, Y.; Taylor, G.; Tritz, K.; Halle, A. von; Wade, M.; White, R.; Wilgen, J.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Zhu, W.; Zweben, S. J.; Akers, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Betti, R.; Bigelow, T.; Bitter, M.; Bonoli, P.; Bourdelle, C.; Chang, C. S.; Chrzanowski, J.; Domier, C.; Dudek, L.; Efthimion, P. C.; Finkenthal, M.; Fredd, E.; Fu, G. Y.; Glasser, A.; Goldston, R. J.; Greenough, N. L.; Grisham, L. R.; Gorelenkov, N.; Guazzotto, L.; Hawryluk, R. J.; Hogan, J.; Houlberg, W.; Humphreys, D.; Jaeger, F.; Kalish, M.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Lao, L. L.; Lawrence, J.; Leuer, J.; Liu, D.; Luhmann, N. C.; Mazzucato, E.; Oliaro, G.; Pacella, D.; Parsells, R.; Schaffer, M.; Semenov, I.; Shaing, K. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Shinohara, K.; Sichta, P.; Tang, X.; Vero, R.; Walker, D.; Wampler, W.

    2005-10-01

    The major objective of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is to understand basic toroidal confinement physics at low aspect ratio and high βT in order to advance the spherical torus (ST) concept. In order to do this, NSTX utilizes up to 7.5 MW of neutral beam injection, up to 6 MW of high harmonic fast waves (HHFWs), and it operates with plasma currents up to 1.5 MA and elongations of up to 2.6 at a toroidal field up to 0.45 T. New facility, and diagnostic and modeling capabilities developed over the past two years have enabled the NSTX research team to make significant progress towards establishing this physics basis for future ST devices. Improvements in plasma control have led to more routine operation at high elongation and high βT (up to ~40%) lasting for many energy confinement times. βT can be limited by either internal or external modes. The installation of an active error field (EF) correction coil pair has expanded the operating regime at low density and has allowed for initial resonant EF amplification experiments. The determination of the confinement and transport properties of NSTX plasmas has benefited greatly from the implementation of higher spatial resolution kinetic diagnostics. The parametric variation of confinement is similar to that at conventional aspect ratio but with values enhanced relative to those determined from conventional aspect ratio scalings and with a βT dependence. The transport is highly dependent on details of both the flow and magnetic shear. Core turbulence was measured for the first time in an ST through correlation reflectometry. Non-inductive start-up has been explored using PF-only and transient co-axial helicity injection techniques, resulting in up to 140 kA of toroidal current generated by the latter technique. Calculated bootstrap and beam-driven currents have sustained up to 60% of the flat-top plasma current in NBI discharges. Studies of HHFW absorption

  1. Langmuir probe-based observables for plasma-turbulence code validation and application to the TORPEX basic plasma physics experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, Paolo; Theiler, C.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Labit, B.; Mueller, S. H.; Podesta, M.; Poli, F. M.

    2009-05-15

    The methodology for plasma-turbulence code validation is discussed, with focus on the quantities to use for the simulation-experiment comparison, i.e., the validation observables, and application to the TORPEX basic plasma physics experiment [A. Fasoli et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 055902 (2006)]. The considered validation observables are deduced from Langmuir probe measurements and are ordered into a primacy hierarchy, according to the number of model assumptions and to the combinations of measurements needed to form each of them. The lowest levels of the primacy hierarchy correspond to observables that require the lowest number of model assumptions and measurement combinations, such as the statistical and spectral properties of the ion saturation current time trace, while at the highest levels, quantities such as particle transport are considered. The comparison of the observables at the lowest levels in the hierarchy is more stringent than at the highest levels. Examples of the use of the proposed observables are applied to a specific TORPEX plasma configuration characterized by interchange-driven turbulence.

  2. Langmuir Decay Instability Cascade in Laser-Plasma Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depierreux, S.; Labaune, C.; Fuchs, J.; Pesme, D.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Baldis, H. A.

    2002-07-01

    Thomson scattering has been used to investigate the nonlinear evolution of electron plasma waves (EPWs) generated by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). Two complementary diagnostics demonstrate the occurrence of the cascade of Langmuir decay instabilities (LDI). The EPW wave-number spectrum displays an asymmetric broadening towards small wave numbers, interpreted as a signature of the secondary EPWs produced in the LDI cascade. The number of cascade steps is in agreement with the broadening of the associated ion-acoustic-waves' spectra. The total energy transferred in the EPWs cascade is found to be either less than or of the same order of magnitude as the energy of the primary EPW.

  3. Langmuir decay instability cascade in laser-plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    Depierreux, S; Labaune, C; Fuchs, J; Pesme, D; Tikhonchuk, V T; Baldis, H A

    2002-07-22

    Thomson scattering has been used to investigate the nonlinear evolution of electron plasma waves (EPWs) generated by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). Two complementary diagnostics demonstrate the occurrence of the cascade of Langmuir decay instabilities (LDI). The EPW wave-number spectrum displays an asymmetric broadening towards small wave numbers, interpreted as a signature of the secondary EPWs produced in the LDI cascade. The number of cascade steps is in agreement with the broadening of the associated ion-acoustic-waves' spectra. The total energy transferred in the EPWs cascade is found to be either less than or of the same order of magnitude as the energy of the primary EPW.

  4. Current halo structures in high-current plasma experiments: {theta}-pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Matveev, Yu. V.

    2007-03-15

    Experimental data elucidating mechanisms for halo formation in {theta}-pinch discharges are presented and discussed. The experiments were performed with different gases (H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, He, and Ar) in a theta-pinch device with a porcelain vacuum chamber and an excitation coil 15 cm in diameter and 30 cm in length. The stored energy, the current in the excitation coil, and the current half-period were W = 10 kJ, I = 400 kA, and T/2 = 14 {mu}s, respectively. It is found that the plasma rings (halos) surrounding the pinch core arise as a result of coaxial pinch stratification due to both the excitation of closed currents (inductons) inside the pinch and the radial convergence of the plasma current sheaths produced after the explosion of T-layers formed near the wall in the initial stage of the discharge. It is concluded that halo structures observed in pinches, tokamaks, and other high-current devices used in controlled fusion research have the same nature.

  5. [Research on the atomic emission spectroscopy of atmospheric pressure plasma process].

    PubMed

    Jin, Jiang; Li, Na; Xu, Lu; Wang, Bo; Jin, Hui-Liang

    2013-02-01

    In the reaction of the atmospheric pressure plasma process, the heat stable process of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet has a direct impact on the removal rate, CF4 is the provider of active F* atom, O2 is important auxiliary gas, and they play an important role in the process. In order to research the rule of the concentration of the 3 parameters upon the atmospheric pressure plasma processing, the atmospheric pressure plasma jet was used for processing and the spectrometer was used to monitor the changes in the process. The experiment indicates that: when the heat is stable, the concentration of the active F* atom essentially remains unchanged; with increasing the concentration of gas CF4, the spectrum of the active F* atom has self-absorption phenomena, so using the atomic emission spectroscopy method to monitor the changes in the concentration of active F* atom generated by CF4 is not completely exact; because O2 can easily react with the dissociation product of CF4, which inhibits the compound of the active F* atom, so in a certain range with increasing the concentration of gas O2, the concentration of the active F* atom becomes strong.

  6. LHCD and ICRF heating experiments in H-mode plasmas on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. J.; Zhao, Y. P.; Wan, B. N.; Ding, B. J.; Xu, G. S.; Gong, X. Z.; Li, J. G.; Lin, Y.; Wukitch, S.; Taylor, G.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Braun, F.; Magne, R.; Litaudon, X.; Kumazawa, R.; Kasahara, H.; Collaboration: EAST Team

    2014-02-12

    An ICRF system with power up to 6.0 MW and a LHCD system up to 4MW have been applied for heating and current drive experiments on EAST. Intensive lithium wall coating was intensively used to reduce particle recycling and Hydrogen concentration in Deuterium plasma, which is needed for effective ICRF and LHCD power absorption in high density plasmas. Significant progress has been made with ICRF heating and LHW current drive for realizing the H-mode plasma operation in EAST. In 2010, H-mode was generated and sustained by LHCD alone, where lithium coating and gas puffing launcher mouth were applied to improve the LHCD power coupling and penetration into the core plasmas at high density of H-modes. During the last two experimental campaigns, ICRF Heating experiments were carried out at the fixed frequency of 27MHz, achieving effective ions and electrons heating with the H Minority Heating (H-MH) mode, where electrons are predominantly heated by collisions with high energy minority ions. The H-MH mode gave the best plasma performance, and realized H-mode alone in 2012. Combination of ICRF and LHW power injection generated the H-mode plasmas with various ELMy characteristics. The first successful application of the ICRF Heating in the D (He3) plasma was also achieved. The progress on ICRF heating, LHCD experiments and their application in achieving H-mode operation from last two years will be discussed in this report.

  7. Experiments on the transportation of a magnetized plasma stream in the GOL-3 facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postupaev, V. V.; Batkin, V. I.; Burdakov, A. V.; Ivanov, I. A.; Kuklin, K. N.; Mekler, K. I.; Rovenskikh, A. F.

    2016-04-01

    The program of the deep upgrade of the GOL-3 multiple-mirror trap is presented. The upgrade is aimed at creating a new GOL-NB open trap located at the GOL-3 site and intended to directly demonstrate the efficiency of using multiple-mirror magnetic cells to improve longitudinal plasma confinement in a gasdynamic open trap. The GOL-NB device will consist of a new central trap, adjoint cells with a multiple-mirror magnetic field, and end tanks (magnetic flux expanders). Plasma in the central trap will be heated by neutral beam injection with a power of up to 1.5 MW and duration of 1 ms. At present, physical experiments directed at developing plasma technologies that are novel for this facility are being carried out using the 6-m-long autonomous part of the GOL-3 solenoid. The aim of this work was to develop a method for filling the central trap with a low-temperature start plasma. Transportation of a plasma stream from an arc source over a distance of 3 m in a uniform magnetic field with an induction of 0.5-4.5 T is demonstrated. In these experiments, the axial plasma density was (1-4) × 1020 m-3 and the mirror ratio varied from 5 to 60. In general, the experiments confirmed the correctness of the adopted decisions for the start plasma source of the GOL-NB device.

  8. Washer-Gun Plasma Source for Magnetic Reconnection Experiments on VTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrublevskis, A.; Egedal, J.; Fox, W.; Katz, N.; Le, A.; Porkolab, M.

    2009-11-01

    We present a recently built electrostatic washer-gun plasma source for the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF). The source produces plasmas with estimated densities of ˜10^19 m^- 3 and electron temperatures of ˜5-20 eV. The present plasma source for VTF is microwave-induced electron cyclotron resonant breakdown and requires a strong toroidal magnetic field, which acts as a guide field in reconnection experiments. The gun will allow reconnection experiments with no guide field. The source is based on the design developed by Sterling Scientific [1, 2]. To operate, gas is injected into a channel formed by a stack of alternating molybdenum and boron nitride washers with a molybdenum electrode washer at each end. A capacitor bank is discharged through these electrodes and the gas. The resulting plasma escapes the channel into the main chamber of the experiment. If available, we will present data on argon plasma produced by the gun inside the VTF. [1ex] [1] G. Fiksel, et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol., 5, 78 (1996)[0ex] [2] D. Hartog et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol., 6, 492 (1997)

  9. Experiment to Study Alfven Wave Propagation in Plasma Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Mark; Bellan, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Arched plasma-filled twisted magnetic flux tubes are generated in the laboratory using pulsed power techniques (J.F. Hansen, S.K.P. Tripathi, P.M. Bellan, 2004). Their structure and time evolution exhibit similarities with both solar coronal loops and spheromaks. We are now developing a method to excite propagating torsional Alfven wave modes in such plasma loops by superposing a ˜10kA, ˜100ns current pulse upon the ˜50kA, 10μs main discharge current that flows along the ˜20cm long, 2cm diameter arched flux tube. To achieve this high power 100ns pulse, a magnetic pulse compression technique based on saturable reactors is employed. A low power prototype has been successfully tested, and design and construction of a full-power device is nearing completion. The full-power device will compress an initial 2μs pulse by a factor of nearly 20; the final stage utilizes a water-filled transmission line with ultra-low inductance to attain the final timescale. This new pulse device will subsequently be used to investigate interactions between Alfven waves and the larger-scale loop evolution; one goal will be to directly image the wave using high-speed photography. Attention will be paid to wave propagation including dispersion and reflection, as well as dissipation mechanisms and possible energetic particle generation.

  10. Collisional processes of interest in MFE plasma research

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R.E.

    1990-05-24

    Research on this grant is devoted to the calculation of heavy particle collision cross sections needed for diagnostic studies of magnetic fusion plasmas. This work requires the development and testing of new theoretical methods, with the implementation of benchmarked techniques to collisions pertinent to fusion reactors. Within the last context, we have provided charge-exchange-recombination cross sections to specific n,1-levels for diagnostic studies on TFTR and for a major compilation for IAEA. We have also completed a cross section study related to the planned neutral beam current drive for ITER. In addition, calculations were completed to assess the use of He neutral atom angular scattering measurements for JT-60. Also, new theoretical methods have been developed to more accurately calculate cross sections involving either He or H{sub 2} targets and partially stripped multiply-charged ions.

  11. D-alpha Probe Investigation on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karama, Jackson; James, Royce; Sherman, Justin; Page, Eric; Schlank, Carter; Stutzman, Brook; Duke-Tenson, Omar; Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory Team

    2013-10-01

    Now that reproducible plasmas have been created on HPX at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory (CGAPL) we are starting to set up a spectral probes to help verify plasma mode transitions to the W-mode. These optical probes will utilize movable filters, ccd cameras and diodes, to gather data at selected spectral frequency bands. Data collected will be used to investigate the plasma's structure and behavior during experiments. The spectral probes will take advantage of HPX's magnetic fields to define and measure the plasma's radiation temp as a function of time. A d-alpha filter will allow for the collection of neutral density fluctuations for different plasma behaviors. In d-alpha mode, the probe may also provide some information on the internal plasma structure and perhaps reveal some global plasma interactions. The spectral probe will add to HPX's data collection capabilities and be used in conjunction with the particle probes, and Thomson Scattering device to create a robust picture of the internal and external plasma parameters on HPX. Progress on the construction of the probe will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY12.

  12. A table top experiment to study plasma confined by a dipole magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Baitha, Anuj Ram

    2016-10-01

    There has been a long quest to understand charged particle generation, confinement and underlying complex processes in a plasma confined by a dipole magnet. Our earth's magnetosphere is an example of such a naturally occurring system. A few laboratory experiments have been designed for such investigations, such as the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) at MIT, the Terella experiment at Columbia university, and the Ring Trap-1 (RT-1) experiment at the University of Tokyo. However, these are large scale experiments, where the dipole magnetic field is created with superconducting coils, thereby, necessitating power supplies and stringent cryogenic requirements. We report a table top experiment to investigate important physical processes in a dipole plasma. A strong cylindrical permanent magnet, is employed to create the dipole field inside a vacuum chamber. The magnet is suspended and cooled by circulating chilled water. The plasma is heated by electromagnetic waves of 2.45 GHz and a second frequency in the range 6 - 11 GHz. Some of the initial results of measurements and numerical simulation of magnetic field, visual observations of the first plasma, and spatial measurements of plasma parameters will be presented.

  13. Laser experiments to simulate coronal mass ejection driven magnetospheres and astrophysical plasma winds on compact magnetized stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W.; Ditmire, T.; Zakharov, Yu. P.

    2010-06-01

    Laboratory experiments using a plasma wind generated by laser-target interaction are proposed to investigate the creation of a shock in front of the magnetosphere and the dynamo mechanism for creating plasma currents and voltages. Preliminary experiments are shown where measurements of the electron density gradients surrounding the obstacles are recorded to infer the plasma winds. The proposed experiments are relevant to understanding the electron acceleration mechanisms taking place in shock-driven magnetic dipole confined plasmas surrounding compact magnetized stars and planets. Exploratory experiments have been published [P. Brady, T. Ditmire, W. Horton, et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 043112 (2009)] with the one Joule Yoga laser and centimeter sized permanent magnets.

  14. Theory and experiments characterizing hypervelocity impact plasmas on biased spacecraft materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nicolas; Close, Sigrid; Goel, Ashish; Johnson, Theresa; Lauben, David; Linscott, Ivan; Strauss, David; Bugiel, Sebastian; Mocker, Anna; Srama, Ralf

    2013-03-15

    Space weather including solar activity and background plasma sets up spacecraft conditions that can magnify the threat from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity impactors include both meteoroids, traveling between 11 and 72 km/s, and orbital debris, with typical impact speeds of 10 km/s. When an impactor encounters a spacecraft, its kinetic energy is converted over a very short timescale into energy of vaporization and ionization, resulting in a small, dense plasma. This plasma can produce radio frequency (RF) emission, causing electrical anomalies within the spacecraft. In order to study this phenomenon, we conducted ground-based experiments to study hypervelocity impact plasmas using a Van de Graaff dust accelerator. Iron projectiles ranging from 10{sup -16} g to 10{sup -11} g were fired at speeds of up to 70 km/s into a variety of target materials under a range of surface charging conditions representative of space weather effects. Impact plasmas associated with bare metal targets as well as spacecraft materials were studied. Plasma expansion models were developed to determine the composition and temperature of the impact plasma, shedding light on the plasma dynamics that can lead to spacecraft electrical anomalies. The dependence of these plasma properties on target material, impact speed, and surface charge was analyzed. Our work includes three major results. First, the initial temperature of the impact plasma is at least an order of magnitude lower than previously reported, providing conditions more favorable for sustained RF emission. Second, the composition of impact plasmas from glass targets, unlike that of impact plasmas from tungsten, has low dependence on impact speed, indicating a charge production mechanism that is significant down to orbital debris speeds. Finally, negative ion formation has a strong dependence on target material. These new results can inform the design and operation of spacecraft in order to mitigate future impact-related space

  15. Laboratory Experiments on Propagating Plasma Bubbles into Vacuum, Vacuum Magnetic Field, and Background Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, Alan G.; Zhang, Yue; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the dynamics of plasma ``bubbles'' as they propagate through a variety of background media. These bubbles are formed by a pulsed coaxial gun with an externally applied magnetic field. Bubble parameters are typically ne ~1020 m-3, Te ~ 5 - 10 eV, and Ti ~ 10 - 15 eV. The structure of the bubbles can range from unmagnetized jet-like structures to spheromak-like structures with complex magnetic flux surfaces. Some of the background media the bubbles interact with are vacuum, vacuum with magnetic field, and other magnetized plasmas. These bubbles exhibit different qualitative behavior depending on coaxial gun parameters such as gas species, gun current, and gun bias magnetic field. Their behavior also depends on the parameters of the background they propagate through. Multi-frame fast camera imaging and magnetic probe data are used to characterize the bubble evolution under various conditions.

