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Sample records for plasma source mass

  1. Conditioning of ion sources for mass spectrometry of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Blanchard, W.R.

    1983-02-01

    Mass spectrometry is a useful diagnostic technique for monitoring plasma species and plasma-surface interactions. In order to maximize the sensitivity of measurements of hydrogen-fueled fusion plasmas or hydrogen-based discharge cleaning and etching plasmas, the ion sources of mass spectrometers are operated at or near the high pressure limit of 10/sup -4/ Torr (10/sup -2/ Pa). Such high ambient pressures of hydrogen give rise to high background levels of residual gases such as H/sub 2/O, CO, and CH/sub 4/, due to surface reactions on the ion source electrodes. For a commonly used ion source configuration, the residual gas production is a linear function of the ambient H/sub 2/ pressure. Hydrogen conditioning can reduce the absolute residual gas levels. Steady-state residual gas production is observed in a conditioned ion source, which is related to a balance of diffusion and sorption on the electrode surfaces.

  2. Plasma Ion Sources for Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian-Guo

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure ionization (API) sources using direct-current (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) plasma have been developed in this thesis work. These ion sources can provide stable discharge currents of ~ 1 mA, 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than that of the corona discharge, a widely used API source. The plasmas can be generated and maintained in 1 atm of various buffer gases by applying -500 to -1000 V (DC plasma) or 1-15 W with a frequency of 165 kHz (RF plasma) on the needle electrode. These ion sources have been used with liquid injection to detect various organic compounds of pharmaceutical, biotechnological and environmental interest. Key features of these ion sources include soft ionization with the protonated molecule as the largest peak, and superb sensitivity with detection limits in the low picogram or femtomole range and a linear dynamic range over ~4 orders of magnitude. The RF plasma has advantages over the DC plasma in its ability to operate in various buffer gases and to produce a more stable plasma. Factors influencing the performance of the ion sources have been studied, including RF power level, liquid flow rate, chamber temperature, solvent composition, and voltage affecting the collision induced dissociation (CID). Ionization of hydrocarbons by the RF plasma API source was also studied. Soft ionization is generally produced. To obtain high sensitivity, the ion source must be very dry and the needle-to-orifice distance must be small. Nitric oxide was used to enhance the sensitivity. The RF plasma source was then used for the analysis of hydrocarbons in auto emissions. Comparisons between the corona discharge and the RF plasma have been made in terms of discharge current, ion residence time, and the ion source model. The RF plasma source provides larger linear dynamic range and higher sensitivity than the corona discharge, due to its much larger discharge current. The RF plasma was also observed to provide longer ion residence times and was not

  3. Comparison of Three Plasma Sources for Ambient Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Kirsty; Salter, Tara L.; Bowfield, Andrew; Walsh, James L.; Gilmore, Ian S.; Bradley, James W.

    2014-09-01

    Plasma-based desorption/ionization sources are an important ionization technique for ambient surface analysis mass spectrometry. In this paper, we compare and contrast three competing plasma based desorption/ionization sources: a radio-frequency (rf) plasma needle, a dielectric barrier plasma jet, and a low-temperature plasma probe. The ambient composition of the three sources and their effectiveness at analyzing a range of pharmaceuticals and polymers were assessed. Results show that the background mass spectrum of each source was dominated by air species, with the rf needle producing a richer ion spectrum consisting mainly of ionized water clusters. It was also seen that each source produced different ion fragments of the analytes under investigation: this is thought to be due to different substrate heating, different ion transport mechanisms, and different electric field orientations. The rf needle was found to fragment the analytes least and as a result it was able to detect larger polymer ions than the other sources.

  4. Osmium isotopic ratio measurements by inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, G.P. III; Bazan, J.M.; Date, A.R.

    1987-04-01

    The isotopic composition of nanogram quantities of osmium was measured by using an inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometer. Sensitivity was enhanced a factor of approx.100 by the use of an osmium tetraoxide vapor generator rather than nebulization of solution. For samples less than or equal to5 ng, the ratios /sup 190/Os//sup 192/Os, /sup 189/Os//sup 192/Os, and /sup 188/Os//sup 192/Os were determined to better than +/- 0.5% (1sigma/sub m/) precision. For the minor isotopes, the ratios /sup 187/Os//sup 192/Os and /sup 186/Os//sup 192/Os were determined to +/-1%, and /sup 184/Os//sup 192/Os (4 x 10/sup -4/) was determined to approx.10%. Isotope ratios for common osmium are reported.

  5. Plasma ionization source for atmospheric pressure mass spectrometry imaging using near-field optical laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Nudnova, Maryia M; Sigg, Jérôme; Wallimann, Pascal; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-01-20

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) at ambient pressures with submicrometer resolution is challenging, due to the very low amount of material available for mass spectrometric analysis. In this work, we present the development and characterization of a method for MSI based on pulsed laser ablation via a scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) aperture tip. SNOM allows laser ablation of material from surfaces with submicrometer spatial resolution, which can be ionized for further chemical analysis with MS. Efficient ionization is realized here with a custom-built capillary plasma ionization source. We show the applicability of this setup for mass spectrometric analysis of three common MALDI matrices, α-4-hydroxycyanocinnamic acid, 3-aminobenzoic acid, and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid. Although the ultimate goal has been to optimize sensitivity for detecting material ablated from submicrometer diameter craters, the effective lateral resolution is currently limited by the sensitivity of the MS detection system. In our case, the sensitivity of the MS was about 1 fmol, which allowed us to achieve a spatial resolution of 2 μm. We also characterize the analytical figures of merit of our method. In particular, we demonstrate good reproducibility, a repetition rate in the range of only a few seconds, and we determined the amount of substance required to achieve optimal resolution and sensitivity. Moreover, the sample topography is available from SNOM scans, a parameter that is missing in common MSI methods.

  6. Recent developments in inductively coupled plasma source magnetic sector multiple collector mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, A. N.; Lee, Der-Chuen; Christensen, J. C.; Jones, C. E.; Hall, C. M.; Yi, Wen; Teagle, D.; Walder, A. J.

    This paper describes advances in isotopic measurements that have been made with an inductively coupled plasma source magnetic sector multiple collector mass spectrometer and presents results of new experiments aimed at further evaluating the instrument's capability. It is shown using standard solutions that trace element ratios such as Rb/Sr can be measured precisely without isotope dilution by comparison with reference solutions of known composition. Similarly, using a new wide flight tube, Pb isotopic compositions and U/Pb ratios can be accurately measured simultaneously without isotope dilution. The effects of deliberately inducing changes in the running conditions (RF power) are shown to be significant for measuring trace element ratios but not for mass bias and interference corrected isotopic compositions. Finally, it is demonstrated that precise and accurate isotopic compositions of elements as refractory as W can be determined relatively easily by solution nebulization and even by direct laser ablation of complex silicates. Isobaric interferences in such experiments are negligible. These experiments serve to highlight the remarkable potential that this new field offers for hitherto difficult isotopic measurements in nuclear, earth, environmental and medical sciences. Isotopic measurements can be made that are reproducible at high precision through a range of running conditions, even in the presence of isobaric interferences. The ability to correct for mass discrimination accurately using a second element of similar mass, the very high sensitivity for elements that are otherwise difficult to ionize, the demonstrated capability for laser ablation work and the ability to measure through a wide mass range simultaneously give this instrument major advantages over other more traditional techniques of isotopic measurement.

  7. Recent developments in inductively coupled plasma source magnetic sector multiple collector mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Halliday, A.N.; Lee, Der-Chuen; Christensen, J.C.; Jones, C.E.; Hall, C.M.; Yi, Wen; Teagle, D.; Walder, A.J.; Freedman, P.A.

    1994-11-01

    This paper describes advances in isotopic measurements that have been made with an inductively coupled plasma source magnetic sector multiple collector mass spectrometer and presents results of new experiments aimed at further evaluating the instrument`s capability. It is shown using standard solutions that trace element ratios such as Rb/Sr can be measured precisely without isotope dilution by comparison with reference solutions of known composition. Similarly, using a new wide flight tube, Pb isotopic compositions and U/Pb ratios can be accurately measured simultaneously without isotope dilution. The effects of deliberately inducing changes in the running conditions (RF power) are shown to be significant for measuring trace element ratios but not for mass bias and interference corrected isotopic compositions. Finally, it is demonstrated that precise and accurate isotopic compositions of elements as refractory as W can be determined relatively easily by solution nebulization and even by direct laser ablation of complex silicates. Isobaric interferences in such experiments are negligible. These experiments serve to highlight the remarkable potential that this new field offers for hitherto difficult isotopic measurements in nuclear, earth, environmental and medical sciences. Isotopic measurements can be made that are reproducible at high precision through a range of running conditions, even in the presence of isobaric interferences. The ability to correct for mass discrimination accurately using a second element of similar mass, the very high sensitivity for elements that are otherwise difficult to ionize, the demonstrated capability for laser ablation work and the ability to measure through a wide mass range simultaneously give this instrument major advantages over other more traditional techniques of isotopic measurement.

  8. Surface analysis using a new plasma assisted desorption/ionisation source for mass spectrometry in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowfield, A.; Barrett, D. A.; Alexander, M. R.; Ortori, C. A.; Rutten, F. M.; Salter, T. L.; Gilmore, I. S.; Bradley, J. W.

    2012-06-01

    The authors report on a modified micro-plasma assisted desorption/ionisation (PADI) device which creates plasma through the breakdown of ambient air rather than utilising an independent noble gas flow. This new micro-PADI device is used as an ion source for ambient mass spectrometry to analyse species released from the surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene, and generic ibuprofen and paracetamol tablets through remote activation of the surface by the plasma. The mass spectra from these surfaces compare favourably to those produced by a PADI device constructed using an earlier design and confirm that the new ion source is an effective device which can be used to achieve ambient mass spectrometry with improved spatial resolution.

  9. An argon-nitrogen-hydrogen mixed-gas plasma as a robust ionization source for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makonnen, Yoseif; Beauchemin, Diane

    2014-09-01

    Multivariate optimization of an argon-nitrogen-hydrogen mixed-gas plasma for minimum matrix effects, while maintaining analyte sensitivity as much as possible, was carried out in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In the presence of 0.1 M Na, the 33.9 ± 3.9% (n = 13 elements) analyte signal suppression on average observed in an all-argon plasma was alleviated with the optimized mixed-gas plasma, the average being - 4.0 ± 8.8%, with enhancement in several cases. An addition of 2.3% v/v N2 in the outer plasma gas, and 0.50% v/v H2 to the central channel, as a sheath around the nebulizer gas flow, was sufficient for this drastic increase in robustness. It also reduced the background from ArO+ and Ar2+ as well as oxide levels by over an order of magnitude. On the other hand, the background from NO+ and ArN+ increased by up to an order of magnitude while the levels of doubly-charged ions increased to 7% (versus 2.7% in an argon plasma optimized for sensitivity). Furthermore, detection limits were generally degraded by 5 to 15 fold when using the mixed-gas plasma versus the argon plasma for matrix-free solution (although they were better for several elements in 0.1 M Na). Nonetheless, the drastically increased robustness allowed the direct quantitative multielement analysis of certified ore reference materials, as well as the determination of Mo and Cd in seawater, without using any matrix-matching or internal standardization.

  10. Continuum flow sampling mass spectrometer for elemental analysis with an inductively coupled plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The sampling of ions from an atmospheric pressure inductively coupled plasma for mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with a supersonic nozzle and skimmer is shown to follow similar behavior found for neutral beam studies and of ion extraction from other plasmas and flames. The dependence of count rates for metal oxide and doubly charged ions on ICP operating parameters, and sampling interface configuration are discussed for this instrument. A simple method is described for the approximate measurement of the ion energy distribution in ICP-MS. The average ion kinetic energy, kinetic energy spread, and maximum kinetic energy are evaluated from a plot of ion signal as a function of retarding voltage applied to the quadrupole mass analyzer. The effects of plasma operating parameters on ion signals and energies are described. The interference on the ionization of cobalt by five salts, NaCl, MgCl/sub 2/, NH/sub 4/I, NH/sub 4/Br and NH/sub 4/Cl, in an ICP is first considered theoretically and subsequently the theoretical trends are established experimentally by ICP-MS. The interference trends are found to be in the order of the most easily ionized element in the matrix salt, i.e., Na > Mg > I > Br > Cl.

  11. Characterization of a Sealed Americium-Beryllium (AmBe) Source by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    James Sommers; Marcos Jimenez; Mary Adamic; Jeffrey Giglio; Kevin Carney

    2009-12-01

    Two Americium-Beryllium neutron sources were dismantled, sampled (sub-sampled) and analyzed via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Characteristics such as “age” since purification, actinide content, trace metal content and inter and intra source composition were determined. The “age” since purification of the two sources was determined to be 25.0 and 25.4 years, respectively. The systematic errors in the “age” determination were ± 4 % 2s. The amount and isotopic composition of U and Pu varied substantially between the sub-samples of Source 2 (n=8). This may be due to the physical means of sub-sampling or the way the source was manufactured. Source 1 was much more consistent in terms of content and isotopic composition (n=3 sub-samples). The Be-Am ratio varied greatly between the two sources. Source 1 had an Am-Be ratio of 6.3 ± 52 % (1s). Source 2 had an Am-Be ratio of 9.81 ± 3.5 % (1s). In addition, the trace element content between the samples varied greatly. Significant differences were determined between Source 1 and 2 for Sc, Sr, Y, Zr, Mo, Ba and W.

  12. Chemometric optimization of a low-temperature plasma source design for ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Anastasia; Engelhard, Carsten

    2015-03-01

    Low-temperature plasmas (LTPs) are attractive sources for atomic and molecular mass spectrometry (MS). In the past, the LTP probe, which was first described by Harper et al., was used successfully for direct molecular mass spectrometric analysis with minimal sample pretreatment in a variety of applications. Unfortunately, the desorption/ionization source itself is commercially not available and custom-built LTP set-ups with varying geometry and operational configurations were utilized in the past. In the present study, a rapid chemometrics approach based on systematic experiments and multivariate data analysis was used to optimize the LTP probe geometry and positioning relative to the atmospheric-pressure inlet of a mass spectrometer. Several parameters were studied including the probe geometry, electrode configuration, quartz tube dimensions, probe positioning and operating conditions. It was found that the plasma-to-MS-inlet distance, the plasma-to-sample-plate distance, and the angle between the latter are very important. Additional effects on the analytical performance were found for the outer electrode width, the positioning of the electrodes, the inner diameter of the quartz tube, the quartz wall thickness, and the gas flow. All experiments were performed using additional heating of the sample to enhance thermal desorption and maximize the signal (T = 150 °C). After software-assisted optimization, attractive detection limits were achieved (e.g., 1.8 × 10- 7 mol/L for 4-acetamidothiophenol). Moreover, relative standard deviation (RSD) improved from values of up to 30% before optimization to < 15% RSD after the procedure was completed. This chemometrics approach for method optimization is not limited to LTP-MS and considered to be attractive for other plasma-based instrumentation as well.

  13. Distance-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry with IonCCD Detection and an Inductively Coupled Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Elise A.; Ray, Steven J.; Enke, Christie G.; Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2016-03-01

    Distance-of-flight mass spectrometry (DOFMS) is demonstrated for the first time with a commercially available ion detector—the IonCCD camera. Because DOFMS is a velocity-based MS technique that provides spatially dispersive, simultaneous mass spectrometry, a position-sensitive ion detector is needed for mass-spectral collection. The IonCCD camera is a 5.1-cm long, 1-D array that is capable of simultaneous, multichannel ion detection along a focal plane, which makes it an attractive option for DOFMS. In the current study, the IonCCD camera is evaluated for DOFMS with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionization source over a relatively short field-free mass-separation distance of 25.3-30.4 cm. The combination of ICP-DOFMS and the IonCCD detector results in a mass-spectral resolving power (FWHM) of approximately 900 and isotope-ratio precision equivalent to or slightly better than current ICP-TOFMS systems. The measured isotope-ratio precision in % relative standard deviation (%RSD) was ≥0.008%RSD for nonconsecutive isotopes at 10-ppm concentration (near the ion-signal saturation point) and ≥0.02%RSD for all isotopes at 1-ppm. Results of DOFMS with the IonCCD camera are also compared with those of two previously characterized detection setups.

  14. Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectrometric Isotopic Determination of Nuclear Wastes Sources Associated with Hanford Tank Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, John C.; Dresel, P. Evan; Farmer, Orville T.

    2007-11-01

    The subsurface distribution of a nuclear waste tank leak on the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site was sampled by slant drilling techniques in order to characterize the chemical and radiological characteristics of the leaked material and assess geochemical transport properties of hazardous constituents. Sediment core samples recovered from the borehole were subjected to distilled water and acid leaching procedures with the resulting leachates analyzed for isotopic and chemical signatures. High-sensitivity inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) techniques were used for determination of isotopic ratios for Cs, I, Mo. Analysis of the isotopic patterns of I and Mo combined with associated chemical data showed evidence for at least two separate intrusions of nuclear waste into the subsurface. Isotopic data for Cs was inconclusive with respect to a source attribution signature.

  15. Pulsed Plasma Electron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasik, Yakov

    2008-11-01

    Pulsed (˜10-7 s) electron beams with high current density (>10^2 A/cm^2) are generated in diodes with electric field of E > 10^6 V/cm. The source of electrons in these diodes is explosive emission plasma, which limits pulse duration; in the case E < 10^5 V/cm this plasma is not uniform and there is a time delay in its formation. Thus, there is a continuous interest in research of electron sources which can be used for generation of uniform electron beams produced at E <= 10^5 V/cm. In the present report, several types of plasma electron source (PES) will be considered. The first type of PES is fiber-based cathodes, with and without CsI coating. The operation of these cathodes is governed by the formation of the flashover plasma which serves as a source of electrons. The second type of PES is the ferroelectric plasma source (FPS). The operation of FPS, characterized by the formation of dense surface flashover plasma is accompanied also by the generation of fast microparticles and energetic neutrals. The latter was explained by Coulomb micro-explosions of the ferroelectric surface due to an large time-varying electric field at the front of the expanding plasma. A short review of recent achievements in the operation of a multi-FPS-assisted hollow anode to generate a large area electron beam will be presented as well. Finally, parameters of the plasma produced by a multi-capillary cathode with FPS and velvet igniters will be discussed. Ya. E. Krasik, J. Z. Gleizer, D. Yarmolich, A. Krokhmal, V. Ts. Gurovich, S.Efimov, J. Felsteiner V. Bernshtam, and Yu. M. Saveliev, J. Appl. Phys. 98, 093308 (2005). Ya. E. Krasik, A. Dunaevsky, and J. Felsteiner, Phys. Plasmas 8, 2466 (2001). D. Yarmolich, V. Vekselman, V. Tz. Gurovich, and Ya. E. Krasik, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 075004 (2008). J. Z. Gleizer, Y. Hadas and Ya. E. Krasik, Europhysics Lett. 82, 55001 (2008).

  16. Large area plasma source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John (Inventor); Patterson, Michael (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    An all permanent magnet Electron Cyclotron Resonance, large diameter (e.g., 40 cm) plasma source suitable for ion/plasma processing or electric propulsion, is capable of producing uniform ion current densities at its exit plane at very low power (e.g., below 200 W), and is electrodeless to avoid sputtering or contamination issues. Microwave input power is efficiently coupled with an ionizing gas without using a dielectric microwave window and without developing a throat plasma by providing a ferromagnetic cylindrical chamber wall with a conical end narrowing to an axial entrance hole for microwaves supplied on-axis from an open-ended waveguide. Permanent magnet rings are attached inside the wall with alternating polarities against the wall. An entrance magnet ring surrounding the entrance hole has a ferromagnetic pole piece that extends into the chamber from the entrance hole to a continuing second face that extends radially across an inner pole of the entrance magnet ring.

  17. A New Radio Frequency Plasma Oxygen Primary Ion Source on Nano Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Improved Lateral Resolution and Detection of Electropositive Elements at Single Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, Julien; Penen, Florent; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Frank, Julia; Hause, Gerd; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Gontier, Etienne; Horréard, François; Hillion, François; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2016-07-19

    An important application field of secondary ion mass spectrometry at the nanometer scale (NanoSIMS) is the detection of chemical elements and, in particular, metals at the subcellular level in biological samples. The detection of many trace metals requires an oxygen primary ion source to allow the generation of positive secondary ions with high yield in the NanoSIMS. The duoplasmatron oxygen source is commonly used in this ion microprobe but cannot achieve the same quality of images as the cesium primary ion source used to produce negative secondary ions (C(-), CN(-), S(-), P(-)) due to a larger primary ion beam size. In this paper, a new type of an oxygen ion source using a rf plasma is fitted and characterized on a NanoSIMS50L. The performances of this primary ion source in terms of current density and achievable lateral resolution have been characterized and compared to the conventional duoplasmatron and cesium sources. The new rf plasma oxygen source offered a net improvement in terms of primary beam current density compared to the commonly used duoplasmatron source, which resulted in higher ultimate lateral resolutions down to 37 nm and which provided a 5-45 times higher apparent sensitivity for electropositive elements. Other advantages include a better long-term stability and reduced maintenance. This new rf plasma oxygen primary ion source has been applied to the localization of essential macroelements and trace metals at basal levels in two biological models, cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:27291826

  18. Cd Isotopic Composition Measured by Plasma Source Mass Spectrometry on Natural and Anthropogenic Materials. A Preliminary Outline of Cd Isotope Systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocent, C.

    2004-05-01

    Cadmium is a trace metal that is used as a geochemical tracer of natural processes, like biological productivity and paleoproductivity, and also of anthropogenic pollution, as Cd is known to be a toxic heavy metal that has become a major environmental and health concern. For these purposes, an outstanding issue is to determine whether Cd, like a number of metallic elements (e.g. Fe, Cu, Zn, Mo, Tl), may display variable isotopic compositions in natural and/or industrial compounds. It is known that Cd may display variable isotopic composition. Indeed, isotopic fractionation processes have been documented in some meteorites and in lunar soils. Consequently, due to its relatively low boiling point (767\\deg C) and also to the large mass range covered by its isotopes (10 mass units), Cd might fractionate isotopically, for example during the outpouring of acidic volcanic magmas and/or the emplacement of granitoids. On another hand, isotopic fractionation could also occur during human activities like refuse incineration or industrial manufacturing, for instance. Finally, biologically-induced isotopic fractionation should not be ruled out, as it is clearly evidenced for other metals, like Fe. A high precision method has been developed for determining the isotopic composition of Cd by plasma source mass spectrometry (Neptune). This method holds on the standard-bracketing technique, owing to the availability of Cd solutions of known isotopic composition provided by the University of M\\H{u}nster. This allows to correct precisely for mass fractionation that occurs in the plasma source mass spectrometer. It is also critical for the analysis to be possible to work with Cd solutions of very high purity. Chemical isolation of Cd involves 3 steps, and may be also suitable for Cd isotopic measurements using solid source mass spectrometry. Preliminary results suggest that Cd is likely to fractionate during smelting activities, as indicated by measurements on mining waste. The

  19. Slotted antenna waveguide plasma source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A high density plasma generated by microwave injection using a windowless electrodeless rectangular slotted antenna waveguide plasma source has been demonstrated. Plasma probe measurements indicate that the source could be applicable for low power ion thruster applications, ion implantation, and related applications. This slotted antenna plasma source invention operates on the principle of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR). It employs no window and it is completely electrodeless and therefore its operation lifetime is long, being limited only by either the microwave generator itself or charged particle extraction grids if used. The high density plasma source can also be used to extract an electron beam that can be used as a plasma cathode neutralizer for ion source beam neutralization applications.

  20. Plasma sources for spacecraft neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of the operation of plasma sources for the neutralization of the surface of a spacecraft traveling in the presence of hot plasma are discussed with special attention given to the hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors. Techiques are developed that allow the calculation of the potentials and particle densities in the near environment of a hollow cathode plasma contactor in both the test tank and the LEO environment. The techniques and codes were validated by comparison of calculated and measured results.

  1. Constricted glow discharge plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; Anders, Simone; Dickinson, Michael; Rubin, Michael; Newman, Nathan

    2000-01-01

    A constricted glow discharge chamber and method are disclosed. The polarity and geometry of the constricted glow discharge plasma source is set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the source are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The source is suitable for applying films of nitrides such as gallium nitride and oxides such as tungsten oxide and for enriching other substances in material surfaces such as oxygen and water vapor, which are difficult process as plasma in any known devices and methods. The source can also be used to assist the deposition of films such as metal films by providing low-energy ions such as argon ions.

  2. Hollow electrode plasma excitation source

    DOEpatents

    Ballou, Nathan E.

    1992-01-01

    A plasma source incorporates a furnace as a hollow anode, while a coaxial cathode is disposed therewithin. The source is located in a housing provided with an ionizable gas such that a glow discharge is produced between anode and cathode. Radiation or ionic emission from the glow discharge characterizes a sample placed within the furnace and heated to elevated temperatures.

  3. Hollow electrode plasma excitation source

    DOEpatents

    Ballou, N.E.

    1992-04-14

    A plasma source incorporates a furnace as a hollow anode, while a coaxial cathode is disposed therewithin. The source is located in a housing provided with an ionizable gas such that a glow discharge is produced between anode and cathode. Radiation or ionic emission from the glow discharge characterizes a sample placed within the furnace and heated to elevated temperatures. 5 figs.

  4. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  5. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and Drugs... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human blood collected...

  6. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  7. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  8. 21 CFR 640.60 - Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Source Plasma. 640.60 Section 640.60 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.60 Source Plasma. The proper name of the product shall be Source Plasma. The product is defined as the fluid portion of human...

  9. Air Plasma Source for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriques, J.; Tatarova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Ferreira, C. M.; Gordiets, B.; IPFN-IST, 1049-001 LX, Portugal Team; Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences Team

    2011-10-01

    Plasma interactions with living matter are presently at the frontiers of plasma research and development. Plasmas contain numerous agents that influence biological activity. They provide essentially two types of biocidal species: reactive species, such as oxygen atoms that lead to lethality of micro-organisms through erosion, and UV radiation that can damage the DNA strands. In this work we investigate a surface wave (2.45 GHz) driven discharge plasma in air, with a small admixture of water vapor, as a source of ground state O(3P) oxygen atoms, NO molecules and UV radiation. A theoretical model describing both the wave driven discharge zone and its flowing afterglow is used to analyze the performance of this plasma source. The predicted plasma-generated NO(X) and O(3P) concentrations and NO(γ) radiation intensity along the source are presented and discussed as a function of the microwave power and water vapor percentage in the gas mixture. To validate the theoretical predictions, the relative concentrations of species have been determined by Mass Spectrometry, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Optical Spectroscopy. Acknowledgment: This work was funded by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology, under research contract PTDC/FIS/108411/2008.

  10. Development of a novel low-flow ion source/sampling cone geometry for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and application in hyphenated techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Thorben; Janzen, Rasmus; Steingrobe, Tobias; Sperling, Michael; Franze, Bastian; Engelhard, Carsten; Buscher, Wolfgang

    2012-10-01

    A novel ion source/sampling cone device for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) especially operated in the hyphenated mode as a detection system coupled with different separation modules is presented. Its technical setup is described in detail. Its main feature is the very low total argon consumption of less than 1.5 L min- 1, leading to significant reduction of operational costs especially when time-consuming speciation analysis is performed. The figures of merit of the new system with respect to sensitivity, detection power, long-term stability and working range were explored. Despite the profound differences of argon consumption of the new system in comparison to the conventional ICP-MS system, many of the characteristic features of the conventional ICP-MS could be maintained to a great extent. To demonstrate the ion source's capabilities, it was used as an element-selective detector for gas (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) where organic compounds of mercury and cobalt, respectively, were separated and detected with the new low-flow ICP-MS detection system. The corresponding chromatograms are shown. The applicability for trace element analysis has been validated with the certified reference material NIST 1643e.

  11. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  12. Metrics for comparing plasma mass filters

    SciTech Connect

    Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-10-15

    High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter.

  13. Metrics For Comparing Plasma Mass Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2012-08-15

    High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter. __________________________________________________

  14. Metrics for comparing plasma mass filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetterman, Abraham J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2011-10-01

    High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter.

  15. Helicon Plasma Source Optimization Studies for VASIMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goulding, R. H.; Baity, F. W.; Barber, G. C.; Carter, M. D.; ChangDiaz, F. R.; Pavarin, D.; Sparks, D. O.; Squire J. P.

    1999-01-01

    A helicon plasma source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is being used to investigate operating scenarios relevant to the VASIMR (VAriable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket). These include operation at high magnetic field (> = 0.4 T), high frequency (<= 30 MHz), high power (< = 3 kW), and with light ions (He+, H+). To date, He plasmas have been produced with n(sub e0) = 1.7 x 10(exp 19)/cu m (measured with an axially movable 4mm microwave interferometer), with Pin = I kW at f = 13.56 MHz and absolute value of B(sub 0) = 0.16 T. In the near future, diagnostics including a mass flow meter and a gridded energy analyzer array will be added to investigate fueling efficiency and the source power balance. The latest results, together with modeling results using the EMIR rf code, will be presented.

  16. Plasma Mass Filters For Nuclear Waste Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-05-25

    Practical disposal of nuclear waste requires high-throughput separation techniques. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which contains the most active and mobile radioisotopes and produces most of the heat. We suggest that the fission products could be separated as a group from nuclear waste using plasma mass filters. Plasmabased processes are well suited to separating nuclear waste, because mass rather than chemical properties are used for separation. A single plasma stage can replace several stages of chemical separation, producing separate streams of bulk elements, fission products, and actinoids. The plasma mass filters may have lower cost and produce less auxiliary waste than chemical processing plants. Three rotating plasma configurations are considered that act as mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, the Ohkawa filter, and the asymmetric centrifugal trap.

  17. Plasma Mass Filters For Nuclear Waste Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-05-26

    Practical disposal of nuclear waste requires high-throughput separation techniques. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which contains the most active and mobile radioisotopes and produces most of the heat. We suggest that the fission products could be separated as a group from nuclear waste using plasma mass filters. Plasmabased processes are well suited to separating nuclear waste, because mass rather than chemical properties are used for separation. A single plasma stage can replace several stages of chemical separation, producing separate streams of bulk elements, fission products, and actinoids. The plasma mass filters may have lower cost and produce less auxiliary waste than chemical processing plants. Three rotating plasma configurations are considered that act as mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, the Ohkawa filter, and the asymmetric centrifugal trap.

  18. Some plasma aspects and plasma diagnostics of ion sources (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesemann, Klaus

    2008-02-15

    We consider plasma properties in the most advanced type of plasma ion sources, electron cyclotron resonance ion sources for highly charged ions. Depending on the operation conditions the plasma in these sources may be highly ionized, which completely changes its transport properties. The most striking difference to weakly ionized plasma is that diffusion will become intrinsically ambipolar. We further discuss means of plasma diagnostics. As noninvasive diagnostic methods we will discuss analysis of the ion beam, optical spectroscopy, and measurement of the x-ray bremsstrahlung continuum. From beam analysis and optical spectroscopy one may deduce ion densities, and electron densities and distribution functions as a mean over the line of sight along the axis (optical spectroscopy) or at the plasma edge (ion beam). From x-ray spectra one obtains information about the population of highly energetic electrons and the energy transfer from the driving electromagnetic waves to the plasma--basic data for plasma modeling.

  19. Some plasma aspects and plasma diagnostics of ion sources.

    PubMed

    Wiesemann, Klaus

    2008-02-01

    We consider plasma properties in the most advanced type of plasma ion sources, electron cyclotron resonance ion sources for highly charged ions. Depending on the operation conditions the plasma in these sources may be highly ionized, which completely changes its transport properties. The most striking difference to weakly ionized plasma is that diffusion will become intrinsically ambipolar. We further discuss means of plasma diagnostics. As noninvasive diagnostic methods we will discuss analysis of the ion beam, optical spectroscopy, and measurement of the x-ray bremsstrahlung continuum. From beam analysis and optical spectroscopy one may deduce ion densities, and electron densities and distribution functions as a mean over the line of sight along the axis (optical spectroscopy) or at the plasma edge (ion beam). From x-ray spectra one obtains information about the population of highly energetic electrons and the energy transfer from the driving electromagnetic waves to the plasma -- basic data for plasma modeling.

  20. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  1. Mass spectrometry of atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Große-Kreul, S.; Hübner, S.; Schneider, S.; Ellerweg, D.; von Keudell, A.; Matejčík, S.; Benedikt, J.

    2015-08-01

    Atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasmas (APPs) are effective source of radicals, metastables and a variety of ions and photons, ranging into the vacuum UV spectral region. A detailed study of these species is important to understand and tune desired effects during the interaction of APPs with solid or liquid materials in industrial or medical applications. In this contribution, the opportunities and challenges of mass spectrometry for detection of neutrals and ions from APPs, fundamental physical phenomena related to the sampling process and their impact on the measured densities of neutrals and fluxes of ions, will be discussed. It is shown that the measurement of stable neutrals and radicals requires a proper experimental design to reduce the beam-to-background ratio, to have little beam distortion during expansion into vacuum and to carefully set the electron energy in the ionizer to avoid radical formation through dissociative ionization. The measured ion composition depends sensitively on the degree of impurities present in the feed gas as well as on the setting of the ion optics used for extraction of ions from the expanding neutral-ion mixture. The determination of the ion energy is presented as a method to show that the analyzed ions are originating from the atmospheric pressure plasma.

  2. The study of helicon plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Miao Tingting; Shang Yong; Zhao Hongwei; Liu Zhanwen; Sun Liangting; Zhang Xuezhen; Zhao Huanyu

    2010-02-15

    Helicon plasma source is known as efficient generator of uniform and high density plasma. A helicon plasma source was developed for investigation of plasma neutralization and plasma lens in the Institute of Modern Physics in China. In this paper, the characteristics of helicon plasma have been studied by using Langmuir four-probe and a high argon plasma density up to 3.9x10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} have been achieved with the Nagoya type III antenna at the conditions of the magnetic intensity of 200 G, working gas pressure of 2.8x10{sup -3} Pa, and rf power of 1200 W with a frequency of 27.12 MHz. In the experiment, the important phenomena have been found: for a given magnetic induction intensity, the plasma density became greater with the increase in rf power and tended to saturation, and the helicon mode appeared at the rf power between 200 and 400 W.

  3. Oxide Coated Cathode Plasma Source of Linear Magnetized Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guanghai; Jin, Xiaoli; Yuan, Lin; Zhang, Qiaofeng; Xie, Jinlin; Li, Hong; Liu, Wandong

    2016-09-01

    Plasma source is the most important part of the laboratory plasma platform for fundamental plasma experimental research. Barium oxide coated cathode plasma source is well recognized as an effective technique due to its high electron emission current. An indirectly heated oxide coated cathode plasma source has been constructed on a linear magnetized plasma device. The electron emission current density can reach 2 A/cm2 to 6 A/cm2 in pulsed mode within pulse length 5-20 ms. A 10 cm diameter, 2 m long plasma column with density 1018 m-3 to 1019 m3 and electron temperature Te ≃ 3-7 eV is produced. The spatial uniformity of the emission ability is less than 4% and the discharge reproducibility is better than 97%. With a wide range of the plasma parameters, this kind of plasma source provides great flexibility for many basic plasma investigations. The detail of construction and initial characterization of oxide coated cathode are described in this paper. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11275200)

  4. Oxide Coated Cathode Plasma Source of Linear Magnetized Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Guanghai; Jin, Xiaoli; Yuan, Lin; Zhang, Qiaofeng; Xie, Jinlin; Li, Hong; Liu, Wandong

    2016-09-01

    Plasma source is the most important part of the laboratory plasma platform for fundamental plasma experimental research. Barium oxide coated cathode plasma source is well recognized as an effective technique due to its high electron emission current. An indirectly heated oxide coated cathode plasma source has been constructed on a linear magnetized plasma device. The electron emission current density can reach 2 A/cm2 to 6 A/cm2 in pulsed mode within pulse length 5–20 ms. A 10 cm diameter, 2 m long plasma column with density 1018 m‑3 to 1019 m3 and electron temperature Te ≃ 3–7 eV is produced. The spatial uniformity of the emission ability is less than 4% and the discharge reproducibility is better than 97%. With a wide range of the plasma parameters, this kind of plasma source provides great flexibility for many basic plasma investigations. The detail of construction and initial characterization of oxide coated cathode are described in this paper. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11275200)

  5. High Power Helicon Plasma Source for Plasma Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prager, James; Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2015-09-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT), Inc. is developing a high power helicon plasma source. The high power nature and pulsed neutral gas make this source unique compared to traditional helicon source. These properties produce a plasma flow along the magnetic field lines, and therefore allow the source to be decoupled from the reaction chamber. Neutral gas can be injected downstream, which allows for precision control of the ion-neutral ratio at the surface of the sample. Although operated at high power, the source has demonstrated very low impurity production. This source has applications to nanoparticle productions, surface modification, and ionized physical vapor deposition.

  6. SDO: Complex Mass of Plasma

    NASA Video Gallery

    A small, but complex mass of solar material gyrated and spun about over the course of 40 hours above the surface of the sun on Sept. 1-3, 2015. It was stretched and pulled back and forth by powerfu...

  7. The Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment and Plasma Source Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chappell, C. R.; Chandler, M. O.; Fields, S. A.; Pollock, C. J.; Reasoner, D. L.; Young, D. T.; Burch, J. L.; Eaker, N.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; McComas, D. J.; Nordholdt, J. E.; Thomsen, M. F.; Berthelier, J. J.; Robson, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) and the Plasma Source Instrument (PSI) have been developed in response to the requirements of the ISTP Program for three-dimensional (3D) plasma composition measurements capable of tracking the circulation of low-energy (0-500 eV) plasma through the polar magnetosphere. This plasma is composed of penetrating magnetosheath and escaping ionospheric components. It is in part lost to the downstream solar wind and in part recirculated within the magnetosphere, participating in the formation of the diamagnetic hot plasma sheet and ring current plasma populations. Significant obstacles which have previously made this task impossible include the low density and energy of the outflowing ionospheric plasma plume and the positive spacecraft floating potentials which exclude the lowest-energy plasma from detection on ordinary spacecraft. Based on a unique combination of focusing electrostatic ion optics and time of flight detection and mass analysis, TIDE provides the sensitivity (seven apertures of about 1 cm squared effective area each) and angular resolution (6 x 18 degrees) required for this purpose. PSI produces a low energy plasma locally at the POLAR spacecraft that provides the ion current required to balance the photoelectron current, along with a low temperature electron population, regulating the spacecraft potential slightly positive relative to the space plasma. TIDE/PSI will: (a) measure the density and flow fields of the solar and terrestrial plasmas within the high polar cap and magnetospheric lobes; (b) quantify the extent to which ionospheric and solar ions are recirculated within the distant magnetotail neutral sheet or lost to the distant tail and solar wind; (c) investigate the mass-dependent degree energization of these plasmas by measuring their thermodynamic properties; (d) investigate the relative roles of ionosphere and solar wind as sources of plasma to the plasma sheet and ring current.

  8. Surface plasma source with saddle antenna radio frequency plasma generator.

    PubMed

    Dudnikov, V; Johnson, R P; Murray, S; Pennisi, T; Piller, C; Santana, M; Stockli, M; Welton, R

    2012-02-01

    A prototype RF H(-) surface plasma source (SPS) with saddle (SA) RF antenna is developed which will provide better power efficiency for high pulsed and average current, higher brightness with longer lifetime and higher reliability. Several versions of new plasma generators with small AlN discharge chambers and different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in the plasma source test stand. A prototype SA SPS was installed in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ion source test stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved unanalyzed peak currents of up to 67 mA with an apparent efficiency up to 1.6 mA∕kW. Control experiments with H(-) beam produced by SNS SPS with internal and external antennas were conducted. A new version of the RF triggering plasma gun has been designed. A saddle antenna SPS with water cooling is fabricated for high duty factor testing.

  9. Surface plasma source with saddle antenna radio frequency plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V.; Johnson, R. P.; Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.

    2012-02-15

    A prototype RF H{sup -} surface plasma source (SPS) with saddle (SA) RF antenna is developed which will provide better power efficiency for high pulsed and average current, higher brightness with longer lifetime and higher reliability. Several versions of new plasma generators with small AlN discharge chambers and different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in the plasma source test stand. A prototype SA SPS was installed in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ion source test stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved unanalyzed peak currents of up to 67 mA with an apparent efficiency up to 1.6 mA/kW. Control experiments with H{sup -} beam produced by SNS SPS with internal and external antennas were conducted. A new version of the RF triggering plasma gun has been designed. A saddle antenna SPS with water cooling is fabricated for high duty factor testing.

  10. Plasma Sheet Source and Loss Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    2000-01-01

    Data from the TIMAS ion mass spectrometer on the Polar satellite, covering 15 ev/e to 33 keV/e in energy and essentially 4(pi) in view angles, are used to investigate the properties of earthward (sunward) field-aligned flows of ions, especially protons, in the plasma sheet-lobe transition region near local midnight. A total of 142 crossings of this region are analyzed at 12-sec time resolution, all in the northern hemisphere, at R(SM) approx. 4 - 7 R(sub E), and most (106) in the poleward (sunward) direction. Earthward proton flows are prominent in this transition region (greater than 50% of the time), typically appearing as sudden "blasts" with the most energetic protons (approx. 33 keV) arriving first with weak flux, followed by protons of decreasing energy and increasing flux until either: (1) a new "blast" appears, (2) the flux ends at a sharp boundary, or (3) the flux fades away within a few minutes as the mean energy drops to a few keV. Frequent step-like changes (less than 12 sec) of the flux suggest that perpendicular gradients on the scale of proton gyroradii are common. Peak flux is similar to central plasma sheet proton flux (10(exp 5) - 10(exp 6)/[cq cm sr sec keV/e] and usually occurs at E approx. 4 - 12 keV. Only the initial phase of each "blast" (approx. 1 min) displays pronounced field-alignment of the proton velocity distribution, consistent with the time-of-flight separation of a more or less isotropic source distribution with df/d(nu) less than 0. The dispersive signatures are often consistent with a source at R(SM) less than or equal to 30 R(sub E). No systematic latitudinal velocity dispersion is found, implying that the equatorial plasma source is itself convecting. In short, the proton "blasts" appear as sudden local expansions of central plasma sheet particles along reconfigured ("dipolarized") magnetic field lines.

  11. Saturn Plasma Sources and Associated Transport Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, M.; Andrews, D. J.; Coates, A. J.; Hamilton, D. C.; Jackman, C. M.; Jia, X.; Kotova, A.; Morooka, M.; Smith, H. T.; Westlake, J. H.

    2015-10-01

    This article reviews the different sources of plasma for Saturn's magnetosphere, as they are known essentially from the scientific results of the Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn and Titan. At low and medium energies, the main plasma source is the H2O cloud produced by the "geyser" activity of the small satellite Enceladus. Impact ionization of this cloud occurs to produce on the order of 100 kg/s of fresh plasma, a source which dominates all the other ones: Titan (which produces much less plasma than anticipated before the Cassini mission), the rings, the solar wind (a poorly known source due to the lack of quantitative knowledge of the degree of coupling between the solar wind and Saturn's magnetosphere), and the ionosphere. At higher energies, energetic particles are produced by energy diffusion and acceleration of lower energy plasma produced by the interchange instabilities induced by the rapid rotation of Saturn, and possibly, for the highest energy range, by contributions from the CRAND process acting inside Saturn's magnetosphere. Discussion of the transport and acceleration processes acting on these plasma sources shows the importance of rotation-induced radial transport and energization of the plasma, and also shows how much the unexpected planetary modulation of essentially all plasma parameters of Saturn's magnetosphere remains an unexplained mystery.

  12. Plasma mass filtering techniques: applications and requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueroult, Renaud; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2013-10-01

    Plasma mass filters differ from conventional chemical filtering techniques in that elements are dissociated, and can therefore be processed without regard to chemical form. In addition, plasma filters can be in principle operated at larger velocities compared to their gaseous and/or liquid counterparts, so that larger throughputs are possible. On the other hand, one has to pay the price of ionization, which sets a lower limit for the processing cost. Plasma mass filtering techniques are consequently foreseen as a promising solution for separation processes which are simultaneously chemically challenging and of high added value. Such separation processes can be, for example, found within the context of nuclear waste remediation, or nuclear spent fuel reprocessing. However, although plasma separation techniques appear globally attractive for these distinct needs, the plasma parameters required to fulfill a particular separation process are expected to depend strongly on the process's attributes (volume, composition, mass difference), which may vary significantly. Such operating parameters' variations are shown to be well accommodated by a particular configuration, called the Magnetic Centrifugal Mass Filter. Work supported by US DOE under contract Nos DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-FG02-06ER54851.

  13. Surface plasma source with anode layer plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim

    2012-02-15

    Proposed plasma generation system can be used for high current negative ion beam production and for directed deposition by flux of sputtered neutrals and negative ions. The main mechanism of negative ion formation in surface plasma sources is the secondary emission from low work function surface bombarded by a flux of positive ion or neutrals. The emission of negative ions is enhanced significantly by introducing a small amount of cesium or other substance with low ionization potential. In the proposed source are used positive ions generated by Hall drift plasma accelerator (anode layer plasma accelerator or plasma accelerator with insulated channel, with cylindrical or race track configuration of emission slit). The target-emitter is bombarded by the ion beam accelerated in crossed ExB fields. Negative ions are extracted from the target surface with geometrical focusing and are accelerated by negative voltage applied between emitter and plasma, contacting with the plasma accelerator. Hall drift ion source has a special design with a space for passing of the emitted negative ions and sputtered particles through the positive ion source.

  14. Hollow-Cathode Source Generates Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deininger, W. D.; Aston, G.; Pless, L. C.

    1989-01-01

    Device generates argon, krypton, or xenon plasma via thermionic emission and electrical discharge within hollow cathode and ejects plasma into surrounding vacuum. Goes from cold start up to full operation in less than 5 s after initial application of power. Exposed to moist air between operations without significant degradation of starting and running characteristics. Plasma generated by electrical discharge in cathode barrel sustained and aided by thermionic emission from emitter tube. Emitter tube does not depend on rare-earth oxides, making it vulnerable to contamination by exposure to atmosphere. Device modified for use as source of plasma in laboratory experiments or industrial processes.

  15. Measuring the Plasma Density of a Ferroelectric Plasma Source in an Expanding Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    A. Dunaevsky; N.J. Fisch

    2003-10-02

    The initial density and electron temperature at the surface of a ferroelectric plasma source were deduced from floating probe measurements in an expanding plasma. The method exploits negative charging of the floating probe capacitance by fast flows before the expanding plasma reaches the probe. The temporal profiles of the plasma density can be obtained from the voltage traces of the discharge of the charged probe capacitance by the ion current from the expanding plasma. The temporal profiles of the plasma density, at two different distances from the surface of the ferroelectric plasma source, could be further fitted by using the density profiles for the expanding plasma. This gives the initial values of the plasma density and electron temperature at the surface. The method could be useful for any pulsed discharge, which is accompanied by considerable electromagnetic noise, if the initial plasma parameters might be deduced from measurements in expanding plasma.

  16. Meter scale plasma source for plasma wakefield experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Shaw, J. L.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.; Hogan, M. J.

    2012-12-21

    High accelerating gradients generated by a high density electron beam moving through plasma has been used to double the energy of the SLAC electron beam [1]. During that experiment, the electron current density was high enough to generate its own plasma without significant head erosion. In the newly commissioned FACET facility at SLAC, the peak current will be lower and without pre-ionization, head erosion will be a significant challenge for the planned experiments. In this work we report on our design of a meter scale plasma source for these experiments to effectively avoid the problem of head erosion. The plasma source is based on a homogeneous metal vapor gas column that is generated in a heat pipe oven [2]. A lithium oven over 30 cm long at densities over 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} has been constructed and tested at UCLA. The plasma is then generated by coupling a 10 TW short pulse Ti:Sapphire laser into the gas column using an axicon lens setup. The Bessel profile of the axicon setup creates a region of high intensity that can stretch over the full length of the gas column with approximately constant diameter. In this region of high intensity, the alkali metal vapor is ionized through multi-photon ionization process. In this manner, a fully ionized meter scale plasma of uniform density can be formed. Methods for controlling the plasma diameter and length will also be discussed.

  17. Inductively generated streaming plasma ion source

    DOEpatents

    Glidden, Steven C.; Sanders, Howard D.; Greenly, John B.

    2006-07-25

    A novel pulsed, neutralized ion beam source is provided. The source uses pulsed inductive breakdown of neutral gas, and magnetic acceleration and control of the resulting plasma, to form a beam. The beam supplies ions for applications requiring excellent control of ion species, low remittance, high current density, and spatial uniformity.

  18. Plasma-based EUV light source

    DOEpatents

    Shumlak, Uri; Golingo, Raymond; Nelson, Brian A.

    2010-11-02

    Various mechanisms are provided relating to plasma-based light source that may be used for lithography as well as other applications. For example, a device is disclosed for producing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light based on a sheared plasma flow. The device can produce a plasma pinch that can last several orders of magnitude longer than what is typically sustained in a Z-pinch, thus enabling the device to provide more power output than what has been hitherto predicted in theory or attained in practice. Such power output may be used in a lithography system for manufacturing integrated circuits, enabling the use of EUV wavelengths on the order of about 13.5 nm. Lastly, the process of manufacturing such a plasma pinch is discussed, where the process includes providing a sheared flow of plasma in order to stabilize it for long periods of time.

  19. A commercial plasma source ion implantation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Scheuer, J.T.; Adler, R.A.; Horne, W.G.

    1996-10-01

    Empire Hard Chrome has recently installed commercial plasma source ion implantation (PSU) equipment built by North Star Research Corporation. Los Alamos National Laboratory has assisted in this commercialization effort via two Cooperative Research and Development Agreements to develop the plasma source for the equipment and to identify low-risk commercial PSII applications. The PSII system consists of a 1 m x 1 m cylindrical vacuum chamber with a rf plasma source. The pulse modulator is capable of delivering pulses kV and peak currents of 300 A at maximum repetition rate of 400 Hz. thyratron tube to switch a pulse forming network which is tailored to match the dynamic PSII load. In this paper we discuss the PSII system, process facility, and early commercial applications to production tooling.

  20. Advances in Plasma-Filled Microwave Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    1998-11-01

    Significant improvements in the performance of high power microwave tubes have been achieved in recent years by the introduction of plasma into the beam- coupling structures of the devices. Plasma has been credited with increasing the maximum electron beam current, frequency bandwidth, electrical efficiency and reducing or eliminating the need for guiding magnetic fields in microwave sources. These advances are critically important for the development of high power, frequency agile microwave systems where size and weight are important. Conversely, plasma has been blamed for causing noise, instabilities, power variations and pulse-length limitations in microwave tubes for many years. Recent experimental and theoretical studies have demonstrated that introducing the right amount of plasma in a controlled manner can be beneficial in the areas described above. Enhanced beam propagation at lower magnetic fields and higher beam current levels due to the space-charge neutralization by plasma can be realized provided that the neutralization fraction is fairly stable and maintained near a value of one for the duration of the desired pulse length. The generation of hybrid waves in plasma-filled slow-wave structures (SWS) operating near cutoff has resulted in an increased electric field on axis and improved coupling to solid beams in both helix and coupled-cavity SWS, and wider coupling-aperture pass-bands and frequency bandwidth in coupled-cavity devices. In the event of excess plasma generation in these TWTs or BWOs, the device structures rapidly approach cutoff or breakdown and the beam forms instabilities, which degrades the output power level and pulse length. Recent experimental and theoretical advances in this field including plasma implementation techniques in the gun and circuit will be presented, and the benefits and limitations of plasma filling of microwave sources will be shown and discussed.

  1. Key issues in plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Faehl, R.J.; Matossian, J.N.

    1996-09-01

    Plasma source ion implantation (PSII) is a scaleable, non-line-of-sight method for the surface modification of materials. In this paper, we consider three important issues that should be addressed before wide-scale commercialization of PSII: (1) implant conformality; (2) ion sources; and (3) secondary electron emission. To insure uniform implanted dose over complex shapes, the ion sheath thickness must be kept sufficiently small. This criterion places demands on ion sources and pulsed-power supplies. Another limitation to date is the availability of additional ion species beyond B, C, N, and 0. Possible solutions are the use of metal arc vaporization sources and plasma discharges in high-vapor-pressure organometallic precursors. Finally, secondary electron emission presents a potential efficiency and x-ray hazard issue since for many metallurgic applications, the emission coefficient can be as large as 20. Techniques to suppress secondary electron emission are discussed.

  2. Ion Beam Plasma Interactions in the ASTRAL Helicon Plasma Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, R. F.; Kesterson, A.; Kamar, O.; Lin, Y.; Munoz, J.; Wang, X.

    2008-11-01

    A 100 KeV NEC duoplasmatron is used to produce an energetic ion beam (10 KeV < E < 100 KeV). The beam is sent through plasmas produced by the ASTRAL helicon plasma source. The beam current and beam size are measured by a device combining Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) and Faraday Cup (FC) features. ASTRAL produces bright intense He/Ne/Ar plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 1E11 -- 1E13 cm-3 and Te = 2 - 10 eV, B-field < 1.3 kGauss, rf power <= 2 kWatt. RF compensated Langmuir probes are used to measure Te and ne. Depending on the ion beam energy and the ratio of beam density over plasma density different wave instabilities will be generated within the plasmas. A real-time spectrum analyzer will be used to identify the wave instabilities and their evolution in the plasma. We will present early experimental results together with some preliminary theoretical simulation using 2D and 3D hybrid simulation codes. In these codes, ions are treated as fully kinetic particles while electrons are treated as a fluid. Both species are moving in a self-consistent electromagnetic field.

  3. Ion acoustic shock wave in collisional equal mass plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Adak, Ashish; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2015-10-15

    The effect of ion-ion collision on the dynamics of nonlinear ion acoustic wave in an unmagnetized pair-ion plasma has been investigated. The two-fluid model has been used to describe the dynamics of both positive and negative ions with equal masses. It is well known that in the dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave, the viscosity mediates wave dissipation in presence of weak nonlinearity and dispersion. This dissipation is responsible for the shock structures in pair-ion plasma. Here, it has been shown that the ion-ion collision in presence of collective phenomena mediated by the plasma current is the source of dissipation that causes the Burgers' term which is responsible for the shock structures in equal mass pair-ion plasma. The dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burgers equation. The analytical and numerical investigations revealed that the ion acoustic wave exhibits both oscillatory and monotonic shock structures depending on the frequency of ion-ion collision parameter. The results have been discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments.

  4. Ion acoustic shock wave in collisional equal mass plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Ashish; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2015-10-01

    The effect of ion-ion collision on the dynamics of nonlinear ion acoustic wave in an unmagnetized pair-ion plasma has been investigated. The two-fluid model has been used to describe the dynamics of both positive and negative ions with equal masses. It is well known that in the dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave, the viscosity mediates wave dissipation in presence of weak nonlinearity and dispersion. This dissipation is responsible for the shock structures in pair-ion plasma. Here, it has been shown that the ion-ion collision in presence of collective phenomena mediated by the plasma current is the source of dissipation that causes the Burgers' term which is responsible for the shock structures in equal mass pair-ion plasma. The dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burgers equation. The analytical and numerical investigations revealed that the ion acoustic wave exhibits both oscillatory and monotonic shock structures depending on the frequency of ion-ion collision parameter. The results have been discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments.

  5. Plasma wake field XUV radiation source

    DOEpatents

    Prono, Daniel S.; Jones, Michael E.

    1997-01-01

    A XUV radiation source uses an interaction of electron beam pulses with a gas to create a plasma radiator. A flowing gas system (10) defines a circulation loop (12) with a device (14), such as a high pressure pump or the like, for circulating the gas. A nozzle or jet (16) produces a sonic atmospheric pressure flow and increases the density of the gas for interacting with an electron beam. An electron beam is formed by a conventional radio frequency (rf) accelerator (26) and electron pulses are conventionally formed by a beam buncher (28). The rf energy is thus converted to electron beam energy, the beam energy is used to create and then thermalize an atmospheric density flowing gas to a fully ionized plasma by interaction of beam pulses with the plasma wake field, and the energetic plasma then loses energy by line radiation at XUV wavelengths Collection and focusing optics (18) are used to collect XUV radiation emitted as line radiation when the high energy density plasma loses energy that was transferred from the electron beam pulses to the plasma.

  6. Plasma Sources for Medical Applications - A Comparison of Spot Like Plasmas and Large Area Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-09-01

    Plasma applications in life science are currently emerging worldwide. Whereas today's commercially available plasma surgical technologies such as argon plasma coagulation (APC) or ablation are mainly based on lethal plasma effects on living systems, the newly emerging therapeutic applications will be based on selective, at least partially non-lethal, possibly stimulating plasma effects on living cells and tissue. Promising results could be obtained by different research groups worldwide revealing a huge potential for the application of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma in fields such as tissue engineering, healing of chronic wounds, treatment of skin diseases, tumor treatment based on specific induction of apoptotic processes, inhibition of biofilm formation and direct action on biofilms or treatment of dental diseases. The development of suitable and reliable plasma sources for the different therapies requires an in-depth knowledge of their physics, chemistry and parameters. Therefore much basic research still needs to be conducted to minimize risk and to provide a scientific fundament for new plasma-based medical therapies. It is essential to perform a comprehensive assessment of physical and biological experiments to clarify minimum standards for plasma sources for applications in life science and for comparison of different sources. One result is the DIN-SPEC 91315, which is now open for further improvements. This contribution intends to give an overview on the status of commercial cold plasma sources as well as cold plasma sources still under development for medical use. It will discuss needs, prospects and approaches for the characterization of plasmas from different points of view. Regarding the manageability in everyday medical life, atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJ) and dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) are of special interest. A comprehensive risk-benefit assessment including the state of the art of commercial sources for medical use

  7. Light source employing laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Yezheng; Tillack, Mark S

    2013-09-17

    A system and a method of generating radiation and/or particle emissions are disclosed. In at least some embodiments, the system includes at least one laser source that generates a first pulse and a second pulse in temporal succession, and a target, where the target (or at least a portion the target) becomes a plasma upon being exposed to the first pulse. The plasma expand after the exposure to the first pulse, the expanded plasma is then exposed to the second pulse, and at least one of a radiation emission and a particle emission occurs after the exposure to the second pulse. In at least some embodiments, the target is a solid piece of material, and/or a time period between the first and second pulses is less than 1 microsecond (e.g., 840 ns).

  8. Microwave Plasma Sources for Gas Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Mizeraczyk, J.; Jasinski, M.; Dors, M.; Zakrzewski, Z.

