Science.gov

Sample records for plasma waves observed

  1. First plasma wave observations at uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Gurnett, D.A.; Kurth, W.S.; Scarf, F.L.; Poynter, R.L.

    1986-07-04

    Radio emissions from Uranus were detected by the Voyager 2 plasma wave instrument about 5 days before closest approach at frequencies of 31.1 and 56.2 kilohertz. About 10 hours before closest approach the bow shock was identified by an abrupt broadband burst of electrostatic turbulence at a radial distance of 23.5 Uranus radii. Once Voyager was inside the magnetosphere, strong whistler-mode hiss and chorus emissions were observed at radial distances less than about 8 Uranus radii, in the same region where the energetic-particle instruments detected intense fluxes of energetic electrons. Various other plasma waves were also observed in this same region. At the ring plane crossing, the plasma-wave instrument detected a large number of impulsive events that are interpreted as impacts of micrometer-sized dust particles on the spacecraft. The maximum impact rate was about 30 to 50 impacts per second, and the north south thickness of the impact region was about 4000 kilometers.

  2. First plasma wave observations at uranus.

    PubMed

    Gurnett, D A; Kurth, W S; Scarf, F L; Poynter, R L

    1986-07-01

    Radio emissions from Uranus were detected by the Voyager 2 plasma wave instrument about 5 days before closest approach at frequencies of 31.1 and 56.2 kilohertz. About 10 hours before closest approach the bow shock was identified by an abrupt broadband burst of electrostatic turbulence at a radial distance of 23.5 Uranus radii. Once Voyager was inside the magnetosphere, strong whistler-mode hiss and chorus emissions were observed at radial distances less than about 8 Uranus radii, in the same region where the energetic particle instruments detected intense fluxes of energetic electrons. Various other plasma waves were also observed in this same region. At the ring plane crossing, the plasma wave instrument detected a large number of impulsive events that are interpreted as impacts of micrometer-sized dust particles on the spacecraft. The maximum impact rate was about 30 to 50 impacts per second, and the north-south thickness of the impact region was about 4000 kilometers.

  3. Voyager 2 plasma wave observations at saturn.

    PubMed

    Scarf, F L; Gurnett, D A; Kurth, W S; Poynter, R L

    1982-01-29

    The first inbound Voyager 2 crossing of Saturn's bow shock [at 31.7 Saturn radii (RS), near local noon] and the last outbound crossing (at 87.4 RS, near local dawn) had similar plasma wave signatures. However, many other aspects of the plasma wave measurements differed considerably during the inbound and outbound passes, suggesting the presence of effects associated with significant north-south or noon-dawn asymmetries, or temporal variations. Within Saturn's magnetosphere, the plasma wave instrument detected electron plasma oscillations, upper hybrid resonance emissions, half-gyrofrequency harmonics, hiss and chorus, narrowband electromagnetic emissions and broadband Saturn radio noise, and noise bursts with characteristics of static. At the ring plane crossing, the plasma wave instrument also detected a large number of intense impulses that we interpret in terms of ring particle impacts on Voyager 2.

  4. Voyager 2 plasma wave observations at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarf, F. L.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Poynter, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The first inbound Voyager 2 crossing of Saturn's bow shock (at 31.7 Saturn radii near local noon) and the last outbound crossing (at 87.4 Saturn radii near local dawn) had similar plasma wave signatures. However, many other aspects of the plasma wave measurements differed considerably during the inbound and outbound passes, suggesting the presence of effects associated with significant north-south or noon-dawn asymmetries, or temporal variations. Within Saturn's magnetosphere, the plasma wave instrument detected electron plasma oscillations, upper hybrid resonance emissions, half-gyrofrequency harmonics, hiss and chorus, narrowband electromagnetic emissions and broadband Saturn radio noise, and noise bursts with characteristics of static. At the ring plane crossing, the plasma wave instrument also detected a large number of intense impulses that were interpreted in terms of ring particle impacts on Voyager 2.

  5. Galileo plasma wave observations of iogenic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chust, T.; Roux, A.; Perraut, S.; Louarn, P.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1999-10-01

    The Galileo plasma wave instrument has detected intense electromagnetic wave emissions approximately centered on the second and fourth harmonics of the local proton gyrofrequency during the close equatorial flyby of Io on 7 December 1995. Their frequencies suggest these emissions are likely generated locally by an instability driven by non thermal protons. Given that this process occurs close to Io, we suggest that hydrogen-bearing compounds, escaping from Io, are broken up/ionized near this moon, thereby releasing protons. Newly-created protons are thus injected in the Jovian corotating plasma with the corotation velocity, leading to the formation of a ring in velocity space. Several electromagnetic wave-particle instabilities can be driven by a ring of newborn protons. Given that the corotating plasma is sub-Alfvénic relative to Io, the magnetosonic mode cannot be destabilized by this proton ring. The full dispersion relation is studied using the WHAMP program ( Rönmark, 1982. Rep. 179. Kiruna Geophys. Inst., Kiruna, Sweden) as well as a new algorithm that allows us to fit the distribution function of newborn protons in a more realistic way. This improvement in the ring model is necessary to explain the relative narrowness of the observed spectral peaks. The measured E/ B ratio is also used to identify the relevant instability and wave mode: this mode results from the coupling between the ion Bernstein and the ion cyclotron mode (IBCW). To our knowledge this mode has not yet been studied. From the instability threshold an estimate of the density of newborn protons around Io is thus given; at about 2 Io radii from the surface and 40°W longitude from the sub-Jupiter meridian, this density is found to be ≥0.5% of the local plasma density (˜4000 cm -3), namely ≥20 cm -3. Assuming a stationary pickup process and a r- n distribution of pickup protons within several Io radii of Io's wake, this implies that more than 10 26 protons/s are created around Io. The

  6. Observations of Plasma Waves at the Earth's Dayside Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangwei

    Plasma waves near the magnetopause are of considerable interest due to the possible role which wave-particle interactions may play in the diffusion and transport of plasma across the magnetopause and the possible effects of plasma turbulence on energy dissipation and magnetic reconnection. Large amplitude plasma waves in a variety of frequency bands are often observed during crossings of the magnetopause current sheet when diagnostics indicate that reconnection is occurring. The studies herein were performed using plasma wave electric and magnetic fields and particle data primarily from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) satellite to investigate the possible generation mechanisms of different wave modes and the roles that the wave modes play in the process of magnetic reconnection and magnetopause boundary layer formation. The main advantages of the THEMIS data set are the long intervals of high time resolution three-dimensional electric and magnetic field burst waveforms. The work began with observations of large amplitude waves in a well-defined electron diffusion region at the subsolar magnetopause. These waves identified as whistler-mode waves, electrostatic solitary waves, lower-hybrid waves and electrostatic electron cyclotron waves, are observed in the same 12 s waveform capture and in association with signatures of active magnetic reconnection. The large amplitude waves in the electron diffusion region are coincident with abrupt increases in electron parallel temperature suggesting strong wave heating. The whistler-mode waves are at the electron scale and enable us to probe electron dynamics in the diffusion region. The energetic electrons (˜30 keV) within the electron diffusion region have anisotropic distributions with Te⊥/Te∥∥ >1 that may provide the free energy for the whistler-mode waves. The energetic anisotropic electrons may be produced during the reconnection process. The whistler-mode waves

  7. Observations of Plasma Waves at the Earth's Dayside Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiangwei

    Plasma waves near the magnetopause are of considerable interest due to the possible role which wave-particle interactions may play in the diffusion and transport of plasma across the magnetopause and the possible effects of plasma turbulence on energy dissipation and magnetic reconnection. Large amplitude plasma waves in a variety of frequency bands are often observed during crossings of the magnetopause current sheet when diagnostics indicate that reconnection is occurring. The studies herein were performed using plasma wave electric and magnetic fields and particle data primarily from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) satellite to investigate the possible generation mechanisms of different wave modes and the roles that the wave modes play in the process of magnetic reconnection and magnetopause boundary layer formation. The main advantages of the THEMIS data set are the long intervals of high time resolution three-dimensional electric and magnetic field burst waveforms. The work began with observations of large amplitude waves in a well-defined electron diffusion region at the subsolar magnetopause. These waves identified as whistler-mode waves, electrostatic solitary waves, lower-hybrid waves and electrostatic electron cyclotron waves, are observed in the same 12 s waveform capture and in association with signatures of active magnetic reconnection. The large amplitude waves in the electron diffusion region are coincident with abrupt increases in electron parallel temperature suggesting strong wave heating. The whistler-mode waves are at the electron scale and enable us to probe electron dynamics in the diffusion region. The energetic electrons (˜30 keV) within the electron diffusion region have anisotropic distributions with Te⊥/Te∥∥ >1 that may provide the free energy for the whistler-mode waves. The energetic anisotropic electrons may be produced during the reconnection process. The whistler-mode waves

  8. Ulysses radio and plasma wave observations in the Jupiter environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. G.; Pedersen, B. M.; Harvey, C. C.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Desch, M. D.; De Villedary, C.; Fainberg, J.; Farrell, W. M.; Goetz, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment has produced new observations of the Jupiter environment, owing to the unique capabilities of the instrument and the traversal of high Jovian latitudes. Broad-band continuum radio emission from Jupiter and in situ plasma waves have proved valuable in delineating the magnetospheric boundaries. Simultaneous measurements of electric and magnetic wave fields have yielded new evidence of whistler-mode radiation within the magnetosphere. Observations of auroral-like hiss provided evidence of a Jovian cusp. The source direction and polarization capabilities of URAP have demonstrated that the outer region of the Io plasma torus supported at least five separate radio sources that reoccurred during successive rotations with a measurable corotation lag. Thermal noise measurements of the Io torus densities yielded values in the densest portion that are similar to models suggested on the basis of Voyager observations of 13 years ago. The URAP measurements also suggest complex beaming and polarization characteristics of Jovian radio components. In addition, a new class of kilometer-wavelength striated Jovian bursts has been observed.

  9. Ulysses radio and plasma wave observations in the jupiter environment.

    PubMed

    Stone, R G; Pedersen, B M; Harvey, C C; Canu, P; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N; Desch, M D; de Villedary, C; Fainberg, J; Farrell, W M; Goetz, K; Hess, R A; Hoang, S; Kaiser, M L; Kellogg, P J; Lecacheux, A; Lin, N; Macdowall, R J; Manning, R; Meetre, C A; Meyer-Vernet, N; Moncuquet, M; Osherovich, V; Reiner, M J; Tekle, A; Thiessen, J; Zarka, P

    1992-09-11

    The Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment has produced new observations of the Jupiter environment, owing to the unique capabilities of the instrument and the traversal of high Jovian latitudes. Broad-band continuum radio emission from Jupiter and in situ plasma waves have proved valuable in delineating the magnetospheric boundaries. Simultaneous measurements of electric and magnetic wave fields have yielded new evidence of whistler-mode radiation within the magnetosphere. Observations of aurorallike hiss provided evidence of a Jovian cusp. The source direction and polarization capabilities of URAP have demonstrated that the outer region of the lo plasma torus supported at least five separate radio sources that reoccurred during successive rotations with a measurable corotation lag. Thermal noise measurements of the lo torus densities yielded values in the densest portion that are similar to models suggested on the basis of Voyager observations of 13 years ago. The URAP measurements also suggest complex beaming and polarization characteristics of Jovian radio components. In addition, a new class of kilometer-wavelength striated Jovian bursts has been observed.

  10. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves observed in the plasma depletion layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Murr, D.

    1991-01-01

    Observations from AMPTE/CCE in the earth's magnetosheath on October 5, 1984 are presented to illustrate 0.1 - 4.0 Hz magnetic field pulsations in the subsolar plasma depletion layer (PDL) for northward sheath field during a magnetospheric compression. The PDL is unambiguously identified by comparing CCE data with data from IRM in the upstream solar wind. Pulsations in the PDL are dominated by transverse waves with F/F(H+) 1.0 or less and a slot in spectral power at F/F(H+) = 0.5. The upper branch is left hand polarized while the lower branch is linearly polarized. In the sheath the proton temperature anisotropy is about 0.6 but it is about 1.7 in the PDL during wave occurrence. The properties and correlation of waves with increased anisotropy indicate that they are electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves.

  11. Plasma and wave observations in the night sector of Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Nairn, C.M.C.; Grard, R.; Skalsky, A. ); Trotignon, J.G. )

    1991-07-01

    The Phobos 2 spacecraft, initially injected into an elliptical orbit around Mars on January 29, 1989, was subsequently transferred, on February 18, 1989, to a nearly circular orbit, close to that of the Phobos moon, with an areocentric radius of the order of 9,600 km. The spacecraft remained in this orbit until the end of the mission, on March 27, 1989. This paper summarizes the plasma and wave observations carried out in the night sector of Mars with the plasma wave system (PWS). Embedded in the magnetic field structure of the Martian tail, cold electron enhancements (tail rays) with densities in the range 10-65 cm{sup {minus}3} are observed in association with broadband wave activity extending from a few hertz up to several kilohertz; these enhancements appear to have characteristics analogous to enhancements observed at Venus. The ion outflow through the Martian eclipse region is estimated from Langmuir probe measurements to be of the order of 10{sup 25} ions/s.

  12. Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Observations at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Averkamp, T. F.; Ceccni, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2005-01-01

    Results are presented from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument during the approach and first few orbits around Saturn. During the approach the intensity modulation of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) showed that the radio rotation period of Saturn has increased to 10 hr 45 min plus or minus 36 sec, about 6 min longer than measured by Voyager in 1980-81. Also, many intense impulsive radio signals called Saturn Electrostatic Discharges (SEDs) were detected from saturnian lightning, starting as far as 1.08 AU from Saturn, much farther than terrestrial lightning can be detected from Earth. Some of the SED episodes have been linked to cloud systems observed in Saturn s atmosphere by the Cassini imaging system. Within the magnetosphere plasma wave emissions have been used to construct an electron density profile through the inner region of the magnetosphere. With decreasing radial distance the electron density increases gradually to a peak of about 100 per cubic centimeter near the outer edge of the A ring, and then drops precipitously to values as low as .03 per cubic centimeter over the rings. Numerous nearly monochromatic whistler-mode emissions were observed as the spacecraft passed over the rings that are believed to be produced by meteoroid impacts on the rings. Whistlermode emissions, similar to terrestrial auroral hiss were also observed over the rings, indicating that an electrodynamic interaction, similar to auroral particle acceleration, may be occurring in or near the rings. During the Titan flybys Langmuir probe and plasma wave measurements provided observations of the density and temperature in Titan's ionosphere.

  13. Plasma and field observations of a Pc 5 wave event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, J. H.; Gallagher, D. L.; Chappell, C. R.; Chandler, M. O.; Olsen, R. C.; Comfort, R. H.; Johnson, J. F. E.; Peterson, W. K.; Weimer, D.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    The particle detector and electric field data collected by the Dynamo Explorer 1 on the Pc 5 wave event encounter on July 14, 1982 are presented, yielding a nearly complete picture of the event. The overall structure of the Pc 5 seems to order the event into two distinct halves, suggesting a temporal or spatial variation of the micropulsation. Thermal plasma measurements showed that the dominant ion throughout both lobes was H(+). Significant quantities of He(+), O(+), N(+), and O(2+) were also observed to be present and rotating together in a plane normal to the magnetic field direction, due to the Pc5 E x B drift. The plasma parameters determined for the two lobes were used in theoretical calculations to predict the period of the observed resonance.

  14. Jupiter plasma wave observations: an initial voyager 1 overview.

    PubMed

    Scarf, F L; Gurnett, D A; Kurth, W S

    1979-06-01

    The Voyager I plasma wave instrument detected low-frequency radio emissions, ion acoustic waves, and electron plasma oscillations for a period of months before encountering Jupiter's bow shock. In the outer magnetosphere, measurements of trapped radio waves were used to derive an electron density profile. Near and within the Io plasma torus the instrument detected high-frequency electrostatic waves, strong whistler mode turbulence, and discrete whistlers, apparently associated with lightning. Some strong emissions in the tail region and some impulsive signals have not yet been positively identified.

  15. Plasma wave phenomena at interplanetary shocks observed by the Ulysses URAP experiment. [Unified Radio and Plasma Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lengyel-Frey, D.; Macdowall, R. J.; Stone, R. G.; Hoang, S.; Pantellini, F.; Harvey, C.; Mangeney, A.; Kellogg, P.; Thiessen, J.; Canu, P.

    1992-01-01

    We present Ulysses URAP observations of plasma waves at seven interplanetary shocks detected between approximately 1 and 3 AU. The URAP data allows ready correlation of wave phenomena from .1 Hz to 1 MHz. Wave phenomena observed in the shock vicinity include abrupt changes in the quasi-thermal noise continuum, Langmuir wave activity, ion acoustic noise, whistler waves and low frequency electrostatic waves. We focus on the forward/reverse shock pair of May 27, 1991 to demonstrate the characteristics of the URAP data.

  16. Electron Densities Near Io from Galileo Plasma Wave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Roux, A.; Bolton, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of electron densities obtained near Io from the Galileo plasma wave instrument during the first four flybys of Io. These flybys were Io, which was a downstream wake pass that occurred on December 7, 1995; I24, which was an upstream pass that occurred on October 11, 1999; I25, which was a south polar pass that occurred on November 26, 1999; and I27, which was an upstream pass that occurred on February 22, 2000. Two methods were used to measure the electron density. The first was based on the frequency of upper hybrid resonance emissions, and the second was based on the low-frequency cutoff of electromagnetic radiation at the electron plasma frequency. For three of the flybys, Io, I25, and I27, large density enhancements were observed near the closest approach to Io. The peak electron densities ranged from 2.1 to 6.8 x 10(exp 4) per cubic centimeters. These densities are consistent with previous radio occultation measurements of Io's ionosphere. No density enhancement was observed during the I24 flyby, most likely because the spacecraft trajectory passed too far upstream to penetrate Io's ionosphere. During two of the flybys, I25 and I27, abrupt step-like changes were observed at the outer boundaries of the region of enhanced electron density. Comparisons with magnetic field models and energetic particle measurements show that the abrupt density steps occur as the spacecraft penetrated the boundary of the Io flux tube, with the region of high plasma density on the inside of the flux tube. Most likely the enhanced electron density within the Io flux tube is associated with magnetic field lines that are frozen to Io by the high conductivity of Io's atmosphere, thereby enhancing the escape of plasma along the magnetic field lines that pass through Io's ionosphere.

  17. Lightning and plasma wave observations from the Galileo flyby of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Roux, A.; Gendrin, R.; Kennel, C. F.; Bolton, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Durig the Galileo flyby of Venus the plasma wave instrument was used to search for impulsive radio signals from lightning and to investigate locally generated plasma waves. A total of nine events were detected in the frequency range from 100 kilohertz to 5.6 megahertz. Although the signals are weak, lightning is the only known source of these signals. Near the bow shock two types of locally generated plasma waves were observed, low-frequency electromagnetic waves from about 5 to 50 hertz and electron plasma oscillation at about 45 kilohertz. The plasma oscillations have considerable fine structure, possibly because of the formation of soliton-like wave packets.

  18. RF wave observations in beam-plasma discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, W.

    1986-01-01

    The Beam Plasma Discharge (BPD) was produced in the large vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center (20 x 30 m) using an energetic electron beam of moderately high perveance. A more complete expression of the threshold current I sub c taking into account the pitch angle injection dependence is given. Ambient plasma density inferred from wave measurements under various beam conditions are reported. Maximum frequency of the excited RF band behaves differently than the frequency of the peak amplitude. The latter shows signs of parabolic saturation consistent with the light data. Beam plasma state (pre-BPD or BPD) does not affect the pitch angle dependence. Unexpected strong modulation of the RF spectrum at half odd integer of the electron cyclotron frequency (n + 1/2)f sub ce is reported (5 n 10). Another new feature, the presence of wave emission around 3/2 f sub ce for I sub b is approximate I sub c is reported.

  19. Plasma wave observations near jupiter: initial results from voyager 2.

    PubMed

    Gurnett, D A; Kurth, W S; Scarf, F L

    1979-11-23

    This report provides an initial survey of results from the plasma wave instrument on the Voyager 2 spacecraft, which flew by Jupiter on 9 July 1979. Measurements made during the approach to the planet show that low-frequency radio emissions from Jupiter have a strong latitudinal dependence, with a sharply defined shadow zone near the equatorial plane. At the magnetopause a new type of broadband electric field turbulence was detected, and strong electrostatic emissions near the upper hybrid resonance frequency were discovered near the low-frequency cutoff of the continuum radiation. Strong whistler-mode turbulence was again detected in the inner magnetosphere, although in this case extending out to substantially larger radial distances than for Voyager 1. In the predawn tail region, continuum radiation was observed extending down to extremely low frequencies, approximately 30 hertz, an indication that the spacecraft was entering a region of very low density, approximately 1.0 x 10(-5) per cubic centimeter, possibly similar to the lobes of Earth's magnetotail.

  20. Determination of Jupiter's electron density profile from plasma wave observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.; Kurth, W. S.; Shaw, R. R.; Poynter, R. L.

    1981-09-01

    The electron density measurements obtained in the Jovian magnetosphere from the plasma wave instruments on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are summarized. Three basic techniques for determining the electron density are discussed. They are (1) local measurements from the low-frequency cutoff of continuum radiation, (2) local measurements from the frequency of upper hybrid resonance emissions, and (3) integral measurements from the dispersion of whistlers. The limitations and advantages of each technique are reviewed.

  1. Plasma Densities in the Vicinity of Callisto from Galileo Plasma Wave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Roux, A.; Bolton, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft has made seven close flybys of Jupiter's moon Callisto. During the closest of these (C22), which approached to within 535 km of the surface, the plasma wave instrument detected a very clear upper hybrid emission as the spacecraft passed near the moon. The peak electron density indicated by the upper hybrid resonance emission was 400/cc, almost one-thousand times the, electron density in the magnetosphere of Jupiter at the orbit of Callisto. These observations indicate that Callisto is probably surrounded by a dense ionospheric-like plasma.

  2. Electrostatic Electron Cyclotron Waves Observed by the Plasma Wave Instrument on Board Polar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Pickett, J. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scudder, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    We report the results of an investigation of waves observed by the Polar spacecraft at high altitudes and latitudes and at frequencies just above the cyclotron frequency. These observations are made frequently when the spacecraft is over the polar cap as well as near the dayside cusp and near the nightside auroral region, and observations are made for ratios of plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency, f(sub p)/f(sub c) = 1. Using the six-channel high-frequency waveform receiver (HFWR) on board the spacecraft, which can provide three-axis electric and three-axis magnetic field measurements, we attempt to identify the wavemode of these emissions and investigate possible source mechanisms including low-energy electron beams. We further observe electromagnetic emission associated with upper hybrid waves near and within the plasmasphere. This emission is consistent with both Z and O modes.

  3. Planetary plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1993-01-01

    The primary types of plasma waves observed in the vicinity of the planets Venus, Mars, Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are described. The observations are organized according to the various types of plasma waves observed, ordered according to decreasing distance from the planet, starting from the sunward side of the planet, and ending in the region near the closest approach. The plasma waves observed include: electron plasma oscillations and ion acoustic waves; trapped continuum radiation; electron cyclotron and upper hybrid waves; whistler-mode emissions; electrostatic ion cyclotron waves; and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves.

  4. THEMIS observation of Kinetic Ballooning/Interchange Waves in the High Bz Plasma Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, Evgeny V.; Nakamura, Rumi; Kubyshkina, Marina V.; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; A, Sergeev, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Using THEMIS observations of plasma sheet oscillations with kinetic ballooning/interchange instability (BICI) signatures, we investigate the properties of the waves when a high background plasma sheet Bz is seen. We find that such waves are in a better agreement with the existing kinetic simulations. Using adapted Tsyganenko models, we also show conjugate all-sky camera observations in the course of the development of the waves.

  5. Experimental observations of transverse shear waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, J; Prasad, G; Sen, A; Kaw, P K

    2002-04-29

    We report experimental observations of transverse shear waves in a three-dimensional dusty plasma that is in the strongly coupled fluid regime. These spontaneous oscillations occur when the ambient neutral pressure is reduced below a threshold value and the measured dispersion characteristics of these waves are found to be in good agreement with predictions of a viscoelastic theory of dusty plasmas.

  6. Electrostatic wave observation during a space simulation beam-plasma discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D. N.; Szuszczewicz, E. P.

    1985-01-01

    ELF waves which were observed during beam-plasma discharge in the large vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center are studied. Phase delays as a function of radius (obtained from cross-correlation measurements of density fluctuations) along with measurements of frequency and plasma potential, density, and temperature have been compared to a zero-order slab model of nonlocal azimuthal drift wave propagation. The inferred wave phase velocity in the plasma frame after Doppler correction is found to be near one half the electron diamagnetic drift velocity. Although the measurements presented do not uniquely define a propagation mode, a model of azimuthal drift wave propagation is found to be consistent with observations.

  7. Observations of Plasma Waves near Mars and Their Implications for Atmospheric Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espley, J. R.; Cloutier, P. A.; Brain, D. A.; Crider, D. H.; Acuna, M. H.

    2004-01-01

    We use data from over 500 premapping orbits of Mars Global Surveyor magnetometer data to present statistical results on the characteristics of the plasma waves in the near Mars space. We find that plasma waves in the dayside Martian magnetosheath are primarily compressional waves (i.e. magnetosonic or mirror mode waves) and in the nightside magnetosheath and tail regions that the waves are primarily associated with ion gyromotion. Some of these waves are produced by gyrating oxygen ions and as such represent observations of the ongoing erosion of the Martian atmosphere by the solar wind.

  8. Observation of helicon wave with m = 0 antenna in a weakly magnetized inductively coupled plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingboe, Bert; Sirse, Nishant; Moloney, Rachel; McCarthy, John

    2015-09-01

    Bounded whistler wave, called ``helicon wave,'' is known to produce high-density plasmas and has been exploited as a high density plasma source for many applications, including electric propulsion for spacecraft. In a helicon plasma source, an antenna wrapped around the magnetized plasma column launches a low frequency wave, ωce/2 >ωhelicon >ωce/100, in the plasma which is responsible for maintaining high density plasma. Several antenna designs have been proposed in order to match efficiently the wave modes. In our experiment, helicon wave mode is observed using an m = 0 antenna. A floating B dot probe, compensated to the capacitively coupled E field, is employed to measure axial-wave-field-profiles (z, r, and θ components) in the plasma at multiple radial positions as a function of rf power and pressure. The Bθ component of the rf-field is observed to be unaffected as the wave propagates in the axial direction. Power coupling between the antenna and the plasma column is identified and agrees with the E, H, and wave coupling regimes previously seen in M =1 antenna systems. That is, the Bz component of the rf-field is observed at low plasma density as the Bz component from the antenna penetrates the plasma. The Bz component becomes very small at medium density due to shielding at the centre of the plasma column; however, with increasing density, a sudden ``jump'' occurs in the Bz component above which a standing wave under the antenna with a propagating wave away from the antenna are observed.

  9. Observation of ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) wave-packet propagation in a tokamak plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.J.; Gould, R.W.

    1987-11-01

    Experimental observation of ICRF wave-packet propagation in a tokamak plasma is reported. Studies were carried out in the Caltech Research Tokamak in a pure hydrogen plasma and in a regime where fast-wave damping was sufficiently small to permit multiple toroidal transits of the wave-packet. Waves were launched by exciting a small loop antenna with a short burst of rf current and were detected with shielded magnetic probes. Probe scans revealed a large increase in wave-packet amplitude at smaller minor radii, and the packet velocity was found to be independent of radial position. Measurement of the packet transit time yielded direct information about the wave group velocity. Packet velocity was investigated as a function of the fundamental excitation frequency, plasma density, and toroidal magnetic field. Results are compared with the predictions of a cold plasma model which includes a vacuum layer at the edge. 24 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Simultaneous observation of HF-enhanced plasma waves and HF-wave self-focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, A.; Duncan, L.M.

    1984-07-01

    Intense HF-radiowaves of the ordinary mode transmitted from the ground enhance plasma waves near the reflection height. These have been extensively studied in the past by the use of Incohernt-Scatter-Radars. Intense HF-radiowaves propagating in the ionosphere also produce electron density irregularities with scale sizes much larger than the HF wavelength of approx.60 m. These have been observed by radio star intensity scintillations. For the past 2 years a new method was used at Arecibo, P.R. which allows radar- and scintillation-measurements at 430 MHz to be performed simultaneously along the same line of sight. The scale sizes deduced from the scintillation measurements are shorter than the scale sizes observed with the radar and are inconsistent with the HF-power density thresholds predicted by existing theories.

  11. Observation of the saturation of Langmuir waves driven by ponderomotive force in a large scale plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkwood, R. K.; Moody, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kruer, W. L.; Estabrook, K. G.; Wharton, K. B.; Williams, E. A.; Berger, R. L.

    1997-06-22

    We report the observation of amplification of a probe laser beam (I {le} 1 {times} 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) in a large scale ({approximately} 1 mm) plasma by interaction with a pumping laser beam (I = 2 {times} 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}) and a stimulated Langmuir wave. When the plasma density is adjusted to allow the Langmuir wave dispersion to match the difference frequency and wave number of the two beams, amplification factors as high as {times} 2.5 result. Interpretation of this amplification as scattering of pump beam energy by the Langmuir wave that is produced by the ponderomotive force of the two beams, allows the dependence of Langmuir wave amplitude on ponderomotive force to be measured. It is found that the Langmuir wave amplitude saturates at a level that depends on ion wave damping, and is generally consistent with secondary ion wave instabilities limiting its growth. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  12. PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS OF AN EIT WAVE OBSERVED BY HINODE/EIS AND SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect

    Veronig, A. M.; Kienreich, I. W.; Muhr, N.; Temmer, M.; Goemoery, P.; Vrsnak, B.; Warren, H. P.

    2011-12-10

    We present plasma diagnostics of an Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) wave observed with high cadence in Hinode/Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) sit-and-stare spectroscopy and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly imagery obtained during the HOP-180 observing campaign on 2011 February 16. At the propagating EIT wave front, we observe downward plasma flows in the EIS Fe XII, Fe XIII, and Fe XVI spectral lines (log T Almost-Equal-To 6.1-6.4) with line-of-sight (LOS) velocities up to 20 km s{sup -1}. These redshifts are followed by blueshifts with upward velocities up to -5 km s{sup -1} indicating relaxation of the plasma behind the wave front. During the wave evolution, the downward velocity pulse steepens from a few km s{sup -1} up to 20 km s{sup -1} and subsequently decays, correlated with the relative changes of the line intensities. The expected increase of the plasma densities at the EIT wave front estimated from the observed intensity increase lies within the noise level of our density diagnostics from EIS Fe XIII 202/203 A line ratios. No significant LOS plasma motions are observed in the He II line, suggesting that the wave pulse was not strong enough to perturb the underlying chromosphere. This is consistent with the finding that no H{alpha} Moreton wave was associated with the event. The EIT wave propagating along the EIS slit reveals a strong deceleration of a Almost-Equal-To -540 m s{sup -2} and a start velocity of v{sub 0} Almost-Equal-To 590 km s{sup -1}. These findings are consistent with the passage of a coronal fast-mode MHD wave, pushing the plasma downward and compressing it at the coronal base.

  13. Ion acoustic waves and related plasma observations in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Marsch, E.; Pilipp, W.; Schwenn, R.; Rosenbauer, H.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents a study of the relationship between the interplanetary ion acoustic waves detected by Helios and the macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of the solar wind plasma. Two major mechanisms, an electron heat flux instability and a double-ion beam instability, are considered for generating the ion-acoustic-like waves observed in the solar wind. The results provide support to both mechanisms for generating the solar wind ion acoustic waves, although each mechanism has problems under certain conditions.

  14. Observation of an Alfvén Wave Parametric Instability in a Laboratory Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, S.; Carter, T. A.

    2016-05-01

    A shear Alfvén wave parametric instability is observed for the first time in the laboratory. When a single finite ω /Ωi kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) is launched in the Large Plasma Device above a threshold amplitude, three daughter modes are produced. These daughter modes have frequencies and parallel wave numbers that are consistent with copropagating KAW sidebands and a low frequency nonresonant mode. The observed process is parametric in nature, with the frequency of the daughter modes varying as a function of pump wave amplitude. The daughter modes are spatially localized on a gradient of the pump wave magnetic field amplitude in the plane perpendicular to the background field, suggesting that perpendicular nonlinear forces (and therefore k⊥ of the pump wave) play an important role in the instability process. Despite this, modulational instability theory with k⊥=0 has several features in common with the observed nonresonant mode and Alfvén wave sidebands.

  15. Ulysses radio and plasma wave observations at high southern heliographic latitudes.

    PubMed

    Stone, R G; Macdowall, R J; Fainberg, J; Kaiser, M L; Desch, M D; Goldstein, M L; Hoang, S; Bougeret, J L; Harvey, C C; Manning, R; Steinberg, J L; Kellogg, P J; Lin, N; Goetz, K; Osherovich, V A; Reiner, M J; Canu, P; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N; Lengyel-Frey, D; Thejappa, G

    1995-05-19

    Ulysses spacecraft radio and plasma wave observations indicate that some variations in the intensity and occurrence rate of electric and magnetic wave events are functions of heliographic latitude, distance from the sun, and phase of the solar cycle. At high heliographic latitudes, solartype Ill radio emissions did not descend to the local plasma frequency, in contrast to the emission frequencies of some bursts observed in the ecliptic. Short-duration bursts of electrostatic and electromagnetic waves were often found in association with depressions in magnetic field amplitude, known as magnetic holes. Extensive wave activity observed in magnetic clouds may exist because of unusually large electron-ion temperature ratios. The lower number of intense in situ wave events at high latitudes was likely due to the decreased variability of the high- latitude solar wind.

  16. A Review of Nonlinear Low Frequency (LF) Wave Observations in Space Plasmas: On the Development of Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1995-01-01

    As the lead-off presentation for the topic of nonlinear waves and their evolution, we will illustrate some prominent examples of waves in space plasmas. We will describe recent observations detected within planetary foreshocks, near comets and in interplanetary space. It is believed that the nonlinear LF plasma wave features discussed here are part of and may be basic to the development of plasma turbulence. In this sense, this is one area of space plasma physics that is fundamental, with applications to fusion physics and astrophysics as well. It is hoped that the reader(s) will be stimulated to study nonlinear wave development themselves, if he/she is not already involved.

  17. VLF and HF Plasma Waves Associated with Spread-F Plasma Depletions Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, Robert; Freudenreich, H.; Schuck, P.; Klenzing, J.

    2011-01-01

    The C/NOFS spacecraft frequently encounters structured plasma depletions associated with equatorial spread-F along its trajectory that varies between 401 km perigee and 867 km apogee in the low latitude ionosphere. We report two classes of plasma waves detected with the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) that appear when the plasma frequency is less than the electron gyro frequency, as is common in spread-F depletions where the plasma number density typically decreases below 10(exp 4)/cu cm. In these conditions, both broadband VLF waves with a clear cutoff at the lower hybrid frequency and broadband HF waves with a clear cutoff at the plasma frequency are observed. We interpret these waves as "hiss-type" emissions possibly associated with the flow of suprathermal electrons within the inter-hemispherical magnetic flux tubes. We also report evidence of enhanced wave "transients" sometimes embedded in the broader band emissions that are associated with lightning sferics detected within the depleted plasma regions that appear in both the VLF and HF data. Theoretical implications of these observations are discussed.

  18. Broadband plasma waves observed in the polar cap boundary layer: Polar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Lakhina, G. S.; Ho, C. M.; Arballo, J. K.; Galvan, C.; Boonsiriseth, A.; Pickett, J. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Peterson, W. K.; Thorne, R. M.

    1998-08-01

    Polar observations indicate the presence of intense broadband plasma waves nearly all of the time (96% occurrence frequency in this study) near the apogee of the Polar trajectory (~6-8RE). The region of wave activity bounds the dayside (0500 to 1800 LT) polar cap magnetic fields, and we thus call these waves polar cap boundary layer (PCBL) waves. The waves are spiky signals spanning a broad frequency range from ~101 to 2×104Hz. The waves have a rough power law spectral shape. The wave magnetic component has on average a f-2.7 frequency dependence and appears to have an upper frequency cutoff of ~(6-7)×103Hz, which is the electron cyclotron frequency. The electric component has on average a f-2.2 frequency dependence and extends up to ~2×104Hz. The frequency dependences of the waves and the amplitude ratios of B'/E' indicate a possible mixture of obliquely propagating electromagnetic whistler mode waves plus electrostatic waves. There are no clear intensity peaks in either the magnetic or electric spectra which can identify the plasma instability responsible for the generation of the PCBL waves. The wave character (spiky nature, frequency dependence and admixture of electromagnetic and electrostatic components) and intensity are quite similar to those of the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) waves detected at and inside the low-latitude dayside magnetopause. Because of the location of the PCBL waves just inside the polar cap magnetic field lines, it is natural to assume that these waves are occurring on the same magnetic field lines as the LLBL waves, but at lower altitudes. Because of the similar wave intensities at both locations and the occurrence at all local times, we rule out an ionospheric source. We also find a magnetosheath origin improbable. The most likely scenario is that the waves are locally generated by field-aligned currents or current gradients. We find a strong relationship between the presence of ionospheric and magnetosheath ions and the

  19. Mesospheric gravity waves and ionospheric plasma bubbles observed during the COPEX campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulino, I.; Takahashi, H.; Medeiros, A. F.; Wrasse, C. M.; Buriti, R. A.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Gobbi, D.

    2011-07-01

    During the Conjugate Point Experiment (COPEX) campaign performed at Boa Vista (2.80∘N;60.70∘W, dip angle21.7∘N) from October to December 2002, 15 medium-scale gravity waves in the OHNIR airglow images were observed. Using a Keogram image analysis, we estimate their parameters. Most of the waves propagate to Northwest, indicating that their main sources are Southeast of Boa Vista. Quasi-simultaneous plasma bubble activities in the OI 630 nm images were observed in seven cases. The distances between the bubble depletions have a linear relationship with the wavelengths of the gravity waves observed in the mesosphere, which suggests a direct contribution of the mesospheric medium-scale gravity waves in seeding the equatorial plasma bubbles.

  20. An Overview of Observations by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation at Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kaiser, M. L.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Roux, A.; Canu, P.; Zarka, P.; Tokarev, Y.

    2001-01-01

    On August 18, 1999, the Cassini spacecraft flew by Earth at an altitude of 1186 km on its way to Saturn. Although the flyby was performed exclusively to provide the spacecraft with sufficient velocity to get to Saturn, the radio and plasma wave science (RPWS) instrument, along with several others, was operated to gain valuable calibration data and to validate the operation of a number of capabilities. In addition, an opportunity to study the terrestrial radio and plasma wave environment with a highly capable instrument on a swift fly-through of the magnetosphere was afforded by the encounter. This paper provides an overview of the RPWS observations, at Earth, including the identification of a number of magnetospheric plasma wave modes, an accurate measurement of the plasma density over a significant portion of the trajectory using the natural wave spectrum in addition to a relaxation sounder and Langmuir probe, the detection of natural and human-produced radio emissions, and the validation of the capability to measure the wave normal angle and Poynting flux of whistler-mode chorus emissions. The results include the observation of a double-banded structure at closest' approach including a band of Cerenkov emission bounded by electron plasma and upper hybrid frequencies and an electron cyclotron harmonic band just above the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency. In the near-Earth plasma sheet, evidence for electron phase space holes is observed, similar to those first reported by Geotail in the magnetotail. The wave normal analysis confirms the Polar result that chorus is generated very close to the magnetic equator and propagates to higher latitudes. The integrated power flux of auroral kilometric radiation is also used to identify a series of substorms observed during the outbound passage through the magnetotail.

  1. Simultaneous Observation of Plasma Waves Detected by the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft During Close Spacecraft Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hospodarsky, George; Santolik, Ondrej; Averkamp, Terrance; Bounds, Scott; Kurth, William; Kletzing, Craig; Wygant, John; Bonnell, John

    2014-05-01

    The twin Van Allen Probe spacecraft launched in August 2012 includes the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) Wave instrument that simultaneously measures three orthogonal components of the wave magnetic field and, with the support of the Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) instrument sensors, three components of the wave electric field at two locations in Earth's magnetosphere. Measuring all six wave components simultaneously allows the wave propagation parameters, such as the wave normal angle and Poynting vector, of the plasma wave emissions to be obtained. The orbit of the spacecraft are designed such that they "lap" each other roughly every 69 days, allowing observations over a range of spacecraft separations, with the closest separations on the order of 100 km. Simultaneous measurements at a range of distances between the two spacecraft provide an opportunity to investigate the scale, size and propagation characteristics of a number of plasma wave emissions associated with the Van Allen radiation belts, including whistler mode chorus. We examine these characteristics of the emissions detected by both spacecraft during separation distance of < 1000 km. Very similar small scale chorus wave packets were detected by both spacecraft when separation distances were the smallest. The similarities and differences detected by both spacecraft and their relation to separation distances will be discussed.

  2. A statistical study of EMIC waves observed by Cluster: 2. Associated plasma conditions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Allen, R. C.; Zhang, J. -C.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Lin, R. -L.; Klecker, B.; Dunlop, M. W.; Andre, M.; Jordanova, Vania Koleva

    2016-07-19

    This is the second in a pair of papers discussing a statistical study of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves detected during 10 years (2001–2010) of Cluster observations. In the first paper, an analysis of EMIC wave properties (i.e., wave power, polarization, normal angle, and wave propagation angle) is presented in both the magnetic latitude (MLAT)-distance as well as magnetic local time (MLT)-L frames. In addition, this paper focuses on the distribution of EMIC wave-associated plasma conditions as well as two EMIC wave generation proxies (the electron plasma frequency to gyrofrequency ratio proxy and the linear theory proxy) in these samemore » frames. Based on the distributions of hot H+ anisotropy, electron and hot H+ density measurements, hot H+ parallel plasma beta, and the calculated wave generation proxies, three source regions of EMIC waves appear to exist: (1) the well-known overlap between cold plasmaspheric or plume populations with hot anisotropic ring current populations in the postnoon to dusk MLT region; (2) regions all along the dayside magnetosphere at high L shells related to dayside magnetospheric compression and drift shell splitting; and (3) off-equator regions possibly associated with the Shabansky orbits in the dayside magnetosphere.« less

  3. Observation of dust acoustic shock wave in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumita K.; Boruah, A.; Nakamura, Y.; Bailung, H.

    2016-05-01

    Dust acoustic shock wave is observed in a strongly coupled laboratory dusty plasma. A supersonic flow of charged microparticles is allowed to perturb a stationary dust fluid to excite dust acoustic shock wave. The evolution process beginning with steepening of initial wave front and then formation of a stable shock structure is similar to the numerical results of the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers equation. The measured Mach number of the observed shock wave agrees with the theoretical results. Reduction of shock amplitude at large distances is also observed due to the dust neutral collision and viscosity effects. The dispersion relation and the spatial damping of a linear dust acoustic wave are also measured and compared with the relevant theory.

  4. Experimental observation of cavitons and rarefaction waves in laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Briand, J.; Tamer, M.E.; Adrian, V.; Gomes, A.; Quemener, Y.; Kieffer, J.C.; Dinguirard, J.P.

    1984-10-01

    A Wollaston's prism interferometer and a 632.9 nm probe beam having a 10 psec (FWHM) pulse are used to detect the electron density profile instabilities in a 1.06 ..mu..m laser-produced plasma. Experimental observations of cavitons and rarefaction waves are presented and discussed for a laser irradiance of 10/sup 15/ W/cm/sup 2/.

  5. Plasma-wave observations at Uranus from Voyager 2. Progress report for period ending February 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Gurnett, D.A.; Kurth, W.S.; Scarf, F.L.; Poynter, R.L.

    1986-03-26

    Radio emissions from Uranus were detected by the Voyager 2 plasma-wave instrument about 5 days before closest approach at frequencies of 31.1 and 56.2 khz. The bow shock was identified by an abrupt broadband burst of electrostatic turbulence about 10 hours before closest approach at a radial distance of 23.5 ru. Once inside of the magnetosphere, strong whistler mode hiss and chorus emissions were observed at radial distances less than about 8 R/sub u/, in the same region where the energetic-particle instruments detected intense fluxes of energetic electrons. A variety of other plasma waves, such as (f sub c) electron-cyclotron waves, were also observed in this same region. At the ring plane crossing, the plasma wave instrument detected a large number of impulsive events that are interpreted as impacts of micron-sized dust particles on the spacecraft. The maximum impact rate was about 20 to 30 impacts/sec, and the north-south thickness of the impact region was about 4000 km. This paper presents an overview of the principal results from the plasma-wave instrument, starting with the first detection of radio emissions from Uranus, and ending a few days after closest approach.

  6. Multiple harmonic ULF waves in the plasma sheet boundary layer observed by Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Kahlstorf, C. R. G.; Posch, J. L.; Keiling, A.; Walsh, A. P.; Denton, R. E.; Broughton, M. C.; Owen, C. J.; FornaçOn, K.-H.; RèMe, H.

    2010-12-01

    The passage of the Cluster satellites in a polar orbit through Earth's magnetotail has provided numerous observations of harmonically related Pc 1-2 ULF wave events, with the fundamental near the local proton cyclotron frequency Ωcp. Broughton et al. (2008) reported observations by Cluster of three such events in the plasma sheet boundary layer, and used the wave telescope technique to determine that their wave vectors k were nearly perpendicular to B. This paper reports the results of a search for such waves throughout the 2003 Cluster tail passage. During the 4 month period of July-October 2003, 35 multiple-harmonic wave events were observed, all in the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL). From the first observed event (22 July) to the last (28 October), 13 of Cluster's 42 tail passes had at least one event. The wave events were rather evenly distributed from XGSE = -7 RE out to the Cluster apogee distance of -18 RE, with one event observed at -4 RE. ZGSE for these events ranged from -10 to -3 RE and +3 to +7 RE (i.e., there were no events for ∣Z∣ < 3 RE). The wave events, with durations from ˜1 to 50 min, were consistently associated with signatures of the PSBL: elevated fluxes of counterstreaming ions with energies ranging from ˜3 to 30 keV, and elevated fluxes of electrons with energies ranging from 0.25 to ˜5 keV. Analysis of plasma parameters suggests that although waves occurred only when the ion beta exceeded 0.1 (somewhat larger than typical for the PSBL), ion particle pressure may be of more physical importance in controlling wave occurrence. Electron distributions were more isotropic in pitch angles than the ion distributions, but some evidence of counterstreaming electrons was detected in 83% of the events. The ions also showed clear signatures of shell-like or ring-like distributions; i.e., with reduced fluxes below the energy of maximum flux. The suprathermal ion fluxes were asymmetric in all events studied, with more ions streaming earthward

  7. Observation of plasma array dynamics in 110 GHz millimeter-wave air breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Alan M.; Hummelt, Jason S.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-10-15

    We present dynamical measurements of self-organizing arrays of plasma structures in air induced by a 110 GHz millimeter-wave beam with linear or circular polarization. The formation of the individual plasmas and the growth of the array pattern are studied using a fast-gated (5-10 ns) intensified camera. We measure the time-dependent speed at which the array pattern propagates in discrete steps toward the millimeter-wave source, observing a peak speed greater than 100 km/s. We observe the expansion of an initially spherical plasma into a disk or an elongated filament, depending on the polarization of the incident beam. The results show good agreement with one-dimensional ionization-diffusion theory and two-dimensional simulations.

  8. Electron distributions observed with Langmuir waves in the plasma sheet boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Junga; Rha, Kicheol; Seough, Jungjoon; Yoon, Peter H.

    2014-09-15

    The present paper investigates the Langmuir turbulence driven by counter-streaming electron beams and its plausible association with observed features in the Earth's plasma sheet boundary layer region. A one-dimensional electrostatic particle-in-cell simulation code is employed in order to simulate broadband electrostatic waves with characteristic frequency in the vicinity of the electron plasma frequency ω/ω{sub pe}≃1.0. The present simulation confirms that the broadband electrostatic waves may indeed be generated by the counter-streaming electron beams. It is also found that the observed feature associated with low energy electrons, namely quasi-symmetric velocity space plateaus, are replicated according to the present simulation. However, the present investigation only partially succeeds in generating the suprathermal tails such that the origin of observed quasi power-law energetic population formation remains outstanding.

  9. Ion Acoustic Wave Broadening Observations in Moderately Coupled, Moderately Collisional Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, T. E.; Benage, J. F.; Montgomery, D. S.; Murillo, M. S.; Wysocki, F. J.; Johnson, R. P.

    2002-11-01

    Weakly coupled scattering theory breaks down as the ratio of Coulomb interaction energy to thermal kinetic energy, Γ _ii =(Ze)^2/a _iikT, approaches unity and/or as collisions become more frequent. Accurate modeling is required in order to fit collective Thomson scattering features from ion acoustic waves and determine plasma parameters Z, Te and Ti. The Trident Laser was used to produce Al, CH, CH2 laser-plasmas, where ne ˜ 10^20 cm-3, T_e ˜ 75-150 eV, Γ _ii ˜ 0.1-0.75 and N _D ˜ 100-500. A separate 351-nm beam was used as a low intensity probe for Thomson scattering. The scattered light was recorded by an imaging spectrograph to provide temporally and spatially -resolved spectral profiles of thermal ion acoustic waves and Langmuir waves. Ion acoustic waves are observed to be broadened to near the frequency shift, dω _ia/ω _ia ˜ 0.75-1.25. Using a collisionless model, we show that plasma inhomogeneities and instruments produce only ˜50% of the broadening. We conclude that collisions and/or coupling cannot be ignored in modeling of collective modes in warm dense plasmas.

  10. Observation of an Alfvén Wave Parametric Instability in a Laboratory Plasma.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, S; Carter, T A

    2016-05-13

    A shear Alfvén wave parametric instability is observed for the first time in the laboratory. When a single finite ω/Ω_{i} kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) is launched in the Large Plasma Device above a threshold amplitude, three daughter modes are produced. These daughter modes have frequencies and parallel wave numbers that are consistent with copropagating KAW sidebands and a low frequency nonresonant mode. The observed process is parametric in nature, with the frequency of the daughter modes varying as a function of pump wave amplitude. The daughter modes are spatially localized on a gradient of the pump wave magnetic field amplitude in the plane perpendicular to the background field, suggesting that perpendicular nonlinear forces (and therefore k_{⊥} of the pump wave) play an important role in the instability process. Despite this, modulational instability theory with k_{⊥}=0 has several features in common with the observed nonresonant mode and Alfvén wave sidebands.

  11. Observation of an Alfvén Wave Parametric Instability in a Laboratory Plasma.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, S; Carter, T A

    2016-05-13

    A shear Alfvén wave parametric instability is observed for the first time in the laboratory. When a single finite ω/Ω_{i} kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) is launched in the Large Plasma Device above a threshold amplitude, three daughter modes are produced. These daughter modes have frequencies and parallel wave numbers that are consistent with copropagating KAW sidebands and a low frequency nonresonant mode. The observed process is parametric in nature, with the frequency of the daughter modes varying as a function of pump wave amplitude. The daughter modes are spatially localized on a gradient of the pump wave magnetic field amplitude in the plane perpendicular to the background field, suggesting that perpendicular nonlinear forces (and therefore k_{⊥} of the pump wave) play an important role in the instability process. Despite this, modulational instability theory with k_{⊥}=0 has several features in common with the observed nonresonant mode and Alfvén wave sidebands. PMID:27232026

  12. Electrostatic solitary waves and plasma environment near the moon observed by KAGUYA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Omura, Y.; Kasahara, Y.; Kojima, H.; Saito, Y.; Nishino, M. N.; Ono, T.; Tsunakawa, H.

    2012-12-01

    WFC-L subsystem[1] of KAGUYA (SELENE)/LRS[2], observes waveforms of plasma waves in 100Hz-100kHz and a lot of electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) have been observed[3]. Although the orthogonal dipole antennas are generally used in the observations, sometimes a pair of monopole antennas were used. We analyze the ESW and the plasma environment around the observed regions. Observed waveforms are fitted to ideal ESW waveforms parallel to the magnetic field and the perpendicular component. The propagation velocities and the potential scales are also evaluated in the case of the monopole observations. Particle data by PACE[4] are also evaluated near the regions where ESW's are observed like, in the solar wind, above the magnetic anomalies, in the wake boundaries, and inside the wake. The ESWs, the plasma environments, the magnetic fields, and their relations will be discussed. References [1] Y. Kasahara, et al., Earth, Planets and Space, 60, 341-351, 2008. [2] T. Ono, et al., Space Science Reviews, 154, Nos. 1-4, 145-192, DOI:10.1007/s11214-010-9673-8, 2010 [3] K. Hashimoto, et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L19204, doi:10.1029/2010GL044529, 2010. [4] Y. Saito, et al., Space Science Reviews, Vol. 154, No. 1-4, 265-303, 2010.

  13. Observation of nonlinear wave decay processes in the solar wind by the AMPTE IRM plasma wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koons, H. C.; Roeder, J. L.; Bauer, O. H.; Haerendel, G.; Treumann, R.

    1987-01-01

    Nonlinear wave decay processes have been detected in the solar wind by the plasma wave experiment aboard the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) IRM spacecraft. The main process is the generation of ultralow-frequency ion acoustic waves from the decay of Langmuir waves near the electron plasma frequency. Frequently, this is accompanied by an enhancement of emissions near twice the plasma frequency. This enhancement is most likely due to the generation of electromagnetic waves from the coalescence of two Langmuir waves. These processes occur within the electron foreshock in front of the earth's bow shock.

  14. Direct observation of the two-plasmon-decay common plasma wave using ultraviolet Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Follett, R K; Edgell, D H; Henchen, R J; Hu, S X; Katz, J; Michel, D T; Myatt, J F; Shaw, J; Froula, D H

    2015-03-01

    A 263-nm Thomson-scattering beam was used to directly probe two-plasmon-decay (TPD) excited electron plasma waves (EPWs) driven by between two and five 351-nm beams on the OMEGA Laser System. The amplitude of these waves was nearly independent of the number of drive beams at constant overlapped intensity, showing that the observed EPWs are common to the multiple beams. In an experimental configuration where the Thomson-scattering diagnostic was not wave matched to the common TPD EPWs, a broad spectrum of TPD-driven EPWs was observed, indicative of nonlinear effects associated with TPD saturation. Electron plasma waves corresponding to Langmuir decay of TPD EPWs were observed in both Thomson-scattering spectra, suggesting the Langmuir decay instability as a TPD saturation mechanism. Simulated Thomson-scattering spectra from three-dimensional numerical solutions of the extended Zakharov equations of TPD are in excellent agreement with the experimental spectra and verify the presence of the Langmuir decay instability.

  15. Direct observation of the two-plasmon-decay common plasma wave using ultraviolet Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, R. K.; Edgell, D. H.; Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Katz, J.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Shaw, J.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-03-26

    A 263-nm Thomson-scattering beam was used to directly probe two-plasmon-decay (TPD) excited electron plasma waves (EPWs) driven by between two and five 351-nm beams on the OMEGA Laser System. The amplitude of these waves was nearly independent of the number of drive beams at constant overlapped intensity, showing that the observed EPWs are common to the multiple beams. In an experimental configuration where the Thomson-scattering diagnostic was not wave matched to the common TPD EPWs, a broad spectrum of TPD-driven EPWs was observed, indicative of nonlinear effects associated with TPD saturation. Electron plasma waves corresponding to Langmuir decay of TPD EPWs were observed in both Thomson-scattering spectra, suggesting the Langmuir decay instability as a TPD saturation mechanism. Simulated Thomson-scattering spectra from three-dimensional numerical solutions of the extended Zakharov equations of TPD are in excellent agreement with the experimental spectra and verify the presence of the Langmuir decay instability.

  16. Direct observation of the two-plasmon-decay common plasma wave using ultraviolet Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Follett, R K; Edgell, D H; Henchen, R J; Hu, S X; Katz, J; Michel, D T; Myatt, J F; Shaw, J; Froula, D H

    2015-03-01

    A 263-nm Thomson-scattering beam was used to directly probe two-plasmon-decay (TPD) excited electron plasma waves (EPWs) driven by between two and five 351-nm beams on the OMEGA Laser System. The amplitude of these waves was nearly independent of the number of drive beams at constant overlapped intensity, showing that the observed EPWs are common to the multiple beams. In an experimental configuration where the Thomson-scattering diagnostic was not wave matched to the common TPD EPWs, a broad spectrum of TPD-driven EPWs was observed, indicative of nonlinear effects associated with TPD saturation. Electron plasma waves corresponding to Langmuir decay of TPD EPWs were observed in both Thomson-scattering spectra, suggesting the Langmuir decay instability as a TPD saturation mechanism. Simulated Thomson-scattering spectra from three-dimensional numerical solutions of the extended Zakharov equations of TPD are in excellent agreement with the experimental spectra and verify the presence of the Langmuir decay instability. PMID:25871046

  17. Transverse auroral ion energization observed on DE-1 with simultaneous plasma wave and ion composition measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Shelley, E. G.; Boardsen, S. A.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Simultaneous high-time-resolution plasma-wave and ion-composition measurements obtained with DE-1 during a magnetospheric-cusp crossing on March 15, 1984 and during an evening auroral-zone crossing on January 4, 1984 are reported. The data are presented graphically and characterized in detail, with a focus on the transverse energization of H(+) and O(+) ions. An O(+) distribution observed during the cusp crossing is shown to be well represented by a bi-Maxwellian distribution with temperatures 180 eV parallel and 250 eV perpendicular to the local magnetic field and a bulk flow velocity of 27 km/s up the magnetic-field line. In the auroral-zone data a simultaneous transverse-energy increase is detected in both H(+) and O(+) components in the presence of plasma-wave emissions at multiples of the hydrogen gyrofrequency.

  18. Plasma waves observed in the near vicinity of the space shuttle

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, I.H.; Gurnett, D.A. )

    1991-08-01

    The OSS 1 and Spacelab 2 missions found intense broadband waves in the near vicinity of the space shuttle. This paper contains a detailed observational characterizaiton and theoretical investigation of the plasma waves observed within about 10 m of the space shuttle during the XPOP roll period of theSpacelab 2 mission. High wave levels are found from 31 Hz to 10 kHz (near the lower hybrid frequency). Above 10 kHz the wave levels decrease with frequency, reaching the background level near 56 kHz. The frequency distribution of wave electric is best interpreted in terms of three components below about 10 kHz and a high-frequency tail. The primary component is a fairly uniform, high level of waves covering the frequency range from 31 Hz to 10 kHz. The two superposed components in this frequency range have electric fields of order twice the uniform level. The second component corresponds to a low-frequency peak in the range 100-178 Hz. The third component is found near, and follows the trend of, the lower hybrid frequency. The waves show a pronounced amplitude and frequency variation with the quantity V{sub parallel}/V{sub T} {approximately} 1 and the shuttle is moving primarily along the magnetic field. This implies that the waves are probably driven by water pickup ions. A new theory involving Doppler-shifted lower hybrid waves driven by beamlike distributions of water ions near the space shuttle is developed using linear theory.

  19. Solar system plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    An overview is given of spacecraft observations of plasma waves in the solar system. In situ measurements of plasma phenomena have now been obtained at all of the planets except Mercury and Pluto, and in the interplanetary medium at heliocentric radial distances ranging from 0.29 to 58 AU. To illustrate the range of phenomena involved, we discuss plasma waves in three regions of physical interest: (1) planetary radiation belts, (2) planetary auroral acceleration regions and (3) the solar wind. In each region we describe examples of plasma waves that are of some importance, either due to the role they play in determining the physical properties of the plasma, or to the unique mechanism involved in their generation.

  20. An Overview of Cassini Radio, Plasma Wave, and Langmuir Probe Observations in the Vicinity of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D.; Kurth, W.; Hospodarsky, G.; Persoon, A.; Desch, M.; Farrell, W.; Kaiser, M.; Goetz, K.; Cecconi, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Harvey, C.; Louarn, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Galopeau, P.; Roux, A.; Fischer, G.; Ladreiter, H.; Rucker, H.; Alleyne, H.; Bostrom, R.; Gustafsson, G.; Wahlund, J.; Pedersen, A.