  16. A cesium TELEC experiment at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    The thermoelectronic laser energy converter (TELEC), was studied as a method of converting a 10.6 mm CO2 laser beam into electric power. The calculated characteristics of a TELEC seem to be well matched to the requirements of a spacecraft laser energy conversion system. The TELEC is a high power density plasma device which absorbs an intense laser beam by inverse bremsstrahlung with the plasma electrons. In the TELEC process, electromagnetic radiation is absorbed directly in the plasma electrons producing a high electron temperature. The energetic electrons diffuse out of the plasma striking two electrodes which are in contact with the plasma at the boundaries. These two electrodes have different areas: the larger one is designated as the collector, the smaller one is designated as the emitter. The smaller electrode functions as an electron emitter to provide continuity of the current. Waste heat is rejected from the collector electrode. An experiment was carried out with a high power laser using a cesium vapor TELEC cell with 30 cm active length. Laser supported plasma was produced in the TELEC device during a number of laser runs over a period of several days. Electric power from the TELEC was observed with currents in the range of several amperes and output potentials of less than 1 volt. The magnitudes of these electric outputs were smaller than anticipated but consistent with the power levels of the laser during this experiment.

  17. Rayleigh-Taylor-instability evolution in colliding-plasma-jet experiments with magnetic and viscous stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Colin Stuart

    2015-01-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability causes mixing in plasmas throughout the universe, from micron-scale plasmas in inertial confinement fusion implosions to parsec-scale supernova remnants. The evolution of this interchange instability in a plasma is influenced by the presence of viscosity and magnetic fields, both of which have the potential to stabilize short-wavelength modes. Very few experimental observations of Rayleigh-Taylor growth in plasmas with stabilizing mechanisms are reported in the literature, and those that are reported are in sub-millimeter scale plasmas that are difficult to diagnose. Experimental observations in well-characterized plasmas are important for validation of computational models used to make design predictions for inertial confinement fusion efforts. This dissertation presents observations of instability growth during the interaction between a high Mach-number, initially un-magnetized plasma jet and a stagnated, magnetized plasma. A multi-frame fast camera captures Rayleigh-Taylor-instability growth while interferometry, spectroscopy, photodiode, and magnetic probe diagnostics are employed to estimate plasma parameters in the vicinity of the collision. As the instability grows, an evolution to longer mode wavelength is observed. Comparisons of experimental data with idealized magnetohydrodynamic simulations including a physical viscosity model suggest that the observed instability evolution is consistent with both magnetic and viscous stabilization. These data provide the opportunity to benchmark computational models used in astrophysics and fusion research.

  18. On the experiments of Surfatron concept with use of capillary plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Y.; Ito, H.; Rajyaguru, C.; Yugami, N.

    2004-12-07

    In the middle of 1980th, the VpxB concept for accelerating electrons are found by Nishida et al, with the use of plasma wave excited by high power microwave in the interaction with weakly magnetized plasma. This acceleration concept was called 'Surfatron effect' in the relativistic regime. However, there is no experimental evidence so far in the relativistic regime, although the acceleration efficiency is highest in all of the concepts based on the plasma wave acceleration scheme, and we are now under experiments. In order to make longer the acceleration distances, there are several ideas including 1)ducting of the electromagnetic waves (EM wave) in the preformed plasma, 2)self-channeling of the EM waves, and others. In this paper, the experimental results are shown on the ducting phenomena by using strong microwave for simulating the laser ducting, and on the capillary plasma scheme.

  19. Flow dynamics and magnetic induction in the von-Kármán plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plihon, N.; Bousselin, G.; Palermo, F.; Morales, J.; Bos, W. J. T.; Godeferd, F.; Bourgoin, M.; Pinton, J.-F.; Moulin, M.; Aanesland, A.

    2015-01-01

    The von-Kármán plasma experiment is a novel versatile experimental device designed to explore the dynamics of basic magnetic induction processes and the dynamics of flows driven in weakly magnetized plasmas. A high-density plasma column (1016-1019 particles. m-3) is created by two radio-frequency plasma sources located at each end of a 1 m long linear device. Flows are driven through J × B azimuthal torques created from independently controlled emissive cathodes. The device has been designed such that magnetic induction processes and turbulent plasma dynamics can be studied from a variety of time-averaged axisymmetric flows in a cylinder. MHD simulations implementing volume-penalization support the experimental development to design the most efficient flow-driving schemes and understand the flow dynamics. Preliminary experimental results show that a rotating motion of up to nearly 1 km/s is controlled by the J × B azimuthal torque.

  20. Developing the Science and Technology for the Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Juergen; Biewer, Theodore; Bigelow, Timothy; Caughman, John; Goulding, Richard; Lumsdaine, Arnold; MPEX Team Team

    2016-10-01

    The Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) is a device planned to address scientific and technological gaps for the development of viable plasma facing components for fusion reactor conditions (FNSF, DEMO). MPEX is designed to deliver those plasma conditions with a novel Radio Frequency plasma source able to produce high density plasmas and heat electron and ions separately with Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) heating and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) with a total installed power of 800 kW. The science and technology for this source system is currently being tested on Proto-MPEX. This is a linear device utilizing 12 water-cooled copper coils able to achieve peak magnetic fields of 1.6T. The currently total installed heating power (for helicon, EBW and ICRH) is 330kW. An overview of the status of this development program is given with an outlook to the next steps.

  1. Connecting Arctic/Antarctic Researchers and Educators (CARE): Supporting Teachers and Researchers Beyond the Research Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warburton, J.; Warnick, W. K.; Breen, K.; Fischer, K.; Wiggins, H.

    2007-12-01

    Teacher research experiences (TREs) require long-term sustained support for successful transfer of research experiences into the classroom. Specifically, a support mechanism that facilitates focused discussion and collaboration among teachers and researchers is critical to improve science content and pedagogical approaches in science education. Connecting Arctic/Antarctic Researchers and Educators (CARE) is a professional development network that utilizes online web meetings to support the integration of science research experiences into classroom curriculum. CARE brings together teachers and researchers to discuss field experiences, current science issues, content, technology resources, and pedagogy. CARE is a component of the Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S. (ARCUS) education program PolarTREC--Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating. PolarTREC is a three-year (2007-2009) teacher professional development program celebrating the International Polar Year (IPY) that advances polar science education by bringing K-12 educators and polar researchers together in hands-on field experiences in the Arctic and Antarctic. Currently in its second year, the program fosters the integration of research and education to produce a legacy of long-term teacher-researcher collaborations, improved teacher content knowledge through experiences in scientific inquiry, and broad public interest and engagement in polar science. The CARE network was established to develop a sustainable learning community through which teachers and researchers will further their work to bring polar research into classrooms. Through CARE, small groups of educators are formed on the basis of grade-level and geographic region; each group also contains a teacher facilitator. Although CARE targets educators with previous polar research experiences, it is also open to those who have not participated in a TRE but who are interested in bringing real-world polar science to the classroom

  2. Advances in the medical research and clinical applications on the plasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuye; Chen, Yuanyuan; Wu, Zhanhe

    2014-04-01

    Plasma DNA has had a strong impact and influence on basic medical research and clinical practice since the discovery of low levels of plasma DNA in healthy individuals under different physiological conditions. Although the source of circulating DNA still requires further investigation, a wide range of research has also proven the value of qualitative and quantitative measurements of plasma DNA in many disease conditions. The use of plasma DNA has a biomarker is advantageous due to accessibility, reliability, reproducibility, sensitivity, specific and relatively low cost. Recently, the detection of circulating (plasma) DNA quantitative changes have been using in the studies on the tumor gene mutations and to monitor disease progressing and to predict the disease prognosis. Such technique also has been using other many different fields, particularly in prenatal diagnosis, for which plasma DNA testing is preferable due to non-invasiveness. This article reviews the research progression and clinical applications of plasma DNA in the last several years.

  3. Plasma diagnostic techniques in thermal-barrier tandem-mirror fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, E.H.; Clauser, J.F.; Carter, M.R.; Failor, B.H.; Foote, J.H.; Hornady, R.S.; James, R.A.; Lasnier, C.J.; Perkins, D.E.

    1986-08-29

    We review two classes of plasma diagnostic techniques used in thermal-barrier tandem-mirror fusion experiments. The emphasis of the first class is to study mirror-trapped electrons at the thermal-barrier location. The focus of the second class is to measure the spatial and temporal behavior of the plasma space potential at various axial locations. The design and operation of the instruments in these two categories are discussed and data that are representative of their performance is presented.

  4. Post-disruptive plasma loss in the Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX)

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S.C.; DeLucia, J.; Okabayashi, M.; Pomphrey, N.; Reusch, M.; Kaye, S.; Takahashi, H.

    1986-07-01

    The free-boundary, axisymmetric tokamak simulation code TSC is used to model the transport time scale evolution and positional stability of PBX. A disruptive thermal quench will cause the plasma column to move inward in major radius. It is shown that the plasma can then lose axisymmetric stability, causing it to displace exponentially off the midplane, terminating the discharge. We verify the accuracy of the code by modeling several controlled experiments shots in PBX.

  5. Numerical Simulations of Collisionless Shock Formation in Merging Plasma Jet Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    the interaction. I. INTRODUCTION Collisionless shocks play an important role in energy transport and evolution of charged-particle distribution...functions in space and astrophysical environments. Although collisionless shocks in plasmas were first predicted in the 1950s [1] and discovered in...laboratory collisionless shock experiments stems from the fact that modern laboratory plasmas can satisfy key physics criteria for the shocks to

  6. Plasma waves produced by the xenon ion beam experiment on the Porcupine sounding rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M.; Kelley, M.

    1982-01-01

    The production of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves by a perpendicular ion beam in the F-region ionosphere is described. The ion beam experiment was part of the Porcupine program and produced electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron waves just above harmonics of the hydrogen cyclotron frequency. The plasma process may be thought of as a magnetized background ionosphere through which an unmagnetized beam is flowing. The dispersion equation for this hypothesis is constructed and solved. Preliminary solutions agree well with the observed plasma waves.

  7. Experimental observations and model calculations of impurity radiation in a plasma gun compact torus experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Goldenbaum, G.C.; Granneman, E.H.A.; Hartman, C.W.; Prono, D.S.; Taska, J.; Turner, W.C.

    1982-08-10

    Several types of radiation measurements were performed on the Beta II compact forms experiment. Among these are time integrated spectra ranging in wavelength from the vuv to the uv, time resolved bolometer measurements of radiation from the x-ray to the infrared, and time and wavelength resolved measurements of certain spectral lines. It is difficult to relate any one of these measurements to plasma parameters of interest such as temperature, density, or impurity content. In this report we compare the results of these, and other measurements with two simple models of the power balance in the plasma in order to estimate the effect of carbon and oxygen impurities on plasma lifetime.

  8. Solvent/detergent-treated plasma: a tale of 30 years of experience.

    PubMed

    Liumbruno, Giancarlo Maria; Marano, Giuseppe; Grazzini, Gioia; Capuzzo, Enrico; Franchini, Massimo

    2015-06-01

    Solvent/detergent-treated plasma was licensed >30 years ago. It has several specific characteristics, the most important being the standardized content of clotting factors, the lack of antibodies implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury pathogenesis and the very high level of safety against transfusion-related viral infections. Since 1992, many clinical studies have confirmed its safety and efficacy in a wide range of congenital and acquired bleeding disorders. After a brief analysis of the pharmaceutical characteristics of solvent/detergent plasma, this review will focus on the clinical experience with this virus-inactivated plasma.

  9. Research and Development of Large Area Color AC Plasma Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Tsutae

    1998-10-01

    Plasma display is essentially a gas discharge device using discharges in small cavities about 0. 1 m. The color plasma displays utilize the visible light from phosphors excited by the ultra-violet by discharge in contrast to monochrome plasma displays utilizing visible light directly from gas discharges. At the early stage of the color plasma display development, the degradation of the phosphors and unstable operating voltage prevented to realize a practical color plasma display. The introduction of the three-electrode surface-discharge technology opened the way to solve the problems. Two key technologies of a simple panel structure with a stripe rib and phosphor alignment and a full color image driving method with an address-and-display-period-separated sub-field method have realized practically available full color plasma displays. A full color plasma display has been firstly developed in 1992 with a 21-in.-diagonal PDP and then a 42-in.-diagonal PDP in 1995 Currently a 50-in.-diagonal color plasma display has been developed. The large area color plasma displays have already been put into the market and are creating new markets, such as a wall hanging TV and multimedia displays for advertisement, information, etc. This paper will show the history of the surface-discharge color plasma display technologies and current status of the color plasma display.

  10. Plasma-Jet-Driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion (PJMIF): Physics and Design for a Plasma Liner Formation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Scott; Cassibry, Jason; Witherspoon, F. Douglas

    2014-10-01

    Spherically imploding plasma liners are a potential standoff compression driver for magneto-inertial fusion, which is a hybrid of and operates in an intermediate density between those of magnetic and inertial fusion. We propose to use an array of merging supersonic plasma jets to form a spherically imploding plasma liner. The jets are to be formed by pulsed coaxial guns with contoured electrodes that are placed sufficiently far from the location of target compression such that no hardware is repetitively destroyed. As such, the repetition rate can be higher (e.g., 1 Hz) and ultimately the power-plant economics can be more attractive than most other MIF approaches. During the R&D phase, a high experimental shot rate at reasonably low cost (e.g., < 1 k/shot) may be achieved with excellent diagnostic access, thus enabling a rapid learning rate. After some background on PJMIF and its prospects for reactor-relevant energy gain, this poster describes the physics objectives and design of a proposed 60-gun plasma-liner-formation experiment, which will provide experimental data on: (i) scaling of peak liner ram pressure versus initial jet parameters, (ii) liner non-uniformity characterization and control, and (iii) control of liner profiles for eventual gain optimization.

  11. Proposal for secondary enclosure setup for experiments to expose plasma facing materials to tritiated plasma in VISIONI

    SciTech Connect

    Broeckx, W.E.K.; Dylst, K.; Bornea, A.; Zamfirache, M.

    2015-03-15

    VISIONI is an equipment at SCK-CEN that allows the exposure of candidate plasma facing materials to tritium - deuterium plasmas at ITER first wall conditions. VISIONI itself, being a vacuum setup, acts as primary confinement. To protect operators against exposure to a tritiated atmosphere VISIONI must be placed in a secondary confinement. The current Tritium lab at SCK-CEN has a walk-in process cell which can be used to enclose the plasma chamber and diagnostics of the VISIONI setup, which have a limited tritium inventory. This allows easy accessibility to the setup in a well-ventilated environment. Routine operations should be conducted from outside the process cell and maintenance operations can be conducted from within the process cell with proper protections. The tritium storage and supply can be enclosed in a glove box with a dedicated air detritiation system which is activated during an experiment or in case of an incident. The detritiation system will oxidize tritium and capture it on molecular sieves. By using this confinement approach it is possible to expose materials to a tritiated plasma while maintaining good accessibility of the VISIONI setup. This paper describes the proposed confinement system and compares it to the most common approach where the entire system is enclosed into one large glovebox.

  12. X-ray shadowgraphing in laser-produced plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    VanHulsteyn, D B; Benjamin, R F

    1977-08-01

    We discuss a design for an x-ray framing camera. Shadowgraphing experiments using a laser-generated x-ray source demonstrate that 5-microm spatial resolution can be obtained for this camera with less than 7 J of laser energy to produce the x-ray source.

  13. Development of plasma sources for ICRF heating experiment in KMAX mirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xuan; Liu, Ming; Yi, Hongshen; Lin, Munan; Shi, Peiyun

    2016-10-01

    KMAX, Keda Mirror with AXisymmeticity, is a tandem mirror machine with a length of 10 meters and diameters of 1.2 meters in the central cell and 0.3 meters in the mirror throat. In the past experiments, the plasma was generated by helicon wave launched from the west end. We obtained the blue core mode in argon discharge, however, it cannot provide sufficient plasma for hydrogen discharge, which is at least 1012 cm-3 required for effective ICRF heating. Several attempts have thus been tried or under design to increase the central cell's plasma density: (1) a washer gun with aperture of 1cm has been successfully tested, and a plasma density of 1013 cm-3 was achieved in the west cell near the gun, however, the plasma is only 1011 cm-3 in the central cell possible due to the mirror trapping and/or neutral quenching effect (2) a larger washer gun with aperture of 2.5 cm and a higher power capacitor bank are being assembled in order to generate more plasmas. In addition, how to mitigate the neutrals is under consideration (3) A hot cathode is been designed and will be tested in combination with plasma gun or alone. Preliminary results from those plasma sources will be presented and discussed.

  14. Integrating Research into LIS Field Experiences in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Selinda Adelle; Hoffmann, Kristin; Dawson, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Field experiences function as a link between LIS theory and practice. Students should be provided with an experience that is a true reflection of the professional environment. The increasing focus on research by academic librarians provides an opportunity and responsibility to integrate research into the field experiences of LIS students.…

  15. Medical School Research Pipeline: Medical Student Research Experience in Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balon, Richard; Heninger, George; Belitsky, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The authors discuss the importance of introducing research training in psychiatry and neurosciences to medical students. Methods: A review of existing models of research training in psychiatry with focus on those providing research training to medical students is presented. Results: Two research-training models for medical students that…

  16. Work Experience Education; Research for Accountability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Polytechnic Coll., San Luis Obispo.

    This extensive color-keyed program guide for general, exploratory, and vocational work experience education programs in California was developed by work experience coordinators, professors, state and local administrators, and various district teams to pilot test at the secondary and university levels. General, exploratory, and vocational goals are…

  17. National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and Planned Research

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.; Neumeyer, C.; Ono, M.; Peng, M.