    2008-03-19

    In this paper atmospheric pressure microwave discharge methods and devices used for producing the non-thermal plasmas for processing of gases are presented. The main part of the paper concerns the microwave plasma sources (MPSs) for environmental protection applications. A few types of the MPSs, i.e. waveguide-based surface wave sustained MPS, coaxial-line-based and waveguide-based nozzle-type MPSs, waveguide-based nozzleless cylinder-type MPS and MPS for microdischarges are presented. Also, results of the laboratory experiments on the plasma processing of several highly-concentrated (up to several tens percent) volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including Freon-type refrigerants, in the moderate (200-400 W) waveguide-based nozzle-type MPS (2.45 GHz) are presented. The results showed that the microwave discharge plasma fully decomposed the VOCs at relatively low energy cost. The energy efficiency of VOCs decomposition reached 1000 g/kWh. This suggests that the microwave discharge plasma can be a useful tool for environmental protection applications. In this paper also results of the use of the waveguide-based nozzleless cylinder-type MPS to methane reforming into hydrogen are presented.

  9. Mass spectrum of N* and source optimization

    SciTech Connect

    S. Basak; R. Edwards; R. Fiebig; G. Fleming; U. M. Heller; C. Morningstar; D. Richards; I. Sato; S. Wallace

    2004-03-01

    We have computed correlation functions for nucleons and extracted the masses for positive- and negative-parities. Use of group theory plays an important role in obtaining sources that have good overlap to higher spin states and minimum contamination from unwanted states. In the simulation three distinct sources and corresponding sinks that transform according to the $G_1$ irreducible representations are tested and used to form matrices of correlation functions. Diagonalizations give us clear mass splittings between low-lying states and excited states for both parities.

  10. 21 CFR 640.74 - Modification of Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Modification of Source Plasma. 640.74 Section 640...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.74 Modification of Source Plasma. (a) Upon approval by the Director, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food...

  11. 21 CFR 640.74 - Modification of Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Modification of Source Plasma. 640.74 Section 640...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.74 Modification of Source Plasma. (a) Upon approval by the Director, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food...

  12. 21 CFR 640.74 - Modification of Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Modification of Source Plasma. 640.74 Section 640...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.74 Modification of Source Plasma. Link to an amendment published at 77 FR 18, Jan. 3, 2012. (a) Upon approval by...

  13. 21 CFR 640.74 - Modification of Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Modification of Source Plasma. 640.74 Section 640...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.74 Modification of Source Plasma. (a) Upon approval by the Director, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food...

  14. 21 CFR 640.74 - Modification of Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Modification of Source Plasma. 640.74 Section 640...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.74 Modification of Source Plasma. (a) Upon approval by the Director, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food...

  15. Magnetic plasma confinement for laser ion source.

    PubMed

    Okamura, M; Adeyemi, A; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Kondo, K; Dabrowski, R

    2010-02-01

    A laser ion source (LIS) can easily provide a high current beam. However, it has been difficult to obtain a longer beam pulse while keeping a high current. On occasion, longer beam pulses are required by certain applications. For example, more than 10 micros of beam pulse is required for injecting highly charged beams to a large sized synchrotron. To extend beam pulse width, a solenoid field was applied at the drift space of the LIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The solenoid field suppressed the diverging angle of the expanding plasma and the beam pulse was widened. Also, it was observed that the plasma state was conserved after passing through a few hundred gauss of the 480 mm length solenoid field.

  16. Hubble-induced mass from MSSM plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Takesako, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Fuminobu E-mail: fumi@tuhep.phys.tohoku.ac.jp

    2013-04-01

    We evaluate the effective mass of a scalar field φ coupled to thermal plasma through Planck-suppressed interactions. We find it useful to rescale the coupled fields so that all the φ-dependences are absorbed into the yukawa and gauge couplings, which allows us to read off the leading order contributions to the effective mass m-tilde {sub φ} from the 2-loop free energy calculated with the rescaled couplings. We give an analytical expression for m-tilde {sub φ} at a sufficiently high temperature in the case where φ is coupled to the MSSM chiral superfields through non-minimal Kähler potential. We find that | m-tilde {sub φ}{sup 2}| is about 10{sup −3}H{sup 2} ∼ 10{sup −2}H{sup 2} at the leading order in terms of the couplings for typical parameter sets, where H is the Hubble expansion rate in the radiation-dominated era.

  17. Mass Communication: A Guide to Reference Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill Univ., Montreal (Quebec). McLennan Library.

    For the study of mass communication in social, cultural and political contexts, this annotated resource guide presents a list of materials available in the McGill University Libraries in Montreal, Canada. As a select bibliography, the guide concentrates on current sources, although some historical coverage of newspaper and journalism is included.…

  18. Low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma sources for plasma medicine.

    PubMed

    Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2016-09-01

    In this review paper, fundamental overviews of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma generation are provided and various sources for plasma medicine are described in terms of operating conditions and plasma properties. PMID:27109191

  19. Low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma sources for plasma medicine.

    PubMed

    Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2016-09-01

    In this review paper, fundamental overviews of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma generation are provided and various sources for plasma medicine are described in terms of operating conditions and plasma properties.

  20. Advances and problems in plasma-optical mass-separation

    SciTech Connect

    Bardakov, V. M.; Ivanov, S. D.; Strokin, N. A.

    2014-03-15

    This paper presents a short review of plasma-optical mass-separation and defines the fields for its possible application. During theoretical studies, numerical simulations, and experiments, the effect of the azimuthator finite size and of the vacuum conditions on the mass separator characteristics was revealed, as well as the quality of different-mass ion separation. The problems, solving which may lead to a successful end of the mass-separation plasma-optical technique implementation, were specified.

  1. Features of semiplanotron surface plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim

    2012-02-15

    Features of the semiplanotron surface plasma sources (SPS) with cesiation used for high efficient negative ion beam production from first development to modern condition are considered. Design features of semiplanotrons SPS with cylindrical and spherical geometric focusing and the features of the negative ion production in the semiplanotrons are reviewed. Several versions of semiplanotrons with efficiency up to 0.1 A of H{sup -} per kW of discharge power are discussed. Modifications of the semiplanotrons for dc operation and for heavy negative ion production are reviewed.

  2. Two-dimensional, three-fluid modeling of capillary plasma discharges in electrothermal mass accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmond, M. J.; Winfrey, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    Electrothermal (ET) plasma launchers have a wide array of applications as mass acceleration devices. An ET plasma launcher utilizes an ET plasma discharge to accelerate a projectile. ET plasma discharges are arc-driven capillary discharges that ablate liner materials and form partially ionized plasmas. ET plasma discharges are generated by driving current pulses through a capillary source. Current pulses typically have peak currents on the order of tens of kA with pulse lengths on the order of hundreds of μs. These types of plasma discharges have been explored for their application to military ballistics, electric thrusters, and nuclear fusion power. ET plasma discharges have been studied using 0D, 1D, and semi-2D fluid models. In this work, a three-fluid, fully two-dimensional model of ET plasma discharges is presented. First approximations used in the newly developed model and code are discussed and simulation results are compared with experiment. Simulation results indicate the development of back flow inside ET plasma discharges due to collisional drag forces between individual plasma species. This back flow is observed for simulations of ET plasma discharges receiving current pulses with peak currents of 10, 20, 30, and 40 kA. Simulation results also reveal the development of fluid perturbations near the breech of the plasma source. These perturbations cause variations in the plasma electrical conductivity and ultimately cause changes in the local ablation rate of the source liner. At higher current pulses, these perturbations are more localized in the region of the source closest to the breech. This effect causes a decrease in the ablated mass in this region relative to the region of the source experiencing the highest ablation.

  3. Conical slow wave antenna as a plasma source.

    PubMed

    Grubb, D P; Lovell, T

    1978-01-01

    A simple conical helix has been successfully employed as a slow wave structure to generate plasmas by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH). The plasma is typical of plasmas created by ''Lisitano coil'' sources, n approximately 10(10)-10(12) cm(-3) with T(e) approximately 2-20 eV. This source, however, is much simpler to fabricate. The ease of fabrication allows the user some flexibility in designing the source to fit a specific plasma physics experiment.

  4. Laboratory Plasma Source as an MHD Model for Astrophysical Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    The significance of the work described herein lies in the demonstration of Magnetized Coaxial Plasma Gun (MCG) devices like CPS-1 to produce energetic laboratory magneto-flows with embedded magnetic fields that can be used as a simulation tool to study flow interaction dynamic of jet flows, to demonstrate the magnetic acceleration and collimation of flows with primarily toroidal fields, and study cross field transport in turbulent accreting flows. Since plasma produced in MCG devices have magnetic topology and MHD flow regime similarity to stellar and extragalactic jets, we expect that careful investigation of these flows in the laboratory will reveal fundamental physical mechanisms influencing astrophysical flows. Discussion in the next section (sec.2) focuses on recent results describing collimation, leading flow surface interaction layers, and turbulent accretion. The primary objectives for a new three year effort would involve the development and deployment of novel electrostatic, magnetic, and visible plasma diagnostic techniques to measure plasma and flow parameters of the CPS-1 device in the flow chamber downstream of the plasma source to study, (1) mass ejection, morphology, and collimation and stability of energetic outflows, (2) the effects of external magnetization on collimation and stability, (3) the interaction of such flows with background neutral gas, the generation of visible emission in such interaction, and effect of neutral clouds on jet flow dynamics, and (4) the cross magnetic field transport of turbulent accreting flows. The applicability of existing laboratory plasma facilities to the study of stellar and extragalactic plasma should be exploited to elucidate underlying physical mechanisms that cannot be ascertained though astrophysical observation, and provide baseline to a wide variety of proposed models, MHD and otherwise. The work proposed herin represents a continued effort on a novel approach in relating laboratory experiments to

  5. Dense Plasma Focus - From Alternative Fusion Source to Versatile High Energy Density Plasma Source for Plasma Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, R. S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF), a coaxial plasma gun, utilizes pulsed high current electrical discharge to heat and compress the plasma to very high density and temperature with energy densities in the range of 1-10 × 1010 J/m3. The DPF device has always been in the company of several alternative magnetic fusion devices as it produces intense fusion neutrons. Several experiments conducted on many different DPF devices ranging over several order of storage energy have demonstrated that at higher storage energy the neutron production does not follow I4 scaling laws and deteriorate significantly raising concern about the device's capability and relevance for fusion energy. On the other hand, the high energy density pinch plasma in DPF device makes it a multiple radiation source of ions, electron, soft and hard x-rays, and neutrons, making it useful for several applications in many different fields such as lithography, radiography, imaging, activation analysis, radioisotopes production etc. Being a source of hot dense plasma, strong shockwave, intense energetic beams and radiation, etc, the DPF device, additionally, shows tremendous potential for applications in plasma nanoscience and plasma nanotechnology. In the present paper, the key features of plasma focus device are critically discussed to understand the novelties and opportunities that this device offers in processing and synthesis of nanophase materials using, both, the top-down and bottom-up approach. The results of recent key experimental investigations performed on (i) the processing and modification of bulk target substrates for phase change, surface reconstruction and nanostructurization, (ii) the nanostructurization of PLD grown magnetic thin films, and (iii) direct synthesis of nanostructured (nanowire, nanosheets and nanoflowers) materials using anode target material ablation, ablated plasma and background reactive gas based synthesis and purely gas phase synthesis of various different types of

  6. Inductively Coupled Plasma Zoom-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Elise A.; Ray, Steven J.; Enke, Christie G.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2016-03-01

    A zoom-time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been coupled to an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionization source. Zoom-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (zoom-TOFMS) combines two complementary types of velocity-based mass separation. Specifically, zoom-TOFMS alternates between conventional, constant-energy acceleration (CEA) TOFMS and energy-focused, constant-momentum acceleration (CMA) (zoom) TOFMS. The CMA mode provides a mass-resolution enhancement of 1.5-1.7× over CEA-TOFMS in the current, 35-cm ICP-zoom-TOFMS instrument geometry. The maximum resolving power (full-width at half-maximum) for the ICP-zoom-TOFMS instrument is 1200 for CEA-TOFMS and 1900 for CMA-TOFMS. The CMA mode yields detection limits of between 0.02 and 0.8 ppt, depending upon the repetition rate and integration time—compared with single ppt detection limits for CEA-TOFMS. Isotope-ratio precision is shot-noise limited at approximately 0.2% relative-standard deviation (RSD) for both CEA- and CMA-TOFMS at a 10 kHz repetition rate and an integration time of 3-5 min. When the repetition rate is increased to 43.5 kHz for CMA, the shot-noise limited, zoom-mode isotope-ratio precision is improved to 0.09% RSD for the same integration time.

  7. Chromium plating pollution source reduction by plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A.; Sridharan, K.; Dodd, R.A.; Conrad, J.R.; Qiu, X.; Hamdi, A.H.; Elmoursi, A.A.; Malaczynski, G.W.; Horne, W.G.

    1995-12-31

    There is growing concern over the environmental toxicity and workers` health issues due to the chemical baths and rinse water used in the hard chromium plating process. In this regard the significant hardening response of chromium to nitrogen ion implantation can be environmentally beneficial from the standpoint of decreasing the thickness and the frequency of application of chromium plating. In this paper the results of a study of nitrogen ion implantation of chrome plated test flats using the non-line-of-sight Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) process, are discussed. Surface characterization was performed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), and Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA). The surface properties were evaluated using a microhardness tester, a pin-on-disk wear tester, and a corrosion measurement system. Industrial field testing of nitrogen PSII treated chromium plated parts showed an improvement by a factor of two compared to the unimplanted case.

  8. The development of space plasma testing facility using RF source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamieneski, Richard; Hyde, Alexander; Batishchev, Oleg

    2012-10-01

    A new testing facility is being developed to simulate space and atmospheric plasmas. It utilizes modified helicon plasma source [1] to ionize gases common to space and ionosphere, namely hydrogen, helium, and nitrogen. Emission spectra of ionized gases are analyzed by vacuum spectrometer to understand plasma composition. The design of computerized controls and data acquisition system are discussed. [4pt] [1] O. Batishchev, Minihelicon Plasma Thruster, IEEE Trans. Plasma Science, 37 (8) 1563, 2009.

  9. Plasma mass filtering for separation of actinides from lanthanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueroult, R.; Fisch, N. J.

    2014-06-01

    Separating lanthanides from actinides is a key process in reprocessing nuclear spent fuel. Plasma mass filters, which operate on dissociated elements, offer conceptual advantages for such a task as compared with conventional chemical methods. The capabilities of a specific plasma mass filter concept, called the magnetic centrifugal mass filter, are analyzed within this particular context. Numerical simulations indicate separation of americium ions from a mixture of lanthanides ions for plasma densities of the order of 1012 cm-3, and ion temperatures of about 10 eV. In light of collision considerations, separating small fractions of heavy elements from a larger volume of lighter ones is shown to enhance the separation capabilities.

  10. Gas-discharge plasma sources for nonlocal plasma technology

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. I.; DeJoseph, C. A. Jr.; Simonov, V. Ya.

    2007-11-12

    Nonlocal plasma technology is based on the effect of self-trapping of fast electrons in the plasma volume [V. I. Demidov, C. A. DeJoseph, Jr., and A. A. Kudryavtsev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 215002 (2006)]. This effect can be achieved by changing the ratio of fast electron flux to ion flux incident on the plasma boundaries. This in turn leads to a significant change in plasma properties and therefore can be useful for technological applications. A gas-discharge device which demonstrates control of the plasma properties by this method is described.

  11. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1992-01-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  12. Matilda: A mass filtered nanocluster source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Gihan

    Cluster science provides a good model system for the study of the size dependence of electronic properties, chemical reactivity, as well as magnetic properties of materials. One of the main interests in cluster science is the nanoscale understanding of chemical reactions and selectivity in catalysis. Therefore, a new cluster system was constructed to study catalysts for applications in renewable energy. Matilda, a nanocluster source, consists of a cluster source and a Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA). A moveable AJA A310 Series 1"-diameter magnetron sputtering gun enclosed in a water cooled aggregation tube served as the cluster source. A silver coin was used for the sputtering target. The sputtering pressure in the aggregation tube was controlled, ranging from 0.07 to 1torr, using a mass flow controller. The mean cluster size was found to be a function of relative partial pressure (He/Ar), sputtering power, and aggregation length. The kinetic energy distribution of ionized clusters was measured with the RFA. The maximum ion energy distribution was 2.9 eV/atom at a zero pressure ratio. At high Ar flow rates, the mean cluster size was 20 ˜ 80nm, and at a 9.5 partial pressure ratio, the mean cluster size was reduced to 1.6nm. Our results showed that the He gas pressure can be optimized to reduce the cluster size variations. Results from SIMION, which is an electron optics simulation package, supported the basic function of an RFA, a three-element lens and the magnetic sector mass filter. These simulated results agreed with experimental data. For the size selection experiment, the channeltron electron multiplier collected ionized cluster signal at different positions during Ag deposition on a TEM grid for four and half hours. The cluster signal was high at the position for neutral clusters, which was not bent by a magnetic field, and the signal decreased rapidly far away from the neutral cluster region. For cluster separation according to mass to charge ratio in a

  13. Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis

    DOEpatents

    Tuszewski, Michel G.

    1997-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector.

  14. Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis

    DOEpatents

    Tuszewski, M.G.

    1997-07-22

    A mass spectrometer and methods are disclosed for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector. 7 figs.

  15. Mass dependency of turbulent parameters in stationary glow discharge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, J. B.; Alexander, A. B.; Wiggins, D. L.; Johnson, J. A. III

    2013-05-15

    A direct current glow discharge tube is used to determine how mass changes the effects of certain turbulence characteristics in a weakly ionized gas. Helium, neon, argon, and krypton plasmas were created, and an axial magnetic field, varied from 0.0 to 550.0 Gauss, was used to enhance mass dependent properties of turbulence. From the power spectra of light emission variations associated with velocity fluctuations, determination of mass dependency on turbulent characteristic unstable modes, energy associated with turbulence, and the rate at which energy is transferred from scale to scale are measured. The magnetic field strength is found to be too weak to overcome particle diffusion to the walls to affect the turbulence in all four types of plasmas, though mass dependency is still detected. Though the total energy and the rate at which the energy moves between scales are mass invariant, the amplitude of the instability modes that characterize each plasma are dependent on mass.

  16. An interchangeable-cathode vacuum arc plasma source.

    PubMed

    Olson, David K; Peterson, Bryan G; Hart, Grant W

    2010-01-01

    A simplified vacuum arc design [based on metal vapor vacuum arc (MeVVA) concepts] is employed as a plasma source for a study of a (7)Be non-neutral plasma. The design includes a mechanism for interchanging the cathode source. Testing of the plasma source showed that it is capable of producing on the order of 10(12) charges at confinable energies using a boron-carbide disk as the cathode target. The design is simplified from typical designs for lower energy and lower density applications by using only the trigger spark rather than the full vacuum arc in high current ion beam designs. The interchangeability of the cathode design gives the source the ability to replace only the source sample, simplifying use of radioactive materials in the plasma source. The sample can also be replaced with a completely different conductive material. The design can be easily modified for use in other plasma confinement or full MeVVA applications.

  17. Analysis of the tuning characteristics of microwave plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotk, Robert; Jasiński, Mariusz; Mizeraczyk, Jerzy

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present an analysis of the tuning characteristics of waveguide-supplied metal-cylinder-based nozzleless microwave plasma source. This analysis has enabled to estimate the electron concentration ne and electron frequency collisions ν in the plasma generated in nitrogen and in a mixture of nitrogen and ethanol vapour. The parameters ne and ν are the basic quantities that characterize the plasma. The presented new plasma diagnostic method is particularly useful, when spectroscopic methods are useless. The presented plasma source is currently used in research of a hydrogen production from liquids.

  18. Gold fingerprinting by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watling, R. John; Herbert, Hugh K.; Delev, Dianne; Abell, Ian D.

    1994-02-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) has been applied to the characterization of the trace element composition "fingerprint" of selected gold samples from Western Australia and South Africa. By comparison of the elemental associations it is possible to relate gold to a specific mineralizing event, mine or bullion sample. This methodology facilitates identification of the provenance of stolen gold or gold used in salting activities. In this latter case, it is common for gold from a number of sources to be used in the salting process. Consequently, gold in the prospect being salted will not come from a single source and identification of multiple sources for this gold will establish that salting has occurred. Preliminary results also indicate that specific elemental associations could be used to identify the country of origin of gold. The technique has already been applied in 17 cases involving gold theft in Western Australia, where it is estimated that up to 2% of gold production is "relocated" each year as a result of criminal activities.

  19. Status of Plasma Spectroscopy Method for CNS Hyper-ECR Ion Source at RIKEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shoichi; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kubono, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Kase, Masayuki; Hattori, Toshiyuki; Shimoura, Susumu

    The optical line spectra of multi-charged gaseous and metal ion beams from ECR plasma have been observed using a grating monochromator with photomultiplier. This new method simplifies the observation of the targeted ion species in the plasma during beam tuning. In this paper we describe present condition of the Hyper-ECR ion source tuning with this plasma spectroscopy method. This data is important because separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is almost impossible.

  20. Negative ion source with hollow cathode discharge plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Prelec, Krsto

    1983-01-01

    A negative ion source of the type where negative ions are formed by bombarding a low-work-function surface with positive ions and neutral particles from a plasma, wherein a highly ionized plasma is injected into an anode space containing the low-work-function surface. The plasma is formed by hollow cathode discharge and injected into the anode space along the magnetic field lines. Preferably, the negative ion source is of the magnetron type.

  1. Negative ion source with hollow cathode discharge plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.; Prelec, K.

    1980-12-12

    A negative ion source of the type where negative ions are formed by bombarding a low-work-function surface with positive ions and neutral particles from a plasma, wherein a highly ionized plasma is injected into an anode space containing the low-work-function surface is described. The plasma is formed by hollow cathode discharge and injected into the anode space along the magnetic field lines. Preferably, the negative ion source is of the magnetron type.

  2. Antitumor action of non thermal plasma sources, DBD and Plasma Gun, alone or in combined protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Eric; Brullé, Laura; Vandamme, Marc; Riès, Delphine; Le Pape, Alain; Pouvesle, Jean-Michel

    2012-10-01

    The presentation deals with the assessment on two non thermal plasma sources developed and optimized for oncology applications. The first plasma source is a floating-electrode dielectric barrier discharge powered at a few hundreds of Hz which deliver air-plasma directly on the surface of cell culture medium in dishes or on the skin or organs of mice bearing cancer tumors. The second plasma source, so called Plasma Gun, is a plasma jet source triggered in noble gas, transferred in high aspect ratio and flexible capillaries, on targeting cells or tumors after plasma transfer in air through the ``plasma plume'' generated at the capillary outlet. In vitro evidence for massive cancer cell destruction and in vivo tumor activity and growth rate reductions have been measured with both plasma sources. DNA damages, cell cycle arrests and apoptosis induction were also demonstrated following the application of any of the two plasma source both in vitro and in vivo. The comparison of plasma treatment with state of the art chemotherapeutic alternatives has been performed and last but not least the benefit of combined protocols involving plasma and chemotherapeutic treatments has been evidenced for mice bearing orthotopic pancreas cancer and is under evaluation for the colon tumors.

  3. Coupled microwave ECR and radio-frequency plasma source for plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, C.C.; Haselton, H.H.

    1994-03-08

    In a dual plasma device, the first plasma is a microwave discharge having its own means of plasma initiation and control. The microwave discharge operates at electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), and generates a uniform plasma over a large area of about 1000 cm[sup 2] at low pressures below 0.1 mtorr. The ECR microwave plasma initiates the second plasma, a radio frequency (RF) plasma maintained between parallel plates. The ECR microwave plasma acts as a source of charged particles, supplying copious amounts of a desired charged excited species in uniform manner to the RF plasma. The parallel plate portion of the apparatus includes a magnetic filter with static magnetic field structure that aids the formation of ECR zones in the two plasma regions, and also assists in the RF plasma also operating at electron cyclotron resonance. 4 figures.

  4. Coupled microwave ECR and radio-frequency plasma source for plasma processing

    DOEpatents

    Tsai, Chin-Chi; Haselton, Halsey H.

    1994-01-01

    In a dual plasma device, the first plasma is a microwave discharge having its own means of plasma initiation and control. The microwave discharge operates at electron cyclotron resonance (ECR), and generates a uniform plasma over a large area of about 1000 cm.sup.2 at low pressures below 0.1 mtorr. The ECR microwave plasma initiates the second plasma, a radio frequency (RF) plasma maintained between parallel plates. The ECR microwave plasma acts as a source of charged particles, supplying copious amounts of a desired charged excited species in uniform manner to the RF plasma. The parallel plate portion of the apparatus includes a magnetic filter with static magnetic field structure that aids the formation of ECR zones in the two plasma regions, and also assists in the RF plasma also operating at electron cyclotron resonance.

  5. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina; Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate.

  6. Initial experimental test of a helicon plasma based mass filter

    DOE PAGES

    Gueroult, R.; Evans, E. S.; Zweben, S. J.; Fisch, N. J.; Levinton, F.

    2016-05-12

    High throughput plasma mass separation requires rotation control in a high density multi-species plasmas. A preliminary mass separation device based on a helicon plasma operating in gas mixtures and featuring concentric biasable ring electrodes is introduced. Plasma profile shows strong response to electrode biasing. In light of floating potential measurements, the density response is interpreted as the consequence of a reshaping of the radial electric field in the plasma. This field can be made confining or de-confining depending on the imposed potential at the electrodes, in a way which is consistent with single particle orbit radial stability. In conclusion, concurrentmore » spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements suggest ion separation, with heavy to light ion emission line ratio increasing with radius when a specific potential gradient is applied to the electrodes.« less

  7. Initial experimental test of a helicon plasma based mass filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueroult, R.; Evans, E. S.; Zweben, S. J.; Fisch, N. J.; Levinton, F.

    2016-06-01

    High throughput plasma mass separation requires rotation control in a high density multi-species plasmas. A preliminary mass separation device based on a helicon plasma operating in gas mixtures and featuring concentric biasable ring electrodes is introduced. Plasma profile shows strong response to electrode biasing. In light of floating potential measurements, the density response is interpreted as the consequence of a reshaping of the radial electric field in the plasma. This field can be made confining or de-confining depending on the imposed potential at the electrodes, in a way which is consistent with single particle orbit radial stability. Concurrent spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements suggest ion separation, with heavy to light ion emission line ratio increasing with radius when a specific potential gradient is applied to the electrodes.

  8. Matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoshan

    1995-07-07

    The inductively coupled plasma is an electrodeless discharge in a gas (usually Ar) at atmospheric pressure. Radio frequency energy generated by a RF power source is inductively coupled to the plasma gas through a water cooled load coil. In ICP-MS the {open_quotes}Fassel{close_quotes} TAX quartz torch commonly used in emission is mounted horizontally. The sample aerosol is introduced into the central flow, where the gas kinetic temperature is about 5000 K. The aerosol is vaporized, atomized, excited and ionized in the plasma, and the ions are subsequently extracted through two metal apertures (sampler and skimmer) into the mass spectrometer. In ICP-MS, the matrix effects, or non-spectroscopic interferences, can be defined as the type of interferences caused by dissolved concomitant salt ions in the solution. Matrix effects can be divided into two categories: (1) signal drift due to the deposition of solids on the sampling apertures; and/or (2) signal suppression or enhancement by the presence of the dissolved salts. The first category is now reasonably understood. The dissolved salts, especially refractory oxides, tend to deposit on the cool tip of the sampling cone. The clogging of the orifices reduces the ion flow into the ICP-MS, lowers the pressure in the first stage of ICP-MS, and enhances the level of metal oxide ions. Because the extent of the clogging increases with the time, the signal drifts down. Even at the very early stage of the development of ICP-MS, matrix effects had been observed. Houk et al. found out that the ICP-MS was not tolerant to solutions containing significant amounts of dissolved solids.

  9. Capillary plasma jet: A low volume plasma source for life science applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topala, I.; Nagatsu, M.

    2015-02-01

    In this letter, we present results from multispectroscopic analysis of protein films, after exposure to a peculiar plasma source, i.e., the capillary plasma jet. This plasma source is able to generate very small pulsed plasma volumes, in kilohertz range, with characteristic dimensions smaller than 1 mm. This leads to specific microscale generation and transport of all plasma species. Plasma diagnosis was realized using general electrical and optical methods. Depending on power level and exposure duration, this miniature plasma jet can induce controllable modifications to soft matter targets. Detailed discussions on protein film oxidation and chemical etching are supported by results from absorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and microscopy techniques. Further exploitation of principles presented here may consolidate research interests involving plasmas in biotechnologies and plasma medicine, especially in patterning technologies, modified biomolecule arrays, and local chemical functionalization.

  10. Capillary plasma jet: A low volume plasma source for life science applications

    SciTech Connect

    Topala, I. E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp; Nagatsu, M. E-mail: tmnagat@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp

    2015-02-02

    In this letter, we present results from multispectroscopic analysis of protein films, after exposure to a peculiar plasma source, i.e., the capillary plasma jet. This plasma source is able to generate very small pulsed plasma volumes, in kilohertz range, with characteristic dimensions smaller than 1 mm. This leads to specific microscale generation and transport of all plasma species. Plasma diagnosis was realized using general electrical and optical methods. Depending on power level and exposure duration, this miniature plasma jet can induce controllable modifications to soft matter targets. Detailed discussions on protein film oxidation and chemical etching are supported by results from absorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and microscopy techniques. Further exploitation of principles presented here may consolidate research interests involving plasmas in biotechnologies and plasma medicine, especially in patterning technologies, modified biomolecule arrays, and local chemical functionalization.

  11. Source apportionment using reconstructed mass calculations.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Naila; Waheed, Shahida

    2014-01-01

    A long-term study was undertaken to investigate the air quality of the Islamabad/Rawalpindi area. In this regard fine and coarse particulate matter were collected from 4 sites in the Islamabad/Rawalpindi region from 1998 to 2010 using Gent samplers and polycarbonate filters and analyzed for their elemental composition using the techniques of Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), Proton Induced X-ray Emission/Proton Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIXE/PIGE) and X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Spectroscopy. The elemental data along with the gravimetric measurements and black carbon (BC) results obtained by reflectance measurement were used to approximate or reconstruct the particulate mass (RCM) by estimation of pseudo sources such as soil, smoke, sea salt, sulfate and black carbon or soot. This simple analysis shows that if the analytical technique used does not measure important major elements then the data will not be representative of the sample composition and cannot be further utilized for source apportionment studies or to perform transboundary analysis. In this regard PIXE/PIGE and XRF techniques that can provide elemental compositional data for most of the major environmentally important elements appear to be more useful as compared to NAA. Therefore %RCM calculations for such datasets can be used as a quality assurance (QA) measure to treat data prior to application of chemometrical tools such as factor analysis (FA) or cluster analysis (CA). PMID:24345244

  12. Ferroelectric Plasma Source for Heavy Ion Beam ChargeNeutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry; Davidson,Ronald C.; Yu, Simon; Waldron, William; Logan, B. Grant

    2005-10-01

    Plasmas are employed as a source of unbound electrons for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams to allow them to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length {approx} 0.1-1 m would be suitable. To produce one-meter plasma, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being developed. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source utilizes the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO{sub 3} to form metal plasma. The drift tube inner surface of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) will be covered with ceramic, and high voltage ({approx} 1-5 kV) applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. A prototype ferroelectric source 20 cm long has produced plasma densities of 5 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. The source was integrated into the previous Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), and successfully charge neutralized the K{sup +} ion beam. Presently, the one-meter source is being fabricated. The source is being characterized and will be integrated into NDCX for charge neutralization experiments.

  13. DETERMINATION OF BROMATE IN DRINKING WATERS BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY WITH INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRIC DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bromate is a disinfection by-product in drinking water, formed during the ozonation of source water containing bromide. An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer is combined with an ion chromatograph for the analysis of bromate in drinking waters. Three chromatographic colu...

  14. LOW IONIZATION STATE PLASMA IN CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jin-Yi; Raymond, John C.

    2012-10-20

    The Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory often observes low ionization state coronal mass ejection (CME) plasma at ultraviolet wavelengths. The CME plasmas are often detected in O VI (3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K), C III (8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} K), Ly{alpha}, and Ly{beta}, with the low ionization plasma confined to bright filaments or blobs that appear in small segments of the UVCS slit. On the other hand, in situ observations by the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer on board Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) have shown mostly high ionization state plasmas in the magnetic clouds in interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) events, while low ionization states are rarely seen. In this analysis, we investigate whether the low ionization state CME plasmas observed by UVCS occupy small enough fractions of the CME to be consistent with the small fraction of ACE ICMEs that show low ionization plasma, or whether the CME plasma must be further ionized after passing the UVCS slit. To do this, we determine the covering factors of low ionization state plasma for 10 CME events. We find that the low ionization state plasmas in CMEs observed by UVCS show average covering factors below 10%. This indicates that the lack of low ionization state ICME plasmas observed by the ACE results from a small probability that the spacecraft passes through a region of low ionization plasma. We also find that the low ionization state plasma covering factors in faster CMEs are smaller than in slower CMEs.

  15. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse.

  16. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beama)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y.

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA/mm2 at the peak of the pulse.

  17. Public Data Set: Impedance of an Intense Plasma-Cathode Electron Source for Tokamak Plasma Startup

    DOE Data Explorer

    Hinson, Edward T. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:000000019713140X); Barr, Jayson L. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000177685931); Bongard, Michael W. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000231609746); Burke, Marcus G. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000176193724); Fonck, Raymond J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000294386762); Perry, Justin M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000171228609)

    2016-05-31

    This data set contains openly-documented, machine readable digital research data corresponding to figures published in E.T. Hinson et al., 'Impedance of an Intense Plasma-Cathode Electron Source for Tokamak Plasma Startup,' Physics of Plasmas 23, 052515 (2016).

  18. Counter-facing plasma guns for efficient extreme ultra-violet plasma light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Akiko; Kuwabara, Hajime; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Kawamura, Tohru; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2013-11-01

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial guns was proposed as a long-pulse and/or repetitive high energy density plasma source. We applied Li as the source of plasma for improvement of the conversion efficiency, the spectral purity, and the repetition capability. For operation of the system with ideal counter-facing plasma focus mode, we changed the system from simple coaxial geometry to a multi-channel configuration. We applied a laser trigger to make synchronous multi-channel discharges with low jitter. The results indicated that the configuration is promising to make a high energy density plasma with high spectral efficiency.

  19. Measurements of plasma bremsstrahlung and plasma energy density produced by electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noland, Jonathan David

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to gain an understanding on the relative importance of microwave power, neutral pressure, and magnetic field configuration on the behavior of the hot electrons within an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) plasma. This was carried out through measurement of plasma bremsstrahlung with both NaI(Tl) (hv > 30 keV) and CdTe (2 keV < hv < 70 keV) x-ray detectors, and through measurement of the plasma energy density with a diamagnetic loop placed around the plasma chamber. We also examined the anisotropy in x-ray power by simultaneously measuring the x-ray spectra in two orthogonal directions: radially and axially, using NaI(Tl) detectors. We have seen that for a 6.4 GHz ECRIS, both the x-ray power produced by confined electrons and the plasma energy density behave logarithmically with microwave power. The x-ray flux created by electrons lost from the plasma, however, does not saturate. Thus, the small increase in plasma density that occurred at high microwave powers (> 150 W on a 6.4 GHz ECRIS) was accompanied by a large increase in total x-ray power. We suggest that the saturation of x-ray power and plasma energy density was due to rf-induced pitch-angle scattering of the electrons. X-ray power and plasma energy density were also shown to saturate with neutral pressure, and to increase nearly linearly as the gradient of the magnetic field in the resonance zone was decreased. All of these findings were in agreement with the theoretical models describing ECRIS plasmas. We have discussed the use of a diamagnetic loop as a means of exploring various plasma time scales on a relative basis. Specifically, we focused much of our attention on studying how changing ion source parameters, such as microwave power and neutral pressure, would effect the rise and decay of the integrated diamagnetic signal, which can be related to plasma energy density. We showed that increasing microwave power lowers the e-fold times at both the leading

  20. Automated control of linear constricted plasma source array

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; Maschwitz, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for controlling an array of constricted glow discharge chambers are disclosed. More particularly a linear array of constricted glow plasma sources whose polarity and geometry are set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the sources are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The quality of film along deposition "tracks" opposite the plasma sources can be measured and compared to desired absolute or relative values by optical and/or electrical sensors. Plasma quality can then be adjusted by adjusting the power current values, gas feed pressure/flow, gas mixtures or a combination of some or all of these to improve the match between the measured values and the desired values.

  1. Mass production of magnetic nickel nanoparticle in thermal plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, Ashok B.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.; Das, A. K.

    2014-04-24

    We report the mass production of Ni metal nanoparticles using dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by homogeneous gas phase condensation process. To increase the evaporation rate and purity of Ni nanoparticles small amount of hydrogen added along with argon in the plasma. Crystal structure analysis was done by using X-ray diffraction technique. The morphology of as synthesized nanoparticles was carried out using FESEM images. The magnetic properties were measured by using vibrating sample magnetometer at room temperature.

  2. Mass production of magnetic nickel nanoparticle in thermal plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, Ashok B.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Das, A. K.; Mathe, V. L.

    2014-04-01

    We report the mass production of Ni metal nanoparticles using dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by homogeneous gas phase condensation process. To increase the evaporation rate and purity of Ni nanoparticles small amount of hydrogen added along with argon in the plasma. Crystal structure analysis was done by using X-ray diffraction technique. The morphology of as synthesized nanoparticles was carried out using FESEM images. The magnetic properties were measured by using vibrating sample magnetometer at room temperature.

  3. The Microhollow Cathode Discharge as ion source for mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunze, Kerstin; Miclea, Manuela; Franzke, Joachim; Niemax, Kay

    2003-10-01

    Microhollow Cathode Discharges (MHCD) are atmospheric pressure, non-equilibrium discharges and well studied for the generation of excimer radiation. The investigated discharge consists of two platinum electrodes with a hole diameter of 100 μm separated by a 200 μm thick Al_2O3 insulator. Diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy reveals a gas temperature of 2000 K and 1000 K and electron density of 6x10^15/cm^3 and 2x10^14/cm^3 for Ar and He, respectively [1]. The ionization degree of 10-3 to 10-5 at atmospheric pressure makes the plasma suitable as a mass selective detector for analytical purposes. Hereby the discharge expands from atmospheric pressure on anode side to a low-pressure regime on cathode side. The MHCD does not only act as an ion source, but the small aperture serves also as sampler for the quadrupole mass spectrometer. Halogenated hydrocarbons in gas mixtures as well as liquid samples, preseparated by a gas chromatograph, could be detected by the halogen mass in the low ppb range. [1] M. Miclea et al., Proc. XVI-th ESCAMPIG Conf., 14-18 July, Grenoble - France (2002)

  4. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Esarey, Eric H.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Leemans, Wim P.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Ben; Durant, Marc; Hamill, Paul; Messmer, Peter; Mullowney, Paul; Nieter, Chet; Paul, Kevin; Shasharina, Svetlana; Veitzer, Seth; Weber, Gunther; Rubel, Oliver; Ushizima, Daniela; Bethel, Wes; Wu, John

    2009-03-20

    Compared to conventional particle accelerators, plasmas can sustain accelerating fields that are thousands of times higher. To exploit this ability, massively parallel SciDAC particle simulations provide physical insight into the development of next-generation accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. These plasma-based accelerators offer a path to more compact, ultra-fast particle and radiation sources for probing the subatomic world, for studying new materials and new technologies, and for medical applications.

  5. POST-CORONAL MASS EJECTION PLASMA OBSERVED BY HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Raymond, J. C.; Miralles, M. P.; Hara, H.

    2012-05-20

    In the present work we study the evolution of an active region after the eruption of a coronal mass ejection (CME) using observations from the EIS and XRT instruments on board Hinode. The field of view includes a post-eruption arcade, a current sheet, and a coronal dimming. The goal of this paper is to provide a comprehensive set of measurements for all these aspects of the CME phenomenon made on the same CME event. The main physical properties of the plasma along the line of sight-electron density, thermal structure, plasma composition, size, and, when possible, mass-are measured and monitored with time for the first three hours following the CME event of 2008 April 9. We find that the loop arcade observed by EIS and XRT may not be related to the post-eruption arcade. Post-CME plasma is hotter than the surrounding corona, but its temperature never exceeds 3 MK. Both the electron density and thermal structure do not show significant evolution with time, while we found that the size of the loop arcade in the Hinode plane of the sky decreased with time. The plasma composition is the same in the current sheet, in the loop arcade, and in the ambient plasma, so all these plasmas are likely of coronal origin. No significant plasma flows were detected.

  6. Pacific Islands Mass Communications; Selected Information Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richstad, Jim; McMillan, Michael

    1977-01-01

    Presents a bibliography of materials on such area of mass communications in the Pacific Islands as broadcasting, radio and television, cinema, communication research, mass media in education, Honululu Media Council, newspapers and newspapermen, and printing and satellite communication. (JEG)

  7. Matching network for RF plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Pickard, Daniel S.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2007-11-20

    A compact matching network couples an RF power supply to an RF antenna in a plasma generator. The simple and compact impedance matching network matches the plasma load to the impedance of a coaxial transmission line and the output impedance of an RF amplifier at radio frequencies. The matching network is formed of a resonantly tuned circuit formed of a variable capacitor and an inductor in a series resonance configuration, and a ferrite core transformer coupled to the resonantly tuned circuit. This matching network is compact enough to fit in existing compact focused ion beam systems.

  8. Imaging thermal plasma mass and velocity analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau, Andrew W.; Howarth, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    We present the design and principle of operation of the imaging ion mass and velocity analyzer on the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP), which measures low-energy (1-90 eV/e) ion mass composition (1-40 AMU/e) and velocity distributions using a hemispherical electrostatic analyzer (HEA), a time-of-flight (TOF) gate, and a pair of toroidal electrostatic deflectors (TED). The HEA and TOF gate measure the energy-per-charge and azimuth of each detected ion and the ion transit time inside the analyzer, respectively, providing the 2-D velocity distribution of each major ionospheric ion species and resolving the minor ion species under favorable conditions. The TED are in front of the TOF gate and optionally sample ions at different elevation angles up to ±60°, for measurement of 3-D velocity distribution. We present examples of observation data to illustrate the measurement capability of the analyzer, and show the occurrence of enhanced densities of heavy "minor" O++, N+, and molecular ions and intermittent, high-velocity (a few km/s) upward and downward flowing H+ ions in localized regions of the quiet time topside high-latitude ionosphere.

  9. Helicon Plasma Source Configuration Analysis by Means of Density Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Angrilli, F.; Barber, G.C.; Carter, M.D.; Goulding, R.H.; Maggiora, R.; Pavarin, D.; Sparks, D.O.

    1999-11-13

    Initial results have been obtained from operation of a helicon plasma source built to conduct optimization studies for space propulsion applications. The source features an easily reconfigurable antenna to test different geometries. Operating with He as the source gas, peak densities >= 1.6X10{sup 19} m{sup -3} have been achieved. Radial and axial plasma profiles have been obtained using a microwave interferometer that can be scanned axially and a Langmuir probe. The source will be used to investigate operation at high magnetic field, frequency, and input power.

  10. Erosion resistant nozzles for laser plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sources

    DOEpatents

    Kubiak, Glenn D.; Bernardez, II, Luis J.

    2000-01-04

    A gas nozzle having an increased resistance to erosion from energetic plasma particles generated by laser plasma sources. By reducing the area of the plasma-facing portion of the nozzle below a critical dimension and fabricating the nozzle from a material that has a high EUV transmission as well as a low sputtering coefficient such as Be, C, or Si, it has been shown that a significant reduction in reflectance loss of nearby optical components can be achieved even after exposing the nozzle to at least 10.sup.7 Xe plasma pulses.

  11. Fullerene-rare gas mixed plasmas in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Asaji, T. Ohba, T.; Uchida, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Minezaki, H.; Ishihara, S.; Racz, R.; Biri, S.; Kato, Y.

    2014-02-15

    A synthesis technology of endohedral fullerenes such as Fe@C{sub 60} has developed with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. The production of N@C{sub 60} was reported. However, the yield was quite low, since most fullerene molecules were broken in the ECR plasma. We have adopted gas-mixing techniques in order to cool the plasma and then reduce fullerene dissociation. Mass spectra of ion beams extracted from fullerene-He, Ar or Xe mixed plasmas were observed with a Faraday cup. From the results, the He gas mixing technique is effective against fullerene destruction.

  12. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O; Wilson, Michael A; Schaller, Emily L

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  13. The mass and speed dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O.; Wilson, Michael A.; Schaller, Emily L.

    2004-01-01

    The speed and mass dependence of meteor air plasma temperatures is perhaps the most important data needed to understand how small meteoroids chemically change the ambient atmosphere in their path and enrich the ablated meteoric organic matter with oxygen. Such chemistry can play an important role in creating prebiotic compounds. The excitation conditions in various air plasma emissions were measured from high-resolution optical spectra of Leonid storm meteors during NASA's Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. This was the first time a sufficient number and range of temperature measurements were obtained to search for meteoroid mass and speed dependencies. We found slight increases in temperature with decreasing altitude, but otherwise nearly constant values for meteoroids with speeds between 35 and 72 km/s and masses between 10(-5) g and 1 g. We conclude that faster and more massive meteoroids produce a larger emission volume, but not a higher air plasma temperature. We speculate that the meteoric plasma may be in multiphase equilibrium with the ambient atmosphere, which could mean lower plasma temperatures in a CO(2)-rich early Earth atmosphere.

  14. Surface Plasma Source Electrode Activation by Surface Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Han, Baoxi; Johnson, Rolland P.; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    In experiments with RF saddle antenna surface plasma sources (SPS), the efficiency of H- ion generation was increased by up to a factor of 5 by long time plasma electrode activation, without adding Cs from Cs supply, by heating the collar to high temperature using hot air flow and plasma discharge. Without cracking or heating the cesium ampoule, but likely with Cs recovery from impurities, the achieved energy efficiency was comparable to that of conventionally cesiated SNS RF sources with an external or internal Cs supply. In the experiments, perfect cesiation was produced (without additional Cs supply) by the collection and trapping of traces of remnant cesium compounds from SPS surfaces.

  15. A Penning-assisted subkilovolt coaxial plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhehui; Beinke, Paul D.; Barnes, Cris W.; Martin, Michael W.; Mignardot, Edward; Wurden, Glen A.; Hsu, Scott C.; Intrator, Thomas P.; Munson, Carter P.

    2005-03-01

    A Penning-assisted 20 MW coaxial plasma source (plasma gun), which can achieve breakdown at sub-kV voltages, is described. The minimum breakdown voltage is about 400 V, significantly lower than previously reported values of 1-5 kV. The Penning region for electrons is created using a permanent magnet assembly, which is mounted to the inside of the cathode of the coaxial plasma source. A theoretical model for the breakdown is given. A 900 V 0.5 F capacitor bank supplies energy for gas breakdown and plasma sustainment from 4 to 6 ms duration. Typical peak gun current is about 100 kA and gun voltage between anode and cathode after breakdown is about 200 V. A circuit model is used to understand the current-voltage characteristics of the coaxial gun plasma. Energy deposited into the plasma accounts for about 60% of the total capacitor bank energy. This plasma source is uniquely suitable for studying multi-MW multi-ms plasmas with sub-MJ capacitor bank energy.

  16. Combined Gas-Liquid Plasma Source for Nanoparticle Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burakov, V. S.; Kiris, V. V.; Nevar, A. A.; Nedelko, M. I.; Tarasenko, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    A gas-liquid plasma source for the synthesis of colloidal nanoparticles by spark erosion of the electrode material was developed and allowed the particle synthesis regime to be varied over a wide range. The source parameters were analyzed in detail for the electrical discharge conditions in water. The temperature, particle concentration, and pressure in the discharge plasma were estimated based on spectroscopic analysis of the plasma. It was found that the plasma parameters did not change signifi cantly if the condenser capacitance was increased from 5 to 20 nF. Purging the electrode gap with argon reduced substantially the pressure and particle concentration. Signifi cant amounts of water decomposition products in addition to electrode elements were found in the plasma in all discharge regimes. This favored the synthesis of oxide nanoparticles.

  17. Pulsed, atmospheric pressure plasma source for emission spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Jin, Zhe; Su, Yongxuan

    2004-05-11

    A low-power, plasma source-based, portable molecular light emission generator/detector employing an atmospheric pressure pulsed-plasma for molecular fragmentation and excitation is described. The average power required for the operation of the plasma is between 0.02 W and 5 W. The features of the optical emission spectra obtained with the pulsed plasma source are significantly different from those obtained with direct current (dc) discharge higher power; for example, strong CH emission at 431.2 nm which is only weakly observed with dc plasma sources was observed, and the intense CN emission observed at 383-388 nm using dc plasma sources was weak in most cases. Strong CN emission was only observed using the present apparatus when compounds containing nitrogen, such as aniline were employed as samples. The present apparatus detects dimethylsulfoxide at 200 ppb using helium as the plasma gas by observing the emission band of the CH radical. When coupled with a gas chromatograph for separating components present in a sample to be analyzed, the present invention provides an apparatus for detecting the arrival of a particular component in the sample at the end of the chromatographic column and the identity thereof.

  18. Alternative modeling methods for plasma-based Rf ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitzer, Seth A.; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Stoltz, Peter H.; Beckwith, Kristian R. C.

    2016-02-01

    Rf-driven ion sources for accelerators and many industrial applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling and simulation of plasma characteristics. For instance, modeling of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) internal antenna H- source has indicated that a large plasma velocity is induced near bends in the antenna where structural failures are often observed. This could lead to improved designs and ion source performance based on simulation and modeling. However, there are significant separations of time and spatial scales inherent to Rf-driven plasma ion sources, which makes it difficult to model ion sources with explicit, kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation codes. In particular, if both electron and ion motions are to be explicitly modeled, then the simulation time step must be very small, and total simulation times must be large enough to capture the evolution of the plasma ions, as well as extending over many Rf periods. Additional physics processes such as plasma chemistry and surface effects such as secondary electron emission increase the computational requirements in such a way that even fully parallel explicit PIC models cannot be used. One alternative method is to develop fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics in order to model ion sources. Time-domain fluid models can simulate plasma evolution, plasma chemistry, and surface physics models with reasonable computational resources by not explicitly resolving electron motions, which thereby leads to an increase in the time step. This is achieved by solving fluid motions coupled with electromagnetics using reduced-physics models, such as single-temperature magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), extended, gas dynamic, and Hall MHD, and two-fluid MHD models. We show recent results on modeling the internal antenna H- ion source for the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the fluid plasma modeling code USim. We compare demonstrate plasma temperature equilibration in two-temperature MHD models

  19. Alternative modeling methods for plasma-based Rf ion sources.

    PubMed

    Veitzer, Seth A; Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Stoltz, Peter H; Beckwith, Kristian R C

    2016-02-01

    Rf-driven ion sources for accelerators and many industrial applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling and simulation of plasma characteristics. For instance, modeling of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) internal antenna H(-) source has indicated that a large plasma velocity is induced near bends in the antenna where structural failures are often observed. This could lead to improved designs and ion source performance based on simulation and modeling. However, there are significant separations of time and spatial scales inherent to Rf-driven plasma ion sources, which makes it difficult to model ion sources with explicit, kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation codes. In particular, if both electron and ion motions are to be explicitly modeled, then the simulation time step must be very small, and total simulation times must be large enough to capture the evolution of the plasma ions, as well as extending over many Rf periods. Additional physics processes such as plasma chemistry and surface effects such as secondary electron emission increase the computational requirements in such a way that even fully parallel explicit PIC models cannot be used. One alternative method is to develop fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics in order to model ion sources. Time-domain fluid models can simulate plasma evolution, plasma chemistry, and surface physics models with reasonable computational resources by not explicitly resolving electron motions, which thereby leads to an increase in the time step. This is achieved by solving fluid motions coupled with electromagnetics using reduced-physics models, such as single-temperature magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), extended, gas dynamic, and Hall MHD, and two-fluid MHD models. We show recent results on modeling the internal antenna H(-) ion source for the SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using the fluid plasma modeling code USim. We compare demonstrate plasma temperature equilibration in two-temperature MHD

  20. Identification of Neutral Particle Sources in MST Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norval, Ryan; Munaretto, Stefano; Goetz, John; Schmitz, Oliver

    2015-11-01

    The plasma wall interaction (PWI) in the MST RFP has yet to be studied systematically to determine the effects of the edge plasma on overall plasma performance. Two imaging views of the MST plasma currently exist. The first views the outboard toroidal and poloidal belt limiters at the main poloidal gap limiter. The second views the inboard poloidal limiter, as well as a section of the outboard toroidal limiter away from the man gap limiter. Data from viewing outboard limiters reveals PWI structures correlate with the plasma conditions. In standard RFP plasmas at lower plasma currents the PWI is dominated by non-axisymmetric radiation belts. As the RFP plasma current rises, increasing axisymmetry is seen from the edge. When in the 3D equilibria of the quasi-single helicity (QSH) state the PWI correlates with the main magnetic mode of the plasma. The dominant source of light observed from the MST edge is from hydrogen recycling. This will be used to inform neutral particle sourcing in the EIRENE neutral transport code. EIRENE will be used to compare how variations in fueling could affect the neutral profile in MST. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. Arc initiation in cathodic arc plasma sources

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre

    2002-01-01

    A "triggerless" arc initiation method and apparatus is based on simply switching the arc supply voltage to the electrodes (anode and cathode). Neither a mechanical trigger electrode nor a high voltage flashover from a trigger electrode is required. A conducting path between the anode and cathode is provided, which allows a hot spot to form at a location where the path connects to the cathode. While the conductive path is eroded by the cathode spot action, plasma deposition ensures the ongoing repair of the conducting path. Arc initiation is achieved by simply applying the relatively low voltage of the arc power supply, e.g. 500 V-1 kV, with the insulator between the anode and cathode coated with a conducting layer and the current at the layer-cathode interface concentrated at one or a few contact points. The local power density at these contact points is sufficient for plasma production and thus arc initiation. A conductive surface layer, such as graphite or the material being deposited, is formed on the surface of the insulator which separates the cathode from the anode. The mechanism of plasma production (and arc initiation) is based on explosive destruction of the layer-cathode interface caused by joule heating. The current flow between the thin insulator coating and cathode occurs at only a few contact points so the current density is high.

  2. Development of a long-slot microwave plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwata, Y.; Kasuya, T.; Miyamoto, N.; Wada, M.

    2016-02-01

    A 20 cm long 10 cm wide microwave plasma source was realized by inserting two 20 cm long 1.5 mm diameter rod antennas into the plasma. Plasma luminous distributions around the antennas were changed by magnetic field arrangement created by permanent magnets attached to the source. The distributions appeared homogeneous in one direction along the antenna when the spacing between the antenna and the source wall was 7.5 mm for the input microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz. Plasma density and temperature at a plane 20 cm downstream from the microwave shield were measured by a Langmuir probe array at 150 W microwave power input. The measured electron density and temperature varied over space from 3.0 × 109 cm-3 to 5.8 × 109 cm-3, and from 1.1 eV to 2.1 eV, respectively.

  3. Development of a long-slot microwave plasma source.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Y; Kasuya, T; Miyamoto, N; Wada, M

    2016-02-01

    A 20 cm long 10 cm wide microwave plasma source was realized by inserting two 20 cm long 1.5 mm diameter rod antennas into the plasma. Plasma luminous distributions around the antennas were changed by magnetic field arrangement created by permanent magnets attached to the source. The distributions appeared homogeneous in one direction along the antenna when the spacing between the antenna and the source wall was 7.5 mm for the input microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz. Plasma density and temperature at a plane 20 cm downstream from the microwave shield were measured by a Langmuir probe array at 150 W microwave power input. The measured electron density and temperature varied over space from 3.0 × 10(9) cm(-3) to 5.8 × 10(9) cm(-3), and from 1.1 eV to 2.1 eV, respectively. PMID:26932114

  4. Operation of the Proto-MPEX High Intensity Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, J. B. O.; Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Bigelow, T. S.; Campbell, I. H.; Diem, S. J.; Martin, E. H.; Pesavento, P. V.; Rapp, J.; Ray, H. B.; Shaw, G. C.; Showers, M. A.; Luo, G.-N.

    2015-11-01

    The Prototype Materials Plasma Experiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear high-intensity rf plasma source that combines a high-density helicon plasma generator with electron and ion heating sections. It is being used to study the physics of heating over-dense plasmas in a linear configuration. The helicon plasma is produced by coupling 13.56 MHz rf power at levels up to 100 kW. Microwaves at 28 GHz (~ 150 kW) are coupled to the electrons in the over-dense helicon plasma via Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW). Ion cyclotron heating (~ 30 kW) will be via a magnetic beach approach. Plasma diagnostics include Thomson Scattering and a retarding field energy analyzer near the target, while a microwave interferometer and double-Langmuir probes are used to determine plasma parameters elsewhere in the system. Filterscopes are being used to measure D-alpha emission and He line ratios at multiple locations, and IR cameras image the target plates to determine heat deposition. High plasma densities in the helicon region have been produced in He (>3x1019/m3) and D (>1.5x1019/m3) , and operation with on-axis magnetic field strength >1 T has been demonstrated. Details of the experimental results and future plans for studying plasma surface/RF antenna interactions will be presented. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  5. The ionospheric source of magnetospheric plasma is not a black box input for global models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welling, D. T.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2016-06-01

    Including ionospheric outflow in global magnetohydrodynamic models of near-Earth outer space has become an important step toward understanding the role of this plasma source in the magnetosphere. Of the existing approaches, however, few tie the outflowing particle fluxes to magnetospheric conditions in a self-consistent manner. Doing so opens the magnetosphere-ionosphere system to nonlinear mass-energy feedback loops, profoundly changing the behavior of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. Based on these new results, it is time for the community eschew treating ionospheric outflow as a simple black box source of magnetospheric plasma.

  6. Immediate Influence of External Sources on Turbulent Plasma Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosuga, Yusuke; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Itoh, Kimitaka

    Immediate impact of external sources on pressure-gradient-driven turbulence and turbulent transport (without waiting the evolution of global parameters and those in mean velocity distribution function) is discussed. The case, where an external source directly couples with plasma fluctuations in particle source and momentum source, is investigated. Theoretical analysis is developed by use of Hasegawa-Wakatani model equations. It is shown that the momentum source can induce the immediate influence on the turbulence and turbulent transport. The effect of this coupling between source and fluctuations on the momentum theorem is also explained.

