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Sample records for plasma-transferred arc weld-surfacing

  1. Micro-Plasma Transferred Arc Additive Manufacturing for Die and Mold Surface Remanufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhavar, Suyog; Paul, Christ Prakash; Jain, Neelesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Micro-plasma transferred arc ( µPTA) additive manufacturing is one of the newest options for remanufacturing of dies and molds surfaces in the near-millimeter range leading to extended usage of the same. We deployed an automatic micro-plasma deposition setup to deposit a wire of 300 µm of AISI P20 tool steel on the substrate of same material for the potential application in remanufacturing of the die and mold surface. Our present research effort is to establish µPTA additive manufacturing as a viable economical and cleaner methodology for potential industrial applications. We undertook the optimization of single weld bead geometry as the first step in our present study. Bead-on-plate trials were conducted to deposit single bead geometry at various processing parameters. The bead geometry (shape and size) and dilution were measured and the parametric dependence was derived. A set of parameters leading to reproducible regular and smooth single bead geometry were identified and used to prepare a thin wall for mechanical testing. The deposits were subjected to material characterization such as microscopic studies, micro-hardness measurements and tensile testing. The process was compared qualitatively with other deposition processes involving high-energy density beams and was found to be advantageous in terms of low initial and running costs with comparable properties. The outcome of the study confirmed the process capability of µPTA deposition leading to deployment of cost-effective and environmentally friendlier technology for die and mold remanufacturing.

  2. Predicting the dilution of plasma transferred arc hardfacing of stellite on carbon steel using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Varahamoorthy, R.; Babu, S.

    2008-12-01

    Control of dilution is important in hardfacing, where low dilution is typically desirable. At present, most fabrication industries use shielded metal are welding, gas metal arc welding, gas tungsten arc welding and submerged are welding processes for hardfacing purposes. In these processes, the percentage of the dilution level is higher, ranging between 10% and 30%. In Plasma Transferred Arc (PTA) hardfacing, a solidified metallurgical bond between the deposit and the substrate is obtained with minimum dilution (less than 10%). This paper highlights the application of response surface methodology to predict and optimize the percentage of the dilution of a cobalt-based hardfaced surface produced by the PTA process. Experiments were conducted based on a fully replicable five-factor, five-level central composite rotatable design and a mathematical model was developed using response surface methodology. Furthermore, the response surface methodology was used to optimize the process parameters that yield the lowest percentage of dilution.

  3. NOREM applications guidelines: Procedures for gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding of NOREM cobalt-free hardfacing alloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.K.; Findlan, S.J.

    1995-11-01

    Wire products have been successfully fabricated and new procedures developed for machine and manual gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of the iron-base NORM hardfacing alloys. These developments enhance the attractiveness of NORM alloys both in replacement valves and in field repairs of installed valves. This report describes the GTAW procedures and summarizes plasma transferred arc welding (PTAW) parameters for shop applications of NORM alloys. The work described here provides a wider range of acceptable welding conditions than those described in EPRI report TR-101094. In addition to its ``welder friendly`` status, the NORM alloy also exhibits wear resistance equivalent to that of cobalt-base hardfacing alloys. NORM alloys should be considered for further applications in both nuclear and fossil plant valves.

  4. Microstructure and high-temperature wear properties of in situ TiC composite coatings by plasma transferred arc surface alloying on gray cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hang; Li, Jian-jun; Zheng, Zhi-zhen; Wang, Ai-hua; Huang, Qi-wen; Zeng, Da-wen

    2015-12-01

    In this work, an in situ synthesized TiC-reinforced metal matrix composite (MMC) coating of approximately 350-400 µm thickness was fabricated on a gray cast iron (GCI) substrate by plasma transferred arc (PTA) surface alloying of Ti-Fe alloy powder. Microhardness tests showed that the surface hardness increased approximately four-fold after the alloying treatment. The microstructure of the MMC coating was mainly composed of residual austenite, acicular martensite, and eutectic ledeburite. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analyzes revealed that the in situ TiC particles, which were formed by direct reaction of Ti with carbon originally contained in the GCI, was uniformly distributed at the boundary of residual austenite in the alloying zone. Pin-on-disc high-temperature wear tests were performed on samples both with and without the MMC coating at room temperature and at elevated temperatures (473 K and 623 K), and the wear behavior and mechanism were investigated. The results showed that, after the PTA alloying treatment, the wear resistance of the samples improved significantly. On the basis of our analysis of the composite coatings by optical microscopy, SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and microhardness measurements, we attributed this improvement of wear resistance to the transformation of the microstructure and to the presence of TiC particles.

