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Sample records for plasma-induced mast cell

  1. Mast cell activation disorders.

    PubMed

    Akin, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Disorders associated with mast cell activation range from relatively common IgE-mediated disease and chronic urticaria to rarer conditions such as mastocytosis or monoclonal mast cell activation disorder. Mast cell activation disorders can be mechanistically classified into primary (associated with abnormal production of mast cells that carry pathologic markers of clonality), secondary (normal mast cells activated in reaction to a microenvironmental trigger), and idiopathic (no etiology is found). Clinical presentations, diagnostic criteria as well as general principles of a stepwise therapy approach are discussed.

  2. Mast Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Elaine Zayas Marcelino; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2014-01-01

    Since first described by Paul Ehrlich in 1878, mast cells have been mostly viewed as effectors of allergy. It has been only in the past two decades that mast cells have gained recognition for their involvement in other physiological and pathological processes. Mast cells have a widespread distribution and are found predominantly at the interface between the host and the external environment. Mast cell maturation, phenotype and function are a direct consequence of the local microenvironment and have a marked influence on their ability to specifically recognize and respond to various stimuli through the release of an array of biologically active mediators. These features enable mast cells to act as both first responders in harmful situations as well as to respond to changes in their environment by communicating with a variety of other cells implicated in physiological and immunological responses. Therefore, the critical role of mast cells in both innate and adaptive immunity, including immune tolerance, has gained increased prominence. Conversely, mast cell dysfunction has pointed to these cells as the main offenders in several chronic allergic/inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the current knowledge of mast cell function in both normal and pathological conditions with regards to their regulation, phenotype and role. PMID:25062998

  3. Mast cells and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Laurent; Hermine, Olivier

    2013-03-01

    The prominent role for mast cells in the inflammatory response has been increasingly well documented in recent years. Mast cells not only contribute to maintain homeostasis via degranulation and to generate IgE-mediated allergic reactions, but also sit at a major crossroads for both innate and adaptive immune responses. The part played by mast cells in chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis identifies mast cells as a valuable treatment target in these diseases. Tyrosine-kinase inhibitors targeting the c-Kit mast cell receptor have been found effective in treating rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, and multiple sclerosis. When used in combination with other available drugs, tyrosine-kinase inhibitors may improve the therapeutic management of these diseases.

  4. Mast cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Dubreuil, Patrice; Chandesris, Marie-Olivia; Hermine, Olivier; Damaj, Gandhi

    2013-02-21

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is a very rare form of aggressive systemic mastocytosis accounting for < 1% of all mastocytosis. It may appear de novo or secondary to previous mastocytosis and shares more clinicopathologic aspects with systemic mastocytosis than with acute myeloid leukemia. Symptoms of mast cell activation-involvement of the liver, spleen, peritoneum, bones, and marrow-are frequent. Diagnosis is based on the presence of ≥ 20% atypical mast cells in the marrow or ≥ 10% in the blood; however, an aleukemic variant is frequently encountered in which the number of circulating mast cells is < 10%. The common phenotypic features of pathologic mast cells encountered in most forms of mastocytosis are unreliable in MCL. Unexpectedly, non-KIT D816V mutations are frequent and therefore, complete gene sequencing is necessary. Therapy usually fails and the median survival time is < 6 months. The role of combination therapies and bone marrow transplantation needs further investigation.

  5. Mast cells and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Stassen, Michael; Hültner, Lothar; Müller, Christian; Schmitt, Edgar

    2002-01-01

    Mast cells have long been recognized as potent producers of a large panel of biologically highly active mediators such as biogenic amines, arachidonic acid metabolites, cytokines and chemokines, but most of their biological functions have been elusive and speculative. By taking advantage of mast cell-deficient mice, the role of mast cells in a variety of experimental settings can now be studied in detail and such approaches have dramatically altered and enlarged our knowledge about mast cell biology and function. Herein we will focus on the role of mast cells in inflammatory reactions of diverse origin, such as delayed type hypersensitivity, atopy, immune complex-mediated inflammation and innate immune responses. From the current standpoint, there is no doubt that the most outstanding and beneficial feature of mast cells is their recently discovered ability to induce a life-saving inflammatory response rapidly upon encountering microbes and microbial constituents. Nevertheless, the picture is also emerging that mast cells are deeply involved in the induction and maintenance of a variety of severe allergic and autoimmune diseases. However, a deeper understanding of their activation and immune-modulatory capacity might open a new window for the development of curative strategies.

  6. Mast cells and mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Mast cells have been recognized for well over 100 years. With time, human mast cells have been documented to originate from CD34+ cells, and have been implicated in host responses in both innate and acquired immunity. In clinical immunology, they are recognized for their central role in IgE-mediated degranulation and allergic inflammation by virtue of their expression of the high-affinity receptor for IgE and release of potent proinflammatory mediators. In hematology, the clinical disease of mastocytosis is characterized by a pathologic increase of mast cells in tissues, often associated with mutations in KIT, the receptor for stem cell factor. More recently, and with increased understanding of how human mast cells are activated through receptors including the high-affinity receptor for IgE and KIT, specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been identified with the potential to interrupt signaling pathways and thus limit the proliferation of mast cells as well as their activation through immunoglobulin receptors. PMID:18684881

  7. Distinguishing Mast Cell Progenitors from Mature Mast Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Joakim S; Ding, Zhoujie; Hallgren, Jenny

    2015-07-15

    Mast cells originate from the bone marrow and develop into c-kit(+) FcɛRI(+) cells. Both mast cell progenitors (MCp) and mature mast cells express these cell surface markers, and ways validated to distinguish between the two maturation forms with flow cytometry have been lacking. Here, we show that primary peritoneal MCp from naïve mice expressed high levels of integrin β7 and had a low side scatter (SSC) light profile; whereas mature mast cells expressed lower levels of integrin β7 and had a high SSC light profile. The maturation statuses of the cells were confirmed using three main strategies: (1) MCp, but not mature mast cells, were shown to be depleted by sublethal whole-body γ-irradiation. (2) The MCp were small and immature in terms of granule formation, whereas the mature mast cells were larger and had fully developed metachromatic granules. (3) The MCp had fewer transcripts of mast cell-specific proteases and the enzyme responsible for sulfation of heparin than mature mast cells. Moreover, isolated peritoneal MCp gave rise to mast cells when cultured in vitro. To summarize, we have defined MCp and mature mast cells in naïve mice by flow cytometry. Using this strategy, mast cell maturation can be studied in vivo.

  8. Mast Cell and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunzhi; Chen, Guangjie

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are important in innate immune system. They have been appreciated as potent contributors to allergic reaction. However, increasing evidence implicates the important role of mast cells in autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Here we review the current stage of knowledge about mast cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:25944979

  9. Tetraspanins in Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Köberle, Martin; Kaesler, Susanne; Kempf, Wolfgang; Wölbing, Florian; Biedermann, Tilo

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) are key mediators of the immune system, most prominently known for their role in eliciting harmful allergic reactions. Mast cell mediator release (e.g. by degranulation) is triggered by FcεRI recognition of antigen – IgE complexes. Until today no therapeutic targeting of this and other mast cell activation pathways is established. Among possible new candidates there are tetraspanins that have been described on MC already several years ago. Tetraspanins are transmembrane proteins acting as scaffolds, mediating local clustering of their interaction partners, and thus amplify their activities. More recently, tetraspanins were also found to exert intrinsic receptor functions. Tetraspanins have been found to be crucial components of fundamental biological processes like cell motility and adhesion. In immune cells, they not only boost the effectiveness of antigen presentation by clustering MHC molecules, they are also key players in all kinds of degranulation events and immune receptor clustering. This review focuses on the contribution of tetraspanins clustered with FcεRI or residing in granule membranes to classical MC functions but also undertakes an outlook on the possible contribution of tetraspanins to newly described mast cell functions and discusses possible targets for drug development. PMID:22783251

  10. Mast cells and COPD.

    PubMed

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Folkerts, Gert; Redegeld, Frank

    2011-08-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is based on the innate and adaptive inflammatory immune response to the inhalation of toxic particles and gases. Although tobacco smoking is the primary cause of this inhalation injury, many other environmental and occupational exposures contribute to the pathology of COPD. The immune inflammatory changes associated with COPD are linked to a tissue-repair and -remodeling process that increases mucus production and causes emphysematous destruction of the gas-exchanging surface of the lung. The common form of emphysema observed in smokers begins in the respiratory bronchioles near the thickened and narrowed small bronchioles that become the major site of obstruction in COPD. The inflamed airways of COPD patients contain several inflammatory cells including neutrophils, macrophages, T lymphocytes, and dendritic cells. The relative contribution of mast cells to airway injury and remodeling is not well documented. In this review, an overview is given on the possible role of mast cells and their mediators in the pathogenesis of COPD. Activation of mast cells and mast cell signaling in response to exposure to cigarette smoke is further discussed.

  11. Human mast cell transcriptome project.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Nakajima, T; Matsumoto, K

    2001-05-01

    After draft reading of the human genome sequence, systemic analysis of the transcriptome (the whole transcripts present in a cell) is progressing especially in commonly available cell types. Until recently, human mast cells were not commonly available. We have succeeded to generate a substantial number of human mast cells from umbilical cord blood and from adult peripheral blood progenitors. Then, we have examined messenger RNA selectively transcribed in these mast cells using high-density oligonucleotide probe arrays. Many unexpected but important transcripts were selectively expressed in human mast cells. We discuss the results obtained from transcriptome screening by introducing our data regarding mast-cell-specific genes.

  12. Mast cells in neoangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nienartowicz, Andrzej; Sobaniec-Łotowska, Maria E; Jarocka-Cyrta, Elzbieta; Lemancewicz, Dorota

    2006-03-01

    Mast cells (MCs) always accompany connective tissue and are located in the proximity of lymphatic and blood vessels and nerve fibers. They are round or oval mononuclear cells with a diameter of 4-20 microm containing in their cytoplasm specific exocrine granules (storing neutral proteases) enclosed by a single membrane, whose presence is regarded as an index of the MC's static state. In view of their wide distribution in the organism, they play various roles in, for example, type I hypersensitivity reactions, chronic inflammatory processes, tissue reconstruction and wound healing, and pathological pulmonary fibrosis. They also play a role in angiogenesis, both in normal conditions during tissue regeneration and in pathological neoplastic states. The microcirculation provides building and nutritional substances to cancer cells and enables cancer spread via the blood. On the other hand, a tumor with good vascularization is more prone to penetration by cytostatics, which is why angiogenesis is a very important process in the course of neoplastic disease. Many authors indicate a close association between mast cells and angiogenesis. Some substances contained in the cytoplasm of these cells are potent stimulators of angiogenesis (tryptase, heparin), while others may inhibit it (protamine, platelet factor 4), and this conditions cancer growth and the development of the metastatic process. It is not known, however, what interactions occur between stimulants and inhibitors and what the proportional involvement of particular mediators in the formation of new vessels is.

  13. Mast cells in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Toshiaki; Ando, Tomoaki; Kimura, Miho; Wilson, Bridget S.; Kawakami, Yuko

    2009-01-01

    Summary of Recent Advances Mast cells play as the major effector cells in immediate hypersensitivity through activation via the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, although many other functions have recently been discovered for this cell type. Given the broad array of proinflammatory mediators secreted from FcεRI-activated mast cells, as well as sensitization to allergens, IgE elevation, and increased mast cells in a majority of atopic dermatitis patients, mast cells are believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Numerous animal models have been used to study this epidemic disease. Here we review the recent progress to synthesize our current understanding of this disease and potential mechanisms for a mast cell's role in the disease. PMID:19828304

  14. Bacterial activation of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Chi, David S; Walker, Elaine S; Hossler, Fred E; Krishnaswamy, Guha

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells often are found in a perivascular location but especially in mucosae, where they may response to various stimuli. They typically associate with immediate hypersensitive responses and are likely to play a critical role in host defense. In this chapter, a common airway pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis, and a commensal bacterium, Neiserria cinerea, are used to illustrate activation of human mast cells. A human mast cell line (HMC-1) derived from a patient with mast cell leukemia was activated with varying concentrations of heat-killed bacteria. Active aggregation of bacteria over mast cell surfaces was detected by scanning electron microscopy. The activation of mast cells was analyzed by nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and cytokine production in culture supernatants. Both M. catarrhalis and N. cinerea induce mast cell activation and the secretion of two key inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-6 and MCP-1. This is accompanied by NF-kappaB activation. Direct bacterial contact with mast cells appears to be essential for this activation because neither cell-free bacterial supernatants nor bacterial lipopolysaccharide induce cytokine secretion.

  15. Mast cells in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Suurmond, Jolien; van der Velden, Daniël; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze; Toes, René E M

    2016-05-05

    Rheumatoid Arthritis is a chronic autoimmune disease with a complex disease pathogenesis leading to inflammation and destruction of synovial tissue in the joint. Several molecules lead to activation of immune pathways, including autoantibodies, Toll-Like Receptor ligands and cytokines. These pathways can cooperate to create the pro-inflammatory environment that results in tissue destruction. Each of these pathways can activate mast cells, inducing the release of a variety of inflammatory mediators, and in combination can markedly enhance mast cell responses. Mast cell-derived cytokines, chemokines, and proteases have the potential to induce recruitment of other leukocytes able to evoke tissue remodeling or destruction. Likewise, mast cells can secrete a plethora of factors that can contribute to tissue remodeling and fibroblast activation. Although the functional role of mast cells in arthritis pathogenesis in mice is not yet elucidated, the increased numbers of mast cells and mast cell-specific mediators in synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients suggest that mast cell activation in rheumatoid arthritis may contribute to its pathogenesis.

  16. Mast cells in gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Stephan C

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells are constitutively found in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The three major physiological functions of GI mast cells comprise of - as far as we know - regulation of GI functions, namely epithelial and endothelial functions, crosstalk with the enteric nervous system, and contribution to the host defense against bacterial, viral and parasitic agents. A number of chronic GI diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis), celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and food allergies, are thought to be associated with mast cell hyperplasia and humoral activity. Clinical conditions characterized by a decrease in mast cell functionality are not known so far. In the present review, we summarize current evidence which show that human mast cells play a central role at the GI barrier, both in health and disease.

  17. Mast cells enhance T cell activation: Importance of mast cell-derived TNF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, Susumu; Suto, Hajime; Kakurai, Maki; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2005-05-01

    Mast cells are not only important effector cells in immediate hypersensitivity reactions and immune responses to pathogens but also can contribute to T cell-mediated disorders. However, the mechanisms by which mast cells might influence T cells in such settings are not fully understood. We find that mast cells can enhance proliferation and cytokine production in multiple T cell subsets. Mast cell-dependent enhancement of T cell activation can be promoted by FcRI-dependent mast cell activation, TNF production by both mast cells and T cells, and mast cell-T cell contact. However, at high concentrations of cells, mast cells can promote T cell activation independent of IgE or TNF. Finally, mast cells also can promote T cell activation by means of soluble factors. These findings identify multiple mechanisms by which mast cells can influence T cell proliferation and cytokine production. allergy | asthma | autoimmunity | cytokines | immune response

  18. Mast cell sarcoma: clinical management.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Catherine R; Butterfield, Joseph

    2014-05-01

    Mast cell sarcoma is a disorder that results in abnormal mast cells as identified by morphology, special stains, and in some publications, c-kit mutation analysis. It affects animal species such as canines more commonly than humans. In humans it is a very rare condition, with variable clinical presentation. There is no standard therapy for the disorder. It can affect any age group. It is occasionally associated with systemic mastocytosis and/or urticaria pigmentosa. The prognosis of mast cell sarcoma in published literature is very poor in humans.

  19. Immunotherapy and mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Carlos, A G; Carlos, M L; Santos, M A; Pedro, E; Santos, S; Lopes-Pregal, A

    1998-10-01

    Tryptase is the more specific markers for mast cell activation and mediators release and can be used as an index of mast cell activation after challenge. Nasal provocation tests have been done in patients allergic to the pollen of Parietaria (pellitory wall) before and after specific systemic immunotherapy and tryptase release evaluated in nasal lavage fluid. After specific immunotherapy the concentration of tryptase in nasal lavage was significantly decreased to all the concentrations used in challenge and the peack of tryptase release was delayed. These results confirm that assays of tryptase in nasal fluid after nasal provocation are a reliable markers of mast cell activation. Immunotherapy with specific allergen decreases mast cell reactivity to the same allergen.

  20. Cytoskeleton in Mast Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dráber, Pavel; Sulimenko, Vadym; Dráberová, Eduarda

    2012-01-01

    Mast cell activation mediated by the high affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI) is a key event in allergic response and inflammation. Other receptors on mast cells, as c-Kit for stem cell factor and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) synergistically enhance the FcεRI-mediated release of inflammatory mediators. Activation of various signaling pathways in mast cells results in changes in cell morphology, adhesion to substrate, exocytosis, and migration. Reorganization of cytoskeleton is pivotal in all these processes. Cytoskeletal proteins also play an important role in initial stages of FcεRI and other surface receptors induced triggering. Highly dynamic microtubules formed by αβ-tubulin dimers as well as microfilaments build up from polymerized actin are affected in activated cells by kinases/phosphatases, Rho GTPases and changes in concentration of cytosolic Ca2+. Also important are nucleation proteins; the γ-tubulin complexes in case of microtubules or Arp 2/3 complex with its nucleation promoting factors and formins in case of microfilaments. The dynamic nature of microtubules and microfilaments in activated cells depends on many associated/regulatory proteins. Changes in rigidity of activated mast cells reflect changes in intermediate filaments build up from vimentin. This review offers a critical appraisal of current knowledge on the role of cytoskeleton in mast cells signaling. PMID:22654883

  1. Mast cells in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jean S; Jawdat, Dunia M

    2004-07-01

    Mast cells have been most extensively studied in their traditional role as an early effector cell of allergic disease. However, in the majority of individuals, it might be the role of this cell as a sentinel in host defense that is most important. Mast cells have been repeatedly demonstrated to play a critical role in defense against bacterial infections, and evidence for their involvement in early responses to viral and fungal pathogens is growing. Mast cells are activated during innate immune responses by multiple mechanisms, including well-established responses to complement components. In addition, novel mechanisms have emerged as a result of the explosion of knowledge in our understanding of pattern-recognition receptors. The mast cell shares many features with other innate immune effector cells, such as neutrophils and macrophages. However, a unique role for mast cells is defined not only by their extensive mediator profile but also by their ability to interact with the vasculature, to expedite selective cell recruitment, and to set the stage for an appropriate acquired response. Copyright 2004 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

  2. Targeting mast cells in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Reber, Laurent L; Frossard, Nelly

    2014-06-01

    Although mast cells have long been known to play a critical role in anaphylaxis and other allergic diseases, they also participate in some innate immune responses and may even have some protective functions. Data from the study of mast cell-deficient mice have facilitated our understanding of some of the molecular mechanisms driving mast cell functions during both innate and adaptive immune responses. This review presents an overview of the biology of mast cells and their potential involvement in various inflammatory diseases. We then discuss some of the current pharmacological approaches used to target mast cells and their products in several diseases associated with mast cell activation.

  3. Mast cell ontogeny: an historical overview.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells were first identified by Paul Ehrlich in 1878, when he was still a medical student. Many fundamental aspects of mast cell ontogeny have been elucidated since Ehrlich's first identification. Demonstration of mast cell derivation from bone marrow precursors could be established in 1977 when Kitamura's group first showed reconstitution of mast cells in mast cell-deficient mice by the adaptive transfer of wild type bone marrow and indicated that these cells were of hematopoietic origin. It is now definitively established that development of mast cells in bone marrow occurs along the myeloid pathway. However, several aspects need further clarification. In particular, identification and chemical characterization of growth factors expressing mast cell differentiating properties and the relationship between mast cell and basophils developmental pathways.

  4. Mast Cell Proteases and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hongyan; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are best known for their role in allergic reactions but are also now recognized for their important contributions to a number of disparate inflammatory conditions through the release of inflammatory mediators, serglycin and other proteoglycans, and proteases. Because these tissue resident inflammatory cells express proteases in such great abundance and their enzymatic activity results in cleavage of a multitude of proteins and peptides, which in turn modify tissue function, their substrate specificity, tissue distribution, and mode of action have become the subjects of great interest. Although mast cell protease-dependent proteolysis is critical to host defense against invading pathogens, regulation of these hydrolytic enzymes is essential to limiting self-induced damage as well. Indeed, dysregulated release of mast cell proteases is now recognized to contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of inflammatory conditions including asthma, abdominal aortic aneurysm formation, vessel damage in atherosclerosis and hypertension, arthritis, and ischemia/reperfusion injury. Understanding how mast cell proteases contribute to inflammation will thus help unravel molecular mechanisms that underlie such immunologic disorders and will help identify new therapeutic targets for drug development. PMID:22125569

  5. Mast cell infiltrates in vulvodynia represent secondary and idiopathic mast cell hyperplasias.

    PubMed

    Regauer, Sigrid; Eberz, Barbara; Beham-Schmid, Christine

    2015-05-01

    Mast cell infiltrates in tissues of vulvodynia are common, but they have not been characterized for criteria of neoplastic mast cell disease or correlated with patient's concomitant diseases associated with increased mast cells. Formalin-fixed specimens of 35 patients with vulvodynia were evaluated immunohistochemically with antibodies to CD 3,4,8,20,117c and human mast cell tryptase, and for WHO-criteria of neoplastic mastocytosis (>25% spindled mast cell, CD25 expression, point mutations of the c-kit gene (D816V), and chronically elevated serum tryptase levels). Only 20/35 specimens showed a T-lymphocyte dominant inflammatory infiltrate on HE-stained sections, but all showed mast cells. 4/35 biopsies showed <10 mast cells/mm(2) , 15/35 specimens 40-60 mast cells/mm(2) and 16/35 specimens >60 mast cells/mm(2) (average 80/mm(2) ). Control tissue contained typically <10 mast cells/mm(2) . Spindling, CD25-expression, c-kit gene mutations, or increased serum tryptase levels were not detected. 26/35 (74%) patients had concomitant autoimmune diseases, psoriasis, atopy, various allergies, preceding infections. Independent of the subtype of vulvodynia, the majority of mast cell rich biopsies with >40 mast cells/mm(2) were classified as a secondary mast cell disorder reflecting an activated immune system in 75% of vulvodynia patients. Patients with increased mast cells may benefit from medical therapy targeting mast cells.

  6. Mast cell activation syndromes presenting as anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Akin, Cem

    2015-05-01

    Anaphylaxis results from severe systemic mast cell activation. In addition to IgE-mediated and physical triggers, it may occur with a clonal mast cell disease and in an idiopathic fashion without clear provoking factors. Disorders of mast cell activation are classified into primary (clonal), secondary, and idiopathic. Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by objective documentation of elevated mast cell mediators during attacks and a favorable response to antimediator therapy. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with recurrent anaphylaxis without a clear cause. This article discusses the diagnosis of MCAS.

  7. An update on mast cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Hannah; Grattan, Clive

    2016-12-01

    Disorders of mast cell activation can be classified as primary (mastocytosis), secondary (reactive) or idiopathic. This article discusses how to recognise and approach the diagnosis of patients suspected to have symptoms of abnormal mast cell activation. Given the highly varied and often complex symptomatology of such patients, we advocate applying a logical step-wise approach to investigating these patients to ensure the correct diagnosis is made. Treatments of mast cell activation disorders are discussed, dividing them into those that ameliorate the effects of mast cell mediators and those that act to stabilise the mast cell.

  8. Lipid Rafts in Mast Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Silveira e Souza, Adriana Maria Mariano; Mazucato, Vivian Marino; Jamur, Maria Célia; Oliver, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells have long been recognized to have a direct and critical role in allergic and inflammatory reactions. In allergic diseases, these cells exert both local and systemic responses, including allergic rhinitis and anaphylaxis. Mast cell mediators are also related to many chronic inflammatory conditions. Besides the roles in pathological conditions, the biological functions of mast cells include roles in innate immunity, involvement in host defense mechanisms against parasites, immunomodulation of the immune system, tissue repair, and angiogenesis. Despite their growing significance in physiological and pathological conditions, much still remains to be learned about mast cell biology. This paper presents evidence that lipid rafts or raft components modulate many of the biological processes in mast cells, such as degranulation and endocytosis, play a role in mast cell development and recruitment, and contribute to the overall preservation of mast cell structure and organization. PMID:21490812

  9. Mast Cells in Allergic Diseases and Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Diana L.; Wasserman, Stephen I.

    1982-01-01

    Mast cells with their stores of vasoactive and chemotactic mediators are central to the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. The cross-linking of receptorbound IgE molecules on the surface of mast cells initiates a complex chain of events, including calcium ion influx, phospholipid methylation and turnover and cyclic nucleotide metabolism, ultimately resulting in the release of mediators of immediate hypersensitivity. These mast cell mediators are important in smooth muscle reactivity, in the recruitment of eosinophilic and neutrophilic leukocytes and in the generation of secondary chemical mediators. Histologic evidence of mast cell degranulation, biochemical evidence of mast cell mediators in blood and tissues and clinical evidence of signs and symptoms reproducible by these mediators have strongly supported the crucial role of mast cells in asthma, urticaria, anaphylaxis, rhinitis and mastocytosis. Because of their unique location at host environment interfaces, mast cells may both participate in allergic diseases and promote homeostasis. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:6293204

  10. Listeria monocytogenes induces mast cell extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Campillo-Navarro, Marcia; Leyva-Paredes, Kahiry; Donis-Maturano, Luis; González-Jiménez, Marco; Paredes-Vivas, Yuriria; Cerbulo-Vázquez, Arturo; Serafín-López, Jeanet; García-Pérez, Blanca; Ullrich, Stephen E; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Pérez-Tapia, Sonia M; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-García, Iris; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel

    2017-02-01

    Mast cells play an essential role in different immunological phenomena including allergy and infectious diseases. Several bacteria induce mast cell activation leading to degranulation and the production of several cytokines and chemokines. However, mast cells also have different microbicidal activities such as phagocytosis and the release of DNA with embedded granular proteins known as Mast Cell Extracellular Traps (MCETs). Although previous reports indicate that extracellular bacteria are able to induce MCETs little is known if intracellular bacteria can induce these structures. In this work, we evaluated MCETs induction by the intracellular bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. We found that mast cells released DNA after stimulation with L. monocytogenes, and this DNA was complexed to histone and tryptase. Before extracellular DNA release, L. monocytogenes induced modifications to the mast cell nuclear envelope and DNA was detected outside the nucleus. L. monocytogenes stimulated mast cells to produce significant amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and blocking NADPH oxidase diminished DNA release by mast cells. Finally, MCETs showed antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes that was partially blocked when β-hexosaminidase activity was inhibited. These results show that L. monocytogenes induces mast cells to produce microbicidal MCETs, suggesting a role for mast cells in containing infection beyond the induction of inflammation.

  11. Mast cells as effectors in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bot, Ilze; Shi, Guo-Ping; Kovanen, Petri T

    2015-02-01

    The mast cell is a potent immune cell known for its functions in host defense responses and diseases, such as asthma and allergies. In the past years, accumulating evidence established the contribution of the mast cell to cardiovascular diseases as well, in particular, by its effects on atherosclerotic plaque progression and destabilization. Through its release not only of mediators, such as the mast cell-specific proteases chymase and tryptase, but also of growth factors, histamine, and chemokines, activated mast cells can have detrimental effects on its immediate surroundings in the vessel wall. This results in matrix degradation, apoptosis, and enhanced recruitment of inflammatory cells, thereby actively contributing to cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge on mast cell function in cardiovascular diseases and speculate on potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent acute cardiovascular syndromes via targeting of mast cells.

  12. Mast cells as effectors in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bot, Ilze; Shi, Guo-Ping; Kovanen, Petri T.

    2014-01-01

    The mast cell is a potent immune cell known for its functions in host defense responses and diseases such as asthma and allergies. In the past years, accumulating evidence established the contribution of the mast cell to cardiovascular diseases as well, in particular by its effects on atherosclerotic plaque progression and destabilization. Through its release of mediators, such as the mast cell-specific proteases chymase and tryptase, but also of growth factors, histamine and chemokines, activated mast cells can have detrimental effects on its immediate surroundings in the vessel wall. This results in matrix degradation, apoptosis and enhanced recruitment of inflammatory cells, thereby actively contributing to cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge on mast cell function in cardiovascular diseases and speculate on potential novel therapeutic strategies to prevent acute cardiovascular syndromes via targeting of mast cells. PMID:25104798

  13. The role of mast cells in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wezel, A; Quax, P H A; Kuiper, J; Bot, I

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque is the major underlying cause of adverse cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction or stroke. Therapeutic interventions should therefore be directed towards inhibiting growth of atherosclerotic lesions as well as towards prevention of lesion destabilization. Interestingly, the presence of mast cells has been demonstrated in both murine and human plaques, and multiple interventional murine studies have pointed out a direct role for mast cells in early and late stages of atherosclerosis. Moreover, it has recently been described that activated lesional mast cells correlate with major cardiovascular events in patients suffering from cardiovascular disease. This review focuses on the effect of different mast cell derived mediators in atherogenesis and in late stage plaque destabilization. Also, possible ligands for mast cell activation in the context of atherosclerosis are discussed. Finally, we will elaborate on the predictive value of mast cells, together with therapeutic implications, in cardiovascular disease.

  14. Mast Cell-Airway Smooth Muscle Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Davinder; Doe, Camille; Woodman, Lucy; Heidi Wan, Wing-Yan; Sutcliffe, Amanda; Hollins, Fay

    2012-01-01

    Background: The mast cell localization to airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundle in asthma is important in the development of disordered airway physiology. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is expressed by airway structural cells. Whether it has a role in the crosstalk between these cells is uncertain. We sought to define TSLP expression in bronchial tissue across the spectrum of asthma severity and to investigate the TSLP and TSLP receptor (TSLPR) expression and function by primary ASM and mast cells alone and in coculture. Methods: TSLP expression was assessed in bronchial tissue from 18 subjects with mild to moderate asthma, 12 with severe disease, and nine healthy control subjects. TSLP and TSLPR expression in primary mast cells and ASM was assessed by immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and its function was assessed by calcium imaging. The role of TSLP in mast cell and ASM proliferation, survival, differentiation, synthetic function, and contraction was examined. Results: TSLP expression was increased in the ASM bundle in mild-moderate disease. TSLP and TSLPR were expressed by mast cells and ASM and were functional. Mast cell activation by TSLP increased the production of a broad range of chemokines and cytokines, but did not affect mast cell or ASM proliferation, survival, or contraction. Conclusions: TSLP expression by the bronchial epithelium and ASM was upregulated in asthma. TSLP promoted mast cell synthetic function, but did not contribute to other functional consequences of mast cell-ASM crosstalk. PMID:22052771

  15. Mast cells in human health and disease.

    PubMed

    DeBruin, Erin J; Gold, Matthew; Lo, Bernard C; Snyder, Kimberly; Cait, Alissa; Lasic, Nikola; Lopez, Martin; McNagny, Kelly M; Hughes, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are primarily known for their role in defense against pathogens, particularly bacteria; neutralization of venom toxins; and for triggering allergic responses and anaphylaxis. In addition to these direct effector functions, activated mast cells rapidly recruit other innate and adaptive immune cells and can participate in "tuning" the immune response. In this review we touch briefly on these important functions and then focus on some of the less-appreciated roles of mast cells in human disease including cancer, autoimmune inflammation, organ transplant, and fibrosis. Although it is difficult to formally assign causal roles to mast cells in human disease, we offer a general review of data that correlate the presence and activation of mast cells with exacerbated inflammation and disease progression. Conversely, in some restricted contexts, mast cells may offer protective roles. For example, the presence of mast cells in some malignant or cardiovascular diseases is associated with favorable prognosis. In these cases, specific localization of mast cells within the tissue and whether they express chymase or tryptase (or both) are diagnostically important considerations. Finally, we review experimental animal models that imply a causal role for mast cells in disease and discuss important caveats and controversies of these findings.

  16. Characterization of the choroidal mast cell.

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, W A

    1987-01-01

    The experimental studies performed on nonpigmented rat choroids and the review of the important literature covered in this thesis seem to justify the following statements: 1. Mast cells are present in the choroid in significant numbers. 2. Mast cell numbers vary considerably from one individual to another and from one location in the choroid to another. 3. The major concentration of mast cells in the uvea is in the posterior choroid. 4. The mast cells of the choroid have a preferential location along arterial vessels. 5. Choroidal mast cell population density apparently decreases with senescence. 6. Mast cell products are present in sufficient quantity to exert substantial effects on physiologic, immunologic, and inflammatory responses in the choroid. 7. Choroidal mast cell products are released with appropriate stimulation and share some properties with the connective-tissue mast cell. 8. Choroidal mast cell demonstrate enough differences to suggest that a local differentiation may be present and may represent a locally controlled modulating effect for choroidal physiologic, immunologic, and inflammatory reactions. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 FIGURE 17 PMID:3328921

  17. The human mast cell: an overview.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, Guha; Ajitawi, Omar; Chi, David S

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells are fascinating, multifunctional, tissue-dwelling cells that have been traditionally associated with the allergic response. However, recent studies suggest these cells may be capable of regulating inflammation, host defense, and innate immunity. The purpose of this review is to present salient aspects of mast cell biology in the context of mast cell function in physiology and disease. After their development from bone marrow-derived progenitor cells that are primed with stem cell factor, mast cells continue their maturation and differentiation in peripheral tissue, developing into two well-described subsets of cells, MC(T) and MC(TC) cells. These cells can be distinguished on the basis of their tissue location, dependence on T lymphocytes, and their granule contents. Mast cells can undergo activation by antigens/allergens, superoxides, complement proteins, neuropeptides, and lipoproteins. After activation, mast cells express histamine, leukotrienes, and prostanoids, as well as proteases, and many cytokines and chemokines. These mediators may be pivotal to the genesis of an inflammatory response. By virtue of their location and mediator expression, mast cells may play an active role in many diseases, such as allergy, parasitic diseases, atherosclerosis, malignancy, asthma, pulmonary fibrosis, and arthritis. Recent data also suggest that mast cells play a vital role in host defense against pathogens by elaboration of tumor necrosis factor alpha. Mast cells also express the Toll-like receptor, which may further accentuate their role in the immune-inflammatory response. This chapter summarizes the many well-known and novel functional aspects of human mast cell biology and emphasizes their unique role in the inflammatory response.

  18. Mast cell tryptase and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, H.

    1997-01-01

    Recent physiological and pharmacological studies have indicated the potential importance of tryptase, the major protein component in mast cells, in inflammatory diseases (especially asthma). Being released at inflammatory sites after the activation of mast cells, tryptase is capable of causing bronchohyperresponsiveness and infiltration of eosinophils, neutrophils, etc. in animal airways. The mechanisms by which tryptase causes bronchoconstriction involve probably the potentiation of other chemical mediators such as histamine, production of bradykinin via the hydrolysis of kininogen, and cleavage of the bronchodilating peptides VIP (vasoactive intestinal peptide) and PHM (peptide histidine-methionine). Tryptase has also been found to be a potent mitogen in vitro for airway smooth muscle cells and epithelial cells, implying its role in the hyperplasia of the asthmatic airways. The experimental data providing evidence for the above roles of tryptase are summarized in the present review, as well as the effects of tryptase inhibition in animal asthma models. The potential strategies for the development of anti-asthmatic agents based on the inhibition of tryptase are discussed. PMID:18472864

  19. Mast cells in nonmammalian vertebrates: an overview.

    PubMed

    Baccari, Gabriella Chieffi; Pinelli, Claudia; Santillo, Alessandra; Minucci, Sergio; Rastogi, Rakesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are best known as multifunctional entities that may confer a benefit on immune system. This review presents the known facts on mast-cell system and breakthroughs in mast-cell biology in fish, amphibians, reptiles, and birds. As compared to mammals, there are relatively few data available on mast cells in many nonmammalian vertebrates. Nevertheless, like in mammals, mast cells in nonmammalian vertebrates contain a wide range of bioactive compounds including histamine, heparin, neuropeptides, and neutral proteases. In bony fishes, these cells secrete antimicrobial peptides as well. Mast cells have a widespread distribution in the brain, endocrine glands, intestine, liver, kidney, skin, tongue, and lungs, the highest concentration occurring in different tissues in the different taxa. Currently, researchers are grappling with the nature of scientific support to substantiate the functional importance of mast cells in nonmammalian vertebrates. Ultimately, the origin and evolution of vertebrate mast cell is of great interest to comparative immunologists seeking an underlying trend in the phylogenetic development of immunity.

  20. Mast Cells: Pivotal Players in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bot, Ilze; van Berkel, Theo J.C; Biessen, Erik A.L

    2008-01-01

    The clinical outcome of cardiovascular diseases as myocardial infarction and stroke are generally caused by rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque. However, the actual cause of a plaque to rupture is not yet established. Interestingly, pathology studies have shown an increased presence of the mast cell, an important inflammatory effector cell in allergy and host defense, in (peri)vascular tissue during plaque progression, which may point towards a causal role for mast cells. Very recent data in mouse models show that mast cells and derived mediators indeed can profoundly impact plaque progression, plaque stability and acute cardiovascular syndromes such as vascular aneurysm or myocardial infarction. In this review, we discuss recent evidence on the role of mast cells in the progression of cardiovascular disorders and give insight in the therapeutic potential of modulation of mast cell function in these processes to improve the resilience of a plaque to rupture. PMID:19936193

  1. Mast cell biology: introduction and overview.

    PubMed

    Gilfillan, Alasdair M; Austin, Sarah J; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the field of mast cell biology has expanded well beyond the boundaries of atopic disorders and anaphy laxis, on which it has been historically focused. The biochemical and signaling events responsible for the development and regulation of mast cells has been increasingly studied, aided in large part by novel breakthroughs in laboratory techniques used to study these cells. The result of these studies has been a more comprehensive definition of mast cells that includes added insights to their overall biology as well as the various disease states that can now be traced to defects in mast cells. This introductory chapter outlines and highlights the various topics of mast cell biology that will be discussed in further detail in subsequent chapters.

  2. Ion channels regulating mast cell biology.

    PubMed

    Ashmole, I; Bradding, P

    2013-05-01

    Mast cells play a central role in the pathophysiology of asthma and related allergic conditions. Mast cell activation leads to the degranulation of preformed mediators such as histamine and the secretion of newly synthesised proinflammatory mediators such as leukotrienes and cytokines. Excess release of these mediators contributes to allergic disease states. An influx of extracellular Ca2+ is essential for mast cell mediator release. From the Ca2+ channels that mediate this influx, to the K+ , Cl- and transient receptor potential channels that set the cell membrane potential and regulate Ca2+ influx, ion channels play a critical role in mast cell biology. In this review we provide an overview of our current knowledge of ion channel expression and function in mast cells with an emphasis on how channels interact to regulate Ca2+ signalling.

  3. Are mast cells important in diabetes?

    PubMed

    Kempuraj, Duraisamy; Caraffa, Alessandro; Ronconi, Gianpaolo; Lessiani, Gianfranco; Conti, Pio

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia and associated with microvascular and macrovascular syndromes mediated by mast cells. Mast cells are activated through cross-linking of their surface high affinity receptors for IgE (FcRI) or other antigens, leading to degranulation and release of stored inflammatory mediators, and cytokines/chemokines without degranulation. Mast cells are implicated in innate and acquired immunity, inflammation and metabolic disorders such as diabetes. Histamine and tryptase genes in mast cells are overexpressed in pancreatic tissue of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. Histamine is a classic inflammatory mediator generated by activated receptors of mast cells from the histamine-forming enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC), which can be activated by two inflammatory chemokines, RANTES and MPC1, when injected intramuscularly or intradermally in mice. This activation is inhibited in genetically mast cell-deficient W/Wv mice, which show higher insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. This study contributes to understanding the mechanism by which mast cells profoundly affect diabetes, and their manipulation could represent a new therapeutic strategy. However, further studies are needed to clarify the role of mast cells in inflammation and metabolic disorders such as diabetes.

  4. [Mast cells and basophils and their disorders].

    PubMed

    Bösiger, J; Fehr, J

    2006-01-01

    This short review gives a brief overview on recent findings about the roles of basophils and mast cells in acquired and innate immunity. We try to give some insight into the methods used to study physiologic functions of mast cells and basophils. We mention variations of circulating basophil numbers as an epiphenomenon of some internal diseases and present an update on mastocytosis.

  5. Mast cells promote melanoma colonization of lungs.

    PubMed

    Öhrvik, Helena; Grujic, Mirjana; Waern, Ida; Gustafson, Ann-Marie; Ernst, Nancy; Roers, Axel; Hartmann, Karin; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-10-18

    Mast cells have been implicated in malignant processes, mainly through clinical correlative studies and by experiments performed using animals lacking mast cells due to defective c-kit signaling. However, mast cell-deficient mouse models based on c-kit defects have recently been questioned for their relevance. Here we addressed the effect of mast cells in a tumor setting by using transgenic Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ mice, in which the deficiency of mast cells is independent of c-kit defects. Melanoma cells (B16.F10) were administered either subcutaneously or intravenously into Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ mice or Mcpt5-Cre- R-DTA+ littermate controls, followed by the assessment of formed tumors. In the subcutaneous model, mast cells were abundant in the tumor stroma of control mice but were absent in Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ mice. However, the absence of mast cells did not affect tumor size. In contrast, after intravenous administration of B16.F10 cells, melanoma colonization of the lungs was markedly reduced in Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ vs. Mcpt5-Cre- R-DTA+ animals. Decreased melanoma colonization of the lungs in Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ animals was accompanied by increased inflammatory cell recruitment into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, suggesting that mast cells suppress inflammation in this setting. Further, qPCR analysis revealed significant alterations in the expression of Twist and E-cadherin in lungs of Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ vs. control Mcpt5-Cre- R-DTA+ animals, suggesting an impact of mast cells on epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In conclusion, this study reveals that mast cells promote melanoma colonization of the lung.

  6. The role of Lin28b in myeloid and mast cell differentiation and mast cell malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leo D.; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Rowe, R. Grant; Nguyen, Phi T.; Sullivan, Jessica L.; Pearson, Daniel S.; Doulatov, Sergei; Wu, Linwei; Lindsley, R. Coleman; Zhu, Hao; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Daley, George Q.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are critical components of the innate immune system and important for host defense, allergy, autoimmunity, tissue regeneration, and tumor progression. Dysregulated mast cell development leads to systemic mastocytosis, a clinically variable but often devastating family of hematologic disorders. Here we report that induced expression of Lin28, a heterochronic gene and pluripotency factor implicated in driving a fetal hematopoietic program, caused mast cell accumulation in adult mice in target organs such as the skin and peritoneal cavity. In vitro assays revealed a skewing of myeloid commitment in LIN28B-expressing hematopoietic progenitors, with increased levels of LIN28B in common myeloid and basophil-mast cell progenitors altering gene expression patterns to favor cell fate choices that enhanced mast cell specification. In addition, LIN28B-induced mast cells appeared phenotypically and functionally immature, and in vitro assays suggested a slowing of mast cell terminal differentiation in the context of LIN28B upregulation. Finally, interrogation of human mast cell leukemia samples revealed upregulation of LIN28B in abnormal mast cells from patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM). This work identifies Lin28 as a novel regulator of innate immune function and a new protein of interest in mast cell disease. PMID:25655194

  7. The Mast Cell-IgE Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells and IgE are so inextricably linked to the pathology of allergic disorders, including fatal anaphylaxis, that it can be difficult to think of them in other contexts. Surely, we do not have mast cells and IgE so that we can eat a peanut and die! It is thought that mast cells and IgE and basophils (circulating granulocytes, whose functions partially overlap with those of mast cells) can contribute to host defense as components of adaptive T helper cell type 2 immune responses to helminths, ticks, and certain other parasites. Accordingly, it was suggested that allergies are misdirected type 2 immune responses in which IgE antibodies are produced against any of a broad variety of apparently harmless antigens. However, components of animal venoms also can sensitize individuals to develop severe IgE-associated allergic reactions, including fatal anaphylaxis, on subsequent venom exposure. Here, I describe evidence that mast cells can enhance innate host resistance to reptile or arthropod venoms during responses to an initial exposure to such venoms and that acquired type 2 immune responses, IgE antibodies, the high-affinity IgE receptor FcεRI, and mast cells can contribute toward acquired resistance in mice to the lethal effects of honeybee or Russell's viper venom. These findings support the hypothesis that mast cells and IgE can help protect the host against noxious substances. PMID:26776074

  8. Mast cell secretome: Soluble and vesicular components.

    PubMed

    Vukman, Krisztina V; Försönits, András; Oszvald, Ádám; Tóth, Eszter Á; Buzás, Edit I

    2017-02-09

    Mast cells are multifunctional master cells implicated in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Their role has been best characterized in allergy and anaphylaxis; however, emerging evidences support their contribution to a wide variety of human diseases. Mast cells, being capable of both degranulation and subsequent recovery, have recently attracted substantial attention as also being rich sources of secreted extracellular vesicles (including exosomes and microvesicles). Along with secreted de novo synthesized soluble molecules and secreted preformed granules, the membrane-enclosed extracellular vesicles represent a previously unexplored part of the mast cell secretome. In this review article we summarize available data regarding the different soluble molecules and membrane-enclosed structures secreted by mast cells. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the release mechanisms including degranulation, piecemeal degranulation, transgranulation, and secretion of different types of extracellular vesicles. Finally, we aim to give a summary of the known biological functions associated with the different mast cell-derived secretion products. The increasingly recognized complexity of mast cell secretome may provide important novel clues to processes by which mast cells contribute to the development of different pathologies and are capable of orchestrating immune responses both in health and disease.

  9. How mast cells make decisions

    PubMed Central

    Karhausen, Jörn; Abraham, Soman N.

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are present in various tissues and are responsible for initiating many of the early inflammatory responses to extrinsic challenges. Recent studies have demonstrated that MCs can tailor their responses, depending on the stimulus encountered and the tissue in which they are stimulated. In this issue of the JCI, Gaudenzio and colleagues examine the mechanistic differences between MC responses observed after engagement of Fcε receptor I and those seen after MC stimulation via the recently identified G protein–coupled receptor MRGPRX2. By showing that discrete cellular activation patterns affect the phenotype of the MC response in vivo and in vitro, the authors provide important information about how MCs differentially process various stimuli into distinct degranulation programs. PMID:27643441

  10. Ancient origin of mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Wong, G. William; Zhuo, Lisheng; Kimata, Koji; Lam, Bing K.; Satoh, Nori; Stevens, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    The sentinel roles of mammalian mast cells (MCs) in varied infections raised the question of their evolutionary origin. We discovered that the test cells in the sea squirt Ciona intestinalis morphologically and histochemically resembled cutaneous human MCs. Like the latter, C. intestinalis test cells stored histamine and varied heparin•serine protease complexes in their granules. Moreover, they exocytosed these preformed mediators when exposed to compound 48/80. In support of the histamine data, a C. intestinalis-derived cDNA was isolated that resembled that which encodes histidine decarboxylase in human MCs. Like heparin-expressing mammalian MCs, activated test cells produced prostaglandin D2 and contained cDNAs that encode a protein that resembles the synthase needed for its biosynthesis in human MCs. The accumulated morphological, histochemical, biochemical, and molecular biology data suggest that the test cells in C. intestinalis are the counterparts of mammalian MCs that reside in varied connective tissues. The accumulated data point to an ancient origin of MCs that predates the emergence of the chordates >500 million years ago, well before the development of adaptive immunity. The remarkable conservation of MCs throughout evolution is consistent with their importance in innate immunity. PMID:25094046

  11. Mast Cell: A Multi-Functional Master Cell

    PubMed Central

    Krystel-Whittemore, Melissa; Dileepan, Kottarappat N.; Wood, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are immune cells of the myeloid lineage and are present in connective tissues throughout the body. The activation and degranulation of mast cells significantly modulates many aspects of physiological and pathological conditions in various settings. With respect to normal physiological functions, mast cells are known to regulate vasodilation, vascular homeostasis, innate and adaptive immune responses, angiogenesis, and venom detoxification. On the other hand, mast cells have also been implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases, including allergy, asthma, anaphylaxis, gastrointestinal disorders, many types of malignancies, and cardiovascular diseases. This review summarizes the current understanding of the role of mast cells in many pathophysiological conditions. PMID:26779180

  12. Mast cells as targets of pimecrolimus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhongcai; Jiao, Zongjiu

    2011-11-01

    Mast cells, the multi-functional secretory cells, are the pivotal effector cells in immune response, and contribute to the pathogenesis of many diverse diseases, like asthma and mastocytosis, by releasing numerous proinflammatory mediators. Pimecrolimus (SDZ ASM 981) is a derivative of the macrolactam ascomycin and is a member of the calcineurin inhibitor class of immunosuppressors. It inhibits the calcineurin-dependent activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells and the expression of a number of proinflammatory cytokines in turn. Pimecrolimus has high and selective anti-inflammatory activity within the skin, and with much lower potential to affect local and systemic immune responses. Therefore it has been widely used for treatment of various inflammatory skin diseases. It has a cellselective mode of action, and mast cells are its specific target cells. Pimecrolimus inhibits the release of both preformed and de novo synthesized mediators from activated mast cells and inhibits accumulation of mast cells by inducing apoptosis. Several experimental and clinical reports have demonstrated the successful application of pimecrolimus and other calcineurin inhibitors, such as tacrolimus and cyclosporine A, to treat mastocytosis, a spectrum of disorders characterized by mast cell hyperplasia, especially cutaneous mastocytosis. These new findings suggest that pimecrolimus and other calcineurin inhibitors may be a novel and effective therapeutic approach for mast cell-associated diseases such as asthma and mastocytosis.

  13. Benign mast cell hyperplasia and atypical mast cell infiltrates in penile lichen planus in adult men.

    PubMed

    Regauer, Sigrid; Beham-Schmid, Christine

    2014-08-01

    Introduction. Lichen planus (LP) is a chronic cytokine-mediated disease of possible auto-immune etiology. 25% of men have anogenital manifestations. Erosive penile LP causes a scarring phimosis of the foreskin in uncircumcised men. Mast cells as potent immune modulators have been implicated in a number of autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, but have not been investigated in LP. Material and Methods. Formalin-fixed tissues of 117 circumcision specimens of adult men affected by LP were evaluated for the extent of mast cell and lymphocyte infiltrates, characterized immunohistochemically with antibodies to CD 3, 4, 8, 20, 21, 25, 30, 117c and human mast cell tryptase. Specimens with dense mast cell infiltrates were analyzed for point mutations of the c-kit gene (D816V). Results. Unaffected skin and modified mucosa of foreskins contained ⟨5 mast cells/mm². The inflammatory infiltrate of LP-lesions displayed ⟨15 mast cells/mm² in 33/117 foreskins, 16-40 mast cells/mm² in 22/117 and ⟩40 mast cells/mm² (average 70, range 40-100) in 62/117 foreskins. Lesional mast cells of 29/117 (24%) foreskins showed aberrant CD25-expression and/or spindled morphology, with 11/29 men having erosive LP, 13/29 a lymphocytic vasculitis and 1/28 a systemic mastocytosis. Neither CD30-expression nor c-kit mutations were identified. Atypical mast cell infiltrates in LP correlated with high disease activity, erosive LP and presence of lymphocytic vasculitis Conclusions. Increased mast cells in penile LP, mostly representing a benign hyperplasia/activation syndrome, suggests them as targets for innovative therapy options for symptomatic LP-patients not responding to corticosteroid therapy. Presently, the biological implications of atypical mast cell infiltrates in penile LP are unknown.

  14. Impact of mast cells on the skin.

    PubMed

    Kritas, S K; Saggini, A; Varvara, G; Murmura, G; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Toniato, E; Pantalone, A; Neri, G; Frydas, S; Rosati, M; Tei, M; Speziali, A; Saggini, R; Pandolfi, F; Cerulli, G; Theoharides, T C; Conti, P

    2013-01-01

    When through the skin a foreign antigen enters it provokes an immune response and inflammatory reaction. Mast cells are located around small vessels that are involved in vasaldilation. They mature under the influence of local tissue to various cytokines. Human skin mast cells play an essential role in diverse physiological and pathological processes and mediate immediate hypersensitive reaction and allergic diseases. Injection of anti-IgE in the skin or other agents that directly activate mast cells may cause the decrease in vascular tone, leakage of plasma and may lead to a fall in blood pressure with fatal anaphylactic shock. Skin mast cells are also implicated as effector cells in response to multiple parasites such as Leishmania which is primarily characterized by its tissue cutaneous tropism. Activated macrophages by IFNgamma, cytotoxic T cells, activated mast cells and several cytokines are involved in the elimination of the parasites and immunoprotection. IL-33 is one of the latest cytokines involved in IgE-induced anaphylaxis and in the pathogenesis of allergic skin disorders. IL-33 has been shown in epidermis of patients with psoriasis and its skin expression causes atopic dermatitis and it is crucial for the development of this disease. Here we review the impact of mast cells on the skin.

  15. Mast cells in allergy: innate instructors of adaptive responses.

    PubMed

    Stelekati, Erietta; Orinska, Zane; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    The function of mast cells as effector cells in allergy has been extensively studied. However, increasing insight into mast cell physiology has revealed new mast cell functions and has introduced mast cells as key players in the regulation of innate as well as adaptive immunity. For example, mast cells have recently been found to express Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which enable them to participate in the innate immune response against pathogens. Furthermore, mast cells have been reported to interact with B cells, dendritic cells and T cells and thereby modulate the direction of an adaptive immune response. Finally, recent documentation that mast cells express functional MHC class II and costimulatory molecules and release immunologically active exosomes, has raised the possibility that mast cells also engage in (as yet) poorly understood antigen presentation functions. In this review, we explore the hypothesis that mast cells serve as central mediators between innate and adaptive immunity, rather as pure effector cells, during allergic innate responses.

  16. The mast cell: a multifunctional effector cell.

    PubMed

    Crivellato, Enrico; Ribatti, Domenico; Mallardi, Franco; Beltrami, Carlo Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) are recognized key cells of type I hypersensitivity reactions. Several lines of evidence, however, indicate that MC not only express critical effector functions in classic IgE-associated allergic disorders, but also play important roles in host defence against parasites, bacteria and perhaps even viruses. Indeed, it is now clear that MC can contribute to host defence in the context of either acquired or innate immune responses through the release of a myriad of pro-inflammatory and immunoregulatory molecules and the expression of a wide spectrum of surface receptors for cytokines and chemokines. Moreover, there is growing evidence that MC exert distinct nonimmunological functions, playing a relevant role in tissue homeostasis, remodeling and fibrosis as well as in the processes of tissue angiogenesis. In this review, we provide a small insight into the biology of mast cells and their potential implications in human pathology.

  17. Mast cell activation syndromes: definition and classification.

    PubMed

    Valent, P

    2013-04-01

    Mast cell activation (MCA) occurs in a number of different clinical conditions, including IgE-dependent allergies, other inflammatory reactions, and mastocytosis. MCA-related symptoms may be mild, moderate, severe, or even life-threatening. The severity of MCA depends on a number of different factors, including genetic predisposition, the number and releasability of mast cells involved in the reaction, the type of allergen, presence of specific IgE, and presence of certain comorbidities. In severe reactions, MCA can be documented by a substantial increase in the serum tryptase level above baseline. When symptoms are recurrent, are accompanied by an increase in mast cell-derived mediators in biological fluids, and are responsive to treatment with mast cell-stabilizing or mediator-targeting drugs, the diagnosis of mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) is appropriate. Based on the underlying condition, these patients can further be classified into i) primary MCAS where KIT-mutated, clonal mast cells are detected, ii) secondary MCAS where an underlying inflammatory disease, often in the form of an IgE-dependent allergy, but no KIT-mutated mast cells, is found, and iii) idiopathic MCAS, where neither an allergy or other underlying disease, nor KIT-mutated mast cells are detectable. It is important to note that in many patients with MCAS, several different factors act together to lead to severe or even life-threatening anaphylaxis. Detailed knowledge about the pathogenesis and complexity of MCAS, and thus establishing the exact final diagnosis, may greatly help in the management and therapy of these patients.

  18. Mast cells in laser and surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, A L; Browne, R M; Frame, J W; Matthews, J B

    1995-01-01

    Precooling of tissues was investigated as a possible means of reducing thermal damage during CO2 laser surgery of the oral mucosa. The changes in mast cells in scalpel, and in non-cooled and precooled (tissue temperature lowered to approximately 10 degrees C) CO2 laser wounds were studied. Standard wounds five mm in length were created with the CO2 laser or scalpel on the dorsum of the tongues of 32 Sprague-Dawley rats under general anesthesia with fentanyl/fluanisone and midazolam. Animals were killed with excess anesthetic immediately or six hours after surgery, their tongues were removed, trimmed, fixed in neutral formalin and processed to paraffin wax. Acid (pH 1.4) toluidine blue stained sections were used to count normal and degranulated mast cells in five fields (0.1 mm2) located at defined positions immediately adjacent to the wound site. At both 0 and 6 hours normal mast cell numbers were significantly different between treatment groups (P<0.045; ANOVA) with mean numbers highest in scalpel wounds and lowest in uncooled laser wounds. Similarly, at 0 time, there were significant differences in degranulated mast cells between treatment groups (P=0.004; ANOVA) but highest numbers were detected in uncooled laser wounds and lowest in scalpel wounds. There were no significant differences in degranulated mast cell counts at six hours although there was a similar distribution in numbers between groups. Total numbers of mast cells (normal + degranulated) did not differ between treatment groups. These results demonstrated that i) laser wounds are associated with greater levels of mast cell degranulation than scalpel wounds and ii) precooling of tissues prior to laser treatment decreases the level of mast cell degranulation. It is concluded that tissue damage in CO2 laser surgery may be reduced by precooling of tissue.

  19. Interaction of phosphatidylserine with mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T W; Lagunoff, D

    1978-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) potentiates histamine secretion from mast cells exposed to concanavalin A and Ca2+. In order to identify the form of PtdSer that is responsible for its effect on mast cell secretion, PtdSer containing a tritium-labeled serine moiety (3H-PtdSer) was synthesized from egg yolk phosphatidylcholine. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 3H-PtdSer and the binding isotherm for 3H-PtdSer interaction with mast cells were determined. The midpoints of the binding isotherm and the dose-response curve for potentiation of secretion coincide and are 2 orders of magnitude greater than the CMC. The shape of the binding curve is explicable either in terms of simple binding of preformed PtdSer micelles or of cooperative binding of monomeric PtdSer in which the number of molecules cooperatively associating with a mast cell binding site is equal to the number of monomers in a PtdSer micelle. In either case, at equilibrium, PtdSer micelles are bound to the mast cells. The number of PtdSer molecules bound to a single mast cell at equilibrium was estimated to be 3.7 X 10(9). PMID:84384

  20. Expanding spectrum of mast cell activation disorders: monoclonal and idiopathic mast cell activation syndromes.

    PubMed

    Picard, Matthieu; Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Mezzano, Veronica; Castells, Mariana

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, 2 new syndromes of mast cell activation have been described in patients with episodes of mast cell mediator release that range from flushing and abdominal cramping to anaphylaxis: monoclonal mast cell activation syndrome (MMAS) and idiopathic mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS). This review will discuss these 2 new syndromes in the larger context of mast cell activation disorders as well as the diagnostic and treatment approaches for these conditions. PubMed was searched using the following terms: mast cell activation disorder, mast cell activation syndrome, and clonal mast cell. Only English-language articles published up until February 27, 2013, were considered. MMAS has been diagnosed in patients with systemic reactions to hymenoptera stings and elevated baseline serum tryptase as well as in patients with unexplained episodes of anaphylaxis. A bone marrow biopsy establishes the diagnosis by revealing the presence of monoclonal mast cells that carry the D816V KIT mutation and/or express CD25 while the diagnostic requirements for systemic mastocytosis are not met. MCAS affects predominantly women in whom no mast cell abnormality or external triggers account for their episodes of mast cell activation. MCAS is a diagnosis of exclusion, and primary and secondary mast cell activation disorders as well as idiopathic anaphylaxis have to be ruled out before making the diagnosis. Patients with MCAS and MMAS are treated in a stepwise fashion with drugs that block the effects of mediators released by mast cells on activation. One third of MCAS patients experience complete resolution of symptoms with treatment, while one third have a major response and one third a minor response to treatment. A combination of drugs is usually necessary to achieve symptom control. No drug trial has been performed in patients with MMAS and MCAS. MMAS and MCAS are 2 newly described, rare syndromes of mast cell activation. Further studies will be necessary to better understand

  1. Signal transduction and chemotaxis in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Draber, Petr; Halova, Ivana; Polakovicova, Iva; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells play crucial roles in both innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Along with basophils, mast cells are essential effector cells for allergic inflammation that causes asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy and atopic dermatitis. Mast cells are usually increased in inflammatory sites of allergy and, upon activation, release various chemical, lipid, peptide and protein mediators of allergic reactions. Since antigen/immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated activation of these cells is a central event to trigger allergic reactions, innumerable studies have been conducted on how these cells are activated through cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI). Development of mature mast cells from their progenitor cells is under the influence of several growth factors, of which the stem cell factor (SCF) seems to be the most important. Therefore, how SCF induces mast cell development and activation via its receptor, KIT, has been studied extensively, including a cross-talk between KIT and FcεRI signaling pathways. Although our understanding of the signaling mechanisms of the FcεRI and KIT pathways is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these pathways are underway. This review will focus on recent progresses in FcεRI and KIT signaling and chemotaxis.

  2. Signal transduction and chemotaxis in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Draber, Petr; Halova, Ivana; Polakovicova, Iva; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells play crucial roles in both innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Along with basophils, mast cells are essential effector cells for allergic inflammation that causes asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy and atopic dermatitis. Mast cells are usually increased in inflammatory sites of allergy and, upon activation, release various chemical, lipid, peptide and protein mediators of allergic reactions. Since antigen/immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated activation of these cells is a central event to trigger allergic reactions, innumerable studies have been conducted on how these cells are activated through cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI). Development of mature mast cells from their progenitor cells is under the influence of several growth factors, of which the stem cell factor (SCF) seems to be the most important. Therefore, how SCF induces mast cell development and activation via its receptor, KIT, has been studied extensively, including a cross-talk between KIT and FcεRI signaling pathways. Although our understanding of the signaling mechanisms of the FcεRI and KIT pathways is far from complete, pharmaceutical applications of the knowledge about these pathways are underway. This review will focus on recent progresses in FcεRI and KIT signaling and chemotaxis. PMID:25941081

  3. Mast cell-orchestrated immunity to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Soman N.; St John, Ashley L.

    2015-01-01

    Although mast cells were discovered more than a century ago, their functions beyond their role in allergic responses remained elusive until recently. However, there is a growing appreciation that an important physiological function of these cells is the recognition of pathogens and modulation of appropriate immune responses. Because of their ability to instantly release several pro-inflammatory mediators from intracellular stores and their location at the host–environment interface, mast cells have been shown to be crucial for optimal immune responses during infection. Mast cells seem to exert these effects by altering the inflammatory environment after detection of a pathogen and by mobilizing various immune cells to the site of infection and to draining lymph nodes. Interestingly, the character and timing of these responses can vary depending on the type of pathogen stimulus, location of pathogen recognition and sensitization state of the responding mast cells. Recent studies using mast cell activators as effective vaccine adjuvants show the potential of harnessing these cells to confer protective immunity against microbial pathogens. PMID:20498670

  4. Mast cell release of superoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dileepan, K.N.; Simpson, K.M.; Stechschulte, D.J.