  7. Plasma spectroscopy of metal ions for hyper-electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shoichi; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kubono, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Kase, Masayuki; Hattori, Toshiyuki; Shimoura, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    In this research, the optical line spectra of metal ions from ECR plasma were observed using a grating monochromator with a photomultiplier. The light intensity of line spectrum from the ECR plasma had a strong correlation with ion beam intensity measured by a magnetic mass analyzer. This correlation is a significant information for the beam tuning process, because it allows to conduct the extraction of the desired metal ion species from the ECR plasma. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process, but this research provides a new approach for its simplification. In this paper the grating monochromator method for metal ion beam tuning such as (40)Ca(12+), (56)Fe(15+), and (85)Rb(20+) of hyper-ECR ion source as an injector for RIKEN Azimuthal Varying Field cyclotron is described.

  8. Lithium ion sources for investigations of fast ion transport in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Boehmer, H.; Heidbrink, W. W.; McWilliams, R.; Leneman, D.; Vincena, S.

    2007-01-15

    In order to study the interaction of ions of intermediate energies with plasma fluctuations, two plasma immersible lithium ion sources, based on solid-state thermionic emitters (Li aluminosilicate) were developed. Compared to discharge based ion sources, they are compact, have zero gas load, small energy dispersion, and can be operated at any angle with respect to an ambient magnetic field of up to 4.0 kG. Beam energies range from 400 eV to 2.0 keV with typical beam current densities in the 1 mA/cm{sup 2} range. Because of the low ion mass, beam velocities of 100-300 km/s are in the range of Alfven speeds in typical helium plasmas in the large plasma device.

  9. Lithium ion sources for investigations of fast ion transport in magnetized plasmas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Boehmer, H; Heidbrink, W W; McWilliams, R; Leneman, D; Vincena, S

    2007-01-01

    In order to study the interaction of ions of intermediate energies with plasma fluctuations, two plasma immersible lithium ion sources, based on solid-state thermionic emitters (Li aluminosilicate) were developed. Compared to discharge based ion sources, they are compact, have zero gas load, small energy dispersion, and can be operated at any angle with respect to an ambient magnetic field of up to 4.0 kG. Beam energies range from 400 eV to 2.0 keV with typical beam current densities in the 1 mAcm(2) range. Because of the low ion mass, beam velocities of 100-300 kms are in the range of Alfven speeds in typical helium plasmas in the large plasma device.

  10. Imploding plasma radiation sources: basic concepts. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Guillory, J.; Davis, J.

    1984-07-31

    This document is prepared as a briefing aid and technical primer for persons unfamiliar and uninitiated with the theory of imploding plasma radiation sources. It is hoped that it will prove helpful in introducing the basic physics concepts of these sources and in presenting these concepts to newcomers and potential users.

  11. What Are the Sources of Solar Energetic Particles? Element Abundances and Source Plasma Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2015-11-01

    We have spent 50 years in heated discussion over which populations of solar energetic particles (SEPs) are accelerated at flares and which by shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The association of the large "gradual" SEP events with shock acceleration is supported by the extensive spatial distribution of SEPs and by the delayed acceleration of the particles. Recent STEREO observations have begun to show that the particle onset times correspond to the observed time of arrival of the shock on the observer's magnetic flux tube and that the SEP intensities are related to the local shock speed. The relative abundances of the elements in these gradual events are a measure of those in the ambient solar corona, differing from those in the photosphere by a widely-observed function of the first ionization potential (FIP) of the elements. SEP events we call "impulsive", the traditional "3He-rich" events with enhanced heavy-element abundances, are associated with type III radio bursts, flares, and narrow CMEs; they selectively populate flux tubes that thread a localized source, and they are fit to new particle-in-cell models of magnetic reconnection on open field lines as found in solar jets. These models help explain the strong enhancements seen in heavy elements as a power (of 2-8) in the mass-to-charge ratio A/Q throughout the periodic table from He to Pb. A study of the temperature dependence of A/Q shows that the source plasma in impulsive SEP events must lie in the range of 2-4 MK to explain the pattern of abundances. This is much lower than the temperatures of >10 MK seen on closed loops in solar flares. Recent studies of A/Q-dependent enhancements or suppressions from scattering during transport show source plasma temperatures in gradual SEP events to be 0.8-1.6 MK in 69 % of the events, i.e. coronal plasma; 24 % of the events show reaccelerated impulsive-event material.

  12. A pulsed xenon megawatt arc plasma source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michels, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The exhaust of the source flowing into vacuum was measured by Thomson scattering diagnosis. Mean electron temperatures and densities were found to be 4-8 eV and of order ten to the 13th power cm/3 respectively over the 8 cm exhaust diameter at 30 cm from the source. Large shot to shot variations were noted. After a transient spike passes, these conditions persist during the power time of 125 microsecond. These exhaust conditions are marginal for evaluation of a proposed near resonant charge exchange pumped laser theory.

  13. Mass discharge assessment at a brominated DNAPL site: Effects of known DNAPL source mass removal.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C D; Davis, G B; Bastow, T P; Woodbury, R J; Rao, P S C; Annable, M D; Rhodes, S

    2014-08-01

    Management and closure of contaminated sites is increasingly being proposed on the basis of mass flux of dissolved contaminants in groundwater. Better understanding of the links between source mass removal and contaminant mass fluxes in groundwater would allow greater acceptance of this metric in dealing with contaminated sites. Our objectives here were to show how measurements of the distribution of contaminant mass flux and the overall mass discharge emanating from the source under undisturbed groundwater conditions could be related to the processes and extent of source mass depletion. In addition, these estimates of mass discharge were sought in the application of agreed remediation targets set in terms of pumped groundwater quality from offsite wells. Results are reported from field studies conducted over a 5-year period at a brominated DNAPL (tetrabromoethane, TBA; and tribromoethene, TriBE) site located in suburban Perth, Western Australia. Groundwater fluxes (qw; L(3)/L(2)/T) and mass fluxes (Jc; M/L(2)/T) of dissolved brominated compounds were simultaneously estimated by deploying Passive Flux Meters (PFMs) in wells in a heterogeneous layered aquifer. PFMs were deployed in control plane (CP) wells immediately down-gradient of the source zone, before (2006) and after (2011) 69-85% of the source mass was removed, mainly by groundwater pumping from the source zone. The high-resolution (26-cm depth interval) measures of qw and Jc along the source CP allowed investigation of the DNAPL source-zone architecture and impacts of source mass removal. Comparable estimates of total mass discharge (MD; M/T) across the source zone CP reduced from 104gday(-1) to 24-31gday(-1) (70-77% reductions). Importantly, this mass discharge reduction was consistent with the estimated proportion of source mass remaining at the site (15-31%). That is, a linear relationship between mass discharge and source mass is suggested. The spatial detail of groundwater and mass flux distributions

  14. Candidate plasma-facing materials for EUV lithography source components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanein, Ahmed; Burtseva, Tatiana; Brooks, Jeff N.; Konkashbaev, Isak K.; Rice, Bryan J.

    2003-06-01

    Material selection and lifetime issues for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography are of critical importance to the success of this technology for commercial applications. This paper reviews current trends in production and use of plasma-facing electrodes, insulators, and wall materials for EUV type sources. Ideal candidate materials should be able to: withstand high thermal shock from the short pulsed plasma; withstand high thermal loads without structural failure; reduce debris generation during discharge; and be machined accurately. We reviewed the literature on current and proposed fusion plasma-facing materials as well as current experience with plasma gun and other simulation devices. Both fusion and EUV source materials involve issues of surface erosion by particle sputtering and heat-induced evaporation/melting. These materials are either bare structural materials or surface coatings. EUV materials can be divided into four categories: wall, electrode, optical, and insulator materials. For electric discharge sources, all four types are required, whereas laser-produced plasma EUV sources do not require electrode and insulator materials. Several types of candidate alloy and other materials and methods of manufacture are recommended for each component of EUV lithography light sources.

  15. A highly reliable trigger for vacuum ARC plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardet, H.; Godechot, X.; Jarjat, F.

    1996-08-01

    The authors have developed a reliable electrical trigger and its associated circuitry to fire vacuum arc plasma or ion source. They tested different embodiments of the trigger device in order to get a highly reliable one, which is able to perform more than 1.2 x 10{sup 6} shots at 60 A and 6.5 ps pulse length. The evolution of the ion current emitted has been recorded as a function of the number of shots. They have also investigated in which direction the plasma jet is emitted : axially or radially. This device can be used to fire a vacuum arc plasma or ion source by plasma injection. It has obvious advantage to be placed outside the cathode and therefore would ease maintenance of vacuum arc devices.

  16. Analysis of radioactive metals by spark source mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A J; Kozy, A; Morris, R N

    1969-04-01

    A spark source mass spectrograph with photographic plate recording has been adapted for the analysis of plutonium and americium metals. Over seventy elements can be determined simultaneously in these metals. A comparison has been made between results obtained by mass spectrography and by conventional methods for impurity elements. The operations involved in handling radioactive materials in the mass spectrograph are also discussed. PMID:18960537

  17. Generation of metal ions in the beam plasma produced by a forevacuum-pressure electron beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Tyunkov, A. V.; Yushkov, Yu. G. Zolotukhin, D. B.; Klimov, A. S.; Savkin, K. P.

    2014-12-15

    We report on the production of metal ions of magnesium and zinc in the beam plasma formed by a forevacuum-pressure electron source. Magnesium and zinc vapor were generated by electron beam evaporation from a crucible and subsequently ionized by electron impact from the e-beam itself. Both gaseous and metallic plasmas were separately produced and characterized using a modified RGA-100 quadrupole mass-spectrometer. The fractional composition of metal isotopes in the plasma corresponds to their fractional natural abundance.

  18. Generation of metal ions in the beam plasma produced by a forevacuum-pressure electron beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyunkov, A. V.; Yushkov, Yu. G.; Zolotukhin, D. B.; Savkin, K. P.; Klimov, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the production of metal ions of magnesium and zinc in the beam plasma formed by a forevacuum-pressure electron source. Magnesium and zinc vapor were generated by electron beam evaporation from a crucible and subsequently ionized by electron impact from the e-beam itself. Both gaseous and metallic plasmas were separately produced and characterized using a modified RGA-100 quadrupole mass-spectrometer. The fractional composition of metal isotopes in the plasma corresponds to their fractional natural abundance.

  19. Characterization of an RF plasma ion source for ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kopalidis, Peter M.; Wan Zhimin

    2012-11-06

    A novel inductively coupled RF plasma ion source has been developed for use in a beamline ion implanter. Ion density data have been taken with an array of four Langmuir probes spaced equally at the source extraction arc slit. These provide ion density uniformity information as a function of source pressure, RF power and gas mixture composition. In addition, total extracted ion beam current data are presented for the same conditions. The comparative advantages of the RF source in terms of higher beam current, reduced maintenance and overall productivity improvement compared to a hot cathode source are discussed.

  20. Are Spicules the Primary Source of Hot Coronal Plasma?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2011-01-01

    The recent discovery of Type II spicules has generated considerable excitement. It has even been suggested that these ejections can account for a majority of the hot plasma observed in the corona, thus obviating the need for "coronal" heating. If this is the case, however, then there should be observational consequences. We have begun to examine some of these consequences and find reason to question the idea that spicules are the primary source of hot coronal plasma.

  1. Dual radio frequency plasma source: Understanding via electrical asymmetry effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bora, B.; Bhuyan, H.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Wong, C. S.

    2013-04-21

    On the basis of the global model, the influences of driving voltage and frequency on electron heating in geometrically symmetrical dual capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma have been investigated. Consistent with the experimental and simulation results, non-monotonic behavior of dc self bias and plasma heating with increasing high frequency is observed. In addition to the local maxima of plasma parameters for the integer values of the ratio between the frequencies ({xi}), ourstudies also predict local maxima for odd integer values of 2{xi} as a consequence of the electrical asymmetry effect produced by dual frequency voltage sources.

  2. e+e- Plasma Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hartouni, Ed P.

    2013-12-06

    This note addresses the idea of a photon source that is based on an e+e- plasma created by co-propagating beams of e+ and e-. The plasma has a well-defined temperature, and the thermal distribution of the charged particles is used to average over the relative velocity cross section multiplied by the relative velocity. Two relevant cross sections are the direct “free-free” annihilation of e+e- pairs in the plasma, and the radiative recombination of e+e- pairs into positronium (Ps) which subsequently undergoes annihilation.

  3. Model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Shahid; Balakrishna, Ajit; Chen, Zhigang; Collins, Ken

    2012-01-01

    A two-dimensional fluid plasma model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source is described. Ferrites are used in this device to improve the electromagnetic coupling between the primary coils carrying radio frequency (rf) current and a secondary plasma loop. Appropriate components of the Maxwell equations are solved to determine the electromagnetic fields and electron power deposition in the model. The effect of gas flow on species transport is also considered. The model is applied to 1 Torr Ar/NH3 plasma in this article. Rf electric field lines form a loop in the vacuum chamber and generate a plasma ring. Due to rapid dissociation of NH3, NHx+ ions are more prevalent near the gas inlet and Ar+ ions are the dominant ions farther downstream. NH3 and its by-products rapidly dissociate into small fragments as the gas flows through the plasma. With increasing source power, NH3 dissociates more readily and NHx+ ions are more tightly confined near the gas inlet. Gas flow rate significantly influences the plasma characteristics. With increasing gas flow rate, NH3 dissociation occurs farther from the gas inlet in regions with higher electron density. Consequently, more NH4+ ions are produced and dissociation by-products have higher concentrations near the outlet.

  4. The PhIX High Intensity Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, R. H.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Peng, Y.-K. M.; Rapp, J.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Biewer, T. M.; Canik, J. M.; Chen, G.; Diem, S. J.; Meitner, S. J.; Owen, L. W.

    2012-10-01

    The Physics Integration eXperiment (PhIX) is a linear high-intensity rf plasma source presently being constructed at ORNL that combines a high density helicon plasma generator with an electron heating section. It will be used to explore the physics related to heating an overdense, streaming plasma in a linear geometry by whistler waves and Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW), including optimization of heating efficiency and maximization of particle flux. Interactions between the plasma production and heating regions, and the source and a downstream target, will also be investigated. Experiments using the device will provide data for the design of an rf powered high particle flux (˜10^24/m^2- s), high heat flux(˜10 MW /m^2) steady-state linear plasma-materials test station (PMTS). In preparatory experiments, the helicon device has operated at power levels up to 90 kW, producing high plasma densities in He (6 x10^19 m-3) and D (> 4 x10^19 m-3), and has also operated at high magnetic field strength up to 0.5 T. Separate ECH experiments have demonstrated both whistler and EBW coupling at 6 GHz to an overdense plasma. A review of these experiments will be presented, as well as an overview of PhIX and its status.

  5. Atomic oxygen patterning from a biomedical needle-plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Seán; Turner, Miles M.

    2013-09-28

    A “plasma needle” is a cold plasma source operating at atmospheric pressure. Such sources interact strongly with living cells, but experimental studies on bacterial samples show that this interaction has a surprising pattern resulting in circular or annular killing structures. This paper presents numerical simulations showing that this pattern occurs because biologically active reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are produced dominantly where effluent from the plasma needle interacts with ambient air. A novel solution strategy is utilised coupling plasma produced neutral (uncharged) reactive species to the gas dynamics solving for steady state profiles at the treated biological surface. Numerical results are compared with experimental reports corroborating evidence for atomic oxygen as a key bactericidal species. Surface losses are considered for interaction of plasma produced reactants with reactive solid and liquid interfaces. Atomic oxygen surface reactions on a reactive solid surface with adsorption probabilities above 0.1 are shown to be limited by the flux of atomic oxygen from the plasma. Interaction of the source with an aqueous surface showed hydrogen peroxide as the dominant species at this interface.

  6. Atomic oxygen patterning from a biomedical needle-plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Seán; Turner, Miles M.

    2013-09-01

    A "plasma needle" is a cold plasma source operating at atmospheric pressure. Such sources interact strongly with living cells, but experimental studies on bacterial samples show that this interaction has a surprising pattern resulting in circular or annular killing structures. This paper presents numerical simulations showing that this pattern occurs because biologically active reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are produced dominantly where effluent from the plasma needle interacts with ambient air. A novel solution strategy is utilised coupling plasma produced neutral (uncharged) reactive species to the gas dynamics solving for steady state profiles at the treated biological surface. Numerical results are compared with experimental reports corroborating evidence for atomic oxygen as a key bactericidal species. Surface losses are considered for interaction of plasma produced reactants with reactive solid and liquid interfaces. Atomic oxygen surface reactions on a reactive solid surface with adsorption probabilities above 0.1 are shown to be limited by the flux of atomic oxygen from the plasma. Interaction of the source with an aqueous surface showed hydrogen peroxide as the dominant species at this interface.

  7. ECR plasma source for heavy ion beam charge neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.; Grisham, L.; Kolchin, P.; Davidson, E.C.; Yu, S.S.; Logan, B.G.

    2002-05-01

    Highly ionized plasmas are being considered as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus beyond the space-charge limit. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length {approx} 0.1-2 m would be suitable for achieving a high level of charge neutralization. An ECR source has been built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) to support a joint Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to study ion beam neutralization with plasma. The ECR source operates at 13.6 MHz and with solenoid magnetic fields of 1-10 gauss. The goal is to operate the source at pressures {approx} 10{sup -6} Torr at full ionization. The initial operation of the source has been at pressures of 10{sup -4}-10{sup -1} Torr. Electron densities in the range of 10{sup 8}-10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} have been achieved. Low-pressure operation is important to reduce ion beam ionization. A cusp magnetic field has been installed to improve radial confinement and reduce the field strength on the beam axis. In addition, axial confinement is believed to be important to achieve lower-pressure operation. To further improve breakdown at low pressure, a weak electron source will be placed near the end of the ECR source.

  8. Surface Plasma Source Electrode Activation by Surface Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Johnson, Rolland P.; Han, B.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, Martin P.; Welton, R. F.

    2011-09-26

    In experiments with RF saddle antenna surface plasma sources (SPS), the efficiency of H{sup -} ion generation was increased by up to a factor of 5 by plasma electrode 'activation', without supplying additional Cs, by heating the collar to high temperature for several hours using hot air flow and plasma discharge. Without cracking or heating the cesium ampoule, but likely with Cs recovery from impurities, the achieved energy efficiency was comparable to that of conventionally cesiated SNS RF sources with an external or internal Cs supply. In the experiments, optimum cesiation was produced (without additional Cs) by the collection and trapping of traces of remnant cesium compounds from SPS surfaces. Such activation by accumulation of impurities on electrode surfaces can be a reason for H{sup -} emission enhancement in other so-called 'volume' negative ion sources.

  9. Simple filtered repetitively pulsed vacuum arc plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Chekh, Yu.; Zhirkov, I. S.; Delplancke-Ogletree, M. P.

    2010-02-15

    A very simple design of cathodic filtered vacuum arc plasma source is proposed. The source without filter has only four components and none of them require precise machining. The source operates in a repetitively pulsed regime, and for laboratory experiments it can be used without water cooling. Despite the simple construction, the source provides high ion current at the filter outlet reaching 2.5% of 400 A arc current, revealing stable operation in a wide pressure range from high vacuum to oxygen pressure up to more than 10{sup -2} mbar. There is no need in complicated power supply system for this plasma source, only one power supply can be used to ignite the arc, to provide the current for the arc itself, to generate the magnetic field in the filter, and provide its positive electric biasing without any additional high power resistance.

  10. Efficient cesiation in RF driven surface plasma negative ion source.

    PubMed

    Belchenko, Yu; Ivanov, A; Konstantinov, S; Sanin, A; Sotnikov, O

    2016-02-01

    Experiments on hydrogen negative ions production in the large radio-frequency negative ion source with cesium seed are described. The system of directed cesium deposition to the plasma grid periphery was used. The small cesium seed (∼0.5 G) provides an enhanced H(-) production during a 2 month long experimental cycle. The gradual increase of negative ion yield during the long-term source runs was observed after cesium addition to the source. The degraded H(-) production was recorded after air filling to the source or after the cesium washing away from the driver and plasma chamber walls. The following source conditioning by beam shots produces the gradual recovery of H(-) yield to the high value. The effect of H(-) yield recovery after cesium coverage passivation by air fill was studied. The concept of cesium coverage replenishment and of H(-) yield recovery due to sputtering of cesium from the deteriorated layers is discussed. PMID:26932015

  11. Reasonable structure for the discharge type plasma source. [In Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    An, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments conducted with a magnetoplasma thruster in which plasma production and acceleration were treated separately indicate that different plasma source geometries have the most direct effect on energy conversion efficiency. An analysis of cup and tube type constraining structures shows the cup type to incur the greatest losses. It is noted that a parallel rail-type open structure such as that employed by the Chinese MDT-2A thruster leads to substantial discharge process dispersion. It is emphasized that the type and performance characteristics of a plasma source have a critical influence on thruster behavior. 5 references.

  12. Simulations of the Plasma Structure of a Radial Line Slotted Antenna Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Jun

    2011-10-01

    The Radial Line Slot Antenna (RLSA) plasma source couples microwave power through a slot antenna structure and window to a plasma characterized by a generation zone adjacent to the window and a diffusion zone that contacts a substrate. The diffusion zone is characterized by a very low electron temperature. This property renders the source useful for soft etch applications and thin film processing for which low ion energy is desirable. Another property of the diffusion zone is that the plasma density falls from the axis to the walls. Static magnetic fields at the walls of other plasma sources have been shown to impede electron losses to walls lowering their loss rate and changing the plasma profile. In this presentation, the impact of different magnetic field configurations on the diffusion zone plasma structure will be described. To do this, an ambipolar-electromagnetic field model previously used to describe RLSA plasmas is modified to account for the impact of magnetic fields on transport coefficients and plasma chemistry. Resonant and other effects of magnetic field are also discussed.

  13. 21 CFR 640.64 - Collection of blood for Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Collection of blood for Source Plasma. 640.64... (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.64 Collection of blood for Source Plasma. (a) Supervision. All blood for the collection of Source Plasma...

  14. 21 CFR 640.64 - Collection of blood for Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Collection of blood for Source Plasma. 640.64... (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.64 Collection of blood for Source Plasma. (a) Supervision. All blood for the collection of Source Plasma...

  15. 21 CFR 640.64 - Collection of blood for Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Collection of blood for Source Plasma. 640.64... (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.64 Collection of blood for Source Plasma. (a) Supervision. All blood for the collection of Source Plasma...

  16. 21 CFR 640.64 - Collection of blood for Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Collection of blood for Source Plasma. 640.64... (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.64 Collection of blood for Source Plasma. (a) Supervision. All blood for the collection of Source Plasma...

  17. 21 CFR 640.64 - Collection of blood for Source Plasma.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Collection of blood for Source Plasma. 640.64... (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Source Plasma § 640.64 Collection of blood for Source Plasma. (a) Supervision. All blood for the collection of Source Plasma...

  18. Simple microwave preionization source for ohmic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, W.; Kwon, Gi-Chung; Kim, Junghee; Kim, Jayhyun; Jeon, Sang-Jean; Huh, Songwhe

    2000-07-01

    A simple economical 2.45 GHz microwave system has been developed and utilized for preionization on the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)-TOKAMAK. The magnetron microwave source was obtained from a widely used, household microwave oven. Since ac operation of the magnetron is not suitable for tokamak application, the magnetron cathode bias circuit was modified to obtain continuous and stable operation of the magnetron for several hundred milliseconds. Application of the developed microwave system to KAIST-TOKAMAK resulted in a reduction of ohmic flux consumption.

  19. A compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer for ion source characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L. Wan, X.; Jin, D. Z.; Tan, X. H.; Huang, Z. X.; Tan, G. B.

    2015-03-15

    A compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer with overall dimension of about 413 × 250 × 414 mm based on orthogonal injection and angle reflection has been developed for ion source characterization. Configuration and principle of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer are introduced in this paper. The mass resolution is optimized to be about 1690 (FWHM), and the ion energy detection range is tested to be between about 3 and 163 eV with the help of electron impact ion source. High mass resolution and compact configuration make this spectrometer useful to provide a valuable diagnostic for ion spectra fundamental research and study the mass to charge composition of plasma with wide range of parameters.

  20. Plasma ionization under simulated ambient Mars conditions for quantification of methane by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taghioskoui, Mazdak; Zaghloul, Mona

    2016-04-01

    Ambient ionization techniques enable ion production in the native sample environment for mass spectrometry, without a need for sample preparation or separation. These techniques provide superior advantages over conventional ionization methods and are well developed and investigated for various analytical applications. However, employing ambient ionization techniques for in situ extra-terrestrial chemical analysis requires these techniques to be designed and developed according to the ambient conditions of extra-terrestrial environments, which substantially differ from the ambient conditions of Earth. Here, we report a plasma ionization source produced under simulated ambient Mars conditions for mass spectrometry. The plasma ionization source was coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer, and quantitative and qualitative analyses of trace amounts of methane, as an analyte of interest in Mars discovery missions, were demonstrated. The miniature plasma source was operational at a net power as low as ∼1.7 W in the pressure range of 4-16 Torr. A detection limit as low as ∼0.15 ppm (v/v) at 16 Torr for methane was demonstrated. PMID:26947458

  1. Plasma ionization under simulated ambient Mars conditions for quantification of methane by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taghioskoui, Mazdak; Zaghloul, Mona

    2016-04-01

    Ambient ionization techniques enable ion production in the native sample environment for mass spectrometry, without a need for sample preparation or separation. These techniques provide superior advantages over conventional ionization methods and are well developed and investigated for various analytical applications. However, employing ambient ionization techniques for in situ extra-terrestrial chemical analysis requires these techniques to be designed and developed according to the ambient conditions of extra-terrestrial environments, which substantially differ from the ambient conditions of Earth. Here, we report a plasma ionization source produced under simulated ambient Mars conditions for mass spectrometry. The plasma ionization source was coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer, and quantitative and qualitative analyses of trace amounts of methane, as an analyte of interest in Mars discovery missions, were demonstrated. The miniature plasma source was operational at a net power as low as ∼1.7 W in the pressure range of 4-16 Torr. A detection limit as low as ∼0.15 ppm (v/v) at 16 Torr for methane was demonstrated.

  2. Comparison of Plasma Activation of Thin Water Layers by Direct and Remote Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Plasma activation of liquids is now being investigated for a variety of biomedical applications. The plasma sources used for this activation can be generally classified as direct (the plasma is in contact with the surface of the liquid) or remote (the plasma does not directly touch the liquid). The direct plasma source may be a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) where the surface of the liquid is a floating electrode or a plasma jet in which the ionization wave forming the plasma plume reaches the liquid. The remote plasma source may be a DBD with electrodes electrically isolated from the liquid or a plasma jet in which the ionization wave in the plume does not reach the liquid. In this paper, a comparison of activation of thin water layers on top of tissue, as might be encountered in wound healing, will be discussed using results from numerical investigations. We used the modeling platform nonPDPSIM to simulate direct plasma activation of thin water layers using DBDs and remote activation using plasma jets using up to hundreds of pulses. The DBDs are sustained in humid air while the plasma jets consist of He/O2 mixtures flowed into humid air. For similar number of pulses and energy deposition, the direct DBD plasma sources produce more acidification and higher production of nitrates/nitrites in the liquid. This is due to the accumulation of NxOy plasma jets, the convective flow removes many of these species prior to their diffusing into the water or reacting to form higher nitrogen oxides. This latter effect is sensitive to the repetition rate which determines whether reactive species formed during prior pulses overlap with newly produced reactive species. in the gas phase. In the plasma jets, the convective flow removes many of these species prior to their diffusing into the water or reacting to form higher nitrogen oxides. This latter effect is sensitive to the repetition rate which determines whether reactive species formed during prior pulses overlap with

  3. Hot plasma associated with a coronal mass ejection

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Miralles, M. P.; Raymond, J. C.; Hara, H.

    2013-11-20

    We analyze coordinated observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on board Hinode of an X-ray Plasma Ejection (XPE) that occurred during the coronal mass ejection (CME) event of 2008 April 9. The XPE was trailing the CME core from behind, following the same trajectory, and could be identified both in EIS and XRT observations. Using the EIS spectrometer, we have determined the XPE plasma parameters, measuring the electron density, thermal distribution, and elemental composition. We have found that the XPE composition and electron density were very similar to those of the pre-event active region plasma. The XPE temperature was higher, and its thermal distribution peaked at around 3 MK; also, typical flare lines were absent from EIS spectra, indicating that any XPE component with temperatures in excess of 5 MK was likely either faint or absent. We used XRT data to investigate the presence of hotter plasma components in the XPE that could have gone undetected by EIS and found that—if at all present—these components have small emission measure values and their temperature is in the 8-12.5 MK range. The very hot plasma found in earlier XPE observations obtained by Yohkoh seems to be largely absent in this CME, although plasma ionization timescales may lead to non-equilibrium ionization effects that could make bright lines from ions formed in a 10 MK plasma not detectable by EIS. Our results supersede the XPE findings of Landi et al., who studied the same event with older response functions for the XRT Al-poly filter; the differences in the results stress the importance of using accurate filter response functions.

  4. Hot Plasma Associated with a Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Miralles, M. P.; Raymond, J. C.; Hara, H.

    2013-11-01

    We analyze coordinated observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on board Hinode of an X-ray Plasma Ejection (XPE) that occurred during the coronal mass ejection (CME) event of 2008 April 9. The XPE was trailing the CME core from behind, following the same trajectory, and could be identified both in EIS and XRT observations. Using the EIS spectrometer, we have determined the XPE plasma parameters, measuring the electron density, thermal distribution, and elemental composition. We have found that the XPE composition and electron density were very similar to those of the pre-event active region plasma. The XPE temperature was higher, and its thermal distribution peaked at around 3 MK also, typical flare lines were absent from EIS spectra, indicating that any XPE component with temperatures in excess of 5 MK was likely either faint or absent. We used XRT data to investigate the presence of hotter plasma components in the XPE that could have gone undetected by EIS and found that—if at all present—these components have small emission measure values and their temperature is in the 8-12.5 MK range. The very hot plasma found in earlier XPE observations obtained by Yohkoh seems to be largely absent in this CME, although plasma ionization timescales may lead to non-equilibrium ionization effects that could make bright lines from ions formed in a 10 MK plasma not detectable by EIS. Our results supersede the XPE findings of Landi et al., who studied the same event with older response functions for the XRT Al-poly filter; the differences in the results stress the importance of using accurate filter response functions.

  5. The ionization length in plasmas with finite temperature ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelić, N.; Kos, L.; Tskhakaya, D. D.; Duhovnik, J.

    2009-12-01

    The ionization length is an important quantity which up to now has been precisely determined only in plasmas which assume that the ions are born at rest, i.e., in discharges known as "cold ion-source" plasmas. Presented here are the results of our calculations of the ionization lengths in plasmas with an arbitrary ion source temperature. Harrison and Thompson (H&T) [Proc. Phys. Soc. 74, 145 (1959)] found the values of this quantity for the cases of several ion strength potential profiles in the well-known Tonks-Langmuir [Phys. Rev. 34, 876 (1929)] discharge, which is characterized by "cold" ion temperature. This scenario is also known as the "singular" ion-source discharge. The H&T analytic result covers cases of ion sources proportional to exp(βΦ) with Φ the normalized plasma potential and β =0,1,2 values, which correspond to particular physical scenarios. Many years following H&T's work, Bissell and Johnson (B&J) [Phys. Fluids 30, 779 (1987)] developed a model with the so-called "warm" ion-source temperature, i.e., "regular" ion source, under B&J's particular assumption that the ionization strength is proportional to the local electron density. However, it appears that B&J were not interested in determining the ionization length at all. The importance of this quantity to theoretical modeling was recognized by Riemann, who recently answered all the questions of the most advanced up-to-date plasma-sheath boundary theory with cold ions [K.-U. Riemann, Phys. Plasmas 13, 063508 (2006)] but still without the stiff warm ion-source case solution, which is highly resistant to solution via any available analytic method. The present article is an extension of H&T's results obtained for a single point only with ion source temperature Tn=0 to arbitrary finite ion source temperatures. The approach applied in this work is based on the method recently developed by Kos et al. [Phys. Plasmas 16, 093503 (2009)].

  6. Operation of Ferroelectric Plasma Sources in a Gas Discharge Mode

    SciTech Connect

    A. Dunaevsky; N.J. Fisch

    2004-03-08

    Ferroelectric plasma sources in vacuum are known as sources of ablative plasma, formed due to surface discharge. In this paper, observations of a gas discharge mode of operation of the ferroelectric plasma sources (FPS) are reported. The gas discharge appears at pressures between approximately 20 and approximately 80 Torr. At pressures of 1-20 Torr, there is a transition from vacuum surface discharge to the gas discharge, when both modes coexist and the surface discharges sustain the gas discharge. At pressures between 20 and 80 Torr, the surface discharges are suppressed, and FPS operate in pure gas discharge mode, with the formation of almost uniform plasma along the entire surface of the ceramics between strips. The density of the expanding plasma is estimated to be about 1013 cm-3 at a distance of 5.5 mm from the surface. The power consumption of the discharge is comparatively low, making it useful for various applications. This paper also presents direct measurements of the yield of secondary electron emission from ferroelectric ceramics, which, at low energies of primary electrons, is high and dependent on the polarization of the ferroelectric material

  7. A low-energy linear oxygen plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2007-01-08

    A new version of a Constricted Plasma Source is described,characterized by all metal-ceramic construction, a linear slit exit of180 mm length, and cw-operation (typically 50 kHz) at an average power of1.5 kW. The plasma source is here operated with oxygen gas, producingstreaming plasma that contains mainly positive molecular and atomic ions,and to a much lesser degree, negative ions. The maximum total ion currentobtained was about 0.5 A. The fraction of atomic ions reached more than10 percent of all ions when the flow rate was less then 10 sccm O2,corresponding to a chamber pressure of about 0.5 Pa for the selectedpumping speed. The energy distribution functions of the different ionspecies were measured with a combinedmass spectrometer and energyanalyzer. The time-averaged distribution functions were broad and rangedfrom about 30eV to 90 eV at 200 kHz and higher frequencies, while theywere only several eV broad at 50 kHz and lower frequencies, with themaximum located at about 40 eV for the grounded anode case. This maximumwas shifted down to about 7 eV when the anode was floating, indicatingthe important role of the plasma potential for the ion energy for a givensubstrate potential. The source could be scaled to greater length and maybe useful for functionalization of surfaces and plasma-assisteddeposition of compound films.

  8. Determination of plasma parameters in solar zebra radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.; Yasnov, L. V.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: We present a new method for determining the magnetic field strength and plasma density in the solar zebra radio sources. Methods: Using the double plasma resonance (DPR) model of the zebra emission, we analytically derived the equations for computing the gyroharmonic number s of selected zebra lines and then solved these equations numerically. Results: The method was successfully tested on artificially generated zebras and then applied to observed ones. The magnetic field strength and plasma density in the radio sources were determined. Simultaneously, we evaluated the parameter Lnb = 2Lb/ (2Ln - Lb), where Ln and Lb are the characteristic scale-heights of the plasma density and magnetic field strength in the zebra source, respectively. Computations show that the maximum frequency of the low-polarized zebras is about 8 GHz, in very good agreement with observations. For the high-polarized zebras, this limit is about four times lower. Microwave zebras are preferentially generated in the regions with steep gradients of the plasma density, such as in the transition region. In models with smaller density gradients, such as those with a barometric density profile, the microwave zebras cannot be produced owing to the strong bremsstrahlung and cyclotron absorptions. We also show that our DPR model is able to explain the zebras with frequency-equidistant zebra lines.

  9. Measurement and visualization of mass transport for the flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ambient mass-spectrometry source.

    PubMed

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P; Ray, Steven J; Hieftje, Gary M

    2014-05-01

    Ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has developed into an important analytical field over the last 9 years. The ability to analyze samples under ambient conditions while retaining the sensitivity and specificity of mass spectrometry has led to numerous applications and a corresponding jump in the popularity of this field. Despite the great potential of ADI-MS, problems remain in the areas of ion identification and quantification. Difficulties with ion identification can be solved through modified instrumentation, including accurate-mass or MS/MS capabilities for analyte identification. More difficult problems include quantification because of the ambient nature of the sampling process. To characterize and improve sample volatilization, ionization, and introduction into the mass spectrometer interface, a method of visualizing mass transport into the mass spectrometer is needed. Schlieren imaging is a well-established technique that renders small changes in refractive index visible. Here, schlieren imaging was used to visualize helium flow from a plasma-based ADI-MS source into a mass spectrometer while ion signals were recorded. Optimal sample positions for melting-point capillary and transmission-mode (stainless steel mesh) introduction were found to be near (within 1 mm of) the mass spectrometer inlet. Additionally, the orientation of the sampled surface plays a significant role. More efficient mass transport resulted for analyte deposits directly facing the MS inlet. Different surfaces (glass slide and rough surface) were also examined; for both it was found that the optimal position is immediately beneath the MS inlet.

  10. Modeling the chemistry of plasma polymerization using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ihrig, D F; Stockhaus, J; Scheide, F; Winkelhake, Oliver; Streuber, Oliver

    2003-04-01

    The goal of the project is a solvent free painting shop. The environmental technologies laboratory is developing processes of plasma etching and polymerization. Polymerized thin films are first-order corrosion protection and primer for painting. Using pure acetylene we get very nice thin films which were not bonded very well. By using air as bulk gas it is possible to polymerize, in an acetylene plasma, well bonded thin films which are stable first-order corrosion protections and good primers. UV/Vis spectroscopy shows nitrogen oxide radicals in the emission spectra of pure nitrogen and air. But nitrogen oxide is fully suppressed in the presence of acetylene. IR spectroscopy shows only C=O, CH(2) and CH(3) groups but no nitrogen species. With the aid of UV/Vis spectra and the chemistry of ozone formation it is possible to define reactive traps and steps, molecule depletion and processes of proton scavenging and proton loss. Using a numerical model it is possible to evaluate these processes and to calculate theoretical mass spectra. Adjustment of theoretical mass spectra to real measurements leads to specific channels of polymerization which are driven by radicals especially the acetyl radical. The estimated theoretical mass spectra show the specific channels of these chemical processes. It is possible to quantify these channels. This quantification represents the mass flow through this chemical system. With respect to these chemical processes it is possible to have an idea of pollutant production processes.

  11. Modeling the chemistry of plasma polymerization using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ihrig, D F; Stockhaus, J; Scheide, F; Winkelhake, Oliver; Streuber, Oliver

    2003-04-01

    The goal of the project is a solvent free painting shop. The environmental technologies laboratory is developing processes of plasma etching and polymerization. Polymerized thin films are first-order corrosion protection and primer for painting. Using pure acetylene we get very nice thin films which were not bonded very well. By using air as bulk gas it is possible to polymerize, in an acetylene plasma, well bonded thin films which are stable first-order corrosion protections and good primers. UV/Vis spectroscopy shows nitrogen oxide radicals in the emission spectra of pure nitrogen and air. But nitrogen oxide is fully suppressed in the presence of acetylene. IR spectroscopy shows only C=O, CH(2) and CH(3) groups but no nitrogen species. With the aid of UV/Vis spectra and the chemistry of ozone formation it is possible to define reactive traps and steps, molecule depletion and processes of proton scavenging and proton loss. Using a numerical model it is possible to evaluate these processes and to calculate theoretical mass spectra. Adjustment of theoretical mass spectra to real measurements leads to specific channels of polymerization which are driven by radicals especially the acetyl radical. The estimated theoretical mass spectra show the specific channels of these chemical processes. It is possible to quantify these channels. This quantification represents the mass flow through this chemical system. With respect to these chemical processes it is possible to have an idea of pollutant production processes. PMID:12707764

  12. Atomic mass dependent electrostatic diagnostics of colliding laser plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, P.; Fallon, C.; Kennedy, E. T.; Costello, J. T.

    2013-09-15

    The behaviours of colliding laser plasma plumes (C{sub p}) compared with single plasma plumes (S{sub p}) are investigated for 14 different atomic mass targets. A Faraday cup, situated at the end of a drift tube (L = 0.99 m), is employed to record the time-of-flight (TOF) current traces for all elements and both plume configurations, for a fixed laser intensity of I{sub p} = 4.2 × 10{sup 10} W cm{sup −2} (F = 0.25 kJ cm{sup −2}). The ratio of the peak current from the C{sub p} relative to twice that from the S{sub p} is designated as the peak current ratio while the ratio of the integrated charge yield from the C{sub p} relative to twice that from the S{sub p} is designated as the charge yield ratio. Variation of the position of the Faraday cup within the drift tube (L = 0.33, 0.55, and 0.99 m) in conjunction with a lower laser fluence (F = 0.14 kJ cm{sup −2}) facilitated direct comparison of the changing TOF traces from both plasma configurations for the five lightest elements studied (C, Al, Si, Ti, and Mn). The results are discussed in the frame of laser plasma hydrodynamic modelling to approximate the critical recombination distance L{sub CR}. The dynamics of colliding laser plasma plumes and the atomic mass dependence trends observed are presented and discussed.

  13. Method and apparatus for plasma source ion implantation

    DOEpatents

    Conrad, John R.

    1988-01-01

    Ion implantation into surfaces of three-dimensional targets is achieved by forming an ionized plasma about the target within an enclosing chamber and applying a pulse of high voltage between the target and the conductive walls of the chamber. Ions from the plasma are driven into the target object surfaces from all sides simultaneously without the need for manipulation of the target object. Repetitive pulses of high voltage, typically 20 kilovolts or higher, causes the ions to be driven deeply into the target. The plasma may be formed of a neutral gas introduced into the evacuated chamber and ionized therein with ionizing radiation so that a constant source of plasma is provided which surrounds the target object during the implantation process. Significant increases in the surface hardness and wear characteristics of various materials are obtained with ion implantation in this manner.

  14. Method and apparatus for plasma source ion implantation

    DOEpatents

    Conrad, J.R.

    1988-08-16

    Ion implantation into surfaces of three-dimensional targets is achieved by forming an ionized plasma about the target within an enclosing chamber and applying a pulse of high voltage between the target and the conductive walls of the chamber. Ions from the plasma are driven into the target object surfaces from all sides simultaneously without the need for manipulation of the target object. Repetitive pulses of high voltage, typically 20 kilovolts or higher, causes the ions to be driven deeply into the target. The plasma may be formed of a neutral gas introduced into the evacuated chamber and ionized therein with ionizing radiation so that a constant source of plasma is provided which surrounds the target object during the implantation process. Significant increases in the surface hardness and wear characteristics of various materials are obtained with ion implantation in this manner. 7 figs.

  15. Ion Flux Characterization of H2 and D2 Plasmas Produced by an ECR Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Eric; Capece, Angela; Roszell, John; Skinner, Charles; Koel, Bruce

    2013-10-01

    The use of lithium-conditioned plasma facing components in tokamaks has been shown to improve plasma confinement through a reduction in hydrogen recycling. Surface science techniques are being applied to probe the interactions between lithiated PFC's and H/D plasmas. A TectraTM Gen 2 plasma source has been commissioned that utilizes electron cyclotron resonance to produce a plasma discharge inside a vacuum test chamber and can produce ion fluxes similar to those typically seen in tokamaks. This source will be utilized to study H/D uptake by lithium films on Mo substrates as a precursor to NSTX-U experiments. In this work we report on the characterization of this source as a first step in its use in surface analysis studies. The source is operated in H2 and D2 gases and the subsequent ion flux of the plasma is measured by a Faraday Cup. Ion flux measurements are presented in a range of gas pressures and grid voltages up to 2 kV. Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship funded by Department of Energy.

  16. Initial Results from the ASTRAL Helicon Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Robert

    2003-10-01

    The Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity (ASTRAL) is 2 m long Helicon source designed to investigate basic plasma and space plasma processes. The device produces a plasma with the following parameters: ne = 10^10 to 10^13 cm-3, Te = 2 to 20 eV and Ti = 0.03 to 0.1 eV. A series of large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.2 kGauss. Operating pressure varies from 0.1 to 100 mTorr and any gas can be used for the discharge. A fractional helix antenna is used to introduce up to 2 kWatt of RF power into the plasma through a matching pi circuit. A number of diagnostics are presently installed on the plasma device. A RF compensated Langmuir probe is used to measure electron temperature and plasma density. A 0.33 m Criss-Cross Scanning monochromator with a high performance CCD camera is used to measure impurity concentration and to develop novel spectroscopy diagnostic. A diode laser based Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is used to obtain ion temperature and ion drift in the plasma column. A microwave interferometer is also used to calibrate the Langmuir probe. First experimental results associated with this new facility are presented.

  17. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MASS FLUX REDUCTION AND SOURCE-ZONE MASS REMOVAL: ANALYSIS OF FIELD DATA

    PubMed Central

    DiFilippo, Erica L.

    2010-01-01

    The magnitude of contaminant mass flux reduction associated with a specific amount of contaminant mass removed is a key consideration for evaluating the effectiveness of a source-zone remediation effort. Thus, there is great interest in characterizing, estimating, and predicting relationships between mass flux reduction and mass removal. Published data collected for several field studies were examined to evaluate relationships between mass flux reduction and source-zone mass removal. The studies analyzed herein represent a variety of source-zone architectures, immiscible-liquid compositions, and implemented remediation technologies. There are two general approaches to characterizing the mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal relationship, end-point analysis and time-continuous analysis. End-point analysis, based on comparing masses and mass fluxes measured before and after a source-zone remediation effort, was conducted for 21 remediation projects. Mass removals were greater than 60% for all but three of the studies. Mass flux reductions ranging from slightly less than to slightly greater than one-to-one were observed for the majority of the sites. However, these single-snapshot characterizations are limited in that the antecedent behavior is indeterminate. Time-continuous analysis, based on continuous monitoring of mass removal and mass flux, was performed for two sites, both for which data were obtained under water-flushing conditions. The reductions in mass flux were significantly different for the two sites (90% vs. ~8%) for similar mass removals (~40%). These results illustrate the dependence of the mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal relationship on source-zone architecture and associated mass-transfer processes. Minimal mass flux reduction was observed for a system wherein mass removal was relatively efficient (ideal mass transfer and displacement). Conversely, a significant degree of mass flux reduction was observed for a site wherein mass removal was inefficient

  18. Hollow cathode plasma source for active spacecraft charge control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deininger, William D.; Aston, Graeme; Pless, Lewis C.

    1987-06-01

    A prototype plasma source spacecraft discharge device has been developed to control overall and differential spacecraft surface charging. The plasma source is based on a unique hollow cathode discharge, where the plasma generation process is contained completely within the cathode. This device can be operated on argon, krypton, or xenon and has a rapid cold start time of less than 4 s. The discharge system design includes a spacecraft-discharge/net-charge sensing circuit which provides the ability to measure the polarity, magnitude, pulse shape, and time duration of a discharging event. Ion currents of up to 325 microA and electron currents ranging from 0.02 to 6.0 A have been extracted from the device. In addition, the spacecraft discharge device successfully discharged capacitively biased plates, from as high as + or - 2500 V, to ground potential, and discharged and clamped actively biased plates at +5 V with respect to ground potential during ground simulation testing.

  19. Invitation to the World of the Plasma for Light Source 3.Light Source Measurement 3.1 Laser Diagnostics of Plasmas for Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motomura, Hideki; Jinno, Masafumi

    Examples and basic theories of various methods of laser diagnostics of plasmas for light sources are introduced. Most introduced papers were presented at International Symposium on the Science and Technology of Light Sources (LS), which is the only international symposium on the science and technology of light sources.

  20. Cometary particulate analyzer. [mass spectrometry of laser plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friichtenicht, J. F.; Miller, D. J.; Utterback, N. G.

    1979-01-01

    A concept for determining the relative abundance of elements contained in cometary particulates was evaluated. The technique utilizes a short, high intensity burst of laser radiation to vaporize and ionize collected particulate material. Ions extracted from this laser produced plasma are analyzed in a time of flight mass spectrometer to yield an atomic mass spectrum representative of the relative abundance of elements in the particulates. Critical aspects of the development of this system are determining the ionization efficiencies for various atomic species and achieving adequate mass resolution. A technique called energy-time focus, which utilizes static electric fields to alter the length of the ion flight path in proportion to the ion initial energy, was used which results in a corresponding compression to the range of ion flight times which effectively improves the inherent resolution. Sufficient data were acquired to develop preliminary specifications for a flight experiment.

  1. Modeling of negative ion transport in a plasma source (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riz, David; Paméla, Jérôme

    1998-02-01

    A code called NIETZSCHE has been developed to simulate the negative ion transport in a plasma source, from their birth place to the extraction holes. The H-/D- trajectory is calculated by numerically solving the 3D motion equation, while the atomic processes of destruction, of elastic collision with H+/D+ and of charge exchange with H0/D0 are handled at each time step by a Monte Carlo procedure. This code can be used to calculate the extraction probability of a negative ion produced at any location inside the source. Calculations performed with NIETZSCHE have been allowed to explain, either quantitatively or qualitatively, several phenomena observed in negative ion sources, such as the isotopic H-/D- effect, and the influence of the plasma grid bias or of the magnetic filter on the negative ion extraction. The code has also shown that, in the type of sources contemplated for ITER, which operate at large arc power densities (>1 W cm-3), negative ions can reach the extraction region provided they are produced at a distance lower than 2 cm from the plasma grid in the case of volume production (dissociative attachment processes), or if they are produced at the plasma grid surface, in the vicinity of the extraction holes.

  2. Modeling of negative ion transport in a plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riz, David; Paméla, Jérôme

    1998-08-01

    A code called NIETZSCHE has been developed to simulate the negative ion transport in a plasma source, from their birth place to the extraction holes. The ion trajectory is calculated by numerically solving the 3-D motion equation, while the atomic processes of destruction, of elastic collision H-/H+ and of charge exchange H-/H0 are handled at each time step by a Monte-Carlo procedure. This code can be used to calculate the extraction probability of a negative ion produced at any location inside the source. Calculations performed with NIETZSCHE have allowed to explain, either quantitatively or qualitatively, several phenomena observed in negative ion sources, such as the isotopic H-/D- effect, and the influence of the plasma grid bias or of the magnetic filter on the negative ion extraction. The code has also shown that in the type of sources contemplated for ITER, which operate at large arc power densities (>1 W cm-3), negative ions can reach the extraction region provided if they are produced at a distance lower than 2 cm from the plasma grid in the case of «volume production» (dissociative attachment processes), or if they are produced at the plasma grid surface, in the vicinity of the extraction holes.

  3. Compact surface plasma H- ion source with geometrical focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikov, V.; Dudnikova, G.

    2016-02-01

    Factors limiting operating lifetime of a Compact Surface Plasma Sources (CSPS) are analyzed and possible treatments for lifetime enhancement are considered. Increased cooling permeate increased discharge power and increased beam intensity and duty factor. A design of an advanced CSPS with geometrical focusing of H- flux is presented.

  4. A new large area lanthanum hexaboride plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. M.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.; Lucky, Z.

    2010-08-01

    A new 18×18 cm2 active area lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) plasma source for use in a dc discharge has been developed at UCLA. The cathode consists of four tiled LaB6 pieces indirectly heated to electron emission (1750 °C) by a graphite heater. A molybdenum mesh anode 33 cm in front of the LaB6 accelerates the electrons, ionizing a fill gas to create a 20×20 cm2 nearly square plasma. The source is run in pulsed operation with the anode biased up to +400 V dc with respect to the cathode for up to 100 ms at a 1 Hz repetition rate. Both the cathode and anode "float" electrically with respect to the chamber walls. The source is placed in a toroidal chamber 2 m wide and 3 m tall with a major radius of 5 m. Toroidal and vertical magnetic fields confine the current-free plasma which follows the field in a helix. The plasma starts on the bottom of the machine and spirals around it up to four times (120 m) and can be configured to terminate either on the top wall or on the neutral gas itself. The source typically operates with a discharge current up to 250 A in helium making plasmas with Te<30 eV, Ti<16 eV, and ne<3×1013 cm-3 in a background field of 100 Gplasma with 0.1<β<1.

  5. RF-Plasma Source Commissioning in Indian Negative Ion Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M. J.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Yadava, Ratnakar; Chakraborty, A. K.; Bansal, G.; Gahlaut, A.; Soni, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Pandya, K.; Parmar, K. G.; Sonara, J.; Kraus, W.; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Obermayer, S.; Martens, C.; Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.

    2011-09-26

    The Indian program of the RF based negative ion source has started off with the commissioning of ROBIN, the inductively coupled RF based negative ion source facility under establishment at Institute for Plasma research (IPR), India. The facility is being developed under a technology transfer agreement with IPP Garching. It consists of a single RF driver based beam source (BATMAN replica) coupled to a 100 kW, 1 MHz RF generator with a self excited oscillator, through a matching network, for plasma production and ion extraction and acceleration. The delivery of the RF generator and the RF plasma source without the accelerator, has enabled initiation of plasma production experiments. The recent experimental campaign has established the matching circuit parameters that result in plasma production with density in the range of 0.5-1x10{sup 18}/m{sup 3}, at operational gas pressures ranging between 0.4-1 Pa. Various configurations of the matching network have been experimented upon to obtain a stable operation of the set up for RF powers ranging between 25-85 kW and pulse lengths ranging between 4-20 s. It has been observed that the range of the parameters of the matching circuit, over which the frequency of the power supply is stable, is narrow and further experiments with increased number of turns in the coil are in the pipeline to see if the range can be widened. In this paper, the description of the experimental system and the commissioning data related to the optimisation of the various parameters of the matching network, to obtain stable plasma of required density, are presented and discussed.

  6. RF-Plasma Source Commissioning in Indian Negative Ion Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, M. J.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Bansal, G.; Gahlaut, A.; Soni, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Pandya, K.; Parmar, K. G.; Sonara, J.; Yadava, Ratnakar; Chakraborty, A. K.; Kraus, W.; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Obermayer, S.; Martens, C.; Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.

    2011-09-01

    The Indian program of the RF based negative ion source has started off with the commissioning of ROBIN, the inductively coupled RF based negative ion source facility under establishment at Institute for Plasma research (IPR), India. The facility is being developed under a technology transfer agreement with IPP Garching. It consists of a single RF driver based beam source (BATMAN replica) coupled to a 100 kW, 1 MHz RF generator with a self excited oscillator, through a matching network, for plasma production and ion extraction and acceleration. The delivery of the RF generator and the RF plasma source without the accelerator, has enabled initiation of plasma production experiments. The recent experimental campaign has established the matching circuit parameters that result in plasma production with density in the range of 0.5-1×1018/m3, at operational gas pressures ranging between 0.4-1 Pa. Various configurations of the matching network have been experimented upon to obtain a stable operation of the set up for RF powers ranging between 25-85 kW and pulse lengths ranging between 4-20 s. It has been observed that the range of the parameters of the matching circuit, over which the frequency of the power supply is stable, is narrow and further experiments with increased number of turns in the coil are in the pipeline to see if the range can be widened. In this paper, the description of the experimental system and the commissioning data related to the optimisation of the various parameters of the matching network, to obtain stable plasma of required density, are presented and discussed.

  7. A new large area lanthanum hexaboride plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C. M.; Gekelman, W.; Pribyl, P.; Lucky, Z.

    2010-08-15

    A new 18x18 cm{sup 2} active area lanthanum hexaboride (LaB{sub 6}) plasma source for use in a dc discharge has been developed at UCLA. The cathode consists of four tiled LaB{sub 6} pieces indirectly heated to electron emission (1750 deg. C) by a graphite heater. A molybdenum mesh anode 33 cm in front of the LaB{sub 6} accelerates the electrons, ionizing a fill gas to create a 20x20 cm{sup 2} nearly square plasma. The source is run in pulsed operation with the anode biased up to +400 V dc with respect to the cathode for up to 100 ms at a 1 Hz repetition rate. Both the cathode and anode ''float'' electrically with respect to the chamber walls. The source is placed in a toroidal chamber 2 m wide and 3 m tall with a major radius of 5 m. Toroidal and vertical magnetic fields confine the current-free plasma which follows the field in a helix. The plasma starts on the bottom of the machine and spirals around it up to four times (120 m) and can be configured to terminate either on the top wall or on the neutral gas itself. The source typically operates with a discharge current up to 250 A in helium making plasmas with T{sub e}<30 eV, T{sub i}<16 eV, and n{sub e}<3x10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} in a background field of 100 Gplasma with 0.1<{beta}<1.

  8. Plasma emission spectroscopy for operating and developing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) H- ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Welton, Robert F; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2014-01-01

    An RF-driven, Cs-enhanced H- ion source feeds the SNS accelerator with a high current (typically >50 mA), ~1.0 ms pulsed beam at 60 Hz. To achieve the persistent high current beam for several weeks long service cycles, each newly installed ion source undergoes a rigorous conditioning and cesiation processes. Plasma conditioning outgases the system and sputter-cleans the ion conversion surfaces. A cesiation process immediately following the plasma conditioning releases Cs to provide coverage on the ion conversion surfaces. The effectiveness of the ion source conditioning and cesiation is monitored with plasma emission spectroscopy using a high-sensitivity optical spectrometer. Plasma emission spectroscopy is also used to provide a mean for diagnosing and confirming a failure of the insulating coating of the ion source RF antenna which is immersed in the plasma. Emissions of composition elements of the antenna coating material, Na emission being the most significant, drastically elevate to signal a failure when it happens. Plasma spectra of the developmental ion source with an AlN chamber and an external RF antenna are also briefly discussed.