    2004-12-01

    The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument detected a wide variety of radio and plasma wave phenomena during the approach and first flyby of Saturn. These include Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR), Saturn electrostatic discharges (SEDs), upstream electrostatic waves, the bow shock, trapped continuum radiation, whistler-mode chorus emissions, electrostatic upper-hybrid emissions, impulsive signals from dust impacts, narrowband electromagnetic emissions in the low-density inner region of the magnetosphere, whistler-mode resonance-cone emissions similar to terrestrial auroral hiss, and many sporadic narrowband whistler-mode emissions apparently associated with the rings. In addition, electron density and temperature measurements were obtained from a Langmuir probe. In this paper we interpret these observations in terms of various key parameters and processes in the Saturnian system. These including new values for the radio rotation period of Saturn, long term variations in the occurrence of atmospheric lightning, the plasma density and temperature in the inner region of Saturn's magnetosphere, the distribution of micron-sized particle near the ring plane, evidence of an electrodynamic interaction between the rings and the co-rotating magnetosphere of Saturn, and the possible occurrence of meteoroid impacts on the rings.

  1. Radio and Plasma Wave Observations at Saturn from Cassini's Approach and First Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Averkamp, T. F.; Cecconi, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Galopeau, P.; Roux, A.; Harvey, C.; Louarn, P.; Bostrom, R.; Gustafsson, G.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Desch, M. D.; Farrell, W. M.; Kaiser, M. L.; Goetz, K.; Kellogg, P. J.; Fischer, G.; Ladreiter, H.-P.; Rucker, H.; Alleyne, H.; Pedersen, A.

    2005-02-01

    We report data from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument during the approach and first orbit at Saturn. During the approach, radio emissions from Saturn showed that the radio rotation period is now 10 hours 45 minutes 45 +/- 36 seconds, about 6 minutes longer than measured by Voyager in 1980 to 1981. In addition, many intense impulsive radio signals were detected from Saturn lightning during the approach and first orbit. Some of these have been linked to storm systems observed by the Cassini imaging instrument. Within the magnetosphere, whistler-mode auroral hiss emissions were observed near the rings, suggesting that a strong electrodynamic interaction is occurring in or near the rings.

  2. Radio and plasma wave observations at Saturn from Cassini's approach and first orbit.

    PubMed

    Gurnett, D A; Kurth, W S; Hospodarsky, G B; Persoon, A M; Averkamp, T F; Cecconi, B; Lecacheux, A; Zarka, P; Canu, P; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N; Galopeau, P; Roux, A; Harvey, C; Louarn, P; Bostrom, R; Gustafsson, G; Wahlund, J-E; Desch, M D; Farrell, W M; Kaiser, M L; Goetz, K; Kellogg, P J; Fischer, G; Ladreiter, H-P; Rucker, H; Alleyne, H; Pedersen, A

    2005-02-25

    We report data from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument during the approach and first orbit at Saturn. During the approach, radio emissions from Saturn showed that the radio rotation period is now 10 hours 45 minutes 45 +/- 36 seconds, about 6 minutes longer than measured by Voyager in 1980 to 1981. In addition, many intense impulsive radio signals were detected from Saturn lightning during the approach and first orbit. Some of these have been linked to storm systems observed by the Cassini imaging instrument. Within the magnetosphere, whistler-mode auroral hiss emissions were observed near the rings, suggesting that a strong electrodynamic interaction is occurring in or near the rings.

  3. Polar Plasma Wave Observations in the Auroral Region and Polar Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Averkamp, T. F.; Kirchner, D. L.; Pickett, J. S.; Persoon, A. M.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    Auroral kilometric radiation (AKR), sometimes associated with auroral myriametric radiation (AMR), has been observed by the plasma wave instrument on board Polar on almost every northern hemisphere pass. High spectral resolution plots of the AKR obtained by the wide-band receiver of the plasma wave instrument on board the spacecraft often show discrete, negative-slope striations each extending over a period of several seconds. A preliminary survey of over 4000 spectrograms (each for 48 seconds of data) indicates that the striations are seen in the northern hemisphere near apogee about 5% of the time. The frequency range is 40 kHz less than f less than 100 kHz, but a few observations of signatures have been made at higher frequency (f less than 225 khz. The frequency drift rates R, are similar ranging from -9.0 kHz/sec less than R less than -1.0 kHz/sec. No data is currently available for perigee (southern hemisphere) passes. The paucity of positive-slope features may be due to the location of the satellite at altitudes well above the AKR source region. Past studies have suggested these features are due to AKR wave growth stimulated by the propagation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves travelling up (-R) or down (+R) the field line, through the source region. High-resolution waveform data from both Polar and FAST show the presence of solitary waves in the auroral region which may also be a source of these striations. AMR is seen as diffuse emission associated with, but at lower frequency than the lower AKR. Direction finding of these emissions is not conclusive, but for one case, they have a source region distinct from the magnetic field line containing the AKR source, but possibly associated with the auroral cavity density gradient.

  4. Geotail observations of spiky electric fields and low-frequency waves in the plasma sheet and plasma sheet boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattell, C.; Mozer, F.; Tsuruda, K.; Hayakawa, H.; Nakamura, M.; Okada, T.; Kokubun, S.; Yamamoto, T.

    1994-01-01

    Electric field data from the Geotail spacecraft provide an opportunity to extend the observations of spiky fields made by International Sun Earth Explorer-1 (ISEE-1) to a region of the magnetosphere where quasistatic electric field measurements have not previously been msde, to examine their possible importance in the dynamics of the middle and distant tail, and to test some hypotheses about their formation. In this paper, examples of large fields in the plasma sheet and its boundary at radial distances up to approximately 90 R(sub E) are presented. It is shown that three different types of large electric fields can occur: (1) spiky fields; (2) 'DC' fields; and (3) waves at frequencies comparable to the lower hybrid frequency. There is usually a gradation between (1) and (3), and often large electric field spikes are embedded in regions of lower amplitude waves. The waves tend to occur in short (few to 10's of seconds) packets whose start and stop times are not always correlated with changes in the magnetic field and/or density (as indicated by the spacecraft potential). The peak frequency is often less than but comparable to the lower hybrid frequency in agreement with theories of lower hybrid drift waves in the magnetotail. The largest spikes are not always associated with the largest changes in the spacecraft potential and/or magnetic field. It is suggested that the spiky fields may represent the nonlinear development of the waves.

  5. Jupiter Data Analysis Program: Analysis of Voyager wideband plasma wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    Voyager plasma wave wideband frames from the Jovian encounters are analyzed. The 511 frames which were analyzed were chosen on the basis of low-rate spectrum analyzer data from the plasma wave receiver. These frames were obtained in regions and during times of various types of plasma or radio wave activity as determined by the low-rate, low-resolution data and were processed in order to provide high resolution measurements of the plasma wave spectrum for use in the study of a number of outstanding problems. Chorus emissions at Jupiter were analyzed. The detailed temporal and spectral form of the very complex chorus emissions near L = 8 on the Voyager 1 inbound passage was compared to both terrestrial chorus emissions as well as to the theory which was developed to explain the terrestrial waves.

  6. Relativistic spherical plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Maksimchuk, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-02-01

    Tightly focused laser pulses that diverge or converge in underdense plasma can generate wake waves, having local structures that are spherical waves. Here we study theoretically and numerically relativistic spherical wake waves and their properties, including wave breaking.

  7. Direct electrical observation of plasma wave-related effects in GaN-based two-dimensional electron gases

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Chen, W.; Li, W.; Zhu, M.; Yue, Y.; Song, B.; Encomendero, J.; Xing, H.; Fay, P.; Sensale-Rodriguez, B.

    2014-10-27

    In this work, signatures of plasma waves in GaN-based high electron mobility transistors were observed by direct electrical measurement at room temperature. Periodic grating-gate device structures were fabricated and characterized by on-wafer G-band (140–220 GHz) s-parameter measurements as a function of gate bias voltage and device geometry. A physics-based equivalent circuit model was used to assist in interpreting the measured s-parameters. The kinetic inductance extracted from the measurement data matches well with theoretical predictions, consistent with direct observation of plasma wave-related effects in GaN-channel devices at room temperature. This observation of electrically significant room-temperature plasma-wave effects in GaN-channel devices may have implications for future millimeter-wave and THz device concepts and designs.

  8. Radio and Plasma Wave Observations at Saturn from Cassini's Approach and First Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Haspodarsky, G. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Averkamp, T. F.; Cecconi, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2005-01-01

    We report data from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument during the approach and first orbit at Saturn. During the approach, radio emissions from Saturn showed that the radio rotation period is now 10 hours 45 minutes 45 k 36 seconds, about 6 minutes longer than measured by Voyager in 1980 to 1981. In addition, many intense impulsive radio signals were detected from Saturn lightning during the approach and first orbit. Some of these have been linked to storm systems observed by the Cassini imaging instrument. Within the magnetosphere, whistler-mode auroral hiss emissions were observed near the rings, suggesting that a strong electrodynamic interaction is occurring in or near the rings.

  9. All-sky imager observations near footprints of plasma sheet waves with kinetic ballooning-interchange signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, E. V.; Nakamura, R.; Sergeev, V. A.; Baumjohann, W.; Kubyshkina, M. V.

    2015-12-01

    We collected several THEMIS observations of plasma sheet oscillations with kinetic ballooning/interchange instability (BICI) signatures. Using an adapted model to find the location of THEMIS footprints, we identified all-sky imager (ASI) observations that may be associated with the waves. The ASI observations reveal a reach activity often being diffuse patchy aurora. We investigate the brightness and motion of the auroral patches and compare them with the BICI activity in the plasma sheet.

  10. Observation of multiple mechanisms for stimulating ion waves in ignition scale plasmas. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkwood, R.K.; MacGowan, B.J.; Montgomery, D.S.

    1997-03-03

    The laser and plasma conditions expected in ignition experiments using indirect drive inertial confinement have been studied experimentally. It has been shown that there are at least three ways in which ion waves can be stimulated in these plasmas and have significant effect on the energy balance and distribution in the target. First ion waves can be stimulated by a single laser beam by the process of Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) in which an ion acoustic and a scattered electromagnetic wave grow from noise. Second, in a plasma where more than one beam intersect, ion waves can Lie excited at the `beat` frequency and wave number of the intersecting beams,, causing the side scatter instability to be seeded, and substantial energy to be transferred between the beams [R. K. Kirkwood et. al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2065 (1996)]. And third, ion waves may be stimulated by the decay of electron plasma waves produced by Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS), thereby inhibiting the SRS process [R. K. Kirkwood et. al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 2706 (1996)].

  11. Identifying Kinetic Plasma Wave Modes Observed in the Acceleration Regions in the Low-Latitude Boundary Layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T.; Nykyri, K.; Dimmock, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding plasma heating and transport across fluid, ion and electron scales is currently not well understood in astrophysical plasmas. We have recently identified (by determining the observational dispersion relation using multi-point spacecraft measurements) an ion-scale, large amplitude fast mode wave observed inside a fluid-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex. The Poyinting flux of the fast mode wave packet was sufficient to produce the observed ~5 keV energy increase of ions of magnetosheath origin. In this followup work, we analyze in detail the other intervals with similar characteristics, where the cold magnetosheath population becomes significantly energized. We identify the plasma wave modes present and discuss whether their energy budget is sufficient for the observed level of energization.

  12. A High-Resolution Study of Quasiperiodic Radio Emissions Observed by the Galileo Plasma Wave Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Christopher, I.; Granroth, L. J.

    2001-01-01

    We have conducted a study of quasiperiodic emission observed by the plasma wave instrument on board the Galileo spacecraft. These emissions appear as broadband bursts with dominant periods ranging from 10 min to over 40 min. For these emissions we have explicitly analyzed the high-resolution (waveform) data to determine the presence of impulsive, solitary signatures. Our investigations have indicated that the broadband bursts, as well as the background more narrowband continuum emission, are composed of a highly turbulent spectrum. Within the broadband burst, however, there are higher-frequency components present, but no impulsive electrostatic signatures. Also significantly, the broadband bursts show no low-frequency dispersion. We conclude that the bursts are consistent with a distant, electromagnetic source, probably in the near-Jupiter vicinity.

  13. Undamped electrostatic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Veltri, P.; Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F.; Morrison, P. J.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2012-09-15

    Electrostatic waves in a collision-free unmagnetized plasma of electrons with fixed ions are investigated for electron equilibrium velocity distribution functions that deviate slightly from Maxwellian. Of interest are undamped waves that are the small amplitude limit of nonlinear excitations, such as electron acoustic waves (EAWs). A deviation consisting of a small plateau, a region with zero velocity derivative over a width that is a very small fraction of the electron thermal speed, is shown to give rise to new undamped modes, which here are named corner modes. The presence of the plateau turns off Landau damping and allows oscillations with phase speeds within the plateau. These undamped waves are obtained in a wide region of the (k,{omega}{sub R}) plane ({omega}{sub R} being the real part of the wave frequency and k the wavenumber), away from the well-known 'thumb curve' for Langmuir waves and EAWs based on the Maxwellian. Results of nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson simulations that corroborate the existence of these modes are described. It is also shown that deviations caused by fattening the tail of the distribution shift roots off of the thumb curve toward lower k-values and chopping the tail shifts them toward higher k-values. In addition, a rule of thumb is obtained for assessing how the existence of a plateau shifts roots off of the thumb curve. Suggestions are made for interpreting experimental observations of electrostatic waves, such as recent ones in nonneutral plasmas.

  14. Plasma waves near the magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. R.; Eastman, T. E.; Harvey, C. C.; Hoppe, M. M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Etcheto, J.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma waves associated with the magnetosphere from the magnetosheath to the outer magnetosphere are investigated to obtain a clear definition of the boundaries and regions, to characterize the waves observed in these regions, to determine which wave modes are present, and to determine their origin. Emphasis is on high time resolution data and a comparison between measurements by different antenna systems. It is shown that the magnetosheath flux transfer events, the magnetopause current layer, the outer magnetosphere, and the boundary layer can be identified by their magnetic field and plasma wave characteristics, as well as by their plasma and energetic particle signatures. The plasma wave characteristics in the current layer and in the boundary layer are very similar to the features in the flux transfer events, and upon entry into their outer magnetosphere, the plasma wave spectra are dominated by intense electromagnetic chorus bursts and electrostatic emissions.

  15. Rapid electron density decay observed by surface-wave probe in afterglow of pulsed fluorocarbon-based plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohya, Yoshinobu; Iwata, Manabu; Ishikawa, Kenji; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Sugai, Hideo

    2016-08-01

    To elucidate the pulsed fluorocarbon plasma behavior, a surface-wave probe with high time resolution was used to measure the electron density n e in the afterglow of plasma. In a dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasma of fluorocarbon chemistry, e.g., an O2-based C4F6 and Ar mixture, n e vanished rapidly in a short time (∼5 µs), whilst the dc current flowing onto the top electrode biased at ‑300 V decreased very slowly (decay time ∼70 µs). This observation is clear evidence of ion–ion plasma formation by electron attachment in the afterglow. We point out that the electron attachment rates for fluorocarbon radicals significantly affect the electrons and ion–ion plasma behaviors observed at the afterglow phase.

  16. Plasma waves produced by an ion beam: Observations by the VLF experiment on Porcupine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D.

    1980-06-01

    Results are presented from the VLF electric field experiments flown on Porcupine flights F3 and F4, which also had ejectable xenon ion sources. The xenon ion beam was found to produce plasma instabilities whose frequencies could be linked to the local proton gyrofrequency. The main energy in the instabilities lies at 3kHz for events when the Xe+ source is close to the rocket, and at 7kHz when the source is farther away. Theory predicts that these frequencies should be the lower-hybrid-resonance and this implies that Xe+ is the dominant ion in the first case and that it is the ambient plasma that dominates later. There is no discernable antenna spin-modulation during the Xe events which indicates that the wave k-vectors are not unidirectional. A theory is cited based on the setting up of the proton cyclotron harmonic waves by the Xe+ or 0+ cyclotron harmonic waves. The second Xe+ event on both flights exhibited an, as yet, unexplained harmonic structure related to half the local proton gyrofrequency.

  17. Electric Field Observations of Plasma Convection, Shear, Alfven Waves, and other Phenomena Observed on Sounding Rockets in the Cusp and Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.

    2009-01-01

    On December 14,2002, a NASA Black Brant X sounding rocket was launched equatorward from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen (79 N) into the dayside cusp and subsequently cut across the open/closed field line boundary, reaching an apogee of771 km. The launch occurred during Bz negative conditions with strong By negative that was changing during the flight. SuperDarn (CUTLASS) radar and subsequent model patterns reveal a strong westward/poleward convection, indicating that the rocket traversed a rotational reversal in the afternoon merging cell. The payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particle, suprathermal electron and ion, and thermal plasma data. We provide an overview of the main observations and focus on the DC electric field results, comparing the measured E x B plasma drifts in detail with the CUTLASS radar observations of plasma drifts gathered simultaneously in the same volume. The in situ DC electric fields reveal steady poleward flows within the cusp with strong shears at the interface of the closed/open field lines and within the boundary layer. We use the observations to discuss ionospheric signatures of the open/closed character of the cusp/low latitude boundary layer as a function of the IMF. The electric field and plasma density data also reveal the presence of very strong plasma irregularities with a large range of scales (10 m to 10 km) that exist within the open field line cusp region yet disappear when the payload was equatorward of the cusp on closed field lines. These intense low frequency wave observations are consistent with strong scintillations observed on the ground at Ny Alesund during the flight. We present detailed wave characteristics and discuss them in terms of Alfven waves and static irregularities that pervade the cusp region at all altitudes.

  18. Relationship of Topside Ionospheric Ion Outflows to Auroral Forms and Precipitation, Plasma Waves, and Convection Observed by Polar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirahara, M.; Horwitz, J. L.; Moore, T. E.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.; Peterson, W. K.; Shelley, E. G.; Chandler, M. O.; Giles, B. L.; Craven, P. D.; Pollock, C. J.; Gurnett, D. A.; Pickett, J. S.; Persoon, A. M.; Scudder, J. D.; Maynard, N. C.; Mozer, F. S.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Nagai, T.

    1998-01-01

    The POLAR satellite often observes upflowing ionospheric ions (UFIs) in and near the aurora] oval on southern perigee (approx. 5000 km altitude) passes. We present the UFI features observed by the thermal ion dynamics experiment (TIDE) and the toroidal imaging mass angle spectrograph (TIMAS) in the dusk-dawn sector under two different geomagnetic activity conditions in order to elicit their relationships with auroral forms, wave emissions, and convection pattern from additional POLAR instruments. During the active interval, the ultraviolet imager (UVI) observed a bright discrete aurora on the duskside after the substorm onset and then observed a small isolated aurora form and diffuse auroras on the dawnside during the recovery phase. The UFIs showed clear conic distributions when the plasma wave instrument (PWI) detected strong broadband wave emissions below approx. 10 kHz, while no significant auroral activities were observed by UVI. At higher latitudes, the low-energy UFI conics gradually changed to the polar wind component with decreasing intensity of the broadband emissions. V-shaped auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) signatures observed above -200 kHz by PWI coincided with the region where the discrete aurora and the UFI beams were detected. The latitude of these features was lower than that of the UFI conics. During the observations of the UFI beams and conics, the lower-frequency fluctuations observed by the electric field instrument were also enhanced, and the convection directions exhibited large fluctuations. It is evident that large electrostatic potential drops produced the precipitating electrons and discrete auroras, the UFI beams, and the AKR, which is also supported by the energetic plasma data from HYDRA. Since the intense broadband emissions were also observed with the UFIs, the ionospheric ions could be energized transversely before or during the parallel acceleration due to the potential drops.

  19. CRRES plasma wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Roger R.; Gurnett, Donald A.; Odem, Daniel L.

    1992-01-01

    The CRRES plasma wave experiment is designed to provide information on the plasma wave environment and the total plasma density in the Earth's radiation belts and throughout the CRRES orbit. This information is valuable both for studying the naturally occurring wave-particle interactions affecting the plasma and particle environment in the plasmasphere and magnetosphere as well as for studying the chemical releases. The electric field sensors for this instrument consist of two long electric dipole antennas (about 100 m tip-to-tip), and the magnetic field sensor is a search coil magnetometer mounted at the end of a 6-m boom. The instrument has a 14-channel spectrum analyzer covering the frequency range from 5.6 Hz to 10 kHz, and a 128-step sweep frequency receiver covering the frequency range from 100 Hz to 400 kHz.

  20. EMHD theory and observations of electron solitary waves in magnetotail plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Sun, Wei-Jie; Xiao, Chi-Jie; Shi, Quan-Qi; Liu, Jiang; Pu, Zu-Yin

    2014-06-01

    A new approach of electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) is developed by including the anisotropy of the electron pressure tensor to take Biermann battery effect into account. Based on the model, the dispersion relation of slow and fast electron magnetosonic modes are derived. A Korteweg-de Vries equation is then obtained from the wave equation to get a solution of one-dimensional slow-mode soliton. Furthermore, according to measurements of Cluster and Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms, we find a good agreement between the theory and observations of magnetic field depression and perpendicular pressure increase.

  1. Observations of plasma waves in the colliding jet region of a magnetic flux rope flanked by two active X lines at the subsolar magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Øieroset, M.; Sundkvist, D.; Chaston, C. C.; Phan, T. D.; Mozer, F. S.; McFadden, J. P.; Angelopoulos, V.; Andersson, L.; Eastwood, J. P.

    2014-08-01

    We have performed a detailed analysis of plasma and wave observations in a magnetic flux rope encountered by the THEMIS-D spacecraft at the subsolar magnetopause. The extent of the flux rope was ˜270 ion skin depths in the outflow direction, and it was flanked by two active X lines producing colliding plasma jets in the flux rope core where ion heating and suprathermal electrons were observed. The colliding jet region was highly dynamic and characterized by enhanced wave power in a broad frequency range. High-frequency waves, including ion acoustic-like waves, electron holes, and whistler mode waves, were observed in a limited spatial region near the flux rope center and did not appear to be associated with the observed large-scale heating and energization. Low-frequency kinetic Alfvén waves, on the other hand, were enhanced in the entire flux rope core, suggesting a possible link with the observed ion heating.

  2. Waves in Space Plasmas Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredricks, R. W.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Waves in Space Plasmas (WISP) program is a joint international effort involving instrumentation to be designed and fabricated by funding from NASA and the National Research Council of Canada. The instrumentation, with a tentatively planned payload for 1986, can be used to perturb the plasma with radio waves to solve problems in ionospheric, atmospheric, magnetospheric, and plasma physics. Among the ionospheric and plasma phenomena to be investigated using WISP instrumentation are VLF wave-particle interactions; ELF/VLF propagation; traveling ionospheric disturbances and gravity wave coupling; equatorial plasma bubble phenomena; plasma wave physics such as mode-coupling, dispersion, and instabilities; and plasma physics of the antenna-plasma interactions.

  3. Experimental observation of nonlinear effects upon the excitation of large-amplitude cyclotron waves in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleskii, Y.G.; Zinchenko, V.I.; Nazarov, N.I.; Demchenko, V.V.

    1982-04-05

    A diamagnetic current flowing across the magnetic field has been detected in a system of a rotating electron beam and a plasma. This current is caused by the rf pressure of a packet of cyclotron waves excited in the plasma. The current flow is accompanied by intense electromagnetic emission from the plasma and by the appearance of electrons with a large transverse energy.

  4. Waves in Space Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, Donald

    2008-11-01

    Although low-frequency radio waves of extra-terrestrial origin were known over a century ago, it wasn't until the beginning of the space era fifty years ago that the origin of these waves could be adequately investigated. Since then spacecraft-borne instruments have shown that space plasmas exhibit an almost bewildering variety of wave phenomena, sometimes referred to as the plasma wave zoo. In this talk I will focus on two types of waves that occur in the magnetospheres of the strongly magnetized planets. They are whistler mode emissions and cyclotron maser radiation. Whistler mode emissions are generated in the now famous plasma wave mode known as the whistler mode, and cyclotron maser radiation is emitted mainly in the right-hand polarized free space mode. Both involve a cyclotron resonant interaction and require a perpendicular anisotropy to achieve wave growth. However, the origin of the anisotropy is different in the two cases. Whistler mode emissions occur in planetary radiation belts and are driven by the loss-cone anisotropy imposed by the planet. The resulting waves play a major role in the scattering and loss of radiation belt electrons. In contrast, the cyclotron maser radiation is generated in the auroral regions where parallel electric fields accelerate down-going electrons to high energies. The wave growth is driven by the shell distribution that arises from a combination of the parallel electric field and the magnetic mirror force. The resulting radiation is extremely intense and can be detected at great distances as an escaping radio emission. Both the whistler mode emissions and the cyclotron maser radiation display an amazing amount of fine structure. This structure is thought to be due to nonlinear trapping of the resonant electrons. The exact nonlinear mechanisms involved are still a topic of current study.

  5. Plasma Waves in the Magnetosheath of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangeway, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    Research supported by this grant is divided into three basic topics of investigation. These are: (1) Plasma waves in the Venus magnetosheath, (2) Plasma waves in the Venus foreshock and solar wind, (3) plasma waves in the Venus nightside ionosphere and ionotail. The main issues addressed in the first area - Plasma waves in the Venus magnetosheath - dealt with the wave modes observed in the magnetosheath and upper ionosphere, and whether these waves are a significant source of heating for the topside ionosphere. The source of the waves was also investigated. In the second area - Plasma waves in the Venus foreshock and solar wind, we carried out some research on waves observed upstream of the planetary bow shock known as the foreshock. The foreshock and bow shock modify the ambient magnetic field and plasma, and need to be understood if we are to understand the magnetosheath. Although most of the research was directed to wave observations on the dayside of the planet, in the last of the three basic areas studied, we also analyzed data from the nightside. The plasma waves observed by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter on the nightside continue to be of considerable interest since they have been cited as evidence for lightning on Venus.

  6. Observations of Plasma Waves in the Colliding Jet Region of a 3D Magnetic Flux Rope Flanked by Two Active Reconnection X Lines at the Subsolar Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oieroset, M.; Sundkvist, D. J.; Chaston, C. C.; Phan, T. D.; Mozer, F.; McFadden, J. P.; Angelopoulos, V.; Andersson, L.; Eastwood, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    We have performed a detailed analysis of plasma and wave observations in a 3D magnetic flux rope encountered by the THEMIS spacecraft at the subsolar magnetopause. The extent of the flux rope was ˜270 ion skin depths in the outflow direction, and it was flanked by two active reconnection X lines producing colliding plasma jets in the flux rope core where ion heating and suprathermal electrons were observed. The colliding jet region was highly dynamic and characterized by the presence of high-frequency waves such as ion acoustic-like waves, electron holes, and whistler mode waves near the flux rope center and low-frequency kinetic Alfvén waves over a larger region. We will discuss possible links between these waves and particle heating.

  7. Plasma waves in the magnetotail of Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.; Mauk, B. H.

    1989-04-01

    Plasma wave phenomena observed during the Voyager 2 passing through the magnetotail of Uranus after its encounter with the planet on January 24, 1986 are described. The location of the wave events, their probable mode of propagation, and their association with various plasma and charged particle observations are presented. It was found that the most remarkable magnetotail plasma waves were inside the distance of about 23 Uranus radii, with an additional event occurring between about 48 and 56 Uranus radii. The frequency of these magnetotail plasma waves was found to be below about 100 Hz, extending down to the 10-Hz lower frequency limit of the receiver. The shape of the spectrum and the location of the wave activity near the boundary layer suggest that these waves may be similar to broadband electrostatic waves observed in similar regions of the earth's magnetotail.

  8. In situ ionospheric observations of severe weather-related gravity waves and associated small-scale plasma structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Michael C.

    1997-01-01

    On July 27, 1988, two sounding rockets were launched over a small thunderstorm cell which constituted the remnants of a large frontal event which had lasted for several hours over the eastern seaboard. One of the rockets was instrumented for detection of the electromagnetic impulse from lightning strikes and its subsequent interaction with the ionospheric plasma [Kelley et al., 1990]. The second had on board an absolute electron density probe, the results from which we report here. We present evidence that a gravity wave was spawned by the front and propagated nearly to the F peak in the ionosphere, where it steepened and created structure in the medium at scales much less than the vertical wavenumber of the major disturbance. The fluctuation spectrum along the rocket path was elevated for scales from 25 km down to less than 10 m. At scales between 10 km and just under 100 m, characterization of the spectrum by a power law yields a spectral index less than that displayed by such well-studied processes as bottomside spread F and barium cloud striations. Similar results have been reported for gravity wave induced intermediate scale structures at midlatitudes [Wernik et al., 1986]. The mixing theory described by Fridman [1990] may be relevant to these observations.

  9. Investigation of the role of plasma wave cascading processes in the formation of midlatitude irregularities utilizing GPS and radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltrass, A.; Scales, W. A.; Erickson, P. J.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Baker, J. B. H.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies reveal that midlatitude ionospheric irregularities are less understood due to lack of models and observations that can explain the characteristics of the observed wave structures. In this paper, the cascading processes of both the temperature gradient instability (TGI) and the gradient drift instability (GDI) are investigated as the cause of these irregularities. Based on observations obtained during a coordinated experiment between the Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar and the Blackstone Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radar, a time series for the growth rate of both TGI and GDI is calculated for observations in the subauroral ionosphere under both quiet and disturbed geomagnetic conditions. Recorded GPS scintillation data are analyzed to monitor the amplitude scintillations and to obtain the spectral characteristics of irregularities producing ionospheric scintillations. Spatial power spectra of the density fluctuations associated with the TGI from nonlinear plasma simulations are compared with both the GPS scintillation spectral characteristics and previous in situ satellite spectral measurements. The spectral comparisons suggest that initially, TGI or/and GDI irregularities are generated at large-scale size (kilometer scale), and the dissipation of the energy associated with these irregularities occurs by generating smaller and smaller (decameter scale) irregularities. The alignment between experimental, theoretical, and computational results of this study suggests that in spite of expectations from linear growth rate calculations, cascading processes involving TGI and GDI are likely responsible for the midlatitude ionospheric irregularities associated with GPS scintillations during disturbed times.

  10. Initial Results of DC Electric Fields, Associated Plasma Drifts, Magnetic Fields, and Plasma Waves Observed on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Klenzing, J.; Rowland, D.; Maynard, N.

    2010-01-01

    Initial results are presented from the Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite, a mission designed to understand, model, and forecast the presence of equatorial ionospheric irregularities. The VEFI instrument includes a vector DC electric field detector, a fixed-bias Langmuir probe operating in the ion saturation regime, a flux gate magnetometer, an optical lightning detector, and associated electronics including a burst memory. Compared to data obtained during more active solar conditions, the ambient DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts are variable and somewhat weak, typically < 1 mV/m. Although average drift directions show similarities to those previously reported, eastward/outward during day and westward/downward at night, this pattern varies significantly with longitude and is not always present. Daytime vertical drifts near the magnetic equator are largest after sunrise, with smaller average velocities after noon. Little or no pre-reversal enhancement in the vertical drift near sunset is observed, attributable to the solar minimum conditions creating a much reduced neutral dynamo at the satellite altitude. The nighttime ionosphere is characterized by larger amplitude, structured electric fields, even where the plasma density appears nearly quiescent. Data from successive orbits reveal that the vertical drifts and plasma density are both clearly organized with longitude. The spread-F density depletions and corresponding electric fields that have been detected thus far have displayed a preponderance to appear between midnight and dawn. Associated with the narrow plasma depletions that are detected are broad spectra of electric field and plasma density irregularities for which a full vector set of measurements is available for detailed study. Finally, the data set includes a wide range of ELF/VLF/HF oscillations corresponding to a variety of plasma waves

  11. Eruption of a plasma blob, associated M-class flare, and large-scale extreme-ultraviolet wave observed by SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Manoharan, P. K.

    2013-05-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the formation and ejection of a plasma blob and associated extreme ultraviolet (EUV) waves in active region (AR) NOAA 11176, observed by SDO/AIA and STEREO on 25 March 2011. The EUV images observed with the AIA instrument clearly show the formation and ejection of a plasma blob from the lower atmosphere of the Sun at ~9 min prior to the onset of the M1.0 flare. This onset of the M-class flare happened at the site of the blob formation, while the blob was rising in a parabolic path with an average speed of ~300 km s. The blob also showed twisting and de-twisting motion in the lower corona, and the blob speed varied from ~10-540 km s. The faster and slower EUV wavefronts were observed in front of the plasma blob during its impulsive acceleration phase. The faster EUV wave propagated with a speed of ~785 to 1020 km s, whereas the slower wavefront speed varied in between ~245 and 465 km s. The timing and speed of the faster wave match the shock speed estimated from the drift rate of the associated type II radio burst. The faster wave experiences a reflection by the nearby AR NOAA 11177. In addition, secondary waves were observed (only in the 171 Å channel), when the primary fast wave and plasma blob impacted the funnel-shaped coronal loops. The Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) magnetograms revealed the continuous emergence of new magnetic flux along with shear flows at the site of the blob formation. It is inferred that the emergence of twisted magnetic fields in the form of arch-filaments/"anemone-type" loops is the likely cause for the plasma blob formation and associated eruption along with the triggering of M-class flare. Furthermore, the faster EUV wave formed ahead of the blob shows the signature of fast-mode MHD wave, whereas the slower wave seems to be generated by the field line compression by the plasma blob. The secondary wave trains originated from the funnel-shaped loops are probably the fast magnetoacoustic waves

  12. Millimeter-wave generation via plasma three-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Robert W.; Santoru, Joseph

    1988-06-01

    Plasma three-wave mixing is a collective phenomena whereby electron-beam-driven electron plasma waves (EPWs) are nonlinearly coupled to an electromagnetic (EM) radiation field. The basic physics of three-wave mixing is investigated in the mm-wave regime and the scaling of mm-wave characteristics established with beam and plasma parameters. Our approach is to employ two counterinjected electron beams in a plasma-loaded circular waveguide to drive counterstreaming EPWs. The nonlinear coupling of these waves generates an EM waveguide mode which oscillates at twice the plasma frequency and is coupled out into rectangular waveguides. Independent control of the waveguide plasma, beam voltage, and beam current is exercised to allow a careful parametric investigation of beam transport, EPW dynamics and three-wave-mixing physics. The beam-plasma experiment, which employs a wire-anode discharge to generate high-density plasma in a 3.8 cm-diameter waveguide, has been used to generate radiation at frequencies from 7 to 60 GHz. Two cold-cathode, secondary-emission electron guns are used to excite the EPWs. Output radiation is observed only when both beams are injected, and the total beam current exceeds a threshold value of 3 A. The threshold is related to the self-magnetic pinch of each beam which increases the beam density and growth rate of the EPWs.

  13. Direct observation of transition to electron Bernstein waves from electromagnetic mode by three mode-conversion scenarios in the dipole confinement torus plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchijima, K.; Takemoto, T.; Morikawa, J.; Ogawa, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Direct measurement experiments on the mode conversion to the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) have been conducted in dipole confinement torus plasmas for three excitation scenarios; i.e. perpendicular injections of an eXtraordinary mode (X-mode) from the low- and high-magnetic-field sides, and the oblique injection of an Ordinary mode (O-mode) from the low-magnetic-field side. By inserting probe antennas into plasmas, wave propagation has been directly measured. At plasma conditions for the EBW excitation, several characteristics which indicate the mode conversion to the EBWs have been observed; i.e. a short wavelength wave, an electrostatic and longitudinal mode, backward propagation at the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) region. Meanwhile, the wavelengths experimentally observed might be slightly longer than those of theoretical prediction. In the case of the oblique injection of the O-mode, it has been identified that the window of the injection angle for the excitation of the EBW would be quite limited, and the optimum angle seems to be roughly in agreement with theory. These experimental results might support that the electromagnetic waves injected outside of torus plasmas reach to the UHR region and convert wave characteristics to the EBWs for three excitation scenarios.

  14. Plasma wave propagation with a plasma density gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Guangsup; Choi, Eun-Ha; Uhm, Han Sup

    2011-03-15

    Plasma waves with the plasma diffusion velocity u{sub n} due to a plasma density gradient are described in a positive column plasma. The ion wave is generated by the perturbation of the operating frequency 10{sup 6} s{sup -1} and it propagates with the group velocity u{sub g{approx}}c{sub s}{sup 2}/u{sub n{approx}}(10{sup 5}-10{sup 6}) m/s, where c{sub s} is the acoustic velocity in a fine tube fluorescent lamp, while the electron wave cannot be generated with a turbulence of low frequency less than the electron oscillation frequency {omega}{sub pe}. The propagation of the lighting signal observed in long tube fluorescent lamps is well understood with the propagation of ion waves occurring along the plasma density gradient.

  15. Effect of wave localization on plasma instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Levedahl, W.K.

    1987-01-01

    The Anderson model of wave localization in random media is invoked to study the effect of solar-wind density turbulence on plasma processes associated with the solar type-III radio burst. ISEE-3 satellite data indicate that a possible model for the type-III process is the parametric decay of Langmuir waves excited by solar-flare electron streams into daughter electromagnetic and ion-acoustic waves. The threshold for this instability, however, is much higher than observed Langmuir-wave levels because of rapid wave convection of the transverse electromagnetic daughter wave in the case where the solar wind is assumed homogeneous. Langmuir and transverse waves near critical density satisfy the Ioffe-Riegel criteria for wave localization in the solar wind with observed density fluctuations {approximately}1%. Computer simulations using a linearized hybrid code show that an electron beam will excite localized Langmuir waves in a plasma with density turbulence. An action-principle approach is used to develop a theory of nonlinear wave processes when waves are localized. A theory of resonant particles diffusion by localized waves is developed to explain the saturation of the beam-plasma instability.

  16. Plasma Turbulence and observational effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan Wei

    Plasma Turbulence is present in many astronomical settings, and it plays an important role in releasing the magnetic and/or kinetic energy into accelerating particles and heating the plasma. With the diffusion approximation, I study the cascade and damping of Alfvén-cyclotron turbulence in solar plasmas numerically. Motivated by wave-wave couplings and nonlinear effects, I test several forms of the diffusion tensor. For a general locally anisotropic and inhomogeneous diffusion tensor in the wave vector space, the turbulence spectrum in the inertial range can be fitted with power-laws with the index varying with the wave propagation direction. For several locally isotropic but inhomogeneous diffusion coefficients, the steady-state turbulence spectra are nearly isotropic in the absence of damping and can be fitted by a single power-law function. However, the energy flux is strongly polarized due to the inhomogeneity that leads to an anisotropic cascade. Including the anisotropic thermal damping, the turbulence spectrum cuts off at the wave numbers, where the damping rates become comparable to the cascade rates. The combined anisotropic effects of cascade and damping make this cutoff wave number dependent on the wave propagation direction, and the propagation direction integrated turbulence spectrum resembles a broken power-law, which cuts off at the maximum of the cutoff wave numbers or the 4 He cyclotron frequency. Taking into account the Doppler effects, the model can naturally reproduce the broken power-law wave spectra observed in the solar wind and predicts that a higher break frequency is always accompanied with a greater spectral index change that may be caused by the increase of the Alfvén Mach number, the reciprocal of the plasma beta, and/or the angle between the solar wind velocity and the mean magnetic field. These predictions can be tested by future observations. Solar flare is the most energetic process in solar system and becomes the natural

  17. Waves In Space Plasmas (WISP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredericks, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Topics included in the WISP science objectives are: (1) VLF wave injection experiments; (2) traveling ionospheric disturbances and atmospheric gravity waves; (3) ionospheric bubbles; and (4) plasma wave physics. Flow charts of the WISP investigation organization, the project life cycle and the instrumentation are given.

  18. Millimeter Wave Communication through Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    Millimeter wave communication through plasma at frequencies of 35 GHz or higher shows promise in maintaining communications connectivity during rocket launch and re-entry, critical events which are typically plagued with communication dropouts. Extensive prior research into plasmas has characterized the plasma frequency at these events, and research at the Kennedy Space Center is investigating the feasibility of millimeter communication through these plasma frequencies.

  19. Creating and studying ion acoustic waves in ultracold neutral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Killian, T. C.; Castro, J.; McQuillen, P.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2012-05-15

    We excite ion acoustic waves in ultracold neutral plasmas by imprinting density modulations during plasma creation. Laser-induced fluorescence is used to observe the density and velocity perturbations created by the waves. The effect of expansion of the plasma on the evolution of the wave amplitude is described by treating the wave action as an adiabatic invariant. After accounting for this effect, we determine that the waves are weakly damped, but the damping is significantly faster than expected for Landau damping.

  20. Nonlinear plasma wave in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, Sergei V.; Zh. Esirkepov, Timur; Kando, Masaki; Koga, James K.; Hosokai, Tomonao; Zhidkov, Alexei G.; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2013-08-01

    Nonlinear axisymmetric cylindrical plasma oscillations in magnetized collisionless plasmas are a model for the electron fluid collapse on the axis behind an ultrashort relativisically intense laser pulse exciting a plasma wake wave. We present an analytical description of the strongly nonlinear oscillations showing that the magnetic field prevents closing of the cavity formed behind the laser pulse. This effect is demonstrated with 3D PIC simulations of the laser-plasma interaction. An analysis of the betatron oscillations of fast electrons in the presence of the magnetic field reveals a characteristic "Four-Ray Star" pattern.

  1. Observation of an edge coherent mode and poloidal flow in the electron cyclotron wave induced high βp plasma in QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Santanu; Zushi, H.; Nishino, N.; Mishra, K.; Mahira, Y.; Tashima, S.; Ejiri, A.; Yamaguchi, T.; Onchi, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Hanada, K.; Nakamura, K.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Kuzmin, A.; Matsuoka, K.

    2016-08-01

    Fluctuations are measured in the edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) of QUEST using fast visible imaging diagnostic. Electron cyclotron wave injection in the Ohmic plasma features excitation of low frequency coherent fluctuations near the separatrix and enhanced cross-field transport. Plasma shifts from initial high field side limiter bound (inboard limited, IL) towards inboard poloidal null (IPN) configuration with steepening of the density profile at the edge. This may have facilitated the increased edge and SOL fluctuation activities. Observation of the coherent mode, associated plasma flow, and particle out-flux, for the first time in the IPN plasma configuration in a spherical tokamak may provide further impetus to the edge and SOL turbulence studies in tokamaks.

  2. Nonlinear whistler wave scattering in space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yukhimuk, V.; Roussel-Dupre, R.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper the evolution of nonlinear scattering of whistler mode waves by kinetic Alfven waves (KAW) in time and two spatial dimensions is studied analytically. The authors suggest this nonlinear process as a mechanism of kinetic Alfven wave generation in space plasmas. This mechanism can explain the dependence of Alfven wave generation on whistler waves observed in magnetospheric and ionospheric plasmas. The observational data show a dependence for the generation of long periodic pulsations Pc5 on whistler wave excitation in the auroral and subauroral zone of the magnetosphere. This dependence was first observed by Ondoh T.I. For 79 cases of VLF wave excitation registered by Ondoh at College Observatory (L=64.6 N), 52 of them were followed by Pc5 geomagnetic pulsation generation. Similar results were obtained at the Loparskaia Observatory (L=64 N) for auroral and subauroral zone of the magnetosphere. Thus, in 95% of the cases when VLF wave excitation occurred the generation of long periodic geomagnetic pulsations Pc5 were observed. The observations also show that geomagnetic pulsations Pc5 are excited simultaneously or insignificantly later than VLF waves. In fact these two phenomena are associated genetically: the excitation of VLF waves leads to the generation of geomagnetic pulsations Pc5. The observations show intensive generation of geomagnetic pulsations during thunderstorms. Using an electromagnetic noise monitoring system covering the ULF range (0.01-10 Hz) A.S. Fraser-Smith observed intensive ULF electromagnetic wave during a large thunderstorm near the San-Francisco Bay area on September 23, 1990. According to this data the most significant amplification in ULF wave activity was observed for waves with a frequency of 0.01 Hz and it is entirely possible that stronger enhancements would have been measured at lower frequencies.

  3. Waves and instabilities in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Plasma as a Dielectric Medium; Nyquist Technique; Absolute and Convective Instabilities; Landau Damping and Phase Mixing; Particle Trapping and Breakdown of Linear Theory; Solution of Viasov Equation via Guilding-Center Transformation; Kinetic Theory of Magnetohydrodynamic Waves; Geometric Optics; Wave-Kinetic Equation; Cutoff and Resonance; Resonant Absorption; Mode Conversion; Gyrokinetic Equation; Drift Waves; Quasi-Linear Theory; Ponderomotive Force; Parametric Instabilities; Problem Sets for Homework, Midterm and Final Examinations.

  4. Detailed characterization of plasma wave behavior using collective Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Tierney, T.

    2004-01-01

    Collective Thomson scattering is widely used to measure bulk plasma parameters in high density, laser-produced plasmas, and is used to detect plasma waves from instabilities. However, inhomogeneity in these small plasmas often leads to a spectrum with insufficient resolution to discern phenomena such as wave damping and nonlinear wave effects. Two techniques are discussed for laser-produced plasmas to overcome these limitations, and provide details of wave damping and nonlinear behavior. First, imaging Thomson scattering is used to obtain spatially-resolved plasma wave profiles in a 100-200 eV plasma, and allows us to infer ion-ion collisional damping rates. Second, a diffraction-limited laser beam is used to drive stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a hot plasma, generating large amplitude Langmuir waves. The comparatively small interaction volume permits sufficient spectral resolution to observe nonlinear wave behavior, previously unresolved in other experiments.

  5. Nonlinear Electromagnetic Waves and Spherical Arc-Polarized Waves in Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B.; Ho, Christian M.; Arballo, John K.; Lakhina, Gurbax S.; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Neubauer, Fritz M.

    1997-01-01

    We review observations of nonlinear plasma waves detected by interplanetary spacecraft. For this paper we will focus primarily on the phase-steepened properties of such waves. Plasma waves at comet Giacobini-Zinner measured by the International Cometary Explorer (ICE), at comets Halley and Grigg-Skjellerup measured by Giotto, and interplanetary Alfven waves measured by Ulysses, will be discussed and intercompared.

  6. Shock Wave Dynamics in Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of the dynamics of shock waves in weakly ionized argon plasmas has been performed using a pressure ruptured shock tube. The velocity of the shock is observed to increase when the shock traverses the plasma. The observed increases cannot be accounted for by thermal effects alone. Possible mechanisms that could explain the anomalous behavior include a vibrational/translational relaxation in the nonequilibrium plasma, electron diffusion across the shock front resulting from high electron mobility, and the propagation of ion-acoustic waves generated at the shock front. Using a turbulence model based on reduced kinetic theory, analysis of the observed results suggest a role for turbulence in anomalous shock dynamics in weakly ionized media and plasma-induced hypersonic drag reduction.

  7. Generalized Langmuir Waves in Magnetized Kinetic Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willes, A. J.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2000-01-01

    The properties of unmagnetized Langmuir waves and cold plasma magnetoionic waves (x, o, z and whistler) are well known. However, the connections between these modes in a magnetized kinetic plasma have not been explored in detail. Here, wave properties are investigated by numerically solving the dispersion equation derived from the Vlasov equations both with and without a beam instability present. For omega(sub p)>Omega(sub e), it is shown that the generalized Langmuir mode at oblique propagation angles has magnetic z-mode characteristics at low wave numbers and thermal Langmuir mode characteristics at high wave numbers. For omega(sub p)wave numbers. The transition from the Langmuir/z mode to the Langmuir/whistler mode near omega(sub p) = Omega(sub e) is rapid. In addition, the effects on wave dispersion and polarization after adding a beam are investigated. Applications of this theory to magnetized Langmuir waves in Earth's foreshock and the solar wind, to waves observed near the plasma frequency in the auroral regions, and to solar type III bursts are discussed.

  8. Plasma Beat-Wave Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Christopher E.

    2002-04-01

    Among all the advanced accelerator concepts that use lasers as the power source, most of the effort to date has been with the idea of using a laser pulse to excite a accelerating mode in a plasma. Within this area, there are a variety of approaches for creating the accelerating mode, as indicated by the other talks in this session. What is common to these approaches is the physics of how a laser pulse pushes on plasma electrons to organize electron-density perturbations, the sources of the ultra-high (> GeV/M) accelerating gradients. It is the "ponderomotive force", proportional to the local gradient of the of the laser intensity, that pushes plasma electrons forward (on the leading edge of the pulse) and backwards (on the trailing edge) which leads to harmonic motion of the electrons. As the laser pulse moves through the plasma at group velocity Vg c, the oscillating electrons show up macroscopically as a plasma mode or wave with frequency w equal to the plasma frequency and k = w/Vg. For short laser pulses, this is the Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) concept. Closely related is the Plasma Beat-Wave Acceleration (PBWA) concept. Here, the laser pulse that perturbs the plasma is composed of two closely-spaced frequencies that "beat", i.e., periodically constructively and destructively interfere, forming an electromagnetic beat wave. One can visualize this as a train of short pulses. If this beating frequency is set to the plasma frequency, then each pulse in the train will reinforce the density perturbation caused by the previous pulse. The principal advantage of multiple pulses driving up the plasma wave as opposed to a single pulse is in efficiency, allowing for the production of relatively large diameter (more 1-D like) accelerating modes. In this talk I will discuss past, current and planned PBWA experiments which are taking place at UCLA, RAL in England, and LULI in France.

  9. Whistler waves observed upstream from collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Waves in the frequency range 0.5 - 4 Hz were studied in the region upstream of the earth's bow shock using data from the fluxgate magnetic field experiment on IMP-6. Analysis of 150 examples of these waves during a three month interval indicates that amplitudes are generally less than 1 or 2 gammas and propagation directions generally make angles of between 20 and 40 degrees with the field direction. The waves as measured in the spacecraft frame of reference are either left or right hand polarized with respect to the average field direction. It is concluded that the observed waves are right handed waves in the plasma frame of reference with wavelengths of approximately 100 km propagating upstream in the whistler mode. Doppler shifting reduces the observed frequencies in the spacecraft frame and reverses the observed polarization for those waves propagating more directly upstream. Similar waves are seen ahead of most interplanetary shocks.

  10. The Polar Plasma Wave Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; Randall, R. F.; Odem, D. L.; Remington, S. L.; Averkamp, T. F.; Debower, M. M.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Huff, R. L.; Kirchner, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    The Plasma Wave Instrument on the Polar spacecraft is designed to provide measurements of plasma waves in the Earth's polar regions over the frequency range from 0.1 Hz to 800 kHz. Three orthogonal electric dipole antennas are used to detect electric fields, two in the spin plane and one aligned along the spacecraft spin axis. A magnetic loop antenna and a triaxial magnetic search coil antenna are used to detect magnetic fields. Signals from these antennas are processed by five receiver systems: a wideband receiver, a high-frequency waveform receiver, a low-frequency waveform receiver, two multichannel analyzers; and a pair of sweep frequency receivers. Compared to previous plasma wave instruments, the Polar plasma wave instrument has several new capabilities. These include (1) an expanded frequency range to improve coverage of both low- and high-frequency wave phenomena, (2) the ability to simultaneously capture signals from six orthogonal electric and magnetic field sensors, and (3) a digital wideband receiver with up to 8-bit resolution and sample rates as high as 249k samples s(exp -1).

  11. Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Large Scale (100's of km) Waves Below the Equatorial F-peak as Seeds of Spread-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.; Liebrecht, C.

    2012-12-01

    Electric field and plasma density observations gathered on the C/NOFS satellite are presented in cases where the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated above the satellite perigee of 400 km in the evening. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite frequently show evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. We present statistics of numerous examples of these large scale waves detected by instruments on the C/NOFS satellite.

  12. Wave structures observed in the equatorial F-region plasma density and temperature during the sunset period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savio, S.; Muralikrishna, P.; Batista, I. S.; de Meneses, F. C.

    2016-11-01

    Electron density and temperature measurements were carried out with Langmuir probes (LP) on board Brazilian sounding rockets launched soon after the local sunset from Natal (5.8°S, 35.2°W, dip 23.7°S) and Alcântara (2.3°S, 44.4°W, dip 7°S), Brazil, on December 02, 2011, and December 08, 2012, respectively. Digisondes operating near the launching sites revealed a rapid rise in the F-region base indicating a probable pre-reversal enhancement of the vertical plasma drift. Strong spread-F traces are also visible on the ionograms simultaneously recorded, suggesting the occurrence of ionospheric bubbles during these campaigns. Electron density and temperature vertical profiles estimated from the LP data exhibit in the E-F region valley (120-300 km) the presence of large-amplitude wave activity, and electron temperature values higher than 1600 K, respectively, phenomena probably related to the electrodynamic processes that occur during the sunset period.

  13. The Unified Radio and Plasma wave investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. G.; Bougeret, J. L.; Caldwell, J.; Canu, P.; De Conchy, Y.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Desch, M. D.; Fainberg, J.; Goetz, K.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    The scientific objectives of the Ulysses Unified Radio and Plasma wave (URAP) experiment are twofold: (1) the determination of the direction, angular size, and polarization of radio sources for remote sensing of the heliosphere and the Jovian magnetosphere and (2) the detailed study of local wave phenomena, which determine the transport coefficients of the ambient plasma. A brief discussion of the scientific goals of the experiment is followed by a comprehensive description of the instrument. The URAP sensors consist of a 72.5 m electric field antenna in the spin plane, a 7.5-m electric field monopole along the spin axis of a pair of orthogonal search coil magnetic antennas. The various receivers, designed to encompass specific needs of the investigation, cover the frequency range from dc to 1 MHz. A relaxation sounder provides very accurate electron density measurements. Radio and plasma wave observations are shown to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the URAP instruments: radio observations include solar bursts, auroral kilometric radiation, and Jovian bursts; plasma waves include Langmuir waves, ion acousticlike noise, and whistlers.

  14. Waves In Space Plasmas (WISP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W. W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Waves in space plasmas (WISP) utilizes powerful radio transmitters and sensitive receivers to probe the secrets of the magnetosphere, ionosphere and atmosphere. The scientific objective is to achieve a better understanding of the physical processes occurring in these regions. For example, audio frequency radio waves will be radiated from the long WISP antenna, will travel to the outer reaches of the magnetosphere, and will interact with Van Allen belt particles, releasing some of their energy which amplifies the waves. Study of this interaction will give us a better understanding of a major magnetospheric process, wave particle interactions. Radio waves from WISP at higher frequencies (AM radio and beyond) will be reflected by the ionosphere and will, for example, advance our understanding of bubbles in the equatorial ionosphere which affect satellite communications.

  15. Waves In Space Plasmas (WISP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W. W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Waves in space plasmas (WISP) utilizes powerful radio transmitters and sensitive receivers to probe the secrets of the magnetosphere, ionosphere and atmosphere. The scientific objective is to achieve a better understanding of the physical processes occurring in these regions. For example, audio frequency radio waves will be radiated from the long WISP antenna, will travel to the outer reaches of the magnetosphere, and will interact with Van Allen belt particles, releasing some of their energy which amplifies the waves. Study of this interaction will give a better understanding of a major magnetospheric process, wave-particle interactions. Radio waves from WISP at higher frequencies (AM radio and beyond) will be reflected by the ionosphere and will, for example, advance our understanding of bubbles in the equatorial ionosphere which affect satellite communications.

  16. Waves in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, Eugene R

    2009-09-21

    Quadratic corrections to the metaplectic formulation of mode conversions. In this work we showed how to systematically deal with quadratic corrections beyond the usual linearization of the dispersion matrix at a conversion. The linearization leads to parabolic cylinder functions as the local approximation to the full-wave behavior, but these do not include the variation in amplitude associated with ray refraction in the neighborhood of the conversion. Hence, the region over which they give a good fit to the incoming and outgoing WKB solutions is small. By including higher order corrections it is possible to provide a much more robust matching. We also showed that it was possible, in principle, to extend these methods to arbitrary order. A new normal form for mode conversion. This is based upon our earlier NSF-DOE-funded work on ray helicity. We have begun efforts to apply these new ideas in practical ray tracing algorithms. Group theoretical foundation of path integrals and phase space representations of wave problems. Using the symbol theory of N. Zobin, we developed a new understanding of path integrals on phase space. The initial goal was to find practical computational tools for dealing with non-standard mode conversions. Along the way we uncovered a new way to represent wave functions directly on phase space without the intermediary of a Wigner function. We are exploring the use of these ideas for numerical studies of conversion, with the goal of eventually incorporating kinetic effects. Wave packet studies of gyroresonance crossing. In earlier work, Huanchun Ye and Allan Kaufman -- building upon ideas due to Lazar Friedland -- had shown that gyroresonance crossings could be treated as a double conversion. This perspective is one we have used for many of our papers since then. We are now performing a detailed numerical comparison between full-wave and ray tracing approaches in the study of minority-ion gyroresonance crossing. In this study, a fast magnetosonic

  17. Waves in Space Plasmas (WISP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, Wynne

    1994-01-01

    Activities under this project have included participation in the Waves in Space Plasmas (WISP) program, a study of the data processing requirements for WISP, and theoretical studies of radio sounding, ducting, and magnetoionic theory. An analysis of radio sounding in the magnetosphere was prepared.

  18. Current in wave driven plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Karney, C.F.F.; Fisch, N.J.

    1985-06-01

    A theory for the generation of current in a toroidal plasma by radio-frequency waves is presented. The effect of an opposing electric field is included, allowing the case of time varying currents to be studied. The key quantities that characterize this regime are identified and numerically calculated. Circuit equations suitable for use in ray-tracing and transport codes are given.

  19. On the breaking of a plasma wave in a thermal plasma. II. Electromagnetic wave interaction with the breaking plasma wave

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, Sergei V.; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki; Koga, James K.; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.; Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Bulanov, Stepan S.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric; Califano, Francesco; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2012-11-15

    In thermal plasma, the structure of the density singularity formed in a relativistically large amplitude plasma wave close to the wavebreaking limit leads to a refraction coefficient with discontinuous spatial derivatives. This results in a non-exponentially small above-barrier reflection of an electromagnetic wave interacting with the nonlinear plasma wave.

  20. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SHOCK WAVE DYNAMICS IN MAGNETIZED PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Nirmol K. Podder

    2009-03-17

    In this four-year project (including one-year extension), the project director and his research team built a shock-wave-plasma apparatus to study shock wave dynamics in glow discharge plasmas in nitrogen and argon at medium pressure (1–20 Torr), carried out various plasma and shock diagnostics and measurements that lead to increased understanding of the shock wave acceleration phenomena in plasmas. The measurements clearly show that in the steady-state dc glow discharge plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave velocity increases, its amplitude decreases, and the shock wave disperses non-linearly as a function of the plasma current. In the pulsed discharge plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave dispersion width and velocity increase as a function of the delay between the switch-on of the plasma and shock-launch. In the afterglow plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave dispersion width and velocity decrease as a function of the delay between the plasma switch-off and shock-launch. These changes are found to be opposite and reversing towards the room temperature value which is the initial condition for plasma ignition case. The observed shock wave properties in both igniting and afterglow plasmas correlate well with the inferred temperature changes in the two plasmas.

  1. Linear and Nonlinear Electrostatic Waves in Unmagnetized Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, A. A.; Shukla, P. K.

    2010-12-14

    A rigorous and systematic theoretical study has been made of linear and nonlinear electrostatic waves propagating in unmagnetized dusty plasmas. The basic features of linear and nonlinear electrostatic waves (particularly, dust-ion-acoustic and dust-acoustic waves) for different space and laboratory dusty plasma conditions are described. The experimental observations of such linear and nonlinear features of dust-ion-acoustic and dust-acoustic waves are briefly discussed.