  5. Cathodic arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  6. Characterization and Optimization of Ni-WC Composite Weld Matrix Deposited by Plasma-Transferred Arc Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahaei, Ali; Horley, Paul; Merlin, Mattia; Torres-Torres, David; Garagnani, Gian Luca; Praga, Rolando; Vázquez, Felipe J. García; Arizmendi-Morquecho, Ana

    2017-01-01

    This work is dedicated to optimization of carbide particle system in a weld bead deposited by PTAW technique over D2 tool steel with high chromium content. The paper reports partial melting of the original carbide grains of the Ni-based filling powder, and growing of the secondary carbide phase (Cr, Ni)_3 W_3 C in the form of dendrites with wide branches that enhanced mechanical properties of the weld. The optimization of bead parameters was made with design of experiment methodology complemented by a complex sample characterization including SEM, EDXS, XRD, and nanoindentation measurements. It was shown that the preheat of the substrate to a moderate temperature 523 K (250° C) establishes linear pattern of metal flow in the weld pool, resulting in the most homogeneous distribution of the primary carbides in the microstructure of weld bead.

  7. Characterization and Optimization of Ni-WC Composite Weld Matrix Deposited by Plasma-Transferred Arc Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahaei, Ali; Horley, Paul; Merlin, Mattia; Torres-Torres, David; Garagnani, Gian Luca; Praga, Rolando; Vázquez, Felipe J. García; Arizmendi-Morquecho, Ana

    2017-03-01

    This work is dedicated to optimization of carbide particle system in a weld bead deposited by PTAW technique over D2 tool steel with high chromium content. The paper reports partial melting of the original carbide grains of the Ni-based filling powder, and growing of the secondary carbide phase (Cr, Ni)_3W_3C in the form of dendrites with wide branches that enhanced mechanical properties of the weld. The optimization of bead parameters was made with design of experiment methodology complemented by a complex sample characterization including SEM, EDXS, XRD, and nanoindentation measurements. It was shown that the preheat of the substrate to a moderate temperature 523 K (250° C) establishes linear pattern of metal flow in the weld pool, resulting in the most homogeneous distribution of the primary carbides in the microstructure of weld bead.

  8. Elements of arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This paper looks at the following arc welding techniques: (1) shielded metal-arc welding; (2) submerged-arc welding; (3) gas metal-arc welding; (4) flux-cored arc welding; (5) electrogas welding; (6) gas tungsten-arc welding; and (7) plasma-arc welding.

  9. Effect of PTA Hardfaced Interlayer Thickness on Ballistic Performance of Shielded Metal Arc Welded Armor Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, M.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2013-03-01

    Ballistic performance of armor steel welds is very poor due to the usage of low strength and low hardness austenitic stainless steel fillers, which are traditionally used to avoid hydrogen induced cracking. In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to study the effect of plasma transferred arc hardfaced interlayer thickness on ballistic performance of shielded metal arc welded armor steel weldments. The usefulness of austenitic stainless steel buttering layer on the armor grade quenched and tempered steel base metal was also considered in this study. Joints were fabricated using three different thickness (4, 5.5, and 7 mm) hardfaced middle layer by plasma transferred arc hardfacing process between the top and bottom layers of austenitic stainless steel using shielded metal arc welding process. Sandwiched joint, in addition with the buttering layer served the dual purpose of weld integrity and ballistic immunity due to the high hardness of hardfacing alloy and the energy absorbing capacity of soft backing weld deposits. This paper will provide some insight into the usefulness of austenitic stainless steel buttering layer on the weld integrity and plasma transferred arc hardfacing layer on ballistic performance enhancement of armor steel welds.

  10. Weld arc simulator

    DOEpatents

    Burr, Melvin J.

    1990-01-30

    An arc voltage simulator for an arc welder permits the welder response to a variation in arc voltage to be standardized. The simulator uses a linear potentiometer connected to the electrode to provide a simulated arc voltage at the electrode that changes as a function of electrode position.

  11. Gas arc constriction for plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has an inert gas applied circumferentially about the arc column externally of the constricting nozzle so as to apply a constricting force on the arc after it has exited the nozzle orifice and downstream of the auxiliary shielding gas. The constricting inert gas is supplied to a plenum chamber about the body of the torch and exits through a series of circumferentially disposed orifices in an annular wall forming a closure at the forward end of the constricting gas plenum chamber. The constricting force of the circumferential gas flow about the arc concentrates and focuses the arc column into a more narrow and dense column of energy after exiting the nozzle orifice so that the arc better retains its energy density prior to contacting the workpiece.