    1987-05-01

    The ability of rat serosal mast cells (MC) to release superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -/) upon activation by immunologic and nonimmunologic stimuli was investigated. Purified MC (90-95%) were either sensitized with monoclonal IgE reactive against dinitrophenyl bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA) and challenged with DNP-BSA, or naive MC were treated with compound 48/80 or ionophore A23187. O/sub 2//sup -/ release was measured by O/sub 2//sup -/ dismutase (SOD)-sensitive reduction of cytochrome C and MC activation was assessed by the release of histamine or (/sup 14/C)5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT). The results reveal that activation of MC by 48/80 or immunologic challenge does not release O/sub 2//sup -/, although these stimuli induce substantial release of histamine and 5HT (40-70%). In contrast, A23187 released O/sub 2//sup -/ (3-6 nMols/10/sup 6/ MC) and histamine (40-80%). In mixed cell preparations containing MC and macrophages (M0), activation of MC with 48/80 resulted in inhibition of M0 O/sub 2//sup -/ release. The MC-mediated inhibition of O/sub 2//sup -/ production was not due to histamine or 5HT, but was due to MC-granule SOD. MC contain abundant quantities of SOD and, therefore, release O/sub 2//sup -/ only when its production exceeds the intracellular SOD threshold following activation with selective stimuli. In addition, the apparent differences in the mode and site of action of various stimuli on MC may contribute to the discriminative release of O/sub 2//sup -/.

  5. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner. PMID:26690128

  6. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception.

    PubMed

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-04

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner.

  7. Characterization of mast cell secretory granules and their cell biology.

    PubMed

    Azouz, Nurit Pereg; Hammel, Ilan; Sagi-Eisenberg, Ronit

    2014-10-01

    Exocytosis and secretion of secretory granule (SG) contained inflammatory mediators is the primary mechanism by which mast cells exert their protective immune responses in host defense, as well as their pathological functions in allergic reactions and anaphylaxis. Despite their central role in mast cell function, the molecular mechanisms underlying the biogenesis and secretion of mast cell SGs remain largely unresolved. Early studies have established the lysosomal nature of the mast cell SGs and implicated SG homotypic fusion as an important step occurring during both their biogenesis and compound secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms that account for key features of this process largely remain to be defined. A novel high-resolution imaging based methodology allowed us to screen Rab GTPases for their phenotypic and functional impact and identify Rab networks that regulate mast cell secretion. This screen has identified Rab5 as a novel regulator of homotypic fusion of the mast cell SGs that thereby regulates their size and cargo composition.

  8. Expression of Mast Cell Proteases Correlates with Mast Cell Maturation and Angiogenesis during Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Devandir Antonio; Toso, Vanina Danuza; Campos, Maria Rita de Cássia; Lara, Vanessa Soares; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2012-01-01

    Tumor cells are surrounded by infiltrating inflammatory cells, such as lymphocytes, neutrophils, macrophages, and mast cells. A body of evidence indicates that mast cells are associated with various types of tumors. Although role of mast cells can be directly related to their granule content, their function in angiogenesis and tumor progression remains obscure. This study aims to understand the role of mast cells in these processes. Tumors were chemically induced in BALB/c mice and tumor progression was divided into Phases I, II and III. Phase I tumors exhibited a large number of mast cells, which increased in phase II and remained unchanged in phase III. The expression of mouse mast cell protease (mMCP)-4, mMCP-5, mMCP-6, mMCP-7, and carboxypeptidase A were analyzed at the 3 stages. Our results show that with the exception of mMCP-4 expression of these mast cell chymase (mMCP-5), tryptases (mMCP-6 and 7), and carboxypeptidase A (mMC-CPA) increased during tumor progression. Chymase and tryptase activity increased at all stages of tumor progression whereas the number of mast cells remained constant from phase II to III. The number of new blood vessels increased significantly in phase I, while in phases II and III an enlargement of existing blood vessels occurred. In vitro, mMCP-6 and 7 are able to induce vessel formation. The present study suggests that mast cells are involved in induction of angiogenesis in the early stages of tumor development and in modulating blood vessel growth in the later stages of tumor progression. PMID:22815822

  9. The emerging role of mast cells in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Jarido, Veronica; Kennedy, Lindsey; Hargrove, Laura; Demieville, Jennifer; Thomson, Joanne; Stephenson, Kristen; Francis, Heather

    2017-08-01

    The depth of our knowledge regarding mast cells has widened exponentially in the last 20 years. Once thought to be only important for allergy-mediated events, mast cells are now recognized to be important regulators of a number of pathological processes. The revelation that mast cells can influence organs, tissues, and cells has increased interest in mast cell research during liver disease. The purpose of this review is to refresh the reader's knowledge of the development, type, and location of mast cells and to review recent work that demonstrates the role of hepatic mast cells during diseased states. This review focuses primarily on liver diseases and mast cells during autoimmune disease, hepatitis, fatty liver disease, liver cancer, and aging in the liver. Overall, these studies demonstrate the potential role of mast cells in disease progression.

  10. Mast cell activation syndrome: Proposed diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Akin, Cem; Valent, Peter; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2010-12-01

    The term mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) is finding increasing use as a diagnosis for subjects who present with signs and symptoms involving the dermis, gastrointestinal track, and cardiovascular system frequently accompanied by neurologic complaints. Such patients often have undergone multiple extensive medical evaluations by different physicians in varied disciplines without a definitive medical diagnosis until the diagnosis of MCAS is applied. However, MCAS as a distinct clinical entity has not been generally accepted, nor do there exist definitive criteria for diagnosis. Based on current understanding of this disease "syndrome" and on what we do know about mast cell activation and resulting pathology, we will explore and propose criteria for its diagnosis. The proposed criteria will be discussed in the context of other disorders involving mast cells or with similar presentations and as a basis for further scientific study and validation.

  11. Vaccine adjuvants: Tailor-made mast-cell granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunzer, Matthias

    2012-03-01

    Mast cells induce protective immune responses through secretion of stimulatory granules. Microparticles modelled after mast-cell granules are now shown to replicate and enhance the functions of their natural counterparts and to direct the character of the resulting immunity.

  12. Mast cells in the human alveolar wall: an electronmicroscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, B; Bull, T B; Guz, A

    1981-01-01

    Mast cells were identified by electronmicroscopy in the alveolar wall of the lung in 20 subjects (10 normal, 10 abnormal). A quantitative and qualitative study was made of the mast cells. In the normal lung there was an average concentration of 350 mast cells/mm2 of alveolar wall and in the abnormal 523/mm2. Mast cells occupied approximately 1.6-2.1% of the area of the alveolar wall. There was marked variation in the structure of the mast cell granules but no differences between those in the normal and abnormal lungs. There was evidence that constant degranulation of mast cells may be occurring in the lung. The role that alveolar mast cells may play in the vasoconstrictor response to alveolar hypoxia is discussed. It is suggested that the tachypnoea present in asthma may partly be due to release of mediators from sensitised mast cells within the alveolar wall. Images PMID:7328180

  13. Mast cell activation syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Frieri, Marianne; Patel, Reenal; Celestin, Jocelyn

    2013-02-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) is a condition with signs and symptoms involving the skin, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, respiratory, and neurologic systems. It can be classified into primary, secondary, and idiopathic. Earlier proposed criteria for the diagnosis of MCAS included episodic symptoms consistent with mast cell mediator release affecting two or more organ systems with urticaria, angioedema, flushing, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramping, hypotensive syncope or near syncope, tachycardia, wheezing, conjunctival injection, pruritus, and nasal stuffiness. Other criteria included a decrease in the frequency, severity, or resolution of symptoms with anti-mediator therapy including H(1) and H(2)histamine receptor antagonists, anti-leukotrienes, or mast cell stabilizers. Laboratory data that support the diagnosis include an increase of a validated urinary or serum marker of mast cell activation (MCA), namely the documentation of an increase of the marker above the patient's baseline value during symptomatic periods on more than two occasions, or baseline serum tryptase levels that are persistently above 15 ng/ml, or documentation of an increase of the tryptase level above baseline value on one occasion. Less specific assays are 24-h urine histamine metabolites, PGD(2) (Prostaglandin D(2)) or its metabolite, 11-β-prostaglandin F(2) alpha. A recent global definition, criteria, and classification include typical clinical symptoms, a substantial transient increase in serum total tryptase level or an increase in other mast cell derived mediators, such as histamine or PGD2 or their urinary metabolites, and a response of clinical symptoms to agents that attenuate the production or activities of mast cell mediators.

  14. Pavlovian Conditioning of Rat Mucosal Mast Cells to Secrete Rat Mast Cell Protease II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacQueen, Glenda; Marshall, Jean; Perdue, Mary; Siegel, Shepard; Bienenstock, John

    1989-01-01

    Antigen (egg albumin) injections, which stimulate mucosal mast cells to secrete mediators, were paired with an audiovisual cue. After reexposure to the audiovisual cue, a mediator (rat mast cell protease II) was measured with a sensitive and specific assay. Animals reexposed to only the audiovisual cue released a quantity of protease not significantly different from animals reexposed to both the cue and the antigen; these groups released significantly more protease than animals that had received the cue and antigen in a noncontingent manner. The results support a role for the central nervous system as a functional effector of mast cell function in the allergic state.

  15. Insights into mast cell functions in asthma using mouse models.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ying; Gregory, Joshua A; Nilsson, Gunnar P; Adner, Mikael

    2013-10-01

    Therapeutics targeting specific mechanisms of asthma have shown promising results in mouse models of asthma. However, these successes have not transferred well to the clinic or to the treatment of asthma sufferers. We suggest a reason for this incongruity is that mast cell-dependent responses, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of both atopic and non-atopic asthma, are not a key component in most of the current asthma mouse models. Two reasons for this are that wild type mice have, in contrast to humans, a negligible number of mast cells localized in the smaller airways and in the parenchyma, and that only specific protocols show mast cell-dependent reactions. The development of mast cell-deficient mice and the reconstitution of mast cells within these mice have opened up the possibility to generate mouse models of asthma with a marked role of mast cells. In addition, mast cell-deficient mice engrafted with mast cells have a distribution of mast cells more similar to humans. In this article we review and highlight the mast cell-dependent and -independent responses with respect to airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation in asthma models using mast cell-deficient and mast cell-engrafted mice.

  16. Development of human mast cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Furitsu, T; Saito, H; Dvorak, A M; Schwartz, L B; Irani, A M; Burdick, J F; Ishizaka, K; Ishizaka, T

    1989-01-01

    Nucleated cells of human umbilical cord blood were cocultured with mouse skin-derived 3T3 fibroblasts. After 7-8 weeks in culture, when the number of the other hematopoietic cells declined, metachromatic granule-containing mononuclear cells appeared in the cultures, and the number of the cells increased up to 12 weeks. After 11-14 weeks in culture, the metachromatic mononuclear cells comprised a substantial portion of the cultured cells. These cells contained 1.8-2 micrograms of histamine per 10(6) cells and bore receptors for IgE. All of the cells contained tryptase in their granules. Electron microscopic analysis showed that these cells were mature human mast cells, clearly different from the basophilic granulocytes or eosinophils that arise in a variety of circumstances in cord blood cell cultures. Most of the cultured mast cells expressed some granules with regular crystalline arrays and contained both tryptase and chymase, and thus resembled human skin mast cells. Images PMID:2532357

  17. Mast cells in airway diseases and interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Glenn; Bradding, Peter

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells are major effector cells of inflammation and there is strong evidence that mast cells play a significant role in asthma pathophysiology. There is also a growing body of evidence that mast cells contribute to other inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. This review discusses the role that mast cells play in airway diseases and highlights how mast cell microlocalisation within specific lung compartments and their cellular interactions are likely to be critical for their effector function in disease.

  18. Microscopy assays for evaluation of mast cell migration and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Bambousková, Monika; Hájková, Zuzana; Dráber, Pavel; Dráber, Petr

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to mast cell migration and chemotaxis is the long-term goal in mast cell research and is essential for comprehension of mast cell function in health and disease. Various techniques have been developed in recent decades for in vitro and in vivo assessment of mast cell motility and chemotaxis. In this chapter three microscopy assays facilitating real-time quantification of mast cell chemotaxis and migration are described, focusing on individual cell tracking and data analysis.

  19. Activation‑induced upregulation of MMP9 in mast cells is a positive feedback mediator for mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Cai, Zhijian; Yang, Fei; Chen, Ming

    2017-04-01

    Activated mast cells are involved in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis (AR). As a member of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family, MMP9 has been previously demonstrated act in a pro‑inflammatory manner. Mast cells regulate the activity of MMP9, and mast cells themselves have been reported to produce MMP9. However, to the best of our knowledge, the involvement of MMP9 in mast cell activation remains to be elucidated. The present study demonstrated an upregulation of MMP9 protein and mRNA expression levels in mast cells activated by phorbol ester and ionomycin. Phosphorylated ERK and AKT protein levels also markedly increased in activated mast cells, and inhibition of the ERK and AKT signaling pathways prevented the increase of MMP9 in activated mast cells. MMP9 was demonstrated to be involved in mast cell activation, since inhibition of MMP9 activity or expression inhibited mast cell activation. Furthermore, IL‑4 treatment reduced MMP9 upregulation in activated mast cells, and interference with IL‑4 signaling with an IL‑4 neutralizing antibody promoted MMP9 upregulation in activated mast cells. These results revealed a novel MMP9‑mediated mechanism underlying mast cell activation, thus providing novel ideas for AR therapy.

  20. P2 receptor-mediated signaling in mast cell biology.

    PubMed

    Bulanova, Elena; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2010-03-01

    Mast cells are widely recognized as effector cells of allergic inflammatory reactions. They contribute to the pathogenesis of different chronic inflammatory diseases, wound healing, fibrosis, thrombosis/fibrinolysis, and anti-tumor immune responses. In this paper, we summarized the role of P2X and P2Y receptors in mast cell activation and effector functions. Mast cells are an abundant source of ATP which is stored in their granules and secreted upon activation. We discuss the contribution of mast cells to the extracellular ATP release and to the maintenance of extracellular nucleotides pool. Recent publications highlight the importance of purinergic signaling for the pathogenesis of chronic airway inflammation. Therefore, the role of ATP and P2 receptors in allergic inflammation with focus on mast cells was analyzed. Finally, ATP functions as mast cell autocrine/paracrine factor and as messenger in intercellular communication between mast cells, nerves, and glia in the central nervous system.

  1. Mast Cells Synthesize, Store, and Release Nerve Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, A.; Buriani, A.; dal Toso, R.; Fabris, M.; Romanello, S.; Aloe, L.; Levi-Montalcini, R.

    1994-04-01

    Mast cells and nerve growth factor (NGF) have both been reported to be involved in neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. In many peripheral tissues, mast cells interact with the innervating fibers. Changes in the behaviors of both of these elements occur after tissue injury/inflammation. As such conditions are typically associated with rapid mast cell activation and NGF accumulation in inflammatory exudates, we hypothesized that mast cells may be capable of producing NGF. Here we report that (i) NGF mRNA is expressed in adult rat peritoneal mast cells; (ii) anti-NGF antibodies clearly stain vesicular compartments of purified mast cells and mast cells in histological sections of adult rodent mesenchymal tissues; and (iii) medium conditioned by peritoneal mast cells contains biologically active NGF. Mast cells thus represent a newly recognized source of NGF. The known actions of NGF on peripheral nerve fibers and immune cells suggest that mast cell-derived NGF may control adaptive/reactive responses of the nervous and immune systems toward noxious tissue perturbations. Conversely, alterations in normal mast cell behaviors may provoke maladaptive neuroimmune tissue responses whose consequences could have profound implications in inflammatory disease states, including those of an autoimmune nature.

  2. Development, significance, and heterogeneity of mast cells with particular regard to the mast cell-specific proteases chymase and tryptase.

    PubMed

    Welle, M

    1997-03-01

    Mast cells are one of the major effector cells in the pathogenesis of the immediate-type hypersensitivity reaction in a number of non-allergic immune disorders as well as in normal physiological processes. In addition, it has been shown recently that mast cells also play a significant role in a life-saving host response to bacterial reactions. But as much as the immunopathological role of mast cells has been acknowledged, these cells have also aroused much controversy and confusion. By now it is clear that one explanation for the sometimes even contradictory opinions on mast cell function arise from mast cell heterogeneity. This heterogeneity can express itself as differences in histochemical, biochemical, and functional characteristics. In vitro systems provided a powerful tool for the investigation of the basic mechanisms for mast cell development and differentiation and helped to demonstrate that mast cell heterogeneity can be traced back to certain cytokine patterns that are present in different microenvironments. In this context it has also been shown that the growth factors required for human mast cell differentiation are somewhat different than those for rodents. In rodents, the atypical, T cell-dependent mucosal type mast cell can be distinguished from the T cell-independent connective tissue-type mast cell. In humans, the strict classification into mucosal and connective tissue-type mast cells is not possible and the content of mast cell-specific proteases chymase and tryptase is the main criterion for mast cell subtypes in humans. The large quantities of tryptase and chymase that are synthesized by mast cells suggest and emphasize the significance of these proteinases in mast cell function and stimulated investigations about the biological properties of these mast cell-specific proteases. Comparing their biological activities it becomes clear that they share some activities. On the other hand, tryptase seems to participate in proinflammatory mast cell

  3. Mast cells mediate neutrophil recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression.

    PubMed

    Wezel, Anouk; Lagraauw, H Maxime; van der Velden, Daniël; de Jager, Saskia C A; Quax, Paul H A; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze

    2015-08-01

    Activated mast cells have been identified in the intima and perivascular tissue of human atherosclerotic plaques. As mast cells have been described to release a number of chemokines that mediate leukocyte fluxes, we propose that activated mast cells may play a pivotal role in leukocyte recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression. Systemic IgE-mediated mast cell activation in apoE(-/-)μMT mice resulted in an increase in atherosclerotic lesion size as compared to control mice, and interestingly, the number of neutrophils was highly increased in these lesions. In addition, peritoneal mast cell activation led to a massive neutrophil influx into the peritoneal cavity in C57Bl6 mice, whereas neutrophil numbers in mast cell deficient Kit(W(-sh)/W(-sh)) mice were not affected. Within the newly recruited neutrophil population, increased levels of CXCR2(+) and CXCR4(+) neutrophils were observed after mast cell activation. Indeed, mast cells were seen to contain and release CXCL1 and CXCL12, the ligands for CXCR2 and CXCR4. Intriguingly, peritoneal mast cell activation in combination with anti-CXCR2 receptor antagonist resulted in decreased neutrophil recruitment, thus establishing a prominent role for the CXCL1/CXCR2 axis in mast cell-mediated neutrophil recruitment. Our data suggest that chemokines, and in particular CXCL1, released from activated mast cells induce neutrophil recruitment to the site of inflammation, thereby aggravating the ongoing inflammatory response and thus affecting plaque progression and destabilization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Lipid networks in mast cell biology].

    PubMed

    Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Murakami, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Tissue-resident mast cells are derived from circulating committed progenitors, which are originated from pluripotential hematopoietic stem cells in bone marrow. These progenitors migrate into extravascular tissues, where they undergo differentiation and maturation into tissue-specific mature phenotypes. When activated by IgE/antigen, stem cell factor, neuropeptides, or other stimuli, mature mast cells release three classes of biologically active products, including pre-formed mediators stored in secretory granules, newly transcribed cytokines and chemokines, and de novo synthesized lipid mediators. Therefore, these cells have been implicated as major effector cells in acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. In recent years, it has become clear that lipid mediators including arachidonic acid metabolites (prostaglandins and leukotrienes) and lysophospholipid-derived products play crucial roles in mast cell-associated pathology. In this article, we will provide an overview of the roles of various lipid mediators in allergic diseases fueled by studies of their biosynthetic enzymes or receptors. In the latter part, we will make a particular focus on phospholipase A(2) enzymes, which are placed at the bottleneck (rate-limiting) step of the lipid mediator-biosynthetic pathways.

  5. Mast Cells Produce a Unique Chondroitin Sulfate Epitope.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Brooke L; Whitelock, John M; O'Grady, Robert; Caterson, Bruce; Lord, Megan S

    2016-02-01

    The granules of mast cells contain a myriad of mediators that are stored and protected by the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains that decorate proteoglycans. Whereas heparin is the GAG predominantly associated with mast cells, mast cell proteoglycans are also decorated with heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate (CS). This study investigated a unique CS structure produced by mast cells that was detected with the antibody clone 2B6 in the absence of chondroitinase ABC digestion. Mast cells in rodent tissue sections were characterized using toluidine blue, Leder stain and the presence of mast cell tryptase. The novel CS epitope was identified in rodent tissue sections and localized to cells that were morphologically similar to cells chemically identified as mast cells. The rodent mast cell-like line RBL-2H3 was also shown to express the novel CS epitope. This epitope co-localized with multiple CS proteoglycans in both rodent tissue and RBL-2H3 cultured cells. These findings suggest that the novel CS epitope that decorates mast cell proteoglycans may play a role in the way these chains are structured in mast cells.

  6. Mast Cells Produce a Unique Chondroitin Sulfate Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Brooke L.; Whitelock, John M.; O’Grady, Robert; Caterson, Bruce; Lord, Megan S.

    2015-01-01

    The granules of mast cells contain a myriad of mediators that are stored and protected by the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains that decorate proteoglycans. Whereas heparin is the GAG predominantly associated with mast cells, mast cell proteoglycans are also decorated with heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate (CS). This study investigated a unique CS structure produced by mast cells that was detected with the antibody clone 2B6 in the absence of chondroitinase ABC digestion. Mast cells in rodent tissue sections were characterized using toluidine blue, Leder stain and the presence of mast cell tryptase. The novel CS epitope was identified in rodent tissue sections and localized to cells that were morphologically similar to cells chemically identified as mast cells. The rodent mast cell-like line RBL-2H3 was also shown to express the novel CS epitope. This epitope co-localized with multiple CS proteoglycans in both rodent tissue and RBL-2H3 cultured cells. These findings suggest that the novel CS epitope that decorates mast cell proteoglycans may play a role in the way these chains are structured in mast cells. PMID:26586669

  7. Isolation, culture, and characterization of intestinal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Sellge, Gernot; Bischoff, Stephan C

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells are bone-marrow-derived tissue cells typically located at barrier sites of the body, such as skin, mucosal barriers, or blood barriers, that is, around blood vessels. This location suggests that mast cells might have a function as immunological "gate-keepers" or "watch dogs" and, indeed, some recent functional data support this idea. Mast cells derive from myeloid progenitors, but in contrast to other myeloid cells, they leave the bone marrow in an immature state; therefore, mast cells are not found in the blood under normal conditions. For full maturation, the tissue environment is necessary. Thus, mature mast cells can be only isolated from tissue such as skin or mucosal sites, which makes mast cell isolation rather complicated. Alternatively, mast cell progenitors can be isolated from the bone marrow, peripheral blood, or cord blood, which is easier but requires subsequent in vitro maturation of mast cells as far as possible using cytokines. This chapter describes a rather new technique of mast cell isolation from human intestinal mucosal tissue yielding approx 1-5 million pure and viable human mast cells suitable to perform functional and cell culture experiments.

  8. Stem cell factor programs the mast cell activation phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomonobu; Smrž, Daniel; Jung, Mi-Yeon; Bandara, Geethani; Desai, Avanti; Smržová, Šárka; Kuehn, Hye Sun; Beaven, Michael A; Metcalfe, Dean D; Gilfillan, Alasdair M

    2012-06-01

    Mast cells, activated by Ag via FcεRI, release an array of proinflammatory mediators that contribute to allergic disorders, such as asthma and anaphylaxis. The KIT ligand, stem cell factor (SCF), is critical for mast cell expansion, differentiation, and survival, and under acute conditions, it enhances mast cell activation. However, extended SCF exposure in vivo conversely protects against fatal Ag-mediated anaphylaxis. In investigating this dichotomy, we identified a novel mode of regulation of the mast cell activation phenotype through SCF-mediated programming. We found that mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells chronically exposed to SCF displayed a marked attenuation of FcεRI-mediated degranulation and cytokine production. The hyporesponsive phenotype was not a consequence of altered signals regulating calcium flux or protein kinase C, but of ineffective cytoskeletal reorganization with evidence implicating a downregulation of expression of the Src kinase Hck. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a major role for SCF in the homeostatic control of mast cell activation with potential relevance to mast cell-driven disease and the development of novel approaches for the treatment of allergic disorders.

  9. Mast cells as targets for immunotherapy of solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Oldford, Sharon A; Marshall, Jean S

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells have historically been studied mainly in the context of allergic disease. In recent years, we have come to understand the critical importance of mast cells in tissue remodeling events and their role as sentinel cells in the induction and development of effective immune responses to infection. Studies of the role of mast cells in tumor immunity are more limited. The pro-tumorigenic role of mast cells has been widely reported. However, mast cell infiltration predicts improved prognosis in some cancers, suggesting that their prognostic value may be dependent on other variables. Such factors may include the nature of local mast cell subsets and the various activation stimuli present within the tumor microenvironment. Experimental models have highlighted the importance of mast cells in orchestrating the anti-tumor events that follow immunotherapies that target innate immunity. Mast cells are long-lived tissue resident cells that are abundant around many solid tumors and are radiation resistant making them unique candidates for combined treatment modalities. This review will examine some of the key roles of mast cells in tumor immunity, with a focus on potential immunotherapeutic interventions that harness the sentinel role of mast cells.

  10. Mast Cell Stabilization Ameliorates Autoimmune Anti-Myeloperoxidase Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Poh-Yi; O’Sullivan, Kim M.; Ooi, Joshua D.; Alikhan, Maliha A.; Odobasic, Dragana; Summers, Shaun A.; Kitching, A. Richard

    2016-01-01

    Observations in experimental murine myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) show mast cells degranulate, thus enhancing injury as well as producing immunomodulatory IL-10. Here we report that, compared with biopsy specimens from control patients, renal biopsy specimens from 44 patients with acute AAV had more mast cells in the interstitium, which correlated with the severity of tubulointerstitial injury. Furthermore, most of the mast cells were degranulated and spindle-shaped in patients with acute AAV, indicating an activated phenotype. We hypothesized that the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate would attenuate mast cell degranulation without affecting IL-10 production. We induced anti-MPO GN by immunizing mice with MPO and a low dose of anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody. When administered before or after induction of MPO autoimmunity in these mice, disodium cromoglycate attenuated mast cell degranulation, development of autoimmunity, and development of GN, without diminishing IL-10 production. In contrast, administration of disodium cromoglycate to mast cell-deficient mice had no effect on the development of MPO autoimmunity or GN. MPO-specific CD4+ effector T cell proliferation was enhanced by co-culture with mast cells, but in the presence of disodium cromoglycate, proliferation was inhibited and IL-10 production was enhanced. These results indicate that disodium cromoglycate blocks injurious mast cell degranulation specifically without affecting the immunomodulatory role of these cells. Thus as a therapeutic, disodium cromoglycate may substantially enhance the regulatory role of mast cells in MPO-AAV. PMID:26374606

  11. Brain mast cell relationship to neurovasculature during development.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mona; Ronda, Jocelyn; Weintraub, Michael; Jain, Kim; Silver, Rae; Silverman, Ann-Judith

    2007-09-26

    Mast cells, derived from the hematopoietic stem cell, are present in the brain from birth. During development, mast cells occur in two locations, namely the pia and the brain parenchyma. The current hypothesis regarding their origin states that brain mast cells (or their precursors) enter the pia and access the thalamus by traveling along the abluminal wall of penetrating blood vessels. The population in the pia reaches a maximum at postnatal (PN) day 11, and declines rapidly thereafter. Chromatin fragmentation suggests that this cell loss is due to apoptosis. In contrast, the thalamic population expands from PN8 to reach adult levels at PN30. Stereological analysis demonstrates that mast cells home to blood vessels. More than 96% of mast cells are inside the blood-brain barrier, with ~90% contacting the blood vessel wall or its extracellular matrix. Mast cells express alpha4 integrins -- a potential mechanism for adhesion to the vascular wall. Despite the steady increase in the volume of microvasculature, at all ages studied, mast cells are preferentially located on large diameter vessels (>16 microm; possibly arteries), and contact only those maturing blood vessels that are ensheathed by astroglial processes. Mast cells not only home to large vessels but also maintain a preferential position at branch points, sites of vessel growth. This observation presents the possibility that mast cells participate in and/or regulate vasculature growth or differentiation. The biochemical and molecular signals that induce mast cell homing in the CNS is an area of active investigation.

  12. Sclerosing mediastinitis and mast cell activation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B

    2012-03-15

    Sclerosing mediastinitis (ScM) is a rare, potentially life-threatening disorder, idiopathic in roughly half the cases. Systemic symptoms not attributable to sclerosis often appear in idiopathic ScM. Mast cell activation disease (MCAD) is a potential cause of these symptoms and also can cause sclerosis. ScM has not previously been associated with MCAD. Presented here are the first two cases of ScM associated with MCAD, specifically mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS). CASE 1: A 58-year-old chronically polymorbid woman developed ScM following matched sibling allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Eight years later MCAS, likely underlying most of her chronic issues, was identified. CASE 2: A 30-year-old chronically polymorbid woman presented with superior vena cava syndrome and was diagnosed with ScM. On further evaluation, MCAS was identified. Treatment promptly effected symptomatic improvement; sclerosis has been stable. Non-compliance yielded symptomatic relapse; restored compliance re-achieved symptomatic remission. Different MCAS presentations reflect elaboration of different mediators, some of which can induce inflammation and fibrosis. Thus, MCAS may have directly and/or indirectly driven ScM in these patients. MCAS should be considered in ScM presenting with comorbidities better explained by mast cell mediator release. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular basis of mast cell disease.

    PubMed

    Soucie, Erinn; Brenet, Fabienne; Dubreuil, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Mastocytosis is an incurable and sometimes fatal haematological disorder grossly described as the accumulation of abnormal mast cells in the bone marrow and other organs causing tissue and organ damage. The clinical manifestations of this disease are extremely variable; disease phenotypes range from indolent to aggressive, and often present with associated non-mast cell haematological disorders (AHNMD), mainly myeloproliferative neoplasm and myelodysplastic syndromes. Recent efforts to genetically dissect the mechanisms that define aggressive and non-aggressive mastocytosis have generated a list of recurrent somatic mutations in mastocytosis patients that are associated with and may predict the evolution towards aggressive disease phenotypes. Here we review these mutations and discuss the molecular mechanisms associated with these mutations in an effort to better understand the biology of this disease and to predict its onset and evolution, with the ultimate goal of devising new and improved treatment strategies.

  14. Anaphylaxis: mechanisms of mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Kalesnikoff, Janet; Galli, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a severe systemic allergic response that is rapid in onset and potentially lethal, and that typically is induced by an otherwise innocuous substance. In IgE-dependent and other examples of anaphylaxis, tissue mast cells and circulating basophilic granulocytes (basophils) are thought to represent major (if not the major) sources of the biologically active mediators that contribute to the pathology and, in unfortunate individuals, fatal outcome, of anaphylaxis. In this chapter, we will describe the mechanisms of mast cell (and basophil) activation in anaphylaxis, with a focus on IgE-dependent activation, which is thought to be responsible for most examples of antigen-induced anaphylaxis in humans. We will also discuss the use of mouse models to investigate the mechanisms that can contribute to anaphylaxis in that species in vivo, and the relevance of such mouse studies to human anaphylaxis. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Hymenoptera Allergy and Mast Cell Activation Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, Patrizia; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Lombardo, Carla; Zanotti, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) can be diagnosed in patients with recurrent, severe symptoms from mast cell (MC)-derived mediators, which are transiently increased in serum and are attenuated by mediator-targeting drugs. When KIT-mutated, clonal MC are detected in these patients, a diagnosis of primary MCAS can be made. Severe systemic reactions to hymenoptera venom (HV) represent the most common form of anaphylaxis in patients with mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis are predominantly males and do not have skin lesions in the majority of cases, and anaphylaxis is characterized by hypotension and syncope in the absence of urticaria and angioedema. A normal value of tryptase (≤11.4 ng/ml) in these patients does not exclude a diagnosis of mastocytosis. Patients with primary MCAS and HV anaphylaxis have to undergo lifelong venom immunotherapy, in order to prevent further potentially fatal severe reactions.

  16. Spectrum of mast cell activation disorders.

    PubMed

    Petra, Anastasia I; Panagiotidou, Smaro; Stewart, Julia M; Conti, Pio; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2014-06-01

    Mast cell (MC) activation disorders present with multiple symptoms including flushing, pruritus, hypotension, gastrointestinal complaints, irritability, headaches, concentration/memory loss and neuropsychiatric issues. These disorders are classified as: cutaneous and systemic mastocytosis with a c-kit mutation and clonal MC activation disorder, allergies, urticarias and inflammatory disorders and mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS), idiopathic urticaria and angioedema. MCs are activated by IgE, but also by cytokines, environmental, food, infectious, drug and stress triggers, leading to secretion of multiple mediators. The symptom profile and comorbidities associated with these disorders, such as chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia, are confusing. We propose the use of the term 'spectrum' and highlight the main symptoms, useful diagnostic tests and treatment approaches.

  17. Twenty-first century mast cell stabilizers

    PubMed Central

    Finn, D F; Walsh, J J

    2013-01-01

    Mast cell stabilizing drugs inhibit the release of allergic mediators from mast cells and are used clinically to prevent allergic reactions to common allergens. Despite the relative success of the most commonly prescribed mast cell stabilizer, disodium cromoglycate, in use for the preventative treatment of bronchial asthma, allergic conjunctivitis and vernal keratoconjunctivitis, there still remains an urgent need to design new substances that are less expensive and require less frequent dosing schedules. In this regard, recent developments towards the discovery of the next generation of mast cell stabilizing drugs has included studies on substances isolated from natural sources, biological, newly synthesized compounds and drugs licensed for other indications. The diversity of natural products evaluated range from simple phenols, alkaloids, terpenes to simple amino acids. While in some cases their precise mode of action remains unknown it has nevertheless sparked interest in the development of synthetic derivatives with improved pharmacological properties. Within the purely synthetic class of inhibitors, particular attention has been devoted to the inhibition of important signalling molecules including spleen TK and JAK3. The statin class of cholesterol-lowering drugs as well as nilotinib, a TK inhibitor, are just some examples of clinically used drugs that have been evaluated for their anti-allergic properties. Here, we examine each approach under investigation, summarize the test data generated and offer suggestions for further preclinical evaluation before their therapeutic potential can be realized. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23441583

  18. Controversial role of mast cells in skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Varricchi, Gilda; Galdiero, Maria R; Marone, Giancarlo; Granata, Francescopaolo; Borriello, Francesco; Marone, Gianni

    2017-01-01

    Cancer development is a multistep process characterized by genetic and epigenetic alterations during tumor initiation and progression. The stromal microenvironment can promote tumor development. Mast cells, widely distributed throughout all tissues, are a stromal component of many solid and haematologic tumors. Mast cells can be found in human and mouse models of skin cancers such as melanoma, basal and squamous cell carcinomas, primary cutaneous lymphomas, haemangiomas and Merkel cell carcinoma. However, human and animal studies addressing potential functions of mast cells and their mediators in skin cancers have provided conflicting results. In several studies, mast cells play a pro-tumorigenic role, whereas in others, they play an anti-tumorigenic role. Other studies have failed to demonstrate a clear role for tumor-associated mast cells. Many unanswered questions need to be addressed before we understand whether tumor-associated mast cells are adversaries, allies or simply innocent bystanders in different types and subtypes of skin cancers.

  19. Characterization of Mast Cell Activation Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B; Self, Sally; Menk, Jeremiah; Lazarchick, John

    2017-03-01

    Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS), a recently recognized nonneoplastic mast cell disease driving chronic multisystem inflammation and allergy, appears prevalent and thus important. We report the first systematic characterization of a large MCAS population. Demographics, comorbidities, symptoms, family histories, physical examination and laboratory findings were reviewed in 298 retrospective and 115 prospective patients with MCAS. Blood samples from prospective subjects were examined by flow cytometry for clonal mast cell disease and tested for cytokines potentially driving the monocytosis frequent in MCAS. Demographically, white females dominated. Median ages at symptom onset and diagnosis were 9 and 49 years, respectively (range: 0-88 and 16-92, respectively) and median time from symptom onset to diagnosis was 30 years (range: 1-85). Median numbers of comorbidities, symptoms, and family medical issues were 11, 20, and 4, respectively (range: 1-66, 2-84, and 0-33, respectively). Gastroesophageal reflux, fatigue and dermatographism were the most common comorbidity, symptom and examination finding. Abnormalities in routine laboratories were common and diverse but typically modest. The most useful diagnostic markers were heparin, prostaglandin D2, histamine and chromogranin A. Flow cytometric and cytokine assessments were unhelpful. Our study highlights MCAS׳s morbidity burden and challenging heterogeneity. Recognition is important given good survival and treatment prospects. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mast cell activation syndrome masquerading as agranulocytosis.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B

    2012-01-01

    Acquired agranulocytosis is a rare, life-threatening disorder. The few known causes/associations usually are readily identifiable (e.g., drug reaction, Felty syndrome, megaloblastosis, large granular lymphocytic leukemia, etc.). We report a novel association with mast cell disease. A 61-year-old morbidly obese man developed rheumatoid arthritis unresponsive to several medications. Agranulocytosis developed shortly after sulfasalazine was started but did not improve when the drug was soon stopped. Other symptoms across many systems developed including hives and presyncope. Marrow aspiration and biopsy showed only neutropenia. Serum tryptase was mildly elevated; urinary prostaglandin D2 was markedly elevated. Other causes were not found. Mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS) was diagnosed. Oral antihistamines, montelukast, and cromolyn were unhelpful; aspirin was initially felt contraindicated. Imatinib immediately increased neutrophils from 0% to 25% but did not help symptoms; subsequent addition of aspirin increased neutrophils further and abated symptoms. Different presentations of different MCAS patients reflect elaboration of different mediators likely consequent to different Kit mutations. Mast cells (MCs) help regulate adipocytes, and adipocytes can inhibit granulopoiesis; thus, a Kit-mutated MC clone may have directly and/or indirectly driven agranulocytosis. MCAS should be considered in otherwise idiopathic agranulocytosis presenting with comorbidities best explained by MC mediator release.

  1. Potential role of mast cells in hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Aromando, Romina F; Pérez, Miguel A; Heber, Elisa M; Trivillin, Verónica A; Tomasi, Víctor H; Schwint, Amanda E; Itoiz, María E

    2008-11-01

    During the process of activation, mast cells release products stored in their granules. Tryptase, a protease released from mast cell granules after activation, induces tumor cell proliferation through the activation of PAR-2 (protease activated receptor 2) on the plasma membrane of carcinoma cells. Chemical cancerization (DMBA) of the hamster cheek pouch is the most accepted model of oral cancer. However, there are no reports on the activation of mast cells during experimental carcinogenesis or on the correlation between mast cell activation and cell proliferation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential effect of mast cells on the proliferation of epithelial cells at different times during the cancerization process. Paraffin serial sections of cancerized, tumor-bearing pouches were stained with Alcian Blue-Safranin to identify the different degrees of mast cell activation. Immunohistochemistry was performed to identify BrdU-positive cells to study tumor cell proliferation. Mast cells were counted and grouped into two categories: inactive mast cells AB-S+++ (red) and active mast cells AB+++S- (blue). Mast cell counts were performed in tumor stroma, base of the tumor (connective tissue immediately below the exophytic tumor), connective and muscle tissue underlying the cancerized epithelium (pouch wall) and adventitious tissue underlying the pouch wall. There was a significant increase in the number of mast cells at the base of tumors (p<0.001) compared to the number of mast cells in the wall of the pouch and in tumor stroma. In normal non-cancerized pouches, inactive mast cells were prevalent both in the wall (AB:S=1:2.15; p<0.001) and in the adventitious tissue (AB:S=1:1.6; p<0.004) of the hamster cheek pouch. At most of the experimental times examined, the ratio of active/inactive mast cells (AB/S) in the wall approximated unity and even reverted. The ratio of mast cells was AB:S 1:1.05 at the base of the tumor and 1:0.24 in tumor stroma (p<0

  2. Generation, isolation, and maintenance of human mast cells and mast cell lines derived from peripheral blood or cord blood.

    PubMed

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Kuehn, Hye Sun; Kirshenbaum, Arnold; Gilfillan, Alasdair M

    2010-08-01

    Antigen-mediated mast cell activation is a pivotal step in the initiation of allergic disorders including anaphylaxis and atopy. To date, studies aimed at investigating the mechanisms regulating these responses, and studies designed to identify potential ways to prevent them, have primarily been conducted in rodent mast cells. However, to understand how these responses pertain to human disease, and to investigate and develop novel therapies for the treatment of human mast cell-driven disease, human mast cell models may have greater relevance. Recently, a number of systems have been developed to allow investigators to readily obtain sufficient quantities of human mast cells to conduct these studies. These mast cells release the appropriate suite of inflammatory mediators in response to known mast cell activators including antigen. These systems have also been employed to examine the signaling events regulating these responses. Proof of principle studies has also demonstrated utility of these systems for the identification of potential inhibitors of mast cell activation and growth. In this unit, techniques for the development and culture of human mast cells from their progenitors and the culture of human mast cell lines are described. The relative merits and drawbacks of each model are also described.

  3. Mast cells in human and experimental cardiometabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Shi, Guo-Ping; Bot, Ilze; Kovanen, Petri T

    2015-11-01

    Mast cells, like many other types of inflammatory cell, perform pleiotropic roles in cardiometabolic diseases such as atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysms, obesity, and diabetes mellitus, as well as complications associated with these diseases. Low numbers of mast cells are present in the heart, aorta, and adipose tissue of healthy humans, but patients with cardiometabolic diseases and animals with experimentally-induced cardiometabolic pathologies have high numbers of mast cells with increased activity in the affected tissues. Mediators released by the activated mast cells, such as chemokines, cytokines, growth factors, heparin, histamine, and proteases, not only function as biomarkers of cardiometabolic diseases, but might also directly contribute to the pathogenesis of such diseases. Mast-cell mediators impede the functions of vascular cells, the integrity of the extracellular matrix, and the activity of other inflammatory cells, thereby contributing to the pathobiology of the conditions at multiple levels. In mouse models, mast-cell activation aggravates the progression of various cardiometabolic pathologies, whereas a genetic deficiency or pharmacological stabilization of mast cells, or depletion or inhibition of specific mast-cell mediators, tends to delay the progression of such conditions. Pharmacological inhibition of mast-cell activation or their targeted effector functions offers potential novel therapeutic strategies for patients with cardiometabolic disorders.

  4. Olopatadine: a drug for allergic conjunctivitis targeting the mast cell.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Andrea; Quintieri, Luigi

    2010-04-01

    Ocular allergic diseases are characterized by specific activation of conjunctival mast cells with subsequent release of preformed and newly formed mediators. Mast cells are thus the first therapeutic target of ocular anti-allergic treatments. In this review, a Medline literature search was conducted on conjunctival mast cells, their role in ocular allergy and mast cell stabilization by ocular anti-allergic compounds. Olopatadine hydrochloride, a mast cell stabilizer and histamine receptor antagonist, has been shown to inhibit mast cell activation in an in vitro model of human mast cell culture, reducing histamine and TNF-alpha release and upregulating proinflammatory mediators in conjunctival epithelial cells. In the in vivo conjunctival allergen challenge (CAC) model in allergic subjects, combined with objective evaluations of tear mediators and cytology, olopatadine reduced histamine tear levels and all aspects of allergic inflammation, confirming the positive clinical effects observed in active allergic patients. Mast cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of ocular allergy. The CAC model is ideal for assessing the mast cell stabilizing effects of anti-allergic compounds. This review of clinical studies demonstrates the superiority of olopatadine compared with other topical allergic drugs.

  5. Mast Cells Can Enhance Resistance to Snake and Honeybee Venoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Martin; Piliponsky, Adrian M.; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Lammel, Verena; Åbrink, Magnus; Pejler, Gunnar; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2006-07-01

    Snake or honeybee envenomation can cause substantial morbidity and mortality, and it has been proposed that the activation of mast cells by snake or insect venoms can contribute to these effects. We show, in contrast, that mast cells can significantly reduce snake-venom-induced pathology in mice, at least in part by releasing carboxypeptidase A and possibly other proteases, which can degrade venom components. Mast cells also significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality induced by honeybee venom. These findings identify a new biological function for mast cells in enhancing resistance to the morbidity and mortality induced by animal venoms.

  6. Augmented mast cell infiltration and microvessel density in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wagrowska-Danilewicz, Małgorzata; Stasikowska-Kanicka, Olga; Tuka, Elżbieta; Danilewicz, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study Recent investigations have taken into account the role of mast cells in prostate cancer formation, analyzing their dual functions (as tumour growth promoters and tumour growth inhibitors). The aim of our study was to compare mast cell infiltration and microvessel density in prostate cancer and in benign prostate hyperplasia. We also attempted to find possible relationships among mast cell infiltration and microvessel density, Gleason score, as well as serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Material and methods The investigation was confined to evaluations of material from prostate needle biopsies, carried out in 26 patients with prostate cancer, and of 14 specimens diagnosed as benign hyperplasia. The numbers of tryptase positive mast cells and CD34 positive vessels were determined using a computer image analysis system. In the patients with prostate cancer, both mast cell infiltrates and microvessel density were significantly increased, as compared to the control patients. Results Significant positive correlations were identified between the mean numbers of mast cells and microvessel densities, both in the prostate cancer group and in the control group. Moreover, significant positive correlations were observed between Gleason score on one hand and the number of mast cells and microvessel density on the other. The correlations between PSA serum levels and both mast cell infiltration and microvessel density were positive, but not in a statistically significant way. Conclusions The reported investigations may support the assumption of mast cell promoter function in prostate cancer development, whereas no evidence was found for their opposite PMID:24592126

  7. Mast Cells in Lung Homeostasis: Beyond Type I Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Campillo-Navarro, Marcia; Chávez-Blanco, Alma D; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Serafín-López, Jeanet; Flores-Mejía, Raúl; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-García, Iris; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel

    2014-06-01

    Lungs are indispensable organs for the respiratory process, and maintaining their homeostasis is essential for human health and survival. However, during the lifetime of an individual, the lungs suffer countless insults that put at risk their delicate organization and function. Many cells of the immune system participate to maintain this equilibrium and to keep functional lungs. Among these cells, mast cells have recently attracted attention because of their ability to rapidly secrete many chemical and biological mediators that modulate different processes like inflammation, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, etc. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the understanding of the role that mast cells play in lung protection during infections, and of the relation of mast cell responses to type I hypersensitivity-associated pathologies. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of mast cells during wound healing in the lung and its association with lung cancer, and how mast cells could be exploited as therapeutic targets in some diseases.

  8. Mast Cells in Lung Homeostasis: Beyond Type I Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Campillo-Navarro, Marcia; Chávez-Blanco, Alma D; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Serafín-López, Jeanet; Flores-Mejía, Raúl; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-García, Iris; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel

    2014-01-01

    Lungs are indispensable organs for the respiratory process, and maintaining their homeostasis is essential for human health and survival. However, during the lifetime of an individual, the lungs suffer countless insults that put at risk their delicate organization and function. Many cells of the immune system participate to maintain this equilibrium and to keep functional lungs. Among these cells, mast cells have recently attracted attention because of their ability to rapidly secrete many chemical and biological mediators that modulate different processes like inflammation, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, etc. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the understanding of the role that mast cells play in lung protection during infections, and of the relation of mast cell responses to type I hypersensitivity-associated pathologies. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of mast cells during wound healing in the lung and its association with lung cancer, and how mast cells could be exploited as therapeutic targets in some diseases PMID:25484639

  9. Mast cell distribution in normal adult skin.

    PubMed

    Janssens, A S; Heide, R; den Hollander, J C; Mulder, P G M; Tank, B; Oranje, A P

    2005-03-01

    To investigate mast cell distribution in normal adult skin to provide a reference range for comparison with mastocytosis. Mast cells (MCs) were counted in uninvolved skin adjacent to basal cell carcinomas and other dermatological disorders in adults. There was an uneven distribution of MCs in different body sites using the anti-tryptase monoclonal antibody technique. Numbers of MCs on the trunk, upper arm, and upper leg were similar, but were significantly different from those found on the lower leg and forearm. Two distinct groups were formed--proximal and distal. There were 77.0 MCs/mm2 at proximal body sites and 108.2 MCs/mm2 at distal sites. Adjusted for the adjacent diagnosis and age, this difference was consistent. The numbers of MCs in uninvolved skin adjacent to basal cell carcinomas and other dermatological disorders were not different from those in the control group. Differences in the numbers of MCs between the distal and the proximal body sites must be considered when MCs are counted for a reliable diagnosis of mastocytosis. A pilot study in patients with mastocytosis underlined the variation in the numbers of MCs in mastocytosis and normal skin, but showed a considerable overlap. The observed numbers of MCs in adults cannot be extrapolated to children. MC numbers varied significantly between proximal and distal body sites and these differences must be considered when MCs are counted for a reliable diagnosis of mastocytosis. There was a considerable overlap between the numbers of MCs in mastocytosis and normal skin.

  10. Mast cells, angiogenesis, and tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of mast cells (MCs) in tumours was described by Ehrlich in his doctoral thesis. Since this early account, ample evidence has been provided highlighting participation of MCs to the inflammatory reaction that occurs in many clinical and experimental tumour settings. MCs are bone marrow-derived tissue-homing leukocytes that are endowed with a panoply of releasable mediators and surface receptors. These cells actively take part to innate and acquired immune reactions as well as to a series of fundamental functions such as angiogenesis, tissue repair, and tissue remodelling. The involvement of MCs in tumour development is debated. Although some evidence suggests that MCs can promote tumourigenesis and tumour progression, there are some clinical sets as well as experimental tumour models in which MCs seem to have functions that favour the host. One of the major issues linking MCs to cancer is the ability of these cells to release potent pro-angiogenic factors. This review will focus on the most recent acquisitions about this intriguing field of research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mast cells in inflammation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mast Cells Contribute to Scar Formation During Fetal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Brian C.; Parent, Allison E.; Meleski, Melissa A.; DiPietro, Luisa A.; Schrementi, Megan E.; Wilgus, Traci A.

    2011-01-01

    Scar formation is a potentially detrimental process of tissue restoration in adults, affecting organ form and function. During fetal development, cutaneous wounds heal without inflammation or scarring at early stages of development, but begin to heal with significant inflammation and scarring as the skin becomes more mature. One possible cell type that could regulate the change from scarless to fibrotic healing is the mast cell. We show here that dermal mast cells in scarless wounds generated at embryonic day 15 (E15) are fewer in number, less mature and do not degranulate in response to wounding as effectively as mast cells of fibrotic wounds made at embryonic day 18 (E18). Differences were also observed between cultured mast cells from E15 and E18 skin with regard to degranulation and preformed cytokine levels. Injection of mast cell lysates into E15 wounds disrupted scarless healing, suggesting that mast cells interfere with scarless repair. Finally, wounds produced at E18, which normally heal with a scar, healed with significantly smaller scars in mast cell-deficient KitW/W-v mice compared to Kit+/+ littermates. Together, these data suggest that mast cells enhance scar formation, and that these cells may mediate the transition from scarless to fibrotic healing during fetal development. PMID:21993557

  12. The impact of mast cells on cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Kritikou, Eva; Kuiper, Johan; Kovanen, Petri T; Bot, Ilze

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells comprise an innate immune cell population, which accumulates in tissues proximal to the outside environment and, upon activation, augments the progression of immunological reactions through the release and diffusion of either pre-formed or newly generated mediators. The released products of mast cells include histamine, proteases, as well as a variety of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, which act on the surrounding microenvironment thereby shaping the immune responses triggered in various diseased states. Mast cells have also been detected in the arterial wall and are implicated in the onset and progression of numerous cardiovascular diseases. Notably, modulation of distinct mast cell actions using genetic and pharmacological approaches highlights the crucial role of this cell type in cardiovascular syndromes. The acquired evidence renders mast cells and their mediators as potential prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in a broad spectrum of pathophysiological conditions related to cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherosclerosis: the role of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, M; Schiavoni, G; Del Piano, M; Shaik, Y; Boscolo, P; Caraffa, A; Grano, M; Teté, S; Conti, F; Sessa, R

    2009-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae), a respiratory pathogen, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, an inflammatory progressive disease, characterized by the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Among several types of inflammatory cells involved in the atherogenesis process, recently particular attention has been directed toward the mast cells. Experimental studies have provided several mechanisms by which C. pneumoniae and mast cells could play a role in all stages of atherosclerosis, from initial inflammatory lesions to plaque rupture. C. pneumoniae, as well as mast cells, may actively participate both through the production of cytokines and matrix-degrading metalloproteinases and by provoking apoptosis of atheroma-associated vascular cells, key events in plaque rupture. This mini-review provides a brief overview on adventitial inflammatory effects of C. pneumoniae and mast cells and their potential role in plaque instability. In addition, in this paper we review the role of mast cells in innate immunity.

  14. Histamine release from human buffy coat-derived mast cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian Song; Lau, Hang Yung Alaster

    2007-04-01

    Mast cells are unique immune cells that release a spectrum of chemical mediators contributing to the inflammatory symptoms of allergic disorders. Although mast cell biology has been extensively studied in the rodents, research on human mast cells is hampered by the lack of a convenient preparation source. This problem has now been addressed by culturing human mast cells from CD34(+) progenitors. We have recently discovered that human buffy coat preparations from local blood banks are an abundant and convenient source of progenitors for culturing mature mast cells which express functional high affinity IgE receptors and contain histamine and tryptase in their granules. In the current study, we further characterize these buffy coat-derived mast cells by studying their responses to common mast cell secretagogues and stabilizers. Mature human mast cells were obtained by culturing isolated progenitors in methylcellulose containing stem cell factor (SCF), IL-3 and IL-6 for 6 weeks and subsequently in liquid medium containing SCF and IL-6 for another 6 to 8 weeks. Following sensitisation with human IgE, these cells released histamine dose-dependently upon activation by anti-IgE and calcium ionophores while compound 48/80 and substance P were relatively ineffective. When the effects of anti-asthmatic agents on anti-IgE-induced mediator release from these cells were compared, only the beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonists and phosphodiesterase inhibitors produced dose-dependent inhibition but not cromolyn or nedocromil. In total, mast cells cultured from human buffy coat progenitors shared similar functional properties of MC(T) subtype of mast cells found predominantly in human lung parenchyma and intestinal mucosa.

  15. Basic science for the clinician 53: mast cells.

    PubMed

    Sigal, Leonard H

    2011-10-01

    Mast cells stand at the interface between the innate immune system and the acquired (adaptive) immune response, serving as sentinels detecting invaders and directing a concerted and coordinated response. Mast cells reside immediately under body surfaces and within lymph nodes, near blood vessels and nerves, perfectly situated to for early detection and defense. They secrete a wide array of prostanoids, cytokines, chemokines, and other proteins mediators and modifiers of a variety of immune and inflammatory functions and bear surface markers suggesting broad functions, including as antigen-presenting cells. Although usually not given their due in medical school lectures, there is great likelihood that mast cells will be implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, and perhaps cancer. Thus, better insights into mast cell functions and mast cell-derived effector molecules should command our attention as we move forward in better understanding disease immunopathogenesis and directed intelligent therapeutics development.

  16. Regulation of basophil and mast cell development by transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Haruka; Kurotaki, Daisuke; Tamura, Tomohiko

    2016-04-01

    Basophils and mast cells play important roles in host defense against parasitic infections and allergic responses. Several progenitor populations, either shared or specific, for basophils and/or mast cells have been identified, thus elucidating the developmental pathways of these cells. Multiple transcription factors essential for their development and the relationships between them have been also revealed. For example, IRF8 induces GATA2 expression to promote the generation of both basophils and mast cells. The STAT5-GATA2 axis induces C/EBPα and MITF expression, facilitating the differentiation into basophils and mast cells, respectively. In addition, C/EBPα and MITF mutually suppress each other's expression. This review provides an overview of recent advances in our understanding of how transcription factors regulate the development of basophils and mast cells.

  17. Mast Cells: A Pivotal Role in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Veerappan, Arul; O'Connor, Nathan J.; Brazin, Jacqueline; Reid, Alicia C.; Jung, Albert; McGee, David; Summers, Barbara; Branch-Elliman, Dascher; Stiles, Brendon; Worgall, Stefan; Kaner, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by an inflammatory response that includes macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and mast cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether mast cells play a role in initiating pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary fibrosis was induced with bleomycin in mast-cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv (MCD) mice and their congenic controls (WBB6F1-+/+). Mast cell deficiency protected against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, but protection was reversed with the re-introduction of mast cells to the lungs of MCD mice. Two mast cell mediators were identified as fibrogenic: histamine and renin, via angiotensin (ANG II). Both human and rat lung fibroblasts express the histamine H1 and ANG II AT1 receptor subtypes and when activated, they promote proliferation, transforming growth factor β1 secretion, and collagen synthesis. Mast cells appear to be critical to pulmonary fibrosis. Therapeutic blockade of mast cell degranulation and/or histamine and ANG II receptors should attenuate pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:23570576

  18. The role of mast cells in allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Amin, Kawa

    2012-01-01

    The histochemical characteristics of human basophils and tissue mast cells were described over a century ago by Paul Ehrlich. When mast cells are activated by an allergen that binds to serum IgE attached to their FcɛRI receptors, they release cytokines, eicosanoids and their secretory granules. Mast cells are now thought to exert critical proinflammatory functions, as well as potential immunoregulatory roles, in various immune disorders through the release of mediators such as histamine, leukotrienes, cytokines chemokines, and neutral proteases (chymase and tryptase). The aim of this review is to describe the role of mast cells in allergic inflammation. Mast cells interact directly with bacteria and appear to play a vital role in host defense against pathogens. Drugs, such as glucocorticoids, cyclosporine and cromolyn have been shown to have inhibitory effects on mast cell degranulation and mediator release. This review shows that mast cells play an active role in such diverse diseases as asthma, rhinitis, middle ear infection, and pulmonary fibrosis. In conclusion, mast cells may not only contribute to the chronic airway inflammatory response, remodeling and symptomatology, but they may also have a central role in the initiation of the allergic immune response, that is providing signals inducing IgE synthesis by B-lymphocytes and inducing Th2 lymphocyte differentiation.

  19. Effects of ionizing radiation on differentiation of murine bone marrow cells into mast cells.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Sho; Yoshino, Hironori; Ishikawa, Junya; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Tsujiguchi, Takakiyo; Nishiyama, Ayaka; Yokoyama, Kouki; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2015-11-01

    Mast cells, immune effector cells produced from bone marrow cells, play a major role in immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic responses. Ionizing radiation affects the functions of mast cells, which are involved in radiation-induced tissue damage. However, whether ionizing radiation affects the differential induction of mast cells is unknown. Here we investigated whether bone marrow cells of X-irradiated mice differentiated into mast cells. To induce mast cells, bone marrow cells from X-irradiated and unirradiated mice were cultured in the presence of cytokines required for mast cell induction. Although irradiation at 0.5 Gy and 2 Gy decreased the number of bone marrow cells 1 day post-irradiation, the cultured bone marrow cells of X-irradiated and unirradiated mice both expressed mast cell-related cell-surface antigens. However, the percentage of mast cells in the irradiated group was lower than in the unirradiated group. Similar decreases in the percentage of mast cells induced in the presence of X-irradiation were observed 10 days post irradiation, although the number of bone marrow cells in irradiated mice had recovered by this time. Analysis of mast cell function showed that degranulation of mast cells after immunoglobulin E-mediated allergen recognition was significantly higher in the X-irradiated group compared with in the unirradiated group. In conclusion, bone marrow cells of X-irradiated mice differentiated into mast cells, but ionizing radiation affected the differentiation efficiency and function of mast cells.

  20. Are Basophils and Mast Cells Masters in HIV Infection?

    PubMed

    Marone, Gianni; Varricchi, Gilda; Loffredo, Stefania; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Rivellese, Felice; de Paulis, Amato

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization AIDS epidemic update estimates that more than 37 million people are living with HIV infection. Despite the unprecedented success of antiretroviral treatments, significant challenges remain in the fight against HIV. In particular, how uninfected cells capture HIV and transmit virions to target cells remains an unanswered question. Tissue mast cells and peripheral blood basophils can be exposed to virions or HIV products during infection. Several HIV proteins (i.e., envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41, Tat, and Nef) can interact with distinct surface receptors expressed by human basophils and mast cells and modulate their functional responses at different levels. Additionally, several groups have provided evidence that human mast cells can be infected in vitro, as well as in vivo, by certain strains of HIV. Recently, it has been demonstrated that basophils purified from healthy donors and intestinal mast cells can efficiently capture HIV on their cell surface and, cocultured with CD4+ T cells, they can transfer the virus to the cocultured cells leading to infection. Direct contact between human basophils or intestinal mast cells and CD4+ T cells can mediate viral trans-infection of T cells through the formation of viral synapses. Thus, basophils and mast cells can provide a cellular basis for capturing and then spreading viruses throughout the body. Collectively, these findings suggest that human basophils and mast cells play a complex and possibly distinct role in HIV infection, warranting further investigations.

  1. Contribution of engineered nanomaterials physicochemical properties to mast cell degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Monica M.; Mendoza, Ryan; Raghavendra, Achyut J.; Podila, Ramakrishna; Brown, Jared M.

    2017-01-01

    The rapid development of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) has grown dramatically in the last decade, with increased use in consumer products, industrial materials, and nanomedicines. However, due to increased manufacturing, there is concern that human and environmental exposures may lead to adverse immune outcomes. Mast cells, central to the innate immune response, are one of the earliest sensors of environmental insult and have been shown to play a role in ENM-mediated immune responses. Our laboratory previously determined that mast cells are activated via a non-FcεRI mediated response following silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) exposure, which was dependent upon key physicochemical properties. Using bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs), we tested the hypothesis that ENM physicochemical properties influence mast cell degranulation. Exposure to 13 physicochemically distinct ENMs caused a range of mast degranulation responses, with smaller sized Ag NPs (5 nm and 20 nm) causing the most dramatic response. Mast cell responses were dependent on ENMs physicochemical properties such as size, apparent surface area, and zeta potential. Surprisingly, minimal ENM cellular association by mast cells was not correlated with mast cell degranulation. This study suggests that a subset of ENMs may elicit an allergic response and contribute to the exacerbation of allergic diseases. PMID:28262689

  2. Contribution of engineered nanomaterials physicochemical properties to mast cell degranulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Monica M.; Mendoza, Ryan; Raghavendra, Achyut J.; Podila, Ramakrishna; Brown, Jared M.

    2017-03-01

    The rapid development of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) has grown dramatically in the last decade, with increased use in consumer products, industrial materials, and nanomedicines. However, due to increased manufacturing, there is concern that human and environmental exposures may lead to adverse immune outcomes. Mast cells, central to the innate immune response, are one of the earliest sensors of environmental insult and have been shown to play a role in ENM-mediated immune responses. Our laboratory previously determined that mast cells are activated via a non-FcεRI mediated response following silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) exposure, which was dependent upon key physicochemical properties. Using bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs), we tested the hypothesis that ENM physicochemical properties influence mast cell degranulation. Exposure to 13 physicochemically distinct ENMs caused a range of mast degranulation responses, with smaller sized Ag NPs (5 nm and 20 nm) causing the most dramatic response. Mast cell responses were dependent on ENMs physicochemical properties such as size, apparent surface area, and zeta potential. Surprisingly, minimal ENM cellular association by mast cells was not correlated with mast cell degranulation. This study suggests that a subset of ENMs may elicit an allergic response and contribute to the exacerbation of allergic diseases.