    1999-11-13

    The U.S. fusion energy sciences program began in 1996 to increase emphasis on confinement concept innovation. The NSTX [1,2] is being built at PPPL as a national fusion science research facility in response to this emphasis. NSTX is to test fusion science principles of the Spherical Torus (ST) plasmas, which include: (1) High plasma pressure in low magnetic field for high fusion power density, (2) Good energy confinement is a small-size plasma, (3) Nearly fully self-driven (bootstrap) plasma current, (4) Dispersed heat and particle fluxes, and (5) Plasma startup without complicated inboard solenoid magnet. These properties of the ST plasma, if verified, would lead to possible future fusion devices of high fusion performance, small size, feasible power handling, and improved economy. The design of NSTX is depicted in Fig.1. The device is designed to study plasmas with major radius up to 85 cm, minor radius up to 68 cm, elongation up to 2, with flexibility in forming double-null, single-null, and inboard limited plasmas. The nominal operation calls for a toroidal field of 0.3 T for 5 s at the major radius, and a plasma current at 1 MA with q {approximately} 10 at edge. It features a compact center stack containing the inner legs of the toroidal field coils, a full size solenoid capable of delivering 0.6 Wb induction, inboard vacuum vessel, and composite carbon tiles. The center stack can be replaced without disturbing the main device, diagnostics, and auxiliary systems. The vessel will be covered fully with graphite tiles and can be baked to 350 C. Other wall conditioning techniques are also planned.

  18. The AMY experiment: Microwave emission from air shower plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Blanco, M.; Boháčová, M.; Buonomo, B.; Cataldi, G.; Coluccia, M. R.; Creti, P.; De Mitri, I.; Di Giulio, C.; Facal San Luis, P.; Foggetta, L.; Gaïor, R.; Garcia-Fernandez, D.; Iarlori, M.; Le Coz, S.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Louedec, K.; Maris, I. C.; Martello, D.; Mazzitelli, G.; Monasor, M.; Perrone, L.; Petrera, S.; Privitera, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Salamida, F.; Salina, G.; Settimo, M.; Valente, P.; Vazquez, J. R.; Verzi, V.; Williams, C.

    2016-07-01

    You The Air Microwave Yield (AMY) experiment investigate the molecular bremsstrahlung radiation emitted in the GHz frequency range from an electron beam induced air-shower. The measurements have been performed at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) of Frascati INFN National Laboratories with a 510 MeV electron beam in a wide frequency range between 1 and 20 GHz. We present the apparatus and the results of the tests performed.

  19. Study of Thermonuclear Alfven Instabilities in Next Step Burning Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    N.N. Gorelenkov; H.L. Berk; R. Budny; C.Z. Cheng; G.-Y. Fu; W.W. Heidbrink; G. Kramer; D. Meade; and R. Nazikian

    2002-07-02

    A study is presented for the stability of alpha-particle driven shear Alfven Eigenmodes (AE) for the normal parameters of the three major burning plasma proposals, ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), FIRE (Fusion Ignition Research Experiment), and IGNITOR (Ignited Torus). A study of the JET (Joint European Torus) plasma, where fusion alphas were generated in tritium experiments, is also included to attempt experimental validation of the numerical predictions. An analytic assessment of Toroidal AE (TAE) stability is first presented, where the alpha particle beta due to the fusion reaction rate and electron drag is simply and accurately estimated in 7-20 keV plasma temperature regime. In this assessment the hot particle drive is balanced against ion-Landau damping of the background deuterons and electron collision effects and stability boundaries are determined. Then two numerical studies of AE instability are presented. In one the High-n stability code HINST is used . This code is capable of predicting instabilities of low and moderately high frequency Alfven modes. HINST computes the non-perturbative solution of the Alfven eigenmodes including effects of ion finite Larmor radius, orbit width, trapped electrons etc. The stability calculations are repeated using the global code NOVAK. We show that for these tokamaks the spectrum of the least stable AE modes are TAE that appear at medium-/high-n numbers. In HINST TAEs are locally unstable due to the alphas pressure gradient in all the devices under the consideration except IGNITOR. However, NOVAK calculations show that the global mode structure enhances the damping mechanisms and produces stability in all configurations considered here. A serious question remains whether the perturbation theory used in NOVAK overestimates the stability predictions, so that it is premature to conclude that the nominal operation of all three proposals are stable to AEs. In addition NBI ions produce a strong

  20. PLASMA-2013: International Conference on Research and Applications of Plasmas (Warsaw, Poland, 2-6 September 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadowski, Marek J.

    2014-05-01

    The PLASMA-2013 International Conference on Research and Applications of Plasmas was held in Warsaw (Poland) from 2 to 6 September 2013. The conference was organized by the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, under the auspices of the Polish Physical Society. The scope of the PLASMA conferences, which have been organized every two years since 1993, covers almost all issues of plasma physics and fusion research as well as selected problems of plasma technology. The PLASMA-2013 conference topics included: •Elementary processes and general plasma physics. •Plasmas in tokamaks and stellarators (magnetic confinement fusion). •Plasmas generated by laser beams and inertial confinement fusion. •Plasmas produced by Z-pinch and plasma-focus discharges. •Low-temperature plasma physics. •Space plasmas and laboratory astrophysics. •Plasma diagnostic methods and applications of plasmas. This conference was designed not only for plasma researchers and engineers, but also for students from all over the world, in particular for those from Central and Eastern Europe. Almost 140 participants had the opportunity to hear 9 general lectures, 11 topical talks and 26 oral presentations, as well as to see and discuss around 120 posters. From about 140 contributions, after the preparation of about 100 papers and the peer review process, only 74 papers have been accepted for publication in this topical issue. Acknowledgments Acting on behalf of the International Scientific Committee I would like to express our thanks to all the invited speakers and all the participants of the PLASMA-2013 conference for their numerous contributions. In particular, I wish to thank all of the authors of papers submitted for publication in this topical issue of Physica Scripta . Particular thanks are due to all of the reviewers for their valuable reports and comments, which helped to improve the quality of many of the papers. International Scientific Committee Marek J Sadowski, NCBJ

  1. Atomic, Molecular and Plasma-Surface Interaction Data for Fusion Energy Research

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. E. H.; Humbert, D.

    2009-05-02

    Research on fusion energy requires a large amount of data in order to predict the behaviour of complex plasma devices. As plasma systems are updated and new machines are designed, data are required for a variety of different materials over a wide range of plasma conditions. The Atomic and Molecular Data Unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency works to coordinate multinational efforts to establish databases for this fusion research effort.

  2. Laser-plasma interaction in the context of inertial fusion: experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, C.; Lewis, K.; Bandulet, H.; Depierreux, S.; Hüller, S.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Pesme, D.; Loiseau, P.

    2007-08-01

    Many nonlinear processes may affect the laser beam propagation and the laser energy deposition in the underdense plasma surrounding the pellet. These processes, associated with anomalous and nonlinear absorption mechanisms, are fundamental issues in the context of Inertial Confinement Fusion. The work presented in this article refers to laser-plasma interaction experiments which were conducted under well-controlled conditions, and to their theoretical and numerical modeling. Thanks to important diagnostics improvements, the plasma and laser parameters were sufficiently characterized in these experiments to make it possible to carry out numerical simulations modeling the laser plasma interaction in which the hydrodynamics conditions were very close to the experimental ones. Two sets of experiments were carried out with the LULI 2000 and the six beam LULI laser facilities. In the first series of experiments, the interaction between two single hot spots was studied as a function of their distance, intensity and light polarization. In the second series, the intensity distribution of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) inside the plasma was studied by means of a new temporally resolved imaging system. Two-dimensional (2D) simulations were carried out with our code Harmony2D in order to model these experiments. For both series of experiments, the numerical results show a very good agreement with the experimental ones for what concerns the main SBS features, namely the spatial and temporal behavior of the SBS-driven acoustic waves, as well as the average SBS reflectivities. Thus, these well diagnosed experiments, carried out with well defined conditions, make it possible to benchmark our theoretical and numerical modelings and, hence, to improve our predictive capabilities for future experiments.

  3. Artificial plasma experiments. Chemical release observations associated with the CRRES program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, Stephen B.

    1994-01-01

    This report submitted is the final report and covers work performed under the contract for the period Apr. 12, 1985 - Dec. 23, 1993. The CRRES program investigated earth plasma environment by active experiments in which metal vapors were injected into the upper atmosphere and magnetosphere. The vapor clouds perturb the ambient ionospheric / magnetospheric environment and the effects could be monitored by passive observing instruments. Our part of the CRRES program, the Artificial Plasma Experiment program, was a ground based and aircraft based investigation to observe artificial chemical releases by optical techniques.

  4. Partnering the University Field Experience Research Model with Action Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnorr, Donna; Painter, Diane D.

    This paper presents a collaborative action research partnership model that involved participation by graduate school of education preservice students, school and university teachers, and administrators. An elementary teacher-research group investigated what would happen when fourth graders worked in teams to research and produce a multimedia…

  5. Rotating plasma disks in dense Z-pinch experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, M. J. E-mail: s.lebedev@imperial.ac.uk; Lebedev, S. V. E-mail: s.lebedev@imperial.ac.uk; Suttle, L.; Burdiak, G.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Hare, J.; Swadling, G.; Patankar, S.; Bocchi, M.; Chittenden, J. P.; Smith, R.; Hall, G. N.; Frank, A.; Blackman, E.; Drake, R. P.; Ciardi, A.

    2014-12-15

    We present data from the first z-pinch experiments aiming to simulate aspects of accretion disk physics in the laboratory. Using off axis ablation flows from a wire array z-pinch we demonstrate the formation of a hollow disk structure that rotates at 60 kms{sup −1} for 150 ns. By analysing the Thomson scattered spectrum we make estimates for the ion and electron temperatures as T{sub i} ∼ 60 eV and ZT{sub e} ∼ 150 to 200 eV.

  6. Analysis of Capillary Guided Laser Plasma Accelerator Experiments at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Panasenko, D.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Lin, C.

    2009-01-22

    Laser wakefield acceleration experiments were carried out by using a hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide. For a 15 mm long, 200 {mu}m diameter capillary, quasi-monoenergetic e-beams up to 300 MeV were observed. By de-tuning discharge delay from optimum guiding performance, self-trapping was found to be stabilized. For a 33 mm long, 300 {mu}m capillary, a parameter regime with high energy electron beams, up to 1 GeV, was found. In this regime, the electron beam peak energy was correlated with the amount of trapped electrons.

  7. NASA Lewis Research Center combustion MHD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. M.

    The MHD power generation experiments were conducted in a high field strength cryomagnet which was adapted from an existing facility. In its original construction, it consisted of 12 high purity aluminum coils pool cooled in a bath of liquid neon. In this configuration, a peak field of 15 tesla was produced. For the present experiments, the center four coils were removed and a 23 cm diameter transverse warm bore tube was inserted to allow the placement of the MHD experiment between the remaining eight coils. In this configuration, a peak field of 6 tesla should be obtainable. The time duration of the experiment is limited by the neon supply which allows on the order of 1 minute of total operating time followed by an 18-hour reliquefaction period. As a result, the experiments are run in a pulsed mode. The run duration for the data presented here was 5 sec. The magnetic field profile along the MHD duct is shown. Since the working fluid is in essence superheated steam, it is easily water quenched at the exit of the diffuser and the components are designed vacuum tight so that the exhaust pipe and demister an be pumped down to simulate the vacuum of outer space.

  8. Plasma Liner Research for MTF at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. F.; Eskridge, R.; Lee, M.; Martin, A.; Smith, J.; Cassibry, J. T.; Wu, S. T.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Knapp, C. E.; Turchi, P. J.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The current research effort at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in MTF is directed towards exploring the critical physics issues of potential embodiments of MTF for propulsion, especially standoff drivers involving plasma liners for MTF. There are several possible approaches for forming plasma liners. One approach consists of using a spherical array of plasma jets to form a spherical plasma shell imploding towards the center of a magnetized plasma, a compact toroid. Current experimental plan and status to explore the physics of forming a 2-D plasma liner (shell) by merging plasma jets are described. A first-generation coaxial plasma guns (Mark-1) to launch the required plasma jets have been built and tested. Plasma jets have been launched reproducibly with a low jitter, and velocities in excess of 50 km/s for the leading edge of the plasma jet. Some further refinements are being explored for the plasma gun, Successful completion of these single-gun tests will be followed by an experimental exploration of the problems of launching a multiple number of these jets simultaneously to form a cylindrical plasma liner.

  9. Improvements and modeling calculations for a laboratory photoionized plasma experiment at Z relevant to astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockard, T. E.; Mayes, D. C.; Durmaz, T.; Mancini, R. C.; Loisel, G.; Bailey, J. E.; Rochau, G. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Heeter, R. F.

    2013-10-01

    Creating a photoionized plasma in a controlled laboratory environment is difficult due to the intense x-ray flux needed to drive the plasma. This is overcome by the intense flux of x-ray photons produced by the pulsed power Z-machine at Sandia National Laboratories. We discuss improvements to a gascell experiment at Z including new ultrathin windows and window plates, and lower filling pressures that permit producing photoionized plasmas of larger ionization parameters. To understand the radiation environment, constrained view-factor calculations have been performed to model the x-ray flux at the gascell. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations were also done to provide information on the overall evolution of the plasma and, in particular, the radiation heating of the plasma including non-equilibrium effects. We will also discuss a series of collisional-radiative atomic kinetics calculations that were done using a collection of laboratory and astrophysics codes. These results are useful to understand the relative importance of photon- and particle-driven atomic processes in the plasma. This work is sponsored in part by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas grant program through DOE Grant DE-FG52-09NA29551, and the Z Facility Fundamental Science Program of SNL.

  10. Washer-Gun Plasma Source for Magnetic Reconnection Experiments on VTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrublevskis, A.; Egedal, J.; Fox, W.; Katz, N.; Le, A.; Porkolab, M.

    2008-11-01

    We present an electrostatic washer-gun plasma source for the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF). The gun will produce plasmas with densities on the order of 10^18 m-3 and electron temperatures on the order of 10-20 eV. It will extend the range of configurations achievable on VTF since the present plasma production method is limited to configurations with strong toroidal magnetic fields, which are required for microwave-induced electron cyclotron resonant breakdown. The gun is based on the design developed by Sterling Scientific [1] with detailed operation described in [1, 2]. During the gun's operation gas is injected into a channel formed by a stack of alternating molybdenum and boron nitride washers with a molybdenum electrode washer at each end. A voltage from a capacitor bank is applied to these electrodes and breaks down the gas in the channel. The resulting plasma escapes the channel into the main chamber of the experiment. If available we will present data characterizing the argon plasma produced by the device.[1ex] [1] Fiksel G et al. Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 5 (1996) 78[1ex] [2] Den Hartog D et al. Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 6 (1997) 492

  11. Spectrometer Development in Support of Thomson Scattering Investigations for the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandri, Eva; Davies, Richard; Azzari, Phil; Frank, John; Frank, Jackson; James, Royce; Hopson, Jordon; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Paolino, Richard; Sherman, Justin; Wright, Erin; Turk, Jeremy

    2016-10-01

    Now that reproducible plasmas have been created on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory (CGAPL), a high-performance spectrometer utilizing volume-phase-holographic (VPH) grating and a charge coupled device (CCD) camera with a range of 380-1090 nm and resolution of 1024x1024 is being assembled. This spectrometer will collect doppler shifted photons created by exciting the plasma with the first harmonic of a 2.5 J Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 1064 nm. Direct measurements of the plasma's temperature and density will be determined using HPX's Thomson Scattering (TS) system as a single spatial point diagnostic. TS has the capability of determining plasma properties on short time scales and will be used to create a robust picture of the internal plasma parameters. A prototype spectrometer has been constructed to explore the Andor CCD camera's resolution and sensitivity. Concurrently, through intensive study of the high energy TS system, safety protocols and standard operation procedures (SOP) for the Coast Guard's largest and most powerful Laser have been developed. The current status of the TS SOP, diagnostic development, and the collection optic's spectrometer will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15-16.

  12. Updates on the Optical Emission Spectroscopy and Thomson Scattering Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke-Tinson, Omar; Karama, Jackson; Azzari, Phillip; Royce, James; Page, Eric; Schlank, Carter; Sherman, Justin; Stutzman, Brooke; Zuniga, Jonathan

    2014-10-01

    HPX at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory (CGAPL) have set up spectral probes to verify plasma mode transitions to the W-mode. These optical probes utilize movable filters, and ccd cameras to gather data at selected spectral frequency bands. Raw data collected will be used to measure the plasma's relative density, temperature, structure, and behavior during experiments. Direct measurements of the plasma's properties can be determined through modeling and by comparison with the state transition tables, using Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES). The spectral probes will take advantage of HPX's magnetic field structure to define and measure the plasma's radiation temp as a function of time and space. In addition, the Thomson Scattering (TS) device will measure internal temperature and density data as the HPX plasma transitions through capacitive and inductive modes while developing into helicon plasma. Currently CGAPL is focused on building its laser beam transport and scattered light collection optical systems. Recently, HPX has acquired an Andor ICCD spectrometer for the spectral analysis. Data collected by the TS system will be logged in real time by CGAPL's Data Acquisition (DAQ) system with LabView remote access. Further progress on HPX will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY13.

  13. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; ...

    2015-04-08

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β~10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict a stronger flux compressionmore » and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.« less

  14. Modeling the heating and atomic kinetics of a photoionized neon plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockard, Tom E.

    Motivated by gas cell photoionized plasma experiments performed by our group at the Z facility of Sandia National Laboratories, we discuss in this dissertation a modeling study of the heating and ionization of the plasma for conditions characteristic of these experiments. Photoionized plasmas are non-equilibrium systems driven by a broadband x-ray radiation flux. They are commonly found in astrophysics but rarely seen in the laboratory. Several modeling tools have been employed: (1) a view-factor computer code constrained with side x-ray power and gated monochromatic image measurements of the z-pinch radiation, to model the time-history of the photon-energy resolved x-ray flux driving the photoionized plasma, (2) a Boltzmann self-consistent electron and atomic kinetics model to simulate the electron distribution function and configuration-averaged atomic kinetics, (3) a radiation-hydrodynamics code with inline non-equilibrium atomic kinetics to perform a comprehensive numerical simulation of the experiment and plasma heating, and (4) steady-state and time-dependent collisional-radiative atomic kinetics calculations with fine-structure energy level description to assess transient effects in the ionization and charge state distribution of the plasma. The results indicate that the photon-energy resolved x-ray flux impinging on the front window of the gas cell is very well approximated by a linear combination of three geometrically-diluted Planckian distributions. Knowledge of the spectral details of the x-ray drive turned out to be important for the heating and ionization of the plasma. The free electrons in the plasma thermalize quickly relative to the timescales associated with the time-history of the x-ray drive and the plasma atomic kinetics. Hence, electrons are well described by a Maxwellian energy distribution of a single temperature. This finding is important to support the application of a radiation-hydrodynamic model to simulate the experiment. It is found

  15. Five years of industrial experience with the plasma dross treatment process

    SciTech Connect

    Lavoie, S.; Lachance, J.