  12. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  13. DC arc weld starter

    DOEpatents

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  14. The Effects of Carbide Characteristics on the Performance of Tungsten Carbide-Based Composite Overlays, Deposited by Plasma-Transferred Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, G.; Wolfe, T.; Meszaros, K.

    2013-06-01

    In Alberta, there are huge quantities of ore processed to remove bitumen from oil sands deposits. The scale of production generates very aggressive tribocorrosive conditions during the mining, extraction, and upgrading processes. It is common to apply tungsten carbide-based composite overlays to improve the reliability and extend service lives of equipment and components. The performance of the applied overlays is largely dependent on the selection of the carbide type and the wear environment. This paper will evaluate overlays containing macrocrystalline, angular eutectic, and spherical eutectic tungsten carbides and discuss the performance of the overlays with a focus on carbide properties and the interactions between the service conditions and the composite material. This discussion will demonstrate how effective selection of protective materials can improve the reliability of oil sands equipment.

  15. Rethinking Recycling in Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P.; Behn, M. D.; Jagoutz, O.

    2012-12-01

    Hacker et al EPSL 2011 and Behn et al Nature Geosci 2011 investigated pathways for return of buoyant, subducted material to arc crust. These include (1) diapirs rising into the hot mantle wedge, with extensive melts adding a component to arc magmas, (2) flow of material back up a relatively cold "subduction channel", adding solids to the lower crust and small-degree partial melts to the upper crust, (3) flow from the forearc along the base of arc crust, and (4) imbrication of forearc material into arc crust. These processes add felsic, incompatible-element-rich components to arc crust. The flux of incompatible elements such as Th in arc lavas, thought to be mainly recycled from subducted sediments, is > sediment subduction flux. There are large uncertainties: arc crustal growth rates are imprecise; young, primitive arc lavas may not be representative of magmatic flux into arc crust; sediment subduction flux may have varied. Nevertheless, this result is found for all arcs examined, using recently published growth rates. Perhaps arc growth rates that include subduction erosion are systematically overestimated. Instead or in addition, maybe significant Th comes from material other than sediments. Here, we consider the implications of pathways 1-4 for arc growth rates and incompatible element enrichment, in the context of subduction erosion and arc-arc collision. Subducting arc lithologies can become separated, with only felsic components returned to arc crust. Buoyant lithologies are mobile in viscous instabilities at > 700-800°C. Whereas thin layers such as sediments may become mobile all at once, instabilities may periodically strip the hottest parts from the top of thick buoyant layers, replacing them with hot mantle. In arc-arc collision, the top of a subducting plate starts at about 0°C on the seafloor, so heating is slow. In subduction erosion, forearc material in the subducting package can be > 200°C before erosion so buoyant lithologies reach 700-800

  16. Arc initiation in cathodic arc plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2002-01-01

    A "triggerless" arc initiation method and apparatus is based on simply switching the arc supply voltage to the electrodes (anode and cathode). Neither a mechanical trigger electrode nor a high voltage flashover from a trigger electrode is required. A conducting path between the anode and cathode is provided, which allows a hot spot to form at a location where the path connects to the cathode. While the conductive path is eroded by the cathode spot action, plasma deposition ensures the ongoing repair of the conducting path. Arc initiation is achieved by simply applying the relatively low voltage of the arc power supply, e.g. 500 V-1 kV, with the insulator between the anode and cathode coated with a conducting layer and the current at the layer-cathode interface concentrated at one or a few contact points. The local power density at these contact points is sufficient for plasma production and thus arc initiation. A conductive surface layer, such as graphite or the material being deposited, is formed on the surface of the insulator which separates the cathode from the anode. The mechanism of plasma production (and arc initiation) is based on explosive destruction of the layer-cathode interface caused by joule heating. The current flow between the thin insulator coating and cathode occurs at only a few contact points so the current density is high.

  17. Long arc stabilities with various arc gas flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, K.; Takeda, K.; Sugimoto, M.; Noguchi, Y.

    2014-11-01

    A new arc torch for use in magnetically driven arc device was developed with a commercially available TIG welding arc torch. The torch has a water-cooling system to the torch nozzle and has a nozzle nut to supply a swirling-free plasma gas flow. Its endurance against arc thermal load is examined. Features of its generated arc are investigated.

  18. Welding arc plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  19. Shielding conditions of local cavity for underwater arc spot welding

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Y.; Koga, H.