  2. The Galileo plasma wave investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Shaw, R. R.; Roux, A.; Gendrin, R.; Kennel, C. F.; Scarf, F. L.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the Galileo plasma wave investigation is to study plasma waves and radio emissions in the magnetosphere of Jupiter. The plasma wave instrument uses an electric dipole antenna to detect electric fields, and two search coil magnetic antennas to detect magnetic fields. The frequency range covered is 5 Hz to 5.6 MHz for electric fields and 5 Hz to 160 kHz for magnetic fields. Low time-resolution survey spectrums are provided by three on-board spectrum analyzers. In the normal mode of operation the frequency resolution is about 10 percent, and the time resolution for a complete set of electric and magnetic field measurements is 37.33 s. High time-resolution spectrums are provided by a wideband receiver. The wideband receiver provides waveform measurements over bandwidths of 1, 10, and 80 kHz. Compared to previous measurements at Jupiter this instrument has several new capabilities. These new capabilities include (1) both electric and magnetic field measurements to distinguish electrostatic and electromagnetic waves, (2) direction finding measurements to determine source locations, and (3) increased bandwidth for the wideband measurements.

  3. The Potential for Ambient Plasma Wave Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James H.; Williams, George J.

    2016-01-01

    A truly robust space exploration program will need to make use of in-situ resources as much as possible to make the endeavor affordable. Most space propulsion concepts are saddled with one fundamental burden; the propellant needed to produce momentum. The most advanced propulsion systems currently in use utilize electric and/or magnetic fields to accelerate ionized propellant. However, significant planetary exploration missions in the coming decades, such as the now canceled Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter, are restricted by propellant mass and propulsion system lifetimes, using even the most optimistic projections of performance. These electric propulsion vehicles are inherently limited in flexibility at their final destination, due to propulsion system wear, propellant requirements, and the relatively low acceleration of the vehicle. A few concepts are able to utilize the environment around them to produce thrust: Solar or magnetic sails and, with certain restrictions, electrodynamic tethers. These concepts focus primarily on using the solar wind or ambient magnetic fields to generate thrust. Technically immature, quasi-propellantless alternatives lack either the sensitivity or the power to provide significant maneuvering. An additional resource to be considered is the ambient plasma and magnetic fields in solar and planetary magnetospheres. These environments, such as those around the Sun or Jupiter, have been shown to host a variety of plasma waves. Plasma wave propulsion takes advantage of an observed astrophysical and terrestrial phenomenon: Alfven waves. These are waves that propagate in the plasma and magnetic fields around and between planets and stars. The generation of Alfven waves in ambient magnetic and plasma fields to generate thrust is proposed as a truly propellantless propulsion system which may enable an entirely new matrix of exploration missions. Alfven waves are well known, transverse electromagnetic waves that propagate in magnetized plasmas at

  4. Simulation of the nonlinear evolution of electron plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Cairns, I. H.

    1991-01-01

    Electrostatic waves driven by an electron beam in an ambient magnetized plasma were studied using a quasi-1D PIC simulation of electron plasma waves (i.e., Langmuir waves). The results disclose the presence of a process for moving wave energy from frequencies and wavenumbers predicted by linear theory to the Langmuir-like frequencies during saturation of the instability. A decay process for producing backward propagating Langmuir-like waves, along with low-frequency waves, is observed. The simulation results, however, indicate that the backscattering process is not the conventional Langmuir wave decay. Electrostatic waves near multiples of the electron plasma frequency are generated by wave-wave coupling during the nonlinear stage of the simulations, confirming the suggestion of Klimas (1983).

  5. Evidence for Langmuir wave collapse in the interplanetary plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, Paul J.; Goetz, K.; Howard, R. L.; Monson, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    With the Fast Envelope Sampler part of the URAP experiment on Ulysses, there is observed much rapidly varying structure in plasma waves in the solar wind. Extremely narrow (1 ms) structures observed together with electrostatic Langmuir waves, as well as some broader Langmuir wave packets are discussed.

  6. Waves in plasmas: some historical highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Stix, T.H.

    1984-08-01

    To illustrate the development of some fundamental concepts in plasma waves, a number of experimental observations, going back over half a century, are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the phenomena of dispersion, collisionfree damping, finite-Larmor-radius and cyclotron and cyclotron-harmonic effects, nonlocal response, and stochasticity. One may note not only the constructive interplay between observation and theory and experiment but also that major advances have come from each of the many disciplines that invoke plasma physics as a tool, including radio communication, astrophysics, controlled fusion, space physics, and basic research.

  7. Saturn's ULF wave foreshock boundary: Cassini observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, N.; Gómez, D. O.; Bertucci, C.; Mazelle, C.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2013-05-01

    Even though the solar wind is highly supersonic, intense ultra-low frequency (ULF) wave activity has been detected in regions just upstream of the bow shocks of magnetized planets. This feature was first observed ahead of the Earth's bow shock, and the corresponding region was called the ULF wave foreshock, which is embedded within the planet's foreshock. The properties as well as the spatial distribution of ULF waves within the Earth's foreshock have been extensively studied over the last three decades and have been explained as a result of plasma instabilities triggered by solar wind ions backstreaming from the bow shock. Since July 2004, the Cassini spacecraft has characterized the Saturnian plasma environment including its upstream region. Since Cassini's Saturn orbit insertion (SOI) in June 2004 through August 2005, we conducted a detailed survey and analysis of observations made by the Vector Helium Magnetometer (VHM). The purpose of the present study is to characterize the properties of waves observed in Saturn's ULF wave foreshock and identify its boundary using single spacecraft techniques. The amplitude of these waves is usually comparable to the mean magnetic field intensity, while their frequencies in the spacecraft frame yields two clearly different types of waves: one with frequencies below the local proton cyclotron frequency (Ω) and another with frequencies above Ω. All the wave crossings described here, clearly show that these waves are associated to Saturn's foreshock. In particular, the presence of waves is associated with the change in θBn to quasi-parallel geometries. Our results show the existence of a clear boundary for Saturn's ULF wave foreshock, compatible with θBn˜45° surfaces.

  8. A statistical study of EMIC waves observed by Cluster. 1. Wave properties. EMIC Wave Properties

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Allen, R. C.; Zhang, J. -C.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Lin, R. -L.; Klecker, B.; Dunlop, M. W.; André, M.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2015-07-23

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are an important mechanism for particle energization and losses inside the magnetosphere. In order to better understand the effects of these waves on particle dynamics, detailed information about the occurrence rate, wave power, ellipticity, normal angle, energy propagation angle distributions, and local plasma parameters are required. Previous statistical studies have used in situ observations to investigate the distribution of these parameters in the magnetic local time versus L-shell (MLT-L) frame within a limited magnetic latitude (MLAT) range. In our study, we present a statistical analysis of EMIC wave properties using 10 years (2001–2010) of datamore » from Cluster, totaling 25,431 min of wave activity. Due to the polar orbit of Cluster, we are able to investigate EMIC waves at all MLATs and MLTs. This allows us to further investigate the MLAT dependence of various wave properties inside different MLT sectors and further explore the effects of Shabansky orbits on EMIC wave generation and propagation. Thus, the statistical analysis is presented in two papers. OUr paper focuses on the wave occurrence distribution as well as the distribution of wave properties. The companion paper focuses on local plasma parameters during wave observations as well as wave generation proxies.« less

  9. A statistical study of EMIC waves observed by Cluster. 1. Wave properties. EMIC Wave Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R. C.; Zhang, J. -C.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Lin, R. -L.; Klecker, B.; Dunlop, M. W.; André, M.; Jordanova, V. K.

    2015-07-23

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are an important mechanism for particle energization and losses inside the magnetosphere. In order to better understand the effects of these waves on particle dynamics, detailed information about the occurrence rate, wave power, ellipticity, normal angle, energy propagation angle distributions, and local plasma parameters are required. Previous statistical studies have used in situ observations to investigate the distribution of these parameters in the magnetic local time versus L-shell (MLT-L) frame within a limited magnetic latitude (MLAT) range. In our study, we present a statistical analysis of EMIC wave properties using 10 years (2001–2010) of data from Cluster, totaling 25,431 min of wave activity. Due to the polar orbit of Cluster, we are able to investigate EMIC waves at all MLATs and MLTs. This allows us to further investigate the MLAT dependence of various wave properties inside different MLT sectors and further explore the effects of Shabansky orbits on EMIC wave generation and propagation. Thus, the statistical analysis is presented in two papers. OUr paper focuses on the wave occurrence distribution as well as the distribution of wave properties. The companion paper focuses on local plasma parameters during wave observations as well as wave generation proxies.

  10. The ULF wave foreshock boundary: Cluster observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, N.; Meziane, K.; Mazelle, C. X.; Bertucci, C.; Gomez, D. O.

    2013-12-01

    In the upstream region of the bow shock, the interaction of backstreaming ions with the incoming solar wind gives rise to a number of plasma instabilities from which ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves can grow. Due to the finite growth rate, it is expected that the region of ULF wave activity is spatially localized in the ion foreshock. Observational evidence of the ULF wave foreshock boundary has accumulated over the last three decades. Among other things, it has been shown that the geometrical characteristics of the boundary are very sensitive to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) cone angle. In the present work, we aimed at revisiting the properties of the ULF wave foreshock boundary. For this purpose, we use the first three years of magnetic field data from the flux gate magnetometer (FGM), and the plasma densities and velocities from the hot ion analyzer (HIA) low-geometry factor side on board RUMBA (SC 1). We use a specific and accurate criterion for the determination of boundary crossings, and a 3-D structure bow shock model to reconstruct the foreshock geometry. In particular, our criterion is used to qualitatively measure the differences between the magnetic field in the wave and no-wave zones, taking into account possible rotations of the IMF. A new identification of the ULF wave foreshock boundary is presented and it is compared with previous results reported in the literature as well as with theoretical predictions.

  11. Ion-wave stabilization of an inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Camparo, J.C.; Mackay, R.

    2006-04-24

    Stabilization of the rf power driving an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) has implications for fields ranging from atomic clocks to analytical chemistry to illumination technology. Here, we demonstrate a technique in which the plasma itself acts as a probe of radio wave power, and provides a correction signal for active rf-power control. Our technique takes advantage of the resonant nature of forced ion waves in the plasma, and their observation in the ICP's optical emission.

  12. Plasma observations at the earth's magnetic equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, R. C.; Shawhan, S. D.; Gallagher, D. L.; Chappell, C. R.; Green, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    New observations of particle and wave data from the magnetic equator from the DE 1 spacecraft are reported. The results demonstrate that the equatorial plasma population is predominantly hydrogen and that the enhanced ion fluxes observed at the equator occur without an increase in the total plasma density. Helium is occasionally found heated along with the protons, and forms about 10 percent of the equatorially trapped population at such times. The heated H(+) ions can be characterized by a bi-Maxwellian with kT(parallel) = 0.5-1.0 eV and kT = 5-50 eV, with a density of 10-100/cu cm. The total plasma density is relatively constant with latitude. First measurements of the equatorially trapped plasma and coincident UHR measurements show that the trapped plasma is found in conjunction with equatorial noise.

  13. Electron Acoustic Waves in Pure Ion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderegg, F.; Affolter, M.; Driscoll, C. F.; O'Neil, T. M.; Valentini, F.

    2012-10-01

    Electron Acoustic Waves (EAWs) are the low-frequency branch of near-linear Langmuir (plasma) waves: the frequency is such that the complex dielectric function (Dr, Di) has Dr= 0; and ``flattening'' of f(v) near the wave phase velocity vph gives Di=0 and eliminates Landau damping. Here, we observe standing axisymmetric EAWs in a pure ion column.footnotetextF. Anderegg, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 095001 (2009). At low excitation amplitudes, the EAWs have vph˜1.4 v, in close agreement with near-linear theory. At moderate excitation strengths, EAW waves are observed over a range of frequencies, with 1.3 v < vph< 2.1 v. Here, the final wave frequency may differ from the excitation frequency since the excitation modifies f (v); and recent theory analyzes frequency shifts from ``corners'' of a plateau at vph.footnotetextF. Valentini et al., arXiv:1206.3500v1. Large amplitude EAWs have strong phase-locked harmonic content, and experiments will be compared to same-geometry simulations, and to simulations of KEENfootnotetextB. Afeyan et al., Proc. Inertial Fusion Sci. and Applications 2003, A.N.S. Monterey (2004), p. 213. waves in HEDLP geometries.

  14. Dichromatic Langmuir waves in degenerate quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinov, A. E. Kitayev, I. N.

    2015-06-15

    Langmuir waves in fully degenerate quantum plasma are considered. It is shown that, in the linear approximation, Langmuir waves are always dichromatic. The low-frequency component of the waves corresponds to classical Langmuir waves, while the high-frequency component, to free-electron quantum oscillations. The nonlinear problem on the profile of dichromatic Langmuir waves is solved. Solutions in the form of a superposition of waves and in the form of beatings of its components are obtained.

  15. Plasma waves near saturn: initial results from voyager 1.

    PubMed

    Gurnett, D A; Kurth, W S; Scarf, F L

    1981-04-10

    The Voyager 1 plasma wave instrument detected many familiar types of plasma waves during the encounter with Saturn, including ion-acoustic waves and electron plasma oscillations upstream of the bow shock, an intense burst of electrostatic noise at the shock, and chorus, hiss, electrostatic electron cyclotron waves, and upper hybrid resonance emissions in the inner magnetosphere. A clocklike Saturn rotational control of low-frequency radio emissions was observed, and evidence was obtained of possible control by the moon Dione. Strong plasma wave emissions were detected at the Titan encounter indicating the presence of a turbulent sheath extending around Titan, and upper hybrid resonance measurements of the electron density show the existence of a dense plume of plasma being carried downstream of Titan by the interaction with the rapidly rotating magnetosphere of Saturn.

  16. High-latitude distributions of plasma waves and spatial irregularities from DE 2 alternating current electric field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, J. P.; Liebrecht, M. C.; Maynard, N. C.; Pfaff, R. F.

    1993-01-01

    The high-latitude spatial distributions of average signal intensities in 12 frequency channels between 4 Hz and 512 kHz as measured by the ac electric field spectrometers on the DE-2 spacecraft are analyzed for 18 mo of measurements. In MLT-INL (magnetic local time-invariant latitude) there are three distinct distributions that can be identified with 4-512 Hz signals from spatial irregularities and Alfven waves, 256-Hz to 4.1-kHz signals from ELF hiss, and 4.1-64 kHz signals from VLF auroral hiss, respectively. Overlap between ELF hiss and spatial irregularity signals occurs in the 256-512 Hz band. VLF hiss signals extend downward in frequency into the 1.0-4.1 kHz band and upward into the frequency range 128-512 kHz. The distinctly different spatial distribution patterns for the three bands, 4-256 Hz, 512-1204 Hz, and 4.1-64 kHz, indicate a lack of any causal relationships between VLF hiss, ELF hiss, and lower-frequency signals from spatial irregularities and Alfven waves.

  17. Low-Frequency Waves in Space Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiling, Andreas; Lee, Dong-Hun; Nakariakov, Valery

    2016-02-01

    Low-frequency waves in space plasmas have been studied for several decades, and our knowledge gain has been incremental with several paradigm-changing leaps forward. In our solar system, such waves occur in the ionospheres and magnetospheres of planets, and around our Moon. They occur in the solar wind, and more recently, they have been confirmed in the Sun's atmosphere as well. The goal of wave research is to understand their generation, their propagation, and their interaction with the surrounding plasma. Low-frequency Waves in Space Plasmas presents a concise and authoritative up-to-date look on where wave research stands: What have we learned in the last decade? What are unanswered questions? While in the past waves in different astrophysical plasmas have been largely treated in separate books, the unique feature of this monograph is that it covers waves in many plasma regions, including: Waves in geospace, including ionosphere and magnetosphere Waves in planetary magnetospheres Waves at the Moon Waves in the solar wind Waves in the solar atmosphere Because of the breadth of topics covered, this volume should appeal to a broad community of space scientists and students, and it should also be of interest to astronomers/astrophysicists who are studying space plasmas beyond our Solar System.

  18. The Earth's ULF Wave Foreshock: Cluster Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, N.; Meziane, K.; Mazelle, C. X.; Gomez, D. O.; Bertucci, C.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between backstreaming ions and the incoming solar wind in the upstream region of the bow shock, gives rise to a number of plasma instabilities from which ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves can grow. The region of ULF wave activity is spatially localized in the ion foreshock. Observational evidence of the ULF wave foreshock boundary has accumulated over the last three decades. In particular, it has been shown that the geometrical characteristics of the boundary are very sensitive to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) cone angle. In the present work, we aim at investigating the statistical properties of the ULF wave foreshock boundary. For this purpose, we make use of the first three years of magnetic field data from the flux gate magnetometer (FGM), and the plasma densities and velocities from the Hot Ion Analyzer (HIA) on board Cluster (SC-1). A new identification of the ULF wave foreshock boundary is presented, using specific and accurate criteria for a correct determination of boundary crossings. In particular, the criteria are based on the degree of IMF rotation as Cluster crosses the boundary. To reconstruct the foreshock geometry, we use two different 3-D gas dynamic bow shock models. The ULF wave foreshock boundary is compared with previous results reported in the literature as well as with theoretical predictions.

  19. Electromagnetic waves in a strong Schwarzschild plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, J.; Tajima, T.

    1996-11-01

    The physics of high frequency electromagnetic waves in a general relativistic plasma with the Schwarzschild metric is studied. Based on the 3 + 1 formalism, we conformalize Maxwell`s equations. The derived dispersion relations for waves in the plasma contain the lapse function in the plasma parameters such as in the plasma frequency and cyclotron frequency, but otherwise look {open_quotes}flat.{close_quotes} Because of this property this formulation is ideal for nonlinear self-consistent particle (PIC) simulation. Some of the physical consequences arising from the general relativistic lapse function as well as from the effects specific to the plasma background distribution (such as density and magnetic field) give rise to nonuniform wave equations and their associated phenomena, such as wave resonance, cutoff, and mode-conversion. These phenomena are expected to characterize the spectroscopy of radiation emitted by the plasma around the black hole. PIC simulation results of electron-positron plasma are also presented.

  20. Gravity Wave Seeding of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Sardul; Johnson, F. S.; Power, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Some examples from the Atmosphere Explorer E data showing plasma bubble development from wavy ion density structures in the bottomside F layer are described. The wavy structures mostly had east-west wavelengths of 150-800 km, in one example it was about 3000 km. The ionization troughs in the wavy structures later broke up into either a multiple-bubble patch or a single bubble, depending upon whether, in the precursor wavy structure, shorter wavelengths were superimposed on the larger scale wavelengths. In the multiple bubble patches, intrabubble spacings vaned from 55 km to 140 km. In a fully developed equatorial spread F case, east-west wavelengths from 690 km down to about 0.5 km were present simultaneously. The spacings between bubble patches or between bubbles in a patch appear to be determined by the wavelengths present in the precursor wave structure. In some cases, deeper bubbles developed on the western edge of a bubble patch, suggesting an east-west asymmetry. Simultaneous horizontal neutral wind measurements showed wavelike perturbations that were closely associated with perturbations in the plasma horizontal drift velocity. We argue that the wave structures observed here that served as the initial seed ion density perturbations were caused by gravity waves, strengthening the view that gravity waves seed equatorial spread F irregularities.

  1. Fundamental plasma emission involving ion sound waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1987-01-01

    The theory for fundamental plasma emission by the three-wave processes L + or - S to T (where L, S and T denote Langmuir, ion sound and transverse waves, respectively) is developed. Kinematic constraints on the characteristics and growth lengths of waves participating in the wave processes are identified. In addition the rates, path-integrated wave temperatures, and limits on the brightness temperature of the radiation are derived.

  2. Large Expanses of Kilometer-Scale Waves Predominantly Observed Below the F-peak Encountered by the Electric Field and Plasma Density Probes on the C/NOFS Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Liebrecht, C.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the C/NOFS equatorial satellite provides a unique data set which includes detailed measurements of irregularities associated with the equatorial ionosphere. We present vector AC electric field and plasma density observations gathered on C/NOFS that reveal vast expanses of kilometer scales along the C/NOFS orbit. In many cases, these waves are observed for 1000's of kilometers along the satellite track and appear most prevalent in cases where the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated above the C/NOFS satellite perigee of 400 km. The vector electric field instrument on C/NOFS clearly shows that the electric field component of these waves is strongest in the zonal direction. The electric field components are strongly correlated with simultaneous observations of plasma density oscillations and appear both with, and without, evidence of larger-scale spread-F depletions. These km-scale, quasi-coherent waves strongly resemble the bottomside, sinusoidal irregularities reported in the Atmosphere Explorer satellite data set by Valladares et al. [JGR, 88, 8025, 1983] and are believed to cause scintillations of VHF radiowaves. Indeed, the observations show that such waves are a common feature in the low latitude ionosphere, particularly below the F-peak. We present detailed analyses of the wave measurements and interpret these new observations in terms of plasma instabilities associated with the nighttime equatorial ionosphere.

  3. Ion plasma wave and its instability in interpenetrating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.; Kono, M.

    2014-04-15

    Some essential features of the ion plasma wave in both kinetic and fluid descriptions are presented. The wave develops at wavelengths shorter than the electron Debye radius. Thermal motion of electrons at this scale is such that they overshoot the electrostatic potential perturbation caused by ion bunching, which consequently propagates as an unshielded wave, completely unaffected by electron dynamics. So in the simplest fluid description, the electrons can be taken as a fixed background. However, in the presence of magnetic field and for the electron gyro-radius shorter than the Debye radius, electrons can participate in the wave and can increase its damping rate. This is determined by the ratio of the electron gyro-radius and the Debye radius. In interpenetrating plasmas (when one plasma drifts through another), the ion plasma wave can easily become growing and this growth rate is quantitatively presented for the case of an argon plasma.

  4. Waves and instabilities in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Work on computer simulation of waves and instabilities in magnetized plasmas is reviewed. Included are verification of linear theory. Particular emphasis is given to investigation of nonlinear processes involved in the saturation of instabilities and of wave damping; these include a nonlinear cyclotron resonance and particle trapping in intense waves.

  5. DC and Wave Electric Fields and Other Plasma Parameters Observed on Two Sounding Rockets in the Dark Cusp during IMF Bz North and South Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Acuna, M.; Bounds, S.; Farrell, W.; Freudenreich, W.; Lepping, R.; Vondrak, R.; Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Egeland, A.

    1999-01-01

    Two Black Brant IX sounding rockets were launched into the dark, dayside cusp near magnetic noon on December 2 and 3, 1997, from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen at 79 deg N reaching altitudes of about 450 km. Real-time ground-based and Wind IMF data were used to determine the launch conditions. The first launch, with Bz north conditions, crossed into and back out of an open field region with merging poleward of the projected trajectory. The second flight, into Bz south conditions, was timed to coincide with an enhancement in the merging rate from a increase in the negative Bz, while the DMSP Fl 3 satellite was situated slightly to the north of the rocket trajectory. Each payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particles, photometer data, and thermal plasma data. Data from both flights will be shown, with an emphasis on the DC electric field results. In particular, the data gathered on December 2, 1997 will be used to discuss ionospheric signatures of merging and the open/closed character of the the cusp/low latitude boundary layer. In contrast, the data gathered on December 3, 1997 shows evidence of pulsed electric field structures which will be examined in the context of cusp plasma entry processes. Both data sets returned a rich variety of plasma waves, as well as optical emissions and thermal plasma data.

  6. DC and Wave Electric Fields and Other Plasma Parameters Observed on Two Sounding Rockets in the Dark Cusp During IMF Bz North and South Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Acuna, M.; Bounds, S.; Farrell, W.; Freudenreich, H.; Lepping, R.; Vondrak, R.; Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Egeland, A.

    1997-01-01

    Two Black Brant IX sounding rockets were launched into the dark, dayside cusp near magnetic noon on December 2 and 3, 1997, from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen at 79 N reaching altitudes of approximately 450 km. Real-time ground-based and Wind IMF data were used to determine the launch conditions. The first launch, with Bz north conditions, crossed into and back out of an open field region with merging poleward of the projected trajectory. The second flight, into Bz south conditions, was timed to coincide with an enhancement in the merging rate from a increase in the negative Bz, while the DMSP F13 satellite was situated slightly to the north of the rocket trajectory. Each payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particles, photometer data, and thermal plasma data. Data from both flights will be shown, with an emphasis on the DC electric field results. In particular, the data gathered on December 2, 1997 will be used to discuss ionospheric signatures of merging and the open/closed character of the the cusp/low latitude boundary layer. In contrast, the data gathered on December 3, 1997 shows evidence of pulsed electric field structures which will be examined in the context of cusp plasma entry processes. Both data sets returned a rich variety of plasma waves, as well as optical emissions and thermal plasma data.

  7. DC and Wave Electric Fields and Other Plasma Parameters Observed on Two Sounding Rockets in the Dark Cusp during IMF BZ North and South Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Bounds, S.; Acuna, M.; Maynard, N. C.; Moen, J.; Egeland, A.; Holtet, J.; Maseide, K.; Sandholt, P. E.; Soraas, F.

    1999-01-01

    Two Black Brant IX sounding rockets were launched into the dark, dayside cusp near magnetic noon on December 2 and 3, 1997, from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen at 79degN reaching altitudes of approximately 450 km. Real-time ground-based and Wind (interplanetary magnetic field) IMF data were used to determine the launch conditions. The first launch, with Bz north conditions, crossed into and back out of an open field region with merging poleward of the projected trajectory. The second flight, into Bz south conditions, was timed to coincide with an enhancement in the merging rate from a increase in the negative Bz, while the (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program) DMSP F13 satellite was situated slightly to the north of the rocket trajectory. Each payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particles, photometer data, and thermal plasma data. Data from both flights will be shown, with an emphasis on the DC electric field results. In particular, the data gathered on December 2, 1997 will be used to discuss ionospheric signatures of merging and the open/closed character of the the cusp/low latitude boundary layer. In contrast, the data gathered on December 3, 1997 shows evidence of pulsed electric field structures which will be examined in the context of cusp plasma entry processes. Both data sets returned a rich variety of plasma waves, as well as optical emissions and thermal plasma data.

  8. Electron Beam Transport in Advanced Plasma Wave Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Ronald L

    2013-01-31

    The primary goal of this grant was to develop a diagnostic for relativistic plasma wave accelerators based on injecting a low energy electron beam (5-50keV) perpendicular to the plasma wave and observing the distortion of the electron beam's cross section due to the plasma wave's electrostatic fields. The amount of distortion would be proportional to the plasma wave amplitude, and is the basis for the diagnostic. The beat-wave scheme for producing plasma waves, using two CO2 laser beam, was modeled using a leap-frog integration scheme to solve the equations of motion. Single electron trajectories and corresponding phase space diagrams were generated in order to study and understand the details of the interaction dynamics. The electron beam was simulated by combining thousands of single electrons, whose initial positions and momenta were selected by random number generators. The model was extended by including the interactions of the electrons with the CO2 laser fields of the beat wave, superimposed with the plasma wave fields. The results of the model were used to guide the design and construction of a small laboratory experiment that may be used to test the diagnostic idea.

  9. Excitation of Chirping Whistler Waves in a Laboratory Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Compernolle, B.; An, X.; Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.; Gekelman, W. N.; Pribyl, P.

    2015-12-01

    Whistler mode chorus emissions with a characteristic frequency chirp are an important magnetospheric wave, responsible for the acceleration of outer radiation belt electrons to relativistic energies and also for the scattering loss of these electrons into the atmosphere. Here, we report on the first laboratory experiment where whistler waves exhibiting fast frequency chirping have been artificially produced using a beam of energetic electrons launched into a cold plasma. Frequency chirps are only observed for a narrow range of plasma and beam parameters, and show a strong dependence on beam density, plasma density and magnetic field gradient. Broadband whistler waves similar to magnetospheric hiss are also observed, and the parameter ranges for each emission are quantified. The research was funded by NSF/DOE Plasma Partnership program by grant DE-SC0010578. Work was done at the Basic Plasma Science Facility (BAPSF) also funded by NSF/DOE.

  10. Wave-Particle Interactions in Electron Acoustic Waves in Pure Ion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Anderegg, F.; Driscoll, C. F.; Dubin, D. H. E.; O'Neil, T. M.

    2009-03-06

    Electron acoustic waves (EAW) with a phase velocity less than twice the plasma thermal velocity are observed on pure ion plasma columns. At low excitation amplitudes, the EAW frequencies agree with theory, but at moderate excitation the EAW is more frequency variable than typical Langmuir waves, and at large excitations resonance is observed over a broad range. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of the wave-coherent ion velocity distribution show phase reversals and wave-particle trapping plateaus at {+-}v{sub ph}, as expected, and corroborate the unusual role of kinetic pressure in the EAW.

  11. Plasma wave aided two photon decay of an electromagnetic wave in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, K. K. Magesh; Singh, Rohtash; Krishan, Vinod

    2014-11-15

    The presence of a Langmuir wave in an unmagnetized plasma is shown to allow parametric decay of an electromagnetic wave into two electromagnetic waves, which is otherwise not allowed due to wave number mismatch. The decay occurs at plasma densities below one ninth the critical density and the decay waves propagate at finite angles to the pump laser. Above the threshold, the growth rate scales linearly with the amplitude of the Langmuir wave and the amplitude of the pump electromagnetic wave. The frequency ω of the lower frequency decay wave increases with the angle its propagation vector makes with that of the pump. The growth rate, however, decreases with ω.

  12. Wave-driven Countercurrent Plasma Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    A.J. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2009-03-20

    A method for driving rotation and a countercurrent flow in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge is described. The rotation is produced by radiofrequency waves near the cyclotron resonance. The wave energy is transferred into potential energy in a manner similar to the α channeling effect. The countercurrent flow may also be driven by radiofrequency waves. By driving both the rotation and the flow pattern using waves instead of electrodes, physical and engineering issues may be avoided.

  13. Decays of electron Bernstein waves near plasma edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Nong; Cary, John R.

    2011-12-01

    Nonlinear wave-wave couplings near the upper hybrid resonance are studied via particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that the decay of an electron Bernstein wave (EBW) depends on the ratio of the incident frequency and electron cyclotron frequency. For ratios less than two, parametric decay into a lower hybrid wave (or an ion Bernstein wave) and EBWs at a lower frequency is observed. For ratios larger than two, the daughter waves could be an electron cyclotron quasi-mode and another EBW or an ion wave and EBW. For sufficiently high incident power, the former process may dominate. Because of the electron cyclotron quasi-mode, electrons can be strongly heated by nonlinear Landau damping. As a result, the bulk of the incident power can be absorbed near plasma edge at high power. The increase in number of decay channels with frequency implies that the allowable power into the plasma must decrease with frequency.

  14. Nonlinear interaction of drift waves with driven plasma currents

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Christian; Grulke, Olaf; Klinger, Thomas

    2010-03-15

    In a cylindrical magnetized plasma, coherent drift wave modes are synchronized by a mode selective drive of plasma currents. Nonlinear effects of the synchronization are investigated in detail. Frequency pulling is observed over a certain frequency range. The dependence of the width of this synchronization range on the amplitude of the driven plasma currents forms Arnold tongues. The transition between complete and incomplete synchronization is indicated by the onset of periodic pulling and phase slippage. Synchronization is observed for driven current amplitudes, which are some percent of the typical value of parallel currents generated by drift waves.

  15. Computational study of nonlinear plasma waves. [plasma simulation model applied to electrostatic waves in collisionless plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuda, Y.

    1974-01-01

    A low-noise plasma simulation model is developed and applied to a series of linear and nonlinear problems associated with electrostatic wave propagation in a one-dimensional, collisionless, Maxwellian plasma, in the absence of magnetic field. It is demonstrated that use of the hybrid simulation model allows economical studies to be carried out in both the linear and nonlinear regimes with better quantitative results, for comparable computing time, than can be obtained by conventional particle simulation models, or direct solution of the Vlasov equation. The characteristics of the hybrid simulation model itself are first investigated, and it is shown to be capable of verifying the theoretical linear dispersion relation at wave energy levels as low as .000001 of the plasma thermal energy. Having established the validity of the hybrid simulation model, it is then used to study the nonlinear dynamics of monochromatic wave, sideband instability due to trapped particles, and satellite growth.

  16. Slow electrostatic solitary waves in Earth's plasma sheet boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakad, Amar; Kakad, Bharati; Anekallu, Chandrasekhar; Lakhina, Gurbax; Omura, Yoshiharu; Fazakerley, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    We modeled Cluster spacecraft observations of slow electrostatic solitary waves (SESWs) in the Earth's northern plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) region on the basis of nonlinear fluid theory and fluid simulation. Various plasma parameters observed by the Cluster satellite at the time of the SESWs were examined to investigate the generation process of the SESWs. The nonlinear fluid model shows the coexistence of slow and fast ion acoustic waves and the presence of electron acoustic waves in the PSBL region. The fluid simulations, performed to examine the evolution of these waves in the PSBL region, showed the presence of an extra mode along with the waves supported by the nonlinear fluid theory. This extra mode is identified as the Buneman mode, which is generated by relative drifts of ions and electrons. A detailed investigation of the characteristics of the SESWs reveals that the SESWs are slow ion acoustic solitary waves.

  17. Effect of wave localization on plasma instabilities. Ph. D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Levedahl, W.K.

    1987-10-01

    The Anderson model of wave localization in random media is involved to study the effect of solar wind density turbulence on plasma processes associated with the solar type III radio burst. ISEE-3 satellite data indicate that a possible model for the type III process is the parametric decay of Langmuir waves excited by solar flare electron streams into daughter electromagnetic and ion acoustic waves. The threshold for this instability, however, is much higher than observed Langmuir wave levels because of rapid wave convection of the transverse electromagnetic daughter wave in the case where the solar wind is assumed homogeneous. Langmuir and transverse waves near critical density satisfy the Ioffe-Reigel criteria for wave localization in the solar wind with observed density fluctuations -1 percent. Numerical simulations of wave propagation in random media confirm the localization length predictions of Escande and Souillard for stationary density fluctations. For mobile density fluctuations localized wave packets spread at the propagation velocity of the density fluctuations rather than the group velocity of the waves. Computer simulations using a linearized hybrid code show that an electron beam will excite localized Langmuir waves in a plasma with density turbulence. An action principle approach is used to develop a theory of non-linear wave processes when waves are localized. A theory of resonant particles diffusion by localized waves is developed to explain the saturation of the beam-plasma instability. It is argued that localization of electromagnetic waves will allow the instability threshold to be exceeded for the parametric decay discussed above.

  18. Evolution Of Nonlinear Waves in Compressing Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit, I.Y. Dodin, and N.J. Fisch

    2011-05-27

    Through particle-in-cell simulations, the evolution of nonlinear plasma waves is examined in one-dimensional collisionless plasma undergoing mechanical compression. Unlike linear waves, whose wavelength decreases proportionally to the system length L(t), nonlinear waves, such as solitary electron holes, conserve their characteristic size {Delta} during slow compression. This leads to a substantially stronger adiabatic amplification as well as rapid collisionless damping when L approaches {Delta}. On the other hand, cessation of compression halts the wave evolution, yielding a stable mode.

  19. Electromagnetic waves in a polydisperse dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Prudskikh, V. V.; Shchekinov, Yu. A.

    2013-10-15

    The properties of low-frequency electromagnetic waves in a polydisperse dusty plasma are studied. The dispersion relation for the waves propagating at an arbitrary angle to the external magnetic field is derived, with the coefficients explicitly determined by the dust-size distribution function. The dependence of wave dispersion on properties of the dust-size distribution function is analysed. It is shown that the cutoff for an oblique propagation in plasma with a wide scatter of dust sizes takes place at a much lower frequency than in a plasma with monosized dust particles. It is found that dispersion properties of a transversal magnetosonic wave mode around dust–cyclotron frequencies considerably differ from those in a plasma with monosized dust. In a plasma with low mass fraction of dust particles, the dispersion is smooth without the cutoff and the resonance intrinsic for a plasma with monosized dust. Increase of the dust fraction results in splitting of the dispersion curve on to two branches. Further increase of the dust fraction leads to emergence of the third branch located between the cutoffs and restricted from the lower and higher frequencies by two resonances. The dependence of the frequencies of cutoffs and resonances on the width of the dust-size distribution, its slope and the dust mass fraction are analysed. It is shown that the transparency frequency windows in a plasma with polydisperse dust are wider for transversal elecromagnetic waves, but narrower for longitudinal or oblique waves.

  20. Kinetic properties of mirror waves in magnetosheath plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckean, M. E.; Winske, D.; Gary, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    Linear and nonlinear properties of waves excited by the mirror instability in high beta, low anisotropy plasmas characteristic of the magnetosheath are investigated using linear theory and one-dimensional hybrid simulations. The mechanisms for wave growth and saturation at low amplitudes are discussed. A new method is considered for generating the large amplitude mirror waves observed in the magnetosheath based on external compression of magnetic flux tubes. Simulations in which the anisotropy is maintained by recycling the ions shows this process can inhibit the growth of ion cyclotron waves and enhances the growth of mirror waves.

  1. Terahertz waves radiated from two noncollinear femtosecond plasma filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Hai-Wei; Hoshina, Hiromichi; Otani, Chiko; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2015-11-23

    Terahertz (THz) waves radiated from two noncollinear femtosecond plasma filaments with a crossing angle of 25° are investigated. The irradiated THz waves from the crossing filaments show a small THz pulse after the main THz pulse, which was not observed in those from single-filament scheme. Since the position of the small THz pulse changes with the time-delay of two filaments, this phenomenon can be explained by a model in which the small THz pulse is from the second filament. The denser plasma in the overlap region of the filaments changes the movement of space charges in the plasma, thereby changing the angular distribution of THz radiation. As a result, this schematic induces some THz wave from the second filament to propagate along the path of the THz wave from the first filament. Thus, this schematic alters the direction of the THz radiation from the filamentation, which can be used in THz wave remote sensing.

  2. Fast wave evanescence in filamentary boundary plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.

    2014-02-15

    Radio frequency waves for heating and current drive of plasmas in tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices must first traverse the scrape-off-layer (SOL) before they can be put to their intended use. The SOL plasma is strongly turbulent and intermittent in space and time. These turbulent properties of the SOL, which are not routinely taken into account in wave propagation codes, can have an important effect on the coupling of waves through an evanescent SOL or edge plasma region. The effective scale length for fast wave (FW) evanescence in the presence of short-scale field-aligned filamentary plasma turbulence is addressed in this paper. It is shown that although the FW wavelength or evanescent scale length is long compared with the dimensions of the turbulence, the FW does not simply average over the turbulent density; rather, the average is over the exponentiation rate. Implications for practical situations are discussed.

  3. Magnetoacoustic shock waves in dissipative degenerate plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S.

    2011-11-15

    Quantum magnetoacoustic shock waves are studied in homogenous, magnetized, dissipative dense electron-ion plasma by using two fluid quantum magneto-hydrodynamic (QMHD) model. The weak dissipation effects in the system are taken into account through kinematic viscosity of the ions. The reductive perturbation method is employed to derive Korteweg-de Vries Burgers (KdVB) equation for magnetoacoustic wave propagating in the perpendicular direction to the external magnetic field in dense plasmas. The strength of magnetoacoustic shock is investigated with the variations in plasma density, magnetic field intensity, and ion kinematic viscosity of dense plasma system. The necessary condition for the existence of monotonic and oscillatory shock waves is also discussed. The numerical results are presented for illustration by using the data of astrophysical dense plasma situations such as neutron stars exist in the literature.

  4. Electromagnetic drift waves dispersion for arbitrarily collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wonjae Krasheninnikov, Sergei I.; Angus, J. R.

    2015-07-15

    The impacts of the electromagnetic effects on resistive and collisionless drift waves are studied. A local linear analysis on an electromagnetic drift-kinetic equation with Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook-like collision operator demonstrates that the model is valid for describing linear growth rates of drift wave instabilities in a wide range of plasma parameters showing convergence to reference models for limiting cases. The wave-particle interactions drive collisionless drift-Alfvén wave instability in low collisionality and high beta plasma regime. The Landau resonance effects not only excite collisionless drift wave modes but also suppress high frequency electron inertia modes observed from an electromagnetic fluid model in collisionless and low beta regime. Considering ion temperature effects, it is found that the impact of finite Larmor radius effects significantly reduces the growth rate of the drift-Alfvén wave instability with synergistic effects of high beta stabilization and Landau resonance.

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Kinetic theory of plasma waves, homogeneous plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porkolab, Miklos

    1998-11-01

    The linear theory of plasma waves in homogeneous plasma is arguably the most mature and best understood branch of plasma physics. Given the recently revised version of Stix's excellent Waves in Plasmas (1992), one might ask whether another book on this subject is necessary only a few years later. The answer lies in the scope of this volume; it is somewhat more detailed in certain topics than, and complementary in many fusion research relevant areas to, Stix's book. (I am restricting these comments to the homogeneous plasma theory only, since the author promises a second volume on wave propagation in inhomogeneous plasmas.) This book is also much more of a theorist's approach to waves in plasmas, with the aim of developing the subject within the logical framework of kinetic theory. This may indeed be pleasing to the expert and to the specialist, but may be too difficult to the graduate student as an `introduction' to the subject (which the author explicitly states in the Preface). On the other hand, it may be entirely appropriate for a second course on plasma waves, after the student has mastered fluid theory and an introductory kinetic treatment of waves in a hot magnetized `Vlasov' plasma. For teaching purposes, my personal preference is to review the cold plasma wave treatment using the unified Stix formalism and notation (which the author wisely adopts in the present book, but only in Chapter 5). Such an approach allows one to deal with CMA diagrams early on, as well as to provide a framework to discuss electromagnetic wave propagation and accessibility in inhomogeneous plasmas (for which the cold plasma wave treatment is perfectly adequate). Such an approach does lack some of the rigour, however, that the author achieves with the present approach. As the author correctly shows, the fluid theory treatment of waves follows logically from kinetic theory in the cold plasma limit. I only question the pedagogical value of this approach. Otherwise, I welcome this

  6. Ion Acoustic Waves in Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.; McQuillen, P.; Killian, T. C.

    2010-08-06

    We photoionize laser-cooled atoms with a laser beam possessing spatially periodic intensity modulations to create ultracold neutral plasmas with controlled density perturbations. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging reveals that the density perturbations oscillate in space and time, and the dispersion relation of the oscillations matches that of ion acoustic waves, which are long-wavelength, electrostatic, density waves.

  7. Chaotic ion motion in magnetosonic plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varvoglis, H.

    1984-01-01

    The motion of test ions in a magnetosonic plasma wave is considered, and the 'stochasticity threshold' of the wave's amplitude for the onset of chaotic motion is estimated. It is shown that for wave amplitudes above the stochasticity threshold, the evolution of an ion distribution can be described by a diffusion equation with a diffusion coefficient D approximately equal to 1/v. Possible applications of this process to ion acceleration in flares and ion beam thermalization are discussed.

  8. Lower hybrid drift waves: space observations.

    PubMed

    Norgren, Cecilia; Vaivads, Andris; Khotyaintsev, Yuri V; André, Mats

    2012-08-01

    Lower hybrid drift waves (LHDWs) are commonly observed at plasma boundaries in space and laboratory, often having the strongest measured electric fields within these regions. We use data from two of the Cluster satellites (C3 and C4) located in Earth's magnetotail and separated by a distance of the order of the electron gyroscale. These conditions allow us, for the first time, to make cross-spacecraft correlations of the LHDWs and to determine the phase velocity and wavelength of the LHDWs. Our results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. We show that the electrostatic potential of LHDWs is linearly related to fluctuations in the magnetic field magnitude, which allows us to determine the velocity vector through the relation ∫δEdt·v = ϕ(δB)(∥). The electrostatic potential fluctuations correspond to ∼10% of the electron temperature, which suggests that the waves can strongly affect the electron dynamics. PMID:23006181

  9. Gabor Wave Packet Method to Solve Plasma Wave Equations

    SciTech Connect

    A. Pletzer; C.K. Phillips; D.N. Smithe

    2003-06-18

    A numerical method for solving plasma wave equations arising in the context of mode conversion between the fast magnetosonic and the slow (e.g ion Bernstein) wave is presented. The numerical algorithm relies on the expansion of the solution in Gaussian wave packets known as Gabor functions, which have good resolution properties in both real and Fourier space. The wave packets are ideally suited to capture both the large and small wavelength features that characterize mode conversion problems. The accuracy of the scheme is compared with a standard finite element approach.

  10. Nonlinear extraordinary wave in dense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Krasovitskiy, V. B.; Turikov, V. A.

    2013-10-15

    Conditions for the propagation of a slow extraordinary wave in dense magnetized plasma are found. A solution to the set of relativistic hydrodynamic equations and Maxwell’s equations under the plasma resonance conditions, when the phase velocity of the nonlinear wave is equal to the speed of light, is obtained. The deviation of the wave frequency from the resonance frequency is accompanied by nonlinear longitudinal-transverse oscillations. It is shown that, in this case, the solution to the set of self-consistent equations obtained by averaging the initial equations over the period of high-frequency oscillations has the form of an envelope soliton. The possibility of excitation of a nonlinear wave in plasma by an external electromagnetic pulse is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  11. Twisted electron-acoustic waves in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aman-ur-Rehman, Ali, S.; Khan, S. A.; Shahzad, K.

    2016-08-01

    In the paraxial limit, a twisted electron-acoustic (EA) wave is studied in a collisionless unmagnetized plasma, whose constituents are the dynamical cold electrons and Boltzmannian hot electrons in the background of static positive ions. The analytical and numerical solutions of the plasma kinetic equation suggest that EA waves with finite amount of orbital angular momentum exhibit a twist in its behavior. The twisted wave particle resonance is also taken into consideration that has been appeared through the effective wave number qeff accounting for Laguerre-Gaussian mode profiles attributed to helical phase structures. Consequently, the dispersion relation and the damping rate of the EA waves are significantly modified with the twisted parameter η, and for η → ∞, the results coincide with the straight propagating plane EA waves. Numerically, new features of twisted EA waves are identified by considering various regimes of wavelength and the results might be useful for transport and trapping of plasma particles in a two-electron component plasma.

  12. Colliding solitary waves in quark gluon plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiei, Azam; Javidan, Kurosh

    2016-09-01

    We study the head-on collision of propagating waves due to perturbations in quark gluon plasmas. We use the Massachusetts Institute of Technology bag model, hydrodynamics equation, and suitable equation of state for describing the time evolution of such localized waves. A nonlinear differential equation is derived for the propagation of small amplitude localized waves using the reductive perturbation method. We show that these waves are unstable and amplitude of the left-moving (right-moving) wave increases (decreases) after the collision, and so they reach the borders of a quark gluon plasma fireball with different amplitudes. Indeed we show that such arrangements are created because of the geometrical symmetries of the medium.

  13. Saturation of Langmuir waves in laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K.L.

    1996-04-01

    This dissertation deals with the interaction of an intense laser with a plasma (a quasineutral collection of electrons and ions). During this interaction, the laser drives large-amplitude waves through a class of processes known as parametric instabilities. Several such instabilities drive one type of wave, the Langmuir wave, which involves oscillations of the electrons relative to the nearly-stationary ions. There are a number of mechanisms which limit the amplitude to which Langmuir waves grow. In this dissertation, these mechanisms are examined to identify qualitative features which might be observed in experiments and/or simulations. In addition, a number of experiments are proposed to specifically look for particular saturation mechanisms. In a plasma, a Langmuir wave can decay into an electromagnetic wave and an ion wave. This parametric instability is proposed as a source for electromagnetic emission near half of the incident laser frequency observed from laser-produced plasmas. This interpretation is shown to be consistent with existing experimental data and it is found that one of the previous mechanisms used to explain such emission is not. The scattering version of the electromagnetic decay instability is shown to provide an enhanced noise source of electromagnetic waves near the frequency of the incident laser.

  14. An overview of plasma wave observations obtained during the Galileo A34 pass through the inner region of the Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Menietti, J. D.; Roux, A.; Bolton, S. J.; Alexander, C. J.

    2003-04-01

    On November 5, 2002, the Galileo spacecraft, which is in orbit around Jupiter, made a pass in to a radial distance of 1.98 RJ (Jovian radii) from Jupiter, much closer than on any previous orbit. Data were successfully acquired during the entire inbound pass through the hot and cold plasma torii, and through the region inside the cold torus to a radial distance of 2.32 RJ, at which point the data system went into safing due to the intense radiation in the inner region of the magnetosphere. The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the results obtained from the plasma wave investigation during this pass, which is designated A34. As on previous passes through the Io plasma torus a narrowband electrostatic emission at the upper hybrid resonance frequency provided a very accurate measurement of the electron density. The peak electron density, 2.6 x 103 cm-3, occurs just before the inner edge of the hot torus, which is at 5.62 RJ. As the spacecraft enters the cold torus the electron density drops to about 6.0 x 102 cm-3 and then gradually increases as the spacecraft approaches Jupiter, reaching a peak of about 2.5 x 103 cm-3 at 4.86 RJ, shortly before the inner edge of the cold torus. At the inner edge of the cold torus, which occurs at 4.76 RJ, the electron density drops dramatically to levels on the order of 1 cm-3. The electron density in this inner region is difficult to interpret because the upper hybrid emission can no longer be clearly identified, and there are numerous narrowband emissions with cutoffs that may or may not be associated with the local electron plasma frequency. As in the hot torus, the low density region inside the cold torus has a persistent level of plasma wave noise below about 103 Hz that is tentatively interpreted as whistler mode noise. The intensity of the whistler mode noise increases noticeably as the spacecraft crosses Thebe's orbit at 3.1 RJ, and increases markedly as the spacecraft crosses Amalthea's orbit at 2.6 RJ. The

  15. Transmission versus transflection mode in FTIR analysis of blood plasma: is the electric field standing wave effect the only reason for observed spectral distortions?

    PubMed

    Staniszewska-Slezak, Emilia; Rygula, Anna; Malek, Kamilla; Baranska, Malgorzata

    2015-04-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy is assessed in terms of two techniques (i.e., transmission and transflection) as a method for rapid measurements of blood plasma. Apart from the expected effect of the electric field standing wave (EFSW), we also noticed that second-derivative IR spectra recorded in transflection mode exhibited a significant shift in the amide I band (up to 1667 cm(-1)) in comparison to the one recorded in transmission (1658 cm(-1)). This has not been reported thus far in studies of the EFSW distortion of IR spectra of biological material. The thinner the sample deposited on the low-e microscope slide, the lower the position of the amide I band found in FTIR spectra, suggesting various plasma compositions after stratification or certain changes in secondary protein conformations due to chemical and/or physical effects. There are potentially several phenomena that can occur at the surface of both IR substrates affecting the protein profile, including changes in optical properties (refractive index), variation in water content in the sample, and segregation of plasma components. All three hypotheses are discussed here, with the help of atomic force microscopy (AFM). PMID:25562064

  16. Plasma waves associated with the first AMPTE magnetotail barium release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Anderson, R. R.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Luehr, H.; Haerendel, G.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma waves observed during the March 21, 1985, AMPTE magnetotail barium release are described. Electron plasma oscillations provided local measurements of the plasma density during both the expansion and decay phases. Immediately after the explosion, the electron density reached a peak of about 400,000/cu cm, and then started decreasing approximately as t to the -2.4 as the cloud expanded. About 6 minutes after the explosion, the electron density suddenly began to increase, reached a secondary peak of about 240/cu cm, and then slowly decayed down to the preevent level over a period of about 15 minutes. The density increase is believed to be caused by the collapse of the ion cloud into the diamagnetic cavity created by the initial expansion. The plasma wave intensities observed during the entire event were quite low. In the diamagnetic cavity, electrostatic emissions were observed near the barium ion plasma frequency, and in another band at lower frequencies. A broadband burst of electrostatic noise was also observed at the boundary of the diamagnetic cavity. Except for electron plasma oscillations, no significant wave activity was observed outside of the diamagnetic cavity.

  17. Electrostatic solitary waves in dusty pair-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, A. P.; Adhikary, N. C.

    2013-10-15

    The propagation of electrostatic waves in an unmagnetized collisionless pair-ion plasma with immobile positively charged dusts is studied for both large- and small-amplitude perturbations. Using a two-fluid model for pair-ions, it is shown that there appear two linear ion modes, namely the “fast” and “slow” waves in dusty pair-ion plasmas. The properties of these wave modes are studied with different mass (m) and temperature (T) ratios of negative to positive ions, as well as the effects of immobile charged dusts (δ). For large-amplitude waves, the pseudopotential approach is performed, whereas the standard reductive perturbation technique is used to study the small-amplitude Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) solitons. The profiles of the pseudopotential, the large amplitude solitons as well as the dynamical evolution of KdV solitons, are numerically studied with the system parameters as above. It is found that the pair-ion plasmas with positively charged dusts support the propagation of solitary waves (SWs) with only the negative potential. The results may be useful for the excitation of SWs in laboratory dusty pair-ion plasmas, electron-free industrial plasmas as well as for observation in space plasmas where electron density is negligibly small compared to that of negative ions.

  18. Scattering of radio frequency waves by blobs in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Abhay K.; Hizanidis, Kyriakos; Kominis, Yannis

    2013-05-15

    The density fluctuations and blobs present in the edge region of magnetic fusion devices can scatter radio frequency (RF) waves through refraction, reflection, diffraction, and coupling to other plasma waves. This, in turn, affects the spectrum of the RF waves and the electromagnetic power that reaches the core of the plasma. The usual geometric optics analysis of RF scattering by density blobs accounts for only refractive effects. It is valid when the amplitude of the fluctuations is small, of the order of 10%, compared to the background density. In experiments, density fluctuations with much larger amplitudes are routinely observed, so that a more general treatment of the scattering process is needed. In this paper, a full-wave model for the scattering of RF waves by a blob is developed. The full-wave approach extends the range of validity well beyond that of geometric optics; however, it is theoretically and computationally much more challenging. The theoretical procedure, although similar to that followed for the Mie solution of Maxwell's equations, is generalized to plasmas in a magnetic field. Besides diffraction and reflection, the model includes coupling to a different plasma wave than the one imposed by the external antenna structure. In the model, it is assumed that the RF waves interact with a spherical blob. The plasma inside and around the blob is cold, homogeneous, and imbedded in a uniform magnetic field. After formulating the complete analytical theory, the effect of the blob on short wavelength electron cyclotron waves and longer wavelength lower hybrid waves is studied numerically.

  19. Ion cyclotron waves observed in the polar cusp.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredricks, R. W.; Russell, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    During the penetration by Ogo 5 of the low-latitude disturbed polar cusp region on Nov. 1, 1968, while a major magnetic storm was in progress, a variety of plasma wave activity was observed. Observations of waves with amplitudes less than 2% of the background magnetic field intensity and having frequencies between approximately 0.67 and 0.87 times the local proton gyrofrequency are described. The polarization of these waves indicates that they are propagating at an appreciable angle to the local geomagnetic field line direction. The source of these waves has not been determined, but currents and gradient drifts are suggested as possible agents.

  20. Excitation of Chirping Whistler Waves in a Laboratory Plasma.

    PubMed

    Van Compernolle, B; An, X; Bortnik, J; Thorne, R M; Pribyl, P; Gekelman, W

    2015-06-19

    Whistler mode chorus emissions with a characteristic frequency chirp are important magnetospheric waves, responsible for the acceleration of outer radiation belt electrons to relativistic energies and also for the scattering loss of these electrons into the atmosphere. Here, we report on the first laboratory experiment where whistler waves exhibiting fast frequency chirping have been artificially produced using a beam of energetic electrons launched into a cold plasma. Frequency chirps are only observed for a narrow range of plasma and beam parameters, and show a strong dependence on beam density, plasma density, and magnetic field gradient. Broadband whistler waves similar to magnetospheric hiss are also observed, and the parameter ranges for each emission are quantified.

  1. Cassini observations of ion cyclotron waves and ions anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crary, F. J.; Dols, V. J.; Cassidy, T. A.; Tokar, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    In Saturn's equatorial, inner magnetosphere, the production of fresh ions in a pick-up distribution generates ion cyclotron waves. These waves are a sensitive indicator of fresh plasma production, but the quantitative relation between wave properties and ionization rates is nontrivial. We present a combined analysis of Cassini MAG and CAPS data, from a variety of equatorial orbits between 2005 and 2012. Using the MAG data, we determine the amplitude and peak frequency of ion cyclotron waves. From the CAPS data we extract the parallel and perpendicular velocity distribution of water group ions. We compare these results with hybrid simulations of the ion cyclotron instability and relate the observed wave amplitudes and ion velocity distributions to the production rate of pickup ions. The resulting relation between wave and plasma properties will allow us to infer ion production rates even at times when no direct ion measurements are available.

  2. Electromagnetic cyclotron waves in the solar wind: Wind observation and wave dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, L. K.; Moya, P. S.; Viñas, A. F.; Stevens, M.

    2016-03-01

    Wind observed long-lasting electromagnetic cyclotron waves near the proton cyclotron frequency on 11 March 2005, in the descending part of a fast wind stream. Bi-Maxwellian velocity distributions are fitted for core protons, beam protons, and α-particles. Using the fitted plasma parameters we conduct kinetic linear dispersion analysis and find ion cyclotron and/or firehose instabilities grow in six of 10 wave intervals. After Doppler shift, some of the waves have frequency and polarization consistent with observation, thus may be correspondence to the cyclotron waves observed.

  3. Observation of resonance overlap in a traveling wave tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doveil, Fabrice; Auhmani, Khalid; Guyomarc'h, Didier

    2003-10-01

    For wave particle interaction, the 1D beam plasma system can be advantageously replaced by a Traveling Wave Tube (TWT). A small cold test electron beam propagates along the axis of the TWT and interacts with one or two waves which are launched on the slow wave structure (a 4 m long helix) of the TWT. The beam kinetic energy is much lower than the wave(s) energy. A trochoidal energy analyzer records the beam energy distribution at the output of the TWT. The resonant velocity domain associated to one wave can thus be observed as well as the transition to large scale stochasticity when the resonant velocity domains of two waves overlap.

  4. LANGMUIR WAVE DECAY IN INHOMOGENEOUS SOLAR WIND PLASMAS: SIMULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Krafft, C.; Volokitin, A. S.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.

    2015-08-20

    Langmuir turbulence excited by electron flows in solar wind plasmas is studied on the basis of numerical simulations. In particular, nonlinear wave decay processes involving ion-sound (IS) waves are considered in order to understand their dependence on external long-wavelength plasma density fluctuations. In the presence of inhomogeneities, it is shown that the decay processes are localized in space and, due to the differences between the group velocities of Langmuir and IS waves, their duration is limited so that a full nonlinear saturation cannot be achieved. The reflection and the scattering of Langmuir wave packets on the ambient and randomly varying density fluctuations lead to crucial effects impacting the development of the IS wave spectrum. Notably, beatings between forward propagating Langmuir waves and reflected ones result in the parametric generation of waves of noticeable amplitudes and in the amplification of IS waves. These processes, repeated at different space locations, form a series of cascades of wave energy transfer, similar to those studied in the frame of weak turbulence theory. The dynamics of such a cascading mechanism and its influence on the acceleration of the most energetic part of the electron beam are studied. Finally, the role of the decay processes in the shaping of the profiles of the Langmuir wave packets is discussed, and the waveforms calculated are compared with those observed recently on board the spacecraft Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory and WIND.

  5. Collapse of nonlinear electron plasma waves in a plasma layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimalsky, V.; Koshevaya, S.; Rapoport, Yu; Kotsarenko, A.

    2016-10-01

    The excitation of nonlinear electron plasma waves in the plasma layer is investigated theoretically. This excitation is realized by means of initial oscillatory perturbations of the volume electron concentration or by initial oscillatory distributions of the longitudinal electron velocity. The amplitudes of the initial perturbations are small and the manifestation of the volume nonlinearity is absent. When the amplitudes of the initial perturbations exceed some thresholds, the values of the electron concentration near the plasma boundary increase catastrophically. The maxima of the electron concentration reach extremely high magnitudes, and sharp peaks in the electron concentration occur, which are localized both in the longitudinal and transverse directions. This effect is interpreted as wave collapse near the plasma boundary.