    1995-12-31

    Alcan`s Guillaume-Tremblay plant, located in Jonquiere, Quebec, has been in operation since 1990. This was the first plasma dross processing plant ever built. In addition to the use of the plasma heating technology, Guillaume-Tremblay has other unique features making it a modern and efficient dross processing facility. This paper presents a general over-view of the practical experience at the Guillaume-Tremblay plant. In particular, the utilization of plasma heating in industrial conditions, the metallurgical performance, the unique dross handling system, the control and information management system and the reclaiming of the by-products will be discussed. Finally, the use of the plasma process for salty dross will be addressed briefly.

  16. Two Non-Invasive Optical Diagnostics for the Plasma Couette Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabbutt, Megan; Flanagan, Ken; Milhone, Jason; Nornberg, Mark; Roesler, Fred; Forest, Cary; WiPAL Team Team

    2016-10-01

    Two non-invasive optical diagnostics have been developed for the Plasma Couette Experiment Upgrade (PCX-U). PCX-U is capable of producing electron temperatures of 5 to 15 eV, densities between 1010 and 5 ×1011 cm-3, and ion temperatures between 0.5 eV to 2 eV. The first diagnostic described utilizes a low cost USB spectrometer for optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Combined with a modified coronal model, OES is used to measure electron temperature in Argon plasmas. A higher resolution spectrometer is used to image ion lines which can be analyzed to determine moments of the ion energy distribution function, particularly ion temperature and flow. Both optical diagnostics are mounted on a linear stage for scanning chords across the plasma volume. Abel transform techniques are used to create radial profiles of measured plasma properties. DOE, NSF.

  17. Preliminary results from the flight of the Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment (SAMPIE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Hillard, G. Barry

    1994-01-01

    SAMPIE, the Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment, flew in the Space Shuttle Columbia payload bay as part of the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology-2 (OAST-2) mission on STS-62, March, 1994. SAMPIE biased samples of solar arrays and space power materials to varying potentials with respect to the surrounding space plasma, and recorded the plasma currents collected and the arcs which occurred, along with a set of plasma diagnostics data. A large set of high quality data was obtained on the behavior of solar arrays and space power materials in the space environment. This paper is the first report on the data SAMPIE telemetered to the ground during the mission. It will be seen that the flight data promise to help determine arcing thresholds, snapover potentials, and floating potentials for arrays and spacecraft in LEO.

  18. Temporally and spatially resolved characterization of microwave induced argon plasmas: Experiment and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Baeva, M. Andrasch, M.; Ehlbeck, J.; Loffhagen, D.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2014-04-14

    Experiments and modeling of the plasma-microwave interaction have been performed in a coaxial microwave plasma source at a field frequency of 2.45 GHz generating argon plasmas at pressures of 20 and 40 millibars and a ratio of flow rate to pressure of 0.125 sccm/Pa. The incident microwave power between 100 W and 300 W is supplied in a regime of a pulse-width modulation with cycle duration of 110 ms and a power-on time of 23 ms. The experiments are based on heterodyne reflectometry and microwave interferometry at 45.75 GHz. They provide the temporal behaviour of the complex reflection coefficient, the microwave power in the plasma, as well as the electron density in the afterglow zone of the discharge. The self-consistent spatially two-dimensional and time-dependent modeling complements the analysis of the plasma-microwave interaction delivering the plasma and electromagnetic field parameters. The consolidating experimental observations and model predictions allow further characterizing the plasma source. The generated plasma has a core occupying the region close to the end of the inner electrode, where maximum electron densities above 10{sup 20} m{sup −3} and electron temperatures of about 1 eV are observed. Due to a longer outer electrode of the coaxial structure, the plasma region is extended and fills the volume comprised by the outer electrode. The electron density reaches values of the order of 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. The heating of the gas occurs in its great part due to elastic collisions with the plasma electrons. However, the contribution of the convective heating is important especially in the extended plasma region, where the gas temperature reaches its maximum values up to approximately 1400 K. The temporally and spatially resolved modeling enables a thorough investigation of the plasma-microwave interaction which clearly shows that the power in-coupling occurs in the region of the highest electron density during the early stage of

  19. Integrated Simulation Studies of Plasma Performances and Fusion Reactions in the Deuterium Experiment of LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Homma, M.; Maeta, S.; Saito, Y.; Fukuyama, A.; Nagaoka, K.; Takahashi, H.; Nakano, H.; Osakabe, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Tanaka, K.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Isobe, M.; Tomita, H.; Ogawa, K.; LHD Exp Group Team

    2016-10-01

    The deuterium experiment project from 2017 is planned in LHD, where the deuterium NBI heating beams with the power more than 30MW are injected into the deuterium plasma. Principal objects of this project are to clarify the isotope effect on the heat and particle transport in the helical plasma and to study energetic particle confinement in a helical magnetic configuration measuring triton burn-up neutrons. We study the deuterium experiment plasma of LHD applying the integrated simulation code, TASK3D [Murakami, PPCF2015], and the 5-D drift kinetic equation solver, GNET [Murakami, NF2006]. (i) More than 20% of ion temperature increment is obtained in the deuterium plasma (nD /nH +nD = 0.8) due to the isotope effect assuming the turbulent transport model based on the H/He plasma experiment of LHD. (ii) The triton burn-up simulation shows the triton slowing down distribution and the strong magnetic configuration dependency of the triton burn-up ratio in LHD. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26420851.

  20. First application of a TES microcalorimeter to a thermonuclear fusion plasma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, K.; Hoshino, A.; Ishisaki, Y.; Morita, U.; Ohashi, T.; Mihara, T.; Mitsuda, K.; Tanaka, K.; Yagi, Y.; Koguchi, H.; Hirano, Y.; Sakakita, H.

    2006-04-01

    We report the first application of a superconductive transition edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeter to a thermonuclear fusion plasma experiment in the toroidal pinch experiment RX (TPE-RX). The TES microcalorimeter was installed in a portable adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR), which is originally designed for a rocket experiment. The ADR was directly connected to TPE-RX with a vacuum duct, and thin Toray-Lumirror or parylene films were used for entrance windows to allow soft X-rays coming into the detector with good efficiency. The detector box was designed to shield the strong magnetic field produced by ADR and TPE-RX. A total of 3472 counts of X-ray signals were detected in 0.2-3.0 keV for 210 plasma shots during the flat-top phase (35-70 ms) after discarding pile-up events. Combining the data with that measured in the energy range of 1.3-8 keV using a SiLi detector, we examined a wide band X-ray spectrum of the plasma. The obtained spectrum is dominated by thermal plasma emission, although at least four different temperature components are required to account for the whole band spectral shape. Impurities in the deuterium plasma are also investigated.

  1. Experiments and PIC simulations on liquid crystal plasma mirrors for pulse contrast enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, G. E.; Poole, P. L.; Krygier, A.; Foster, P. S.; Scott, G. G.; Wilson, L. A.; Bailey, J.; Bourgeois, N.; Hernandez-Gomez, C.; Heery, R.; Purcell, J.; Neely, D.; Rajeev, P. P.; Freeman, R. R.; Schumacher, D. W.

    2016-10-01

    High pulse contrast is crucial for performing many experiments on high intensity lasers in order to minimize modification of the target surface by pre-pulse. This is often achieved through the use of solid dielectric plasma mirrors which can limit laser shot rates. Liquid crystal films, originally developed as variable thickness ion acceleration targets, have been demonstrated as effective plasma mirrors for pulse cleaning, reaching peak reflectivities over 70%. These films were used as plasma mirrors in an ion acceleration experiment on the Scarlet laser and the resultant increase in peak proton energy and change in acceleration direction will be discussed. Also presented here are novel 2D3V, LSP particle-in-cell simulations of dielectric plasma mirror operation. By including multiphoton ionization and dimensionality corrections, an excellent match to experiment is obtained over 4 decades in intensity. Analysis of pulse shortening and plasma critical surface behavior in these simulations will be discussed. Formation of thin films at 1.5 Hz will also be presented. Performed with support from the DARPA PULSE program through AMRDEC, from NNSA, and from OSC.

  2. Propulsion Research on the Variable Tandem Mirror Plasma Rocket.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-07

    T.F. Yang. and F.R. Chang-Diaz. An icrh beach effect in a tandem mirror device. To be submitted to Physics of Fluid. 9; Scott Peng, , J. Freidberg ...mirror plasma propulsion device. Technical Report To be Published, MIT Plasma Fusion Center, 1990. 14j J. F. Freidberg . Ideal magnetohydrodynamic theory

  3. Imploding plasma x-ray laser research. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S.; Koppel, L.; Burr, L.; Rodenburg, R.; Fortner, R.; Stewart, R.; Dietrich, D.; Egan, P.; Young, B.; Dukart, R.

    1984-09-01

    The population inversion mechanisms and gain estimates for the Ne-like Kr x-ray laser scheme are discussed. An experimental configuration has been developed which produces stable plasmas with conditions close to the optimum for lasing. By imploding a coaxial argon plasma on an inner krypton plasma (the puff-on-puff configuration), a quiescent krypton center plasma was produced with an electron temperature of about 600 eV and an electron density of about 10/sup 21/ cm/sup -3/. The center plasma was stable and linear, with little evidence of kink instabilities. Nozzle development work was also performed. X-ray measurements of electron temperature and density as well as XUV linewidths are presented. (LEW)

  4. Researching Graduates' Lived Experiences of Vocational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, Tony

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to exemplify the value of using a phenomenological approach when investigating graduates' lived experiences of vocational learning. For this study, qualitative data was obtained during a series of email interviews with 35 participants. As a group they are highly aspirational and, during their graduate studies, were…

  5. Replication concepts for bioenergy research experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While there are some large and fundamental differences among disciplines related to the conversion of biomass to bioenergy, all scientific endeavors involve the use of biological feedstocks. As such, nearly every scientific experiment conducted in this area, regardless of the specific discipline, is...

  6. Active experiments in geospace plasmas with gigawatts of RF power at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, James

    2016-07-01

    The ionosphere provides a relatively quiescent plasma target, stable on timescales of minutes, for a whole host of active plasma experiments. The largest HF transmitter built to date is the HAARP phased-array HF transmitter near Gakona, Alaska which can deliver up to 3.6 Gigawatts (ERP) of CW RF power in the range of 2.8 - 10 MHz to the ionosphere with millisecond pointing, power modulation, and frequency agility. With an ionospheric background thermal energy in the range of only 0.1 eV, this amount of power gives access to the highest regimes of the nonlinearity (RF intensity to thermal pressure) ratio. HAARP's unique features have enabled the conduct of a number of nonlinear plasma experiments in the inter¬action region of overdense ionospheric plasma including generation of artificial aurorae, artificial ionization layers, VLF wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, parametric instabilities, stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE), strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and suprathermal electron acceleration. Diagnostics include the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) sited at HAARP, the SuperDARN-Kodiak HF radar, spacecraft radio beacons, HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) and optics for optical emissions. We report on short timescale ponderomotive overshoot effects, artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI), the aspect angle dependence of the intensity of the HF-enhanced plasma line, and production of suprathermal electrons. Applications are made to the controlled study of fundamental nonlinear plasma processes of relevance to laboratory plasmas, ionospheric irregularities affecting spacecraft communication and navigation systems, artificial ionization mirrors, wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, active global magnetospheric experiments, and many more.

  7. Temperature and Electron Density Determination on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Plasmas: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Najarian, Maya L.; Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory is designed for physical chemistry students to gain experience using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in understanding plasma diagnostics. LIBS uses a high-powered laser that is focused on the sample causing a plasma to form. The emission of this plasma is then spectrally resolved and detected. Temperature and electron…

  8. Theory of plasma contactors in ground-based experiments and low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerver, M. J.; Hastings, D. E.; Oberhardt, M. R.

    1990-01-01

    An examination of several models of electron collection by plasma contactors leads to a definition of the range of validity and applicability for each model. It is noted that most present ground-based experiments are of limited relevance to space applications of plasma contactors, since they operate in a regime where the magnetic field and effective collisions are at most only marginally important. An exception is the experiment of Stenzel and Urrutia (1986), which examined a plasma whose electron Larmor radius was small by comparison to the scale of the potential, and in which the anomalous transport of electrons across the magnetic field was important. The enhanced electron current was not continuous in time, but occurred in periodic bursts as the instabilities periodically emerged, saturated, and decayed.

  9. Evolution of plasma loops in a semi-toroidal pinch experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mackel, F. Ridder, S.; Tenfelde, J.; Tacke, T.; Soltwisch, H.

    2015-04-15

    The FlareLab experiment is a pulsed-power discharge generating magnetized plasma loops similar to a pinch experiment in a semi-toroidal configuration. After gas breakdown along a circular magnetic guide field, the structure expands in its major radius as the plasma becomes highly conductive and the discharge current rises. Photographs, current and electron density measurements reveal a significant broadening in the lateral direction leading to an increasing departure from radial symmetry of plasma parameters in the cross section. It is shown that the luminosity is related to both high electron density and high current density. Simultaneous measurements of current density and electric field reveal a high parallel resistivity of the plasma leading to fast diffusion across the magnetic field. Indications for anomalous resistivity are found by comparison with the Spitzer formula. As the experiment differs from a z-pinch experiment only by the semi-circular shape of the current path, the observed evolution is unexpected and might be of more fundamental significance.

  10. PLASMA-F experiment: Three years of on-orbit operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyi, L. M.; Zastenker, G. N.; Petrukovich, A. A.; Chesalin, L. S.; Nazarov, V. N.; Prokhorenko, V. I.; Balaz, J.; Kudela, K.; Strgarski, I.; Slivka, M.; Gladyshev, V. A.; Kirpichev, I. P.; Sarris, E.; Sarris, T.; Lakutina, E. V.; Minskaya, L. K.; Krukovskaya, E. V.; Beznos, A. V.; Markov, Y. I.; Tretyakov, A. E.; Batanov, O. V.; Korotkov, F. V.; Melnik, A. P.; Konoplev, V. V.; Ryabova, A. D.; Gevorkova, E. V.; Klimenchenko, M. V.; Bazhenov, A. G.; Belova, I. E.; Gavrilova, E. A.; Ananenkova, A. N.; Rudnevskaya, L. V.; Dyachkov, A. V.; Starostina, O. A.; Ryazanova, E. E.; Eismont, N. A.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.; Prech, L.; Cermak, I.; Vaverka, J.; Komarek, A.; Vojta, J.; Karimov, B. T.; Agafonov, Y. N.; Borodkova, N. L.; Gagua, T. I.; Gagua, I. T.; Koloskova, I. V.; Leibov, A. V.; Parhomov, V. A.; Ryazanceva, M. O.; Khrapchenkov, V. V.; Chugunova, O. M.

    2015-12-01

    Composition and tasks of the PLAZMA-F experiment onboard the SPEKTR-R satellite are described in this paper. A record high time resolution is a feature of solar wind plasma flux and energetic particle flux measurements. It allowed detecting a number of new and significant properties and parameters.

  11. Experiments in diamond film fabrication in table-top plasma apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masi, James V.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this experiment are to illustrate the process of plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition and to show devices which can be made simply in the laboratory. These devices illustrate clearly the concepts of bandgap, junctions, and photoelectronic processes. Films and devices are measured electrically, optically, and thermally.

  12. Exploring the universe in the laboratory: photoionized plasma experiments at Z relevant to astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Roberto

    2014-08-01

    Many astrophysical environments such as x-ray binaries, active galactic nuclei, and accretion disks of compact objects have photoionized plasmas. Detailed x-ray spectral observations performed with the Chandra and XMM-Newton orbiting telescopes provide critical information on the state of photoionized plasmas. However, the complexity of the astrophysical environment makes the spectral analysis challenging, and thus laboratory experiments are important for data interpretation and testing of modeling codes. The Z facility at Sandia National Laboratories is a powerful source of x-rays to produce and study in the laboratory photoionized plasmas relevant for astrophysics. We discuss an experimental and theory/modeling effort in which the intense x-ray flux emitted at the collapse of a z-pinch implosion conducted at the Z pulsed-power machine is employed to produce a neon photoionized plasma. The broadband x-ray radiation flux from the z-pinch is used to both create the photoionized plasma and provide a source of backlighting photons to study the atomic kinetics through K-shell line absorption spectroscopy. The plasma is contained in a cm-scale gas cell that can be located at different distances from the z-pinch, thus effectively controlling the x-ray flux producing the plasma. Time-integrated transmission spectra have been observed with a spectrometer equipped with two elliptically-bent KAP crystals from photoionized plasmas covering an order of magnitude range in ionization parameter. The transmission data shows a rich line absorption spectrum that spans over several ionization stages of neon including Be-, Li-, He- and H-like ions. Modeling calculations are used to interpret the transmission spectra recorded in the Z experiments with the goal of extracting the charge- state distribution, electron temperature and the radiation flux driving the plasma, as well as to determine the ionization parameter of the plasma. This work is sponsored in part by the National Nuclear

  13. Beginning Counselor Educators' Experiences Developing a Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilde, Brandon J.

    2010-01-01

    To date, counselor education literature is narrow in the accounts of counselor educators' experiences as active scholars (Hill, 2004). Consequently, there is little research accounting for the experience of developing a research agenda for counselor educators during their initial faculty appointment. Hermeneutic, phenomenological methodology was…

  14. An Authentic Research Experience for Undergraduates on a Budget: Using Data from Simple Experiments to Develop Mini-Research Proposals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of undergraduate research are well documented, and many colleges and universities include a senior research requirement for graduation. In addition, most science curricula attempt to include discoverystyle, laboratory components to prepare students for their research experiences and to expose them to research methods in different…

  15. Linguistic analysis of project ownership for undergraduate research experiences.

    PubMed

    Hanauer, D I; Frederick, J; Fotinakes, B; Strobel, S A

    2012-01-01

    We used computational linguistic and content analyses to explore the concept of project ownership for undergraduate research. We used linguistic analysis of student interview data to develop a quantitative methodology for assessing project ownership and applied this method to measure degrees of project ownership expressed by students in relation to different types of educational research experiences. The results of the study suggest that the design of a research experience significantly influences the degree of project ownership expressed by students when they describe those experiences. The analysis identified both positive and negative aspects of project ownership and provided a working definition for how a student experiences his or her research opportunity. These elements suggest several features that could be incorporated into an undergraduate research experience to foster a student's sense of project ownership.