  9. Predicting DNAPL mass discharge from pool-dominated source zones.

    PubMed

    Christ, John A; Ramsburg, C Andrew; Pennell, Kurt D; Abriola, Linda M

    2010-05-20

    Models that link simplified descriptions of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zone architecture with predictions of mass flux can be effective screening tools for evaluation of source zone management strategies. Recent efforts have focused on the development and implementation of upscaled models to approximate the relationship between mass removal and flux-averaged, down-gradient contaminant concentration (or mass flux) reduction. The efficacy of these methods has been demonstrated for ganglia-dominated source zones. This work extends these methods to source zones dominated by high-saturation DNAPL pools. An existing upscaled mass transfer model was modified to reproduce dissolution behavior in pool-dominated scenarios by employing a two-domain (ganglia and pools) representation of the source zone. The two-domain upscaled model is parameterized using the initial fraction of the source zone that exists as pool regions, the initial fraction of contaminant eluting from these pool regions, and the flux-averaged down-gradient contaminant concentration. Comparisons of model predictions with a series of three-dimensional source zone numerical simulations and data from two-dimensional aquifer cell experiments demonstrate the ability of the model to predict DNAPL dissolution from ganglia- and pool-dominated source zones for all levels of mass recovery. PMID:20227132

  10. Large-Area Permanent-Magnet ECR Plasma Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2007-01-01

    A 40-cm-diameter plasma device has been developed as a source of ions for material-processing and ion-thruster applications. Like the device described in the immediately preceding article, this device utilizes electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) excited by microwave power in a magnetic field to generate a plasma in an electrodeless (noncontact) manner and without need for an electrically insulating, microwave-transmissive window at the source. Hence, this device offers the same advantages of electrodeless, windowless design - low contamination and long operational life. The device generates a uniform, high-density plasma capable of sustaining uniform ion-current densities at its exit plane while operating at low pressure [<10(exp -4) torr (less than about 1.3 10(exp -2) Pa)] and input power <200 W at a frequency of 2.45 GHz. Though the prototype model operates at 2.45 GHz, operation at higher frequencies can be achieved by straightforward modification to the input microwave waveguide. Higher frequency operation may be desirable in those applications that require even higher background plasma densities. In the design of this ECR plasma source, there are no cumbersome, power-hungry electromagnets. The magnetic field in this device is generated by a permanent-magnet circuit that is optimized to generate resonance surfaces. The microwave power is injected on the centerline of the device. The resulting discharge plasma jumps into a "high mode" when the input power rises above 150 W. This mode is associated with elevated plasma density and high uniformity. The large area and uniformity of the plasma and the low operating pressure are well suited for such material-processing applications as etching and deposition on large silicon wafers. The high exit-plane ion-current density makes it possible to attain a high rate of etching or deposition. The plasma potential is <3 V low enough that there is little likelihood of sputtering, which, in plasma processing, is undesired

  11. Crux: rapid open source protein tandem mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    McIlwain, Sean; Tamura, Kaipo; Kertesz-Farkas, Attila; Grant, Charles E; Diament, Benjamin; Frewen, Barbara; Howbert, J Jeffry; Hoopmann, Michael R; Käll, Lukas; Eng, Jimmy K; MacCoss, Michael J; Noble, William Stafford

    2014-10-01

    Efficiently and accurately analyzing big protein tandem mass spectrometry data sets requires robust software that incorporates state-of-the-art computational, machine learning, and statistical methods. The Crux mass spectrometry analysis software toolkit ( http://cruxtoolkit.sourceforge.net ) is an open source project that aims to provide users with a cross-platform suite of analysis tools for interpreting protein mass spectrometry data. PMID:25182276

  12. Plasma phenomenology in astrophysical systems: Radio-sources and jets

    SciTech Connect

    Montani, Giovanni; Petitta, Jacopo

    2014-06-15

    We review the plasma phenomenology in the astrophysical sources which show appreciable radio emissions, namely Radio-Jets from Pulsars, Microquasars, Quasars, and Radio-Active Galaxies. A description of their basic features is presented, then we discuss in some details the links between their morphology and the mechanisms that lead to the different radio-emissions, investigating especially the role played by the plasma configurations surrounding compact objects (Neutron Stars, Black Holes). For the sake of completeness, we briefly mention observational techniques and detectors, whose structure set them apart from other astrophysical instruments. The fundamental ideas concerning angular momentum transport across plasma accretion disks—together with the disk-source-jet coupling problem—are discussed, by stressing their successes and their shortcomings. An alternative scenario is then inferred, based on a parallelism between astrophysical and laboratory plasma configurations, where small-scale structures can be found. We will focus our attention on the morphology of the radio-jets, on their coupling with the accretion disks and on the possible triggering phenomena, viewed as profiles of plasma instabilities.

  13. Resonant planar antenna as an inductive plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Guittienne, Ph.; Lecoultre, S.; Howling, A. A.; Hollenstein, Ch.; Fayet, P.; Larrieu, J.

    2012-04-15

    A resonant planar antenna as an inductive plasma source operating at 13.56 MHz inside a low pressure vacuum vessel is presented for potential plasma processing applications. Its principle consists in interconnecting elementary resonant meshes composed of inductive and capacitive elements. Due to its structure, the antenna shows a set of resonant modes associated with peaks of the real input impedance. Each of these modes is defined by its own current and voltage distribution oscillating at the frequency of the mode. A rectangular antenna of 0.55mx0.20m has been built, and first results obtained with argon plasmas are presented. Plasma generation is shown to be efficient as densities up to 4{center_dot}10{sup 17}m{sup -3} at 2000 W have been measured by microwave interferometry at a distance of 4 cm from the source plane. It is also demonstrated that the plasma couples inductively with the resonating currents flowing in the antenna above a threshold power of about 60 W. A non-uniformity of less than {+-}5% is obtained at 1000 W at a few centimeters above the antenna over 75% of its surface.

  14. Active plasma source formation in the MAP diode

    SciTech Connect

    Lamppa, K.P.; Stinnett, R.W.; Renk, T.J.

    1995-07-01

    The Ion Beam Surface Treatment (IBEST) program is exploring using ion beams to treat the surface of a wide variety of materials. These experiments have shown that improved corrosion resistance, surface hardening, grain size modification, polishing and surface cleaning can all be achieved using a pulsed 0.4-0.8 MeV ion beam delivering 1-10 J/cm{sup 2}. The Magnetically-confined Anode Plasma (MAP) diode, developed at Cornell University, produces an active plasma which can be used to treat the surfaces of materials. The diode consists of a fast puff valve as the source of gas to produce the desired ions and two capacitively driven B-fields. A slow magnetic field is used for electron insulation and a fast field is used to both ionize the puffed gas and to position the plasma in the proper spatial location in the anode prior to the accelerator pulse. The relative timing between subsystems is an important factor in the effective production of the active plasma source for the MAP diode system. The MAP diode has been characterized using a Langmuir probe to measure plasma arrival times at the anode annulus for hydrogen gas. This data was then used to determine the optimum operating point for the MAP diode on RHEPP-1 accelerator shots. Operation of the MAP diode system to produce an ion beam of 500 kV, 12 kA with 40% efficiency (measured at the diode) has been demonstrated.

  15. Plasma and Ion Sources in Large Area Coatings: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2005-02-28

    Efficient deposition of high-quality coatings often requires controlled application of excited or ionized particles. These particles are either condensing (film-forming) or assisting by providing energy and momentum to the film growth process, resulting in densification, sputtering/etching, modification of stress, roughness, texture, etc. In this review, the technical means are surveyed enabling large area application of ions and plasmas, with ion energies ranging from a few eV to a few keV. Both semiconductortype large area (single wafer or batch processing with {approx} 1000 cm{sup 2}) and in-line web and glass-coating-type large area (> 10{sup 7} m{sup 2} annually) are considered. Characteristics and differences between plasma and ion sources are explained. The latter include gridded and gridless sources. Many examples are given, including sources based on DC, RF, and microwave discharges, some with special geometries like hollow cathodes and E x B configurations.

  16. Small plasma focus as neutron pulsed source for nuclides identification

    SciTech Connect

    Milanese, M.; Moroso, R.; Barbaglia, M.; Niedbalski, J.; Mayer, R.; Castillo, F.

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, we present preliminary results on the feasibility of employing a low energy (2 kJ, 31 kV) plasma focus device as a portable source of pulsed neutron beams (2.45 MeV) generated by nuclear fusion reactions D-D, for the “in situ” analysis of substances by nuclear activation. This source has the relevant advantage of being pulsed at requirement, transportable, not permanently radioactive, without radioactive waste, cheap, among others. We prove the feasibility of using this source showing several spectra of the characteristic emission line for manganese, gold, lead, and silver.

  17. Negative-mass Instability in Nonlinear Plasma Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Dodin, I. Y.; Schmit, P. F.; Rocks, J.; Fisch, N. J.

    2013-01-30

    The negative-mass instability (NMI), previously found in ion traps, appears as a distinct regime of the sideband instability in nonlinear plasma waves with trapped particles. As the bounce frequency of these particles decreases with the bounce action, bunching can occur if the action distribution is inverted in trapping islands. In contrast to existing theories that also infer instabilities from the anharmonicity of bounce oscillations, spatial periodicity of the islands turns out to be unimportant, and the particle distribution can be unstable even if it is at at the resonance. An analytical model is proposed which describes both single traps and periodic nonlinear waves and concisely generalizes the conventional description of the sideband instability in plasma waves. The theoretical results are supported by particle-in-cell simulations carried out for a regime accentuating the NMI effect.

  18. Betatron Radiation from a Beam Driven Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, M.; Corde, S.; /SLAC

    2012-08-13

    Photons produced by the betatron oscillation of electrons in a beam-driven plasma wake provide a uniquely intense and high-energy source of hard X-rays and gamma rays. This betatron radiation is interesting not only for its high intensity and spectral characteristics, but also because it can be used as a diagnostic for beam matching into the plasma, which is critical for maximizing the energy extraction efficiency of a plasma accelerator stage. At SLAC, gamma ray detection devices have been installed at the dump area of the FACET beamline where the betatron radiation from the plasma source used in the E200 plasma wakefield acceleration experiment may be observed. The ultra-dense, high-energy beam at FACET (2 x 10{sup 10} electrons, 20 x 20 {micro}m{sup 2} spot, 20-100 {micro}m length, 20 GeV energy) when sent into a plasma source with a nominal density of {approx} 1 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} will generate synchrotron-like spectra with critical energies well into the tens of MeV. The intensity of the radiation can be increased by introducing a radial offset to the centroid of the witness bunch, which may be achieved at FACET through the use of a transverse deflecting RF cavity. The E200 gamma ray detector has two main components: a 30 x 35 cm{sup 2} phosphorescent screen for observing the transverse extent of the radiation, and a sampling electromagnetic calorimeter outfitted with photodiodes for measuring the on-axis spectrum. To estimate the spectrum, the observed intensity patterns across the calorimeter are fit with a Gaussian-integrated synchrotron spectrum and compared to simulations. Results and observations from the first FACET user run (April-June 2012) are presented.

  19. Betatron radiation from a beam driven plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litos, M.; Corde, S.

    2012-12-01

    Photons produced by the betatron oscillation of electrons in a beam-driven plasma wake provide a uniquely intense and high-energy source of hard X-rays and gamma rays. This betatron radiation is interesting not only for its high intensity and spectral characteristics, but also because it can be used as a diagnostic for beam matching into the plasma, which is critical for maximizing the energy extraction efficiency of a plasma accelerator stage. At SLAC, gamma ray detection devices have been installed at the dump area of the FACET beamline where the betatron radiation from the plasma source used in the E200 plasma wakefield acceleration experiment may be observed. The ultra-dense, high-energy beam at FACET (2 × 1010 electrons, 20 × 20μm2 spot, 20 - 100μm length, 20GeV energy) when sent into a plasma source with a nominal density of ˜ 1 × 1017 cm-3 will generate synchrotron-like spectra with critical energies well into the tens of MeV. The intensity of the radiation can be increased by introducing a radial offset to the centroid of the witness bunch, which may be achieved at FACET through the use of a transverse deflecting RF cavity. The E200 gamma ray detector has two main components: a 30 × 35cm2 phosphorescent screen for observing the transverse extent of the radiation, and a sampling electromagnetic calorimeter outfitted with photodiodes for measuring the on-axis spectrum. To estimate the spectrum, the observed intensity patterns across the calorimeter are fit with a Gaussian-integrated synchrotron spectrum and compared to simulations. Results and observations from the first FACET user run (April-June 2012) are presented.

  20. Betatron radiation from a beam driven plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Litos, M.; Corde, S.

    2012-12-21

    Photons produced by the betatron oscillation of electrons in a beam-driven plasma wake provide a uniquely intense and high-energy source of hard X-rays and gamma rays. This betatron radiation is interesting not only for its high intensity and spectral characteristics, but also because it can be used as a diagnostic for beam matching into the plasma, which is critical for maximizing the energy extraction efficiency of a plasma accelerator stage. At SLAC, gamma ray detection devices have been installed at the dump area of the FACET beamline where the betatron radiation from the plasma source used in the E200 plasma wakefield acceleration experiment may be observed. The ultra-dense, high-energy beam at FACET (2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} electrons, 20 Multiplication-Sign 20{mu}m{sup 2} spot, 20 - 100{mu}m length, 20GeV energy) when sent into a plasma source with a nominal density of {approx} 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} will generate synchrotron-like spectra with critical energies well into the tens of MeV. The intensity of the radiation can be increased by introducing a radial offset to the centroid of the witness bunch, which may be achieved at FACET through the use of a transverse deflecting RF cavity. The E200 gamma ray detector has two main components: a 30 Multiplication-Sign 35cm{sup 2} phosphorescent screen for observing the transverse extent of the radiation, and a sampling electromagnetic calorimeter outfitted with photodiodes for measuring the on-axis spectrum. To estimate the spectrum, the observed intensity patterns across the calorimeter are fit with a Gaussian-integrated synchrotron spectrum and compared to simulations. Results and observations from the first FACET user run (April-June 2012) are presented.

  1. Tin LPP plasma control in the argon cusp source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGeoch, Malcolm W.

    2016-03-01

    The argon cusp plasma has been introduced [1,2] for 500W class tin LPP exhaust control in view of its high power handling, predicted low tin back-scatter from a beam dump, and avoidance of hydrogen usage. The physics of tin ion control by a plasma is first discussed. Experimentally, cusp stability and exhaust disc geometry have previously been proved at full scale [2], the equivalent of 300W-500W usable EUV. Here we verify operation of the plasma barrier that maintains a high argon density next to the collector, for its protection, and a low density in the long path toward the intermediate focus, for efficiency. A pressure differential of 2Pa has been demonstrated in initial work. Other aspects of tin LPP plasma control by the cusp have now been demonstrated using tin ions from a low Hz 130mJ CO2 laser pulse onto a solid tin surface at the cusp center. Plasma is rejected at the <0.5% level at the collector mirror location using the cusp magnetic field alone. Plasma also is rejected using a low argon density (<1x1014cm-3). We have measured the tin ion flow pattern toward the large area annular beam dump. Scaling of the cusp design to match a specified exhaust power is discussed. In view of this work, argon cusp exhaust control appears to be very promising for 500W class tin LPP sources.

  2. Oscillating plasma bubbles. III. Internal electron sources and sinks

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2012-08-15

    An internal electron source has been used to neutralize ions injected from an ambient plasma into a spherical grid. The resultant plasma is termed a plasma 'bubble.' When the electron supply from the filament is reduced, the sheath inside the bubble becomes unstable. The plasma potential of the bubble oscillates near but below the ion plasma frequency. Different modes of oscillations have been observed as well as a subharmonic and multiple harmonics. The frequency increases with ion density and decreases with electron density. The peak amplitude occurs for an optimum current and the instability is quenched at large electron densities. The frequency also increases if Langmuir probes inside the bubble draw electrons. Allowing electrons from the ambient plasma to enter, the bubble changes the frequency dependence on grid voltage. It is concluded that the net space charge density in the sheath determines the oscillation frequency. It is suggested that the sheath instability is caused by ion inertia in an oscillating sheath electric field which is created by ion bunching.

  3. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic Plasma Modeling of Inductively Coupled Plasma Source and Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, Shahid; Agarwal, Ankur; Kenney, Jason; Wu, Ming-Feng; Collins, Ken

    2012-10-01

    Inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) are widely used for etching and deposition in the semiconductor industry. As device dimensions shrink with concomitant decreased tolerance for variability, it is critical to improve plasma and process uniformity in all plasma processes. In ICP systems, one of the major sources of non-uniformity is the radio-frequency (RF) antenna used to generate the electromagnetic wave. Discontinuities at current feed and grounding locations as well as electromagnetic field variations along the antenna coils can perturb the azimuthal electric field, resulting in a non-uniform plasma. For plasma modeling of ICP systems, a related problem is how capacitive coupling from the antenna is accounted for. ICP models have generally considered field variation along the antenna and capacitive coupling using simplified circuit models for the antenna structures. Modern ICP antennas are however quite complicated, making circuit approximations of the antenna too crude for system design. A three-dimensional parallel plasma model is described in this paper, where the full set of Maxwell equations are solved in conjunction with plasma transport equations for the plasma and the antenna. Several examples from the use of this model in ICP system design are presented.

  4. Fission Yield Measurements by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Irina Glagolenko; Bruce Hilton; Jeffrey Giglio; Daniel Cummings; Karl Grimm; Richard McKnight

    2009-11-01

    Correct prediction of the fission products inventory in irradiated nuclear fuels is essential for accurate estimation of fuel burnup, establishing proper requirements for spent fuel transportation and storage, materials accountability and nuclear forensics. Such prediction is impossible without accurate knowledge of neutron induced fission yields. Unfortunately, the accuracy of the fission yields reported in the ENDF/B-VII.0 library is not uniform across all of the data and much of the improvement is desired for certain isotopes and fission products. We discuss our measurements of cumulative fission yields in nuclear fuels irradiated in thermal and fast reactor spectra using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

  5. Plasma mass-spectrometric detection for high-performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Heitkemper, D.T.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma mass spectrometry is evaluated as a detector for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Both the argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and the helium microwave induced plasma (MIP) ion sources are investigated. Anion-exchange HPLC is directly combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the speciation of arsenic in urine. Four arsenic species are determined in urine samples using the method of standard additions. The absolute detection limits ranged from 20 to 91 pg As in aqueous media and 36-96 pg As in urine. The determination of inorganic arsenite is complicated by the presence of an interfering peak, which is believed to arise from the co-elution of chlorine-containing species and subsequent formation of {sup 40}Ar{sup 35}Cl{sup +} (m/z = 75). Continuous hydride generation is investigated for sample introduction with ICP-MS. The system allows for the simultaneous determination of hydride forming elements with elements which do not form volatile hydrides. Detection limits for volatile hydrides are generally 1 order of magnitude improved over conventional sample introduction employing pneumatic nebulization. The hydride system is used on-line with ion pairing HPLC for the speciation of four arsenic species. Detection limits ranged from 2.3 to 10.6 pg As for each of the arsenic species. Reversed phase HPLC is directly coupled to helium microwave induced plasma mass spectrometry (MIP-MS) for the element-selective detection of halogenated organic compounds. Absolute detection limits are approximately 50 pg Br, 1 pg I, and 10 ng Cl for the corresponding halogenated compounds. The effect of organic solvents on the background mass spectrum is investigated.

  6. Fundamental studies of the plasma extraction and ion beam formation processes in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Hongsen

    1995-02-10

    The fundamental and practical aspects are described for extracting ions from atmospheric pressure plasma sources into an analytical mass spectrometer. Methodologies and basic concepts of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are emphasized in the discussion, including ion source, sampling interface, supersonic expansion, slumming process, ion optics and beam focusing, and vacuum considerations. Some new developments and innovative designs are introduced. The plasma extraction process in ICP-MS was investigated by Langmuir measurements in the region between the skimmer and first ion lens. Electron temperature (T{sub e}) is in the range 2000--11000 K and changes with probe position inside an aerosol gas flow. Electron density (n{sub e}) is in the range 10{sup 8}--10{sup 10} {sup {minus}cm }at the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3} near the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3} downstream further behind the skimmer. Electron density in the beam leaving the skimmer also depends on water loading and on the presence and mass of matrix elements. Axially resolved distributions of electron number-density and electron temperature were obtained to characterize the ion beam at a variety of plasma operating conditions. The electron density dropped by a factor of 101 along the centerline between the sampler and skimmer cones in the first stage and continued to drop by factors of 10{sup 4}--10{sup 5} downstream of skimmer to the entrance of ion lens. The electron density in the beam expansion behind sampler cone exhibited a 1/z{sup 2} intensity fall-off (z is the axial position). An second beam expansion originated from the skimmer entrance, and the beam flow underwent with another 1/z{sup 2} fall-off behind the skimmer. Skimmer interactions play an important role in plasma extraction in the ICP-MS instrument.

  7. Ion track structure probed by plasma desorption mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    U. R. Sundqvist, Bo

    1993-07-01

    Since the discovery of plasma desorption mass spectrometry by Torgerson [D.F. Torgerson, R.P. Skowronski and R.D. Macfarlane, Biophys. Res. Commun., 60(1974) 616], the method has mainly been used in mass spectrometric studies of bioorganic molecules. However, the ejecta in this electronic sputtering process have also been studied with the aim to gain information on the structure of the ion track formed in a solid by the incident fission fragment. In this paper such studies will be described. In particular, the ejection of large whole ionised organic molecules and the synthesis of fullerenes at the impact of a fast heavy ion on an organic solid will be discussed. Those two processes are connected to different parts of the ion track. Also, the ejection of light ions and damage cross sections will be discussed and are shown to give additional information on the time and space evolution of energy deposited in a fast ion track.

  8. Quantitative aspects of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bulska, Ewa; Wagner, Barbara

    2016-10-28

    Accurate determination of elements in various kinds of samples is essential for many areas, including environmental science, medicine, as well as industry. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a powerful tool enabling multi-elemental analysis of numerous matrices with high sensitivity and good precision. Various calibration approaches can be used to perform accurate quantitative measurements by ICP-MS. They include the use of pure standards, matrix-matched standards, or relevant certified reference materials, assuring traceability of the reported results. This review critically evaluates the advantages and limitations of different calibration approaches, which are used in quantitative analyses by ICP-MS. Examples of such analyses are provided.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'. PMID:27644971

  9. Quantitative aspects of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulska, Ewa; Wagner, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Accurate determination of elements in various kinds of samples is essential for many areas, including environmental science, medicine, as well as industry. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a powerful tool enabling multi-elemental analysis of numerous matrices with high sensitivity and good precision. Various calibration approaches can be used to perform accurate quantitative measurements by ICP-MS. They include the use of pure standards, matrix-matched standards, or relevant certified reference materials, assuring traceability of the reported results. This review critically evaluates the advantages and limitations of different calibration approaches, which are used in quantitative analyses by ICP-MS. Examples of such analyses are provided. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  10. Radio frequency line-plasma source using permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Sakawa, Youichi; Yano, Kentaro; Shoji, Tatsuo

    2004-09-01

    A high-density and uniform line-plasma source is developed by an inductive rf discharge using a rectangular discharge chamber (200x100x20 mm) with a pair of permanent magnets placed on top and bottom of the chamber. Ion-saturation current-density J{sub is} profile is controlled by varying the width of the magnets and the distance between the antenna and the magnets. A 140-mm-wide plasma [plasma density {approx_equal}(1.8-2.5)x10{sup 12} cm{sup -3} for electron temperature =4-8 eV] of a uniformity variation within 90% is produced using a 140-mm-long antenna for an Ar pressure of 20 mTorr and a rf power of 3 kW. The measured J{sub is} profiles are explained by solving the equation of motion for electrons under a magnetic field structure of longitudinal line cusps.

  11. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    DOE PAGES

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-05-28

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. It was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled bymore » the pulsed magnetic field. Thus, this approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.« less

  12. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-05-28

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. It was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. Thus, this approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  13. Enhanced magnetic ionization in hydrogen reflex discharge plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Toader, E.I.; Covlea, V.N.

    2005-03-01

    The effect of enhanced magnetic ionization on the external and internal parameters of a high-density, low pressure reflex plasma source operating in hydrogen is studied. The Langmuir probe method and Druyvesteyn procedure coupled with suitable software are used to measure the internal parameters. The bulk plasma region is free of an electric field and presents a high degree of uniformity. The electron energy distribution function is bi-Maxwellian with a dip/shoulder structure around 5.5 eV, independent of external parameters and radial position. Due to the enhanced hollow cathode effect by the magnetic trapping of electrons, the electron density n{sub e} is as high as 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}, and the electron temperature T{sub e} is as low as a few tens of an electron volt, for dissipated energy of tens of Watts. The bulk plasma density scales with the dissipated power.

  14. Physics data base for the Beam Plasma Neutron Source (BPNS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coensgen, F. H.; Casper, T. A.; Correll, D. L.; Damm, C. C.; Futch, A. H.; Molvik, A. W.

    1990-10-01

    A 14-MeV deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron source for accelerated end-of-life testing of fusion reactor materials has been designed on the basis of a linear two-component collisional plasma system. An intense flux (up to 5 x 10(exp 18)/sq m sec) of 14 MeV neutrons is produced in a fully ionized high-density (n sub e approx. = 3 x 10(exp 21) per cu m) tritium target by transverse injection of 60 MW of neutral beam power. Power deposited in the target is removed by thermal electron conduction to large end chambers, where it is deposited in gaseous plasma collectors. We show in this paper that the major physics issues have now been experimentally demonstrated. These include magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium and stability, microstability, startup, fueling, Spitzer electron thermal conductivity, and power deposition in a gaseous plasma collector. However, an integrated system was not demonstrated.

  15. Radiation sources based on laser-plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    Jaroszynski, D A; Bingham, R; Brunetti, E; Ersfeld, B; Gallacher, J; van der Geer, B; Issac, R; Jamison, S P; Jones, D; de Loos, M; Lyachev, A; Pavlov, V; Reitsma, A; Saveliev, Y; Vieux, G; Wiggins, S M

    2006-03-15

    Plasma waves excited by intense laser beams can be harnessed to produce femtosecond duration bunches of electrons with relativistic energies. The very large electrostatic forces of plasma density wakes trailing behind an intense laser pulse provide field potentials capable of accelerating charged particles to high energies over very short distances, as high as 1GeV in a few millimetres. The short length scale of plasma waves provides a means of developing very compact high-energy accelerators, which could form the basis of compact next-generation light sources with unique properties. Tuneable X-ray radiation and particle pulses with durations of the order of or less than 5fs should be possible and would be useful for probing matter on unprecedented time and spatial scales. If developed to fruition this revolutionary technology could reduce the size and cost of light sources by three orders of magnitude and, therefore, provide powerful new tools to a large scientific community. We will discuss how a laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerator can be used to produce radiation with unique characteristics over a very large spectral range.

  16. Aerosol detection efficiency in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Hubbard, Joshua A.; Zigmond, Joseph A.

    2016-03-02

    We used an electrostatic size classification technique to segregate particles of known composition prior to being injected into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Moreover, we counted size-segregated particles with a condensation nuclei counter as well as sampled with an ICP-MS. By injecting particles of known size, composition, and aerosol concentration into the ICP-MS, efficiencies of the order of magnitude aerosol detection were calculated, and the particle size dependencies for volatile and refractory species were quantified. Similar to laser ablation ICP-MS, aerosol detection efficiency was defined as the rate at which atoms were detected in the ICP-MS normalized bymore » the rate at which atoms were injected in the form of particles. This method adds valuable insight into the development of technologies like laser ablation ICP-MS where aerosol particles (of relatively unknown size and gas concentration) are generated during ablation and then transported into the plasma of an ICP-MS. In this study, we characterized aerosol detection efficiencies of volatile species gold and silver along with refractory species aluminum oxide, cerium oxide, and yttrium oxide. Aerosols were generated with electrical mobility diameters ranging from 100 to 1000 nm. In general, it was observed that refractory species had lower aerosol detection efficiencies than volatile species, and there were strong dependencies on particle size and plasma torch residence time. Volatile species showed a distinct transition point at which aerosol detection efficiency began decreasing with increasing particle size. This critical diameter indicated the largest particle size for which complete particle detection should be expected and agreed with theories published in other works. Aerosol detection efficiencies also displayed power law dependencies on particle size. Aerosol detection efficiencies ranged from 10-5 to 10-11. Free molecular heat and mass transfer theory was

  17. Aerosol detection efficiency in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Joshua A.; Zigmond, Joseph A.

    2016-05-01

    An electrostatic size classification technique was used to segregate particles of known composition prior to being injected into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Size-segregated particles were counted with a condensation nuclei counter as well as sampled with an ICP-MS. By injecting particles of known size, composition, and aerosol concentration into the ICP-MS, efficiencies of the order of magnitude aerosol detection were calculated, and the particle size dependencies for volatile and refractory species were quantified. Similar to laser ablation ICP-MS, aerosol detection efficiency was defined as the rate at which atoms were detected in the ICP-MS normalized by the rate at which atoms were injected in the form of particles. This method adds valuable insight into the development of technologies like laser ablation ICP-MS where aerosol particles (of relatively unknown size and gas concentration) are generated during ablation and then transported into the plasma of an ICP-MS. In this study, we characterized aerosol detection efficiencies of volatile species gold and silver along with refractory species aluminum oxide, cerium oxide, and yttrium oxide. Aerosols were generated with electrical mobility diameters ranging from 100 to 1000 nm. In general, it was observed that refractory species had lower aerosol detection efficiencies than volatile species, and there were strong dependencies on particle size and plasma torch residence time. Volatile species showed a distinct transition point at which aerosol detection efficiency began decreasing with increasing particle size. This critical diameter indicated the largest particle size for which complete particle detection should be expected and agreed with theories published in other works. Aerosol detection efficiencies also displayed power law dependencies on particle size. Aerosol detection efficiencies ranged from 10- 5 to 10- 11. Free molecular heat and mass transfer theory was applied, but

  18. Preliminary Study of a Hybrid Helicon-ECR Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. Hala, A.; Oksuz, L.; Ximing, Zhu

    2016-08-01

    A new type of hybrid discharge is experimentally investigated in this work. A helicon source and an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source were combined to produce plasma. As a preliminary study of this type of plasma, the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) method was used to obtain values of electron temperature and density under a series of typical conditions. Generally, it was observed that the electron temperature decreases and the electron density increases as the pressure increased. When increasing the applied power at a certain pressure, the average electron density at certain positions in the discharge does not increase significantly possibly due to the high degree of neutral depletion. Electron temperature increased with power in the hybrid mode. Possible mechanisms of these preliminary observations are discussed.

  19. On the density limit in the helicon plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kotelnikov, Igor A.

    2014-12-15

    Existence of the density limit in the helicon plasma sources is revisited. The low- and high-frequency regimes of a helicon plasma source operation are distinguished. In the low-frequency regime with ω<√(ω{sub ci}ω{sub ce}), the density limit is deduced from the Golant-Stix criterion of the accessibility of the lower hybrid resonance. In the high-frequency case, ω>√(ω{sub ci}ω{sub ce}), an appropriate limit is given by the Shamrai-Taranov criterion. Both these criteria are closely related to the phenomenon of the coalescence of the helicon wave with the Trivelpiece-Gould mode. We draw a conclusion that the derived density limits are not currently achieved in existing devices, perhaps, because of high energy cost of gas ionization.

  20. A capillary discharge plasma source of intense VUV radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel'man, Igor I; Shevelko, A P; Yakushev, O F; Knight, L V; Turley, R S

    2003-01-31

    The results of investigation of a capillary discharge plasma, used as a source of intense VUV radiation and soft X-rays, are presented. The plasma was generated during the discharge of low-inductance condensers in a gas-filled ceramic capillary. Intense line radiation was observed in a broad spectral range (30-400 A) in various gases (CO{sub 2}, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe). The absolute radiation yield for the xenon discharge was {approx}5 mJ (2{pi} sr){sup -1} pulse{sup -1} within a spectral band of width 9 A at 135 A. Such a radiation source can be used for various practical applications, such as EUV projection lithography, microscopy of biological objects in a 'water window', reflectometry, etc. (special issue devoted to the 80th anniversary of academician n g basov's birth)

  1. Dynamics of ion beam charge neutralization by ferroelectric plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Anton D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry R.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2016-04-01

    Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPSs) can generate plasma that provides effective space-charge neutralization of intense high-perveance ion beams, as has been demonstrated on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment NDCX-I and NDCX-II. This article presents experimental results on charge neutralization of a high-perveance 38 keV Ar+ beam by a plasma produced in a FEPS discharge. By comparing the measured beam radius with the envelope model for space-charge expansion, it is shown that a charge neutralization fraction of 98% is attainable with sufficiently dense FEPS plasma. The transverse electrostatic potential of the ion beam is reduced from 15 V before neutralization to 0.3 V, implying that the energy of the neutralizing electrons is below 0.3 eV. Measurements of the time-evolution of beam radius show that near-complete charge neutralization is established ˜5 μs after the driving pulse is applied to the FEPS and can last for 35 μs. It is argued that the duration of neutralization is much longer than a reasonable lifetime of the plasma produced in the sub-μs surface discharge. Measurements of current flow in the driving circuit of the FEPS show the existence of electron emission into vacuum, which lasts for tens of μs after the high voltage pulse is applied. It is argued that the beam is neutralized by the plasma produced by this process and not by a surface discharge plasma that is produced at the instant the high-voltage pulse is applied.

  2. PLASMOSE - antimicrobial effects of modular atmospheric plasma sources

    PubMed Central

    Ehlbeck, Jörg; Brandenburg, Ronny; von Woedtke, Thomas; Krohmann, Udo; Stieber, Manfred; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2008-01-01

    The technological potential of non-thermal plasmas for the antimicrobial treatment of heat sensitive materials is well known and has been documented in a great number of research activities, but the realisation of industrial plasma-based decontamination processes remains a great challenge. One of the reasons for this situation is the fact that an antimicrobial treatment process needs to consider all properties of the product to be treated as well as the requirements of the complete procedure, e.g. a reprocessing of a medical instrument. The aim of the BMBF-funded network project PLASMOSE is to demonstrate the applicability of plasma-based processes for the antimicrobial treatment on selected, heat sensitive products. Modular and selective plasma sources, driven at atmospheric pressure are used. This basic approach shall combine the technological advantages of atmospheric pressure plasmas (avoidance of vacuum devices and batch processing) with the flexibility and handling properties of modular devices. Two different objectives were selected: the outer surface treatment of medical products and the treatment of hollow packaging for pharmaceutical products. The outer surface treatment of medical products, in particular catheters for intracardial electrophysiological studies, is investigated by means of RF-driven plasma jets in argon. Due to its compact design they are predestined for modularisation and can be adapted to nearly any complex 3-dimensional structure as given by the medical products. The realisation of an antimicrobial treatment process of hollow packaging for pharmaceutical products has quite different demands. Such a process is needed to be implemented in in-line filling procedures and to work without additional process gases. The idea is to use an atmospheric air, microwave-driven self propagating discharge. The plasma process is optimized for the decontamination of 200 ml bottles by field simulation studies combined with optical emissions spectroscopy

  3. Dynamics of ion beam charge neutralization by ferroelectric plasma sources

    DOE PAGES

    Stepanov, Anton D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry R.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2016-04-27

    Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPSs) can generate plasma that provides effective space-charge neutralization of intense high-perveance ion beams, as has been demonstrated on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment NDCX-I and NDCX-II. This article presents experimental results on charge neutralization of a high-perveance 38 keV Ar+ beam by a plasma produced in a FEPS discharge. By comparing the measured beam radius with the envelope model for space-charge expansion, it is shown that a charge neutralization fraction of 98% is attainable with sufficiently dense FEPS plasma. The transverse electrostatic potential of the ion beam is reduced from 15V before neutralization to 0.3 V,more » implying that the energy of the neutralizing electrons is below 0.3 eV. Measurements of the time-evolution of beam radius show that near-complete charge neutralization is established similar to –5 μs after the driving pulse is applied to the FEPS and can last for 35 μs. It is argued that the duration of neutralization is much longer than a reasonable lifetime of the plasma produced in the sub-mu s surface discharge. Measurements of current flow in the driving circuit of the FEPS show the existence of electron emission into vacuum, which lasts for tens of mu s after the high voltage pulse is applied. Lastly, it is argued that the beam is neutralized by the plasma produced by this process and not by a surface discharge plasma that is produced at the instant the high-voltage pulse is applied.« less

  4. Applications of plasma sources for nitric oxide medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilets, Victor; Shekhter, Anatoly; Pekshev, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has important roles in the function of many tissues and organs. Wound healing processes are always accompanying by the increase of nitric oxide concentration in wound tissue. These facts suggest a possible therapeutic use of various NO donors for the acceleration of the wound healing and treatment of other diseases. Our previous studies indicated that gaseous NO flow produced by air-plasma generators acts beneficially on the wound healing. This beneficial effect could be caused by the mechanism involving peroxynitrite as an intermediate. As a result of mobilization of various antioxidant reactions more endogenous NO molecules become available as signaling molecules. to regulate the metabolic processes in wound tissue. In this paper different air plasma sources generated therapeutic concentrations of NO are discussed. The concentration of NO and other therapeutically important gas products are estimated by thermodynamic simulation. Synergy effects of NO with other plasma components are discussed as a factor enhancing therapeutic results. Some new medical application of plasma devices are presented. Advanced Plasma Therapies Inc.

  5. Measurement of optical emission from the hydrogen plasma of the Linac4 ion source and the SPL plasma generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettry, J.; Bertolo, S.; Castel, A.; Chaudet, E.; Ecarnot, J.-F.; Favre, G.; Fayet, F.; Geisser, J.-M.; Haase, M.; Habert, A.; Hansen, J.; Joffe, S.; Kronberger, M.; Lombard, D.; Marmillon, A.; Balula, J. Marques; Mathot, S.; Midttun, O.; Moyret, P.; Nisbet, D.; O'Neil, M.; Paoluzzi, M.; Prever-Loiri, L.; Arias, J. Sanchez; Schmitzer, C.; Steyaert, R. Scrivens D.; Vestergard, H.; Wilhelmsson, M.

    2011-09-01

    At CERN, a non caesiated H- ion volume source derived from the DESY ion source is being commissioned. For a proposed High Power Superconducting Proton Linac (HP-SPL), a non caesiated plasma generator was designed to operate at the two orders of magnitude larger duty factor required by the SPL. The commissioning of the plasma generator test stand and the plasma generator prototype are completed and briefly described. The 2 MHz RF generators (100 kW, 50 Hz repetition rate) was successfully commissioned; its frequency and power will be controlled by arbitrary function generators during the 1 ms plasma pulse. In order to characterize the plasma, RF-coupling, optical spectrometer, rest gas analyzer and Langmuir probe measurements will be used. Optical spectrometry allows direct comparison with the currently commissioned Linac4 H- ion source plasma. The first measurements of the optical emission of the Linac4 ion source and of the SPL plasma generator plasmas are presented.

  6. Reductions in contaminant mass discharge following partial mass removal from DNAPL source zones.

    PubMed

    Suchomel, Eric J; Pennell, Kurt D

    2006-10-01

    Although in situ remediation technologies have been used to aggressively treat dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones, complete contaminant removal or destruction is rarely achieved. To evaluate the effects of partial source zone mass removal on dissolved-phase contaminant flux, four experiments were conducted in a two-dimensional aquifer cell that contained a tetrachloroethene (PCE) source zone and down-gradient plume region. Initial source zone PCE saturation distributions, quantified using a light transmission system, were expressed in terms of a ganglia-to-pool ratio (GTP), which ranged from 0.16 (13.8% ganglia) to 1.6 (61.5% ganglia). The cells were flushed sequentially with a 4% (wt.) Tween 80 surfactant solution to achieve incremental PCE mass removal, followed by water flooding until steady-state mass discharge and plume concentrations were established. In all cases, the GTP ratio decreased with increasing mass removal, consistent with the observed preferential dissolution of PCE ganglia and persistence of high-saturation pools. In the ganglia-dominated system (GTP = 1.6), greater than 70% mass removal was required before measurable reductions in plume concentrations and mass discharge were observed. For pool-dominated source zones (GTP < 0.3), substantial reductions (>50%) in mass discharge were realized after only 50% mass removal.

  7. High-resolution mass spectrometer for liquid metal ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Wortmann, Martin; Ludwig, Arne; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D.; Meijer, Jan

    2013-09-15

    Recently, a mass spectrometer for liquid metal ion sources (LMIS) has been built and set into operation. This device uses an E×B-filter as mass dispersive element and provides sufficient resolution to analyse the emission of clusters from LMIS to much higher mass ranges (>2000 amu) than commercially available mass filters for focused ion beam systems. It has also been shown that for small masses the composition of clusters from different isotopes can be resolved. Furthermore, a rather high fluence of monodisperse clusters in the range of 10{sup 6}–10{sup 7} clusters/s can be achieved with this setup. This makes it a promising tool for the preparation of mass selected clusters. In this contribution, theoretical considerations as well as technical details and the results of first measurements are presented.

  8. High-resolution mass spectrometer for liquid metal ion sources.

    PubMed

    Wortmann, Martin; Ludwig, Arne; Meijer, Jan; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D

    2013-09-01

    Recently, a mass spectrometer for liquid metal ion sources (LMIS) has been built and set into operation. This device uses an E × B-filter as mass dispersive element and provides sufficient resolution to analyse the emission of clusters from LMIS to much higher mass ranges (>2000 amu) than commercially available mass filters for focused ion beam systems. It has also been shown that for small masses the composition of clusters from different isotopes can be resolved. Furthermore, a rather high fluence of monodisperse clusters in the range of 10(6)-10(7) clusters/s can be achieved with this setup. This makes it a promising tool for the preparation of mass selected clusters. In this contribution, theoretical considerations as well as technical details and the results of first measurements are presented.

  9. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-12-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  10. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  11. Fissile mass estimation by pulsed neutron source interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelashvili, I.; Dubi, C.; Ettedgui, H.; Ocherashvili, A.; Pedersen, B.; Beck, A.; Roesgen, E.; Crochmore, J. M.; Ridnik, T.; Yaar, I.

    2015-06-01

    Passive methods for detecting correlated neutrons from spontaneous fissions (e.g. multiplicity and SVM) are widely used for fissile mass estimations. These methods can be used for fissile materials that emit a significant amount of fission neutrons (like plutonium). Active interrogation, in which fissions are induced in the tested material by an external continuous source or by a pulsed neutron source, has the potential advantages of fast measurement, alongside independence of the spontaneous fissions of the tested fissile material, thus enabling uranium measurement. Until recently, using the multiplicity method, for uranium mass estimation, was possible only for active interrogation made with continues neutron source. Pulsed active neutron interrogation measurements were analyzed with techniques, e.g. differential die away analysis (DDA), which ignore or implicitly include the multiplicity effect (self-induced fission chains). Recently, both, the multiplicity and the SVM techniques, were theoretically extended for analyzing active fissile mass measurements, made by a pulsed neutron source. In this study the SVM technique for pulsed neutron source is experimentally examined, for the first time. The measurements were conducted at the PUNITA facility of the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy. First promising results, of mass estimation by the SVM technique using a pulsed neutron source, are presented.

  12. Radial geometry cesium plasma source with improved mechanical features

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.; Beckers, R.M.; Johnson, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    An improved version of the radial geometry cesium plasma negative ion source, described by Alton and Blazey, has been designed, evaluated and employed for use during routine operation of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) tandem accelerator. The mechanical features of the source have been improved to facilitate rapid change of degradable parts such as the sputter probe insulator and cathodes and to provide better thermal isolation of the externally mounted oven from the discharge chamber. The source has demonstrated improved operational stability, higher intensities and increased reliability over its predecessor. Negative ion beams from more than twenty-five elements have been provided for the HHIRF experimental program including several molecular hydride beams from difficult elements such as Be, Mg, Ti, Sc, Nd and Zr. A detailed description of the mechanical features of the source as well as the negative ion yield dependence on certain operational parameters are presented. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. High Power Light Gas Helicon Plasma Source For VASMIR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, J. P.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Glover, T. W.; Jacobson, V. T.; McCaskill, G. E.; Winter, D. S.; Baity, F. W.; Carter, M. D.; Goulding, R. H.

    2004-01-01

    The VASIMR space propulsion development effort relies on a high power (greater than 10kW) helicon source to produce a dense flowing plasma (H, D and He) target for ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) acceleration of the ions. Subsequent expansion in an expanding magnetic field (magnetic nozzle) converts ion lunetic energy to directed momentum. This plasma source must have critical features to enable an effective propulsion device. First, it must ionize most of the input neutral flux of gas, thus producing a plasma stream with a high degree of ionization for application of ICR power. This avoids propellant waste and potential power losses due to charge exchange. Next, the plasma stream must flow into a region of high magnetic field (approximately 0.5 T) for efficient ICR acceleration. Third, the ratio of input power to plasma flux must be low, providing an energy per ion-electron pair approaching 100 eV. Lastly, the source must be robust and capable of very long life-times (years). In our helicon experiment (VX-10) we have measured a ratio of input gas to plasma flux near 100%. The plasma flows from the helicon region (B approximately 0.1 T) into a region with a peak magnetic field of 0.8 T. The energy input per ion-electron pair has been measured at 300 plus or minus 100 eV. Recent results at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) show an enhanced efficiency mode of operation with a high power density, over 5 kW in a 5 cm diameter tube. Our helicon is presently 9 cm in diameter and operates up to 3.5 kW of input power. An upgrade to a power level of 10 kW is underway. Much of our recent work has been with a Boswell double-saddle antenna design. We are also converting the antenna design to a helical type. With these modifications, we anticipate an improvement in the ionization efficiency. This paper presents the results from scaling the helicon in the VX-10 device from 3.5 to 10 kW. We also compare the operation with a double-saddle to a helical antenna design. Finally, we

  14. Multicomponent NAPL source dissolution: evaluation of mass-transfer coefficients.

    PubMed

    Mobile, Michael A; Widdowson, Mark A; Gallagher, Daniel L

    2012-09-18

    Mass transfer rate coefficients were quantified by employing an inverse modeling technique to high-resolution aqueous phase concentration data observed following an experimental release of a multicomponent nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) at a field site. A solute transport model (SEAM3D) was employed to simulate advective-dispersive transport over time coupled to NAPL dissolution. Model calibration was demonstrated by accurately reproducing the observed breakthrough times and peak concentrations at multiple observation points, observed mass discharge at pumping wells, and the reported mass depletions for three soluble NAPL constituents. Vertically variable NAPL mass transfer coefficients were derived for each constituent using an optimized numerical solute transport model, ranging from 0.082 to 2.0 day(-1) across all constituents. Constituent-specific coefficients showed a positive correlation with liquid-phase diffusion coefficients. Application of a time-varying mass transfer coefficient as NAPL mass depleted showed limited sensitivity during which over 80% of the most soluble NAPL constituent dissolved from the source. Long-term simulation results, calibrated to the experimental data and rendered in terms of mass discharge versus source mass depletion, exhibited multistage behavior.

  15. Comprehensive Analysis of Low-Molecular-Weight Human Plasma Proteome Using Top-Down Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Dong Huey; Nam, Eun Ji; Park, Kyu Hyung; Woo, Se Joon; Lee, Hye Jin; Kim, Hee Cheol; Yang, Eun Gyeong; Lee, Cheolju; Lee, Ji Eun

    2016-01-01

    While human plasma serves as a great source for disease diagnosis, low-molecular-weight (LMW) proteome (<30 kDa) has been shown to contain a rich source of diagnostic biomarkers. Here we employ top-down mass spectrometry to analyze the LMW proteoforms present in four types of human plasma samples pooled from three healthy controls (HCs) without immunoaffinity depletion and with depletion of the top two, six, and seven high-abundance proteins. The LMW proteoforms were first fractionated based on molecular weight using gel-eluted liquid fraction entrapment electrophoresis (GELFrEE). Then, the GELFrEE fractions containing up to 30 kDa were subjected to nanocapillary-LC-MS/MS, and the high-resolution MS and MS/MS data were processed using ProSightPC 3.0. As a result, a total of 442 LMW proteins and cleaved products, including those with post-translational modifications and single amino acid variations, were identified. From additional comparative analysis of plasma samples without immunoaffinity depletion between HCs and colorectal cancer (CRC) patients via top-down approach, tens of LMW proteoforms, including platelet factor 4, were found to show >1.5-fold changes between the plasma samples of HCs and CRC patients, and six of the LMW proteins were verified by Western blot analysis.

  16. High Resolution Studies of the Origins of Polyatomic Ions in Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Jill Wisnewski

    2006-01-01

    The inductively coupled plasma (ICP) is an atmospheric pressure ionization source. Traditionally, the plasma is sampled via a sampler cone. A supersonic jet develops behind the sampler, and this region is pumped down to a pressure of approximately one Torr. A skimmer cone is located inside this zone of silence to transmit ions into the mass spectrometer. The position of the sampler and skimmer cones relative to the initial radiation and normal analytical zones of the plasma is key to optimizing the useful analytical signal [1]. The ICP both atomizes and ionizes the sample. Polyatomic ions form through ion-molecule interactions either in the ICP or during ion extraction [l]. Common polyatomic ions that inhibit analysis include metal oxides (MO+), adducts with argon, the gas most commonly used to make up the plasma, and hydride species. While high resolution devices can separate many analytes from common interferences, this is done at great cost in ion transmission efficiency--a loss of 99% when using high versus low resolution on the same instrument [2]. Simple quadrupole devices, which make up the bulk of ICP-MS instruments in existence, do not present this option. Therefore, if the source of polyatomic interferences can be determined and then manipulated, this could potentially improve the figures of merit on all ICP-MS devices, not just the high resolution devices often utilized to study polyatomic interferences.

  17. Liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge ionization source for elemental mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marcus, R Kenneth; Quarles, C Derrick; Barinaga, Charles J; Carado, Anthony J; Koppenaal, David W

    2011-04-01

    A new, low power ionization source for elemental MS analysis of aqueous solutions is described. The liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) operates by a process wherein the surface of the liquid emanating from a 75 μm i.d. glass capillary acts as the cathode of the direct current glow discharge. Analyte-containing solutions at a flow rate of 100 μL min(-1) are vaporized by the passage of current, yielding gas phase solutes that are subsequently ionized in the <5 W (maximum of 60 mA and 500 V), ~1 mm(3) volume, plasma. The LS-APGD is mounted in place of the normal electrospray ionization source of a Thermo Scientific Exactive Orbitrap mass spectrometer system without any other modifications. Basic operating characteristics are described, including the role of discharge power on mass spectral composition, the ability to obtain ultrahigh resolution elemental isotopic patterns, and demonstration of potential limits of detection based on the injection of aliquots of multielement standards (S/N > 1000 for 5 ng mL(-1) Cs). While much optimization remains, it is believed that the LS-APGD ion source may present a practical alternative to high-powered (>1 kW) plasma sources typically employed in elemental mass spectrometry, particularly for those cases where costs, operational overhead, simplicity, or integrated elemental/molecular analysis considerations are important. PMID:21355580

  18. Negative hydrogen ion production in a helicon plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Santoso, J. Corr, C. S.; Manoharan, R.; O'Byrne, S.

    2015-09-15

    In order to develop very high energy (>1 MeV) neutral beam injection systems for applications, such as plasma heating in fusion devices, it is necessary first to develop high throughput negative ion sources. For the ITER reference source, this will be realised using caesiated inductively coupled plasma devices, containing either hydrogen or deuterium discharges, operated with high rf input powers (up to 90 kW per driver). It has been suggested that due to their high power coupling efficiency, helicon devices may be able to reduce power requirements and potentially obviate the need for caesiation due to the high plasma densities achievable. Here, we present measurements of negative ion densities in a hydrogen discharge produced by a helicon device, with externally applied DC magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 8.5 mT at 5 and 10 mTorr fill pressures. These measurements were taken in the magnetised plasma interaction experiment at the Australian National University and were performed using the probe-based laser photodetachment technique, modified for the use in the afterglow of the plasma discharge. A peak in the electron density is observed at ∼3 mT and is correlated with changes in the rf power transfer efficiency. With increasing magnetic field, an increase in the negative ion fraction from 0.04 to 0.10 and negative ion densities from 8 × 10{sup 14 }m{sup −3} to 7 × 10{sup 15 }m{sup −3} is observed. It is also shown that the negative ion densities can be increased by a factor of 8 with the application of an external DC magnetic field.

  19. Invited article: Characterization of background sources in space-based time-of-flight mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, J A; Gershman, D J; Gloeckler, G; Lundgren, R A; Zurbuchen, T H; Orlando, T M; McLain, J; von Steiger, R

    2014-09-01

    For instruments that use time-of-flight techniques to measure space plasma, there are common sources of background signals that evidence themselves in the data. The background from these sources may increase the complexity of data analysis and reduce the signal-to-noise response of the instrument, thereby diminishing the science value or usefulness of the data. This paper reviews several sources of background commonly found in time-of-flight mass spectrometers and illustrates their effect in actual data using examples from ACE-SWICS and MESSENGER-FIPS. Sources include penetrating particles and radiation, UV photons, energy straggling and angular scattering, electron stimulated desorption of ions, ion-induced electron emission, accidental coincidence events, and noise signatures from instrument electronics. Data signatures of these sources are shown, as well as mitigation strategies and design considerations for future instruments.

  20. Invited Article: Characterization of background sources in space-based time-of-flight mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, J. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Gloeckler, G.; Lundgren, R. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Orlando, T. M.; McLain, J.; Steiger, R. von

    2014-09-15

    For instruments that use time-of-flight techniques to measure space plasma, there are common sources of background signals that evidence themselves in the data. The background from these sources may increase the complexity of data analysis and reduce the signal-to-noise response of the instrument, thereby diminishing the science value or usefulness of the data. This paper reviews several sources of background commonly found in time-of-flight mass spectrometers and illustrates their effect in actual data using examples from ACE-SWICS and MESSENGER-FIPS. Sources include penetrating particles and radiation, UV photons, energy straggling and angular scattering, electron stimulated desorption of ions, ion-induced electron emission, accidental coincidence events, and noise signatures from instrument electronics. Data signatures of these sources are shown, as well as mitigation strategies and design considerations for future instruments.

  1. The role of plasma evolution and photon transport in optimizing future advanced lithography sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sizyuk, Tatyana; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2013-08-28

    Laser produced plasma (LPP) sources for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons are currently based on using small liquid tin droplets as target that has many advantages including generation of stable continuous targets at high repetition rate, larger photons collection angle, and reduced contamination and damage to the optical mirror collection system from plasma debris and energetic particles. The ideal target is to generate a source of maximum EUV radiation output and collection in the 13.5 nm range with minimum atomic debris. Based on recent experimental results and our modeling predictions, the smallest efficient droplets are of diameters in the range of 20–30 μm in LPP devices with dual-beam technique. Such devices can produce EUV sources with conversion efficiency around 3% and with collected EUV power of 190 W or more that can satisfy current requirements for high volume manufacturing. One of the most important characteristics of these devices is in the low amount of atomic debris produced due to the small initial mass of droplets and the significant vaporization rate during the pre-pulse stage. In this study, we analyzed in detail plasma evolution processes in LPP systems using small spherical tin targets to predict the optimum droplet size yielding maximum EUV output. We identified several important processes during laser-plasma interaction that can affect conditions for optimum EUV photons generation and collection. The importance and accurate description of modeling these physical processes increase with the decrease in target size and its simulation domain.

  2. New Types of Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle (Contractor) and MDS Sciex (Participant) and ESA, Inc. (Participant) is to research, develop and apply new types of ionization sources and sampling/inlet systems for analytical mass spectrometry making use of the Participants state-of-the-art atmospheric sampling mass spectrometry electrochemical cell technology instrumentation and ancillary equipment. The two overriding goals of this research project are: to understand the relationship among the various instrumental components and operational parameters of the various ion sources and inlet systems under study, the chemical nature of the gases, solvents, and analytes in use, and the nature and abundances of the ions ultimately observed in the mass spectrometer; and to develop new and better analytical and fundamental applications of these ion sources and inlet systems or alternative sources and inlets coupled with mass spectrometry on the basis of the fundamental understanding obtained in Goal 1. The end results of this work are expected to be: (1) an expanded utility for the ion sources and inlet systems under study (such as the analysis of new types of analytes) and the control or alteration of the ionic species observed in the gas-phase; (2) enhanced instrument performance as judged by operational figures-of-merit such as dynamic range, detection limits, susceptibility to matrix signal suppression and sensitivity; and (3) novel applications (such as surface sampling with electrospray) in both applied and fundamental studies. The research projects outlined herein build upon work initiated under the previous CRADA between the Contractor and MDS Sciex on ion sources and inlet systems for mass spectrometry. Specific ion source and inlet systems for exploration of the fundamental properties and practical implementation of these principles are given.

  3. Ion temperature in the ASTRAL helicon plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Robert

    2005-10-01

    Ion temperature is measured in the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) helicon plasma source by means of a diode laser based Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic. ASTRAL produces plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 10^10 to 10^13 cm-3, Te = 2 to 15 eV and Ti = 0.03 to 0.5 eV. A series of 7 large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.3 kGauss. A fractional helix antenna is used to introduce rf power up to 2 kWatt. The 1.5 MHz bandwidth diode laser has a Littrow external cavity with a mode-hop free tuning range up to 15 GHz and with a total power output of about 15 mW. The wavelength is measured by a wavemeter and frequent monitoring prevents wavelength drift. For Ar plasma, the laser tuned at 668.61 nm, is used to pump the 3d^4F7/2 Ar II metastable level to the 4p^4D5/2 level. The fluorescence radiation between the 4p^4D5/2 and the 4s^4P3/2 levels (442.6 nm) is monitored by a PMT. Other diagnostics are presently installed on the plasma device. They included a RF compensated Langmuir probe which is used to measure both electron temperature and plasma density. A spectrometer which features a 0.33 m Criss-Cross Scanning monochromator and a CCD camera is used for spectroscopy studies of the plasma.

  4. Isotope mass and charge effects in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pusztai, I.; Candy, J.; Gohil, P.

    2011-12-15

    The effect of primary ion species of differing charge and mass - specifically, deuterium, hydrogen, and helium - on instabilities and transport is studied in DIII-D plasmas through gyrokinetic simulations with gyro [J. Candy and E. Belli, General Atomics Technical Report No. GA-A26818, 2010]. In linear simulations under imposed similarity of the profiles, there is an isomorphism between the linear growth rates of hydrogen isotopes, but the growth rates are higher for Z > 1 main ions due to the appearance of the charge in the Poisson equation. On ion scales the most significant effect of the different electron-to-ion mass ratio appears through collisions stabilizing trapped electron modes. In nonlinear simulations, significant favorable deviations from pure gyro-Bohm scaling are found due to electron-to-ion mass ratio effects and collisions. The presence of any non-trace impurity species cannot be neglected in a comprehensive simulation of the transport; including carbon impurity in the simulations caused a dramatic reduction of energy fluxes. The transport in the analyzed deuterium and helium discharges could be well reproduced in gyrokinetic and gyrofluid simulations while the significant hydrogen discrepancy is the subject of ongoing investigation.

  5. Ion source for high-precision mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Todd, Peter J.; McKown, Henry S.; Smith, David H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is directed to a method for increasing the precision of positive-ion relative abundance measurements conducted in a sector mass spectrometer having an ion source for directing a beam of positive ions onto a collimating slit. The method comprises incorporating in the source an electrostatic lens assembly for providing a positive-ion beam of circular cross section for collimation by the slit.

  6. Ion source for high-precision mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Todd, P.J.; McKown, H.S.; Smith, D.H.

    1982-04-26

    The invention is directed to a method for increasing the precision of positive-ion relative abundance measurements conducted in a sector mass spectrometer having an ion source for directing a beam of positive ions onto a collimating slit. The method comprises incorporating in the source an electrostatic lens assembly for providing a positive-ion beam of circular cross section for collimation by the slit. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Studies of Ion Beam Charge Neutralization by Ferroelectric Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grisham, L.; Davidson, R. C.