  6. Inductance of rf-wave-heated plasmas.

    PubMed

    Farshi, E; Todo, Y

    2003-03-14

    The inductance of rf-wave-heated plasmas is derived. This inductance represents the inductance of fast electrons located in a plateau during their acceleration due to electric field or deceleration due to collisions and electric field. This inductance has been calculated for small electric fields from the two-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation as the flux crossing the surface of critical energy mv(2)(ph)/2 in the velocity space. The new expression may be important for radio-frequency current drive ramp-up, current drive efficiency, current profile control, and so on in tokamaks. This inductance may be incorporated into transport codes that study plasma heating by rf waves.

  7. The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Kirchner, D. L.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Averkamp, T. F.; Zarka, P.; Lecacheux, A.; Manning, R.; Roux, A.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Galopeau, P.; Meyer, A.; Boström, R.; Gustafsson, G.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Åhlen, L.; Rucker, H. O.; Ladreiter, H. P.; Macher, W.; Woolliscroft, L. J. C.; Alleyne, H.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Farrell, W. M.; Harvey, C. C.; Louarn, P.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Pedersen, A.

    2004-09-01

    The Cassini radio and plasma wave investigation is designed to study radio emissions, plasma waves, thermal plasma, and dust in the vicinity of Saturn. Three nearly orthogonal electric field antennas are used to detect electric fields over a frequency range from 1 Hz to 16 MHz, and three orthogonal search coil magnetic antennas are used to detect magnetic fields over a frequency range from 1 Hz to 12 kHz. A Langmuir probe is used to measure the electron density and temperature. Signals from the electric and magnetic antennas are processed by five receiver systems: a high frequency receiver that covers the frequency range from 3.5 kHz to 16 MHz, a medium frequency receiver that covers the frequency range from 24 Hz to 12 kHz, a low frequency receiver that covers the frequency range from 1 Hz to 26 Hz, a five-channel waveform receiver that covers the frequency range from 1 Hz to 2.5 kHz in two bands, 1 Hz to 26 Hz and 3 Hz to 2.5 kHz, and a wideband receiver that has two frequency bands, 60 Hz to 10.5 kHz and 800 Hz to 75 kHz. In addition, a sounder transmitter can be used to stimulate plasma resonances over a frequency range from 3.6 kHz to 115.2 kHz. Fluxes of micron-sized dust particles can be counted and approximate masses of the dust particles can be determined using the same techniques as Voyager. Compared to Voyagers 1 and 2, which are the only spacecraft that have made radio and plasma wave measurements in the vicinity of Saturn, the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument has several new capabilities. These include (1) greatly improved sensitivity and dynamic range, (2) the ability to perform direction-finding measurements of remotely generated radio emissions and wave normal measurements of plasma waves, (3) both active and passive measurements of plasma resonances in order to give precise measurements of the local electron density, and (4) Langmuir probe measurements of the local electron density and temperature. With these new capabilities, it will be

  8. Potential role of kinetic Alfvén waves and whistler waves in solar wind plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandal, P.; Yadav, N.; Sharma, R. P.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    Spacecraft observations indicate the signatures of highly oblique kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) and whistler waves in the solar wind plasma. In the present work, we explore the possible role of KAWs and whistler waves in the observed solar wind magnetic turbulent spectrum. The nonlinear spatial evolution of KAW is studied including the effects of the ponderomotive force which results in intense localized structures due to the background density modification. Weak quasi-transverse whistler wave propagating through these localized structures also gets localized in the form of small-scale localized structures. We present numerically calculated magnetic power spectra for both KAW as well as for whistler wave. Our obtained results demonstrate the important role that KAWs and whistler waves play in the energy cascading from larger to smaller scales. The relevance of these results to recent spacecraft observations is also pointed out.

  9. A large volume uniform plasma generator for the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Min; Li Xiaoping; Xie Kai; Liu Donglin; Liu Yanming

    2013-01-15

    A large volume uniform plasma generator is proposed for the experiments of electromagnetic (EM) wave propagation in plasma, to reproduce a 'black out' phenomenon with long duration in an environment of the ordinary laboratory. The plasma generator achieves a controllable approximate uniform plasma in volume of 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 260 mm Multiplication-Sign 180 mm without the magnetic confinement. The plasma is produced by the glow discharge, and the special discharge structure is built to bring a steady approximate uniform plasma environment in the electromagnetic wave propagation path without any other barriers. In addition, the electron density and luminosity distributions of plasma under different discharge conditions were diagnosed and experimentally investigated. Both the electron density and the plasma uniformity are directly proportional to the input power and in roughly reverse proportion to the gas pressure in the chamber. Furthermore, the experiments of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma are conducted in this plasma generator. Blackout phenomena at GPS signal are observed under this system and the measured attenuation curve is of reasonable agreement with the theoretical one, which suggests the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. Ulysses observations of wave activity at interplanetary shocks and implications for type II radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Lengyel-Frey, D. |; Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R.J.; Stone, R.G.; Phillips, J.L. |

    1997-02-01

    We present the first quantitative investigation of interplanetary type II radio emission in which in situ waves measured at interplanetary shocks are used to compute radio wave intensities for comparison with type II observations. This study is based on in situ measurements of 42 in-ecliptic forward shocks as well as 10 intervals of type II emission observed by the Ulysses spacecraft between 1 AU and 5 AU. The analysis involves comparisons of statistical properties of type II bursts and in situ waves. Most of the 42 shocks are associated with the occurrence of electrostatic waves near the time of shock passage at Ulysses. These waves, which are identified as electron plasma waves and ion acoustic-like waves, are typically most intense several minutes before shock passage. This suggests that wave-wave interactions might be of importance in electromagnetic wave generation and that type II source regions are located immediately upstream of the shocks. We use the in situ wave measurements to compute type II brightness temperatures, assuming that emission at the fundamental of the electron plasma frequency is generated by the merging of electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves or the decay of electron plasma waves into ion acoustic and transverse waves. Second harmonic emission is assumed to be produced by the merging of electron plasma waves. The latter mechanism requires that a portion of the electron plasma wave distribution is backscattered, presumably by density inhomogeneities in regions of observed ion acoustic wave activity. The computed type II brightness temperatures are found to be consistent with observed values for both fundamental and second harmonic emission, assuming that strong ({approx_equal}10{sup {minus}4}V/m) electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves are coincident and that the electron plasma waves have phase velocities less than about 10 times the electron thermal velocity. (Abstract Truncated)

  11. Standing waves along a microwave generated surface wave plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J.; Asmussen, J.

    1982-01-01

    Two surface wave plasma columns, generated by microwave power in argon at gas pressures of 0.05 torr to 330 torr, interact in the same discharge tube to form standing surface waves. Radial electric field and azimuthal magnetic field outside the discharge tube are measured to be 90 deg out of phase with respect to axial position and to decay exponentially with radial distance from the tube axis. Maximum light emission occurs at the position of maximum azimuthal magnetic field and minimum radial electric field. Electron temperature and density are measured at low pressures with double probes inserted into the plasma at a null of radial electric field. Measured electron densities compare well with those predicted by Gould-Trivelpiece surface wave theory.

  12. Spatiotemporal synchronization of drift waves in a magnetron sputtering plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Martines, E.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Antoni, V.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Adámek, J.

    2014-10-15

    A feedforward scheme is applied for drift waves control in a magnetized magnetron sputtering plasma. A system of driven electrodes collecting electron current in a limited region of the explored plasma is used to interact with unstable drift waves. Drift waves actually appear as electrostatic modes characterized by discrete wavelengths of the order of few centimeters and frequencies of about 100 kHz. The effect of external quasi-periodic, both in time and space, travelling perturbations is studied. Particular emphasis is given to the role played by the phase relation between the natural and the imposed fluctuations. It is observed that it is possible by means of localized electrodes, collecting currents which are negligible with respect to those flowing in the plasma, to transfer energy to one single mode and to reduce that associated to the others. Due to the weakness of the external action, only partial control has been achieved.

  13. Two dimensional kinetic analysis of electrostatic harmonic plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca-Pongutá, E. C.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Yoon, P. H.

    2016-06-01

    Electrostatic harmonic Langmuir waves are virtual modes excited in weakly turbulent plasmas, first observed in early laboratory beam-plasma experiments as well as in rocket-borne active experiments in space. However, their unequivocal presence was confirmed through computer simulated experiments and subsequently theoretically explained. The peculiarity of harmonic Langmuir waves is that while their existence requires nonlinear response, their excitation mechanism and subsequent early time evolution are governed by essentially linear process. One of the unresolved theoretical issues regards the role of nonlinear wave-particle interaction process over longer evolution time period. Another outstanding issue is that existing theories for these modes are limited to one-dimensional space. The present paper carries out two dimensional theoretical analysis of fundamental and (first) harmonic Langmuir waves for the first time. The result shows that harmonic Langmuir wave is essentially governed by (quasi)linear process and that nonlinear wave-particle interaction plays no significant role in the time evolution of the wave spectrum. The numerical solutions of the two-dimensional wave spectra for fundamental and harmonic Langmuir waves are also found to be consistent with those obtained by direct particle-in-cell simulation method reported in the literature.

  14. Plasma transport induced by kinetic Alfven wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Izutsu, T.; Hasegawa, H.; Fujimoto, M.; Nakamura, T. K. M.

    2012-10-15

    At the Earth's magnetopause that separates the hot-tenuous magnetospheric plasma from the cold dense solar wind plasma, often seen is a boundary layer where plasmas of both origins coexist. Plasma diffusions of various forms have been considered as the cause of this plasma mixing. Here, we investigate the plasma transport induced by wave-particle interaction in kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence, which is one of the candidate processes. We clarify that the physical origin of the KAW-induced cross-field diffusion is the drift motions of those particles that are in Cerenkov resonance with the wave: E Multiplication-Sign B-like drift that emerges in the presence of non-zero parallel electric field component and grad-B drift due to compressional magnetic fluctuations. We find that KAW turbulence, which has a spectral breakpoint at which an MHD inertial range transits to a dissipation range, causes selective transport for particles whose parallel velocities are specified by the local Alfven velocity and the parallel phase velocity at the spectral breakpoint. This finding leads us to propose a new data analysis method for identifying whether or not a mixed plasma in the boundary layer is a consequence of KAW-induced transport across the magnetopause. The method refers to the velocity space distribution function data obtained by a spacecraft that performs in situ observations and, in principle, is applicable to currently available dataset such as that provided by the NASA's THEMIS mission.

  15. Waves in Space Plasmas (WISP). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Calvert, W.

    1994-08-01

    Activities under this project have included participation in the Waves in Space Plasmas (WISP) program, a study of the data processing requirements for WISP, and theoretical studies of radio sounding, ducting, and magnetoionic theory. An analysis of radio sounding in the magnetosphere was prepared.

  16. ISEE/ICE plasma wave data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.

    1989-01-01

    The work performed for the period 1 Jan. 1985 to 30 Oct. 1989 is presented. The objective was to provide reduction and analysis of data from a scientific instrument designed to study solar wind and plasma wave phenomena on the International Sun Earth Explorer 3 (ISEE-3)/International Cometary Explorer (ICE) missions.

  17. Simulations of auroral plasma processes - Electric fields, waves and particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Thiemann, H.; Schunk, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Plasma processes driven by current sheets of finite thicknesses in an ambient magnetized plasma are studied using a 2 1/2 dimensional particle-in-cell code, and similarities are found between simulated plasma processes and those observed in the auroral plasma. Current sheets are shown to be bounded by large perpendicular electric fields occurring near their edges above the conducting boundary. Shaped potential structures form when the current sheets are narrow, and when the current sheets are wide, potential structures develop a significant parallel potential drop such that the electrons are accelerated upwards. Downward parallel electric fields of variable strength are noted in the downward current region, and double layer formation is seen in both narrow and wide current sheets. High frequency oscillations near the electron plasma frequency and its harmonic are seen, and low frequency waves are observed.

  18. Ground observations of kinetic Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kloecker, N.; Luehr, H.; Robert, P.; Korth, A.

    1985-01-01

    Ground-based observations with the EISCAT magnetometer of locally confined intense drifting current systems and Geos-2 measurements during four events in November and December 1982 are examined. In the ground-based measurements near the Harang discontinuity, the events are characterized by strong pulsations with amplitudes in the horizontal component up to 1000 nT and periods of about 300 s and longer. They occur in the evening hours adjacent to the poleward side of the discontinuity with the onset of a substorm; at the same time, the inner edge of the plasma sheet passes the Geos-2 position, magnetically conjugate to ground stations. It is shown that the events can be explained in terms of kinetic Alfven waves. 8 references.

  19. Energetic electrons and plasma waves associated with a solar type III radio burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Potter, D. W.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.

    1981-01-01

    Detailed in situ observations from the ISEE 3 spacecraft of energetic electrons, plasma waves, and radio emission for the type II solar radio burst of February 17, 1979, are presented. The reduced, one-dimensional electron distribution function is constructed as a function of time. Since the faster electrons arrive before the slower ones, a bump on tail distribution forms which is unstable to the growth of Langmuir waves. The plasma wave growth computed from the distribution function agrees well with the observed onset of the Langmuir waves, and there is qualitative agreement between variations in the plasma wave levels and in the development of regions of positive slope in the function. The evolution of the function, however, predicts far higher plasma wave levels than those observed. The maximum levels observed are approximately equal to the threshold for nonlinear wave processes, such as oscillation two-stream instability and soliton collapse.

  20. Dust structurization observed in a dc glow discharge dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Jonathon R.; Kim, Su-Hyun; Merlino, Robert L.

    2010-11-01

    Dusty plasmas, which are inherently open systems which require an ionization source to replenish the plasma absorbed on the grains, tend to exhibit self-organization. Various structures have been observed in dusty plasmas such as dust crystals, voids, and vortices. Due to the presence of drifting ions in dc discharge plasmas, spontaneously excited dust acoustic waves are also a common occurrence. By adjusting the discharge parameters we have observed a new phenomenon in dusty plasmas -- the spontaneous formation of three-dimensional stationary dust density structures. These structures appear as an ordered pattern consisting of alternating regions of high and low dust density arranged in a nested bowl-type configuration The stationary structure evolves from dust density waves that slow down as their wavelength decreases and eventually stop moving when the wavelength reaches some minimum size.

  1. Electron plasma wave propagation in external-electrode fluorescent lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Guangsup; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Jeong, Jong-Mun; Hong, Byoung-Hee; Koo, Je-Huan; Choi, Eun-Ha; Verboncoeur, John P.; Uhm, Han Sup

    2008-01-14

    The optical propagation observed along the positive column of external electrode fluorescent lamps is shown to be an electron plasma wave propagating with the electron thermal speed of (kT{sub e}/m){sup 1/2}. When the luminance of the lamp is 10 000-20 000 cd/m{sup 2}, the electron plasma temperature and the plasma density in the positive column are determined to be kT{sub e}{approx}1.26-2.12 eV and n{sub o}{approx}(1.28-1.69)x10{sup 17} m{sup -3}, respectively.

  2. Analysis of plasma wave interference patterns in the Spacelab 2 PDP data. [PDP (Plasma Diagnostics Package)

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Wei.

    1992-01-01

    During the Spacelab 2 mission the University of Iowa's Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) explored the plasma environment around the shuttle. Wideband spectrograms of plasma waves were obtained from the PDP at frequencies from 0 to 30 kHz up to 400 m from the shuttle. These spectrograms frequently showed interference patterns caused by waves with wavelengths short compared to the antenna length (3.89 meters). Two types of interference patterns were observed in the wideband data: associated with the ejection of an electron beam from the space shuttle; associated with lower hybrid waves generated by an interaction between the neutral gas cloud around shuttle and the ambient ionospheric plasma. Analysis of these antenna interference patterns permits a determination of the wavelength, the plasma rest frame frequency, the direction of propagation, the power spectrum and in some cases the location of the source. The electric field noise associated with the electron beam was observed in the wideband data for two periods during which an electron frequency range at low frequencies (below 10 kHz) and shows clear evidence of interference patterns. The broadband low frequency noise was the dominant type of noise produced by the electron beam. The waves have a linear dispersion relation very similar to ion acoustic waves. The returning to the shuttle in response to the ejected electron beam. The waves associated with the lower hybrid resonance have rest frame frequencies near the lower hybrid frequency and propagate perpendicular to the magnetic field. The occurrence of these waves depends strongly on the PDP's position relative to the shuttle and the magnetic field direction. The authors results confirm previous identifications of these waves as lower hybrid waves and suggest they are driven by pick-up ions (H[sub 2]O[sup +]) produced by a charge exchange interaction between a water cloud around the shuttle and the ambient ionosphere.

  3. A direct Vlasov simulation of nonlinear plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Kentaro; Boyd, Iain; Kaganovich, Igor

    2013-10-01

    A direct Vlasov simulation, which solves the collisionless Vlasov equation directly on a discretized phase space, achieves good resolution of velocity distribution functions in comparison to particle methods. In this presentation, nonlinear electron plasma waves (EPWs) and ion acoustic waves (IAWs) are investigated with a fully-kinetic one-dimensional Vlasov simulation. A parallelized Vlasov simulation is employed since grid resolution of the discretized phase space is required to be fine enough in order to capture the nonlinear waves with higher harmonic modes. The primary goal is benchmarking our simulation with results obtained from another Vlasov code and verification with the nonlinear theories [R. L. Berger et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 032107 (2013)]. The frequency shift of nonlinear plasma waves is investigated by applying an initial density perturbation or an external driver potential. It has been observed that the plasma frequency decreases for EPWs and increases for IAWs for Te /Ti = 10 , which agrees with Berger's simulation and theories. A further investigation varying the generation of the nonlinear wave such as driver amplitude and duration time will be performed and discussed. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences Program, Grant # DE-SC0001939, and the Air Force Research Laboratory Grant # F9550-09-1-0695.

  4. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, D P; Chen, Y; Kletzing, C A; Denton, M H; Kurth, W S

    2015-01-01

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1–0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wave intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10−3 nT2, using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons. PMID:26167444

  5. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, D. P.; Chen, Y.; Kletzing, C. A.; Denton, M. H.; Kurth, W. S.

    2015-02-17

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1–0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wave intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10⁻³ nT², using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons.

  6. Formation mechanism of steep wave front in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, M. Kasuya, N.; Itoh, S.-I.; Kobayashi, T.; Arakawa, H.; Itoh, K.; Fukunaga, K.; Yamada, T.; Yagi, M.

    2015-03-15

    Bifurcation from a streamer to a solitary drift wave is obtained in three dimensional simulation of resistive drift waves in cylindrical plasmas. The solitary drift wave is observed in the regime where the collisional transport is important as well as fluctuation induced transport. The solitary drift wave forms a steep wave front in the azimuthal direction. The phase of higher harmonic modes are locked to that of the fundamental mode, so that the steep wave front is sustained for a long time compared to the typical time scale of the drift wave oscillation. The phase entrainment between the fundamental and second harmonic modes is studied, and the azimuthal structure of the stationary solution is found to be characterized by a parameter which is determined by the deviation of the fluctuations from the Boltzmann relation. There are two solutions of the azimuthal structures, which have steep wave front facing forward and backward in the wave propagation direction, respectively. The selection criterion of these solutions is derived theoretically from the stability of the phase entrainment. The simulation result and experimental observations are found to be consistent with the theoretical prediction.

  7. Electrostatic rogue-waves in relativistically degenerate plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we investigate the modulational instability and the possibility of electrostatic rogue-wave propagations in a completely degenerate plasma with arbitrary degree of degeneracy, i.e., relativistically degenerate plasma, ranging from solid density to the astrophysical compact stars. The hydrodynamic approach along with the perturbation method is used to reduce the governing equations to the nonlinear Schrödinger equation from which the modulational instability, the growth rate of envelope excitations and the occurrence of rogue as well as super-rogue waves in the plasma, is evaluated. It is observed that the modulational instability in a fully degenerate plasma can be quite sensitive to the plasma number-density and the wavenumber of envelop excitations. It is further revealed that the relativistically degeneracy plasmas (R{sub 0} > 1) are almost always modulationally unstable. It is found, however, that the highly energetic sharply localized electrostatic rogue as well as super-rogue waves can exist in the astrophysical compact objects like white dwarfs and neutron star crusts. The later may provide a link to understand many physical processes in such stars and it may lead us to the origin of the random-localized intense short gamma-ray bursts, which “appear from nowhere and disappear without a trace” quite similar to oceanic rogue structures.

  8. Excitation of chirping whistler waves in a laboratory plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Whistler mode chorus emissions with a characteristic frequency chirp largely control the dynamic variability of the Earth's outer radiation belt. They are responsible for the acceleration of outer radiation belt electrons to relativistic energies and also for the scattering loss of these electrons into the atmosphere. Here, we report on the first laboratory experiment where whistler waves exhibiting fast frequency chirping have been artificially produced using a gyrating beam of energetic electrons injected into a cold plasma. It is shown that there is an optimal beam density for frequency chirps, which indicates the existence of optimum wave amplitude for the generation of chirps. Also, frequency chirps only occur for a very narrow range of ratio of fpe /fce , similar to that observed in space. Strong magnetic field gradient, which prohibits the formation of phase space electron hole, disrupts frequency chirps as expected. Broadband whistler waves similar to magnetospheric hiss are also observed at relatively high plasma density. Their mode structures are identified by the phase-correlation technique. It is demonstrated that broadband whistlers are excited through Landau resonance, cyclotron resonance and anomalous cyclotron resonance. Wave growth rate and wave normal angle given by linear theory are consistent with experimental results in general. Preliminary particle-in-cell simulation captures the linear theory prediction of broadband whistlers and also gives important information on the evolution of electron distribution function. Supported by NSF/DOE Plasma Partnership grant DE-SC0010578.

  9. A Schamel equation for ion acoustic waves in superthermal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G. Kourakis, I.; Verheest, F.; Hellberg, M. A.; Anowar, M. G. M.

    2014-09-15

    An investigation of the propagation of ion acoustic waves in nonthermal plasmas in the presence of trapped electrons has been undertaken. This has been motivated by space and laboratory plasma observations of plasmas containing energetic particles, resulting in long-tailed distributions, in combination with trapped particles, whereby some of the plasma particles are confined to a finite region of phase space. An unmagnetized collisionless electron-ion plasma is considered, featuring a non-Maxwellian-trapped electron distribution, which is modelled by a kappa distribution function combined with a Schamel distribution. The effect of particle trapping has been considered, resulting in an expression for the electron density. Reductive perturbation theory has been used to construct a KdV-like Schamel equation, and examine its behaviour. The relevant configurational parameters in our study include the superthermality index κ and the characteristic trapping parameter β. A pulse-shaped family of solutions is proposed, also depending on the weak soliton speed increment u{sub 0}. The main modification due to an increase in particle trapping is an increase in the amplitude of solitary waves, yet leaving their spatial width practically unaffected. With enhanced superthermality, there is a decrease in both amplitude and width of solitary waves, for any given values of the trapping parameter and of the incremental soliton speed. Only positive polarity excitations were observed in our parametric investigation.

  10. Plasma wave turbulence associated with an interplanetary shock. [wave in solar wind upstream of magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Neubauer, F. M.; Schwenn, R.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with interplanetary shocks, detected and analyzed to date, from the Helios 1 and 2 spacecraft in eccentric solar orbits. The plasma wave turbulence associated with the shock observed on March 30, 1976 is studied in detail. This event is of particular interest because it represents a clearly defined burst of turbulence against a quiet solar wind background both upstream and downstream of the shock. The shock itself is an oblique shock with upstream parameters characterized by a low Mach number, a low beta, and an abnormally large electron to ion temperature ratio. The types of plasma wave detected are discussed.

  11. Plasma effects in a travelling wave tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manish; Bhasin, Lalita; Tripathi, V. K.

    2010-02-01

    The effect of a plasma on a travelling wave tube comprising a sheath helix is studied. The plasma, taken to be (i) strongly magnetized or (ii) unmagnetized, allows a larger beam current to pass owing to charge and current neutralization. The beam excites an azimuthally symmetric slow wave via Cerenkov resonance. In the case of a strongly magnetized plasma when ωp>ω (where ωp is the plasma frequency), the amplitude of the axial electric field peaks on the axis and the phase velocity is suppressed, whereas for ωp<ω the field amplitude peaks at the helix surface and the phase velocity is enhanced. As a consequence, when a beam is placed close to the helix, the growth rate increases with ωp as long as ωp <ω and decreases with ωp when ωp>ω. In the case of an unmagnetized plasma, the mode is more strongly localized near the helix and the growth rate increases with ωp.

  12. Wave excitation by nonlinear coupling among shear Alfvén waves in a mirror-confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikezoe, R. Ichimura, M.; Okada, T.; Hirata, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sumida, S.; Jang, S.; Takeyama, K.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Wang, X.

    2015-09-15

    A shear Alfvén wave at slightly below the ion-cyclotron frequency overcomes the ion-cyclotron damping and grows because of the strong anisotropy of the ion temperature in the magnetic mirror configuration, and is called the Alfvén ion-cyclotron (AIC) wave. Density fluctuations caused by the AIC waves and the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves used for ion heating have been detected using a reflectometer in a wide radial region of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror plasma. Various wave-wave couplings are clearly observed in the density fluctuations in the interior of the plasma, but these couplings are not so clear in the magnetic fluctuations at the plasma edge when measured using a pick-up coil. A radial dependence of the nonlinearity is found, particularly in waves with the difference frequencies of the AIC waves; bispectral analysis shows that such wave-wave coupling is significant near the core, but is not so evident at the periphery. In contrast, nonlinear coupling with the low-frequency background turbulence is quite distinct at the periphery. Nonlinear coupling associated with the AIC waves may play a significant role in the beta- and anisotropy-limits of a mirror-confined plasma through decay of the ICRF heating power and degradation of the plasma confinement by nonlinearly generated waves.

  13. Solitary kinetic Alfven waves in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yangfang; Wu, D. J.; Morfill, G. E.

    2008-08-15

    Solitary kinetic Alfven waves in dusty plasmas are studied by considering the dust charge variation. The effect of the dust charge-to-mass ratio on the soliton solution is discussed. The Sagdeev potential is derived analytically with constant dust charge and then calculated numerically by taking the dust charge variation into account. We show that the dust charge-to-mass ratio plays an important role in the soliton properties. The soliton solutions are comprised of two branches. One branch is sub-Alfvenic and the soliton velocity is obviously smaller than the Alfven speed. The other branch is super-Alfvenic and the soliton velocity is very close to or greater than the Alfven speed. Both compressive and rarefactive solitons can exist. For the sub-Alfvenic branch, the rarefactive soliton is bell-shaped and it is much narrower than the compressive one. However, for the super-Alfvenic branch, the compressive soliton is bell-shaped and narrower, and the rarefactive one is broadened. When the charge-to-mass ratio of the dust grains is sufficiently high, the width of the rarefactive soliton, in the super-Alfvenic branch, will broaden extremely and a electron depletion will be observed. It is also shown that the bell-shaped soliton can transition to a cusped structure when the velocity is sufficiently high.

  14. Waves in space plasma dipole antenna subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Mark

    1993-01-01

    The Waves In Space Plasma (WISP) flight experiment requires a 50-meter-long deployable dipole antenna subsystem (DASS) to radiate radio frequencies from the STS Orbiter cargo bay. The transmissions are to excite outer ionospheric plasma between the dipole and a free-flying receiver (Spartan) for scientific purposes. This report describes the singular DASS design requirements and how the resulting design satisfies them. A jettison latch is described in some detail. The latch releases the antenna in case of any problems which might prevent the bay doors from closing for re-entry and landing of the Orbiter.

  15. Relativistic Bernstein waves in a degenerate plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Muddasir; Hussain, Azhar; Murtaza, G.

    2011-09-15

    Bernstein mode for a relativistic degenerate electron plasma is investigated. Using relativistic Vlasov-Maxwell equations, a general expression for the conductivity tensor is derived and then employing Fermi-Dirac distribution function a generalized dispersion relation for the Bernstein mode is obtained. Two limiting cases, i.e., non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic are discussed. The dispersion relations obtained are also graphically presented for some specific values of the parameters depicting how the propagation characteristics of Bernstein waves as well as the Upper Hybrid oscillations are modified with the increase in plasma number density.

  16. Shear-Alfven Waves in Gyrokinetic Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    W.W.Lee; J.L.V.Lewandowski; T.S. Hahm; Z. Lin

    2000-10-18

    It is found that the thermal fluctuation level of the shear-Alfven waves in a gyrokinetic plasma decreases with plasma b(* cs2/uA2), where cs is the ion acoustic speed and uA is the Alfven velocity. This unique thermodynamic property based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem is verified in this paper using a new gyrokinetic particle simulation scheme, which splits the particle distribution function into the equilibrium part as well as the adiabatic and nonadiabatic parts.

  17. Twisted dust acoustic waves in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, P. K.

    2012-08-15

    We examine linear dust acoustic waves (DAWs) in a dusty plasma with strongly correlated dust grains, and discuss possibility of a twisted DA vortex beam carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM). For our purposes, we use the Boltzmann distributed electron and ion density perturbations, the dust continuity and generalized viscoelastic dust momentum equations, and Poisson's equation to obtain a dispersion relation for the modified DAWs. The effects of the polarization force, strong dust couplings, and dust charge fluctuations on the DAW spectrum are examined. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the DAW can propagate as a twisted vortex beam carrying OAM. A twisted DA vortex structure can trap and transport dust particles in dusty plasmas.

  18. Kinetic Alfven waves and plasma transport at the magnetopause

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.R.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1997-05-01

    Large amplitude compressional type waves, with frequencies ranging from 10--500 mHz, are nearly always found in the magnetosheath near the magnetopause where there are large gradients in density, pressure and magnetic field. As compressional waves propagation to the magnetopause, there gradients efficiently couple them with shear/kinetic Alfven waves near the Alfven field-line resonance location ({omega} = k{sub {parallel}} v{sub A}). The authors present a solution of the kinetic-MHD wave equations for this process using a realistic equilibrium profile including full ion Larmor radius effects and wave-particle resonance interactions for electrons and ions to model the dissipation. For northward IMF a KAW propagates backward to the magnetosheath. For southward IMF the wave remains in the magnetopause but can propagate through the k{sub {parallel}} = 0 location. The quasi-linear theory predicts that KAWs produce plasma transport with a diffusion coefficient D{sub {perpendicular}} {approximately} 10{sup 9} m{sup 2}/s and plasma convection on the order of 1 km/s. However, for southward IMF additional transport can occur because magnetic islands form at the k{sub {parallel}} = 0 location. Due to the broadband nature of the observed waves these islands can overlap leading to stochastic transport which is much larger than that due to quasilinear effects.

  19. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hartley, D. P.; Chen, Y.; Kletzing, C. A.; Denton, M. H.; Kurth, W. S.

    2015-02-17

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1–0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wavemore » intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10⁻³ nT², using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons.« less

  20. Plasma wave experiment for the ISEE-3 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarf, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Results of analyses of data received from a scientific instrument designed to study solar wind and plasma wave phenomena on the ISEE-3 mission are discussed in two papers prepared for publication. A study of plasma wave levels in and interplanetary magnetic field orientation preceding observations of interplanetary shocks by the satellite infers that quasi-parallel, interplanetary shocks are preceded by foreshocks whose presence is not obviously attributable to scattering of ion beams generated at quasi-perpendicular zones of these interplanetary shocks. Investigations of whistler mode turbulence in the disturbed solar wind resulted in various indirect lines of evidence indicating that these whistler waves are generated propagating at large angles to the local interplanetary field, a fact which helps identify possible free energy sources for their growth.

  1. Singular waves in a magnetized pair-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Sukanta; Misra, Amar P.

    2009-07-15

    The existence of singular waves along the boundary of a magnetized pair-ion plasma is proved for both plasma-metal and plasma-vacuum interfaces. Such waves are shown to propagate at the points of intersection of the complex-zone boundary and the surface wave dispersion curve in a weakly magnetized plasma. The results could be relevant for negative ion plasmas in the laboratory and space as well as for the modeling of a plasma sustained by a traveling surface wave.

  2. Waves in plasmas: Highlights from the past and present

    SciTech Connect

    Stix, T.H.

    1990-03-01

    To illustrate the development of some fundamental concepts in plasma waves, a number of experimental observations, going back over half a century, are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the phenomena of dispersion, collisionfree damping, ray trajectories, amplitude transport, plasma wave echos, finite-Larmor-radius and cyclotron and cyclotron-harmonic effects, nonlocal response, and mode conversion. Also to the straight, trajectory approximation and two-level phase mixing. And to quasilinear diffusion and its relation to radiofrequency heating, current drive and induced neoclassical transport, and to stochasticity and superadiabaticity. One notes not only the constructive interplay between experiment and theory but also that major advances have come from each of the many disciplines that invoke plasma physics as a tool, including radio communication, astrophysics, controlled fusion, space physics, and basic research. 47 refs., 33 figs.

  3. Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic Waves In The Collisionless Space Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhalilov, N. S.; Kuznetsov, V. D.; Staude, J.

    2007-12-01

    The instability of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) waves in an anisotropic, collisionless, rarefied hot plasma is studied. Anisotropy properties of such a plasma are caused by a strong magnetic field, when the thermal gas pressures across and along the field become unequal. Moreover, there appears an anisotropy of the thermal fluxes. The study of the anisotropy features of the plasma are motivated by observed solar coronal data. The 16 moments equations derived from the Boltzmann-Vlasov kinetic equation are used. These equations strongly differ from the usual isotropic MHD case. For linear disturbances the wave equations in homogenous anisotropic plasma are deduced. The general dispersion relation for the incompressible wave modes is derived, solved and analyzed. It is shown that a wide wave spectrum with stable and unstable behavior is possible, in contrast to the usual isotropic MHD case. The dependence of the instability on magnetic field, pressure anisotropy, and heat fluxes is investigated. The general instability condition is obtained. The results can be applied to the theory of solar and stellar coronal heating, to wind models and in other modeling, where the collisionless approximation is valid.

  4. First Observation of Electrorheological Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ivlev, A. V.; Morfill, G. E.; Thomas, H. M.; Raeth, C.; Huber, P.; Kompaneets, R.; Joyce, G.; Fortov, V. E.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Reiter, T.; Turin, M.; Vinogradov, P.

    2008-03-07

    We report the experimental discovery of ''electrorheological (ER) complex plasmas,'' where the control of the interparticle interaction by an externally applied electric field is due to distortion of the Debye spheres that surround microparticles (dust) in a plasma. We show that interactions in ER plasmas under weak ac fields are mathematically equivalent to those in conventional ER fluids. Microgravity experiments, as well as molecular dynamics simulations, show a phase transition from an isotropic to an anisotropic (string) plasma state as the electric field is increased.

  5. Ducted kinetic Alfven waves in plasma with steep density gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Houshmandyar, Saeid; Scime, Earl E.

    2011-11-15

    Given their high plasma density (n {approx} 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}), it is theoretically possible to excite Alfven waves in a conventional, moderate length (L {approx} 2 m) helicon plasma source. However, helicon plasmas are decidedly inhomogeneous, having a steep radial density gradient, and typically have a significant background neutral pressure. The inhomogeneity introduces regions of kinetic and inertial Alfven wave propagation. Ion-neutral and electron-neutral collisions alter the Alfven wave dispersion characteristics. Here, we present the measurements of propagating kinetic Alfven waves in helium helicon plasma. The measured wave dispersion is well fit with a kinetic model that includes the effects of ion-neutral damping and that assumes the high density plasma core defines the radial extent of the wave propagation region. The measured wave amplitude versus plasma radius is consistent with the pile up of wave magnetic energy at the boundary between the kinetic and inertial regime regions.

  6. Photon acceleration in plasma wake wave

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Zhigang; Shen, Baifei Yi, Longqing; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Shan; Li, Shun

    2015-04-15

    The photon acceleration effect in a laser wake field is investigated based on photon Hamiltonian dynamics. A test laser pulse is injected into a plasma wave at an incident angle θ{sub i}, which could slow down the photon velocity along the propagating direction of the wake wave so as to increase the acceleration distance for the photons. The photon trapping condition is analyzed in detail, and the maximum frequency shift of the trapped photon is obtained. The acceleration gradient and dephasing length are emphatically studied. The compression of the test laser pulse is examined and used to interpret the acceleration process. The limit of finite transverse width of the wake wave on photon acceleration is also discussed.

  7. Geotail MCA Plasma Wave Investigation Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Roger R.

    1997-01-01

    The primary goals of the International Solar Terrestrial Physics/Global Geospace Science (ISTP/GGS) program are identifying, studying, and understanding the source, movement, and dissipation of plasma mass, momentum, and energy between the Sun and the Earth. The GEOTAIL spacecraft was built by the Japanese Institute of Space and Astronautical Science and has provided extensive measurements of entry, storage, acceleration, and transport in the geomagnetic tail and throughout the Earth's outer magnetosphere. GEOTAIL was launched on July 24, 1992, and began its scientific mission with eighteen extensions into the deep-tail region with apogees ranging from around 60 R(sub e) to more than 208 R(sub e) in the period up to late 1994. Due to the nature of the GEOTAIL trajectory which kept the spacecraft passing into the deep tail, GEOTAIL also made 'magnetopause skimming passes' which allowed measurements in the outer magnetosphere, magnetopause, magnetosheath, bow shock, and upstream solar wind regions as well as in the lobe, magnetosheath, boundary layers, and central plasma sheet regions of the tail. In late 1994, after spending nearly 30 months primarily traversing the deep tail region, GEOTAIL began its near-Earth phase. Perigee was reduced to 10 R(sub e) and apogee first to 50 R(sub e) and finally to 30 R(sub e) in early 1995. This orbit provides many more opportunities for GEOTAIL to explore the upstream solar wind, bow shock, magnetosheath, magnetopause, and outer magnetosphere as well as the near-Earth tail regions. The WIND spacecraft was launched on November 1, 1994 and the POLAR spacecraft was launched on February 24, 1996. These successful launches have dramatically increased the opportunities for GEOTAIL and the GGS spacecraft to be used to conduct the global research for which the ISTP program was designed. The measurement and study of plasma waves have made and will continue to make important contributions to reaching the ISTP/GGS goals and solving the

  8. Collisional damping rates for plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tigik, S. F.; Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.

    2016-06-01

    The distinction between the plasma dynamics dominated by collisional transport versus collective processes has never been rigorously addressed until recently. A recent paper [P. H. Yoon et al., Phys. Rev. E 93, 033203 (2016)] formulates for the first time, a unified kinetic theory in which collective processes and collisional dynamics are systematically incorporated from first principles. One of the outcomes of such a formalism is the rigorous derivation of collisional damping rates for Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves, which can be contrasted to the heuristic customary approach. However, the results are given only in formal mathematical expressions. The present brief communication numerically evaluates the rigorous collisional damping rates by considering the case of plasma particles with Maxwellian velocity distribution function so as to assess the consequence of the rigorous formalism in a quantitative manner. Comparison with the heuristic ("Spitzer") formula shows that the accurate damping rates are much lower in magnitude than the conventional expression, which implies that the traditional approach over-estimates the importance of attenuation of plasma waves by collisional relaxation process. Such a finding may have a wide applicability ranging from laboratory to space and astrophysical plasmas.

  9. Plasma heating, plasma flow and wave production around an electron beam injected into the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckler, J. R.; Erickson, K. N.

    1986-01-01

    A brief historical summary of the Minnesota ECHO series and other relevant electron beam experiments is given. The primary purpose of the ECHO experiments is the use of conjugate echoes as probes of the magnetosphere, but beam-plasma and wave studies were also made. The measurement of quasi-dc electric fields and ion streaming during the ECHO 6 experiment has given a pattern for the plasma flow in the hot plasma region extending to 60m radius about the ECHO 6 electron beam. The sheath and potential well caused by ion orbits is discussed with the aid of a model which fits the observations. ELF wave production in the plasma sheath around the beam is briefly discussed. The new ECHO 7 mission to be launched from the Poker Flat range in November 1987 is described.

  10. Plasma mitigation of shock wave: experiments and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2007-12-01

    Two types of plasma spikes, generated by on-board 60 Hz periodic and pulsed dc electric discharges in front of two slightly different wind tunnel models, were used to demonstrate the non-thermal plasma techniques for shock wave mitigation. The experiments were conducted in a Mach 2.5 wind tunnel. (1) In the periodic discharge case, the results show a transformation of the shock from a well-defined attached shock into a highly curved shock structure, which has increased shock angle and also appears in diffused form. As shown in a sequence with increasing discharge intensity, the shock in front of the model moves upstream to become detached with increasing standoff distance from the model and is eliminated near the peak of the discharge. The power measurements exclude the heating effect as a possible cause of the observed shock wave modification. A theory using a cone model as the shock wave generator is presented to explain the observed plasma effect on shock wave. The analysis shows that the plasma generated in front of the model can effectively deflect the incoming flow; such a flow deflection modifies the structure of the shock wave generated by the cone model, as shown by the numerical results, from a conic shape to a curved one. The shock front moves upstream with a larger shock angle, matching well with that observed in the experiment. (2) In the pulsed dc discharge case, hollow cone-shaped plasma that envelops the physical spike of a truncated cone model is produced in the discharge; consequently, the original bow shock is modified to a conical shock, equivalent to reinstating the model into a perfect cone and to increase the body aspect ratio by 70%. A significant wave drag reduction in each discharge is inferred from the pressure measurements; at the discharge maximum, the pressure on the frontal surface of the body decreases by more than 30%, the pressure on the cone surface increases by about 5%, whereas the pressure on the cylinder surface remains

  11. The plasma wave environment of an auroral arc - Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in the diffuse aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bering, E. A.

    1984-01-01

    Electric field plasma wave observations were made with a sounding rocket payload in and near a quiet auroral arc. This payload was launched on March 9, 1978 from Poker Flat, Alaska. The payload trajectory was close to the magnetic meridian and passed over a 40 kR auroral arc. The present investigation is concerned with ac electric field observations in the ELF and lower VLF covering a frequency range from 2.5 Hz to 8 kHz. Attention is given to aspects of instrumentation, the general situation, a data analysis, and the obtained results. Waves were observed at low altitude in a region of downward parallel current and diffuse aurora. These waves had properties consistent with those expected for hydrogen and oxygen electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves.

  12. Observation of low magnetic field density peaks in helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Barada, Kshitish K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Saxena, Y. C.

    2013-04-15

    Single density peak has been commonly observed in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges. In this paper, we report the observations of multiple density peaks in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges produced in the linear helicon plasma device [Barada et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 063501 (2012)]. Experiments are carried out using argon gas with m = +1 right helical antenna operating at 13.56 MHz by varying the magnetic field from 0 G to 100 G. The plasma density varies with varying the magnetic field at constant input power and gas pressure and reaches to its peak value at a magnetic field value of {approx}25 G. Another peak of smaller magnitude in density has been observed near 50 G. Measurement of amplitude and phase of the axial component of the wave using magnetic probes for two magnetic field values corresponding to the observed density peaks indicated the existence of radial modes. Measured parallel wave number together with the estimated perpendicular wave number suggests oblique mode propagation of helicon waves along the resonance cone boundary for these magnetic field values. Further, the observations of larger floating potential fluctuations measured with Langmuir probes at those magnetic field values indicate that near resonance cone boundary; these electrostatic fluctuations take energy from helicon wave and dump power to the plasma causing density peaks.

  13. Theoretical study of plasma effect on a conical shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, S.P.; Kuo, Steven S.

    2006-03-15

    Experiments conducted previously in a Mach 2.5 wind tunnel showed that localized plasma generated by an on-board 60 Hz electric discharge in front of a 60 deg. cone-shaped model considerably increases the shock angle of the attached shock generated by the cone model. Based on the measured power and cycle energy of the electric discharge, the estimated peak and average temperature enhancements were too low to justify the heating effect as a possible cause of the observed shock wave modification. In this work, a theory also using a cone model as the shock wave generator is presented to explain the observed plasma effect on the shock wave. Through electron-neutral elastic collisions and ion-neutral charge transfer collisions, plasma generated in front of the baseline shock front can deflect the incoming flow before it reaches the cone model; such a flow deflection modifies the structure of the shock wave generated by the cone model from a conic shape to a slightly curved one. The shock remains to be attached to the tip of the cone; however, the shock front moves upstream to increase the shock angle, consistent with the experimental results.

  14. Ion Cyclotron Waves Observed in the Comet Halley: A New Look to Giotto Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Martinez, M. R.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Haro-Corzo, S. S. A. R., Sr.; Arriaga-Contreras, V. V. R.

    2015-12-01

    Ion Cyclotron Waves (ICW) were observed with Giotto spacecraft. Magnetic field data have been analyzed in the past to determine the nature of ICW and compared with other comets, as Giacobini-Zinner and Grigg-Skjellerup. It is important to develop tools that allow re-analyze these data in order to know better the characteristics of these waves. In this work we have applied a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis in which we define the transverse and compressive powers for a better contrast and characterization of ICW. The information obtained will be presented through dynamic spectra in several time intervals. This tool will allow to explore the possibility to check the existence of Harmonic Mode Waves (HMW) of these waves. Finally, we use linear kinetic theory, using WHAMP code, in order to determine conditions for wave growth in a plasma resembling the regions where these waves were observed.

  15. Dynamical aspects of various solitary waves and double layers in dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, G. C.; Sarma, Jnanjyoti; Talukdar, M.

    1998-01-01

    Employing quasipotential analysis, the Sagdeev potential equation has been derived in a multicomponent plasma consisting of free and trapped electrons and contaminated by the dust charged grains forming therein by the attachment of electrons to finite-size dust particles. Because of the free and trapped electrons in the dusty plasma, the plasma-acoustic wave exhibits the different features of various solitary waves. The Sagdeev potential equation, at a small-amplitude approximation, leads to the evaluation, by a proposed new formalism of a simple wave solution technique, of the new scenario of solitary wave propagation in a dusty plasma. It has been shown that the ordering of the nonisothermality in the dusty plasma also plays a unique role. In the case of a plasma with first-order nonisothermality, the Sagdeev potential equation derives the compressive solitary wave propagation, while for plasma with higher-order nonisothermality the method might fail to solve the Sagdeev potential equation and, thus, an alternate method is used to reveal the coexistence of compressive and rarefactive solitary waves. In addition, for certain plasma parameters, the solitary waves disappear and a double layer is expected. Again, with the better approximation in the Sagdeev potential, more features of solitary waves, known as spiky and explosive, along with the double layers, are also highlighted. The observations made of the solitary waves could be of further interest in the understanding of laboratory and space plasmas.

  16. Dynamical aspects of various solitary waves and double layers in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Das, G.C.; Sarma, J.; Talukdar, M.

    1998-01-01

    Employing quasipotential analysis, the Sagdeev potential equation has been derived in a multicomponent plasma consisting of free and trapped electrons and contaminated by the dust charged grains forming therein by the attachment of electrons to finite-size dust particles. Because of the free and trapped electrons in the dusty plasma, the plasma-acoustic wave exhibits the different features of various solitary waves. The Sagdeev potential equation, at a small-amplitude approximation, leads to the evaluation, by a proposed new formalism of a simple wave solution technique, of the new scenario of solitary wave propagation in a dusty plasma. It has been shown that the ordering of the nonisothermality in the dusty plasma also plays a unique role. In the case of a plasma with first-order nonisothermality, the Sagdeev potential equation derives the compressive solitary wave propagation, while for plasma with higher-order nonisothermality the method might fail to solve the Sagdeev potential equation and, thus, an alternate method is used to reveal the coexistence of compressive and rarefactive solitary waves. In addition, for certain plasma parameters, the solitary waves disappear and a double layer is expected. Again, with the better approximation in the Sagdeev potential, more features of solitary waves, known as spiky and explosive, along with the double layers, are also highlighted. The observations made of the solitary waves could be of further interest in the understanding of laboratory and space plasmas.{copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Plasma production for electron acceleration by resonant plasma wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Croia, M.; Curcio, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G. P.; Filippi, F.; Ghigo, A.; Lollo, V.; Pella, S.; Pompili, R.; Romeo, S.; Ferrario, M.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique known nowadays, able to provide very high accelerating fields (10-100 GV/m), enabling acceleration of electrons to GeV energy in few centimeter. However, the quality of the electron bunches accelerated with this technique is still not comparable with that of conventional accelerators (large energy spread, low repetition rate, and large emittance); radiofrequency-based accelerators, in fact, are limited in accelerating field (10-100 MV/m) requiring therefore hundred of meters of distances to reach the GeV energies, but can provide very bright electron bunches. To combine high brightness electron bunches from conventional accelerators and high accelerating fields reachable with plasmas could be a good compromise allowing to further accelerate high brightness electron bunches coming from LINAC while preserving electron beam quality. Following the idea of plasma wave resonant excitation driven by a train of short bunches, we have started to study the requirements in terms of plasma for SPARC_LAB (Ferrario et al., 2013 [1]). In particular here we focus on hydrogen plasma discharge, and in particular on the theoretical and numerical estimates of the ionization process which are very useful to design the discharge circuit and to evaluate the current needed to be supplied to the gas in order to have full ionization. Eventually, the current supplied to the gas simulated will be compared to that measured experimentally.

  18. Counterstreaming magnetized plasmas. II. Perpendicular wave propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Tautz, R.C.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2006-06-15

    The properties of longitudinal and transverse oscillations in magnetized symmetric counterstreaming Maxwellian plasmas with equal thermal velocities for waves propagating perpendicular to the stream direction are investigated on the basis of Maxwell equations and the nonrelativistic Vlasov equation. With the constraint of vanishing particle flux in the stream direction, three distinct dispersion relations are known, which are the ordinary-wave mode, the Bernstein wave mode, and the extraordinary electromagnetic wave mode, where the latter two are only approximations. In this article, all three dispersion relations are evaluated for a counterstreaming Maxwellian distribution function in terms of the hypergeometric function {sub 2}F{sub 2}. The growth rates for the ordinary-wave mode are compared to earlier results by Bornatici and Lee [Phys. Fluids 13, 3007 (1970)], who derived approximate results, whereas in this article the exact dispersion relation is solved numerically. The original results are therefore improved and show differences of up to 21% to the results obtained in this article.

  19. Warm wavebreaking of nonlinear plasma waves with arbitrary phasevelocities

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2004-11-12

    A warm, relativistic fluid theory of a nonequilibrium, collisionless plasma is developed to analyze nonlinear plasma waves excited by intense drive beams. The maximum amplitude and wavelength are calculated for nonrelativistic plasma temperatures and arbitrary plasma wave phase velocities. The maximum amplitude is shown to increase in the presence of a laser field. These results set a limit to the achievable gradient in plasma-based accelerators.

  20. Helicon waves in uniform plasmas. II. High m numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M.

    2015-09-15

    Helicons are whistler modes with azimuthal wave numbers. They have been studied in solids and plasmas where boundaries play a role. The present work shows that very similar modes exist in unbounded gaseous plasmas. Instead of boundaries, the antenna properties determine the topology of the wave packets. The simplest antenna is a magnetic loop which excites m = 0 or m = 1 helicons depending on whether the dipole moment is aligned parallel or perpendicular to the ambient background magnetic field B{sub 0}. While these low order helicons have been described by J. M. Urrutia and R. L. Stenzel [“Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. I. Low m modes,” Phys. Plasmas 22, 092111 (2015)], the present work focuses on high order modes up to m = 8. These are excited by antenna arrays forming magnetic multipoles. Their wave magnetic field has been measured in space and time in a large and uniform laboratory plasma free of boundary effects. The observed wave topology exhibits m pairs of unique field line spirals which may have inspired the name “helicon” to this mode. All field lines converge into these nested spirals which propagate like corkscrews along B{sub 0}. The field lines near the axis of helicons are perpendicular to B{sub 0} and circularly polarized as in parallel whistlers. Helical antennas couple to these transverse fields but not to the spiral fields of helicons. Using a circular antenna array of phased m = 0 loops, right or left rotating or non-rotating multipole antenna fields are generated. They excite m < 0 and m > 0 modes, showing that the plasma supports both modes equally well. The poor excitation of m < 0 modes is a characteristic of loops with dipole moment across B{sub 0}. The radiation efficiency of multipole antennas has been found to decrease with m.

  1. Electrostatic waves and instabilities in multispecies nonneutral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, Daniel H. E.

    2010-11-15

    This paper briefly describes waves and instabilities in a multispecies nonneutral plasma that have previously been studied only in neutral plasmas: ion sound waves, drift waves, and ion temperature gradient waves. The theory of their dispersion relations and growth rates is similar to that for neutral plasmas, but results differ in several important respects. For instance, drift waves are not necessarily unstable, the instabilities generally do not cause plasma loss, and they can be controlled (e.g., turned on or off) by manipulation of density and temperature profiles using standard experimental techniques such as centrifugal separation and laser cooling/heating. This should allow precise experimental studies of instability growth and saturation.

  2. Solitary waves and double layers in a dusty electronegative plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, A. A.; Shukla, P. K.; Eliasson, B.

    2009-10-15

    A dusty electronegative plasma containing Boltzmann electrons, Boltzmann negative ions, cold mobile positive ions, and negatively charged stationary dust has been considered. The basic features of arbitrary amplitude solitary waves (SWs) and double layers (DLs), which have been found to exist in such a dusty electronegative plasma, have been investigated by the pseudopotential method. The small amplitude limit has also been considered in order to study the small amplitude SWs and DLs analytically. It has been shown that under certain conditions, DLs do not exist, which is in good agreement with the experimental observations of Ghim and Hershkowitz [Y. Ghim (Kim) and N. Hershkowitz, Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 151503 (2009)].

  3. On the theory of Langmuir waves in a quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzelev, M. V.

    2010-04-15

    Nonlinear quantum-mechanical equations are derived for Langmuir waves in an isotropic electron collisionless plasma. A general analysis of dispersion relations is carried out for complex spectra of Langmuir waves and van Kampen waves in a quantum plasma with an arbitrary electron momentum distribution. Quantum nonlinear collisionless Landau damping in Maxwellian and degenerate plasmas is studied. It is shown that collisionless damping of Langmuir waves (including zero sound) occurs in collisionless plasmas due to quantum correction in the Cherenkov absorption condition, which is a purely quantum effect. Solutions to the quantum dispersion equation are obtained for a degenerate plasma.

  4. Free energy in plasmas under wave-induced diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N.J. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Rax, J.M. )

    1993-05-01

    When waves propagate through a bounded plasma, the wave may be amplified or damped at the expense of the plasma kinetic energy. In many cases of interest, the primary effect of the wave is to cause plasma diffusion in velocity and configuration space. In the absence of collisions, the rearrangement of the plasma conserves entropy, as large-grain structures are mixed and fine-grain structures emerge. The maximum extractable energy by waves so diffusing the plasma is a quantity of fundamental interest; it can be defined, but it is difficult to calculate. Through the consideration of specific examples, certain strategies for maximizing energy extraction are identified.

  5. Stability and waves of transonic laboratory and space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goedbloed, J. P.

    2003-04-01

    The properties of magnetohydrodynamic waves and instabilities of laboratory and space plasmas are determined by the overall magnetic confinement geometry and by the detailed distributions of the density, pressure, magnetic field, and background velocity of the plasma. Consequently, measurement of the spectrum of MHD waves (MHD spectroscopy) gives direct information on the internal state of the plasma, provided a theoretical model is available to solve the forward as well as the inverse spectral problems. This terminology entails a program, viz. to improve the accuracy of our knowledge of plasmas, both in the laboratory and in space. Here, helioseismology (which could be considered as one of the forms of MHD spectroscopy) may serve as a luminous example. The required study of magnetohydrodynamic waves and instabilities of both laboratory and space plasmas has been conducted for many years starting from the assumption of static equilibrium. Recently, there is a outburst of interest for plasma states where this assumption is violated. In fusion research, this interest is due to the importance of neutral beam heating and pumped divertor action for the extraction of heat and exhaust needed in future tokamak reactors. Both result in rotation of the plasma with speeds that do not permit the assumption of static equilibrium anymore. In astrophysics, observations in the full range of electromagnetic radiation has revealed the primary importance of plasma flows in such diverse situations as coronal flux tubes, stellar winds, rotating accretion disks, and jets emitted from radio galaxies. These flows have speeds which substantially influence the background stationary equilibrium state, if such a state exists at all. Consequently, it is important to study both the stationary states of magnetized plasmas with flow and the waves and instabilities they exhibit. We will present new results along these lines, extending from the discovery of gaps in the continuous spectrum and low

  6. Nonlinear wave interactions in shallow water magnetohydrodynamics of astrophysical plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimachkov, D. A.; Petrosyan, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    The rotating magnetohydrodynamic flows of a thin layer of astrophysical and space plasmas with a free surface in a vertical external magnetic field are considered in the shallow water approximation. The presence of a vertical external magnetic field changes significantly the dynamics of wave processes in an astrophysical plasma, in contrast to a neutral fluid and a plasma layer in an external toroidal magnetic field. There are three-wave nonlinear interactions in the case under consideration. Using the asymptotic method of multiscale expansions, we have derived nonlinear equations for the interaction of wave packets: three magneto- Poincare waves, three magnetostrophic waves, two magneto-Poincare and one magnetostrophic waves, and two magnetostrophic and one magneto-Poincare waves. The existence of decay instabilities and parametric amplification is predicted. We show that a magneto-Poincare wave decays into two magneto-Poincare waves, a magnetostrophic wave decays into two magnetostrophic waves, a magneto-Poincare wave decays into one magneto-Poincare and one magnetostrophic waves, and a magnetostrophic wave decays into one magnetostrophic and one magneto-Poincare waves. There are the following parametric amplification mechanisms: the parametric amplification of magneto-Poincare waves, the parametric amplification of magnetostrophic waves, the amplification of a magneto-Poincare wave in the field of a magnetostrophic wave, and the amplification of a magnetostrophic wave in the field of a magneto-Poincare wave. The instability growth rates and parametric amplification factors have been found for the corresponding processes.

  7. Model of the Dynamics of Plasma-Wave Channels in Magnetized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokov, E. A.; Chugunov, Yu. V.

    2016-06-01

    We analyze the dynamics of the plasma-wave channels excited in magnetized plasmas in the whistler frequency range. A linear theory of excitation of a plasma waveguide by an external source is developed using the quasistatic approximation. Self-consistent spatio-temporal distributions of the electric field of quasipotential waves and plasma density, which are solutions of the nonlinear nonstationary problem of the ionizing self-channeling of waves in plasmas are found on the basis of the linear theory.

  8. Observation of equipartition of seismic waves.

    PubMed

    Hennino, R; Trégourès, N; Shapiro, N M; Margerin, L; Campillo, M; van Tiggelen, B A; Weaver, R L

    2001-04-01

    Equipartition is a first principle in wave transport, based on the tendency of multiple scattering to homogenize phase space. We report observations of this principle for seismic waves created by earthquakes in Mexico. We find qualitative agreement with an equipartition model that accounts for mode conversions at the Earth's surface.

  9. Multisatellite and ground-based observations of transient ULF waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potemra, T. A.; Zanetti, L. J.; Takahashi, K.; Luehr, H.; Lepping, R. P.

    1989-01-01

    Transient ULF pulsations associated with variations in solar wind plasma density observed by the IMP 8 satellite are presently studied in light of observations obtained during a fortuitous alignment of the AMPTE and Viking satellites with respect to the EISCAT Magnetometer Cross. It is found that the isolated 10-min oscillation in solar wind plasma density produced magnetic field compression oscillations within the magnetosphere at the same frequency, thereby enhancing resonant oscillations at approximately twice the frequency which were already present. Support is seen for the periodic solar wind density variation's exciting of a tailward-traveling large-scale magnetosphere wave train which excites local field line resonant oscillations.