  3. Roles and relevance of mast cells in infection and vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yu; Xiang, Zou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In addition to their well-established role in allergy mast cells have been described as contributing to functional regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses in host defense. Mast cells are of hematopoietic origin but typically complete their differentiation in tissues where they express immune regulatory functions by releasing diverse mediators and cytokines. Mast cells are abundant at mucosal tissues which are portals of entry for common infectious agents in addition to allergens. Here, we review the current understanding of the participation of mast cells in defense against infection. We also discuss possibilities of exploiting mast cell activation to provide adequate adjuvant activity that is needed in high-quality vaccination against infectious diseases. PMID:26565602

  4. Microbes taming mast cells: Implications for allergic inflammation and beyond.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, Paul

    2016-05-05

    There is increasing awareness of a relationship between our microbiota and the pathogenesis of allergy and other inflammatory diseases. In investigating the mechanisms underlying microbiota modulation of allergy the focus has been on the induction phase; alterations in the phenotype and function of antigen presenting cells, induction of regulatory T cells and shifts in Th1/Th2 balance. However there is evidence that microbes can influence the effector phase of disease, specifically that certain potentially beneficial bacteria can attenuate mast cell activation and degranulation. Furthermore, it appears that different non-pathogenic bacteria can utilize distinct mechanisms to stabilize mast cells, acting locally though direct interaction with the mast cell at mucosal sites or attenuating systemic mast cell dependent responses, likely through indirect signaling mechanisms. The position of mast cells on the frontline of defense against pathogens also suggests they may play an important role in fostering the host-microbiota relationship. Mast cells are also conduits of neuro-immuo-endocrine communication, suggesting the ability of microbes to modulate cell responses may have implications for host physiology beyond immunology. Further investigation of mast cell regulation by non-pathogenic or symbiotic bacteria will likely lead to a greater understanding of host microbiota interaction and the role of the microbiome in health and disease.

  5. Novel Identified Receptors on Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Migalovich-Sheikhet, Helena; Friedman, Sheli; Mankuta, David; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) are major participants in the allergic reaction. In addition they possess immunomodulatory roles in the innate and adaptive immune reactions. Their functions are modulated through a number of activating and inhibitory receptors expressed on their surface. This review deals with some of the most recently described receptors, their expression patterns, ligand(s), signal transduction mechanisms, possible cross-talk with other receptors and, last but not least, regulatory functions that the MC can perform based on their receptor expression in health or in disease. Where the receptor role on MC is still not clear, evidences from other hematopoietic cells expressing them is provided as a possible insight for their function on MC. Suggested strategies to modulate these receptors’ activity for the purpose of therapeutic intervention are also discussed. PMID:22876248

  6. Mast cells and IgE: from history to today.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hirohisa; Ishizaka, Teruko; Ishizaka, Kimishige

    2013-03-01

    Role of mast cells in allergy had remained undetermined until the discovery of IgE in 1966. Then, IgE purified from many Liters of plasma, which had been donated from a patient with fatal myeloma, was distributed to researchers all over the world, and thus accelerated exploring the mechanisms involved in allergic reactions, particularly about the role of mast cells and basophils in the IgE-mediated reactions. Identification of mast cells as a progeny of a bone marrow hematopoietic stem cell in 1977 led us to successful in vitro culture of human mast cells. Along with the development of molecular biological techniques, the structure of the high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) was determined in 1989. These findings and subsequent investigations brought deeper understanding of IgE-mediated allergic diseases in the past half century, especially where mast cells are involved. We have now even obtained the information about whole genome expression of FcεRI-dependently activated mast cells. In sharp contrast to our comprehension of allergic diseases where IgE and mast cells are involved, the mechanisms involved in non-IgE-mediated allergic diseases or non-IgE-mediated phase of IgE-mediated diseases are almost left unsolved and are waiting for devoted investigators to reveal it.

  7. Quantification and localization of mast cells in periapical lesions.

    PubMed

    Mahita, V N; Manjunatha, B S; Shah, R; Astekar, M; Purohit, S; Kovvuru, S

    2015-01-01

    Periapical lesions occur in response to chronic irritation in periapical tissue, generally resulting from an infected root canal. Specific etiological agents of induction, participating cell population and growth factors associated with maintenance and resolution of periapical lesions are incompletely understood. Among the cells found in periapical lesions, mast cells have been implicated in the inflammatory mechanism. Quantifications and the possible role played by mast cells in the periapical granuloma and radicular cyst. Hence, this study is to emphasize the presence (localization) and quantification of mast cells in periapical granuloma and radicular cyst. A total of 30 cases and out of which 15 of periapical granuloma and 15 radicular cyst, each along with the case details from the previously diagnosed cases in the department of oral pathology were selected for the study. The gender distribution showed male 8 (53.3%) and females 7 (46.7%) in periapical granuloma cases and male 10 (66.7%) and females 5 (33.3%) in radicular cyst cases. The statistical analysis used was unpaired t-test. Mean mast cell count in periapical granuloma subepithelial and deeper connective tissue, was 12.40 (0.99%) and 7.13 (0.83%), respectively. The mean mast cell counts in subepithelial and deeper connective tissue of radicular cyst were 17.64 (1.59%) and 12.06 (1.33%) respectively, which was statistically significant. No statistical significant difference was noted among males and females. Mast cells were more in number in radicular cyst. Based on the concept that mast cells play a critical role in the induction of inflammation, it is logical to use therapeutic agents to alter mast cell function and secretion, to thwart inflammation at its earliest phases. These findings may suggest the possible role of mast cells in the pathogenesis of periapical lesions.

  8. Quantification and Localization of Mast Cells in Periapical Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mahita, VN; Manjunatha, BS; Shah, R; Astekar, M; Purohit, S; Kovvuru, S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Periapical lesions occur in response to chronic irritation in periapical tissue, generally resulting from an infected root canal. Specific etiological agents of induction, participating cell population and growth factors associated with maintenance and resolution of periapical lesions are incompletely understood. Among the cells found in periapical lesions, mast cells have been implicated in the inflammatory mechanism. Aim: Quantifications and the possible role played by mast cells in the periapical granuloma and radicular cyst. Hence, this study is to emphasize the presence (localization) and quantification of mast cells in periapical granuloma and radicular cyst. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 cases and out of which 15 of periapical granuloma and 15 radicular cyst, each along with the case details from the previously diagnosed cases in the department of oral pathology were selected for the study. The gender distribution showed male 8 (53.3%) and females 7 (46.7%) in periapical granuloma cases and male 10 (66.7%) and females 5 (33.3%) in radicular cyst cases. The statistical analysis used was unpaired t-test. Results: Mean mast cell count in periapical granuloma subepithelial and deeper connective tissue, was 12.40 (0.99%) and 7.13 (0.83%), respectively. The mean mast cell counts in subepithelial and deeper connective tissue of radicular cyst were 17.64 (1.59%) and 12.06 (1.33%) respectively, which was statistically significant. No statistical significant difference was noted among males and females. Conclusion: Mast cells were more in number in radicular cyst. Based on the concept that mast cells play a critical role in the induction of inflammation, it is logical to use therapeutic agents to alter mast cell function and secretion, to thwart inflammation at its earliest phases. These findings may suggest the possible role of mast cells in the pathogenesis of periapical lesions. PMID:25861530

  9. Human mast cells costimulate T cells through a CD28-independent interaction.

    PubMed

    Suurmond, Jolien; Dorjée, Annemarie L; Huizinga, Tom W J; Toes, René E M

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells are innate immune cells usually residing in peripheral tissues, where they are likely to activate T-cell responses. Similar to other myeloid immune cells, mast cells can function as antigen-presenting cells. However, little is known about the capacity of human mast cells to costimulate CD4(+) T cells. Here, we studied the T-cell stimulatory potential of human mast cells. Peripheral blood derived mast cells were generated and cocultured with isolated CD4(+) T cells. In the presence of T-cell receptor triggering using anti-CD3, mast cells promoted strong proliferation of T cells, which was two- to fivefold stronger than the "T-cell promoting capacity" of monocytes. The interplay between mast cells and T cells was dependent on cell-cell contact, suggesting that costimulatory molecules on the mast cell surface are responsible for the effect. However, in contrast to monocytes, the T-cell costimulation by mast cells was independent of the classical costimulatory molecule CD28, or that of OX40L, ICOSL, or LIGHT. Our data show that mast cells can costimulate human CD4(+) T cells to induce strong T-cell proliferation, but that therapies aiming at disrupting the interaction of CD28 and B7 molecules do not inhibit mast cell mediated T-cell activation.

  10. Role of Mast Cells in Regulation of T Cell Responses in Experimental and Clinical Settings.

    PubMed

    Elieh Ali Komi, Daniel; Grauwet, Korneel

    2017-09-19

    Mast cells secrete a wide spectrum of stored or newly synthesized pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory, and/or immunosuppressive mediators and express several costimulatory and inhibitory surface molecules. Mast cells finely tune activities of T cells, B cells, and regulatory cells and effectively contribute to the development of different T cell-associated responses by influencing their recruitment, activation, proliferation, and differentiation. The interaction between mast cells and T cells, with regard to cellular functionality and immune responses, can be assessed in both activating and inhibitory regulations. While Th2 cytokines, including IL-5 and IL-9, stimulate stem cell factor (SCF)-dependent proliferation of mast cells, Th1 cytokine IFN-γ suppresses SCF-mediated differentiation of mast cell progenitors. Mast cell mediators such as CCL5 have a role in the recruitment of CD8+ T cells to viral infection sites where their ability in clearance of viral reservoirs is needed. The capacity of mast cells in presenting antigens by classes I and II MHC molecules to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells respectively is considered one of the main antigen-dependent interactions of mast cells with T cells. Interestingly, Tregs recruit mast cells to different sites through secretion of IL-9, while the OX40L (expressed on mast cell)-OX40(expressed on T cell) interaction inhibits the extent of the mast cell degranulation. Recently, the capability of exosomes to carry regulatory receptors of the mast cell surface and their role in T cell activation has been investigated. Functional interplay between mast cells and T cell subsets has been suggested primarily by investigating their co-localization in inflamed tissues and involvement of mast cells in autoimmune diseases. In this review, the interactions of mast cells with T cells are reviewed in cell-to-cell, cytokine, and exosome categories.

  11. Widespread immunological functions of mast cells: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Feyerabend, Thorsten B

    2012-07-27

    Immunological functions of mast cells are currently considered to be much broader than the original role of mast cells in IgE-driven allergic disease. The spectrum of proposed mast cell functions includes areas as diverse as the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses, protective immunity against viral, microbial, and parasitic pathogens, autoimmunity, tolerance to graft rejection, promotion of or protection from cancer, wound healing, angiogenesis, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, obesity, and others. The vast majority of in vivo mast cell data have been based on mast cell-deficient Kit mutant mice. However, work in new mouse mutants with unperturbed Kit function, which have a surprisingly normal immune system, has failed to corroborate some key immunological aspects, formerly attributed to mast cells. Here, we consider the implications of these recent developments for the state of the field as well as for future work, aiming at deciphering the physiological functions of mast cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. New insights in mast cell modulation by palmitoylethanolamide.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, D; Negro, L; Vaia, M; Cinelli, M P; Iuvone, T

    2013-02-01

    Since its discovery palmitoylethanolamide was considered as an endogenous compound able to negatively modulate the inflammatory process. Its effects have been extensively investigated in in vitro, in vivo and in clinical studies. Notwithstanding some discrepancy, nowadays the efficacy of palmitoylethanolamide in controlling mast cell behaviour, which likely accounts for its many anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic and analgesic effects, is well recognized. In view of their strategic localization at sites directly interfacing with the external environment, mast cells act as surveillance antennae against different types of injury and can undergo activation, thereby regulating both innate and adaptive immune reactions through the release of several preformed and newly synthesized mediators. Mast cells are now viewed as key players in orchestrating several disorders including both acute and chronic inflammatory processes, and have a role in angiogenesis and hyperalgesia. Since mast cells exert also important physiological, homeostatic functions, the most recent goal for pharmacologists is to control, rather than block, mast cell degranulation in order to modulate the pathological scenario. The aim of the present review is to summarise the evidence regarding the role played by palmitoylethanolamide in the control of mast cell activation, starting from in vitro studies, going through in vivo evidence in animal models of disease sustained by mast cell activation, and finally reviewing recent clinical studies using this molecule.

  13. Mucosal mast cells and developmental changes in gastric absorption.

    PubMed

    Catto-Smith, A G; Ripper, J L

    1995-01-01

    We aimed to establish whether gastric mucosal mast cells undergo degranulation during normal postnatal development and to correlate this with gastric electrical parameters, paracellular permeability, and macromolecular absorption. Sprague-Dawley rats were studied between 10 and 30 days after birth. Gastric mucosal mast cell degranulation occurred and was maximal on days 15 and 17, measured by histology and gastric and serum levels of rat mast cell protease II. Short-circuit current, transepithelial conductance, and permeability of voltage-clamped glandular stomach were elevated in younger animals, falling with age except for a transient but significant increase in conductance and permeability at 17 days, closely correlated with maximal mast cell degranulation. Macromolecular uptake was significantly increased in animals aged 10-15 days. Concanavalin A and antigen-induced mast cell degranulation increased conductance and permeability in vitro in younger animals. We conclude that 1) gastric mucosal mast cells degranulate during development, 2) the neonatal stomach has increased permeability and uptake of macromolecules, and 3) gastric mucosal mast cell degranulation during development may affect mucosal permeability.

  14. Immunohistochemical characterization of feline mast cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Mallett, C L; Northrup, N C; Saba, C F; Rodriguez, C O; Rassnick, K M; Gieger, T L; Childress, M O; Howerth, E W

    2013-01-01

    Expression of histamine, serotonin, and KIT was evaluated in 61 archived feline mast cell tumors (MCTs) from the skin (n = 29), spleen (n = 17), and gastrointestinal (GI) tract (n = 15) using immunohistochemistry. Twenty-eight percent of cutaneous MCTs, 18% of splenic MCTs, and 53% of GI MCTs displayed histamine immunoreactivity. Serotonin immunoreactivity was detected in 3 GI and 1 cutaneous MCT. Sixty-nine percent of cutaneous MCTs, 35% of splenic MCTs, and 33% of GI MCTs were positive for KIT. Expression of these biogenic amines and KIT was less common than expected. Results of this study suggest heterogeneity in feline MCTs based on anatomic location. Further studies are needed to explain the significance of these differences.

  15. The mechanisms of exocytosis in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Blank, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Upon activation through high affinity IgE receptors (FcεRI), mast cells (MCs) can release up to 100% of their content of preformed mediators stored in cytoplasmic secretory granules by compound exocytosis. This causes Type I immediate hypersensitivity reactions and, in the case of inappropriate activation by allergens, the symptoms of allergy. Recent work has uncovered a central role of SNARE (Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor (NSF) Attachment Protein (SNAP) Receptors) proteins in regulating the numerous membrane fusion events during exocytosis. This has defined a series of new molecular actors in MC exocytosis that participate in the regulation of membrane fusion and the connection of the fusion machinery with early signaling events. The purpose of this chapter is to describe these proteins and provide a brief overview on their mechanism of action.

  16. Expression of cell surface antigens on mast cells: mast cell phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Hauswirth, Alexander W; Florian, Stefan; Schernthaner, Gerit-Holger; Krauth, Maria-Theresa; Sonneck, Karoline; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Valent, Peter

    2006-01-01

    During the past few decades, a number of functionally important cell surface antigens have been detected on human mast cells (MCs). These antigens include the stem cell factor receptor (SCFR/CD117), the high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptor, adhesion molecules, and activation-linked membrane determinants. Several of these antigens (CD2, CD25, CD35, CD88, CD203c) appear to be upregulated on MCs in patients with systemic mastocytosis and therefore are used as diagnostic markers. Quantitative measurement of these markers on MCs is thus of diagnostic value and is usually performed by multicolor-based flow cytometry techniques utilizing a PE- or APC-labeled antibody against CD117 for MCs detection. This chapter gives an overview about the methods of staining of MC in various tissues with special reference to novel diagnostic markers applied in patients with suspected systemic mastocytosis.

  17. Mast cells mediate malignant pleural effusion formation.

    PubMed

    Giannou, Anastasios D; Marazioti, Antonia; Spella, Magda; Kanellakis, Nikolaos I; Apostolopoulou, Hara; Psallidas, Ioannis; Prijovich, Zeljko M; Vreka, Malamati; Zazara, Dimitra E; Lilis, Ioannis; Papaleonidopoulos, Vassilios; Kairi, Chrysoula A; Patmanidi, Alexandra L; Giopanou, Ioanna; Spiropoulou, Nikolitsa; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Aidinis, Vassilis; Spyratos, Dionisios; Teliousi, Stamatia; Papadaki, Helen; Taraviras, Stavros; Snyder, Linda A; Eickelberg, Oliver; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kalomenidis, Ioannis; Blackwell, Timothy S; Agalioti, Theodora; Stathopoulos, Georgios T

    2015-06-01

    Mast cells (MCs) have been identified in various tumors; however, the role of these cells in tumorigenesis remains controversial. Here, we quantified MCs in human and murine malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) and evaluated the fate and function of these cells in MPE development. Evaluation of murine MPE-competent lung and colon adenocarcinomas revealed that these tumors actively attract and subsequently degranulate MCs in the pleural space by elaborating CCL2 and osteopontin. MCs were required for effusion development, as MPEs did not form in mice lacking MCs, and pleural infusion of MCs with MPE-incompetent cells promoted MPE formation. Once homed to the pleural space, MCs released tryptase AB1 and IL-1β, which in turn induced pleural vasculature leakiness and triggered NF-κB activation in pleural tumor cells, thereby fostering pleural fluid accumulation and tumor growth. Evaluation of human effusions revealed that MCs are elevated in MPEs compared with benign effusions. Moreover, MC abundance correlated with MPE formation in a human cancer cell-induced effusion model. Treatment of mice with the c-KIT inhibitor imatinib mesylate limited effusion precipitation by mouse and human adenocarcinoma cells. Together, the results of this study indicate that MCs are required for MPE formation and suggest that MC-dependent effusion formation is therapeutically addressable.

  18. Mast cells in allergy and autoimmunity: implications for adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Gregory D; Brown, Melissa A

    2006-01-01

    As in the fashion industry, trends in a particular area of scientific investigation often are fleeting but then return with renewed and enthusiastic interest. Studies of mast cell biology are good examples of this. Although dogma once relegated mast cells almost exclusively to roles in pathological inflammation associated with allergic disease, these cells are emerging as important players in a number of other physiological processes. Consequently, they are quickly becoming the newest "trendy" cell, both within and outside the field of immunology. As sources of a large array of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, mast cells also express cell surface molecules with defined functions in lymphocyte activation and trafficking. Here, we provide an overview of the traditional and newly appreciated contributions of mast cells to both innate and adaptive immune responses.

  19. Lipaemic plasma induces haemolysis in resuspended red cell concentrate.

    PubMed

    Bashir, S; Wiltshire, M; Cardigan, R; Thomas, S

    2013-04-01

    We investigated whether haemolysis in red cells suspended in plasma was affected by the lipid content and/or methylene blue (MB) treatment of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP). We also investigated whether haemolysis was affected by the conditions under which lipaemic plasma was stored. Study 1: Visibly lipaemic (n = 22) or nonlipaemic FFP (n = 24) units were thawed, pooled and split into identical pairs, one of which was MB treated. These units were used to resuspend red cell concentrates (RCC) and tested for haemolysis immediately and after 24 and 48 h of storage at 2-6°C. Study 2: Fresh plasma was aliquoted into 15-ml tubes and stored in one of four ways as follows: room temperature; 2-6°C; frozen and thawed; or twice frozen and thawed. A sample of RCC was resuspended in each of these plasmas and haemolysis measured after 2 h. Study 3: Plasma was divided into 15-ml tubes and stored as in study 2 followed by storage left standing upright in a refrigerator (2-6°C) for 24 h (with the exception of the room temperature sample). Plasma was separated into top, middle and bottom fractions and used to resuspend RCC that were assessed for haemolysis after 2 h. The levels of haemolysis in RCC were immediately greater when suspended in lipaemic plasma (0·70 ± 0·53% v 0·05 ± 0·06% for nonlipaemic plasma), which increased further on subsequent storage for 48 h (1·22 ± 0·40% v 0·15 ± 0·14% for nonlipaemic plasma). This was irrespective of whether plasma was MB treated. Lipaemic plasma stored frozen and then thawed resulted in the greatest haemolysis. In lipaemic plasma stored at 2-6°C, the chylomicron-rich top fraction caused the highest level of haemolysis. Haemolysis in red cells is increased in those suspended in lipaemic plasma and is dependent upon the storage conditions of that plasma prior to suspension. These data are relevant to the choice of plasma used to suspend red cells for neonatal exchange transfusion. © 2012 The Author(s). Vox Sanguinis © 2012

  20. Mast cells mediate malignant pleural effusion formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannou, Anastasios D.; Marazioti, Antonia; Spella, Magda; Kanellakis, Nikolaos I.; Apostolopoulou, Hara; Psallidas, Ioannis; Prijovich, Zeljko M.; Vreka, Malamati; Zazara, Dimitra E.; Lilis, Ioannis; Papaleonidopoulos, Vassilios; Kairi, Chrysoula A.; Patmanidi, Alexandra L.; Giopanou, Ioanna; Spiropoulou, Nikolitsa; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Aidinis, Vassilis; Spyratos, Dionisios; Teliousi, Stamatia; Papadaki, Helen; Taraviras, Stavros; Snyder, Linda A.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kalomenidis, Ioannis; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Agalioti, Theodora; Stathopoulos, Georgios T.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) have been identified in various tumors; however, the role of these cells in tumorigenesis remains controversial. Here, we quantified MCs in human and murine malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) and evaluated the fate and function of these cells in MPE development. Evaluation of murine MPE-competent lung and colon adenocarcinomas revealed that these tumors actively attract and subsequently degranulate MCs in the pleural space by elaborating CCL2 and osteopontin. MCs were required for effusion development, as MPEs did not form in mice lacking MCs, and pleural infusion of MCs with MPE-incompetent cells promoted MPE formation. Once homed to the pleural space, MCs released tryptase AB1 and IL-1β, which in turn induced pleural vasculature leakiness and triggered NF-κB activation in pleural tumor cells, thereby fostering pleural fluid accumulation and tumor growth. Evaluation of human effusions revealed that MCs are elevated in MPEs compared with benign effusions. Moreover, MC abundance correlated with MPE formation in a human cancer cell–induced effusion model. Treatment of mice with the c-KIT inhibitor imatinib mesylate limited effusion precipitation by mouse and human adenocarcinoma cells. Together, the results of this study indicate that MCs are required for MPE formation and suggest that MC-dependent effusion formation is therapeutically addressable. PMID:25915587

  1. Mast Cell Proteases as Protective and Inflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Caughey, George H.

    2014-01-01

    Proteases are the most abundant class of proteins produced by mast cells. Many of these are stored in membrane-enclosed intracellular granules until liberated by degranulating stimuli, which include cross-linking of high affinity IgE receptor FcεRI by IgE bound to multivalent allergen. Understanding and separating the functions of the proteases is important because expression differs among mast cells in different tissue locations. Differences between laboratory animals and humans in protease expression also influence the degree of confidence with which results obtained in animal models of mast cell function can be extrapolated to humans. The inflammatory potential of mast cell proteases was the first aspect of their biology to be explored and has received the most attention, in part because some of them—notably tryptases and chymases—are biomarkers of local and systemic mast cell degranulation and anaphylaxis. Although some of the proteases indeed augment allergic inflammation and are potential targets for inhibition to treat asthma and related allergic disorders, they are protective and even anti-inflammatory in some settings. For example, mast cell tryptases may protect from serious bacterial lung infections and may limit the “rubor” component of inflammation caused by vasodilating neuropeptides in the skin. Chymases help to maintain intestinal barrier function and to expel parasitic worms, and may support blood pressure during anaphylaxis by generating angiotensin II. In other life-or-death examples, carboxypeptidase A3 and other mast cell peptidases limit systemic toxicity of endogenous peptides like endothelin and neurotensin during septic peritonitis, and inactivate venom-associated peptides. On the other hand, mast cell peptidase-mediated destruction of protective cytokines, like IL-6, can enhance mortality from sepsis. Peptidases released from mast cells also influence non-mast cell proteases, such as by activating matrix metalloproteinase cascades

  2. Eosinophils and mast cells in leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania spp. are parasitic protozoa endemic in tropical and subtropical regions and the causative agent of leishmaniasis, a collection of syndromes whose clinical manifestations vary according to host and pathogen factors. Leishmania spp. are inoculated into the mammalian host by the bite of an infected sand fly, whereupon they are taken up by phagocytosis, convert into the replicative amastigote stage within macrophages, reproduce, spread to new macrophages and cause disease manifestations. A curative response against leishmaniasis depends in the classical activation of macrophages and the IL-12-dependent onset of an adaptive type 1 response characterized by the production of IFN-γ. Emerging evidence suggests that neutrophils, dendritic cells and other immune cells can serve as either temporary or stable hosts for Leishmania spp. Furthermore, it is becoming apparent that the initial interactions of the parasite with resident or early recruited immune cells can shape both the macrophage response and the type of adaptive immune response being induced. In this review, we compile a growing number of studies demonstrating how the earliest interactions of Leishmania spp. with eosinophils and mast cells influence the macrophage response to infection and the development of the adaptive immune response, hence, determining the ultimate outcome of infection. PMID:24838146

  3. Mast cells in rheumatoid arthritis: Friends or foes?

    PubMed

    Rivellese, Felice; Nerviani, Alessandra; Rossi, Francesca Wanda; Marone, Gianni; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; de Paulis, Amato; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2017-04-11

    Mast cells are tissue-resident cells of the innate immunity, implicated in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). They are present in synovia and their activation has been linked to the potentiation of inflammation in the course of RA. However, recent investigations questioned the role of mast cells in arthritis. In particular, animal models generated conflicting results, so that many of their pro-inflammatory, i.e. pro-arthritogenic functions, even though supported by robust experimental evidences, have been labelled as redundant. At the same time, a growing body of evidences suggests that mast cells can act as tunable immunomodulatory cells. These characteristics, not yet fully understood in the context of RA, could partially explain the inconsistent results obtained with experimental models, which do not account for the pro- and anti-inflammatory functions exerted in more chronic heterogeneous conditions such as RA. Here we present an overview of the current knowledge on mast cell involvement in RA, including the intriguing hypothesis of mast cells acting as subtle immunomodulatory cells and the emerging concept of synovial mast cells as potential biomarkers for patient stratification.

  4. Lysophosphatidic acid synthesis and phospholipid metabolism in rat mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The role of lysophosphatidic acid in mast cell response to antigen was investigated using an isolated rat serosal mast cell model. The cells were incubated with monoclonal murine immunoglobulin E to the dinitrophenyl hapten and prelabeled with /sup 32/P-orthophosphate or /sup 3/H-fatty acids. Lysophosphatidic acid was isolated form cell extracts by 2-dimensional thin-layer chromatography, and the incorporated radioactivity was assessed by liquid scintillation counting. Lysophosphatidic acid labeling with /sup 32/P was increased 2-4 fold within 5 minutes after the addition of antigen or three other mast cell agonists. Functional group analyses unequivocally showed that the labeled compound was lysophosphatidic acid. Lysophosphatidic acid synthesis was dependent on the activity of diacylglycerol lipase, suggesting formation from monoacylglycerol. In addition, the studies of lysophosphatidic acid synthesis suggest that the addition of antigen to mast cells may initiate more than one route of phospholipid degradation and resynthesis. Whatever the origin of lysophosphatidic acid, the results of this study demonstrated that lysophosphatidic acid synthesis is stimulated by a variety of mast cell agonists. Dose-response, kinetic, and pharmacologic studies showed close concordance between histamine release and lysophosphatidic acid labeling responses. These observations provide strong evidence that lysophosphatidic acid plays an important role in mast cell activation.

  5. Carbonic anhydrase enzymes regulate mast cell-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Henry, Everett K; Sy, Chandler B; Inclan-Rico, Juan M; Espinosa, Vanessa; Ghanny, Saleena S; Dwyer, Daniel F; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Rivera, Amariliz; Siracusa, Mark C

    2016-08-22

    Type 2 cytokine responses are necessary for the development of protective immunity to helminth parasites but also cause the inflammation associated with allergies and asthma. Recent studies have found that peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to type 2 cytokine-mediated inflammation through their enhanced ability to develop into mast cells. In this study, we show that carbonic anhydrase (Car) enzymes are up-regulated in type 2-associated progenitor cells and demonstrate that Car enzyme inhibition is sufficient to prevent mouse mast cell responses and inflammation after Trichinella spiralis infection or the induction of food allergy-like disease. Further, we used CRISPR/Cas9 technology and illustrate that genetically editing Car1 is sufficient to selectively reduce mast cell development. Finally, we demonstrate that Car enzymes can be targeted to prevent human mast cell development. Collectively, these experiments identify a previously unrecognized role for Car enzymes in regulating mast cell lineage commitment and suggest that Car enzyme inhibitors may possess therapeutic potential that can be used to treat mast cell-mediated inflammation. © 2016 Henry et al.

  6. Anaphylaxis and mast cell disease: what is the risk?

    PubMed

    Akin, Cem

    2010-01-01

    Mastocytosis is a proliferative disorder of the hematopoietic mast cell progenitor that results from expansion of a clone carrying the D816V c-kit mutation. Based on the dramatic increase in incidence of anaphylaxis in patients with mastocytosis, recent studies analyzed the presence of clonal mast cell markers, including D816V c-kit mutation, in patients with recurrent IgE- and non-IgE-mediated anaphylaxis. These studies demonstrated the presence of an aberrant mast cell clone in a significant proportion of patients with unexplained anaphylaxis, or anaphylaxis due to hymenoptera venom. Clonal mast cell disease should be suspected in particular in patients presenting with profound cardiovascular manifestations such as hypotension and syncope in the absence of urticaria.

  7. A new technique for staining mast cells using ferroin.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, V H; Orrea, S C; Raimondi, A R; Itoiz, M E

    2003-10-01

    We describe here a new method for specific staining of mast cells using ferroin. Different hamster tissues were fixed in 4% formalin and processed for paraffin embedding. Sections were stained with hematoxylin followed by ferroin acidified with 2.5 N sulfuric acid to pH 4.0. Mast cells stained an intense orange color that contrasted markedly with bluish violet nuclei. High contrast was also observed when ferroin colored sections were counterstained with light green instead of hematoxylin. To evaluate the specificity of the stain, hamster cheek pouch sections were stained with toluidine blue, alcian blue-safranin O, and ferroin. Quantitative evaluation of mast cells stained with the three techniques showed no statistical difference. The simplicity and selectivity of this method is sufficient for image analysis of mast cells.

  8. Burning mouth syndrome and mast cell activation disorder.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B

    2011-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS), a chronic diffuse oral pain syndrome affecting ∼1% of the general population, is diagnosed when explanatory oral pathology and other identifiable causes are absent. BMS has been recognized for decades, but its etiology remains unknown and has not previously been attributed to mast cell disease. Three cases of BMS are reported in which evidence of an underlying mast cell activation disorder (MCAD) was found; all 3 patients' oral pain responded well to MCAD-directed therapy. Mediators released from mast cells have a wide range of local and remote effects and potentially may cause the neuropathic changes and/or inflammation thought to lead to the symptoms of BMS. Mast cell disease either in oral tissue or at sites remote from the mouth should be considered in the differential diagnosis of BMS.

  9. Mast cells: new therapeutic target in helminth immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Vukman, K V; Lalor, R; Aldridge, A; O'Neill, S M

    2016-01-01

    Helminth infection and their secreted antigens have a protective role in many immune-mediated inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, studies have focused primarily on identifying immune protective mechanisms of helminth infection and their secreted molecules on dendritic cells and macrophages. Given that mast cells have been shown to be implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of many inflammatory disorders, their role should also be examined and considered as cellular target for helminth-based therapies. As there is a dearth of studies examining the interaction of helminth-derived antigens and mast cells, this review will focus on the role of mast cells during helminth infection and examine our current understanding of the involvement of mast cells in TH 1/TH 17-mediated immune disorders. In this context, potential mechanisms by which helminths could target the TH 1/TH 17 promoting properties of mast cells can be identified to unveil novel therapeutic mast cell driven targets in combating these inflammatory disorders.

  10. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies of mast cell histamine

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Ludowyke, R.; Lagunoff, D.

    1987-11-03

    The state of histamine in mast cells was studied by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. Spectra were measured for histamine in situ in intact mast cells, for histamine in suspensions of mast cell granule matrices that had been stripped of their membranes, and for histamine in solutions of heparin. The /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of intact mast cells is relatively simple, consisting predominantly of resonances for intracellular histamine superimposed on a weaker background of resonances from heparin and proteins of the cells. All of the intracellular histamine contributes of the NMR signals, indicating it must be relatively mobile and not rigidly associated with the negatively charged granule matrix. Spectra for intracellular histamine and for histamine in granule matrices are similar, indicating the latter to be a reasonable model for the in situ situation. The dynamics of binding of histamine by granule matrices and by heparin are considerably different; exchange of histamine between the bulk water and the granule matrices is slow on the /sup 1/H NMR time scale, whereas exchange between the free and bound forms in heparin solution is fast. The chemical shifts of resonances for histamine in mast cells are pH dependent, decreasing as the intragranule pH increases without splitting or broadening. The results are interpreted to indicate that histamine in mast cells is relatively labile, with rapid exchange between histamine and pools of free histamine in water compartments confined in the granule matrix.

  11. Mast cells protect against Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Junkins, Robert D; Carrigan, Svetlana O; Wu, Zhengli; Stadnyk, Andrew W; Cowley, Elizabeth; Issekutz, Thomas; Berman, Jason; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in immune-compromised individuals. Maintaining the integrity of the respiratory epithelium is critical for an effective host response to P. aeruginosa. Given the close spatial relationship between mast cells and the respiratory epithelium, and the importance of tightly regulated epithelial permeability during lung infections, we examined whether mast cells influence airway epithelial integrity during P. aeruginosa lung infection in a mouse model. We found that mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh)/Kit(W-sh) mice displayed greatly increased epithelial permeability, bacterial dissemination, and neutrophil accumulation compared with wild-type animals after P. aeruginosa infection; these defects were corrected on reconstitution with mast cells. An in vitro Transwell co-culture model further demonstrated that a secreted mast cell factor decreased epithelial cell apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor production after P. aeruginosa infection. Together, our data demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for mast cells in the maintenance of epithelial integrity during P. aeruginosa infection, through a mechanism that likely involves prevention of epithelial apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor production. Our understanding of mechanisms of the host response to P. aeruginosa will open new avenues for the development of successful preventative and treatment strategies.

  12. Thrombomodulin inhibits the activation of eosinophils and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Roeen, Ziaurahman; Toda, Masaaki; D'Alessandro-Gabazza, Corina N; Onishi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Tetsu; Yasuma, Taro; Urawa, Masahito; Taguchi, Osamu; Gabazza, Esteban C

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils and mast cells play critical roles in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Activation of both cells leads to the release of pro-inflammatory mediators in the airway of asthmatic patients. Recently, we have shown that inhaled thrombomodulin inhibits allergic bronchial asthma in a mouse model. In the present study, we hypothesize that thrombomodulin can inhibit the activation of eosinophils and mast cells. The effect of thrombomodulin on the activation and release of inflammatory mediators from eosinophils and mast cells was evaluated. Thrombomodulin inhibited the eotaxin-induced chemotaxis, upregulation of CD11b and degranulation of eosinophils. Treatment with thrombomodulin also significantly suppressed the degranulation and synthesis of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in eosinophils and mast cells. Mice treated with a low-dose of inhaled thrombomodulin have decreased number of eosinophils and activated mast cells and Th2 cytokines in the lungs compared to untreated mice. The results of this study suggest that thrombomodulin may modulate allergic responses by inhibiting the activation of both eosinophils and mast cells.

  13. Changes in numbers and types of mast cell colony-forming cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice after injection of distilled water: evidence that mast cells suppress differentiation of bone marrow-derived precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Kanakura, Y.; Kuriu, A.; Waki, N.; Nakano, T.; Asai, H.; Yonezawa, T.; Kitamura, Y.

    1988-03-01

    Two different types of cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice produce mast cell colonies in methylcellulose. Large mast cell colonies are produced by bone marrow-derived precursors resembling lymphoid cells by light microscopy (L-CFU-Mast), whereas medium and small mast cell colonies are produced by morphologically identifiable mast cells (M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast, respectively). In the present study we eradicated peritoneal mast cells by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of distilled water. The regeneration process was investigated to clarify the relationship between L-CFU-Mast, M-CFU-Mast, and S-CFU-Mast. After injection of distilled water, M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast disappeared, but L-CFU-Mast increased, and then M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast appeared, suggesting the presence of a hierarchic relationship. When purified peritoneal mast cells were injected two days after the water injection, the L-CFU-Mast did not increase. In the peritoneal cavity of WBB6F1-+/+ mice that had been lethally irradiated and rescued by bone marrow cells of C57BL/6-bgJ/bgJ (beige, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice, L-CFU-Mast were of bgJ/bgJ type, but M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast were of +/+ type. The injection of distilled water to the radiation chimeras resulted in the development of bgJ/bgJ-type M-CFU-Mast and then S-CFU-Mast. The presence of mast cells appeared to suppress the recruitment of L-CFU-Mast from the bloodstream and to inhibit the differentiation of L-CFU-Mast to M-CFU-Mast.

  14. Angiopoietin1 Inhibits Mast Cell Activation and Protects against Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng-Tao; Liu, Yi-Nan; He, Qi-Hua; Xiao, Jun-Jun; Bai, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Since morbidity and mortality rates of anaphylaxis diseases have been increasing year by year, how to prevent and manage these diseases effectively has become an important issue. Mast cells play a central regulatory role in allergic diseases. Angiopoietin1 (Ang-1) exhibits anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting vascular permeability, leukocyte migration and cytokine production. However, Ang-1's function in mast cell activation and anaphylaxis diseases is unknown. The results of our study suggest that Ang-1 decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines production of mast cells by suppressing IκB phosphorylation and NF-κB nuclear translocation. Ang-1 also strongly inhibited compound 48/80 induced and FcεRI-mediated mast cells degranulation by decreasing intracellular calcium levels in vitro. In vivo lentivirus-mediated delivery of Ang-1 in mice exhibited alleviated leakage in IgE-dependent passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA). Furthermore, exogenous Ang-1 intervention treatment prevented mice from compound 48/80-induced mesentery mast cell degranulation, attenuated increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines, relieved lung injury, and improved survival in anaphylaxis shock. The results of our study reveal, for the first time, the important role of Ang-1 in the activation of mast cells, and identify a therapeutic effect of Ang-1 on anaphylaxis diseases. PMID:24586553

  15. Mast Cell-Derived Histamine Mediates Cystitis Pain

    PubMed Central

    Rudick, Charles N.; Bryce, Paul J.; Guichelaar, Laura A.; Berry, Ruth E.; Klumpp, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Mast cells trigger inflammation that is associated with local pain, but the mechanisms mediating pain are unclear. Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a bladder disease that causes debilitating pelvic pain of unknown origin and without consistent inflammation, but IC symptoms correlate with elevated bladder lamina propria mast cell counts. We hypothesized that mast cells mediate pelvic pain directly and examined pain behavior using a murine model that recapitulates key aspects of IC. Methods and Findings Infection of mice with pseudorabies virus (PRV) induces a neurogenic cystitis associated with lamina propria mast cell accumulation dependent upon tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF), TNF-mediated bladder barrier dysfunction, and pelvic pain behavior, but the molecular basis for pelvic pain is unknown. In this study, both PRV-induced pelvic pain and bladder pathophysiology were abrogated in mast cell-deficient mice but were restored by reconstitution with wild type bone marrow. Pelvic pain developed normally in TNF- and TNF receptor-deficient mice, while bladder pathophysiology was abrogated. Conversely, genetic or pharmacologic disruption of histamine receptor H1R or H2R attenuated pelvic pain without altering pathophysiology. Conclusions These data demonstrate that mast cells promote cystitis pain and bladder pathophysiology through the separable actions of histamine and TNF, respectively. Therefore, pain is independent of pathology and inflammation, and histamine receptors represent direct therapeutic targets for pain in IC and other chronic pain conditions. PMID:18461160

  16. Dermal mast cell responses in Paragonimus westermani-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, M H

    1997-12-01

    This study was carried out to determine whether dermal mast cell responses to Paragonimus westermani in an abnormal host, the mouse, were dependent on the site of metacercarial inoculation. In mice during subcutaneous infection, the number of dermal mast cells were increased significantly (p < 0.05) at the first week (38.3/mm2) and then persisted at a high level until the sixth week (45.2/mm2) of infection compared with PBS-injected (control) mice (range: 19.4-25.1/mm2). In mice during oral infection, the number of dermal mast cells were increased significantly (p < 0.05) at two weeks (33.5/mm2) after infection and remained at these levels thereafter compared with non-infected (control) mice (range: 17.4-22.3/mm2). In mice both during subcutaneous and oral infection, the recruited dermal mast cells showed extensive degranulation at the second week (68.4% and 60.7%, respectively), reached a peak at the third week (81.4%, and 92.1%, respectively) and then declined slightly thereafter. By contrast, in both control mice, about 10% of dermal mast cells were degranulated. In conclusion, this study suggests that dermal mast cell responses to P. westermani in mice are dependent on cutaneous sensitization by larval excretory-secretory antigens, irrespective of infection route.

  17. Increased Bone Mass in Female Mice Lacking Mast Cell Chymase

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Thomas; Gustafson, Ann-Marie; Calounova, Gabriela; Hu, Lijuan; Rasmusson, Annica; Jonsson, Kenneth B.; Wernersson, Sara; Åbrink, Magnus; Andersson, Göran; Larsson, Sune; Melhus, Håkan; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Here we addressed the potential impact of chymase, a mast-cell restricted protease, on mouse bone phenotype. We show that female mice lacking the chymase Mcpt4 acquired a persistent expansion of diaphyseal bone in comparison with wild type controls, reaching a 15% larger diaphyseal cross sectional area at 12 months of age. Mcpt4-/- mice also showed increased levels of a bone anabolic serum marker and higher periosteal bone formation rate. However, they were not protected from experimental osteoporosis, suggesting that chymase regulates normal bone homeostasis rather than the course of osteoporosis. Further, the absence of Mcpt4 resulted in age-dependent upregulation of numerous genes important for bone formation but no effects on osteoclast activity. In spite of the latter, Mcpt4-/- bones had increased cortical porosity and reduced endocortical mineralization. Mast cells were found periosteally and, notably, bone-proximal mast cells in Mcpt4-/- mice were degranulated to a larger extent than in wild type mice. Hence, chymase regulates degranulation of bone mast cells, which could affect the release of mast cell-derived factors influencing bone remodelling. Together, these findings reveal a functional impact of mast cell chymase on bone. Further studies exploring the possibility of using chymase inhibitors as a strategy to increase bone volume may be warranted. PMID:27936149

  18. SNARE complex-mediated degranulation in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Woska, Joseph R; Gillespie, Marc E

    2012-04-01

    Mast cell function and dysregulation is important in the development and progression of allergic and autoimmune disease. Identifying novel proteins involved in mast cell function and disease progression is the first step in the design of new therapeutic strategies. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) are a family of proteins demonstrated to mediate the transport and fusion of secretory vesicles to the membrane in mast cells, leading to the subsequent release of the vesicle cargo through an exocytotic mechanism. The functional role[s] of specific SNARE family member complexes in mast cell degranulation has not been fully elucidated. Here, we review recent and historical data on the expression, formation and localization of various SNARE proteins and their complexes in murine and human mast cells. We summarize the functional data identifying the key SNARE family members that appear to participate in mast cell degranulation. Furthermore, we discuss the utilization of RNA interference (RNAi) methods to validate SNARE function and the use of siRNA as a therapeutic approach to the treatment of inflammatory disease. These studies provide an overview of the specific SNARE proteins and complexes that serve as novel targets for the development of new therapies to treat allergic and autoimmune disease.

  19. Role of mast cells in fibrosis of classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shoko; Yokote, Taiji; Hiraoka, Nobuya; Nishiwaki, Uta; Hanafusa, Toshiaki; Nishimura, Yasuichiro; Tsuji, Motomu

    2016-12-01

    The underlying mechanism of fibrosis in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) remains uncertain. This study aimed to investigate the association of fibrosis in the lymph nodes of patients with CHL through histological examination of the expression of cytokines associated with fibrosis and mast cell proliferation. Additionally, we sought to determine the degree of mast cell infiltration in a nodular sclerosis subtype of CHL (NSCHL) compared with that in non-NSCHL. We analyzed lymph nodes from 22 patients with CHL, of which eight were of the NSCHL and 14 of the non-NSCHL subtype, using immunohistochemical staining of forkhead box P3 (FOXP3), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, interleukin (IL)-3, IL-13, and stem cell factor (SCF). Mast cells were positive for TGF-β and IL-13, and FOXP3-positive cells were negative for TGF-β. Only the expression of IL-13 in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells was significantly more frequently observed in NSCHL than that in non-NSCHL (P = 0.0028) and was associated with a higher rate of fibrosis (P = 0.0097). The number of mast cells was significantly higher in NSCHL than that in non-NSCHL (P = 0.0001). A significantly positive correlation was observed between the rate of fibrosis and the number of mast cells (correlation coefficient, 0.8524; 95% CI, 0.6725-0.9372) (P <0.0001). The number of mast cells was significantly higher in the group with IL-13-positive HRS cells than that in the group with IL-13-negative HRS cells (P = 0.0157). Based on these findings, we hypothesize that IL-13 production by HRS cells may lead to fibrosis, and furthermore, promote mast cell proliferation and infiltration. This in turn might further produce the fibrotic cytokines IL-13 and TGF-β, resulting in fibrosis typical of NSCHL.

  20. Mercury induces inflammatory mediator release from human mast cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mercury is known to be neurotoxic, but its effects on the immune system are less well known. Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, but also in innate and acquired immunity, as well as in inflammation. Many patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) have "allergic" symptoms; moreover, the prevalence of ASD in patients with mastocytosis, characterized by numerous hyperactive mast cells in most tissues, is 10-fold higher than the general population suggesting mast cell involvement. We, therefore, investigated the effect of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) on human mast cell activation. Methods Human leukemic cultured LAD2 mast cells and normal human umbilical cord blood-derived cultured mast cells (hCBMCs) were stimulated by HgCl2 (0.1-10 μM) for either 10 min for beta-hexosaminidase release or 24 hr for measuring vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and IL-6 release by ELISA. Results HgCl2 induced a 2-fold increase in β-hexosaminidase release, and also significant VEGF release at 0.1 and 1 μM (311 ± 32 pg/106 cells and 443 ± 143 pg/106 cells, respectively) from LAD2 mast cells compared to control cells (227 ± 17 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p < 0.05). Addition of HgCl2 (0.1 μM) to the proinflammatory neuropeptide substance P (SP, 0.1 μM) had synergestic action in inducing VEGF from LAD2 mast cells. HgCl2 also stimulated significant VEGF release (360 ± 100 pg/106 cells at 1 μM, n = 5, p < 0.05) from hCBMCs compared to control cells (182 ± 57 pg/106 cells), and IL-6 release (466 ± 57 pg/106 cells at 0.1 μM) compared to untreated cells (13 ± 25 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p < 0.05). Addition of HgCl2 (0.1 μM) to SP (5 μM) further increased IL-6 release. Conclusions HgCl2 stimulates VEGF and IL-6 release from human mast cells. This phenomenon could disrupt the blood-brain-barrier and permit brain inflammation. As a result, the findings of the present study provide a biological mechanism for how low levels of mercury may contribute to ASD

  1. Mast Cells Regulate Wound Healing in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tellechea, Ana; Leal, Ermelindo C.; Kafanas, Antonios; Auster, Michael E.; Kuchibhotla, Sarada; Ostrovsky, Yana; Tecilazich, Francesco; Baltzis, Dimitrios; Zheng, Yongjun; Carvalho, Eugénia; Zabolotny, Janice M.; Weng, Zuyi; Petra, Anastasia; Patel, Arti; Panagiotidou, Smaro; Pradhan-Nabzdyk, Leena; Theoharides, Theoharis C.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a severe complication of diabetes that lacks effective treatment. Mast cells (MCs) contribute to wound healing, but their role in diabetes skin complications is poorly understood. Here we show that the number of degranulated MCs is increased in unwounded forearm and foot skin of patients with diabetes and in unwounded dorsal skin of diabetic mice (P < 0.05). Conversely, postwounding MC degranulation increases in nondiabetic mice, but not in diabetic mice. Pretreatment with the MC degranulation inhibitor disodium cromoglycate rescues diabetes-associated wound-healing impairment in mice and shifts macrophages to the regenerative M2 phenotype (P < 0.05). Nevertheless, nondiabetic and diabetic mice deficient in MCs have delayed wound healing compared with their wild-type (WT) controls, implying that some MC mediator is needed for proper healing. MCs are a major source of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in mouse skin, but the level of VEGF is reduced in diabetic mouse skin, and its release from human MCs is reduced in hyperglycemic conditions. Topical treatment with the MC trigger substance P does not affect wound healing in MC-deficient mice, but improves it in WT mice. In conclusion, the presence of nondegranulated MCs in unwounded skin is required for proper wound healing, and therapies inhibiting MC degranulation could improve wound healing in diabetes. PMID:27207516

  2. Secreted phospholipase A2 and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Makoto; Taketomi, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipase A2s (PLA2s) are a group of enzymes that hydrolyze the sn-2 position of phospholipids to release (typically unsaturated) fatty acids and lysophospholipids, which serve as precursors for a variety of bioactive lipid mediators. Among the PLA2 superfamily, secreted PLA2 (sPLA2) enzymes comprise the largest subfamily that includes 11 isoforms with a conserved His-Asp catalytic dyad. Individual sPLA2 enzymes exhibit unique tissue and cellular localizations and specific enzymatic properties, suggesting their distinct biological roles. Recent studies using transgenic and knockout mice for individual sPLA2 isofoms have revealed their involvement in various pathophysiological events. Here, we overview the current state of knowledge about sPLA2s, specifically their roles in mast cells (MCs) in the context of allergology. In particular, we highlight group III sPLA2 (PLA2G3) as an "anaphylactic sPLA2" that promotes MC maturation and thereby anaphylaxis through a previously unrecognized lipid-orchestrated circuit.

  3. Subthreshold IKK activation modulates the effector functions of primary mast cells and allows specific targeting of transformed mast cells.

    PubMed

    Drube, Sebastian; Weber, Franziska; Loschinski, Romy; Beyer, Mandy; Rothe, Mandy; Rabenhorst, Anja; Göpfert, Christiane; Meininger, Isabel; Diamanti, Michaela A; Stegner, David; Häfner, Norman; Böttcher, Martin; Reinecke, Kirstin; Herdegen, Thomas; Greten, Florian R; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Hartmann, Karin; Krämer, Oliver H; Kamradt, Thomas

    2015-03-10

    Mast cell differentiation and proliferation depends on IL-3. IL-3 induces the activation of MAP-kinases and STATs and consequently induces proliferation and survival. Dysregulation of IL-3 signaling pathways also contribute to inflammation and tumorigenesis. We show here that IL-3 induces a SFK- and Ca²⁺-dependent activation of the inhibitor of κB kinases 2 (IKK2) which results in mast cell proliferation and survival but does not induce IκBα-degradation and NFκB activation. Therefore we propose the term "subthreshold IKK activation".This subthreshold IKK activation also primes mast cells for enhanced responsiveness to IL-33R signaling. Consequently, co-stimulation with IL-3 and IL-33 increases IKK activation and massively enhances cytokine production induced by IL-33.We further reveal that in neoplastic mast cells expressing constitutively active Ras, subthreshold IKK activation is associated with uncontrolled proliferation. Consequently, pharmacological IKK inhibition reduces tumor growth selectively by inducing apoptosis in vivo.Together, subthreshold IKK activation is crucial to mediate the full IL-33-induced effector functions in primary mast cells and to mediate uncontrolled proliferation of neoplastic mast cells. Thus, IKK2 is a new molecularly defined target structure.

  4. Subthreshold IKK activation modulates the effector functions of primary mast cells and allows specific targeting of transformed mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Drube, Sebastian; Beyer, Mandy; Rothe, Mandy; Rabenhorst, Anja; Göpfert, Christiane; Meininger, Isabel; Diamanti, Michaela A.; Stegner, David; Häfner, Norman; Böttcher, Martin; Reinecke, Kirstin; Herdegen, Thomas; Greten, Florian R.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Hartmann, Karin; Krämer, Oliver H.; Kamradt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Mast cell differentiation and proliferation depends on IL-3. IL-3 induces the activation of MAP-kinases and STATs and consequently induces proliferation and survival. Dysregulation of IL-3 signaling pathways also contribute to inflammation and tumorigenesis. We show here that IL-3 induces a SFK- and Ca2+-dependent activation of the inhibitor of κB kinases 2 (IKK2) which results in mast cell proliferation and survival but does not induce IκBα-degradation and NFκB activation. Therefore we propose the term “subthreshold IKK activation”. This subthreshold IKK activation also primes mast cells for enhanced responsiveness to IL-33R signaling. Consequently, co-stimulation with IL-3 and IL-33 increases IKK activation and massively enhances cytokine production induced by IL-33. We further reveal that in neoplastic mast cells expressing constitutively active Ras, subthreshold IKK activation is associated with uncontrolled proliferation. Consequently, pharmacological IKK inhibition reduces tumor growth selectively by inducing apoptosis in vivo. Together, subthreshold IKK activation is crucial to mediate the full IL-33-induced effector functions in primary mast cells and to mediate uncontrolled proliferation of neoplastic mast cells. Thus, IKK2 is a new molecularly defined target structure. PMID:25749030

  5. Analyzing the Functions of Mast Cells In Vivo Using 'Mast Cell Knock-in' Mice.

    PubMed

    Gaudenzio, Nicolas; Sibilano, Riccardo; Starkl, Philipp; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J; Reber, Laurent L

    2015-05-27

    Mast cells (MCs) are hematopoietic cells which reside in various tissues, and are especially abundant at sites exposed to the external environment, such as skin, airways and gastrointestinal tract. Best known for their detrimental role in IgE-dependent allergic reactions, MCs have also emerged as important players in host defense against venom and invading bacteria and parasites. MC phenotype and function can be influenced by microenvironmental factors that may differ according to anatomic location and/or based on the type or stage of development of immune responses. For this reason, we and others have favored in vivo approaches over in vitro methods to gain insight into MC functions. Here, we describe methods for the generation of mouse bone marrow-derived cultured MCs (BMCMCs), their adoptive transfer into genetically MC-deficient mice, and the analysis of the numbers and distribution of adoptively transferred MCs at different anatomical sites. This method, named the 'mast cell knock-in' approach, has been extensively used over the past 30 years to assess the functions of MCs and MC-derived products in vivo. We discuss the advantages and limitations of this method, in light of alternative approaches that have been developed in recent years.

  6. Characterization of plasma-induced cell membrane permeabilization: focus on OH radical distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Shota; Honda, Ryosuke; Hokari, Yutaro; Takashima, Keisuke; Kanzaki, Makoto; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2016-08-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasma (APP) is used medically for plasma-induced cell permeabilization. However, how plasma irradiation specifically triggers permeabilization remains unclear. In an attempt to identify the dominant factor(s), the distribution of plasma-produced reactive species was investigated, primarily focusing on OH radicals. A stronger plasma discharge, which produced more OH radicals in the gas phase, also produced more OH radicals in the liquid phase (OHaq), enhancing the cell membrane permeability. In addition, plasma irradiation-induced enhancement of cell membrane permeability decreased markedly with increased solution thickness (<1 mm), and the plasma-produced OHaq decayed in solution (diffusion length on the order of several hundred micrometers). Furthermore, the horizontally center-localized distribution of OHaq corresponded with the distribution of the permeabilized cells by plasma irradiation, while the overall plasma-produced oxidizing species in solution (detected by iodine-starch reaction) exhibited a doughnut-shaped horizontal distribution. These results suggest that OHaq, among the plasma-produced oxidizing species, represents the dominant factor in plasma-induced cell permeabilization. These results enhance the current understanding of the mechanism of APP as a cell-permeabilization tool.

  7. Exploring a regulatory role for mast cells: 'MCregs'?

    PubMed

    Frossi, Barbara; Gri, Giorgia; Tripodo, Claudio; Pucillo, Carlo

    2010-03-01

    Regulatory cells can mould the fate of the immune response by direct suppression of specific subsets of effector cells, or by redirecting effectors against invading pathogens and infected or neoplastic cells. These functions have been classically, although not exclusively, ascribed to different subsets of T cells. Recently, mast cells have been shown to regulate physiological and pathological immune responses, and thus to act at the interface between innate and adaptive immunity assuming different functions and behaviors at discrete stages of the immune response. Here, we focus on these poorly defined, and sometimes apparently conflicting, functions of mast cells. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mast Cells as Cellular Sensors in Inflammation and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Beghdadi, Walid; Madjene, Lydia Célia; Benhamou, Marc; Charles, Nicolas; Gautier, Gregory; Launay, Pierre; Blank, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are localized in tissues. Intense research on these cells over the years has demonstrated their role as effector cells in the maintenance of tissue integrity following injury produced by infectious agents, toxins, metabolic states, etc. After stimulation they release a sophisticated array of inflammatory mediators, cytokines, and growth factors to orchestrate an inflammatory response. These mediators can directly initiate tissue responses on resident cells, but they have also been shown to regulate other infiltrating immune cell functions. Research in recent years has revealed that the outcome of mast cell actions is not always detrimental for the host but can also limit disease development. In addition, mast cell functions highly depend on the physiological context in the organism. Depending on the genetic background, strength of the injurious event, the particular microenvironment, mast cells direct responses ranging from pro- to anti-inflammatory. It appears that they have evolved as cellular sensors to discern their environment in order to initiate an appropriate physiological response either aimed to favor inflammation for repair or at the contrary limit the inflammatory process to prevent further damage. Like every sophisticated machinery, its dysregulation leads to pathology. Given the broad distribution of mast cells in tissues this also explains their implication in many inflammatory diseases. PMID:22566827

  9. Blockade of mast cell activation reduces cutaneous scar formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Schrementi, Megan E; Ranzer, Matthew J; Wilgus, Traci A; DiPietro, Luisa A

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound.

  10. Changes in duodenal mast cells in response to dehydroleucodine.

    PubMed

    Penissi, Alicia; Rudolph, Isolde; Fogal, Teresa; Piezzi, Ramón

    2003-01-01

    Dehydroleucodine (DhL), a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Artemisia douglasiana Besser, prevents gastroduodenal damage elicited by necrosis-inducing agents such as absolute ethanol. Changes in the number of mast cells or evidence of activation of the cells for mediator release have been observed in a wide spectrum of disease processes involving the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study we examined the effects of DhL on duodenal mast cell population and their histamine content, with the goal of throwing more light on the mechanism of action of the drug. Male Rockland mice (n = 30) were divided into two groups and administered orally with 0.4% carboxymethylcellulose (CMC; control group) or DhL in 0.4% CMC, 40 mg/kg body weight (DhL group). The animals were killed 60 min after dosing and their duodena were removed. Mucosal and submucosal mast cells were studied by light and electron microscopy, and the duodenal histamine content was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. DhL increased the number of mast cells in the submucosal layer. This was related to an increase in the tissue histamine levels (from 324 +/- 19.14 to 1,284 +/- 20 pg/mg tissue, in controls and DhL-treated, respectively). The mast cells in the submucosa from the control group showed a cytoplasm containing a predominant population of homogenously dense granules, and the DhL-treated group exhibited swollen granules showing different degrees of particulation. The mucosal mast cell population showed no modifications in response to the cytoprotective agent. DhL induces (1) a selective increase in the number of mast cells in the submucosal layer and (2) changes in the distribution and appearance of their secretory granules. These findings, probably associated with the higher histamine levels after DhL treatment, could be involved in the cytoprotective action of the lactone, previously reported by us. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Blockade of Mast Cell Activation Reduces Cutaneous Scar Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ranzer, Matthew J.; Wilgus, Traci A.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the skin initiates a cascade of well-orchestrated events that ultimately leads to repair of the wound. The inflammatory response is key to wound healing both through preventing infection and stimulating proliferation and remodeling of the skin. Mast cells within the tissue are one of the first immune cells to respond to trauma, and upon activation they release pro-inflammatory molecules to initiate recruitment of leukocytes and promote a vascular response in the tissue. Additionally, mast cells stimulate collagen synthesis by dermal fibroblasts, suggesting they may also influence scar formation. To examine the contribution of mast cells in tissue repair, we determined the effects the mast cell inhibitor, disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), on several parameters of dermal repair including, inflammation, re-epithelialization, collagen fiber organization, collagen ultrastructure, scar width and wound breaking strength. Mice treated with DSCG had significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, and CXCL1. Although DSCG treatment reduced the production of inflammatory mediators, the rate of re-epithelialization was not affected. Compared to control, inhibition of mast cell activity caused a significant decrease in scar width along with accelerated collagen re-organization. Despite the reduced scar width, DSCG treatment did not affect the breaking strength of the healed tissue. Tryptase β1 exclusively produced by mast cells was found to increase significantly in the course of wound healing. However, DSCG treatment did not change its level in the wounds. These results indicate that blockade of mast cell activation reduces scar formation and inflammation without further weakening the healed wound. PMID:24465509

  12. Mast cell heterogeneity in non-human primates

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, K.E.; Szucs, E.F.; Metcalfe, D.D.

    1986-03-05

    Mast cells of rodents may be subdivided in terms of their properties, but the extent of such heterogeneity in man and higher animals is still unknown. The authors have compared lung (LMC) and intestinal (IMC) mast cells obtained from individual monkeys. LMC contained more histamine (HA) than IMC (6.61+/-1.3 vs. 1.6+/-0.6 pg/cell, means+/-SEM, n=3). LMC released more HA (17.7+/-2.1% vs. 9.2+/-1.0%, means+/-SEM, n=16) and also generated more LTC/sub 4/ equivalents as measured by radioimmunoassay (range 13.4-41.5 vs. 3.0-4.0 ng/10/sup 6/ mast cells) following an anaphylactic stimulus. The majority (>90%) of LMC stained metachromatically under conditions appropriate for heparin-containing cells, whereas IMC required more forcing conditions to display metachromasia. In contrast to these quantitative and qualitative mediator differences, functional responses of LMC and IMC were similar. Thus, HA release was inhibited comparably by theophylline, isoprenaline and dibutyryl cyclic AMP, but quercetin was slightly more active on IMC. Substance P caused dose-related HA release from both cell types, although the amount released varied between individual animal, (range LMC 1.2-20.2%, IMC 1.8-23.0%, n=4). Other neuropeptides (pentagastrin) vasoactive intestinal peptide, neurotensin, somatostatin) did not release HA. They conclude that mast cell heterogeneity in higher animals may be reflected more by cytochemical rather than functional differences between mast cell classes.