    2013-10-01

    Space-charge forces limit the possible transverse compression of high perveance ion beams that are used in ion-beam-driven high energy density physics applications; the minimum radius to which a beam can be focused is an increasing function of perveance. The limit can be overcome if a plasma is introduced in the beam path between the focusing element and the target in order to neutralize the space charge of the beam. This concept has been implemented on the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX) at LBNL using Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPS). In our experiment at PPPL, we propagate a perveance-dominated ion beam through a FEPS to study the effect of the neutralizing plasma on the beam envelope and its evolution in time. A 30-60 keV space-charge-dominated Argon beam is focused with an Einzel lens into a FEPS located at the beam waist. The beam is intercepted downstream from the FEPS by a movable Faraday cup that provides time-resolved 2D current density profiles of the beam spot on target. We report results on: (a) dependence of charge neutralization on FEPS plasma density; (b) effects on beam emittance, and (c) time evolution of the beam envelope after the FEPS pulse. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. Are chromospheric nanoflares a primary source of coronal plasma?

    SciTech Connect

    Klimchuk, J. A.; Bradshaw, S. J. E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu

    2014-08-10

    It has been suggested that the hot plasma of the solar corona comes primarily from impulsive heating events, or nanoflares, that occur in the lower atmosphere, either in the upper part of the ordinary chromosphere or at the tips of type II spicules. We test this idea with a series of hydrodynamic simulations. We find that synthetic Fe XII (195) and Fe XIV (274) line profiles generated from the simulations disagree dramatically with actual observations. The integrated line intensities are much too faint; the blueshifts are much too fast; the blue-red asymmetries are much too large; and the emission is confined to low altitudes. We conclude that chromospheric nanoflares are not a primary source of hot coronal plasma. Such events may play an important role in producing the chromosphere and powering its intense radiation, but they do not, in general, raise the temperature of the plasma to coronal values. Those cases where coronal temperatures are reached must be relatively uncommon. The observed profiles of Fe XII and Fe XIV come primarily from plasma that is heated in the corona itself, either by coronal nanoflares or a quasi-steady coronal heating process. Chromospheric nanoflares might play a role in generating waves that provide this coronal heating.

  9. Extraction of ions and electrons from audio frequency plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haleem, N. A.; Abdelrahman, M. M.; Ragheb, M. S.

    2016-09-01

    Herein, the extraction of high ion / electron current from an audio frequency (AF) nitrogen gas discharge (10 - 100 kHz) is studied and investigated. This system is featured by its small size (L= 20 cm and inner diameter = 3.4 cm) and its capacitive discharge electrodes inside the tube and its high discharge pressure ˜ 0.3 Torr, without the need of high vacuum system or magnetic fields. The extraction system of ion/electron current from the plasma is a very simple electrode that allows self-beam focusing by adjusting its position from the source exit. The working discharge conditions were applied at a frequency from 10 to 100 kHz, power from 50 - 500 W and the gap distance between the plasma meniscus surface and the extractor electrode extending from 3 to 13 mm. The extracted ion/ electron current is found mainly dependent on the discharge power, the extraction gap width and the frequency of the audio supply. SIMION 3D program version 7.0 package is used to generate a simulation of ion trajectories as a reference to compare and to optimize the experimental extraction beam from the present audio frequency plasma source using identical operational conditions. The focal point as well the beam diameter at the collector area is deduced. The simulations showed a respectable agreement with the experimental results all together provide the optimizing basis of the extraction electrode construction and its parameters for beam production.

  10. Laser ablated zirconium plasma: A source of neutral zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Dheerendra; Thareja, Raj K.

    2010-10-15

    The authors report spectroscopic investigations of laser produced zirconium (Zr) plasma at moderate laser fluence. At low laser fluence the neutral zirconium species are observed to dominate over the higher species of zirconium. Laser induced fluorescence technique is used to study the velocity distribution of ground state neutral zirconium species. Two-dimensional time-resolved density distributions of ground state zirconium is mapped using planner laser induced fluorescence imaging and total ablated mass of neutral zirconium atoms is estimated. Temporal and spatial evolutions of electron density and temperature are discussed by measuring Stark broadened profile and ratio of intensity of emission lines, respectively.

  11. Measurement and Visualization of Mass Transport for the Flowing Atmospheric Pressure Afterglow (FAPA) Ambient Mass-Spectrometry Source

    PubMed Central

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P.; Ray, Steven J.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2014-01-01

    Ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) has developed into an important analytical field over the last nine years. The ability to analyze samples under ambient conditions while retaining the sensitivity and specificity of mass spectrometry has led to numerous applications and a corresponding jump in the popularity of this field. Despite the great potential of ADI-MS, problems remain in the areas of ion identification and quantification. Difficulties with ion identification can be solved through modified instrumentation, including accurate-mass or MS/MS capabilities for analyte identification. More difficult problems include quantification due to the ambient nature of the sampling process. To characterize and improve sample volatilization, ionization, and introduction into the mass-spectrometer interface, a method of visualizing mass transport into the mass spectrometer is needed. Schlieren imaging is a well-established technique that renders small changes in refractive index visible. Here, schlieren imaging was used to visualize helium flow from a plasma-based ADI-MS source into a mass spectrometer while ion signals were recorded. Optimal sample positions for melting-point capillary and transmission-mode (stainless steel mesh) introduction were found to be near (within 1 mm of) the mass spectrometer inlet. Additionally, the orientation of the sampled surface plays a significant role. More efficient mass transport resulted for analyte deposits directly facing the MS inlet. Different surfaces (glass slide and rough surface) were also examined; for both it was found that the optimal position is immediately beneath the MS inlet. PMID:24658804

  12. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Uranium Error Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, D P; Maclean, S; Shepley, D; Shaw, R K

    2001-07-01

    The Hazards Control Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP/MS) technology to analyze uranium in urine. The ICP/MS used by the Hazards Control Department is a Perkin-Elmer Elan 6000 ICP/MS. The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program requires that the total error be assessed for bioassay measurements. A previous evaluation of the errors associated with the ICP/MS measurement of uranium demonstrated a {+-} 9.6% error in the range of 0.01 to 0.02 {micro}g/l. However, the propagation of total error for concentrations above and below this level have heretofore been undetermined. This document is an evaluation of the errors associated with the current LLNL ICP/MS method for a more expanded range of uranium concentrations.

  13. Final Report - Ion Production and Transport in Atmospheric Pressure Ion Source Mass Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, Paul B.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2014-05-14

    This document is the final report on a project that focused in the general theme of atmospheric-pressure ion production and transport for mass spectrometry. Within that general theme there were two main projects: the fundamental study of the transport of elemental ions through the vacuum interface of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS), and fundamental studies of the ionization mechanisms in ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) sources for molecular mass spectrometry. In both cases the goal was to generate fundamental understanding of key instrumental processes that would lead to the development of instruments that were more sensitive and more consistent in their performance. The emphasis on consistency derives from the need for instruments that have the same sensitivity, regardless of sample type. In the jargon of analytical chemistry, such instruments are said to be free from matrix effects. In the ICPMS work each stage of ion production and of ion transport from the atmospheric pressure to the high-vacuum mass analyzer was studied. Factors controlling ion transport efficiency and consistency were identified at each stage of pressure reduction. In the ADI work the interactions between an electrospray plume and a fluorescent sample on a surface were examined microscopically. A new mechanism for analyte ion production in desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) was proposed. Optical spectroscopy was used to track the production of reactive species in plasmas used as ADI sources. Experiments with mixed-gas plasmas demonstrated that the addition of a small amount of hydrogen to a helium ADI plasma could boost the sensitivity for some analytes by over an order of magnitude.

  14. A compact and continuously driven supersonic plasma and neutral source.

    PubMed

    Asai, T; Itagaki, H; Numasawa, H; Terashima, Y; Hirano, Y; Hirose, A

    2010-10-01

    A compact and repetitively driven plasma source has been developed by utilizing a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) for diagnostics requiring deep penetration of a large amount of neutral flux. The system consists of a MCPG 95mm in length with a DN16 ConFlat connection port and an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) inverter power unit. The power supply consists of an array of eight IGBT units and is able to switch the discharge on and off at up to 10 kV and 600 A with a maximum repetitive frequency of 10 kHz. Multiple short duration discharge pulses maximize acceleration efficiency of the plasmoid. In the case of a 10 kHz operating frequency, helium-plasmoids in the velocity range of 20 km/s can be achieved.

  15. Observe Z sources at High Mass Accretion Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canizares, Claude

    2008-09-01

    We propose to test a new interpretation that links mass accretion rate to observed spectral changes in Z-sources in a diffwrent way than previously though. Integral part of the test is to catch Z-source on the horizontal branch (HB). There are a few sources where RXTE and previous observatories established a fairly accurate record of how often they appear on a specific spectral branch. 4 observations for 8 ks each has a 50% chance to observe GX 5-1 on the HB.

  16. 2MASS Extended Source Catalog: Overview and Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, T.; Chester, T.; Cutri, R.; Schneider, S.; Skrutskie, M.; Huchra, J.

    1999-01-01

    The 2 Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS)will observe over one-million galaxies and extended Galactic sources covering the entire sky at wavelenghts between 1 and 2 m. Most of these galaxies, from 70 to 80%, will be newly catalogued objetcs.

  17. Nitric Oxide Plasma Sources for Bio-Decontamination and Plasma Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilets, Victor N.; Shekhter, Anatoly B.

    One of the main products generated in atmospheric plasma sources is nitric oxide. The nitric oxide molecule is known as anti-bacterial agent on one hand and the molecule providing signaling and regulation biological functions on the other hand. Human body produces NO to kill invading pathogens. At the same time nitric oxide works as a primary vasoregulator and anti-hypertensive agent. NO also ­regulates: inflammation, collagen production, angiogenesis and apoptosis. Exogenous NO generated by plasma devices could enhance bio-activity of NO-assisted ­processes in human organism. Some applications of nitric oxide for bio-decontamination and plasma therapy will be illustrated and discussed in the paper.

  18. Humidity Effects on Fragmentation in Plasma-Based Ambient Ionization Sources.

    PubMed

    Newsome, G Asher; Ackerman, Luke K; Johnson, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Post-plasma ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) sources are fundamentally dependent on surrounding water vapor to produce protonated analyte ions. There are two reports of humidity effects on ADI spectra. However, it is unclear whether humidity will affect all ADI sources and analytes, and by what mechanism humidity affects spectra. Flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization and direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectra of various surface-deposited and gas-phase analytes were acquired at ambient temperature and pressure across a range of observed humidity values. A controlled humidity enclosure around the ion source and mass spectrometer inlet was used to create programmed humidity and temperatures. The relative abundance and fragmentation of molecular adduct ions for several compounds consistently varied with changing ambient humidity and also were controlled with the humidity enclosure. For several compounds, increasing humidity decreased protonated molecule and other molecular adduct ion fragmentation in both FAPA and DART spectra. For others, humidity increased fragment ion ratios. The effects of humidity on molecular adduct ion fragmentation were caused by changes in the relative abundances of different reagent protonated water clusters and, thus, a change in the average difference in proton affinity between an analyte and the population of water clusters. Control of humidity in ambient post-plasma ion sources is needed to create spectral stability and reproducibility. PMID:26384684

  19. Humidity Effects on Fragmentation in Plasma-Based Ambient Ionization Sources.

    PubMed

    Newsome, G Asher; Ackerman, Luke K; Johnson, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Post-plasma ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) sources are fundamentally dependent on surrounding water vapor to produce protonated analyte ions. There are two reports of humidity effects on ADI spectra. However, it is unclear whether humidity will affect all ADI sources and analytes, and by what mechanism humidity affects spectra. Flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization and direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectra of various surface-deposited and gas-phase analytes were acquired at ambient temperature and pressure across a range of observed humidity values. A controlled humidity enclosure around the ion source and mass spectrometer inlet was used to create programmed humidity and temperatures. The relative abundance and fragmentation of molecular adduct ions for several compounds consistently varied with changing ambient humidity and also were controlled with the humidity enclosure. For several compounds, increasing humidity decreased protonated molecule and other molecular adduct ion fragmentation in both FAPA and DART spectra. For others, humidity increased fragment ion ratios. The effects of humidity on molecular adduct ion fragmentation were caused by changes in the relative abundances of different reagent protonated water clusters and, thus, a change in the average difference in proton affinity between an analyte and the population of water clusters. Control of humidity in ambient post-plasma ion sources is needed to create spectral stability and reproducibility.

  20. Humidity Effects on Fragmentation in Plasma-Based Ambient Ionization Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsome, G. Asher; Ackerman, Luke K.; Johnson, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Post-plasma ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) sources are fundamentally dependent on surrounding water vapor to produce protonated analyte ions. There are two reports of humidity effects on ADI spectra. However, it is unclear whether humidity will affect all ADI sources and analytes, and by what mechanism humidity affects spectra. Flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) ionization and direct analysis in real time (DART) mass spectra of various surface-deposited and gas-phase analytes were acquired at ambient temperature and pressure across a range of observed humidity values. A controlled humidity enclosure around the ion source and mass spectrometer inlet was used to create programmed humidity and temperatures. The relative abundance and fragmentation of molecular adduct ions for several compounds consistently varied with changing ambient humidity and also were controlled with the humidity enclosure. For several compounds, increasing humidity decreased protonated molecule and other molecular adduct ion fragmentation in both FAPA and DART spectra. For others, humidity increased fragment ion ratios. The effects of humidity on molecular adduct ion fragmentation were caused by changes in the relative abundances of different reagent protonated water clusters and, thus, a change in the average difference in proton affinity between an analyte and the population of water clusters. Control of humidity in ambient post-plasma ion sources is needed to create spectral stability and reproducibility.

  1. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and its Application in Life Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gu-feng; Wang, Hong-mei

    2001-08-01

    Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has made much progress since its birth in the late 1990s. This paper will give a rather systematic overview on the use of this technique in new devices and technologies related to plasma source, sample-introducing device and detecting spectrometer etc. In this overview, an emphasis will be put on the evaluation of the ICP-MS technique in combination with a series of physical, chemical and biological techniques, such as laser ablation (LA), capillary electrophoresis (CE) and high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC), along with their representative high accuracy and high sensitivity. Finally, comprehensive and fruitful applications of the ICP-MS and its combinative techniques in the detection of trace metallic elements and isotopes in complex biological and environmental samples will be revealed.

  2. Techniques for mass resolution improvement achieved by typical plasma mass analyzers: Modeling and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaou, Georgios; Yamauchi, Masatoshi; Wieser, Martin; Barabash, Stas; Fedorov, Andrei

    2016-04-01

    Mass separation and particularly distinction between atomic ions and molecular ions are essential in understanding a wide range of plasma environments, with each consisted of different species with various properties. In this study we present the optimization results of light-weight (about 2 kg) magnetic mass analyzers with high g-factor for Rosetta (Ion Composition Analyser: ICA) and for Mars Express and Venus Express (Ion Mass Analyser: IMA). For the instrument's optimization we use SIMION, a 3D ion tracing software in which we can trace particle beams of several energies and directions, passing through the instrument's units. We first reproduced ICA and IMA results, which turned out to be different from simple models for low energy (< 100 eV). We then change the mechanical structure of several units of the instrument and we quantify the new mass resolution achieved with each change. Our goal is to find the optimal instrument's structure, which will allow us to achieve a proper mass resolution to distinguish atomic nitrogen from atomic oxygen for the purposes of a future magnetospheric mission.

  3. XUV laser-plasma source based on solid Ar filament

    SciTech Connect

    Peth, Christian; Kalinin, Anton; Barkusky, Frank; Mann, Klaus; Toennies, J. Peter; Rusin, Lev Yu

    2007-10-15

    We present a laser driven soft x-ray source based on a novel solid argon filament. The continuously flowing micron-sized filament (diameter {approx}56 {mu}m, flow speed {approx}5 mm/s) was used as a laser target in order to generate a plasma source of high brightness in the ''water window'' (2.2-4.4 nm) spectral range. The emission properties of the source were characterized in detail with respect to crucial parameters such as positional and energy stability using an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) sensitive pinhole camera and an XUV spectrometer. The results are compared with an argon plasma based on a gas puff target operated under the same experimental conditions showing an increase of the brilliance by a factor of 84. By changing the capillary geometry from a constant diameter to a convergent shape the flow speed of the filament was significantly increased up to 250 mm/s, facilitating the operation at higher repetition rates.

  4. Plasma expansion across a transverse magnetic field in a negative hydrogen ion source for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantz, U.; Schiesko, L.; Wünderlich, D.

    2014-08-01

    High power negative hydrogen ion sources operating at 0.3 Pa are a key component of the neutral beam injection systems for the international fusion experiment ITER. To achieve the required large ion current at a tolerable number of co-extracted electrons the source is equipped with a magnetic filter field (up to 10 mT). The IPP prototype source (1/8 of the area of the ITER source) has been equipped with a flexible magnetic filter frame to perform filter field studies (position, polarity, strength). Axial profiles of the plasma parameters are measured with two Langmuir probes, positioned in the upper and the lower half of the expansion chamber. In addition to the expected decrease in electron temperature and density a vertical drift develops the direction depending on the polarity of the field. Without field no drift is observed. The drift is less pronounced in caesium seeded discharges and almost vanishes in deuterium, indicating an influence of the ion mass on the drift. A comparison with results from a half-size ITER source reveals that the plasma is much more uniform in the large source.

  5. Isotope mass and charge effects in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusztai, I.; Candy, J.; Gohil, P.

    2011-12-01

    The effect of primary ion species of differing charge and mass—specifically, deuterium, hydrogen, and helium—on instabilities and transport is studied in DIII-D plasmas through gyrokinetic simulations with gyro [J. Candy and E. Belli, General Atomics Technical Report No. GA-A26818, 2010]. In linear simulations under imposed similarity of the profiles, there is an isomorphism between the linear growth rates of hydrogen isotopes, but the growth rates are higher for Z > 1 main ions due to the appearance of the charge in the Poisson equation. On ion scales the most significant effect of the different electron-to-ion mass ratio appears through collisions stabilizing trapped electron modes. In nonlinear simulations, significant favorable deviations from pure gyro-Bohm scaling are found due to electron-to-ion mass ratio effects and collisions. The presence of any non-trace impurity species cannot be neglected in a comprehensive simulation of the transport; including carbon impurity in the simulations caused a dramatic reduction of energy fluxes. The transport in the analyzed deuterium and helium discharges could be well reproduced in gyrokinetic and gyrofluid simulations while the significant hydrogen discrepancy is the subject of ongoing investigation.

  6. Apparatus for coating a surface with a metal utilizing a plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Ian G.; MacGill, Robert A.; Galvin, James E.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method for coating or layering a surface with a metal utilizing a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source. The apparatus includes a trigger mechanism for actuating the metal vacuum vapor arc plasma source in a pulsed mode at a predetermined rate. The surface or substrate to be coated or layered is supported in position with the plasma source in a vacuum chamber. The surface is electrically biased for a selected period of time during the pulsed mode of operation of the plasma source. Both the pulsing of the metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source and the electrical biasing of the surface are synchronized for selected periods of time.

  7. Magnetic insulation of secondary electrons in plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Wood, B.P.; Faehl, R.J.; Fleischmann, H.H.

    1993-09-01

    The uncontrolled loss of accelerated secondary electrons in plasma source ion implantation (PSII) can significantly reduce system efficiency and poses a potential x-ray hazard. This loss might be reduced by a magnetic field applied near the workpiece. The concept of magnetically-insulated PSII is proposed, in which secondary electrons are trapped to form a virtual cathode layer near the workpiece surface where the local electric field is essentially eliminated. Subsequent electrons that are emitted can then be reabsorbed by the workpiece. Estimates of anomalous electron transport from microinstabilities are made. Insight into the process is gained with multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  8. Plasma dynamics in a discharge produced by a pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Anurag; Lee, Sehan; Yeom, Geun Y.

    2014-11-01

    Using a Langmuir probe, time resolved measurements of plasma parameters were carried out in a discharge produced by a pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled plasma source. The discharge was sustained in an argon gas environment at a pressure of 10 mTorr. The low frequency (P{sub 2} {sub MHz}) was pulsed at 1 kHz and a duty ratio of 50%, while high frequency (P{sub 13.56} {sub MHz}) was maintained in the CW mode. All measurements were carried out at the center of the discharge and 20 mm above the substrate. The results show that, at a particular condition (P{sub 2} {sub MHz} = 200 W and P{sub 13.56} {sub MHz }= 600 W), plasma density increases with time and stabilizes at up to ∼200 μs after the initiation of P{sub 2} {sub MHz} pulse at a plasma density of (2 × 10{sup 17} m{sup −3}) for the remaining duration of pulse “on.” This stabilization time for plasma density increases with increasing P{sub 2} {sub MHz} and becomes ∼300 μs when P{sub 2} {sub MHz} is 600 W; however, the growth rate of plasma density is almost independent of P{sub 2} {sub MHz}. Interestingly, the plasma density sharply increases as the pulse is switched off and reaches a peak value in ∼10 μs, then decreases for the remaining pulse “off-time.” This phenomenon is thought to be due to the sheath modulation during the transition from “pulse on” to “pulse off” and partly due to RF noise during the transition period. The magnitude of peak plasma density in off time increases with increasing P{sub 2} {sub MHz}. The plasma potential and electron temperature decrease as the pulse develops and shows similar behavior to that of the plasma density when the pulse is switched off.

  9. Serum/plasma methylmercury determination by isotope dilution gas chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Douglas C; Faarinen, Mikko; Österlund, Heléne; Rodushkin, Ilia; Christensen, Morten

    2011-09-01

    A method for the determination of methylmercury in plasma and serum samples was developed. The method uses isotope dilution with (198)Hg-labeled methylmercury, extraction into dichloromethane, back-extraction into water, aqueous-phase ethylation, purge and trap collection, thermal desorption, separation by gas chromatography, and mercury isotope specific detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. By spiking 2 mL sample with 1.2 ng tracer, measurements in a concentration interval of (0.007-2.9) μg L(-1) could be performed with uncertainty amplification factors <2. A limit of quantification of 0.03 μg L(-1) was estimated at 10 times the standard deviation of concentrations measured in preparation blanks. Within- and between-run relative standard deviations were <10% at added concentration levels of 0.14 μg L(-1), 0.35 μg L(-1) and 2.8 μg L(-1), with recoveries in the range 82-110%. Application of the method to 50 plasma/serum samples yielded a median (mean; range) concentration of methylmercury of 0.081 (0.091; <0.03-0.19) μg L(-1). This is the first time methylmercury has been directly measured in this kind of specimen, and is therefore the first estimate of a reference range.

  10. Study of negative ion transport phenomena in a plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riz, D.; Paméla, J.

    1996-07-01

    NIETZSCHE (Negative Ions Extraction and Transport ZSimulation Code for HydrogEn species) is a negative ion (NI) transport code developed at Cadarache. This code calculates NI trajectories using a 3D Monte-Carlo technique, taking into account the main destruction processes, as well as elastic collisions (H-/H+) and charge exchanges (H-/H0). It determines the extraction probability of a NI created at a given position. According to the simulations, we have seen that in the case of volume production, only NI produced close to the plasma grid (PG) can be extracted. Concerning the surface production, we have studied how NI produced on the PG and accelerated by the plasma sheath backward into the source could be extracted. We demonstrate that elastic collisions and charge exchanges play an important role, which in some conditions dominates the magnetic filter effect, which acts as a magnetic mirror. NI transport in various conditions will be discussed: volume/surface production, high/low plasmas density, tent filter/transverse filter.

  11. Challenges in plasma and extraction modelling of negative ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvas, Taneli

    2013-09-01

    The physical processes taking place in negative ion source plasmas are modelled by state-of-the-art 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) codes. These codes are used to gain understanding and to find optimal solutions for negative ion beam production. The PIC codes can be made to match to the reality if all relevant processes were included. This is unfortunately limited by the availability of data about the processes and the huge amount of computational resources needed for the simulations. The optimization of the extraction system and beam transport ion optics is often made using computationally less intensive methods utilized in so-called gun codes. These codes use simplified plasma models to provide a starting point for the extracted beams being simulated. The relatively fast computation allows systematic studies, which are not practical with PIC codes. The gun codes often match well to reality, but they do have difficulties reproducing some effects, especially in negative ion extraction, due to the approximations made in the plasma model. Could the future solutions for beam production modelling couple the two types of simulations?

  12. Detailed beam and plasma measurements on the vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) Penning H⁻ ion source.

    PubMed

    Lawrie, S R; Faircloth, D C; Letchford, A P; Whitehead, M O; Wood, T

    2016-02-01

    A vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) is operational at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). This project supports and guides the overall ion source R&D effort for the ISIS spallation neutron and muon facility at RAL. The VESPA produces 100 mA of pulsed H(-) beam, but perveance scans indicate that the source is production-limited at extraction voltages above 12 kV unless the arc current is increased. A high resolution optical monochromator is used to measure plasma properties using argon as a diagnostic gas. The atomic hydrogen temperature increases linearly with arc current, up to 2.8 eV for 50 A; whereas the electron temperature has a slight linear decrease toward 2.2 eV. The gas density is 10(21) m(-3), whilst the electron density is two orders of magnitude lower. Densities follow square root relationships with arc current, with gas density decreasing whilst electron (and hence ion) density increases. Stopping and range of ions in matter calculations prove that operating a high current arc with an argon admixture is extremely difficult because cathode-coated cesium is heavily sputtered by argon.

  13. Detailed beam and plasma measurements on the vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) Penning H⁻ ion source.

    PubMed

    Lawrie, S R; Faircloth, D C; Letchford, A P; Whitehead, M O; Wood, T

    2016-02-01

    A vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) is operational at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). This project supports and guides the overall ion source R&D effort for the ISIS spallation neutron and muon facility at RAL. The VESPA produces 100 mA of pulsed H(-) beam, but perveance scans indicate that the source is production-limited at extraction voltages above 12 kV unless the arc current is increased. A high resolution optical monochromator is used to measure plasma properties using argon as a diagnostic gas. The atomic hydrogen temperature increases linearly with arc current, up to 2.8 eV for 50 A; whereas the electron temperature has a slight linear decrease toward 2.2 eV. The gas density is 10(21) m(-3), whilst the electron density is two orders of magnitude lower. Densities follow square root relationships with arc current, with gas density decreasing whilst electron (and hence ion) density increases. Stopping and range of ions in matter calculations prove that operating a high current arc with an argon admixture is extremely difficult because cathode-coated cesium is heavily sputtered by argon. PMID:26932004

  14. Detailed beam and plasma measurements on the vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) Penning H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrie, S. R.; Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Whitehead, M. O.; Wood, T.

    2016-02-01

    A vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) is operational at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). This project supports and guides the overall ion source R&D effort for the ISIS spallation neutron and muon facility at RAL. The VESPA produces 100 mA of pulsed H- beam, but perveance scans indicate that the source is production-limited at extraction voltages above 12 kV unless the arc current is increased. A high resolution optical monochromator is used to measure plasma properties using argon as a diagnostic gas. The atomic hydrogen temperature increases linearly with arc current, up to 2.8 eV for 50 A; whereas the electron temperature has a slight linear decrease toward 2.2 eV. The gas density is 1021 m-3, whilst the electron density is two orders of magnitude lower. Densities follow square root relationships with arc current, with gas density decreasing whilst electron (and hence ion) density increases. Stopping and range of ions in matter calculations prove that operating a high current arc with an argon admixture is extremely difficult because cathode-coated cesium is heavily sputtered by argon.

  15. When API Mass Spectrometry Meets Super Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lee Chuin

    2015-01-01

    In a tutorial paper on the application of free-jet technique for API-MS, John Fenn mentioned that “…for a number of years and a number of reasons, it has been found advantageous in many situations to carry out the ionization process in gas at pressures up to 1000 Torr or more” (Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 200: 459–478, 2000). In fact, the first ESI mass spectrometer constructed by Yamashita and Fenn had a counter-flow curtain gas source at 1050 Torr (ca. 1.4 atm) to sweep away the neutral (J. Phys. Chem. 88: 4451–4459, 1984). For gaseous ionization using electrospray plume, theoretical analysis also shows that “super-atmospheric operation would be more preferable in space-charge-limited situations.”(Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 300: 182–193, 2011). However, electrospray and the corona-based chemical ion source (APCI) in most commercial instrument are basically operated under an atmospheric pressure ambient, perhaps out of the concern of safety, convenience and simplicity in maintenance. Running the ion source at pressure much higher than 1 atm is not so common, but had been done by a number of groups as well as in our laboratory. A brief review on these ion sources will be given in this paper. PMID:26819912

  16. When API Mass Spectrometry Meets Super Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lee Chuin

    2015-01-01

    In a tutorial paper on the application of free-jet technique for API-MS, John Fenn mentioned that "…for a number of years and a number of reasons, it has been found advantageous in many situations to carry out the ionization process in gas at pressures up to 1000 Torr or more" (Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 200: 459-478, 2000). In fact, the first ESI mass spectrometer constructed by Yamashita and Fenn had a counter-flow curtain gas source at 1050 Torr (ca. 1.4 atm) to sweep away the neutral (J. Phys. Chem. 88: 4451-4459, 1984). For gaseous ionization using electrospray plume, theoretical analysis also shows that "super-atmospheric operation would be more preferable in space-charge-limited situations."(Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 300: 182-193, 2011). However, electrospray and the corona-based chemical ion source (APCI) in most commercial instrument are basically operated under an atmospheric pressure ambient, perhaps out of the concern of safety, convenience and simplicity in maintenance. Running the ion source at pressure much higher than 1 atm is not so common, but had been done by a number of groups as well as in our laboratory. A brief review on these ion sources will be given in this paper.

  17. When API Mass Spectrometry Meets Super Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lee Chuin

    2015-01-01

    In a tutorial paper on the application of free-jet technique for API-MS, John Fenn mentioned that "…for a number of years and a number of reasons, it has been found advantageous in many situations to carry out the ionization process in gas at pressures up to 1000 Torr or more" (Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 200: 459-478, 2000). In fact, the first ESI mass spectrometer constructed by Yamashita and Fenn had a counter-flow curtain gas source at 1050 Torr (ca. 1.4 atm) to sweep away the neutral (J. Phys. Chem. 88: 4451-4459, 1984). For gaseous ionization using electrospray plume, theoretical analysis also shows that "super-atmospheric operation would be more preferable in space-charge-limited situations."(Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 300: 182-193, 2011). However, electrospray and the corona-based chemical ion source (APCI) in most commercial instrument are basically operated under an atmospheric pressure ambient, perhaps out of the concern of safety, convenience and simplicity in maintenance. Running the ion source at pressure much higher than 1 atm is not so common, but had been done by a number of groups as well as in our laboratory. A brief review on these ion sources will be given in this paper. PMID:26819912

  18. Ion extraction from a saddle antenna RF surface plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, V. Johnson, R. P.; Han, B.; Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Breitschopf, J.; Dudnikova, G.

    2015-04-08

    Existing RF Surface Plasma Sources (SPS) for accelerators have specific efficiencies for H{sup +} and H{sup −} ion generation around 3 to 5 mA/cm{sup 2} per kW, where about 50 kW of RF power is typically needed for 50 mA beam current production. The Saddle Antenna (SA) SPS described here was developed to improve H{sup −} ion production efficiency and SPS reliability and availability. At low RF power, the efficiency of positive ion generation in the plasma has been improved to 200 mA/cm{sup 2} per kW of RF power at 13.56 MHz. Initial cesiation of the SPS was performed by heating cesium chromate cartridges by discharge as was done in the very first versions of the SPS. A small oven to decompose cesium compounds and alloys was developed and tested. After cesiation, the current of negative ions to the collector was increased from 1 mA to 10 mA with RF power ∼1.5 kW in the plasma (6 mm diameter emission aperture) and up to 30 mA with ∼4 kW RF power in the plasma and 250 Gauss longitudinal magnetic field. The ratio of electron current to negative ion current was improved from 30 to 2. Stable generation of H{sup −} beam without intensity degradation was demonstrated in the AlN discharge chamber for a long time at high discharge power in an RF SPS with an external antenna. Continuous wave (CW) operation of the SA SPS has been tested on the small test stand. The general design of the CW SA SPS is based on the pulsed version. Some modifications were made to improve the cooling and cesiation stability. The extracted collector current can be increased significantly by optimizing the longitudinal magnetic field in the discharge chamber. CW operation with negative ion extraction was tested with RF power up to 1.8 kW from the generator (∼1.2 kW in the plasma) with production up to Ic=7 mA. Long term operation was tested with 1.2 kW from the RF generator (∼0.8 kW in the plasma) with production of Ic=5 mA, Iex ∼15 mA (Uex=8 kV, Uc=14 kV)

  19. The terrestrial plasma source - A new perspective in solar-terrestrial processes from Dynamics Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Charles R.

    1988-01-01

    The geospace environment has been viewed as a mixing bowl for plasmas of both solar and terrestrial origin. The present perspective on the nature of the supply mechanisms has undergone a radical evolution over the past decade, particularly during the five years of the Dynamics Explorer mission. During this period, the terrestrial source has increased in importance in both magnitude and character of ionospheric outflow. These outflows include the classical polar wind, the cleft ion fountain, the auroral ion fountain, and the polar cap. The earth can be envisioned as a multifaceted fountain which ejects particles from different spatial locations spread around the globe. These particles exhibit a range of masses from 1 to 32 amu and a range of energies from 1 eV to 10 keV. The total flux of this ionospheric outflow is very large: adequate to supply the entire magnetospheric particle population. And the implications of the outflow are significant across a broad spectrum of solar-terrestrial processes ranging from sources of magnetospheric plasmas, to influences on ionospheric density and temperature structure, to energy transfer in phenomena such as stable auroral red arcs. The Dynamics Explorer mission has made a major contribution in the characterization of the terrestrial plasma source.

  20. Laser Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic for the ASTRAL Plasma Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Robert; Kamar, Ola; Munoz, Jorge

    2006-10-01

    A Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) diagnostic is presented in this poster. The ion temperature measurements are made in the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) helicon plasma source using a diode laser based LIF diagnostic. ASTRAL produces Ar plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 10^10 to 10^13 cm-3, Te = 2 to 10 eV and Ti = 0.03 to 0.5 eV. A series of 7 large coils produce an axial magnetic field up to 1.3 kGauss. Operating pressure varies from 0.1 to 100 mTorr and any gas can be used for the discharge. A fractional helix antenna is used to introduce rf power up to 2 kWatt. A number of diagnostics are presently installed on the plasma device (Langmuir Probe, Spectrometer, LIF system). The LIF diagnostic makes use of a diode laser with the following characteristics: 1.5 MHz bandwidth, Littrow external cavity, mode-hop free tuning range up to 16 GHz, total power output of about 15 mW. The wavelength is measured by a precision wavemeter and frequent monitoring prevents wavelength drift. For Ar plasma, a new LIF scheme has been developed. The laser tuned at 686.354 nm, is used to pump the 3d^4F5/2 Ar II metastable level to the 4p^4D5/2 state. The fluorescence radiation between the 4p^4D5/2 and the 4s^4P3/2 terms (442.6 nm) is monitored by a PMT.

  1. Compact cryogenic source of periodic hydrogen and argon droplet beams for relativistic laser-plasma generation.

    PubMed

    Costa Fraga, R A; Kalinin, A; Kühnel, M; Hochhaus, D C; Schottelius, A; Polz, J; Kaluza, M C; Neumayer, P; Grisenti, R E

    2012-02-01

    We present a cryogenic source of periodic streams of micrometer-sized hydrogen and argon droplets as ideal mass-limited target systems for fundamental intense laser-driven plasma applications. The highly compact design combined with a high temporal and spatial droplet stability makes our injector ideally suited for experiments using state-of-the-art high-power lasers in which a precise synchronization between the laser pulses and the droplets is mandatory. We show this by irradiating argon droplets with multi-terawatt pulses.

  2. Changes in contaminant mass discharge from DNAPL source mass depletion: evaluation at two field sites.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Michael C; Wood, A Lynn; Annable, Michael D; Hatfield, Kirk; Cho, Jaehyun; Holbert, Charles; Rao, P Suresh C; Enfield, Carl G; Lynch, Kira; Smith, Richard E

    2008-11-14

    Changes in contaminant fluxes resulting from aggressive remediation of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zone were investigated at two sites, one at Hill Air Force Base (AFB), Utah, and the other at Ft. Lewis Military Reservation, Washington. Passive Flux Meters (PFM) and a variation of the Integral Pumping Test (IPT) were used to measure fluxes in ten wells installed along a transect down-gradient of the trichloroethylene (TCE) source zone, and perpendicular to the mean groundwater flow direction. At both sites, groundwater and contaminant fluxes were measured before and after the source-zone treatment. The measured contaminant fluxes (J; ML(-2)T(-1)) were integrated across the well transect to estimate contaminant mass discharge (M(D); MT(-1)) from the source zone. Estimated M(D) before source treatment, based on both PFM and IPT methods, were approximately 76 g/day for TCE at the Hill AFB site; and approximately 640 g/day for TCE, and approximately 206 g/day for cis-dichloroethylene (DCE) at the Ft. Lewis site. TCE flux measurements made 1 year after source treatment at the Hill AFB site decreased to approximately 5 g/day. On the other hand, increased fluxes of DCE, a degradation byproduct of TCE, in tests subsequent to remediation at the Hill AFB site suggest enhanced microbial degradation after surfactant flooding. At the Ft. Lewis site, TCE mass discharge rates subsequent to remediation decreased to approximately 3 g/day for TCE and approximately 3 g/day for DCE approximately 1.8 years after remediation. At both field sites, PFM and IPT approaches provided comparable results for contaminant mass discharge rates, and show significant reductions (>90%) in TCE mass discharge as a result of DNAPL mass depletion from the source zone.

  3. Laser produced plasma sources for nanolithography—Recent integrated simulation and benchmarking

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, A.; Sizyuk, T.

    2013-05-15

    Photon sources for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) are still facing challenging problems to achieve high volume manufacturing in the semiconductor industry. The requirements for high EUV power, longer optical system and components lifetime, and efficient mechanisms for target delivery have narrowed investigators towards the development and optimization of dual-pulse laser sources with high repetition rate of small liquid tin droplets and the use of multi-layer mirror optical system for collecting EUV photons. We comprehensively simulated laser-produced plasma sources in full 3D configuration using 10–50 μm tin droplet targets as single droplets as well as, for the first time, distributed fragmented microdroplets with equivalent mass. The latter is to examine the effects of droplet fragmentation resulting from the first pulse and prior to the incident second main laser pulse. We studied the dependence of target mass and size, laser parameters, and dual pulse system configuration on EUV radiation output and on atomic and ionic debris generation. Our modeling and simulation included all phases of laser target evolution: from laser/droplet interaction, energy deposition, target vaporization, ionization, plasma hydrodynamic expansion, thermal and radiation energy redistribution, and EUV photons collection as well as detail mapping of photons source size and location. We also simulated and predicted the potential damage to the optical mirror collection system from plasma thermal and energetic debris and the requirements for mitigating systems to reduce debris fluence. The debris effect on mirror collection system is analyzed using our three-dimensional ITMC-DYN Monte Carlo package. Modeling results were benchmarked against our CMUXE laboratory experimental studies for the EUV photons production and for debris and ions generation.

  4. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer having a cold cathode ionization source

    DOEpatents

    Felter, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    An improved quadrupole mass spectrometer is described. The improvement lies in the substitution of the conventional hot filament electron source with a cold cathode field emitter array which in turn allows operating a small QMS at much high internal pressures then are currently achievable. By eliminating of the hot filament such problems as thermally "cracking" delicate analyte molecules, outgassing a "hot" filament, high power requirements, filament contamination by outgas species, and spurious em fields are avoid all together. In addition, the ability of produce FEAs using well-known and well developed photolithographic techniques, permits building a QMS having multiple redundancies of the ionization source at very low additional cost.

  5. Positive-column plasma studied by fast-flow glow discharge mass spectrometry: Could it be a ``Rydberg gas?''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Rod; Miller, Pat; Mortimer, Ifor; Mitchell, David; Dash, Neil

    2003-07-01

    Ions created from the fast-flowing positive column plasma of a glow discharge were monitored using a high voltage magnetic sector mass spectrometer. Since the field gradient and sheath potentials created by the plasma inside the source opposed cation transfer, it is inferred that the ions detected were the field-ionized Rydberg species. This is supported by the mass spectral changes which occurred when a negative bias was applied to the sampling aperture and by the contrasting behavior when attached to a quadrupole analyzer. Reaction with H2 (titrated into the flowing plasma) quenched not only the ionization of discharge gas Rydberg atoms but also the passage of electric current through the plasma, without significant changes to the field and sheath potentials. Few “free” ions were present and the lifetimes of the Rydberg atoms detected were much longer than seen in lower pressure experiments, indicating additional stabilization in the plasma environment. The observations support the model of the flowing plasma, given previously [R. S. Mason, P. D. Miller, and I. P. Mortimer, Phys. Rev. E 55, 7462 (1997)] as mainly a neutral Rydberg atom gas, rather than a conventional ion-electron plasma.

  6. Laser desorption lamp ionization source for ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinghao; Zare, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    A two-step laser desorption lamp ionization source coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer (LDLI-ITMS) has been constructed and characterized. The pulsed infrared (IR) output of an Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) is directed to a target inside a chamber evacuated to ~15 Pa causing desorption of molecules from the target's surface. The desorbed molecules are ionized by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp (filled with xenon, major wavelength at 148 nm). The resulting ions are stored and detected in a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap modified from a Finnigan Mat LCQ mass spectrometer operated at a pressure of ≥ 0.004 Pa. The limit of detection for desorbed coronene molecules is 1.5 pmol, which is about two orders of magnitude more sensitive than laser desorption laser ionization mass spectrometry using a fluorine excimer laser (157 nm) as the ionization source. The mass spectrum of four standard aromatic compounds (pyrene, coronene, rubrene and 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (OPC)) shows that parent ions dominate. By increasing the infrared laser power, this instrument is capable of detecting inorganic compounds. PMID:25601688

  7. Uranium quantification in semen by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Todor I; Ejnik, John W; Guandalini, Gustavo; Xu, Hanna; Hoover, Dennis; Anderson, Larry; Squibb, Katherine; McDiarmid, Melissa A; Centeno, Jose A

    2013-01-01

    In this study we report uranium analysis for human semen samples. Uranium quantification was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. No additives, such as chymotrypsin or bovine serum albumin, were used for semen liquefaction, as they showed significant uranium content. For method validation we spiked 2g aliquots of pooled control semen at three different levels of uranium: low at 5 pg/g, medium at 50 pg/g, and high at 1000 pg/g. The detection limit was determined to be 0.8 pg/g uranium in human semen. The data reproduced within 1.4-7% RSD and spike recoveries were 97-100%. The uranium level of the unspiked, pooled control semen was 2.9 pg/g of semen (n=10). In addition six semen samples from a cohort of Veterans exposed to depleted uranium (DU) in the 1991 Gulf War were analyzed with no knowledge of their exposure history. Uranium levels in the Veterans' semen samples ranged from undetectable (<0.8 pg/g) to 3350 pg/g. This wide concentration range for uranium in semen is consistent with known differences in current DU body burdens in these individuals, some of whom have retained embedded DU fragments.

  8. Discharge plasmas as EUV Sources for Future Micro Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruecken, Thomas

    2007-08-01

    Future extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography will require very high radiation intensities in a narrow wavelength range around 13.5 nm, which is most efficiently emitted as line radiation by highly ionized heavy particles. Currently the most intense EUV sources are based on xenon or tin gas discharges. After having investigated the limits of a hollow cathode triggered xenon pinch discharge Philips Extreme UV favors a laser triggered tin vacuum spark discharge. Plasma and radiation properties of these highly transient discharges will be compared. Besides simple MHD-models the ADAS software package has been used to generate important atomic and spectral data of the relevant ion stages. To compute excitation and radiation properties, collisional radiative equilibria of individual ion stages are computed. For many lines opacity effects cannot be neglected. In the xenon discharges the optical depths allow for a treatment based on escape factors. Due to the rapid change of plasma parameters the abundancies of the different ionization stages must be computed dynamically. This requires effective ionization and recombination rates, which can also be supplied by ADAS. Due to very steep gradients (up to a couple orders of magnitude per mm) the plasma of tin vacuum spark discharges is very complicated. Therefore we shall describe here only some technological aspects of our tin EUV lamp: The electrode system consists of two rotating which are pulled through baths of molten tin such that a tin film remains on their surfaces. With a laser pulse some tin is ablated from one of the wheels and travels rapidly through vacuum towards the other rotating wheel. When the tin plasma reaches the other electrodes it ignites and the high current phase starts, i.e. the capacitor bank is unloaded, the plasma is pinched and EUV is radiated. Besides the good spectral properties of tin this concept has some other advantages: Erosion of electrodes is no severe problem as the tin film is

  9. Focused ion beams using a high-brightness plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guharay, Samar

    2002-10-01

    High-brightness ion beams, with low energy spread, have merits for many new applications in microelectronics, materials science, and biology. Negative ions are especially attractive for the applications that involve beam-solid interactions. When negative ions strike a surface, especially an electrically isolated surface, the surface charging voltage is limited to few volts [1]. This property can be effectively utilized to circumvent problems due to surface charging, such as device damage and beam defocusing. A compact plasma source, with the capability to deliver either positive or negative ion beams, has been developed. H- beams from this pulsed source showed brightness within an order of magnitude of the value for beams from liquid-metal ion sources. The beam angular intensity is > 40 mAsr-1 and the corresponding energy spread is <2.5 eV [2]. Using a simple Einzel lens with magnification of about 0.1, a focused current density of about 40 mAcm-2 is obtained. It is estimated that an additional magnification of about 0.1 can yield a focused current density of > 1 Acm-2 and a spot size of 100 nm. Such characteristics of focused beam parameters, using a dc source, will immediately open up a large area of new applications. [1] P. N. Guzdar, A. S. Sharma, S. K. Guharay, "Charging of substrates irradiated by particle beams" Appl. Phys. Lett. 71, 3302 (1997). [2] S. K. Guharay, E. Sokolovsky, J. Orloff, "Characteristics of ion beams from a Penning source for focused ion beam applications" J. Vac. Sci Technol. B17, 2779 (1999).

  10. Diagnostics of reactive pulsed plasmas by UV and VUV absorption spectroscopy and by modulated beam Mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunge, Gilles

    2011-10-01

    Pulsed plasmas are promising for etching applications in the microelectronic industry. However, many new phenomena are involved when a high density discharge is pulsed. To better understand these processes it is necessary to probe the radicals' kinetics with a microsecond resolution. We have developed several diagnostics to reach this goal including broad band absorption spectroscopy with UV LEDs to detect small polyatomic radicals and with a deuterium VUV source to detect larger closed shell molecules and the modulated mass spectrometry to monitor atomic species. We will discuss the impact of the plasma pulsing frequency and duty cycle on the radical densities in Cl2 based plasmas, and the consequences on plasma processes. Work done in collaboration with Paul Bodart, Melisa Brihoum, Maxime Darnon, Erwin Pargon, Olivier Joubert, and Nader Sadeghi, CNRS/LTM.

  11. Laser produced plasma for efficient extreme ultraviolet light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Tony; Cummins, Thomas; O' Gorman, Colm; Li Bowen; Harte, Colm S.; O'Reilly, Fergal; Sokell, Emma; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry

    2012-05-25

    Extreme ultraviolet emission from laser produced plasma and their relevance to EUV source development is discussed. The current state of the field for Sn LPP sources operating at 13.5 nm is described and initial results are given for EUV emission from CO{sub 2} laser irradiation of a bulk Sn target. A maximum conversion efficiency of 1.7% has been measured and the influence of the CO{sub 2} laser temporal profile on the CE is discussed. A double pulse irradiation scheme is shown to increase CE up to a maximum value of 2.1% for an optimum prepulse - pulse delay of 150 ns. The emergence of a new EUVL source wavelength at 6.7 nm based on Gd and Tb LPPs has been outlined. An initial experiment investigating picosecond laser irradiation as a means to produce strong 6.7 nm emission from a Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} target has been performed and verified.

  12. Counter-facing plasma focus system as a repetitive and/or long-pulse high energy density plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Yutaka; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2009-11-01

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial plasma guns is proposed as a long-pulse and/or repetitive high energy density plasma source. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrated that with an assist of breakdown and outer electrode connections, current sheets evolved into a configuration for stable plasma confinement at the center of the electrodes. The current sheets could successively compress and confine the high energy density plasma every half period of the discharge current, enabling highly repetitive light emissions in extreme ultraviolet region with time durations in at least ten microseconds.

  13. Counter-facing plasma focus system as a repetitive and/or long-pulse high energy density plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyama, Yutaka; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2009-11-15

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial plasma guns is proposed as a long-pulse and/or repetitive high energy density plasma source. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrated that with an assist of breakdown and outer electrode connections, current sheets evolved into a configuration for stable plasma confinement at the center of the electrodes. The current sheets could successively compress and confine the high energy density plasma every half period of the discharge current, enabling highly repetitive light emissions in extreme ultraviolet region with time durations in at least ten microseconds.

  14. Study on Surface Modification of Polymer Films by Using Atmospheric Plasma Jet Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Yuichiro; Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Hara, Tamio

    2008-07-01

    Reactive gas plasma treatments of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and polyimide (Kapton) have been performed using an atmospheric plasmas jet source. Characteristics of surface modification have been examined by changing the distance between the plasma jet source and the treated sample, and by changing the working gas spaces. Simultaneously, each plasma jet source has been investigated by space-resolving spectroscopy in the UV/visible region. Polymer surfaces have been analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A marked improvement in the hydrophilicity of the polymer surfaces has been made by using N2 or O2 plasma jet source with a very short exposure time of about 0.01 s, whereas the less improvement has been obtained using on air plasma jet source because of NOx compound production. Changes in the chemical states of C of the polymer surfaces have been observed in XPS spectra after N2 plasma jet spraying.

  15. Spectroscopy Study of the ASTRAL helicon plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branscomb, David

    2005-10-01

    A spectroscopy study of the ASTRAL (Auburn Steady sTate Research fAciLity) helicon plasma source is presented. A spectrometer which features a 0.33 m Criss-Cross Scanning monochromator and a CCD camera is used for this study. ASTRAL produces Ar plasmas with the following parameters: ne = 10^12 to 10^13 cm-3 and Te = 2 to 15 eV. Ar I , Ar II and Ar III species are monitored as a function of rf power. In the 250 to 450 nm range, Ar II transitions dominate the spectrum and very few Ar I transitions are present. In the 300 to 400 nm range Ar III transitions are barely visible at low power and become intense at high power. In the 700-1000 nm range, Ar I transitions dominate the spectrum while very few Ar II transitions are observed. Ar II and Ar III intensity increases with rf power while Ar I intensity are independent of power. This constant Ar I intensity strongly suggests that neutral depletion occurs within the core as the power is raised. A discussion relative to the different observations is presented with links to theoretical excitation rate coefficients.

  16. Plasma source ion implantation technology for engineering surfaces of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, E. H.; Lawrence, D. F.; Sridharan, K.; Sandstrom, P. W.

    2001-07-01

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation* (PSII) is a non-line-of-sight technique for energetic ion surface modification of materials. At the University of Wisconsin there are presently three PSII systems two of which measure about 1 m3 and a third that measures 0.1 m3. Plasma generation is achieved in vacuum through filamentary, RF, DC-pulsed, or glow discharge. High voltage pulsing is achieved using a tetrode modulator that pulses at up to 60kV or by a solid-state pulser that can supply 20kV. Recently, a crossatron modulator capable of 40kV and 1kA peak anode current was built in-house. Surface properties of a wide range of materials have been beneficially modified using PSII in ion implantation, film deposition, energetic ion mixing, and sputtering modes. Industrial field testing of PSII-treated parts has yielded promising results but successful commercialization requires judicious selection of applications which effectively exploit the unique aspects of PSII as a surface modification tool.*J.R. Conrad U.S. Patent#4764394, 1988

  17. Plasma and Radiation Modelling of EUV Sources for Micro Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruecken, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    Future extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography will require very high radiation intensities in a narrow wavelength range around 13.5 nm, which is most efficiently emitted as line radiation by highly ionized heavy particles. Currently the most intense EUV sources are based on Xenon or Tin discharges. After having investigated the limits of a hollow cathode triggered Xenon pinch discharge a Laser triggered Tin vacuum spark discharge is favored by Philips Extreme UV. Plasma and radiation properties of these highly transient discharges will be compared. Besides simple MHD-models the ADAS software package has been used to generate important atomic and spectral data of the relevant ion stages. To compute excitation and radiation properties, collisional radiative equilibria of individual ion stages are computed. For many lines opacity effects cannot be neglected. The optical depths, however, allow for a treatment based on escape factors. Due to the rapid change of plasma parameters the abundances of the different ionization stages must be computed dynamically. This requires effective ionization and recombination rates, which can also be supplied by ADAS.

  18. Plasma and Radiation Modelling of EUV Sources for Micro Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Kruecken, Thomas

    2007-04-06

    Future extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography will require very high radiation intensities in a narrow wavelength range around 13.5 nm, which is most efficiently emitted as line radiation by highly ionized heavy particles. Currently the most intense EUV sources are based on Xenon or Tin discharges. After having investigated the limits of a hollow cathode triggered Xenon pinch discharge a Laser triggered Tin vacuum spark discharge is favored by Philips Extreme UV.Plasma and radiation properties of these highly transient discharges will be compared. Besides simple MHD-models the ADAS software package has been used to generate important atomic and spectral data of the relevant ion stages. To compute excitation and radiation properties, collisional radiative equilibria of individual ion stages are computed. For many lines opacity effects cannot be neglected. The optical depths, however, allow for a treatment based on escape factors. Due to the rapid change of plasma parameters the abundances of the different ionization stages must be computed dynamically. This requires effective ionization and recombination rates, which can also be supplied by ADAS.

  19. Numerical Model of the Plasma Sheath Generated by the Plasma Source Instrument Aboard the Polar Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Wing C.; Singh, Nagendra; Moore, Thomas E.; Craven, Paul D.

    2000-01-01

    The plasma sheath generated by the operation of the Plasma Source Instrument (PSI) aboard the POLAR satellite is studied by using a 3-dimensional Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code. When the satellite passes through the region of low density plasma, the satellite charges to positive potentials as high as 4050Volts due to the photoelectrons emission. In such a case, ambient core ions cannot accurately be measured or detected. The goal of the onboard PSI is to reduce the floating potential of the satellite to a sufficiently low value so that the ions in the polar wind become detectable. When the PSI is operated, an ion-rich Xenon plasma is ejected from the satellite, such that the floating potential of the satellite is reduced and is maintained at about 2Volts. Accordingly, in our 3-dimensional PIC simulation, we considered that the potential of the satellite is 2Volts as a fixed bias. Considering the relatively high density of the Xenon plasma in the sheath (approx. 10 - 10(exp 3)/cc), the ambient plasma of low density (less than 1/cc) is neglected. In the simulations, the electric fields and plasma dynamics are calculated self-consistently. We found that an "Apple" shape positive potential sheath forms surrounding the satellite. In the region near the PSI emission, a high positive potential hill develops. Near the Thermal Ion Detection Experiment (TIDE) detector away from the PSI, the potentials are sufficiently low for the ambient polar wind ions to reach it. In the simulations, it takes about a hundred electron gyroperiods for the sheath to reach a quasi-steady state. This time is approximately the time taken by the heavy Xe(+) ions to expand up to about one average Larmor radius of electrons from the satellite surface. Using the steady state sheath, we performed trajectory calculations to characterize the detector response to a highly supersonic polar wind flow. The detected ions' velocity distribution shows significant deviations from a shifted Maxwellian in the

  20. Numerical Model of the Plasma Sheath Generated by the Plasma Source Instrument Aboard the Polar Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Leung, W. C.; Moore, T. E.; Craven, P. D.

    2001-01-01

    The plasma sheath generated by the operation of the Plasma Source Instrument (PSI) aboard the Polar satellite is studied by using a three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) code. When the satellite passes through the region of low-density plasma, the satellite charges to positive potentials as high as 40-50 V, owing to the photoelectron emission. In such a case, ambient core ions cannot accurately be measured or detected. The goal of the onboard PSI is to reduce the floating potential of the satellite to a sufficiently low value so that the ions in the polar wind become detectable. When the PSI is operated, ion-rich xenon plasma is ejected from the satellite, such that the floating potential of the satellite is reduced and is maintained at approximately 2 V. Accordingly, in our three-dimensional PIC simulation we considered that the potential of the satellite is 2 V as a fixed bias. Considering the relatively high density of the xenon plasma in the sheath (10-10(exp 3)/cc), the ambient plasma of low density (<1/cc) is neglected. In the simulations the electric fields and plasma dynamics are calculated self-consistently. We found that an 'apple'-shape positive potential sheath forms surrounding the satellite. In the region near the PSI emission a high positive potential hill develops. Near the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment detector away from the PSI, the potentials are sufficiently low for the ambient polar wind ions to reach it. In the simulations it takes only about a couple of tens of electron gyroperiods for the sheath to reach a quasi steady state. This time is approximately the time taken by the heavy Xe(+) ions to expand up to about one average Larmor radius of electrons from the satellite surface. After this time the expansion of the sheath in directions transverse to the ambient magnetic field slows down because the electrons are magnetized. Using the quasi steady sheath, we performed trajectory calculations to characterize the detector response to a

  1. Detection of uranium in industrial and mines samples by microwave plasma torch mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Yang, Meiling; Sun, Rong; Zhong, Tao; Chen, Huanwen

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma torch (MPT), traditionally used as the light source for atomic emission spectrophotometry, has been employed as the ambient ionization source for sensitive detection of uranium in various ground water samples with widely available ion trap mass spectrometer. In the full-scan mass spectra obtained in the negative ion detection mode, uranium signal was featured by the uranyl nitrate complexes (e.g. [UO2 (NO3 )3 ](-) ), which yielded characteristic fragments in the tandem mass spectrometry experiments, allowing confident detection of trace uranium in water samples without sample pretreatment. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the calibration curves were linearly responded within the concentration levels ranged in 10-1000 µg·l(-1) , with the limit of detection (LOD) of 31.03 ng·l(-1) . The relative standard deviations (RSD) values were 2.1-5.8% for the given samples at 100 µg·l(-1) . The newly established method has been applied to direct detection of uranium in practical mine water samples, providing reasonable recoveries 90.94-112.36% for all the samples tested. The analysis of a single sample was completed within 30 s, showing a promising potential of the method for sensitive detection of trace uranium with improved throughput. PMID:26889932

  2. Detection of uranium in industrial and mines samples by microwave plasma torch mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Yang, Meiling; Sun, Rong; Zhong, Tao; Chen, Huanwen

    2016-02-01

    Microwave plasma torch (MPT), traditionally used as the light source for atomic emission spectrophotometry, has been employed as the ambient ionization source for sensitive detection of uranium in various ground water samples with widely available ion trap mass spectrometer. In the full-scan mass spectra obtained in the negative ion detection mode, uranium signal was featured by the uranyl nitrate complexes (e.g. [UO2 (NO3 )3 ](-) ), which yielded characteristic fragments in the tandem mass spectrometry experiments, allowing confident detection of trace uranium in water samples without sample pretreatment. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the calibration curves were linearly responded within the concentration levels ranged in 10-1000 µg·l(-1) , with the limit of detection (LOD) of 31.03 ng·l(-1) . The relative standard deviations (RSD) values were 2.1-5.8% for the given samples at 100 µg·l(-1) . The newly established method has been applied to direct detection of uranium in practical mine water samples, providing reasonable recoveries 90.94-112.36% for all the samples tested. The analysis of a single sample was completed within 30 s, showing a promising potential of the method for sensitive detection of trace uranium with improved throughput.