  10. Twisted electrostatic ion-cyclotron waves in dusty plasmas.

    PubMed

    Shukla, P K

    2013-01-01

    We show the existence of a twisted electrostatic ion-cyclotron (ESIC) wave carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) in a magnetized dusty plasma. For our purposes, we derive a 3D wave equation for the coupled ESIC and dust ion-acoustic (DIA) waves from the hydrodynamic equations that are composed of the continuity and momentum equations, together with Poisson's equation. The 3D wave equation reveals the formation of a braided or twisted ESIC wave structure carrying OAM. The braided or twisted ESIC wave structure can trap and transport plasma particles in magnetoplasmas, such as those in Saturn's F-ring and in the forthcoming magnetized dusty plasma experiments. PMID:23410477

  11. Energetic electrons and plasma waves associated with a solar type III radio burst

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R.P.; Potter, D.W.; Gurnett, D.A.; Scarf, F.L.

    1981-12-01

    We present detailed in situ observations from the ISEE 3 spacecraft of energetic electrons, plasma waves, and radio emission for the type III solar radio burst of 1979 February 17. The reduced one-dimensional distribution function f (v) of the electrons is constructed as a function of time. Since the faster electrons arrive before the slower ones, a bump on tail distribution is formed which is unstable on the growth of Langmuir waves. The plasma wave growth computed from f (v) agrees well with the observed onset of the Langmuir waves, and there is qualitative agreement between variations in the plasma wave levels and in the development of regions of positive slope in f (v). The evolution of f (v), however, predicts far higher plasma wave levels than those observed. The maximum levels observed are about equal to the threshold for nonlinear wave processes, such as oscillating two-stream instability and soliton collapse. Also, the lack of obvious plateauing of the distribution suggests that the observed waves have been removed from resonance with the beam electrons. Finally, the plasma waves are observed to be highly impulsive in nature.

  12. Electromagnetic wave propagation through an overdense magnetized collisional plasma layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoma, C.; Rose, D. V.; Miller, C. L.; Clark, R. E.; Hughes, T. P.

    2009-08-01

    The results of investigations into the feasibility of using a magnetic window to propagate electromagnetic waves through a finite-sized overdense plasma slab are described. We theoretically calculate the transmission coefficients for right- and left-handed circularly polarized plane waves through a uniform magnetized plasma slab. Using reasonable estimates for the plasma properties expected to be found in the ionized shock layer surrounding a hypersonic aircraft traveling in the earth's upper atmosphere (radio blackout conditions), and assuming a 1 GHz carrier frequency for the radio communications channel, we find that the required magnetic field for propagation of right-handed circularly polarized, or whistler, waves is on the order of a few hundred gauss. Transmission coefficients are calculated as a function of sheath thickness and are shown to be quite sensitive to the electron collision frequency. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are shown to be in good agreement with the theory. These simulations also demonstrate that Ohmic heating of the electrons can be considerable. Two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using a simplified waveguide and antenna model illustrate the same general transmission behavior as the theory and one-dimensional simulations. In addition, a net focusing effect due to the plasma is also observed in two and three dimensions. These simulations can be extended to design and analyze more realistic waveguide and antenna models.

  13. Electromagnetic wave propagation through an overdense magnetized collisional plasma layer

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, C.; Rose, D. V.; Miller, C. L.; Clark, R. E.; Hughes, T. P.

    2009-08-15

    The results of investigations into the feasibility of using a magnetic window to propagate electromagnetic waves through a finite-sized overdense plasma slab are described. We theoretically calculate the transmission coefficients for right- and left-handed circularly polarized plane waves through a uniform magnetized plasma slab. Using reasonable estimates for the plasma properties expected to be found in the ionized shock layer surrounding a hypersonic aircraft traveling in the earth's upper atmosphere (radio blackout conditions), and assuming a 1 GHz carrier frequency for the radio communications channel, we find that the required magnetic field for propagation of right-handed circularly polarized, or whistler, waves is on the order of a few hundred gauss. Transmission coefficients are calculated as a function of sheath thickness and are shown to be quite sensitive to the electron collision frequency. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are shown to be in good agreement with the theory. These simulations also demonstrate that Ohmic heating of the electrons can be considerable. Two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using a simplified waveguide and antenna model illustrate the same general transmission behavior as the theory and one-dimensional simulations. In addition, a net focusing effect due to the plasma is also observed in two and three dimensions. These simulations can be extended to design and analyze more realistic waveguide and antenna models.

  14. ULF waves in the Martian foreshock: MAVEN observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Lican; Mazelle, Christian; Meziane, Karim; Ruhunusiri, Suranga; Espley, Jared; Halekas, Jasper; Connerney, Jack; McFadden, Jim; Mitchell, Dave; Larson, Davin; Brain, Dave; Jakosky, Bruce; Ge, Yasong; Du, Aimin

    2016-04-01

    Foreshock ULF waves constitute a significant physical phenomenon of the plasma environment for terrestrial planets. The occurrence of these ULF waves, associated with backstreaming ions reflected and accelerated at the bow shock, implies specific conditions and properties of the shock and its foreshock. Using measurements from MAVEN, we report clear observations of this type of ULF waves in the Martian foreshock. We show from different case studies that the peak frequency of the wave case in spacecraft frame is too far from the local ion cyclotron frequency to be associated with local pickup ions taking into account the Doppler shifted frequency from a cyclotron resonance, the obliquity of the mode, resonance broadening and experimental uncertainties. On the opposite their properties fit very well with foreshock waves driven unstable by backtreaming field-aligned ion beams. The propagation angle is usually less than 30 degrees from ambient magnetic field. The waves also display elliptical and left-hand polarizations with respect to interplanetary magnetic field in the spacecraft frame. It is clear for these cases that foreshock ions are simultaneous present for the ULF wave interval. Such observation is important in order to discriminate with the already well-reported pickup ion (protons) waves associated with exospheric hydrogen in order to quantitatively use the later to study seasonal variations of the hydrogen corona.

  15. Low Frequency Waves in the Plasma Environment Around the Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vayner, Boris V.; Ferguson, Dale C.

    1996-01-01

    As a part of the SAMPIE (The Solar Array Module Plasma Interaction Experiment) program, the Langmuir probe (LP) was employed to measure plasma characteristics during the flight of STS-62. The whole set of data could be divided into two parts: (1) low frequency sweeps to determine voltage-current characteristics and to find the electron temperature and number density; (2) high frequency turbulence (HFT) data caused by electromagnetic noise around the Shuttle. Broadband noise was observed at 250-20,000 Hz frequencies. Measurements were performed in ram conditions; thus, it seems reasonable to believe that the influence of spacecraft operations on plasma parameters was minimized. It is shown that ion acoustic waves were observed, and two kinds of instabilities are suggested for explanation of the origin of these waves. According to the purposes of SAMPIE, samples of solar cells were placed in the cargo bay of the Shuttle, and high negative bias voltages were applied to them to initiate arcing between these cells and the surrounding plasma. The arcing onset was registered by special counters, and data were obtained that included the amplitudes of current, duration of each arc, and the number of arcs per one experiment. The LP data were analyzed for two different situations: with arcing and without arcing. Electrostatic noise spectra for both situations and a theoretical explanation of the observed features are presented in this paper.

  16. Plasma waves produced by the xenon ion beam experiment on the Porcupine sounding rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M.; Kelley, M.

    1982-01-01

    The production of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves by a perpendicular ion beam in the F-region ionosphere is described. The ion beam experiment was part of the Porcupine program and produced electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron waves just above harmonics of the hydrogen cyclotron frequency. The plasma process may be thought of as a magnetized background ionosphere through which an unmagnetized beam is flowing. The dispersion equation for this hypothesis is constructed and solved. Preliminary solutions agree well with the observed plasma waves.

  17. Nonplanar Shock Waves in Dusty Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamun, A. A.; Shukla, P. K.

    2011-11-01

    Nonplanar (viz. cylindrical and spherical) electro-acoustic [dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) and dust-acoustic (DA)] shock waves have been investigated by employing the reductive perturbation method. The dust charge fluctuation (strong correlation among highly charged dust) is the source of dissipation, and is responsible for the formation of the DIA (DA) shock structures. The effects of cylindrical and spherical geometries on the time evolution of DIA and DA shock structures are examined and identified. The combined effects of vortex-like electron distribution and dust charge fluctuation (dust-correlation and effective dust-temperature) on the basic features of nonplanar DIA (DA) shock waves are pinpointed. The implications of our results in laboratory dusty plasma experiments are briefly discussed.

  18. Nonlinear Generation of Electromagnetic Waves through Induced Scattering by Thermal Plasma.

    PubMed

    Tejero, E M; Crabtree, C; Blackwell, D D; Amatucci, W E; Mithaiwala, M; Ganguli, G; Rudakov, L

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the conversion of electrostatic pump waves into electromagnetic waves through nonlinear induced scattering by thermal particles in a laboratory plasma. Electrostatic waves in the whistler branch are launched that propagate near the resonance cone. When the amplitude exceeds a threshold ~5 × 10(-6) times the background magnetic field, wave power is scattered below the pump frequency with wave normal angles (~59°), where the scattered wavelength reaches the limits of the plasma column. The scattered wave has a perpendicular wavelength that is an order of magnitude larger than the pump wave and longer than the electron skin depth. The amplitude threshold, scattered frequency spectrum, and scattered wave normal angles are in good agreement with theory. The results may affect the analysis and interpretation of space observations and lead to a comprehensive understanding of the nature of the Earth's plasma environment. PMID:26647962

  19. Nonlinear Generation of Electromagnetic Waves through Induced Scattering by Thermal Plasma.

    PubMed

    Tejero, E M; Crabtree, C; Blackwell, D D; Amatucci, W E; Mithaiwala, M; Ganguli, G; Rudakov, L

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the conversion of electrostatic pump waves into electromagnetic waves through nonlinear induced scattering by thermal particles in a laboratory plasma. Electrostatic waves in the whistler branch are launched that propagate near the resonance cone. When the amplitude exceeds a threshold ~5 × 10(-6) times the background magnetic field, wave power is scattered below the pump frequency with wave normal angles (~59°), where the scattered wavelength reaches the limits of the plasma column. The scattered wave has a perpendicular wavelength that is an order of magnitude larger than the pump wave and longer than the electron skin depth. The amplitude threshold, scattered frequency spectrum, and scattered wave normal angles are in good agreement with theory. The results may affect the analysis and interpretation of space observations and lead to a comprehensive understanding of the nature of the Earth's plasma environment.

  20. Nonlinear Generation of Electromagnetic Waves through Induced Scattering by Thermal Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Tejero, E. M.; Crabtree, C.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.; Mithaiwala, M.; Ganguli, G.; Rudakov, L.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the conversion of electrostatic pump waves into electromagnetic waves through nonlinear induced scattering by thermal particles in a laboratory plasma. Electrostatic waves in the whistler branch are launched that propagate near the resonance cone. When the amplitude exceeds a threshold ~5 × 10−6 times the background magnetic field, wave power is scattered below the pump frequency with wave normal angles (~59°), where the scattered wavelength reaches the limits of the plasma column. The scattered wave has a perpendicular wavelength that is an order of magnitude larger than the pump wave and longer than the electron skin depth. The amplitude threshold, scattered frequency spectrum, and scattered wave normal angles are in good agreement with theory. The results may affect the analysis and interpretation of space observations and lead to a comprehensive understanding of the nature of the Earth’s plasma environment. PMID:26647962

  1. Observations of gravity waves at atmospheric fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abusamah, Azizan B. Hj

    1990-09-01

    An observational study of pressure perturbations associated with the passage of atmospheric fronts over the British Isles using a triangular array of sensitive microbarographs reveals the preponderance of gravity wave activities in the vicinity of the surface cold front (SCF). Examination of the time series of these pressure perturbations in the frequency domain shows an enhancement for frequencies less than the local buoyancy frequency N after the passage of the SCF. The spectral analysis also shows two predominant frequency peaks usually located near N and N/2 s(exp -1). Isolating these frequencies shows that there is a systematic amplitude modulation with an amplification near the SCF and at a region 2-3 hours before and after the SCF passage. The cross-correlation analysis reveals that the gravity waves in the post SCF region propagate towards the SCF. As these waves approach the SCF, the across front component of the phase speed decreases and the direction of propagation of the wave rotates in an anticlockwise manner. It is found that a consistent description of the gravity waves can only be made if first the waves are assumed to be ducted, i.e. there is a reflecting layer aloft, and second that as these waves propagate through the frontal environment, due to the inhomogeneity, they are refracted. A number of conceptual models are then developed to account for the observed wave behavior in a frontal region. In this investigation it is shown that the stable layer associated with the frontal zone can form a good upper reflector for non-hydrostatic gravity waves. It is also argued that the slope of this layer plays an important role in the refraction of the observed gravity waves. A model of wave propagation in a wedge is then used to account for this slope.

  2. Electromagnetic wave band structure due to surface plasmon resonances in a complex plasma.

    PubMed

    Vladimirov, S V; Ishihara, O

    2016-07-01

    The dielectric properties of complex plasma containing either metal or dielectric spherical inclusions (macroparticles, dust) are investigated. We focus on surface plasmon resonances on the macroparticle surfaces and their effect on electromagnetic wave propagation. It is demonstrated that the presence of surface plasmon oscillations can significantly modify plasma electromagnetic properties by resonances and cutoffs in the effective permittivity. This leads to related branches of electromagnetic waves and to the wave band gaps. The conditions necessary to observe the band-gap structure in laboratory dusty plasma and/or space (cosmic) dusty plasmas are discussed.

  3. Electromagnetic wave band structure due to surface plasmon resonances in a complex plasma.

    PubMed

    Vladimirov, S V; Ishihara, O

    2016-07-01

    The dielectric properties of complex plasma containing either metal or dielectric spherical inclusions (macroparticles, dust) are investigated. We focus on surface plasmon resonances on the macroparticle surfaces and their effect on electromagnetic wave propagation. It is demonstrated that the presence of surface plasmon oscillations can significantly modify plasma electromagnetic properties by resonances and cutoffs in the effective permittivity. This leads to related branches of electromagnetic waves and to the wave band gaps. The conditions necessary to observe the band-gap structure in laboratory dusty plasma and/or space (cosmic) dusty plasmas are discussed. PMID:27575225

  4. Experimental observation of precursor solitons in a flowing complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Surabhi; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-04-01

    The excitation of precursor solitons ahead of a rapidly moving object in a fluid, a spectacular phenomenon in hydrodynamics that has often been observed ahead of moving ships, has surprisingly not been investigated in plasmas where the fluid model holds good for low frequency excitations such as ion acoustic waves. In this Rapid Communication we report an experimental observation of precursor solitons in a flowing dusty plasma. The nonlinear solitary dust acoustic waves (DAWs) are excited by a supersonic mass flow of the dust particles over an electrostatic potential hill. In a frame where the fluid is stationary and the hill is moving the solitons propagate in the upstream direction as precursors while wake structures consisting of linear DAWs are seen to propagate in the downstream region. A theoretical explanation of these excitations based on the forced Korteweg-deVries model equation is provided and their practical implications in situations involving a charged object moving in a plasma are discussed.

  5. Experimental observation of precursor solitons in a flowing complex plasma.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Surabhi; Bandyopadhyay, P; Sen, A

    2016-04-01

    The excitation of precursor solitons ahead of a rapidly moving object in a fluid, a spectacular phenomenon in hydrodynamics that has often been observed ahead of moving ships, has surprisingly not been investigated in plasmas where the fluid model holds good for low frequency excitations such as ion acoustic waves. In this Rapid Communication we report an experimental observation of precursor solitons in a flowing dusty plasma. The nonlinear solitary dust acoustic waves (DAWs) are excited by a supersonic mass flow of the dust particles over an electrostatic potential hill. In a frame where the fluid is stationary and the hill is moving the solitons propagate in the upstream direction as precursors while wake structures consisting of linear DAWs are seen to propagate in the downstream region. A theoretical explanation of these excitations based on the forced Korteweg-deVries model equation is provided and their practical implications in situations involving a charged object moving in a plasma are discussed. PMID:27176247

  6. Upstream waves at Mars - Phobos observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Eroshenko, E.

    1990-01-01

    The region upstream from the Mars subsolar bow shock is surveyed for the presence of MHD wave phenomena using the high temporal resolution data from the Magma magnetometer. Strong turbulence is observed when the magnetic field is connected to the Mars bow shock in such a way as to allow diffuse ions to reach the spacecraft. Also weak waves are observed at the proton gyro frequency. These waves are left-hand elliptically polarized and may be associated with the pick-up of protons from the Mars hydrogen exosphere.

  7. Upstream waves at Mars - PHOBOS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Yeroshenko, Ye.

    1990-05-01

    The region upstream from the Mars subsolar bow shock is surveyed for the presence of MHD wave phenomena using the high temporal resolution data from the Magma magnetometer. Strong turbulence is observed when the magnetic field is connected to the Mars bow shock in such a way as to allow diffuse ions to reach the spacecraft. Also weak waves are observed at the proton gyro frequency. These waves are left-hand elliptically polarized and may be associated with the pick-up of protons from the Mars hydrogen exosphere.

  8. Upstream waves at Mars: Phobos observations

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.T.; Luhmann, J.G. ); Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W. ); Yeroshenko, Ye. )

    1990-05-01

    The region upstream from the Mars subsolar bow shock is surveyed for the presence of MHD wave phenomena using the high temporal resolution data from the MAGMA magnetometer. Strong turbulence is observed when the magnetic field is connected to the Mars bow shock in such a way as to allow diffuse ions to reach the spacecraft. On 2 occasions this turbulence occurred upon crossing the Phobos orbit. Also weak, {minus}0.15 nT, waves are observed at the proton gyro frequency. These waves are left-hand elliptically polarized and may be associated with the pick-up of protons from the Mars hydrogen exosphere.

  9. Interference patterns in the Spacelab 2 plasma wave data: Lower hybrid waves driven by pickup ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Wei; Gurnett, Donald A.; Cairns, Iver H.

    1993-01-01

    During the Spacelab 2 mission the University of Iowa's Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) was released from the shuttle to explore the plasma environment around the shuttle. Wideband spectrograms were obtained from the PDP at frequencies from 0 to 30 kHz and distances up to 400 m from the shuttle. The wideband data frequently showed antenna interference patterns when the PDP was on the downstream side of the shuttle. Analysis of these interference patterns allows a determination of the wavelength, the plasma rest frame frequency, the direction of propagation, the power spectrum, and in some cases the location of the source. We concentrate our analysis on interference patterns due to lower hybrid waves: waves which have rest frame frequencies near the lower hybrid frequency and propagate perpendicular to the magnetic field. The waves have an almost flat dispersion relation with frequencies just above the lower hybrid frequency and relatively short wavelengths (1 - 4 m). The observed lower hybrid waves depend strongly on the position of the PDP relative to the shuttle and the magnetic field direction. Our results confirm previous suggestions that the lower hybrid waves are generated primarily in the vicinity of the shuttle and that they are driven by a charge exchange interaction between the ambient ionosphere and a H2O cloud around the shuttle.

  10. Dust acoustic waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. Kalman, G.

    1997-12-01

    Dust grains, or solid particles of {mu}m to sub-{mu}m sizes, are observed in various low-temperature laboratory plasmas such as process plasmas and dust plasma crystals. The massive dust grains are generally highly charged, and it has been shown within the context of standard plasma theory that their presence can lead to new low-frequency modes such as dust acoustic waves. In certain laboratory plasmas, however, the dust may be strongly coupled, as characterized by the condition {Gamma}{sub d}=Q{sub d}{sup 2}exp({minus}d/{lambda}{sub D})/dT{sub d}{ge}1, where Q{sub d} is the dust charge, d is the intergrain spacing, T{sub d} is the dust thermal energy, and {lambda}{sub D} is the plasma screening length. This paper investigates the dispersion relation for dust acoustic waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma comprised of strongly coupled negatively charged dust grains, and weakly correlated classical ions and electrons. The dust grains are assumed to interact via a (screened Coulomb) Yukawa potential. The strongly coupled gas phase (liquid phase) is considered, and a quasilocalized charge approximation scheme is used, generalized to take into account electron and/or ion screening of the dust grains. The scheme relates the small-k dispersion to the total correlation energy of the system, which is obtained from the results of published numerical simulations. Some effects of collisions of charged particles with neutrals are taken into account. Applications to laboratory dusty plasmas are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Multipoint Plasma Density Measurements from Cluster Wave and Particle Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persoon, A.; Gurnett, D.; Pickett, J.; Canu, P.; Décréau, P.; Laakso, H.; Pedersen, A.; Andre, M.; Parks, G.; Wilber, M.; Reme, H.; Goldstein, M.; Fazakerly, A.

    2001-12-01

    Measurements from instruments onboard the Cluster spacecraft are used to study regions of diminished plasma density inside and poleward of the nightside auroral zone. The plasma density is derived from the digitization of the electron plasma frequency cutoff of the whistler mode auroral hiss, using the electric field spectrum measurements from the Wideband Plasma Wave Instrument (WBD). Two nightside auroral zone crossings, on May 8 and July 21, 2001, each with simultaneous measurements from two Cluster spacecraft, have been selected for this study. Both of these intervals contain multiple low density structures and provide an opportunity to make multi-instrument comparisons of the WBD electric spectrum measurements with the electron plasma frequency measurements of the WHISPER experiment and the spacecraft potential measurements of the Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) experiment. Since the satellite potential measurements are very sensitive to variations in the electron density, EFW spacecraft potential and density measurements will complement the WBD density measurements in the low density regions. Density variations will also be compared to the observed ion fluxes, using the ion distribution functions of the Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) instruments and the low energy electron fluxes, using the electron velocity and energy distributions of the Electron and Current Experiment (PEACE).

  12. Plasma-wave Generation in a Dynamic Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huan; Zhang, Fan

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new electromagnetic (EM)-emission mechanism in magnetized, force-free plasma, which is driven by the evolution of the underlying dynamic spacetime. In particular, the emission power and angular distribution of the emitted fast-magnetosonic and Alfvén waves are separately determined. Previous numerical simulations of binary black hole mergers occurring within magnetized plasma have recorded copious amounts of EM radiation that, in addition to collimated jets, include an unexplained, isotropic component that becomes dominant close to the merger. This raises the possibility of multimessenger gravitational-wave and EM observations on binary black hole systems. The mechanism proposed here provides a candidate analytical characterization of the numerical results, and when combined with previously understood mechanisms such as the Blandford-Znajek process and kinetic-motion-driven radiation, it allows us to construct a classification of different EM radiation components seen in the inspiral stage of compact-binary coalescences.

  13. Measurements of beat wave accelerated electrons in a toroidal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.H. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Hwang, D.W. . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1992-06-01

    Electrons are accelerated by large amplitude electron plasma waves driven by counter-propagating microwaves with a difference frequency approximately equal to the electron plasma frequency. Energetic electrons are observed only when the phase velocity of the wave is in the range 3v{sub e} < v{sub ph} < 7v{sub e} (v{sub ph} was varied 2v{sub e} < v{sub ph} < 10v{sub e}), where v{sub e} is the electron thermal velocity, (kT{sub e}/m{sub e}){sup {1/2}}. As the phase velocity increases, fewer electrons are accelerated to higher velocities. The measured current contained in these accelerated electrons has the power dependence predicted by theory, but the magnitude is lower than predicted.

  14. Antenna excitation of drift wave in a toroidal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, A.; Ricci, P.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Labit, B.; Mueller, S. H.; Podesta, M.; Poli, F. M.; Skiff, F.

    2007-10-15

    In a magnetized toroidal plasma, an antenna tunable in vertical wave number is used to excite density perturbations. Coherent detection is performed by means of Langmuir probes to directly determine both the wave vector and the plasma response induced by the antenna. Comparison between the theoretical density response predicted by the generalized Hasegawa-Wakatani model, and the experimentally determined density response enables us the identification of one peak of the plasma response as a drift wave.

  15. Solitary and shock waves in magnetized electron-positron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ding; Li, Zi-Liang; Abdukerim, Nuriman; Xie, Bai-Song

    2014-02-15

    An Ohm's law for electron-positron (EP) plasma is obtained. In the framework of EP magnetohydrodynamics, we investigate nonrelativistic nonlinear waves' solutions in a magnetized EP plasma. In the collisionless limit, quasistationary propagating solitary wave structures for the magnetic field and the plasma density are obtained. It is found that the wave amplitude increases with the Mach number and the Alfvén speed. However, the dependence on the plasma temperature is just the opposite. Moreover, for a cold EP plasma, the existence range of the solitary waves depends only on the Alfvén speed. For a hot EP plasma, the existence range depends on the Alfvén speed as well as the plasma temperature. In the presence of collision, the electromagnetic fields and the plasma density can appear as oscillatory shock structures because of the dissipation caused by the collisions. As the collision frequency increases, the oscillatory shock structure becomes more and more monotonic.

  16. On the toroidal plasma rotations induced by lower hybrid waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaoyin; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2013-02-01

    A theoretical model is developed to explain the plasma rotations induced by lower hybrid waves in Alcator C-Mod. In this model, torodial rotations are driven by the Lorentz force on the bulk-electron flow across flux surfaces, which is a response of the plasma to the resonant-electron flow across flux surfaces induced by the lower hybrid waves. The flow across flux surfaces of the resonant electrons and the bulk electrons are coupled through the radial electric field initiated by the resonant electrons, and the friction between ions and electrons transfers the toroidal momentum to ions from electrons. An improved quasilinear theory with gyrophase dependent distribution function is developed to calculate the perpendicular resonant-electron flow. Toroidal rotations are determined using a set of fluid equations for bulk electrons and ions, which are solved numerically by a finite-difference method. Numerical results agree well with the experimental observations in terms of flow profile and amplitude. The model explains the strong correlation between torodial flow and internal inductance observed experimentally, and predicts both counter-current and co-current flows, depending on the perpendicular wave vectors of the lower hybrid waves.

  17. On the Toroidal Plasma Rotations Induced by Lower Hybrid Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xiaoyin; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2012-11-14

    A theoretical model is developed to explain the plasma rotations induced by lower hybrid waves in Alcator C-Mod. In this model, torodial rotations are driven by the Lorentz force on the bulk electron flow across flux surfaces, which is a response of the plasma to the resonant-electron flow across flux surfaces induced by the lower hybrid waves. The flow across flux surfaces of the resonant electrons and the bulk electrons are coupled through the radial electric fi eld initiated by the resonant electrons, and the friction between ions and electrons transfers the toroidal momentum to ions from electrons. An improved quasilinear theory with gyrophase dependent distribution function is developed to calculate the perpendicular resonant-electron flow. Toroidal rotations are determined using a set of fluid equations for bulk electrons and ions, which are solved numerically by a fi nite- difference method. Numerical results agree well with the experimental observations in terms of flow pro file and amplitude. The model explains the strong correlation between torodial flow and internal inductance observed experimentally, and predicts both counter-current and co-current flows, depending on the perpendicular wave vectors of the lower hybrid waves. __________________________________________________

  18. Magnetospheric radio and plasma wave research - 1987-1990

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, W.S. )

    1991-01-01

    This review covers research performed in the area of magnetospheric plasma waves and wave-particle interactions as well as magnetospheric radio emissions. The report focuses on the near-completion of the discovery phase of radio and plasma wave phenomena in the planetary magnetospheres with the successful completion of the Voyager 2 encounters of Neptune and Uranus. Consideration is given to the advances made in detailed studies and theoretical investigations of radio and plasma wave phenomena in the terrestrial magnetosphere or in magnetospheric plasmas in general.

  19. In situ observations of interstellar plasma with Voyager 1.

    PubMed

    Gurnett, D A; Kurth, W S; Burlaga, L F; Ness, N F

    2013-09-27

    Launched over 35 years ago, Voyagers 1 and 2 are on an epic journey outward from the Sun to reach the boundary between the solar plasma and the much cooler interstellar medium. The boundary, called the heliopause, is expected to be marked by a large increase in plasma density, from about 0.002 per cubic centimeter (cm(-3)) in the outer heliosphere, to about 0.1 cm(-3) in the interstellar medium. On 9 April 2013, the Voyager 1 plasma wave instrument began detecting locally generated electron plasma oscillations at a frequency of about 2.6 kilohertz. This oscillation frequency corresponds to an electron density of about 0.08 cm(-3), very close to the value expected in the interstellar medium. These and other observations provide strong evidence that Voyager 1 has crossed the heliopause into the nearby interstellar plasma.

  20. MESSENGER Observations of ULF Waves in Mercury's Foreshock Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Guan; Chi, Peter J.; Bardsen, Scott; Blanco-Cano, Xochitl; Slavin, James A.; Korth, Haje

    2012-01-01

    The region upstream from a planetary bow shock is a natural plasma laboratory containing a variety of wave particle phenomena. The study of foreshocks other than the Earth s is important for extending our understanding of collisionless shocks and foreshock physics since the bow shock strength varies with heliocentric distance from the Sun, and the sizes of the bow shocks are different at different planets. The Mercury s bow shock is unique in our solar system as it is produced by low Mach number solar wind blowing over a small magnetized body with a predominately radial interplanetary magnetic field. Previous observations of Mercury upstream ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves came exclusively from two Mercury flybys of Mariner 10. The MESSENGER orbiter data enable us to study of upstream waves in the Mercury s foreshock in depth. This paper reports an overview of upstream ULF waves in the Mercury s foreshock using high-time resolution magnetic field data, 20 samples per second, from the MESSENGER spacecraft. The most common foreshock waves have frequencies near 2 Hz, with properties similar to the 1-Hz waves in the Earth s foreshock. They are present in both the flyby data and in every orbit of the orbital data we have surveyed. The most common wave phenomenon in the Earth s foreshock is the large-amplitude 30-s waves, but similar waves at Mercury have frequencies at 0.1 Hz and occur only sporadically with short durations (a few wave cycles). Superposed on the "30-s" waves, there are spectral peaks at 0.6 Hz, not reported previously in Mariner 10 data. We will discuss wave properties and their occurrence characteristics in this paper.

  1. Nonlinear trapping and self-guiding of magnetized Langmuir waves due to thermal plasma filamentation

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarov, Vladimir V.; Starodubtsev, Mikhail V.; Kostrov, Alexander V.

    2007-12-15

    Nonlinear interaction of Langmuir waves with a laboratory magnetoplasma has been studied under the conditions relevant to the ionospheric heating experiments. Self-guiding of magnetized Langmuir waves is observed at critical plasma density ({omega}={omega}{sub p}): Langmuir waves are trapped inside a narrow, magnetic-field-aligned plasma density depletion region, which is formed by trapped waves due to thermal plasma nonlinearity, i.e., due to local plasma heating and consequent thermodiffusion. Magnetized Langmuir waves are trapped inside the depletion region through their specific dispersion properties; this fact has been shown using the kinetically modified dispersion relation. The threshold of the nonlinear wave trapping exhibits significant growth in the vicinity of harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency.

  2. ISIS Topside-Sounder Plasma-Wave Investigations as Guides to Desired Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO) Data Search Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert F.; Fung, Shing F.

    2008-01-01

    Many plasma-wave phenomena, observed by space-borne radio sounders, cannot be properly explained in terms of wave propagation in a cold plasma consisting of mobile electrons and infinitely massive positive ions. These phenomena include signals known as plasma resonances. The principal resonances at the harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency, the plasma frequency, and the upper-hybrid frequency are well explained by the warm-plasma propagation of sounder-generated electrostatic waves, Other resonances have been attributed to sounder-stimulated plasma instability and non-linear effects, eigenmodes of cylindrical electromagnetic plasma oscillations, and plasma memory processes. Data from the topside sounders of the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) program played a major role in these interpretations. A data transformation and preservation effort at the Goddard Space Flight Center has produced digital ISIS topside ionograms and a metadata search program that has enabled some recent discoveries pertaining to the physics of these plasma resonances. For example, data records were obtained that enabled the long-standing question (several decades) of the origin of the plasma resonance at the fundamental electron cyclotron frequency to be explained [Muldrew, Radio Sci., 2006]. These data-search capabilities, and the science enabled by them, will be presented as a guide to desired data search capabilities to be included in the Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO).

  3. Relativistic nonlinear plasma waves in a magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, C. F.; Pellat, R.

    1975-01-01

    Five relativistic plane nonlinear waves were investigated: circularly polarized waves and electrostatic plasma oscillations propagating parallel to the magnetic field, relativistic Alfven waves, linearly polarized transverse waves propagating in zero magnetic field, and the relativistic analog of the extraordinary mode propagating at an arbitrary angle to the magnetic field. When the ions are driven relativistic, they behave like electrons, and the assumption of an 'electron-positron' plasma leads to equations which have the form of a one-dimensional potential well. The solutions indicate that a large-amplitude superluminous wave determines the average plasma properties.

  4. The Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI) onboard the BepiColombo/MMO: First measurement of electric fields, electromagnetic waves, and radio waves around Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaba, Y.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Blomberg, L. G.; Kojima, H.; Yagitani, S.; Moncuquet, M.; Trotignon, J.-G.; Chanteur, G.; Kumamoto, A.; Kasahara, Y.; Lichtenberger, J.; Omura, Y.; Ishisaka, K.; Matsumoto, H.

    2010-01-01

    The BepiColombo Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO) spacecraft includes the plasma and radio wave observation system called Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI). Since the receivers for electric field, plasma waves, and radio waves are not installed in any of the preceding spacecraft to Mercury, the PWI will provide the first opportunity for conducting in-situ and remote-sensing observations of electric fields, plasma waves, and radio waves in the Hermean magnetosphere and exosphere. These observations are valuable in studying structure, dynamics, and energy exchange processes in the unique magnetosphere of Mercury. They are characterized by the key words of the non-MHD environment and the peculiar interaction between the relatively large planet without ionosphere and the solar wind with high dynamic pressure. The PWI consists of three sets of receivers (EWO, SORBET, and AM 2P), connected to two sets of electric field sensors (MEFISTO and WPT) and two kinds of magnetic field sensors (LF-SC and DB-SC). The PWI will observe both waveforms and frequency spectra in the frequency range from DC to 10 MHz for the electric field and from 0.3 Hz to 640 kHz for the magnetic field. From 2008, we will start the development of the engineering model, which is conceptually consistent with the flight model design. The present paper discusses the significance and objectives of plasma/radio wave observations in the Hermean magnetosphere, and describes the PWI sensors, receivers and their performance as well as the onboard data processing.

  5. Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission Indicator of Glow Plasma Discharges from Ionospheric HF Wave Transmissions with HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Scales, W.; Briczinski, S. J.; Fu, H.; Mahmoudian, A.; Samimi, A.

    2012-12-01

    High power radio waves resonantly interact with to accelerate electrons for production of artificial aurora and plasma clouds. These plasma clouds are formed when the HF frequency is tuned near a harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency. At a narrow band resonance, large electrostatic fields are produced below the F-layer and the neutral atmosphere breaks down with a glow plasma discharge. The conditions for this resonance are given by matching the pump wave frequency and wave-number with the sum of daughter frequencies and wave-numbers for several plasma modes. The most likely plasma mode that accelerates the electrons is the electron Bernstein wave in conjunction with an ion acoustic wave. Both upper hybrid and whistler mode waves are also possible sources of electron acceleration. To determine the plasma process for electron acceleration, stimulated electromagnetic emissions are measured using ground receivers in a north-south chain from the HAARP site. Recent observations have shown that broad band spectral lines downshifted from the HF pump frequency are observed when artificial plasma clouds are formed. For HF transmissions are the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th gyro harmonic, the downshifted indicators are found 500 Hz, 20 kHz, and 140 kHz, respectively, from the pump frequency. This Indicator Mode (IM) anticipates that a plasma layer will be formed before it is recorded with an ionosonde or optical imager.

  6. Effective-action approach to wave propagation in scalar QED plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yuan; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Qin, Hong

    2016-07-01

    A relativistic quantum field theory with nontrivial background fields is developed and applied to study waves in plasmas. The effective action of the electromagnetic 4-potential is calculated ab initio from the standard action of scalar QED using path integrals. The resultant effective action is gauge invariant and contains nonlocal interactions, from which gauge bosons acquire masses without breaking the local gauge symmetry. To demonstrate how the general theory can be applied, we give two examples: a cold unmagnetized plasma and a cold uniformly magnetized plasma. Using these two examples, we show that all linear waves well known in classical plasma physics can be recovered from relativistic quantum results when taking the classical limit. In the opposite limit, classical wave dispersion relations are modified substantially. In unmagnetized plasmas, longitudinal waves propagate with nonzero group velocities even when plasmas are cold. In magnetized plasmas, anharmonically spaced Bernstein waves persist even when plasmas are cold. These waves account for cyclotron absorption features observed in spectra of x-ray pulsars. Moreover, cutoff frequencies of the two nondegenerate electromagnetic waves are red-shifted by different amounts. These corrections need to be taken into account in order to correctly interpret diagnostic results in laser plasma experiments.

  7. Poloidal ULF wave observed in the plasmasphere boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W.; Cao, J.; Zong, Q.; Li, X.; Sarris, T. E.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2012-12-01

    We investigate an event on the formation of a plasmasphere boundary layer and its effect on ULF wave generation observed by THEMIS satellites during three consecutive outbound passes. On September 13 2011, TH-D observed a sharp plasmapause at L=3.4. The plasmasphere starts to expand and to be refilled on September 14th. On September 15th, a plasmasphere boundary layer is formed with two density drops at L=4.5 and 6.5, respectively. Strong radial magnetic field and azimuthal electric field oscillations are observed within the two density gradients, suggesting poloidal ULF wave. Even mode signature and bump-on-tail plasma distribution at ~10keV observed in this event favour the mechanism of drift-bounce resonance. We suggest that the plasma density structures in plasmasphere boundary layers can provide conditions for resonances that could generate ULF waves. All the above features suggest that plasmasphere boundary layer may have impact on the generation of ULF wave and potential impact on radiation belt acceleration.

  8. Propagation velocity of Alfven wave packets in a dissipative plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Amagishi, Y.; Nakagawa, H. ); Tanaka, M. )

    1994-09-01

    We have experimentally studied the behavior of Alfven wave packets in a dissipative plasma due to ion--neutral-atom collisions. It is urged that the central frequency of the packet is observed to gradually decrease with traveling distance in the absorption range of frequencies because of a differential damping among the Fourier components, and that the measured average velocity of its peak amplitude is not accounted for by the conventional group velocity, but by the prediction derived by Tanaka, Fujiwara, and Ikegami [Phys. Rev. A 34, 4851 (1986)]. Furthermore, when the initial central frequency is close to the critical frequency in the anomalous dispersion, the wave packet apparently collapses when traveling along the magnetic field; however, we have found that it is decomposed into another two wave packets with the central frequencies being higher or lower than the critical frequency.

  9. Observations of purely compressional waves in the upper ULF band observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, J. L.; Engebretson, M. J.; Johnson, J.; Kim, E. H.; Thaller, S. A.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C.; Smith, C. W.; Reeves, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Purely compressional electromagnetic waves, also denoted fast magnetosonic waves, equatorial noise, and ion Bernstein modes, can both heat thermal protons and accelerate electrons up to relativistic energies. These waves have been observed both in the near-equatorial region in the inner magnetosphere and in the plasma sheet boundary layer. Although these waves have been observed by various types of satellite instruments (DC and AC magnetometers and electric field sensors), most recent studies have used data from AC sensors, and many have been restricted to frequencies above ~50 Hz. We report here on a survey of ~200 of these waves, based on DC electric and magnetic field data from the EFW double probe and EMFISIS fluxgate magnetometer instruments, respectively, on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft during its first two years of operation. The high sampling rate of these instruments makes it possible to extend observational studies of the lower frequency population of such waves to lower L shells than any previous study. These waves, often with multiple harmonics of the local proton gyrofrequency, were observed both inside and outside the plasmapause, in regions with plasma number densities ranging from 10 to >1000 cm-3. Wave occurrence was sharply peaked near the magnetic equator and occurred at L shells from below 2 to ~6 (the spacecraft apogee). Waves appeared at all local times but were more common from noon to dusk. Outside the plasmapause, occurrence maximized broadly across noon. Inside the plasmapause, occurrence maximized in the dusk sector, in an extended plasmasphere. Every event occurred in association with a positive gradient in the HOPE omnidirectional proton flux in the range between 2 keV and 10 keV. The Poynting vector, determined for 8 events, was in all cases directed transverse to B, but with variable azimuth, consistent with earlier models and observations.

  10. Plasma waves downstream of weak collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.; Greenstadt, E. W.; Moses, S. L.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    In September 1983 the International Sun Earth Explorer 3 (ISEE 3) International Cometary Explorer (ICE) spacecraft made a long traversal of the distant dawnside flank region of the Earth's magnetosphere and had many encounters with the low Mach number bow shock. These weak shocks excite plasma wave electric field turbulence with amplitudes comparable to those detected in the much stronger bow shock near the nose region. Downstream of quasi-perpendicular (quasi-parallel) shocks, the E field spectra exhibit a strong peak (plateau) at midfrequencies (1 - 3 kHz); the plateau shape is produced by a low-frequency (100 - 300 Hz) emission which is more intense behind downstream of two quasi-perpendicular shocks show that the low frequency signals are polarized parallel to the magnetic field, whereas the midfrequency emissions are unpolarized or only weakly polarized. A new high frequency (10 - 30 kHz) emission which is above the maximum Doppler shift exhibit a distinct peak at high frequencies; this peak is often blurred by the large amplitude fluctuations of the midfrequency waves. The high-frequency component is strongly polarized along the magnetic field and varies independently of the lower-frequency waves.

  11. Surface Wave Driven Air-Water Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarova, Elena; Henriques, Julio; Ferreira, Carlos

    2013-09-01

    The performance of a surface wave driven air-water plasma source operating at atmospheric pressure and 2.45 GHz has been analyzed. A 1D model has been developed in order to describe in detail the creation and loss processes of active species of interest and to provide a complete characterization of the axial structure of the source, including the discharge and the afterglow zones. The main electron creation channel was found to be the associative ionization process N +O -->NO+ + e. The NO(X) relative density in the afterglow plasma jet ranges from 1.2% to 1.6% depending on power and water percentage according to the model predictions and the measurements. Other types of species such as NO2 and nitrous acid HNO2 have also been detected by mass and FT-IR spectroscopy. Furthermore, high densities of O2(a1Δg) singlet delta oxygen molecules and OH radicals (1% and 5%, respectively) can be achieved in the discharge zone. In the late afterglow the O2(a1Δg) density is about 0.1% of the total density. The plasma source has a flexible operation and potential for channeling the energy in ways that maximize the density of active species of interest. This study was funded by the Foundation for Science and Technology, Portuguese Ministry of Education and Science, under the research contract PTDC/FIS/108411/2008.

  12. Electrostatic Solitary Waves (ESWs) observed by Kaguya near the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Hashitani, M.; Omura, Y.; Kasahara, Y.; Kojima, H.; Ono, T.; Tsunakawa, H.

    2010-12-01

    In KAGUYA (SELENE) LRS[1], WFC-L [2] observes waveforms of plasma waves in 100Hz-100kHz and a lot of electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) have been observed. Some results have been reported [3]. Although orthogonal dipole antennas are generally used in the observations, sometimes a pair of monopole antennas were used. We reports observations mainly by the latter antennas. The velocities and spatial scales of ESWs are evaluated from waveforms observed in the monopole mode. Generally their velocities are from several 100km/s to several 1000km/s. Their spatial scales are several 10m and the potential depths were less than 0.05 eV. Their velocities are very slow near the wake boundaries. The ESW waveforms have often components perpendicular to the background magnetic field and the potential structure has a component perpendicular to the background magnetic field. This means that these waves were observed close the source regions. Acknowledgments: The SELENE project has been organized by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The authors express their thanks to all members of the SELENE project team. References [1] Y. Kasahara, Y. Goto, K. Hashimoto, T. Imachi, A. Kumamoto, T. Ono, and H. Matsumoto, Plasma Wave Observation Using Waveform Capture in the Lunar Radar Sounder on board the SELENE Spacecraft, Earth, Planets and Space, 60, 341-351, 2008. [2] K. Hashimoto, M. Hashitani, Y. Kasahara, Y. Omura, M.N. Nishino, Y. Saito, S. Yokota, T. Ono, H. Tsunakawa, H. Shibuya, M. Matsushima, H. Shimizu, and F. Takahashi, Electrostatic solitary waves associated with magnetic anomalies and wake boundary of the Moon observed by KAGUYA, accepted for publication in Geophys. Res. Lett., 2010.

  13. Observation of intermittency in wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Falcon, E; Fauve, S; Laroche, C

    2007-04-13

    We report the observation of intermittency in gravity-capillary wave turbulence on the surface of mercury. We measure the temporal fluctuations of surface wave amplitude at a given location. We show that the shape of the probability density function of the local slope increments of the surface waves strongly changes across the time scales. The related structure functions and the flatness are found to be power laws of the time scale on more than one decade. The exponents of these power laws increase nonlinearly with the order of the structure function. All these observations show the intermittent nature of the increments of the local slope in wave turbulence. We discuss the possible origin of this intermittency. PMID:17501356

  14. Relativistic electromagnetic waves in an electron-ion plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chian, Abraham C.-L.; Kennel, Charles F.

    1987-01-01

    High power laser beams can drive plasma particles to relativistic energies. An accurate description of strong waves requires the inclusion of ion dynamics in the analysis. The equations governing the propagation of relativistic electromagnetic waves in a cold electron-ion plasma can be reduced to two equations expressing conservation of energy-momentum of the system. The two conservation constants are functions of the plasma stream velocity, the wave velocity, the wave amplitude, and the electron-ion mass ratio. The dynamic parameter, expressing electron-ion momentum conversation in the laboratory frame, can be regarded as an adjustable quantity, a suitable choice of which will yield self-consistent solutions when other plasma parameters were specified. Circularly polarized electromagnetic waves and electrostatic plasma waves are used as illustrations.

  15. Generation of acoustic rogue waves in dusty plasmas through three-dimensional particle focusing by distorted waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ya-Yi; Tsai, Jun-Yi; I, Lin

    2016-06-01

    Rogue waves--rare uncertainly emerging localized events with large amplitudes--have been experimentally observed in many nonlinear wave phenomena, such as water waves, optical waves, second sound in superfluid He II (ref. ) and ion acoustic waves in plasmas. Past studies have mainly focused on one-dimensional (1D) wave behaviour through modulation instabilities, and to a lesser extent on higher-dimensional behaviour. The question whether rogue waves also exist in nonlinear 3D acoustic-type plasma waves, the kinetic origin of their formation and their correlation with surrounding 3D waveforms are unexplored fundamental issues. Here we report the direct experimental observation of dust acoustic rogue waves in dusty plasmas and construct a picture of 3D particle focusing by the surrounding tilted and ruptured wave crests, associated with the higher probability of low-amplitude holes for rogue-wave generation.

  16. An observational study of MHD wave-induced density fluctuations upstream of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, Steven; Fey, Alan; Anderson, Gregory; Fuselier, Stephen

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of plasma density fluctations upstream of the earth's bow shock and their association with MHD waves is reported. The normalized density fluctuation was 14 percent on a day when the plasma beta was less than unity and the waves were circularly polarized and of relatively low amplitude, and 17 percent on a day when the plasma beta was in excess of unity and the waves were elliptically polarized and of large fractional amplitude. On both days there was a feature of the density power spectrum at the MHD carrier wave frequency attributable to oblique propagation of the waves with propagation angles of a few degrees with respect to the mean field. Ponderomotive effects due to spatial gradient in the MHD wave energy density are proposed as responsible for a correlation betweeen density and transverse wave intensity on both days. Generation of density fluctuations by linear polarized MHD waves is not an important contributor to the observed density fluctuations.

  17. Statistics of beam-driven waves in plasmas with ambient fluctuations: Reduced-parameter approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tyshetskiy, Yu.; Cairns, I. H.; Robinson, P. A.

    2008-09-15

    A reduced-parameter (RP) model of quasilinear wave-plasma interactions is used to analyze statistical properties of beam-driven waves in plasmas with ambient density fluctuations. The probability distribution of wave energies in such a system is shown to have a relatively narrow peak just above the thermal wave level, and a power-law tail at high energies, the latter becoming progressively more evident for increasing characteristic amplitude of the ambient fluctuations. To better understand the physics behind these statistical features of the waves, a simplified model of stochastically driven thermal waves is developed on the basis of the RP model. An approximate analytic solution for stationary statistical distribution of wave energies W is constructed, showing a good agreement with that of the original RP model. The 'peak' and 'tail' features of the wave energy distribution are shown to be a result of contributions of two groups of wave clumps: those subject to either very slow or very fast random variations of total wave growth rate (due to fluctuations of ambient plasma density), respectively. In the case of significant ambient plasma fluctuations, the overall wave energy distribution is shown to have a clear power-law tail at high energies, P(W){proportional_to}W{sup -{alpha}}, with nontrivial exponent 1<{alpha}<2, while for weak fluctuations it is close to the lognormal distribution predicted by pure stochastic growth theory. The model's wave statistics resemble the statistics of plasma waves observed by the Ulysses spacecraft in some interplanetary type III burst sources. This resemblance is discussed qualitatively, and it is suggested that the stochastically driven thermal waves might be a candidate for explaining the power-law tails in the observed wave statistics without invoking mechanisms such as self-organized criticality or nonlinear wave collapse.

  18. In-situ observations of nonlinear wave particle interaction of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, M.; Miyoshi, Y.; Keika, K.; Katoh, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Nakamura, S.; Omura, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Direct measurement method for the electromagnetic wave and space plasma interaction has been suggested by a computer simulation study [Katoh et al., 2013], so-called Wave Particle Interaction Analysis (WPIA). We perform the WPIA for rising tone electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves (so-called EMIC triggered emissions), of which generation mechanism is essentially the same as the chorus emissions. THEMIS observation data (EFI, FGM, and ESA) are used for the WPIA. In the WPIA, we calculate (1) the inner product of the wave electric field and the velocity of the energetic protons: Wint, (2) the inner product of the wave magnetic field and the velocity of the energetic protons: WBint, and (3) the phase angle ζ between the wave magnetic field and the perpendicular velocity of the energetic protons. The values of (1) and (2) indicate the existence of the resonant currents inducing the nonlinear wave growth and the frequency change, respectively. We find the negative Wint and positive WBint at the nonlinear growing phase of the triggered emission as predicted in the theory [e.g. Omura and Nunn, 2011, Shoji and Omura, 2013]. In histogram of (3), we show the existence of the electromagnetic proton holes in the phase space generating the resonant currents. We also perform a hybrid simulation and evaluate WPIA method for EMIC waves. The simulation results show good agreement with the in-situ THEMIS observations.

  19. Discovery of cometary kilometric radiations and plasma waves at Comet Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, H.; Morioka, A.; Miyake, W.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1986-05-01

    The plasma-wave probe carried by the spacecraft Sakigake discovered discrete spectra of emissions from comet Halley in the frequency range 30 - 195 kHz. The observed cometary kilometric radiation appears to come from moving shocks in the coma region which are possibly associated with temporal variations of the solar wind. Waves due to plasma instabilities associated with the pick-up of cometary ions by the solar wind were observed within a region almost 107km from the comet nucleus.

  20. Observations of Gravity Waves at Atmospheric Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Samah, Azizan B. Hj.

    1990-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. An observational study of pressure perturbations associated with the passage of atmospheric fronts over the British Isles using a triangular array of sensitive microbarographs reveals the preponderance of gravity wave activities in the vicinity of the surface cold front (SCF). Examination of the time series of these pressure perturbations in the frequency domain shows an enhancement for frequencies less than the local buoyancy frequency N after the passage of the SCF. The spectral analysis also shows two predominant frequency peaks usually located near N and N/2 s ^{-1}. Isolating these frequencies shows that there is a systematic amplitude modulation with an amplification near the SCF and at a region 2-3 hours before and after the SCF passage. The cross-correlation analysis reveals that the gravity waves in the post SCF region propagate towards the SCF. As these waves approach the SCF, the across front component of the phase speed decreases and the direction of propagation of the wave rotates in an anticlockwise manner. It is found that a consistent description of the gravity waves can only be made if first the waves are assumed to be ducted, i.e. there is a reflecting layer aloft, and second that as these waves propagate through the frontal environment, due to the inhomogeneity, they are refracted. A number of conceptual models are then developed to account for the observed wave behaviour in a frontal region. In this investigation it is shown that the stable layer associated with the frontal zone can form a good upper reflector for non-hydrostatic gravity waves. It is also argued that the slope of this layer plays an important role in the refraction of the observed gravity waves. A model of wave propagation in a wedge is then used to account for this slope. This model however predicts a clockwise rotation of the direction of propagation as the wave propagates toward the SCF. This rotation is the opposite

  1. Harmonic plasma waves excitation and structure evolution of intense ion beams in background plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhang-Hu; Wang, You-Nian

    2016-08-01

    The long-term dynamic evolutions of intense ion beams in plasmas have been investigated with two-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulations, taking into account the effect of the two-stream instability between beam ions and plasma electrons. Depending on the initial beam radial density profile and velocity distribution, ring structures may be formed in the beam edge regions. At the later stage of beam-plasma interactions, the ion beams are strongly modulated by the two-stream instability and multiple density spikes are formed in the longitudinal direction. The formation of these density spikes is shown to result from the excitation of harmonic plasma waves when the instability gets saturated. Comparisons between the beam cases with initial flat-top and Gaussian radial density profiles are made, and a higher instability growth rate is observed for the flat-top profile case.

  2. MHD waves and oscillations in the solar plasma. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Erdélyi, Robert

    2006-02-15

    The Sun's magnetic field is responsible for many spectacularly dynamic and intricate phenomena, such as the 11 year solar activity cycle, the hot and tenuous outer atmosphere called the solar corona, and the continuously expanding stream of solar particles known as the solar wind.Recently, there has been an enormous increase in our understanding of the role of solar magnetism in producing the observed complex atmosphere of the Sun. One such advance has occurred in the detection, by several different high-resolution space instruments on-board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer satellites, of magnetic waves and oscillations in the solar corona. The new subjects of solar atmospheric and coronal seismology are undergoing rapid development. The aim of this Scientific Discussion Meeting was to address the progress made through observational, theoretical and numerical studies of wave phenomena in the magnetic solar plasma. Major theoretical and observational advances were reported by a wide range of international scientists and pioneers in this field, followed by lively discussions and poster sessions on the many intriguing questions raised by the new results. Theoretical and observational aspects of magnetohydrodynamic waves and oscillations in general, and how these wave phenomena differ in various regions of the Sun, including sunspots, the transient lower atmosphere and the corona (in magnetic loops, plumes and prominences), were addressed through invited review papers and selected poster presentations. The results of these deliberations are collected together in this volume. PMID:16414880

  3. Influence of electromagnetic oscillating two-stream instability on the evolution of laser-driven plasma beat-wave

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, D. N.; Singh, K. P.; Suk, H.

    2007-01-15

    The electrostatic oscillating two-stream instability of laser-driven plasma beat-wave was studied recently by Gupta et al. [Phys. Plasmas 11, 5250 (2004)], who applied their theory to limit the amplitude level of a plasma wave in the beat-wave accelerator. As a self-generated magnetic field is observed in laser-produced plasma, hence, the electromagnetic oscillating two-stream instability may be another possible mechanism for the saturation of laser-driven plasma beat-wave. The efficiency of this scheme is higher than the former.

  4. Analysis of waves in the plasma guided by a periodical vane-type slow wave structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.J.; Kou, C.S.

    2005-10-01

    In this study, the dispersion relation has been derived to characterize the propagation of the waves in the plasma guided by a periodical vane-type slow wave structure. The plasma is confined by a quartz plate. Results indicate that there are two different waves in this structure. One is the plasma mode that originates from the plasma surface wave propagating along the interface between the plasma and the quartz plate, and the other is the guide mode that originally travels along the vane-type slow wave structure. In contrast to its original slow wave characteristics, the guide mode becomes a fast wave in the low-frequency portion of the passband, and there exists a cut-off frequency for the guide mode. The vane-type guiding structure has been shown to limit the upper frequency of the passband of the plasma mode, compared with that of the plasma surface wave. In addition, the passband of the plasma mode increases with the plasma density while it becomes narrower for the guide mode. The influences of the parameters of the guiding structure and plasma density on the propagation of waves are also presented.

  5. Electromagnetic-wave excitation in a large laboratory beam-plasma system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whelan, D. A.; Stenzel, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism by which unstable electrostatic waves of a beam-plasma system are converted into observed electromagnetic waves is of current interest in space physics and in tokamak fusion research. The process involved in the conversion of electrostatic to electromagnetic waves at the critical layer is well understood. However, the radiation from uniform plasmas cannot be explained on the basis of this process. In connection with certain difficulties, it has not yet been possible to establish the involved emission processes by means of experimental observations. In the considered investigation these difficulties are overcome by employing a large laboratory plasma in a parameter range suitable for detailed diagnostics. A finite-diameter electron beam is injected into a uniform quiescent afterglow plasma of dimensions large compared with electromagnetic wavelengths. The considered generation mechanism concerning the electromagnetic waves is conclusively confirmed by observing the temporal evolution of an instability

  6. High latitude electromagnetic plasma wave emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    The principal types of electromagnetic plasma wave emission produced in the high latitude auroral regions are reviewed. Three types of radiation are described: auroral kilometric radiation, auroral hiss, and Z mode radiation. Auroral kilometric radiation is a very intense radio emission generated in the free space R-X mode by electrons associated with the formation of discrete auroral arcs in the local evening. Theories suggest that this radiation is an electron cyclotron resonance instability driven by an enhanced loss cone in the auroral acceleration region at altitudes of about 1 to 2 R sub E. Auroral hiss is a somewhat weaker whistler mode emission generated by low energy (100 eV to 10 keV) auroral electrons. The auroral hiss usually has a V shaped frequency time spectrum caused by a freqency dependent beaming of the whistler mode into a conical beam directed upward or downward along the magnetic field.

  7. Channeled particle acceleration by plasma waves in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Noble, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    A solid state accelerator concept utilizing particle acceleration along crystal channels by longitudinal electron plasma waves in a metal is presented. Acceleration gradients of order 100 GV/cm are theoretically possible. Particle dechanneling due to electron multiple scattering can be eliminated with a sufficiently high acceleration gradient. Plasma wave dissipation and generation in metals are also discussed.

  8. Observation of wave turbulence in vibrating plates.

    PubMed

    Boudaoud, Arezki; Cadot, Olivier; Odille, Benoît; Touzé, Cyril

    2008-06-13

    The nonlinear interaction of waves in a driven medium may lead to wave turbulence, a state such that energy is transferred from large to small length scales. Here, wave turbulence is observed in experiments on a vibrating plate. The frequency power spectra of the normal velocity of the plate may be rescaled on a single curve, with power-law behaviors that are incompatible with the weak turbulence theory of Düring et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 025503 (2006)10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.025503]. Alternative scenarios are suggested to account for this discrepancy -- in particular the occurrence of wave breaking at high frequencies. Finally, the statistics of velocity increments do not display an intermittent behavior. PMID:18643508

  9. C/NOFS Satellite Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Plasma Instabilities Below the Equatorial F-Peak -- Evidence for ~500 km-scale Spread-F "Precursor" Waves Driven by Zonal Shear Flow and km-Scale, Narrow-Banded Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaff, R. F.; Freudenreich, H. T.; Klenzing, J. H.; Liebrecht, M. C.; Valladares, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    As solar activity has increased, the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated on numerous occasions above the C/NOFS satellite perigee of 400km. In particular, during the month of April, 2011, the satellite consistently journeyed below the F-peak whenever the orbit was in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly after sunset. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite have revealed two types of instabilities which had not previously been observed in the C/NOFS data set (to our knowledge): The first is evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. A second new result (for C/NOFS) is the appearance of km-scale irregularities that are a common feature in the electric field and plasma density data that also appear when the satellite is below the F-peak at night. The vector electric field insrument on C/NOFS clearly shows that the electric field component of these waves is strongest in the zonal direction. These waves are strongly correlated with simultaneous observations of plasma density oscillations and appear both with, and without, evidence of larger-scale spread-F depletions. These km-scale, quasi-coherent waves strongly resemble the bottomside, sinusoidal irregularities reported in the Atmosphere Explorer satellite data set by Valladares et al. [JGR, 88, 8025, 1983]. We

  10. C/NOFS Satellite Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Plasma Instabilities Below the Equatorial F-Peak -- Evidence for Approximately 500 km-Scale Spread-F "Precursor" Waves Driven by Zonal Shear Flow and km-Scale, Narrow-Banded Irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.; Liebrecht, C.; Valladares, C.