  13. Mast cell and histamine content of human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Agius, R M; Godfrey, R C; Holgate, S T

    1985-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed in 97 patients including control patients with bronchial carcinoma (24) and patients with sarcoidosis (20), cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis (9), and asthma (4), and others. Cytocentrifuged slides were stained by two methods: May-Grünwald Giemsa and toluidine blue. In the last 32 subjects the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was separated into supernatant and cell pellet for the subsequent assay of the performed mast cell mediator, histamine. Comparison of the two methods of staining showed a bias towards toluidine blue. Controls had a differential mean (SE) mast cell count of 0.07% (0.01%). Higher counts were noted in cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis--0.61% (0.15%) (p less than 0.001)--and in sarcoidosis--0.14% (0.02%) (p less than 0.05). There was a strong correlation between absolute mast cell counts and cell lysate histamine concentration (r = 0.78, p less than 0.001). Less strong, significant, correlations between supernatant histamine concentration and absolute mast cell counts (r = 0.48, p less than 0.01) or cell lysate histamine concentration (r = 0.72, p less than 0.01) were also found. Derived mean values of histamine per mast cell ranged from 3.7 to 10.9 picograms. The mean histamine content of lavage fluid supernatant as a percentage of the total lavage fluid histamine was 24.9% (3.3%). The possible clinical significance of these findings is discussed. Images PMID:4060097

  14. The role of mast cells in neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Nelissen, Sofie; Lemmens, Evi; Geurts, Nathalie; Kramer, Peter; Maurer, Marcus; Hendriks, Jerome; Hendrix, Sven

    2013-05-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are densely granulated perivascular resident cells of hematopoietic origin and well known for their pathogenetic role in allergic and anaphylactic reactions. In addition, they are also involved in processes of innate and adaptive immunity. MCs can be activated in response to a wide range of stimuli, resulting in the release of not only pro-inflammatory, but also anti-inflammatory mediators. The patterns of secreted mediators depend upon the given stimuli and microenvironmental conditions, accordingly MCs have the ability to promote or attenuate inflammatory processes. Their presence in the central nervous system (CNS) has been recognized for more than a century. Since then a participation of MCs in various pathological processes in the CNS has been well documented. They can aggravate CNS damage in models of brain ischemia and hemorrhage, namely through increased blood-brain barrier damage, brain edema and hemorrhage formation and promotion of inflammatory responses to such events. In contrast, recent evidence suggests that MCs may have a protective role following traumatic brain injury by degrading pro-inflammatory cytokines via specific proteases. In neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis, the role of MCs seems to be ambiguous. MCs have been shown to be damaging, neuroprotective, or even dispensable, depending on the experimental protocols used. The role of MCs in the formation and progression of CNS tumors such as gliomas is complex and both positive and negative relationships between MC activity and tumor progression have been reported. In summary, MCs and their secreted mediators modulate inflammatory processes in multiple CNS pathologies and can thereby either contribute to neurological damage or confer neuroprotection. This review intends to give a concise overview of the regulatory roles of MCs in brain disease.

  15. The Role of Mast Cells in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Oh Young

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders, but its treatment is unsatisfactory as its pathophysiology is multifactorial. The putative factors of IBS pathophysiology are visceral hypersensitivity and intestinal dysmotility, also including psychological factors, dysregulated gut-brain axis, intestinal microbiota alterations, impaired intestinal permeability, and mucosal immune alterations. Recently, mucosal immune alterations have received much attention with the role of mast cells in IBS. Mast cells are abundant in the intestines and function as intestinal gatekeepers at the interface between the luminal environment in the intestine and the internal milieu under the intestinal epithelium. As a gatekeeper at the interface, mast cells communicate with the adjacent cells such as epithelial, neuronal, and other immune cells throughout the mediators released when they themselves are activated. Many studies have suggested that mast cells play a role in the pathophysiology of IBS. This review will focus on studies of the role of mast cell in IBS and the limitations of studies and will also consider future directions. PMID:28115927

  16. Role of mast cells in atherosclerosis: a classical inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Spinas, E; Kritas, S K; Saggini, A; Mobili, A; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Pantalone, A; Tei, M; Speziali, A; Saggini, R; Conti, P

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease and hyperlipidaemia is one of the main risk factors for aging, hypertension and diabetes. Variance in plasma LDL cholesterol concentration may be associated with differences in cardiovascular disease risk and high levels of lipids are associated with increased risk of developing atherosclerosis. Macrophages, which generate pro-inflammatory cytokines, mainly interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-alpha), are deeply involved in atherosclerosis, as well as mast cells which generate several cytokines, including IL-6 and IFN-gamma, and chemokines such as eotaxin, MCP-1 and RANTES involved in monocyte recruitment and differentiation in the arterial wall. In addition, mast cells participate in lipid retention and vascular cell remodeling, and are mediators of innate and adaptive immunity during atherosclerosis. Mast cells which accumulate in the human arterial intima and adventitia during atherosclerotic plaque progression, release vasoactive and angiogenic compounds, and pro-inflammatory mediators, such as arachidonic acid metabolites, histamine, cytokines/chemokines, platelet activating factor (PAF) and proteolytic enzymes. Mast cells can be activated by pro-inflammatory stimuli, including cytokines, hypercholesterolemia, and hyperglycemia, and trigger the endothelial expression of adhesion molecules such as P-selection, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and chemokines which mediate the recruitment and adhesion of leukocytes. The participation of mast cells in atherosclerosis is still an enigma and it may be of therapeutic interest to clarify this process.

  17. Imaging immune response of skin mast cells in vivo with two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunqiang; Pastila, Riikka K.; Lin, Charles P.

    2012-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has provided insightful information of the dynamic process of immune cells in vivo. However, the use of exogenous labeling agents limits its applications. There is no method to perform functional imaging of mast cells, a population of innate tissue-resident immune cells. Mast cells are widely recognized as the effector cells in allergy. Recently their roles as immunoregulatory cells in certain innate and adaptive immune responses are being actively investigated. Here we report in vivo mouse skin mast cells imaging with two-photon microscopy using endogenous tryptophan as the fluorophore. We studied the following processes. 1) Mast cells degranulation, the first step in the mast cell activation process in which the granules are released into peripheral tissue to trigger downstream reactions. 2) Mast cell reconstitution, a procedure commonly used to study mast cells functioning by comparing the data from wild type mice, mast cell-deficient mice, and mast-cell deficient mice reconstituted with bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Imaging the BMMCs engraftment in tissue reveals the mast cells development and the efficiency of BMMCs reconstitution. We observed the reconstitution process for 6 weeks in the ear skin of mast cell-deficient Kit wsh/ w-sh mice by two-photon imaging. Our finding is the first instance of imaging mast cells in vivo with endogenous contrast.

  18. Effect of methylmercury on the rat mast cell degranulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graevskaya, E. E.; Yasutake, A.; Aramai, R.; Rubin, A. B.

    2003-05-01

    Methylmercury is the well-known neurotoxicant as weil as a modulator of the immune system. We investigated the effects of MeHg on the rat mast cell degranulation induced by nonimmunological stimuli (the selective liberator of histamine, compound 48/80, and calcium ionophore A23187) both in vivo and in vitro. In 8, 12 and 15 days afterthe final administration of MeHg we observed the suppression of calcium ionophore A23187-and 48/80-induced histamine release, which enhanced with time. In experiments in vitro incubation of peritoneal mast cells with MeHg alone in the dose range 10^{-8} to 10^{-6} did not induce mast cell degranulation, however modified the activation of mast cells by compound 48/80, and calcium ionophore A23187. We observed activation of stimulated secretion by preliminary incubation with low dose of MeHg 10^{-8} M and inhibition by dose of MeHg 10^{-6} M. These results show that MeHg treatment can modify mast cell function in vivo and in vitro and provide insight into the understanding what role this cell has in the pathogenesis of Minamata disease-comlected disorders.

  19. Peritoneal mast cell stabilization potential of Pothos scandens L

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh; Duraiswamy, B.; Satishkumar, M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the peritoneal mast cell stabilization activity of Pothos scandens extracts Materials and Methods: Pothos scandens L. (family- Araceae) aerial part was successively extracted with ethanol and aqueous to prepare extract of the plant. The extracts of P. scandens were evaluated for stabilization of mast cell in rat allergic models. The extract of P. scandens ethanolic, 50% aqueous ethanolic and aqueous (1, 10 and 100 μg/ml) was studied for peritoneal mast cell stabilization activity in rat mesenteric preparation induced by C 48/80. Result: Preliminary phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of carbohydrates, fixed oil, proteins, alkaloids, glycosides, flavonoids and phenolic compounds. The ethanolic, 50% aqueous ethanolic and aqueous extracts of P. scandens L. showed dose dependent increase in the number of intact cells when compare with C48/80 at the concentration of 10 and 100 μg/ml. It virtues further work towards the isolation of phytoconstituents from this plant. Conclusion: This finding provides evidence that the P. scandens L. inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and mast cell degranulation. P. scandens has a potential as allergic anti- asthmatic agent. PMID:23542883

  20. Polycythemia from mast cell activation syndrome: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B

    2011-07-01

    A middle-aged woman presented with fatigue and mild increases in hematocrit and red cell mass. Polycythemia vera was diagnosed. She underwent therapeutic phlebotomy but clinically worsened. On reevaluation, other problems were noted including episodic malaise, nausea, rash and vasomotor issues. The JAK2V617F mutation was absent; paraneoplastic erythrocytosis was investigated. Serum tryptase and urinary N-methylhistamine were normal, but urinary prostaglandin D2 was elevated. Skin and marrow biopsies showed no mast cell abnormalities. Extensive other evaluation was negative. Gastrointestinal tract biopsies were histologically normal but revealed increased, aberrant mast cells on immunohistochemistry; the KITD816V mutation was absent. Mast cell activation syndrome, recently identified as a clonal disorder involving assorted KIT mutations, was diagnosed. Imatinib 200 mg/d rapidly effected complete, sustained response. Diagnosis of mast cell activation syndrome is hindered by multiple factors, but existing therapies for mast cell disease are usually achieve significant benefit, highlighting the importance of early diagnosis. Multiple important aspects of clinical reasoning are illustrated by the case.

  1. Principles of treatment for mast cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Govier, Susanne M

    2003-05-01

    Mast cell tumors (MCT) are the most common malignant cutaneous tumors that occur in dogs. They are most commonly found on the trunk, accounting for approximately 50% to 60% of all sites. MCTs associated with the limbs account for approximately 25% of all sites. Cutaneous MCTs have a wide variety of clinical appearances. Histologic grade is the most consistent prognostic factor available for dogs. MCTs located at 'nail bed' (subungual), inguinal/preputial area, and any mucocutaneous area like perineum or oral cavity carry a guarded prognosis and tend to metastasize. MCTs usually exfoliate well and are cytologically distinct. The extent of staging procedures following fine-needle aspirate cytologic diagnosis is based on the presence or absence of negative prognostic indicators. Surgery is the treatment of choice for solitary MCTs with no evidence of metastasis. Reponses rates to chemotherapy, (partial response) as high as 78% have been reported, and preliminary evidence suggests that multiagent (prednisone and vinblastine) protocols may confer a higher response rate than single-agent therapy. MCTs are the second most common cutaneous tumor in the cat. There are two distinct forms of cutaneous MCTs in the cat. The more common form is the mastocytic form, and the less common is the histiocytic form. Unlike in the dog, the head and neck are the most common sites for MCTs in the cat followed by the trunk and limbs. Cats with disseminated forms of MCT often present with systemic signs of illness, which include depression, anorexia, weight loss, and vomiting. The diagnosis and staging of MCTs in cats is similar to that in the dog. As with dogs with cutaneous MCTs, surgery is the treatment of choice. Little is known about the effectiveness of adjunctive chemotherapy options for cutaneous MCTs. Adjunctive chemotherapy does not appear to increase survival times.

  2. Approaches for Analyzing the Roles of Mast Cells and Their Proteases In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Stephen J.; Tsai, Mindy; Marichal, Thomas; Tchougounova, Elena; Reber, Laurent L.; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    The roles of mast cells in health and disease remain incompletely understood. While the evidence that mast cells are critical effector cells in IgE-dependent anaphylaxis and other acute IgE-mediated allergic reactions seems unassailable, studies employing various mice deficient in mast cells or mast cell-associated proteases have yielded divergent conclusions about the roles of mast cells or their proteases in certain other immunological responses. Such “controversial” results call into question the relative utility of various older versus newer approaches to ascertain the roles of mast cells and mast cell proteases in vivo. This review discusses how both older and more recent mouse models have been used to investigate the functions of mast cells and their proteases in health and disease. We particularly focus on settings in which divergent conclusions about the importance of mast cells and their proteases have been supported by studies that employed different models of mast cell or mast cell protease deficiency. We think that two major conclusions can be drawn from such findings: (1) no matter which models of mast cell or mast cell protease deficiency one employs, the conclusions drawn from the experiments always should take into account the potential limitations of the models (particularly abnormalities affecting cell types other than mast cells) and (2) even when analyzing a biological response using a single model of mast cell or mast cell protease deficiency, details of experimental design are critical in efforts to define those conditions under which important contributions of mast cells or their proteases can be identified. PMID:25727288

  3. Expression profiling of constitutive mast cells reveals a unique identity within the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Daniel F.; Barrett, Nora A.; Austen, K. Frank

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are evolutionarily ancient sentinel cells. Like basophils, mast cells express the high-affinity IgE receptor and are implicated in host defense and diverse immune-mediated diseases. To better characterize the function of these cells, we assessed the transcriptional profiles of mast cells isolated from peripheral connective tissues and basophils isolated from spleen and blood. We found that mast cells were transcriptionally distinct, clustering independently from all other profiled cells, and that mast cells demonstrated considerably greater heterogeneity across tissues than previously appreciated. We observed minimal homology between mast cells and basophils, which share more overlap with other circulating granulocytes than with mast cells. Derivation of mast cell and basophil transcriptional signatures underscores their differential capacity to detect environmental signals and influence the inflammatory milieu. PMID:27135604

  4. Atherosclerosis: a chronic inflammatory disease mediated by mast cells.

    PubMed

    Conti, Pio; Shaik-Dasthagirisaeb, Yazdami

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a process that plays an important role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and immune disease, involving multiple cell types, including macrophages, T-lymphocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mast cells. The fundamental damage of atherosclerosis is the atheromatous or fibro-fatty plaque which is a lesion that causes several diseases. In atherosclerosis the innate immune response, which involves macrophages, is initiated by the arterial endothelial cells which respond to modified lipoproteins and lead to Th1 cell subset activation and generation of inflammatory cytokines and chemoattractant chemokines. Other immune cells, such as CD4+ T inflammatory cells, which play a critical role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, and regulatory T cells [Treg], which have a protective effect on the development of atherosclerosis are involved. Considerable evidence indicates that mast cells and their products play a key role in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Activated mast cells can have detrimental effects, provoking matrix degradation, apoptosis, and enhancement as well as recruitment of inflammatory cells, which actively contributes to atherosclerosis and plaque formation. Here we discuss the relationship between atherosclerosis, inflammation and mast cells.

  5. Mast cell sarcoma: new cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Canioni, Danielle; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Soussan, Michael; Arock, Michel; Bruneau, Julie; Dubreuil, Patrice; Bodemer, Christine; Chandesris, Marie-Olivia; Lortholary, Olivier; Hermine, Olivier; Damaj, Gandhi

    2016-01-01

    Mast cell sarcoma (MCS) is a rare form of mastocytosis characterized by the presence of solid tumor(s) comprising malignant mast cells that harbor destructive infiltration capability and metastatic potential. Here, we present an extensive literature review and report on 23 cases of MCS, including 3 new cases from the French National Reference Center for Mastocytosis. From our analysis, it appears that MCS can occur at any age. It can manifest de novo or, to a lesser extent, may evolve from a previously established mastocytosis. Bone tumor is a frequent manifestation, and symptoms of mast cell activation are rare. Histological diagnosis can be difficult because MCS is frequently composed of highly atypical neoplastic mast cells and can thus mimic other tumors. Unexpectedly, the canonical KIT D816V mutation is found in only 21% of MCS; therefore, complete KIT gene sequencing is required. The prognosis of patients with MCS is poor, with a median survival time of less than 18 months, and progression to mast cell leukemia is not unusual. Because conventional chemotherapies usually fail, the role of targeted therapies and bone marrow transplantation warrants further investigation in such aggressive neoplasms. PMID:27602777

  6. The role of mast cells in treatment of scabies.

    PubMed

    Amer, M; Mostafa, F F; Nasr, A N; el-Harras, M

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to recognize the role of mast cells in the pathogenesis of scabies. One hundred and fifty patients and 10 controls were included in the study. Group 1 included 20 patients without previous treatment. In group 2, 80 patients were treated with antiscabietic drugs. Group 3 had 50 patients who received an antiscabietic drug followed by 3 days of crotamiton. Diurnal and nocturnal skin biopsies were taken from group 1. In groups 2 and 3, the biopsies were taken after 2 weeks of treatment. Sections were cut and stained by hematoxylin and eosin and Giemsa stains. Mast cells were increased in diurnal and nocturnal biopsies. Evident degranulation of mast cells was detected in nocturnal biopsies. The mast cell number decreased to half its pretreatment number in patients treated with antiscabietic drugs and to its normal number in patients treated with antiscabietic drugs followed by 3 days with crotamiton. The number of mast cells are increased in scabietic lesions. This plays a role in the pathogenesis of the clinical and histologic picture of scabies. We recommend that an antiscabietic drug should be followed by 3 days of crotamiton in the treatment of scabies.

  7. Non-thermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Melanoma Cells via Production of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Sensenig, Rachel; Kalghatgi, Sameer; Cerchar, Ekaterina; Fridman, Gregory; Shereshevsky, Alexey; Torabi, Behzad; Arjunan, Krishna Priya; Podolsky, Erica; Fridman, Alexander; Friedman, Gary; Azizkhan-Clifford, Jane; Brooks, Ari D.

    2012-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma may provide a novel approach to treat malignancies via induction of apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of DBD plasma to induce apoptosis in melanoma cells. Melanoma cells were exposed to plasma at doses that did not induce necrosis, and cell viability and apoptotic activity were evaluated by Trypan blue exclusion test, Annexin-V/PI staining, caspase-3 cleavage, and TUNEL® analysis. Trypan blue staining revealed that non-thermal plasma treatment significantly decreased the viability of cells in a dose-dependent manner 3 and 24 h after plasma treatment. Annexin-V/PI staining revealed a significant increase in apoptosis in plasma-treated cells at 24, 48, and 72 h post-treatment (p<0.001). Caspase-3 cleavage was observed 48 h post-plasma treatment at a dose of 15 J/cm2. TUNEL® analysis of plasma-treated cells demonstrated an increase in apoptosis at 48 and 72 h post-treatment (p<0.001) at a dose of 15 J/cm2. Pre-treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), an intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, significantly decreased apoptosis in plasma-treated cells at 5 and 15 J/cm2. Plasma treatment induces apoptosis in melanoma cells through a pathway that appears to be dependent on production of intracellular ROS. DBD plasma production of intracellular ROS leads to dose-dependent DNA damage in melanoma cells, detected by γ-H2AX, which was completely abrogated by pre-treating cells with ROS scavenger, NAC. Plasma-induced DNA damage in turn may lead to the observed plasma-induced apoptosis. Since plasma is non-thermal, it may be used to selectively treat malignancies. PMID:21046465

  8. Mast cells, glia and neuroinflammation: partners in crime?

    PubMed

    Skaper, Stephen D; Facci, Laura; Giusti, Pietro

    2014-03-01

    Glia and microglia in particular elaborate pro-inflammatory molecules that play key roles in central nervous system (CNS) disorders from neuropathic pain and epilepsy to neurodegenerative diseases. Microglia respond also to pro-inflammatory signals released from other non-neuronal cells, mainly those of immune origin such as mast cells. The latter are found in most tissues, are CNS resident, and traverse the blood-spinal cord and blood-brain barriers when barrier compromise results from CNS pathology. Growing evidence of mast cell-glia communication opens new perspectives for the development of therapies targeting neuroinflammation by differentially modulating activation of non-neuronal cells that normally control neuronal sensitization - both peripherally and centrally. Mast cells and glia possess endogenous homeostatic mechanisms/molecules that can be up-regulated as a result of tissue damage or stimulation of inflammatory responses. Such molecules include the N-acylethanolamine family. One such member, N-palmitoylethanolamine is proposed to have a key role in maintenance of cellular homeostasis in the face of external stressors provoking, for example, inflammation. N-Palmitoylethanolamine has proven efficacious in mast-cell-mediated experimental models of acute and neurogenic inflammation. This review will provide an overview of recent progress relating to the pathobiology of neuroinflammation, the role of microglia, neuroimmune interactions involving mast cells and the possibility that mast cell-microglia cross-talk contributes to the exacerbation of acute symptoms of chronic neurodegenerative disease and accelerates disease progression, as well as promoting pain transmission pathways. We will conclude by considering the therapeutic potential of treating systemic inflammation or blockade of signalling pathways from the periphery to the brain in such settings.

  9. Mast Cell Hyperplasia and Eosinophilia Induced by Ascaris Body Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Archer, G. T.; Binet, J.-L.

    1971-01-01

    Daily i.p. injections of dilute Ascaris body fluid into rats induced peritoneal eosinophilia and the formation of pin-point follicles in the omentum. The follicles comprised plasma cells, macrophages and fibroblasts together with large numbers of eosinophils and mast cells. Electron microscopy of eosinophils in the follicles revealed loss of cytoplasmic granules and numerous vesicular and tubular structures in the cytoplasm. The mast cells showed clear areas round the granules, suggesting dissolution of granule components. ImagesFigs. 4-6Figs. 7-8Figs. 13-14Figs. 9-10Figs. 1-3Figs. 11-12 PMID:5135540

  10. Mast cells are required for phototolerance induction and scratching abatement.

    PubMed

    Schweintzger, Nina A; Bambach, Isabella; Reginato, Eleonora; Mayer, Gerlinde; Limón-Flores, Alberto Y; Ullrich, Stephen E; Byrne, Scott N; Wolf, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Dermal mast cells protect the skin from inflammatory effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and are required for UV-induced immune suppression. We sought to determine a potential mechanistic role of mast cells in reducing the sensitivity to UV radiation (i.e. phototolerance induction) through photohardening. We administered single UV exposures as well as a chronic UV irradiation regime to mast cell-deficient Kit(W-Sh/W-Sh) mice and their controls. The chronic irradiation protocol was similar to that given for prophylaxis in certain photodermatoses in humans. Compared to controls, UV-exposed Kit(W-Sh/W-Sh) mice were more susceptible to epidermal hyperplasia and dermal oedema which was linked to blood vessel dilation. Unexpectedly, Kit(W-Sh/W-Sh) mice exhibited an excessive scratching behaviour following broadband UVB plus UVA or solar simulated UV irradiation at doses far below their minimal skin-swelling dose. Protection from this UV-induced scratching phenotype was dependent on mast cells, as engraftment of bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells abated it entirely. Kit(W-Sh/W-Sh) mice were entirely resistant to phototolerance induction by photohardening treatment. Compared to controls, these mice also showed reduced numbers of regulatory T cells and neutrophils in the skin 24 h after UV irradiation. While it is well known that mast cell-deficient mice are resistant to UV-induced immune suppression, we have discovered that they are prone to develop photo-itch and are more susceptible to UV-induced epidermal hyperplasia and skin oedema.

  11. TLR3-induced activation of mast cells modulates CD8+ T-cell recruitment.

    PubMed

    Orinska, Zane; Bulanova, Elena; Budagian, Vadim; Metz, Martin; Maurer, Marcus; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2005-08-01

    Mast cells play an important role in host defense against various pathogens, but their role in viral infection has not been clarified in detail. dsRNA, synthesized by various types of viruses and mimicked by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) is recognized by Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). In this study, we demonstrate that poly(I:C) injection in vivo potently stimulates peritoneal mast cells to up-regulate a number of different costimulatory molecules. Therefore, we examined the expression and the functional significance of TLR3 activation in mast cells. Mast cells express TLR3 on the cell surface and intracellularly. After stimulation of mast cells with poly(I:C) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV), TLR3 is phosphorylated and the expression of key antiviral response cytokines (interferon beta, ISG15) and chemokines (IP10, RANTES) is upregulated. Interestingly, mast cells activated via TLR3-poly(I:C) potently stimulate CD8+ T-cell recruitment. Indeed, mast-cell-deficient mice (KitW/KitW-v) given an intraperitoneal injection of poly(I:C) show a decreased CD8+ T-cell recruitment, whereas granulocytes normally migrate to the peritoneal cavity. Mast-cell reconstitution of KitW/KitW-v mice normalizes the CD8+ T-cell influx. Thus, mast cells stimulated through engagement of TLR3 are potent regulators of CD8+ T-cell activities in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Mast cells and mast cell mediators as targets of dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Theoharides, Theoharis C; Bielory, Leonard

    2004-08-01

    To review the increasing amount of data that support or dispel the use of dietary supplements in the treatment of inflammatory conditions that involve mast cells, such as allergies, arthritis, and chronic pelvic pain syndrome. A search was conducted in MEDLINE for natural substances, dietary supplements, flavonoids, and proteoglycans for their in vitro or in vivo effects on allergic and inflammatory conditions. Studies were selected for inclusion because of the impact factor of the journal, the definitive nature of the findings, the soundness of the study design, and the expert opinion of the authors. Dietary supplements include a large group of products, such as vitamins, minerals, plant, or animal extracts, as well as herbal preparations that are often called medicinal herbs. Many of the available dietary supplements contain a multitude of ingredients, the source and/or purity of which is seldom disclosed; some of these may have biologic effects of their own or may interact with other supplements or drugs, often leading to adverse effects. The most well-documented evidence published to date is on the inhibitory action of natural compounds, especially flavonoids, on mast cells and allergic symptoms. Some flavonoids have weak inhibitory activity, whereas others may have no benefit or may be detrimental. Sulfated proteoglycans could provide synergistic action but require formulations with increased absorption. Combining the most active flavonoids with proteoglycans could be helpful in atopic and inflammatory conditions. However, a complete list of active ingredients and their source, purity, and exact concentration should be a requirement for nutraceuticals to standardize, compare, and promote their safe use.

  13. Mast cells, glia and neuroinflammation: partners in crime?

    PubMed Central

    Skaper, Stephen D; Facci, Laura; Giusti, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Glia and microglia in particular elaborate pro-inflammatory molecules that play key roles in central nervous system (CNS) disorders from neuropathic pain and epilepsy to neurodegenerative diseases. Microglia respond also to pro-inflammatory signals released from other non-neuronal cells, mainly those of immune origin such as mast cells. The latter are found in most tissues, are CNS resident, and traverse the blood–spinal cord and blood–brain barriers when barrier compromise results from CNS pathology. Growing evidence of mast cell–glia communication opens new perspectives for the development of therapies targeting neuroinflammation by differentially modulating activation of non-neuronal cells that normally control neuronal sensitization – both peripherally and centrally. Mast cells and glia possess endogenous homeostatic mechanisms/molecules that can be up-regulated as a result of tissue damage or stimulation of inflammatory responses. Such molecules include the N-acylethanolamine family. One such member, N-palmitoylethanolamine is proposed to have a key role in maintenance of cellular homeostasis in the face of external stressors provoking, for example, inflammation. N-Palmitoylethanolamine has proven efficacious in mast-cell-mediated experimental models of acute and neurogenic inflammation. This review will provide an overview of recent progress relating to the pathobiology of neuroinflammation, the role of microglia, neuroimmune interactions involving mast cells and the possibility that mast cell–microglia cross-talk contributes to the exacerbation of acute symptoms of chronic neurodegenerative disease and accelerates disease progression, as well as promoting pain transmission pathways. We will conclude by considering the therapeutic potential of treating systemic inflammation or blockade of signalling pathways from the periphery to the brain in such settings. PMID:24032675

  14. Familial occurrence of systemic mast cell activation disease.

    PubMed

    Molderings, Gerhard J; Haenisch, Britta; Bogdanow, Manuela; Fimmers, Rolf; Nöthen, Markus M

    2013-01-01

    Systemic mast cell activation disease (MCAD) comprises disorders characterized by an enhanced release of mast cell mediators accompanied by accumulation of dysfunctional mast cells. Demonstration of familial clustering would be an important step towards defining the genetic contribution to the risk of systemic MCAD. The present study aimed to quantify familial aggregation for MCAD and to investigate the variability of clinical and molecular findings (e.g. somatic mutations in KIT) among affected family members in three selected pedigrees. Our data suggest that systemic MCAD pedigrees include more systemic MCAD cases than would be expected by chance, i.e., compared with the prevalence of MCAD in the general population. The prevalence of MCAD suspected by symptom self-report in first-degree relatives of patients with MCAD amounted to approximately 46%, compared to prevalence in the general German population of about 17% (p<0.0001). In three families with a high familial loading of MCAD, the subtype of MCAD and the severity of mediator-related symptoms varied between family members. In addition, genetic alterations detected in KIT were variable, and included mutations at position 816 of the amino acid sequence. In conclusion, our data provide evidence for common familial occurrence of MCAD. Our findings observed in the three pedigrees together with recent reports in the literature suggest that, in familial cases (i.e., in the majority of MCAD), mutated disease-related operator and/or regulator genes could be responsible for the development of somatic mutations in KIT and other proteins important for the regulation of mast cell activity. Accordingly, the immunohistochemically different subtypes of MCAD (i.e. mast cell activation syndrome and systemic mastocytosis) should be more accurately regarded as varying presentations of a common generic root process of mast cell dysfunction, than as distinct diseases.

  15. Cultivation and characterization of canine skin-derived mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kawarai, Shinpei; Masuda, Kenichi; Ohmori, Keitaro; Matsuura, Shinobu; Yasuda, Nobutaka; Nagata, Masahiko; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2010-02-01

    It is essential to develop a technique to culture purified skin-derived mast cells (SMCs) to facilitate immunological research on allergic diseases in dogs. This study was performed to develop an efficient culture system for canine SMCs and to characterize the cells in comparison to canine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Enzymatically digested skin biopsy samples were cultivated in serum-free AIM-V medium supplemented with recombinant canine stem cell factor. Three to five weeks after the initiation of culture, mast cells were collected by a magnetic activated cell separation system using anti-c-Kit antibody. The collected cells were composed of a uniform population showing morphological characteristics of mast cells with a round or oval nucleus and abundant toluidine blue-positive metachromatic granules in the cytoplasm. The results of flow cytometric analysis for the presence of cell membrane c-Kit and Fc epsilon receptor I (FcepsilonRI) indicated that approximately 90% of the cells were mast cells. The cytoplasmic granules were positive for both tryptase and chymase. Apparent dose-dependent degranulation was induced by antibody-mediated cross-linking of immunoglobulin E (IgE) bound to the cells. These cytological and immunological characteristics observed in SMCs were mostly similar to those observed in BMMCs; however, IgE-mediated degranulation was significantly lower in SMCs than BMMCs. The culture system for canine SMCs developed in this study would be useful in understanding the pathophysiology and developing anti-allergic therapeutics in canine allergic dermatitis.

  16. Mast cell tumour in a giant Galapagos tortoise (Geochelone nigra vicina).

    PubMed

    Santoro, M; Stacy, B A; Morales, J A; Gastezzi-Arias, P; Landazuli, S; Jacobson, E R

    2008-01-01

    A well-differentiated cutaneous mast cell tumour was diagnosed in a subadult female giant Galapagos tortoise. The tumour was a pedunculated, verrucose mass located near the base of the neck. The histological features, which were diagnostic for a mast cell tumour, included abundant intracytoplasmic granules that were stained metachromatically with Giemsa and toluidine blue stains. Mast cell tumours are rare in reptiles, and this is the first description of a mast cell tumour in a chelonian.

  17. Virus-Infected Human Mast Cells Enhance Natural Killer Cell Functions.

    PubMed

    Portales-Cervantes, Liliana; Haidl, Ian D; Lee, Patrick W; Marshall, Jean S

    2017-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces are protected from infection by both structural and sentinel cells, such as mast cells. The mast cell's role in antiviral responses is poorly understood; however, they selectively recruit natural killer (NK) cells following infection. Here, the ability of virus-infected mast cells to enhance NK cell functions was examined. Cord blood-derived human mast cells infected with reovirus (Reo-CBMC) and subsequent mast cell products were used for the stimulation of human NK cells. NK cells upregulated the CD69 molecule and cytotoxicity-related genes, and demonstrated increased cytotoxic activity in response to Reo-CBMC soluble products. NK cell interferon (IFN)-γ production was also promoted in the presence of interleukin (IL)-18. In vivo, SCID mice injected with Reo-CBMC in a subcutaneous Matrigel model, could recruit and activate murine NK cells, a property not shared by normal human fibroblasts. Soluble products of Reo-CBMC included IL-10, TNF, type I and type III IFNs. Blockade of the type I IFN receptor abrogated NK cell activation. Furthermore, reovirus-infected mast cells expressed multiple IFN-α subtypes not observed in reovirus-infected fibroblasts or epithelial cells. Our data define an important mast cell IFN response, not shared by structural cells, and a subsequent novel mast cell-NK cell immune axis in human antiviral host defense.

  18. Murine mast cells secrete and respond to interleukin-33.

    PubMed

    Tung, Hui-Ying; Plunkett, Beverly; Huang, Shau-Ku; Zhou, Yufeng

    2014-03-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) appears to play a crucial role in the expression of allergic diseases, but its cellular source and regulatory mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Mast cells, one of the major effecter cell populations in mediating allergy, express high levels of IL-33 receptor, ST2, and have been shown to express IL-33 transcripts. In this study, we aimed to examine the secretion of IL-33 in mast cells and their response to IL-33. We have successfully detected secreted IL-33 from cell supernatants through a modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique-cell-based ELISA. Activation of bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (BMMCs) by crosslinkage of an antigen [ovalbumin (OVA)] and OVA-specific IgE mAbs significantly induced the expression of IL-33 transcripts, cytosolic and secreted proteins. In addition, the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR-9 ligands could trigger IL-33 mRNA expression. Exposure of BMMCs to IL-33 significantly increased the levels of IL-13 and IL-6 expression, concomitant with enhanced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) (ERK, p38, and JNK) and nuclear factor-kappa B. These results suggest that mouse BMMCs are capable of producing and serving as endogenous sources of IL-33, and that IL-33 plays an important role in regulating mast cell functions.

  19. Aged Lymphatic Vessels and Mast Cells in Perilymphatic Tissues.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sarit; Meininger, Cynthia J; Gashev, Anatoliy A

    2017-05-03

    This review provides a comprehensive summary of research on aging-associated alterations in lymphatic vessels and mast cells in perilymphatic tissues. Aging alters structure (by increasing the size of zones with low muscle cell investiture), ultrastructure (through loss of the glycocalyx), and proteome composition with a concomitant increase in permeability of aged lymphatic vessels. The contractile function of aged lymphatic vessels is depleted with the abolished role of nitric oxide and an increased role of lymphatic-born histamine in flow-dependent regulation of lymphatic phasic contractions and tone. In addition, aging induces oxidative stress in lymphatic vessels and facilitates the spread of pathogens from these vessels into perilymphatic tissues. Aging causes the basal activation of perilymphatic mast cells, which, in turn, restricts recruitment/activation of immune cells in perilymphatic tissues. This aging-associated basal activation of mast cells limits proper functioning of the mast cell/histamine/NF-κB axis that is essential for the regulation of lymphatic vessel transport and barrier functions as well as for both the interaction and trafficking of immune cells near and within lymphatic collecting vessels. Cumulatively, these changes play important roles in the pathogenesis of alterations in inflammation and immunity associated with aging.

  20. Mast Cell Targeted Chimeric Toxin Can Be Developed as an Adjunctive Therapy in Colon Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Li, Linmei; Shi, Renren; Liu, Xueting; Zhang, Junyan; Zou, Zehong; Hao, Zhuofang; Tao, Ailin

    2016-01-01

    The association of colitis with colorectal cancer has become increasingly clear with mast cells being identified as important inflammatory cells in the process. In view of the relationship between mast cells and cancer, we studied the effect and mechanisms of mast cells in the development of colon cancer. Functional and mechanistic insights were gained from ex vivo and in vivo studies of cell interactions between mast cells and CT26 cells. Further evidence was reversely obtained in studies of mast cell targeted Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin. Experiments revealed mast cells could induce colon tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Cancer progression was found to be related to the density of mast cells in colonic submucosa. The activation of MAPK, Rho-GTPase, and STAT pathways in colon cancer cells was triggered by mast cells during cell-to-cell interaction. Lastly, using an Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin we constructed, we confirmed the promoting effect of mast cells in development of colon cancer. Mast cells are a promoting factor of colon cancer and thus also a potential therapeutic target. The Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin targeting mast cells could effectively prevent colon cancer in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, these data may demonstrate a novel immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment of tumors. PMID:26978404

  1. Cutaneous mast cell tumor (Mastocytoma): Cyto- histopathological and haematological investigations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous mast cell tumours (MCTs) are the most common skin tumours in dogs. Due to the prevalence of canine MCTs and the variable biologic behavior of this disease, accurate prognostication and a thorough understanding of MCT biology are critical for the treatment of this disease. A cytologic diagnosis of mast cell tumor with evidence of prior hemorrhage was made, and the masses were surgically removed. Cytological evaluation of fine-needle aspirates from the cutaneous mass from the axillary comprised many well-differentiated, highly granulated mast cells with moderate numbers of eosinophils. Nuclei were varied in size and shape with high nuclear’to’cytoplasmic ratio, prominent nucleoli, marked atypical and mitotic figures. Microscopically, mass consisted of sheets of neoplastic round cells that formed nonencapsulated nodules in the dermis and infiltrated into the adjacent dermal collagen, and also there was diffuse subcutis invasion of round to pleomorphic tumor cells. Tumor cells had moderate to abundant cytoplasm, round to ovoid nuclei with scattered chromatin, and mitotic figures. In this tumor, cytoplasmic granules showed atypical metachromasia. In addition, eosinophils were scattered among the mast cells at the periphery of the nodules. The presence of eosinophils and the observation, at high magnification, of cells with cytoplasmic metachromatic granules. Invasion of the deep subcutaneous fat or cutaneous muscles were a common feature of grade III tumour. Finally, a diagnosis of grade III cutaneous mast cell tumor was made. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) of this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/4755249151157024. PMID:24444100

  2. In Vitro Desensitization of Human Skin Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Gomez, Gregorio; Macey, Matthew; Kepley, Christopher L.

    2013-01-01

    Desensitization is a clinical procedure whereby incremental doses of a drug are administered over several hours to a sensitive patient until a therapeutic dose and clinical tolerance are achieved. Clinical tolerance may occur in part by attenuating the mast cell response. In the present study, primary human skin mast cells were used to establish and characterize an in vitro model of desensitization. Mast cells in culture were armed with allergen-specific (4-hydroxy-3-nitro-phenylacety and Der p2) and non-specific IgE antibodies, and then desensitized by incremental exposures to 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacety-BSA. This desensitization procedure abrogated the subsequent degranulation response to the desensitizing allergen, to an unrelated allergen, and to IgG anti-FcεRI, but not to C5a, substance P, compound 48/80, and calcium ionophore. Desensitized cells regained their FcεRI-dependent degranulation capability by 24–48 h after free allergen had been removed. Therefore, sensitized human skin mast cells are reversibly desensitized in vitro by exposure to incremental doses of that allergen, which also cross-desensitizes them to an unrelated allergen. PMID:22009002

  3. Mast cell dipeptidyl peptidase I mediates survival from sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mallen–St. Clair, Jon; Pham, Christine T.N.; Villalta, S. Armando; Caughey, George H.; Wolters, Paul J.

    2004-01-01

    Sepsis is a common, life-threatening disease for which there is little treatment. The cysteine protease dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) activates granule-associated serine proteases, several of which play important roles in host responses to bacterial infection. To examine DPPI’s role in sepsis, we compared DPPI–/– and DPPI+/+ mice using the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of septic peritonitis, finding that DPPI–/– mice are far more likely to survive sepsis. Outcomes of CLP in mice lacking mast cell DPPI reveal that the absence of DPPI in mast cells, rather than in other cell types, is responsible for the survival advantage. Among several cytokines surveyed in peritoneal fluid and serum, IL-6 is highly and differentially expressed in DPPI–/– mice compared with DPPI+/+ mice. Remarkably, deleting IL-6 expression in DPPI–/– mice eliminates the survival advantage. The increase in IL-6 in septic DPPI–/– mice, which appears to protect these mice from death, may be related to reduced DPPI-mediated activation of mast cell tryptase and other peptidases, which we show cleave IL-6 in vitro. These results indicate that mast cell DPPI harms the septic host and that DPPI is a novel potential therapeutic target for treatment of sepsis. PMID:14966572

  4. Argon Plasma-Induced Graft Polymerization of PEGMA on Chitosan Membrane Surface for Cell Adhesion Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shiheng; Ren, Li; Wang, Yingjun

    2013-10-01

    For its biocompatibility and biodegradability, chitosan has had considerable attention for biomedical applications in recent years. In this paper, polymerization of poly (ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) was grafted onto chitosan membrane surface through argon plasma-induced graft polymerization. The surface properties after modification were characterized by contact angle measurement, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The results indicated that PEGMA can be grafted successfully onto chitosan membrane surface. The surface hydrophilicity and free energy were improved and the surface roughness increased after modification. The adhesion of a human corneal epithelial cell (HCEC) on chitosan membrane surface was enhanced due to improvement of surface free energy and roughness.

  5. The production and secretion of complement component C1q by human mast cells.

    PubMed

    van Schaarenburg, Rosanne A; Suurmond, Jolien; Habets, Kim L L; Brouwer, Mieke C; Wouters, Diana; Kurreeman, Fina A S; Huizinga, Tom W J; Toes, René E M; Trouw, Leendert A

    2016-10-01

    C1q is the initiation molecule of the classical pathway of the complement system and is produced by macrophages and immature dendritic cells. As mast cells share the same myeloid progenitor cells, we have studied whether also mast cells can produce and secrete C1q. Mast cells were generated in vitro from CD34+ progenitor cells from buffy coats or cord blood. Fully differentiated mast cells were shown by both RNA sequencing and qPCR to express C1QA, C1QB and C1QC. C1q produced by mast cells has a similar molecular make-up as serum C1q. Reconstituting C1q depleted serum with mast cell supernatant in haemolytic assays, indicated that C1q secreted by mast cells is functionally active. The level of C1q in supernatants produced under basal conditions was considerably enhanced upon stimulation with LPS, dexamethasone in combination with IFN- γ or via FcεRI triggering. Mast cells in human tissues stained positive for C1q in both healthy and in inflamed tissue. Moreover, mast cells in healthy and diseased skin appear to be the predominant C1q positive cells. Together, our data reveal that mast cells are able to produce and secrete functional active C1q and indicate mast cells as a local source of C1q in human tissue.

  6. Clonal mast cell activation syndrome with anaphylaxis to sulfites.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Liliana; Ring, Johannes; Brockow, Knut

    2013-01-01

    Sulfites are rarely suspected as causative agents of immediate-type hypersensitivity. We report on a 49-year-old male patient who developed recurrent severe hypotension after food ingestion. A diagnosis of monoclonal mast cell activation syndrome was established. In the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge, the patient reacted to potassium metabisulfite with anaphylaxis.

  7. Protamine and mast-cell-mediated angiogenesis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, A.; Sörbo, J.; Norrby, K.

    1990-01-01

    Different doses of protamine sulphate (PS) given s.c. (at 12-h intervals) were tested for signs of non-specific toxicity measured as effect on body weight and small-gut proliferation as well as on mast-cell secretion and mast-cell-mediated mitogenesis in the mesenteric windows following i.p. injection of Compound 48/80, a potent mast cell secretagogue, in normal rats. In a non-toxic dose range, the effect of PS on mast-cell-mediated angiogenesis, effected by 48/80, was quantified as the number of vessels per mm of mesenteric window in histological sections at x 400. No intelligible dose-effect relationship was discernible between the dose of PS given and the effect on angiogenesis. Only in a tight interval, at 40 mg PS/kg but not at 20 or 60 mg PS/kg, was the angiogenesis statistically significantly suppressed. Hence, it was concluded that PS can be angiostatic but does not exert a more general angiostatic effect in the autogenous systems used. PMID:1691920

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of mast cell disorders: practical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Sandes, Alex Freire; Medeiros, Raphael Salles Scortegagna; Rizzatti, Edgar Gil

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE The term mastocytosis covers a group of rare disorders characterized by neoplastic proliferation and accumulation of clonal mast cells in one or more organs. The aim of this study was to assess the principal elements for diagnosing and treating these disorders. DESIGN AND SETTING Narrative review of the literature conducted at Grupo Fleury, São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS This study reviewed the scientific papers published in the PubMed, Embase (Excerpta Medica Database), Lilacs (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde) and Cochrane Library databases that were identified using the search term "mastocytosis." RESULTS The clinical presentation of mastocytosis is remarkably heterogeneous and ranges from skin lesions that may regress spontaneously to aggressive forms associated with organ failure and short survival. Currently, seven subtypes of mastocytosis are recognized through the World Health Organization classification system for hematopoietic tumors. These disorders are diagnosed based on clinical manifestations and on identification of neoplastic mast cells using morphological, immunophenotypic, genetic and molecular methods. Abnormal mast cells display atypical and frequently spindle-shaped morphology, and aberrant expression of the CD25 and CD2 antigens. Elevation of serum tryptase is a common finding in some subtypes, and more than 90% of the patients present the D816V KIT mutation in mast cells. CONCLUSION Here, we described the most common signs and symptoms among patients with mastocytosis and suggested a practical approach for the diagnosis, classification and initial clinical treatment of mastocytosis.

  9. Sphingosine-1-phosphate and other lipid mediators generated by mast cells as critical players in allergy and mast cell function.

    PubMed

    Kulinski, Joseph M; Muñoz-Cano, Rosa; Olivera, Ana

    2016-05-05

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), platelet activating factor (PAF) and eicosanoids are bioactive lipid mediators abundantly produced by antigen-stimulated mast cells that exert their function mostly through specific cell surface receptors. Although it has long been recognized that some of these bioactive lipids are potent regulators of allergic diseases, their exact contributions to disease pathology have been obscured by the complexity of their mode of action and the regulation of their metabolism. Indeed, the effects of such lipids are usually mediated by multiple receptor subtypes that may differ in their signaling mechanisms and functions. In addition, their actions may be elicited by cell surface receptor-independent mechanisms. Furthermore, these lipids may be converted into metabolites that exhibit different functionalities, adding another layer of complexity to their overall biological responses. In some instances, a second wave of lipid mediator synthesis by both mast cell and non-mast cell sources may occur late during inflammation, bringing about additional roles in the altered environment. New evidence also suggests that bioactive lipids in the local environment can fine-tune mast cell maturation and phenotype, and thus their responsiveness. A better understanding of the subtleties of the spatiotemporal regulation of these lipid mediators, their receptors and functions may aid in the pursuit of pharmacological applications for allergy treatments.

  10. Products from mast cells influence T lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production--relevant to allergic asthma?

    PubMed

    de Pater-Huijsen, F L; Pompen, M; Jansen, H M; Out, T A

    1997-06-01

    In IgE allergic diseases both mast cells and T lymphocytes play an important role. Whereas mast cels have been implicated in immediate allergic responses, T lymphocytes mediate subsequent late phase responses and chronic inflammation. Here we review possible links between the early mast cell activation and the later T lymphocyte stimulation. Products from mast cells were found to exert effects on T lymphocytes. Human Mast Cell line-1 (HMC-1) mast cells modulated proliferation and cytokine production of a human CD8+ T-cell clone in vitro. Activated mast cells seemed to drive this CD8+ T-cell clone towards a more pronounced T (helper) 1 type of response, simultaneously decreasing T-cell numbers. It is hypothesized that this might be a negative feed back mechanism operating in allergic subjects, by which the Th2-driven IgE production and eosinophilia are counteracted.

  11. Immunohistochemical Evaluation of Mast Cells in Leukoplakia and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Malathi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction More than 90% of oral cancers are squamous cell carcinomas with oral leukoplakia being the most common potentially malignant disorder. Among the cell types in the stroma, mast cells play an important role in tumourigenesis through various mechanisms. Aim The present study was aimed at comparing the mast cell count among normal oral mucosa, leukoplakia and Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSSC) and to evaluate the possible role of mast cells in carcinogenesis. Materials and Methods Mast cell count was assessed immunohistochemically using anti-mast cell tryptase amongst 20 cases of leukoplakia and OSSC each and 10 normal gingival samples. Overall comparison was done using Kruskal Wallis test and intergroup comparison was done using Mann-Whitney U test. Results The results of the present study showed an increase in mast cell count from normal oral mucosa (Mean: 7.73) to leukoplakia (Mean: 15.11) to squamous cell carcinoma (Mean: 22.73). Comparison of mean number of mast cells amongst three groups (p-value: 0.001) and intergroup comparisons showed statistical significance. Conclusion Mast cells favour malignant transformation and can be used as indicators of disease progression. PMID:27656549

  12. Interleukin-33 and Mast Cells Bridge Innate and Adaptive Immunity: From the Allergologist’s Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Tae Young; Kim, Young Hyo

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin (IL) 33, a member of the IL-1 superfamily, is an “alarmin” protein and is secreted in its active form from damaged cells undergoing necrotic cell death. Mast cells are one of the main effector cell types in allergic disorders. They secrete a variety of mediators, including T helper 2 cytokines. As mast cells have high-affinity IgE receptors (FcεRI) on their surface, they can capture circulating IgE. IgE-bound mast cells degranulate large amounts of histamine, heparin, and proteases when they encounter antigens. As IL-33 is an important mediator of innate immunity and mast cells play an important role in adaptive immune responses, interactions between the two could link innate and adaptive immunity. IL-33 promotes the adhesion of mast cells to laminin, fibronectin, and vitronectin. IL-33 increases the expression of adhesion molecules, such as intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, in endothelial cells, thus enhancing mast cell adhesion to blood vessel walls. IL-33 stimulates mast cell proliferation by activating the ST2/Myd88 pathway; increases mast cell survival by the activation of survival proteins such as Bcl-XL; and promotes the growth, development, and maturation of mast cell progenitors. IL-33 is also involved in the activation of mature mast cells and production of different proinflammatory cytokines. The interaction of IL-33 and mast cells could have important clinical implications in the field of clinical urology. Epithelial dysfunction and mast cells could play an important role in the pathogenesis of interstitial cystitis. Urinary levels of IL-33 significantly increase in patients with interstitial cystitis. In addition, the number of mast cells significantly increase in the urinary bladders of patients with interstitial cystitis. Therefore, inhibition of mast cell activation and degranulation in response to increase in IL-33 is a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of interstitial cystitis

  13. [³H]serotonin release assay using antigen-stimulated rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Skaper, Stephen D; Facci, Laura

    2012-01-01

    The concentration of nerve growth factor (NGF) is elevated in a number of inflammatory and autoimmune states in conjunction with increased accumulation of mast cells. Mast cells, which are of hematopoietic lineage, and NGF appear to be involved in neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. Mast cells themselves are capable of producing and responding to NGF. Here we describe a protocol for the isolation and culture of peritoneal-derived rat mast cells, together with a [(3)H]serotonin release assay which is useful in assessing the effects of antigens and neurotrophic factors on mast-cell activation.

  14. Isolation and characterization of mast cells in mouse models of allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kovarova, Martina

    2013-01-01

    After their activation, mast cells release a variety of bioactive mediators that contribute to characteristic symptoms of allergic reactions. Ex vivo analysis of mast cells derived from their progenitors or isolated from mice is an indispensable tool for the development of newer and more effective therapies of allergic syndromes. Here, we describe the differentiation and isolation of mouse mast cells from different sources including differentiation from bone marrow, differentiation from fetal liver, and isolation of residential connective tissue-type mast cells from the peritoneum. These techniques are valuable tools for the study of mast cell function and their contribution to allergic reactions.

  15. [Systemic mast cell disease with gastrointestinal symptoms--a diagnostic questionnaire].

    PubMed

    Molderings, G J; Kolck, U; Scheurlen, C; Brüss, M; Frieling, T; Raithel, M; Homann, J

    2006-09-22

    Systemic mast cell disease often becomes clinically manifest as a mast cell mediator activation syndrome with episodic or chronic nonspecific abdominal symptoms. As a result of genetic alterations, pathological mast cells have an increased proliferation rate as well as accumulation within different organs with consequential effect on gastrointestinal secretion, absorption, pain perception and motility caused by release of their mediators. These changes may not be detected in routine laboratory or imaging methods. This report describes how the diagnosis systemic mast cell disease can be established with a diagnostic questionnaire based on a synopsis of clinical findings relevant to a mast cell mediator activation syndrome.

  16. New Roles for Mast Cells in Modulating Allergic Reactions and Immunity Against Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Alison M.; Abraham, Soman N.

    2009-01-01

    Mast cells have primarily been associated with mediating the pathological secondary responses to allergens in sensitized hosts. In view of the recent evidence for a mast cell role in modulating primary immune responses to pathogens, the likelihood for a role of mast cells in influencing primary immune response to allergens has grown. New evidence suggests that mast cells drive the development of Th2 responses to allergens, particularly when allergen exposure occurs concomitantly with exposure to pathogen products present in the environment. These new roles for mast cells in allergy and infection suggest additional drug targets to prevent development of allergic disease and allergic exacerbations of established disease. PMID:19828301

  17. Cre-mediated cell ablation contests mast cell contribution in models of antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Weiser, Anne; Tietz, Annette; Stassen, Michael; Harris, Nicola; Kopf, Manfred; Radermacher, Peter; Möller, Peter; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane; Fehling, Hans Jörg; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer

    2011-11-23

    Immunological functions of mast cells remain poorly understood. Studies in Kit mutant mice suggest key roles for mast cells in certain antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. However, Kit mutations affect multiple cell types of both immune and nonimmune origin. Here, we show that targeted insertion of Cre-recombinase into the mast cell carboxypeptidase A3 locus deleted mast cells in connective and mucosal tissues by a genotoxic Trp53-dependent mechanism. Cre-mediated mast cell eradication (Cre-Master) mice had, with the exception of a lack of mast cells and reduced basophils, a normal immune system. Cre-Master mice were refractory to IgE-mediated anaphylaxis, and this defect was rescued by mast cell reconstitution. This mast cell-deficient strain was fully susceptible to antibody-induced autoimmune arthritis and to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Differences comparing Kit mutant mast cell deficiency models to selectively mast cell-deficient mice call for a systematic re-evaluation of immunological functions of mast cells beyond allergy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Adenine suppresses IgE-mediated mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Silwal, Prashanta; Shin, Keuna; Choi, Seulgi; Kang, Seong Wook; Park, Jin Bong; Lee, Hyang-Joo; Koo, Suk-Jin; Chung, Kun-Hoe; Namgung, Uk; Lim, Kyu; Heo, Jun-Young; Park, Jong Il; Park, Seung-Kiel

    2015-06-01

    Nucleobase adenine is produced by dividing human lymphoblasts mainly from polyamine synthesis and inhibits immunological functions of lymphocytes. We investigated the anti-allergic effect of adenine on IgE-mediated mast cell activation in vitro and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of adenine to IgE-sensitized mice attenuated IgE-mediated PCA reaction in a dose dependent manner, resulting in a median effective concentration of 4.21 mg/kg. In mast cell cultures, only adenine among cytosine, adenine, adenosine, ADP and ATP dose-dependently suppressed FcɛRI (a high affinity receptor for IgE)-mediated degranulation with a median inhibitory concentration of 1.6mM. It also blocked the production of LTB4, an inflammatory lipid mediator, and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-4. In addition, adenine blocked thapsigargin-induced degranulation which is FcɛRI-independent but shares FcɛRI-dependent signaling events. Adenine inhibited the phosphorylation of signaling molecules important to FcɛRI-mediated allergic reactions such as Syk, PLCγ2, Gab2, Akt, and mitogen activated protein kinases ERK and JNK. From this result, we report for the first time that adenine inhibits PCA in mice and allergic reaction by inhibiting FcɛRI-mediated signaling events in mast cells. Therefore, adenine may be useful for the treatment of mast cell-mediated allergic diseases. Also, the upregulation of adenine production may provide another mechanism for suppressing mast cell activity especially at inflammatory sites.

  19. Marine brevetoxin induces IgE-independent mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hilderbrand, Susana C; Murrell, Rachel N; Gibson, James E; Brown, Jared M

    2011-02-01

    Brevetoxins (PbTx) are sodium channel neurotoxins produced by the marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis during red tide blooms. Inhalation of PbTx in normal individuals and individuals with pre-existing airways disease results in adverse airway symptoms including bronchoconstriction. In animal models of allergic inflammation, inhalation of PbTx results in a histamine H₁-mediated bronchoconstriction suggestive of mast cell activation. How mast cells would respond directly to PbTx is unknown. We thus explored the activation of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) following exposure to purified PbTx-2. Following in vitro exposure to PbTx-2, we examined cellular viability, mast cell degranulation (β-hexosaminidase release), intracellular Ca²+ and Na+ flux, and the production of inflammatory mediators (IL-6). PbTx-2 induced significant cellular toxicity within 24 h as measured by LDH release and Annexin-V staining. However, within 1 h of exposure, PbTx-2 induced BMMC degranulation and an increase in IL-6 mRNA expression independent of the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) stimulation. Activation of BMMCs by PbTx-2 was associated with altered intracellular Ca²+ and Na+ levels. Brevenal, a naturally produced compound that antagonizes the activity of PbTx, prevented changes in intracellular Na+ levels but did not alter activation of BMMCs by PbTx-2. These findings demonstrate that PbTx-2 activates mast cells independent of FcεRI providing insight into critical events in the pathogenesis and a potential therapeutic target in brevetoxin-induced airway symptoms.

  20. Ablation of human skin mast cells in situ by lysosomotropic agents.

    PubMed

    Hagforsen, Eva; Paivandy, Aida; Lampinen, Maria; Weström, Simone; Calounova, Gabriela; Melo, Fabio R; Rollman, Ola; Pejler, Gunnar

    2015-07-01

    Mast cells are known to have a detrimental impact on numerous types of inflammatory skin diseases such as contact dermatitis, atopic eczema and cutaneous mastocytosis. Regimens that dampen skin mast cell-mediated activities can thus offer an attractive therapeutic option under such circumstances. As mast cells are known to secrete a large array of potentially pathogenic compounds, both from preformed stores in secretory lysosomes (granules) and after de novo synthesis, mere inhibition of degranulation or interference with individual mast cell mediators may not be sufficient to provide an effective blockade of harmful mast cell activities. An alternative strategy may therefore be to locally reduce skin mast cell numbers. Here, we explored the possibility of using lysosomotropic agents for this purpose, appreciating the fact that mast cell granules contain bioactive compounds prone to trigger apoptosis if released into the cytosolic compartment. Based on this principle, we show that incubation of human skin punch biopsies with the lysosomotropic agents siramesine or Leu-Leu methyl ester preferably ablated the mast cell population, without causing any gross adverse effects on the skin morphology. Subsequent analysis revealed that mast cells treated with lysosomotropic agents predominantly underwent apoptotic rather than necrotic cell death. In summary, this study raises the possibility of using lysosomotropic agents as a novel approach to targeting deleterious mast cell populations in cutaneous mastocytosis and other skin disorders negatively influenced by mast cells.

  1. Correlation of nodal mast cells with clinical outcome in dogs with mast cell tumour and a proposed classification system for the evaluation of node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Weishaar, K M; Thamm, D H; Worley, D R; Kamstock, D A

    2014-11-01

    Lymph node metastasis in dogs with mast cell tumour has been reported as a negative prognostic indicator; however, no standardized histological criteria exist to define metastatic disease. The primary aim of this study was to determine whether different histological patterns of node-associated mast cells correlate with clinical outcome in dogs with mast cell tumour. A secondary goal was to propose a criteria-defined classification system for histological evaluation of lymph node metastasis. The Colorado State University Diagnostic Medicine Center database was searched for cases of canine mast cell tumours with reported lymph node metastasis or evidence of node-associated mast cells. Additional cases were obtained from a clinical trial involving sentinel lymph node mapping and node extirpation in dogs with mast cell neoplasia. Forty-one cases were identified for inclusion in the study. Demographic data, treatment and clinical outcome were collected for each case. Lymph nodes were classified according to a novel classification system (HN0-HN3) based on the number of, distribution of, and architectural disruption by, nodal mast cells. The findings of this study indicate that characterization of nodal mast cells as proposed by this novel classification system correlates with, and is prognostic for, clinical outcome in dogs with mast cell tumours.

  2. Comparison of Mast Cells and Inflammatory Cells within Periapical Lesions and Comparison of Degranulated Mast Cells Between Fibrous and Inflamed Area in Radicular Cysts: An Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Rahul; Akifuddin, Syed; Sidhu, Gagandeep Kaur; Khan, Nadia; Singla, Kapil

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The role of mast cells as the key effector of allergic inflammation, anaphylactic inflammatory reactions and in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation, is well-known. The present study is adopted to compare mast cells and inflammatory cells within periapical granuloma and cysts and localize the mast cells and quantify their number in the periapical cysts so as to propose a role of mast cells in the pathogenesis of this lesion. Materials and Methods: Biopsy specimens of 30 periapical lesions were stained with hematoxylin–eosin, and immunohistochemical Mast Cell Tryptase from Bio SB (IHC detection system kit) antibody. The tryptase positive mast cells and mononuclear inflammatory cells were counted in 10 consecutive high power fields (100X) using the binocular microscope from Motic attached to a computer with Motic Advanced Images 3.2 software. Results: Comparative microscopic analysis indicated that periapical cyst shows more percentage of mast cells and less percentage of inflammatory cell than periapical granuloma (comparison of mean and standard deviation of total number of mast cells and inflammatory cells, mast cells 3.15±1.39 in the granuloma group and 4.43±1.91in the cyst group, inflammatory cells, 67.11±1.2 in the granuloma group and 52.66±0.8 in the cyst group). Numerous degranulated mast cells were observed in the fibrous wall than the inflammatory infiltrate of the periapical cysts. The mean and standard deviation of degranulated mast cells between the inflammatory and fibrous zone within the cyst group, being 0.95±1.10 and1.68±1.34 respectively. The values varied significantly between the two zones. Conclusion: The number of inflammatory cells in the cyst group is less than periapical granuloma and total number of mast cells in the cyst group is more as compared to periapical granuloma. The degranulated cells were quantified and they were higher in the fibrous area of the cysts than the inflammatory zone. This study could support the

  3. Comparison of Mast Cells and Inflammatory Cells within Periapical Lesions and Comparison of Degranulated Mast Cells Between Fibrous and Inflamed Area in Radicular Cysts: An Immunohistochemical Study.

    PubMed

    Shiromany, Aseem; Sood, Rahul; Akifuddin, Syed; Sidhu, Gagandeep Kaur; Khan, Nadia; Singla, Kapil

    2014-12-01

    The role of mast cells as the key effector of allergic inflammation, anaphylactic inflammatory reactions and in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation, is well-known. The present study is adopted to compare mast cells and inflammatory cells within periapical granuloma and cysts and localize the mast cells and quantify their number in the periapical cysts so as to propose a role of mast cells in the pathogenesis of this lesion. Biopsy specimens of 30 periapical lesions were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, and immunohistochemical Mast Cell Tryptase from Bio SB (IHC detection system kit) antibody. The tryptase positive mast cells and mononuclear inflammatory cells were counted in 10 consecutive high power fields (100X) using the binocular microscope from Motic attached to a computer with Motic Advanced Images 3.2 software. Comparative microscopic analysis indicated that periapical cyst shows more percentage of mast cells and less percentage of inflammatory cell than periapical granuloma (comparison of mean and standard deviation of total number of mast cells and inflammatory cells, mast cells 3.15±1.39 in the granuloma group and 4.43±1.91in the cyst group, inflammatory cells, 67.11±1.2 in the granuloma group and 52.66±0.8 in the cyst group). Numerous degranulated mast cells were observed in the fibrous wall than the inflammatory infiltrate of the periapical cysts. The mean and standard deviation of degranulated mast cells between the inflammatory and fibrous zone within the cyst group, being 0.95±1.10 and1.68±1.34 respectively. The values varied significantly between the two zones. The number of inflammatory cells in the cyst group is less than periapical granuloma and total number of mast cells in the cyst group is more as compared to periapical granuloma. The degranulated cells were quantified and they were higher in the fibrous area of the cysts than the inflammatory zone. This study could support the fact that the various mediators released on

  4. Equine Airway Mast Cells are Sensitive to Cell Death Induced by Lysosomotropic Agents.

    PubMed

    Wernersson, S; Riihimäki, M; Pejler, G; Waern, I

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells are known for their detrimental effects in various inflammatory conditions. Regimens that induce selective mast cell apoptosis may therefore be of therapeutic significance. Earlier studies have demonstrated that murine- and human-cultured mast cells are highly sensitive to apoptosis induced by the lysosomotropic agent LeuLeuOMe (LLME). However, the efficacy of lysosomotropic agents for inducing apoptosis of in vivo-derived airway mast cells and the impact on mast cells in other species have not been assessed. Here we addressed whether lysosomotropic agents can induce cell death of equine in vivo-derived mast cells. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids from horses were incubated with LLME at 15-100 μm for up to 48 h. The overall cell viability was unaffected by 15 μm LLME up to 48 h, whereas a relatively modest drop in total cell counts (~30%) was seen at the highest LLME dose used. In contrast to the relatively low effect on total cell counts, LLME efficiently and dose dependently reduced the number of mast cells in BAL fluids, with an almost complete depletion (96%) of mast cells after 24 h of incubation with 100 μm LLME. A significant but less dramatic reduction (up to ~45%) of lymphocytes was also seen, whereas macrophages and neutrophils were essentially resistant. The appearance of apoptotic bodies suggested a mechanism involving apoptosis rather than necrosis. These findings suggest that equine airway mast cells are highly sensitive to lysosomotropic agents. Possibly, lysosomotropic agents could be of therapeutic value to treat disorders involving harmful accumulation of mast cells in the airways.