  16. Failed Rocket Payload Included Research Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2014-11-01

    About an hour and a half before the launch of the Orbital Sciences Corporation's Antares rocket and Cygnus cargo spacecraft at 6:22 p.m. on 28 October, Jeff Goldstein arrived at his vantage point on Arbuckle Neck Road in Assawoman, Va. It was just 1.5 miles from launchpad 0A at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility. Goldstein, director of the National Center for Earth and Space Science Education (NCESSE) had come with about 35 elementary school through college students, as well as some parents, teachers, and school administrators, to watch the liftoff that would deliver the students' microgravity experiments to the International Space Station (ISS).

  17. Educators' experience of teaching nursing research to undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Tamam B; Porter, Eileen J

    2008-11-01

    Most research pertaining to the teaching of nursing research has focused on learning outcomes and students' attitudes toward research. Few scholars have explored what it is like to teach nursing research. The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of teaching undergraduate nursing research. Data were obtained from 12 nurse educators through e-mail interviews and analyzed using Giorgi's method of descriptive phenomenology. Four meaning units describe the experience: marketing research content, introducing the research process, enhancing student abilities to learn about research, and enhancing personal abilities to teach research. The three meaning units that focus on faculty intentions toward students are somewhat consistent with prior research but include interesting new ideas. Concerning the last meaning unit, participants reported an interest in learning about teaching strategies, advanced statistics, and informational technology. Deans and directors should explore the learning needs of such faculty and offer appropriate ongoing education.

  18. The Student Experience of Community-Based Research: An Autoethnography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingman, Benjamin C.

    2016-01-01

    This autoethnography provides a description and thematic illustration of the student experience of a community-based research (CBR) course and partnership. Through evaluating personal experiences with CBR, the author identified three qualities of meaningful CBR experiences: trust, indeterminacy, and emotion. These qualities are explored, and…

  19. Experiments and simulations on non-plasma ignition of semiconductor bridge igniter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Weiqiang; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Jupeng; Li, Yong; Wang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Since semiconductor bridge (SCB) igniter has been invented, it is commonly considered as a plasma generator. However, the plasma ignition mechanism may be affected by the hotspot ignition temperature of the primary explosives that is lower than the melting point of SCB in the igniter. In an effort to investigate the non-plasma ignition performance of SCB igniter, a one-dimensional model was established for temperature distribution analysis under constant current and capacitor discharge excitation. The simulation results featured the progress of heat transfer and the energy level required by non-plasma ignition of SCB was estimated. Furthermore, sensitivity experiments were carried out to test simulation results and to obtain the firing current range of SCB igniter with lead styphnate (LTNR). Experiment results indicated that safety conditions are 1.953 A constant current input lasting 1 ms under constant current excitation and 7.072 V voltage input using 47 µF storage capacitor under capacitor discharge excitation. All-firing conditions of non-plasma ignition are 2.035 A constant current input lasting 1 ms under constant current excitation and 7.647 V voltage input using 47 µF storage capacitor under capacitor discharge excitation.

  20. Updates on Optical Emission Spectroscopy & Langmuir Probe Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karama, Jackson; Frank, John; Azzari, Phillip; Hopson, Jordan; James, Royce; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Paolino, Richard; Sandri, Eva; Sherman, Justin; Wright, Eva; Turk, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    HPX is developing a to shorter lifetime (20 - 30 ns) more reproducible plasma at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory (CGAPL). Once achieved, spectral and particle probes will help to verify plasma mode transitions to the W-mode. These optical probes utilize movable filters, and ccd cameras to gather data at selected spectral frequency bands. Once corrections for the RF field are in place for the Langmuir probe, raw data will be collected and used to measure the plasma's density, temperature, and potentially the structure and behavior during experiments. Direct measurements of plasma properties can be determined with modeling and by comparison with the state transition tables, both using Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES). The spectral will add to HPX's data collection capabilities and be used in conjunction with the particle probes, and Thomson Scattering device to create a robust picture of the internal and external plasma parameters on HPX. Progress on the implementation of the OES and Langmuir probes will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15.

  1. Experimental research on electrical propulsion. Note 2: Experimental research on a plasma jet with vortex type stabilization for propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robotti, A. C.; Oggero, M.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental electric propulsion research are presented. A plasma generator, with an arc stabilized by an air vortex is examined. The heat transfer efficiency between arc and fluid environment at a varying current and flow rate is discussed.

  2. Human Nutrition Research Conducted at State Agricultural Experiment Stations and 1890/Tuskegee Agricultural Research Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driskell, Judy A.; Myers, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Cooperative State Research Service-administered and state-appropriated State Agriculture Experiment Station funds for human nutrition research increased about two-fold from FY70-FY86, while the percentage of budget expended for this research decreased. (JOW)

  3. Space Station Biological Research Project: Reference Experiment Book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Catherine (Editor); Wade, Charles (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP), which is the combined efforts of the Centrifuge Facility (CF) and the Gravitational Biology Facility (GBF), is responsible for the development of life sciences hardware to be used on the International Space Station to support cell, developmental, and plant biology research. The SSBRP Reference Experiment Book was developed to use as a tool for guiding this development effort. The reference experiments characterize the research interests of the international scientific community and serve to identify the hardware capabilities and support equipment needed to support such research. The reference experiments also serve as a tool for understanding the operational aspects of conducting research on board the Space Station. This material was generated by the science community by way of their responses to reference experiment solicitation packages sent to them by SSBRP scientists. The solicitation process was executed in two phases. The first phase was completed in February of 1992 and the second phase completed in November of 1995. Representing these phases, the document is subdivided into a Section 1 and a Section 2. The reference experiments contained in this document are only representative microgravity experiments. They are not intended to define actual flight experiments. Ground and flight experiments will be selected through the formal NASA Research Announcement (NRA) and Announcement of Opportunity (AO) experiment solicitation, review, and selection process.

  4. Long Pulse High Performance Plasma Scenario Development for the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kessel, C.E.; Bell, R.E.; Bell, M.G.; Gates, D.A.; Harvey, R.W.

    2006-01-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion, 44, 452 (2004)] is targeting long pulse high performance, noninductive sustained operations at low aspect ratio, and the demonstration of nonsolenoidal startup and current rampup. The modeling of these plasmas provides a framework for experimental planning and identifies the tools to access these regimes. Simulations based on neutral beam injection (NBI)-heated plasmas are made to understand the impact of various modifications and identify the requirements for (1) high elongation and triangularity, (2) density control to optimize the current drive, (3) plasma rotation and/or feedback stabilization to operate above the no-wall limit, and (4) electron Bernstein waves (EBW) for off-axis heating/current drive (H/CD). Integrated scenarios are constructed to provide the transport evolution and H/CD source modeling, supported by rf and stability analyses. Important factors include the energy confinement, Zeff, early heating/H mode, broadening of the NBI-driven current profile, and maintaining q(0) and qmin>1.0. Simulations show that noninductive sustained plasmas can be reached at IP=800 kA, BT=0.5 T, 2.5, N5, 15%, fNI=92%, and q(0)>1.0 with NBI H/CD, density control, and similar global energy confinement to experiments. The noninductive sustained high plasmas can be reached at IP=1.0 MA, BT=0.35 T, 2.5, N9, 43%, fNI=100%, and q(0)>1.5 with NBI H/CD and 3.0 MW of EBW H/CD, density control, and 25% higher global energy confinement than experiments. A scenario for nonsolenoidal plasma current rampup is developed using high harmonic fast wave H/CD in the early low IP and low Te phase, followed by NBI H/CD to continue the current ramp, reaching a maximum of 480 kA after 3.4 s.

  5. Empirical Modeling of Plasma Clouds Produced by the Metal Oxide Space Clouds (MOSC) Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, T.; Caton, R. G.; Miller, D.; Holmes, J. M.; Groves, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Metal Oxide Space Clouds (MOSC) chemical release experiments employed the ALTAIR radar as a primary measurement of plasma density in the clouds. However, the radar provides only the local plasma density along the beam line of sight, and the measurements are of limited value without context to determine the location of the radar beam relative to the larger plasma cloud. We have constructed an empirical model of the cloud locations, shapes, and sizes as a function of time for both MOSC launches using fits to all-sky images recorded from near the launch site. When combined with ALTAIR radar measurements of local plasma density at the sampled point and ionosonde measurements of the peak plasma density, a robust 4-D representation of the plasma density can be derived and used to estimate ionization yields and to study impacts on the background ionosphere and RF propagation. Optical image data was fit to a 2-D Gaussian model to derive peak intensity, background, rotation of the cloud in the horizontal plane, and half-widths in the N-S and E-W directions. The optical images show a closely linear increase in half-width after the first minute or two. Very good agreement between the model and radar integrated total electron content (TEC) measurements are obtained with a simple exponential envelope to the peak TEC within the cloud, indicating that the optical distribution closely tracks the plasma density. Comparison of TEC with peak plasma density and the observed spatial dimensions of the cloud are used to estimate the rate of change in total electron number during the period of observation and to compare with predictions of prior theoretical and numerical models.

  6. ECH Plasma Experiments on an Internal Coil Device with a High Temperature Superconductor Coil

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Yuichi; Morikawa, Junji; Ohkuni, Kotaro; Yamakoshi, Shigeo; Goto, Takuya; Mito, Toshiyuki; Yanagi, Nagato; Iwakuma, Masataka

    2005-01-15

    Self-organization related with relaxation phenomenon is playing an important role in various aspects of magnetic confined plasmas. Recently a relaxation theory including the plasma flow has been developed by Mahajan-Yoshida, and a new relaxation state has been identified. The two-fluid relaxation condition is given by {beta} + (V/V{sub A}){sup 2} = const. To study a self-organized structure with strong plasma flow, we have introduced an internal coil device. By inducing a radial electric field with appropriate methods, we could drive a toroidal plasma flow, and confine a high beta plasma in a core region. The internal coil device Mini-RT with a high temperature superconductor(HTS) coil(Rc=0.15m, Ic=50kA) has been constructed. The vacuum chamber is 1 m in diameter and {approx}0.7 m in height. The magnetic field strength near the internal coil is around 0.1 T, and a radio-frequency wave of 2.45 GHz is applied for the plasma production. We have started ECH plasma experiments with the coil supported mechanically. The electron density, which has a peak near the internal coil, is of order 10{sup 16} m{sup -3}, reaching the cut-off density of the microwave. While, the electron temperature is of order 10 eV with a broad profile. Estimated energy confinement time is of order 10{sup -(5-6)} sec. The levitation experiment of the HTS coil has been carried out. The position of the HTS coil is measured with laser sensors, and is feedback-controlled with the levitation coil current. We have succeeded to levitating the HTS coil during one hour with an accuracy of less than 20 {omega}m. A preliminary experiment for the plasma production at the floating condition of the HTS coil has been initiated. It is affirmed that the levitation system works well and plasma with separatrix configuration is produced.

  7. Taking Research Experiences for Undergraduates Online

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubenthal, Michael; Judge, Jasmeet

    2013-04-01

    To today's budding scientists, the notion of sharing experiences and working collaboratively with distant peers is not a novelty. Instead, this is what most young scientists expect to achieve through the Internet portals they carry in their pockets and backpacks. They have never known a world without information and communication technologies (ICT) such as laptops, mobile phones, text messaging, and the Internet. As a result, they have grown to rely on uninterrupted access to the Internet for a range of information-gathering and communication activities. Further, this generation of students has fully embraced structured online learning opportunities. For example, in 2011 more than 6.7 million U.S. students in higher education took at least one online course [Allen and Seaman, 2013].

  8. Robotic Scopes & Research Experiences for Secondary Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelderman, Richard; Carini, Michael T.; Barnaby, David; Walter, Donald K.

    STARBASE is being developed to connect secondary science students and teachers with cutting edge astronomical research. We regularly operate via remote control over the Internet two telescopes operating in the USA: the 0.6m in Kentucky and the 1.3m RCT in Arizona. Both observatories are being upgraded to provide robotic control executing scripted observations without real-time human oversight. This telescope network is being developed in order to support our growing network of students and teachers from rural public middle and high schools in the southeast United States. Our objective is to work with the teachers to bring to their students the adventure of directly exploring the Universe. We provide professional development workshops one at the introductory level and another in affiliation with Hands-On Universe to provide software and instruction required to introduce image-processing into the curriculum. We continue our involvement with classroom visits and the ability to request observations via our web-based interface. Most of our teachers have selected research projects involving an entire class but we have also worked closely with individual students motivated to pursue a more detailed project (e.g. eclipsing binaries or AGN variability). Our poster presents details of our efforts and results of our program evaluation

  9. Workshop on Plasma Experiments in the Laboratory and in Space. Abstracts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    Region I. Roth (Space Sciences Laborazory, University of California, Berkeley, Cali- fornia 94720) M . K. Hudson (Physics and Astronomy Department...of cbarpd gramins forming a Couomb lattce is brieflydescribed. m 4~o i L PL-ASN’A - ILASM^ IN1rERA4C1-rlONS Experiments on the Merging of Currents in...quiescent plasma column which is 0.5 m in diameter. The ambient magnetic field is Bz 3 kG and plasma density n < 5.0X10 12 /cm 3 in Ar. The two current

  10. [Argon plasma coagulation (APC): a new mode in gastrointestinal endoscopy--first experience].

    PubMed

    Dajcman, D; Skalicky, M; Pernat, C; Pocajt, M

    2001-01-01

    Argon plasma coagulation (APC) is a new method of non-contact electrocoagulation in which current is applied to tissues by means of ionised argon gas (argon plasma). The development of special applicators has made this method applicable for gastrointestinal endoscopy. The primary indication for APC is the treatment of hemorrhage in the gastrointestinal tract. APC has been proven to be highly effective and easily used, with clear advantages over previously used methods. This article describes the introduction of APC in Slovenia and the first experiences with this method in the clinical department of internal medicine in Maribor.

  11. Surface Treatment of a Lithium Limiter for Spherical Torus Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Doerner, R.; Antar, G.; Timberlake, J.; Spaleta, J.; Hoffman, D.; Jones, B.; Munsat, T.; Kugel, H.; Taylor, G.; Stutman, D.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Maingi, R.; Molesa, S.; Efthimion, P.; Menard, J.; Finkenthal, M.; Luckhardt, S.

    2001-03-20

    The concept of a flowing lithium first wall for a fusion reactor may lead to a significant advance in reactor design, since it could virtually eliminate the concerns with power density and erosion, tritium retention, and cooling associated with solid walls. As part of investigations to determine the feasibility of this approach, plasma interaction questions in a toroidal plasma geometry are being addressed in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U) spherical torus (ST). The first experiments involved a toroidally local lithium limiter (L3). Measurements of pumpout rates indicated that deuterium pumping was greater for the L3 compared to conventional boron carbide limiters. The difference in the pumpout rates between the two limiter types decreased with plasma exposure, but argon glow discharge cleaning was able to restore the pumping effectiveness of the L3. At no point, however, was the extremely low recycling regime reported in previous lithium experiments achieved. This may be due to the much larger lithium surfaces that were exposed to the plasma in the earlier work. The possibility will be studied in the next set of CDX-U experiments, which are to be conducted with a large area, fully toroidal lithium limiter.

  12. Backreflection diagnostics for ultra-intense laser plasma experiments based on frequency resolved optical gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F.; Hornung, J.; Schmidt, C.; Eckhardt, M.; Roth, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Bagnoud, V.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the development and implementation of a time resolved backscatter diagnostics for high power laser plasma experiments at the petawatt-class laser facility PHELIX. Pulses that are backscattered or reflected from overcritical plasmas are characterized spectrally and temporally resolved using a specially designed second harmonic generation frequency resolved optical gating system. The diagnostics meets the requirements made by typical experiments, i.e., a spectral bandwidth of more than 30 nm with sub-nanometer resolution and a temporal window of 10 ps with 50 fs temporal resolution. The diagnostics is permanently installed at the PHELIX target area and can be used to study effects such as laser-hole boring or relativistic self-phase-modulation which are important features of laser-driven particle acceleration experiments.

  13. Photon Physics and Plasma Research, Photonics Applications and Web Engineering, Wilga, May 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2012-05-01

    This paper is the third part (out of five) of the research survey of WILGA Symposium work, May 2012 Edition, concerned with Photon Physics and Plasma Research. It presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from different technical universities from this country during the Jubilee XXXth SPIE-IEEE Wilga 2012, May Edition, symposium on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposium embraced, among others, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonics-electronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JET tokamak and pi-of-the sky experiments development. The symposium is an annual summary in the development of numerable Ph.D. theses carried out in this country in the area of advanced electronic and photonic systems. It is also a great occasion for SPIE, IEEE, OSA and PSP students to meet together in a large group spanning the whole country with guests from this part of Europe. A digest of Wilga references is presented [1-270].

  14. Does Early Research Experience Affect Subsequent Career Choice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pechmann, Connie A.; Pichert, James W.

    The Vanderbilt Summer Research Program in diabetes, which was designed to interest medical students in research careers and diabetes care, was evaluated. The program provides stipends to 20 sophomore and junior medical students for 12 weeks of preceptor-supervised laboratory research work, clinical experience, and classroom instruction. The…

  15. Research Administrator Salary: Association with Education, Experience, Credentials and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shambrook, Jennifer; Roberts, Thomas J.; Triscari, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Research Administrators Stress Perception Survey (2010 RASPerS) collected data from 1,131 research administrators on salary, years experience, educational level, Certified Research Administrator (CRA) status, and gender. Using these data, comparisons were made to show how salary levels are associated with each of these variables. Using…

  16. Plasma theory and simulation research. Final technical report, January 1, 1986--October 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Birdsall, C.K.

    1989-12-31

    Our research group uses both theory and simulation as tools in order to increase the understanding of instabilities, heating, diffusion, transport and other phenomena in plasmas. We also work on the improvement of simulation, both theoretically and practically. Our focus has been more and more on the plasma edge (the ``sheath``), interactions with boundaries, leading to simulations of whole devices (someday a numerical tokamak).