    1996-12-01

    Arc spot welding to join lapped plates is an effective maintenance operation for emergent recovering technique of defects under water. The welding operation is easy and effective except for an excessive amount of weld metal for deep penetration. A special nozzle for CO{sub 2} arc spot welding was designed to maintain this defect. A large amount of swirl shielding gas flow is adopted to discharge the excessive weld metal and to reduce digging action of weld pool. An additional high speed air jet is supplied to reinforce these effects. Almost flat weld bead is obtained by using of this nozzle. The effect of swirl shielding flow and additional air jet on the pressure is studied. When an excessive axial gas flow is used, a pressure at the weld pool becomes high enough to press down the weld surface below original surface level of base plate, and some molten metal is splashed out. Then, it is difficult to get a sound weld geometry. A swirl gas flow is tried to reduce the static pressure on the weld pool. The pressure on the weld pool by the swirl flow becomes much lower compared to the case by axial flow. When the swirl flow is used, a flat bead can be obtained. But some molten metal which is blown out by the swirl gas is resolidified at the edge of the nozzle. The additional high speed air jet is required to blow out the splashed metal from the nozzle completely. It has a suction effect itself. The pressure on the weld pool is also decreased. But the interaction between the swirl flow and the additional jet shows a complicated manner. This paper discusses the interaction between main shielding gas flow and the additional air jet to guarantee the good shielding condition for underwater use.

  20. WSTF electrical arc projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linley, Larry

    1994-09-01

    The objectives of these projects include the following: validate method used to screen wire insulation with arc tracking characteristics; determine damage resistance to arc as a function of source voltage and insulation thickness; investigate propagation characteristics of Kapton at low voltages; and investigate pyrolytic properties of polyimide insulated (Kapton) wire for low voltage (less than 35 VDC) applications. Supporting diagrams and tables are presented.

  1. WSTF electrical arc projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linley, Larry

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of these projects include the following: validate method used to screen wire insulation with arc tracking characteristics; determine damage resistance to arc as a function of source voltage and insulation thickness; investigate propagation characteristics of Kapton at low voltages; and investigate pyrolytic properties of polyimide insulated (Kapton) wire for low voltage (less than 35 VDC) applications. Supporting diagrams and tables are presented.

  2. TIGER Arc Modification Application

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Hillary

    1995-03-06

    The application enables the geometric correction of TIGER arcs to a more accurate spatial data set. This is done in a structured automated environment according to Census Bureau guidelines and New Mexico state GIS standards. Arcs may be deleted, added, combined, split, and moved relative to a coverage or image displayed in the background.

  3. Lazy arc consistency

    SciTech Connect

    Schiex, T.; Gaspin, C.; Regin, J.C.; Verfaillie, G.

    1996-12-31

    Arc consistency filtering is widely used in the framework of binary constraint satisfaction problems: with a low complexity, inconsistency may be detected and domains are filtered. In this paper, we show that when detecting inconsistency is the objective, a systematic domain filtering is useless and a lazy approach is more adequate. Whereas usual arc consistency algorithms produce the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, when it exists, we propose a method, called LAC{tau}, which only looks for any arc consistent sub-domain. The algorithm is then extended to provide the additional service of locating one variable with a minimum domain cardinality in the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, without necessarily computing all domain sizes. Finally, we compare traditional AC enforcing and lazy AC enforcing using several benchmark problems, both randomly generated CSP and real life problems.

  4. Tokamak ARC damage

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage.

  5. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Deichelbohrer, Paul R [Richland, WA

    1986-01-01

    A portable, hand held electric arc saw has a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc to erode a workpiece. Electric current is supplied to the blade by biased brushes and a slip ring which are mounted in the frame. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads stretched between two pulleys are used to facilitate movement of the electric arc saw. The pulleys are formed of dielectric material to electrically insulate the crawler treads from the frame.

  6. Welding arc initiator

    DOEpatents

    Correy, Thomas B.

    1989-01-01

    An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome.

  7. Welding arc initiator

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1989-05-09

    An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome. 3 figs.

  8. Metal halide arc discharge lamp having short arc length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muzeroll, Martin E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A metal halide arc discharge lamp includes a sealed light-transmissive outer jacket, a light-transmissive shroud located within the outer jacket and an arc tube assembly located within the shroud. The arc tube assembly includes an arc tube, electrodes mounted within the arc tube and a fill material for supporting an arc discharge. The electrodes have a spacing such that an electric field in a range of about 60 to 95 volts per centimeter is established between the electrodes. The diameter of the arc tube and the spacing of the electrodes are selected to provide an arc having an arc diameter to arc length ratio in a range of about 1.6 to 1.8. The fill material includes mercury, sodium iodide, scandium tri-iodide and a rare gas, and may include lithium iodide. The lamp exhibits a high color rendering index, high lumen output and high color temperature.