  5. Mast cells express novel functional IL-15 receptor alpha isoforms.

    PubMed

    Bulanova, Elena; Budagian, Vadim; Orinska, Zane; Krause, Hans; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2003-05-15

    Mast cells previously have been reported to be regulated by IL-15 and to express a distinct IL-15R, termed IL-15RX. To further examine IL-15 binding and signaling in mast cells, we have studied the nature of the IL-15R and some of its biological activities in these cells. In this study, we report the existence of three novel isoforms of the IL-15R alpha chain in murine bone marrow-derived mast cells as a result of an alternative exon-splicing mechanism within the IL-15R alpha gene. These correspond to new mRNA transcripts lacking exon 4; exons 3 and 4; or exons 3, 4, and 5 (IL-15R alpha Delta 4, IL-15R alpha Delta 3,4, IL-15R alpha Delta 3,4,5). After transient transfection in COS-7 cells, all IL-15R alpha isoforms associate with the Golgi apparatus, the endoplasmic reticulum, the perinuclear space, and the cell membrane. Analysis of glycosylation pattern demonstrates the usage of a single N-glycosylation site, while no O-glycosylation is observed. Importantly, IL-15 binds with high affinity to, and promotes the survival of, murine BA/F3 cells stably transfected with the IL-15R alpha isoforms. Furthermore, we report that signaling mediated by IL-15 binding to the newly identified IL-15R alpha isoforms involves the phosphorylation of STAT3, STAT5, STAT6, Janus kinase 2, and Syk kinase. Taken together, our data indicate that murine mast cells express novel, fully functional IL-15R alpha isoforms, which can explain the selective regulatory effects of IL-15 on these cells.

  6. Mucosal mast cells are indispensable for the timely termination of Strongyloides ratti infection.

    PubMed

    Reitz, M; Brunn, M-L; Rodewald, H-R; Feyerabend, T B; Roers, A; Dudeck, A; Voehringer, D; Jönsson, F; Kühl, A A; Breloer, M

    2017-03-01

    Mast cells and basophils are innate immune cells with overlapping functions that contribute to anti-helminth immunity. Mast cell function during helminth infection was previously studied using mast cell-deficient Kit-mutant mice that display additional mast cell-unrelated immune deficiencies. Here, we use mice that lack basophils or mucosal and connective tissue mast cells in a Kit-independent manner to re-evaluate the impact of each cell type during helminth infection. Neither mast cells nor basophils participated in the immune response to tissue-migrating Strongyloides ratti third-stage larvae, but both cell types contributed to the early expulsion of parasitic adults from the intestine. The termination of S. ratti infection required the presence of mucosal mast cells: Cpa3(Cre) mice, which lack mucosal and connective tissue mast cells, remained infected for more than 150 days. Mcpt5(Cre) R-DTA mice, which lack connective tissue mast cells only, and basophil-deficient Mcpt8(Cre) mice terminated the infection after 1 month with wild-type kinetics despite their initial increase in intestinal parasite burden. Because Cpa3(Cre) mice showed intact Th2 polarization and efficiently developed protective immunity after vaccination, we hypothesize that mucosal mast cells are non-redundant terminal effector cells in the intestinal epithelium that execute anti-helminth immunity but do not orchestrate it.

  7. Further characterization of protein kinase C in mouse mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.R.; Ishizaka, T.

    1986-03-01

    Bridging of cell-bound IgE antibody molecules on colony stimulating factor dependent mouse mast cell line (PT-18) cells by multivalent antigen induces the mobilization and uptake of Ca/sup 2 +/ monitored by Quin-2 and the production of diacylglycerol. Exposure of the sensitized cells to antigen also induces a substantial increase in protein kinase C (PKC) activity in the plasma membrane (340 units to 1375 units: 1 unit = 1 pmol of /sup 32/P incorporated into Histone H-1/min/10/sup 7/ cells), within 30 seconds. There is also an increase in /sup 3/H phorbol-12, 13-dibutyrate (/sup 3/H-PDB) binding which parallels the increase in PKC activity both in kinetics and antigen dose dependency. Determination of K/sub m/ and V/sub max/ for PKC revealed no difference between the cytosolic and membranous forms of PKC. Partial purification of PKC from the membrane of sensitized mast cells which had been labeled with /sup 32/P and stimulated with DNP-HSA revealed a protein of 80-84,000 molecular weight, which migrated on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis just above an authentic standard of PKC purified from rat brain. Treatment of the PKC from mouse mast cell membrane with alkaline phosphatase resulted in a reduction of phosphorylating activity and bindability of /sup 3/H-PDB. In conclusion, the authors speculate that activation of mouse mast cells by cross-linking IgE results in the phosphorylation of a silent-pool of PKC converting it from an inactive state to an activated form.

  8. The mast cell - B-cell axis in lung vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Breitling, Siegfried; Hui, Zhang; Zabini, Diana; Hu, Yijie; Hoffmann, Julia; Goldenberg, Neil M; Tabuchi, Arata; Buelow, Roland; Dos Santos, Claudia; Kuebler, Wolfgang Michael

    2017-02-24

    Over the past years, a critical role for the immune system and in particular, for mast cells, in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH) has emerged. However, the way in which mast cells promote PH is still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which mast cells may contribute to PH, specifically focusing on the interaction between the innate and adaptive immune response and the role of B-cells and autoimmunity. Experiments were performed in Sprague Dawley rats and B-cell deficient JH-KO rats in the monocrotaline, sugen-hypoxia and the aortic banding model of PH. Hemodynamics, cell infiltration, IL-6 expression, and vascular remodeling were analyzed. Gene array analyses revealed constituents of immunoglobulins as most prominently regulated mast cell dependent genes in the lung in experimental PH. IL-6 was shown to link mast cells to B-cells, as a) IL-6 was upregulated and colocalized with mast cells and was reduced by mast cell stabilizers, and b) IL-6 or mast cell blockade reduced B-cells in lungs of monocrotaline-treated rats. A functional role for B-cells in PH was demonstrated, in that either blocking B-cells by an anti-CD20 antibody or B-cell deficiency in JH-KO rats attenuated right ventricular systolic pressure and vascular remodeling in experimental PH. We here identify a mast cell - B-cell axis driven by IL-6 as critical immune pathway in the pathophysiology of PH. Our results provide novel insights into the role of the immune system in PH, which may be therapeutically exploited by targeted immunotherapy.

  9. Ultraviolet B radiation increases hairless mouse mast cells in a dose-dependent manner and alters distribution of UV-induced mast cell growth factor.

    PubMed

    Kligman, L H; Murphy, G F

    1996-01-01

    In studies of the effects of chronic UVB irradiation on dermal connective tissue in the hairless mouse, we observed that the number and size of mast cells was increased. Because mast cells are known to be associated with connective tissue remodeling, we examined and quantified the effect of increasing UVB (290-320 nm) doses on this cell. Groups of mice were exposed to filtered FS-40 Westinghouse lamps (290-400 nm: peak irradiance 313 nm) for 1-5 minimal erythema doses (MED) thrice weekly for 10 weeks. Appropriate controls were included. Biopsies, processed for light microscopy, were stained with toluidine blue. Mast cells were counted in 15 high-magnification fields per specimen with upper and lower dermis scored separately. Significant increases in large densely granular mast cells occurred at 2 MED in the lower dermis, in association with a UVB-exacerbated granulomatous reaction. In the upper dermis, mast cells were significantly increased with 3 MED. These findings suggest that mast cells may play a dual role in UV-irradiated skin with those in the lower dermis related to inflammation processes and those in the upper dermis involved in connective tissue modeling. To gain understanding of the mechanism of mast cell recruitment and maturation, we examined the effect of UVB on mast cell growth factor expression. This was enhanced in the epidermis by UVB, with a shift from cytoplasmic staining to membrane-associated or intercellular staining at 2 MED and higher. Dermal dendritic and mononuclear cells also showed increased reactivity.

  10. Ivermectin influence on the mast cell activity in nodules of onchocerciasis patients.

    PubMed

    Wildenburg, G; Korten, S; Mainuka, P; Büttner, D W

    1998-11-01

    Onchocercal nodules were stained immunohistochemically using antibodies specific for human mast cells and IgE to elucidate the localization and frequency of mast cells after a single oral dose of 150 microg/kg ivermectin. Tryptase-and chymase-positive mast cells occurred predominantly in mixed inflammatory infiltrates and perivascularly, and never adhered to adult worms or microfilariae. Up to three days after ivermectin, mast cells and IgE-positive cells were markedly increased in the capsular area of nodules containing female worms with embryos and microfilariae compared to untreated nodules. In the centre of these nodules, around the adult Onchocerca volvulus, we found many tryptase-positive cells. More mast cells were IgE-positive than in untreated nodules, equalling the number of tryptase-positive mast cells. There was a clear correlation between the appearance of mast cells and the attacks on damaged microfilariae by eosinophils and macrophages and in the vicinity of adult worms by neutrophils that occur soon after ivermectin treatment. Onchocercomata harbouring female worms with oocytes only revealed, after all treatment intervals, the same mast cell numbers as untreated nodules. In conclusion, during the first three days after administration, ivermectin produces increased numbers of mast cells in nodules harbouring females with embryos and microfilariae, probably as part of an allergic reaction to the attacked microfilariae. Four to 19 days after ivermectin the number of mast cells in the entire nodule is no longer elevated.

  11. Acrolein induction of oxidative stress and degranulation in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Hochman, Daniel J; Collaco, Christopher R; Brooks, Edward G

    2014-08-01

    Increases in asthma worldwide have been associated epidemiologically with expanding urban air pollution. The mechanistic relationship between airway hyper-responsiveness, inflammation, and ambient airborne triggers remains ambiguous. Acrolein, a ubiquitous aldehyde pollutant, is a product of incomplete combustion reactions. Acrolein is abundant in cigarette smoke, effluent from industrial smokestacks, diesel exhaust, and even hot oil cooking vapors. Acrolein is a potent airway irritant and can induce airway hyper-responsiveness and inflammation in the lungs of animal models. In the present study, we utilized the mast cell analog, RBL-2H3, to interrogate the responses of cells relevant to airway inflammation and allergic responses as a model for the induction of asthma-like conditions upon exposure to acrolein. We hypothesized that acrolein would induce oxidative stress and degranulation in airway mast cells. Our results indicate that acrolein at 1 ppm initiated degranulation and promoted the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Introduction of antioxidants to the system significantly reduced both ROS generation and degranulation. At higher levels of exposure (above 100 ppm), RBL-2H3 cells displayed signs of severe toxicity. This experimental data indicates acrolein can induce an allergic inflammation in mast cell lines, and the initiation of degranulation was moderated by the application of antioxidants. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  12. Rab11 Regulates the Mast Cell Exocytic Response.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joshua D; Shelby, Sarah A; Holowka, David; Baird, Barbara

    2016-09-01

    Stimulated exocytic events provide a means for physiological communication and are a hallmark of the mast cell-mediated allergic response. In mast cells these processes are triggered by antigen crosslinking of IgE bound to its high-affinity receptor, FcϵRI, on the cell surface. Here we use the endosomal v-SNARE VAMP8, and the lysosomal hydrolase β-hexosaminidase (β-Hex), each C-terminally fused to super-ecliptic pHluorin, to monitor stimulated exocytosis. Using these pHluorin-tagged constructs, we monitor stimulated exocytosis by fluorimetry and visualize individual exocytic events with total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy. Similar to constitutive recycling endosome (RE) trafficking, we find that stimulated RE exocytosis, monitored by VAMP8, is attenuated by expression of dominant negative (S25N) Rab11. Stimulated β-Hex exocytosis is also reduced in the presence of S25N Rab11, suggesting that expression of this mutant broadly impacts exocytosis. Interestingly, pretreatment with inhibitors of actin polymerization, cytochalasin D or latrunculin A, substantially restores both RE and lysosome exocytosis in cells expressing S25N Rab11. Conversely, stabilizing F-actin with jasplakinolide inhibits antigen-stimulated exocytosis but is not additive with S25N Rab11-mediated inhibition, suggesting that these reagents inhibit related processes. Together, our results suggest that Rab11 participates in the regulation necessary for depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton during stimulated exocytosis in mast cells.

  13. Different radiosensitivities of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and skin of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Sonoda, T.; Mori, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although tissue mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, some descendants of bone marrow-derived precursors retain the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mast cells even after localization in the skin. The purpose of the present study was to determine the D/sub 0/ values for mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and those localized in the skin. Bone marrow cells were removed from (WB X C57BL/6)F/sub 1/+/+ mice after various doses of irradiation and injected into the skin of the congenic W/W/sup v/ mice which were genetically without mast cells. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow was evaluated by determining the proportion of the injection sites at which mast cells did not appear. For the assay of the radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors localized in the skin, pieces of skin were removed from beige C57BL/6 (bg/sup J//bg/sup J/, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice after various doses of irradiation and grafted onto the backs of the normal C57BL/6 mice. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the skin was evaluated by determining the decrease of beige-type mast cells which possessed giant granules. Mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow were much more radiosenitive than those localized in the skin. D/sup 0/ value was about 100 rad for the former and about 800 rad for the latter.

  14. Different radiosensitivities of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and skin of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Sonoda, T.; Mori, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although tissue mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, some descendants of bone marrow-derived precursors retain the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mast cells even after localization in the skin. The purpose of the present study was to determine the D0 values for mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and those localized in the skin. Bone marrow cells were removed from (WB X C57BL/6)F1-+/+ mice after various doses of irradiation and injected into the skin of the congenic W/Wv mice which were genetically without mast cells. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow was evaluated by determining the proportion of the injection sites at which mast cells did not appear. For the assay of the radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors localized in the skin, pieces of skin were removed from beige C57BL/6 (bgJ/bgJ. Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice after various doses of irradiation and grafted onto the back of the normal C57BL/6 mice. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the skin was evaluated by determining the decrease of beige-type mast cells which possessed giant granules. Mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow were much more radiosensitive than those localized in the skin. D0 value was about 100 rad for the former and about 800 rad for the latter.

  15. Wnt-β-Catenin Signaling Promotes the Maturation of Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Nishijima, Misae; Tashiro, Katsuhisa; Kawabata, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. Immature mast cells migrate into peripheral tissues from the bone marrow and undergo complete maturation. Interestingly, mast cells have characteristics similar to hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), such as self-renewal and c-kit expression. In HSCs, Wnt signaling is involved in their maintenance and differentiation. On the other hand, the relation between Wnt signaling and mast cell differentiation is poorly understood. To study whether Wnt signals play a role in the maturation of mast cells, we studied the effect of Wnt proteins on mast cell maturation of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). The expression levels of CD81 protein and histidine decarboxylase mRNA and activity of mast cell-specific protease were all elevated in BMMCs treated with Wnt5a. In addition, Wnt5a induced the expression of Axin2 and TCF mRNA in BMMCs. These results showed that Wnt5a could promote the maturation of mast cells via the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and provide important insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the differentiation of mast cells.

  16. Lung mast cell density defines a subpopulation of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cha, Seung-Ick; Chang, Christine S; Kim, Eun Kyung; Lee, Jae W; Matthay, Michael A; Golden, Jeffrey A; Elicker, Brett M; Jones, Kirk; Collard, Harold R; Wolters, Paul J

    2012-07-01

    The relationship of mast cells to the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis remains undefined despite recognition of their presence in the lungs of patients with pulmonary fibrosis. This study was performed to characterize the relationship of mast cells to fibrotic lung diseases. Lung tissues from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), systemic sclerosis (SSc)-related interstitial lung disease (ILD) and normal individuals were subjected to chymase immunostaining and the mast cell density quantified. Eosinophils were quantified by immunostaining for eosinophil peroxidase. Changes in lung function were correlated with mast cell density. Lung tissue obtained from IPF patients had a higher density of chymase-immunoreactive mast cells than that from patients with HP, SSc-related ILD or normal lungs. IPF lung tissue had a higher density of eosinophils than normal lung. There was no correlation between mast cell density and eosinophil density in IPF lung. IPF patients with high mast cell density had a slower rate of decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) than IPF patients with low mast cell density. Mast cell density in IPF lungs is higher than in other fibrotic lung diseases and normal lungs. Increased mast cell density in IPF may predict slower disease progression. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Iliac bone marrow mast cells in relation to the renal osteodystrophy of patients treated by haemodialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, H A; Peart, K M

    1976-01-01

    Mast cells have been counted in iliac bone biopsies from patients with chronic renal failure treated by haemodialysis, and attempts made to relate mast cells to the various features of azotaemic renal osteodystrophy. There was a significant increase in the number of marrow mast cells in comparison with controls, and haemodialysis has no favourable effect on the marrow mast cell hyperplasia which occurs in chronic renal failure. There was a general tendency towards greater numbers of mast cells in cases with most marked ostetis fibrosa but it was not possible consistently to relate hyperparathyroidism to mast cell numbers. Patients treated by parathyroidectomy, aluminium hydroxide, or the newer vitamin D metabolites failed to show any consistent fall in marrow mast cell numbers in spite of improvement in the ostetis fibrosa. The number of marrow mast cells was related to the duration of haemodialysis and to the amount of osteoid present and iversely to the percentage mineralization of bone. It was not possible to identify any causal relationship between the presence or severity of osteomalacia and the number of mast cells in the haemodialysed patients although mast cell hyperplasia was also observed in patients with osteomalacia unassociated with renal disease. Images PMID:939806

  18. Lung mast cell density defines a subpopulation of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Seung-Ick; Chang, Christine S; Kim, Eun Kyung; Lee, Jae W.; Matthay, Michael A; Golden, Jeffrey A; Elicker, Brett M; Jones, Kirk; Collard, Harold R; Wolters, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Aims The relationship of mast cells to the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis remains undefined despite recognition of their presence in the lungs of patients with pulmonary fibrosis. This study was performed to characterize the relationship of mast cells to fibrotic lung diseases. Methods and results Lung tissues from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), systemic sclerosis (SSc)-related interstitial lung disease (ILD) and normal individuals were subjected to chymase immunostaining and the mast cell density quantified. Eosinophils were quantified by immunostaining for eosinophil peroxidase. Changes in lung function were correlated with mast cell density. Lung tissue obtained from IPF patients had a higher density of chymase-immunoreactive mast cells than that from patients with HP, SSc-related ILD or normal lungs. IPF lung tissue had a higher density of eosinophils than normal lung. There was no correlation between mast cell density and eosinophil density in IPF lung. IPF patients with high mast cell density had a slower rate of decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) than IPF patients with low mast cell density. Conclusions Mast cell density in IPF lungs is higher than in other fibrotic lung diseases and normal lungs. Increased mast cell density in IPF may predict slower disease progression. PMID:22394225

  19. Inhibition of mast cell-dependent anaphylaxis by sodium salicylate

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H M; Shin, H Y; Choo, Y K; Park, J K

    1999-01-01

    Sodium salicylate (NaSal) is a commonly used agent with a wide pharmacological spectrum. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of NaSal on anaphylaxis. NaSal (10−1 and 1 mm) significantly inhibited systemic anaphylaxis induced by compound 48/80 in rats. NaSal also significantly inhibited local anaphylaxis activated by anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) immunoglobulin E (IgE). NaSal (10−1 and 1 mm) significantly inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC) activated by compound 48/80 or anti-DNP IgE. Northern-blot analysis demonstrated that a significantly reduced level of the mRNA of l-histidine decarboxylase was expressed in mast cells treated with NaSal, compared with that without NaSal. NaSal (10−2 and 10−1 mm) had a significant inhibitory effect on anti-DNP IgE-induced tumour necrosis factor-α secretion from RPMC. The level of cyclic AMP in RPMC, when NaSal (1 mm) was added, transiently and significantly increased about sixfold compared with that of basal cells. These results suggest a possible use of NaSal in managing mast cell-dependent anaphylaxis. PMID:10233741

  20. Advanced mast cell disease: an Italian Hematological Multicenter experience.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Livio; Valentini, Caterina Giovanna; Caira, Morena; Rondoni, Michela; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Candoni, Anna; Allione, Bernardino; Cattaneo, Chiara; Marbello, Laura; Caramatti, Cecilia; Pogliani, Enrico Maria; Iannitto, Emilio; Giona, Fiorina; Ferrara, Felicetto; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Fanci, Rosa; Lunghi, Monia; Fianchi, Luana; Sanpaolo, Grazia; Stefani, Pietro Maria; Pulsoni, Alessandro; Martinelli, Giovanni; Leone, Giuseppe; Musto, Pellegrino

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate clinical features, treatments and outcome of patients with systemic mast cell disease (MCD) who arrived to the attention of hematologists. A retrospective study was conducted over 1995-2006 in patients admitted in 18 Italian hematological divisions. Twenty-four cases of advanced MCD were collected: 12 aggressive SM (50%), 8 mast cell leukemia (33%), 4 SM with associated clonal non-mast cell-lineage hematologic disease (17%). Spleen and liver were the principal extramedullary organ involved. The c-kit point mutation D816V was found in 13/18 patients in which molecular biology studies were performed (72%). Treatments were very heterogeneous: on the whole Imatinib was administered in 17 patients, alpha-Interferon in 8, 2-CdA in 3; 2 patients underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The overall response rate to Imatinib, the most frequently employed drugs, was of 29%, registering one complete remission and four partial remission; all responsive patients did not present D816V c-kit mutation. Overall three patients (12%) died for progression of disease. We conclude that MCD is characterized by severe mediator-related symptoms but with a moderate mortality rate. D816V c-kit mutation is frequent and associated with resistance against Imatinib. Because of the rarity of these forms, an effective standard of care is lacking. More data are needed to find new and successful therapeutic strategies.

  1. Mast cells in canine cutaneous hemangioma, hemangiosarcoma and mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Woldemeskel, Moges; Rajeev, Sreekumari

    2010-02-01

    Mast cell count (MCC) in 45 dogs with cutaneous hemangioma (HA, n = 12), hemangiosarcoma (HSA, n = 12), mammary adenoma (AD, n = 9) and mammary adenocarcinoma (AC, n = 12) was made using Toluidine blue stained sections. Antibodies against endothelial cell markers, Factor VIII and VEGF were used to visualize and determine the hot spot micro-vessel density (MVD). Total MCC and MCC along the invasive edges were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in canine mammary AC than in AD. The total MCC did not significantly differ (p > 0.05), in HSAs (8.6 +/- 3.3) than in HAs (5.5 +/- 2.8). There is a positive correlation (r = 0.14) between the hot spot MCC and MVD in mammary AC, although not significant (p = 0.3172), indicating that mast cells are associated with angiogenesis in canine mammary AC. This study suggests that mast cells may play an important role in neovascularization of canine cutaneous vascular and mammary neoplasms. Detailed studies encompassing correlation of MCC and MVD with clinical outcomes and prognosis in these neoplasms are recommended.

  2. Deficient Differentiation of Mast Cells in the Skin of mi/mi Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kasugai, Tsutomu; Oguri, Kayoko; Jippo-Kanemoto, Tomoko; Morimoto, Masahiro; Yamatodani, Atsushi; Yoshida, Keiichi; Ebi, Yoshitaka; Isozaki, Koji; Tei, Hideki; Tsujimura, Tohru; Nomura, Shintaro; Okayama, Minoru; Kitamura, Yukihiko

    1993-01-01

    The staining property of skin mast cells changed from Alcian blue+/berberine sulfate- to Alcian blue +/berberine sulfate+ in the skin of normal (+/+) and Wv/Wv mice. In contrast, this change did not occur in the skin of mi/mi mice. Heparin content and histamine content per a mi/mi skin mast cell were estimated to be 34% and 18% those of a +/+ skin mast cell, respectively. The low heparin content of mi/mi skin mast cells seemed to be consistent with the Alcian blue+/berberine sulfate- staining property. Expression of genes encoding mast cell-specific proteolytic enzymes was examined by Northern blotting and in situ hybridization. Messenger RNA of mast cell carboxypeptidase A was expressed most of all by +/+, WV Wv/W+ and mi/mi skin mast cells, but mRNA of mouse mast cell protease (MMCP)-6 was expressed by approximately a half of +/+ and Wv/Wv skin mast cells and by only 3% of mi/mi skin mast cells. A significant amount of MMCP-2 mRNA was not expressed in the skin of all +/+, Wv/Wv and mi/mi mice. This shows the presence of at least three phenotypes in skin mast cells of mice: berberine sulfate+/MMCP-6+, berberine sulfate+/MMCP-6-, and berberine sulfate-/ MMCP-6-. The in situ hybridization of mRNA of mast cell-specific proteolytic enzymes seemed to be useful to describe abnormalities of mast cell differentiation in the skin of mi/mi mice. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5 PMID:8238251

  3. Cardiovascular symptoms in patients with systemic mast cell activation disease.

    PubMed

    Kolck, Ulrich W; Haenisch, Britta; Molderings, Gerhard J

    2016-08-01

    Traditionally, mast cell activation disease (MCAD) has been considered as just one rare (neoplastic) disease, mastocytosis, focused on the mast cell (MC) mediators tryptase and histamine and the suggestive, blatant symptoms of flushing and anaphylaxis. Recently another form of MCAD, the MC activation syndrome, has been recognized featuring inappropriate MC activation with little to no neoplasia and likely much more heterogeneously clonal and far more prevalent than mastocytosis. Increasing expertise and appreciation has been established for the truly very large menagerie of MC mediators and their complex patterns of release, engendering complex, nebulous presentations of chronic and acute illness best characterized as multisystem polymorbidity of generally inflammatory ± allergic theme. We describe the pathogenesis of MCAD with a particular focus on clinical cardiovascular symptoms and the therapeutic options for MC mediator-induced cardiovascular symptoms.

  4. Protective Role of Mast Cells in Primary Systemic Vasculitis: A Perspective.

    PubMed

    Springer, Jason M; Raveendran, Vineesh V; Gierer, Selina A; Maz, Mehrdad; Dileepan, Kottarappat N

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells are important cells of the immune system. Although traditionally considered as key players in allergic and hypersensitivity reactions, emerging evidence suggests that mast cells have many complex roles in vascular disease. These include regulation of vasodilation, angiogenesis, activation of matrix metalloproteinases, apoptosis of smooth muscle cells, and activation of the renin angiotensin system. Mast cells are also known to play an immunomodulatory role via modulation of regulatory T-cell (Treg), macrophage and endothelial cell functions. This dual role of the mast cells is evident in myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-mouse model of glomerulonephritis in which mast cell deficiency worsens glomerulonephritis, whereas inhibition of mast cell degranulation is effective in abrogating the development of glomerulonephritis. Our previous work demonstrated that mast cell degranulation inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin 6 (IL-6) production in mice. This effect was not seen in histamine-1-receptor knockout (H1R(-/-)) mice suggesting a role for histamine in IL-6 homeostasis. In addition, mast cell degranulation-mediated decrease in IL-6 production was associated with an upregulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 protein in the aorta. We propose that mast cells regulate large artery inflammation through T-cells, shifting a primarily Th1 and Th17 toward a Th2 response and leading to enhanced IL-10 production, activation Treg cells, and the inhibition of macrophage functions.

  5. Mast cells in the cytokine network: the what, where from and what for.

    PubMed

    Czarnetzki, B M; Grabbe, J; Kolde, G; Krüger-Krasagakes, S; Welker, P; Zuberbier, T

    1995-08-01

    The basic understanding of mast cell ontogeny and function has been fundamentally changed in recent years with observations that the cells produce and respond to a broad range of cytokines. These rapidly accruing data and their potential significance were discussed at the recent symposium "Mast Cells in the Cytokine Network", and the overview lectures of most speakers are summarized in this special journal issue. In the present introductory manuscript, the organizers of the meeting discuss data fundamental to an understanding of the topic and highlight aspects of special interest. They consider mast cells to be defined most reliably by their unique ultrastructure since the cells are highly heterogeneous in dependence of the species studied, their tissue location, their stage of development and probably also in relation to cytokines. Most other characteristics of mast cells are shared with diverse other cell types. Murine mast cell development is induced by several cytokines. These factors are mostly ineffective in human cells except for stem cell factor which causes mast cell development from CD34+/c-kit+ progenitors. There is however recent evidence that fibroblasts and keratinocytes produce additional growth factors for human mast cells. Regarding cytokine secretion, most molecules known so far are produced by both murine and human mast cells. The cells furthermore bear receptors for several cytokines, enabling them to respond in an autocrine and paracrine fashion. Mast cells may thus function within a complex cytokine network, affecting physiological as well as immunological and inflammatory processes.

  6. Release of histamine from mast cells by a synthetic ionophore

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, T.P.; Smith, T.F.; Hunter, R.L.

    1986-03-01

    Polyphore 27:10 is a copolymer composed of blocks of polyoxyethylene and polyoxypropylene. Subcutaneous injection of this copolymer in mice causes significant inflammation as determined by footpad swelling and increased vascular permeability as measured by extravasation of Evan's blue dye. Micromolar concentrations trigger release of histamine from purified mouse mast cells and human peripheral blood basophils in vitro. Histamine release from murine mast cells required physiologic temperature, metabolic energy, and calcium ions in the surrounding medium. Replacement of sodium ions in the medium with either potassium or lithium markedly inhibited release. Since Polyphore 27:10 has structural homology with ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and the crown polyethers, both of which chelate metal ions, The authors investigated whether Polyphore 27:10 could act as an ionophore. The Polyphore transported cations across artificial lipid membranes and made erythrocytes highly permeable to sodium ions, but not calcium at physiologic concentrations. They propose that the potent inflammatory and histamine-releasing activities of this copolymer are in part due to its ability to depolarize and degranulate mast cells.

  7. Mast cell mediators and peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Langer, J C; Liebman, S M; Monk, P K; Pelletier, G J

    1995-09-01

    We have previously shown that mast cell stabilization attenuates peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat. The present study investigated the mechanism of this protection. Adhesions were created in weanling rats using cecal scraping and application of 95% ethanol. Rats received specific blockers for the mast cell products histamine, serotonin (5HT), leukotriene D4, and platelet activating factor intraperitoneally 30 min before laparotomy and at the time of abdominal closure. Control animals received saline. Adhesions were assessed blindly 1 week later using a standardized scale. Adhesion formation was not affected by histamine blockade using combined mepyramine and ranitidine, 5-HT1 blockade using methysergide, 5-HT3 blockade using ondansetron, leukotriene D4 blockade using MK-571, or platelet activating factor blockade using WEB-2086. However, blockade of the 5-HT2 receptor using ketanserin resulted in significant dose-dependent attenuation of adhesions compared to saline. These data suggest that mast cells mediate peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat through release of serotonin acting on 5HT2 receptors. Further understanding of this process may lead to new strategies for the prevention of postoperative adhesions.

  8. Anaphylatoxin C3a induced mediator release from mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Herrscher, R.; Hugli, T.E.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated the biochemical and functional consequences of the binding of highly purified human C3a to isolated rat serosal mast cells. C3a caused a dose-dependent (1-30 ..mu..M), noncytotoxic release of up to 64% (+/- 7 SEM) of the mast cell histamine content. C3a (10..mu..M) increased /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ uptake 8.2- fold (+/- 2.2 SEM) above unstimulated control values within 10 minutes. Arachidonyl-diacylglycerol and arachidonyl-monoacylglycerol levels increased significantly within 2 minutes after C3a (10 ..mu..M) stimulation. Turnover of phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidic acid, and phosphatidylcholine were increased within 15 minutes. In contrast to antigen, C3a stimulation (10 ..mu..M) was not enhanced by exogenous phosphatidylserine, and was not inhibited by ethanol (100 ..mu..mM). C3a suppressed arachidonic acid (AA) release to 38% (+/- 9 SEM) below baseline, and did not cause PGD/sub 2/ formation. C3a and the desarginine form of C3a caused identical responses in all experiments. These studies indicate that C3a stimulation activates mast cell preformed mediator release in a manner very similar to antigen-IgE stimulation, but C3a suppresses free AA levels and does not stimulate PGD/sub 2/ synthesis.

  9. The Role of Mast Cells in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Shaik-Dasthagirisaheb, Yasdani B; Conti, Pio

    2016-01-01

    Immunity and inflammation are deeply involved in Alzheimer's disease. The most important properties of pathological Alzheimer's disease are the extracellular deposits of amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates along with other unknown mutated proteins, which are implicated in immunity and inflammation. Mast cells are found in the brain of all mammalian species and in the periphery, and their biological mediators, including cytokines/chemokines, arachidonic acid products and stored enzymes, play an import role in Alzheimer's disease. Cytokines/chemokines, which are generated mostly by microglia and astrocytes in Alzheimer's disease, contribute to nearly every aspect of neuroinflammation and amyloid â-protein plaque aggregates may induce in mast cells the release of a plethora of mediators, including pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, CXCL8 and CCL2-3-4. These proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines are prominent mediators of neuroinflammation in brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, and their inhibition may be associated with improved recovery. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the roles of mast cell mediators (stored and de novo synthesis) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. [The role of mast cell population in aortic intima in development of human atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, V S; Drobkova, I P; Tcherpachenko, N M; Sirotkin, V N

    2002-01-01

    To assess the role of mast cells in development of human atherosclerosis. Autopsy material (transverse cross-sections of the aorta and membranous preparations of intima) from 53 persons who died of accidental causes. Original method of the study of aortic cellular populations on membranous preparations of intima allowed to analyze character of accumulation of lipids in fatty streaks, as well as changes of mast cells and relative amount of various cellular populations in intact intima and during development of early atherosclerotic lesions. In intact intima mast cells are consistently found, their quantity depends on age and degree of intimal hyperplasia. Density of mast cell population in age groups 17-29 and 30-49 years was 5.8 and 9.6 cells/mm2, respectively. Ratio of mast cells to total amount of lymphocytes and monocytes was 1:6. Two types of fatty streaks ('early' and 'transitional') can be distinguished depending on structure of lipid inclusions and cellular composition. Compared with intact intima 'early' fatty streaks have increased content of lymphocytes and monocytes. Average density of mast cells in early streaks is 12.2 cells/mm2 with ratio of mast cells to total amount of lymphocytes and monocytes 1:11. Development of 'transitional' fatty streaks preceding plaque formation is characterized by signs of inflammation with multifold increase of content of lymphocytes and monocytes and ratio of amount of mast cells to that of mononuclear cells 1:20. Density of mast cells including their degranulating forms is the highest (18.1 cells/mm2) on periphery of 'transitional' fatty streaks while substantially smaller amount of mast cells (3.2 cells/mm2) can be found in central areas of these streaks. Mast cells actively participate in atherogenesis, development and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. Formation of fatty streaks in human aorta is associated with signs of immune inflammation (lymphocytic-monocytic reaction and increased amount of mast cells).

  11. Mast cells: an expanding pathophysiological role from allergy to other disorders.

    PubMed

    Anand, Preet; Singh, Baldev; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Singh, Nirmal

    2012-07-01

    The mast cells are multi-effector cells with wide distribution in the different body parts and traditionally their role has been well-defined in the development of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions including bronchial asthma. Due to the availability of genetically modified mast cell-deficient mice, the broadened pathophysiological role of mast cells in diverse diseases has been revealed. Mast cells exert different physiological and pathophysiological roles by secreting their granular contents, including vasoactive amines, cytokines and chemokines, and various proteases, including tryptase and chymase. Furthermore, mast cells also synthesize plasma membrane-derived lipid mediators, including prostaglandins and leukotrienes, to produce diverse biological actions. The present review discusses the pathophysiological role of mast cells in different diseases, including atherosclerosis, pulmonary hypertension, ischemia-reperfusion injury, male infertility, autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, bladder pain syndrome (interstitial cystitis), anxiety, Alzheimer's disease, nociception, obesity and diabetes mellitus.

  12. Mast cells accumulate in the renal capsule adjacent to transplanted pancreatic islets in rats.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Caroline; Jansson, Leif

    2006-12-01

    Mast cells are important mediators of normal angiogenesis, and participate in normal would healing, i.e. processes involved in pancreatic islet engraftment. The aim of the study was to evaluate if mast cells are present in islet grafts. For this purpose, male normoglycaemic Wistar-Furth rats were either untreated or syngeneically implanted with 250 islets under the renal capsule. The animals were killed 1 month later, and the kidneys and endogenous pancreas were removed, fixed and embedded in paraffin. The distribution of mast cells was studied in Alcian Blue stained sections. Mast cells were rarely encountered in endogenous islets, but were frequent in the renal capsule adjacent to islet grafts. Mast cells interspersed between graft endocrine cells were as rare as in the endogenous pancreas. We conclude that mast cells may contribute to the engraftment after islet transplantation.

  13. Induction of Mast Cell Accumulation by Tryptase via a Protease Activated Receptor-2 and ICAM-1 Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Junling; Zhang, Huiyun; Zhan, Mengmeng; Chen, Hanqiu; Fang, Zeman; Xu, Chiyan; Chen, Huifang; He, Shaoheng

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are primary effector cells of allergy, and recruitment of mast cells in involved tissue is one of the key events in allergic inflammation. Tryptase is the most abundant secretory product of mast cells, but little is known of its influence on mast cell accumulation. Using mouse peritoneal model, cell migration assay, and flow cytometry analysis, we investigated role of tryptase in recruiting mast cells. The results showed that tryptase induced up to 6.7-fold increase in mast cell numbers in mouse peritoneum following injection. Inhibitors of tryptase, an antagonist of PAR-2 FSLLRY-NH2, and pretreatment of mice with anti-ICAM-1, anti-CD11a, and anti-CD18 antibodies dramatically diminished tryptase induced mast cell accumulation. On the other hand, PAR-2 agonist peptides SLIGRL-NH2 and tc-LIGRLO-NH2 provoked mast cell accumulation following injection. These implicate that tryptase induced mast cell accumulation is dependent on its enzymatic activity, activation of PAR-2, and interaction between ICAM-1 and LFA-1. Moreover, induction of trans-endothelium migration of mast cells in vitro indicates that tryptase acts as a chemoattractant. In conclusion, provocation of mast cell accumulation by mast cell tryptase suggests a novel self-amplification mechanism of mast cell accumulation. Mast cell stabilizers as well as PAR-2 antagonist agents may be useful for treatment of allergic reactions. PMID:27378825

  14. Human mast cells decrease SLPI levels in type II – like alveolar cell model, in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hollander, Camilla; Nyström, Max; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Westin, Ulla

    2003-01-01

    Background Mast cells are known to accumulate at sites of inflammation and upon activation to release their granule content, e.g. histamine, cytokines and proteases. The secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is produced in the respiratory mucous and plays a role in regulating the activity of the proteases. Result We have used the HMC-1 cell line as a model for human mast cells to investigate their effect on SLPI expression and its levels in cell co-culture experiments, in vitro. In comparison with controls, we found a significant reduction in SLPI levels (by 2.35-fold, p < 0.01) in a SLPI-producing, type II-like alveolar cell line, (A549) when co-cultured with HMC-1 cells, but not in an HMC-1-conditioned medium, for 96 hours. By contrast, increased SLPI mRNA expression (by 1.58-fold, p < 0.05) was found under the same experimental conditions. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed mast cell transmigration in co-culture with SLPI-producing A549 cells for 72 and 96 hours. Conclusion These results indicate that SLPI-producing cells may assist mast cell migration and that the regulation of SLPI release and/or consumption by mast cells requires interaction between these cell types. Therefore, a "local relationship" between mast cells and airway epithelial cells might be an important step in the inflammatory response. PMID:12952550

  15. Th17 cell-mediated immune responses promote mast cell proliferation by triggering stem cell factor in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyung-Ah; Park, Minhwa; Kim, Yu-Hee; Woo, So-Youn

    2017-06-10

    Although mast cells are traditionally thought to function as effector cells in allergic responses, they have increasingly been recognized as important regulators of various immune responses. Mast cells mature locally; thus, tissue-specific influences are important for promoting mast cell accumulation and survival in the skin and the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we determined the effects of keratinocytes on mast cell accumulation during Th17-mediated skin inflammation. We observed increases in dermal mast cells in imiquimod-induced psoriatic dermatitis in mice accompanied by the expression of epidermal stem cell factor (SCF), a critical mast cell growth factor. Similar to mouse epidermal keratinocytes, SCF was highly expressed in the human HaCaT keratinocyte cell line following stimulation with IL-17. Further, keratinocytes promoted mast cell proliferation following stimulation with IL-17 in vitro. However, the effects of keratinocytes on mast cells were significantly diminished in the presence of anti-CD117 (stem cell factor receptor) blocking antibodies. Taken together, our results revealed that the Th17-mediated inflammatory environment promotes mast cell accumulation through keratinocyte-derived SCF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mast cells drive mesenteric afferent signalling during acute intestinal ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Kirkup, Anthony J; Grundy, David

    2011-08-01

    Acute intestinal ischaemia stimulates visceral afferent nerves but the mechanisms responsible for this excitation are not fully understood. Mast cells may participate in this process as they are known to signal to mesenteric afferents during intestinal anaphylaxis and contribute to early inflammation and neuronal damage in response to cerebral ischaemia. We therefore hypothesised that mast cells are early responders to acute intestinal ischaemia and their activation initiates rapid signalling to the CNS via the excitation of mesenteric afferents. Primary afferent firing was recorded from a mesenteric nerve bundle supplying a segment of jejunum in anaesthetized adult rats. Acute focal ischaemia was produced by clamping theme senteric vessels for 8 min, and reperfusion followed removal of the vessel clip. Two episodes of ischaemia–reperfusion (I–R) separated by a 30 min interval were performed. Drugs or their vehicles were administered 10 min before the 2nd I–R episode. Ischaemia caused a reproducible, intense and biphasic afferent firing that was temporally dissociated from the concomitantly triggered complex pattern of intestinal motor activity. The L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine, significantly attenuated this afferent firing by a mechanism independent of its action on intestinal tone. Ischaemia-induced afferent firing was also abrogated by the mast cell stabilizer, doxantrazole, and the H1 histamine receptor antagonist, pyrilamine. In contrast, the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium, and the N-type calcium channel toxin, ω-conotoxin GVIA, each reduced the ischaemia-evoked motor inhibition but not the concurrent afferent discharge. Similarly, the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, naproxen, had no effect on the ischaemic afferent response but reduced the intestinal tone shortly from the onset of ischaemia to the early period of reperfusion. These data support a critical role for mast cell-derived histamine in the direct chemoexcitation of

  17. Dengue Virus Infection of Mast Cells Triggers Endothelial Cell Activation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Michael G.; Hermann, Laura L.; Issekutz, Andrew C.; Marshall, Jean S.; Rowter, Derek; Al-Afif, Ayham; Anderson, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Vascular perturbation is a hallmark of severe forms of dengue disease. We show here that antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection of primary human cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMCs) and the human mast cell-like line HMC-1 results in the release of factor(s) which activate human endothelial cells, as evidenced by increased expression of the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Endothelial cell activation was prevented by pretreatment of mast cell-derived supernatants with a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-specific blocking antibody, thus identifying TNF as the endothelial cell-activating factor. Our findings suggest that mast cells may represent an important source of TNF, promoting vascular endothelial perturbation following antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection. PMID:21068256

  18. Neuropeptide NGF mediates neuro-immune response and inflammation through mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Kritas, S K; Saggini, A; Cerulli, G; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Pantalone, A; Frydas, S; Rosati, M; Tei, M; Speziali, A; Saggini, R; Pandolfi, F; Conti, P

    2014-01-01

    Human mast cells (first described in 1879 by Paul Ehrlich) develop from committed precursors in the bone marrow expressing the differentiation marker CD34+ and distinct from the three other myeloid cells. Mast cells are present in various tissues especially near blood vessels, epithelia and nerves and they are activated by cross-linking of FcεRI, but also by a number of neuropeptides. NGF mediates a number of inflammatory and autoimmune states in conjunction with an increased accumulation of mast cells which appear to be involved in neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. Here we report some relationships between mast cells and nerve growth factor (NGF).

  19. Mast cells, neovascularization, and microhemorrhages are associated with saccular intracranial artery aneurysm wall remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ollikainen, Eliisa; Tulamo, Riikka; Frösen, Juhana; Lehti, Satu; Honkanen, Petri; Hernesniemi, Juha; Niemelä, Mika; Kovanen, Petri T

    2014-09-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to remodeling, degeneration, and rupture of saccular intracranial artery aneurysms. Mast cells are important proinflammatory and proangiogenic cells in chronic inflammatory vascular diseases. Here we studied mast cells and neovascularization in 36 intraoperatively resected aneurysms using histology and immunohistochemistry and analyzed the clinical characteristics of the aneurysms according to bleeding status (unruptured vs ruptured). Among the 36 aneurysms, 9 contained mast cells (tryptase-positive cells) and 15 contained neovessels (CD34- and CD31-positive capillarylike structures). The density of neovessels was significantly higher in aneurysm walls containing mast cells than in walls not containing them. In particular, wall areas with abundant mast cells and neovessels also contained iron deposits, indicating damage of newly formed endothelium with ensuing microhemorrhages. Walls with the highest neovessel density and the greatest iron deposition also showed evidence of degeneration. Finally, none of the mast cell-containing aneurysms showed an intact luminal endothelium. Thus, mast cells may adversely affect both neovascular and luminal endothelia. The novel association of mast cells with neovessels and injurious microhemorrhages, as well as with luminal endothelial erosion, suggests that mast cells contribute to remodeling and degeneration of saccular intracranial artery aneurysms.

  20. [NON-CLONAL MAST CELL ACTIVATION SYNDROME: DESCRIPTION OF SERIES OF PATIENTS, DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA AND TREATMENT].

    PubMed

    Confino-Cohen, Ronit; Mekori, Yoseph A

    2015-08-01

    A non-clonal mast cell activation syndrome is a newly emerged diagnosis. It shares the clinical features of anaphylaxis and mastocytosis despite having distinct mast cell biology. In this,paper we describe a series of patients representing the spectrum of non-clonal mast cell activation syndrome (nc-MCAS). We highlight the clinical manifestations of nc-MCAS as well as the diagnostic criteria and treatment options.

  1. Lysophosphatidic acid triggers mast cell-driven atherosclerotic plaque destabilization by increasing vascular inflammation[S

    PubMed Central

    Bot, Martine; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; MacAleese, Luke; Lagraauw, H. Maxime; van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Quax, Paul H. A.; Kuiper, Johan; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Biessen, Erik A. L.; Bot, Ilze

    2013-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive lysophospholipid, accumulates in the atherosclerotic plaque. It has the capacity to activate mast cells, which potentially exacerbates plaque progression. In this study, we thus aimed to investigate whether LPA contributes to plaque destabilization by modulating mast cell function. We here show by an imaging mass spectrometry approach that several LPA species are present in atherosclerotic plaques. Subsequently, we demonstrate that LPA is a potent mast cell activator which, unlike other triggers, favors release of tryptase. Local perivascular administration of LPA to an atherosclerotic carotid artery segment increases the activation status of perivascular mast cells and promotes intraplaque hemorrhage and macrophage recruitment without impacting plaque cell apoptosis. The mast cell stabilizer cromolyn could prevent intraplaque hemorrhage elicited by LPA-mediated mast cell activation. Finally, the involvement of mast cells in these events was further emphasized by the lack of effect of perivascular LPA administration in mast cell deficient animals. We demonstrate that increased accumulation of LPA in plaques induces perivascular mast cell activation and in this way contributes to plaque destabilization in vivo. This study points to local LPA availability as an important factor in atherosclerotic plaque stability. PMID:23396975

  2. Suppression of Brain Mast Cells Degranulation Inhibits Microglial Activation and Central Nervous System Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongquan; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Yiming; Zhou, Xiqiao; Qian, Yanning; Zhang, Shu

    2017-03-01

    Brain inflammation has a critical role in the pathophysiology of brain diseases. Microglia, the resident immune cells in the brain, play an important role in brain inflammation, while brain mast cells are the "first responder" in the injury rather than microglia. Functional aspects of mast cell-microglia interactions remain poorly understood. Our results demonstrated that site-directed injection of the "mast cell degranulator" compound 48/80 (C48/80) in the hypothalamus induced mast cell degranulation, microglial activation, and inflammatory factor production, which initiated the acute brain inflammatory response. "Mast cell stabilizer" disodium cromoglycate (cromolyn) inhibited this effect, including decrease of inflammatory cytokines, reduced microglial activation, inhibition of MAPK and AKT pathways, and repression of protein expression of histamine receptor 1 (H1R), histamine receptor 4 (H4R), protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2), and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in microglia. We also demonstrated that C48/80 had no effect on microglial activation in mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice. These results implicate that activated brain mast cells trigger microglial activation and stabilization of mast cell inhibits microglial activation-induced central nervous system (CNS) inflammation. Interactions between mast cells and microglia could constitute a new and unique therapeutic target for CNS immune inflammation-related diseases.

  3. Lysophosphatidic acid triggers mast cell-driven atherosclerotic plaque destabilization by increasing vascular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bot, Martine; de Jager, Saskia C A; MacAleese, Luke; Lagraauw, H Maxime; van Berkel, Theo J C; Quax, Paul H A; Kuiper, Johan; Heeren, Ron M A; Biessen, Erik A L; Bot, Ilze

    2013-05-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive lysophospholipid, accumulates in the atherosclerotic plaque. It has the capacity to activate mast cells, which potentially exacerbates plaque progression. In this study, we thus aimed to investigate whether LPA contributes to plaque destabilization by modulating mast cell function. We here show by an imaging mass spectrometry approach that several LPA species are present in atherosclerotic plaques. Subsequently, we demonstrate that LPA is a potent mast cell activator which, unlike other triggers, favors release of tryptase. Local perivascular administration of LPA to an atherosclerotic carotid artery segment increases the activation status of perivascular mast cells and promotes intraplaque hemorrhage and macrophage recruitment without impacting plaque cell apoptosis. The mast cell stabilizer cromolyn could prevent intraplaque hemorrhage elicited by LPA-mediated mast cell activation. Finally, the involvement of mast cells in these events was further emphasized by the lack of effect of perivascular LPA administration in mast cell deficient animals. We demonstrate that increased accumulation of LPA in plaques induces perivascular mast cell activation and in this way contributes to plaque destabilization in vivo. This study points to local LPA availability as an important factor in atherosclerotic plaque stability.

  4. An essential role for platelet-activating factor in activating mast cell migration following ultraviolet irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Chacón-Salinas, Rommel; Chen, Limo; Chávez-Blanco, Alma D.; Limón-Flores, Alberto Y.; Ma, Ying; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    The UVB (290–320 nm) radiation in sunlight is responsible for inducing skin cancer. Exposure to UV radiation is also immunosuppressive, and the systemic immune suppression induced by UV is a well-recognized risk factor for cancer induction. As UVB radiation is absorbed within the upper layers of the skin, indirect mechanisms must play a role in activating systemic immune suppression. One prominent example is mast cell migration, which from the skin to the draining LN is an essential step in the cascade of events leading to immune suppression. What triggers mast cell migration is not entirely clear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that PAF, a lipid mediator of inflammation produced by the skin in response to UV exposure, is involved. Mast cell-deficient mice (KitW-sh/W-sh) are resistant to the suppressive effect of UV radiation, and reconstituting mast cell-deficient mice with normal bone marrow-derived mast cells restores susceptibility to immunosuppression. However, when mast cells from PAFR−/− mice were used, the reconstituted mice were not susceptible to the suppressive effects of UV. Furthermore, PAFR−/− mice showed impaired UV-induced mast cell migration when compared with WT mice. Finally, injecting PAF into WT mice mimicked the effect of UV irradiation and induced mast cell migration but not in PAFR−/− mice. Our findings indicate that PAFR binding induces mast cells to migrate from the skin to the LNs, where they mediate immune suppression. PMID:24009177

  5. Dexamethasone rapidly suppresses IL-33-stimulated mast cell function by blocking transcription factor activity.

    PubMed

    Paranjape, Anuya; Chernushevich, Oksana; Qayum, Amina Abdul; Spence, Andrew J; Taruselli, Marcela T; Abebayehu, Daniel; Barnstein, Brian O; McLeod, Jamie Josephine Avila; Baker, Bianca; Bajaj, Gurjas S; Chumanevich, Alena P; Oskeritzian, Carole A; Ryan, John J

    2016-12-01

    Mast cells are critical effectors of allergic disease and can be activated by IL-33, a proinflammatory member of the IL-1 cytokine family. IL-33 worsens the pathology of mast cell-mediated diseases, but therapies to antagonize IL-33 are still forthcoming. Because steroids are the mainstay of allergic disease treatment and are well known to suppress mast cell activation by other stimuli, we examined the effects of the steroid dexamethasone on IL-33-mediated mast cell function. We found that dexamethasone potently and rapidly suppressed cytokine production elicited by IL-33 from murine bone marrow-derived and peritoneal mast cells. IL-33 enhances IgE-mediated mast cell cytokine production, an activity that was also antagonized by dexamethasone. These effects were consistent in human mast cells. We additionally observed that IL-33 augmented migration of IgE-sensitized mast cells toward antigen. This enhancing effect was similarly reversed by dexamethasone. Simultaneous addition of dexamethasone with IL-33 had no effect on the phosphorylation of MAP kinases or NFκB p65 subunit; however, dexamethasone antagonized AP-1- and NFκB-mediated transcriptional activity. Intraperitoneal administration of dexamethasone completely abrogated IL-33-mediated peritoneal neutrophil recruitment and prevented plasma IL-6 elevation. These data demonstrate that steroid therapy may be an effective means of antagonizing the effects of IL-33 on mast cells in vitro and in vivo, acting partly by suppressing IL-33-induced NFκB and AP-1 activity.

  6. Secretory activity of mast cell during stress: effect of prolyl-glycyl-proline and Semax.

    PubMed

    Umarova, B A; Kopylova, G N; Smirnova, E A; Guseva, A A; Zhuikova, S E

    2003-10-01

    Stress increased secretory activity of mast cells in the mesentery and subcutaneous fat of rats. Intraperitoneal injection of Semax and prolyl-glycyl-proline in doses of 0.05 and 1 mg/kg, respectively, 1 h before stress abolished this effect. The test preparations did not modulate secretory activity of mast cells in unstressed animals. Semax and prolyl-glycyl-proline in vitro prevented activation of mast cells with synacten and acetylcholine. The stabilizing effect of peptides on mast cells probably determines their antiulcer activity.

  7. IgE Receptor-Mediated Mast-Cell Renin Release

    PubMed Central

    Aldi, Silvia; Robador, Pablo A.; Tomita, Kengo; Di Lorenzo, Annarita; Levi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Renin is a newly discovered constituent of mast cells. Given that mast cells play a major role in IgE-mediated allergic hypersensitivity, we investigated whether activation of the high-affinity IgE receptor FcεRI elicits release of mast-cell renin. Cross-linking of FcεRI on the surface of mature bone marrow–derived mast cells elicited release of enzymatically active renin protein. The angiotensin I–forming activity of the renin protein was completely blocked by the selective renin inhibitor BILA 2157, which excludes formation of angiotensin I by proteases other than renin. FcεRI-mediated mast-cell renin release was inhibited by dexamethasone and potentiated by the proinflammatory mediator PGE2. Furthermore, cross-linking of mast-cell FcεRI in ex vivo murine hearts passively sensitized with monoclonal anti-DNP IgE also resulted in mast-cell degranulation and overflow of renin. Our findings indicate that IgE-mediated allergic hypersensitivity provokes release of renin from both cultured and resident cardiac mast cells, a process likely to be exacerbated in a chronic inflammatory background. Given the widespread distribution of mast cells, and the presence of angiotensinogen and angiotensin-converting enzyme in many tissues, renin release in immediate hypersensitivity reactions could result in local angiotensin II generation and multiorgan dysfunctions. PMID:24262755

  8. No Role for Mast Cells in Obesity-Related Metabolic Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Chmelař, Jindřich; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Chung, Kyoung-Jin; Prucnal, Marta; Voehringer, David; Roers, Axel; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-related adipose tissue (AT) inflammation that promotes metabolic dysregulation is associated with increased AT mast cell numbers. Mast cells are potent inducers of inflammatory responses and could potentially contribute to obesity-induced AT inflammation and metabolic dysregulation. Conflicting findings were reported on obesity-related metabolic dysfunction in mast cell-deficient mice, thus creating a controversy that has not been resolved to date. Whereas traditional Kit hypomorphic mast cell-deficient strains featured reduced diet-induced obesity and diabetes, a Kit-independent model of mast cell deficiency, Cpa3Cre/+ mice, displayed no alterations in obesity and insulin sensitivity. Herein, we analyzed diet-induced obesity in Mcpt5-Cre R-DTA mice, in which the lack of mast cells is caused by a principle different from mast cell deficiency in Cpa3Cre/+ mice or Kit mutations. We observed no difference between mast cell-deficient and -proficient mice in diet-induced obesity with regards to weight gain, glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, metabolic parameters, hepatic steatosis, and AT or liver inflammation. We conclude that mast cells play no essential role in obesity and related pathologies. PMID:27933062

  9. Neutrophil Recruitment by Tumor Necrosis Factor from Mast Cells in Immune Complex Peritonitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Ramos, Bernard F.; Jakschik, Barbara A.

    1992-12-01

    During generalized immune complex-induced inflammation of the peritoneal cavity, two peaks of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) were observed in the peritoneal exudate of normal mice. In mast cell-deficient mice, the first peak was undetected, and the second peak of TNF and neutrophil influx were significantly reduced. Antibody to TNF significantly inhibited neutrophil infiltration in normal but not in mast cell-deficient mice. Mast cell repletion of the latter normalized TNF, neutrophil mobilization, and the effect of the antibody to TNF. Thus, in vivo, mast cells produce the TNF that augments neutrophil emigration.

  10. Immunology and clinical manifestations of non-clonal mast cell activation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cardet, Juan-Carlos; Castells, Mariana C; Hamilton, Matthew J

    2013-02-01

    There is a spectrum of disorders that clinically manifest as a result of mast cell activation. A non-clonal form has emerged in the literature where many of the clinical features of systemic mastocytosis are shared despite having a distinct mast cell biology. In this review, we summarize key features of the science behind mast cell activation relevant to what is now known as non-clonal mast cell activation syndrome (nc-MCAS). We highlight the clinical manifestations of nc-MCAS with a focus on diagnosis and treatment.

  11. Gs-coupled adenosine receptors differentially limit antigen-induced mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xiaoyang; Chason, Kelly D; Jania, Corey; Acosta, Tatiana; Ledent, Catherine; Tilley, Stephen L

    2013-02-01

    Mast cell activation results in the immediate release of proinflammatory mediators prestored in cytoplasmic granules, as well as initiation of lipid mediator production and cytokine synthesis by these resident tissue leukocytes. Allergen-induced mast cell activation is central to the pathogenesis of asthma and other allergic diseases. Presently, most pharmacological agents for the treatment of allergic disease target receptors for inflammatory mediators. Many of these mediators, such as histamine, are released by mast cells. Targeting pathways that limit antigen-induced mast cell activation may have greater therapeutic efficacy by inhibiting the synthesis and release of many proinflammatory mediators produced in the mast cell. In vitro studies using cultured human and mouse mast cells, and studies of mice lacking A(2B) receptors, suggest that adenosine receptors, specifically the G(s)-coupled A(2A) and A(2B) receptors, might provide such a target. Here, using a panel of mice lacking various combinations of adenosine receptors, and mast cells derived from these animals, we show that adenosine receptor agonists provide an effective means of inhibition of mast cell degranulation and induction of cytokine production both in vitro and in vivo. We identify A(2B) as the primary receptor limiting mast cell degranulation, whereas the combined activity of A(2A) and A(2B) is required for the inhibition of cytokine synthesis.

  12. Isolation and characterization of hepatic mast cells from cholestatic rats

    PubMed Central

    Hargrove, Laura; Graf-Eaton, Allyson; Kennedy, Lindsey; Demieville, Jennifer; Owens, Jennifer; Hodges, Kyle; Ladd, Brittany; Francis, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are immune cells that release histamine and other mediators. MC number increases after bile duct ligation (BDL) and blocking mast cell-derived histamine decrease biliary proliferation. We aimed to isolate and characterize MCs from cholestatic livers. Rats were subjected to BDL starting at 6 hrs and up to 14 days. MC infiltration was evaluated by toluidine blue. BDL rats were perfused using standard collagenase perfusion. Following enzymatic digestion, tissue was passed through a fine gauge needle. Suspensions were incubated with MAb AA4, washed and incubated with goat anti-mouse coated Dynal® beads. MCs were stained with toluidine blue, and in isolated MCs, the expression of FCεRI and MC proteases was measured. The expression of histidine decarboxylase, histamine receptors, VEGF-receptors and TIE 1 and 2 was evaluated by qPCR. Histamine and VEGF-A secretion was measured in MC supernatants. MC purity was evaluated by CK-19, CK-8, albumin, VAP-1 and α-SMA expression. In vitro, cholangiocytes and HSCs were treated with isolated MC supernatants from BDL rats treated with either NaCl or cromolyn sodium (to block MC histamine release) and biliary proliferation and hepatic fibrosis were measured. MCs infiltrate the liver and surround bile ducts starting at day 2. We isolated a virtually pure preparation of mature, functional MCs. TEM images reveal distinct secretory granules and isolated MCs secrete histamine. MCs express FCεRI, chymase, tryptase, RMCPI and RMCPII, but were virtually void of other cell markers. Biliary proliferation and fibrosis increased following treatment with MC supernatants from BDL rats + NaCl and these parameters decreased in cells treated with MC supernatants from BDL + cromolyn sodium. In conclusion, we have isolated and characterized MCs from cholestatic livers. MCs regulate cholestatic liver injury and hepatic fibrosis. This tool provides a better understanding of the paracrine influence of mast cells on biliary

  13. The role of mast cells on angiogenesis in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Nirmala; Nanda, Kanwardeep; Rehman, Farzan; Girish, KL.; Tippu, Shoaib; Arora, Asit

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Angiogenesis or neovascularization has long been known to aid in progression and metastasis of malignant tumors. Tumor angiogenesis is a complex event mediated by angiogenic factors released from cancer cells and or by host immune cells. Mast cells may induce tumor progression and potentiate metastasis by stimulating angiogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to validate topographic distribution of micro vessel density (MVD) and mast cell density (MCD) and help to elucidate the possible role of mast cells in tumor angiogenesis and correlating this with advanced disease parameters. Study Design: MVD and MCD were investigated in tumor specimens from 30 patients diagnosed with different histologic grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Intratumor vessels were stained with collagen Type IV antibody and mast cells with Toluidine blue before being measured by light microscopy. Results: There was a significant correlation between MVD and disease progression and number of blood vessels increased from well to poorly differentiated OSCC where as MCD decreased. Conclusions: These findings suggest that angiogenesis indeed occur in OSCC and might be used as an index to inflect the aggression of the disease however mast cells make up only a part of complex process of angiogenesis along with other factors secreted by tumor. Key words:Angiogenesis, mast cells, oral squamous cell carcinoma, progression, metastasis. PMID:22143687

  14. Human lung-derived mature mast cells cultured alone or with mouse 3T3 fibroblasts maintain an ultrastructural phenotype different from that of human mast cells that develop from human cord blood cells cultured with 3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, A. M.; Furitsu, T.; Estrella, P.; Ishizaka, T.