  17. Ignition of beam plasma discharge in the electron beam experiment in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Roberts, W. T.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1985-01-01

    An ignition of beam plasma discharge (BPD) in space was observed in a neutral gas-electron beam interaction experiment by Space Shuttle/Spacelab-1 in 1983. An electron beam of 8 kV 100 mA was injected into a high dense nitrogen gas cloud of 10 to the 23rd molecules which was released during 100 msec from the Orbiter. The appearance of the beam and its surroundings observed by a low-light-level TV camera showed a local ignition of the beam plasma discharge in the gas cloud. The enhanced plasma production, generation of auroral emission, and associated wave emission were also detected by onboard diagnostic instruments.

  18. Efficient modeling of laser-plasma accelerator staging experiments using INF&RNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-03-01

    The computational framework INF&RNO (INtegrated Fluid & paRticle simulatioN cOde) allows for fast and accurate modeling, in 2D cylindrical geometry, of several aspects of laser-plasma accelerator physics. In this paper, we present some of the new features of the code, including the quasistatic Particle-In-Cell (PIC)/fluid modality, and describe using different computational grids and time steps for the laser envelope and the plasma wake. These and other features allow for a speedup of several orders of magnitude compared to standard full 3D PIC simulations while still retaining physical fidelity. INF&RNO is used to support the experimental activity at the BELLA Center, and we will present an example of the application of the code to the laser-plasma accelerator staging experiment.

  19. Plasma blobs in a basic toroidal experiment: Origin, dynamics, and induced transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, S. H.; Diallo, A.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Labit, B.; Podesta, M.

    2007-11-15

    Detaching plasma blobs with very similar properties to tokamaks are observed in the basic toroidal plasma experiment TORPEX [A. Fasoli et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 055902 (2006)]. The blobs originate from the breaking of wave crests of a drift-interchange wave, which span over regions characterized by strongly inhomogeneous background parameters. Once decoupled from the wave, the blobs follow a predominantly radial trajectory pattern. The blob-induced cross-field transport can instantaneously exceed the steady-state parallel fluxes by one order of magnitude, while accounting for only 10% of the time-average device losses. If the particles were confined in the parallel direction, as is the case in tokamaks, blobs would constitute the dominant loss mechanism in TORPEX. The presented results show that the presence of grad B is sufficient and neither a magnetic-topology change nor the presence of limiters, both absent in TORPEX, are necessary for the generation of blobs.

  20. Radiofrequency antenna for suppression of parasitic discharges in a helicon plasma thruster experiment.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazunori

    2012-08-01

    A radiofrequency (rf) antenna for helicon plasma thruster experiments is developed and tested using a permanent magnets helicon plasma source immersed in a vacuum chamber. A magnetic nozzle is provided by permanent magnets arrays and an argon plasma is produced by a 13.56 MHz radiofrequency helicon-wave or inductively-coupled discharge. A parasitic discharge outside the source tube is successfully suppressed by covering the rf antenna with a ceramic ring and a grounded shield; a decrease in the ion saturation current of a Langmuir probe located outside the source tube is observed and the ion saturation current on axis increases simultaneously, compared with the case of a standard uncovered rf antenna. It is also demonstrated that the covered antenna can yield stable operation of the source.

  1. On the Observation of Jitter Radiation in Solid-Density Laser-Plasma Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Brett; Medvedev, Mikhail

    2015-11-01

    Plasmas created by high-intensity lasers are often subject to the formation of kinetic-streaming instabilities, such as the Weibel instability, which lead to the spontaneous generation of high-amplitude, tangled magnetic fields. These fields typically exist on small spatial scales, i.e., ``sub-Larmor scales''. Radiation from charged particles moving through small-scale electromagnetic (EM) turbulence, known as jitter radiation, has spectral characteristics distinct from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation, and it carries valuable information on the statistical properties of the EM field structure and evolution. Consequently, jitter radiation from laser-produced plasmas may offer insight into the underlying electromagnetic turbulence. Here we investigate the prospects for, and demonstrate the feasibility of, such direct radiative diagnostics for mildly relativistic, solid-density laser plasmas produced in lab experiments. Supported by grant DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER54940 and NSF grant AST-1209665.

  2. The effect of boundaries on the ion acoustic beam-plasma instability in experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rapson, Christopher; Grulke, Olaf; Matyash, Konstantin; Klinger, Thomas

    2014-05-15

    The ion acoustic beam-plasma instability is known to excite strong solitary waves near the Earth's bow shock. Using a double plasma experiment, tightly coupled with a 1-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, the results presented here show that this instability is critically sensitive to the experimental conditions. Boundary effects, which do not have any counterpart in space or in most simulations, unavoidably excite parasitic instabilities. Potential fluctuations from these instabilities lead to an increase of the beam temperature which reduces the growth rate such that non-linear effects leading to solitary waves are less likely to be observed. Furthermore, the increased temperature modifies the range of beam velocities for which an ion acoustic beam plasma instability is observed.

  3. Collaborative Research: Instability and transport of laser beam in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Harvey Arnold; Lushnikov, Pavel

    2014-11-18

    Our goal was to determine the onset of laser light scattering due to plasma wave instabilities. Such scatter is usually regarded as deleterious since laser beam strength is thereby diminished. While this kind of laser-plasma-instability (LPI) has long been understood for the case of coherent laser light, the theory of LPI onset for a laser beam with degraded coherence is recent. Such a laser beam fills plasma with a mottled intensity distribution, which has large fluctuations. The key question is: do the exceptionally large fluctuations control LPI onset or is it controlled by the relatively quiescent background laser intensity? We have answered this question. This is significant because LPI onset power in the former case is typically small compared to that of the latter. In addition, if large laser intensity fluctuations control LPI onset, then nonlinear effects become significant for less powerful laser beams than otherwise estimated.

  4. Hot-electron plasma formation and confinement in the tandem mirror experiment-upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Ress, D.B.

    1988-06-01

    The tandem mirror experiment-upgrade (TMX-U) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the first experiment to investigate the thermal-barrier tandem-mirror concept. One attractive feature of the tandem magnetic mirror as a commercial power reactor is that the fusion reactions occur in an easily accessible center-cell. On the other hand, complicated end-cells are necessary to provide magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and improved particle confinement of the center-cell plasma. In these end-cells, enhanced confinement is achieved with a particular axial potential profile that is formed with electron-cyclotron range-of-frequency heating (ECRF heating, ECRH). By modifying the loss rates of electrons at spatially distinct locations within the end-cells, the ECRH can tailor the plasma potential profile in the desired fashion. Specifically, the thermal-barrier concept requires generation of a population of energetic electrons near the midplane of each end-cell. To be effective, the transverse (to the magnetic field) spatial structure of the hot-electron plasma must be fairly uniform. In this dissertation we characterize the spatial structure of the ECRH-generated plasma, and determine how the structure builds up in time. Furthermore, the plasma should efficiently absorb the ECRF power, and a large fraction of the electrons must be well confined near the end-cell midplane. Therefore, we also examine in detail the ECRH power balance, determining how the ECRF power is absorbed by the plasma, and the processes through which that power is confined and lost. 43 refs., 69 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Design, development, and results from a charge-collector diagnostic for a toroidal electron plasma experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pahari, Sambaran; Lachhvani, Lavkesh Bajpai, Manu; Rathod, Karan; Yeole, Yogesh; Chattopadhyay, P. K.

    2015-08-15

    A suitable charge-collector has been designed and developed to estimate charge-content of electron plasmas in a Small Aspect Ratio Toroidal Experiment in a C-shaped trap (SMARTEX-C). The electrons are periodically injected and held in the trap with the aid of electrostatic end-fields and a toroidal magnetic field. After a preset “hold” time, the trapped charges are dumped onto a grounded collector (by gating it). As the charges flow along the magnetic field lines onto the collector, the integrated current gives the charge-content of the plasma at the instant of dump. In designing such a charge collector, several challenges peculiar to the geometry of the trap and the nature of the plasma had to be addressed. Instantaneous charge measurements synchronised with the E × B drift of the plasma, along with fast transit times of electrons to the collector (few 100 ns or less) (due to the low aspect ratio of the trap) essentially require fast gating of the collector. The resulting large capacitive transients alongside low charge content (few nC) of such plasmas further lead to increasing demands on response and sensitivity of the collector. Complete cancellation of such transients is shown to be possible, in principle, by including the return path in our measurement circuit but the “non-neutrality” of the plasma acts as a further impediment. Ultimately, appropriate shielding and measurement circuits allow us to (re)distribute the capacitance and delineate the paths of these currents, leading to effective cancellation of transients and marked improvement in sensitivity. Improved charge-collector has thus been used to successfully estimate the time evolution of total charge of the confined electron plasma in SMARTEX-C.

  6. The Charged Aerosol Release Experiment (Care II) to Study Artificial Dusty Plasmas in the Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.; Gatling, G.; Briczinski, S. J., Jr.; Vierinen, J.; Bhatt, A.; Holzworth, R. H., II; McCarthy, M.; Gustavsson, B.; La Hoz, C.; Latteck, R.

    2015-12-01

    A sounding rocket launched from Andoya, Norway in September 2015 carried 37 rocket motors and a multi-instrument daughter payload into the ionosphere to study the generation of plasma wave electric fields and ionospheric density disturbances by the high-speed injection of dust particles. The primary purpose of the CARE II mission is to validate the dress-particle theory of enhanced incoherent scatter from a dusty plasma and to validate models of plasma instabilities driven by high-speed charged particles. The CARE II chemical payload produces 66 kg of micron-sized dust particles composed of aluminium oxide. In addition to the dust, simple molecular combustion products such as N2, H2, CO2, CO, H20 and NO will be injected into the bottomside of the F-layer. Charging of the dust and ion charge exchange with the molecules yields plasma particles moving at hypersonic velocities. Streaming instabilities and shear electric fields causes plasma turbulence that can be detected using ground radars and in situ plasma instruments. The instrument payload was separated from the chemical release payload soon after launch to measure electric field vectors, electron and ion densities, and integrated electron densities from the rocket to the ground. The chemical release of high speed dust was directed upward on the downleg of the rocket trajectory to intersect the F-Layer. The instrument section was about 600 meters from the dust injection module at the release time. Ground HF and UHF radars were operated to detected scatter and refraction by the modified ionosphere. Optical instruments from airborne and ground observatories were used to map the dispersal of the dust using scattered sunlight. The plasma interactions are being simulated with both fluid and particle-in-cell (PIC) codes. CARE II is a follow-on to the CARE I rocket experiment conducted from Wallops Island Virginia in September 2009.

  7. Acceleration of Dense Flowing Plasmas using ICRF Power in the VASIMR Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, Jared P.

    2005-09-01

    ICRF power in the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) concept energizes ions (> 100 eV) in a diverging magnetic field to accelerate a dense (˜ 1019 m-3) flowing plasma to velocities useful for space propulsion (˜100 km/s). Theory predicts that an ICRF slow wave launched from the high field side of the resonance will propagate in the magnetic beach to absorb nearly all of the power at the resonance, thus efficiently converting the RF power to ion kinetic energy. The plasma flows through the resonance only once, so the ions are accelerated in a single pass. This process has proven efficient (˜ 70%) with an ICRF power level of 1.5 kW at about 3.6 MHz in the VASIMR experiment, VX-30, using deuterium plasma created by a helicon operating in flowing mode. We have measured ICRF plasma loading up to 2 ohms, consistent with computational predictions made using Oak Ridge National Laboratory's EMIR code. Recent helicon power upgrades (20 kW at 13.56 MHz) have enabled a 5 cm diameter target plasma for ICRF with an ion flux of over 3×10 20 s-1 and a high degree of ionization. This paper summarizes our ICRF results and presents the latest helicon developments in VX-30.

  8. Acceleration of Dense Flowing Plasmas using ICRF Power in the VASIMR Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Squire, Jared P.

    2005-09-26

    ICRF power in the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) concept energizes ions (> 100 eV) in a diverging magnetic field to accelerate a dense ({approx} 1019 m-3) flowing plasma to velocities useful for space propulsion ({approx}100 km/s). Theory predicts that an ICRF slow wave launched from the high field side of the resonance will propagate in the magnetic beach to absorb nearly all of the power at the resonance, thus efficiently converting the RF power to ion kinetic energy. The plasma flows through the resonance only once, so the ions are accelerated in a single pass. This process has proven efficient ({approx} 70%) with an ICRF power level of 1.5 kW at about 3.6 MHz in the VASIMR experiment, VX-30, using deuterium plasma created by a helicon operating in flowing mode. We have measured ICRF plasma loading up to 2 ohms, consistent with computational predictions made using Oak Ridge National Laboratory's EMIR code. Recent helicon power upgrades (20 kW at 13.56 MHz) have enabled a 5 cm diameter target plasma for ICRF with an ion flux of over 3x10 20 s-1 and a high degree of ionization. This paper summarizes our ICRF results and presents the latest helicon developments in VX-30.

  9. One year's experience using a rotating filter for therapeutic plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, A A; Halley, S E; Reardon, J; Sevigny, J

    1989-01-01

    The authors previously demonstrated the feasibility of using a rotating filter system for therapeutic plasma exchange. They now report on the technical details of a 1 year clinical experience. Seventeen patients underwent 188 treatments. Hemoaccess was provided by antecubital veins (147 Rx), femoral catheters (37 Rx), or an a-v fistula (3 Rx). Blood flows ranged from 75 to 100 ml/min. Net plasma removed per treatment was 3,231 +/- 53 ml (mean +/- SE, n = 188). Mean plasma removal rate per treatment was 40.2 +/- 0.6 ml/min; mean treatment time was 83 +/- 2 min. Platelet counts before and after treatment revealed a 15 +/- 4% decline (n = 46 Rx). Despite filtration fractions up to 86% there was no evidence of significant membrane plugging or hemolysis. For semiselective removal of cholesterol, the rotating filter was used in a cascade system with a secondary filter. Eighty percent of processed plasma was returned to the patient, but the treatment time was prolonged by 37% and the total cholesterol removed was 26% less when compared with the single pass system. The authors conclude that an inexpensive rotating filter can provide a highly efficient plasma exchange. The inherent efficiency of this system must be considered when evaluating its use with secondary filtration techniques.

  10. The effect of seed electrons on the repeatability of atmospheric pressure plasma plume propagation: I. Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, L.; Chang, L.; Xian, Y.; Lu, X.

    2016-09-01

    One of the significant differences between the traditional streamers and the plasma jets is the repeatability of their propagation. In this paper, the effect of the seed electron density on the repeatability of the plasma jets is investigated. The seed electron density plays an essential role in the propagation of plasma plume which is in either repeatable mode or random mode depending on the frequency of the applied voltage and the mixture percentage of the working gas. By measuring the propagation velocities and the ignition delay time, it is found that the propagation velocities of the plasma plume are independent of the seed electron density. However, the jitter of the ignition delay time strongly depends on the frequency of the applied voltage and the mixture percentage of the working gas. After detailed analyzing of the experiment results, it is concluded that the minimum seed electron density required for the plasma bullet to propagate in repeatable mode is on the order of 108 cm-3 for gas pressure of 2 × 104 Pa. The minimum required seed electron density for the gas pressure of 4 × 103 Pa is on the order of 107 cm-3. Further analysis shows that, at one atmospheric pressure, the required minimum seed electron density for repeatable mode is on the order of 109 cm-3.

  11. Current Status of MPPE (Mercury Plasma Particle Experiment) on BepiColombo/MMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshifumi; Hirahara, Masafumi; Barabash, Stas; Delcourt, Dominique; André, Nicolas; Takashima, Takeshi; Asamura, Kazushi

    2015-04-01

    Mercury's plasma/particle environment has gradually become clear thanks to the new observations made by MESSENGER spacecraft orbiting around Mercury. However, it is also true that many questions will be left unsolved. In order to elucidate the detailed plasma structure and dynamics around Mercury, an orbiter BepiColombo MMO (Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter) is going to be launched in 2016 as a joint mission between ESA and ISAS/JAXA. Mercury Plasma/Particle Experiment (MPPE) is a comprehensive instrument package for plasma, high-energy particle and energetic neutral atom measurements. It consists of 7 sensors: two Mercury Electron Analyzers (MEA1 and MEA2), Mercury Ion Analyzer (MIA), Mass Spectrum Analyzer (MSA), High Energy Particle instrument for electron (HEP-ele), High Energy Particle instrument for ion (HEP-ion), and Energetic Neutrals Analyzer (ENA). Currently, the MPPE sensors are on the MMO spacecraft under system integration test at ISAS/JAXA (Institute of Space and Astronautical Science / Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency). Evaluation of the sensor calibration data and the final check of the onboard processing software are being made in order to realize the flawless future plasma/particle observations around Mercury.

  12. Characterization of plasma and laser conditions for single hot spot interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.S.; Johnson, R.P.; Cobble, J.A.; Fernandez, J.C.; Lindman, E.L.; Rose, H.A.; Estabrook, K.G.

    1998-11-01

    The LANL TRIDENT laser system is being used for fundamental experiments which study the interaction of self-focusing, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in a single (diffraction limited) laser hot spot in order to better understand the coupling between these plasma instabilities. The diffraction limited beam mimics a single hot spot found in speckle distributions that are typical of random or kinoform phase plate (RPP or KPP) smoothing. A long scale length, hot plasma ({approximately} 1 mm, {approximately} 0.5 keV) is created by a separate heater beam, and the single hot spot beam is used to drive parametric instabilities. The focal plane distribution and wavefront of the single hot spot beam are characterized, and the intensity of the single hot spot can be varied between 10{sup 14}--10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}. The plasma density, temperature, and flow profiles are measured using gated imaging spectroscopy of collective Thomson scattering. Results of the laser and plasma characterization, and initial results of backscattered SRS, SBS, and beam steering in a flowing plasma are presented.