  9. Arc Voltage Between Deion Grid Affected by Division of Arc in Magnetic Driven Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inuzuka, Yutaro; Yamato, Takashi; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic driven arc has been applied to DC breaker and fault current limiters. However, it has not been researched, especially stagnation and re-strike of the arc. In this paper, the arc voltage between deion grid affected by division of arc in magnetic driven arc and arc behavior are measured by using the oscilloscope and HSVC (High Speed Video Camera). As a result, arc voltage increased because of division of the arc. The arc mean moving speed increases with increasing the external magnetic field. However, when the arc was not stalemate, the arc moving speed does not change so much. The arc re-strike time increases and stalemate time decreases with increasing the external magnetic field. Therefore, the anode spot moving speed increases 8 times because arc re-strike occurs easily with the external magnetic field. Thus, the erosion of electrodes decreases and the arc movement becomes the smooth. When the arc is divided, the arc voltage increased because of the electrode fall voltage. Therefore, the arc voltage increases with increasing the number of deion grid.

  10. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-18

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

  11. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven; Sanders, David M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  12. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1983-08-08

    A portable, hand-held electric arc saw apparatus comprising a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc between the blade and a workpiece of opposite polarity. Electrically conducting means are provided on said frame for transmitting current to said blade. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads are employed to facilitate movement of the apparatus relative to the workpiece.

  13. Liquation Cracking in Arc and Friction-Stir Welding of Mg-Zn Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Dustin C.; Chai, Xiao; Tang, Xin; Kou, Sindo

    2015-01-01

    As compared to Al alloys, which are known to be susceptible to liquation ( i.e., liquid formation) and liquation-induced cracking, most Mg alloys have a lower eutectic temperature and thus are likely to be even more susceptible. The present study was conducted to study liquation and liquation cracking in Mg alloys during arc welding and friction-stir welding (FSW). Binary Mg-Zn alloys were selected as a model material in view of their very low eutectic temperature of 613 K (340 °C). Mg-Zn alloys with 2, 4, and 6 wt pct of Zn were cast and welded in the as-cast condition by both gas-tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and FSW. A simple test for liquation cracking was developed, which avoided interference by solidification cracking in the nearby fusion zone. Liquation and liquation cracking in GTAW were found to be in the decreasing order of Mg-6Zn, Mg-4Zn, and Mg-2Zn. Liquation cracking occurred in FSW of Mg-6Zn but not Mg-4Zn or Mg-2Zn. Instead of a continuous ribbon-like flash connected to the weld edge, small chips, and powder covered the weld surface of Mg-6Zn. The results from GTAW and FSW were discussed in light of the binary Mg-Zn phase diagram and the curves of temperature vs fraction solid during solidification.

  14. Consolidating NASA's Arc Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balboni, John A.; Gokcen, Tahir; Hui, Frank C. L.; Graube, Peter; Morrissey, Patricia; Lewis, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the consolidation of NASA's high powered arc-jet testing at a single location. The existing plasma arc-jet wind tunnels located at the Johnson Space Center were relocated to Ames Research Center while maintaining NASA's technical capability to ground-test thermal protection system materials under simulated atmospheric entry convective heating. The testing conditions at JSC were reproduced and successfully demonstrated at ARC through close collaboration between the two centers. New equipment was installed at Ames to provide test gases of pure nitrogen mixed with pure oxygen, and for future nitrogen-carbon dioxide mixtures. A new control system was custom designed, installed and tested. Tests demonstrated the capability of the 10 MW constricted-segmented arc heater at Ames meets the requirements of the major customer, NASA's Orion program. Solutions from an advanced computational fluid dynamics code were used to aid in characterizing the properties of the plasma stream and the surface environment on the calorimeters in the supersonic flow stream produced by the arc heater.

  15. Control of arc length during gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Madigan, R.B.; Quinn, T.P.

    1994-12-31

    An arc-length control system has been developed for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) under spray transfer welding conditions. The ability to monitor and control arc length during arc welding allows consistent weld characteristics to be maintained and therefore improves weld quality. Arc length control has only been implemented for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), where an automatic voltage control (AVC) unit adjusts torch-to-work distance. The system developed here compliments the voltage- and current-sensing techniques commonly used for control of GMAW. The system consists of an arc light intensity sensor (photodiode), a Hall-effect current sensor, a personal computer and software implementing a data interpretation and control algorithms. Arc length was measured using both arc light and arc current signals. Welding current was adjusted to maintain constant arc length. A proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller was used. Gains were automatically selected based on the desired welding conditions. In performance evaluation welds, arc length varied from 2.5 to 6.5 mm while welding up a sloped workpiece (ramp in CTWD) without the control. Arc length was maintained within 1 mm of the desired (5 mm ) with the control.