    1991-01-01

    Culture systems designed to maintain or develop human mast cells have proved difficult, yet these systems would provide valuable resources for future investigations of human mast cell biology. Cocultures of either isolated mature human lung mast cells (Levi-Schaffer et al., J Immunol 1987, 139:494-500) or human cord blood mononuclear cells (Furitsu, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1989, 86:10039-10043) with 3T3 embryonic mouse skin fibroblasts have implicated fibroblasts as an important factor in the successful maintenance and development of human mast cells in vitro. The authors cultured isolated, mature human lung mast cells either with or without 3T3 cells for 1 month and examined their ultrastructural phenotype. Mast cell viability in each circumstance was equivalent, but mast cell yield was improved in the presence of 3T3 cells. The ultrastructural phenotype was identical in both culture systems. Mast cells were shown to maintain the phenotype of their in vivo lung counterparts (ie, scroll granules predominanted, and numerous lipid bodies were present). This ultrastructural phenotype differs from that of mast cells that develop in cocultures of human cord blood cells and 3T3 cells, where developing mast cells with crystalline granules and few lipid bodies prevail, a phenotype much like that of human skin mast cells in vivo (Furitsu, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1989, 86:10039-10043). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1750506

  15. Blood pressure modulation following activation of mast cells by cationic cell penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Basheer, Maamoun; Schwalb, Herzl; Shefler, Irit; Levdansky, Lilia; Mekori, Yoseph A; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2011-12-01

    Short cell penetrating peptides (CPP) are widely used in vitro to transduce agents into cells. But their systemic effect has not been yet studied in detail. We studied the systemic effect of the cell penetrating peptides, penetratin, transportan and pro-rich, on rat hemodynamic functions. Intra-arterial monitoring of blood pressure showed that injection of the positively charged penetratin and transportan in a wide range of concentrations (2.5-320 μg/kg) caused highly significant transient decrease in the systolic and diastolic blood pressure in a dose dependent manner (p<0.01). Pretreatment with histamine receptors blockers or with cromolyn, a mast cell stabilizing agent, significantly attenuated this effect. Furthermore, in vitro incubation of these both peptides with mast cells line, LAD2, caused a massive mast cell degranulation. In vitro studies showed that these CPP in a wide range of concentrations were not cytotoxic without any effect on the survival of LAD2 mast cell line. In contrast, the less positively charged and proline-rich CPP, pro-rich, had no systemic effects with no effect on mast cell degranulation. Our results indicate that intravenously administrated positively charged CPP may have deleterious consequences due to their induced BP drop, mediated by mast cell activation. Therefore, the major effect of mast cell activation on BP should be considered in developing possible future drug therapies based on the injection of membrane-permeable and positively charged CPP. Nevertheless, lower levels of such CPP may be considered as a treatment of systemic high BP through moderate systemic mast cell activation.

  16. Isolation of Mature (Peritoneum-Derived) Mast Cells and Immature (Bone Marrow-Derived) Mast Cell Precursors from Mice

    PubMed Central

    Meurer, Steffen K.; Neß, Melanie; Weiskirchen, Sabine; Kim, Philipp; Tag, Carmen G.; Kauffmann, Marlies; Huber, Michael; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are a versatile cell type playing key roles in tissue morphogenesis and host defence against bacteria and parasites. Furthermore, they can enhance immunological danger signals and are implicated in inflammatory disorders like fibrosis. This granulated cell type originates from the myeloid lineage and has similarities to basophilic granulocytes, both containing large quantities of histamine and heparin. Immature murine mast cells mature in their destination tissue and adopt either the connective tissue (CTMC) or mucosal (MMC) type. Some effector functions are executed by activation/degranulation of MCs which lead to secretion of a typical set of MC proteases (MCPT) and of the preformed or newly synthesized mediators from its granules into the local microenvironment. Due to the potential accumulation of mutations in key signalling pathway components of corresponding MC cell-lines, primary cultured MCs are an attractive mean to study general features of MC biology and aspects of MC functions relevant to human disease. Here, we describe a simple protocol for the simultaneous isolation of mature CTMC-like murine MCs from the peritoneum (PMCs) and immature MC precursors from the bone marrow (BM). The latter are differentiated in vitro to yield BM-derived MCs (BMMC). These cells display the typical morphological and phenotypic features of MCs, express the typical MC surface markers, and can be propagated and kept in culture for several weeks. The provided protocol allows simple amplification of large quantities of homogenous, non-transformed MCs from the peritoneum and bone marrow-derived mast cells for cell- and tissue-based biomedical research. PMID:27337047

  17. The effects of Fasciola hepatica tegumental antigens on mast cell function.

    PubMed

    Vukman, Krisztina V; Adams, Paul N; Dowling, David; Metz, Martin; Maurer, Marcus; O'Neill, Sandra M

    2013-06-01

    Fasciola hepatica infection is associated with T helper 2/T regulatory immune responses and increased mast cell numbers. The aim of this study was to examine the interaction between F. hepatica tegumental coat antigen and mast cells in vivo and in vitro. Firstly, BALB/C, C57BL/6 or STAT6(-/-) mice were infected with F. hepatica metacercarie or mice were treated with F. hepatica tegumental coat antigen and then mast cells numbers in the peritoneal cavity and/or the liver were quantified. Also, the proliferation, chemotaxis, degranulation and cytokine secretion of mast cells from bone marrow or from peritoneal exudate cells stimulated with F. hepatica tegumental coat antigen were measured. Finally, we tested whether F. hepatica tegumental coat antigen inhibits degranulation of mast cells in vivo in a passive cutaneous and systemic anaphylaxis mouse model. Mast cell numbers increased in the peritoneal cavity and liver of F. hepatica infected mice, and this was mimicked by injection of F. hepatica tegumental coat antigen in a STAT6(-/-) independent manner. The increase in mast cell number was not the result of F. hepatica tegumental coat antigen-induced proliferation; rather F. hepatica tegumental coat antigen indirectly induces mast cell migration by dendritic cell-derived chemokines. Fasciola hepatica tegumental coat antigen interactions with mast cells do not drive T helper 2 or T regulatory immune responses. These studies on mast cell and F. hepatica tegumental coat antigen interaction may help us to understand the function of mast cells in immunity against F. hepatica and the immunomodulatory effect of F. hepatica tegumental coat antigen on these cells.

  18. Mast cells as effector cells of innate immunity and regulators of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Cardamone, Chiara; Parente, Roberta; Feo, Giulia De; Triggiani, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    Mast cells are widely distributed in human organs and tissues and they are particularly abundant at major body interfaces with the external environment such as the skin, the lung and the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, mast cells are located around blood vessels and are highly represented within central and peripheral lymphoid organs. The strategic distribution of mast cells closely reflects the primary role of these cells in providing first-line defense against environmental dangers, in regulating local and systemic inflammatory reactions and in shaping innate and adaptive immune responses. Human mast cells have pleiotropic and multivalent functions that make them highly versatile cells able to rapidly adapt responses to microenvironmental changes. They express a wide variety of surface receptors including immunoglobulin receptors, pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptors and danger signal receptors. The abundance of these receptors makes mast cells unique and effective surveillance cells able to detect promptly aggression by viral, bacterial and parasitic agents. In addition, mast cells express multiple receptors for cytokines and chemokines that confer them the capacity of being recruited and activated at sites of inflammation. Once activated by immunological or nonimmunological stimuli mast cells secrete a wide spectrum of preformed (early) and de novo synthesized (late) mediators. Preformed mediators are stored within granules and are rapidly released in the extracellular environment to provide a fast vascular response that promotes inflammation and local recruitment of other innate immunity cells such as neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils and monocyte/macrophages. Later on, delayed release of multiple cytokines and chemokines from mast cells further induce modulation of cells of adaptive immunity and regulates tissue injury and, eventually, resolution of inflammation. Finally, mast cells express several costimulatory and inhibitory surface molecules

  19. Mast cell activation contributes to sickle cell pathobiology and pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Lucile; Vang, Derek; Nguyen, Julia; Gupta, Mihir; Luk, Kathryn; Ericson, Marna E.; Simone, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an inherited disorder associated with severe lifelong pain and significant morbidity. The mechanisms of pain in SCA remain poorly understood. We show that mast cell activation/degranulation contributes to sickle pain pathophysiology by promoting neurogenic inflammation and nociceptor activation via the release of substance P in the skin and dorsal root ganglion. Mast cell inhibition with imatinib ameliorated cytokine release from skin biopsies and led to a correlative decrease in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and white blood cells in transgenic sickle mice. Targeting mast cells by genetic mutation or pharmacologic inhibition with imatinib ameliorates tonic hyperalgesia and prevents hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced hyperalgesia in sickle mice. Pretreatment with the mast cell stabilizer cromolyn sodium improved analgesia following low doses of morphine that were otherwise ineffective. Mast cell activation therefore underlies sickle pathophysiology leading to inflammation, vascular dysfunction, pain, and requirement for high doses of morphine. Pharmacological targeting of mast cells with imatinib may be a suitable approach to address pain and perhaps treat SCA. PMID:23775718

  20. Mast cell activation contributes to sickle cell pathobiology and pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Lucile; Vang, Derek; Nguyen, Julia; Gupta, Mihir; Luk, Kathryn; Ericson, Marna E; Simone, Donald A; Gupta, Kalpna

    2013-09-12

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an inherited disorder associated with severe lifelong pain and significant morbidity. The mechanisms of pain in SCA remain poorly understood. We show that mast cell activation/degranulation contributes to sickle pain pathophysiology by promoting neurogenic inflammation and nociceptor activation via the release of substance P in the skin and dorsal root ganglion. Mast cell inhibition with imatinib ameliorated cytokine release from skin biopsies and led to a correlative decrease in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and white blood cells in transgenic sickle mice. Targeting mast cells by genetic mutation or pharmacologic inhibition with imatinib ameliorates tonic hyperalgesia and prevents hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced hyperalgesia in sickle mice. Pretreatment with the mast cell stabilizer cromolyn sodium improved analgesia following low doses of morphine that were otherwise ineffective. Mast cell activation therefore underlies sickle pathophysiology leading to inflammation, vascular dysfunction, pain, and requirement for high doses of morphine. Pharmacological targeting of mast cells with imatinib may be a suitable approach to address pain and perhaps treat SCA.

  1. The development of human mast cells. An historical reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-03-15

    The understanding of mast cell (MC) differentiation is derived mainly from in vitro studies of different stages of stem and progenitor cells. The hematopoietic lineage development of human MCs is unique compared to other myeloid-derived cells. Human MCs originate from CD34(+)/CD117(+)/CD13(+)multipotent hematopoietic progenitors, which undergo transendothelial recruitment into peripheral tissues, where they complete differentiation. Stem cell factor (SCF) is a major chemotactic factor for MCs and their progenitors. SCF also elicits cell-cell and cell-substratum adhesion, facilitates the proliferation, and sustains the survival, differentiation, and maturation, of MCs. Because MC maturation is influenced by local microenvironmental factors, different MC phenotypes can develop in different tissues and organs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mast cells play no role in the pathogenesis of postoperative ileus induced by intestinal manipulation.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Pinilla, Pedro J; Farro, Giovanna; Di Giovangiulio, Martina; Stakenborg, Nathalie; Némethova, Andrea; de Vries, Annick; Liston, Adrian; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Rodewald, Hans-Reimwer; Boeckxstaens, Guy E; Matteoli, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal manipulation (IM) during abdominal surgery results in intestinal inflammation leading to hypomotility or ileus. Mast cell activation is thought to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of postoperative ileus (POI). However, this conclusion was mainly drawn using mast cell-deficient mouse models with abnormal Kit signaling. These mice also lack interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) resulting in aberrant gastrointestinal motility even prior to surgery, compromising their use as model to study POI. To avoid these experimental weaknesses we took advantage of a newly developed knock-in mouse model, Cpa3(Cre/+) , devoid of mast cells but with intact Kit signaling. The role of mast cells in the development of POI and intestinal inflammation was evaluated assessing gastrointestinal transit and muscularis externa inflammation after IM in two strains of mice lacking mast cells, i.e. Kit(W-sh/W-sh) and Cpa3(Cre/+) mice, and by use of the mast cell stabilizer cromolyn. Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice lack ICC networks and already revealed significantly delayed gastrointestinal transit even before surgery. IM did not further delay intestinal transit, but induced infiltration of myeloperoxidase positive cells, expression of inflammatory cytokines and recruitment of monocytes and neutrophils into the muscularis externa. On the contrary, Cpa3(Cre/+) mice have a normal network of ICC and normal gastrointestinal. Surprisingly, IM in Cpa3(Cre/+) mice caused delay in gut motility and intestinal inflammation as in wild type littermates mice (Cpa3(+/+) ). Furthermore, treatment with the mast cell inhibitor cromolyn resulted in an inhibition of mast cells without preventing POI. Here, we confirm that IM induced mast cell degranulation. However, our data demonstrate that mast cells are not required for the pathogenesis of POI in mice. Although there might be species differences between mouse and human, our results argue against mast cell inhibitors as a therapeutic approach to shorten POI.

  3. Mast Cells Play No Role in the Pathogenesis of Postoperative Ileus Induced by Intestinal Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Pinilla, Pedro J.; Farro, Giovanna; Di Giovangiulio, Martina; Stakenborg, Nathalie; Némethova, Andrea; de Vries, Annick; Liston, Adrian; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Rodewald, Hans-Reimwer; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Matteoli, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal manipulation (IM) during abdominal surgery results in intestinal inflammation leading to hypomotility or ileus. Mast cell activation is thought to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of postoperative ileus (POI). However, this conclusion was mainly drawn using mast cell-deficient mouse models with abnormal Kit signaling. These mice also lack interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) resulting in aberrant gastrointestinal motility even prior to surgery, compromising their use as model to study POI. To avoid these experimental weaknesses we took advantage of a newly developed knock-in mouse model, Cpa3Cre/+, devoid of mast cells but with intact Kit signaling. Design The role of mast cells in the development of POI and intestinal inflammation was evaluated assessing gastrointestinal transit and muscularis externa inflammation after IM in two strains of mice lacking mast cells, i.e. KitW-sh/W-sh and Cpa3Cre/+ mice, and by use of the mast cell stabilizer cromolyn. Results KitW-sh/W-sh mice lack ICC networks and already revealed significantly delayed gastrointestinal transit even before surgery. IM did not further delay intestinal transit, but induced infiltration of myeloperoxidase positive cells, expression of inflammatory cytokines and recruitment of monocytes and neutrophils into the muscularis externa. On the contrary, Cpa3Cre/+ mice have a normal network of ICC and normal gastrointestinal. Surprisingly, IM in Cpa3Cre/+ mice caused delay in gut motility and intestinal inflammation as in wild type littermates mice (Cpa3+/+). Furthermore, treatment with the mast cell inhibitor cromolyn resulted in an inhibition of mast cells without preventing POI. Conclusions Here, we confirm that IM induced mast cell degranulation. However, our data demonstrate that mast cells are not required for the pathogenesis of POI in mice. Although there might be species differences between mouse and human, our results argue against mast cell inhibitors as a therapeutic

  4. Adipose tissue as a dedicated reservoir of functional mast cell progenitors.

    PubMed

    Poglio, Sandrine; De Toni-Costes, Fabienne; Arnaud, Emmanuelle; Laharrague, Patrick; Espinosa, Eric; Casteilla, Louis; Cousin, Béatrice

    2010-11-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) is a heterogeneous tissue, found in various locations throughout the body, containing mature adipocytes and the stroma-vascular fraction (SVF). The SVF includes a large proportion of immune hematopoietic cells, among which, mast cells that contribute to diet-induced obesity. In this study, we asked whether mast cells present in mice adipose tissue could derive from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) identified in the tissue. We therefore performed both in vitro and in vivo experiments dedicated to monitoring the progeny of WAT-derived HSPC. The entire study was conducted in parallel with bone marrow-derived cells, considered the gold standard for hematopoietic-lineage studies. Here, we demonstrate that adipose-derived HSPC contain a precursor-cell population committed to the mast cell lineage, and able to efficiently home to peripheral organs such as intestine and skin, where it acquires properties of functional tissue mast cells. Additionally, WAT contains a significant mast cell progenitor population, suggesting that the entire mast cell lineage process take place in WAT. Considering the quantitative importance of WAT in the adult organism and the increasing roles recently assigned to mast cells in physiopathology, WAT may represent an important source of mast cells in physiological and pathological situations. Copyright © 2010 AlphaMed Press.

  5. The Lectin ArtinM Induces Recruitment of Rat Mast Cells from the Bone Marrow to the Peritoneal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Buranello, Patricia Andressa; Moulin, Maria Raquel Isnard; Souza, Devandir Antonio; Jamur, Maria Célia; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Oliver, Constance

    2010-01-01

    Background The D-mannose binding lectin ArtinM is known to recruit neutrophils, to degranulate mast cells and may have potential therapeutic applications. However, the effect of ArtinM on mast cell recruitment has not been investigated. Methodology Male Wistar rats were injected i.p. with ArtinM or ConA (control). The ability of the lectin to degranulate peritoneal and mesenteric mast cells was examined. Recruitment of mast cells to the peritoneal cavity and mesentery after ArtinM injection was examined with or without depletion of peritoneal mast cells by distilled water. Results ArtinM degranulated both peritoneal and mesentery mast cells in vitro. Three days after i.p. injection of the lectin there were reduced numbers of mast cells in the peritoneal lavage, while at 7 days post injection of ArtinM, the number of peritoneal mast cells was close to control values. Since immature mast cells are recruited from the bone marrow, the effect of the lectin on bone marrow mast cells was examined. Injection of ArtinM resulted in an increased number of mast cells in the bone marrow. To determine if degranulation of mast cells in the peritoneal cavity was required for the increase in bone marrow mast cells, the peritoneal cavity was depleted of mast cells with ultrapure water. Exposure to ArtinM increased the number of mast cells in the bone marrow of rats depleted of peritoneal mast cells. Conclusions The ArtinM induced recruitment of mast cells from the bone marrow to the peritoneal cavity may partially explain the therapeutic actions of ArtinM. PMID:20339538

  6. Distorted secretory granule composition in mast cells with multiple protease deficiency.

    PubMed

    Grujic, Mirjana; Calounova, Gabriela; Eriksson, Inger; Feyerabend, Thorsten; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Tchougounova, Elena; Kjellén, Lena; Pejler, Gunnar

    2013-10-01

    Mast cells are characterized by an abundance of secretory granules densely packed with inflammatory mediators such as bioactive amines, cytokines, serglycin proteoglycans with negatively charged glycosaminoglycan side chains of either heparin or chondroitin sulfate type, and large amounts of positively charged proteases. Despite the large biological impact of mast cell granules and their contents on various pathologies, the mechanisms that regulate granule composition are incompletely understood. In this study, we hypothesized that granule composition is dependent on a dynamic electrostatic interrelationship between different granule compounds. As a tool to evaluate this possibility, we generated mice in which mast cells are multideficient in a panel of positively charged proteases: the chymase mouse mast cell protease-4, the tryptase mouse mast cell protease-6, and carboxypeptidase A3. Through a posttranslational effect, mast cells from these mice additionally lack mouse mast cell protease-5 protein. Mast cells from mice deficient in individual proteases showed normal morphology. In contrast, mast cells with combined protease deficiency displayed a profound distortion of granule integrity, as seen both by conventional morphological criteria and by transmission electron microscopy. An assessment of granule content revealed that the distorted granule integrity in multiprotease-deficient mast cells was associated with a profound reduction of highly negatively charged heparin, whereas no reduction in chondroitin sulfate storage was observed. Taken together with previous findings showing that the storage of basic proteases conversely is regulated by anionic proteoglycans, these data suggest that secretory granule composition in mast cells is dependent on a dynamic interrelationship between granule compounds of opposite electrical charge.

  7. Targeting cardiac mast cells: pharmacological modulation of the local renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Reid, Alicia C; Brazin, Jacqueline A; Morrey, Christopher; Silver, Randi B; Levi, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    Enhanced production of angiotensin II and excessive release of norepinephrine in the ischemic heart are major causes of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Mast cell-dependent mechanisms are pivotal in the local formation of angiotensin II and modulation of norepinephrine release in cardiac pathophysiology. Cardiac mast cells increase in number in myocardial ischemia and are located in close proximity to sympathetic neurons expressing angiotensin AT1- and histamine H3-receptors. Once activated, cardiac mast cells release a host of potent pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokines, chemokines, preformed mediators (e.g., histamine) and proteases (e.g., renin). In myocardial ischemia, angiotensin II (formed locally from mast cell-derived renin) and histamine (also released from local mast cells) respectively activate AT1- and H3-receptors on sympathetic nerve endings. Stimulation of angiotensin AT1-receptors is arrhythmogenic whereas H3-receptor activation is cardioprotective. It is likely that in ischemia/reperfusion the balance may be tipped toward the deleterious effects of mast cell renin, as demonstrated in mast cell-deficient mice, lacking mast cell renin and histamine in the heart. In these mice, no ventricular fibrillation occurs at reperfusion following ischemia, as opposed to wild-type hearts which all fibrillate. Preventing mast cell degranulation in the heart and inhibiting the activation of a local renin-angiotensin system, hence abolishing its detrimental effects on cardiac rhythmicity, appears to be more significant than the loss of histamine-induced cardioprotection. This suggests that therapeutic targets in the treatment of myocardial ischemia, and potentially congestive heart failure and hypertension, should include prevention of mast cell degranulation, mast cell renin inhibition, local ACE inhibition, ANG II antagonism and H3-receptor activation.

  8. Mast Cells Regulate Epidermal Barrier Function and the Development of Allergic Skin Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sehra, Sarita; Serezani, Ana P M; Ocaña, Jesus A; Travers, Jeffrey B; Kaplan, Mark H

    2016-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by infiltration of eosinophils, T helper cells, and mast cells. The role of mast cells in atopic dermatitis is not completely understood. To define the effects of mast cells on skin biology, we observed that mast cells regulate the homeostatic expression of epidermal differentiation complex and other skin genes. Decreased epidermal differentiation complex gene expression in mice that genetically lack mast cells (Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice) is associated with increased uptake of protein antigens painted on the skin by dendritic cells (DCs) compared with similarly treated wild-type mice, suggesting a protective role for mast cells in exposure to nominal environmental allergens. To test this further, we crossed Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice with signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (i.e., Stat6) VT transgenic mice that develop spontaneous atopic dermatitis-like disease that is dependent on T helper cell 2 cytokines and is associated with high serum concentrations of IgE. We observed that Stat6VT × Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice developed more frequent and more severe allergic skin inflammation than Stat6VT transgenic mice that had mast cells. Together, these studies suggest that mast cells regulate epidermal barrier function and have a potential protective role in the development of atopic dermatitis-like disease.

  9. Siglec-8 as mast cell selective target: developing paradigms amidst inconvenient truths.

    PubMed

    Molderings, Gerhard J

    2017-09-14

    Due to the limited efficacy of current drugs in treating systemic mast cell activation disease, there is an urgent need for more effective drugs selectively acting at mast cells. In the past, a large number of compounds have been claimed to be effective and mast cell selective on the basis of cell culture experiments and studies on blood leukocytes which could not be verified in organ and animal studies. Nevertheless, over time in review papers about potential mast cell targets mast cell selectivity of these targets has been no longer challenged. A recent example for such developing paradigms amidst inconvenient truths is the hype on the purported selective expression of the putative adhesion molecule sialic acid binding Ig-like lectin 8 (Siglec-8) in mast cells and eosinophils, although current data from different publically available databases/sources clearly demonstrate a widespread expression of Siglec-8 in the cells of most tissues. Two suggestions are presented: (1) In the specific case of Siglec-8, the limited mast cell selectivity should be kept in mind in the development and surveillance of Siglec-8-based mast cell- and eosinophil-targeted therapeutic strategies because of potential severe adverse effects in the Siglec-8-positive tissues. (2) In general, readers should always challenge reports about the selective expression of potential targets for drugs in a few cell types of the organism, even if they are published in highly renown journals.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of glucocorticoid action in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Oppong, Emmanuel; Flink, Nesrin; Cato, Andrew C B

    2013-11-05

    Glucocorticoids are compounds that have successfully been used over the years in the treatment of inflammatory disorders. They are known to exhibit their effects through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) that acts to downregulate the action of proinflammatory transcription factors such as AP-1 and NF-κB. The GR also exerts anti-inflammatory effects through activation of distinct genes. In addition to their anti-inflammatory actions, glucocorticoids are also potent antiallergic compounds that are widely used in conditions such as asthma and anaphylaxis. Nevertheless the mechanism of action of this hormone in these disorders is not known. In this article, we have reviewed reports on the effects of glucocorticoids in mast cells, one of the important immune cells in allergy. Building on the knowledge of the molecular action of glucocorticoids and the GR in the treatment of inflammation in other cell types, we have made suggestions as to the likely mechanisms of action of glucocorticoids in mast cells. We have further identified some important questions and research directions that need to be addressed in future studies to improve the treatment of allergic disorders.

  11. Mast cells as novel mediators of reproductive processes.

    PubMed

    Woidacki, Katja; Jensen, Federico; Zenclussen, Ana C

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between mast cells (MCs) and pregnancy is a controversially discussed topic. The presence and quantitative distribution of MCs in the reproductive tract was confirmed in different species. A phase-dependent oscillation of MCs during the hormonal regulated estrous cycle was suggested and on this basis, MCs were assumed to play a positive role in implantation because of their ability to secrete histamine. At later pregnancy stages, they were proposed to have rather a negative role, as their exacerbated activation is associated with pre-term delivery. The present review is intended to provide an overview about uterine MCs that bring to light their unexpected relevance for reproductive processes.

  12. Mast Cells Regulate Epidermal Barrier Function and the Development of Allergic Skin Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sehra, Sarita; Serezani, Ana PM; Ocaña, Jesus A.; Travers, Jeffrey B.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by infiltration of eosinophils, T helper cells and mast cells. The role of mast cells in AD is not completely understood. To define the effects of mast cells on skin biology, we observed that mast cells regulate the homeostatic expression of Epidermal Differentiation Complex (EDC) and other skin genes. Decreased EDC gene expression in mice that genetically lack mast cells (KitW-sh/W-sh mice) is associated with increased uptake of protein antigens painted on the skin by dendritic cells, compared to similarly treated wild-type mice, suggesting a protective role for mast cells in exposure to nominal environmental allergens. To test this further, we crossed KitW-sh/W-sh mice with Stat6VT transgenic mice that develop spontaneous AD-like disease that is dependent on Th2 cytokines and associated with high serum concentrations of IgE. We observed that Stat6VT x KitW-sh/W-sh mice developed more frequent and more severe allergic skin inflammation than Stat6VT transgenic mice that had mast cells. Together, these studies suggest that mast cells regulate epidermal barrier function and have a potential protective role in the development of AD-like disease. PMID:27021404

  13. Mast Cell Interaction with Neutrophils in Human Gastric Carcinomas: Ultrastructural Observations

    PubMed Central

    Branca, Giovanni; Alberto Caruso, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The role of mast cells in cell-cell immune interactions has received increasing attention, although their functional interaction with neutrophils still remains to be clarified in tumors. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between mast cells and neutrophils in a series of gastric carcinomas (GC). Patients and Methods. 52 surgically resected GC specimens were routinely processed for both light and electron microscopy. Only cases showing both mast cells and neutrophils in the tumor stroma were considered in the analysis. Results. Only 9 GC (M : F = 5 : 4; age range: 50–82 years) showed both mast cells and neutrophils in the tumor stroma. At ultrathin sections, we identified heterotypic aggregation and intermingling of mast cells and neutrophils. Mast cells had mature phenotype and showed full complement of granules with homogeneous, scroll, particle, and mixed pattern. In addition, we found normal-appearing or early apoptosis showing neutrophils. Conclusion. Our histological findings showed the likely interaction between mast cells and neutrophils in GC. We hypothesize that the granular content of mast cells may be released in small quantity through a mechanism called “kiss-and-run fusion,” which is alternative to well-known massive anaphylactic or piecemeal degranulation. PMID:27882290

  14. Mast Cell-Deficient W-sash c-kit Mutant KitW-sh/W-sh Mice as a Model for Investigating Mast Cell Biology in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Grimbaldeston, Michele A.; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Piliponsky, Adrian M.; Tsai, Mindy; Tam, See-Ying; Galli, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    Mice carrying certain mutations in the white spotting (W) locus (ie, c-kit) exhibit reduced c-kit tyrosine kinase-dependent signaling that results in mast cell deficiency and other phenotypic abnormalities. The c-kit mutations in KitW/W-v mice impair melanogenesis and result in anemia, sterility, and markedly reduced levels of tissue mast cells. In contrast, KitW-sh/W-sh mice, bearing the W-sash (Wsh) inversion mutation, have mast cell deficiency but lack anemia and sterility. We report that adult KitW-sh/W-sh mice had a profound deficiency in mast cells in all tissues examined but normal levels of major classes of other differentiated hematopoietic and lymphoid cells. Unlike KitW/W-v mice, KitW-sh/W-sh mice had normal numbers of TCRγδ intraepithelial lymphocytes in the intestines and did not exhibit a high incidence of idiopathic dermatitis, ulcers, or squamous papillomas of the stomach, but like KitW/W-v mice, they lacked interstitial cells of Cajal in the gut and exhibited bile reflux into the stomach. Systemic or local reconstitution of mast cell populations was achieved in nonirradiated adult KitW-sh/W-sh mice by intravenous, intraperitoneal, or intradermal injection of wild-type bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells but not by transplantation of wild-type bone marrow cells. Thus, KitW-sh/W-sh mice represent a useful model for mast cell research, especially for analyzing mast cell function in vivo. PMID:16127161

  15. The role of stem cell factor (c-kit ligand) and inflammatory cytokines in pulmonary mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, N W; Kunkel, S L; Strieter, R M; Evanoff, H L; Kunkel, R G; Key, M L; Taub, D D

    1996-03-15

    Mast cells play a critical role in allergic airway responses via IgE-specific activation and release of potent inflammatory mediators. In the present study, we have isolated and characterized primary mast cell lines derived from the upper airways of normal mice. The primary mast cell lines were grown and maintained by incubation with interleukin-3 (IL-3) and stem cell factor (SCF) and shown to be c-kit (SCF receptor) positive by flow cytometry. Subsequently, we examined the proliferation of both airway and bone marrow derived mast cell lines in response to inflammatory and hematopoietic cytokines, including SCF, IL-1, IL-3, interferon-gamma, IL-4, and IL-10. The results from the pulmonary mast cell lines were compared with those from bone marrow derived mast cells. Pulmonary mast cell lines were capable of proliferating in response to IL-3, IL-4, IL-10, and SCF, whereas the combination of SCF with the other cytokines did not increase the response over SCF alone. In contrast, the bone marrow-derived mast cells proliferated strongest to SCF or IL-3, but only modestly to IL-4 and IL-10. Furthermore, the combination of SCF with IL-3, but not the other cytokines, exhibited an increase in bone marrow-derived mast cell proliferation. Cytokine-specific stimulation of histamine release in the airway-derived and bone marrow-derived mast cells showed parallel results. SCF was the only cytokine shown to induce substantial histamine release. However, when certain nonhistamine releasing cytokines were combined with SCF, a synergistic increase in histamine release was induced in upper airway, but not bone marrow-derived mast cells. The results of these studies suggest that cytokines differentially modulate induction of proliferation and degranulation of bone marrow and upper airway-derived mast cells and may further indicate a cytokine activational cascade in tissue mast cells.

  16. Antibacterial agent triclosan suppresses RBL-2H3 mast cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Rachel K.; Hutchinson, Lee M.; Burpee, Benjamin T.; Tupper, Emily J.; Pelletier, Jonathan H.; Kormendy, Zsolt; Hopke, Alex R.; Malay, Ethan T.; Evans, Brieana L.; Velez, Alejandro; Gosse, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent, which has been shown previously to alleviate human allergic skin disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that the mechanism of this action of triclosan is, in part, due to effects on mast cell function. Mast cells play important roles in allergy, asthma, parasite defense, and carcinogenesis. In response to various stimuli, mast cells degranulate, releasing allergic mediators such as histamine. In order to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory effect of triclosan on mast cells, we monitored the level of degranulation in a mast cell model, rat basophilic leukemia cells, clone 2H3. Having functional homology to human mast cells, as well as a very well defined signaling pathway leading to degranulation, this cell line has been widely used to gain insight into mast-cell driven allergic disorders in humans. Using a fluorescent microplate assay, we determined that triclosan strongly dampened the release of granules from activated rat mast cells starting at 2 μM treatment, with dose-responsive suppression through 30 μM. These concentrations were found to be non-cytotoxic. The inhibition was found to persist when early signaling events (such as IgE receptor aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation) were bypassed by using calcium ionophore stimulation, indicating that the target for triclosan in this pathway is likely downstream of the calcium signaling event. Triclosan also strongly suppressed F-actin remodeling and cell membrane ruffling, a physiological process that accompanies degranulation. Our finding that triclosan inhibits mast cell function may explain the clinical data mentioned above and supports the use of triclosan or a mechanistically similar compound as a topical treatment for allergic skin disease, such as eczema. -- Highlights: ►The effects of triclosan on mast cell function using a murine mast cell model. ►Triclosan strongly inhibits degranulation of mast cells.

  17. Electrogene therapy with interleukin-12 in canine mast cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pavlin, Darja; Cemazar, Maja; Cör, Andrej; Sersa, Gregor; Pogacnik, Azra; Tozon, Natasa

    2011-01-01

    Background Mast cell tumors (MCT) are the most common malignant cutaneous tumors in dogs with extremely variable biological behaviour. Different treatment approaches can be used in canine cutaneous MCT, with surgical excision being the treatment of choice. In this study, electrogene therapy (EGT) as a new therapeutic approach to canine MCTs, was established. Materials and methods. Eight dogs with a total of eleven cutaneous MCTs were treated with intratumoral EGT using DNA plasmid encoding human interleukin-12 (IL-12). The local response to the therapy was evaluated by repeated measurements of tumor size and histological examination of treated tumors. A possible systemic response was assessed by determination of IL-12 and interferon- γ (IFN-γ) in patients’ sera. The occurence of side effects was monitored with weekly clinical examinations of treated animals and by performing basic bloodwork, consisting of the complete bloodcount and determination of selected biochemistry parameters. Results Intratumoral EGT with IL-12 elicits significant reduction of treated tumors’ size, ranging from 13% to 83% (median 50%) of the initial tumor volume. Additionally, a change in the histological structure of treated nodules was seen. There was a reduction in number of malignant mast cells and inflammatory cell infiltration of treated tumors. Systemic release of IL-12 in four patients was detected, without any noticeable local or systemic side effects. Conclusions These data suggest that intratumoral EGT with plasmid encoding IL-12 may be useful in the treatment of canine MCTs, exerting a local antitumor effect. PMID:22933932

  18. Mast cell lines HMC-1 and LAD2 in comparison with mature human skin mast cells--drastically reduced levels of tryptase and chymase in mast cell lines.

    PubMed

    Guhl, Sven; Babina, Magda; Neou, Angelos; Zuberbier, Torsten; Artuc, Metin

    2010-09-01

    To circumvent the costly isolation procedure associated with tissue mast cells (MC), two human MC lines, i.e. HMC-1 and LAD2, are frequently employed, but their relation to mature MC is unknown. Here, we quantitatively assessed their expression of MC markers in direct comparison to skin MC (sMC). sMC expressed all lineage markers at highest and HMC-1 cells at lowest levels. LAD2 cells expressed comparable high-affinity IgE receptor alpha (FcepsilonRIalpha) and FcepsilonRIgamma but less FcepsilonRIbeta than sMC and displayed slightly reduced, but robust FcepsilonRI-mediated histamine release. Only minor differences were found for total histamine content and c-Kit expression. Huge, and to this level unexpected, differences were found for MC tryptase and chymase, with sMC > LAD2 > HMC-1. Taken together, HMC-1 cells represent very immature malignantly transformed MC, whereas LAD2 cells can be considered intermediately differentiated. Because of the minute levels of MC proteases, MC lines can serve as surrogates of tissue MC to a limited degree only.

  19. Evaluation of mast cells in periapical cysts, dentigerous cysts, and keratocystic odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    de Noronha Santos Netto, Juliana; Pires, Fábio Ramôa; da Fonseca, Eliene Carvalho; Silva, Licínio Esmeraldo; de Queiroz Chaves Lourenço, Simone

    2012-09-01

    Several cell types are associated with the development of cystic and tumoral odontogenic lesions. Among inflammatory cells, mast cells can be associated with their pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to analyze mast cells in periapical cysts, dentigerous cysts, and keratocystic odontogenic tumors. Tissue sections were submitted to toluidine blue staining and immunohistochemistry with antibody anti-tryptase (clone G3). Mast cells were quantitated using Image-Pro Plus software to obtain the mean number of mast cells in three regions: epithelial, superficial portion of the fibrous wall and deep portion of the fibrous wall from 20 periapical cysts, 20 dentigerous cysts (six non-inflamed and 14 inflamed) and 20 keratocystic odontogenic tumors (four non-inflamed and 16 inflamed). The mean number of mast cells detected per lesion by immunohistochemistry (4.1) was higher than by histochemistry (1.5) (P<0.0001). Inflamed dentigerous cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumors showed a higher mean number of mast cells than non-inflamed lesions in all regions. The deep region from all cysts showed the highest mean number of degranulated mast cells, except for non-inflamed keratocystic odontogenic tumors analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemical staining detected higher number of mast cells than histochemistry. The higher number of mast cells observed in inflamed lesions could indicate the participation of these cells in the inflammatory response in odontogenic lesions. The prevalence of degranulated mast cells in the deep region suggests intense activity of these cells, possibly related to growth of cystic lesions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Mast cell activation disease: a concise practical guide for diagnostic workup and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Mast cell activation disease comprises disorders characterized by accumulation of genetically altered mast cells and/or abnormal release of these cells' mediators, affecting functions in potentially every organ system, often without causing abnormalities in routine laboratory or radiologic testing. In most cases of mast cell activation disease, diagnosis is possible by relatively non-invasive investigation. Effective therapy often consists simply of antihistamines and mast cell membrane-stabilising compounds supplemented with medications targeted at specific symptoms and complications. Mast cell activation disease is now appreciated to likely be considerably prevalent and thus should be considered routinely in the differential diagnosis of patients with chronic multisystem polymorbidity or patients in whom a definitively diagnosed major illness does not well account for the entirety of the patient's presentation. PMID:21418662

  1. Mast cell activation disease: a concise practical guide for diagnostic workup and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Molderings, Gerhard J; Brettner, Stefan; Homann, Jürgen; Afrin, Lawrence B

    2011-03-22

    Mast cell activation disease comprises disorders characterized by accumulation of genetically altered mast cells and/or abnormal release of these cells' mediators, affecting functions in potentially every organ system, often without causing abnormalities in routine laboratory or radiologic testing. In most cases of mast cell activation disease, diagnosis is possible by relatively non-invasive investigation. Effective therapy often consists simply of antihistamines and mast cell membrane-stabilising compounds supplemented with medications targeted at specific symptoms and complications. Mast cell activation disease is now appreciated to likely be considerably prevalent and thus should be considered routinely in the differential diagnosis of patients with chronic multisystem polymorbidity or patients in whom a definitively diagnosed major illness does not well account for the entirety of the patient's presentation.

  2. Role of mast cell- and non-mast cell-derived inflammatory mediators in immunologic induction of synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, A A; Leal-Cardoso, J H; Weinreich, D

    1997-07-01

    We have previously discovered a long-lasting enhancement of synaptic transmission in mammal autonomic ganglia caused by immunological activation of ganglionic mast cells. Subsequent to mast cell activation, lipid and peptide mediators are released which may modulate synaptic function. In this study we determined whether some mast cell-derived mediators, prostaglandin D2 (PGD2; 1.0 microM), platelet aggregating factor (PAF; 0.3 microM) and U44619 (a thromboxane analogue; 1.0 microM), and also endothelin-1 (ET-1; 0.5 microM) induce synaptic potentiation in the guinea pig superior cervical ganglion (SCG), and compared their effects on synaptic transmission with those induced by a sensitizing antigen, ovalbumin (OVA; 10 micrograms/ml). The experiments were carried out on SCGs isolated from adult male guinea pigs (200-250 g) actively sensitized to OVA, maintained in oxygenated Locke solution at 37 degrees C. Synaptic potentiation was measured through alterations of the integral of the post-ganglionic compound action potential (CAP). All agents tested caused long-term (LTP; duration > or = 30 min) or short-term (STP; < 30 min) potentiation of synaptic efficacy, as measured by the increase in the integral of the post-ganglionic CAP. The magnitude of mediator-induced potentiation was never the same as the antigen-induced long-term potentiation (A-LTP). The agent that best mimicked the antigen was PGD2, which induced a 75% increase in CAP integral for LTP (antigen: 94%) and a 34% increase for STP (antigen: 91%). PAF-, U44619-, and ET-1-induced increases in CAP integral ranged for LTP from 34 to 47%, and for STP from 0 to 26%. These results suggest that the agents investigated may participate in the induction of A-LTP.

  3. Mast Cells and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: From the Bench to the Bedside.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Song, Jun; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-04-30

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is traditionally defined as a functional disorder since it lacks demonstrable pathological abnormalities. However, in recent years, low grade inflammatory infiltration, often rich in mast cells, in both the small and large bowel, has been observed in some patients with IBS. The close association of mast cells with major intestinal functions, such as epithelial secretion and permeability, neuroimmune interactions, visceral sensation, and peristalsis, makes researchers and gastroenterologists to focus attention on the key roles of mast cells in the pathogenesis of IBS. Numerous studies have been carried out to identify the mechanisms in the development, infiltration, activation, and degranulation of intestinal mast cells, as well as the actions of mast cells in the processes of mucosal barrier disruption, mucosal immune dysregulation, visceral hypersensitivity, dysmotility, and local and central stress in IBS. Moreover, therapies targeting mast cells, such as mast cell stabilizers (cromoglycate and ketotifen) and antagonists of histamine and serotonin receptors, have been tried in IBS patients, and have partially exhibited considerable efficacy. This review focuses on recent advances in the role of mast cells in IBS, with particular emphasis on bridging experimental data with clinical therapeutics for IBS patients.

  4. Effect of sulfur mustard on mast cells in hairless guinea pig skin

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, J.S.; Bryant, M.A.; Braue, E.H.

    1993-05-13

    The skin of 24 anesthetized hairless guinea pigs was exposed to saturated sulfur mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide; HD) for 5 and 7 minutes using 14-mm diameter vapor cups. Animals were euthanatized 24 hours after exposure and skin specimens taken for morphometric evaluation of granulated mast cells with an image analysis system (IAS). Tissue specimens were processed in paraffin, sectioned at 5 microns and stained with Unna's stain for mast cells. The number of granulated mast cells and the area occupied by mast cell granules was determined. There were significantly fewer mast cells (p < 0.05) in either HD exposure group than in sham-exposed animals, with significantly fewer mast cells in the 7-minute than the 5-minute HD group. There were also significantly smaller areas occupied by granules in either HD exposure group than in sham-exposed animals. HD-induced lesions in the hairless guinea pig have shown signs of an inflammatory response, and with their granules of vasoactive histamine, mast cells might be expected to play a role in HD-induced injury. Changes in mast cells exposed to low sulfur mustard levels, as detected by an IAS, may serve as an early marker for cutaneous damage, which might not be as easily determined with routine light microscopy.

  5. The Mastocytosis Society survey on mast cell disorders: patient experiences and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Susan; Russell, Nancy; Jennings, Blair; Slee, Valerie; Sterling, Lisa; Castells, Mariana; Valent, Peter; Akin, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Mast cell diseases include mastocytosis and mast cell activation syndromes, some of which have been shown to involve clonal defects in mast cells that result in abnormal cellular proliferation or activation. Numerous clinical studies of mastocytosis have been published, but no population-based comprehensive surveys of patients in the United States have been identified. Few mast cell disease specialty centers exist in the United States, and awareness of these mast cell disorders is limited among nonspecialists. Accordingly, information concerning the experiences of the overall estimated population of these patients has been lacking. To identify the experiences and perceptions of patients with mastocytosis, mast cell activation syndromes, and related disorders, The Mastocytosis Society (TMS), a US based patient advocacy, research, and education organization, conducted a survey of its members and other people known or suspected to be part of this patient population. A Web-based survey was publicized through clinics that treat these patients and through TMS's newsletter, Web site, and online blogs. Both online and paper copies of the questionnaire were provided, together with required statements of consent. The first results are presented for 420 patients. These results include demographics, diagnoses, symptoms, allergies, provoking factors of mast cell symptoms, and disease impact. Patients with mastocytosis and mast cell activation syndromes have provided clinical specialists, collaborators, and other patients with information to enable them to explore and deepen their understanding of the experiences and perceptions of people coping with these disorders. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Role of mast cells in skin tag development: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Asmaa Gaber; Maraee, Alaa Hassan; Antar, Azza Gaber; Fareed, Shimaa

    2014-08-01

    To detect mast cell density by toluidine blue and immunohistochemical staining for mast cell tryptase in skin tags as compared to normal skin to determine whether they have a role in skin tag development. This study was carried out on 30 patients with skin tags and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy controls without skin tags. There was a significant difference between skin tag and control groups regarding mast cell density evaluated by toluidine blue staining (p = 0.003) and mast cell tryptase expression (p = 0.001), where the density was higher in skin tags as compared to normal skin. Mast cells were higher in number using toluidine blue staining in lesions arising in sites other than the head and neck (p = 0.028). High expression of mast cell tryptase was significantly associated with marked collagenosis (p = 0.02) and presence of eosinophils (p = 0.04). The present study demonstrates the possible role of mast cells in promoting fibrosis and facilitating the development of skin tags. Mast cells may attract eosinophils to cooperate in inducing more fibrosis in skin tag development.

  7. The Role of Mast Cell Specific Chymases and Tryptases in Tumor Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Junior, Devandir Antonio; Santana, Ana Carolina; da Silva, Elaine Zayas Marcelino; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Celia

    2015-01-01

    An association between mast cells and tumor angiogenesis is known to exist, but the exact role that mast cells play in this process is still unclear. It is thought that the mediators released by mast cells are important in neovascularization. However, it is not known how individual mediators are involved in this process. The major constituents of mast cell secretory granules are the mast cell specific proteases chymase, tryptase, and carboxypeptidase A3. Several previous studies aimed to understand the way in which specific mast cell granule constituents act to induce tumor angiogenesis. A body of evidence indicates that mast cell proteases are the pivotal players in inducing tumor angiogenesis. In this review, the likely mechanisms by which tryptase and chymase can act directly or indirectly to induce tumor angiogenesis are discussed. Finally, information presented here in this review indicates that mast cell proteases significantly influence angiogenesis thus affecting tumor growth and progression. This also suggests that these proteases could serve as novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of various types of cancer. PMID:26146612

  8. 1-Fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and its derivatives act as secretagogues on rodent mast cells.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Yohei; Yoshimura, Marie; Sakamaki, Kazuma; Inoue, Asuka; Kakinoki, Aya; Hokari, Satoshi; Sakanaka, Mariko; Aoki, Junken; Miyachi, Hiroyuki; Furuta, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that activated mast cells are involved in contact hypersensitivity, although the precise mechanisms of their activation are still not completely understood. We investigated the potential of common experimental allergens to induce mast cell activation using murine bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells and rat peritoneal mast cells. Among these allergens, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and 1-fluoro-2,4-dinirobenzene (DNFB) were found to induce degranulation of rat peritoneal mast cells. DNFB-induced degranulation is accompanied by cytosolic Ca(2+) mobilization and is significantly inhibited by pertussis toxin, U73122 (a phospholipase C inhibitor), and BAPTA (a Ca(2+) chelator), raising the possibility that DNFB acts on the G protein-coupled receptors and activates Gi , which induces activation of phospholipase C, as well as known mast cell secretagogues, such as compound 48/80. DNFB could induce mast cell degranulation in the absence of serum proteins and IgE. Structure-activity relationship analyses revealed an inverse correlation between the degree of degranulation and the electron density of the C1 carbon of the DNFB derivatives. These findings raise a possibility that DNFB functions as a potent contact allergen through induction of cutaneous mast cell degranulation.

  9. Increased numbers of duodenal mucosal mast cells in turkeys inoculated with hemorrhagic enteritis virus.

    PubMed

    Opengart, K; Eyre, P; Domermuth, C H

    1992-05-01

    The relation between average duodenal mast cell count, duodenal mucosal mast cell numbers, duodenal connective tissue mast cell numbers, circulating basophil numbers, heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, and lesion score were studied to gain an understanding of the events that may lead to intestinal lesion formation associated with hemorrhagic enteritis virus (HEV) infection. Changes in vascular permeability in the duodenum in birds inoculated with HEV were examined, using colloidal carbon and ferritin as vascular markers. Turkeys inoculated with HEV had significantly (P less than 0.05) higher duodenal mast cell counts than did noninfected controls. Birds inoculated with HEV had significantly (P less than 0.05) more mucosal mast cells than did phosphate-buffered saline solution-inoculated birds. Connective tissue mast cell and basophil numbers were unaffected by viral inoculation. Thermal stress did not have significant effect on lesion severity, but did increase number of birds that developed the characteristic intestinal lesions. The heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio was significantly (P less than 0.05) higher in HEV-inoculated birds, compared with phosphate-buffered saline solution-inoculated controls. Increase in vascular permeability was only detected in HEV-inoculated birds with intestinal lesions. Results indicate that mast cells, and the vasoactive mediators contained within mast cells, may be important in the early manifestation of HEV infection. They also provide a possible mechanism through which biochemical and physiologic changes characteristic of HEV infection can occur.

  10. Mast Cells and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: From the Bench to the Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Song, Jun; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is traditionally defined as a functional disorder since it lacks demonstrable pathological abnormalities. However, in recent years, low grade inflammatory infiltration, often rich in mast cells, in both the small and large bowel, has been observed in some patients with IBS. The close association of mast cells with major intestinal functions, such as epithelial secretion and permeability, neuroimmune interactions, visceral sensation, and peristalsis, makes researchers and gastroenterologists to focus attention on the key roles of mast cells in the pathogenesis of IBS. Numerous studies have been carried out to identify the mechanisms in the development, infiltration, activation, and degranulation of intestinal mast cells, as well as the actions of mast cells in the processes of mucosal barrier disruption, mucosal immune dysregulation, visceral hypersensitivity, dysmotility, and local and central stress in IBS. Moreover, therapies targeting mast cells, such as mast cell stabilizers (cromoglycate and ketotifen) and antagonists of histamine and serotonin receptors, have been tried in IBS patients, and have partially exhibited considerable efficacy. This review focuses on recent advances in the role of mast cells in IBS, with particular emphasis on bridging experimental data with clinical therapeutics for IBS patients. PMID:26755686

  11. 3T3 fibroblasts induce cloned interleukin 3-dependent mouse mast cells to resemble connective tissue mast cells in granular constituency

    SciTech Connect

    Dayton, E.T.; Pharr, P.; Ogawa, M.; Serafin, W.E.; Austen, K.F.; Levi-Schaffer, F.; Stevens, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    As assessed by ultrastructure, histochemical staining, and T-cell dependency, in vitro-differentiated interleukin 3-dependent mouse mast cells are comparable to the mast cells that reside in the gastrointestinal mucosa but not in the skin or the serosal cavity of the mouse. The authors now demonstrate that when cloned interleukin 3-dependent mast cells are cocultured with mouse skin-derived 3T3 fibroblasts in the presence of WEHI-3 conditioned medium for 28 days, the mast cells acquire the ability to stain with safranin, increase their histamine content approx. 50-fold and their carboxypeptidase. A content approx. 100-fold, and augment approx. their biosynthesis of proteoglycans bearing /sup 35/S-labeled haparin relative to /sup 35/S-labeled chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans. Thus, fibroblasts induce interleukin 3-dependent mouse mast cells to change phenotype from mucosal-like to connective tissue-like, indicating that the biochemical and functional characteristics of this mast cell type are strongly influenced by the connective tissue microenvironment.

  12. Mast cell migration to Th2 stimulated airway smooth muscle from asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, A; Kaur, D; Page, S; Woodman, L; Armour, C L; Baraket, M; Bradding, P; Hughes, J M; Brightling, C E

    2006-01-01

    Background Mast cell microlocalisation within the airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundle is an important determinant of the asthmatic phenotype. We hypothesised that mast cells migrate towards ASM in response to ASM derived chemokines. Methods Primary ASM cultures from subjects with and without asthma were stimulated with interleukin (IL)‐1β, IL‐4, and IL‐13 alone and in combination. Mast cell chemotaxis towards these ASM supernatants was investigated, and the chemotaxins mediating migration by using specific blocking antibodies for stem cell factor (SCF) and the chemokine receptors CCR3, CXCR1, 3 and 4 as well as the Gi inhibitor pertussis toxin and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein were defined. The concentrations of CCL11, CXCL8, CXCL10, TGF‐β, and SCF in the supernatants were measured and the effect of non‐asthmatic ASM supernatants on the mast cell chemotactic activity of asthmatic ASM was examined. Results Human lung mast cells and HMC‐1 cells migrated towards Th2 stimulated ASM from asthmatics but not non‐asthmatics. Mast cell migration was mediated through the combined activation of CCR3 and CXCR1. CCL11 and CXCL8 expression by ASM increased markedly after stimulation, but was similar in those with and without asthma. ASM supernatants from non‐asthmatics inhibited mast cell migration towards the asthmatic ASM supernatant. Conclusion Th2 stimulated ASM from asthmatics is chemotactic for mast cells. Non‐asthmatic ASM releases a mediator or mediators that inhibit mast cell migration towards stimulated asthmatic ASM. Specifically targeting mast cell migration into the ASM bundle may provide a novel treatment for asthma. PMID:16601090

  13. Galangin attenuates mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hui-Hun; Bae, Yunju; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2013-07-01

    A great number of people are suffering from allergic inflammatory disease such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and sinusitis. Therefore discovery of drugs for the treatment of these diseases is an important subject in human health. In this study, we investigated anti-allergic inflammatory effect of galangin and underlying mechanisms of action using in vitro and in vivo models. Galangin inhibited histamine release by the reduction of intracellular calcium in phorbol 12-mystate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated human mast cells (HMC-1). Galangin decreased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, and IL-8. The inhibitory effect of galangin on theses pro-inflammatory cytokines was related with c-Jun N-terminal kinases, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor-κB, and caspase-1. Furthermore, galangin attenuated IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and the expression of histamine receptor 1 at the inflamed tissue. The inhibitory effects of galangin were more potent than cromolyn, a known anti-allergic drug. Our results showed that galangin down-regulates mast cell-derived allergic inflammatory reactions by blocking histamine release and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In light of in vitro and in vivo anti-allergic inflammatory effects, galangin could be a beneficial anti-allergic inflammatory agent.

  14. Silibinin attenuates mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis-like reactions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun Ho; Yan, Guang Hai

    2009-05-01

    Silibinin is known to have hepatoprotective, anti-carcinogenic and anti-inflammatory effects. However, roles of silibinin in the immediate-type allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) have not fully been investigated. In the present study, we have demonstrated that silibinin attenuated mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis-like reactions involved in allergic diseases. Oral administration of silibinin inhibited compound 48/80-induced passive cutaneous anaphylaxis-like reaction in mice. Silibinin also attenuated anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) immunoglobulin (Ig) E-mediated passive systemic and cutaneous anaphylaxis. Silibinin had no cytotoxicity on rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC). Silibinin dose-dependently reduced histamine release from RPMC activated by compound 48/80 or anti-DNP IgE. Moreover, silibinin inhibited the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 in RPMC. Pretreatment of silibinin suppressed the antigen-stimulated calcium uptake and activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) in RPMC. Furthermore, silibinin increased the intracellular cAMP level. Increased cAMP, decreased calcium uptake and suppressed NF-kappaB activity might be involved in the inhibitory effect of silibinin on the secretory response. Our findings provide possibility that silibinin may serve as an effective therapeutic agent for allergic diseases.

  15. Targeting mast cells: a new way to treat endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Binda, Maria Mercedes; Donnez, Jacques; Dolmans, Marie-Madeleine

    2017-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic estrogen-dependent inflammatory disease of unclear etiology that affects 15-20% of women of reproductive age. Efforts are now focusing on understanding new mechanisms involved in its physiopathology, like novel target pathways and different molecules. There is evidence that mast cells (MCs) play a role in this disease. This article summarizes recent achievements in preclinical studies and clinical activities investigating the role of MCs in endometriosis. Targeting MCs might offer new alternatives to treat this disease. Areas covered: A systematic literature search was performed (PubMed, Cochrane Library and ClinicalTrials.gov) using the keywords 'endometriosis and mast cells'. All relevant articles (34) found in PubMed were examined and their reference lists reviewed in order to pinpoint further studies for potential inclusion. Expert opinion: Since endometriosis is a multifactorial disease, and considering that numbers of MCs and activated MCs were clearly increased in endometriotic lesions in both animals and humans, use of MC stabilizers and inhibitors may prove to be effective to treat endometriosis and its associated pain. However, more data from preclinical studies and clinical trials will help to better define the status of MCs in the treatment of this pathology.

  16. Pharmacologic modulation of inflammatory mediator release by rat mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, T. J.; Parker, C. W.

    1976-01-01

    Current knowledge of the mechanism of inflammatory mediator release from mast cells is reviewed with particular reference to the role of cyclic nucleotides and calcium and their interrelationship with one another as defined by studies in highly purified rat peritoneal mast cells. Data are presented indicating an important role for intracellular cAMP and calcium in the mediation or modulation of release, as well as evidence for a close relationship between these two regulatory systems. Releasing agents which clearly act at the level of the plasma membrane (concanavalin A and anti-IgE antibody) are shown to differ from releasing agents that may not (48/80 and the ionophore A23187) in regard to the early cellular cAMP response, dependency of the release reaction on phosphatidyl serine, and kinetics of release. Pharmacologic modulators of release are discussed; these include: PGE1 and theophylline, which raise cAMP and inhibit release; and diazoxide, adenine, and carbachol which lower cAMP and potentiate release. Adenosine was also found to enhance release with marked effects at concentrations in the low nanomolar range. PMID:63247

  17. Pharmacological treatment options for mast cell activation disease.

    PubMed

    Molderings, Gerhard J; Haenisch, Britta; Brettner, Stefan; Homann, Jürgen; Menzen, Markus; Dumoulin, Franz Ludwig; Panse, Jens; Butterfield, Joseph; Afrin, Lawrence B

    2016-07-01

    Mast cell activation disease (MCAD) is a term referring to a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by aberrant release of variable subsets of mast cell (MC) mediators together with accumulation of either morphologically altered and immunohistochemically identifiable mutated MCs due to MC proliferation (systemic mastocytosis [SM] and MC leukemia [MCL]) or morphologically ordinary MCs due to decreased apoptosis (MC activation syndrome [MCAS] and well-differentiated SM). Clinical signs and symptoms in MCAD vary depending on disease subtype and result from excessive mediator release by MCs and, in aggressive forms, from organ failure related to MC infiltration. In most cases, treatment of MCAD is directed primarily at controlling the symptoms associated with MC mediator release. In advanced forms, such as aggressive SM and MCL, agents targeting MC proliferation such as kinase inhibitors may be provided. Targeted therapies aimed at blocking mutant protein variants and/or downstream signaling pathways are currently being developed. Other targets, such as specific surface antigens expressed on neoplastic MCs, might be considered for the development of future therapies. Since clinicians are often underprepared to evaluate, diagnose, and effectively treat this clinically heterogeneous disease, we seek to familiarize clinicians with MCAD and review current and future treatment approaches.

  18. Mast cells control insulitis and increase Treg cells to confer protection against STZ-induced type 1 diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Carlos, Daniela; Yaochite, Juliana N U; Rocha, Fernanda A; Toso, Vanina D; Malmegrim, Kelen C R; Ramos, Simone G; Jamur, Maria C; Oliver, Constance; Camara, Niels O; Andrade, Marcus V M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Silva, João S

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative alterations in mast cell numbers in pancreatic lymph nodes (PLNs) have been reported to be associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D) progression, but their potential role during T1D remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the role of mast cells in T1D induced by multiple low-dose streptozotocin (MLD-STZ) treatments, using two strains of mast cell-deficient mice (W/W(v) or Wsh/Wsh) and the adoptive transfer of mast cells. Mast cell deficient mice developed severe insulitis and accelerated hyperglycemia, with 100% of mice becoming diabetic compared to their littermates. In parallel, these diabetic mice had decreased numbers of T regulatory (Treg) cells in the PLNs. Additionally, mast cell deficiency caused a significant reduction in IL-10, TGF-β, and IL-6 expression in the pancreatic tissue. Interestingly, IL-6-deficient mice are more susceptible to T1D associated with reduced Treg-cell numbers in the PLNs, but mast cell transfer from wild-type mice induced protection to T1D in these mice. Finally, mast cell adoptive transfer prior to MLD-STZ administration conferred resistance to T1D, promoted increased Treg cells, and decreased IL-17-producing T cells in the PLNs. Taken together, our results indicate that mast cells are implicated in resistance to STZ-induced T1D via an immunological tolerance mechanism mediated by Treg cells.

  19. Cerebral mast cells contribute to postoperative cognitive dysfunction by promoting blood brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Susu; Dong, Hongquan; Zhang, Xiang; Li, Nana; Sun, Jie; Qian, Yanning

    2016-02-01

    Trauma induced neuroinflammation plays a key role in the development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). The blood-brain barrier (BBB), a highly specialized endothelial layer, is exquisitely sensitive to inflammatory insults, which can result in numerous neurocognitive syndromes. While brain mast cells are the "first responder" in the injury, the functional interactions between mast cells and the BBB remain poorly understood. Our results demonstrate that tibial fracture surgery can induce cognitive impairment relating to an inflammatory response and destabilization of the BBB. Disodium cromoglycate (cromolyn)--which acts as a mast cell stabilizer--inhibited this effect. Specifically, cromolyn resulted in ameliorated cognitive ability, decrease of inflammatory cytokines and increase of BBB stability. Taken together, these results suggest that activated mast cells contributed to central nervous system inflammation and cognitive dysfunction by promoting BBB disruption, and interactions between mast cells and the BBB could constitute a new and unique therapeutic target for POCD.

  20. Detection of mast cell secretion by using surface enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Li, Ren; Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua; Xie, Shusen; Lin, Juqiang

    2016-10-01

    Acupuncture can cause a remarkable increase in degranulation of the mast cells, which has attracted the interest of researchers since the 1980s. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) could obtain biochemical information with high sensitivity and specificity. In this study, SERS was used to detect the degree of degranulation of mast cells according to different incubate time. Mast cells was incubated with culture medium for 0 h, 12 h and 24 h, then centrifuge the culture medium, decant the supernatant, and discard the mast cell. SERS was performed to obtain the biochemical fingerprinting signatures of the centrifuged medium. The spectra data are then analyzed by spectral peaks attribution and the principal component analysis (PCA). The measured Raman spectra of the two groups were separated well by PCA. It indicated that mast cells had secreted some substances into cultured medium though degranulation did not happen.