  3. Note: Triggering behavior of a vacuum arc plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, C. H.; Long, J. D.; Zheng, L.; Dong, P.; Yang, Z.; Li, J.; Wang, T.; He, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    Axial symmetry of discharge is very important for application of vacuum arc plasma. It is discovered that the triggering method is a significant factor that would influence the symmetry of arc discharge at the final stable stage. Using high-speed multiframe photography, the transition processes from cathode-trigger discharge to cathode-anode discharge were observed. It is shown that the performances of the two triggering methods investigated are quite different. Arc discharge triggered by independent electric source can be stabilized at the center of anode grid, but it is difficult to achieve such good symmetry through resistance triggering. It is also found that the triggering process is highly correlated to the behavior of emitted electrons.

  4. Double planar wire array as a compact plasma radiation source

    SciTech Connect

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Williamson, K. M.; Yilmaz, M. F.; Shrestha, I.; Ouart, N. D.; Osborne, G. C.; Rudakov, L. I.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Coverdale, C. A.; Deeney, C.

    2008-03-15

    Magnetically compressed plasmas initiated by a double planar wire array (DPWA) are efficient radiation sources. The two rows in a DPWA implode independently and then merge together at stagnation producing soft x-ray yields and powers of up to 11.5 kJ/cm and more than 0.4 TW/cm, higher than other planar arrays or low wire-number cylindrical arrays on the 1 MA Zebra generator. DPWA, where precursors form in two stages, produce a shaped radiation pulse and radiate more energy in the main burst than estimates of implosion kinetic energy. High radiation efficiency, compact size (as small as 3-5 mm wide), and pulse shaping show that the DPWA is a potential candidate for ICF and radiation physics research.

  5. Note: Triggering behavior of a vacuum arc plasma source.

    PubMed

    Lan, C H; Long, J D; Zheng, L; Dong, P; Yang, Z; Li, J; Wang, T; He, J L

    2016-08-01

    Axial symmetry of discharge is very important for application of vacuum arc plasma. It is discovered that the triggering method is a significant factor that would influence the symmetry of arc discharge at the final stable stage. Using high-speed multiframe photography, the transition processes from cathode-trigger discharge to cathode-anode discharge were observed. It is shown that the performances of the two triggering methods investigated are quite different. Arc discharge triggered by independent electric source can be stabilized at the center of anode grid, but it is difficult to achieve such good symmetry through resistance triggering. It is also found that the triggering process is highly correlated to the behavior of emitted electrons. PMID:27587176

  6. On the possibility of the multiple inductively coupled plasma and helicon plasma sources for large-area processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jin-Won; Lee, Yun-Seong Chang, Hong-Young; An, Sang-Hyuk

    2014-08-15

    In this study, we attempted to determine the possibility of multiple inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and helicon plasma sources for large-area processes. Experiments were performed with the one and two coils to measure plasma and electrical parameters, and a circuit simulation was performed to measure the current at each coil in the 2-coil experiment. Based on the result, we could determine the possibility of multiple ICP sources due to a direct change of impedance due to current and saturation of impedance due to the skin-depth effect. However, a helicon plasma source is difficult to adapt to the multiple sources due to the consistent change of real impedance due to mode transition and the low uniformity of the B-field confinement. As a result, it is expected that ICP can be adapted to multiple sources for large-area processes.

  7. On the possibility of the multiple inductively coupled plasma and helicon plasma sources for large-area processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin-Won; Lee, Yun-Seong; Chang, Hong-Young; An, Sang-Hyuk

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we attempted to determine the possibility of multiple inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and helicon plasma sources for large-area processes. Experiments were performed with the one and two coils to measure plasma and electrical parameters, and a circuit simulation was performed to measure the current at each coil in the 2-coil experiment. Based on the result, we could determine the possibility of multiple ICP sources due to a direct change of impedance due to current and saturation of impedance due to the skin-depth effect. However, a helicon plasma source is difficult to adapt to the multiple sources due to the consistent change of real impedance due to mode transition and the low uniformity of the B-field confinement. As a result, it is expected that ICP can be adapted to multiple sources for large-area processes.

  8. Magnetic-Nozzle Studies for Fusion Propulsion Applications: Gigawatt Plasma Source Operation and Magnetic Nozzle Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James H.; Mikekkides, Ioannis; Mikellides, Pavlos; Gregorek, Gerald; Marriott, Darin

    2004-01-01

    This project has been a multiyear effort to assess the feasibility of a key process inherent to virtually all fusion propulsion concepts: the expansion of a fusion-grade plasma through a diverging magnetic field. Current fusion energy research touches on this process only indirectly through studies of plasma divertors designed to remove the fusion products from a reactor. This project was aimed at directly addressing propulsion system issues, without the expense of constructing a fusion reactor. Instead, the program designed, constructed, and operated a facility suitable for simulating fusion reactor grade edge plasmas, and to examine their expansion in an expanding magnetic nozzle. The approach was to create and accelerate a dense (up to l0(exp 20)/m) plasma, stagnate it in a converging magnetic field to convert kinetic energy to thermal energy, and examine the subsequent expansion of the hot (100's eV) plasma in a subsequent magnetic nozzle. Throughout the project, there has been a parallel effort between theoretical and numerical design and modelling of the experiment and the experiment itself. In particular, the MACH2 code was used to design and predict the performance of the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) plasma accelerator, and to design and predict the design and expected behavior for the magnetic field coils that could be added later. Progress to date includes the theoretical accelerator design and construction, development of the power and vacuum systems to accommodate the powers and mass flow rates of interest to out research, operation of the accelerator and comparison to theoretical predictions, and computational analysis of future magnetic field coils and the expected performance of an integrated source-nozzle experiment.

  9. A microwave plasma source for VUV atmospheric photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tigrine, S.; Carrasco, N.; Vettier, L.; Cernogora, G.

    2016-10-01

    Microwave plasma discharges working at low pressure are nowadays a well-developed technique mainly used to provide radiation at different wavelengths. The aim of this work is to show that those discharges are an efficient windowless vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) photon source for planetary atmospheric photochemistry experiments. To do this, we use a surfatron-type discharge with a neon gas flow in the mbar pressure range coupled to a photochemical reactor. Working in the VUV range allows nitrogen-dominated atmospheres to be focused on (λ  <  100 nm). The experimental setup makes sure that no energy sources (electrons, metastable atoms) other than the VUV photons interact with the reactive medium. Neon has two resonance lines at 73.6 and 74.3 nm that behave differently depending on the pressure or power conditions. In parallel, the VUV photon flux emitted at 73.6 nm has been experimentally estimated in different pressure and power conditions, and varies in a large range between 2  ×  1013 ph s-1 cm-2 and 4  ×  1014 ph s-1 cm-2, which is comparable to a VUV synchrotron photon flux. Our first case study is the atmosphere of Titan and its N2-CH4 atmosphere. With this VUV source, the production of HCN and C2N2, two major Titan compounds, is detected, ensuring the suitability of the source for atmospheric photochemistry experiments.

  10. Method of high-precision microsampled blood and plasma mass densitometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinghofer-Szalkay, H.

    1986-01-01

    The reliability of the mechanical oscillator technique for blood and plasma density measurements on samples of volumes less than 0.1 ml is examined, and a precision of 0.001 g/l is found if plasma-isodensic heparin solution and siliconized densitometers are employed. Sources of measurement errors in the density determinations include storage of plasma samples, inhomogeneity of blood samples, and density reading before adequate temperature equilibration. In tests of plasma sample storage, the best reproducibility was obtained with samples kept at 4 C. Linear correlations were found between plasma density and plasma protein concentration, blood density and blood hemoglobin concentration, and erythrocyte density and MCHC.

  11. Capillary Electrophoresis-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Michalke, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    During the recent years, capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been fully established as a powerful tool in separation sciences as well as in element speciation. This road of success is based on the rapid analysis time, low sample requirements, high separation efficiency, and low operating costs of CE. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is known for superior detection and multielement capability. Consequently, the combination of both instruments is approved for analysis of complex sample types at low element concentrations which require high detection power. Also the diversity of potential applications brings CE-ICP-MS coupling into central focus of element speciation. The key to successful combination of ICP-MS as an (multi-)element selective detector for CE is the availability of a suitable and effective interface.Therefore, this chapter summarizes the most important and basic principles about coupling of capillary electrophoresis to ICP-MS. Specifically, the major requirements for interfacing are described and technical solutions are given. Such solutions include the closing of the electrical circuit from CE at the nebulization, the adoption of flow rates for efficient nebulization, the reduction of a suction flow through the capillary, caused by the nebulizer, and maintaining the high separation resolution from CE across the interface for ICP-MS detection. Additionally, detailed information is presented to determine and quantify the siphoning suction through the CE capillary by the nebulizer. Finally, two applications, namely, the manganese and selenium speciation in cerebrospinal fluid are shown as examples, providing the relevant operational parameter. PMID:27645737

  12. Ablation plasma transport using multicusp magnetic field for laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Umezawa, M.; Uchino, T.; Ikegami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Harada, N.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a plasma guiding method using multicusp magnetic field to transport the ablation plasma keeping the density for developing laser ion sources. To investigate the effect of guiding using the magnetic field on the ablation plasma, we demonstrated the transport of the laser ablation plasma in the multicusp magnetic field. The magnetic field was formed with eight permanent magnets and arranged to limit the plasma expansion in the radial direction. We investigated the variation of the plasma ion current density and charge distribution during transport in the magnetic field. The results indicate that the plasma is confined in the radial direction during the transport in the multicusp magnetic field.

  13. A membrane-separator interface for mass-spectrometric analysis of blood plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Gerasimov, D. G.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of rapid mass-spectrometric determination of the content of anesthetic agents in blood plasma with the aid of a membrane-separator interface. The interface employs a hydrophobic selective membrane that is capable of separating various anesthetic drugs (including inhalation anesthetic sevofluran, noninhalation anesthetic thiopental, hypnotic propofol, and opioid analgesic fentanyl) from the blood plasma and introducing samples into a mass spectrometer. Analysis of the blood plasma was not accompanied by the memory effect and did not lead to membrane degradation. Results of clinical investigation of the concentration of anesthetics in the blood plasma of patients are presented.

  14. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hai-En; Wang, Xiaoming; Shaw, Joseph M.; Li, Zhengyan; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Zhang, Xi; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.; Downer, M. C.

    2015-02-01

    We present an in-depth experimental-computational study of the parameters necessary to optimize a tunable, quasi-monoenergetic, efficient, low-background Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the self-aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The main findings are (1) an LPA driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses produce not only a high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, but also a high-quality, relativistically intense (a0 ˜ 1) spent drive pulse that remains stable in profile and intensity over the LPA tuning range. (2) A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit retro-reflects the spent drive pulse efficiently into oncoming electrons to produce CBS x-rays without detectable bremsstrahlung background. Meanwhile, anomalous far-field divergence of the retro-reflected light demonstrates relativistic "denting" of the PM. Exploiting these optimized LPA and PM conditions, we demonstrate quasi-monoenergetic (50% FWHM energy spread), tunable (75-200 KeV) CBS x-rays, characteristics previously achieved only on more powerful laser systems by CBS of a split-off, counter-propagating pulse. Moreover, laser-to-x-ray photon conversion efficiency (˜6 × 10-12) exceeds that of any previous LPA-based quasi-monoenergetic Compton source. Particle-in-cell simulations agree well with the measurements.

  15. Comprehensive blood plasma lipidomics by liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sandra, Koen; Pereira, Alberto Dos Santos; Vanhoenacker, Gerd; David, Frank; Sandra, Pat

    2010-06-18

    A lipidomics strategy, combining high resolution reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) with high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QqTOF), is described. The method has carefully been assessed in both a qualitative and a quantitative fashion utilizing human blood plasma. The inherent low technical variability associated with the lipidomics method allows to measure 65% of the features with an intensity RSD value below 10%. Blood plasma lipid spike-in experiments demonstrate that relative concentration differences smaller than 25% can readily be revealed by means of a t-test. Utilizing an advanced identification strategy, it is shown that the detected features mainly originate from (lyso-)phospholipids, sphingolipids, mono-, di- and triacylglycerols and cholesterol esters. The high resolution offered by the up-front RPLC step further allows to discriminate various isomeric species associated with the different lipid classes. The added value of utilizing a Jetstream electrospray ionization (ESI) source over a regular ESI source in lipidomics is for the first time demonstrated. In addition, the application of ultra high performance LC (UHPLC) up to 1200bar to extend the peak capacity or increase productivity is discussed. PMID:20307888

  16. Mass changes of microparticles in a plasma observed by a phase-resolved resonance method

    SciTech Connect

    Carstensen, Jan; Jung, Hendrik; Greiner, Franko; Piel, Alexander

    2011-03-15

    The influence of a plasma environment on melamine formaldehyde particles is studied. High-precision measurements of the vertical confinement frequency with a phase-resolved resonance method indicate that the particle mass is affected in two ways: the deposition of sputtered material at the particle leads to a mass gain, whereas the outgassing of water causes a mass loss.

  17. Mass changes of microparticles in a plasma observed by a phase-resolved resonance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstensen, Jan; Jung, Hendrik; Greiner, Franko; Piel, Alexander

    2011-03-01

    The influence of a plasma environment on melamine formaldehyde particles is studied. High-precision measurements of the vertical confinement frequency with a phase-resolved resonance method indicate that the particle mass is affected in two ways: the deposition of sputtered material at the particle leads to a mass gain, whereas the outgassing of water causes a mass loss.

  18. Quasi-steady carbon plasma source for neutral beam injector.

    PubMed

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2014-02-01

    Carbon plasma is successfully sustained during 1000 s without any carrier gas in the bucket type ionization chamber with cusp magnetic field. Every several seconds, seed plasmas having ∼3 ms duration time are injected into the ionization chamber by a shunting arch plasma gun. The weakly ionized carbon plasma ejected from the shunting arch is also ionized by 2.45 GHz microwave at the electron cyclotron resonance surface and the plasma can be sustained even in the interval of gun discharges. Control of the gun discharge interval allows to keep high pressure and to sustain the plasma for long duration.

  19. Quasi-steady carbon plasma source for neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Koguchi, H. Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y.

    2014-02-15

    Carbon plasma is successfully sustained during 1000 s without any carrier gas in the bucket type ionization chamber with cusp magnetic field. Every several seconds, seed plasmas having ∼3 ms duration time are injected into the ionization chamber by a shunting arch plasma gun. The weakly ionized carbon plasma ejected from the shunting arch is also ionized by 2.45 GHz microwave at the electron cyclotron resonance surface and the plasma can be sustained even in the interval of gun discharges. Control of the gun discharge interval allows to keep high pressure and to sustain the plasma for long duration.

  20. X-ray source characterization of aluminum X-pinch plasmas driven by the 0. 5 TW LION accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, N.; Hammer, D.A.; Kalantar, D.H.; Rondeau, G.D.; Workman, J.B. ); Richardson, M.C.; Hong Chen )

    1989-12-01

    Recent experiments at Cornell have been performed to investigate X-pinch plasmas as intense x-ray sources which might be used to pump resonant photoexcitation lasers. Crossed Al wires have been driven by up to 600 kA current for 40 ns. High density bright spots are observed at the crossing point(s). Various diagnostics were used to characterize the X-pinch plasmas as a function of initial mass loading for several specific wire configurations. The optimum mass loading for different ionization stages of Al, and the total x-ray energy yields, which are on the order of hundreds of Joules, were examined. Estimates of plasma density, {similar to}10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3}, and temperature, about 400 eV, were obtained.

  1. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakraborty, A.

    2016-02-01

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  2. Measurement of optical emission from the hydrogen plasma of the Linac4 ion source and the SPL plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Lettry, J.; Bertolo, S.; Castel, A.; Chaudet, E.; Ecarnot, J.-F.; Favre, G.; Fayet, F.; Geisser, J.-M.; Haase, M.; Habert, A.; Hansen, J.; Joffe, S.; Kronberger, M.; Lombard, D.; Marmillon, A.; Balula, J. Marques; Mathot, S.; Midttun, O.; Moyret, P.; Nisbet, D.

    2011-09-26

    At CERN, a non caesiated H{sup -} ion volume source derived from the DESY ion source is being commissioned. For a proposed High Power Superconducting Proton Linac (HP-SPL), a non caesiated plasma generator was designed to operate at the two orders of magnitude larger duty factor required by the SPL. The commissioning of the plasma generator test stand and the plasma generator prototype are completed and briefly described. The 2 MHz RF generators (100 kW, 50 Hz repetition rate) was successfully commissioned; its frequency and power will be controlled by arbitrary function generators during the 1 ms plasma pulse. In order to characterize the plasma, RF-coupling, optical spectrometer, rest gas analyzer and Langmuir probe measurements will be used. Optical spectrometry allows direct comparison with the currently commissioned Linac4 H{sup -} ion source plasma. The first measurements of the optical emission of the Linac4 ion source and of the SPL plasma generator plasmas are presented.

  3. High brightness EUV sources based on laser plasma at using droplet liquid metal target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokhodov, A. Yu; Krivokorytov, M. S.; Sidelnikov, Yu V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Medvedev, V. V.; Koshelev, K. N.

    2016-05-01

    We present the study of a source of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation based on laser plasma generated due to the interaction of radiation from a nanosecond Nd : YAG laser with a liquidmetal droplet target consisting of a low-temperature eutectic indium–tin alloy. The generator of droplets is constructed using a commercial nozzle and operates on the principle of forced capillary jet decomposition. Long-term spatial stability of the centre-of-mass position of the droplet with the root-mean-square deviation of ~0.5 μm is demonstrated. The use of a low-temperature working substance instead of pure tin increases the reliability and lifetime of the droplet generator. For the time- and space-averaged power density of laser radiation on the droplet target 4 × 1011 W cm-2 and the diameter of radiating plasma ~80 μm, the mean efficiency of conversion of laser energy into the energy of EUV radiation at 13.5 +/- 0.135 nm equal to 2.3% (2π sr)-1 is achieved. Using the doublepulse method, we have modelled the repetitively pulsed regime of the source operation and demonstrated the possibility of its stable functioning with the repetition rate up to 8 kHz for the droplet generation repetition rate of more than 32 kHz, which will allow the source brightness to be as large as ~0.96 kW (mm2 sr)-1.

  4. High brightness EUV sources based on laser plasma at using droplet liquid metal target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokhodov, A. Yu; Krivokorytov, M. S.; Sidelnikov, Yu V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Medvedev, V. V.; Koshelev, K. N.

    2016-05-01

    We present the study of a source of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation based on laser plasma generated due to the interaction of radiation from a nanosecond Nd : YAG laser with a liquidmetal droplet target consisting of a low-temperature eutectic indium-tin alloy. The generator of droplets is constructed using a commercial nozzle and operates on the principle of forced capillary jet decomposition. Long-term spatial stability of the centre-of-mass position of the droplet with the root-mean-square deviation of ~0.5 μm is demonstrated. The use of a low-temperature working substance instead of pure tin increases the reliability and lifetime of the droplet generator. For the time- and space-averaged power density of laser radiation on the droplet target 4 × 1011 W cm-2 and the diameter of radiating plasma ~80 μm, the mean efficiency of conversion of laser energy into the energy of EUV radiation at 13.5 +/- 0.135 nm equal to 2.3% (2π sr)-1 is achieved. Using the doublepulse method, we have modelled the repetitively pulsed regime of the source operation and demonstrated the possibility of its stable functioning with the repetition rate up to 8 kHz for the droplet generation repetition rate of more than 32 kHz, which will allow the source brightness to be as large as ~0.96 kW (mm2 sr)-1.

  5. Mass spring lattice modeling of the scanning laser source technique.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Younghoon; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2002-06-01

    The scanning laser source (SLS) technique is a promising new laser ultrasonic tool for the detection of small surface-breaking defects. The SLS approach is based on monitoring the changes in laser generated ultrasound as a laser source is scanned over a defect. Changes in amplitude and frequency content have been observed for ultrasound generated by the laser over uniform and defective areas. In this paper, the SLS technique is simulated numerically using the mass spring lattice model. Thermoelastic laser generation of ultrasound in an elastic material is modeled using a shear dipole distribution. The spatial and temporal energy distribution profiles of typical pulsed laser sources are used to model the laser source. The amplitude and spectral variations in the laser generated ultrasound as the SLS scans over a large aluminum block containing a small surface-breaking crack are observed. The experimentally observed SLS amplitude and spectral signatures are shown to be captured very well by the model. In addition, the possibility of utilizing the SLS technique to size surface-breaking cracks that are sub-wavelength in depth is explored. PMID:12109544

  6. Method for analyzing the mass of a sample using a cold cathode ionization source mass filter

    DOEpatents

    Felter, Thomas E.

    2003-10-14

    An improved quadrupole mass spectrometer is described. The improvement lies in the substitution of the conventional hot filament electron source with a cold cathode field emitter array which in turn allows operating a small QMS at much high internal pressures then are currently achievable. By eliminating of the hot filament such problems as thermally "cracking" delicate analyte molecules, outgassing a "hot" filament, high power requirements, filament contamination by outgas species, and spurious em fields are avoid all together. In addition, the ability of produce FEAs using well-known and well developed photolithographic techniques, permits building a QMS having multiple redundancies of the ionization source at very low additional cost.

  7. Multifluid MHD simulation of Saturn's magnetosphere: Dynamics of mass- and momentum-loading, and seasonal variation of the plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendar, A.; Paty, C. S.; Arridge, C. S.; Jackman, C. M.; Smith, H. T.

    2013-12-01

    Saturn's magnetosphere is driven externally, by the solar wind, and internally, by the planet's strong magnetic field, rapid rotation rate, and the addition of new plasma created from Saturn's neutral cloud. Externally, the alignment of the rotational and magnetic dipole axes, combined with Saturn's substantial inclination to its plane of orbit result in substantial curvature of the plasma sheet during solstice. Internally, new water group ions are produced in the inner regions of the magnetosphere from photoionization and electron-impact ionization of the water vapor and OH cloud sourced from Enceladus and other icy bodies in Saturn's planetary system. In addition to this, charge-exchange collisions between the relatively fast-moving water group ions and the slower neutrals results in a net loss of momentum from the plasma. In order to study these phenomena, we have made significant modifications to the Saturn multifluid model. This model has been previously used to investigate the external triggering of plasmoids and the interchange process using a fixed internal source rate. In order to improve the fidelity of the model, we have incorporated a physical source of mass- and momentum-loading by including an empirical representation of Saturn's neutral cloud and modifying the multifluid MHD equations to include mass- and momentum-loading terms. Collision cross-sections between ions, electrons, and neutrals are calculated as functions of closure velocity and energy at each grid point and time step, enabling us to simulate the spatially and temporally varying plasma-neutral interactions. In addition to this, by altering the angle of incidence of the solar wind relative to Saturn's rotational axis and applying a realistic latitudinally- and seasonally-varying ionospheric conductivity, we are also able to study seasonal effects on Saturn's magnetosphere. We use the updated multifluid simulation to investigate the dynamics of Saturn's magnetosphere, focusing specifically

  8. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry. Progress report, January 1, 1990--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1992-09-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  9. Chemical and physical processes in the retention of functional groups in plasma polymers studied by plasma phase mass spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ryssy, Joonas; Prioste-Amaral, Eloni; Assuncao, Daniela F N; Rogers, Nicholas; Kirby, Giles T S; Smith, Louise E; Michelmore, Andrew

    2016-02-14

    Surface engineering of functionalised polymer films is a rapidly expanding field of research with cross disciplinary implications and numerous applications. One method of generating functionalised polymer films is radio frequency induced plasma polymerisation which provides a substrate independent coating. However, there is currently limited understanding surrounding chemical interactions in the plasma phase and physical interactions at the plasma-surface interface, and their effect on functional group retention in the thin film. Here we investigate functionalised plasma polymer films generated from four precursors containing primary amines. Using XPS and fluorine tagging with 4-(trifluoromethyl)benzaldehyde, the primary amine content of plasma polymer films was measured as a function of applied power at constant precursor pressure. The results were then correlated with analysis of the plasma phase by mass spectrometry which showed loss of amine functionality for both neutral and ionic species. Surface interactions are also shown to decrease primary amine retention due to abstraction of hydrogen by high energy ion impacts. The stability of the plasma polymers in aqueous solution was also assessed and is shown to be precursor dependent. Increased understanding of the chemical and physical processes in the plasma phase and at the surface are therefore critical in designing improved plasma polymerisation processes. PMID:26791435

  10. Improved Mass Spectrometry Assay For Plasma Hepcidin: Detection and Characterization of a Novel Hepcidin Isoform

    PubMed Central

    Laarakkers, Coby M. M.; Wiegerinck, Erwin T.; Klaver, Siem; Kolodziejczyk, Maria; Gille, Hendrik; Hohlbaum, Andreas M.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based assays for the quantification of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin are pivotal to discriminate between the bioactive 25-amino acid form that can effectively block the sole iron transporter ferroportin and other naturally occurring smaller isoforms without a known role in iron metabolism. Here we describe the design, validation and use of a novel stable hepcidin-25+40 isotope as internal standard for quantification. Importantly, the relative large mass shift of 40 Da makes this isotope also suitable for easy-to-use medium resolution linear time-of-flight (TOF) platforms. As expected, implementation of hepcidin-25+40 as internal standard in our weak cation exchange (WCX) TOF MS method yielded very low inter/intra run coefficients of variation. Surprisingly, however, in samples from kidney disease patients, we detected a novel peak (m/z 2673.9) with low intensity that could be identified as hepcidin-24 and had previously remained unnoticed due to peak interference with the formerly used internal standard. Using a cell-based bioassay it was shown that synthetic hepcidin-24 was, like the -22 and -20 isoforms, a significantly less potent inducer of ferroportin degradation than hepcidin-25. During prolonged storage of plasma at room temperature, we observed that a decrease in plasma hepcidin-25 was paralleled by an increase in the levels of the hepcidin-24, -22 and -20 isoforms. This provides first evidence that all determinants for the conversion of hepcidin-25 to smaller inactive isoforms are present in the circulation, which may contribute to the functional suppression of hepcidin-25, that is significantly elevated in patients with renal impairment. The present update of our hepcidin TOF MS assay together with improved insights in the source and preparation of the internal standard, and sample stability will further improve our understanding of circulating hepcidin and pave the way towards further optimization and standardization of

  11. Temperature of the Source Plasma in Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reames, Donald V.

    2016-03-01

    Scattering during interplanetary transport of particles during large, "gradual" solar energetic-particle (SEP) events can cause element abundance enhancements or suppressions that depend upon the mass-to-charge ratio [A/Q] of the ions as an increasing function early in events and a decreasing function of the residual scattered ions later. Since the Q-values for the ions depend upon the source plasma temperature [T], best fits of the power-law dependence of enhancements vs. A/Q can determine T. These fits provide a fundamentally new method to determine the most probable value of T for these events in the energy region 3 - 10 MeV amu^{-1}. Complicated variations in the grouping of element enhancements or suppressions match similar variations in A/Q at the best-fit temperature. We find that fits to the times of increasing and decreasing powers give similar values of T, in the range of 0.8 - 1.6 MK for 69 % of events, consistent with the acceleration of ambient coronal plasma by shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). However, 24 % of the SEP events studied showed plasma of 2.5 - 3.2 MK, typical of that previously determined for the smaller impulsive SEP events; these particles may be reaccelerated preferentially by quasi-perpendicular shock waves that require a high injection threshold that the impulsive-event ions exceed or simply by high intensities of impulsive suprathermal ions at the shock. The source-temperature distribution of ten higher-energy ground-level events (GLEs) in the sample is similar to that of the other gradual events, at least for SEPs in the energy-range of 3 - 10 MeV amu^{-1}. Some events show evidence that a portion of the ions may have been further stripped of electrons before the shock acceleration; such events are smaller and tend to cluster late in the solar cycle.

  12. XID II: STATISTICAL CROSS-ASSOCIATION OF ROSAT BRIGHT SOURCE CATALOG X-RAY SOURCES WITH 2MASS POINT SOURCE CATALOG NEAR-INFRARED SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Haakonsen, Christian Bernt; Rutledge, Robert E. E-mail: rutledge@physics.mcgill.ca

    2009-09-01

    The 18,806 ROSAT All Sky Survey Bright Source Catalog (RASS/BSC) X-ray sources are quantitatively cross-associated with near-infrared (NIR) sources from the Two Micron All Sky Survey Point Source Catalog (2MASS/PSC). An association catalog is presented, listing the most likely counterpart for each RASS/BSC source, the probability P {sub id} that the NIR source and X-ray source are uniquely associated, and the probability P {sub no-id} that none of the 2MASS/PSC sources are associated with the X-ray source. The catalog includes 3853 high quality (P {sub id}>0.98) X-ray-NIR matches, 2280 medium quality (0.98 {>=} P {sub id}>0.9) matches, and 4153 low quality (0.9 {>=} P {sub id}>0.5) matches. Of the high quality matches, 1418 are associations that are not listed in the SIMBAD database, and for which no high quality match with a USNO-A2 optical source was presented for the RASS/BSC source in previous work. The present work offers a significant number of new associations with RASS/BSC objects that will require optical/NIR spectroscopy for classification. For example, of the 6133 P {sub id}>0.9 2MASS/PSC counterparts presented in the association catalog, 2411 have no classification listed in the SIMBAD database. These 2MASS/PSC sources will likely include scientifically useful examples of known source classes of X-ray emitters (white dwarfs, coronally active stars, active galactic nuclei), but may also contain previously unknown source classes. It is determined that all coronally active stars in the RASS/BSC should have a counterpart in the 2MASS/PSC, and that the unique association of these RASS/BSC sources with their NIR counterparts thus is confusion limited.

  13. Pulsed electromagnetic gas acceleration. [magnetohydrodynamics, plasma power sources and plasma propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, R. G.; Vonjaskowsky, W. F.; Clark, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    Terminal voltage measurements with various cathodes and anodes in a high power, quasi-steady magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) are discussed. The magnitude of the current at the onset of voltage fluctuations is shown to be an increasing function of cathode area and a weaker decreasing function of anode area. Tests with a fluted cathode indicated that the fluctuations originate in the plasma adjacent to the cathode rather than at the cathode surface. Measurements of radiative output from an optical cavity aligned to examine the current-carrying portion of a two-dimensional, 56 kA magnetoplasmadynamic discharge reveal no lasing in that region, consistent with calculations of electron excitation and resonance radiation trapping. A voltage-swept double probe technique allows single-shot determination of electron temperature and electron number density in the recombining MPD exhaust flow. Current distributions within the cavity of MPD hollow cathodes for various static prefills with no injected mass flow are examined.

  14. Inductively Coupled Plasma: Fundamental Particle Investigations with Laser Ablation and Applications in Magnetic Sector Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Saetveit, Nathan Joe

    2008-01-01

    Particle size effects and elemental fractionation in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are investigated with nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation, differential mobility analysis, and magnetic sector ICP-MS. Laser pulse width was found to have a significant influence on the LA particle size distribution and the elemental composition of the aerosol and thus fractionation. Emission from individual particles from solution nebulization, glass, and a pressed powder pellet are observed with high speed digital photography. The presence of intact particles in an ICP is shown to be a likely source of fractionation. A technique for the online detection of stimulated elemental release from neural tissue using magnetic sector ICP-MS is described. Detection limits of 1 μg L-1 or better were found for P, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn in a 60 μL injection in a physiological saline matrix.

  15. Initial Operation of the Proto-MPEX High Intensity Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, J. B. O.; Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Bigelow, T. S.; Diem, S. J.; Pesavento, P. V.; Rapp, J.; Ray, H. B.; Shaw, G. C.; Luo, G.-N.

    2014-10-01

    The Prototype Materials Plasma Experiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear high-intensity rf plasma source that combines a high-density helicon plasma generator with electron and ion heating. It is being used to study the physics of heating over-dense plasmas, as well as exploring source interactions with a downstream target. The helicon plasma is produced by coupling 13.56 MHz rf power at levels up to 100 kW. Microwaves at 28 GHz (up to ~200 kW) are coupled to the electrons in the over-dense helicon plasma via Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW). Ion cyclotron heating (~30 kW) is via a magnetic beach approach. Tungsten baffles are used to help control neutral pressure between the helicon source and a tungsten target. Plasma diagnostics include Thomson Scattering and a retarding field energy analyzer to determine plasma parameters near the target, while a microwave interferometer and Langmuir probes are used to determine plasma parameters near the source and elsewhere in the system. High plasma densities have been produced in He (>3 × 1019/m3) and D (>1.5 × 1019/m3) , and operation in magnetic field strengths up to 1 T has been demonstrated. Details of the experimental results will be presented, as well as future plans for studying plasma surface interactions and rf antenna plasma interactions. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  16. Transport modeling of the ORNL high intensity linear RF plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, L. W.; Peng, Y. K. M.; Canik, J. M.; Goulding, R. H.; Bonnin, X.

    2010-11-01

    Recent progress in the electrode-less helicon hydrogenic plasma sourceootnotetextR.H. Goulding, et al., Proc. 18th Conf on RF Power in Plasmas, Gent, Belgium, June, 2009. have motivated the development at ORNL of an RF-plasma source that magnetically links a helicon to a mirror cell in which the plasma is heated by EBW, ICH and whistler waves. The <4m long plasma column further includes a parallel transport region connected to a pumped target plate. Such a source is modeled at three levels using: a two-point model, a 1D-parallel Braginski's fluid model in which the plasma sources/sinks are computed using the kinetic Monte Carlo neutrals code DEGAS, and the 2D SOLPS code. The required source plasma parameters to achieve certain target plasma parameters, particularly at high plasma heat and particle fluxes, are found to be sensitive to the plasma and neutrals parameters in the helicon and RF mirror cells, the effective heating via various RF techniques, the plasma and neutrals boundary conditions at the target plates and around the RF-plasma heating zones, and the pumped reservoirs with partial backflow of thermal molecules. New results of this investigation will be reported.

  17. Improvement of a plasma uniformity of the 2nd ion source of KSTAR neutral beam injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, S. H.; Kim, T. S.; Lee, K. W.; Chang, D. H.; In, S. R.; Bae, Y. S.

    2014-02-01

    The 2nd ion source of KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) NBI (Neutral Beam Injector) had been developed and operated since last year. A calorimetric analysis revealed that the heat load of the back plate of the ion source is relatively higher than that of the 1st ion source of KSTAR NBI. The spatial plasma uniformity of the ion source is not good. Therefore, we intended to identify factors affecting the uniformity of a plasma density and improve it. We estimated the effects of a direction of filament current and a magnetic field configuration of the plasma generator on the plasma uniformity. We also verified that the operation conditions of an ion source could change a uniformity of the plasma density of an ion source.

  18. Improvement of a plasma uniformity of the 2nd ion source of KSTAR neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, S. H. Kim, T. S.; Lee, K. W.; Chang, D. H.; In, S. R.; Bae, Y. S.

    2014-02-15

    The 2nd ion source of KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) NBI (Neutral Beam Injector) had been developed and operated since last year. A calorimetric analysis revealed that the heat load of the back plate of the ion source is relatively higher than that of the 1st ion source of KSTAR NBI. The spatial plasma uniformity of the ion source is not good. Therefore, we intended to identify factors affecting the uniformity of a plasma density and improve it. We estimated the effects of a direction of filament current and a magnetic field configuration of the plasma generator on the plasma uniformity. We also verified that the operation conditions of an ion source could change a uniformity of the plasma density of an ion source.

  19. Improvement of a plasma uniformity of the 2nd ion source of KSTAR neutral beam injector.

    PubMed

    Jeong, S H; Kim, T S; Lee, K W; Chang, D H; In, S R; Bae, Y S

    2014-02-01

    The 2nd ion source of KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) NBI (Neutral Beam Injector) had been developed and operated since last year. A calorimetric analysis revealed that the heat load of the back plate of the ion source is relatively higher than that of the 1st ion source of KSTAR NBI. The spatial plasma uniformity of the ion source is not good. Therefore, we intended to identify factors affecting the uniformity of a plasma density and improve it. We estimated the effects of a direction of filament current and a magnetic field configuration of the plasma generator on the plasma uniformity. We also verified that the operation conditions of an ion source could change a uniformity of the plasma density of an ion source. PMID:24593593

  20. Dense Plasma Focus Fusion Neutron Sources Progress at NSTec, September 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, E. C.

    2011-07-02

    A number of dense plasma focus (DPF) sources are introduced, including their operating characteristics and current activities. Neutron resonance spectroscopy is discussed and the feasibility of using DPF for neutron sources is considered.

  1. Development challenges for Low Temperature Plasma Sources ``from Idea to Prototype''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerling, T.; Baudler, J.-S.; Horn, S.; Schmidt, M.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2015-09-01

    While plasma medicine is a well-motivated and intensively investigated topic, the requirements on the plasma sources change for individual applications. For example in dermatology, a large scale treatment is favored, while in dentistry, a localized application of plasma sources is required. Meanwhile, plasma source development is based on feasibility and not on the application. When a source is developed, it is usually motivated towards an application instead of considering an application and designing a plasma source to fit its needs. Each approach has its advantage and can lead to an advance in the field. With this contribution, we will present an approach from idea to prototype and show challenges in the plasma source development. For example, the consideration of legal regulations, adaption of the plasma source for a specific field of application and the interplay of gas flow dynamics with electrical field distribution. The solution was developed within several iterations to optimize it for different requirements. The obstacles that occurred during the development process will be highlighted and discussed. Afterwards the final source is characterized for a potential medical application and compared directly with a plasma source certified as a medical product. Acknowledging grants: AU 11 038; ESF/IV-BM-B35-0010/13.

  2. Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma: Sources and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napartovich, A. P.

    2008-07-01

    Non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure is an inherently unstable object. Nature of discharge plasma instabilities and conditions for observation of uniform non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure in different environments will be discussed. Various discharge techniques have been developed, which could support uniform non-thermal plasma with parameters varied in a wide range. Time limitation by plasma instabilities can be overcome by shortening pulse length or by restriction of plasma plug residence time with a fast gas flow. Discharge instabilities leading to formation of filaments or sparks are provoked by a positive feedback between the electric field and plasma density, while the counteracting process is plasma and thermal diffusion. With gas pressure growth the size of plasma fluctuation, which could be stabilized by diffusion, diminishes. As a result, to have long lived uniform plasma one should miniaturize discharge. There exist a number of active methods to organize negative feedback between the electric field and plasma density in order to suppress or, at least, delay the instability. Among them are ballast resistors in combination with electrode sectioning, reactive ballast, electronic feedback, and dielectric barrier across the electric current. The last methods are relevant for ac discharges. In the lecture an overview will be given of different discharge techniques scalable in pressure up to one atmosphere. The interest in this topic is dictated by a potential economic benefit from numerous non-thermal plasma technologies. The spectrum of non-thermal plasma applications is continuously broadening. An incomplete list of known applications includes: plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition, etching, polymerization, gas-phase synthesis, protective coating deposition, toxic and harmful gas decomposition, destruction of warfare agents, electromagnetic wave shielding, polymer surface modifications, gas laser excitation, odor control, plasma assisted

  3. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an equal mass plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Adak, Ashish; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2014-09-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in an inhomogeneous pair-ion plasma has been analyzed. Considering two fluid model for two species of ions (positive and negative), we obtain the possibility of the existence of RT instability. The growth rate of the RT instability as usual depends on gravity and density gradient scale length. The results are discussed in context of pair-ion plasma experiments.

  4. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry and the European Discovery of America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houk, R. S.

    2000-05-01

    The background and initial experimental results in inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are juxtaposed with similar events from the voyages of Christopher Columbus, particularly with the first voyage.

  5. MASS AND ENERGY OF ERUPTING SOLAR PLASMA OBSERVED WITH THE X-RAY TELESCOPE ON HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jin-Yi; Moon, Yong-Jae; Kim, Kap-Sung; Raymond, John C.; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2015-01-10

    We investigate seven eruptive plasma observations by Hinode/XRT. Their corresponding EUV and/or white light coronal mass ejection features are visible in some events. Five events are observed in several passbands in X-rays, which allows for the determination of the eruptive plasma temperature using a filter ratio method. We find that the isothermal temperatures vary from 1.6 to 10 MK. These temperatures are an average weighted toward higher temperature plasma. We determine the mass constraints of eruptive plasmas by assuming simplified geometrical structures of the plasma with isothermal plasma temperatures. This method provides an upper limit to the masses of the observed eruptive plasmas in X-ray passbands since any clumping causes the overestimation of the mass. For the other two events, we assume the temperatures are at the maximum temperature of the X-ray Telescope (XRT) temperature response function, which gives a lower limit of the masses. We find that the masses in XRT, ∼3 × 10{sup 13}-5 × 10{sup 14} g, are smaller in their upper limit than the total masses obtained by LASCO, ∼1 × 10{sup 15} g. In addition, we estimate the radiative loss, thermal conduction, thermal, and kinetic energies of the eruptive plasma in X-rays. For four events, we find that the thermal conduction timescales are much shorter than the duration of eruption. This result implies that additional heating during the eruption may be required to explain the plasma observations in X-rays for the four events.

  6. Microwave plasma source operating with atmospheric pressure air-water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarova, E.; Henriques, J. P.; Felizardo, E.; Lino da Silva, M.; Ferreira, C. M.; Gordiets, B.

    2012-11-01

    The overall performance of a surface wave driven air-water plasma source operating at atmospheric pressure and 2.45 GHz has been analyzed. A 1D model previously developed has been improved in order to describe in detail the creation and loss processes of active species of interest. This model provides a complete characterization of the axial structure of the source, including the discharge and the afterglow zones. The main electron creation channel was found to be the associative ionization process N + O → NO+ + e. The NO(X) relative density in the afterglow plasma jet ranges from 1.2% to 1.6% depending on power and water percentage, according to the model predictions and the measurements. Other types of species such as NO2 and nitrous acid HNO2 have also been detected by mass and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. The relative population density of O(3P) ground state atoms increases from 8% to 10% in the discharge zone when the input microwave power increases from 200 to 400 W and the water percentage from 1% to 10%. Furthermore, high densities of O2(a1Δg) singlet delta oxygen molecules and OH radicals (1% and 5%, respectively) can be achieved in the discharge zone. In the late afterglow the O2(a1Δg) density is about 0.1% of the total density. This plasma source has a flexible operation and potential for channeling the energy in ways that maximize the density of active species of interest.

  7. VUV Emission of Microwave Driven Argon Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriques, Julio; Espinho, Susana; Felizardo, Edgar; Tatarova, Elena; Dias, Francisco; Ferreira, Carlos

    2013-09-01

    An experimental and kinetic modeling investigation of a low-pressure (0.1-1.2 mbar), surface wave (2.45 GHz) induced Ar plasma as a source vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light is presented, using visible and VUV optical spectroscopy. The electron density and the relative VUV emission intensities of excited Ar atoms (at 104.8 nm and 106.6 nm) and ions (at 92.0 nm and 93.2 nm) were determined as a function of the microwave power and pressure. The experimental results were analyzed using a 2D self-consistent theoretical model based on a set of coupled equations including the electron Boltzmann equation, the rate balance equations for the most important electronic excited species and for charged particles, the gas thermal balance equation, and the wave electrodynamics. The principal collisional and radiative processes for neutral Ar(3p54s) and Ar(3p54p) and ionized Ar(3s3p6 2S1/2) levels are accounted for. Model predictions are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. This study was funded by the Foundation for Science and Technology, Portuguese Ministry of Education and Science, under the research contract PTDC/FIS/108411/2008.

  8. Operations manual for the plasma source ion implantation economics program

    SciTech Connect

    Bibeault, M.L.; Thayer, G.R.

    1995-10-01

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) is a surface modification technique for metal. PSIICOSTMODEL95 is an EXCEL-based program that estimates the cost for implementing a PSII system in a manufacturing setting where the number of parts to be processed is over 5,000 parts per day and the shape of each part does not change from day to day. Overall, the manufacturing process must be very well defined and should not change. This document is a self-contained manual for PSIICOSTMODEL95. It assumes the reader has some general knowledge of the technical requirements for PSII. Configuration of the PSII process versus design is used as the methodology in PSIICOSTMODEL95. The reason behind this is twofold. First, the design process cannot be programmed into a computer when the relationships between design variables are not understood. Second, the configuration methodology reduces the number of assumptions that must be programmed into our software. Misuse of results are less likely to occur if the user has fewer assumptions to understand.

  9. Some Rare Earth Elements Analysis by Microwave Plasma Torch Coupled with the Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiaohong; Jiang, Tao; Qi, Wenhao; Zuo, Jun; Yang, Meiling; Fei, Qiang; Xiao, Saijin; Yu, Aimin; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive mass spectrometric analysis method based on the microwave plasma technique is developed for the fast detection of trace rare earth elements (REEs) in aqueous solution. The plasma was produced from a microwave plasma torch (MPT) under atmospheric pressure and was used as ambient ion source of a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ). Water samples were directly pneumatically nebulized to flow into the plasma through the central tube of MPT. For some REEs, the generated composite ions were detected in both positive and negative ion modes and further characterized in tandem mass spectrometry. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) was at the level 0.1 ng/mL using MS2 procedure in negative mode. A single REE analysis can be completed within 2~3 minutes with the relative standard deviation ranging between 2.4% and 21.2% (six repeated measurements) for the 5 experimental runs. Moreover, the recovery rates of these REEs are between the range of 97.6%–122.1%. Two real samples have also been analyzed, including well and orange juice. These experimental data demonstrated that this method is a useful tool for the field analysis of REEs in water and can be used as an alternative supplement of ICP-MS. PMID:26421013

  10. Some Rare Earth Elements Analysis by Microwave Plasma Torch Coupled with the Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaohong; Jiang, Tao; Qi, Wenhao; Zuo, Jun; Yang, Meiling; Fei, Qiang; Xiao, Saijin; Yu, Aimin; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Huanwen

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive mass spectrometric analysis method based on the microwave plasma technique is developed for the fast detection of trace rare earth elements (REEs) in aqueous solution. The plasma was produced from a microwave plasma torch (MPT) under atmospheric pressure and was used as ambient ion source of a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ). Water samples were directly pneumatically nebulized to flow into the plasma through the central tube of MPT. For some REEs, the generated composite ions were detected in both positive and negative ion modes and further characterized in tandem mass spectrometry. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) was at the level 0.1 ng/mL using MS(2) procedure in negative mode. A single REE analysis can be completed within 2~3 minutes with the relative standard deviation ranging between 2.4% and 21.2% (six repeated measurements) for the 5 experimental runs. Moreover, the recovery rates of these REEs are between the range of 97.6%-122.1%. Two real samples have also been analyzed, including well and orange juice. These experimental data demonstrated that this method is a useful tool for the field analysis of REEs in water and can be used as an alternative supplement of ICP-MS. PMID:26421013

  11. Dependence of the source performance on plasma parameters at the BATMAN test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wimmer, C.; Fantz, U.

    2015-04-08

    The investigation of the dependence of the source performance (high j{sub H{sup −}}, low j{sub e}) for optimum Cs conditions on the plasma parameters at the BATMAN (Bavarian Test MAchine for Negative hydrogen ions) test facility is desirable in order to find key parameters for the operation of the source as well as to deepen the physical understanding. The most relevant source physics takes place in the extended boundary layer, which is the plasma layer with a thickness of several cm in front of the plasma grid: the production of H{sup −}, its transport through the plasma and its extraction, inevitably accompanied by the co-extraction of electrons. Hence, a link of the source performance with the plasma parameters in the extended boundary layer is expected. In order to characterize electron and negative hydrogen ion fluxes in the extended boundary layer, Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy and Langmuir probes have been applied for the measurement of the H{sup −} density and the determination of the plasma density, the plasma potential and the electron temperature, respectively. The plasma potential is of particular importance as it determines the sheath potential profile at the plasma grid: depending on the plasma grid bias relative to the plasma potential, a transition in the plasma sheath from an electron repelling to an electron attracting sheath takes place, influencing strongly the electron fraction of the bias current and thus the amount of co-extracted electrons. Dependencies of the source performance on the determined plasma parameters are presented for the comparison of two source pressures (0.6 Pa, 0.45 Pa) in hydrogen operation. The higher source pressure of 0.6 Pa is a standard point of operation at BATMAN with external magnets, whereas the lower pressure of 0.45 Pa is closer to the ITER requirements (p ≤ 0.3 Pa)

  12. Dependence of the source performance on plasma parameters at the BATMAN test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, C.; Fantz, U.

    2015-04-01

    The investigation of the dependence of the source performance (high jH-, low je) for optimum Cs conditions on the plasma parameters at the BATMAN (Bavarian Test MAchine for Negative hydrogen ions) test facility is desirable in order to find key parameters for the operation of the source as well as to deepen the physical understanding. The most relevant source physics takes place in the extended boundary layer, which is the plasma layer with a thickness of several cm in front of the plasma grid: the production of H-, its transport through the plasma and its extraction, inevitably accompanied by the co-extraction of electrons. Hence, a link of the source performance with the plasma parameters in the extended boundary layer is expected. In order to characterize electron and negative hydrogen ion fluxes in the extended boundary layer, Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy and Langmuir probes have been applied for the measurement of the H- density and the determination of the plasma density, the plasma potential and the electron temperature, respectively. The plasma potential is of particular importance as it determines the sheath potential profile at the plasma grid: depending on the plasma grid bias relative to the plasma potential, a transition in the plasma sheath from an electron repelling to an electron attracting sheath takes place, influencing strongly the electron fraction of the bias current and thus the amount of co-extracted electrons. Dependencies of the source performance on the determined plasma parameters are presented for the comparison of two source pressures (0.6 Pa, 0.45 Pa) in hydrogen operation. The higher source pressure of 0.6 Pa is a standard point of operation at BATMAN with external magnets, whereas the lower pressure of 0.45 Pa is closer to the ITER requirements (p ≤ 0.3 Pa).

  13. Studies for the Europagenic Plasma Source in Jupiter's Inner Magnetosphere during the Galileo Europa Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, William H.

    2004-01-01

    Progress in research to understand the three-dimensional nature of the Europagenic plasma torus is summarized. Efforts to improve the plasma torus description near Europa's orbit have included a better understanding of Europa's orbit and an improved description of the planetary magnetic field. New plasma torus chemistry for molecular and atomic species has been introduced and implemented in Europa neutral cloud models. Preliminary three-dimensional model calculations for Europa's neutral clouds and their plasma sources are presented.

  14. Characterisation of a micro-plasma for ambient mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Bowfield, Andrew; Bunch, Josephine; Salter, Tara L; Steven, Rory T; Gilmore, Ian S; Barrett, Dave A; Alexander, Morgan R; McKay, Kirsty; Bradley, James W

    2014-11-01

    Results are presented on the characterisation and optimisation of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure micro-plasma ion source used for ambient mass spectrometry imaging. The geometry of the experiment is optimised to produce the most intense and stable ion signals. Signal stabilities (relative standard deviation) of 2.3-6.5% are achieved for total ion current measurements from chromatograms. Parameters are utilised to achieve MS imaging by raster scanning of PTFE/glass samples with a spatial resolution of 147 ± 31 μm. A systematic study of resolution as a function of acquisition parameters was also undertaken to underpin future technique development. Mass spectra are obtained from PTFE/glass sample edges in negative ion mode and used to construct images to calculate the spatial resolution. Images are constructed using the intensity variation of the dominant ion observed in the PTFE spectrum. Mass spectra originating from the polymer are dominated by three series of ions in a m/z spectral window from 200-500 Da. These ions are each separated by 50 Da and have the chemical formula [C2F + [CF2]n](-), [CF + [CF2]n + O](-) and [CF + [CF2]n + O3](-). The mechanism for the generation of these ions appears to be a polymer chain scission followed by ionisation by atmospheric ion adduction. Positive and negative ion mode mass spectra of personal care products, amino acids and pharmaceuticals, dominated by the proton abstracted/protonated molecular ion, highlight the potential areas of application for such a device. Further to this end a mass spectral image of cardamom seeds, constructed using the variation in intensity of possible fragments of the 1,8-cineole molecule, is included to reveal the potential application to the imaging of foods and other biological materials. PMID:25142127

  15. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Hai-En; Wang, Xiaoming; Shaw, Joseph M.; Li, Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Downer, M. C.; Arefiev, Alexey V.; Zhang, Xi; Khudik, V.; Shvets, G.

    2015-02-15

    We present an in-depth experimental-computational study of the parameters necessary to optimize a tunable, quasi-monoenergetic, efficient, low-background Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the self-aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The main findings are (1) an LPA driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses produce not only a high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beam, but also a high-quality, relativistically intense (a{sub 0} ∼ 1) spent drive pulse that remains stable in profile and intensity over the LPA tuning range. (2) A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit retro-reflects the spent drive pulse efficiently into oncoming electrons to produce CBS x-rays without detectable bremsstrahlung background. Meanwhile, anomalous far-field divergence of the retro-reflected light demonstrates relativistic “denting” of the PM. Exploiting these optimized LPA and PM conditions, we demonstrate quasi-monoenergetic (50% FWHM energy spread), tunable (75–200 KeV) CBS x-rays, characteristics previously achieved only on more powerful laser systems by CBS of a split-off, counter-propagating pulse. Moreover, laser-to-x-ray photon conversion efficiency (∼6 × 10{sup −12}) exceeds that of any previous LPA-based quasi-monoenergetic Compton source. Particle-in-cell simulations agree well with the measurements.

  16. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology inmicrofabrications

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Lili

    2007-01-01

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 μm-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance (25

  17. Roles of a plasma grid in a negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Bacal, M.; Sasao, M.; Wada, M.; McAdams, R.

    2015-04-08

    The plasma grid is electrically biased with respect to other parts of source chamber wall in both volume sources and sources seeded with alkali metals. The roles of the plasma grid in these two kinds of sources will be described. The main functions of the plasma grid in volume sources are: optimizing the extracted negative ion current, reducing the co-extracted electron current, controlling the axial plasma potential profile, recycling the hydrogen atoms to molecules, concentrating the negative ions near its surface and, when biased positive, depleting the electron population near its surface. These functions are maintained in the sources seeded with alkali metals. However an additional function appears in the Cs seeded sources, namely direct emission of negative ions under positive ion and neutral hydrogen bombardment.

  18. Apparatus for coating a surface with a metal utilizing a plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Brown, I.G.; MacGill, R.A.; Galvin, J.E.

    1991-05-07

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for coating or layering a surface with a metal utilizing a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source. The apparatus includes a trigger mechanism for actuating the metal vacuum vapor arc plasma source in a pulsed mode at a predetermined rate. The surface or substrate to be coated or layered is supported in position with the plasma source in a vacuum chamber. The surface is electrically biased for a selected period of time during the pulsed mode of operation of the plasma source. Both the pulsing of the metal vapor vacuum arc plasma source and the electrical biasing of the surface are synchronized for selected periods of time. 10 figures.

  19. Plasma Heating Inside Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections by Alfvénic Fluctuations Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Chi; He, Jiansen; Zhang, Lingqian; Richardson, John D.; Belcher, John W.; Tu, Cui

    2016-11-01

    Nonlinear cascade of low-frequency Alfvénic fluctuations (AFs) is regarded as one of the candidate energy sources that heat plasma during the non-adiabatic expansion of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). However, AFs inside ICMEs were seldom reported in the literature. In this study, we investigate AFs inside ICMEs using observations from Voyager 2 between 1 and 6 au. It has been found that AFs with a high degree of Alfvénicity frequently occurred inside ICMEs for almost all of the identified ICMEs (30 out of 33 ICMEs) and for 12.6% of the ICME time interval. As ICMEs expand and move outward, the percentage of AF duration decays linearly in general. The occurrence rate of AFs inside ICMEs is much less than that in ambient solar wind, especially within 4.75 au. AFs inside ICMEs are more frequently presented in the center and at the boundaries of ICMEs. In addition, the proton temperature inside ICME has a similar “W”-shaped distribution. These findings suggest significant contribution of AFs on local plasma heating inside ICMEs.

  20. Thermodynamic Structure of Collision-Dominated Expanding Plasma: Heating of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Injections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Y.; Richardson, J. D.; Belcher, J. W.; Kasper, J. C.; Elliott, H. A.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic structure of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) using combined surveys of the ejecta between 0.3 and 20 AU. ICMEs are shown to have a moderate expansion in the solar wind compared with theoretical predictions. The expansion seems to be governed by a polytrope with gamma approx. 1.3 in this distance range. We find that Coulomb collisions are important contributors to the ion-ion equilibration process in the ICME plasma. The alpha-proton differential speed quickly drops to below 10 km/s due to strong Coulomb collisions. However, the two species of particles are far from thermal equilibrium with a temperature ratio T(sub alpha/T(sub p) = 4-6, suggestive of a preferential heating of alpha particles. The plasma heating rate as a function of heliocentric &stance required for the temperature profile is deduced by taking into account the expansion and energy transfer between protons and alphas via Coulomb collisions. The turbulence dissipation rate is also inferred from the inertial range power spectrum of magnetic fluctuations within ICMEs. Comparison of the turbulence dissipation rate with the required heating rate shows that turbulence dissipation seems sufficient to explain the ICME heating. Sources powering the turbulence are also investigated by examining the instabilities induced by temperature anisotropies and energy deposition by pickup ions.

  1. Comparison in the analytical performance between krypton and argon glow discharge plasmas as the excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2009-04-01

    The emission characteristics of ionic lines of nickel, cobalt, and vanadium were investigated when argon or krypton was employed as the plasma gas in glow discharge optical emission spectrometry. A dc Grimm-style lamp was employed as the excitation source. Detection limits of the ionic lines in each iron-matrix alloy sample were compared between the krypton and the argon plasmas. Particular intense ionic lines were observed in the emission spectra as a function of the discharge gas (krypton or argon), such as the Co II 258.033 nm for krypton and the Co II 231.707 nm for argon. The explanation for this is that collisions with the plasma gases dominantly populate particular excited levels of cobalt ion, which can receive the internal energy from each gas ion selectively, for example, the 3d(7)4p (3)G(5) (6.0201 eV) for krypton and the 3d(7)4p (3)G(4) (8.0779 eV) for argon. In the determination of nickel as well as cobalt in iron-matrix samples, more sensitive ionic lines could be found in the krypton plasma rather than the argon plasma. Detection limits in the krypton plasma were 0.0039 mass% Ni for the Ni II 230.299-nm line and 0.002 mass% Co for the Co II 258.033-nm line. However, in the determination of vanadium, the argon plasma had better analytical performance, giving a detection limit of 0.0023 mass% V for the V II 309.310-nm line.