  16. Arc electrode interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, X.; Berns, D.; Heberlein, J.

    1994-01-01

    The project consisted of two parts: (1) the cathode interaction studies which were a continuation of previous work and had the objective of increasing our understanding of the microscopic phenomena controlling cathode erosion in arc jet thrusters, and (2) the studies of the anode attachment in arc jet thrusters. The cathode interaction studies consisted of (1) a continuation of some modeling work in which the previously derived model for the cathode heating was applied to some specific gases and electrode materials, and (2) experimental work in which various diagnostics was applied to the cathode. The specific diagnostics used were observation of the cathode tip during arcing using a Laser Strobe Video system in conjunction with a tele-microscope, a monochromator with an optical multichannel analyzer for the determination of the cathode temperature distribution, and various ex situ materials analysis methods. The emphasis of our effort was shifted to the cathode materials analysis because a parallel project was in place during the second half of 1993 with a visiting scientist pursuing arc electrode materials studies. As a consequence, the diagnostic investigations of the arc in front of the cathode had to be postponed to the first half of 1994, and we are presently preparing these measurements. The results of last year's study showed some unexpected effects influencing the cathode erosion behavior, such as increased erosion away from the cathode tip, and our understanding of these effects should improve our ability to control cathode erosion. The arc jet anode attachment studies concentrated on diagnostics of the instabilities in subsonic anode attachment arc jet thrusters, and were supplemental measurements to work which was performed by one of the authors who spent the summer as an intern at NASA Lewis Research Center. A summary of the results obtained during the internship are included because they formed an integral part of the study. Two tasks for 1994, the

  17. Pulsed Long Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, N. Yu

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a method and an appliance for pulsed arc welding. The method supports dosage of energy required for melting each bead of electrode metal starting from the detachment of a bead. The appliance including a sensor to register bead detachment shows this moment due to the voltage burst in the arc space. Transferred beads of electrode metal are of similar size because of the dosage of energy used for melting each bead, as the consequence, the process is more stable and starting conditions to transfer electrode metal are similar, as the result, a produced weld is improved.

  18. ARc Welding (Industrial Processing Series).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARC WELDING , *BIBLIOGRAPHIES), (*ARC WELDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), ALUMINUM ALLOYS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, METAL PLATES, SPOT WELDING , STEEL...INERT GAS WELDING , MARAGING STEELS, MICROSTRUCTURE, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HEAT RESISTANT METALS, WELDABILITY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, RESISTANCE WELDING

  19. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  20. Variable polarity arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  1. Gas tungsten arc welder

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  2. Arc Length Gone Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreaux, Gregory M.; Wells, M. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Everyone with a thorough knowledge of single variable calculus knows that integration can be used to find the length of a curve on a given interval, called its arc length. Fortunately, if one endeavors to pose and solve more interesting problems than simply computing lengths of various curves, there are techniques available that do not require an…

  3. Hall-effect arc protector

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, Richard A.; Kotter, Dale K.

    1997-01-01

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored.

  4. Hall-effect arc protector

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, R.A.; Kotter, D.K.

    1997-05-13

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored. 2 figs.

  5. Semicircular Rashba arc spin polarizer

    SciTech Connect

    Bin Siu, Zhuo; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Ghee Tan, Seng

    2014-05-07

    In this work, we study the generation of spin polarized currents using curved arcs of finite widths, in which the Rashba spin orbit interaction (RSOI) is present. Compared to the 1-dimensional RSOI arcs with zero widths studied previously, the finite width presents charge carriers with another degree of freedom along the transverse width of the arc, in addition to the longitudinal degree of freedom along the circumference of the arc. The asymmetry in the transverse direction due to the difference in the inner and outer radii of the arc breaks the antisymmetry of the longitudinal spin z current in a straight RSOI segment. This property can be exploited to generate spin z polarized current output from the RSOI arc by a spin unpolarized current input. The sign of the spin current can be manipulated by varying the arc dimensions.

  6. HOLLOW CARBON ARC DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-10-11

    A device is described for producing an energetic, direct current, hollow, carbon-arc discharge in an evacuated container and within a strong magnetic field. Such discharges are particularly useful not only in dissociation and ionization of high energy molecular ion beams, but also in acting as a shield or barrier against the instreaming of lowenergy neutral particles into a plasma formed within the hollow discharge when it is used as a dissociating mechanism for forming the plasma. There is maintained a predetermined ratio of gas particles to carbon particles released from the arc electrodes during operation of the discharge. The carbon particles absorb some of the gas particles and are pumped along and by the discharge out of the device, with the result that smaller diffusion pumps are required than would otherwise be necessary to dispose of the excess gas.