  13. Working group report on beam plasmas, electronic propulsion, and active experiments using beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, J. M.; Eastman, T.; Gabriel, S.; Hawkins, J.; Matossian, J.; Raitt, J.; Reeves, G.; Sasaki, S.; Szuszczewicz, E.; Winkler, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The JPL Workshop addressed a number of plasma issues that bear on advanced spaceborne technology for the years 2000 and beyond. Primary interest was on the permanently manned space station with a focus on identifying environmentally related issues requiring early clarification by spaceborne plasma experimentation. The Beams Working Group focused on environmentally related threats that platform operations could have on the conduct and integrity of spaceborne beam experiments and vice versa. Considerations were to include particle beams and plumes. For purposes of definition it was agreed that the term particle beams described a directed flow of charged or neutral particles allowing single-particle trajectories to represent the characteristics of the beam and its propagation. On the other hand, the word plume was adopted to describe a multidimensional flow (or expansion) of a plasma or neutral gas cloud. Within the framework of these definitions, experiment categories included: (1) Neutral- and charged-particle beam propagation, with considerations extending to high powers and currents. (2) Evolution and dynamics of naturally occurring and man-made plasma and neutral gas clouds. In both categories, scientific interest focused on interactions with the ambient geoplasma and the evolution of particle densities, energy distribution functions, waves, and fields.

  14. Organization by Gordon Research Conferences of the 2012 Plasma Processing Science Conference 22-27 July 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jane

    2012-07-27

    The 2012 Gordon Research Conference on Plasma Processing Science will feature a comprehensive program that will highlight the most cutting edge scientific advances in plasma science and technology as well as explore the applications of this nonequilibrium medium in possible approaches relative to many grand societal challenges. Fundamental science sessions will focus on plasma kinetics and chemistry, plasma surface interactions, and recent trends in plasma generation and multi-phase plasmas. Application sessions will explore the impact of plasma technology in renewable energy, the production of fuels from renewable feedstocks and carbon dioxide neutral solar fuels (from carbon dioxide and water), and plasma-enabled medicine and sterilization.

  15. Academics' Perceptions of the Purpose of Undergraduate Research Experiences in a Research-Intensive Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Anna; Howitt, Susan; Wilson, Kate; Roberts, Pam

    2012-01-01

    The inclusion of research experiences as core components of undergraduate curricula implies that students will be exposed to and situated within the research activities of their university. Such experiences thus provide a new prism through which to view the relations between teaching, research and learning. The intentions and actions of academics…

  16. Student Experience of Final-Year Undergraduate Research Projects: An Exploration of "Research Preparedness"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Kylie; Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid

    2013-01-01

    During this past decade the level of interest in building research capacity has intensified in Australia and internationally, with a particular emphasis on the development of postgraduate research students, but also extending to undergraduate research experience. This study investigated the student experience across a diverse range of fourth-year…

  17. A Community Mentoring Model for STEM Undergraduate Research Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Dale, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a community mentoring model for UREs that avoids some of the common pitfalls of the traditional paradigm while harnessing the power of learning communities to provide young scholars a stimulating collaborative STEM research experience.

  18. Technology transfer needs and experiences: The NASA Research Center perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on technology transfer needs and experiences - the NASA Research Center perspective are provided. Topics covered include: functions of NASA, incentives and benefits, technology transfer mechanisms, economics of technology commercialization, examples, and conclusions.

  19. Analysis of Low-Z EUV Spectra from ``Sparky'' Laboratory Plasma Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Penka; Safronova, Alla; Kantsyrev, Victor

    2012-02-01

    This study provides an analysis of recent experimental EUV and soft X-ray laser plasma spectra from the compact laser facility ``Sparky'', generated under various plasma conditions. The developed non-LTE kinetic models of low-atomic number elements, such as C, O, F, etc., based on the Flexible Atomic Code data, are utilized . By matching the features of experimental spectra to the predictions of our atomic and plasma models, whose parameters are studied and precisely specified, the conditions of source plasmas can be inferred. The emitted EUV radiation we examine generally falls in the 90 å to 260 å wavelength range. In addition, the most intense lines from He-like ions of C and O in the soft X-ray region (20 å - 40 å) are observed. The most diagnostically significant temperature and density sensitive spectral lines are identified and proposed to use in plasma diagnostics for various applications including fusion research. This work is supported by DOE under grant DE-FG02-08ER54951.

  20. Fusion Reactor and Break-Even Experiment Based on Stabilized Liner Compression of Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchi, Peter; Frese, Sherry; Frese, Michael

    2016-10-01

    An optimum regime, known as magnetized-target or magneto-inertial fusion (MTF/MIF), requires magnetic fields at megagauss levels, which are attainable by use of dynamic conductors called liners. The stabilized liner compressor (SLC) provides the basis for controlled implosion and re-capture of the liner for reversible energy exchange between liner kinetic energy and the internal energy of a magnetized-plasma target. This exchange requires rotational stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor modes on the inner surface of the liner and pneumatically driven free-pistons that eliminate such modes at the outer surface. We discuss the implications of the SLC approach for the power reactor, a breakeven experiment, and intermediate experiments to develop the plasma target. Features include the importance of pneumatic drive and the liner-blanket for economic feasibility of MTF/MIF. Supported by ARPA-E ALPHA Program.

  1. SBS in Long-Scale-Length Plasmas for Direct-Drive ICF: Comparing Experiments with Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seka, W.; Myatt, J.; Maximov, A. V.; Short, R. W.; Craxton, R. S.; Regan, S. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.

    2002-11-01

    Single- and multiple-beam SBS experiments will be compared to detailed simulations for plasmas representing direct-drive NIF conditions. The SBS spectra exhibit red- and blue-shifted features. The blue-shifted component is clearly identified with SBS in a flat velocity gradient that rapidly moves to higher expansion velocities. This feature can be reduced or suppressed by beam-smoothing techniques in both the experiments and simulations. The red-shifted spectrum originates near the critical density; it arises from EM seeding and is not reduced by beam smoothing. The agreement between experimental data and simulations now allows for more-confident extrapolation to other plasma conditions. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  2. The electric field structure of auroral arcs as determined from barium plasma injection experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    Barium plasma injection experiments have revealed a number of features of electric fields in and near auroral forms extending from a few hundred to many thousands of km in altitude. There is evidence for V-type potential structures over some auroras, but not in others. For some auroral arcs, large E fields are found at ionospheric altitudes outside the arc but the E field inside the arc is near zero. In a few other auroras, most recently one investigated in an experiment conducted from Poker Flat on March 22, 1980, large, rapidly fluctuating E fields were detected by barium plasma near 600 km altitude. These E fields suggest that the motion of auroral rays can be an effect of low-altitude electric fields, or that V-type potential structures may be found at low altitudes.

  3. Experiment attributes to establish tube with twisted tape insert performance cooling plasma facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Emily; Ramirez, Emilio; Ruggles, Art E.; Griffard, Cory

    2015-08-18

    The modeling capability for tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with reference to the application of cooling plasma facing components in magnetic confinement fusion devices. The history of experiments examining the cooling performance of tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with emphasis on the manner of heating, flow stability limits and the details of the test section and fluid delivery system. Models for heat transfer, burnout, and onset of net vapor generation in straight tube flows and tube with twisted tape are compared. As a result, the gaps in knowledge required to establish performance limits of the plasma facing components are identified and attributes of an experiment to close those gaps are presented.

  4. A design of experiment study of plasma sprayed alumina-titania coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Steeper, T.J.; Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Wilson, G.C.; Riggs, W.L. II; Rotolico, A.J.; Nerz, J.E.

    1992-08-01

    An experimental study of the plasma spraying of alumina-titania powder is presented in this paper. This powder system is being used to fabricate heater tubes that emulate nuclear fuel tubes for use in thermal-hydraulic testing. Coating experiments were conducted using a Taguchi fractional-factorial design parametric study. Operating parameters were varied around the typical spray parameters in a systematic design of experiments in order to display the range of plasma processing conditions and their effect on the resultant coating. The coatings were characterized by hardness and electrical tests, image analysis, and optical metallography. Coating qualities are discussed with respect to dielectric strength, hardness, porosity, surface roughness, deposition efficiency, and microstructure. The attributes of the coatings are correlated with the changes in operating parameters.

  5. Optical pyrometer system for collisionless shock experiments in high-power laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, T.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Sano, T.; Takabe, H.; Dono, S.; Ide, T.; Tanji, H.; Shiroshita, A.; Shibata, S.; Aoki, H.; Waugh, J. N.; Woolsey, N. C.; Gregory, C. D.

    2012-10-15

    A temporally and spatially resolved optical pyrometer system has been fielded on Gekko XII experiments. The system is based on the self-emission measurements with a gated optical imager (GOI) and a streaked optical pyrometer (SOP). Both detectors measure the intensity of the self-emission from laser-produced plasmas at the wavelength of 450 nm with a bandpass filter with a width of {approx}10 nm in FWHM. The measurements were calibrated with different methods, and both results agreed with each other within 30% as previously reported [T. Morita et al., Astrophys. Space Sci. 336, 283 (2011)]. As a tool for measuring the properties of low-density plasmas, the system is applicable for the measurements of the electron temperature and density in collisionless shock experiments [Y. Kuramitsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 175002 (2011)].

  6. Exploring perceptions and experiences of Bolivian health researchers with research ethics.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Sarah; Aalborg, Annette; Basagoitia, Armando; Cortes, Jacqueline; Lanza, Oscar; Schwind, Jessica S

    2015-04-01

    In Bolivia, there is increasing interest in incorporating research ethics into study procedures, but there have been inconsistent application of research ethics practices. Minimal data exist regarding the experiences of researchers concerning the ethical conduct of research. A cross-sectional study was administered to Bolivian health leaders with research experience (n = 82) to document their knowledge, perceptions, and experiences of research ethics committees and infrastructure support for research ethics. Results showed that 16% of respondents reported not using ethical guidelines to conduct their research and 66% indicated their institutions did not consistently require ethics approval for research. Barriers and facilitators to incorporate research ethics into practice were outlined. These findings will help inform a comprehensive rights-based research ethics education program in Bolivia.

  7. Research of the Remote Experiment System Based on Virtual Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Liangyu; Liu, Jianjun; Yang, Xiufang

    The remote education based on Virtual Reality technology is one of the leading developmental ways in modern education. The present researching status of VR technology's application in the remote experiment is analyzed and the characteristics are summarized in this paper. Then the remote experiment system is designed and the learning mode of the 3-D virtual experiment, the virtual experiment model based on Internet, the functional modules of virtual experiment system are studied. The network-based system of remote virtual experiment is built with the programming languages VRML and JavaScript. Furthermore, the remote experiment system on fatigue test of the drive axle is developed and some key problems in the remote virtual experiment are realized.

  8. Feasibility Study for a Plasma Dynamo Facility to Investigate Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, Cary B.

    2013-09-19

    The scientific equipment purchased on this grant was used on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment as part of Professor Forest's feasibility study for determining if it would be worthwhile to propose building a larger plasma physics experiment to investigate various fundamental processes in plasma astrophysics. The initial research on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment was successful so Professor Forest and Professor Ellen Zweibel at UW-Madison submitted an NSF Major Research Instrumentation proposal titled "ARRA MRI: Development of a Plasma Dynamo Facility for Experimental Investigations of Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics." They received funding for this project and the Plasma Dynamo Facility also known as the "Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment" was constructed. This experiment achieved its first plasma in the fall of 2012 and U.S. Dept. of Energy Grant No. DE-SC0008709 "Experimental Studies of Plasma Dynamos," now supports the research.

  9. In situ measurements of ionospheric plasma turbulence over five frequency decades: Heritage flight of the Plasma Local Anomalous Noise Experiment (PLANE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habash Krause, L.; Enloe, C. L.; McHarg, M. G.

    2013-12-01

    Observations of ionospheric plasma density and frequency-dependent broadband plasma turbulence made during the heritage flight of the Plasma Local Anomalous Noise Experiment (PLANE) are presented. Rather than record high frequency time series data, the experiment was designed to record Power Spectral Distributions (PSDs) in five decadal frequency bins with upper limits ranging from 1.0 Hz to 10 kHz. Additionally, PLANE was designed distinguish turbulence in the ambient plasma from that local to the spacecraft. The instrument consists of two retarding potential analyzers (RPAs) connected together via a feedback loop to force one analyzer into the I-V trace retardation region at all times. Fluctuations in this measurement are believed to be ambient only as the RPA's voltage would be too high for locally turbulent plasma to surmount the potential barrier, which is nominally at ram energy. The instrument requires pointing along the spacecraft's ram velocity vector to make this measurement, thus requiring stabilization in pitch and yaw. During PLANE's heritage flight, though the satellite's attitude control system failed early in the mission, plasma data were collected during opportune times in which the instrument rotated into and out of the ram. Observations of plasma density and PSDs of high frequency plasma turbulence were recorded on several occasions. Additionally, a plasma source onboard the satellite was used to generate artificial plasma turbulence, and the PLANE data observed periodic structure presumably associated with the rotation of the spacecraft during these source firings. A brief comparison with other high frequency in situ plasma instruments is presented.

  10. The Importance of Early Experiences: Clinical, Research, and Policy Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeanah, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    The degree to which early adverse experiences exert long term effects on development and how much early adversity may be overcome through subsequent experiences are important mental health questions. The clinical, research and policy perspectives on these questions lead to different answers. From a clinical perspective, change is always possible,…

  11. Daily Experience Research: Methods and Applications in Therapeutic Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voelkl, Judith E.; Baldwin, Cheryl K.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the major approaches used by social scientists to measure daily experiences, including interval-contingent, signal- contingent, and event-contingent methods. Examples of how these methods have been used in therapeutic recreation and leisure research are provided. The unique challenges and issues of measuring the daily experiences of…

  12. When Women Are Equal: The Canada Research Chair Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Karen R.; Drakich, Janice

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the gendered nature of elite academic careers. Of interest is how similar or different the experiences are of women and men who have been appointed to Canada Research Chairs (CRCs). In particular, we examine the impacts of holding a CRC position and consider the factors that shape that experience for women and men. Based on…

  13. How to Conduct Clinical Qualitative Research on the Patient's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenail, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    From a perspective of patient-centered healthcare, exploring patients' (a) preconceptions, (b) treatment experiences, (c) quality of life, (d) satisfaction, (e) illness understandings, and (f) design are all critical components in improving primary health care and research. Utilizing qualitative approaches to discover patients' experiences can…

  14. The AWAKE Proton-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muggli, Patric

    2012-10-01

    We are planning an experiment at CERN to accelerate externally injected electrons e^- on the wake driven by a long, self-modulated proton p^+ bunch. In the plan the 12cm-long bunch from the SPS with 10^11 p^+ experiences a two-stream transverse instability that modulates the bunch radius at the plasma wake period. The bunch is focused to 200μm into a plasma with density in the 10^14-10^15cm-3 range. The modulation instability is seeded by co-propagating with the p^+ bunch a short laser pulse that ionizes a gas or vapor. The modulation resonantly drives wakefields to large amplitude. The low energy e^- ( 5-20MeV) produced by a rf-photoinjector gun are injected after the instability has saturated, 3-5m into the plasma and is accelerated to the GeV energy range. The e^- energy spectrum is measured by a large energy acceptance magnetic spectrometer. Bunch modulation diagnostics such as time resolved OTR and electro-optic measurements are also included. The general plans for the experiment as well as the latest developments will be presented.

  15. Search for the quark-gluon plasma (1989): The NA35 experiment at the CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, H.G.

    1989-09-01

    Results from the NA35 experiment at the CERN SPS are described in the context of possible formation and identification of a quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Evidence is presented that the initial energy density and temperature are sufficient for the QGP to be produced, and that hydrodynamic flow occurs in the expansion stage. Evidence for an unexpectedly large pion source size and for enhanced strangeness production is presented, and discussed in terms of QGP formation. Plans for experiments in 1990--91 with an expanded set up are presented, and prospects for a program with Pb beams at the SPS are discussed. 39 refs., 12 figs.

  16. Plasma etching of cavities into diamond anvils for experiments at high pressures and high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, S.T.; Cynn, H.; Falabella, S.; Evans, W.J.; Aracne-Ruddle, C.; Farber, D.; Vohra, Y.K.

    2012-10-23

    We describe a method for precisely etching small cavities into the culets of diamond anvils for the purpose of providing thermal insulation for samples in experiments at high pressures and high temperatures. The cavities were fabricated using highly directional oxygen plasma to reactively etch into the diamond surface. The lateral extent of the etch was precisely controlled to micron accuracy by etching the diamond through a lithographically fabricated tungsten mask. The performance of the etched cavities in high-temperature experiments in which the samples were either laser heated or electrically heated is discussed.

  17. Simulations of Super Alfvenic Laser Ablation Experiments in the Large Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Stephen Eric

    Hybrid plasma simulations, consisting of kinetic ions treated using standard Particle- In-Cell (PIC) techniques and an inertialess charge-neutralizing electron fluid, have been used to investigate the properties of collisionless shocks for a number of years. They agree well with sparse data obtained by flying through Earth's bow shock and have been used to model high energy explosions in the ionosphere. In this doctoral dissertation hybrid plasma simulation is used on much smaller scales to model collisionless shocks in a controlled laboratory setting. Initially a two-dimensional hybrid code from Los Alamos National Laboratory was used to find the best experimental parameters for shock formation, and interpret experimental data. It was demonstrated using the hybrid code that the experimental parameters needed to generate a shock in the laboratory are relaxed compared to previous work that was done. It was also shown that stronger shocks can be generated when running into a density gradient. Laboratory experiments at the University of California at Los Angeles using the high energy kJ-class Nd:Glass 1053 nm Raptor laser, and later the low energy yet high repetition rate 25 J Nd:Glass 1053 nm Peening laser have been performed in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD), which have provided some much needed data to benchmark the hybrid simulation method. The LAPD provides a repeatable, quiescent, ambient magnetized plasma to surround the exploding laser produced plasma that is ablated from a High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) target. The plasma density peaks in the machine at ni O(1013 cm-3 ), which is sufficiently dense to strongly couple energy and momentum from a laser ablated carbon plasma ejected from the HDPE target into the magnetized ambient plasma. It has been demonstrated that a sub-critical shock is formed in the LAPD using the high energy Raptor laser, though the data from this experiment is scant. Hybrid simulation was used as an analysis tool for the shock

  18. Developing Authentic Research Experiences Using EarthScope Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall-Wallace, M. K.