  2. Mass- and energy-analyses of ions from plasma by means of a miniature Thomson spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowski, M. J.; Czaus, K.; Malinowski, K.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Zebrowski, J.

    2009-05-15

    The paper presents an improved version of a miniature mass-spectrometer of the Thomson-type, which has been adopted for ion analysis near the dense plasma region inside a vacuum chamber. Problems connected with the separation of ions from plasma streams are considered. Input diaphragms and pumping systems, needed to ensure good vacuum inside the analyzing region, are described. The application of the miniature Thomson-type analyzer is illustrated by ion parabolas recorded in plasma-focus facility and rod plasma injector experiment. A quantitative analysis of the recorded ion parabolas is presented. Factors influencing accuracy of the ion analysis are discussed and methods of the spectrometer calibration are described.

  3. Radiative decay of keV-mass sterile neutrinos in a strongly magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrynina, Alexandra A.; Mikheev, Nicolay V.; Raffelt, Georg G.

    2014-12-01

    The radiative decay of sterile neutrinos with typical masses of 10 keV is investigated in the presence of a strong magnetic field and degenerate plasma. A full account is taken of the strongly modified photon dispersion relation relative to vacuum. The limiting cases of relativistic and nonrelativistic plasma are analyzed. The decay rate in a strongly magnetized plasma as a function of the electron number density is compared with the unmagnetized case. We find that a strong magnetic field suppresses the catalyzing influence of the plasma on the decay rate.

  4. Plasma emission spectroscopy for operating and developing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) H{sup −} ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X. Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.

    2014-02-15

    A RF-driven, Cs-enhanced H{sup −} ion source feeds the SNS accelerator with a high current (typically >50 mA), ∼1.0 ms pulsed beam at 60 Hz. To achieve the persistent high current beam for several weeks long service cycles, each newly installed ion source undergoes a rigorous conditioning and cesiation processes. Plasma conditioning outgases the system and sputter-cleans the ion conversion surfaces. A cesiation process immediately following the plasma conditioning releases Cs to provide coverage on the ion conversion surfaces. The effectiveness of the ion source conditioning and cesiation is monitored with plasma emission spectroscopy using a high-sensitivity optical spectrometer. Plasma emission spectroscopy is also used to provide a means for diagnosing and confirming a failure of the insulating coating of the ion source RF antenna which is immersed in the plasma. Emissions of composition elements of the antenna coating material, Na emission being the most significant, drastically elevate to signal a failure when it happens. Plasma spectra of the developmental ion source with an AlN (aluminum nitrite) chamber and an external RF antenna are also briefly discussed.

  5. Marginal instability threshold condition of the aperiodic ordinary mode in equal-mass plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vafin, S.; Schlickeiser, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2014-10-15

    The purely growing ordinary (O) mode instability for counter-streaming bi-Maxwellian plasma particle distribution functions has recently received renewed attention due to its importance for the solar wind plasma. Here, the analytical marginal instability condition is derived for magnetized plasmas consisting of equal-mass charged particles, distributed in counter-streams with equal temperatures. The equal-mass composition assumption enormously facilitates the theoretical analysis due to the equality of the values of the electron and positron (positive and negative ion) plasma and gyrofrequencies. The existence of a new instability domain of the O-mode at small plasma beta values is confirmed, when the parallel counter-stream free energy exceeds the perpendicular bi-Maxwellian free energy.

  6. Identification of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections at 1 AU Using Multiple Solar Wind Plasma Composition Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the use of multiple simultaneous solar wind plasma compositional anomalies, relative to the composition of the ambient solar wind, for identifying interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) plasma. We first summarize the characteristics of several solar wind plasma composition signatures (O(+7)/O(+6), Mg/O, Ne/O, Fe charge states, He/p) observed by the ACE and WIND spacecraft within the ICMEs during 1996 - 2002 identsed by Cane and Richardson. We then develop a set of simple criteria that may be used to identify such compositional anomalies, and hence potential ICMEs. To distinguish these anomalies from the normal variations seen in ambient solar wind composition, which depend on the wind speed, we compare observed compositional signatures with those 'expected' in ambient solar wind with the same solar wind speed. This method identifies anomalies more effectively than the use of fixed thresholds. The occurrence rates of individual composition anomalies within ICMEs range from approx. 70% for enhanced iron and oxygen charge states to approx. 30% for enhanced He/p (> 0.06) and Ne/O, and are generally higher in magnetic clouds than other ICMEs. Intervals of multiple anomalies are usually associated with ICMEs, and provide a basis for the identification of the majority of ICMEs. We estimate that Cane and Richardson, who did not refer to composition data, probably identitied approx. 90% of the ICMEs present. However, around 10% of their ICMEs have weak compositional anomalies, suggesting that the presence of such signatures does not provide a necessary requirement for an ICME. We note a remarkably similar correlation between the Mg/O and O(7)/O(6) ratios in hourly-averaged data both within ICMEs and the ambient solar wind. This 'universal' relationship suggests that a similar process (such as minor ion heating by waves inside coronal magnetic field loops) produces the first-ionization potential bias and ion freezing-in temperatures in the source regions

  7. A biresonant plasma source based on a gapped linear microwave vibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Davydov, A. M.; Kossyi, I. A.; Arapov, K. A.; Chapkevich, A. A.

    2011-03-15

    The operating principle of a novel microwave plasma source-a linear microwave vibrator with a gap-is discussed. The source is placed on a microwave-transparent window of a chamber filled with a plasma-forming gas (argon or methane). The device operation is based on the combination of two resonances-geometric and plasma ones. The results of experimental tests of the source are presented. For a microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz, microwave power of {<=}1 kW, and plasma-forming gas pressure in the range 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2}-10{sup -1} Torr, the source is capable of filling the reactor volume with a plasma having an electron density of about 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3} and electron temperature of a few electronvolts.

  8. A plasma source driven predator-prey like mechanism as a potential cause of spiraling intermittencies in linear plasma devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiser, D.; Ohno, N.; Tanaka, H.; Vela, L.

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional global drift fluid simulations are carried out to analyze coherent plasma structures appearing in the NAGDIS-II linear device (nagoya divertor plasma Simulator-II). The numerical simulations reproduce several features of the intermittent spiraling structures observed, for instance, statistical properties, rotation frequency, and the frequency of plasma expulsion. The detailed inspection of the three-dimensional plasma dynamics allows to identify the key mechanism behind the formation of these intermittent events. The resistive coupling between electron pressure and parallel electric field in the plasma source region gives rise to a quasilinear predator-prey like dynamics where the axisymmetric mode represents the prey and the spiraling structure with low azimuthal mode number represents the predator. This interpretation is confirmed by a reduced one-dimensional quasilinear model derived on the basis of the findings in the full three-dimensional simulations. The dominant dynamics reveals certain similarities to the classical Lotka-Volterra cycle.

  9. A plasma source driven predator-prey like mechanism as a potential cause of spiraling intermittencies in linear plasma devices

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, D.; Ohno, N.; Tanaka, H.; Vela, L.

    2014-03-15

    Three-dimensional global drift fluid simulations are carried out to analyze coherent plasma structures appearing in the NAGDIS-II linear device (nagoya divertor plasma Simulator-II). The numerical simulations reproduce several features of the intermittent spiraling structures observed, for instance, statistical properties, rotation frequency, and the frequency of plasma expulsion. The detailed inspection of the three-dimensional plasma dynamics allows to identify the key mechanism behind the formation of these intermittent events. The resistive coupling between electron pressure and parallel electric field in the plasma source region gives rise to a quasilinear predator-prey like dynamics where the axisymmetric mode represents the prey and the spiraling structure with low azimuthal mode number represents the predator. This interpretation is confirmed by a reduced one-dimensional quasilinear model derived on the basis of the findings in the full three-dimensional simulations. The dominant dynamics reveals certain similarities to the classical Lotka-Volterra cycle.

  10. Plasma ignition and steady state simulations of the Linac4 H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Mattei, S. Lettry, J.; Grudiev, A.; Ohta, M.; Yasumoto, M.; Hatayama, A.

    2014-02-15

    The RF heating of the plasma in the Linac4 H{sup −} ion source has been simulated using a particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision method. This model is applied to investigate the plasma formation starting from an initial low electron density of 10{sup 12} m{sup −3} and its stabilization at 10{sup 18} m{sup −3}. The plasma discharge at low electron density is driven by the capacitive coupling with the electric field generated by the antenna, and as the electron density increases the capacitive electric field is shielded by the plasma and induction drives the plasma heating process. Plasma properties such as e{sup −}/ion densities and energies, sheath formation, and shielding effect are presented and provide insight to the plasma properties of the hydrogen plasma.

  11. Magnetic mirror trap with electron-cyclotron plasma heating as a source of multiply charged ions

    SciTech Connect

    Golovanivskii, K.S.

    1986-03-01

    This paper presents the physical operating principles of sources of multiply charged ions using electron cyclotron resonance. It is shown that the conditions that must be satisfied for multiple ionization are well matched to the conditions of effective plasma confinement in a magnetic mirror trap when a collision mode of confinement is provided. Plasma stability with hot electrons in the mirror magnetic trap and the mechanisms of plasma heating by highfrequency fields are analyzed. Two sources of multiply charged ions with ECR plasma heating are examined. Evaluations of the future of this area are given.

  12. Measurements of uranium mass confined in high density plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeffler, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    An X-ray absorption method for measuring the amount of uranium confined in high density, rf-heated uranium plasmas is described. A comparison of measured absorption of 8 keV X-rays with absorption calculated using Beer Law indicated that the method could be used to measure uranium densities from 3 times 10 to the 16th power atoms/cu cm to 5 times 10 to the 18th power atoms/cu cm. Tests were conducted to measure the density of uranium in an rf-heated argon plasma with UF6 infection and with the power to maintain the discharge supplied by a 1.2 MW rf induction heater facility. The uranium density was measured as the flow rate through the test chamber was varied. A maximum uranium density of 3.85 times 10 to the 17th power atoms/cu cm was measured.

  13. Develpoment of a one-meter plasma source for heavy ion beam chargeneutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry; Davidson, RonaldC.; Yu, Simon; Waldron, William; Logan, B. Grant

    2005-01-18

    Highly ionized plasmas are being employed as a medium for charge neutralizing heavy ion beams in order to focus to a small spot size. Calculations suggest that plasma at a density of 1-100 times the ion beam density and at a length {approx} 0.1-1 m would be suitable for achieving a high level of charge neutralization. A radio frequency (RF) source was constructed at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in support of the joint Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to study ion beam neutralization. Pulsing the source enabled operation at pressures {approx} 10{sup -6} Torr with plasma densities of 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. Near 100% ionization was achieved. The plasma was 10 cm in length, but future experiments require a source 1 m long. The RF source does not easily scale to the length. Consequently, large-volume plasma sources based upon ferroelectric ceramics are being considered. These sources have the advantage of being able to increase the length of the plasma and operate at low neutral pressures. The source will utilize the ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO{sub 3} to form metal plasma. A 1 m long section of the drift tube inner surface of NTX will be covered with ceramic. A high voltage ({approx} 1-5 kV) is applied between the drift tube and the front surface of the ceramic by placing a wire grid on the front surface. Plasma densities of 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3} and neutral pressures {approx} 10{sup -6} Torr are expected. A test stand to produce 20 cm long plasma is being constructed and will be tested before a 1 m long source is developed.

  14. Surface effects on the diagnostic of carbon/nitrogen low-pressure plasmas studied by differentially pumped mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alegre, Daniel; Ferreira, Jose A; Tabarés, Francisco L

    2014-05-01

    In this work, the characterization of the species produced in reactive plasmas by differentially pumped mass spectrometry is addressed. A H2/CH4/N2 mixture (90 : 5 : 5) was fed into a direct current glow discharge and analysed by conventional and cryo-trap assisted mass spectrometry. The gaseous mixture was chosen because of its particular relevance in the inhibition of tritium-rich carbon film deposition in fusion plasmas (scavenger technique) and in the deposition of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films by plasma-assisted chemical vapour deposition. Important changes in the composition of the detected species upon surface modification of the reactor walls (stainless steel or covered by an amorphous hydrogenated carbon layer) or in the way they are sampled (length and spatial configuration of the stainless steel duct) were detected. They are analysed in terms of radical formation and recombination on the reactor walls or into the sampling duct, thus providing some insight into the underlying chemistry. In general, when the reactor walls are covered by an amorphous hydrogenated carbon layer, more hydrocarbons are produced, but the radical production is lower and seem to be less reactive than in stainless steel. Also, two sources of oxygen contamination in the plasma have been identified, from the native oxide layer in stainless steel and from unintended water contamination in the chamber, which modify considerably the detected species. PMID:24809896

  15. Dropper for micron and submicron size powders for a plasma mass filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Eugene S.; Zweben, Stewart J.; Gueroult, Renaud; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Levinton, Fred

    2014-10-01

    The goal of the Plasma Mass Filter (PMF) experiment at PPPL, in collaboration with Nova Photonics, Inc., is to achieve separation between high-Z and low-Z atoms, for possible application to processing of nuclear waste to remove the highly radioactive high-Z components. The PMF features a rotating plasma column in which centrifugal forces push high-mass ions out of the plasma radially, while low-mass ions exit the plasma axially. In order to control the injection location, high-Z materials are introduced in powder form into the PMF plasma. The current experiment is limted to ~1 kW RF, giving a calculated maximum flow rate of ~0.1 mg/s. An electron temperature of a few eV and assumptions about the residence time of the dust particles in the PMF plasma limits the calculated maximum particle size to ~1 μm. While previous dusty plasma experiments have dealt with particles on the order of 2-3 μm, submicron particles are comparatively more difficult to manipulate under vacuum due to increased Van Der Waals and electrostatic forces. A powder dropper capable of reliably dropping micron and submicron-size particles at this flow rate is being developed, consisting of a mesh-bottomed container that is coupled to vibration motors. This work supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  16. Submarine mass failures as tsunami sources: their climate control.

    PubMed

    Tappin, D R

    2010-05-28

    Recent research on submarine mass failures (SMFs) shows that they are a source of hazardous tsunamis, with the tsunami magnitude mainly dependent on water depth of failure, SMF volume and failure mechanism, cohesive slump or fragmental landslide. A major control on the mechanism of SMFs is the sediment type, together with its post-depositional alteration. The type of sediment, fine- or coarse-grained, its rate of deposition together with post-depositional processes may all be influenced by climate. Post-depositional processes, termed sediment 'preconditioning', are known to promote instability and failure. Climate may also control the triggering of SMFs, for example through earthquake loading or cyclic loading from storm waves or tides. Instantaneous triggering by other mechanisms such as fluid overpressuring and hydrate instability is controversial, but is here considered unlikely. However, these mechanisms are known to promote sediment instability. SMFs occur in numerous environments, including the open continental shelf, submarine canyon/fan systems, fjords, active river deltas and convergent margins. In all these environments there is a latitudinal variation in the scale of SMFs. The database is limited, but the greatest climate influence appears to be in high latitudes where glacial/interglacial cyclicity has considerable control on sedimentation, preconditioning and triggering. Consideration of the different types of SMFs in the context of their climate controls provides additional insight into their potential hazard in sourcing tsunamis. For example, in the Atlantic, where SMFs are common, the tsunami hazard under the present-day climate may not be as great as their common occurrence suggests.

  17. Determining feeding state and rate of mass change in insectivorous bats using plasma metabolite analysis.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Liam P; Fenton, M Brock; Faure, Paul A; Guglielmo, Christopher G

    2009-01-01

    Insectivorous bats regularly experience dramatic and sometimes rapid changes in nutrient stores, yet our ability to study these changes has been limited by available techniques. Plasma metabolite analysis has proven effective for studying individual rates of mass change in birds but has not been validated for other taxa. We tested the effectiveness of plasma metabolite analysis by conducting a study with captive big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) and little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) in the field. In the lab, we varied food availability to induce various rates of mass change. As predicted, individual rate of mass change was positively correlated with plasma triglyceride concentration, but there was no relationship with plasma beta-hydroxybutyrate concentration, whereas such a relationship has been found in birds. In the field, we collected blood samples from postlactating females as they emerged in the evening (fasted) and when they returned from feeding in the morning. Plasma triglyceride concentration was greater in fed bats than fasted bats, and the increase was less when rain limited foraging. Contrary to predictions, beta-hydroxybutyrate concentration was also greater in fed bats than fasted bats. Analysis of plasma triglyceride concentration provides a technique for assessing individual feeding state and rate of mass change of bats and will facilitate further study of bat nutritional ecology and energetics.

  18. Plasma polymerization chemistry of unsaturated hydrocarbons: neutral species identification by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillon, X.; Houssiau, L.

    2014-08-01

    Radio frequency discharges ignited in low-pressure and pure hydrocarbon gases were investigated by mass spectrometry. The plasma process was applied to four unsaturated monomers: styrene C8H8, benzene C6H6, ethylene C2H4 and acetylene C2H2. The remote mass spectrometer location restricted species identification to neutral closed-shell molecules in their respective plasmas. Among the peaks in the mass spectra, those directly due to neutrals produced in the plasma were determined following a successful two-step methodology. Firstly, the use of low electron impact energy limited the fragmentation and strongly simplified the cracking patterns. Secondly, attribution of peaks directly due to neutrals was confirmed or ruled out by systematically measuring their appearance potential. In the case of styrene, not less than 48 new molecules were detected. The discussion of the observed stable by-products in each discharge suggested several radicals responsible for their production. Comparing the set of species among the four plasmas showed that the repeated addition of intermediates with one or two carbon atoms and with low H content dominated the chemistry. Under our conditions of intermediate to high W/FM (power over mass flow ratio), the gas-phase plasma polymerization then preferentially occurred through significant fragmentation and recombination. Finally, the measured appearance potentials during plasma provided estimation for the threshold ionization energy of several highly unsaturated hydrocarbons, useful for modeling.

  19. Tamped Exploding Wire as a Strongly-Coupled Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, T.; Workman, J.; Benage, J., Jr.; Kyrala, G.

    1998-11-01

    In the strongly-coupled plasma (SCP) regime (Γ >1), the coulomb interaction energy between particles is comparable or greater than their thermal energy. These characteristics inhibit most conventional diagnostic and experimental techniques. We present an innovative design for an experiment that provides good diagnostic access and the initial conditions of a SCP. A 3.5kJ pulsed-power driver has been constructed to explode a 200-micron aluminum wire tamped in lead glass. A 100-micron square slit assembly will then collimate the thermally expanding plasma; whereupon, the plasma plume will have a density of order one-tenth solid and a temperature near 1eV. Measurements of the plasma temperature will be made using an optical framing camera. The plasma will be spatially and temporally imaged using a laser-produced x-ray backlighter to provide information pertaining to density. Images will be recorded using both streak and x-ray CCD cameras. Initial results of measurements using these techniques will be presented along with a description of how this plasma will be used to make equation of state measurements in the SCP regime.

  20. Langmuir probe diagnostics of plasma in high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, P.; Kewlani, H.; Mishra, L.; Patil, D. S.; Mittal, K. C.

    2013-07-01

    A high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source has been developed for low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma generated in this proton ion source is performed using Langmuir probe. The diagnostics of plasma in the ion source is important as it determines beam parameters of the ion source, i.e., beam current, emittance, and available species. The plasma parameter measurement in the ion source is performed in continuously working and pulsed mode using hydrogen as plasma generation gas. The measurement is performed in the ECR zone for operating pressure and microwave power range of 10-4-10-3 mbar and 400-1000 W. An automated Langmuir probe diagnostics unit with data acquisition system is developed to measure these parameters. The diagnostics studies indicate that the plasma density and plasma electron temperature measured are in the range 5.6 × 1010 cm-3 to 3.8 × 1011 cm-3 and 4-14 eV, respectively. Using this plasma, ion beam current of tens of mA is extracted. The variations of plasma parameters with microwave power, gas pressure, and radial location of the probe have been studied.

  1. Langmuir probe diagnostics of plasma in high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, P.; Kewlani, H.; Mishra, L.; Mittal, K. C.; Patil, D. S.

    2013-07-15

    A high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source has been developed for low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma generated in this proton ion source is performed using Langmuir probe. The diagnostics of plasma in the ion source is important as it determines beam parameters of the ion source, i.e., beam current, emittance, and available species. The plasma parameter measurement in the ion source is performed in continuously working and pulsed mode using hydrogen as plasma generation gas. The measurement is performed in the ECR zone for operating pressure and microwave power range of 10{sup −4}–10{sup −3} mbar and 400–1000 W. An automated Langmuir probe diagnostics unit with data acquisition system is developed to measure these parameters. The diagnostics studies indicate that the plasma density and plasma electron temperature measured are in the range 5.6 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} to 3.8 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3} and 4–14 eV, respectively. Using this plasma, ion beam current of tens of mA is extracted. The variations of plasma parameters with microwave power, gas pressure, and radial location of the probe have been studied.

  2. Langmuir probe diagnostics of plasma in high current electron cyclotron resonance proton ion source.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, P; Kewlani, H; Mishra, L; Patil, D S; Mittal, K C

    2013-07-01

    A high current Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) proton ion source has been developed for low energy high intensity proton accelerator at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre. Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma generated in this proton ion source is performed using Langmuir probe. The diagnostics of plasma in the ion source is important as it determines beam parameters of the ion source, i.e., beam current, emittance, and available species. The plasma parameter measurement in the ion source is performed in continuously working and pulsed mode using hydrogen as plasma generation gas. The measurement is performed in the ECR zone for operating pressure and microwave power range of 10(-4)-10(-3) mbar and 400-1000 W. An automated Langmuir probe diagnostics unit with data acquisition system is developed to measure these parameters. The diagnostics studies indicate that the plasma density and plasma electron temperature measured are in the range 5.6 × 10(10) cm(-3) to 3.8 × 10(11) cm(-3) and 4-14 eV, respectively. Using this plasma, ion beam current of tens of mA is extracted. The variations of plasma parameters with microwave power, gas pressure, and radial location of the probe have been studied.

  3. 200-mm-diameter neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma etcher and silicon etching

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Tomohiro; Nukaga, Osamu; Ueki, Shinji; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Inamoto, Yoshimasa; Ohtake, Hiroto; Samukawa, Seiji

    2010-09-15

    The authors developed a neutral beam source consisting of a 200-mm-diameter inductively coupled plasma etcher and a graphite neutralization aperture plate based on the design of a neutral beam source that Samukawa et al. [Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., Part 2 40, L779 (2001)] developed. They measured flux and energy of neutral particles, ions, and photons using a silicon wafer with a thermocouple and a Faraday cup and calculated the neutralization efficiency. An Ar neutral beam flux of more than 1 mA/cm{sup 2} in equivalent current density and a neutralization efficiency of more than 99% were obtained. The spatial uniformity of the neutral beam flux was within {+-}6% within a 100 mm diameter. Silicon etching using a F{sub 2}-based neutral beam was done at an etch rate of about 47 nm/min, while Cl{sub 2}-based neutral beam realized completely no undercut. The uniformity of etch rate was less than {+-}5% within the area. The etch rate increased by applying bias power to the neutralization aperture plate, which shows that accelerated neutral beam was successfully obtained. These results indicate that the neutral beam source is scalable, making it possible to obtain a large-diameter and uniform neutral beam, which is inevitable for application to mass production.

  4. Optimizing laser produced plasmas for efficient extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sizyuk, Tatyana; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2014-08-15

    Photon sources produced by laser beams with moderate laser intensities, up to 10{sup 14 }W/cm{sup 2}, are being developed for many industrial applications. The performance requirements for high volume manufacture devices necessitate extensive experimental research supported by theoretical plasma analysis and modeling predictions. We simulated laser produced plasma sources currently being developed for several applications such as extreme ultraviolet lithography using 13.5% ± 1% nm bandwidth, possibly beyond extreme ultraviolet lithography using 6.× nm wavelengths, and water-window microscopy utilizing 2.48 nm (La-α) and 2.88 nm (He-α) emission. We comprehensively modeled plasma evolution from solid/liquid tin, gadolinium, and nitrogen targets as three promising materials for the above described sources, respectively. Results of our analysis for plasma characteristics during the entire course of plasma evolution showed the dependence of source conversion efficiency (CE), i.e., laser energy to photons at the desired wavelength, on plasma electron density gradient. Our results showed that utilizing laser intensities which produce hotter plasma than the optimum emission temperatures allows increasing CE for all considered sources that, however, restricted by the reabsorption processes around the main emission region and this restriction is especially actual for the 6.× nm sources.

  5. Monitoring Surface Condition of Plasma Grid of a Negative Hydrogen Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Kasuya, T.; Tokushige, S.; Kenmotsu, T.

    2011-09-26

    Surface condition of a plasma grid in a negative hydrogen ion source is controlled so as to maximize the beam current under a discharge operation with introducing Cs into the ion source. Photoelectric current induced by laser beams incident on the plasma grid can produce a signal to monitor the surface condition, but the signal detection can be easily hindered by plasma noise. Reduction in size of a detection electrode embedded in the plasma grid can improve signal-to-noise ratio of the photoelectric current from the electrode. To evaluate the feasibility of monitoring surface condition of a plasma gird by utilizing photoelectric effect, a small experimental setup capable of determining quantum yields of a surface in a cesiated plasma environment is being assembled. Some preliminary test results of the apparatus utilizing oxide cathodes are reported.

  6. Global Stability of Plasma Proteomes for Mass Spectrometry-Based Analyses*

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Li, Ming; Yarbrough, Wendell G.; Slebos, Robbert J. C.; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    Peptide-based mass spectrometry approaches, such as multiple reaction monitoring, provide a powerful means to measure candidate protein biomarkers in plasma. A potential confounding problem is the effect of preanalytical variables, which may affect the integrity of proteins and peptides. Although some blood proteins undergo rapid physiological proteolysis ex vivo, the stability of most plasma proteins to preanalytical variables remains largely unexplored. We applied liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry shotgun proteomics and multiple reaction monitoring analyses to characterize the stability of proteins at the peptide level in plasma. We systematically evaluated the effects of delay in plasma preparation at different temperatures, multiple freeze-thaw cycles and erythocyte hemolysis on peptide and protein inventories in prospectively collected human plasma. Time course studies indicated few significant changes in peptide and protein identifications, semitryptic peptides and methionine-oxidized peptides in plasma from blood collected in EDTA plasma tubes and stored for up to a week at 4 °C or room temperature prior to plasma isolation. Similarly, few significant changes were observed in similar analyses of plasma subjected to up to 25 freeze-thaw cycles. Hemolyzed samples produced no significant differences beyond the presence of hemoglobin proteins. Finally, paired comparisons of plasma and serum samples prepared from the same patients also yielded few significant differences, except for the depletion of fibrinogen in serum. Blood proteins thus are broadly stable to preanalytical variables when analyzed at the peptide level. Collection protocols to generate plasma for multiple reaction monitoring-based analyses may have different requirements than for other analyses directed at intact proteins. PMID:22301387

  7. Effective mass of holographic Brownian particle in rotating plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmaja, A. Nata; Kassim, H. Abu; Yusof, N.

    2015-04-01

    The dynamics of string fluctuations under a rotating Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole is studied using the method developed in Son and Teaney [J. High Energy Phys. 07 (2009) 021]. We compare our result with the one computed previously in Atmaja [J. High Energy Phys. 02 (2013) 021], using a different method as developed in de Boer et al. [J. High Energy Phys. 07 (2009) 094] for the case of a corotating string. The result supports the claim made in Atmaja [J. High Energy Phys. 02 (2013) 021] that the end of the string, which is identified as an external quark at the boundary, behaves as a Brownian particle with the mass is given by an effective mass parameter Meff equals to the zero-temperature mass of an external quark M0 times the cube of a Lorentz factor γ . Furthermore, we extend the computation to a higher dimensional rotating AdS black hole, where the metric is effectively asymptotic to AdS3 and the fluctuation is taken only along the corotating motion. It turns out that the effective mass of the external quark has a universal form of Meff=γ3M0 .

  8. Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, and chemical reactant sources

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C

    2013-11-26

    Combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor systems, chemical reactant sources, and related methods are disclosed. In one embodiment, a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor system comprising a reaction chamber, a combustion torch positioned to direct a flame into the reaction chamber, and one or more reactant feed assemblies configured to electrically energize at least one electrically conductive solid reactant structure to form a plasma and feed each electrically conductive solid reactant structure into the plasma to form at least one product is disclosed. In an additional embodiment, a chemical reactant source for a combustion flame-plasma hybrid reactor comprising an elongated electrically conductive reactant structure consisting essentially of at least one chemical reactant is disclosed. In further embodiments, methods of forming a chemical reactant source and methods of chemically converting at least one reactant into at least one product are disclosed.

  9. Short pulse, high power microwave radiation source with a laser-induced sheet plasma mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru

    2009-05-01

    We have demonstrated the short pulse, high power microwave radiation source using an ultraviolet laser-induced sheet plasma mirror in a gas-filled x-band rectangular waveguide from the conventional microwave sources and components. A laser-induced sheet plasma with an overdense plasma acts as a plasma mirror. The long pulse propagating in the gas-filled waveguide was sliced by the sheet plasma mirror at two different points along the waveguide. We observed about twice the power of the pulse by adding the two sliced microwave pulses produced by this scheme. A maximum peak power of 200 kW with a pulse duration of 10 ns (full width at half maximum) from the long microwave pulse source with a pulse duration of 0.8 mus was observed.

  10. Optimum plasma grid bias for a negative hydrogen ion source operation with Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacal, Marthe; Sasao, Mamiko; Wada, Motoi; McAdams, Roy

    2016-02-01

    The functions of a biased plasma grid of a negative hydrogen (H-) ion source for both pure volume and Cs seeded operations are reexamined. Proper control of the plasma grid bias in pure volume sources yields: enhancement of the extracted negative ion current, reduction of the co-extracted electron current, flattening of the spatial distribution of plasma potential across the filter magnetic field, change in recycling from hydrogen atomic/molecular ions to atomic/molecular neutrals, and enhanced concentration of H- ions near the plasma grid. These functions are maintained in the sources seeded with Cs with additional direct emission of negative ions under positive ion and neutral hydrogen bombardment onto the plasma electrode.

  11. Electrospray mass spectrometry with controlled in-source atomization (ERIAD) as a promising elemental method: evaluation of analytical features.

    PubMed

    Gall, L N; Fomina, N S; Giles, R; Masukevich, S V; Beliaeva, O A; Gall, N R

    2015-01-01

    Electrospray ionization with controlled in-source fragmentation and atomization (ERIAD) is promising method for mass-spectrometric elemental analysis. This paper concerns the main analytical features and necessary instrumentation for ERIAD. The method is shown to be effective for more than 70 elements of the periodic table: those that present as cations in a water solution. It shows a high absolute sensitivity with a low spread from Li to U, and a detection limit of tens of parts per trillion. The soft ionization used results in the absence of plasma chemical reaction products, typical for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and the spectra are nearly free from interferences. The method does not require a high resolution and can be used for samples with an artificial isotopic content. The method is essentially valid for radiochemistry and metallomics, as it has the possibility to combine measurements of chemical, elemental, and even isotopic content simultaneously. PMID:26307716

  12. Mass Spectrometry of 3D-printed plastic parts under plasma and radiative heat environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, W. F.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Bates, E. M.; Birmingham, W.; Takeno, J.; Knop, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present the design and preliminary results of a mass spectrometry system used to assess vacuum compatibility of 3D-printed parts, developed at the Dusty Plasma Laboratory of the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). A decrease in outgassing was observed when electroplated parts were inserted in the test chamber vs. non electroplated ones. Outgassing will also be tested under different environments such as plasma and radiative heat. Heat will be generated by a titanium getter pump placed inside a 90 degree elbow, such that titanium does not coat the part. A mirror inside the elbow will be used to throttle the heat arriving at the part. Plasma exposure of 3D printed parts will be achieved by placing the parts in a separate chamber connected to the spectrometer by a vacuum line that is differentially pumped. The signals from the mass spectrometer will be analyzed to see how the vacuum conditions fluctuate under different plasma discharges.

  13. Characterization of an atmospheric pressure air plasma source for polymer surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shujun; Tang, Jiansheng

    2013-10-01

    An atmospheric pressure air plasma source was generated through dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). It was used to modify polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) surfaces with very high throughput. An equivalent circuit model was used to calculate the peak average electron density. The emission spectrum from the plasma was taken and the main peaks in the spectrum were identified. The ozone density in the down plasma region was estimated by Absorption Spectroscopy. NSF and ARC-ODU

  14. Modeling of Localized Neutral Particle Sources in 3D Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M V; Rognlien, T D; Fenstermacher, M E; Borchardt, M; Mutzke, A; Riemann, J; Schneider, R; Owen, L W

    2002-05-23

    A new edge plasma code BoRiS [1] has a fully 3D fluid plasma model. We supplement BoRiS with a 3D fluid neutral model including equations for parallel momentum and collisional perpendicular diffusion. This makes BoRiS an integrated plasma-neutral model suitable for a variety of applications. We present modeling results for a localized gas source in the geometry of the NCSX stellarator.

  15. MASS-REMOVAL AND MASS-FLUX-REDUCTION BEHAVIOR FOR IDEALIZED SOURCE ZONES WITH HYDRAULICALLY POORLY-ACCESSIBLE IMMISCIBLE LIQUID

    SciTech Connect

    Brusseau, M. L.; Difilippo, Erica L.; marble, justin C.; Oostrom, Mart

    2008-04-01

    A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to investigate aqueous dissolution and mass-removal behavior for systems wherein immiscible liquid was non-uniformly distributed in physically heterogeneous source zones. The study focused specifically on characterizing the relationship between mass flux reduction and mass removal for systems for which immiscible liquid is poorly accessible to flowing water. Two idealized scenarios were examined, one wherein immiscible liquid at residual saturation exists within a lower-permeability unit residing in a higher-permeability matrix, and one wherein immiscible liquid at higher saturation (a pool) exists within a higher-permeability unit adjacent to a lower-permeability unit. The results showed that significant reductions in mass flux occurred at relatively moderate mass-removal fractions for all systems. Conversely, minimalmass flux reduction occurred until a relatively large fraction of mass (>80%) was removed for the control experiment, which was designed to exhibit ideal mass removal. In general, mass flux reduction was observed to follow an approximately one-to-one relationship with mass removal. Two methods for estimating mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal behavior, one based on system-indicator parameters (ganglia-to-pool ratio) and the other a simple mass-removal function, were used to evaluate the measured data. The results of this study illustrate the impact of poorly accessible immiscible liquid on mass-removal and mass-flux processes, and the difficulties posed for estimating mass-flux-reduction/mass-removal behavior.

  16. Improving low-level plasma protein mass spectrometry-based detection for candidate biomarker discovery and validation

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Jason S.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-09-01

    Methods. To improve the detection of low abundance protein candidate biomarker discovery and validation, particularly in complex biological fluids such as blood plasma, increased sensitivity is desired using mass spectrometry (MS)-based instrumentation. A key current limitation on the sensitivity of electrospray ionization (ESI) MS is due to the fact that many sample molecules in solution are never ionized, and the vast majority of the ions that are created are lost during transmission from atmospheric pressure to the low pressure region of the mass analyzer. Two key technologies, multi-nanoelectrospray emitters and the electrodynamic ion funnel have recently been developed and refined at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to greatly improve the ionization and transmission efficiency of ESI MS based analyses. Multi-emitter based ESI enables the flow from a single source (typically a liquid chromatography [LC] column) to be divided among an array of emitters (Figure 1). The flow rate delivered to each emitter is thus reduced, allowing the well-documented benefits of nanoelectrospray 1 for both sensitivity and quantitation to be realized for higher flow rate separations. To complement the increased ionization efficiency afforded by multi-ESI, tandem electrodynamic ion funnels have also been developed at PNNL, and shown to greatly improve ion transmission efficiency in the ion source interface.2, 3 These technologies have been integrated into a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer for multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) of probable biomarker candidates in blood plasma and show promise for the identification of new species even at low level concentrations.

  17. Use of a remote plasma source for CVD chamber clean and exhaust gas abatement applications

    SciTech Connect

    Holber, W.; Chen, X.; Smith, D.; Besen, M.

    1999-07-01

    Remote plasma sources have traditionally been used in semiconductor processing applications such as dry removal of photoresist, where the capability of delivering a large flux of atomic oxygen into a semiconductor process chamber, with little of the associated plasma used to dissociate the oxygen, has made them attractive. With the development of fluorine-compatible remote plasma sources, a range of new application opportunities has opened up. In remote cleaning of CVD chambers, the remote plasma source is positioned before the process chamber, and a stream of atomic fluorine from the source is flowed into the chamber, where it can effectively clean a wide variety of materials such as SiO{sub 2}, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and W. The cleaning process is purely chemical, with no associated in-situ plasma which can cause degradation of the process chamber. In exhaust gas abatement, the remote plasma source is located between the outlet of the etch or deposition process chamber and the mechanical pump. By adding appropriate gases, the exhaust stream from the chamber can be converted to form which can be managed more readily. Using a robust toroidal plasma source design, the ASTRON{trademark} remote plasma source has been used to address both of these areas. As an atomic fluorine source, over the typical operating range of 2--10 Torr several SLM of gases such as NF{sub 3} can be fully dissociated. As an exhaust gas abatement device, with operating pressure in the 0.1--1.0 Torr regime, abatement of perfluorocompounds (PFC's) at greater than 95% levels has been demonstrated. Using a variety of techniques--FTIR, RGA, and sample etching--the operation of this source technology and issues such as transport of atomic fluorine over substantial distances has been investigated.

  18. Counter-facing plasma focus system as an efficient and long-pulse EUV light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwabara, H.; Hayashi, K.; Kuroda, Y.; Nose, H.; Hotozuka, K.; Nakajima, M.; Horioka, K.

    2011-04-01

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial plasma guns is proposed as a long-pulse and efficient EUV light source. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrated that with an assist of breakdown and outer electrode connections, current sheets evolved into a configuration for stable plasma confinement at the center of the electrode. The current sheets could successively compress and confine the high energy density plasma every half period of the discharge current, enabling highly repetitive light emissions in extreme ultraviolet region with time duration in at least ten microseconds for Xe plasma. Also, we confirmed operations of our system for Li plasma. We estimated the highest EUV energy in Li plasma operation at 93mJ/4π sr per 2% bandwidth per pulse.

  19. Injection of auxiliary electrons for increasing the plasma density in highly charged and high intensity ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odorici, F.; Malferrari, L.; Montanari, A.; Rizzoli, R.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Neri, L.

    2016-02-01

    Different electron guns based on cold- or hot-cathode technologies have been developed since 2009 at INFN for operating within ECR plasma chambers as sources of auxiliary electrons, with the aim of boosting the source performances by means of a higher plasma lifetime and density. Their application to microwave discharge ion sources, where plasma is not confined, has required an improvement of the gun design, in order to "screen" the cathode from the plasma particles. Experimental tests carried out on a plasma reactor show a boost of the plasma density, ranging from 10% to 90% when the electron guns are used, as explained by plasma diffusion models.

  20. Injection of auxiliary electrons for increasing the plasma density in highly charged and high intensity ion sources.

    PubMed

    Odorici, F; Malferrari, L; Montanari, A; Rizzoli, R; Mascali, D; Castro, G; Celona, L; Gammino, S; Neri, L

    2016-02-01

    Different electron guns based on cold- or hot-cathode technologies have been developed since 2009 at INFN for operating within ECR plasma chambers as sources of auxiliary electrons, with the aim of boosting the source performances by means of a higher plasma lifetime and density. Their application to microwave discharge ion sources, where plasma is not confined, has required an improvement of the gun design, in order to "screen" the cathode from the plasma particles. Experimental tests carried out on a plasma reactor show a boost of the plasma density, ranging from 10% to 90% when the electron guns are used, as explained by plasma diffusion models.

  1. Initial Operation of the PhIX High Intensity Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, J. B. O.; Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Bigelow, T. S.; Diem, S. J.; Pesavento, P. V.; Rapp, J.; Shaw, G. C.

    2013-10-01

    The Physics Integration eXperiment (PhIX) is a linear high-intensity rf plasma source that combines a high-density helicon plasma generator with an electron heating section. It is being used to study the physics of heating over-dense plasmas in a linear configuration, as well as exploring source interactions with a downstream target. The helicon plasma is produced by coupling 13.56 MHz rf power at levels up to 100 kW. Microwaves at 18 GHz are coupled to the electrons in the over-dense helicon plasma via whistler waves and Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW). An energy analyzer embedded in the target substrate is being used to determine the ion energy and ion flux at the target, while a microwave interferometer and Langmuir probes are used to determine plasma parameters near the source and near the target. High plasma densities have been produced in He (>5 × 1019/m3) and H (>1.5 × 1019/m3) , and operation in magnetic field strengths up to 0.5T has been demonstrated. Details of the experimental results will be presented, as well as future plans for studying plasma surface interactions and rf antenna plasma interactions. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  2. Monte Carlo estimates of edge particle sources in TJ-II plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Bruna, D.; Popov, Tsv; de la Cal, E.

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional calculations of the electron source in plasmas of the TJ-II stellarator (Madrid, Spain) are performed using the Monte Carlo code EIRENE. When possible, the results are compared with diagnostic measurements in equivalent coordinates. Examples are shown for the Hα light evolution during a plasma collapse, CX fluxes, neutrals distributions along diagnostic chords and line radiation emissivities.

  3. Development of ion source for simulation of edge localized mode in divertor plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Daibo, A. Okamoto, A.; Takahashi, H.; Kumagai, T.; Takahashi, T.; Tsubota, S.; Kitajima, S.

    2014-02-15

    A helium ion beam is injected into a linear plasma device for the development of an ion beam source simulating high energy particle flux in divertor plasma. Beam current density more than 10 mA/cm{sup 2} is extracted. Measurement of beam currents indicates that the beam is transported along the linear device and reaches to the downstream end plate.

  4. Characterization of plasma parameters, first beam results, and status of electron cyclotron resonance source

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, S. K.; Jain, Akhilesh; Hannurkar, P. R.; Kotaiah, S.

    2007-05-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source at 50 keV, 30 mA proton current has been designed, fabricated, and assembled. Its plasma study has been done. Plasma chamber was excited with 350 W of microwave power at 2450 MHz, along with nitrogen and hydrogen gases. Microwave power was fed to the plasma chamber through waveguide. Plasma density and electron temperature were studied under various operating conditions, such as magnetic field, gas pressure, and transversal distance. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current-voltage variation. The nitrogen plasma density calculated was approximately 4.5x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}, and electron temperatures of 3-10 eV (cold) and 45-85 eV (hot) were obtained. The total ion beam current of 2.5 mA was extracted, with two-electrode extraction geometry, at 15 keV beam energy. The optimization of the source is under progress to extract 30 mA proton beam current at 50 keV beam energy, using three-electrode extraction geometry. This source will be used as an injector to continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 100 MeV proton linac. The required root-mean-square normalized beam emittance is less than 0.2{pi} mm mrad. This article presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and status of ECR proton source.

  5. Characterization of plasma parameters, first beam results, and status of electron cyclotron resonance source.

    PubMed

    Jain, S K; Jain, Akhilesh; Hannurkar, P R; Kotaiah, S

    2007-05-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source at 50 keV, 30 mA proton current has been designed, fabricated, and assembled. Its plasma study has been done. Plasma chamber was excited with 350 W of microwave power at 2450 MHz, along with nitrogen and hydrogen gases. Microwave power was fed to the plasma chamber through waveguide. Plasma density and electron temperature were studied under various operating conditions, such as magnetic field, gas pressure, and transversal distance. Langmuir probe was used for plasma characterization using current-voltage variation. The nitrogen plasma density calculated was approximately 4.5 x 10(11) cm(-3), and electron temperatures of 3-10 eV (cold) and 45-85 eV (hot) were obtained. The total ion beam current of 2.5 mA was extracted, with two-electrode extraction geometry, at 15 keV beam energy. The optimization of the source is under progress to extract 30 mA proton beam current at 50 keV beam energy, using three-electrode extraction geometry. This source will be used as an injector to continuous wave radio frequency quadrupole, a part of 100 MeV proton linac. The required root-mean-square normalized beam emittance is less than 0.2pi mm mrad. This article presents the study of plasma parameters, first beam results, and status of ECR proton source.

  6. Plasma diagnostics approach to welding heat source/molten pool interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Key, J.F.; McIlwain, M.E.; Isaacson, L.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma diagnostic techniques show that weld fusion zone profile and loss of metal vapors from the molten pool are strongly dependent on both the intensity and distribution of the heat source. These plasma properties, are functions of cathode vertex angle and thermal conductivity of the shielding gas, especially near the anode.

  7. Ion heating and short wavelength fluctuations in a helicon plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scime, E. E.; Carr, J.; Galante, M.; Magee, R. M.; Hardin, R.

    2013-03-01

    For typical helicon source parameters, the driving antenna can couple to two plasma modes; the weakly damped "helicon" wave, and the strongly damped, short wavelength, slow wave. Here, we present direct measurements, obtained with two different techniques, of few hundred kHz, short wavelength fluctuations that are parametrically driven by the primary antenna and localized to the edge of the plasma. The short wavelength fluctuations appear for plasma source parameters such that the driving frequency is approximately equal to the lower hybrid frequency. Measurements of the steady-state ion temperature and fluctuation amplitude radial profiles suggest that the anomalously high ion temperatures observed at the edge of helicon sources result from damping of the short wavelength fluctuations. Additional measurements of the time evolution of the ion temperature and fluctuation profiles in pulsed helicon source plasmas support the same conclusion.

  8. Multimodal Vacuum-Assisted Plasma Ion (VaPI) Source with Transmission Mode and Laser Ablation Sampling Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keelor, Joel D.; Farnsworth, Paul B.; Weber, Arthur L.; Abbott-Lyon, Heather; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a multimodal ion source design that can be configured on the fly for various analysis modes, designed for more efficient and reproducible sampling at the mass spectrometer atmospheric pressure (AP) interface in a number of different applications. This vacuum-assisted plasma ionization (VaPI) source features interchangeable transmission mode and laser ablation sampling geometries. Operating in both AC and DC power regimes with similar results, the ion source was optimized for parameters including helium flow rate and gas temperature using transmission mode to analyze volatile standards and drug tablets. Using laser ablation, matrix effects were studied, and the source was used to monitor the products of model prebiotic synthetic reactions.

  9. Multimodal Vacuum-Assisted Plasma Ion (VaPI) Source with Transmission Mode and Laser Ablation Sampling Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Keelor, Joel D; Farnsworth, Paul B; L Weber, Arthur; Abbott-Lyon, Heather; Fernández, Facundo M

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a multimodal ion source design that can be configured on the fly for various analysis modes, designed for more efficient and reproducible sampling at the mass spectrometer atmospheric pressure (AP) interface in a number of different applications. This vacuum-assisted plasma ionization (VaPI) source features interchangeable transmission mode and laser ablation sampling geometries. Operating in both AC and DC power regimes with similar results, the ion source was optimized for parameters including helium flow rate and gas temperature using transmission mode to analyze volatile standards and drug tablets. Using laser ablation, matrix effects were studied, and the source was used to monitor the products of model prebiotic synthetic reactions. PMID:26883531

  10. Investigation of large-area multicoil inductively coupled plasma sources using three-dimensional fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brcka, Jozef

    2016-07-01

    A multi inductively coupled plasma (ICP) system can be used to maintain the plasma uniformity and increase the area processed by a high-density plasma. This article presents a source in two different configurations. The distributed planar multi ICP (DM-ICP) source comprises individual ICP sources that are not overlapped and produce plasma independently. Mutual coupling of the ICPs may affect the distribution of the produced plasma. The integrated multicoil ICP (IMC-ICP) source consists of four low-inductance ICP antennas that are superimposed in an azimuthal manner. The identical geometry of the ICP coils was assumed in this work. Both configurations have highly asymmetric components. A three-dimensional (3D) plasma model of the multicoil ICP configurations with asymmetric features is used to investigate the plasma characteristics in a large chamber and the operation of the sources in inert and reactive gases. The feasibility of the computational calculation, the speed, and the computational resources of the coupled multiphysics solver are investigated in the framework of a large realistic geometry and complex reaction processes. It was determined that additional variables can be used to control large-area plasmas. Both configurations can form a plasma, that azimuthally moves in a controlled manner, the so-called “sweeping mode” (SM) or “polyphase mode” (PPM), and thus they have the potential for large-area and high-density plasma applications. The operation in the azimuthal mode has the potential to adjust the plasma distribution, the reaction chemistry, and increase or modulate the production of the radicals. The intrinsic asymmetry of the individual coils and their combined operation were investigated within a source assembly primarily in argon and CO gases. Limited investigations were also performed on operation in CH4 gas. The plasma parameters and the resulting chemistry are affected by the geometrical relation between individual antennas. The aim of

  11. Quantitative determination of nebivolol from human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nandania, Jatin; Rajput, S J; Contractor, Pritesh; Vasava, Pragnesh; Solanki, Bhavik; Vohra, Mohsin

    2013-04-01

    In the present work, a rapid, sensitive, specific, precise and accurate liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for determination of nebivolol in human plasma was developed and validated with a large calibration curve range (50-5000 pg/mL) which can be used for routine drug analysis and bioequivalence studies. Liquid-liquid extraction method was used to extract the analyte from the human plasma. The separation was achieved using Waters symmetry, C18, 4.6 × 150 mm, 5 μm column with formic acid in water, 0.01%, v/v: Acetonitrile (40:60) as a mobile phase. A flow rate of 0.8 mL/min, no splitting and run time 2.00 min was used for the chromatographic analysis of nebivolol. Sensitivity of this method was found to be 30 pg/mL. The analyte was analyzed by mass spectrometry in the multiple reaction monitoring mode. A Turbo-Ion spray source was interfaced between the HPLC and triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (MDS Sciex API 4000). The precursor-product ion m/z 406.00-151.00 for nebivolol and m/z 410.20-151.00 for nebivolol-D4 were used for quantification of an analyte and its IS. The method was validated in terms of accuracy, precision, selectivity, absolute recovery, freeze-thaw stability, bench-top stability, dry extract stability, short and long term stock solution stability, wet extract stability and re-injection reproducibility. The within- and between-batch accuracy was found to lie within the range of 87.00-100.40% and within- and between-batch precision was obtained within the range 0.33-8.67%. The mean recovery of all three concentration levels for drug was obtained 67.67% where as the mean recovery of IS was 68.74%. The %RSD value at higher concentration and lower concentration in all stability experiments was within 15%. This method is free from ion suppression, ion enhancement and any type of abnormal ionization.

  12. Spatial distribution of the plasma parameters in the RF negative ion source prototype for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lishev, S.; Schiesko, L.; Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.

    2015-04-08

    A numerical model, based on the fluid plasma theory, has been used for description of the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters (electron density and temperature, plasma potential as well as densities of the three types of positive hydrogen ions) in the IPP prototype RF negative hydrogen ion source. The model covers the driver and the expansion plasma region of the source with their actual size and accounts for the presence of the magnetic filter field with its actual value and location as well as for the bias potential applied to the plasma grid. The obtained results show that without a magnetic filter the two 2D geometries considered, respectively, with an axial symmetry and a planar one, represent accurately the complex 3D structure of the source. The 2D model with a planar symmetry (where the E×B and diamagnetic drifts could be involved in the description) has been used for analysis of the influence, via the charged-particle and electron-energy fluxes, of the magnetic filter and of the bias potential on the spatial structure of the plasma parameters in the source. Benchmarking of results from the code to experimental data shows that the model reproduces the general trend in the axial behavior of the plasma parameters in the source.

  13. Spatial distribution of the plasma parameters in the RF negative ion source prototype for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lishev, S.; Schiesko, L.; Wünderlich, D.; Fantz, U.

    2015-04-01

    A numerical model, based on the fluid plasma theory, has been used for description of the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters (electron density and temperature, plasma potential as well as densities of the three types of positive hydrogen ions) in the IPP prototype RF negative hydrogen ion source. The model covers the driver and the expansion plasma region of the source with their actual size and accounts for the presence of the magnetic filter field with its actual value and location as well as for the bias potential applied to the plasma grid. The obtained results show that without a magnetic filter the two 2D geometries considered, respectively, with an axial symmetry and a planar one, represent accurately the complex 3D structure of the source. The 2D model with a planar symmetry (where the E×B and diamagnetic drifts could be involved in the description) has been used for analysis of the influence, via the charged-particle and electron-energy fluxes, of the magnetic filter and of the bias potential on the spatial structure of the plasma parameters in the source. Benchmarking of results from the code to experimental data shows that the model reproduces the general trend in the axial behavior of the plasma parameters in the source.

  14. Evaluation of Inductively Couple Plasma-time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry for Laser Ablation Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Bajic; D.B. Aeschliman; D.P. Baldwin; R.S. Houk

    2003-09-30

    The purpose of this trip to LECO Corporation was to test the non-matrix matched calibration method and the principal component analysis (PCA) method on a laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-time of flight mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-TOFMS) system. An LA-ICP-TOFMS system allows for multielement single-shot analysis as well as spatial analysis on small samples, because the TOFMS acquires an entire mass spectrum for all ions extracted simultaneously from the ICP. The TOFMS system differs from the double-focusing mass spectrometer, on which the above methods were developed, by having lower sensitivity and lower mass resolution.

  15. IMPULSIVE ACCELERATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. I. STATISTICS AND CORONAL MASS EJECTION SOURCE REGION CHARACTERISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Bein, B. M.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Temmer, M.; Muhr, N.; Kienreich, I.; Utz, D.

    2011-09-10

    We use high time cadence images acquired by the STEREO EUVI and COR instruments to study the evolution of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) from their initiation through impulsive acceleration to the propagation phase. For a set of 95 CMEs we derived detailed height, velocity, and acceleration profiles and statistically analyzed characteristic CME parameters: peak acceleration, peak velocity, acceleration duration, initiation height, height at peak velocity, height at peak acceleration, and size of the CME source region. The CME peak accelerations we derived range from 20 to 6800 m s{sup -2} and are inversely correlated with the acceleration duration and the height at peak acceleration. Seventy-four percent of the events reach their peak acceleration at heights below 0.5 R{sub sun}. CMEs that originate from compact sources low in the corona are more impulsive and reach higher peak accelerations at smaller heights. These findings can be explained by the Lorentz force, which drives the CME accelerations and decreases with height and CME size.

  16. Effects of Mass Flow Rate on the Thermal-Flow Characteristics of Microwave CO2 Plasma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Na, Young-Ho; Uhm, Han-Sup; Kim, Youn-Jea

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the thermal-flow characteristics of atmospheric pressure microwave CO2 plasma were numerically investigated by simulation. The electric and gas flow fields in the reaction chamber with a microwave axial injection torch operated at 2.45 GHz were simulated. The microwave launcher had the standard rectangular waveguide WR340 geometry. The simulation was performed by using the COMSOL Multiphysics plasma model with various mass flow rates of CO2. The electric fields, temperature profiles and the density of electrons were graphically depicted for different CO2 inlet mass flow rates. PMID:26413663

  17. Effects of Mass Flow Rate on the Thermal-Flow Characteristics of Microwave CO2 Plasma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang-Ki; Na, Young-Ho; Uhm, Han-Sup; Kim, Youn-Jea

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the thermal-flow characteristics of atmospheric pressure microwave CO2 plasma were numerically investigated by simulation. The electric and gas flow fields in the reaction chamber with a microwave axial injection torch operated at 2.45 GHz were simulated. The microwave launcher had the standard rectangular waveguide WR340 geometry. The simulation was performed by using the COMSOL Multiphysics plasma model with various mass flow rates of CO2. The electric fields, temperature profiles and the density of electrons were graphically depicted for different CO2 inlet mass flow rates.

  18. Influence of Ambient Plasmas to the Field Dynamics of Laser Driven Mass-Limited Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Schnuerer, M.; Sokollik, T.; Steinke, S.; Nickles, P. V.; Sandner, W.; Toncian, T.; Amin, M.; Willi, O.; Andreev, A. A.

    2010-02-02

    Dilute plasmas surrounding mass-limited targets provide sufficient current for influencing strong fields, which are built up due to the interaction of an intense and ultrafast laser pulse. Such situation occurs, where evaporation of the target surface is present. The high-intensity laser pulse interacts with the quasi-isolated mass-limited target and the spatial wings of the intensity distribution account for ionization of the ambient plasma. A fast change of strong electrical fields following intense laser irradiation of water droplets (16 micron diameter) has been measured with proton imaging. An analytical model explains charge transport accounting for the observation.

  19. A solar powered handheld plasma source for microbial decontamination applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Y.; Lynch, M. J.; Modic, M.; Whalley, R. D.; Walsh, J. L.

    2016-09-01

    A fully portable atmospheric pressure air plasma system is reported to be suitable for the microbial decontamination of both surfaces and liquids. The device operates in quiescent air, and includes an integrated battery which is charged from a solar cell and weighs less than 750 g, making it highly amenable for a wide variety of applications beyond the laboratory. Using particle imaging velocimetry to visualise air flows around the device, the geometric configuration of the plasma generating electrodes was enhanced to induce a gas flow on the order of 0.5 m s‑1 directed towards a sample placed downstream, thus improving the transport of plasma generated reactive species to the sample. The microbial decontamination efficiency of the system was assessed using potable water samples inoculated with common waterborne organisms Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The reduction in the number of microorganisms was found to be in the range of 2–8 log and was strongly dependent on the plasma generation conditions.

  20. Air spark-like plasma source for antimicrobial NOx generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovich, M. J.; Ono, T.; Galleher, C.; Curtis, B.; Clark, D. S.; Machala, Z.; Graves, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate and analyse the generation of nitrogen oxides and their antimicrobial efficacy using atmospheric air spark-like plasmas. Spark-like discharges in air in a 1 L confined volume are shown to generate NOx at an initial rate of about 1.5  ×  1016 NOx molecules/J dissipated in the plasma. Such a discharge operating in this confined volume generates on the order of 6000 ppm NOx in 10 min. Around 90% of the NOx is in the form of NO2 after several minutes of operation in the confined volume, suggesting that NO2 is the dominant antimicrobial component. The strong antimicrobial action of the NOx mixture after several minutes of plasma operation is demonstrated by measuring rates of E. coli disinfection on surfaces and in water exposed to the NOx mixture. Some possible applications of plasma generation of NOx (perhaps followed by dissolution in water) include disinfection of surfaces, skin or wound antisepsis, and sterilization of medical instruments at or near room temperature.