  7. Arc jet diagnostics tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willey, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    Two objectives were addressed during a 10 week 1988 NASA/ASEE summer faculty fellowship at the Johnson Space Center Atmospheric Reentry Materials Structures Evaluation Facility (ARMSEF). These objectives were the evaluation of mass spectrometry for the measurement of atomic and molecular species in an arc jet environment, and the determination of atomic recombination coefficients for reaction cured glass (RCG) coated high temperature surface insulation (HRSI) materials subjected to simulated reentry conditions. Evaluation of mass spectrometry for the measurement of atomic and molecular species provided some of the first measurements of point compositions in arc jet tunnel environments. A major objective of this project centered around the sampling residence time. A three staged vacuum sampling system pulled the molecules and atoms from the arc jet to a quadrupole ionization mass spectrometer in 400 milliseconds. Conditions investigated included a composition survey across the nozzle exit at 3 cm z-distance from the nozzle exit for 3 different currents. Also, a point composition survey was taken around a shock created by the presence of a blunt body.

  8. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Plasma Arc Brazed AISI 304L Stainless Steel and Galvanized Steel Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yajuan; Li, Ruifeng; Yu, Zhishui; Wang, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Plasma arc brazing is used to join the AISI 304L stainless steel and galvanized steel plate butt joints with the CuSi3Mn1 filler wire. The effect of parameters on weld surface appearance, interfacial microstructure, and composition distribution in the joint was studied. The microhardness and mechanical tests were conducted to determine the mechanical properties of the welded specimens. The results indicated that good appearance, bead shape, and sufficient metallurgical bonding could be obtained when the brazing process was performed with a wire feeding speed of 0.8 m/min, plasma gas flow rate of 3.0 l/min, welding current of 100 A, and welding speed of 27 cm/min. During plasma arc brazing process, the top corner of the stainless steel and galvanized steel plate were heated and melted, and the melted quantity of stainless steel was much more than that of the galvanized steel due to the thermal conductivity coefficient difference between the dissimilar materials. The microhardness test results shows that the microhardness value gradually increased from the side of the galvanized steel to the stainless steel in the joint, and it is good for improving the mechanical properties of joint. The tensile strength was a little higher than that of the brazing filler, and the fracture position of weld joint was at the base metal of galvanized steel plate.

  9. Controlling Arc Length in Plasma Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Circuit maintains arc length on irregularly shaped workpieces. Length of plasma arc continuously adjusted by control circuit to maintain commanded value. After pilot arc is established, contactor closed and transfers arc to workpiece. Control circuit then half-wave rectifies ac arc voltage to produce dc control signal proportional to arc length. Circuit added to plasma arc welding machines with few wiring changes. Welds made with circuit cleaner and require less rework than welds made without it. Beads smooth and free of inclusions.

  10. Models for Jupiter's decametric arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warwick, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Arc-shaped structures that dominate Jupiter's decametric emission are discussed in terms of a magnetic fine structure. The sequence of arcs manifest the occurence of widespread fine structures similar to the white ovals on Jupiter's visible surface. An arc concave toward increasing time occurs at the east limb passage, and an arc convex occurs at the west limb passage, which is consistent with the early source producing vertex early arcs, and the late source producing vertex late arcs. Due to the geometry of the Io plasma torus (IPT) which is arranged so that Io skims the northern surface of the IPT, for any connection between Io and Jupiter's surface that involves Alfven waves, the propagation time, the refraction and the directional defocusing of these waves must be strongly influenced by the amount of Alfven wave path length between the instantaneous position of Io and the surface of the IPT.

  11. Joan of Arc.

    PubMed

    Foote-Smith, E; Bayne, L

    1991-01-01

    For centuries, romantics have praised and historians and scientists debated the mystery of Joan of Arc's exceptional achievements. How could an uneducated farmer's daughter, raised in harsh isolation in a remote village in medieval France, have found the strength and resolution to alter the course of history? Hypotheses have ranged from miraculous intervention to creative psychopathy. We suggest, based on her own words and the contemporary descriptions of observers, that the source of her visions and convictions was in part ecstatic epileptic auras and that she joins the host of creative religious thinkers suspected or known to have epilepsy, from St. Paul and Mohammed to Dostoevsky, who have changed western civilization.