    2003-12-01

    EarthScope, a decade-long experiment to understand the formation, structure, and evolution of the North American continent, will carry-out active investigations in nearly every county in the US. The excitement of a huge science experiment in one's own backyard piques interest, but teachers need resources and professional development experiences to capitalize upon this excitement and create opportunities for their students' learning. The EarthScope Education and Outreach Network will provide the interface to make EarthScope science, and the advanced technology and modern approaches used to understand Earth, relevant and beneficial to K-16 educators vested in advancing Earth science education. Three obstacles must be overcome for success in carrying out authentic EarthScope research in the classroom. First, scientists and teachers must work together to identify relevant and developmentally appropriate research questions for the target audience. Second, teachers will need professional development experiences that engage them in authentic research and that provide support for introducing a similar research experience in their own classroom. Third, the outcome of the research experience must have value to the scientist, teacher and student to motivate sustained participation by all. The dense array of seismometers being deployed in the USArray component of EarthScope will permit students and the public to see first-hand Earth's dynamic response to both human and natural events in their hometown and around the country. Targeted local experiments will make EarthScope's scientific investigations and discoveries relevant for educational efforts on a region-by-region basis. Combining the real-time seismic data streams from USArray with data and instrumentation from the growing US Educational Seismic Network (USESN) opens up endless possibilities for student-centered research. In this paper, I will discuss the lessons learned from eight years of leading a high school

  19. Embedding a Recovery Orientation into Neuroscience Research: Involving People with a Lived Experience in Research Activity.

    PubMed

    Stratford, Anthony; Brophy, Lisa; Castle, David; Harvey, Carol; Robertson, Joanne; Corlett, Philip; Davidson, Larry; Everall, Ian

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the importance and value of involving people with a lived experience of mental ill health and recovery in neuroscience research activity. In this era of recovery oriented service delivery, involving people with the lived experience of mental illness in neuroscience research extends beyond their participation as "subjects". The recovery paradigm reconceptualises people with the lived experience of mental ill health as experts by experience. To support this contribution, local policies and procedures, recovery-oriented training for neuroscience researchers, and dialogue about the practical applications of neuroscience research, are required.

  20. ELM simulation experiments using transient heat and particle load produced by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoda, K.; Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2011-10-01

    It is considered that thermal transient events such as type I edge-localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions will limit the lifetime of plasma-facing components (PFCs) in ITER. It is predicted that the heat load onto the PFCs during type I ELMs in ITER is 0.2-2MJ/m2 with pulse length of ~0.1-1ms. We have investigated interaction between transient heat and particle load and the PFCs by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) at University of Hyogo. In the experiment, a pulsed plasma with duration of ~0.5ms, incident ion energy of ~30eV, and surface absorbed energy density of ~0.3-0.7MJ/m2 was produced by the MCPG. However, no melting occurred on a tungsten surface exposed to a single plasma pulse of ~0.7MJ/m2, while cracks clearly appeared at the edge part of the W surface. Thus, we have recently started to improve the performance of the MCPG in order to investigate melt layer dynamics of a tungsten surface such as vapor cloud formation. In the modified MCPG, the capacitor bank energy for the plasma discharge is increased from 24.5 kJ to 144 kJ. In the preliminary experiments, the plasmoid with duration of ~0.6 ms, incident ion energy of ~ 40 eV, and the surface absorbed energy density of ~2 MJ/m2 was successfully produced at the gun voltage of 6 kV.

  1. Soft x-ray studies of plasma-focus pinch structures in PF-1000U experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadowski, M. J.; Paduch, M.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Surala, W.; Zaloga, D.; Miklaszewski, R.; Zielinska, E.; Tomaszewski, K.

    2015-10-01

    This work reports on recent experiments performed at the modernized PF-1000U plasma-focus facility. In contrast to earlier studies the main attention was focussed on measurements of the soft x-ray emission. Detailed time-integrated x-ray measurements, carried out using filtered pinhole cameras with sensitive x-ray films, are presented and analysed. The fine structure of the collapsing current sheath and dense pinch column is investigated. Observations of ‘plasma filaments’ are discussed and compared with those from the old POSEIDON facility. New results are time-integrated x-ray images of PF-1000U discharges with additional gas puffing, which in many cases show distinct plasma filaments and/or ‘hot spots’ formed inside the dense pinch column. The formation of such ‘hot-spots’ is explained by necking and breaking of the plasma filaments. Results of time-resolved x-ray measurements, performed outside the experimental chamber by means of scintillation probes, and inside with PIN-diodes placed behind pinholes and absorption filters, are also presented Time-resolved measurements, carried out using an old XUV framing-camera and a new soft x-ray four-frame camera (SXRFFC), are also presented and discussed. Correlations of the time-integrated x-ray images (of plasma filaments and hot spots) with time-resolved x-ray signals are discussed. The hypothesis that plasma-current filaments appear in almost all PF-type discharges is supported by pictures of radial erosion tracks on the anode front-plate after many discharges.

  2. Researchers' Experiences, Positive and Negative, in Integrative Landscape Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tress, Bärbel; Tress, Gunther; Fry, Gary

    2005-12-01

    Integrative (interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary) landscape research projects are becoming increasingly common. As a result, researchers are spending a larger proportion of their professional careers doing integrative work, participating in shifting interdisciplinary teams, and cooperating directly with non-academic participants. Despite the growing importance of integrative research, few studies have investigated researchers’ experiences in these projects. How do researchers perceive the outcomes of integrative projects, or career effects? Do they view the projects generally as successes or failures? This study analyses researchers’ experiences in integrative landscape studies and investigates what factors shape these experiences. The data stems from 19 semi-structured qualitative interviews and a Web-based survey among 207 participants in integrative landscape research projects. It finds that researchers experience participation in integrative projects as positive, in particular discussions among participants, networking, teamwork, and gaining new insights and skills. Furthermore, most researchers perceive the projects as successful and as having a positive effect on their careers. Less positive aspects of integration relate to publications and merit points. Factors found to contribute to positive experiences include reaching a high degree of integration amongst the involved disciplines, common definitions of integrative research concepts, and projects that include a large share of fundamental research as well as projects with many project outcomes. Based on these findings, we advise future projects to plan for integration, facilitate discussions, and reach agreement on integrative concepts. We suggest that aspects of fundamental research be included in integrative projects. We also suggest that planning be done at an early stage for peer-reviewed publications, to ensure that participants gain merit points from their participation in integrative research

  3. Artificial plasma cusp generated by upper hybrid instabilities in HF heating experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Spencer; Snyder, Arnold

    2013-05-01

    High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program digisonde was operated in a fast mode to record ionospheric modifications by the HF heating wave. With the O mode heater of 3.2 MHz turned on for 2 min, significant virtual height spread was observed in the heater off ionograms, acquired beginning the moment the heater turned off. Moreover, there is a noticeable bump in the virtual height spread of the ionogram trace that appears next to the plasma frequency (~ 2.88 MHz) of the upper hybrid resonance layer of the HF heating wave. The enhanced spread and the bump disappear in the subsequent heater off ionograms recorded 1 min later. The height distribution of the ionosphere in the spread situation indicates that both electron density and temperature increases exceed 10% over a large altitude region (> 30 km) from below to above the upper hybrid resonance layer. This "mini cusp" (bump) is similar to the cusp occurring in daytime ionograms at the F1-F2 layer transition, indicating that there is a small ledge in the density profile reminiscent of F1-F2 layer transitions. Two parametric processes exciting upper hybrid waves as the sidebands by the HF heating waves are studied. Field-aligned purely growing mode and lower hybrid wave are the respective decay modes. The excited upper hybrid and lower hybrid waves introduce the anomalous electron heating which results in the ionization enhancement and localized density ledge. The large-scale density irregularities formed in the heat flow, together with the density irregularities formed through the parametric instability, give rise to the enhanced virtual height spread. The results of upper hybrid instability analysis are also applied to explain the descending feature in the development of the artificial ionization layers observed in electron cyclotron harmonic resonance heating experiments.

  4. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjei, Daniel; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Pina, Ladislav; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray "water window" spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280-540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 103 photons/μm2/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms' sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the "water window", where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET - Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  5. Rutgers University Research Experience for Teachers in Engineering: Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laffey, Evelyn H.; Cook-Chennault, Kimberly; Hirsch, Linda S.

    2013-01-01

    In addressing the nation's need for a more technologically-literate society, the Rutgers University Research Experience for Teachers in Engineering (RU RET-E) is designed to: (1) engage middle and high school math and science teachers in innovative "green" engineering research during the summer, and (2) support teachers in integrating…

  6. A Model for an Introductory Undergraduate Research Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canaria, Jeffrey A.; Schoffstall, Allen M.; Weiss, David J.; Henry, Renee M.; Braun-Sand, Sonja B.

    2012-01-01

    An introductory, multidisciplinary lecture-laboratory course linked with a summer research experience has been established to provide undergraduate biology and chemistry majors with the skills needed to be successful in the research laboratory. This three-credit hour course was focused on laboratory skills and was designed to reinforce and develop…

  7. Using Phenomenology to Conduct Environmental Education Research: Experience and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazir, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Recently, I applied a phenomenological methodology to study environmental education at an outdoor education center. In this article, I reflect on my experience of doing phenomenological research to highlight issues researchers may want to consider in using this type of methodology. The main premise of the article is that phenomenology, with its…

  8. Development of a Structured Undergraduate Research Experience: Framework and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Anne M.; Lewis, Stephanie N.; Bevan, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Participating in undergraduate research can be a pivotal experience for students in life science disciplines. Development of critical thinking skills, in addition to conveying scientific ideas in oral and written formats, is essential to ensuring that students develop a greater understanding of basic scientific knowledge and the research process.…

  9. Evidence in Support of Removing Boundaries to Undergraduate Research Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haave, Neil; Audet, Doris

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate research is one of several high impact educational practices used by educational institutions to increase student engagement and success (Kuh, 2008). Many studies on the impact of undergraduate research have surveyed students or faculty on their personal experience and its influence on students' subsequent degrees and employment…

  10. Faculty's Degrees, Experience and Research Vary with Specialty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedler, Fred; Counts, Tim; Carey, Arlen; Santana, Maria Cristina

    1998-01-01

    Examines issues of professional experience, degrees, research, and productivity for journalism and mass communication faculty members, separating and comparing different specialties. Finds that requirements regarding academic degrees and research vary from specialty to specialty and that 53% of those teaching in advertising, radio/television, and…

  11. Diversifying Science: Underrepresented Student Experiences in Structured Research Programs

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Nolan L.; Lin, Monica H.; Arellano, Lucy; Espinosa, Lorelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Targeting four institutions with structured science research programs for undergraduates, this study focuses on how underrepresented students experience science. Several key themes emerged from focus group discussions: learning to become research scientists, experiences with the culture of science, and views on racial and social stigma. Participants spoke of essential factors for becoming a scientist, but their experiences also raised complex issues about the role of race and social stigma in scientific training. Students experienced the collaborative and empowering culture of science, exhibited strong science identities and high self-efficacy, while developing directed career goals as a result of “doing science” in these programs. PMID:23503690

  12. NASA Glenn Research Center Experience with LENR Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1989 NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has performed some small-scale limited experiments that show evidence of effects claimed by some to be evidence of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR). The research at GRC has involved observations and work on measurement techniques for observing the temperature effects in reactions of isotopes of hydrogen with palladium hydrides. The various experiments performed involved loading Pd with gaseous H2 and D2, and exposing Pd thin films to multi-bubble sonoluminescence in regular and deuterated water. An overview of these experiments and their results will be presented.

  13. NASA Glenn Research Center Experience with "LENR Phenomenon"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1989 NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has performed some small-scale limited experiments that show evidence of effects claimed by some to be evidence of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR). The research at GRC has involved observations and work on measurement techniques for observing the temperature effects in reactions of isotopes of hydrogen with palladium hydrides. The various experiments performed involved loading Pd with gaseous H2 and D2, and exposing Pd thin films to multi-bubble sonoluminescence in regular and deuterated water. An overview of these experiments and their results will be presented.

  14. Application of imaging plate to x-ray imaging and spectroscopy in laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N; Snavely, R; Gregori, G; Koch, J A; Park, H; Remington, B A

    2006-04-25

    We report recent progress of x-ray diagnostic techniques in laser plasma experiment with using imaging plates. Imaging plate is a photo-stimulable phosphor screen (BaF(Br0.85,10.15):Eu{sup 2+}) deposited on flexible metal or plastic substrate. We applied the imaging plate to x-ray microscopy in laser fusion experiment experiments. Self-emission x-ray images of imploded core were obtained successfully with using imaging plate and high magnification target mounted pinhole arrays. The imaging plates were applied also in ultra-intense laser experiment at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. Small samarium foil was irradiated by high intensity laser pulse from the Vulcan laser system. The k shell x-rays from the foil ({approx}40keV) was used as a line x-ray source for microscopic radiography. Performance of imaging plate on high-energy x-ray backlit radiography was demonstrated by imaging sinusoidal grooves of 6um amplitude on a Au foil. Detailed spectrum of k shell x-ray from Cu embedded foil target was successfully observed by fully coupling imaging plate with a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite crystal spectrometer. The performances of the imaging plates evaluated in actual laser plasma experiments will be presented.

  15. High energy density laboratory astrophysics experiments with supersonic magnetized plasmas on the MAGPIE pulsed-power facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S. V.; Burdiak, G. C.; Chittenden, J. P.; Clayson, T.; Garcia, C.; Hare, J. D.; Suttle, L. G.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Frank, A.; Ciardi, A.; Loureiro, N. F.

    2016-10-01

    The use of plasma flows generated by pulsed-power facilities provides a natural platform for designing magnetized HEDLA experiments. The plasma in this case is created and accelerated by the JxB force of the driving, Mega-Ampere level currents, forming plasma flows with embedded, frozen-in magnetic fields. Here we present several recent experiments performed on the MAGPIE pulsed-power facility focusing on studies of the structure of magnetized bow shocks, the dynamics of counter-streaming plasma jets, the formation of shocks in inverse liners, and magnetic reconnection in colliding plasmas. The relatively large spatial and temporal scales characterizing these experimental platforms, together with excellent diagnostic access, allow detailed characterization of the key plasma parameters and quantitative comparison of the experimental results with numerical simulations. Work supported by DOE cooperative Agreements No. DE-F03-02NA00057 and No. DE-SC-0001063.

  16. Computational modeling of magentically driven liner-on-plasma fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehey, P.T.; Faehl, R.J.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.

    1996-12-31

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) is an approach to controlled fusion which potentially avoids the difficulties of the traditional magnetic and inertial confinement approaches. It appears possible to investigate the critical issues for MTF at low cost, relative to traditional fusion programs, utilizing pulsed power drivers much less expensive than ICF drivers, and plasma configurations much less expensive than those needed for full magnetic confinement. Computational and experimental research into MTF is proceeding at Los Alamos, VNIIEF, and other laboratories.

  17. Undergraduate research experiences support science career decisions and active learning.

    PubMed

    Lopatto, David

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the reliability of student evaluations of summer undergraduate research experiences using the SURE (Survey of Undergraduate Research Experiences) and a follow-up survey disseminated 9 mo later. The survey further examines the hypothesis that undergraduate research enhances the educational experience of science undergraduates, attracts and retains talented students to careers in science, and acts as a pathway for minority students into science careers. Undergraduates participated in an online survey on the benefits of undergraduate research experiences. Participants indicated gains on 20 potential benefits and reported on career plans. Most of the participants began or continued to plan for postgraduate education in the sciences. A small group of students who discontinued their plans for postgraduate science education reported significantly lower gains than continuing students. Women and men reported similar levels of benefits and similar patterns of career plans. Undergraduate researchers from underrepresented groups reported higher learning gains than comparison students. The results replicated previously reported data from this survey. The follow-up survey indicated that students reported gains in independence, intrinsic motivation to learn, and active participation in courses taken after the summer undergraduate research experience.

  18. Undergraduate Research Experiences Support Science Career Decisions and Active Learning

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the reliability of student evaluations of summer undergraduate research experiences using the SURE (Survey of Undergraduate Research Experiences) and a follow-up survey disseminated 9 mo later. The survey further examines the hypothesis that undergraduate research enhances the educational experience of science undergraduates, attracts and retains talented students to careers in science, and acts as a pathway for minority students into science careers. Undergraduates participated in an online survey on the benefits of undergraduate research experiences. Participants indicated gains on 20 potential benefits and reported on career plans. Most of the participants began or continued to plan for postgraduate education in the sciences. A small group of students who discontinued their plans for postgraduate science education reported significantly lower gains than continuing students. Women and men reported similar levels of benefits and similar patterns of career plans. Undergraduate researchers from underrepresented groups reported higher learning gains than comparison students. The results replicated previously reported data from this survey. The follow-up survey indicated that students reported gains in independence, intrinsic motivation to learn, and active participation in courses taken after the summer undergraduate research experience. PMID:18056301

  19. Self-consistent description of the core and boundary plasma in the high-field ignition experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, R.; Zagórski, R.

    2000-03-01

    A model has been developed which is capable to describe in a self-consistent way plasma dynamics in the center and edge region of fusion reactor. The core plasma is treated in the frame of 1D radial transport model whereas a 1D analytical model along magnetic field lines for plasma and impurity transport outside the last closed magnetic surface (LCMS) is applied. The model has been used to investigate operation regimes of the high-field IGNITOR experiment.

  20. Designing Undergraduate Research Experiences: A Multiplicity of Options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manduca, C. A.

    2001-12-01

    Research experiences for undergraduate students can serve many goals including: developing student understanding of the process of science; providing opportunities for students to develop professional skills or test career plans; completing publishable research; enabling faculty professional development; or enhancing the visibility of a science program. The large range of choices made in the design of an undergraduate research program or opportunity must reflect the goals of the program, the needs and abilities of the students and faculty, and the available resources including both time and money. Effective program design, execution, and evaluation can all be enhanced if the goals of the program are clearly articulated. Student research experiences can be divided into four components: 1) defining the research problem; 2) developing the research plan or experiment design; 3) collecting and interpreting data, and 4) communicating results. In each of these components, the program can be structured in a wide variety of ways and students can be given more or less guidance or freedom. While a feeling of ownership of the research project appears to be very important, examples of successful projects displaying a wide range of design decisions are available. Work with the Keck Geology Consortium suggests that four strategies can enhance the likelihood of successful student experiences: 1) students are well-prepared for research experience (project design must match student preparation); 2) timelines and events are structured to move students through intermediate goals to project completion; 3) support for the emotional, financial, academic and technical challenges of a research project is in place; 4) strong communications between students and faculty set clear expectations and enable mid-course corrections in the program or project design. Creating a research culture for the participants or embedding a project in an existing research culture can also assist students in