    2011-01-01

    As solar activity has increased, the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated on numerous occasions above the C/NOFS satellite perigee of 400km. In particular, during the month of April, 2011, the satellite consistently journeyed below the F-peak whenever the orbit was in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly after sunset. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite have revealed two types of instabilities which had not previously been observed in the C/NOFS data set (to our knowledge): The first is evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. A second new result (for C/NOFS) is the appearance of km-scale irregularities that are a common feature in the electric field and plasma density data that also appear when the satellite is below the F -peak at night. The vector electric field instrument on C/NOFS clearly shows that the electric field component of these waves is strongest in the zonal direction. These waves are strongly correlated with simultaneous observations of plasma density oscillations and appear both with, and without, evidence of larger-scale spread-F depletions. These km-scale, quasi-coherent waves strongly resemble the bottomside, sinusoidal irregularities reported in the Atmosphere Explorer satellite data set by Valladares et al. [JGR, 88, 8025, 1983

  11. On the rogue waves propagation in non-Maxwellian complex space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    El-Tantawy, S. A. El-Awady, E. I.; Tribeche, M. E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz

    2015-11-15

    The implications of the non-Maxwellian electron distributions (nonthermal/or suprathermal/or nonextensive distributions) are examined on the dust-ion acoustic (DIA) rogue/freak waves in a dusty warm plasma. Using a reductive perturbation technique, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The latter is used to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable DIA wavepackets and to describe the rogue waves (RWs) propagation. Rogue waves are large-amplitude short-lived wave groups, routinely observed in space plasmas. The possible region for the rogue waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of space plasmas. It is shown that the RWs strengthen for decreasing plasma nonthermality and increasing superthermality. For nonextensive electrons, the RWs amplitude exhibits a bit more complex behavior, depending on the entropic index q. Moreover, our numerical results reveal that the RWs exist with all values of the ion-to-electron temperature ratio σ for nonthermal and superthermal distributions and there is no limitation for the freak waves to propagate in both two distributions in the present plasma system. But, for nonextensive electron distribution, the bright- and dark-type waves can propagate in this case, which means that there is a limitation for the existence of freak waves. Our systematic investigation should be useful in understanding the properties of DIA solitary waves that may occur in non-Maxwellian space plasmas.

  12. Multipoint observations of chorus and plasmaspheric hiss waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Li, W.; Chen, L.; Nishimura, Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2014-12-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss is a wideband, incoherent, whistler-mode plasma wave that is found predominantly in inner magnetospheric high-density plasma regions such as the plasmasphere or plasmaspheric drainage plume. The origin of plasmaspheric hiss has been a topic of intense study and some controversy ever since its discovery in the late 1960's. A recent set of modeling studies has shown that a different plasma wave, namely whistler-mode chorus, could be responsible for creating plasmaspheric hiss by propagating from its source region in the equatorial plasmatrough, and into the plasmasphere. Early coordinated observations made simultaneously on multiple THEMIS probes have shown excellent consistency between models and data, but later results concerning the nature of chorus waves and its relation to pulsating aurora, the discovery of low-frequency hiss, and coincident observations between high L-shell chorus and hiss have shown that there are facets of the chorus-hiss connection that are still a puzzle. In this talk, we briefly review the chorus-hiss connection mechanism and focus on recent results and open questions.

  13. Nonlinear absorption of Alfven wave in dissipative plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Taiurskii, A. A. Gavrikov, M. B.

    2015-10-28

    We propose a method for studying absorption of Alfven wave propagation in a homogeneous non-isothermal plasma along a constant magnetic field, and relaxation of electron and ion temperatures in the A-wave. The absorption of a A-wave by the plasma arises due to dissipative effects - magnetic and hydrodynamic viscosities of electrons and ions and their elastic interaction. The method is based on the exact solution of two-fluid electromagnetic hydrodynamics of the plasma, which for A-wave, as shown in the work, are reduced to a nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations.

  14. Surface electromagnetic wave equations in a warm magnetized quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chunhua; Yang, Weihong; Wu, Zhengwei; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-07-15

    Based on the single-fluid plasma model, a theoretical investigation of surface electromagnetic waves in a warm quantum magnetized inhomogeneous plasma is presented. The surface electromagnetic waves are assumed to propagate on the plane between a vacuum and a warm quantum magnetized plasma. The quantum magnetohydrodynamic model includes quantum diffraction effect (Bohm potential), and quantum statistical pressure is used to derive the new dispersion relation of surface electromagnetic waves. And the general dispersion relation is analyzed in some special cases of interest. It is shown that surface plasma oscillations can be propagated due to quantum effects, and the propagation velocity is enhanced. Furthermore, the external magnetic field has a significant effect on surface wave's dispersion equation. Our work should be of a useful tool for investigating the physical characteristic of surface waves and physical properties of the bounded quantum plasmas.

  15. Nonlinear Alfvén waves in dissipative MHD plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jugao; Chen, Yinhua; Yu, M. Y.

    2016-03-01

    Nonlinear Alfvén wave trains in resistive and viscous magnetohydrodynamics plasmas are investigated. In weakly dissipative one-dimensional systems the inclusion of these effects leads to dissipative damping of Alfvén waves and heating of the plasma. It is found that plasma flow along the background magnetic field can reduce/increase the visco-resistive damping when the flow is along/against the Alfvén wave. In strongly dissipative systems, the front of the Alfvén wave train damps slower than the others, and it gradually forms a damping soliton. In two-dimensional systems, Alfvén wave phase mixing induced by inhomogeneity of the background plasma leads to enhancement of the dissipative damping and the corresponding plasma heating.

  16. Kinematics of four-wave decay of high-frequency plasma oscillations into upper hybrid and electron-cyclotron plasma waves under multiple electron gyroresonance conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vas'kov, V. V.; Ryabova, N. A.

    1996-03-01

    We consider the conditions for four-wave decay of two primary plasmons with wave vectorěc k_{_0 } and frequency ω0 close to the multiple gyroresonance frequency nωBe into two secondary plasmons with frequencies ω1 > ω0 and ω2 < ω0. The secondary plasmons belong to the upper hybrid and the electron cyclotron branches. It is shown that the main features of the broad upshifted maximum (BUM) in the SEE spectrum can be explained in the context of the proposed process. The BUM feature appears in the region of frequencies having a positive shift from the high-power radio wave frequency. In particular the broad band nature of the BUM can be a result of the broad spectrum of wave number k0 of the primary plasma waves. In this case the observed cut-off frequency Δfcutoff limiting the BUM spectrum on the lower side can result from the lower bound of k0 (the increase in ω1 corresponds to decay of shorter wave plasmons). In our approach we assume that the generation of primary plasma oscillations by the high-power radio wave and the conversion of secondary plasma waves into the electromagnetic waves is due to coherent scattering of corresponding waves by small-scale magnetic-field-aligned artificial irregularities or to another nonlinear processes.

  17. ICE/ISEE plasma wave data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.; Moses, S. L.

    1993-01-01

    This report is one of the final processing of ICE plasma wave (pw) data and analysis of late ISEE 3, ICE cometary, and ICE cruise trajectory data, where coronal mass ejections (CME's) were the first locus of attention. Interest in CME's inspired an effort to represent our pw data in a condensed spectrogram format that facilitated rapid digestion of interplanetary phenomena on long (greater than 1 day) time scales. The format serendipitously allowed us to also examine earth-orbiting data from a new perspective, invigorating older areas of investigation in Earth's immediate environment. We, therefore, continued to examine with great interest the last year of ISEE 3's precomet phase, when it spent considerable time far downwind from Earth, recording for days on end conditions upstream, downstream, and across the very weak, distant flank bow shock. Among other motivations has been the apparent similarity of some shock and post shock structures to the signatures of the bow wave surrounding comet Giacobini-Zinner, whose ICE-phase data we revisited.

  18. Shock waves in strongly coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Khlebnikov, Sergei; Kruczenski, Martin; Michalogiorgakis, Georgios

    2010-12-15

    Shock waves are supersonic disturbances propagating in a fluid and giving rise to dissipation and drag. Weak shocks, i.e., those of small amplitude, can be well described within the hydrodynamic approximation. On the other hand, strong shocks are discontinuous within hydrodynamics and therefore probe the microscopics of the theory. In this paper, we consider the case of the strongly coupled N=4 plasma whose microscopic description, applicable for scales smaller than the inverse temperature, is given in terms of gravity in an asymptotically AdS{sub 5} space. In the gravity approximation, weak and strong shocks should be described by smooth metrics with no discontinuities. For weak shocks, we find the dual metric in a derivative expansion, and for strong shocks we use linearized gravity to find the exponential tail that determines the width of the shock. In particular, we find that, when the velocity of the fluid relative to the shock approaches the speed of light v{yields}1 the penetration depth l scales as l{approx}(1-v{sup 2}){sup 1/4}. We compare the results with second-order hydrodynamics and the Israel-Stewart approximation. Although they all agree in the hydrodynamic regime of weak shocks, we show that there is not even qualitative agreement for strong shocks. For the gravity side, the existence of shock waves implies that there are disturbances of constant shape propagating on the horizon of the dual black holes.

  19. Scattering of radio frequency waves by cylindrical density filaments in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Abhay K.; Hizanidis, Kyriakos

    2016-02-01

    In tokamak fusion plasmas, coherent fluctuations in the form of blobs or filaments are routinely observed in the scrape-off layer. Radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic waves, excited by antenna structures placed near the wall of a tokamak, have to propagate through the scrape-off layer before reaching the core of the plasma. While the effect of fluctuations on the properties of RF waves has not been quantified experimentally, it is of interest to carry out a theoretical study to determine if fluctuations can affect the propagation characteristics of RF waves. Usually, the difference between the plasma density inside the filament and the background plasma density is sizable, the ratio of the density difference to the background density being of order one. Generally, this precludes the use of geometrical optics in determining the effect of fluctuations, since the relevant ratio has to be much less than one, typically, of the order of 10% or less. In this paper, a full-wave, analytical model is developed for the scattering of a RF plane wave by a cylindrical plasma filament. It is assumed that the plasma inside and outside the filament is cold and uniform and that the major axis of the filament is aligned along the toroidal magnetic field. The ratio of the density inside the filament to the density of the background plasma is not restricted. The theoretical framework applies to the scattering of any cold plasma wave. In order to satisfy the boundary conditions at the interface between the filament and the background plasma, the electromagnetic fields inside and outside the filament need to have the same k∥ , the wave vector parallel to the ambient magnetic field, as the incident plane wave. Consequently, in contrast to the scattering of a RF wave by a spherical blob [Ram et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056110-1-056110-10 (2013)], the scattering by a field-aligned filament does not broaden the k∥ spectrum. However, the filament induces side-scattering leading to surface

  20. Wave rectification in plasma sheaths surrounding electric field antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, M. H.; Carlson, C. W.; Mcfadden, J. P.; Clemmons, J. H.; Ergun, R. E.; Mozer, F. S.

    1994-01-01

    Combined measurements of Langmuir or broadband whistler wave intensity and lower-frequency electric field waveforms, all at 10-microsecond time resolution, were made on several recent sounding rockets in the auroral ionosphere. It is found that Langmuir and whistler waves are partically rectified in the plasma sheaths surrounding the payload and the spheres used as antennas. This sheath rectification occurs whenever the high frequency (HF) potential across the sheath becomes of the same order as the electron temperature or higher, for wave frequencies near or above the ion plasma frequency. This rectification can introduce false low-frequency waves into measurements of electric field spectra when strong high-frequency waves are present. Second harmonic signals are also generated, although at much lower levels. The effect occurs in many different plasma conditions, primarily producing false waves at frequencies that are low enough for the antenna coupling to the plasma to be resistive.

  1. Bounce-harmonic Landau Damping of Plasma Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderegg, Francois

    2015-11-01

    We present measurement of plasma wave damping, spanning the temperature regimes of direct Landau damping, bounce-harmonic Landau damping, inter-species drag damping, and viscous damping. Direct Landau damping is dominant at high temperatures, but becomes negligible as v plasmas contained in Penning-Malmberg trap, with wave-coherent LIF diagnostics of particle velocities. Our focus is on bounce harmonics damping, controlled by an applied ``squeeze'' potential, which generates harmonics in the wave potential and in the particle dynamics. A particle moving in z experiences a non-sinusoidal mode potential caused by the squeeze, producing high spatial harmonics with lower phase velocity. These harmonics are Landau damped even when the mode phase velocity vph is large compared to the thermal velocity v , since the nth harmonic is resonant with a particle bouncing at velocity vb =vph / n . Here we increase the bounce harmonics through applied squeeze potential; but some harmonics are always present in finite length systems. For our centered squeeze geometry, theory shows that only odd harmonics are generated, and predicts the Landau damping rate from vph / n . Experimentally, the squeeze potential increases the wave damping and reduces its frequency. The frequency shift occurs because the squeeze potential reduces the number of particle where the mode velocity is the largest, therefore reducing the mode frequency. We observe an increase in the damping proportional to Vs2,and a frequency reduction proportional to Vs , in quantitative agreement with theory. Wave-coherent laser induced fluorescence allows direct observation of bounce resonances on the particle distribution, here predominantly at vph / 3 . A clear increase of the bounce harmonics is visible on the particle distribution when the squeeze potential is applied. Supported by NSF Grant PHY-1414570, and DOE Grants DE-SC0002451 and DE-SC0008693.

  2. Plasma wave signatures in the magnetotail reconnection region - MHD simulation and ray tracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omura, Yoshiharu; Green, James L.

    1993-01-01

    An MHD simulation was performed to obtain a self-consistent model of magnetic field and plasma density near the X point reconnection region. The MHD model was used to perform extensive ray tracing calculations in order to clarify the propagation characteristics of the plasma waves near the X point reconnection region. The dynamic wave spectra possibly observed by the Geotail spacecraft during a typical cross-tail trajectory are reconstructed. By comparing the extensive ray tracing calculations with the plasma wave data from Geotail, it is possible to perform a kind of 'remote sensing' to identify the location and structure of potential X point reconnection regions.

  3. Flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Surabhi; Bandyopadhyay, Pintu; Sen, Abhijit

    2015-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of particle flow induced large amplitude shock waves in a dusty plasma. These dust acoustic shocks (DAS) are observed for strongly supersonic flows and have been studied in a U-shaped Dusty Plasma Experimental (DPEx) device for charged kaolin dust in a background of Argon plasma. The strong flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change of the dust density near the potential hill is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks. The dynamics of the shocks are captured by fast video pictures of the structures that are illuminated by a laser sheet beam. The physical characteristics of the shock are delineated from a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of plasma parameters and flow speeds. Details of these observations and a physical explanation based on model calculations will be presented.

  4. Trapping of electrons in troughs of self generated electromagnetic standing waves in a bounded plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Sahu, Debaprasad; Pandey, Shail; Chatterjee, Sanghomitro; Dey, Indranuj; Roy Chowdhury, Krishanu

    2014-01-15

    Observations and measurements are reported on electron trapping in troughs of self-generated electromagnetic standing waves in a bounded plasma column confined in a minimum-B field. The boundaries are smaller than the free space wavelength of the waves. Earlier work of researchers primarily focused upon electron localization effects induced by purely electrostatic perturbation. We demonstrate the possibility in the presence of electromagnetic standing waves generated in the bounded plasma column. The electron trapping is verified with electrostatic measurements of the plasma floating potential, electromagnetic measurements of the wave field profile, and optical intensity measurements of Argon ionic line at 488 nm. The experimental results show a reasonably good agreement with predictions of a Monte Carlo simulation code that takes into account all kinematical and dynamical effects in the plasma in the presence of bounded waves and external fields.

  5. Dispersion relation of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi-component magneto-plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khaira, Vibhooti Ahirwar, G.

    2015-07-31

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi component plasma composed of electrons (denoted by e{sup −}), hydrogen ions (denoted by H{sup +}), helium ions (denoted by He{sup +}) and positively charged oxygen ions (denoted by O{sup +})in magnetized cold plasma. The wave is assumed to propagate perpendicular to the static magnetic field. It is found that the addition of heavy ions in the plasma dispersion modified the lower hybrid mode and also allowed an ion-ion mode. The frequencies of the lower hybrid and ion- ion hybrid modes are derived using cold plasma theory. It is observed that the effect of multi-ionfor different plasma densities on electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is to enhance the wave frequencies. The results are interpreted for the magnetosphere has been applied parameters by auroral acceleration region.

  6. PLASMA NEAR THE HELIOSHEATH: OBSERVATIONS AND INTERPRETATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J. D.; Wang, C. E-mail: cw@spaceweather.ac.cn

    2010-03-01

    Voyager 2 (V2) has observed heliosheath plasma since 2007 August. The plasma flux decreases by 25% before the termination shock (TS), then, as V2 moved into the heliosheath, the plasma density, temperature, and flux all decreased by an additional factor of 2. We suggest three effects combine to cause these decreases. (1) V2 moved into the lower-flux transition region between the low- and high-speed solar wind. This hypothesis is consistent with Ulysses observations of the transition location, explains the 25% decrease in solar wind flux observed before the TS crossing, and can reconcile discrepancies between the V2 and Voyager 1 heliosheath speeds and between the V2 speeds and model results. (2) The weaker source at the Sun. (3) The heliosheath plasma turning and flowing toward the heliotail.

  7. Surface wave and linear operating mode of a plasma antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Bogachev, N. N. Bogdankevich, I. L.; Gusein-zade, N. G.; Rukhadze, A. A.

    2015-10-15

    The relation between the propagation conditions of a surface electromagnetic wave along a finiteradius plasma cylinder and the linear operating mode of a plasma antenna is investigated. The solution to the dispersion relation for a surface wave propagating along a finite-radius plasma cylinder is analyzed for weakly and strongly collisional plasmas. Computer simulations of an asymmetrical plasma dipole antenna are performed using the KARAT code, wherein the dielectric properties of plasma are described in terms of the Drude model. The plasma parameters corresponding to the linear operating mode of a plasma antenna are determined. It is demonstrated that the characteristics of the plasma antenna in this mode are close to those of an analogous metal antenna.

  8. Relativistic nonlinear plasma waves in a magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, C. F.; Pellat, R.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of five relativistic plane nonlinear waves, taking into account circularly polarized waves and electrostatic plasma oscillations propagating parallel to the magnetic field, relativistic Alfven waves, linearly polarized transverse waves propagating in zero magnetic field, and the relativistic analog of the extraordinary mode propagating at an arbitrary angle to the magnetic field. It is found that a large-amplitude superluminous wave determines the average plasma properties, and not vice versa. Attention is given to the implications of the obtained results for the acceleration of cosmic rays in pulsar magnetospheres.

  9. The transmission of Alfven waves through the Io plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, A. N.; Schwartz, S. J.

    1989-04-01

    The nature of Alfven wave propagation through the Io plasma torus was investigated using a one-dimensional model with uniform magnetic field and an exponential density decrease to a constant value. The solution was interpreted in terms of a wave that is incident upon the torus, a reflected wave, and a wave that is transmitted through the torus. The results obtained indicate that Io's Alfven waves may not propagate completely through the plasma torus, and, thus, the WKB theory and ray tracing may not provide meaningful estimates of the energy transport.

  10. Magnetosonic shock wave in collisional pair-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Ashish; Sikdar, Arnab; Ghosh, Samiran; Khan, Manoranjan

    2016-06-01

    Nonlinear propagation of magnetosonic shock wave has been studied in collisional magnetized pair-ion plasma. The masses of both ions are same but the temperatures are slightly different. Two fluid model has been taken to describe the model. Two different modes of the magnetosonic wave have been obtained. The dynamics of the nonlinear magnetosonic wave is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burgers' equation. It has been shown that the ion-ion collision is the source of dissipation that causes the Burgers' term which is responsible for the shock structures in equal mass pair-ion plasma. The numerical investigations reveal that the magnetosonic wave exhibits both oscillatory and monotonic shock structures depending on the strength of the dissipation. The nonlinear wave exhibited the oscillatory shock wave for strong magnetic field (weak dissipation) and monotonic shock wave for weak magnetic field (strong dissipation). The results have been discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments.

  11. Second harmonic plasma emission involving ion sound waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1987-01-01

    The theory for second harmonic plasma emission by the weak turbulence (or random phase) processes L + L + or - S to T, proceeding in two three-wave steps, L + or - S to L prime and L + L prime to T, where L, S and T denote Langmuir, ion sound and electromagnetic waves, respectively, is developed. Kinematic constraints on the characteristics and growth lengths of waves participating in the wave processes, and constraints on the characteristics of the source plasma, are derived. Limits on the brightness temperature of the radiation and the levels of the L prime and S waves are determined. Expressions for the growth rates and path-integrated wave temperatures are derived for simple models of the wave spectra and source plasma.

  12. Cyclotron waves in a non-neutral plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, Daniel H. E.

    2013-04-15

    A kinetic theory of linear electrostatic plasma waves with frequencies near the cyclotron frequency {Omega}{sub c{sub s}} of a given plasma species s is developed for a multispecies non-neutral plasma column with general radial density and electric field profiles. Terms in the perturbed distribution function up to O(1/{Omega}{sub c{sub s}{sup 2}}) are kept, as are the effects of finite cyclotron radius r{sub c} up to O(r{sub c}{sup 2}). At this order, the equilibrium distribution is not Maxwellian if the plasma temperature or rotation frequency is not uniform. For r{sub c}{yields}0, the theory reproduces cold-fluid theory and predicts surface cyclotron waves propagating azimuthally. For finite r{sub c}, the wave equation predicts that the surface wave couples to radially and azimuthally propagating Bernstein waves, at locations where the wave frequency equals the local upper hybrid frequency. The equation also predicts a second set of Bernstein waves that do not couple to the surface wave, and therefore have no effect on the external potential. The wave equation is solved both numerically and analytically in the WKB approximation, and analytic dispersion relations for the waves are obtained. The theory predicts that both types of Bernstein wave are damped at resonances, which are locations where the Doppler-shifted wave frequency matches the local cyclotron frequency as seen in the rotating frame.

  13. Reflective properties of electromagnet-optical waves in superconducting plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuma, Toshiro; Ohno, J.

    1995-12-31

    Superconducting (SC) plasmas were discovered recently, the studies of which are becoming important. As for the SC plasmas, the penetration depth of magnetic fields to the superconductor due to the fundamental Meissner effect is given by {lambda} = c/{omega}{sub ps}, ({omega}{sub ps}: the SC electron plasma frequency). The investigations on the SC plasmas are discussed in this report. Electromagnet-optical field distributions near the SC plasma boundary are numerically investigated, when electromagnet-optical beam waves with finite size are radiated to SC plasma with ambient incident angle. Typical electric field patterns for TE incident wave are shown. The figure indicates the existence of the parallel shift of the reflective position of the beam wave for the case of the perfect reflection. The reflective shift is found to result from field penetrations to the superconductor which depend on the parameter of the SC plasmas.

  14. Observation of multifractal intermittent dust-acoustic-wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ya-Yi; Chang, Mei-Chu; I, Lin

    2012-10-01

    Intermittent dust acoustic wave turbulence self-excited by downward ion flow in dissipative dusty plasma is experimentally observed and investigated. The power spectra of the temporal dust density fluctuation show distinct bumps in the low-frequency regime and power-law scaling in the high-frequency regime. The structure-function analysis demonstrates the multifractal dynamics of the wave turbulence. Decreasing dissipation by decreasing neutral pressure leads to a more turbulent state with a less distinct low-frequency bump in the power spectrum, more stretched non-Gaussian tails in the histogram of the wave-height increment at a small time interval τ, and a higher degree of multifractality. The loss of long time memory with increasing τ for a more turbulent state causes a change from the distribution with stretched non-Gaussian tails to Gaussian with increasing τ.

  15. ALFVEN WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Terradas, J.; Carbonell, M. E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.es

    2013-04-20

    Alfven waves are a particular class of magnetohydrodynamic waves relevant in many astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of Alfven waves is affected by the interaction between ionized and neutral species. Here we study Alfven waves in a partially ionized plasma from the theoretical point of view using the two-fluid description. We consider that the plasma is composed of an ion-electron fluid and a neutral fluid, which interact by means of particle collisions. To keep our investigation as general as possible, we take the neutral-ion collision frequency and the ionization degree as free parameters. First, we perform a normal mode analysis. We find the modification due to neutral-ion collisions of the wave frequencies and study the temporal and spatial attenuation of the waves. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoff values of the wavelength that constrain the existence of oscillatory standing waves in weakly ionized plasmas. Later, we go beyond the normal mode approach and solve the initial-value problem in order to study the time-dependent evolution of the wave perturbations in the two fluids. An application to Alfven waves in the low solar atmospheric plasma is performed and the implication of partial ionization for the energy flux is discussed.

  16. Plasma wave system measurements of the Martian bow shock from the Phobos 2 spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Trotignon, J.G. ); Grard, R. ); Savin, S. )

    1991-07-01

    The high-resolution data of the electric field observations performed by the plasma wave system (PWS) during some of the Martian bow shock intersections by Phobos 2 were analyzed. Plasma and wave detectors are very useful instruments for locating the shock transition region and studying structures in the upstream region, such as the foot or the electron foreshock. The electron plasma oscillations that develop in the latter give access to the plasma density of the solar wind. Shock surface models derived from the PWS data are compared to those obtained by other authors, and attention is paid to similarities and differences between the electric field measurements obtained for Mars, Venus, and Earth

  17. Variable dual-frequency electrostatic wave launcher for plasma applications.

    PubMed

    Jorns, Benjamin; Sorenson, Robert; Choueiri, Edgar

    2011-12-01

    A variable tuning system is presented for launching two electrostatic waves concurrently in a magnetized plasma. The purpose of this system is to satisfy the wave launching requirements for plasma applications where maximal power must be coupled into two carefully tuned electrostatic waves while minimizing erosion to the launching antenna. Two parallel LC traps with fixed inductors and variable capacitors are used to provide an impedance match between a two-wave source and a loop antenna placed outside the plasma. Equivalent circuit analysis is then employed to derive an analytical expression for the normalized, average magnetic flux density produced by the antenna in this system as a function of capacitance and frequency. It is found with this metric that the wave launcher can couple to electrostatic modes at two variable frequencies concurrently while attenuating noise from the source signal at undesired frequencies. An example based on an experiment for plasma heating with two electrostatic waves is used to demonstrate a procedure for tailoring the wave launcher to accommodate the frequency range and flux densities of a specific two-wave application. This example is also used to illustrate a method based on averaging over wave frequencies for evaluating the overall efficacy of the system. The wave launcher is shown to be particularly effective for the illustrative example--generating magnetic flux densities in excess of 50% of the ideal case at two variable frequencies concurrently--with a high adaptability to a number of plasma dynamics and heating applications. PMID:22225213

  18. Radio and Plasma Waves in the Magnetosphere of Saturn: Similarities to Earth and Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D.; Kurth, W.; Hospodarsky, G.; Persoon, A.; Cecconi, B.; Desch, M.; Farrell, W.; Kaiser, M.; Kellogg, P.; Goetz, K.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Harvey, C.; Louarn, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Galopeau, P.; Roux, A.; Fischer, G.; Ladreiter, H.; Rucker, H.; Alleyne, H.; Bostrom, R.; Gustafsson, G.; Wahlund, J.; Pedersen, A.

    2005-05-01

    With a few notable exceptions, most of the radio and plasma waves observed in the magnetosphere of Saturn are remarkably similar to those observed in the magnetospheres of Earth and Jupiter. For example, Saturn kilometric radiation, terrestrial kilometric radiation, and Jovian decametric radiation have many characteristics in common and are all generated by the same basic plasma mechanism, namely the cyclotron maser instability. Similar statements can be made about a broad range of other radio and plasma wave phenomena, for example, electrostatic emissions at the upper hybrid frequency, electrostatic waves near odd half-integral harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency, and various whistler-mode electromagnetic emissions. What is different at these various planets are the plasma parameters and the types of interactions that lead to the plasma instabilities. Thus, the frequencies of the cyclotron maser radiation at Saturn, Earth and Jupiter are all different because the magnetic field strengths are different. And, there is no terrestrial analog of the Io-controlled Jovian decametric radiation, since there is no moon orbiting in the inner region of the terrestrial magnetosphere. In this talk, we will review the radio and plasma wave observations obtained by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument in the vicinity of Saturn, and compare these to similar observations at Earth and Jupiter with the objective of contrasting and understanding the physical processes involved.

  19. Electrostatic ion cyclotron and ion plasma waves in a symmetric pair-ion plasma cylinder.

    PubMed

    Kono, M; Vranjes, J; Batool, N

    2014-03-14

    Complicated wave behavior observed in the cylindrical pair-ion (fullerene) experiments by Oohara and co-workers are now identified to be low harmonic ion cyclotron waves combined with ion plasma oscillations inherent to kinetic theory. The electrostatic dispersion equation derived is based on an approximation for the current from the exact solutions of the characteristic cylindrical geometry form of the Vlasov plasma equation in a uniform magnetized plasma cylinder surrounded by a larger metal boundary outside a vacuum gap, which thus differs from that in unbounded plasmas. Positive and negative ions, differing only in the sign of their charge, respond to a potential in the same time scale and cooperate to reflect the enhanced kinetic orbital behaviors to the macroscopic propagation characteristics. In addition, the experimental value of the Larmor radius (comparable to the discharge radius but small enough to make the analytic approximation useful) makes higher harmonic ion cyclotron effects both observable and calculable with the appropriate approximation for the kinetic theory. PMID:24679299

  20. Beam-plasma amplifiers based on nonhomogeneous plasma-cavity slow-wave structure

    SciTech Connect

    Perevodchikov, V.I.; Mitin, L.A.; Shapiro, A.L.; Zavjalov, M.A.

    1995-11-01

    The investigation of interaction of E-beam with hybrid waves of nonhomogeneous plasma-cavity slow-wave structure have been carried out. It`s shown that depression of external magnetic field at out-put part of plasma-cavity structure may be used for decreasing of phase velocity of active waves and phase space synchronization ones with space charge fields, induced in plasma. This mode of operation of plasma TWT was calculated. The investigations carried out theoretically has been supported by experiments with plasma TWT.

  1. Nonextensivity effect on radio-wave transmission in plasma sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, A.; Esfandiari-Kalejahi, A.; Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, new theoretical findings on the application of magnetic field in effective transmission of electromagnetic (EM) waves through a plasma sheath around a hypersonic vehicle are reported. The results are obtained by assuming the plasma sheath to consist of nonextensive electrons and thermal ions. The expressions for the electric field and effective collision frequency are derived analytically in the framework of nonextensive statistics. Examination of the reflection, transmission, and absorption coefficients regarding the strength of the ambient magnetic field shows the significance of q-nonextensive parameter effect on these entities. For small values of the magnetic field, the transmission coefficient increases to unity only in the range of - 1 < q < 1 . It is also found that the EM wave transmission through the nonextensive plasma sheath can take place using lower magnetic field strengths in the presence of superthermal electrons compared with that of Maxwellian ones. It is observed that superthermal electrons, with nonextensive parameter, q < 1, play a dominant role in overcoming the radio blackout for hypersonic flights.

  2. Wave mode identification of electrostatic noise observed with ISEE 3 in the deep tail boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsutsui, M.; Matsumoto, H.; Strangeway, R. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Phillips, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of the VLF electrostatic noise observed with ISEE 3 in the low-latitude boundary layer of distant geomagnetic tail are examined using a display format for the wave dynamic spectra different from that used by Scarf et al. (1984). It is shown that the observed noise is composed of impulsive bursts. The results of the detailed analysis of the noise parameters are used to develop a model of plasma wave behavior in the plasma rest frame. A hypothesis is proposed that the wide frequency extent of the noise spectra is composed of Doppler effects of waves propagating nearly omnidirectionally within the plasma rest frame, which is moving with the electron bulk speed. On the basis of this hypothesis, the wavelength of the observed waves were determined from the width of the frequency extent and the measured electron bulk speed. It is shown that the wavelength ranges from 2 to 8 times the plasma Debye length.

  3. The Nonlinear Coupling of Alfven and Lower Hybrid Waves in Space Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Singh, N.; Krivorutsky, E.

    2003-01-01

    Space plasmas support a wide variety of waves, and wave-particle interactions as well as wave-wave interactions which are of crucial importance to magnetospheric and ionospheric plasma behavior. The excitation of lower hybrid waves (LHWs), in particular, is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. It is demonstrated that large-amplitude Alfven waves may generate LHWs in the auroral zone and ring current region and in some cases (particularly in the inner magnetosphere) this serves as the Alfven wave saturation mechanism. We present several examples of observational data which illustrate that the proposed mechanism is a plausible candidate to explain certain classes of LHW generation events in the ionosphere and magnetosphere and demonstrate electron and ion energization involving these processes. Furthermore, we will present results from particle-in-cell simulations showing the generation of particle drifts in response to an Alfven wave, resulting in excitation of waves and ion heating in a multi- ion plasma.

  4. Kinetic processes in the plasma sheet observed during auroral activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingim, Matthew Owen

    In this dissertation we analyze plasma sheet magnetic field and plasma data observed during varying levels of auroral activity from very small, isolated events known as pseudobreakups to large, global events known as substorms. The plasma and magnetic field data are taken from instruments onboard the WIND spacecraft while it traverses the near-Earth plasma sheet. Simultaneous global auroral images from POLAR/UVI allow us to determine the auroral activity level. The goal of this dissertation is to provide the most complete set of plasma sheet observations during auroral activity currently available. The kinetic aspects of the plasma dynamics which have largely been ingnored in other works are emphasized here. We have the capability to resolve changes in the three dimensional ion distribution functions with a time resolution comparable to or faster than the local ion gyroperiod. In addition, we consider the typically neglected electron dynamics when relating plasma sheet processes to the aurora. We find that the plasma sheet signatures of both pseudobreakups and substorms appear very similar. During both types of events, increases in auroral precipitation into the ionosphere are associated with large amplitude, high frequency magnetic field fluctuations, large Earthward ion < v>, increases in the fluxes of high energy ions and electrons, and hardening of the electron spectrum. Both ion and electron distributions appear to be composed of multiple components. Electromagnetic waves with power at frequencies up to and above the local proton gyrofrequency area also observed. Additionally, the ion distributions can change significantly in one gyroperiod. Together, these results imply that the microphysical processes occurring in the plasma sheet during pseudobreakups and substorms are the same and that kinetic effects are important. Therefore, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) cannot adequately describe the physics occurring during large ion < v> events.

  5. Exchange interaction effects on waves in magnetized quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Trukhanova, Mariya Iv. Andreev, Pavel A.

    2015-02-15

    We have applied the many-particle quantum hydrodynamics that includes the Coulomb exchange interaction to magnetized quantum plasmas. We considered a number of wave phenomena that are affected by the Coulomb exchange interaction. Since the Coulomb exchange interaction affects the longitudinal and transverse-longitudinal waves, we focused our attention on the Langmuir waves, the Trivelpiece-Gould waves, the ion-acoustic waves in non-isothermal magnetized plasmas, the dispersion of the longitudinal low-frequency ion-acoustic waves, and low-frequency electromagnetic waves at T{sub e} ≫ T{sub i}. We have studied the dispersion of these waves and present the numeric simulation of their dispersion properties.

  6. Low-frequency electromagnetic plasma waves at comet P/Grigg-Skjellerup: Analysis and interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubauer, Fritz M.; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Coates, A. J.; Johnstone, A. D.

    1993-01-01

    The propagation and polarization characteristic of low-frequency electromagnetic wave fields near comet P/Grigg-Skjellerup (P/GS) are analyzed using magnetic field and plasma observations obtained by the Giotto magnetometer experiment and the Johnstone plasma analyzer during the encounter at the comet on July 10, 1992. The results have been physically interpreted.

  7. Altimeter Observations of Baroclinic Oceanic Inertia-Gravity Wave Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, R. E.; Cheng, B.

    1996-01-01

    For a wide range of nonlinear wave processes - from capillary to planetary waves - theory predicts the existence of Kolmogorov-type spectral cascades of energy and other conserved quantities occuring via nonlinear resonant wave-wave interactions. So far, observations of wave turbulence (WT) have been limited to small-scale processes such as surface gravity and capillary-gravity waves.

  8. Testing THEMIS wave measurements against the cold plasma theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubenschuss, Ulrich; Santolik, Ondrej; Le Contel, Olivier; Bonnell, John

    2016-04-01

    The THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) mission records a multitude of electromagnetic waves inside Earth's magnetosphere and provides data in the form of high-resolution electric and magnetic waveforms. We use multi-component measurements of whistler mode waves and test them against the theory of wave propagation in a cold plasma. The measured ratio cB/E (c is speed of light in vacuum, B is magnetic wave amplitude, E is electric wave amplitude) is compared to the same quantity calculated from cold plasma theory over linearized Faraday's law. The aim of this study is to get estimates for measurement uncertainties, especially with regard to the electric field and the cold plasma density, as well as evaluating the validity of cold plasma theory inside Earth's radiation belts.

  9. Satellite observations of the QBO wave driving by Kelvin waves and gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Kalisch, Silvio; Riese, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) of the zonal wind in the tropical stratosphere is an important process in atmospheric dynamics influencing a wide range of altitudes and latitudes. Effects of the QBO are found also in the mesosphere and in the extra-tropics. The QBO even has influence on the surface weather and climate, for example during winter in the northern hemisphere at midlatitudes. Still, climate models have large difficulties in reproducing a realistic QBO. One reason for this deficiency are uncertainties in the wave driving by planetary waves and, in particular, gravity waves that are usually too small-scale to be resolved in global models. Different global equatorial wave modes (e.g., Kelvin waves) have been identified by longitude-time 2D spectral analysis in Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) satellite temperature data, as well as ECMWF temperatures. We find good agreement between SABER satellite observations and ECMWF wave variances in both QBO-related temporal variations and their magnitude. Slow phase speed waves are strongly modulated by the QBO, higher phase speed waves are almost unaffected by the QBO, and ultra-fast equatorial waves can even reach the MLT region. Momentum fluxes and zonal wind drag due to Kelvin waves are derived, and the relative contribution of Kelvin waves to the QBO wind reversal from westward to eastward wind is estimated to be about 30% of the total wave driving. This is in good agreement with the general assumption that gravity waves (GWs) are probably more important for the QBO driving than global-scale waves. This is further supported by SABER and High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) satellite observations of gravity wave drag in the equatorial region. These observations are compared with the drag still missing in the ECMWF ERA Interim (ERAI) tropical momentum budget after considering zonal wind tendency, Coriolis force, advection terms and drag of resolved global

  10. Cross-Frequency Coupling of Plasma Waves in the Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazanov, G. V.

    2014-12-01

    Wave-particle and wave-wave interactions are crucial elements of magnetosphere and ionosphere plasma dynamics. Such interactions provide a channel of energy redistribution between different plasma populations, and lead to connections between physical processes developing on different spatial and temporal scales. The lower hybrid waves (LHWs) are particularly interesting for plasma dynamics, because they couple well with both electrons and ions. The excitation of LHWs is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. It is demonstrated that large-amplitude Alfven and/or EMIC waves, in particular those associated with lower frequency (LF) turbulence, may generate LHWs in the auroral zone and ring current region and in some cases this serves as the Alfven and/or EMIC waves saturation mechanism. We believe that this described scenario, as well as some other cross-frequency coupling of plasma waves processes that will be discussed in this presentation, can play a vital role in various parts of the magnetospheric plasma, especially in the places under investigation by the NASA THEMIS and Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP)) missions.

  11. Nonlocal theory of electromagnetic wave decay into two electromagnetic waves in a rippled density plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Sati, Priti; Tripathi, V. K.

    2012-12-15

    Parametric decay of a large amplitude electromagnetic wave into two electromagnetic modes in a rippled density plasma channel is investigated. The channel is taken to possess step density profile besides a density ripple of axial wave vector. The density ripple accounts for the momentum mismatch between the interacting waves and facilitates nonlinear coupling. For a given pump wave frequency, the requisite ripple wave number varies only a little w.r.t. the frequency of the low frequency decay wave. The radial localization of electromagnetic wave reduces the growth rate of the parametric instability. The growth rate decreases with the frequency of low frequency electromagnetic wave.

  12. ICE/ISEE plasma wave data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.

    1992-01-01

    The interval reported on, from Jan. 1990 to Dec. 1991, has been one of continued processing and archiving of ICE plasma wave (pw) data and transition from analysis of ISEE 3 and ICE cometary data to ICE data taken along its cruise trajectory, where coronal mass ejections are the focus of attention. We have continued to examine with great interest the last year of ISEE 3's precomet phase, when it spent considerable time far downwind from Earth, recording conditions upstream, downstream, and across the very weak, distant flank bow shock. Among other motivations was the apparent similarity of some shock and post shock structures to the signatures of the bow wave surrounding comet Giacobini-Zinner, whose ICE-phase data was revisited. While pursuing detailed, second-order scientific inquiries still pending from the late ISEE 3 recordings, we have also sought to position ourselves for study of CME's by instituting a data processing format new to the ISEE 3/ICE pw detector. Processed detector output has always been summarized and archived in 24-hour segments, with all pw channels individually plotted and stacked one above the next down in frequency, with each channel calibrated separately to keep all data patterns equally visible in the plots, regardless of gross differences in energy content at the various frequencies. Since CME's, with their preceding and following solar wind plasmas, can take more than one day to pass by the spacecraft, a more condensed synoptic view of the pw data is required to identify, let alone assess, CME characteristics than has been afforded by the traditional routines. This requirement is addressed in a major new processing initiative in the past two years. Besides our own ongoing and fresh investigations, we have cooperated, within our resources, with studies conducted extramurally by distant colleagues irrespective of the phase of the ISEE 3/ICE mission under scrutiny. The remainder of this report summarizes our processing activities, our

  13. Electron generation of electrostatic waves in the plasma sheet boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onsager, T. G.; Thomsen, M. F.; Elphic, R. C.; Gosling, J. T.; Anderson, R. R.; Kettmann, G.

    1993-01-01

    Broadband electrostatic noise (BEN) has been shown to occur in conjunction with ion beams; extensive investigations of possible ion beam-related instabilities that could generate the observed wave spectra have been conducted. It has also been demonstrated that unstable electron distribution functions are sometimes measured in the plasma sheet boundary layer. We present simultaneous observations of ion and electron distribution functions and electric field wave spectra measured by ISEE 1 and ISEE 2 in the Earth's magnetotail. As the spacecraft moved from the tail lobe toward the plasma sheet, the fast indication of boundary layer plasma was seen in the electron distributions, followed some minutes later by the detection of boundary layer ions. The onset of large-amplitude electrostatic waves at frequencies up to the electron plasma frequency was coincident with the onset of the boundary layer electrons, suggesting that broadband electrostatic waves may often be generated by unstable electron distributions in the plasma sheet boundary layer, particularly the higher frequency portion of the wave spectrum. The observed changes in the electron distribution functions indicate that the plasma was not heated locally by the waves.

  14. Waves In Space Plasmas (WISP): A space plasma lab active experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredricks, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Waves in Space Plasmas (WISP) series of Spacelab Space Plasma Labs devoted to active experimentation, are introduced. Space Plasma Lab-1 is keyed to active probing of the ionosphere and magnetosphere using controlled wave injections by the WISP VLF and HF transmitters, supported by a free-flying plasma diagnostics package instrumented with wave receivers and particle probe diagnostics, designed to measure radiation and propagation of plasma waves, precipitated particle fluxes due to wave/particle interactions, and similar phenomena resulting from wave injectons. The VLF transmitter delivers up to 1 kW of RF power into the antenna terminals over the range from 0.3 to 30 kHz. The HF transmitter delivers up to 500 W to the antenna over the range from 1 to 30 MHz. A dipole antenna commandable to any extension up to 300 m tip-to-tip is available.

  15. Conical slow wave antenna as a plasma source.

    PubMed

    Grubb, D P; Lovell, T

    1978-01-01

    A simple conical helix has been successfully employed as a slow wave structure to generate plasmas by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH). The plasma is typical of plasmas created by ''Lisitano coil'' sources, n approximately 10(10)-10(12) cm(-3) with T(e) approximately 2-20 eV. This source, however, is much simpler to fabricate. The ease of fabrication allows the user some flexibility in designing the source to fit a specific plasma physics experiment.

  16. Wave Normal and Poynting Vector Calculations using the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hospodarsky, G. B.; Averkamp, T. F.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Dougherty, M.; Inan, Umran; Wood, Troy

    2001-01-01

    Wave normal and Poynting vector measurements from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument (RPWS) are used to examine the propagation characteristics of various plasma waves during the Earth flyby on August 18, 1999. Using the five-channel waveform receiver (WFR), the wave normal vector is determined using the Means method for a lightning-induced whistler, equatorial chorus, and a series of low-frequency emissions observed while Cassini was in the magnetosheath. The Poynting vector for these emissions is also calculated from the five components measured by the WFR. The propagation characteristics of the lightning-induced whistler were found to be consistent with the whistler wave mode of propagation, with propagation antiparallel to the magnetic field (southward) at Cassini. The sferic associated with this whistler was observed by both Cassini and the Stanford VLF group at the Palmer Station in Antarctica. Analysis of the arrival direction of the sferic at the Palmer Station suggests that the lightning stroke is in the same sector as Cassini. Chorus was observed very close (within a few degrees) to the magnetic equator during the flyby. The chorus was found to propagate primarily away from the magnetic equator and was observed to change direction as Cassini crossed the magnetic equator. This suggests that the source region of the chorus is very near the magnetic equator. The low-frequency emission in the magnetosheath has many of the characteristics of lion roars. The average value of the angle between the wave normal vector and the local magnetic field was found to be 16 degrees, and the emissions ranged in frequency from 0. 19 to 0.75 f(sub ce), where f(sub ce) is the electron cyclotron frequency. The wave normal vectors of these waves were primarily in one direction for each individual burst (either parallel or antiparallel to the local field) but varied in direction throughout the magnetosheath. This suggests that the sources of the emissions are far from

  17. Low-frequency waves within isolated magnetic clouds and complex structures: STEREO observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu-Tapia, A.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Kajdic, P.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Jian, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2015-04-01

    Complex Structures (CSs) formed by the interaction of magnetic cloud (MC)-like structures with other transients (e.g., another MC, a stream interaction region, or a fast stream of solar wind) were frequently observed in the interplanetary space by STEREO spacecraft during the solar minimum 23 and the rising phase of the solar cycle 24. Here we report the presence of low-frequency waves (LFWs) inside some isolated MCs (IMCs) and inside the CSs observed by STEREO during such period (2007-2011). It is important to study in detail the properties of waves in space plasmas since particle distribution functions can be modified by wave-particle interactions. We compare wave characteristics within IMCs with those waves observed inside CSs. Both left-handed (LH) and right-handed (RH), near-circularly polarized, transverse and almost parallel-propagating LFWs (around the proton cyclotron frequency) were sporadically observed inside both IMCs and CSs. In contrast, compressive mirror-mode waves (MMs) were observed only within CSs. We studied local plasma conditions inside the IMCs and CSs to gain insight about wave origin: most of the MMs within CSs were observed in regions with enhanced plasma beta (β>1) the majority of the LH waves were found in low beta plasmas (β<1), and the RH waves were predominantly observed at moderate betas (0.4<β≤2). These observations are in agreement with linear kinetic theory predictions for the growth of the mirror, the LH ion cyclotron, and the RH ion firehose instability, respectively. It is possible that the waves were generated locally inside the IMCs and CSs via temperature anisotropies. The plasma beta enhancements that were frequently observed inside the CSs may be the result of compressions and heating taking place inside the interacting structures.

  18. Geotail MCA plasma wave data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Roger R.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Grant NAG 5-2346 supports the data analysis effort at The University of Iowa for the GEOTAIL Multi-Channel Analyzer (MCA) which is a part of the GEOTAIL Plasma Wave Instrument (PWI). At the beginning of this reporting period we had just begun to receive our GEOTAIL Sirius data on CD-ROMs. Much programming effort went into adapting and refining the data analysis programs to include the CD-ROM inputs. Programs were also developed to display the high-frequency-resolution PWI Sweep Frequency Analyzer (SFA) data and to include in all the various plot products the electron cyclotron frequency derived from the magnitude of the magnetic field extracted from the GEOTAIL Magnetic Field (MGF) data included in the GEOTAIL Sirius data. We also developed programs to use the MGF data residing in the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) GEOTAIL Scientific Data Base (SDB). Our programmers also developed programs and provided technical support for the GEOTAIL data analysis efforts of Co-lnvestigator William W. L. Taylor at Nichols Research Corporation (NRC). At the end of this report we have included brief summaries of the NRC effort and the progress being made.

  19. Effect of wave localization on plasma instabilities. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levedahl, William Kirk

    1987-01-01

    The Anderson model of wave localization in random media is involved to study the effect of solar wind density turbulence on plasma processes associated with the solar type III radio burst. ISEE-3 satellite data indicate that a possible model for the type III process is the parametric decay of Langmuir waves excited by solar flare electron streams into daughter electromagnetic and ion acoustic waves. The threshold for this instability, however, is much higher than observed Langmuir wave levels because of rapid wave convection of the transverse electromagnetic daughter wave in the case where the solar wind is assumed homogeneous. Langmuir and transverse waves near critical density satisfy the Ioffe-Reigel criteria for wave localization in the solar wind with observed density fluctuations -1 percent. Numerical simulations of wave propagation in random media confirm the localization length predictions of Escande and Souillard for stationary density fluctations. For mobile density fluctuations localized wave packets spread at the propagation velocity of the density fluctuations rather than the group velocity of the waves. Computer simulations using a linearized hybrid code show that an electron beam will excite localized Langmuir waves in a plasma with density turbulence. An action principle approach is used to develop a theory of non-linear wave processes when waves are localized. A theory of resonant particles diffusion by localized waves is developed to explain the saturation of the beam-plasma instability. It is argued that localization of electromagnetic waves will allow the instability threshold to be exceeded for the parametric decay discussed above.

  20. The ISPM unified radio and plasma wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. G.; Caldwell, J.; Deconchy, Y.; Deschanciaux, C.; Ebbett, R.; Epstein, G.; Groetz, K.; Harvey, C. C.; Hoang, S.; Howard, R.

    1983-01-01

    Hardware for the International Solar Polar Mission (ISPM) Unified Radio and Plasma (URAP) wave experiment is presented. The URAP determines direction and polarization of distant radio sources for remote sensing of the heliosphere, and studies local wave phenomena which determine the transport coefficients of the ambient plasma. Electric and magnetic field antennas and preamplifiers; the electromagnetic compatibility plan and grounding; radio astronomy and plasma frequency receivers; a fast Fourier transformation data processing unit waveform analyzer; dc voltage measurements; a fast envelope sampler for the solar wind, and plasmas near Jupiter; a sounder; and a power converter are described.

  1. Evolution of nonlinear ion-acoustic solitary wave propagation in rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Das, G. C.; Nag, Apratim

    2006-08-15

    A simple unmagnetized plasma rotating around an axis at an angle {theta} with the propagation direction of the acoustic mode has been taken. The nonlinear wave mode has been derived as an equivalent Sagdeev potential equation. A special procedure, known as the tanh method, has been developed to study the nonlinear wave propagation in plasma dynamics. Further, under small amplitude approximation, the nonlinear plasma acoustic mode has been exploited to study the evolution of soliton propagation in the plasma. The main emphasis has been given to the interaction of Coriolis force on the changes of coherent structure of the soliton. The solitary wave solution finds the different nature of solitons called compressive and rarefactive solitons as well as its explosions or collapses along with soliton dynamics and these have been showing exciting observations in exhibiting a narrow wave packet with the generation of high electric pressure and the growth of high energy which, in turn, yields the phenomena of radiating soliton in dynamics.

  2. Nonplanar ion-acoustic solitary waves with superthermal electrons in warm plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Eslami, Parvin; Mottaghizadeh, Marzieh; Pakzad, Hamid Reza

    2011-07-15

    In this paper, we consider an unmagnetized plasma consisting of warm adiabatic ions, superthermal electrons, and thermal positrons. Nonlinear cylindrical and spherical modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations are derived for ion acoustic waves by using reductive perturbation technique. It is observed that an increasing positron concentration decreases the amplitude of the waves. Furthermore, the effects of the superthermal parameter (k) on the ion acoustic waves are found.

  3. Hybrid simulation of wave propagation in the Io plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, B. H.; Delamere, P. A.; Damiano, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The transmission of waves between Jupiter and Io is an excellent case study of magnetosphere/ionosphere (MI) coupling because the power generated by the interaction at Io and the auroral power emitted at Jupiter can be reasonably estimated. Wave formation begins with mass loading as Io passes through the plasma torus. A ring beam distribution of pickup ions and perturbation of the local flow by the conducting satellite generate electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves and Alfven waves. We investigate wave propagation through the torus and to higher latitudes using a hybrid plasma simulation with a physically realistic density gradient, assessing the transmission of Poynting flux and wave dispersion. We also analyze the propagation of kinetic Alfven waves through a density gradient in two dimensions.

  4. On the generation of plasma waves in Saturn's inner magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.; Kurth, W. S.

    1993-01-01

    Voyager 1 plasma wave measurements of Saturn's inner magnetosphere are reviewed with regard to interpretative aspects of the wave spectrum. A comparison of the wave emission profile with the electron plasma frequency obtained from in situ measurements of the thermal ion density shows good agreement with various features in the wave data identified as electrostatic modes and electromagnetic radio waves. Theoretical calculations of the critical flux of superthermal electrons able to generate whistler-mode waves and electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves through a loss-cone instability are presented. The comparison of model results with electron measurements shows excellent agreement, thereby lending support to the conclusion that a moderate perpendicular anisotropy in the hot electron distribution is present in the equatorial region of L = 5-8.

  5. On the generation of plasma waves in Saturn's inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, D. D.; Kurth, W. S.

    1993-06-01

    Voyager 1 plasma wave measurements of Saturn's inner magnetosphere are reviewed with regard to interpretative aspects of the wave spectrum. A comparison of the wave emission profile with the electron plasma frequency obtained from in situ measurements of the thermal ion density shows good agreement with various features in the wave data identified as electrostatic modes and electromagnetic radio waves. Theoretical calculations of the critical flux of superthermal electrons able to generate whistler-mode waves and electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves through a loss-cone instability are presented. The comparison of model results with electron measurements shows excellent agreement, thereby lending support to the conclusion that a moderate perpendicular anisotropy in the hot electron distribution is present in the equatorial region of L = 5-8.

  6. MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, Roberto; Ballester, Jose Luis; Carbonell, Marc E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es

    2013-11-01

    Compressible disturbances propagate in a plasma in the form of magnetoacoustic waves driven by both gas pressure and magnetic forces. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of ionized and neutral species are coupled due to ion-neutral collisions. As a consequence, magnetoacoustic waves propagating through a partially ionized medium are affected by ion-neutral coupling. The degree to which the behavior of the classic waves is modified depends on the physical properties of the various species and on the relative value of the wave frequency compared to the ion-neutral collision frequency. Here, we perform a comprehensive theoretical investigation of magnetoacoustic wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma using the two-fluid formalism. We consider an extensive range of values for the collision frequency, ionization ratio, and plasma β, so that the results are applicable to a wide variety of astrophysical plasmas. We determine the modification of the wave frequencies and study the frictional damping due to ion-neutral collisions. Approximate analytic expressions for the frequencies are given in the limit case of strongly coupled ions and neutrals, while numerically obtained dispersion diagrams are provided for arbitrary collision frequencies. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoffs in the dispersion diagrams that constrain wave propagation for certain combinations of parameters. A specific application to propagation of compressible waves in the solar chromosphere is given.

  7. Linear and Nonlinear MHD Wave Processes in Plasmas. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tataronis, J. A.

    2004-06-01

    This program treats theoretically low frequency linear and nonlinear wave processes in magnetized plasmas. A primary objective has been to evaluate the effectiveness of MHD waves to heat plasma and drive current in toroidal configurations. The research covers the following topics: (1) the existence and properties of the MHD continua in plasma equilibria without spatial symmetry; (2) low frequency nonresonant current drive and nonlinear Alfven wave effects; and (3) nonlinear electron acceleration by rf and random plasma waves. Results have contributed to the fundamental knowledge base of MHD activity in symmetric and asymmetric toroidal plasmas. Among the accomplishments of this research effort, the following are highlighted: Identification of the MHD continuum mode singularities in toroidal geometry. Derivation of a third order ordinary differential equation that governs nonlinear current drive in the singular layers of the Alfvkn continuum modes in axisymmetric toroidal geometry. Bounded solutions of this ODE implies a net average current parallel to the toroidal equilibrium magnetic field. Discovery of a new unstable continuum of the linearized MHD equation in axially periodic circular plasma cylinders with shear and incompressibility. This continuum, which we named “accumulation continuum” and which is related to ballooning modes, arises as discrete unstable eigenfrequency accumulate on the imaginary frequency axis in the limit of large mode numbers. Development of techniques to control nonlinear electron acceleration through the action of multiple coherent and random plasmas waves. Two important elements of this program aye student participation and student training in plasma theory.

  8. Linear and nonlinear dynamics of current-driven waves in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Ali; Ali Shan, S.; Haque, Q.; Saleem, H.

    2012-09-15

    The linear and nonlinear dynamics of a recently proposed plasma mode of dusty plasma is studied using kappa distribution for electrons. This electrostatic wave can propagate in the plasma due to the sheared flow of electrons and ions parallel to the external magnetic field in the presence of stationary dust. The coupling of this wave with the usual drift wave and ion acoustic wave is investigated. D'Angelo's mode is also modified in the presence of superthermal electrons. In the nonlinear regime, the wave can give rise to dipolar vortex structures if the shear in flow is weaker and tripolar vortices if the flow has steeper gradient. The results have been applied to Saturn's magnetosphere corresponding to negatively charged dust grains. But the theoretical model is applicable for positively charged dust as well. This work will be useful for future observations and studies of dusty environments of planets and comets.

  9. Relativistic wave-breaking limit of electrostatic waves in cold electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Mithun; Maity, Chandan; Chakrabarti, Nikhil; Sengupta, Sudip

    2016-06-01

    A one-dimensional nonlinear propagation of relativistically strong electrostatic waves in cold electron-positron-ion (EPI) plasmas has been analyzed. The motion of all the three species, namely, electron, positron, and ion has been treated to be relativistic. The maximum permissible electric field amplitude - so called "wave-breaking limit" of such an electrostatic wave before wave-breaking has been derived, showing its dependence on the relativistic Lorentz factor associated with the phase velocity of the plasma wave, on the electron/positron to ion mass ratio, and on the ratio of equilibrium ion density to equilibrium electron/positron density.

  10. Influence of Plasma Pressure Fluctuation on RF Wave Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiwei; Bao, Weimin; Li, Xiaoping; Liu, Donglin; Zhou, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Pressure fluctuations in the plasma sheath from spacecraft reentry affect radio-frequency (RF) wave propagation. The influence of these fluctuations on wave propagation and wave properties is studied using methods derived by synthesizing the compressible turbulent flow theory, plasma theory, and electromagnetic wave theory. We study these influences on wave propagation at GPS and Ka frequencies during typical reentry by adopting stratified modeling. We analyzed the variations in reflection and transmission properties induced by pressure fluctuations. Our results show that, at the GPS frequency, if the waves are not totally reflected then the pressure fluctuations can remarkably affect reflection, transmission, and absorption properties. In extreme situations, the fluctuations can even cause blackout. At the Ka frequency, the influences are obvious when the waves are not totally transmitted. The influences are more pronounced at the GPS frequency than at the Ka frequency. This suggests that the latter can mitigate blackout by reducing both the reflection and the absorption of waves, as well as the influences of plasma fluctuations on wave propagation. Given that communication links with the reentry vehicles are susceptible to plasma pressure fluctuations, the influences on link budgets should be taken into consideration. supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2014CB340205) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61301173)

  11. Plasma wave experiment for the ISEE-3 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarf, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of data from a scientific instrument designed to study solar wind and plasma wave phenomena on the ISEE-3 mission is presented. The performance of work on the data analysis phase is summarized.