  1. A solar powered handheld plasma source for microbial decontamination applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Y.; Lynch, M. J.; Modic, M.; Whalley, R. D.; Walsh, J. L.

    2016-09-01

    A fully portable atmospheric pressure air plasma system is reported to be suitable for the microbial decontamination of both surfaces and liquids. The device operates in quiescent air, and includes an integrated battery which is charged from a solar cell and weighs less than 750 g, making it highly amenable for a wide variety of applications beyond the laboratory. Using particle imaging velocimetry to visualise air flows around the device, the geometric configuration of the plasma generating electrodes was enhanced to induce a gas flow on the order of 0.5 m s-1 directed towards a sample placed downstream, thus improving the transport of plasma generated reactive species to the sample. The microbial decontamination efficiency of the system was assessed using potable water samples inoculated with common waterborne organisms Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The reduction in the number of microorganisms was found to be in the range of 2-8 log and was strongly dependent on the plasma generation conditions.

  2. Exploding Aluminum Wire as a Strongly-Coupled Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, Thomas; Benage, John; Byrd, Karen; Evans, Scott; Kyrala, George; Scarberry, Richard; Workman, Jonathan

    1999-11-01

    Low temperature ( ~ 1 eV), high density ( ne ~ 10^21 cm-3) plasmas are called Strongly-Coupled Plasmas (SCP) when the coulombic interaction energy exceeds the thermal energy. Conventional diagnostic techniques are inadequate for high-precision measurements in SCPs; however, our novel diagnostic design provides high-resolution measurements. A 3.5kJ Marx Bank electrically explodes radially tamped 160-micron aluminum wires. A 100-micron square slit assembly collimates the thermally expanding plasma to create a shaped plume of 1/10th solid density near one eV, satisfying SCP conditions. Two-color self-emission recorded by a framing camera gives the spatial and temporal profiles as well as the blackbody temperature. The absorption of a laser-produced x-ray backlighter (Ti Kα, 4.75 keV) with a high-spatial resolution x-ray microscope provides density measurements. These diagnostic techniques characterize the initial conditions of the thermally expanding plasma plume, which will be used to measure the equation of state (EOS) of a SCP. Preliminary EOS measurements will be provided, if available.

  3. Supersonic Argon Flow In An Arc Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect

    Izrar, B.; Dudeck, M.; Andre, P.; Elchinger, M. F.; Aubreton, J.

    2006-01-15

    The plasma properties inside a D.C. arc-jet operating with argon is analysed by means of a continuum description taking into account non equilibrium ionization processes and dissipative effects. The relaxation of the different physical processes inside the nozzle and the evolution of the Mach number are aanalysed.

  4. Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Perdian, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

  5. Genesis of focused ion beams for plasma nanotechnology using a bounded microwave plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Paul, Samit

    2015-01-01

    Bounded plasmas exhibit many interesting properties that are not found in plasmas of “infinite” extent such as space and astrophysical plasmas. Our studies have revealed that the dispersion properties of waves in a bounded magnetoplasma deviates considerably from the predictions of the Clemmow-Mullaly-Allis (CMA) model, giving rise to new regimes of wave propagation and absorption. This article highlights some of these interesting effects observed in experiments. One of the principal outcomes of this research is the genesis of a novel multielement focused ion beam (MEFIB) system that utilizes compact bounded plasmas in a minimum-B field to provide intense focused ion beams of a variety of elements for plasma-based nanotechnology.

  6. Development and evaluation of high resolution quadrupole mass analyzer and an inductively coupled plasma-Mach disk

    SciTech Connect

    Amad, Ma'an Hazem

    1999-12-10

    By definition a plasma is an electrically conducting gaseous mixture containing a significant concentration of cations and electrons. The Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) is an electrodeless discharge in a gas at atmospheric pressure. This discharge is an excellent one for vaporizing, atomizing, and ionizing elements. The early development of the ICP began in 1942 by Babat and then by Reed in the early 1960s. This was then followed by the pioneering work of Fassel and coworkers in the late 1960s. Commercial ICP spectrometers were introduced in the mid 1970s. A major breakthrough in the area of ICP took place in the early 1980s when the ICP was shown to be an excellent ion source for mass spectrometry.

  7. Ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry using a liquid sampling-atmospheric glow discharge (LS-APGD) ionization source.

    PubMed

    Marcus, R Kenneth; Burdette, Carolyn Q; Manard, Benjamin T; Zhang, Lynn X

    2013-10-01

    A novel approach to ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (ADI-MS) is described, based on a recently developed liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) ionization source. The device is essentially unmodified relative to its implementation in elemental mass spectrometry, where the operational space is characterized by low operation power (<10 W) and low solution delivery rates (<50 μL min(-1)). In this implementation, the plasma is produced between a Ni anode and an electrolytic liquid (1 M HNO3) cathode flowing through a glass capillary that is angled towards the sample surface, at a distance of ~2 mm away. Analyte species can be desorbed/ionized from neat solution residues and complex solid samples. The ADI-LS-APGD source is mounted onto the source interface of a Thermo Finnigan LCQ Advantage Max quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer without modifications to the instrument faceplate or ion optics. Described here is the initial evaluation of the roles of source geometry and working parameters, including electrolytic solution composition and plasma current, on the response of caffeine residues, with preliminary limits of detection based on the relative standard deviation of the spectral background suggested to be on the 10-pg level. Demonstrative spectra are presented for green tea extracts and raw leaves, coffee beans, a dried (raw) tobacco leaf, an analgesic tablet, and paper currency. Versatility is further revealed through the determination of components in common cigarette smoke. In each case, the spectra are characterized by (M + H)(+) species of the expected constituents. The capacity for a single source to perform both in solution and particulate elemental analysis (as shown previously) and ADI of molecular species is unique in the realm of mass spectrometry.

  8. Application of a Plasma Mass Separator to Advanced LWR Spent Fuel Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, Richard; Miller, Robert; Papay, Larry; Wagoner, John; Ahlfeld, Charles; Czerwinski, Ken

    2006-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is investigating spent fuel reprocessing for the purposes of increasing the effective capacity of a deep geological repository, reducing the radiotoxicity of waste placed in the repository and conserving nuclear fuel resources. DOE is considering hydro-chemical processing of the spent fuel after cutting the fuel cladding and fuel dissolution in nitric acid. The front end process, known as UREX, is largely based on the PUREX process and extracts U, Tc as well as fission product gases. A number of additional processing steps have become known as UREX+. One of the steps includes a further chemical treatment of remove Cs and Sr to reduce repository heat load. Other steps include successive extraction of the actinides from residual fission products, including the lanthanides. The additional UREX+ processing renders the actinides suitable for burning as reactor fuel in an advanced reactor to convert actinides to shorter-lived fission products and to produce power. New methods for separating groups of elements by their atomic mass have been developed and can be exploited to enhance spent fuel reprocessing. These physical processes dry the waste streams so that they can be vaporized and singly ionized in plasma that is contained in longitudinal magnetic and perpendicular electric fields. Proper configuration of the fields causes the plasma to rapidly rotate and expel heavier mass ions at the center of the machine. Lower mass ions form closed orbits within the cylindrical plasma column and are transported to either end of the machine. This plasma mass separator was originally developed to reduce the mass of material that must be immobilized in borosilicate glass from DOE defense waste at former weapons production facilities. The plasma mass separator appears to be well-suited for processing the UREX raffinate and solids streams by exploiting the large atomic mass gap that exists between lanthanides (< {approx}180 amu) and actinides

  9. Spatio-temporal behavior of microwave sheath-voltage combination plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Satyananda; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-05-01

    Microwave sheath-Voltage combination Plasma (MVP) is a high density plasma source and can be used as a suitable plasma processing device (e.g., ionized physical vapor deposition). In the present report, the spatio-temporal behavior of an argon MVP sustained along a direct-current biased Ti rod is investigated. Two plasma modes are observed, one is an "oxidized state" (OS) at the early time of the microwave plasma and the other is "ionized sputter state" (ISS) at the later times. Transition of the plasma from OS to ISS results a prominent change in the visible color of the plasma, resulting from a significant increase in the plasma density, as measured by a Langmuir probe. In the OS, plasma is dominated by Ar ions, and the density is in amplitude order of 1011 cm-3. In the ISS, metal ions from the Ti rod contribute significantly to the ion composition, and higher density plasma (1012 cm-3) is produced. Nearly uniform high density plasma along the length of the Ti rod is produced at very low input microwave powers (around 30 W). Optical emission spectroscopy measurements confirm the presence of sputtered Ti ions and Ti neutrals in the ISS.

  10. Plasma Measurement of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source for New Materials Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kiyokatsu; Uchida, Takashi; Minezaki, Hidekazu; Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Asaji, Toyohisa; Muramatsu, Masayuki; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Kato, Yushi; Yoshida, Yoshikazu

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) has been designed and developed for a synthesis of new materials such as endohedral metallofullerenes. The plasma chamber diameter is 140 mm in order to produce large m/q ions, like singly charged C60 ions effectively. In this study, we examined the performance of our ECRIS by plasma measurements using a Langmuir probe. The plasma density increased with increasing Ar pressure and reached to 6.1×1017 m-3 at a pressure of 5.0×10-3 Pa. The plasma was produced over a large volume compared with conventional ECRISs.

  11. Characteristics of plasma grid bias in large-scaled negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kisaki, M.; Tsumori, K.; Ikeda, K.; Nakano, H.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.

    2014-02-15

    The electron density was measured at various bias voltages to understand how the plasma grid bias affects the electron near the plasma grid in large-scaled negative ion sources. It was found that the response of the electron to the bias voltage changes depending on negative ion production processes. The electron density remarkably decreases with increasing the bias voltage in the pure-volume plasma. On the other hand, the electron density depends on the bias voltage weakly in the Cs-seeded plasma. In addition, it was observed that the response of the co-extracted electron current to the bias voltage has similar trend to that of the electron density.

  12. Fundamental design problems and properties of microwave plasma/ion sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Root, J.; Rogers, J.; Asmussen, J.; Hawley, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    Design problems and procedures associated with microwave plasma sources are applied to cylindrical plasmas inside coaxial and cylindrical cavities. The experimental performance of these cavities is presented. Measurements of electron density and electron temperature for several inert gases, and different tube diameters and pressures are presented and compared with microwave and positive column discharge theories. Results show that plasmas with electron densities in excess of 10 to the 12th/cu cm are easily produced from microwave S band energy. The potential for these sources for ion engines is evaluated.

  13. Measurement of the Internal Magnetic Field of Plasmas using an Alpha Particle Source

    SciTech Connect

    S.J. Zweben; D.S. Darrow; P.W. Ross; J.L. Lowrance; G. Renda

    2004-05-13

    The internal magnetic fields of plasmas can be measured under certain conditions from the integrated v x B deflection of MeV alpha particles emitted by a small radioactive source. This alpha source and large-area alpha particle detector would be located inside the vacuum vessel but outside the plasma. Alphas with a typical energy of 5.5 MeV (241Am) can reach the center of almost all laboratory plasmas and magnetic fusion devices, so this method can potentially determine the q(r) profile of tokamaks or STs. Orbit calculations, background evaluations, and conceptual designs for such a vxB (or ''AVB'') detector are described.

  14. Narrow bandwidth Thomson photon source development using Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, C. G. R.; Steinke, S.; Tsai, H.-E.; Rykovanov, S. G.; Vay, J.-L.; Bonatto, A.; Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-11-01

    Compact, high-quality photon sources at MeV energies are being developed based on Laser-Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). Simulations are presented on production of controllable narrow bandwidth sources using the beam and plasma capabilities of LPAs. An independent scattering laser, combined with appropriate pulse shaping and laser guiding is important to realize high photon yield. Plasma optics are described to tailor beam divergence in cm-scale distances, reducing photon source bandwidth. The LPA can further be used to de-accelerate the electron beam after photon production to reduce undesired radiation. Combination of laser driven and beam driven deceleration is presented to reduce residual beam energy, as is important for a laboratory or field operable source. Design of experiments and laser capabilities to combine these elements will be presented, towards a compact photon source system.

  15. Negative ion production in the RF multiaperture surface-plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Abdrashitov, G.; Belchenko, Yu. Dranichnikov, A.; Gorbovsky, A.; Kapitonov, V.; Kolmogorov, V.; Kondakov, A.; Konstantinov, S.; Sanin, A.; Selivanov, A.; Selivanov, P.; Shikhovtsev, I.; Stupishin, N.; Tiunov, M.; Ivanov, A.; Sotnikov, O.; Binderbauer, M.; Putvinski, S.; Smirnov, A.; Sevier, L.

    2015-04-08

    The experiments on negative hydrogen ion beam production in a multi-aperture long-pulse surface-plasma source are described. H- ions are produced on the surface of a plasma grid covered by cesium and illuminated by fast plasma particles. The source uses a radio-frequency driver to generate plasma. A composite magnet system made of external permanent magnets confines and filters electrons in the plasma region, and deflects them in the extraction area. A multiaperture, multi-electrode ion optical system is used for beam formation. The electrode heating and cooling during long pulses is accomplished by circulating a heat transfer fluid through channels drilled in the electrodes bodies. H- ions extraction through a single aperture and 21 apertures was performed and studied. A stable H- beam with the current up to 0.7 A, energy up to 74 kV, and pulse duration up to 7 s was routinely obtained.

  16. Some consequences to ion source behavior of high plasma drift velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I. G.; Monteiro, O. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.; Keidar, M.; Oks, E. M.; Vizir, A.

    2000-02-01

    We consider the case of energetic ion beam formation when the ion streaming velocity within the source plasma is substantial, i.e., when the ions have a drift speed (in the positive downstream direction) that is on the order of or greater than the ion acoustic speed in the plasma. Some interesting consequences can follow, including the capability of a negatively biased substrate located in the plasma stream to maintain high bias voltage, and of an ion source with no extractor or ''conventionally poor'' extractor providing a kind of plasma immersion ion implantation mode of operation. Here we summarize the kind of plasma geometry in which this situation can occur, and describe some experimental observations we've made of these effects, with reference to a simple theoretical basis for the mechanism. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Iron-Isotopic Fractionation Studies Using Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Zhang, C.; Barling, J.; Roe, J. E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    The importance of Fe biogeochemistry has stimulated interest in Fe isotope fractionation. Recent studies using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) and a "double spike" demonstrate the existence of biogenic Fe isotope effects. Here, we assess the utility of multiple-collector inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry(MC-ICP-MS) with a desolvating sample introduction system for Fe isotope studies, and present data on Fe biominerals produced by a thermophilic bacterium. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Investigations into the origins of polyatomic ions in inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Sally M.

    2010-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) is an elemental analytical instrument capable of determining nearly all elements in the periodic table at limits of detection in the parts per quadrillion and with a linear analytical range over 8-10 orders of magnitude. Three concentric quartz tubes make up the plasma torch. Argon gas is spiraled through the outer tube and generates the plasma powered by a looped load coil operating at 27.1 or 40.6 MHz. The argon flow of the middle channel is used to keep the plasma above the innermost tube through which solid or aqueous sample is carried in a third argon stream. A sample is progressively desolvated, atomized and ionized. The torch is operated at atmospheric pressure. To reach the reduced pressures of mass spectrometers, ions are extracted through a series of two, approximately one millimeter wide, circular apertures set in water cooled metal cones. The space between the cones is evacuated to approximately one torr. The space behind the second cone is pumped down to, or near to, the pressure needed for the mass spectrometer (MS). The first cone, called the sampler, is placed directly in the plasma plume and its position is adjusted to the point where atomic ions are most abundant. The hot plasma gas expands through the sampler orifice and in this expansion is placed the second cone, called the skimmer. After the skimmer traditional MS designs are employed, i.e. quadrupoles, magnetic sectors, time-of-flight. ICP-MS is the leading trace element analysis technique. One of its weaknesses are polyatomic ions. This dissertation has added to the fundamental understanding of some of these polyatomic ions, their origins and behavior. Although mainly continuing the work of others, certain novel approaches have been introduced here. Chapter 2 includes the first reported efforts to include high temperature corrections to the partition functions of the polyatomic ions in ICP-MS. This and other objections to preceeding

  19. Permanent Magnet Ecr Plasma Source With Magnetic Field Optimization

    DOEpatents

    Doughty, Frank C.; Spencer, John E.

    2000-12-19

    In a plasma-producing device, an optimized magnet field for electron cyclotron resonance plasma generation is provided by a shaped pole piece. The shaped pole piece adjusts spacing between the magnet and the resonance zone, creates a convex or concave resonance zone, and decreases stray fields between the resonance zone and the workpiece. For a cylindrical permanent magnet, the pole piece includes a disk adjacent the magnet together with an annular cylindrical sidewall structure axially aligned with the magnet and extending from the base around the permanent magnet. The pole piece directs magnetic field lines into the resonance zone, moving the resonance zone further from the face of the magnet. Additional permanent magnets or magnet arrays may be utilized to control field contours on a local scale. Rather than a permeable material, the sidewall structure may be composed of an annular cylindrical magnetic material having a polarity opposite that of the permanent magnet, creating convex regions in the resonance zone. An annular disk-shaped recurve section at the end of the sidewall structure forms magnetic mirrors keeping the plasma off the pole piece. A recurve section composed of magnetic material having a radial polarity forms convex regions and/or magnetic mirrors within the resonance zone.

  20. Pulsed microdischarge with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for elemental analysis on solid metal samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Weifeng; Yin, Zhibin; Cheng, Xiaoling; Hang, Wei; Li, Jianfeng; Huang, Benli

    2015-05-01

    Pulsed microdischarge employed as source for direct solid analysis was investigated in N2 environment at atmospheric pressure. Compared with direct current (DC) microdischarge, it exhibits advantages with respect to the ablation and emission of the sample. Comprehensive evidence, including voltage-current relationship, current density (j), and electron density (ne), suggests that pulsed microdischarge is in the arc regime while DC microdischarge belongs to glow. Capability in ablating metal samples demonstrates that pulsed microdischarge is a viable option for direct solid sampling because of the enhanced instantaneous energy. Using optical spectrometer, only common emission lines of N2 can be acquired in DC mode, whereas primary atomic and ionic lines of the sample are obtained in the case of pulsed mode. Calculations show a significant difference in N2 vibrational temperatures between DC and pulsed microdischarge. Combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), pulsed microdischarge exhibits much better performances in calibration linearity and limits of detection (LOD) than those of DC discharge in direct analysis of samples of different matrices. To improve transmission efficiency, a mixture of Ar and N2 was employed as discharge gas as well as carrier gas in follow-up experiments, facilitating that LODs of most elements reached ng/g. PMID:25851038

  1. Energy and Mass Transport of Magnetospheric Plasmas during the November 2003 Magnetic Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Chging; Moore, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Intensive energy and mass transport from the solar wind across the magnetosphere boundary is a trigger of magnetic storms. The storm on 20-21 November 2003 was elicited by a high-speed solar wind and strong southward component of interplanetary magnetic field. This storm attained a minimum Dst of -422 nT. During the storm, some of the solar wind particles enter the magnetosphere and eventually become part of the ring current. At the same time, the fierce solar wind powers strong outflow of H+ and O+ from the ionosphere, as well as from the plasmasphere. We examine the contribution of plasmas from the solar wind, ionosphere and plasmasphere to the storm-time ring current. Our simulation shows, for this particular storm, ionospheric O+ and solar wind ions are the major sources of the ring current particles. The polar wind and plasmaspheric H+ have only minor impacts. In the storm main phase, the strong penetration of solar wind electric field pushes ions from the geosynchronous orbit to L shells of 2 and below. Ring current is greatly intensified during the earthward transport and produces a large magnetic depression in the surface field. When the convection subsides, the deep penetrating ions experience strong charge exchange loss, causing rapid decay of the ring current and fast initial storm recovery. Our simulation reproduces very well the storm development indicated by the Dst index.

  2. Water Masses and Nutrient Sources to the Gulf of Maine

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, David W.; Pettigrew, Neal R.; Thomas, Maura A.; Neary, Mark G.; McGillicuddy, Dennis J.; O’Donnell, James

    2016-01-01

    The Gulf of Maine, a semi-enclosed basin on the continental shelf of the northwest Atlantic Ocean, is fed by surface and deep water flows from outside the Gulf: Scotian Shelf Water from the Nova Scotian shelf that enters the Gulf at the surface, and Slope Water that enters at depth and along the bottom through the Northeast Channel. There are two types of Slope Water, Labrador Slope Water (LSW) and Warm Slope Water (WSW); it is these deep water masses that are the major source of dissolved inorganic nutrients to the Gulf. It has been known for some time that the volume inflow of Slope Waters of either type that enters the Gulf of Maine is variable, that it co-varies with the magnitude of inflowing Scotian Shelf Water, and that periods of greater inflows of Scotian Shelf Water have become more frequent in recent years, accompanied by reduced Slope Water inflows. We present here analyses of a ten-year record of data collected by moored sensors in Jordan Basin, in the interior Gulf of Maine, and in the Northeast Channel, along with recent and historical hydrographic and nutrient data, that help reveal the nature of Scotian Shelf Water and Slope Water inflows. Proportional inflows of nutrient-rich Slope Waters and nutrient-poor Scotian Shelf Waters alternate episodically with one another on time scales of months to several years, creating a variable nutrient field upon which the biological productivities of the Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank depend. Unlike decades past, the inflows of Slope Waters of either type do not appear to be correlated with the North Atlantic Oscillation, which had been shown earlier to influence the relative proportions of the two Slope Waters, WSW and LSW, that enter the Gulf. We suggest that of greater importance in recent years are more frequent, episodic influxes of colder, fresher, less dense, and low-nutrient Scotian Shelf Water into the Gulf of Maine, and concomitant reductions in the inflow of deep, nutrient-rich Slope Waters. We also

  3. Analysis of plasma dynamics of a negative ion source based on probe measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, M.; Tanga, A.; Falter, H.D.; Franzen, P.; Heinemann, B.; Holtum, D.; Kraus, W.; Lackner, K.; McNeely, P.; Riedl, R.; Speth, E.; Wilhelm, R.

    2004-10-15

    Measurements and analysis of the plasma flow in an ion source made for negative ion extraction are reported in this article. The plasma flow has been measured using a Mach probe having two orthogonal probe heads. The plasma flow along the axis is driven by the electron pressure gradient, dragging along the ions via a measured ambipolar electric field against the collisional drag on the background gas. The force on the ions created by the electric field is mainly balanced by the collisional drag force. The collision between the ions and the background gas creates a pressure gradient along the flow direction. The one-dimensional plasma dynamic analysis supports the consistency of the experimental observations. The presence of a transverse magnetic filter reduces the plasma flow velocity, which could affect the negative ion production on the cesiated grid surface. A simple analysis shows that a strong plasma flow could enhance the surface production of negative ions.

  4. Developpement et utilisation de sources de plasma pour steriliser des instruments medicaux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollak, Jerome

    Advances in plasma sterilization of medical devices (MDs) are dependent upon both the development of plasma sources adapted to the processing of these MDs, and upon the understanding of the inactivation mechanisms of microorganisms. The main objectives of this thesis were, on the one hand, to develop plasma sources that are spatially uniform and that have a low gas temperature (< 50°C) and, on the other hand, the identification and optimization of biocidal agents (e.g. UV radiation) in their plasmas. In the course of this work, we have designed and developed three types of electromagnetic field applicators to sustain plasma. The first was a network of distributed antennas on the outside of the dielectric discharge-vessel, which possessed multiple high-frequency (HF) input ports fed by a waveguide-based power divider. This distributed source concept was soon abandoned in favour of two other plasma source designs, since the latter ones provided immediate advantages for biomedical sterilization, and also in terms of energy efficiency and frequency bandwidth (e.g. near-constant input impedance). These two plasma sources are based on planar transmission line designs where the plasma is part of the transmission line: the first allows one to sterilize the inner surfaces (lumen) of thermally sensitive dielectric tubes (e.g. cardiac catheters), while the other enables one to immerse three-dimensional objects within the plasma (e.g. forceps). Two types of microorganisms were used to test the performances to identify and to optimise the biocidal agents of the plasma sources that we have developed namely, sedimented bacterial spores from a suspension of Bacillus atrophaeus and vegetative Staphylococcus aureus bacteria embedded in a biofilm matrix. Inactivation of these microorganisms in our plasma sterilizers results through irradiation. This sterilization process is rapid (a few minutes), non-toxic (it does not require venting), and it affects thermally sensitive polymers

  5. Production of intense ion beams in a reflex triode with an external plasma source at the anode

    SciTech Connect

    Bystritskii, V.M.; Verigin, A.A.; Volkov, S.N.; Krasik, Y.E.; Podkatov, V.I.

    1986-09-01

    An experimental study of the production of intense ion beams in a reflex triode with an external plasma source at the anode is reported. The ions had various ratios Z/M. When the anode plasma is produced in a preliminary charging pulse of the accelerator, the plasma density is too low for operation under charge-limited emission conditions. In this case, an ion beam is observed to be produced from the plasma formed by the direct heating of the anode material by oscillating electrons. When an anode plasma resulting from the breakdown of a dielectric insert or of the vacuum gap of a composite andode by an external voltage source is used to produce an ion beam, the reflex triode operating conditions depend on delaying the operation of the accelerator with respect to the external source. The highest efficiency (approx. =20%) in the production of an ion beam is observed at t/sub d/ = 3--6 ..mu..s. In this case, the reflex triode operates under increasing or constant impedance conditions. It was shown in the course of the experiments that the ion beam which is produced is nonuniform. There are three groups of ions: H/sup +/, C/sup n//sup +/, and Cu/sup n//sup +/. The energy of the heavy ions depends on the applied anode potential. The different mass components of the ion beam do not appear at the same time. The macroscopic divergence of the beam is 4--6/sup 0/ at the periphery and drops off to approx. <1/sup 0/ at the center. The microscopic divergence of the beam is 3/sup 0/. The total energy of the ion beam which is produced is less than 120 J at an average current approx. =2.8 kA.

  6. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Braymen, Steven D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization.

  7. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS COUPLED ON-LINE WITH INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR ELEMENTAL SPECIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel interface to connect a capillary electrophoresis (CE) system with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (ICPMS) detector is reported here. The interface was built using a direct injection nebulizer (DIN) system. In this interface, the CE capillary was placed co...

  8. Determination of Arsenic in Sinus Wash and Tap Water by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnell, Anna M.; Nahan, Keaton; Holloway, Dawone; Vonderheide, Anne P.

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is a toxic element to which humans are primarily exposed through food and water; it occurs as a result of human activities and naturally from the earth's crust. An experiment was developed for a senior level analytical laboratory utilizing an Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) for the analysis of arsenic in household…

  9. Effects of orbit squeezing on poloidal mass flow and bootstrap current in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C. ); Hsu, C.T. ); Hazeltine, R.D. )

    1994-10-01

    It is shown, by solving the drift kinetic equation, that the asymptotic values of the poloidal mass flow and the bootstrap current in the banana regime of large-aspect-ratio tokamak plasmas are not affected by orbit squeezing. However, because the definition of ion collisionality [upsilon][sub *[ital i

  10. A 28 GHz ECH/EBW System for the Proto-MPEX plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Tim; Caughman, John; Campbell, Ian; Diem, Stephanie; Dukes, Carl; Goulding, Richard; Killough, Stephen; Rapp, Juergen

    2015-11-01

    The Prototype Materials Plasma Exposure Experiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear high-intensity RF plasma source that requires plasma electron heating in overdense conditions to provide target parameters in the density and temperature range needed for plasma facing material studies. In Proto-MPEX, a dense helicon plasma is produced by 13.56 MHz RF power and is further heated by 28 GHz microwaves via Electron Bernstein Waves (EBW). A 28 GHz 200 kW cw gyrotron system from earlier experiments at ORNL provides the microwave power and has been successful to date at generating >150 kW in short pulses into a dummy load and >100 kW into the plasma via a 88.9 mm corrugated waveguide system and compact launcher near the plasma edge. For successful coupling via EBW into an overdense plasma, the launcher must be optimized and if possible have adjustable launch angle to maximize the efficiency. Modeling of the EBW coupling has been performed using the GENRAY-C code for the expected plasma profile in order to determine the best beam profile and polarization requirements. A compact HE11 mode waveguide launch with adjustable launch angle has been installed that is tightly coupled to the plasma. The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  11. Determination of acenocoumarol in human plasma by capillary gas chromatography with mass-selective detection.

    PubMed

    Pommier, F; Ackermann, R; Sioufi, A; Godbillon, J

    1994-03-18

    A method for the determination of acenocoumarol in human plasma by capillary gas chromatography-mass-selective detection is described. After addition of a structurally related analogue as the internal standard, the compounds are extracted from plasma at acidic pH into toluene, back-extracted with a basic solution and re-extracted from hydrochloric acid solution with toluene, which is then evaporated to dryness. The compounds are converted into their methyl derivatives, which are determined by gas chromatography using a mass-selective detector at m/z 324 for acenocoumarol and m/z 338 for the internal standard. The reproducibility and accuracy of the method were found to be suitable over the acenocoumarol concentrations range 2.2-74 nmol/l. The method could be considered as selective for acenocoumarol in the presence of its major metabolites in plasma.

  12. Microwave plasma torch mass spectrometry for the direct detection of copper and molybdenum ions in aqueous liquids.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiaohong; Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Runzhi; Wang, Shangxian; Zou, Wei; Zhu, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    Microwave plasma torch (MPT) is a simple and low power-consumption ambient ion source. And the MPT Mass spectra of many metal elements usually exhibit some novel features different from their inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectra, which may be helpful for metal element analysis. Here, we presented the results about the MPT mass spectra of copper and molybdenum elements by a linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ). The generated copper or molybdenum contained ions in plasma were characterized further in collision-induced dissociated (CID) experiments. These researches built a novel, direct and sensitive method for the direct analysis of trace levels of copper and molybdenum in aqueous liquids. Quantitative results showed that the limit of detection (LOD) by using MS(2) procedure was estimated to be 0.265 µg/l (ppb) for copper and 0.497 µg/l for molybdenum. The linear dynamics ranges cover at least 2 orders of magnitude and the analysis of a single aqueous sample can be completed in 5-6 min with a reasonable semi-quantitative sense. Two practical aqueous samples, milk and urine, were also analyzed qualitatively with reasonable recovery rates and RSD. These experimental data demonstrated that the MPT MS is able to turn into a promising and hopeful tool in field analysis of copper and molybdenum ions in water and some aqueous media, and can be applied in many fields, such as environmental controlling, hydrogeology, and water quality inspection. Moreover, MPT MS could also be used as the supplement of ICP-MS for the rapid and in-situ analysis of metal ions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27194522

  13. Direct gas-phase detection of nerve and blister warfare agents utilizing active capillary plasma ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wolf, J-C; Schaer, M; P Siegenthaler, P; Zenobi, R

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasensitive direct gas-phase detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) is demonstrated utilizing active capillary plasma ionization and triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation. Four G- agents, two V-agents and various blistering agents [including sulfur mustard (HD)] were detected directly in the gas phase with limits of detection in the low parts per trillion (ng m(-3)) range. The direct detection of HD was shown for dry carrier gas conditions, but signals vanished when humidity was present, indicating a possible direct detection of HD after sufficient gas phase pretreatment. The method provided sufficient sensitivity to monitor directly the investigated volatile CWAs way below their corresponding minimal effect dose, and in most cases even below the eight hours worker exposure concentration. In general, the ionization is very soft, with little to no in-source fragmentation. Especially for the G-agents, some dimer formation occurred at higher concentrations. This adds complexity, but also further selectivity, to the corresponding mass spectra. Our results show that the active capillary plasma ionization is a robust, sensitive, "plug and play" ambient ionization source suited (but not exclusively) to the very sensitive detection of CWAs. It has the potential to be used with portable MS instrumentation. PMID:26307710

  14. Mass Spectrometry Investigation on Decamethylcyclopentasiloxane Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma for SiCOH Film Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Yan; Ye, Chao; Ning, Zhao-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    We investigate the fragmentation behaviour of decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (DMCPS) plasma using a quadrupole mass spectrometry, which is used as the precursor to deposit SiCOH film in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma system. The structure of DMCPS molecules comprises a fivefold Si-O ring and ten -CH3 groups bonded at five Si atoms. In ECR discharge plasma, the main fragmentation behaviour of DMCPS includes two stages. One is the breaking of fivefold Si-O rings and then the formation of threefold Si-O rings and Si-O chain species. The other is the decomposing of hydrocarbon groups from Si atoms and then the crosslink of hydrocarbon species. Combined with the bonding configuration of SiCOH films, the relation between species in ECR plasma and films structures is analysed.

  15. Documenting utility of paddlefish otoliths for quantification of metals using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, James M.; Schaffler, James J.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE The otoliths of the inner ear of fishes record the environment of their surrounding water throughout their life. For paddlefish (Polyodon spathula), otoliths have not been routinely used by scientists since their detriments were outlined in the early 1940s. We sought to determine if paddlefish otoliths were useful for resolving elemental information contained within. METHODS Adult paddlefish were collected from two wild, self-sustaining populations in Oklahoma reservoirs in the Arkansas River basin. Juveniles were obtained from a hatchery in the Red River basin of Oklahoma. Otoliths were removed and laser ablation, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to quantify eight elements (Li, Mg, Mn, Rb, Sr, Y, Ba, and Pb) along the core and edge portions, which were analyzed for differences between otolith regions and among paddlefish sources. RESULTS Differences were found among samples for six of the eight elements examined. Otoliths from Red River basin paddlefish born in a hatchery had significantly lower amounts of Mg and Mn, but higher levels of Rb than otoliths from wild paddlefish in the Arkansas River basin. Concentrations of Y, Sr, and Ba were reduced on the edges of adult paddlefish from both reservoirs compared with the cores. CONCLUSIONS This research shows the utility of using an ICP-MS analysis of paddlefish otoliths. Future research that seeks to determine sources of paddlefish production, such as which reservoir tributaries are most important for reproduction or what proportion of the population is composed of wild versus hatchery-produced individuals, appears promising. Published in 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Alton, G.D.

    1998-11-24

    Microwave injection methods are disclosed for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant ``volume`` ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources. 5 figs.

  17. Production of large resonant plasma volumes in microwave electron cyclotron resonance ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Alton, Gerald D.

    1998-01-01

    Microwave injection methods for enhancing the performance of existing electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources. The methods are based on the use of high-power diverse frequency microwaves, including variable-frequency, multiple-discrete-frequency, and broadband microwaves. The methods effect large resonant "volume" ECR regions in the ion sources. The creation of these large ECR plasma volumes permits coupling of more microwave power into the plasma, resulting in the heating of a much larger electron population to higher energies, the effect of which is to produce higher charge state distributions and much higher intensities within a particular charge state than possible in present ECR ion sources.

  18. Determination of rutin in rat plasma by ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengchun; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Wang, Hao; Lin, Baoli; Wang, Shuanghu; Hu, Guoxin

    2015-04-01

    A sensitive and rapid ultra performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS-MS) method for the determination of rutin in rat plasma was developed and validated. After addition of tolbutamide as internal standard (IS), protein precipitation by acetonitrile was used as sample preparation. The chromatographic separation was performed on an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column (2.1 × 50 mm, 1.7 μm particle size), using acetonitrile-0.1% formic acid as the mobile phase with gradient elution, delivered at a flow-rate of 0.4 mL/min. Mass spectrometric analysis was performed using a XEVO TQD mass spectrometer coupled with an electro-spray ionization (ESI) source in the positive ion mode. The MRM transitions of m/z 610.91→302.98 and m/z 271.2→155.1 were used to quantify for rutin and tolbutamide, respectively. This assay method has been fully validated in terms of specificity, linearity, recovery and matrix effect, accuracy, precision and stability. Calibration curves were linear in the concentration ranges of 25-2000 ng/mL for rutin. Only 3 min was needed for an analytical run. This developed method was successfully used for determination of rutin in rat plasma for pharmacokinetic study.

  19. Measurement of High Frequency Perturbations to the Ion Velocity Distribution in the HELIX Helicon Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Boivin, R. F.; Franck, C.; Klinger, T.; Scime, E. E.

    2001-10-01

    Using lasers to measure plasma parameters has become more common in recent years. Lasers can provide information about plasma parameters without perturbing the plasma. The most common technique for ion parameter measurements is Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). LIF typically measures the ion velocity distribution and provides information about the ion temperatures and ion flows in the plasma. More recently, Skiff and Anderegg [1987] and Safarty et al. [1996] have shown that measurements of the perturbed ion velocity distribution can provide wave number information for waves propagating in a plasma due the non-local nature of the dielectric tensor. In the past two years, attempts have been made to measure the perturbed ion velocity distribution function at frequencies relevant to Helicon plasma sources. The objective of the measurements is to identify electrostatic oscillation associated to the slow wave or "Trivelpeice Gould modes" in helicon plasma sources. Past efforts to measure the perturbed ion velocity distribution function have been unsuccessful due to technical difficulties associated with measuring the cross correlation of the photon and reference signals. Using a high frequency SR544 Stanford Research lock-in amplifier, high frequency perturbations to the ion velocity distribution in a helicon source have been measured. Perturbed ion velocity distribution measurements, along with the related theory will be presented.

  20. UV and IR laser ablation for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.R.; Koppenaal, D.W.; Farmer, O.T.

    1993-06-01

    Laser ablation particle plume compositions are characterized using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP/MS). This study evaluates the mass response characteristics peculiar to ICP/MS detection as a function of laser fluence and frequency. Evaluation of the ICP/MS mass response allows deductions to be made concerning how representative the laser ablation produced particle plume composition is relative to the targeted sample. Using a black glass standard, elemental fractionation was observed, primarily for alkalis and other volatile elements. The extent of elemental fractionation between the target sample and the sampled plume varied significantly as a function of laser fluences and IR and UV laser frequency.

  1. Very Large Area/Volume Microwave ECR Plasma and Ion Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor); Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for producing very large area and large volume plasmas. The invention utilizes electron cyclotron resonances in conjunction with permanent magnets to produce dense, uniform plasmas for long life ion thruster applications or for plasma processing applications such as etching, deposition, ion milling and ion implantation. The large area source is at least five times larger than the 12-inch wafers being processed to date. Its rectangular shape makes it easier to accommodate to materials processing than sources that are circular in shape. The source itself represents the largest ECR ion source built to date. It is electrodeless and does not utilize electromagnets to generate the ECR magnetic circuit, nor does it make use of windows.

  2. High-current diode with ferroelectric plasma source-assisted hollow anode

    SciTech Connect

    Vekselman, V.; Gleizer, J. Z.; Yatom, S.; Gurovich, V. Tz.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2010-11-15

    The operation of a ferroelectric plasma source-assisted hollow anode (HA) electron source in a vacuum diode powered by an {approx}200 kV and {approx}400 ns pulsed generator was studied using time- and space-resolved laser induced fluorescence diagnostics. It was found that the plasma ion ''temperature'' in the vicinity of the HA output grid increases up to {approx}15 eV during the accelerating pulse, which is consistent with a model of the potential screening of the grid by the randomly moving ions [Phys. Plasmas 13, 073506 (2006)]. Also it was shown that the increase in the HA plasma potential up to several kilovolts because of the appearance of a noncompensated ion charge in the HA bulk plasma due to electrons fast extraction, leads to explosive emission centers being generated at the HA grid and to nonuniformity in the cross-sectional electron beam current density. Finally, the plasma prefilled mode of diode operation was studied using a simple one-dimensional model of the plasma erosion and the HA plasma electron heating by energetic ions was considered.

  3. Research progress on ionic plasmas generated in an intense hydrogen negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Takeiri, Y. Tsumori, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Kaneko, O.; Ikeda, K.; Nakano, H.; Kisaki, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Osakabe, M.; Kondo, T.; Sato, M.; Shibuya, M.; Komada, S.; Sekiguchi, H.; Geng, S.

    2015-04-08

    Characteristics of ionic plasmas, observed in a high-density hydrogen negative ion source, are investigated with a multi-diagnostics system. The ionic plasma, which consists of hydrogen positive- and negative-ions with a significantly low-density of electrons, is generated in the ion extraction region, from which the negative ions are extracted through the plasma grid. The negative ion density, i.e., the ionic plasma density, as high as the order of 1×10{sup 17}m{sup −3}, is measured with cavity ring-down spectroscopy, while the electron density is lower than 1×10{sup 16}m{sup −3}, which is confirmed with millimeter-wave interferometer. Reduction of the negative ion density is observed at the negative ion extraction, and at that time the electron flow into the ionic plasma region is observed to conserve the charge neutrality. Distribution of the plasma potential is measured in the extraction region in the direction normal to the plasma grid surface with a Langmuir probe, and the results suggest that the sheath is formed at the plasma boundary to the plasma grid to which the bias voltage is applied. The beam extraction should drive the negative ion transport in the ionic plasma across the sheath formed on the extraction surface. Larger reduction of the negative ions at the beam extraction is observed in a region above the extraction aperture on the plasma grid, which is confirmed with 2D image measurement of the Hα emission and cavity ring-down spectroscopy. The electron distribution is also measured near the plasma grid surface. These various properties observed in the ionic plasma are discussed.

  4. Axial mass fraction measurements in a 300kA dense plasma focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero Bendixsen, L. S.; Bott-Suzuki, S. C.; Cordaro, S. W.; Krishnan, M.; Chapman, S.; Coleman, P.; Chittenden, J.

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics and characteristics of the plasma sheath during the axial phase in a ˜300 kA, ˜2 kJ dense plasma focus using a static gas load of Ne at 1-4 Torr are reported. The sheath, which is driven axially at a constant velocity ˜105 m/s by the j × B force, is observed using optical imaging, to form an acute angle between the electrodes. This angle becomes more acute (more parallel to the axis) along the rundown. The average sheath thickness nearer the anode is 0.69 ± 0.02 mm and nearer the cathode is 0.95 ± 0.02 mm. The sheath total mass increases from 1 ± 0.02 μg to 6 ± 0.02 μg over the pressure range of 1-4 Torr. However, the mass fraction (defined as the sheath mass/total mass of cold gas between the electrodes) decreases from 7% to 5%. In addition, the steeper the plasma sheath, the more mass is lost from the sheath, which is consistent with radial and axial motion. Experimental results are compared to the Lee code when 100% of the current drives the axial and radial phase.

  5. Optical emission spectroscopy studies of the influence of laserablated mass on dry inductively coupled plasma conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ciocan, A.C.; Mao, X.L.; Borisov, Oleg V.; Russo, R.E.

    1997-07-01

    The amount of ablated mass can influence the temperature andexcitation characteristics of the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) andmust be taken into account to ensure accurate chemical analysis. The ICPelectron number density was investigated by using measurements of the Mgionic to atomic resonant-line ratios during laser ablation of an aluminummatrix. The ICP excitation temperature was measured by using selected Felines during laser ablation of an iron matrix. A Nd:YAG laser (3 ns pulseduration) at 266 nm was used for these ablation-sampling studies. Laserenergy, power density, and repetition rate were varied in order to changethe quantity of ablated mass into the ICP. Over the range of laseroperating conditions studied herein, the ICP was not significantlyinfluenced by the quantity of solid sample. Therefore, analyticalmeasurements can be performed accurately and fundamental studies of laserablation processes (such as ablation mass roll-off, fractionalvaporization) can be investigated using inductively coupled plasma-atomicemission spectroscopy (ICP-AES).

  6. Observation of helicon wave with m = 0 antenna in a weakly magnetized inductively coupled plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingboe, Bert; Sirse, Nishant; Moloney, Rachel; McCarthy, John

    2015-09-01

    Bounded whistler wave, called ``helicon wave,'' is known to produce high-density plasmas and has been exploited as a high density plasma source for many applications, including electric propulsion for spacecraft. In a helicon plasma source, an antenna wrapped around the magnetized plasma column launches a low frequency wave, ωce/2 >ωhelicon >ωce/100, in the plasma which is responsible for maintaining high density plasma. Several antenna designs have been proposed in order to match efficiently the wave modes. In our experiment, helicon wave mode is observed using an m = 0 antenna. A floating B dot probe, compensated to the capacitively coupled E field, is employed to measure axial-wave-field-profiles (z, r, and θ components) in the plasma at multiple radial positions as a function of rf power and pressure. The Bθ component of the rf-field is observed to be unaffected as the wave propagates in the axial direction. Power coupling between the antenna and the plasma column is identified and agrees with the E, H, and wave coupling regimes previously seen in M =1 antenna systems. That is, the Bz component of the rf-field is observed at low plasma density as the Bz component from the antenna penetrates the plasma. The Bz component becomes very small at medium density due to shielding at the centre of the plasma column; however, with increasing density, a sudden ``jump'' occurs in the Bz component above which a standing wave under the antenna with a propagating wave away from the antenna are observed.

  7. A Guide to Mass Communication Sources. Journalism Monographs Number Seventy-Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, M. Gilbert; Cooper, Douglas W.

    Designed to assist social scientists interested in conducting mass communication research, this report describes a number of sources of mass communication data and information. The sources are grouped in two categories: print media (primarily newspapers and magazines) and electronic media (radio, television, and motion pictures). These categories…

  8. Linear electric field mass analysis: a technique for three-dimensional high mass resolution space plasma composition measurements.

    PubMed

    McComas, D J; Nordholt, J E; Bame, S J; Barraclough, B L; Gosling, J T

    1990-08-01

    A revolutionary type of three-dimensional space plasma composition analyzer has been developed that combines very high-resolution mass composition measurements on a fraction of the incident ions simultaneously with lower mass resolution but high sensitivity measurements of the remaining population in a single compact and robust sensor design. Whereas the lower mass resolution measurements are achieved using conventional energy/charge (E/q) and linear time-of-flight analysis, the high mass resolution measurements are made by timing reflected E/q analyzed ions in a linear electric field (LEF). In a LEF the restoring (reflecting) force that an ion experiences in the direction parallel to the field is proportional to the depth it travels into the LEF region, and its equation of motion in that direction is that of a simple harmonic oscillator. Consequently, an ion's travel time is independent of its initial angle and energy and is simply proportional to the square root of the ion's mass/charge (m/q). The measured m/q resolution, (m/q)/Delta(m/q), for a small LEF-based prototype that we have developed and tested is approximately 20. In addition, our laboratory measurements with the prototype instrument show that characteristic time-of-flight spectra allow the resolution of atomic and molecular species with nearly identical m/q values. The measured response of the prototype is in excellent agreement with computer simulations of the device. Advanced design work using this computer simulation indicates that three-dimensional plasma composition analyzers with m/q resolutions of at least 50 are readily achievable.

  9. High Power Light Gas Helicon Plasma Source for VASIMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squire, Jared P.; Chang-Diaz, Franklin R.; Glover, Timothy W.; Jacobson, Verlin T.; Baity, F. Wally; Carter, Mark D.; Goulding, Richard H.

    2004-01-01

    In the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory (ASPL) helicon experiment (VX-10) we have measured a plasma flux to input gas rate ratio near 100% for both helium and deuterium at power levels up to 10 kW. Recent results at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) show enhanced efficiency operation with a high power density, over 5 kW in a 5 cm diameter tube. Our helicon is presently 9 cm in diameter and operates up to 10 kW of input power. The data here uses a Boswell double-saddle antenna design with a magnetic cusp just upstream of the antenna. Similar to ORNL, for deuterium at near 10 kW, we find an enhanced performance of operation at magnetic fields above the lower hybrid matching condition.

  10. Design of a Hollow-Anode Discharge Source for Generation of Supersonic Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, In Je; Cho, Soon Gook; Bae, Min Keun; Joo, Sung Kiu; Kim, Jin Woo; Kim, Hyung Jin; Chung, Kyu Sun; CenterEdge Plasma Sciences Team

    2013-10-01

    A hollow-anode discharge source was developed to produce supersonic plasma jets for various astrophysics applications. It not only provides the high density of the high-energy electrons in the hollow node region due to beam-like properties of the electron stream and focusing of the concave cathode, but also is able to easily control generating power according to applied input power. We have simulated the geometry of a plasma source by considering uniform density discharge model at a simple cylindrical structure, and have estimated the plasma parameters, such as electron temperature (Te) and plasma density (ne), with source geometry, applied power and pressure. Te is determined from particle balance by equating the total surface particle loss to the total volume ionization, while ne at the central region of source is calculated from energy balance by equating the total power absorbed to the total power lost. To perform supersonic plasma flow, the nozzle of a hollow-anode discharge source has been simulated by computing the flow using the one dimensional equations for the isentropic flow of ideal gas, and the Rankine-Hugoniot relation of normal shock waves for ideal gases.

  11. Ionization sources and mass analyzers in MS imaging.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Menger, Robert F; Drexler, Dieter M; Yost, Richard A; Garrett, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicology study is one important step in drug discovery and development. MS imaging has become one of the popular methods in this field. Here, selected ionization methods such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, secondary ion MS and desorption electrospray ionization have been briefly discussed. To differentiate drug and drug metabolites from endogenous compounds present in the biological system, exact mass and/or tandem MS is necessary. As a result, mass analyzers such as time-of-flight, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance or Orbitrap are often the method of choice and are briefly introduced. PMID:26511148

  12. Heat and Mass Transfer Within an Evaporating Solution Droplet in a Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Yanguang; Hu, Yuan

    2012-06-01

    Solution precursors have been injected into the plasma gases to produce finely structured ceramic coatings with nano- and sub-micrometric features. The trajectory history and heat and mass transfer within individual solution droplets play a very important role in determining the coating microstructure. A mathematical model is developed to analyse the thermal behavior of individual precursor droplets travelling in the high temperature plasma jet. This model involves the motion and evaporation of the precursor droplet in a DC plasma jet and the heat and mass transfer within the evaporating droplet. The influence of Stefan flow, as well as the variable thermo-physical properties of the solution and the plasma gas, is considered. The internal circulation due to the relative velocity between the droplet and the plasma jet, which may be approximated by the Hill vortex, is considered as well. The trajectory, temporal droplet surface temperature, and radius variation are predicted. The temporal temperature and concentration distributions within the evaporating droplet are presented for different injection parameters.

  13. Accessibility condition of wave propagation and multicharged ion production in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yushi; Yano, Keisuke; Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu

    2016-02-01

    A new tandem type source of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas has been constructing for producing synthesized ion beams in Osaka University. Magnetic mirror field configuration with octupole magnets can be controlled to various shape of ECR zones, namely, in the 2nd stage plasma to be available by a pair mirror and a supplemental coil. Noteworthy correlations between these magnetic configurations and production of multicharged ions are investigated in detail, as well as their optimum conditions. We have been considering accessibility condition of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves propagating in ECR ion source plasma, and then investigated their correspondence relationships with production of multicharged ions. It has been clarified that there exits efficient configuration of ECR zones for producing multicharged ion beams experimentally, and then has been suggested from detail accessibility conditions on the ECR plasma that new resonance, i.e., upper hybrid resonance, must have occurred.

  14. Accessibility condition of wave propagation and multicharged ion production in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Yano, Keisuke; Nishiokada, Takuya; Nagaya, Tomoki; Kimura, Daiju; Kumakura, Sho; Imai, Youta; Hagino, Shogo; Otsuka, Takuro; Sato, Fuminobu

    2016-02-01

    A new tandem type source of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas has been constructing for producing synthesized ion beams in Osaka University. Magnetic mirror field configuration with octupole magnets can be controlled to various shape of ECR zones, namely, in the 2nd stage plasma to be available by a pair mirror and a supplemental coil. Noteworthy correlations between these magnetic configurations and production of multicharged ions are investigated in detail, as well as their optimum conditions. We have been considering accessibility condition of electromagnetic and electrostatic waves propagating in ECR ion source plasma, and then investigated their correspondence relationships with production of multicharged ions. It has been clarified that there exits efficient configuration of ECR zones for producing multicharged ion beams experimentally, and then has been suggested from detail accessibility conditions on the ECR plasma that new resonance, i.e., upper hybrid resonance, must have occurred. PMID:26931928

  15. Subcutoff microwave driven plasma ion sources for multielemental focused ion beam systems.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Jose V; Chowdhury, Abhishek; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2008-06-01

    A compact microwave driven plasma ion source for focused ion beam applications has been developed. Several gas species have been experimented including argon, krypton, and hydrogen. The plasma, confined by a minimum B multicusp magnetic field, has good radial and axial uniformity. The octupole multicusp configuration shows a superior performance in terms of plasma density (~1.3 x 10(11) cm(-3)) and electron temperature (7-15 eV) at a power density of 5-10 Wcm(2). Ion current densities ranging from a few hundreds to over 1000 mA/cm(2) have been obtained with different plasma electrode apertures. The ion source will be combined with electrostatic Einzel lenses and should be capable of producing multielemental focused ion beams for nanostructuring and implantations. The initial simulation results for the focused beams have been presented.

  16. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in the analysis of biological samples and pharmaceutical drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossipov, K.; Seregina, I. F.; Bolshov, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is widely used in the analysis of biological samples (whole blood, serum, blood plasma, urine, tissues, etc.) and pharmaceutical drugs. The shortcomings of this method related to spectral and non-spectral interferences are manifested in full measure in determination of the target analytes in these complex samples strongly differing in composition. The spectral interferences are caused by similarity of masses of the target component and sample matrix components. Non-spectral interferences are related to the influence of sample matrix components on the physicochemical processes taking place during formation and transportation of liquid sample aerosols into the plasma, on the value and spatial distribution of plasma temperature and on the transmission of the ion beam from the interface to mass spectrometer detector. The review is devoted to analysis of different mechanisms of appearance of non-spectral interferences and to ways for their minimization or elimination. Special attention is paid to the techniques of biological sample preparation, which largely determine the mechanisms of the influence of sample composition on the results of element determination. The ways of lowering non-spectral interferences by instrumental parameter tuning and application of internal standards are considered. The bibliography includes 189 references.

  17. Mass spectrometric studies of SiO2 deposition in an indirect plasma enhanced LPCVD system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, R.; Lile, D. L.; Mcconica, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    Reaction pathways for the low temperature deposition of SiO2 from silane and indirect plasma-excited oxygen-nitrogen mixtures are proposed based on experimental evidence gained from mass spectrometry in an indirect plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition chamber. It was observed that about 80-85 percent of the silane was oxidized to byproduct hydrogen and only about 15-20 percent to water. Such conversion levels have led us to interpret that silanol (SiH3OH) could be the precursor for SiO2 film deposition, rather than siloxane /(SiH3)2O/ which has generally been cited in the literature. From mass spectrometry, we have also shown the effects of the plasma, and of mixing small amounts of N2 with the oxygen flow, in increasing the deposition rate of SiO2. Free radical reaction of nitric oxide, synthesized from the reaction of oxygen and nitrogen in the plasma chamber, and an *ncrease in atomic oxygen concentration, are believed to be the reasons for these SiO2 deposition rate increases. Through mass spectrometry we have, in addition, been able to identify products, presumably originating from terminating reactions, among a sequence of chemical reactions proposed for the deposition of SiO2.

  18. Determination of 4-hydroxytamoxifen in mouse plasma in the pg/mL range by gradient capillary liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Plumb, R S; Warwick, H; Higton, D; Dear, G J; Mallett, D N

    2001-01-01

    Capillary high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC; 300 microm i.d.) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry has been used to determine the concentration of 4-hydroxytamoxifen in mouse plasma in the pg/mL range following the administration of Tamoxifen. A limit of quantification (LOQ) of 100 pg/mL was achieved using only 25 microL of plasma. The on-column sensitivity was determined to be 100 fg. The column performance was determined isocratically before and after the assay and showed only a 15% reduction in performance after 70 injections of plasma extract. No significant peak band broadening was observed due to the mass spectrometer interface using a standard TurboIonspray source.

  19. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric determination of rufinamide in low volume plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Gáll, Zsolt; Vancea, Szende; Dogaru, Maria T; Szilágyi, Tibor

    2013-12-01

    Quantification of rufinamide in plasma was achieved using a selective and sensitive liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a reversed phase column (Zorbax SB-C18 100mm×3mm, 3.5μm) under isocratic conditions. The mobile phase consisted of a mixture of water containing 0.1% formic acid and methanol (50:50, v/v). The mass spectrometric detection of the analyte was in multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM) using an electrospray positive ionization (ESI positive). The monitored ions were 127m/z derived from 239m/z rufinamide and 108m/z derived from 251m/z the internal standard (lacosamide). Protein precipitation with methanol was applied for sample preparation using only 50μl aliquots. The concentration range was 40-2000ng/ml for rufinamide in plasma. The limit of detection was 1.25ng/ml and the lower limit of quantification was established at 5ng/ml rufinamide concentration. Selectivity and matrix effect was verified using individual human, rat and rabbit plasma samples. Short-term, post-preparative and freeze-thaw stability was also investigated. The proposed method provides accuracy, precision and high-throughput (short runtime 4.5min) for quantitative determination of rufinamide in plasma. This is the first reported liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method for analysis of rufinamide from low volume plasma samples. The LC-MS/MS method was validated according to the current official guidelines and can be applied to accurately measure rufinamide level of large number of plasma samples from clinical studies or therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:24140655

  20. Plasma glucocorticoid concentrations and body mass in ground squirrels: seasonal variation and circannual organization.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Scott; Pelz, Kimberly M; Muecke, Eva-Maria; Holekamp, Kay E; Zucker, Irving

    2006-04-01

    We examined variation in plasma glucocorticoid concentrations of free-living Belding's ground squirrels (Spermophilus beldingi) and captive golden-mantled ground squirrels (Spermophilus lateralis) housed in constant environmental conditions. Plasma corticosterone concentrations were not significantly correlated with time held captive in traps prior to collection of blood samples in males or non-breeding females, but these variables were significantly correlated in breeding females during the pre-mating, lactation, and post-lactation periods. Among male S. beldingi, plasma corticosterone concentrations increased over the course of the active season, and were significantly higher in non-breeding than breeding individuals. Corticosterone concentrations also increased in non-breeding females throughout the active period. In breeding females, baseline (non-stress) corticosterone concentrations, determined from blood samples collected within 3 min of capture, increased during gestation and declined during lactation, whereas stress values of corticosterone, determined from blood samples collected within 4-11 min of capture, increased during gestation and then again during the period after young emerged from the natal burrow. Changes in plasma corticosterone concentrations of S. beldingi paralleled changes in body mass. Among S. lateralis, plasma concentrations of cortisol were elevated when males and females were in reproductive condition and lower in reproductively quiescent squirrels. The annual peak in plasma cortisol concentrations occurred just prior to increases in body mass associated with pre-hibernation fattening. Collectively, these results suggest that concentrations of circulating glucocorticoids fluctuate with circannual rhythmicity in conjunction with annual cycles of change in body mass and activity; within these circannual cycles glucocorticoid concentrations are influenced by stress and breeding status. PMID:16360155