  1. Exposure to tobacco-derived materials induces overproduction of secreted proteinases in mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Small-Howard, Andrea; Turner, Helen . E-mail: hturner@queens.org

    2005-04-15

    Mast cells reside at interfaces with the environment, including the mucosa of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. This localization exposes mast cells to inhaled, or ingested, environmental challenges. In the airways of smokers, resident immune cells will be in contact with the condensed components of cigarette smoke. Mast cells are of particular interest due to their ability to promote airway remodeling and mucus hypersecretion. Clinical data show increased levels of mast cell-secreted tryptase and increased numbers of degranulated mast cells in the lavage and bronchial tissue of smokers. Since mast cell-secreted proteinases (MCPTs), including tryptases, contribute to pathological airway remodeling, we investigated the relationship between mast cell proteinases and smoke exposure. We exposed a mast cell line to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). We show that CSC exposure increases MCPT levels in mast cells using an assay for tryptase-type MCPT activity. We hypothesized that this increase in MCPT activity reflects a CSC-induced increase in the cytosolic pool of proteinase molecules, via stimulation of MCPT transcription. Transcript array data suggested that mRNA changes in response to CSC were limited in number and peaked after 3 h of CSC exposure. However, we noted marked transcriptional regulation of several MCPT genes. CSC-induced changes in the mRNA levels for MCPTs were confirmed using quantitative RT-PCR. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic exposure to cigarette smoke up-regulates MCPT levels in mast cells at both the protein and the mRNA level. We suggest that the pathological airway remodeling that has been described in clinical studies of smoke inhalation may be attributable to MCPT overproduction in vivo.

  2. Mast cell mediated inflammatory response in chickens after infection with very virulent infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Decheng; Xiong, Jinmao; She, Ruiping; Liu, Liqiang; Zhang, Yanmei; Luo, Dongmei; Li, Wengui; Hu, Yanxin; Wang, Yinghua; Zhang, Qiong; Sun, Quan

    2008-07-15

    The potential role of the mast cells in the invasion of very virulent infectious bursal disease virus (vvIBDV) is unknown. We evaluated mast cell activity and tryptase production after vvIBDV infection in special pathogen-free (SPF) chickens using cytochemistry and immunohistochemistry analyses. The results were as follows: (1) severe histologic lesions were observed in the thymus, spleen, cloacal bursa, liver, kidney and other tissues. vvIBDV viral antigens were detected and presented extensively in the parenchymatous organs, in particular, the cloacal bursa, liver, kidney, thymus, spleen and pancreas. (2) In the vvIBDV-infected group, the mast cell population increased markedly in the liver, kidney, thymus, glandular stomach, spleen and cloacal bursa on days 1, 2 and 3 after vvIBDV infection (p<0.05). However, very few mast cells were observed in those same tissues in the controls, especially in the bursa of Fabricius. (3) Tryptase, a marker for activated mast cells, has a positive correlation with mast cell distribution. The mast cells identified in the tissues were likely to be activated since they were associated with cell degranulation and the presence of tryptase. Furthermore, the co-localization of mast cells, and presence of vvIBDV antigens suggests that the mast cells were activated by vvIBDV infection. Our results also suggest that tryptase may contribute to the inflammation of acute IBD induced by vvIBDV infection. Our research contributes to the further understanding of inflammatory response mechanisms and the contribution of mast cell activity to this process.

  3. Mast cells, disease and gastrointestinal cancer: A comprehensive review of recent findings

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Kyle; Kennedy, Lindsey; Meng, Fanyin; Alpini, Gianfranco; Francis, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Paul Ehrlich, a German scientist, discovered what is known as the mast cell in the late 1800’s, which has proven to be an important player in the immune system of vertebrates. Mast cells are ubiquitous throughout the tissues of the human body and play numerous roles, both beneficial and destructive. We know they are important in our army of immunity warrior cells, which defend us against viruses, bacteria and parasitic invaders. They are also very well known for the havoc they wreak, causing uncomfortable symptoms due to their release of histamine and other mediators which cause the all too familiar itching, sneezing, urticaria and rhinorrhea of allergic responses. Mast cell activities are diverse and include painful inflammatory reactions in autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. In the gastrointestinal system, mast cells are implicated in diverse actions such as increased gastric acid secretion, polyp formation and uncomfortable conditions such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome. The role of immunology and mast cells in these areas is intriguing but less well understood than their role in allergic responses. Because mast cells have been implicated in both physiologic as well as pathogenic processes, they have been the subjects of avid study. Review of the current literature on mast cell biology reveals that there are many studies of their presence within the tumor microenvironment and evidence, which supports mast cell influence on tumor angiogenesis, tumor invasion, and immune suppression. The studies reviewed in this article concentrate largely on mast cells in human GI malignancies. This review also provides background information regarding mast cells, such as their origination, their location within the body, how they are activated and how they function as mediators. PMID:22943044

  4. Bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells and peritoneal mast cells as targets of a growth activity secreted by BALB/3T3 fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Jozaki, K.; Kuriu, A.; Hirota, S.; Onoue, H.; Ebi, Y.; Adachi, S.; Ma, J.Y.; Tarui, S.; Kitamura, Y. )

    1991-03-01

    When fibroblast cell lines were cultured in contact with bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (CMC), both NIH/3T3 and BALB/3T3 cell lines supported the proliferation of CMC. In contrast, when contact between fibroblasts and CMC was prohibited by Biopore membranes or soft agar, only BALB/3T3 fibroblasts supported CMC proliferation, suggesting that BALB/3T3 but not NIH/3T3 cells secreted a significant amount of a mast cell growth activity. Moreover, the BALB/3T3-derived growth activity induced the incorporation of (3H)thymidine by CMC and the clonal growth of peritoneal mast cells in methylcellulose. The mast cell growth activity appeared to be different from interleukin 3 (IL-3) and interleukin 4 (IL-4), because mRNAs for these interleukins were not detectable in BALB/3T3 fibroblasts. Although mast cells are genetically deficient in tissues of W/Wv mice, CMC did develop when bone marrow cells of W/Wv mice were cultured with pokeweed mitogen-stimulated spleen cell-conditioned medium. Because BALB/3T3 fibroblast-conditioned medium (BALB-FCM) did not induce the incorporation of (3H)thymidine by W/Wv CMC, the growth activity in BALB-FCM appeared to be a ligand for the receptor encoded by the W (c-kit) locus. Because CMC and peritoneal mast cells are obtained as homogeneous suspensions rather easily, these cells may be potentially useful as targets for the fibroblast-derived mast cell growth activity.

  5. A novel method to generate and culture human mast cells: Peripheral CD34+ stem cell-derived mast cells (PSCMCs).

    PubMed

    Schmetzer, Oliver; Valentin, Patricia; Smorodchenko, Anna; Domenis, Rossana; Gri, Giorgia; Siebenhaar, Frank; Metz, Martin; Maurer, Marcus

    2014-11-01

    The identification and characterization of human mast cell (MC) functions are hindered by the shortage of MC populations suitable for investigation. Here, we present a novel technique for generating large numbers of well differentiated and functional human MCs from peripheral stem cells (=peripheral stem cell-derived MCs, PSCMCs). Innovative and key features of this technique include 1) the use of stem cell concentrates, which are routinely discarded by blood banks, as the source of CD34+ stem cells, 2) cell culture in serum-free medium and 3) the addition of LDL as well as selected cytokines. In contrast to established and published protocols that use CD34+ or CD133+ progenitor cells from full blood, we used a pre-enriched cell population obtained from stem cell concentrates, which yielded up to 10(8) differentiated human MCs per batch after only three weeks of culture starting with 10(6) total CD34+ cells. The total purity on MCs (CD117+, FcεR1+) generated by this method varied between 55 and 90%, of which 4-20% were mature MCs that contain tryptase and chymase and show expression of FcεRI and CD117 in immunohistochemistry. PSCMCs showed robust histamine release in response to stimulation with anti-FcεR1 or IgE/anti-IgE, and increased proliferation and differentiation in response to IL-1β or IFN-γ. Taken together, this new protocol of the generation of large numbers of human MCs provides for an innovative and suitable option to investigate the biology of human MCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Global microRNA expression is essential for murine mast cell development in vivo.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sun Young; Brandal, Stephanie; Kapur, Reuben; Zhu, Zhou; Takemoto, Clifford M

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that have been shown to play a critical role in normal physiology and disease, such as hematopoietic development and cancer. However, their role in mast-cell function and development is poorly understood. The major objective of this study was to determine how global miRNA expression affects mast-cell physiology. The RNase III endonuclease, Dicer, is required for the processing of pre-miRNAs into mature miRNAs. To investigate the effect of global miRNA depletion on mast cells in vivo, we generated a mast-cell-specific knock out of Dicer in mice. Transgenic mice (Mcpt5-Cre) that express Cre selectively in connective tissue mast cells were crossed with mice carrying the floxed conditional Dicer allele (Dicer fl/fl). Mcpt5-Cre × Dicer fl/fl mice with homozygous Dicer gene deletion in mast cells were found to have a profound mast-cell deficiency with near complete loss of peritoneal, gastrointestinal, and skin mast cells. We examined the in vivo functional consequence of mast-cell-specific Dicer deletion using an immunoglobulin-E-dependent passive systemic anaphylaxis murine model. Immunoglobulin-E-sensitized wild type Mcpt5-Cre × Dicer +/+ and heterozygous Mcpt5-Cre × Dicer fl/+ mice show marked hypothermia with antigen; however, homozygous Mcpt5-Cre × Dicer fl/fl mice were completely unresponsive to antigen challenge. These studies suggest a critical role for Dicer and miRNA expression for establishment of tissue compartments of functional mast cells in vivo.

  7. Degradation of C3a anaphylatoxins by rat mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuoka, Y.; Hugli, T.E.

    1986-05-01

    Incubation of /sup 125/I-human C3a with rat peritoneal mast cells (RMC) causes extensive degradation of the ligand. Both cell-bound and free /sup 125/I-C3a (hu) was degraded by RMC, even at 0/sup 0/C, based on SDS-PAGE analysis. The authors examined several protease inhibitors for their ability to prevent degradation of /sup 125/I-C3a (hu). Degradation of /sup 125/I-C3a (hu) by RMC was not inhibited by leupeptin, antipain, elastatinal, pepstatin, ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin or EDTA. TPCK and TLCK were only partially effective. PMSF, chymostatin and SBTI were most effective in preventing /sup 125/I-C3a (hu) degradation. These latter compounds are effective inhibitors of the chymotrypsin-like enzyme chymase extracted from RMC, as is TPCK, based on hydrolysis of the substrate BTEE. Degradation of cell-bound ligand is totally prevented only by PMSF (or DFP). Therefore, /sup 125/I-C3a (hu) bound to the RMC appears to be degraded predominantly by chymase; however the cell-bound ligand is attacked by other surface proteases. Degradation of rat C3a by RMC was examined. After incubation with RMC, cell-bound and free /sup 125/I-C3a (rat) showed no evidence of degradation with or without inhibitors present. From these results, the authors conclude that chymase may not play a significant role in regulating anaphylatoxin activity. Furthermore, the authors propose that rat C3a is a preferred ligand for identifying receptors on mast cells because of its resistance to proteolysis.

  8. Phenotypic changes of bone marrow-derived mast cells after intraperitoneal transfer into W/Wv mice that are genetically deficient in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The ability of mouse IL-3-dependent, bone marrow culture-derived mast cells (BMMC) to generate serosal mast cells (SMC) in vivo after adoptive transfer to mast cell-deficient mice has been defined by chemical and immunochemical criteria. BMMC differentiated and grown from WBB6F1-+/+ mouse progenitor cells in medium containing PWM/splenocyte-conditioned medium synthesized a approximately 350,000 Mr protease-resistant proteoglycan bearing approximately 55,000 Mr glycosaminoglycans, as defined by gel filtration of each. Approximately 85% of the glycosaminoglycans bound to the cell-associated BMMC proteoglycans were chondroitin sulfates based upon their susceptibility to chondroitinase ABC digestion; HPLC of the chondroitinase ABC- generated unsaturated disaccharides revealed these glycosaminoglycans to be chondroitin sulfate E. As determined by heparinase and nitrous acid degradations, approximately 10% of the glycosaminoglycans bound to BMMC proteoglycans were heparin. In contrast, mast cells recovered from the peritoneal cavity of congenitally mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv mice 15 wk after intraperitoneal injection of BMMC synthesized approximately 650,000 Mr protease-resistant proteoglycans that contained approximately 80% heparin glycosaminoglycans of approximately 105,000 Mr. Thus, after adoptive transfer, the SMC of the previously mast cell-deficient mice were like those recovered from the normal WBB6F1-+/+ mice that were shown to synthesize approximately 600,000 Mr proteoglycans that contained approximately 80% heparin glycosaminoglycans of approximately 115,000 Mr. As assessed by indirect immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry using the B1.1 rat mAb (an antibody that recognizes an epitope located on the neutral glycosphingolipid globopentaosylceramide), approximately 5% of BMMC bound the antibody detectably, whereas approximately 72% of the SMC that were harvested from mast cell-deficient mice 15 wk after adoptive transfer of BMMC were B1.1-positive

  9. Mast cells in chronic inflammation, pelvic pain and depression in women.

    PubMed

    Graziottin, Alessandra; Skaper, Stephen D; Fusco, Mariella

    2014-07-01

    Inflammatory and neuroinflammatory processes are increasingly recognized as critical pathophysiologic steps in the development of multiple chronic diseases and in the etiology of persistent pain and depression. Mast cells are immune cells now viewed as cellular sensors in inflammation and immunity. When stimulated, mast cells release an array of mediators to orchestrate an inflammatory response. These mediators can directly initiate tissue responses on resident cells, and may also regulate the activity of other immune cells, including central microglia. New evidence supports the involvement of peripheral and central mast cells in the development of pain processes as well as in the transition from acute, to chronic and neuropathic pain. That behavioral and endocrine states can increase the number and activation of peripheral and brain mast cells suggests that mast cells represent the immune cells that peripherally and centrally coordinate inflammatory processes in neuropsychiatric diseases such as depression and anxiety which are associated with chronic pelvic pain. Given that increasing evidence supports the activated mast cell as a director of common inflammatory pathways/mechanisms contributing to chronic and neuropathic pelvic pain and comorbid neuropsychiatric diseases, mast cells may be considered a viable target for the multifactorial management of both pain and depression.

  10. Cutaneous mast cell tumor and mastocytosis in a black-masked lovebird (Agapornis personata).

    PubMed

    Dallwig, Rebecca K; Whittington, Julia K; Terio, Karen; Barger, Ann

    2012-03-01

    A 12-year-old female black-masked lovebird (Agapornis personata) with a cobalt color mutation was presented for self-mutilation of a mass located on the right lateral neck. Cytologic evaluation of the soft tissue mass revealed a predominance of poorly stained mast cells with metachromatic intracytoplasmic granules. The presumptive diagnosis was cutaneous mast cell tumor. Clinical evaluation, results of a complete blood cell count and biochemical analysis, and radiographs did not reveal systemic manifestation of mast cell disease. The mass was surgically resected, but surgical margins were limited because of the location of the mass and the small size of the patient. The lovebird died the day after surgery. Gross postmortem examination revealed splenomegaly, multifocal pinpoint white nodules throughout the liver parenchyma, severe thickening and yellow coloration of the great vessels, and pale pink swelling of the caudal right kidney. Histopathologic analysis of the resected mass revealed sheets of round cells that contain metachromatic granules, defined as neoplastic mast cells, within a fine fibrovascular stroma. Similar neoplastic cells were seen in the right kidney, hepatic sinusoids, splenic pulp, periovarian connective tissue, and bone marrow. The histopathologic diagnosis was a cutaneous mast cell tumor and disseminated mast cell disease, or mastocytosis. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of a cutaneous mast cell tumor and mastocytosis in a psittacine bird.

  11. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ modulates mast cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Yao, Pei-Li; Morales, Jose L; Gonzalez, Frank J; Peters, Jeffrey M

    2017-04-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-β/δ (PPARβ/δ) is known to have multiple anti-inflammatory effects, typically observed in endothelial cells, macrophages, T cells and B cells. Despite the fact that mast cells are important mediators of inflammation, to date, the role of PPARβ/δ in mast cells has not been examined. Hence, the present study examined the hypothesis that PPARβ/δ modulates mast cell phenotype. Bone-marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) and peritoneal mast cells from Pparβ/δ(+/+) mice expressed higher levels of high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) compared with Pparβ/δ(-/-) mice. BMMCs from Pparβ/δ(+/+) mice also exhibited dense granules, associated with higher expression of enzymes and proteases compared with Pparβ/δ(-/-) mice. Resting BMMCs from Pparβ/δ(+/+) mice secreted lower levels of inflammatory cytokines, associated with the altered activation of phospholipase Cγ1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases compared with Pparβ/δ(-/-) mice. Moreover, the production of cytokines by mast cells induced by various stimuli was highly dependent on PPARβ/δ expression. This study demonstrates that PPARβ/δ is an important regulator of mast cell phenotype.

  12. Mast cells are dispensable in a genetic mouse model of chronic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sulcova, Jitka; Meyer, Michael; Guiducci, Eva; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Werner, Sabine

    2015-06-01

    Chronic inflammatory skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, affect a large percentage of the population, but the role of different immune cells in the pathogenesis of these disorders is largely unknown. Recently, we found that mice lacking fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (Fgfr1) and Fgfr2 (K5-R1/R2 mice) in the epidermis have a severe impairment in the epidermal barrier, which leads to the development of a chronic inflammatory skin disease that shares many features with human atopic dermatitis. Using Fgfr1-/Fgfr2-deficient mice, we analyzed the consequences of the loss of mast cells. Mast cells accumulated and degranulated in the skin of young Fgfr1-/Fgfr2-deficient mice, most likely as a consequence of increased expression of the mast cell chemokine Ccl2. The increase in mast cells occurred before the development of histological abnormalities, indicating a functional role of these cells in the inflammatory skin phenotype. To test this hypothesis, we mated the Fgfr1-/Fgfr2-deficient mice with mast cell-deficient CreMaster mice. Surprisingly, loss of mast cells did not or only mildly affect keratinocyte proliferation, epidermal thickness, epidermal barrier function, accumulation and activation of different immune cells, or expression of different proinflammatory cytokines in the skin. These results reveal that mast cells are dispensable for the development of chronic inflammation in response to a defect in the epidermal barrier. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Regulation of mast cell characteristics by cytokines: divergent effects of interleukin-4 on immature mast cell lines versus mature human skin mast cells.

    PubMed

    Thienemann, Friedrich; Henz, Beate M; Babina, Magda

    2004-08-01

    Mast cells (MC) are of hematopoietic origin but complete their differentiation exclusively within tissues. The mediators that positively or negatively affect the maturation process are incompletely defined. Here, the human MC line HMC-1 (subclone 5C6) was used along with several treatments (IL-4, IL-6, NGFbeta), either alone or in combination, and MC differentiation was monitored by flow-cytometric analysis of c-kit, tryptase, and FcepsilonRIalpha expression. Of the different treatments, IL-4 displayed the clearest effects by suppressing the expression of the three markers and inhibiting cellular growth, while the other cytokines had no (NGFbeta) or negligible (IL-6) effects only. The downregulating effects of IL-4 could not be overcome by any other treatment. There is some controversy in the literature as to the impact of IL-4 on the MC lineage. To determine whether the effects from IL-4 were differentiation stage dependent, two further human MC subsets (skin MC and LAD 2 cells) were investigated. No effects on c-kit and FcepsilonRIalpha expression were noted when terminally differentiated skin MC were used as target cells, while a modest downregulation of c-kit was observed with intermediately matured LAD 2 cells. In sharp contrast to HMC-1 5C6 cells, the survival of skin MC was significantly enhanced by IL-4 treatment. Our data therefore imply that at a lower maturation stage, IL-4 acts as a negative regulator of the MC lineage, but that this property disappears or is even reversed upon terminal differentiation of the cell. Our study provides direct proof that the effects of IL-4 vary substantially in the course of MC maturation.

  14. Key regulators control distinct transcriptional programmes in blood progenitor and mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Calero-Nieto, Fernando J; Ng, Felicia S; Wilson, Nicola K; Hannah, Rebecca; Moignard, Victoria; Leal-Cervantes, Ana I; Jimenez-Madrid, Isabel; Diamanti, Evangelia; Wernisch, Lorenz; Göttgens, Berthold

    2014-01-01

    Despite major advances in the generation of genome-wide binding maps, the mechanisms by which transcription factors (TFs) regulate cell type identity have remained largely obscure. Through comparative analysis of 10 key haematopoietic TFs in both mast cells and blood progenitors, we demonstrate that the largely cell type-specific binding profiles are not opportunistic, but instead contribute to cell type-specific transcriptional control, because (i) mathematical modelling of differential binding of shared TFs can explain differential gene expression, (ii) consensus binding sites are important for cell type-specific binding and (iii) knock-down of blood stem cell regulators in mast cells reveals mast cell-specific genes as direct targets. Finally, we show that the known mast cell regulators Mitf and c-fos likely contribute to the global reorganisation of TF binding profiles. Taken together therefore, our study elucidates how key regulatory TFs contribute to transcriptional programmes in several distinct mammalian cell types. PMID:24760698

  15. Inhibitory effects of Acorus calamus extracts on mast cell-dependent anaphylactic reactions using mast cell and mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Young; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Wan-Jae; Jiang, Jun; Kim, Myong-Ki; Shin, Yong-Kook; Kim, Dong-Woo; Moon, Won-Kook; Kwon, Sang-Chul; Koppula, Sushruta; Kang, Tae-Bong; Lee, Kwang-Ho

    2012-05-07

    Acorus calamus Linn. (Araceae) is a traditional herbal plant used for centuries to treat various allergic symptoms including asthma and bronchitis. The present study was focused to provide a pharmacological basis for the traditional use of Acorus calamus in allergic symptoms using the mast cell-dependent anaphylactic reactions in in vitro and in vivo models. Cell viabilities were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Dinitrophenyl-human serum albumin (DNP-HSA) induced β-hexosaminidase and interleukin (IL)-4 productions in IgE-sensitized rat basophilic leukaemia (RBL-2H3) cells were measured by enzymatic assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reaction mouse model was implemented for in vivo studies. Hot water (HW), butylene glycol (BG), hexane (HE) and steam distilled (SD) extracts of Acorus calamus showed different cytoxicity levels evaluated in RBL-2H3 cells. Sub-toxic doses of HW extract suppressed the β-hexosaminidase secretion and IL-4 production significantly and dose dependently in DNP-HSA induced IgE-sensitized RBL-2H3 cells compared to other extracts of Acorus calamus. Further, in vivo studies also revealed that the HW extract significantly inhibited the PCA reaction in mouse compared to the normal control group. HW extract of Acorus calamus most effectively inhibited degranulation and IL-4 secretion in DNP-HSA-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells and also reduced the mast cell-mediated PCA reaction in mouse, providing a therapeutic evidence for its traditional use in ameliorating allergic reactions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Induction of mast cell proliferation, maturation, and heparin synthesis by the rat c-kit ligand, stem cell factor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, M.; Takeishi, Takashi; Geissler, E.N. ); Thompson, H.; Metcalfe, D.D. ); Langley, K.E.; Zsebo, K.M.; Galli, S.J. )

    1991-07-15

    The authors investigated the effects of a newly recognized multifunctional growth factor, the c-kit ligand stem cell factor (SCF), on mouse mast cell proliferation and phenotype. Recombinant rat SCF{sup 164} (rrSCF{sup 164}) induced the development of large numbers of dermal mast cells in normal mice in vivo. Many of these mast cells had features of connective tissue-type mast cells (CTMC), in that they were reactive both with the heparin-binding fluorescent dye berberine sulfate and with safranin. In vitro, rrSCF{sup 164} induced the proliferation of cloned interleukin 3 (IL-3)-dependent mouse mast cells and primary populations of IL-3-dependent, bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (BMCMC), which represent immature mast cells, and purified peritoneal mast cells, which represent a type of mature CTMC> BMCMC maintained in rrSCF{sup 164} not only proliferated but also matured. These findings identify SCF as a single cytokine that can induce immature, IL-3-dependent mast cells to mature and to acquire multiple characteristics of CTMC. These findings also directly demonstrate that SCF can regulate the development of a cellular lineage expressing c-kit through effects on both proliferation and maturation.

  17. New models for analyzing mast cell functions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Reber, Laurent L; Marichal, Thomas; Galli, Stephen J

    2012-12-01

    In addition to their well-accepted role as critical effector cells in anaphylaxis and other acute IgE-mediated allergic reactions, mast cells (MCs) have been implicated in a wide variety of processes that contribute to disease or help to maintain health. Although some of these roles were first suggested by analyses of MC products or functions in vitro, it is critical to determine whether, and under which circumstances, such potential roles actually can be performed by MCs in vivo. This review discusses recent advances in the development and analysis of mouse models to investigate the roles of MCs and MC-associated products during biological responses in vivo, and comments on some of the similarities and differences in the results obtained with these newer versus older models of MC deficiency.

  18. New Developments in Mast Cell Biology: Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Greer; Bradding, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are present in connective tissue and at mucosal surfaces in all classes of vertebrates. In health, they contribute to tissue homeostasis, host defense, and tissue repair via multiple receptors regulating the release of a vast stockpile of proinflammatory mediators, proteases, and cytokines. However, these potentially protective cells are a double-edged sword. When there is a repeated or long-term stimulus, MC activation leads to tissue damage and dysfunction. Accordingly, MCs are implicated in the pathophysiologic aspects of numerous diseases covering all organs. Understanding the biology of MCs, their heterogeneity, mechanisms of activation, and signaling cascades may lead to the development of novel therapies for many diseases for which current treatments are lacking or are of poor efficacy. This review will focus on updates and developments in MC biology and their clinical implications, with a particular focus on their role in respiratory diseases.

  19. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Eisenmann, Kathryn M.

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD) plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy. PMID:28243603

  20. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Karki, Surya B; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda; Eisenmann, Kathryn M; Ayan, Halim

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD) plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy.

  1. The history of the controversial relationship between mast cells and basophils.

    PubMed

    Crivellato, Enrico; Nico, Beatrice; Ribatti, Domenico

    2011-12-30

    Work on mast cells and basophils began with their identification by Paul Ehrlich at the end of the 19th century. Mast cells and basophils were immediately perceived as closely linked cells and early nomenclature formulated by Ehrlich himself, i.e., tissue "Mastzellen" and blood "Mastzellen", reflected this unifying viewpoint. With time, important functional affinities but also substantial diversities were recognized. This review article focuses on the historical development of the concept of mast cell/basophil specificity, from the initial identification of these cells to current studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. EFFECT OF SIVANAAR AMIRTHAM AND AYAKKANTHA CHENDOORAM IN EXPERIMENTAL INFLAMMATION AND MAST CELL PROTECTION

    PubMed Central

    Jaswanth, A.; Ravikumar, Akila; Robert, S. Jerry Heison; Jayakar, B.

    1998-01-01

    The Siddha Drugs Sivannar Amirthan (SA), Ayakkantha chendooram (AC) and their combinations were screened for their anti-inflammatory effect against carrageenin induced paw edema and for its protective effect on mast cellos against degranulation, A significant anti-inflammatory and mast cell protective effects were observed. PMID:22556884

  3. Type 1 diabetes in NOD mice unaffected by mast cell deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Dario A; Fu, Wenxian; Schonefeldt, Susann; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Lampi, Yulia; Liston, Adrian; Mathis, Diane; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer

    2014-11-01

    Mast cells have been invoked as important players in immune responses associated with autoimmune diseases. Based on in vitro studies, or in vivo through the use of Kit mutant mice, mast cells have been suggested to play immunological roles in direct antigen presentation to both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, in the regulation of T-cell and dendritic cell migration to lymph nodes, and in Th1 versus Th2 polarization, all of which could significantly impact the immune response against self-antigens in autoimmune disease, including type 1 diabetes (T1D). Until now, the role of mast cells in the onset and incidence of T1D has only been indirectly tested through the use of low-specificity mast cell inhibitors and activators, and published studies reported contrasting results. Our three laboratories have generated independently two strains of mast cell-deficient nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, NOD.Cpa3(Cre/+) (Heidelberg) and NOD.Kit(W-sh/W-sh) (Leuven and Boston), to address the effects of mast cell deficiency on the development of T1D in the NOD strain. Our collective data demonstrate that both incidence and progression of T1D in NOD mice are independent of mast cells. Moreover, analysis of pancreatic lymph node cells indicated that lack of mast cells has no discernible effect on the autoimmune response, which involves both innate and adaptive immune components. Our results demonstrate that mast cells are not involved in T1D in the NOD strain, making their role in this process nonessential and excluding them as potential therapeutic targets. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  4. Differential effects of protoporphyrin and uroporphyrin on murine mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, H.W.; Gigli, I.; Wasserman, S.I.

    1987-03-01

    To investigate the mechanisms responsible for the distinct cutaneous manifestations of erythropoietic protoporphyria and porphyria cutanea tarda, the effects of protoporphyrin (PP) and uroporphyrin (URO), the predominant porphyrins in the respective disease, on mast cells were examined. Release of preformed and generated mediators was assessed by the release of radioactivity from cells labeled with (/sup 3/H)serotonin and (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid, respectively. Clinically relevant doses of PP (25-500 ng/ml) and 396-407 nm irradiation (3-16 X 10(2)J/m2) induced maximal net release of preformed mediators ,f 44.52 +/- 6.6 to 58.01 +/- 4.0% (mean +/- SE). In contrast, irradiation in the presence of URO (50-5000 ng/ml) resulted in less than 5% net release. (3H)Serotonin release induced by PP and irradiation was calcium-independent, and was not enhanced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a known activator of protein kinase C. This release was suppressed by catalase, a scavenger of hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, irradiation in the presence of PP, but not in the presence of URO, resulted in perturbation of cell membrane. Irradiation in the presence of PP also resulted in a maximal net release of generated mediators of 9.98 +/- 3.5% (mean +/- SE), whereas similar treatment in the presence of URO induced less than 0.5% net release. These results suggested that the burning, stinging, erythema, and edema experienced by patients with erythropoietic protoporphyria following sun exposure, and the lack of such findings in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda, may be explained, at least in part, by the differential effects of PP and URO on mast cells.

  5. Effects of a Moderately Lower Temperature on the Proliferation and Degranulation of Rat Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoyu; Yin, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Jiwei; Chen, Lin; Chen, Jingwen; Han, Xiaodong; Xiang, Zou; Li, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are traditionally considered as key effector cells in IgE-mediated allergic diseases. However, the roles of mast cells have also been implicated in diverse physiological and pathological processes. Mast cells are distributed in various organs and tissues of various species. Some of the organs and tissues, such as testis, skin, and the upper part of the respiratory tract, have a temperature that is lower than the body's core temperature. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of a lower temperature on the proliferation and degranulation of rat mast cells. Here, we demonstrate that cell growth was retarded at 35°C compared to 37°C for both rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC) and RBL-2H3, a rat mast cell line. Furthermore, RPMC became more susceptible to degranulation at 35°C compared to 37°C. In contrast, degranulation of RBL-2H3 was not as sensitive to temperature change as RPMC. The functionality of mast cells in unique organs with a lower temperature warrants further analysis.

  6. Olopatadine inhibits exocytosis in rat peritoneal mast cells by counteracting membrane surface deformation.

    PubMed

    Baba, Asuka; Tachi, Masahiro; Maruyama, Yoshio; Kazama, Itsuro

    2015-01-01

    Besides its anti-allergic properties as a histamine receptor antagonist, olopatadine stabilizes mast cells by inhibiting the release of chemokines. Since olopatadine bears amphiphilic features and is preferentially partitioned into the lipid bilayers of the plasma membrane, it would induce some morphological changes in mast cells and thus affect the process of exocytosis. Employing the standard patch-clamp whole-cell recording technique, we examined the effects of olopatadine and other anti-allergic drugs on the membrane capacitance (Cm) in rat peritoneal mast cells during exocytosis. Using confocal imaging of a water-soluble fluorescent dye, lucifer yellow, we also examined their effects on the deformation of the plasma membrane. Low concentrations of olopatadine (1 or 10 µM) did not significantly affect the GTP-γ-S-induced increase in the Cm. However, 100 µM and 1 mM olopatadine almost totally suppressed the increase in the Cm. Additionally, these doses completely washed out the trapping of the dye on the cell surface, indicating that olopatadine counteracted the membrane surface deformation induced by exocytosis. As shown by electron microscopy, olopatadine generated inward membrane bending in mast cells. This study provides electrophysiological evidence for the first time that olopatadine dose-dependently inhibits the process of exocytosis in rat peritoneal mast cells. Such mast cell stabilizing properties of olopatadine may be attributed to its counteracting effects on the plasma membrane deformation in degranulating mast cells. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Impaired mast cell maturation and degranulation and attenuated allergic responses in Ndrg1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Sunaga, Kohei; Tanaka, Satoshi; Nakamura, Masanori; Arata, Satoru; Okuda, Tomohiko; Moon, Tae-Chul; Chang, Hyeun-Wook; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Kokame, Koichi; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Murakami, Makoto; Kudo, Ichiro

    2007-06-01

    We have previously reported that N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is an early inducible protein during the maturation of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) toward a connective tissue mast cell-like phenotype. To clarify the function of NDRG1 in mast cells and allergic responses, we herein analyzed mast cell-associated phenotypes of mice lacking the Ndrg1 gene. Allergic responses including IgE-mediated passive systemic and cutaneous anaphylactic reactions were markedly attenuated in Ndrg1-deficient mice as compared with those in wild-type mice. In Ndrg1-deficient mice, dermal and peritoneal mast cells were decreased in number and morphologically abnormal with impaired degranulating ability. Ex vivo, Ndrg1-deficient BMMCs cocultured with Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts in the presence of stem cell factor, a condition that facilitates the maturation of BMMCs toward a CTMC-like phenotype, displayed less exocytosis than replicate wild-type cells after the cross-linking of FcepsilonRI or stimulation with compound 48/80, even though the exocytotic response of IL-3-maintained, immature BMMCs from both genotypes was comparable. Unlike degranulation, the production of leukotriene and cytokines by cocultured BMMCs was unaffected by NDRG1 deficiency. Taken together, the altered phenotypes of Ndrg1-deficient mast cells both in vivo and ex vivo suggest that NDRG1 has roles in the terminal maturation and effector function (degranulation) of mast cells.

  8. Opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans elicits a temporal response in primary human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lopes, José Pedro; Stylianou, Marios; Nilsson, Gunnar; Urban, Constantin F

    2015-07-20

    Immunosuppressed patients are frequently afflicted with severe mycoses caused by opportunistic fungal pathogens. Besides being a commensal, colonizing predominantly skin and mucosal surfaces, Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen. Mast cells are present in tissues prone to fungal colonization being expectedly among the first immune cells to get into contact with C. albicans. However, mast cell-fungus interaction remains a neglected area of study. Here we show that human mast cells mounted specific responses towards C. albicans. Collectively, mast cell responses included the launch of initial, intermediate and late phase components determined by the secretion of granular proteins and cytokines. Initially mast cells reduced fungal viability and occasionally internalized yeasts. C. albicans could evade ingestion by intracellular growth leading to cellular death. Furthermore, secreted factors in the supernatants of infected cells recruited neutrophils, but not monocytes. Late stages were marked by the release of cytokines that are known to be anti-inflammatory suggesting a modulation of initial responses. C. albicans-infected mast cells formed extracellular DNA traps, which ensnared but did not kill the fungus. Our results suggest that mast cells serve as tissue sentinels modulating antifungal immune responses during C. albicans infection. Consequently, these findings open new doors for understanding fungal pathogenicity.

  9. Carbon-fiber microelectrode amperometry reveals sickle-cell-induced inflammation and chronic morphine effects on single mast cells.

    PubMed

    Manning, Benjamin M; Hebbel, Robert P; Gupta, Kalpna; Haynes, Christy L

    2012-03-16

    Sickle cell disease, caused by a mutation of hemoglobin, is characterized by a complex pathophysiology including an important inflammatory component. Mast cells are tissue-resident leukocytes known to influence a range of immune functions in a variety of different ways, largely through the secretion of biologically active mediators from preformed granules. However, it is not understood how mast cells influence the inflammatory environment in sickle cell disease. A notable consequence of sickle cell disease is severe pain. Therefore, morphine is often used to treat this disease. Because mast cells express opioid receptors, it is pertinent to understand how chronic morphine exposure influences mast cell function and inflammation in sickle cell disease. Herein, carbon-fiber microelectrode amperometry (CFMA) was used to monitor the secretion of immunoactive mediators from single mast cells. CFMA enabled the detection and quantification of discrete exocytotic events from single mast cells. Mast cells from two transgenic mouse models expressing human sickle hemoglobin (hBERK1 and BERK) and a control mouse expressing normal human hemoglobin (HbA-BERK) were monitored using CFMA to explore the impact of sickle-cell-induced inflammation and chronic morphine exposure on mast cell function. This work, utilizing the unique mechanistic perspective provided by CFMA, describes how mast cell function is significantly altered in hBERK1 and BERK mice, including decreased serotonin released compared to HbA-BERK controls. Furthermore, morphine was shown to significantly increase the serotonin released from HbA-BERK mast cells and demonstrated the capacity to reverse the observed sickle-cell-induced changes in mast cell function.

  10. Mast Cells are Important Modifiers of Autoimmune Disease: With so Much Evidence, Why is There Still Controversy?

    PubMed

    Brown, Melissa A; Hatfield, Julianne K

    2012-01-01

    There is abundant evidence that mast cells are active participants in events that mediate tissue damage in autoimmune disease. Disease-associated increases in mast cell numbers accompanied by mast cell degranulation and elaboration of numerous mast cell mediators at sites of inflammation are commonly observed in many human autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and bullous pemphigoid. In animal models, treatment with mast cell stabilizing drugs or mast cell ablation can result in diminished disease. A variety of receptors including those engaged by antibody, complement, pathogens, and intrinsic danger signals are implicated in mast cell activation in disease. Similar to their role as first responders in infection settings, mast cells likely orchestrate early recruitment of immune cells, including neutrophils, to the sites of autoimmune destruction. This co-localization promotes cellular crosstalk and activation and results in the amplification of the local inflammatory response thereby promoting and sustaining tissue damage. Despite the evidence, there is still a debate regarding the relative role of mast cells in these processes. However, by definition, mast cells can only act as accessory cells to the self-reactive T and/or antibody driven autoimmune responses. Thus, when evaluating mast cell involvement using existing and somewhat imperfect animal models of disease, their importance is sometimes obscured. However, these potent immune cells are undoubtedly major contributors to autoimmunity and should be considered as important targets for therapeutic disease intervention.

  11. Antibacterial agent triclosan suppresses RBL-2H3 mast cell function.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Rachel K; Hutchinson, Lee M; Burpee, Benjamin T; Tupper, Emily J; Pelletier, Jonathan H; Kormendy, Zsolt; Hopke, Alex R; Malay, Ethan T; Evans, Brieana L; Velez, Alejandro; Gosse, Julie A

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent, which has been shown previously to alleviate human allergic skin disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that the mechanism of this action of triclosan is, in part, due to effects on mast cell function. Mast cells play important roles in allergy, asthma, parasite defense, and carcinogenesis. In response to various stimuli, mast cells degranulate, releasing allergic mediators such as histamine. In order to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory effect of triclosan on mast cells, we monitored the level of degranulation in a mast cell model, rat basophilic leukemia cells, clone 2H3. Having functional homology to human mast cells, as well as a very well defined signaling pathway leading to degranulation, this cell line has been widely used to gain insight into mast-cell driven allergic disorders in humans. Using a fluorescent microplate assay, we determined that triclosan strongly dampened the release of granules from activated rat mast cells starting at 2 μM treatment, with dose-responsive suppression through 30 μM. These concentrations were found to be non-cytotoxic. The inhibition was found to persist when early signaling events (such as IgE receptor aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation) were bypassed by using calcium ionophore stimulation, indicating that the target for triclosan in this pathway is likely downstream of the calcium signaling event. Triclosan also strongly suppressed F-actin remodeling and cell membrane ruffling, a physiological process that accompanies degranulation. Our finding that triclosan inhibits mast cell function may explain the clinical data mentioned above and supports the use of triclosan or a mechanistically similar compound as a topical treatment for allergic skin disease, such as eczema. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mast cell: an emerging partner in immune interaction.

    PubMed

    Gri, Giorgia; Frossi, Barbara; D'Inca, Federica; Danelli, Luca; Betto, Elena; Mion, Francesca; Sibilano, Riccardo; Pucillo, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are currently recognized as effector cells in many settings of the immune response, including host defense, immune regulation, allergy, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. MC pleiotropic functions reflect their ability to secrete a wide spectrum of preformed or newly synthesized biologically active products with pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive properties, in response to multiple signals. Moreover, the modulation of MC effector phenotypes relies on the interaction of a wide variety of membrane molecules involved in cell-cell or cell-extracellular-matrix interaction. The delivery of co-stimulatory signals allows MC to specifically communicate with immune cells belonging to both innate and acquired immunity, as well as with non-immune tissue-specific cell types. This article reviews and discusses the evidence that MC membrane-expressed molecules play a central role in regulating MC priming and activation and in the modulation of innate and adaptive immune response not only against host injury, but also in peripheral tolerance and tumor-surveillance or -escape. The complex expression of MC surface molecules may be regarded as a measure of connectivity, with altered patterns of cell-cell interaction representing functionally distinct MC states. We will focalize our attention on roles and functions of recently discovered molecules involved in the cross-talk of MCs with other immune partners.

  13. Naturally occurring polyphenolic antioxidants modulate IgE-mediated mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Gong, J; Liu, F; Mohammed, U

    2000-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to modulate activities of a host of kinases, phosphatases and transcription factors. Rutin and chlorogenic acid (CGA) are the major polyphenolic antioxidants present in the small molecular fraction of smokeless tobacco leaf extracts, as ascertained by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry. Levels of intracellular ROS in resting versus antigen-immunoglobulin E (IgE)-challenged murine mast cells were measured at 510 nm by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) using carboxy-dichlorofluorescein (DCFH-DA). Enhanced ROS production was observed in IgE-sensitized mast cells following antigenic challenge. Rutin and CGA reduced ROS levels in antigen-IgE-activated mast cells. Concomitantly, they also profoundly inhibited histamine release by these activated mast cells. In contrast, rutin and CGA augmented the inducible cytokine messages, i.e. interleukin (IL)-10, IL-13, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in IgE-sensitized mast cells following antigen challenge. This study indicates that tobacco polyphenolic antioxidants that quench intracellular ROS, differentially affect two effector functions of antigen-IgE-activated mast cells. This model system may be employed to determine the molecular target of polyphenols. The potential role of these polyphenolic antioxidants on IgE-mediated allergy in vivo depends on a balance of their differential effects on mast cell activation.

  14. Cresyl Violet Stains Mast Cells Selectively: Its Application to Counterstaining in Immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Noriyuki; Tarumi, Wataru; Hamada, Naomi; Ishizuka, Bunpei; Itoh, Masanori T

    2017-04-01

    The thiazine dye toluidine blue (TB) is well known to stain mast cells and hyaline cartilage metachromatically, and thus is mostly often used for their identification. However, TB is not suitable for counterstaining in immunohistochemistry, because of its high-background staining in the cytoplasm of other cell species and in extracellular structures. To expand the knowledge about dyestuffs staining mast cells in consideration with their usage in immunohistochemistry, we determined the stainability of several thiazines and oxazines, which are structurally related compounds to TB, using sections of mast cell-containing tissues. We found that all azine dyes used metachromatically stained mast cells and cartilage. Among these dyes, an oxazines cresyl violet (CV) stained mast cells with lower background, suggesting that those are useful for detecting mast cells and for counterstaining in immunohistochemistry. To ascertain its utility, CV was used in immunostaining of bHSDs in sections from adult rat ovary. Immunopositive signals reflected by DAB development in brown were clearly detected even after CV staining. We conclude that, similar to thiazines, oxazines stain mast cells metachromatically, and that of these, CV is more useful as a counterstain in immunohistochemistry than TB.

  15. P2X7 receptors induce degranulation in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Wareham, Kathryn J; Seward, Elizabeth P

    2016-06-01

    Mast cells play important roles in host defence against pathogens, as well as being a key effector cell in diseases with an allergic basis such as asthma and an increasing list of other chronic inflammatory conditions. Mast cells initiate immune responses through the release of newly synthesised eicosanoids and the secretion of pre-formed mediators such as histamine which they store in specialised granules. Calcium plays a key role in regulating both the synthesis and secretion of mast-cell-derived mediators, with influx across the membrane, in particular, being necessary for degranulation. This raises the possibility that calcium influx through P2X receptors may lead to antigen-independent secretion of histamine and other granule-derived mediators from human mast cells. Here we show that activation of P2X7 receptors with both ATP and BzATP induces robust calcium rises in human mast cells and triggers their degranulation; both effects are blocked by the P2X7 antagonist AZ11645373, or the removal of calcium from the extracellular medium. Activation of P2X1 receptors with αβmeATP also induces calcium influx in human mast cells, which is significantly reduced by both PPADS and NF 449. P2X1 receptor activation, however, does not trigger degranulation. The results indicate that P2X7 receptors may play a significant role in contributing to the unwanted activation of mast cells in chronic inflammatory conditions where extracellular ATP levels are elevated.

  16. Carnosine attenuates mast cell degranulation and histamine release induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yao; Zhang, Shihong; Fu, Lin; Hu, Weiwei; Chen, Zhong

    2008-04-01

    Carnosine (beta-alanyl-histidine) is a naturally occurring dipeptide that has been characterized as a putative hydrophilic antioxidant. The protective function of carnosine has been demonstrated in neuronal cells under ischemic injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of carnosine on oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced degranulation and histamine release from mast cells. Cultured mast cells were exposed to OGD for 4 h, and then the degranulation was observed immediately by microscopy. Histamine release was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). OGD caused degranulation of mast cells, and increased histamine and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Carnosine (at a concentration of 5 mM) alone did not produce any appreciable effect on degranulation, histamine, and LDH release from mast cells under normal condition, but significantly inhibited the degranulation, histamine, and LDH release of mast cells induced by OGD. These results indicate that carnosine can protect mast cells from degranulation and histamine release and it may be an endogenous mast cell stabilizer in the pathological processes induced by ischemia.

  17. Estimation of the total number of mast cells in the human umbilical cord. A methodological study.

    PubMed

    Engberg Damsgaard, T M; Windelborg Nielsen, B; Sørensen, F B; Henriques, U; Schiøtz, P O

    1992-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the total number of mast cells in the human umbilical cord. Using 50 microns-thick paraffin sections, made from a systematic random sample of umbilical cord, the total number of mast cells per cord was estimated using a combination of the optical disector and fractionated sampling. The mast cell of the human umbilical cord was found in Wharton's jelly, most frequently in close proximity to the three blood vessels. No consistent pattern of variation in mast cell numbers from the fetal end of the umbilical cord towards the placenta was seen. The total number of mast cells found in the umbilical cord was 5,200,000 (median), range 2,800,000-16,800,000 (n = 7), that is 156,000 mast cells per gram umbilical cord (median), range 48,000-267,000. Thus, the umbilical cord constitutes an adequate source of mast cells for further investigation of these cells in the newborn, e.g. for describing their functional and secretory characteristics and possible clinical relevance in relation to the development of allergic, inflammatory and immunological diseases in infancy and childhood.

  18. Mast cells and macrophages in normal C57/BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Gersch, Christine; Dewald, Oliver; Zoerlein, Martin; Michael, Lloyd H; Entman, Mark L; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2002-07-01

    Mast cells and macrophages have an important role in immunity and inflammation. Because mice are used extensively for experimental studies investigating immunological and inflammatory responses, we examined mast cell and macrophage distribution in normal murine tissues. Mast cells were abundant in the murine dermis, tongue, and skeletal muscle but were rarely found in the heart, lung, spleen, kidney, liver, and the bowel mucosa. In contrast, dogs exhibited large numbers of mast cells in the lung parenchyma, liver, and bowel. Some murine dermal mast cells had long cytoplasmic projections filled with granular content. Mouse mast cells demonstrated intense histamine immunoreactivity and were identified with histochemical enzymatic techniques for tryptase and chymase. Macrophages, identified using the monoclonal antibody F4/80, were abundant in the spleen, lung, liver, kidney, and bowel but relatively rare in the heart, tongue, and dermis. Using a nuclease protection assay we investigated mRNA expression of stem cell factor (SCF), a crucial survival factor for mast cells, and the macrophage growth factors macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Stem cell factor mRNA was highly expressed in the murine lung. Relatively low levels of SCF mRNA expression were found in the tongue and earlobe, which are tissues containing a high number of mast cells. Macrophage CSF and GM-CSF mRNA was highly expressed in the lung and spleen. The murine heart, an organ with a low macrophage content, expressed high levels of M-CSF but negligible levels of GM-CSF mRNA. Constitutive growth factor mRNA expression in murine tissues without significant populations of mast cells and macrophages may suggest an alternative role for these factors in tissue homeostasis.

  19. Interleukin-17-positive mast cells contribute to synovial inflammation in spondylarthritis.

    PubMed

    Noordenbos, Troy; Yeremenko, Nataliya; Gofita, Ioana; van de Sande, Marleen; Tak, Paul P; Caňete, Juan D; Baeten, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Studies comparing spondylarthritis (SpA) to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovitis suggest that innate immune cells may play a predominant role in the pathogenesis of SpA. Recent observations have indicated a marked synovial mast cell infiltration in psoriatic SpA. We therefore undertook the present study to investigate the potential contribution of mast cells to synovial inflammation in SpA. Synovial tissue and fluid were obtained from patients with either nonpsoriatic or psoriatic SpA (n=82) and patients with RA (n=50). Synovial biopsy tissue was analyzed by immunostaining and used in ex vivo cultures. Synovial fluid was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We observed a strong and specific increase of c-Kit-positive mast cells in the synovium from patients with SpA compared to the synovium from patients with RA synovitis, which was independent of disease subtype (nonpsoriatic versus psoriatic), disease duration, and treatment. Staining of mast cell granules, analysis of synovial fluid, and results in ex vivo tissue culture did not indicate increased degranulation in SpA synovitis. However, mast cells expressed significantly more interleukin-17 (IL-17) in SpA than in RA synovitis, and mast cells constituted the major IL-17-expressing cell population in the SpA synovium. Ex vivo targeting of synovial mast cells with the c-Kit inhibitor imatinib mesylate significantly decreased the production of IL-17 as well as other proinflammatory cytokines in synovial tissue cultures. Analysis of paired pre- and posttreatment synovial tissue samples indicated that the mast cell/IL-17 axis in SpA was not modulated by effective tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockade. The specific and TNF-independent increase in IL-17-expressing mast cells may contribute to the progression of synovial inflammation in peripheral SpA. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  20. Emerging Role of Mast Cells and Macrophages in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jia-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells are essential in allergic immune responses. Recent discoveries have revealed their direct participation in cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders. Although more sophisticated mechanisms are still unknown, data from animal studies suggest that mast cells act similarly to macrophages and other inflammatory cells and contribute to human diseases through cell–cell interactions and the release of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and proteases to induce inflammatory cell recruitment, cell apoptosis, angiogenesis, and matrix protein remodeling. Reduced cardiovascular complications and improved metabolic symptoms in animals receiving over-the-counter antiallergy medications that stabilize mast cells open another era of mast cell biology and bring new hope to human patients suffering from these conditions. PMID:22240242

  1. Recognition of Candida albicans by Dectin-1 induces mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Patlán, Alejandro; Campillo-Navarro, Marcia; Rodríguez-Cortés, Octavio; Muñoz-Cruz, Samira; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-García, Iris; Serafín-López, Jeanet; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel

    2015-09-01

    Mast cells are crucial elements of the innate immune response. They reside in tissues that are commonly exposed to the external environment, such as the skin and mucosae, where they can rapidly detect the presence of pathogens and mount a potent inflammatory response that recruits other cellular effectors of the immune response. The contribution of mast cells to the immune response to viruses, bacteria, protozoa and multicellular parasites is well established, but there is scarce information about the role of these cells in fungal infections. In this study, we analyzed if mast cells are activated by Candida albicans and if the C-type lectin receptor Dectin-1 is involved in its recognition. We found that both yeasts and hyphae of C. albicans-induced mast cell degranulation and production of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, CCL3 and CCL4, while only yeasts were able to induce IL-1β. Mast cells also produced ROS after stimulation with both dimorphic phases of C. albicans. When mast cells were activated with yeasts and hyphae, they showed decreased expression of IκBα and increased presence of phosphorylated Syk. Blockade of the receptor Dectin-1, but not Toll-like receptor 2, decreased TNF-α production by mast cell in response to C. albicans. These results indicate that mast cells are capable of sensing the two phases of C. albicans, and suggest that mast cells participate as an early inductor of inflammation during the early innate immune response to this fungus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Humanized mouse model of mast cell-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and passive systemic anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Bryce, Paul J; Falahati, Rustom; Kenney, Laurie L; Leung, John; Bebbington, Christopher; Tomasevic, Nenad; Krier, Rebecca A; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; Brehm, Michael A

    2016-09-01

    Mast cells are a critical component of allergic responses in humans, and animal models that allow the in vivo investigation of their contribution to allergy and evaluation of new human-specific therapeutics are urgently needed. To develop a new humanized mouse model that supports human mast cell engraftment and human IgE-dependent allergic responses. This model is based on the NOD-scid IL2rg(null)SCF/GM-CSF/IL3 (NSG-SGM3) strain of mice engrafted with human thymus, liver, and hematopoietic stem cells (termed Bone marrow, Liver, Thymus [BLT]). Large numbers of human mast cells develop in NSG-SGM3 BLT mice and populate the immune system, peritoneal cavity, and peripheral tissues. The human mast cells in NSG-SGM3 BLT mice are phenotypically similar to primary human mast cells and express CD117, tryptase, and FcεRI. These mast cells undergo degranulation in an IgE-dependent and -independent manner, and can be readily cultured in vitro for additional studies. Intradermal priming of engrafted NSG-SGM3 mice with a chimeric IgE containing human constant regions resulted in the development of a robust passive cutaneous anaphylaxis response. Moreover, we describe the first report of a human mast cell antigen-dependent passive systemic anaphylaxis response in primed mice. NSG-SGM3 BLT mice provide a readily available source of human mast cells for investigation of mast cell biology and a preclinical model of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis and passive systemic anaphylaxis that can be used to investigate the pathogenesis of human allergic responses and to test new therapeutics before their advancement to the clinic. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The function of CCR3 on mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Collington, Sarah J; Westwick, John; Williams, Timothy J; Weller, Charlotte L

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms governing the population of tissues by mast cells are not fully understood, but several studies using human mast cells have suggested that expression of the chemokine receptor CCR3 and migration to its ligands may be important. In CCR3-deficient mice, a change in mast cell tissue distribution in the airways following allergen challenge was reported compared with wild-type mice. In addition, there is evidence that CCR3 is important in mast cell maturation in mouse. In this study, bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) were cultured and CCR3 expression and the migratory response to CCR3 ligands were characterized. In addition, BMMCs were cultured from wild-type and CCR3-deficient mice and their phenotype and migratory responses were compared. CCR3 messenger RNA was detectable in BMMCs, but this was not significantly increased after activation by immunoglobulin E (IgE). CCR3 protein was not detected on BMMCs during maturation and expression could not be enhanced after IgE activation. Resting and IgE-activated immature and mature BMMCs did not migrate in response to the CCR3 ligands eotaxin- 1 and eotaxin-2. Comparing wild-type and CCR3-deficient BMMCs, there were no differences in mast cell phenotype or ability to migrate to the mast cell chemoattractants leukotriene B4 and stem cell factor. The results of this study show that CCR3 may not mediate mast cell migration in mouse BMMCs in vitro. These observations need to be considered in relation to the findings of CCR3 deficiency on mast cells in vivo.

  4. Codeine induces human mast cell chemokine and cytokine production: involvement of G-protein activation

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, C. H.; Schleimer, R. P.; Kulka, M.

    2007-01-01

    Background Activation of mast cells and the systemic release of histamine are common side effects of opiates such as codeine and morphine. In some individuals, codeine not only elicits a sizable early response due to mast cell degranulation, but can also lead to late cutaneous allergic inflammation possibly through the production of chemokines. However, individuals who exhibit a late phase reaction to codeine often do not react to its synthetic analog, meperidine. The goal of this study was to test whether codeine and meperidine induce secretion of inflammatory mediators in human mast cells. Methods To characterize opiate activation of human mast cells, we stimulated cultured human (LAD2 cell line and CD34+-derived) mast cells with codeine and meperidine and measured degranulation and chemokine production. Results Codeine, but not meperidine, activated human mast cell degranulation within 30 min in a dose-dependent manner. Degranulation was blocked by the phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, wortmannin, and pertussis toxin but not by Ro-31-8220, a PKC inhibitor or forskolin, a cyclic adenylyl cyclase activator. After 3 and 8 h of stimulation, codeine, but not meperidine, activated human mast cells to release monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (CCL2), regulated on activation, normal T expressed and secreted (RANTES, CCL5) and interleukin-8 (CXCL 8) but not inducible protein-10 (CXCL10). Conclusions Codeine activates human mast cell degranulation and chemokine production by activating protein kinase A and PI3 kinase, possibly leading to NF-κB activation. Therefore, opiates may regulate late phase allergic inflammation by activating chemokine production by human mast cells. PMID:17441793

  5. Moraxella catarrhalis induces mast cell activation and nuclear factor kappa B-dependent cytokine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, G; Martin, R; Walker, E; Li, C; Hossler, F; Hall, K; Chi, D S

    2003-01-01

    Human mast cells are often found perivascularly and at mucosal sites and may play crucial roles in the inflammatory response. Recent studies have suggested a prominent role for mast cells in host defense. In this study, we analyzed the effects of a common airway pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis and a commensal bacterium, Neiserria cinerea, on activation of human mast cells. Human mast cell leukemia cells (HMC-1) were activated with either phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore or with varying concentrations of heat-killed suspensions of bacteria. Supernatants were assayed for the cytokines interleukin-4 (IL-4), granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-6, IL-8, IL-13 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). Nuclear proteins were isolated and assayed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) for nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) nuclear binding activity. In some experiments, NF-kappaB inhibitor, Bay-11 was added to determine functional significance. Both M. catarrhalis and N. cinerea induced mast cell activation and selective secretion of two key inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and MCP-1. This was accompanied by NF-kappaB activation. Neither spun bacterial supernatants nor bacterial lipopolysaccharide induced cytokine secretion, suggesting need for direct bacterial contact with mast cells. Scanning electron microscopy revealed active aggregation of bacteria over mast cell surfaces. The NF-kappaB inhibitor, Bay-11, inhibited expression of MCP-1. These findings suggest the possibility of direct interactions between human mast cells and common bacteria and provide evidence for a novel role for human mast cells in innate immunity.

  6. Role of mast cell in the late phase of contact hypersensitivity induced by trimellitic anhydride

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Ok Hee

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are known as effector cells of IgE-mediated allergic responses, but role of mast cells in contact hypersensitivity (CHS) has been considered controversial. In this study, we investigated role of mast cell in trimellitic anhydride (TMA)-induced CHS. The mice were sensitized to TMA on the back and repeatedly challenged with TMA on the left ear at 1-week intervals. The ear after challenge showed biphasic responses. The repetition of TMA challenge shifted in time course of ear response and enlarged the extent of early and late phase reactions in proportion to the frequency of TMA challenges in C57BL/6 mice. In late phase reaction, peak of ear response by single challenge showed at 24 hours after challenge, but the peak by repeat challenges at 8 hours after the last challenge. Number of mast cells and eosinophils per unit area increased in proportion to frequency of TMA challenges. However, mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-KitW/KitW-v mice developed the late phase reaction without the early phase reaction. The repetition of TMA challenge shifted in time course of ear response and enlarged the extent of ear response and the infiltration of eosinophils. The magnitude of these responses observed according to the frequency of the TMA challenge in mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-KitW/KitW-v mice was significantly lower than that in C57BL/6 mice. Also TMA elicited mast cell degranulation and histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusively, TMA induces the early and late phase reactions in CHS, and mast cells may be required for TMA-induced CHS. PMID:26770872

  7. Fluvastatin Suppresses Mast Cell and Basophil IgE Responses: Genotype-Dependent Effects

    PubMed Central

    Kolawole, Elizabeth Motunrayo; McLeod, Jamie Josephine Avila; Ndaw, Victor; Abebayehu, Daniel; Barnstein, Brian O.; Faber, Travis; Spence, Andrew J.; Taruselli, Marcela; Paranjape, Anuya; Haque, Tamara T.; Qayum, Amina Abdul; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan S.; Sturgill, Jamie L.; Chalfant, Charles E.; Straus, David B.; Oskeritzian, Carole A.; Ryan, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cell- and basophil-associated inflammatory diseases are a considerable burden to society. A significant portion of patients have symptoms despite standard-of-care therapy. Statins, used to lower serum cholesterol, have immune modulating activities. We tested the in vitro and in vivo effects of statins on IgE-mediated mast cell and basophil activation. Fluvastatin showed the most significant inhibitory effects of the six statins tested, suppressing IgE-induced cytokine secretion among mouse mast cells and basophils. Fluvastatin's effects were reversed by mevalonic acid or geranylgeranyl pyrophosphatase, and mimicked by geranylgeranyl transferase inhibition. Fluvastatin selectively suppressed key FcεRI signaling pathways, including Syk, Akt, and ERK. While mast cells and basophils from the C57BL/6J mouse strain were responsive to fluvastatin, those from 129/SvImJ mice were completely resistant. Resistance correlated with fluvastatin-induced upregulation of the statin target HMG-CoA reductase. Human mast cell cultures from eight donors showed a wide range of fluvastatin responsiveness. These data demonstrate that fluvastatin is a potent suppressor of IgE-mediated mast cell activation, acting at least partly via blockade of geranyl lipid production downstream of HMG-CoA reductase. Importantly, consideration of statin use for treating mast cell-associated disease needs to incorporate genetic background effects, which can yield drug resistance. PMID:26773154

  8. [Bacteria and viruses modulate FcεRI-dependent mast cell activity].

    PubMed

    Słodka, Aleksandra; Brzezińska-Błaszczyk, Ewa

    2013-03-08

    Undoubtedly, mast cells play a central role in allergic processes. Specific allergen cross-linking of IgE bound to the high affinity receptors (FcεRI) on the mast cell surface leads to the release of preformed mediators and newly synthesized mediators, i.e. metabolites of arachidonic acid and cytokines. More and more data indicate that bacteria and viruses can influence FcεRI-dependent mast cell activation. Some bacterial and viral components can reduce the surface expression of FcεRI. There are also findings that ligation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) by bacterial or viral antigens can affect IgE-dependent mast cell degranulation and preformed mediator release as well as eicosanoid production. The synergistic interaction of TLR ligands and allergen can also modify cytokine synthesis by mast cells stimulated via FcεRI. Moreover, data suggest that specific IgE for bacterial or viral antigens can influence mast cell activity. What is more, some bacterial and viral components or some endogenous proteins produced during viral infection can act as superantigens by interacting with the VH3 domain of IgE. All these observations indicate that bacterial and viral infections modify the course of allergic diseases by affecting FcεRI-dependent mast cell activation. 