  12. Three-wave coupling coefficients for perpendicular wave propagation in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Brodin, G.; Stenflo, L.

    2015-10-15

    The resonant interaction between three waves in a uniform magnetized plasma is reconsidered. Starting from previous kinetic expressions, we limit our investigation to waves propagating perpendicularly to the external magnetic field. It is shown that reliable results can only be obtained in the two-dimensional case, i.e., when the wave vectors have both x and y components.

  13. Inverse mirror plasma experimental device (IMPED) - a magnetized linear plasma device for wave studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Sayak; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Sengupta, S.; Saxena, Y. C.; Pal, R.

    2015-04-01

    In a quasineutral plasma, electrons undergo collective oscillations, known as plasma oscillations, when perturbed locally. The oscillations propagate due to finite temperature effects. However, the wave can lose the phase coherence between constituting oscillators in an inhomogeneous plasma (phase mixing) because of the dependence of plasma oscillation frequency on plasma density. The longitudinal electric field associated with the wave may be used to accelerate electrons to high energies by exciting large amplitude wave. However when the maximum amplitude of the wave is reached that plasma can sustain, the wave breaks. The phenomena of wave breaking and phase mixing have applications in plasma heating and particle acceleration. For detailed experimental investigation of these phenomena a new device, inverse mirror plasma experimental device (IMPED), has been designed and fabricated. The detailed considerations taken before designing the device, so that different aspects of these phenomena can be studied in a controlled manner, are described. Specifications of different components of the IMPED machine and their flexibility aspects in upgrading, if necessary, are discussed. Initial results meeting the prerequisite condition of the plasma for such study, such as a quiescent, collisionless and uniform plasma, are presented. The machine produces δnnoise/n <= 1%, Luniform ~ 120 cm at argon filling pressure of ~10-4 mbar and axial magnetic field of B = 1090 G.

  14. Parametric instabilities of parallel propagating incoherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nariyuki, Y.; Hada, T.; Tsubouchi, K.

    2007-12-15

    Large amplitude, low-frequency Alfven waves constitute one of the most essential elements of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the fast solar wind. Due to small collisionless dissipation rates, the waves can propagate long distances and efficiently convey such macroscopic quantities as momentum, energy, and helicity. Since loading of such quantities is completed when the waves damp away, it is important to examine how the waves can dissipate in the solar wind. Among various possible dissipation processes of the Alfven waves, parametric instabilities have been believed to be important. In this paper, we numerically discuss the parametric instabilities of coherent/incoherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma using a one-dimensional hybrid (superparticle ions plus an electron massless fluid) simulation, in order to explain local production of sunward propagating Alfven waves, as suggested by Helios/Ulysses observation results. Parameter studies clarify the dependence of parametric instabilities of coherent/incoherent Alfven waves on the ion and electron beta ratio. Parametric instabilities of coherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma are vastly different from those in the cold ions (i.e., MHD and/or Hall-MHD systems), even if the collisionless damping of the Alfven waves are neglected. Further, ''nonlinearly driven'' modulational instability is important for the dissipation of incoherent Alfven waves in a finite ion beta plasma regardless of their polarization, since the ion kinetic effects let both the right-hand and left-hand polarized waves become unstable to the modulational instability. The present results suggest that, although the antisunward propagating dispersive Alfven waves are efficiently dissipated through the parametric instabilities in a finite ion beta plasma, these instabilities hardly produce the sunward propagating waves.

  15. Observation of Hamiltonian chaos and its control in wave particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doveil, F.; Macor, A.; Aïssi, A.

    2007-12-01

    Wave-particle interactions are central in plasma physics. They can be studied in a traveling wave tube (TWT) to avoid intrinsic plasma noise. This led to detailed experimental analysis of the self-consistent interaction between unstable waves and an either cold or warm beam. More recently a test cold electron beam has been used to observe its non-self-consistent interaction with externally excited wave(s). The velocity distribution function of the electron beam is recorded with a trochoidal energy analyzer at the output of the TWT. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the slow wave structure (a 4 m long helix) of the TWT. The nonlinear synchronization of particles by a single wave responsible for Landau damping is observed. The resonant velocity domain associated with a single wave is also observed, as well as the transition to large scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap. This transition exhibits a 'devil's staircase' behavior when increasing the excitation amplitude in agreement with numerical simulation. A new strategy for control of chaos by building barriers of transport which prevent electrons from escaping from a given velocity region as well as its robustness are successfully tested. The underlying concepts extend far beyond the field of electron devices and plasma physics.

  16. Pulse evolution and plasma-wave phase velocity in channel-guided laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, C; Rossi, F; Schroeder, C B; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2015-08-01

    The self-consistent laser evolution of an intense, short-pulse laser exciting a plasma wave and propagating in a preformed plasma channel is investigated, including the effects of pulse steepening and energy depletion. In the weakly relativistic laser intensity regime, analytical expressions for the laser energy depletion, pulse self-steepening rate, laser intensity centroid velocity, and phase velocity of the plasma wave are derived and validated numerically. PMID:26382537

  17. Observations of Electrostatic and Electromagnetic Waves in the Earth's Magnetosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filbert, Paul Charles

    Using data from the University of Minnesota Plasma Wave Experiment aboard the IMP-6 (Explorer 43) satellite, three topics are addressed. The first concerns the wave lengths of certain electrostatic waves in the earth's magnetosphere. Using the fact that the X and Y dipole antennas on IMP-6 are of unequal length, the antenna response to electrostatic waves is calculated as a function of wavelength. This result is used to experimentally determine the wavelengths of Bernstein mode waves observed just beyond the plasmapause. These wavelengths are then used in conjunction with present theoretical models to determine the energy of the electrons driving these waves and a range of energies between (TURN) several tens to (TURN) several hundreds of electron volts is found. This procedure is also applied to Langmuir waves observed upstream of the earth's bow shock and the results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Second it is demonstrated that enhanced levels of the so-called continuum radiation are correlated with AE enhancements. In addition, a source region of continuum radiation is directly observed and movement of the source region is seen which is consistent with a cloud of electrons having been injected into the night side magnetosphere and undergoing gradient drifts in an eastward direction towards local dawn. This drift movement is then used to estimate the energy of the electrons which produce the observed continuum enhancement and a range between 10 kev to 50 kev is found. Spectral properties of the directly observed source are also presented, and indicate a high frequency spectral index of (TURN)f('-5.5). A new type of continuum radiation which correlates with TKR on a time scale of (TURN)1 minute is also observed and is found to have a source region distinct from that mentioned above. Third, a correlation between TKR and VLF auroral hiss has been observed for several high latitude passes of IMP-6 through the midnight auroral zone. This

  18. Observations of a new class of upstream waves with periods near 3 seconds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.; Russell, C. T.; Thomsen, M. F.; Gosling, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    A new class of ULF waves with periods near 3 s in the earth's upstream region is found by examining the high time resolution magnetic field data from the ISEE spacecraft. These waves are observed in the part of the upstream region which is magnetically connected to the bow shock, but only when the solar wind plasma beta is high (greater than 1). The waves are always right-handed, nearly circularly polarized in the spacecraft frame. The directions of the wave vectors are in the general direction of the average magnetic field, and the waves are convected downstream in the spacecraft frame. This study of these waves has shown that they appear to be intrinsically left-handed ion cyclotron waves in the plasma rest frame.

  19. Filamentation of magnetosonic wave and generation of magnetic turbulence in laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Modi, K. V.; Tiwary, Prem Pyari; Singh, Ram Kishor Sharma, R. P.; Satsangi, V. R.

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents a theoretical model for the magnetic turbulence in laser plasma interaction due to the nonlinear coupling of magnetosonic wave with ion acoustic wave in overdense plasma. For this study, dynamical equations of magnetosonic waves and the ion acoustic waves have been developed in the presence of ponderomotive force due to the pump magnetosonic wave. Slowly converging and diverging behavior has been studied semi-analytically, this results in the formation of filaments of the magnetosonic wave. Numerical simulation has also been carried out to study nonlinear stage. From the results, it has been found that the localized structures become quite complex in nature. Further, power spectrum has been studied. Results show that the spectral index follows (∼k{sup −2.0}) scaling at smaller scale. Relevance of the present investigation has been shown with the experimental observation.

  20. Ionospheric Plasma Structures Observed by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Charles C. H.; Chen, Chia-Hung; Thampi, Smitha V.; Liu, Jann-Yenq; Liu, C. H.

    The GPS Occultation eXperiment (GOX) on board the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) has provided large amount of the ionospheric electron density soundings since the satellite con-stellation was launched in April 2006. By averaging the electron density profiles distributed global-wide during one-or two-month period, three-dimensional ionospheric electron density maps can be constructed for studying quiet-time ionosphere climatology. Through analysis of the 3-D ionospheric maps during the four years period of the mission, the occultation observa-tions have shown further details of ionospheric plasma structures, such as, the wave-signature of the equatorial ionosphere, the mid-latitude summer nighttime anomaly (MSNA) and the plasma depletion bay (PDB). Additional to the GOX, two other instruments, the tiny iono-spheric photometer (TIP) and the tri-band beacon (TBB), on board the constellation provide more aspects of these plasma structures. In this presentation, we summarize the ionospheric plasma structures observed by the constellation mission, as well as the important details of the plasma structures unveiled by the constellation for better understandings the associated formation mechanism.

  1. Observation of the backward electrostatic ion cyclotron wave

    SciTech Connect

    Goree, J.; Ono, M.; Wong, K.L.

    1984-12-01

    The backward branch of the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave has been observed, we believe, for the first time. The wave, which was driven by a phased antenna structure inserted in a neon plasma, exists in the parameter ranges 2T/sub i//m/sub i/ << (..omega../k/sub parallel/)/sup 2/ << 2T/sub e//m/sub e/, n..cap omega../sub i/ < ..omega.. < (n+1)..cap omega../sub i/, T/sub e/ greater than or equal to T/sub i/, and ..omega../sub pi/ > ..cap omega../sub i/. Double-tip probe interferomety data agree with the theoretical dispersion relation.

  2. Plasma waves in the shock interaction regions at Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, C. F.; Coroniti, F. V.; Scarf, F. L.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Smith, E. J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The nature of the comet-solar wind interaction is studied by analyzing the detailed evolution of the plasma wave spectra of Comet Giacobini-Zinner across the interaction region. Electron heat fluxes and associated electron plasma waves, steepened low-frequency wave packets, and density fluctuations observed upstream of Giacobini-Zinner shocks are also found upstream of quasi-parallel bow shocks. Downstream, the pulsations in the cometary magnetic field magnitude, in addition to the large density spikes, are usually also found downstream of quasi-parallel bow shocks. Other similarities to interplanetary shocks and terrestrial bow shocks are described.

  3. Simultaneous excitation of broadband electrostatic noise and electron cyclotron waves in the plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berchem, Jean P.; Schriver, David; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    1991-01-01

    Electron cyclotron harmonics and broadband electrostatic noise (BEN) are often observed in the earth's outer plasma sheet. While it is well known that ion beams in the plasma sheet boundary layer can generate BEN, new two-dimensional electrostatic simulations show that field-aligned ion beams with a small perpendicular ring distribution can drive not only BEN, but also electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) waves simultaneously. Simulation results are presented here using detailed diagnostics of wave properties, including dispersion relations of all wave modes.

  4. Weakly nonlinear dust ion-acoustic shock waves in a dusty plasma with nonthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Berbri, Abderrezak; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2009-05-15

    Weakly nonlinear dust ion-acoustic (DIA) shock waves are investigated in a dusty plasma with nonthermal electrons. A modified Korteweg-de Vries equation with a cubic nonlinearity is derived. Due to the net negative dust charge {mu}Z{sub d} and electron nonthermality, the present plasma model can admit compressive and rarefactive weak DIA shock waves. The effect of increasing {mu}Z{sub d} is to lower the critical nonthermal parameter {beta}{sub c} above which only rarefactive DIA shock waves are admitted. Our investigation may help to understand the nonlinear structures observed in the auroral acceleration regions.

  5. Obliquely Propagating Dust-Density Plasma Waves in the Presence of an Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Piel, A.; Klindworth, M.; Arp, O.; Melzer, A.; Wolter, M.

    2006-11-17

    Self-excited dust-density waves are experimentally studied in a dusty plasma under microgravity. Two types of waves are observed: a mode inside the dust volume propagating in the direction of the ion flow and a new mode propagating obliquely at the boundary between the dusty plasma and the space-charge sheath. A model for dust-density waves propagating at an arbitrary angle with respect to the ion-flow direction is presented, which explains the preference for oblique or parallel modes as a function of ion velocity.

  6. Evolution of rogue waves in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tolba, R. E. El-Bedwehy, N. A.; Moslem, W. M.; El-Labany, S. K.

    2015-04-15

    The evolution of rogue waves associated with the dynamics of positively charged dust grains that interact with streaming electrons and ions is investigated. Using a perturbation method, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). The rational solution of the NLSE is presented, which proposed as an effective tool for studying the rogue waves in Jupiter. It is found that the existence region of rogue waves depends on the dust-acoustic speed and the streaming densities of the ions and electrons. Furthermore, the supersonic rogue waves are much taller than the subsonic rogue waves by ∼25 times.

  7. Jovian plasma sheet density profile from low-frequency radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucker, H. O.; Ladreiter, H. P.; Leblanc, Y.; Jones, D.; Kurth, W. S.

    1989-04-01

    By using planetary radio astronomy (PRA), plasma wave system (PWS), and magnetometer (MAG) data from Voyager 1 and 2 (V1 and V2), essential features of the nightside Jovian plasma sheet are derived, and the density gradient of the corotating plasma structure in the middle Jovian magnetosphere is calculated. The PRA experiment gives information about the plasma wave polarization. The density profile of the plasma sheet is determined using the hinge point position of the plasma disk derived from MAG data, and the low-frequency cutoffs observed at three frequencies (562 Hz, 1 kHz, and 1.78 kHz) from the PWS experiment. It is shown that the hinge point position varies with the solar wind ram pressure.

  8. Polar Plasma Wave Investigation Data Analysis in the Extended Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.; Menietti, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) is a region where solar wind momentum and energy is transferred to the magnetosphere. Enhanced "broadband" electric plasma waves from less than 5 Hz to l0(exp 5) Hz and magnetic waves from less than 5 Hz to the electron cyclotron frequency are characteristic of the LLBL. Analyses of Polar plasma waves show that these "broadband" waves are actually discrete electrostatic and electromagnetic modes as well as solitary bipolar pulses (electron holes). It is noted that all wave modes can be generated by approx. 100 eV to approx. 10 keV auroral electrons and protons. We will review wave-particle interactions, with focus on cross- diffusion rates and the contributions of such interactions toward the formation of the boundary layer. In summary, we will present a scenario where the global solar wind-magnetosphere interaction is responsible for the auroral zone particle beams, and hence for the generation of plasma waves and the formation of the boundary layer. It is speculated that all planetary magnetospheres will have boundary layers and they will be characterized by similar currents and plasma wave modes.

  9. Polar Plasma Wave Investigation Data Analysis in the Extended Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    2004-01-01

    The low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) is a region where solar wind momentum and energy is transferred to the magnetosphere. Enhanced "broadband" electric plasma waves from less than 5 Hz to 10(exp 5) Hz and magnetic waves from less than 5 Hz to the electron cyclotron frequency are characteristic of the LLBL. Analyses of Polar plasma waves show that these "broadband" waves are actually discrete electrostatic and electromagnetic modes as well as solitary bipolar pulses (electron holes). It is noted that all wave modes can be generated by approx. 100 eV to approx. 10 keV auroral electrons and protons. We will review wave-particle interactions, with focus on cross-diffusion rates and the contributions of such interactions toward the formation of the boundary layer. In summary, we will present a scenario where the global solar wind-magnetosphere interaction is responsible for the auroral zone particle beams, and hence for the generation of plasma waves and the formation of the boundary layer. It is speculated that all planetary magnetospheres will have boundary layers and they will be characterized by similar currents and plasma wave modes.

  10. Survey of Galileo plasma observations in Jupiter's plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagenal, Fran; Wilson, Robert J.; Siler, Scott; Paterson, William R.; Kurth, William S.

    2016-05-01

    The plasma science (PLS) instrument on the Galileo spacecraft (orbiting Jupiter from December 1995 to September 2003) measured properties of the ions that were trapped in the magnetic field. The PLS data provide a survey of the plasma properties between ~5 and 30 Jupiter radii (RJ) in the equatorial region. We present plasma properties derived via two analysis methods: numerical moments and forward modeling. We find that the density decreases with radial distance by nearly 5 orders of magnitude from ~2 to 3000 cm-3 at 6 RJ to ~0.05 cm-3 at 30 RJ. The density profile did not show major changes from orbit to orbit, suggesting that the plasma production and transport remained constant within about a factor of 2. The radial profile of ion temperature increased with distance which implied that contrary to the concept of adiabatic cooling on expansion, the plasma heats up as it expands out from Io's orbit (where Ti ~ 60-80 eV) at ~6 RJ to a few keV at 30 RJ. There does not seem to be a long-term, systematic variation in ion temperature with either local time or longitude. This latter finding differs from earlier analysis of Galileo PLS data from a selection of orbits. Further examination of all data from all Galileo orbits suggests that System III variations are transitory on timescales of weeks, consistent with the modeling of Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph observations. The plasma flow is dominated by azimuthal flow that is between 80% and 100% of corotation out to 25 RJ.

  11. Eulerian simulations of collisional effects on electrostatic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Perrone, Denise; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2013-09-15

    The problem of collisions in a plasma is a wide subject with a huge historical literature. In fact, the description of realistic plasmas is a tough problem to attack, both from the theoretical and the numerical point of view. In this paper, a Eulerian time-splitting algorithm for the study of the propagation of electrostatic waves in collisional plasmas is presented. Collisions are modeled through one-dimensional operators of the Fokker-Planck type, both in linear and nonlinear forms. The accuracy of the numerical code is discussed by comparing the numerical results to the analytical predictions obtained in some limit cases when trying to evaluate the effects of collisions in the phenomenon of wave plasma echo and collisional dissipation of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal waves. Particular attention is devoted to the study of the nonlinear Dougherty collisional operator, recently used to describe the collisional dissipation of electron plasma waves in a pure electron plasma column [M. W. Anderson and T. M. O'Neil, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112110 (2007)]. Finally, for the study of collisional plasmas, a recipe to set the simulation parameters in order to prevent the filamentation problem can be provided, by exploiting the property of velocity diffusion operators to smooth out small velocity scales.

  12. Eulerian simulations of collisional effects on electrostatic plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Perrone, Denise; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2013-09-01

    The problem of collisions in a plasma is a wide subject with a huge historical literature. In fact, the description of realistic plasmas is a tough problem to attack, both from the theoretical and the numerical point of view. In this paper, a Eulerian time-splitting algorithm for the study of the propagation of electrostatic waves in collisional plasmas is presented. Collisions are modeled through one-dimensional operators of the Fokker-Planck type, both in linear and nonlinear forms. The accuracy of the numerical code is discussed by comparing the numerical results to the analytical predictions obtained in some limit cases when trying to evaluate the effects of collisions in the phenomenon of wave plasma echo and collisional dissipation of Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal waves. Particular attention is devoted to the study of the nonlinear Dougherty collisional operator, recently used to describe the collisional dissipation of electron plasma waves in a pure electron plasma column [M. W. Anderson and T. M. O'Neil, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112110 (2007)]. Finally, for the study of collisional plasmas, a recipe to set the simulation parameters in order to prevent the filamentation problem can be provided, by exploiting the property of velocity diffusion operators to smooth out small velocity scales.

  13. Large-amplitude circularly polarized electromagnetic waves in magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vasko, I. Y. Artemyev, A. V.; Zelenyi, L. M.

    2014-05-15

    We consider large-amplitude circularly polarized (LACP) waves propagating in a magnetized plasma. It is well-known that the dispersion relation for such waves coincides with the dispersion relation given by the linear theory. We develop the model of LACP wave containing a finite population of Cerenkov resonant particles. We find that the current of resonant particles modifies the linear dispersion relation. Dispersion curves of low-frequency (i.e., whistler and magnetosonic) waves are shifted toward larger values of the wave vector, i.e., waves with arbitrarily large wavelengths do not exist in this case. Dispersion curves of high-frequency waves are modified so that the wave phase velocity becomes smaller than the speed of light.

  14. Solitary versus shock wave acceleration in laser-plasma interactions.

    PubMed

    Macchi, Andrea; Nindrayog, Amritpal Singh; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2012-04-01

    The excitation of nonlinear electrostatic waves, such as shock and solitons, by ultraintense laser interaction with overdense plasmas and related ion acceleration are investigated by numerical simulations. Stability of solitons and formation of shock waves is strongly dependent on the velocity distribution of ions. Monoenergetic components in ion spectra are produced by "pulsed" reflection from solitary waves. Possible relevance to recent experiments on "shock acceleration" is discussed. PMID:22680581

  15. Interaction between whistler waves and ion-cyclotron waves in magnetospheric plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Taranenko, Y.N.; Chmyrev, V.M.

    1986-11-01

    The authors have analyzed accurate solutions of a system of abbreviated equations which describe the decay interaction of whistler waves with ion-cyclotron waves in magnetospheric plasma. The equations allow for longitudinal and transverse drift of wave packets. As a result of this analysis, they show that the modulation period of a whistle which is received near the earth's surface is determined by the velocity of the ion-cyclotron waves and by the magnitude of the initial signal amplitude.

  16. Excitation, propagation and damping of helicon waves in a high density, low temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caneses, J. F.; Blackwell, B. D.

    2015-11-01

    The MAGnetized Plasma Interaction Experiment (MAGPIE) is a helicon linear plasma device built to study fusion relevant plasma-surface interactions. In this work, we investigate helicon wave propagation in high density (1018-1019 m-3) low temperature (2-4 eV) magnetized (50-200 G) hydrogen plasma produced by a half-helical antenna operated at 7 MHz and 20 kW. Using the cold dielectric tensor with collisional terms (electron-neutral and Coulomb), helicon wave damping is calculated along the length of MAGPIE using a WKB approximation. Comparison with experiment indicates that wave damping, under these conditions, is entirely collisional. Numerical results from a fully electromagnetic wave code and 2D wavefield measurements indicate that helicon waves are excited at the plasma edge by the antenna's transverse current straps while the helical straps play a secondary role. These waves propagate towards the center of the discharge along the whistler wave ray direction (19 degrees to the background magnetic field), interfere on-axis and form the axial interference pattern commonly observed in helicon devices.

  17. Gradient instabilities of electromagnetic waves in Hall thruster plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tomilin, Dmitry

    2013-04-15

    This paper presents a linear analysis of gradient plasma instabilities in Hall thrusters. The study obtains and analyzes the dispersion equation of high-frequency electromagnetic waves based on the two-fluid model of a cold plasma. The regions of parameters corresponding to unstable high frequency modes are determined and the dependence of the increments and intrinsic frequencies on plasma parameters is obtained. The obtained results agree with those of previously published studies.

  18. Method of accelerating photons by a relativistic plasma wave

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John M.; Wilks, Scott C.

    1990-01-01

    Photons of a laser pulse have their group velocity accelerated in a plasma as they are placed on a downward density gradient of a plasma wave of which the phase velocity nearly matches the group velocity of the photons. This acceleration results in a frequency upshift. If the unperturbed plasma has a slight density gradient in the direction of propagation, the photon frequencies can be continuously upshifted to significantly greater values.

  19. Interference patterns in the Spacelab 2 plasma wave data - oblique electrostatic waves generated by the electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Wei; Gurnett, D.A.; Cairns, I.H. )

    1992-11-01

    During the Spacelab 2 mission the University of Iowa's Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) explored the plasma environment around the shuttle. Wideband spectrograms of plasma waves were obtained from the PDP at frequencies of 0-30 kHz and at distances up to 400 m from the shuttle. Strong low-frequency (below 10 kHz) electric field noise was observed in the wideband data during two periods in which an electron beam was ejected from the shuttle. This noise shows clear evidence of interference patterns caused by the finite (3.89 m) antenna length. The low-frequency noise was the most dominant type of noise produced by the ejected electron beam. Analysis of antenna interference patterns generated by these waves permits a determination of the wavelength, the direction of propagation, and the location of the source region. The observed waves have a linear dispersion relation very similar to that of ion acoustic waves. The waves are believed to be oblique ion acoustic or high-order ion cyclotron waves generated by a current of ambient electrons returning to the shuttle in response to the ejected electron beam. 31 refs.

  20. Interference patterns in the Spacelab 2 plasma wave data - Oblique electrostatic waves generated by the electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Wei; Gurnett, Donald A.; Cairns, Iver H.

    1992-01-01

    During the Spacelab 2 mission the University of Iowa's Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) explored the plasma environment around the shuttle. Wideband spectrograms of plasma waves were obtained from the PDP at frequencies of 0-30 kHz and at distances up to 400 m from the shuttle. Strong low-frequency (below 10 kHz) electric field noise was observed in the wideband data during two periods in which an electron beam was ejected from the shuttle. This noise shows clear evidence of interference patterns caused by the finite (3.89 m) antenna length. The low-frequency noise was the most dominant type of noise produced by the ejected electron beam. Analysis of antenna interference patterns generated by these waves permits a determination of the wavelength, the direction of propagation, and the location of the source region. The observed waves have a linear dispersion relation very similar to that of ion acoustic waves. The waves are believed to be oblique ion acoustic or high-order ion cyclotron waves generated by a current of ambient electrons returning to the shuttle in response to the ejected electron beam.

  1. Intense plasma waves at and near the solar wind termination shock.

    PubMed

    Gurnett, D A; Kurth, W S

    2008-07-01

    Plasma waves are a characteristic feature of shocks in plasmas, and are produced by non-thermal particle distributions that develop in the shock transition layer. The electric fields of these waves have a key role in dissipating energy in the shock and driving the particle distributions back towards thermal equilibrium. Here we report the detection of intense plasma-wave electric fields at the solar wind termination shock. The observations were obtained from the plasma-wave instrument on the Voyager 2 spacecraft. The first evidence of the approach to the shock was the detection of upstream electron plasma oscillations on 1 August 2007 at a heliocentric radial distance of 83.4 au (1 au is the Earth-Sun distance). These narrowband oscillations continued intermittently for about a month until, starting on 31 August 2007 and ending on 1 September 2007, a series of intense bursts of broadband electrostatic waves signalled a series of crossings of the termination shock at a heliocentric radial distance of 83.7 au. The spectrum of these waves is quantitatively similar to those observed at bow shocks upstream of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune.

  2. Intense plasma waves at and near the solar wind termination shock.

    PubMed

    Gurnett, D A; Kurth, W S

    2008-07-01

    Plasma waves are a characteristic feature of shocks in plasmas, and are produced by non-thermal particle distributions that develop in the shock transition layer. The electric fields of these waves have a key role in dissipating energy in the shock and driving the particle distributions back towards thermal equilibrium. Here we report the detection of intense plasma-wave electric fields at the solar wind termination shock. The observations were obtained from the plasma-wave instrument on the Voyager 2 spacecraft. The first evidence of the approach to the shock was the detection of upstream electron plasma oscillations on 1 August 2007 at a heliocentric radial distance of 83.4 au (1 au is the Earth-Sun distance). These narrowband oscillations continued intermittently for about a month until, starting on 31 August 2007 and ending on 1 September 2007, a series of intense bursts of broadband electrostatic waves signalled a series of crossings of the termination shock at a heliocentric radial distance of 83.7 au. The spectrum of these waves is quantitatively similar to those observed at bow shocks upstream of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. PMID:18596804

  3. Simulation Study of Surface and Body Waves in a Magnetized Bounded Plasma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Dilruba

    The problem of wave propagation in a magnetized plasma slab has been studied by particle simulation of plasma. In our model, a warm homogeneous plasma slab is bounded by vacuum on two sides. Using a 2-D electrostatic particle code, we simulated two different cases. For the sharp boundary case with wave propagation perpendicular to the external field, two branches of surface waves are found to exist. A theoretical analysis showed that the discreteness of the modes is due to the quantization condition imposed by the boundary. A generalized surface mode which is damped in time appears below the second cyclotron harmonic and it is found that by specifying the complex frequency in the Bernstein wave dispersion relation, the wavelength and attenuation in the direction normal to the slab is predicted accurately. Short time scale phase mixing, damping and recurrence phenomena of Bernstein body modes are also observed. Oblique propagation of the waves are studied by the magnetic field perpendicular to the plasma -vacuum interface. For the free boundary model, the confinement is provided by fixed ion plus the magnetic field. Wave propagation was studied with and without an external magnetic field applied parallel to the slab boundaries. Among the interesting features observed in the case is a continuous spectrum with long wavelength parallel to the boundary (k _{y}lambda_{de} = 0). Transition layer effect is studied and compared with the rigid wall. The dispersion characteristics of the body wave spectrum remain unchanged. They also show the same type of initial phase mixing, damping and recurrence phenomena as for the sharp boundary. The surface wave spectrum shows remarkable differences. The cold plasma surface modes appear nearly at the same frequency. A very low frequency oscillation localized within the transition layer is also observed for all the two-dimensional modes. For the case of the unmagnetized plasma, only a discrete set of body waves appear above the plasma

  4. Wave-particle interactions induced by SEPAC on Spacelab 1 Wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W. W. L.; Obayashi, T.; Kawashima, N.; Sasaki, S.; Yanagisawa, M.; Burch, J. L.; Reasoner, D. L.; Roberts, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    Space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC) flew on Spacelab 1 in November and December 1983. SEPAC included an accelerator which emitted electrons into the ionospheric plasma with energies up to 5 keV and currents up to 300 mA. The SEPAC equipment also included an energetic plasma generator, a neutral gas generator, and an extensive array of diagnostics. The diagnostics included plasma wave detectors, and energetic electron analyzer, a photometer, a high sensitivity television camera, a Langmuir probe and a pressure gage. Twenty-eight experiments were performed during the mission to investigate beam-plasma interactions, electron beam dynamics, plasma beam propagation, and vehicle charging. The wave-particle interactions were monitored by the plasma wave instrumentation, by the energetic electron detector and by the optical detectors. All show evidence of wave-particle interactions, which are described in this paper.

  5. Fractional resonances between waves and energetic particles in tokamak plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kramer, G J; Chen, L; Fisher, R K; Heidbrink, W W; Nazikian, R; Pace, D C; Van Zeeland, M A

    2012-07-20

    From numerical simulation and analytical modeling it is shown that fast ions can resonate with plasma waves at fractional values of the particle drift-orbit transit frequency when the plasma wave amplitude is sufficiently large. The fractional resonances, which are caused by a nonlinear interaction between the particle orbit and the wave, give rise to an increased density of resonances in phase space which reduces the threshold for stochastic transport. The effects of the fractional resonances on spatial and energy transport are illustrated for an energetic particle geodesic acoustic mode but they apply equally well to other types of MHD activity.

  6. Ion temperature in plasmas with intrinsic Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C. S.; Yoon, P. H.; Wang, C. B.

    2014-10-15

    This Brief Communication clarifies the physics of non-resonant heating of protons by low-frequency Alfvenic turbulence. On the basis of general definition for wave energy density in plasmas, it is shown that the wave magnetic field energy is equivalent to the kinetic energy density of the ions, whose motion is induced by the wave magnetic field, thus providing a self-consistent description of the non-resonant heating by Alfvenic turbulence. Although the study is motivated by the research on the solar corona, the present discussion is only concerned with the plasma physics of the heating process.

  7. Wave propagation in a quasi-chemical equilibrium plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, T.-M.; Baum, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Wave propagation in a quasi-chemical equilibrium plasma is studied. The plasma is infinite and without external fields. The chemical reactions are assumed to result from the ionization and recombination processes. When the gas is near equilibrium, the dominant role describing the evolution of a reacting plasma is played by the global conservation equations. These equations are first derived and then used to study the small amplitude wave motion for a near-equilibrium situation. Nontrivial damping effects have been obtained by including the conduction current terms.

  8. Cluster observations of surface waves in the ion jets from magnetotail reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lei; Wygant, John R.; Cattell, C.; Dombeck, J.; Thaller, Scott; Mouikis, Chris; Balogh, A.; Rème, H.

    2011-12-01

    We present a Cluster spacecraft investigation of plasma sheet-confined waves and the associated Poynting flux in strong ion jets near a reconnection region in the geomagnetic tail at ˜-17 Re. Using phase lag analysis, we determine from multispacecraft measurements the phase front, wavelength, and phase velocity of the waves with spacecraft frame frequencies from 0.03 Hz to 1 Hz. The wave phase velocities were found to be directed nearly perpendicular to the local magnetic field laying in the plasma sheet plane. The strong evidence that the waves were driven by ion velocity shears has been provided. The waves are confined by the plasma sheet and their amplitude diminishes in the tail lobes. The δE/δB ratios are mostly on the order of the Alfven speed. The observed wave characteristics are different from plasma sheet flapping observed at the same time. The field-aligned Poynting flux was found to be directed away from the reconnection region. The values of earthward Poynting flux (100 ergs/cm2s or 0.1 W/m2) and longitudinal scales (10-100 km) mapped to the auroral ionosphere suggest that the observed waves may provide energy needed to accelerate auroral particles and may drive observed motions in auroral curls.

  9. Evidence for Nonlinear Langmuir Wave Behavior in the Earth's foreshock: Cluster Observations and Instrumental Concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigsbee, K.; Kletzing, C. A.; Pickett, J. S.; Schwartz, S. J.; Lefebvre, B.; Lucek, E.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Kucharek, H.

    2008-12-01

    Langmuir wave characteristics in the Earth's foreshock were examined to identify possible nonlinear wave behavior for two case studies. The occurrence rates of four types of power spectra near the foreshock edge were determined: (1) spectra with power at the local plasma frequency fpe only, (2) spectra with power at fpe and 2fpe, (3) spectra with double peaks near fpe, and (4) spectra with double peaks near fpe and peaks at low frequencies indicative of ion acoustic waves. The wave amplitudes from the Cluster WBD Plasma Wave Receiver and PEACE electron distributions were more consistent with three-wave electrostatic decay processes than modulational instabilities. However, only a few spectra had both the double peaks near fpe and ion acoustic waves needed for these three-wave interactions. According to theoretical studies, transverse electromagnetic waves at roughly twice the local plasma frequency 2fpe can be generated if beam-driven Langmuir waves coalesce with backscattered Langmuir waves that result from electrostatic decay processes. However, we found that in the Cluster data set, most harmonics are caused by instrumental effects. This suggests that past studies of harmonic generation based on observations of weak harmonics may be questionable.

  10. Nonlinear interactions between electromagnetic waves and electron plasma oscillations in quantum plasmas.

    PubMed

    Shukla, P K; Eliasson, B

    2007-08-31

    We consider nonlinear interactions between intense circularly polarized electromagnetic (CPEM) waves and electron plasma oscillations (EPOs) in a dense quantum plasma, taking into account the electron density response in the presence of the relativistic ponderomotive force and mass increase in the CPEM wave fields. The dynamics of the CPEM waves and EPOs is governed by the two coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations and Poisson's equation. The nonlinear equations admit the modulational instability of an intense CPEM pump wave against EPOs, leading to the formation and trapping of localized CPEM wave pipes in the electron density hole that is associated with a positive potential distribution in our dense plasma. The relevance of our investigation to the next generation intense laser-solid density plasma interaction experiments is discussed.

  11. High amplitude waves in the expanding solar wind plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J. M.; Velli, M.; Grappin, R.

    1996-07-20

    We simulated the 1 D nonlinear time-evolution of high-amplitude Alfven, slow and fast magnetoacustic waves in the solar wind propagating outward at different angles to the mean magnetic (spiral) field, using the expanding box model. The simulation results for Alfven waves and fast magnetoacustic waves fit the observational constraints in the solar wind best, showing decreasing trends for energies and other rms-quantities due to expansion and the appearance of inward propagating waves as minor species in the wind. Inward propagating waves are generated by reflection of Alfven waves propagating at large angles to the magnetic field or they coincide with the occurrence of compressible fluctuations. It is the generation of sound due to ponderomotive forces of the Alfven wave which we can detect in the latter case. For slow magnetoacustic waves we find a kind of oscillation of the character of the wave between a sound wave and an Alfven wave. This is the more, the slow magnetoacustic wave is close to a sound wave in the beginning. On the other hand, fast magnetoacustic waves are much more dissipated than the other wave-types and their general behaviour is close to the Alfven. The normalized cross-helicity {sigma}{sub c} is close to one for Alfven-waves and this quantity is decreasing slightly when density-fluctuations are generated. {sigma}{sub c} decreases significantly when the waves are close to perpendicular propagation. Then, the waves are close to quasi-static structures.

  12. Stimulation of plasma waves by electron guns on the ISEE-1 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebreton, J.-P.; Torbert, R.; Anderson, R.; Harvey, C.

    1982-01-01

    The results of the ISEE-1 satellite experiment relating to observations of the waves stimulated during electron injections, when the spacecraft is passing through the magnetosphere, the magnetosheath, and the solar wind, are discussed. It is shown that the injection of an electron beam current of the order of 10 to 60 microamperes with energies ranging from 0 to 40 eV produces enhancements in the electric wave spectrum. An attempt has been made to identify the low-frequency electrostatic wave observed below the ion plasma frequency as an ion acoustic mode, although the excitation mechanism is not clear. A coupling mechanism between the electron plasma mode and streaming electrons with energies higher than the thermal speed of the cold electron population has been proposed to explain the observations above the electron plasma frequency.

  13. MESSENGER Orbital Observations of Large-Amplitude Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves at Mercury's Magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundberg, Torbjorn; Boardsen, Scott A.; Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Raines, Jim M.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-01-01

    We present a survey of Kelvi\\ n-Helmholtz (KH) waves at Mercury's magnetopause during MESSENGER's first Mercury year in orb it. The waves were identified on the basis of the well-established sawtooth wave signatures that are associated with non-linear KH vortices at the magnetopause. MESSENGER frequently observed such KH waves in the dayside region of the magnetosphere where the magnetosheath flow velocity is still sub -sonic, which implies that instability growth rates at Mercury's magnetopau are much larger than at Earth. We attribute these greater rates to the limited wave energy dissipation in Mercury's highly resistive regolith. The wave amplitude was often on the order of ' 00 nT or more, and the wave periods were - 10- 20 s. A clear dawn-dusk asymmetry is present in the data, in that all of the observed wave events occurred in the post-noon and dusk-side sectors of the magnetopause. This asymmetry is like ly related to finite Larmor-radius effects and is in agreement with results from particle-in-cell simulations of the instability. The waves were observed almost exclusively during periods when the north-south component of the magnetosheath magnetic field was northward, a pattern similar to that for most terrestrial KH wave events. Accompanying plasma measurements show that the waves were associated with the transport of magnetosheath plasma into the magnetosphere.

  14. Electromagnetic envelope solitary waves with transverse perturbation in a plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Borhanian, J.

    2013-04-15

    The system of fluid-Maxwell equations governing the two-dimensional dynamics of electromagnetic waves in a plasma is analyzed by means of multiple scale perturbation method. It is shown that the evolution of the amplitude of wave field is governed by a two-dimensional nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The stability of bright envelope solitons is studied using the variational method. It is found that the development of transverse periodic perturbations on bright solitons is faster for a plasma with near critical density. Dynamics of electromagnetic bright solitons is investigated in the long-wave approximation. Our model predicts the appearance of collapse of electromagnetic waves in plasmas and describes the collapse dynamics at initial stages.

  15. MAVEN observation of an obliquely propagating low-frequency wave upstream of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhunusiri, Suranga; Halekas, J. S.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J. R.; McFadden, J. P.; Mazelle, C.; Brain, D.; Collinson, G.; Harada, Y.; Larson, D. E.; Mitchell, D. L.; Livi, R.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-03-01

    We report Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN mission observations of a large amplitude low-frequency plasma wave that propagated oblique to the ambient magnetic field upstream of Mars along with a non-solar-wind plasma component that had a flow velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field. We consider nine possibilities for this wave that include various combinations of its propagation direction, polarization in the solar wind frame, and ion source responsible for its generation. Using the observed wave parameters and the measured plasma parameters as constraints, we uniquely identify the wave by systematically discarding these possibilities. We determine that the wave is a right-hand polarized wave that propagated upstream in the solar wind frame. We find two possibilities for the ion source that can be responsible for this wave generation. They are either newly born pickup protons or reflected solar wind protons from the bow shock. We determine that the observed non-solar-wind component is not responsible for the wave generation, and it is likely that the non-solar-wind component was merely perturbed by the passage of the wave.

  16. Low-Frequency Waves in Cold Three-Component Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qiang; Tang, Ying; Zhao, Jinsong; Lu, Jianyong

    2016-09-01

    The dispersion relation and electromagnetic polarization of the plasma waves are comprehensively studied in cold electron, proton, and heavy charged particle plasmas. Three modes are classified as the fast, intermediate, and slow mode waves according to different phase velocities. When plasmas contain positively-charged particles, the fast and intermediate modes can interact at the small propagating angles, whereas the two modes are separate at the large propagating angles. The near-parallel intermediate and slow waves experience the linear polarization, circular polarization, and linear polarization again, with the increasing wave number. The wave number regime corresponding to the above circular polarization shrinks as the propagating angle increases. Moreover, the fast and intermediate modes cause the reverse change of the electromagnetic polarization at the special wave number. While the heavy particles carry the negative charges, the dispersion relations of the fast and intermediate modes are always separate, being independent of the propagating angles. Furthermore, this study gives new expressions of the three resonance frequencies corresponding to the highly-oblique propagation waves in the general three-component plasmas, and shows the dependence of the resonance frequencies on the propagating angle, the concentration of the heavy particle, and the mass ratio among different kinds of particles. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11303099, 41531071 and 41574158), and the Youth Innovation Promotion Association CAS

  17. Self-excited dust-acoustic waves in an electron-depleted nanodusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tadsen, Benjamin Greiner, Franko; Groth, Sebastian; Piel, Alexander

    2015-11-15

    A dust density wave field is observed in a cloud of nanodust particles confined in a radio frequency plasma. Simultaneous measurements of the dust properties, grain size and density, as well as the wave parameters, frequency and wave number, allow for an estimate of the ion density, ion drift velocity, and the dust charge using a hybrid model for the wave dispersion. It appears that the charge on the dust grains in the cloud is drastically reduced to tens of elementary charges compared with isolated dust particles in a plasma. The charge is much higher at the cloud's periphery, i.e., towards the void in the plasma center and also towards the outer edge of the cloud.

  18. Constraining the braneworld with gravitational wave observations.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Sean T

    2010-04-01

    Some braneworld models may have observable consequences that, if detected, would validate a requisite element of string theory. In the infinite Randall-Sundrum model (RS2), the AdS radius of curvature, l, of the extra dimension supports a single bound state of the massless graviton on the brane, thereby reproducing Newtonian gravity in the weak-field limit. However, using the AdS/CFT correspondence, it has been suggested that one possible consequence of RS2 is an enormous increase in Hawking radiation emitted by black holes. We utilize this possibility to derive two novel methods for constraining l via gravitational wave measurements. We show that the EMRI event rate detected by LISA can constrain l at the approximately 1 microm level for optimal cases, while the observation of a single galactic black hole binary with LISA results in an optimal constraint of l < or = 5 microm. PMID:20481929

  19. Solar Flare Observations at Submm-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, P.; Raulin, J.-P.; Correia, E.; Costa, J. E. R.; Guillermo, C.; de Castro, Giménez; Silva, A. V. R.; Levato, H.; Rovira, M.; Mandrini, C.; Fernández-Borda, R.; Bauer, O.

    We report on the recent installation of the new Solar Submillimeter Telescope(SST) at the El Leoncito site, located in the Argentinean Andes, and also show first observational results. The instrument consists of a radome-enclosed 1.5-m cassegrain reflector and a system of two radiometers at 405 GHz and four at 212 GHz. The SST observes the quiet Sun and solar bursts simultaneously at both submillimeter-wave frequencies with a sampling rate of 1 millisecond. Since SST has seen the "first light" in May 1999, nearly 45 hours of continuous tracking of solar active regions were collected during short campaigns which produced first evidence for solar activity. The project has been funded by the Brazilian agency FAPESP, receiving support from the Argentinean agency CONICET through their institutes CASLEO and IAFE and from IAP, University of Bern and the Swiss National Science Foundation.

  20. Nonlinear interaction of dispersive Alfven waves and magnetosonic waves in space plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R. P.; Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, H. D.

    2009-03-15

    This paper presents the model equations governing the nonlinear interaction between dispersive Alfven wave (DAW) and magnetosonic wave in the low-{beta} plasmas ({beta}<waves) applicable to solar corona and intermediate-{beta} plasmas (m{sub e}/m{sub i}<<{beta}<<1; known as kinetic Alfven waves) applicable to solar wind in Earth's magnetosphere. When the ponderomotive nonlinearities are incorporated in the DAW dynamics, the model equations of DAW and magnetosonic wave turn out to be a modified Zakharov system of equations. Numerical solution of the problem has been obtained when the incident pump kinetic Alfven wave/inertial Alfven wave is having a small perturbation.

  1. Wave merging mechanism: formation of low-frequency Alfven and magnetosonic waves in cosmic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tishchenko, V N; Shaikhislamov, I F

    2014-02-28

    We investigate the merging mechanism for the waves produced by a pulsating cosmic plasma source. A model with a separate background/source description is used in our calculations. The mechanism was shown to operate both for strong and weak source – background interactions. We revealed the effect of merging of individual Alfven waves into a narrow low-frequency wave, whose amplitude is maximal for a plasma expansion velocity equal to 0.5 – 1 of the Alfven Mach number. This wave is followed along the field by a narrow low-frequency magnetosonic wave, which contains the bulk of source energy. For low expansion velocities the wave contains background and source particles, but for high velocities it contains only the background particles. The wave lengths are much greater than their transverse dimension. (letters)

  2. The Nonlinear Coupling of Alfven and Lower Hybrid Waves in Space Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.

    2004-01-01

    Space plasmas support a wide variety of waves, and wave-particle interactions as well as wave-wave interactions which are of crucial importance to magnetospheric and ionospheric plasma behavior. The excitation of lower hybrid waves (LHWs) in particular is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. It is demonstrated that large-amplitude Alfven waves may generate LHWs in the auroral zone and ring current region and in some cases (particularly in the inner magnetosphere) this serves as the Alfven wave saturation mechanism. We present several examples of observational data which illustrate that the proposed mechanism is a plausible candidate to explain certain classes of LHW generation events in the ionosphere and magnetosphere and demonstrate electron and ion energization involving these processes. We discuss the morphology dynamics and level of LHW activity generated by electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves during the May 2-7 1998 storm period on the global scale. The LHWs were calculated based on a newly developed self-consistent model (Khazanov et. al. 2002) that couples the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current (RC) ion dynamic and another equation describes the evolution of EMIC waves. It is found that the LHWs are excited by helium ions due to their mass dependent drift in the electric field of EMIC waves. The level of LHW activity is calculated assuming that the induced scattering process is the main saturation mechanism for these waves. The calculated LHWs electric fields are consistent with the observational data.

  3. Terahertz generation by beating two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Qiao, Xin; Cheng, Li-Hong; Tang, Rong-An; Zhang, Ai-Xia; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2015-09-15

    Terahertz (THz) radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma is discussed theoretically. The critical angle between the two Langmuir waves and the critical wave-length (wave vector) of Langmuir waves for generating THz radiation are obtained analytically. Furthermore, the maximum radiation energy is obtained. We find that the critical angle, the critical wave-length, and the generated radiation energy strongly depend on plasma temperature and wave-length of the Langmuir waves. That is, the THz radiation generated by beating of two Langmuir waves in a warm and collisional plasma can be controlled by adjusting the plasma temperature and the Langmuir wave-length.

  4. A morphological study of waves in the thermosphere using DE-2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, S. H.; Kuo, S. P.; Shmoys, J.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical model and data analysis of DE-2 observations for determining the correlation between the neutral wave activity and plasma irregularities have been presented. The relationships between the observed structure of the sources, precipitation and joule heating, and the fluctuations in neutral and plasma parameters are obtained by analyzing two measurements of neutral atmospheric wave activity and plasma irregularities by DE-2 during perigee passes at an altitude on the order of 300 to 350 km over the polar cap. A theoretical model based on thermal nonlinearity (joule heating) to give mode-mode coupling is developed to explore the role of neutral disturbance (winds and gravity waves) on the generation of plasma irregularities.

  5. Plasma wave instabilities in nonequilibrium graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Chinta M.; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2016-09-01

    We study two-stream instabilities in a nonequilibrium system in which a stream of electrons is injected into doped graphene. As with equivalent nonequilibrium parabolic band systems, we find that the graphene systems can support unstable charge-density waves whose amplitudes grow with time. We determine the range of wave vectors q that are unstable, and their growth rates. We find no instability for waves with wave vectors parallel or perpendicular to the direction of the injected carriers. We find that, within the small-wave-vector approximation, the angle between q and the direction of the injected electrons that maximizes the growth rate increases with increasing |q | . We compare the range and strength of the instability in graphene to that of two- and three-dimensional parabolic band systems.

  6. Nonlinear nonresonant forces by radio-frequency waves in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Zhe; Fisch, Nathaniel J.; Qin, Hong; Myra, J. R.

    2007-08-15

    Nonresonant forces by applied rf waves in plasmas are analyzed. Along the background dc magnetic field, the force arises from the gradient of the ponderomotive potential. Only when the dc magnetic field is straight, however, is this parallel force completely consistent with that from the single particle picture, where the ponderomotive force depends on the gradients of rf fields only. Across the dc magnetic field, besides the ponderomotive force from the particle picture, additional Reynolds stress and polarization stress contribute to the total force. For waves with frequency much lower than the cyclotron frequency, the perpendicular forces from the particle and fluid pictures can have opposite signs. In plasmas with a symmetry angle (e.g., toroidal systems), nonresonant forces cannot drive net flow or current in the flux surface, but the radial force may influence macroscopic behavior of plasma. Moreover, nonresonant forces may drive flow or current in linear plasmas or in a localized region of toroidal plasmas.

  7. Parametric decay of an extraordinary electromagnetic wave in relativistic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dorofeenko, V. G.; Krasovitskiy, V. B.; Turikov, V. A.

    2015-03-15

    Parametric instability of an extraordinary electromagnetic wave in plasma preheated to a relativistic temperature is considered. A set of self-similar nonlinear differential equations taking into account the electron “thermal” mass is derived and investigated. Small perturbations of the parameters of the heated plasma are analyzed in the linear approximation by using the dispersion relation determining the phase velocities of the fast and slow extraordinary waves. In contrast to cold plasma, the evanescence zone in the frequency range above the electron upper hybrid frequency vanishes and the asymptotes of both branches converge. Theoretical analysis of the set of nonlinear equations shows that the growth rate of decay instability increases with increasing initial temperature of plasma electrons. This result is qualitatively confirmed by numerical simulations of plasma heating by a laser pulse injected from vacuum.

  8. Parametric decay of an extraordinary electromagnetic wave in relativistic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorofeenko, V. G.; Krasovitskiy, V. B.; Turikov, V. A.

    2015-03-01

    Parametric instability of an extraordinary electromagnetic wave in plasma preheated to a relativistic temperature is considered. A set of self-similar nonlinear differential equations taking into account the electron "thermal" mass is derived and investigated. Small perturbations of the parameters of the heated plasma are analyzed in the linear approximation by using the dispersion relation determining the phase velocities of the fast and slow extraordinary waves. In contrast to cold plasma, the evanescence zone in the frequency range above the electron upper hybrid frequency vanishes and the asymptotes of both branches converge. Theoretical analysis of the set of nonlinear equations shows that the growth rate of decay instability increases with increasing initial temperature of plasma electrons. This result is qualitatively confirmed by numerical simulations of plasma heating by a laser pulse injected from vacuum.

  9. Observation and Control of Hamiltonian Chaos in Wave-particle Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Doveil, F.; Ruzzon, A.; Elskens, Y.

    2010-11-23

    Wave-particle interactions are central in plasma physics. The paradigm beam-plasma system can be advantageously replaced by a traveling wave tube (TWT) to allow their study in a much less noisy environment. This led to detailed analysis of the self-consistent interaction between unstable waves and an either cold or warm electron beam. More recently a test cold beam has been used to observe its interaction with externally excited wave(s). This allowed observing the main features of Hamiltonian chaos and testing a new method to efficiently channel chaotic transport in phase space. To simulate accurately and efficiently the particle dynamics in the TWT and other 1D particle-wave systems, a new symplectic, symmetric, second order numerical algorithm is developed, using particle position as the independent variable, with a fixed spatial step.This contribution reviews: presentation of the TWT and its connection to plasma physics, resonant interaction of a charged particle in electrostatic waves, observation of particle trapping and transition to chaos, test of control of chaos, and description of the simulation algorithm.The velocity distribution function of the electron beam is recorded with a trochoidal energy analyzer at the output of the TWT. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the 4m long helix of the TWT. The nonlinear synchronization of particles by a single wave, responsible for Landau damping, is observed. We explore the resonant velocity domain associated with a single wave as well as the transition to large scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap. This transition exhibits a devil's staircase behavior when increasing the excitation level in agreement with numerical simulation.A new strategy for control of chaos by building barriers of transport in phase space as well as its robustness is successfully tested. The underlying concepts extend far beyond the field of

  10. Observation and Control of Hamiltonian Chaos in Wave-particle Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doveil, F.; Elskens, Y.; Ruzzon, A.

    2010-11-01

    Wave-particle interactions are central in plasma physics. The paradigm beam-plasma system can be advantageously replaced by a traveling wave tube (TWT) to allow their study in a much less noisy environment. This led to detailed analysis of the self-consistent interaction between unstable waves and an either cold or warm electron beam. More recently a test cold beam has been used to observe its interaction with externally excited wave(s). This allowed observing the main features of Hamiltonian chaos and testing a new method to efficiently channel chaotic transport in phase space. To simulate accurately and efficiently the particle dynamics in the TWT and other 1D particle-wave systems, a new symplectic, symmetric, second order numerical algorithm is developed, using particle position as the independent variable, with a fixed spatial step. This contribution reviews : presentation of the TWT and its connection to plasma physics, resonant interaction of a charged particle in electrostatic waves, observation of particle trapping and transition to chaos, test of control of chaos, and description of the simulation algorithm. The velocity distribution function of the electron beam is recorded with a trochoidal energy analyzer at the output of the TWT. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the 4m long helix of the TWT. The nonlinear synchronization of particles by a single wave, responsible for Landau damping, is observed. We explore the resonant velocity domain associated with a single wave as well as the transition to large scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap. This transition exhibits a devil's staircase behavior when increasing the excitation level in agreement with numerical simulation. A new strategy for control of chaos by building barriers of transport in phase space as well as its robustness is successfully tested. The underlying concepts extend far beyond the

  11. Analysis and experiments of a whistler-wave plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, E.B.; Ferguson, S.W.; Makowski, M.A.; Stallard, B.W.; Power, J.L.

    1993-08-06

    A plasma thruster operating at high specific impulse ({ge} 3500 s) has been proposed to be based on electron-cyclotron resonance heating of whistler waves propagating on a plasma column on a magnetic hill. Calculations using a particle-in-cell code demonstrate that the distortion of the electron velocity distribution by the heating significantly reduces the flow of plasma up the field, greatly improving efficiency and reducing material interactions relative to a thermal plasma. These and other calculations are presented together with initial experiments on the plasma generated in the proposed device. The experiments are conducted in a magnetic field (3.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} T at resonance) and a magnetic mirror ratio of 5. Microwaves (0.915 GHz, <20 kW) are coupled to the plasma with a helical antenna. Vacuum field measurements are in good agreement with prediction. The desired plasma spatial distribution has not yet been achieved.

  12. High Density Plasma Heating by EC-Waves Injected from the High-Field Side for Mode Conversion to Electron Bernstein Waves in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Y.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Igami, H.; Takahashi, H.; Nishiura, M.; Ogasawara, S.; Makino, R.; Mutoh, T.; Yamada, H.; Komori, A.

    2013-02-01

    To realize an excitation of electron Bernstein waves (EBW) via mode conversion from X-mode waves injected from the high magnetic field side (HFS), new inner-vessel mirrors were installed close to a helical coil in the large helical device (LHD). 77 GHz electron cyclotron (EC) wave beams injected from an existing EC-wave injection system toward the new mirror are reflected on the mirror so that the beams are injected to plasmas from HFS. Evident increases in the electron temperature at the plasma core region and the plasma stored energy were observed by the HFS beam injection to the plasmas with the line-average electron density of 7.5×1019 m-3, which is slightly higher than the plasma cut-off density of 77 GHz EC-waves, 7.35×1019 m-3. The heating efficiency evaluated from the changes in the time derivative of the plasma stored energy reached ~70%. Although so far it is not clear which is the main cause of the heating effect, the mode-converted EBW or the X-mode wave itself injected from the HFS, an effective heating of high-density plasma over the plasma cut-off of EC-wave was successfully demonstrated.

  13. A search for Saturn electrostatic discharges in the Voyager plasma wave data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.

    1983-01-01

    A search of Voyager spacecraft plasma wave data for evidence of Saturn electrostatic discharges, whose detection was suggested to be likely on the basis of radio astronomy observations, has yielded no evidence of this phenomenon. The statistical significance of this null result is analyzed, and its ramifications are commented upon. The explanations entertained for the lack of plasma wave observations of electrostatic discharges include the possibility that many events are of much shorter duration than previously reported, or that there may be a nonlinear distortion in the radio astronomy receiver employed which may have artificially broadened the spectrum of the discharges.

  14. In situ observations of wave-induced sea ice breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohout, A. L.; Williams, M. J. M.; Toyota, T.; Lieser, J.; Hutchings, J.

    2016-09-01

    Ocean waves can propagate hundreds of kilometers into sea ice, leaving behind a wake of broken ice floes. Three floe breakup events were observed during the second Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystem Experiment (SIPEX-2). We show that the three breakup events were likely influenced by ocean waves. We compare the observations to a wave induced floe breakup model which includes an empirical wave attenuation model, and show that the model underestimates the extent of floe breaking for long period waves.

  15. Linear coupling of acoustic and cyclotron waves in plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Rogava, Andria; Gogoberidze, Grigol

    2005-05-15

    It is found that in magnetized electrostatic plasma flows the velocity shear couples ion-acoustic waves with ion-cyclotron waves and leads, under favorable conditions, to their efficient reciprocal transformations. It is shown that in a two-dimensional setup this coupling has a remarkable feature: it is governed by equations that are mathematically equal to the ones describing coupling of sound waves with internal gravity waves [Rogava and Mahajan, Phys. Rev. E 55, 1185 (1997)] in neutral fluids. For flows with low shearing rates a fully analytic, quantitative description of the coupling efficiency, based on a noteworthy quantum-mechanical analogy, is given and transformation coefficients are calculated.

  16. Dispersion relations for electromagnetic wave propagation in chiral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, M. X.; Guo, B. Peng, L.; Cai, X.

    2014-11-15

    The dispersion relations for electromagnetic wave propagation in chiral plasmas are derived using a simplified method and investigated in detail. With the help of the dispersion relations for each eignwave, we explore how the chiral plasmas exhibit negative refraction and investigate the frequency region for negative refraction. The results show that chirality can induce negative refraction in plasmas. Moreover, both the degree of chirality and the external magnetic field have a significant effect on the critical frequency and the bandwidth of the frequency for negative refraction in chiral plasmas. The parameter dependence of the effects is calculated and discussed.