  9. Mast Cells Mediate Hyperoxia-Induced Airway Hyper-reactivity in Newborn Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Eric D.; Potts, Erin N.; Mason, Stanley N.; Foster, W. Michael; Auten, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Premature infants are at increased risk of developing airway hyper-reactivity following oxidative stress and inflammation. Mast cells contribute to airway hyper-reactivity partly by mediator release, so we sought to determine if blocking mast cell degranulation or recruitment prevents hyperoxia-induced airway hyper-reactivity, mast cell accumulation, and airway smooth muscle changes. Rats were exposed at birth to air or 60% O2 for 14 days, inducing significantly increased airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) in the latter group, induced by nebulized methacholine challenge, measured by forced oscillometry. Daily treatment (postnatal days 1-14) with intraperitoneal cromolyn prevented hyperoxia-induced AHR, as did treatment with imatinib on postnatal days 5-14, compared with vehicle treated controls. Cromolyn prevented mast cell degranulation in the trachea but not hilar airways, and blocked mast cell accumulation in the hilar airways. Imatinib treatment completely blocked mast cell accumulation in tracheal/hilar airway tissues. Hyperoxia-induced AHR in neonatal rats is mediated, at least in part, via the mast cell. PMID:20386143

  10. Non cytotoxic guinea-pig mesenteric mast cell stimulation by protamine.

    PubMed

    Augusto, C; Lunardi, L O; Vugman, I

    1987-12-01

    Protamine stimulates guinea-mesenteric mast cells in a concentration-dependent manner, both histamine release and mast cell degranulation being correlated. Mast cell stimulation is blocked by 2,4-DNP (0.03 mM), low (0 degrees C) and high (45 degrees C) temperature. The inhibitory effect by 2,4-DNP is reversed by glucose (5.0 mM), while incubation at 37 degrees reverses that by low and high temperature. Lack of calcium from the incubation medium does not influence mast cell stimulation by protamine. However calcium chelation with EDTA (2.0 mM) or EGTA (2.0 mM) blocks mast cell stimulation. Addition of calcium (0.9 mM) reverses this inhibition. These observations indicate that guinea-pig mast cell stimulation by protamine is a nonlytic, energy and calcium dependent process, similar to anaphylaxis, but different from that of other basic compounds which induce mast cell lysis.

  11. Hydrogen inhalation ameliorated mast cell mediated brain injury after ICH in mice

    PubMed Central

    Manaenko, Anatol; Lekic, Tim; Ma, Qingyi; Zhang, John H.; Tang, Jiping

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hydrogen inhalation was neuroprotective in several brain injury models. Its mechanisms are believed to be related to anti-oxidative stress. We investigated the potential neurovascular protective effect of hydrogen inhalation especially effect on mast cell activation in a mouse model of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). DESIGN Controlled in vivo laboratory study. SETTING Animal research laboratory SUBJECTS 171, 8 weeks old male CD-1 mice were used. INTERVENTIONS Collagenase-induced ICH model in 8 weeks old, male, CD-1 mice was used. Hydrogen was administrated via spontaneous inhalation. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and neurological deficits were investigated at 24 and 72 hours after ICH. Mast cell activation was evaluated by Western blot and immuno-staining. The effects of hydrogen inhalation on mast cell activation were confirmed in an autologous blood injection model ICH. MEASURMENT AND MAIN RESULTS At 24 and 72 hours post-ICH, animals showed BBB disruption, brain edema, neurological deficits, accompanied with phosphorylation of Lyn kinase and release of tryptase, indicating mast cell activation. Hydrogen treatment diminished phosphorylation of Lyn kinase and release of tryptase, decreased accumulation and degranulation of mast cells, attenuated BBB disruption and improved neurobehavioral function. CONCLUSION Activation of mast cells following ICH contributed to increase of BBB permeability and brain edema. Hydrogen inhalation preserved BBB disruption by prevention of mast cell activation after ICH. PMID:23388512

  12. Tetraspanin CD151 Is a Negative Regulator of FcεRI-Mediated Mast Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; Bryce, Paul J; Schleimer, Robert P; Wechsler, Joshua B; Loffredo, Lucas F; Cook-Mills, Joan M; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Berdnikovs, Sergejs

    2015-08-15

    Mast cells are critical in the pathogenesis of allergic disease due to the release of preformed and newly synthesized mediators, yet the mechanisms controlling mast cell activation are not well understood. Members of the tetraspanin family are recently emerging as modulators of FcεRI-mediated mast cell activation; however, mechanistic understanding of their function is currently lacking. The tetraspanin CD151 is a poorly understood member of this family and is specifically induced on mouse and human mast cells upon FcεRI aggregation but its functional effects are unknown. In this study, we show that CD151 deficiency significantly exacerbates the IgE-mediated late phase inflammation in a murine model of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. Ex vivo, FcεRI stimulation of bone marrow-derived mast cells from CD151(-/-) mice resulted in significantly enhanced expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-4, IL-13, and TNF-α compared with wild-type controls. However, FcεRI-induced mast cell degranulation was unaffected. At the molecular signaling level, CD151 selectively regulated IgE-induced activation of ERK1/2 and PI3K, associated with cytokine production, but had no effect on the phospholipase Cγ1 signaling, associated with degranulation. Collectively, our data indicate that CD151 exerts negative regulation over IgE-induced late phase responses and cytokine production in mast cells.

  13. Identification and immunophenotypic characterization of normal and pathological mast cells.

    PubMed

    Morgado, José Mário; Sánchez-Muñoz, Laura; Teodósio, Cristina; Escribano, Luís

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are secretory cells that are central players in human allergic disease and immune responses. With the exception of a few pathological situations, MCs are usually present at relatively low frequencies in most tissues. Since their first description, MCs in tissues were identified mostly using their morphological characteristics and their typical coloration when stained with aniline dyes. However, increasing availability of highly specific antibodies now permits the use of fluorescence-based flow cytometry as the method of choice for the quantification, characterization, and purification of cells in suspension. This technique allows for a rapid analysis of thousands of events and for the identification of cells present at frequencies as low as one event in 10(6) unwanted cells. This method also permits for simultaneous characterization of multiple antigens at a single-cell level, which is ideal in order to study rare populations of cells like MCs. Here we describe the basis of flow cytometry-based immunophenotyping applied to the study of MC. The protocol focuses on the study of human MCs present in body fluids (mainly bone marrow) but can easily be adapted to study MCs from other tissues and species.

  14. Mast Cell: An Emerging Partner in Immune Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Gri, Giorgia; Frossi, Barbara; D’Inca, Federica; Danelli, Luca; Betto, Elena; Mion, Francesca; Sibilano, Riccardo; Pucillo, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are currently recognized as effector cells in many settings of the immune response, including host defense, immune regulation, allergy, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. MC pleiotropic functions reflect their ability to secrete a wide spectrum of preformed or newly synthesized biologically active products with pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive properties, in response to multiple signals. Moreover, the modulation of MC effector phenotypes relies on the interaction of a wide variety of membrane molecules involved in cell–cell or cell-extracellular-matrix interaction. The delivery of co-stimulatory signals allows MC to specifically communicate with immune cells belonging to both innate and acquired immunity, as well as with non-immune tissue-specific cell types. This article reviews and discusses the evidence that MC membrane-expressed molecules play a central role in regulating MC priming and activation and in the modulation of innate and adaptive immune response not only against host injury, but also in peripheral tolerance and tumor-surveillance or -escape. The complex expression of MC surface molecules may be regarded as a measure of connectivity, with altered patterns of cell–cell interaction representing functionally distinct MC states. We will focalize our attention on roles and functions of recently discovered molecules involved in the cross-talk of MCs with other immune partners. PMID:22654879

  15. Histamine from brain resident MAST cells promotes wakefulness and modulates behavioral states.

    PubMed

    Chikahisa, Sachiko; Kodama, Tohru; Soya, Atsushi; Sagawa, Yohei; Ishimaru, Yuji; Séi, Hiroyoshi; Nishino, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Mast cell activation and degranulation can result in the release of various chemical mediators, such as histamine and cytokines, which significantly affect sleep. Mast cells also exist in the central nervous system (CNS). Since up to 50% of histamine contents in the brain are from brain mast cells, mediators from brain mast cells may significantly influence sleep and other behaviors. In this study, we examined potential involvement of brain mast cells in sleep/wake regulations, focusing especially on the histaminergic system, using mast cell deficient (W/W(v)) mice. No significant difference was found in the basal amount of sleep/wake between W/W(v) mice and their wild-type littermates (WT), although W/W(v) mice showed increased EEG delta power and attenuated rebound response after sleep deprivation. Intracerebroventricular injection of compound 48/80, a histamine releaser from mast cells, significantly increased histamine levels in the ventricular region and enhanced wakefulness in WT mice, while it had no effect in W/W(v) mice. Injection of H1 antagonists (triprolidine and mepyramine) significantly increased the amounts of slow-wave sleep in WT mice, but not in W/W(v) mice. Most strikingly, the food-seeking behavior observed in WT mice during food deprivation was completely abolished in W/W(v) mice. W/W(v) mice also exhibited higher anxiety and depression levels compared to WT mice. Our findings suggest that histamine released from brain mast cells is wake-promoting, and emphasizes the physiological and pharmacological importance of brain mast cells in the regulation of sleep and fundamental neurobehavior.

  16. Intracellular RNA recognition pathway activates strong anti-viral response in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, J; Rintahaka, J; Kovanen, P T; Matikainen, S; Eklund, K K

    2013-04-01

    Mast cells have been implicated in the first line of defence against parasites and bacteria, but less is known about their role in anti-viral responses. Allergic diseases often exacerbate during viral infection, suggesting an increased activation of mast cells in the process. In this study we investigated human mast cell response to double-stranded RNA and viral infection. Cultured human mast cells were incubated with poly(I:C), a synthetic RNA analogue and live Sendai virus as a model of RNA parainfluenza virus infection, and analysed for their anti-viral response. Mast cells responded to intracellular poly(I:C) by inducing type 1 and type 3 interferons and TNF-α. In contrast, extracellular Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR)-3-activating poly(I:C) failed to induce such response. Infection of mast cells with live Sendai virus induced an anti-viral response similar to that of intracellular poly(I:C). Type 1, but not type 3 interferons, up-regulated the expression of melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA-5) and retinoic acid-inducible gene-1 (RIG-1), and TLR-3, demonstrating that human mast cells do not express functional receptors for type 3 interferons. Furthermore, virus infection induced the anti-viral proteins MxA and IFIT3 in human mast cells. In conclusion, our results support the notion that mast cells can recognize an invading virus through intracellular virus sensors and produce high amounts of type 1 and type 3 interferons and the anti-viral proteins human myxovirus resistance gene A (MxA) and interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 3 (IFIT3) in response to the virus infection.

  17. The clinical and molecular diversity of mast cell leukemia with or without associated hematologic neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Jawhar, Mohamad; Schwaab, Juliana; Meggendorfer, Manja; Naumann, Nicole; Horny, Hans-Peter; Sotlar, Karl; Haferlach, Torsten; Schmitt, Karla; Fabarius, Alice; Valent, Peter; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Cross, Nicholas C.P.; Metzgeroth, Georgia; Reiter, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Mast cell leukemia is a rare variant of advanced systemic mastocytosis characterized by at least 20% of mast cells in a bone marrow smear. We evaluated clinical and molecular characteristics of 28 patients with (n=20, 71%) or without an associated hematologic neoplasm. De novo mast cell leukemia was diagnosed in 16 of 28 (57%) patients and secondary mast cell leukemia evolving from other advanced systemic mastocytosis subtypes in 12 of 28 (43%) patients, of which 7 patients progressed while on cytoreductive treatment. Median bone marrow mast cell infiltration was 65% and median serum tryptase was 520 μg/L. C-findings were identified in 26 of 28 (93%) patients. Mutations in KIT (D816V, n=19; D816H/Y, n=5; F522C, n=1) were detected in 25 of 28 (89%) patients and prognostically relevant additional mutations in SRSF2, ASXL1 or RUNX1 (S/A/Rpos) in 13 of 25 (52%) patients. Overall response rate in 18 treatment-naïve patients was 5 of 12 (42%) on midostaurin and 1 of 6 (17%) on cladribine, and after switch 1 of 4 (25%) on midostaurin and 0 of 3 on cladribine, respectively. S/A/Rpos adversely affected response to treatment and progression to secondary mast cell leukemia (n=6) or acute myeloid leukemia (n=3) while on treatment (P<0.05). The median overall survival from mast cell leukemia diagnosis was 17 months as compared to 44 months in a control group of 124 patients with advanced systemic mastocytosis but without mast cell leukemia (P=0.03). In multivariate analyses, S/A/Rpos remained the only independent poor prognostic variable predicting overall survival (P=0.007). In conclusion, the molecular signature should be determined in all patients with mast cell leukemia because of its significant clinical and prognostic relevance. PMID:28255023

  18. Mast cell activation is involved in stress-induced epithelial barrier dysfunction in the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chan Juan; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Chang Qing; Zhang, Kuo; Zhou, Shu Pei; Duan, Li Ping

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the role of mast cell in stress-induced barrier dysfunction in the esophagus and its possible pathway involved using mast cell-deficient (Ws/Ws) rats. Ws/Ws rats and normal (+/+) rats were submitted to chronic restraint stress (CRS) 2 h/day for 7 days. Tissues were obtained from distal esophagus. Mast cells were counted under Alcian blue-safranin O stain. Activation of mast cells was assessed using transmission electron microscope. Esophageal epithelial barrier dysfunction was evaluated by measuring intercellular spaces (ICS) and by quantifying tight junction (TJ) proteins. The localization and expression of mast cell-derived tryptase and proteinase activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) were assessed. A higher number of mast cells and higher proportion of activated mast cells were observed in CRS +/+ rats compared with non-stress controls. Increased ICS and decreased expression of some TJ proteins were observed in the CRS +/+ rats but not in the CRS Ws/Ws rats. Tryptase and its receptor PAR-2 were found elevated concomitantly by nearly 100% in CRS +/+ rats, but not in CRS Ws/Ws rats. Mast cells play an important role in stress-induced epithelial barrier dysfunction in esophagus. The mechanism may involve the activation of PAR-2 by mast cell-derived tryptase, causing proinflammatory responses and the subsequent disruption of the epithelial TJ proteins and a disturbed cytoskeleton function, resulting in dilated intercellular spaces. © 2015 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Analysis of non-thermal plasma-induced cell injury in human lung cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Sano, Kaori; Wada, Motoi; Mizuno, Kazue; Ono, Ryo; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Recent progress of biomedical application of atmospheric pressure plasma shows that the biological effects are mainly due to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in liquid produced by the plasma exposure. To elucidate the cellular responses induced by exposure to the plasma, we focused on identification and quantification of reactive chemical species in plasma-exposed cell culture medium, and cell injury in mammalian cells after treatment of the plasma-exposed medium. In this study, we examined human lung cancer cell lines. The contribution of H2O2 to the cellular responses was considered. Here, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) sustained by a pulsed power supply in argon was used. After APPJ exposure to cell culture medium, RONS detection in liquid was conducted. It showed that OH radical, ONOO-, NO2-, NO3-, and H2O2 were produced in the plasma-exposed medium. Cellular responses of human lung cancer cell lines to the plasma-exposed medium in a concentration-dependence manner were also studied. It showed that the plasma-exposed medium and the H2O2 treatment gave similar reduction in viability and induction of apoptosis. This work was partly supported by MEXT KAKENHI Grant Number 24108005 and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26390096.

  20. Mast cell chymase reduces the toxicity of Gila monster venom, scorpion venom, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in mice.

    PubMed

    Akahoshi, Mitsuteru; Song, Chang Ho; Piliponsky, Adrian M; Metz, Martin; Guzzetta, Andrew; Abrink, Magnus; Schlenner, Susan M; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Pejler, Gunnar; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J

    2011-10-01

    Mast cell degranulation is important in the pathogenesis of anaphylaxis and allergic disorders. Many animal venoms contain components that can induce mast cell degranulation, and this has been thought to contribute to the pathology and mortality caused by envenomation. However, we recently reported evidence that mast cells can enhance the resistance of mice to the venoms of certain snakes and that mouse mast cell-derived carboxypeptidase A3 (CPA3) can contribute to this effect. Here, we investigated whether mast cells can enhance resistance to the venom of the Gila monster, a toxic component of that venom (helodermin), and the structurally similar mammalian peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). Using 2 types of mast cell-deficient mice, as well as mice selectively lacking CPA3 activity or the chymase mouse mast cell protease-4 (MCPT4), we found that mast cells and MCPT4, which can degrade helodermin, can enhance host resistance to the toxicity of Gila monster venom. Mast cells and MCPT4 also can limit the toxicity associated with high concentrations of VIP and can reduce the morbidity and mortality induced by venoms from 2 species of scorpions. Our findings support the notion that mast cells can enhance innate defense by degradation of diverse animal toxins and that release of MCPT4, in addition to CPA3, can contribute to this mast cell function.

  1. Cutaneous mast cell maturation does not depend on an intact bone marrow microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Charley, M.R.; Mikhael, A.; Sontheimer, R.D.; Gilliam, J.N.; Bennett, M.

    1984-01-01

    A study was made to determine whether the maturation of murine cutaneous mast cells from stem cells depends on an intact bone marrow microenvironment. Normal bone marrow cells (+/+) were infused into 2 groups of mast cell-deficient mice: WBB6F1-W/Wv mice and /sup 89/Sr-pretreated W/Wv mice. /sup 89/Sr is a long-lived bone-seeking radioisotope which provides continuous irradiation of the marrow and thereby ablates the marrow microenvironment. Skin biopsies revealed that the /sup 89/Sr-pretreated mice and the controls had repopulated their skin with mast cells equally well. Natural killer cell function was significantly depressed in the /sup 89/Sr-treated mice, confirming that the marrow microenvironment had been functionally altered. It appears that, although the precursors for cutaneous mast cells are marrow derived, they do not need an intact marrow microenvironment for maturation.

  2. Mast cells play an important role in Chlamydia pneumoniae lung infection by facilitating immune cell recruitment into the airway

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Norika; Shimada, Kenichi; Chen, Shuang; Jones, Heather D.; Alsabeh, Randa; Slepenkin, Anatoly V.; Peterson, Ellena; Crother, Timothy R.; Arditi, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are known as central players in allergy and anaphylaxis, and play a pivotal role in host defense against certain pathogens. Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cpn) is an important human pathogen, but it is unclear what role mast cells play during Cpn infection. We infected C57BL/6 (WT) and mast cell-deficient mice, Kitw-sh/w-sh (Wsh), with Cpn. Wsh mice showed improved survival than WT, with fewer cells in Wsh BALF despite similar levels of cytokines and chemokines. We also found a more rapid clearance of bacteria from the lungs of Wsh mice compared with WT. Cromolyn, a mast cell stabilizer, reduced BAL cells and bacterial burden similar to Wsh mice; conversely, Compound 48/80, a mast cell degranulator, increased the number of BAL cells and bacterial burden. Histology showed that WT lungs had diffuse inflammation while Wsh mice had patchy accumulations of neutrophils and perivascular accumulations of lymphocytes. Infected Wsh mice had reduced amounts of MMP-9 in BALF and were resistant to epithelial integral membrane protein degradation, suggesting that barrier integrity remains intact in Wsh mice. Mast cell reconstitution in Wsh mice led to enhanced bacterial growth and normal epithelial integral membrane protein degradation, highlighting the specific role of mast cells in this model. These data suggest that mast cells play a detrimental role during Cpn infection by facilitating immune cell infiltration into the airspace and providing a more favorable replicative environment for Cpn. PMID:25754739

  3. Human mast cells transmigrate through human umbilical vein endothelial monolayers and selectively produce IL-8 in response to stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha.

    PubMed

    Lin, T J; Issekutz, T B; Marshall, J S

    2000-07-01

    Mature mast cells are generally considered to be less mobile cells residing within tissue sites. However, mast cell numbers are known to increase in the context of inflammation, and mast cells are recognized to be important in regulating local neutrophil infiltration. CXC chemokines may play a critical role in this process. In this study two human mast cell-like lines, HMC-1 and KU812, and human cord blood-derived primary cultured mast cells were employed to examine role of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in regulating mast cell migration and mediator production. It was demonstrated that human mast cells constitutively express mRNA and protein for CXCR4. Stimulation of human mast cells with SDF-1, the only known ligand for CXCR4, induced a significant increase in intracellular calcium levels. In vitro, SDF-1 alpha mediated dose-dependent migration of human cord blood-derived mast cells and HMC-1 cells across HUVEC monolayers. Although SDF-1 alpha did not induce mast cell degranulation, it selectively stimulated production of the neutrophil chemoattractant IL-8 without affecting TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, GM-CSF, IFN-gamma, or RANTES production, providing further evidence of the selective modulation of mast cell function by this chemokine. These findings provide a novel, SDF-1-dependent mechanism for mast cell transendothelial migration and functional regulation, which may have important implications for the local regulation of mast cells in disease.

  4. Stimulation of mast cells leads to cholesterol accumulation in macrophages in vitro by a mast cell granule-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkonen, J.O.; Kovanen, P.T.

    1987-04-01

    The uptake of low density lipoprotein (LDL) by cultured mouse macrophages was markedly promoted by isolated rat mast cell granules present in the culture medium. The granule-mediated uptake of /sup 125/I-LDL enhanced the rate of cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages, the result being accumulation of cholesteryl esters in these cells. Binding of LDL to the granules was essential for the granule-mediated uptake of LDL by macrophages, for the uptake process was prevented by treating the granules with avidin or protamine chloride or by treating LDL with 1,2-cyclohexanedione, all of which inhibit the binding of LDL to the granules. Inhibition of granule phagocytosis by the macrophages with cytochalasin B also abolished the granule-mediated uptake of LDL. Finally, mouse macrophage monolayers and LDL were incubated in the presence of isolated rat serosal mast cells. Stimulation of the mast cells with compound 48/80, a degranulating agent, resulted in dose-dependent release of secretory granules from the mast cells and a parallel increase in /sup 14/C cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages. The results show that, in this in vitro model, the sequence of events leading to accumulation of cholesteryl esters in macrophages involves initial stimulation of mast cells, subsequent release of their secretory granules, binding of LDL to the exocytosed granules, and, finally, phagocytosis of the LDL-containing granules by macrophages.

  5. Mast Cell-Targeted Strategies in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ammendola, Michele; Sacco, Rosario; Sammarco, Giuseppe; Luposella, Maria; Patruno, Rosa; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Sarro, Giovambattista De; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mast cells (MCs) are cells that originate in the bone marrow from pluripotent CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells. Precursors of MCs migrate through the circulation to their target tissues, completing their maturation process into granulated cells under the influence of several microenvironment growth factors. The most important of these factors is the ligand for the c-Kit receptor (c-Kit-R) namely stem cell factor (SCF), secreted mainly by fibroblasts and endothelial cells (ECs). SCF also regulates development, survival and de novo proliferation of MCs. It has already been demonstrated that gain-of-function mutations of gene c-Kit encoding c-Kit-R result in the development of some tumors. Furthermore, MCs are able also to modulate both innate and adaptive immune response and to express the high-affinity IgE receptor following IgE activation. Among the other IgE-independent MC activation mechanisms, a wide variety of other surface receptors for cytokines, chemokines, immunoglobulins, and complement are also described. Interestingly, MCs can stimulate angiogenesis by releasing of several pro-angiogenic cytokines stored in their cytoplasm. Studies published in the last year suggest that angiogenesis stimulated by MCs may play an important role in tumor growth and progression. Here, we aim to focus several biological features of MCs and to summarize new anti-cancer MC-targeted strategies with potential translation in human clinical trials. PMID:27330532

  6. Effect of Sulfur Mustard on Mast Cells in Hairless Guinea Pig Skin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-13

    AD-P008 756 EFFECT OF SULFUR MUSTARD ON MAST CELLS IN HAIRLESS GUINEA PIG SKIN JOHN S. GRAHAM, MARK A . BRYANT and ERNEST H. BRAUE U.S. Army Medical...with their granules of vasoactive histamine, mast cells might be expected to play a role in HD-induced injury. Changes in mast cells exposed to low...histopathology 94-07918 Best Available Copy C0t PONENT PART NOTICE THIS PAPER IS A CCWPOWENT PART OF THE FOLLOWING COIPILATION REPORT: TITLE: Proceedins of the

  7. Influence of ethanolic extract of Tephrosia purpurea Linn. on mast cells and erythrocytes membrane integrity.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, A B; Dikshit, V J; Damre, A S; Kulkarni, K R; Saraf, M N

    2000-08-01

    The ethanolic extract of T. purpurea Linn. was studied for its in vitro effect on rat mast cell degranulation and erythrocyte membrane integrity in vitro. The extract in concentration of 25-200 microg/ml showed a dose-dependant inhibition of rat mast cell degranulation induded by compound 48/80 and egg albumin. T. purpurea extract was found to inhibit haemolysis of erythrocytes induced by hypotonic solution but accelerated haemolysis induced by heat at a concentration of 100 microg/ml. The studies reveal that the ethanolic extract of T. purpurea may inhibit degranulation of mast cells by a mechanism other than membrane stabilization.

  8. Esophageal Mast Cell Infiltration in a 32-Year-Old Woman with Noncardiac Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keol; Kwon, Hee Jin; Kim, In Young; Yoo, Kwai Han; Lee, Seulkee; Min, Yang Won; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2016-01-01

    Noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) is one of the most common esophageal symptoms and lacks a clearly defined mechanism. The most common cause of NCCP is gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). One of the accepted mechanisms of NCCP in a patient without GERD has been altered visceral sensitivity. Mast cells may play a role in visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome. In this case, a patient with NCCP and dysphagia who was unresponsive to proton pump inhibitor treatment had an increased esophageal mast cell infiltration and responded to 14 days of antihistamine and antileukotriene treatment. We suggest that there may be a relationship between esophageal symptoms such as NCCP and esophageal mast cell infiltration.

  9. [Mast cell activation disease: a concise practical guide for diagnostic workup and therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Molderings, G J; Homann, J; Brettner, S; Raithel, M; Frieling, T

    2014-07-01

    In the present paper clinical phenotypes, pathogenetic relationships, and diagnostic algorithms as well as therapeutic concepts of/for systemic mast cell activation disease are reviewed. The reader should be able to recognize and diagnose a systemic mast cell activation disease, as well as to counsel a personalized drug therapy. In the case of chronic multisystem polymorbidity systemic mast cell activation disease should be considered as a differential diagnosis at an early stage. In most cases, specific, little invasive investigations allow diagnosing the disease and, hence, an appropriate therapy can be initiated.

  10. Dermal mast cells affect the development of sunlight-induced skin tumours.

    PubMed

    Sarchio, Seri N E; Kok, Lai-Fong; O'Sullivan, Clare; Halliday, Gary M; Byrne, Scott N

    2012-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation contained in sunlight is considered a major risk in the induction of skin cancer. While mast cells are best known for their role in allergic responses, they have also been shown to play a crucial role in suppressing the anti-tumour immune response following UV exposure. Evidence is now emerging that UV may also trigger mast cell release of cutaneous tissue remodelling and pro-angiogenic factors. In this review, we will focus on the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which UV recruits and then activates mast cells to initiate and promote skin cancer development.

  11. Live Staphylococcus aureus Induces Expression and Release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Terminally Differentiated Mouse Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Johnzon, Carl-Fredrik; Rönnberg, Elin; Guss, Bengt; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells have been shown to express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), thereby implicating mast cells in pro-angiogenic processes. However, the mechanism of VEGF induction in mast cells and the possible expression of VEGF in fully mature mast cells have not been extensively studied. Here, we report that terminally differentiated peritoneal cell-derived mast cells can be induced to express VEGF in response to challenge with Staphylococcus aureus, thus identifying a mast cell-bacteria axis as a novel mechanism leading to VEGF release. Whereas live bacteria produced a robust upregulation of VEGF in mast cells, heat-inactivated bacteria failed to do so, and bacteria-conditioned media did not induce VEGF expression. The induction of VEGF was not critically dependent on direct cell-cell contact between bacteria and mast cells. Hence, these findings suggest that VEGF can be induced by soluble factors released during the co-culture conditions. Neither of a panel of bacterial cell-wall products known to activate toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling promoted VEGF expression in mast cells. In agreement with the latter, VEGF induction occurred independently of Myd88, an adaptor molecule that mediates the downstream events following TLR engagement. The VEGF induction was insensitive to nuclear factor of activated T-cells inhibition but was partly dependent on the nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cells signaling pathway. Together, these findings identify bacterial challenge as a novel mechanism by which VEGF is induced in mast cells.

  12. Natural Killer Cells and Mast Cells from gp49B Null Mutant Mice Are Functional

    PubMed Central

    Rojo, Susana; Stebbins, Christopher C.; Peterson, Mary E.; Dombrowicz, David; Wagtmann, Nicolai; Long, Eric O.

    2000-01-01

    Immune responses are controlled by a combination of positive and negative cellular signals. Effector cells in the immune system express inhibitory receptors that serve to limit effector cell expansion and to protect the host from autoreactivity. gp49B is a receptor of unknown function that is expressed on activated mast cells and natural killer (NK) cells and whose cytoplasmic tail endows it with inhibitory potential. To gain insight into the function of gp49B in mice, we disrupted the gp49B gene by homologous recombination. gp49B0 mice were born at expected ratios, were healthy and fertile, and displayed normal long-term survival rates. gp49B0 mice showed no defect in NK or mast cell development. Furthermore, NK and mast cells from the gp49B0 mice showed activation properties in vitro similar to those of cells isolated from wild-type mice. Therefore, gp49B is not critical for the development, expansion, and maturation of mast cells and NK cells in vivo. The healthy status of gp49B0 mice makes them suitable for testing the role of gp49B in immune responses to infectious agents. PMID:10982834

  13. Paul Ehrlich's mastzellen: a historical perspective of relevant developments in mast cell biology.

    PubMed

    Ghably, Jack; Saleh, Hana; Vyas, Harsha; Peiris, Emma; Misra, Niva; Krishnaswamy, Guha

    2015-01-01

    Following the discovery of mast cells (or mastzellen) by the prolific physician researcher, Paul Ehrlich, many advances have improved our understanding of these cells and their fascinating biology. The discovery of immunoglobulin E and receptors for IgE and IgG on mast cells heralded further in vivo and in vitro studies, using molecular technologies and gene knockout models. Mast cells express an array of inflammatory mediators including tryptase, histamine, cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. They play a role in many varying disease states, from atopic diseases, parasitic infections, hematological malignancies, and arthritis to osteoporosis. This review will attempt to summarize salient evolving areas in mast cell research over the last few centuries that have led to our current understanding of this pivotal multifunctional cell.

  14. The Role of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Mast Cell-Stimulated Fibroblast Proliferation and Collagen Production

    PubMed Central

    Ningyan, Gu; Xu, Yao; Hongfei, Shi; Jingjing, Chen; Min, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Current clinical and translational studies have shown that mast cell plays a pivotal role in multiple fibrotic diseases including scleroderma. However, the lack of mature human mast cell culture model exhibits a major obstacle for further dissection of cytokines and signaling molecules required for mast cell mediated fibrosis in various diseases. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor is a mast cell released pro-inflammatory cytokine which is deregulated in scleroderma patients and is also involved in non-scleroderma related fibrosis. In the current study, we successfully generated a practical and reliable human mast cell culture system with bone marrow CD34+ hematopietic precursors. The derivative mast cell is normal in terms of both morphology and function as manifested by normal degranulation. More importantly, we were able to show mast cell conditioned medium as well as MIF supplementation augments fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis. This positive regulatory effect of mast cell conditioned medium can be dampened by MIF antibody. In addition, MIF-knockdown significantly inhibits pro-fibrotic activities of CD34+ hematopietic precursor derived mast cells. These data strongly suggest that mast cell released MIF is required for mast cell mediated fibrogenic activities. The current manuscript seems to be the first mechanistic report showing the significance of MIF in mast cell mediated fibrosis, which may pave the way for the development of potential MIF-targeted therapy for fibrotic diseases to a further extent. Moreover, we strongly believe mast cell culture and differentiation model as well as corresponding genetic manipulation methodology will be helpful in characterizing novel mast cell based therapeutic targets. PMID:25826375

  15. Mast cell chymase reduces the toxicity of Gila monster venom, scorpion venom, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in mice

    PubMed Central

    Akahoshi, Mitsuteru; Song, Chang Ho; Piliponsky, Adrian M.; Metz, Martin; Guzzetta, Andrew; Åbrink, Magnus; Schlenner, Susan M.; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Pejler, Gunnar; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Mast cell degranulation is important in the pathogenesis of anaphylaxis and allergic disorders. Many animal venoms contain components that can induce mast cell degranulation, and this has been thought to contribute to the pathology and mortality caused by envenomation. However, we recently reported evidence that mast cells can enhance the resistance of mice to the venoms of certain snakes and that mouse mast cell–derived carboxypeptidase A3 (CPA3) can contribute to this effect. Here, we investigated whether mast cells can enhance resistance to the venom of the Gila monster, a toxic component of that venom (helodermin), and the structurally similar mammalian peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). Using 2 types of mast cell–deficient mice, as well as mice selectively lacking CPA3 activity or the chymase mouse mast cell protease-4 (MCPT4), we found that mast cells and MCPT4, which can degrade helodermin, can enhance host resistance to the toxicity of Gila monster venom. Mast cells and MCPT4 also can limit the toxicity associated with high concentrations of VIP and can reduce the morbidity and mortality induced by venoms from 2 species of scorpions. Our findings support the notion that mast cells can enhance innate defense by degradation of diverse animal toxins and that release of MCPT4, in addition to CPA3, can contribute to this mast cell function. PMID:21926462

  16. Mast Cells Comprise the Major of Interleukin 17-Producing Cells and Predict a Poor Prognosis in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jian-Fei; Pan, Hong-Ying; Ying, Xi-Hui; Lou, Jian; Ji, Jian-Song; Zou, Hai

    2016-03-01

    IL-17 and IL-17-producing cells have been found in many types of human cancers and murine models. However, the source of tumor-infiltrating IL-17 and IL-17-producing cells in HCC and the prognostic values remain poorly understood. A total of 57 HCC patients were enrolled in this study, and immunofluorescence double stain was used to evaluate the colocalization of CD3 T cells, CD4 T cells, CD56 NK cells, CD20 B cells, CD68 Macrophages, and MCT mast cells with IL-17. The prognostic value of IL-17-producing cells was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression model. MCT mast cells, but not other cells, were the predominant IL-17-producing cell type. Overall survival analysis revealed that the increasing intratumoral-infiltrated MCT mast cells were significantly associated with poor prognosis. Immunofluorescence double stain showed a positive correlation between the number of MCT mast cells and MCVs. These findings indicated the major IL-17-producing cells in HCC were MCT mast cells and these cells infiltration may promote tumor progression by angiogenesis. Increased MCT mast cells was associated with a poor prognosis, indicating therapy targeting MCT mast cells might be an effective strategy in controlling intratumor IL-17 infiltration and MCVs.

  17. Aspergillus oryzae lectin induces anaphylactoid oedema and mast cell activation through its interaction with fucose of mast cell-bound non-specific IgE.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, K; Yoshino, S

    2011-11-01

    We investigated whether Aspergillus oryzae lectin (AOL), a fucose-specific lectin, induces anaphylactoid reactions and mast cell activation. The injection of AOL into footpads of mice produced a dose-related acute paw oedema. The AOL-induced oedema was attenuated by predose of histamine H1 receptor blocker or pretreatment of the lectin with fucose before injection and was not observed in SCID and mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv mice. These results suggested that the AOL-induced anaphylactoid reaction was mediated by histamine released from mast cells. In addition, the activation of mast cells was seemed to be induced by the crosslinking of IgE on the cell surface following the binding of AOL to fucose residues in IgE. Consistent with the in vivo results, AOL induced the degranulation of the rat mast cell line RBL2H3 sensitized with monoclonal IgE. As AOL induced the increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration of IgE-sensitized RBL2H3 cells as well as antigen stimulation, AOL could input signals from FcεRI. The degranulation of IgE-sensitized RBL2H3 cells by AOL was diminished by pretreatment of AOL with fucose. Defucosylated IgE did not induce degranulation of RBL2H3 cells in response to AOL stimulation, in spite of its ability to induce degranulation by antigen stimulation as intact IgE. These results indicated that AOL bound to fucose residue of IgE causing antigen-independent IgE-mediated mast cell activation and anaphylactoid reactions in vitro and in vivo, respectively. AOL bound to human IgE as well as to mouse IgE, suggesting the possible implication of AOL in the allergic response to Aspergillus oryzae in humans.

  18. Do mast cells affect villous architecture? Facts and conjectures.

    PubMed

    Crivellato, E; Finato, N; Ribatti, D; Beltrami, C A

    2005-10-01

    In adult life, the architecture of the intestinal villus is maintained by a complex series of epithelial-stromal interactions that involve different types of fixed and mobile cells located in the intestinal mucosa. Mast cells (MC) are normal constituents of the small bowel mucosa where they reside in the villous and pericryptal lamina propria as well as within the columnar epithelial cell layer. Besides being involved in numerous immune and inflammatory reactions in the context of both innate and acquired host defence, MC are known to exert important non-immunological functions like wound repair, extracellular matrix remodelling, angiogenesis and neurotrophism as well as modulation of fibroblast, epithelial cell and smooth muscle cell activity. These pleiotropic functions put MC in a central, strategic position to organize tissue defence, restore tissue damage and maintain tissue homeostasis. This review summarizes the most recent advances concerning the functional anatomy of the crypt-villus unit and discusses the way intestinal MC might become part of the instructive circuits that ultimately lead to the maintenance of a proper villous shape.

  19. Myeloid derived suppressor cells enhance IgE-mediated mast cell responses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We previously demonstrated that enhanced development of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in ADAM10 transgenic mice yielded resistance to infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection, and that co-culturing MDSC with IgE-activated mast cells enhanced cytokine production. In the current...

  20. Mast Cell Proteases 6 and 7 Stimulate Angiogenesis by Inducing Endothelial Cells to Release Angiogenic Factors

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Devandir Antonio; Borges, Antonio Carlos; Santana, Ana Carolina; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2015-01-01

    Mast cell proteases are thought to be involved with tumor progression and neo-vascularization. However, their exact role is still unclear. The present study was undertaken to further elucidate the function of specific subtypes of recombinant mouse mast cell proteases (rmMCP-6 and 7) in neo-vascularization. SVEC4-10 cells were cultured on Geltrex® with either rmMCP-6 or 7 and tube formation was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, the capacity of these proteases to induce the release of angiogenic factors and pro and anti-angiogenic proteins was analyzed. Both rmMCP-6 and 7 were able to stimulate tube formation. Scanning electron microscopy showed that incubation with the proteases induced SVEC4-10 cells to invade the gel matrix. However, the expression and activity of metalloproteases were not altered by incubation with the mast cell proteases. Furthermore, rmMCP-6 and rmMCP-7 were able to induce the differential release of angiogenic factors from the SVEC4-10 cells. rmMCP-7 was more efficient in stimulating tube formation and release of angiogenic factors than rmMCP-6. These results suggest that the subtypes of proteases released by mast cells may influence endothelial cells during in vivo neo-vascularization. PMID:26633538

  1. TRAF6 specifically contributes to FcepsilonRI-mediated cytokine production but not mast cell degranulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong Jun; Chen, Wei; Carrigan, Svetlana O; Chen, Wei-Min; Roth, Kristy; Akiyama, Taishin; Inoue, Jun-ichiro; Marshall, Jean S; Berman, Jason N; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2008-11-14

    TRAF6 (tumor necrosis factor-associated factor 6) is an essential adaptor downstream from the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor and Toll-like receptor superfamily members. This molecule is critical for dendritic cell maturation and T cell homeostasis. Here we show that TRAF6 is important in high affinity IgE receptor, FcepsilonRI-mediated mast cell activation. In contrast to dendritic cells and T cells, TRAF6-deficient mast cells matured normally and showed normal IgE-dependent degranulation. Importantly, TRAF6-deficient mast cells showed impaired production of cytokine interleukin-6, CCL-9, interleukin-13, and TNF following FcepsilonRI aggregation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed decreased NF-kappaB p65 binding to CCL-9 and TNF promoters in TRAF6-deficient mast cells. Antigen and IgE-induced IkappaB phosphorylation and NF-kappaB p65 translocation to the nucleus were diminished in TRAF6-deficient mast cells. NF-kappaB luciferase activity in response to antigen and IgE stimulation was severely impaired in TRAF6-deficient mast cells. In addition, antigen and IgE-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 and JNK, but not ERK1/2, was significantly reduced in TRAF6-deficient mast cells. These results identified TRAF6 as an important signal transducer in FcepsilonRI-mediated signaling in mast cells. Our findings implicate TRAF6 as a new adaptor/regulator molecule for allergen-mediated inflammation in allergy.

  2. The adaptor 3BP2 is required for KIT receptor expression and human mast cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Ainsua-Enrich, Erola; Serrano-Candelas, Eva; Álvarez-Errico, Damiana; Picado, César; Sayós, Joan; Rivera, Juan; Martín, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    3BP2 is a cytoplasmic adaptor protein that acts as a positive regulator in mast cell FcεRI-dependent signaling. The KIT receptor whose ligand is the stem cell factor (SCF) is necessary for mast cell development, proliferation and survival as well as for optimal IgE-dependent signal. Activating mutations in KIT have been associated with several diseases including mastocytosis. In the present work, we found that 3BP2 silencing impairs KIT signaling pathways, thus affecting PI3K and MAP kinase pathways in human mast cells from HMC-1, LAD2 (human mast cell lines) and CD34+-derived mast cells. Unexpectedly, silencing of 3BP2 reduces KIT expression in normal human mast cells as well as in HMC-1 cells where KIT is mutated, thus increasing cellular apoptosis and caspase 3/7 activity. 3BP2 silencing reduces KIT transcription expression levels. Interestingly, 3BP2 silencing decreased MITF expression, a transcription factor involved in KIT expression. Reconstitution of 3BP2 in knockdown cells leads to reversal of KIT expression as well as survival phenotype. Accordingly MITF reconstitution enhances KIT expression levels in 3BP2 silenced cells. Moreover, downregulation of KIT expression by miRNA221 overexpression or the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib also reduced 3BP2 and MITF expression. Furthermore, KIT tyrosine activity inhibition reduced 3BP2 and MITF expression, demonstrating again a tight and reciprocal relationship between these molecules. Taken together, our results show that 3BP2 regulates human mast cell survival and participates in KIT-mediated signal transduction by directly controlling KIT receptor expression, suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target in mast cell-mediated inflammatory diseases and deregulated KIT disorders. PMID:25810396

  3. Mast cells in renal inflammation and fibrosis: lessons learnt from animal studies.

    PubMed

    Madjene, Lydia Celia; Pons, Maguelonne; Danelli, Luca; Claver, Julien; Ali, Liza; Madera-Salcedo, Iris K; Kassas, Asma; Pellefigues, Christophe; Marquet, Florian; Dadah, Albert; Attout, Tarik; El-Ghoneimi, Alaa; Gautier, Gregory; Benhamou, Marc; Charles, Nicolas; Daugas, Eric; Launay, Pierre; Blank, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are hematopoietic cells involved in inflammation and immunity and have been recognized also as important effector cells in kidney inflammation. In humans, only a few mast cells reside in kidneys constitutively but in progressive renal diseases their numbers increase substantially representing an essential part of the interstitial infiltrate of inflammatory cells. Recent data obtained in experimental animal models have emphasized a complex role of these cells and the mediators they release as they have been shown both to promote, but also to protect from disease and fibrosis development. Sometimes conflicting results have been reported in similar models suggesting a very narrow window between these activities depending on the pathophysiological context. Interestingly in mice, mast cell or mast cell mediator specific actions became also apparent in the absence of significant mast cell kidney infiltration supporting systemic or regional actions via draining lymph nodes or kidney capsules. Many of their activities rely on the capacity of mast cells to release, in a timely controlled manner, a wide range of inflammatory mediators, which can promote anti-inflammatory actions and repair activities that contribute to healing, but in some circumstances or in case of inappropriate regulation may also promote kidney disease.

  4. Mast Cells and Influenza A Virus: Association with Allergic Responses and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Amy C.; Temple, Rachel M.; Obar, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a widespread infectious agent commonly found in mammalian and avian species. In humans, IAV is a respiratory pathogen that causes seasonal infections associated with significant morbidity in young and elderly populations, and has a large economic impact. Moreover, IAV has the potential to cause both zoonotic spillover infection and global pandemics, which have significantly greater morbidity and mortality across all ages. The pathology associated with these pandemic and spillover infections appear to be the result of an excessive inflammatory response leading to severe lung damage, which likely predisposes the lungs for secondary bacterial infections. The lung is protected from pathogens by alveolar epithelial cells, endothelial cells, tissue resident alveolar macrophages, dendritic cells, and mast cells. The importance of mast cells during bacterial and parasitic infections has been extensively studied; yet, the role of these hematopoietic cells during viral infections is only beginning to emerge. Recently, it has been shown that mast cells can be directly activated in response to IAV, releasing mediators such histamine, proteases, leukotrienes, inflammatory cytokines, and antiviral chemokines, which participate in the excessive inflammatory and pathological response observed during IAV infections. In this review, we will examine the relationship between mast cells and IAV, and discuss the role of mast cells as a potential drug target during highly pathological IAV infections. Finally, we proposed an emerging role for mast cells in other viral infections associated with significant host pathology. PMID:26042121

  5. Regulation of plasma histamine levels by the mast cell clock and its modulation by stress

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yuki; Ishimaru, Kayoko; Shibata, Shigenobu; Nakao, Atsuhito

    2017-01-01

    At steady state, plasma histamine levels exhibit circadian variations with nocturnal peaks, which is implicated in the nighttime exacerbation of allergic symptoms. However, the regulatory mechanisms are largely unexplored. This study determined how steady-state plasma histamine levels are regulated and affected by environmental factors. We found that plasma histamine levels decreased in mast cell–deficient mice and their circadian variations were lost in mast cell–deficient mice reconstituted with bone marrow–derived mast cells (BMMCs) harboring a mutation in the circadian gene Clock. Clock temporally regulates expression of organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3), which is involved in histamine transport, in mast cells; OCT inhibition abolished circadian variations in plasma histamine levels. Mice housed under aberrant light/dark conditions or suffering from restraint stress exhibited de-synchronization of the mast cell clockwork, concomitant with the loss of circadian variations in OCT3 expression and plasma histamine levels. The degree of compound 48/80–induced plasma extravasation in mice was correlated with plasma histamine levels. Collectively, the mast cell clock mediates circadian regulation of plasma histamine levels at steady state, in part by controlling OCT3 expression, which can be modulated by stress. Additionally, we propose that plasma histamine levels potentiate mast cell–mediated allergic reactions. PMID:28074918

  6. Temporal and spatial distribution of mast cells and steroidogenic enzymes in the human fetal adrenal.

    PubMed

    Naccache, Alexandre; Louiset, Estelle; Duparc, Céline; Laquerrière, Annie; Patrier, Sophie; Renouf, Sylvie; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Mukai, Kuniaki; Lefebvre, Hervé; Castanet, Mireille

    2016-10-15

    Mast cells are present in the human adult adrenal with a potential role in the regulation of aldosterone secretion in both normal cortex and adrenocortical adenomas. We have investigated the human developing adrenal gland for the presence of mast cells in parallel with steroidogenic enzymes profile and serotonin signaling pathway. RT-QPCR and immunohistochemical studies were performed on adrenals at 16-41 weeks of gestation (WG). Tryptase-immunopositive mast cells were found from 18 WG in the adrenal subcapsular layer, close to 3βHSD- and CYP11B2-immunoreactive cells, firstly detected at 18 and 24 WG, respectively. Tryptophan hydroxylase and serotonin receptor type 4 expression increased at 30 WG before the CYP11B2 expression surge. In addition, HDL and LDL cholesterol receptors were expressed in the subcapsular zone from 24 WG. Altogether, our findings suggest the implication of mast cells and serotonin in the establishment of the mineralocorticoid synthesizing pathway during fetal adrenal development.

  7. Beyond apoptosis: The mechanism and function of phosphatidylserine asymmetry in the membrane of activating mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Rysavy, Noel M.; Shimoda, Lori M. N.; Dixon, Alyssa M.; Speck, Mark; Stokes, Alexander J.; Turner, Helen; Umemoto, Eric Y.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of plasma membrane asymmetry is a hallmark of apoptosis, but lipid bilayer asymmetry and loss of asymmetry can contribute to numerous cellular functions and responses that are independent of programmed cell death. Exofacial exposure of phosphatidylserine occurs in lymphocytes and mast cells after antigenic stimulation and in the absence of apoptosis, suggesting that there is a functional requirement for phosphatidylserine exposure in immunocytes. In this review we examine current ideas as to the nature of this functional role in mast cell activation. Mechanistically, there is controversy as to the candidate proteins responsible for phosphatidylserine translocation from the internal to external leaflet, and here we review the candidacies of mast cell PLSCR1 and TMEM16F. Finally we examine the potential relationship between functionally important mast cell membrane perturbations and phosphatidylserine exposure during activation. PMID:25759911

  8. A Role for Human Skin Mast Cells in Dengue Virus Infection and Systemic Spread.

    PubMed

    Troupin, Andrea; Shirley, Devon; Londono-Renteria, Berlin; Watson, Alan M; McHale, Cody; Hall, Alex; Hartstone-Rose, Adam; Klimstra, William B; Gomez, Gregorio; Colpitts, Tonya M

    2016-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes serious global human disease and mortality. Skin immune cells are an important component of initial DENV infection and systemic spread. Here, we show that mast cells are a target of DENV in human skin and that DENV infection of skin mast cells induces degranulation and alters cytokine and growth factor expression profiles. Importantly, to our knowledge, we also demonstrate for the first time that DENV localizes within secretory granules in infected skin mast cells. In addition, DENV within extracellular granules was infectious in vitro and in vivo, trafficking through lymph to draining lymph nodes in mice. We demonstrate an important role for human skin mast cells in DENV infection and identify a novel mechanism for systemic spread of DENV infection from the initial peripheral mosquito injection site. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Beyond apoptosis: the mechanism and function of phosphatidylserine asymmetry in the membrane of activating mast cells.

    PubMed

    Rysavy, Noel M; Shimoda, Lori M N; Dixon, Alyssa M; Speck, Mark; Stokes, Alexander J; Turner, Helen; Umemoto, Eric Y

    2014-01-01

    Loss of plasma membrane asymmetry is a hallmark of apoptosis, but lipid bilayer asymmetry and loss of asymmetry can contribute to numerous cellular functions and responses that are independent of programmed cell death. Exofacial exposure of phosphatidylserine occurs in lymphocytes and mast cells after antigenic stimulation and in the absence of apoptosis, suggesting that there is a functional requirement for phosphatidylserine exposure in immunocytes. In this review we examine current ideas as to the nature of this functional role in mast cell activation. Mechanistically, there is controversy as to the candidate proteins responsible for phosphatidylserine translocation from the internal to external leaflet, and here we review the candidacies of mast cell PLSCR1 and TMEM16F. Finally we examine the potential relationship between functionally important mast cell membrane perturbations and phosphatidylserine exposure during activation.

  10. Multiple bidirectional alterations of phenotype and changes in proliferative potential during the in vitro and in vivo passage of clonal mast cell populations derived from mouse peritoneal mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kanakura, Y.; Thompson, H.; Nakano, T.; Yamamura, T.; Asai, H.; Kitamura, Y.; Metcalfe, D.D.; Galli, S.J.

    1988-09-01

    Mouse peritoneal mast cells (PMC) express a connective tissue-type mast cell (CTMC) phenotype, including reactivity with the heparin-binding fluorescent dye berberine sulfate and incorporation of (35S) sulfate predominantly into heparin proteoglycans. When PMC purified to greater than 99% purity were cultured in methylcellulose with IL-3 and IL-4, approximately 25% of the PMC formed colonies, all of which contained both berberine sulfate-positive and berberine sulfate-negative mast cells. When these mast cells were transferred to suspension culture, they generated populations that were 100% berberine sulfate-negative, a characteristic similar to that of mucosal mast cells (MMC), and that synthesized predominantly chondroitin sulfate (35S) proteoglycans. When ''MMC-like'' cultured mast cells derived from WBB6F1-+/+ PMC were injected into the peritoneal cavities of mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv mice, the adoptively transferred mast cell population became 100% berberine sulfate-positive. In methylcellulose culture, these ''second generation PMC'' formed clonal colonies containing both berberine sulfate-positive and berberine sulfate-negative cells, but exhibited significantly less proliferative ability than did normal +/+ PMC. Thus, clonal mast cell populations initially derived from single PMC exhibited multiple and bidirectional alterations between CTMC-like and MMC-like phenotypes. However, this process was associated with a progressive diminution of the mast cells' proliferative ability.

  11. Defective bone repair in mast cell-deficient Cpa3Cre/+ mice

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Daniel; Samberg, Robert; Abou-Rjeili, Mira; Wong, Timothy H.; Li, Ailian; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Henderson, Janet E.; Martineau, Paul A.

    2017-01-01

    In the adult skeleton, cells of the immune system interact with those of the skeleton during all phases of bone repair to influence the outcome. Mast cells are immune cells best known for their pathologic role in allergy, and may be involved in chronic inflammatory and fibrotic disorders. Potential roles for mast cells in tissue homeostasis, vascularization and repair remain enigmatic. Previous studies in combined mast cell- and Kit-deficient KitW-sh/W-sh mice (KitW-sh) implicated mast cells in bone repair but KitW-sh mice suffer from additional Kit-dependent hematopoietic and non- hematopoietic deficiencies that could have confounded the outcome. The goal of the current study was to compare bone repair in normal wild type (WT) and Cpa3Cre/+ mice, which lack mast cells in the absence of any other hematopoietic or non- hematopoietic deficiencies. Repair of a femoral window defect was characterized using micro CT imaging and histological analyses from the early inflammatory phase, through soft and hard callus formation, and finally the remodeling phase. The data indicate 1) mast cells appear in healing bone of WT mice but not Cpa3Cre/+ mice, beginning 14 days after surgery; 2) re-vascularization of repair tissue and deposition of mineralized bone was delayed and dis-organised in Cpa3Cre/+ mice compared with WT mice; 3) the defects in Cpa3Cre/+ mice were associated with little change in anabolic activity and biphasic alterations in osteoclast and macrophage activity. The outcome at 56 days postoperative was complete bridging of the defect in most WT mice and fibrous mal-union in most Cpa3Cre/+ mice. The results indicate that mast cells promote bone healing, possibly by recruiting vascular endothelial cells during the inflammatory phase and coordinating anabolic and catabolic activity during tissue remodeling. Taken together the data indicate that mast cells have a positive impact on bone repair. PMID:28350850

  12. Defective bone repair in mast cell-deficient Cpa3Cre/+ mice.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-GarciaLuna, Jose Luis; Chan, Daniel; Samberg, Robert; Abou-Rjeili, Mira; Wong, Timothy H; Li, Ailian; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Henderson, Janet E; Martineau, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    In the adult skeleton, cells of the immune system interact with those of the skeleton during all phases of bone repair to influence the outcome. Mast cells are immune cells best known for their pathologic role in allergy, and may be involved in chronic inflammatory and fibrotic disorders. Potential roles for mast cells in tissue homeostasis, vascularization and repair remain enigmatic. Previous studies in combined mast cell- and Kit-deficient KitW-sh/W-sh mice (KitW-sh) implicated mast cells in bone repair but KitW-sh mice suffer from additional Kit-dependent hematopoietic and non- hematopoietic deficiencies that could have confounded the outcome. The goal of the current study was to compare bone repair in normal wild type (WT) and Cpa3Cre/+ mice, which lack mast cells in the absence of any other hematopoietic or non- hematopoietic deficiencies. Repair of a femoral window defect was characterized using micro CT imaging and histological analyses from the early inflammatory phase, through soft and hard callus formation, and finally the remodeling phase. The data indicate 1) mast cells appear in healing bone of WT mice but not Cpa3Cre/+ mice, beginning 14 days after surgery; 2) re-vascularization of repair tissue and deposition of mineralized bone was delayed and dis-organised in Cpa3Cre/+ mice compared with WT mice; 3) the defects in Cpa3Cre/+ mice were associated with little change in anabolic activity and biphasic alterations in osteoclast and macrophage activity. The outcome at 56 days postoperative was complete bridging of the defect in most WT mice and fibrous mal-union in most Cpa3Cre/+ mice. The results indicate that mast cells promote bone healing, possibly by recruiting vascular endothelial cells during the inflammatory phase and coordinating anabolic and catabolic activity during tissue remodeling. Taken together the data indicate that mast cells have a positive impact on bone repair.

  13. A comparative study of mast cells and eosinophil leukocytes in the mammalian testis.

    PubMed

    Anton, F; Morales, C; Aguilar, R; Bellido, C; Aguilar, E; Gaytán, F

    1998-05-01

    The existence of a physiological integration between the immune and endocrine systems has long been recognized. In spite of the abundant literature data on the presence of cells of the immune system in the testis, mast cells and eosinophil leukocytes have received little attention. We have studied the presence, distribution and numbers of mast cells and eosinophils in the testes of 12 mammalian species. Mast cells were frequently found in equine (stallion, ass and mule) and human testis, whereas eosinophils were nearly absent. On the contrary, eosinophils were abundant in the hare testis, while mast cells were lacking. Both cells types were present in high numbers in swine (wild and domestic boar) testis. Otherwise, mast cells and eosinophils were absent from the testicular parenchyma of several species (rat, dog, cat, bull and deer), although they were present, in most cases, around blood vessels in the tunica albuginea. The presence of high numbers of mast cells and/or eosinophil leukocytes in the testicular parenchyma of some species suggest a role for these cells in local regulatory pathways.

  14. Mast cells in common wolffish Anarhichas lupus L.: ontogeny, distribution and association with lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Hellberg, Hege; Bjerkås, Inge; Vågnes, Øyvind B; Noga, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    The morphology, ontogeny and tissue distribution of mast cells were studied in common wolffish(Anarhichas lupus L.) at the larval, juvenile and adult life stages using light and electron-microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Fish were sampled at 1 day, 1, 2, 3, 4, 8 and 12 weeks post-hatching in addition to 6 and 9 months and 2 years and older. From 8 weeks post-hatching, mast cells in common wolffish mainly appeared as oval or rounded cells 8-15 mm in diameter with an eccentrically placed, ovoid nucleus and filled with cytoplasmic granules up to 1.2 mm in diameter. Granules were refractile and eosinophilic to slightly basophilic in H&E and stained bright red with Martius-scarlet-blue and purple with pinacyanol erythrosinate in formalin-fixed tissues. Mast cells stained positive for piscidin 4 and Fc ε RI by immunohistochemistry. From 1 day to 4 weeks post-hatching, immature mast cell containing only a few irregularly sized cytoplasmic granules were observed by light and electron-microscopy in loose connective tissue of cranial areas. From 1 day post-hatching, these cells stained positive for piscidin 4 and Fc ε RI by immunohistochemistry. From 12 weeks post-hatching, mast cells showed a primarily perivascular distribution and were particularly closely associated with lymphatic vessels and sinuses. Mast cells were mainly located at the peripheral border of the adventitia of arteries and veins, while they were in intimate contact with the endothelium of the lymphatic vessels. Numerous mast cells were observed in the intestine. A stratum compactum, as described in salmonids, was not observed in wolffish intestine,nor were mast cells confined to a separate layer, a stratum granulosum. Lymphatic vessels consisting of endothelium, intimal connective tissue and a poorly developed basal lamina were observed in the intestine. Scanning electron microscopy was used to compare the structure and localization of intestinal mast cells of common wolffish and rainbow trout

  15. Involvement of mast cells and histamine in edema induced in mice by Scolopendra viridicornis centipede venom.

    PubMed

    Távora, Bianca C L F; Kimura, Louise F; Antoniazzi, Marta M; Chiariello, Thiago M; Faquim-Mauro, Eliana L; Barbaro, Katia C

    2016-10-01

    Bites caused by Scolopendra viridicornis centipede are mainly characterized by burning pain, paresthesia and edema. On this regard, the aim of this work was to study the involvement of mast cells and histamine in edema induced by Scolopendra viridicornis (Sv) centipede venom. The edema was analyzed on mice paws. The mice were pretreated with cromolyn (mast cell degranulation inhibitor) and antagonists of histamine receptors, such as promethazine (H1R), cimetidine (H2R) and thioperamide (H3/H4R). The analyses were carried out at different times after the injection of Sv venom (15 μg) or PBS in the footpad of mice. Our results showed a significant inhibition of the edema induced by Sv venom injection in mice previously treated: cromolyn (38-91%), promethazine (50-59%) and thioperamide (around 30%). The treatment with cimetidine did not alter the edema induced by Sv venom. Histopathological analysis showed that Sv venom injection (15 μg) induced edema, leukocyte recruitment and mast cells degranulation, when compared with the PBS-injected mice. Direct effects of the Sv venom on mast cells were studied in PT-18 line (mouse mast cell) and RBL-2H3 cells (rat mast cells). The data showed that higher doses (3.8 and 7.5 μg) of Sv venom were cytotoxic for both cell lineages and induced morphological changes. However, lower doses of the venom induced degranulation of both mast cell lines, as well as the secretion of MCP-1, IL-6 and IL-1β. The production of PGD2 was only observed in the RBL-2H3 line incubated with Sv venom. Taking our results together, we demonstrated that upon Sv venom exposure, mast cells and histamine are crucial for the establishment of the local inflammatory reaction.

  16. Allergen-sensitization in vivo enhances mast cell-induced inflammatory responses and supports innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Eva; Quintanar, J Luis; Ramírez-Celis, Nora Alejandra; Quintanar-Stephano, Andrés

    2009-12-02

    Mast cells are immune cells that play a crucial role in inflammatory reactions related to allergic reactions and the defense against certain parasites and bacteria. In allergy, the binding of immunoglobulin E (IgE) to its high-affinity receptor (FcepsilonRI) sensitizes mast cells. Subsequent cross-linking of IgE-FcepsilonRI by multivalent antigen results in cellular activation and the release of proinflammatory mediators. Recent in vivo and in vitro experiments suggest that IgE not only acts as an allergen sensor, but also induces molecular and biological changes in mast cells. In the present study we examined whether allergen-sensitization in vivo could modify the magnitude of mast cells-induced inflammatory responses. Moreover, we studied changes in peritoneal mast cell number and histamine amount during and after sensitization. We provided evidence that sensitization, at the time of the maximum allergen-specific IgE-titer, increases the intensity of a local inflammatory process generated in a cutaneous anaphylactic reaction. Sensitization also supports innate immunity, improving survival and speeding up the resolution of an acute inflammatory reaction induced by polymicrobial sepsis, while decreasing the amount of histamine in peritoneal mast cells. In addition, our results showed that sensitization induces a late increase in the number and histamine amount of peritoneal mast cells. Thus, our findings clearly demonstrated that sensitization induces changes in mast cells which prepare the cell to induce more intense inflammatory responses. This entails an increased detrimental role in subsequent IgE-dependent allergic reactions and an improved protective function in innate defense against pathogens.

  17. Systemic Effects of Ingested Lactobacillus Rhamnosus: Inhibition of Mast Cell Membrane Potassium (IKCa) Current and Degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Paul; Wang, Binxiang; Khambati, Ibrahim; Kunze, Wolfgang A.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of the intestine to certain strains lactobacillus can have systemic immune effects that include the attenuation of allergic responses. Despite the central role of mast cells in allergic disease little is known about the effect of lactobacilli on the function of these cells. To address this we assessed changes in rat mast cell activation following oral treatment with a strain of Lactobacillus known to attenuate allergic responses in animal models. Sprague Dawley rats were fed with L.rhamnosus JB-1 (1×109) or vehicle control for 9 days. Mediator release from peritoneal mast cells (RPMC) was determined in response to a range of stimuli. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) was used to assess mast cell responses in vivo. The Ca2+ activated K+ channel (KCa3.1) current, identified as critical to mast cell degranulation, was monitored by whole cell patch-clamp. L.rhamnosus JB-1 treatment lead to significant inhibition of mast cell mediator release in response to a range of stimuli including IgE mediated activation. Fu