  17. A physical mechanism of nonthermal plasma effect on shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, S.P.; Kuo, Steven S.

    2005-01-01

    An electric discharge is applied to generate a plasma spike in front of a wedge. Use of this plasma spike to modify the shock wave structure in a supersonic flow over the wedge is then studied. It is shown that the plasma spike can effectively deflect the incoming flow before the flow reaches the wedge; consequently, the shock structure in the interaction region is modified from an oblique to a curved shape. Moreover, the shock becomes detached as the strength of the plasma spike exceeds a critical level.

  18. Voyager Observations of Magnetic Waves due to Newborn Interstellar Pickup Ions: 2-6 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Poornima; Taylor, David K.; Smith, Charles W.; Joyce, Colin J.; Fisher, Meghan K.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Cannon, Bradford E.; Richardson, John D.

    2016-05-01

    We report observations by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft of low-frequency magnetic waves excited by newborn interstellar pickup ions H+ and He+ during 1978-1979 when the spacecraft were in the range from 2 to 6.3 au. The waves have the expected association with the cyclotron frequency of the source ions, are left-hand polarized in the spacecraft frame, and have minimum variance directions that are quasi-parallel to the local mean magnetic field. There is one exception to this in that one wave event that is excited by pickup H+ is right-hand polarized in the spacecraft frame, but similar exceptions have been reported by Cannon et al. and remain unexplained. We apply the theory of Lee & Ip that predicts the energy spectrum of the waves and then compare growth rates with turbulent cascade rates under the assumption that turbulence acts to destroy the enhanced wave activity and transport the associated energy to smaller scales where dissipation heats the background plasma. As with Cannon et al., we find that the ability to observe the waves depends on the ambient turbulence being weak when compared with growth rates, thereby allowing sustained wave growth. This analysis implies that the coupled processes of pitch-angle scattering and wave generation are continuously associated with newly ionized pickup ions, despite the fact that the waves themselves may not be directly observable. When waves are not observed, but wave excitation can be argued to be present, the wave energy is simply absorbed by the turbulence at a rate that prevents significant accumulation. In this way, the kinetic process of wave excitation by scattering of newborn ions continues to heat the plasma without producing observable wave energy. These findings support theoretical models that invoke efficient scattering of new pickup ions, leading to turbulent driving in the outer solar wind and in the IBEX ribbon beyond the heliopause.

  19. Ion acoustic shock wave in collisional equal mass plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Adak, Ashish; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2015-10-15

    The effect of ion-ion collision on the dynamics of nonlinear ion acoustic wave in an unmagnetized pair-ion plasma has been investigated. The two-fluid model has been used to describe the dynamics of both positive and negative ions with equal masses. It is well known that in the dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave, the viscosity mediates wave dissipation in presence of weak nonlinearity and dispersion. This dissipation is responsible for the shock structures in pair-ion plasma. Here, it has been shown that the ion-ion collision in presence of collective phenomena mediated by the plasma current is the source of dissipation that causes the Burgers' term which is responsible for the shock structures in equal mass pair-ion plasma. The dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burgers equation. The analytical and numerical investigations revealed that the ion acoustic wave exhibits both oscillatory and monotonic shock structures depending on the frequency of ion-ion collision parameter. The results have been discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments.

  20. Ion acoustic shock wave in collisional equal mass plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Ashish; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2015-10-01

    The effect of ion-ion collision on the dynamics of nonlinear ion acoustic wave in an unmagnetized pair-ion plasma has been investigated. The two-fluid model has been used to describe the dynamics of both positive and negative ions with equal masses. It is well known that in the dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave, the viscosity mediates wave dissipation in presence of weak nonlinearity and dispersion. This dissipation is responsible for the shock structures in pair-ion plasma. Here, it has been shown that the ion-ion collision in presence of collective phenomena mediated by the plasma current is the source of dissipation that causes the Burgers' term which is responsible for the shock structures in equal mass pair-ion plasma. The dynamics of the weakly nonlinear wave is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burgers equation. The analytical and numerical investigations revealed that the ion acoustic wave exhibits both oscillatory and monotonic shock structures depending on the frequency of ion-ion collision parameter. The results have been discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments.

  1. Hybrid Model of Inhomogeneous Solar Wind Plasma Heating by Alfven Wave Spectrum: Parametric Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind plasma at 0.3 AU and beyond show that a turbulent spectrum of magnetic fluctuations is present. Remote sensing observations of the corona indicate that heavy ions are hotter than protons and their temperature is anisotropic (T(sub perpindicular / T(sub parallel) >> 1). We study the heating and the acceleration of multi-ion plasma in the solar wind by a turbulent spectrum of Alfvenic fluctuations using a 2-D hybrid numerical model. In the hybrid model the protons and heavy ions are treated kinetically as particles, while the electrons are included as neutralizing background fluid. This is the first two-dimensional hybrid parametric study of the solar wind plasma that includes an input turbulent wave spectrum guided by observation with inhomogeneous background density. We also investigate the effects of He++ ion beams in the inhomogeneous background plasma density on the heating of the solar wind plasma. The 2-D hybrid model treats parallel and oblique waves, together with cross-field inhomogeneity, self-consistently. We investigate the parametric dependence of the perpendicular heating, and the temperature anisotropy in the H+-He++ solar wind plasma. It was found that the scaling of the magnetic fluctuations power spectrum steepens in the higher-density regions, and the heating is channeled to these regions from the surrounding lower-density plasma due to wave refraction. The model parameters are applicable to the expected solar wind conditions at about 10 solar radii.

  2. Lower Hybrid Oscillations in Multicomponent Space Plasmas Subjected to Ion Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Krivorutsky, E. N.; Moore, T. E.; Liemohn, M. W.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    It is found that in multicomponent plasmas subjected to Alfven or fast magnetosonic waves, such as are observed in regions of the outer plasmasphere and ring current-plasmapause overlap, lower hybrid oscillations are generated. The addition of a minor heavy ion component to a proton-electron plasma significantly lowers the low-frequency electric wave amplitude needed for lower hybrid wave excitation. It is found that the lower hybrid wave energy density level is determined by the nonlinear process of induced scattering by ions and electrons; hydrogen ions in the region of resonant velocities are accelerated; and nonresonant particles are weakly heated due to the induced scattering. For a given example, the light resonant ions have an energy gain factor of 20, leading to the development of a high-energy tail in the H(+) distribution function due to low-frequency waves.

  3. Astrophysical Plasmas: Codes, Models, and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canto, Jorge; Rodriguez, Luis F.

    2000-05-01

    The conference Astrophysical Plasmas: Codes, Models, and Observations was aimed at discussing the most recent advances, arid some of the avenues for future work, in the field of cosmical plasmas. It was held (hiring the week of October 25th to 29th 1999, at the Centro Nacional de las Artes (CNA) in Mexico City, Mexico it modern and impressive center of theaters and schools devoted to the performing arts. This was an excellent setting, for reviewing the present status of observational (both on earth and in space) arid theoretical research. as well as some of the recent advances of laboratory research that are relevant, to astrophysics. The demography of the meeting was impressive: 128 participants from 12 countries in 4 continents, a large fraction of them, 29% were women and most of them were young persons (either recent Ph.Ds. or graduate students). This created it very lively and friendly atmosphere that made it easy to move from the ionization of the Universe and high-redshift absorbers, to Active Galactic Nucleotides (AGN)s and X-rays from galaxies, to the gas in the Magellanic Clouds and our Galaxy, to the evolution of H II regions and Planetary Nebulae (PNe), and to the details of plasmas in the Solar System and the lab. All these topics were well covered with 23 invited talks, 43 contributed talks. and 22 posters. Most of them are contained in these proceedings, in the same order of the presentations.

  4. Secondary Fast Magnetoacoustic Waves Trapped in Randomly Structured Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ding; Li, Bo; Walsh, Robert W.

    2016-09-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic waves are an important tool for inferring parameters of the solar atmosphere. We numerically simulate the propagation of fast wave pulses in randomly structured plasmas that mimic the highly inhomogeneous solar corona. A network of secondary waves is formed by a series of partial reflections and transmissions. These secondary waves exhibit quasi-periodicities in both time and space. Since the temporal and spatial periods are related simply through the speed of the fast wave, we quantify the properties of secondary waves by examining the dependence of the average temporal period (\\bar{p}) on the initial pulse width (w 0) and studying the density contrast ({δ }ρ ) and correlation length (L c ) that characterize the randomness of the equilibrium density profiles. For small-amplitude pulses, {δ }ρ does not alter \\bar{p} significantly. Large-amplitude pulses, on the other hand, enhance the density contrast when {δ }ρ is small but have a smoothing effect when {δ }ρ is sufficiently large. We found that \\bar{p} scales linearly with L c and that the scaling factor is larger for a narrower pulse. However, in terms of the absolute values of \\bar{p}, broader pulses generate secondary waves with longer periods, and this effect is stronger in random plasmas with shorter correlation lengths. Secondary waves carry the signatures of both the leading wave pulse and the background plasma. Our study may find applications in magnetohydrodynamic seismology by exploiting the secondary waves detected in the dimming regions after coronal mass ejections or extreme ultraviolet waves.

  5. Terahertz Josephson plasma waves in layered superconductors: spectrum, generation, nonlinear and quantum phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savel'ev, Sergey; Yampol'skii, V. A.; Rakhmanov, A. L.; Nori, Franco

    2010-02-01

    The recent growing interest in terahertz (THz) and sub-THz science and technology is due to its many important applications in physics, astronomy, chemistry, biology and medicine, including THz imaging, spectroscopy, tomography, medical diagnosis, health monitoring, environmental control, as well as chemical and biological identification. We review the problem of linear and nonlinear THz and sub-THz Josephson plasma waves in layered superconductors and their excitations produced by moving Josephson vortices. We start by discussing the coupled sine-Gordon equations for the gauge-invariant phase difference of the order parameter in the junctions, taking into account the effect of breaking the charge neutrality, and deriving the spectrum of Josephson plasma waves. We also review surface and waveguide Josephson plasma waves. The spectrum of these waves is presented, and their excitation is discussed. We review the propagation of weakly nonlinear Josephson plasma waves below the plasma frequency, ωJ, which is very unusual for plasma-like excitations. In close analogy to nonlinear optics, these waves exhibit numerous remarkable features, including a self-focusing effect and the pumping of weaker waves by a stronger one. In addition, an unusual stop-light phenomenon, when ∂ω/∂k ≈ 0, caused by both nonlinearity and dissipation, can be observed in the Josephson plasma waves. At frequencies above ωJ, the current-phase nonlinearity can be used for transforming continuous sub-THz radiation into short, strongly amplified, pulses. We also present quantum effects in layered superconductors, specifically, the problem of quantum tunneling of fluxons through stacks of Josephson junctions. Moreover, the nonlocal sine-Gordon equation for Josephson vortices is reviewed. We discuss the Cherenkov and transition radiations of the Josephson plasma waves produced by moving Josephson vortices, either in a single Josephson junction or in layered superconductors. Furthermore, the

  6. Alfven waves in dusty plasmas with plasma particles described by anisotropic kappa distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Galvao, R. A.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Juli, M. C. de

    2012-12-15

    We utilize a kinetic description to study the dispersion relation of Alfven waves propagating parallelly to the ambient magnetic field in a dusty plasma, taking into account the fluctuation of the charge of the dust particles, which is due to inelastic collisions with electrons and ions. We consider a plasma in which the velocity distribution functions of the plasma particles are modelled as anisotropic kappa distributions, study the dispersion relation for several combinations of the parameters {kappa}{sub Parallel-To} and {kappa}{sub Up-Tack }, and emphasize the effect of the anisotropy of the distributions on the mode coupling which occurs in a dusty plasma, between waves in the branch of circularly polarized waves and waves in the whistler branch.

  7. Conversion of ordinary and extraordinary waves into upper hybrid waves in inhomogeneous plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung-Sub; Kim, Eun-Hwa; Lee, Dong-Hun; Kim, Kihong

    2005-05-15

    Linear mode conversion of ordinary and extraordinary waves into upper hybrid waves has been investigated by adopting a time-dependent numerical model. In order to solve the wave equations as an initial-valued problem, the finite difference method is used in both time and space. It is examined how wave coupling occurs in a cold magnetized plasma, where inhomogeneity lies perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, by analyzing time histories of both electric and magnetic field components. The results show that electromagnetic energy of ordinary and extraordinary waves is transferred into electrostatic energy when the resonant condition at upper hybrid resonances is satisfied.

  8. Electromagnetic Waves near the Proton Cyclotron Frequency: STEREO Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, L. K.; Wei, H. Y.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Klecker, B.; Omidi, N.; Isenberg, P. A.; Goldstein, M. L.; Figueroa-Viñas, A.; Blanco-Cano, X.

    2014-05-01

    Transverse, near-circularly polarized, parallel-propagating electromagnetic waves around the proton cyclotron frequency were found sporadically in the solar wind throughout the inner heliosphere. They could play an important role in heating and accelerating the solar wind. These low-frequency waves (LFWs) are intermittent but often occur in prolonged bursts lasting over 10 minutes, named "LFW storms." Through a comprehensive survey of them from Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory A using dynamic spectral wave analysis, we have identified 241 LFW storms in 2008, present 0.9% of the time. They are left-hand (LH) or right-hand (RH) polarized in the spacecraft frame with similar characteristics, probably due to Doppler shift of the same type of waves or waves of intrinsically different polarities. In rare cases, the opposite polarities are observed closely in time or even simultaneously. Having ruled out interplanetary coronal mass ejections, shocks, energetic particles, comets, planets, and interstellar ions as LFW sources, we discuss the remaining generation scenarios: LH ion cyclotron instability driven by greater perpendicular temperature than parallel temperature or by ring-beam distribution, and RH ion fire hose instability driven by inverse temperature anisotropy or by cool ion beams. The investigation of solar wind conditions is compromised by the bias of the one-dimensional Maxwellian fit used for plasma data calibration. However, the LFW storms are preferentially detected in rarefaction regions following fast winds and when the magnetic field is radial. This preference may be related to the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability in fast wind and the minimum in damping along the radial field.

  9. Electromagnetic waves near the proton cyclotron frequency: Stereo observations

    SciTech Connect

    Jian, L. K.; Wei, H. Y.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Klecker, B.; Omidi, N.; Isenberg, P. A.; Goldstein, M. L.; Figueroa-Viñas, A.; Blanco-Cano, X.

    2014-05-10

    Transverse, near-circularly polarized, parallel-propagating electromagnetic waves around the proton cyclotron frequency were found sporadically in the solar wind throughout the inner heliosphere. They could play an important role in heating and accelerating the solar wind. These low-frequency waves (LFWs) are intermittent but often occur in prolonged bursts lasting over 10 minutes, named 'LFW storms'. Through a comprehensive survey of them from Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory A using dynamic spectral wave analysis, we have identified 241 LFW storms in 2008, present 0.9% of the time. They are left-hand (LH) or right-hand (RH) polarized in the spacecraft frame with similar characteristics, probably due to Doppler shift of the same type of waves or waves of intrinsically different polarities. In rare cases, the opposite polarities are observed closely in time or even simultaneously. Having ruled out interplanetary coronal mass ejections, shocks, energetic particles, comets, planets, and interstellar ions as LFW sources, we discuss the remaining generation scenarios: LH ion cyclotron instability driven by greater perpendicular temperature than parallel temperature or by ring-beam distribution, and RH ion fire hose instability driven by inverse temperature anisotropy or by cool ion beams. The investigation of solar wind conditions is compromised by the bias of the one-dimensional Maxwellian fit used for plasma data calibration. However, the LFW storms are preferentially detected in rarefaction regions following fast winds and when the magnetic field is radial. This preference may be related to the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability in fast wind and the minimum in damping along the radial field.

  10. Hybrid numerical model of shock waves in collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vshivkova, L.; Dudnikova, G.; Vshivkov, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present a 2D hybrid numerical plasma model of generation and structure of collisionless shock waves in plasma and ion acceleration on their front considering physical processes in supernova remnant shock precursor. In modeling a shock wave is generated by sending a supersonic flow against a reflecting wall. The consequent interaction between incoming and reflected plasma flows lead to formation of waves, the structure of which depends on a flow velocity. The hybrid approach reduces the computational expenses relative to a fully kinetic one, and on the other hand, permits to model ions with a greater accuracy than the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) allows. Also, another important advantage of the hybrid approach is the possibility to study the important instabilities on an ion time scale, neglecting the modes associated with electrons. In the current work a new computational scheme where stability condition allows carry out computations on more wide set of computational and physical parameters is presented.

  11. Asymmetric drift instability of magnetosonic waves in anisotropic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, M. F.; Chen, Lunjin

    2016-10-01

    The general dispersion relation of obliquely propagating magneto-sonic (MS) waves for the inhomogeneous and anisotropic plasmas is analyzed including the effect of wave-particle interaction. The numerical analysis is performed without expanding both the plasma dispersion and the modified Bessel functions to highlight the effects of density inhomogeneity and the temperature anisotropy. The obtained results are compared with the recent work [Naim et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 062117 (2015)], where only drift mode near the magnetosonic frequency is investigated. In our paper, we additionally analyzed two related modes depicting that the drift effect leads to an asymmetric behavior in the dispersion properties of drift MS waves. The possible application to the solar coronal heating problem has also been discussed.

  12. Scattering of electrons by vacuum fluctuations of plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veklenko, B. A.; Afanas'ev, V. P.; Lubenchenko, A. V.

    2014-04-01

    Interaction between a probe electron beam and longitudinal electromagnetic oscillations of the Fermi plasma in metals (plasmons) is investigated by the methods of quantum electrodynamics. The quantum description of plasmons allows one to construct a consistent theory of the scattering process and point out the applicability limits of the existing semiclassical theories. The quantum description of plasmons leads to the concept of electromagnetic vacuum of longitudinal waves, which is the subject of the present study. The vacuum of longitudinal waves significantly deforms the shape of plasma dielectric permittivity, thus leading to the broadening of Langmuir peaks of scattered electrons, which has so far resisted theoretical analysis. The presence of the electromagnetic vacuum of longitudinal plasma waves has a considerable effect on the integral scattering probability of electrons by plasmons.

  13. Ion-acoustic cnoidal waves in a quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.; Haas, F.

    2014-10-15

    Nonlinear ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are studied in an unmagnetized quantum plasma. Using the reductive perturbation method, a Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived for appropriate boundary conditions and nonlinear periodic wave solutions are obtained. The corresponding analytical solution and numerical plots of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves and solitons in the phase plane are presented using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential approach. The variations in the nonlinear potential of the ion-acoustic cnoidal waves are studied at different values of quantum parameter H{sub e} which is the ratio of electron plasmon energy to electron Fermi energy defined for degenerate electrons. It is found that both compressive and rarefactive ion-acoustic cnoidal wave structures are formed depending on the value of the quantum parameter. The dependence of the wavelength and frequency on nonlinear wave amplitude is also presented.

  14. Nonlinear waves in nonplanar and nonuniform dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Jukui; Zhang Liping

    2006-02-15

    The nonlinear properties of the dust acoustic solitary wave and shock wave in inhomogeneous nonplanar dusty plasmas are considered theoretically and numerically. The effects of nonthermally distributed ions, nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation, and the inhomogeneity caused by nonuniform equilibrium particle density, nonuniform equilibrium charging, and nonplanar geometry on waves are presented. When {tau}{sub ch}/{tau}{sub d} is small but finite, where {tau}{sub ch} is the charging time scale and {tau}{sub d} is the hydrodynamical time scale, a variable coefficients nonplanar Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) Burgers equation governing the nonlinear waves is derived by the perturbation method. The analytical expressions for the evolution of soliton and shock wave (both oscillatory and monotone shock) are obtained and the theoretical results are confirmed by the numerical solution of the nonlinear wave equation.

  15. Observations of ELF electromagnetic waves associated with equatorial spread F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Holtet, J. A.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1979-01-01

    Extreme low frequency electromagnetic waves have been observed below the F peak in the equatorial ionosphere by instruments onboard OGO-6. Electrostatic wave observations indicate that the steep gradient was unstable to the process which causes equatorial spread F above the region where the electromagnetic waves were observed. The data are very similar to observations near the polar cusp and give further evidence that ELF waves are excluded from regions of rapid and irregular density increases. Low level electromagnetic waves with similar properties were occasionally observed on the nightside by the OVI-17 electric field sensor and may be plasmaspheric hiss which has propagated to low altitude.

  16. High amplitude waves in the expanding solar wind plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Velli, M.; Grappin, R.

    1995-01-01

    We simulated the 1-D nonlinear time-evolution of high-amplitude Alfven, slow and fast magnetoacoustic waves in the solar wind propagating outward at different angles to the mean magnetic (spiral) field, using the expanding box model. The simulation results for Alfven waves and fast magnetoacustic waves fit the observational constraints in the solar wind best, showing decreasing trends for energies and other rms-quantities due to expansion and the appearance of inward propagating waves as minor species in the wind. Inward propagating waves are generated by reflection of Alfven waves propagating at large angles to the magnetic field or they coincide with the occurrence of compressible fluctuations. In our simulations, fast and slow magnetoacoustic waves seem to have a level in the density-fluctuations which is too high when we compare with the observations. Furthermore, the evolution of energies for slow magnetoacoustic waves differs strongly from the evolution of fluctuation energies in situ.

  17. Solar Wind Strahl Broadening by Self-Generated Plasma Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavan, J.; Vinas, A. F.; Yoon, P. H.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.

    2013-01-01

    This Letter reports on the results of numerical simulations which may provide a possible explanation for the strahl broadening during quiet solar conditions. The relevant processes involved in the broadening are due to kinetic quasi-linear wave-particle interaction. Making use of static analytical electron distribution in an inhomogeneous field, it is found that self-generated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency, i.e., Langmuir waves, are capable of scattering the strahl component, resulting in energy and pitch-angle diffusion that broadens its velocity distribution significantly. The present theoretical results provide an alternative or complementary explanation to the usual whistler diffusion scenario, suggesting that self-induced electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency might play a key role in broadening the solar wind strahl during quiet solar conditions.

  18. Propagation of transverse waves in a radially expanding plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solodyna, C. V.; Belcher, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Investigation of the properties of low-frequency transverse waves in an expanding plasma. The wave vector, the background magnetic field, and the streaming velocity of the plasma are all assumed to lie along the radial direction. Expressions are presented for the radial dependence of the amplitude and phase of left and right circularly polarized waves, correct to first order in the wave frequency divided by the proton cyclotron frequency. Differences in the phase velocities of these two circular polarizations result in a Faraday rotation that can be substantial for typical interplanetary conditions near 1 AU. The implications of these results for a realistic solar wind model with the interplanetary magnetic field along the spiral direction are also considered.

  19. SOLAR WIND STRAHL BROADENING BY SELF-GENERATED PLASMA WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Pavan, J.; Gaelzer, R.; Vinas, A. F.; Yoon, P. H.; Ziebell, L. F. E-mail: rudi@ufpel.edu.br E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu

    2013-06-01

    This Letter reports on the results of numerical simulations which may provide a possible explanation for the strahl broadening during quiet solar conditions. The relevant processes involved in the broadening are due to kinetic quasi-linear wave-particle interaction. Making use of static analytical electron distribution in an inhomogeneous field, it is found that self-generated electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency, i.e., Langmuir waves, are capable of scattering the strahl component, resulting in energy and pitch-angle diffusion that broadens its velocity distribution significantly. The present theoretical results provide an alternative or complementary explanation to the usual whistler diffusion scenario, suggesting that self-induced electrostatic waves at the plasma frequency might play a key role in broadening the solar wind strahl during quiet solar conditions.

  20. Accumulative coupling between magnetized tenuous plasma and gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan

    2016-07-01

    We explicitly compute the plasma wave (PW) induced by a plane gravitational wave (GW) traveling through a region of strongly magnetized plasma, governed by force-free electrodynamics. The PW comoves with the GW and absorbs its energy to grow over time, creating an essentially force-free counterpart to the inverse-Gertsenshtein effect. The time-averaged Poynting flux of the induced PW is comparable to the vacuum case, but the associated current may offer a more sensitive alternative to photodetection when designing experiments for detecting/constraining high-frequency gravitational waves. Aside from the exact solutions, we also offer an analysis of the general properties of the GW to PW conversion process, which should find use when evaluating electromagnetic counterparts to astrophysical gravitational waves that are generated directly by the latter as a second-order phenomenon.

  1. Electron Acoustic Solitary Waves in Magnetized Quantum Plasma with Relativistic Degenerated Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhenni; Wu, Zhengwei; Li, Chunhua; Yang, Weihong

    2014-11-01

    A model for the nonlinear properties of obliquely propagating electron acoustic solitary waves in a two-electron populated relativistically quantum magnetized plasma is presented. By using the standard reductive perturbation technique, the Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation is derived and this equation gives the solitary wave solution. It is observed that the relativistic effects, the ratio of the cold to hot electron unperturbed number density and the magnetic field normalized by electron cyclotron frequency significantly influence the solitary structures.

  2. Magnetosphere--Ionosphere Coupling: Effects of Plasma Alfven Wave Relative Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, P. J.; Dum, C. T.

    1989-06-01

    The introduction of relative perpendicular motion between a flux-tube supporting shear Alfven wave activity and the background plasma is studied in the context of the coupling of a wave generating region with a distant ionosphere. The results of a representative simulation, using an extended version of the code developed by Lysak & Dum (J. geophys. Res. 88, 365 (1983)), are used as a basis for interpreting some aspects of recent satellite observations.

  3. Magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling: effects of plasma Alfvén wave relative motion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, P. J.; Dum, C. T.

    The introduction of relative perpendicular motion between a flux-tube supporting shear Alfvén wave activity and the background plasma is studied in the context of the coupling of a wave generating region with a distant ionosphere. The results of a representative simulation, using an extended version of the code developed by Lysak & Dum, are used as a basis for interpreting some aspects of recent satellite observations.

  4. Resonance absorption of propagating fast waves in a cold plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1990-01-01

    Absorption of propagating waves impinging on a surface in which the plasma and magnetic field may change is investigated by examining in depth the problem of a combination of cold plasma, uniform magnetic field and a surface density which varies linearly from zero at the left end to some finite value at the right end, beyond which the density is constant. Two cases are considered: one in which the plasma is a vacuum everywhere to the left of the surface (which may correspond to coronal conditions) and one in which the plasma density jumps to a very large value to the left of the surface (which may mimic the magnetosphere with the dense region at the left corresponding to the plasmasphere). A complete discussion of the resonance absorption of propagating fast waves for the case considered by Kiveloson and Southwood (1986) is presented, emphasizing approximate analytical results whenever possible; these results are then compared with exact numerical solutions.

  5. Three-wave coupling in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tinakiche, N.; Annou, R.; Tripathi, V. K.

    2012-07-15

    The three-wave coupling processes in electron-positron-ion plasmas are investigated. The non-linear dispersion relation is derived along with the non-linear growth rate in both resonant and non resonant processes. It is shown that the inclusion of positron affects the dielectric properties of the plasma as well as the nonlinear growth rates of parametric processes. As one increases the positron density to electron density ratio from 0 to 1, maintaining quasi neutrality of the plasma, the growth rates of stimulated Raman, Brillouin, and Compton scattering processes in an isothermal plasma tend to zero due to the ponderomotive forces acting on electrons and positrons due the pump and scattered waves being equal.

  6. Nonlinear Plasma Waves Excitation by Intense Ion Beams in Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2004-04-15

    Plasma neutralization of an intense ion pulse is of interest for many applications, including plasma lenses, heavy ion fusion, cosmic ray propagation, etc. An analytical electron fluid model has been developed to describe the plasma response to a propagating ion beam. The model predicts very good charge neutralization during quasi-steady-state propagation, provided the beam pulse duration {tau}{sub b} is much longer than the electron plasma period 2{pi}/{omega}{sub p}, where {omega}{sub p} = (4{pi}e{sup 2}n{sub p}/m){sup 1/2} is the electron plasma frequency and n{sub p} is the background plasma density. In the opposite limit, the beam pulse excites large-amplitude plasma waves. If the beam density is larger than the background plasma density, the plasma waves break. Theoretical predictions are compared with the results of calculations utilizing a particle-in-cell (PIC) code. The cold electron fluid results agree well with the PIC simulations for ion beam propagation through a background plasma. The reduced fluid description derived in this paper can provide an important benchmark for numerical codes and yield scaling relations for different beam and plasma parameters. The visualization of numerical simulation data shows complex collective phenomena during beam entry and exit from the plasma.

  7. Stability of shock waves in high temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Madhusmita; Bhattacharya, Chandrani; Menon, S. V. G.

    2011-10-15

    The Dyakov-Kontorovich criteria for spontaneous emission of acoustic waves behind shock fronts are investigated for high temperature aluminum and beryllium plasmas. To this end, the Dyakov and critical stability parameters are calculated from Rankine-Hugoniot curves using a more realistic equation of state (EOS). The cold and ionic contributions to the EOS are obtained via scaled binding energy and mean field theory, respectively. A screened hydrogenic model, including l-splitting, is used to calculate the bound electron contribution to the electronic EOS. The free electron EOS is obtained from Fermi-Dirac statistics. Predictions of the model for ionization curves and shock Hugoniot are found to be in excellent agreement with available experimental and theoretical data. It is observed that the electronic EOS has significant effect on the stability of the planar shock front. While the shock is stable for low temperatures and pressures, instability sets in as temperature rises. The basic reason is ionization of electronic shells and consequent increase in electronic specific heat. The temperatures and densities of the unstable region correspond to those where electronic shells get ionized. With the correct modeling of bound electrons, we find that shock instability for Al occurs at a compression ratio {approx}5.4, contrary to the value {approx}3 reported in the literature. Free electrons generated in the ionization process carry energy from the shock front, thereby giving rise to spontaneously emitted waves, which decay the shock front.

  8. Landau damping of Langmuir waves in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ouazene, M.; Annou, R.

    2011-11-15

    As free electrons move in the nearest neighbour ion's potential well, the equilibrium velocity departs from Maxwell distribution. The effect of the non-Maxwellian velocity distribution function (NMVDF) on many properties of the plasma such as the transport coefficients, the kinetic energy, and the degree of ionization is found to be noticeable. A correction to the Langmuir wave dispersion relation is proved to arise due to the NMVDF as well [Phys. Plasmas 17, 052105 (2010)]. The study is extended hereafter to include the effect of NMVDF on the Landau damping of Langmuir wave.

  9. On Variational Methods in the Physics of Plasma Waves

    SciTech Connect

    I.Y. Dodin

    2013-03-08

    A fi rst-principle variational approach to adiabatic collisionless plasma waves is described. The focus is made on one-dimensional electrostatic oscillations, including phase-mixed electron plasma waves (EPW) with trapped particles, such as Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal modes. The well known Whitham's theory is extended by an explicit calculation of the EPW Lagrangian, which is related to the oscillation-center energies of individual particles in a periodic fi eld, and those are found by a quadrature. Some paradigmatic physics of EPW is discussed for illustration purposes. __________________________________________________

  10. Langmuir wave dispersion relation in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ouazene, M.; Annou, R.

    2010-05-15

    The Langmuir wave dispersion relation is derived in partially ionized plasmas, where free electrons are confined to move in a nearest neighbor ions' potential well. The equilibrium velocity distribution function experiences then, a departure from Maxwell distribution function. The effect of the non-Maxwellian character of the distribution function on the Langmuir phase and group velocities as well as the phase matching conditions and the nonlinear growth rate of decay instability is investigated. The proposed Langmuir wave dispersion relation is relevant to dense and cryogenic plasmas.

  11. Surface wave propagation in non-ideal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. P.; Dwivedi, C. B.

    2015-03-01

    The properties of surface waves in a partially ionized, compressible magnetized plasma slab are investigated in this work. The waves are affected by the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects which causes finite drift of the magnetic field in the medium. When the magnetic field drift is ignored, the characteristics of the wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma fluid is similar to the fully ionized ideal MHD except now the propagation properties depend on the fractional ionization as well as on the compressibility of the medium. The phase velocity of the sausage and kink waves increases marginally (by a few per cent) due to the compressibility of the medium in both ideal as well as Hall-diffusion-dominated regimes. However, unlike ideal regime, only waves below certain cut-off frequency can propagate in the medium in Hall dominated regime. This cut-off for a thin slab has a weak dependence on the plasma beta whereas for thick slab no such dependence exists. More importantly, since the cut-off is introduced by the Hall diffusion, the fractional ionization of the medium is more important than the plasma compressibility in determining such a cut-off. Therefore, for both compressible as well incompressible medium, the surface modes of shorter wavelength are permitted with increasing ionization in the medium. We discuss the relevance of these results in the context of solar photosphere-chromosphere.

  12. Method for generating a plasma wave to accelerate electrons

    DOEpatents

    Umstadter, D.; Esarey, E.; Kim, J.K.

    1997-06-10

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for generating large amplitude nonlinear plasma waves, driven by an optimized train of independently adjustable, intense laser pulses. In the method, optimal pulse widths, interpulse spacing, and intensity profiles of each pulse are determined for each pulse in a series of pulses. A resonant region of the plasma wave phase space is found where the plasma wave is driven most efficiently by the laser pulses. The accelerator system of the invention comprises several parts: the laser system, with its pulse-shaping subsystem; the electron gun system, also called beam source, which preferably comprises photo cathode electron source and RF-LINAC accelerator; electron photo-cathode triggering system; the electron diagnostics; and the feedback system between the electron diagnostics and the laser system. The system also includes plasma source including vacuum chamber, magnetic lens, and magnetic field means. The laser system produces a train of pulses that has been optimized to maximize the axial electric field amplitude of the plasma wave, and thus the electron acceleration, using the method of the invention. 21 figs.

  13. Method for generating a plasma wave to accelerate electrons

    DOEpatents

    Umstadter, Donald; Esarey, Eric; Kim, Joon K.

    1997-01-01

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for generating large amplitude nonlinear plasma waves, driven by an optimized train of independently adjustable, intense laser pulses. In the method, optimal pulse widths, interpulse spacing, and intensity profiles of each pulse are determined for each pulse in a series of pulses. A resonant region of the plasma wave phase space is found where the plasma wave is driven most efficiently by the laser pulses. The accelerator system of the invention comprises several parts: the laser system, with its pulse-shaping subsystem; the electron gun system, also called beam source, which preferably comprises photo cathode electron source and RF-LINAC accelerator; electron photo-cathode triggering system; the electron diagnostics; and the feedback system between the electron diagnostics and the laser system. The system also includes plasma source including vacuum chamber, magnetic lens, and magnetic field means. The laser system produces a train of pulses that has been optimized to maximize the axial electric field amplitude of the plasma wave, and thus the electron acceleration, using the method of the invention.

  14. Nonlinear Generalized Hydrodynamic Wave Equations in Strongly Coupled Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Veeresha, B. M.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P. K.

    2008-09-07

    A set of nonlinear equations for the study of low frequency waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma medium is derived using the phenomenological generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model and is used to study the modulational stability of dust acoustic waves to parallel perturbations. Dust compressibility contributions arising from strong Coulomb coupling effects are found to introduce significant modifications in the threshold and range of the instability domain.

  15. Ion-Acoustic Waves in Self-Gravitaing Dusty Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Nagendra; Kumar, Vinod; Kumar, Anil

    2008-09-07

    The propagation and damping of low frequency ion-acoustic waves in steady state, unmagnetised, self-gravitating dusty plasma are studied taking into account two important damping mechanisms creation damping and Tromso damping. It is found that imaginary part of wave number is independent of frequency in case of creation damping. But when we consider the case of creation and Tromso damping together, an additional contribution to damping appears with the increase in frequency attributed to Tromso effect.

  16. Ion-acoustic solitary waves in relativistic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Das, G.C.; Paul, S.N.

    1985-03-01

    This is a sequel to our earlier study on ion-acoustic waves studied through the augmentation to a modified Korteweg--deVries (K--dV) equation. We have derived a K--dV equation in a plasma, taking account of weakly relativistic effects, and the result shows that the solitary wave does exhibit the relativistic effect in the presence of ion streaming.

  17. Obliquely Propagating Electromagnetic Waves in Magnetized Kappa Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaelzer, R.

    2015-12-01

    The effects of velocity distribution functions (VDFs) that exhibit a power-law dependence on the high-energy tail have been the subjectof intense research by the space plasma community. Such functions, known as kappa or superthermal distributions, have beenfound to provide a better fitting to the VDF measured by spacecraft in the solar wind. One of the problems that is being addressed on this new light is the temperature anisotropy of solar wind protons and electrons. An anisotropic kappa VDF contains a large amount of free energy that can excite waves in the solar wind. Conversely, the wave-particle interaction is important to determine the shape of theobserved particle distributions.In the literature, the general treatment for waves excited by (bi-)Maxwellian plasmas is well-established. However, for kappa distributions, either isotropic or anisotropic, the wave characteristics have been studied mostly for the limiting cases of purely parallel or perpendicular propagation. Contributions for the general case of obliquely-propagating electromagnetic waves have been scarcely reported so far. The absence of a general treatment prevents a complete analysis of the wave-particle interaction in kappa plasmas, since some instabilities, such as the firehose, can operate simultaneously both in the parallel and oblique directions.In a recent work [1], we have obtained expressions for the dielectric tensor and dispersion relations for the low-frequency, quasi-perpendicular dispersive Alfvén waves resulting from a kappa VDF. In the present work, we generalize the formalism introduced by [1] for the general case of electrostatic and/or electromagnetic waves propagating in a kappa plasma in any frequency range and for arbitrary angles.We employ an isotropic distribution, but the methods used here can be easily applied to more general anisotropic distributions,such as the bi-kappa or product-bi-kappa. [1] R. Gaelzer and L. F. Ziebell, Journal of Geophysical Research 119, 9334

  18. Statistical study on magnetotail lobe waves with period 40 - 600 s observed by Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoqiang; Zhang, Tielong; Volwerk, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Ultra low frequency (ULF) waves play an important role in energy transport and dissipation in the magnetosphere. In this paper, 263 waves with period 40 - 150 s and 161 waves with period 150 - 600 s in the Earth's magnetotail lobe have been studied by using Cluster data from years 2001 to 2009. Our findings are as follows: (1) 90% of the wave amplitudes with period 40 - 150 s are below ~0.25 nT for transverse components, and ~0.16 nT for compressional component; The amplitudes of longer period waves are somewhat larger; For waves with period 150 - 600 s, 90% of the wave amplitudes are below ~0.36 nT and ~0.39 nT for transverse and compressional components, respectively. (2) Waves within 40 - 150 s prefer to occur in the lobe region close to the plasma sheet, while waves within 150 - 600 s can be observed throughout the lobe region; (3) The amplitudes of lobe waves and AE index are weakly correlated; However, we find that amplitudes tend to be larger when the AE index is larger; (4) Amplitudes also tend to be larger when the solar wind velocity, the solar wind dynamic pressure or its variations (∆PSW) is larger; The correlation coefficient between amplitudes of waves within 150 - 600 s and ∆PSW is up to ~0.58. We suggest that both dynamic pressure in the plasma sheet boundary layer or plasma sheet (inner source) and solar wind conditions (outer source) can contribute to the generation of lobe ULF waves; Waves within 40 - 150 s are effected more by inner source; ∆PSW is more associated with compressional waves within 150 - 600 s than that within 40 - 150 s.

  19. Linear waves in a resistive plasma with Hall current

    SciTech Connect

    Almaguer, J.A. )

    1992-10-01

    Dispersion relations for the case of a magnetized plasma are determined taking into account the Hall current and a constant resistivity, {eta}, in Ohm's law. It is found that the Hall effect is relevant only for parallel (to the equilibrium magnetic field) wave numbers in the case of uniform plasmas, giving place to a dispersive behavior. In particular, the cases of {eta}{r arrow}0 and small (nonzero) resistivity are discussed.

  20. Electron-acoustic solitary waves in a nonextensive plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Djebarni, Lyes

    2010-12-15

    The problem of arbitrary amplitude electron-acoustic solitary waves (EASWs) in a plasma having cold fluid electrons, hot nonextensive electrons, and stationary ions is addressed. It is found that the 'Maxwellianization' process of the hot nonextensive component does not favor the propagation of the EASWs. In contrast to superthermality, nonextensivity makes the electron-acoustic solitary structure less spiky. Our theoretical analysis brings a possibility to develop more refined theories of nonlinear solitary structures in astrophysical plasmas.

  1. Low frequency waves associated with PSBL ion beams. Cluster observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorenko, Elena; Sauvaud, Jean-Andre; Zeleniy, Lev; Burinskaya, T.

    The processes of non-adiabatic ion acceleration occurring in the Current Sheet of the Earth's magnetotail produce highly accelerated (up to 2500km/s) field-aligned ion beams (beamlets) with transient appearance streaming earthward in the Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer (PSBL). Multipoint Cluster observations have led to a new understanding of these phenomena with a spatial rather than a temporal structure. Comparison of data from different Cluster spacecraft allows to evaluate the duration of beamlets to be, at least, 5-15 min and confirms their welldefined localization along Y and/or Z directions, i.e. across the lobe magnetic field. Earlier results reporting shorter duration of beamlet observations could be understood by the invoking of an additional effect revealed by Cluster: earthward propagation of magnetic perturbations along the beamlet filaments. Phase velocity of these perturbations is of the order of the local Alfven velocity (V 600-1000km/s) and related fast flappings of localized beamlet structures in Y-Z direction significantly decreases the time of their observation at a given spacecraft. Statistical studies of 90 beamlets have shown that the typical wave length of the related disturbances is about tens RE and typical period is about several minutes. Such Alfvenic-type disturbances may be caused by Kelvin-Helmholtz instability triggered by a flow shear between the highvelocity plasma beam streaming at the PSBL boundary and the slowly moving plasma of the outer lobe. Our analysis revealed that for the majority of accelerated ion beams observed in the PSBL of magnetotail the conditions for the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are satisfied. This work was supported by RFBR grants 07-02-00319; 06-02-72561

  2. Plasma characterization using ultraviolet Thomson scattering from ion-acoustic and electron plasma waves (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follett, R. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Henchen, R. J.; Katz, J.; Myatt, J. F.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    Collective Thomson scattering is a technique for measuring the plasma conditions in laser-plasma experiments. Simultaneous measurements of ion-acoustic and electron plasma-wave spectra were obtained using a 263.25-nm Thomson-scattering probe beam. A fully reflective collection system was used to record light scattered from electron plasma waves at electron densities greater than 1021 cm-3, which produced scattering peaks near 200 nm. An accurate analysis of the experimental Thomson-scattering spectra required accounting for plasma gradients, instrument sensitivity, optical effects, and background radiation. Practical techniques for including these effects when fitting Thomson-scattering spectra are presented and applied to the measured spectra to show the improvements in plasma characterization.

  3. Computational study of nonlinear plasma waves: 1: Simulation model and monochromatic wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matda, Y.; Crawford, F. W.

    1974-01-01

    An economical low noise plasma simulation model is applied to a series of problems associated with electrostatic wave propagation in a one-dimensional, collisionless, Maxwellian plasma, in the absence of magnetic field. The model is described and tested, first in the absence of an applied signal, and then with a small amplitude perturbation, to establish the low noise features and to verify the theoretical linear dispersion relation at wave energy levels as low as 0.000,001 of the plasma thermal energy. The method is then used to study propagation of an essentially monochromatic plane wave. Results on amplitude oscillation and nonlinear frequency shift are compared with available theories. The additional phenomena of sideband instability and satellite growth, stimulated by large amplitude wave propagation and the resulting particle trapping, are described.

  4. Excitation of Plasma Waves in Aurora by Electron Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    daSilva, C. E.; Vinas, A. F.; deAssis, A. S.; deAzevedo, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we study numerically the excitation of plasma waves by electron beams, in the auroral region above 2000 km of altitude. We have solved the fully kinetic dispersion relation, using numerical method and found the real frequency and the growth rate of the plasma wave modes. We have examined the instability properties of low-frequency waves such as the Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) wave as well as Lower-Hybrid (LH) wave in the range of high-frequency. In all cases, the source of free energy are electron beams propagating parallel to the geomagnetic field. We present some features of the growth rate modes, when the cold plasma parameters are changed, such as background electrons and ions species (H(+) and O(+)) temperature, density or the electron beam density and/or drift velocity. These results can be used in a test-particle simulation code, to investigate the ion acceleration and their implication in the auroral acceleration processes, by wave-particle interaction.

  5. Experimental observation of the longitudinal plasma excitation in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, A.; Shukrinov, Yu M.; Oya, G.

    2008-10-01

    We have investigated the current-voltage characteristics (IVCs) of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs). Recently, it is predicted that the longitudinal plasma wave can be excited by the parametric resonance in IJJs. Such an excitation induces a singularity called as breakpoint region around switch back region in the IVC. We have succeeded in the observation of the breakpoint region in the IVC of the mesa with 5 IJJs at 4.2 K. Furthermore, it is found that the temperature dependence of the breakpoint current is in agreement with the theoretical prediction. This suggests that the wave number of the excited plasma wave varies with temperature.

  6. Linear and nonlinear heavy ion-acoustic waves in a strongly coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, S. A. Mamun, A. A.; Hossen, M. R.

    2015-09-15

    A theoretical study on the propagation of linear and nonlinear heavy ion-acoustic (HIA) waves in an unmagnetized, collisionless, strongly coupled plasma system has been carried out. The plasma system is assumed to contain adiabatic positively charged inertial heavy ion fluids, nonextensive distributed electrons, and Maxwellian light ions. The normal mode analysis is used to study the linear behaviour. On the other hand, the well-known reductive perturbation technique is used to derive the nonlinear dynamical equations, namely, Burgers equation and Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) equation. They are also numerically analyzed in order to investigate the basic features of shock and solitary waves. The adiabatic effects on the HIA shock and solitary waves propagating in such a strongly coupled plasma are taken into account. It has been observed that the roles of the adiabatic positively charged heavy ions, nonextensivity of electrons, and other plasma parameters arised in this investigation have significantly modified the basic features (viz., polarity, amplitude, width, etc.) of the HIA solitary/shock waves. The findings of our results obtained from this theoretical investigation may be useful in understanding the linear as well as nonlinear phenomena associated with the HIA waves both in space and laboratory plasmas.

  7. Linear and nonlinear heavy ion-acoustic waves in a strongly coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ema, S. A.; Hossen, M. R.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    A theoretical study on the propagation of linear and nonlinear heavy ion-acoustic (HIA) waves in an unmagnetized, collisionless, strongly coupled plasma system has been carried out. The plasma system is assumed to contain adiabatic positively charged inertial heavy ion fluids, nonextensive distributed electrons, and Maxwellian light ions. The normal mode analysis is used to study the linear behaviour. On the other hand, the well-known reductive perturbation technique is used to derive the nonlinear dynamical equations, namely, Burgers equation and Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV) equation. They are also numerically analyzed in order to investigate the basic features of shock and solitary waves. The adiabatic effects on the HIA shock and solitary waves propagating in such a strongly coupled plasma are taken into account. It has been observed that the roles of the adiabatic positively charged heavy ions, nonextensivity of electrons, and other plasma parameters arised in this investigation have significantly modified the basic features (viz., polarity, amplitude, width, etc.) of the HIA solitary/shock waves. The findings of our results obtained from this theoretical investigation may be useful in understanding the linear as well as nonlinear phenomena associated with the HIA waves both in space and laboratory plasmas.

  8. Do nonlinear waves evolve in a universal manner in dusty and other plasma environments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Maharaj, S. K.; Moolla, S.; Lazarus, I. J.; Reddy, R. V.; Lakhina, G. S.; Lakhina

    2014-12-01

    Using a fluid theory approach, this article provides a comparative study on the evolution of nonlinear waves in dusty plasmas, as well as other plasma environments, viz electron-ion, and electron-positron plasmas. Where applicable, relevance to satellite measurements is pointed out. A range of nonlinear waves from low frequency (ion acoustic and ion cyclotron waves), high frequency (electron acoustic and electron cyclotron waves) in electron-ion plasmas, ultra-low frequency (dust acoustic and dust cyclotron waves) in dusty plasmas and in electron-positron plasmas are discussed. Depending upon the plasma parameters, saw-tooth and bipolar structures are shown to evolve.

  9. New Observation of Wave Excitation and Inverse Cascade in the Foreshock Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiansen; Duan, Die; Yan, Limei; Huang, Shiyong; Tu, Chuanyi; Marsch, Eckart; Wang, Linghua; Tian, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Foreshock with nascent plasma turbulence is regarded as a fascinating region to understand the basic plasma physical processes, e.g., wave-particle interactions as well as wave-wave couplings. Although there have been a bunch of intensive studies on this topic, some key clues about the chain of the physical processes still lacks from observations, e.g., the co-existence of upstream energetic particles as the free energy source, excited pump waves as the wave seed, inverse cascaded daughter waves, and scattered energetic particles as the end of nonlinear processes. A relatively comprehensive case study with some new observations is presented in this work. In our case, upstream energetic protons drifting at tens of Alfvén speed with respect to the background plasma protons is observed from 3DP/PESA-High onboard the WIND spacecraft. When looking at the wave magnetic activities, we are surprised to find the co-existence of high-frequency (0.1-0.5 Hz) large-amplitude right-hand polarized (RHP) waves and low-frequency (0.02-0.1 Hz) small-amplitude left-hand polarized (LHP) waves in the spacecraft (SC) frame. The anti-correlation between magnetic and velocity fluctuations along with the sunward magnetic field direction indicates the low-frequency LHP waves in the SC frame is in fact the sunward upstream RHP waves in the solar wind frame. This new observation lays solid foundation for the applicability of plasma non-resonance instability theory and inverse cascade theory to the foreshock region, in which the downstream high-frequency RHP pump waves are excited by the upstream reflected energetic protons through non-resonance instability and low-frequency RHP daughter waves are generated by the pump waves due to nonlinear parametric decay. The weak signal of alpha particle flux in the foreshock region concerned is also favorable to the occurrence of nonlinear decay process. Furthermore, enhanced downstream energetic proton fluxes are found and inferred to be scattered by

  10. Simulation studies of plasma waves in the electron foreshock - The generation of downshifted oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dum, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    The generation of waves with frequencies downshifted from the plasma frequency, as observed in the electron foreshock, is analyzed by particle simulation. Wave excitation differs fundamentally from the familiar excitation of the plasma eigenmodes by a gentle bump-on-tail electron distribution. Beam modes are destabilized by resonant interaction with bulk electrons, provided the beam velocity spread is very small. These modes are stabilized, starting with the higher frequencies, as the beam is broadened and slowed down by the interaction with the wave spectrum. Initially a very cold beam is also capable of exciting frequencies considerably above the plasma frequency, but such oscillations are quickly stabilized. Low-frequency modes persist for a long time, until the bump in the electron distribution is completely 'ironed' out. This diffusion process also is quite different from the familiar case of well-separated beam and bulk electrons. A quantitative analysis of these processes is carried out.

  11. Electrostatic waves in plasma: the case of an expanding microwave plasma sustained in argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauberteau, J. L.; Jauberteau, I.

    2014-12-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the electrostatic wave dispersion in plasma. Investigations are focused on waves with angular frequency ranging between the ion and the electron angular resonance frequency. The dispersion equation is resolved by means of a Fourier transform spectral method in the case of theoretical Maxwell-Boltzmann electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs), and in the case of experimental EEDFs measured by means of a Langmuir probe in microwave expanding plasma sustained in argon. The results show the change of the dispersion curve with the plasma parameters and the role of electrons and ions in the shape of the dispersion curve.

  12. Wave instabilities in an anisotropic magnetized space plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhalilov, N. S.; Kuznetsov, V. D.; Staude, J.

    2008-10-01

    Aims: We study wave instability in an collisionless, rarefied hot plasma (e.g. solar wind or corona). We consider the anisotropy produced by the magnetic field, when the thermal gas pressures across and along the field become unequal. Methods: We apply the 16-moment transport equations (obtained from the Boltzmann-Vlasov kinetic equation) including the anisotropic thermal fluxes. The general dispersion relation for the incompressible wave modes is derived. Results: It is shown that a new, more complex wave spectrum with stable and unstable behavior is possible, in contrast to the classic fire-hose modes obtained in terms of the 13-moment integrated equations.

  13. Interpretation of measurements of the polarization percentage for plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pincon, J. L.; Marouan, Y.; Lefeuvre, F.

    1992-02-01

    The conditions of the application of the pure-state concept to the analysis of a plasma wave in a magnetoplasma are studied. Estimations of the Samson percentage of polarization are discussed. The best results are obtained with the minimum prediction error estimator. Simple physical interpretation is possible when the estimator is derived from the three magnetic-wave-field components only. There is an exception for electrostatic waves. Propagation modes and the region of the Clemmow-Mullaly-Allis diagram exist for which the percentage of polarization may be considered as a measure of the dispersion in k vectors.

  14. Plasma effect in tape helix traveling-wave tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saviz, S.; Salehizadeh, F.

    2014-05-01

    A linearized relativistic field theory of a plasma-loaded helix traveling-wave tube is presented for a configuration where a solid electron beam propagate through a sheath helix enclosed within a loss-free wall in which the gap between the helix and the outer wall is filled with a dielectric. Numerical study of the effect of plasma density on the phase velocity and growth rate has been done. Numerical results show that the plasma have different behaviors in different density limits.

  15. Collapse of nonlinear surface dust sound waves in the system dusty plasma-dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimalsky, Vladimir; Koshevaya, Svetlana; Medina, Ivan Luis; Kotsarenko, Anatoliy; Perez Enriquez, Hector Roman

    2010-05-01

    Dusty plasmas in space, the Earth's ionosphere, in volcano fumaroles, and under laboratory conditions now are under investigations. An important property of dusty plasmas is the support of various waves and oscillations, both linear and nonlinear ones. The dusty plasmas can be bounded, for instance, in the volcano fumaroles, in laboratories, or near spacecrafts, and are the waveguides for surface plasma waves. Note that in the surface plasma waves the oscillations of the surface charge take place. Even in the case when the volume nonlinearity is small, the variations of the dust concentration near the interface can reach essential values. Moreover, because the dust concentration is principally nonnegative, the surface nonlinearity cannot be considered as moderate. In the report, the nonlinear monopulses of surface dust sound waves in the system dusty plasma - dielectric are investigated. The waves propagate along z-axis whereas they are localized in x-direction near the interface. The dusty plasma includes the positive ions (light component) and the negative dust (heavy component). The set of hydrodynamic equations for the dust, namely, the continuity equation and the equation for the momentum, jointly with the Poisson one are used. The Boltzmann distribution is used for the ions. The electric and hydrodynamic boundary conditions are applied at the interface. The initial condition for the electric potential is monopulse-like, both along z and x axes. The simulations demonstrate that the monopulses of small amplitudes are subject to dispersion and diffraction. But when the moderate nonlinearity manifests, the pulse dynamics change drastically. Namely, near the interface the variations of the dust concentration reach extremely high values, where the collapse of the surface dust sound waves occurs. The estimations have demonstrated that the pointed above phenomena can be observed in fumaroles under volcano eruptions.

  16. Registration of ELF waves in rocket-satellite experiment with plasma injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobeinikov, V. G.; Oraevskii, V. N.; Ruzhin, Iu. Ia.; Sobolev, Ia. P.; Skomarovskii, V. S.; Chmyrev, V. M.; Namazov, C. A.; Pokhunkov, A. A.; Nesmeianov, V. I.

    1992-12-01

    Two rocket KOMBI-SAMA experiments with plasma injection at height 100-240 km were performed in August 1987 in the region of Brazilian magnetic anomaly (L = 1.25). The launching time of the rocket was determined so that plasma injection was at the time when COSMOS 1809 satellite passed as close as possible to magnetic tube of injection. Caesium plasma jet was produced during not less than 300 s by an electric plasma generator separated from the payload. When the satellite passed the geomagnetic tube intersecting the injection region an enhancement of ELF emission at 140 Hz, 450 Hz by a factor of 2 was registered on board the satellite. An enhancement of energetic particle flux by a factor of 4-5 was registered on board the rocket. Observed ELF emission below 100 Hz is interpreted as the generation of oblique electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves due to drift plasma instability at the front of the plasma jet.

  17. RF wave propagation and scattering in turbulent tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W. Michoski, C.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2015-12-10

    Drift wave turbulence driven by the steep electron and ion temperature gradients in H-mode divertor tokamaks produce scattering of the RF waves used for heating and current drive. The X-ray emission spectra produced by the fast electrons require the turbulence broaden RF wave spectrum. Both the 5 GHz Lower Hybrid waves and the 170 GHz electron cyclotron [EC] RF waves experience scattering and diffraction by the electron density fluctuations. With strong LHCD there are bifurcations in the coupled turbulent transport dynamics giving improved steady-state confinement states. The stochastic scattering of the RF rays makes the prediction of the distribution of the rays and the associated particle heating a statistical problem. Thus, we introduce a Fokker-Planck equation for the probably density of the RF rays. The general frame work of the coupled system of coupled high frequency current driving rays with the low-frequency turbulent transport determines the profiles of the plasma density and temperatures.

  18. Surface waves in magnetized quantum electron-positron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, A. P.; Ghosh, N. K.; Shukla, P. K.

    2010-02-01

    The dispersion properties of electrostatic surface waves propagating along the interface between a quantum magnetoplasma composed of electrons and positrons, and vacuum are studied by using a quantum magnetohydrodynamic plasma model. The general dispersion relation for arbitrary orientation of the magnetic field and the propagation vector is derived and analyzed in some special cases of interest (viz. when the magnetic field is directed parallel and perpendicular to the boundary surface). It is found that the quantum effects facilitate the propagation of electrostatic surface modes in a dense magnetoplasma. The effect of the external magnetic field is found to increase the frequency of the quantum surface wave. The existence of a singular wave on the boundary surface is also proved, and its properties are analyzed numerically. It is shown that the new wave characteristics appear due to the Rayleigh type of the wave.

  19. RF wave propagation and scattering in turbulent tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W.; Michoski, C.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2015-12-01

    Drift wave turbulence driven by the steep electron and ion temperature gradients in H-mode divertor tokamaks produce scattering of the RF waves used for heating and current drive. The X-ray emission spectra produced by the fast electrons require the turbulence broaden RF wave spectrum. Both the 5 GHz Lower Hybrid waves and the 170 GHz electron cyclotron [EC] RF waves experience scattering and diffraction by the electron density fluctuations. With strong LHCD there are bifurcations in the coupled turbulent transport dynamics giving improved steady-state confinement states. The stochastic scattering of the RF rays makes the prediction of the distribution of the rays and the associated particle heating a statistical problem. Thus, we introduce a Fokker-Planck equation for the probably density of the RF rays. The general frame work of the coupled system of coupled high frequency current driving rays with the low-frequency turbulent transport determines the profiles of the plasma density and temperatures.

  20. Interaction of High Intensity Electromagnetic Waves with Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    G. Shvets

    2008-10-03

    The focus of our work during the duration of this grant was on the following areas: (a) the fundamental plasma physics of intense laser-plasma interactions, including the nonlinear excitation of plasma waves for accelerator applications, as well as the recently discovered by us phenomenon of the relativistic bi-stability of relativistic plasma waves driven by a laser beatwave; (b) interaction of high power microwave beams with magnetized plasma, including some of the recently discovered by us phenomena such as the Undulator Induced Transparency (UIT) as well as the new approaches to dynamic manipulation of microwave pulses; (c) investigations of the multi-color laser pulse interactions in the plasma, including the recently discovered by us phenomenon of Electromagnetic Cascading (EC) and the effect of the EC of three-dimensional dynamics of laser pulses (enhanced/suppressed selffocusing etc.); (d) interaction of high-current electron beams with the ambient plasma in the context of Fast Ignitor (FI) physics, with the emphasis on the nonlinear dynamics of the Weibel instability and beam filamentation.