  12. APPARATUS FOR ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Lingafelter, J.W.

    1960-04-01

    An apparatus is described in which a welding arc created between an annular electrode and a workpiece moves under the influence of an electromagnetic field about the electrode in a closed or annular path. This mode of welding is specially suited to the enclosing of nuclear-fuel slugs in a protective casing. For example, a uranium slug is placed in an aluminum can, and an aluminum closure is welded to the open end of the can along a closed or annular path conforming to the periphery of the end closure.

  13. Arcing on dc power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moores, Greg; Heller, R. P.; Sutanto, Surja; Dugal-Whitehead, Norma R.

    1992-01-01

    Unexpected and undesirable arcing on dc power systems can produce hazardous situations aboard space flights. The potential for fire and shock might exist in a situation where there is a broken conductor, a loose power connection, or a break in the insulation of the power cable. Such arcing has been found to be reproducible in a laboratory environment. Arcing tests show that the phenomena can last for several seconds and yet be undetectable by present protection schemes used in classical power relaying and remote power controller applications. This paper characterizes the arcing phenomena and suggests future research that is needed.

  14. Electric arc welding gun

    DOEpatents

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  15. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  16. TAMA. TIGER Arc Modification Application

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, H

    1994-06-03

    The application enables the geometric correction of TIGER arcs to a more accurate spatial data set. This is done in a structured automated environment according to Census Bureau guidelines and New Mexico state GIS standards. Arcs may be deleted, added, combined, split, and moved relative to a coverage or image displayed in the background.

  17. Of Eggs and Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Thomas, P. C.; Helfenstein, P.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Hedman, M. M.; Agarwal, M.

    2012-10-01

    New scenarios for the origins of Saturn’s rings/interior moons have directed scientific attention to the region just exterior to Saturn’s main rings. Four satellites (Aegaeon = Ae; Anthe = An; Methone = Me; Pallene = Pa) discovered by the Cassini mission on either side of Mimas’s orbit perhaps comprise a distinct class of ring-moon. They are tiny (R = 0.3-2.5 km); three (AeAnMe) are trapped in co-rotation resonances with Mimas and reside within ring-arcs; and at least two (MePa) have remarkably regular shapes. Images with pixel scales as fine as 27 m taken in May 2012 reveal Methone to be ovoid within 10 m (from sub-pixel limb detection) and devoid of any craters (>130 m) across its 9 km2 of surface; Pallene and even tiny Aegaeon have similar appearances in lesser-quality images. Numerical simulations demonstrate that particles comprising the surrounding ring-arcs populate the same resonances as their embedded moons; escape speeds from the moons are < 0.5 m/s, smaller than the 2 m/s that dynamically characterize the resonant well. We investigate the gentle transfer of particles back and forth between the ring-arcs and any embedded bodies. In this environment, the moons’ shapes are smooth equipotentials; electrostatic effects may also determine how grains settle to surfaces. Considering these shapes to represent equipotential surfaces for rotating, tidally distorted, homogeneous bodies, we infer mean satellite densities of 250+/-60 (Pa), 310+/-30 (Me), and 540+/-120 (Ae) kg m-3. About half of Methone’s leading hemisphere is covered by a sharply bounded, lemon-shaped, relatively dark region, having a form reminiscent of Mimas’s thermal anomaly (Howett et al. 2011). Its (601 nm) albedo is 13% lower than the bounding brighter material. An irregularly shaped, even-darker (by 4%) blotch straddles the apex of the moon’s motion. Impacts with circum-planetary meteoroids and plasma are likely responsible for these features.

  18. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  19. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, Kamal N.

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  20. Arc spot grouping: An entanglement of arc spot cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, Shin; Hwangbo, Dogyun; Ohno, Noriyasu; Tsventoukh, Mikhail M.; Barengolts, Sergey A.

    2014-12-21

    In recent experiments, clear transitions in velocity and trail width of an arc spot initiated on nanostructured tungsten were observed on the boundary of the thick and thin nanostructured layer regions. The velocity of arc spot was significantly decreased on the thick nanostructured region. It was suggested that the grouping decreased the velocity of arc spot. In this study, we try to explain the phenomena using a simple random walk model that has properties of directionality and self-avoidance. And grouping feature was added by installing an attractive force between spot cells with dealing with multi-spots. It was revealed that an entanglement of arc spot cells decreased the spot velocity, and spot cells tend to stamp at the same location many times.

  1. Convergent evolution of the arginine deiminase pathway: the ArcD and ArcE arginine/ornithine exchangers.

    PubMed

    Noens, Elke E E; Lolkema, Juke S

    2017-02-01

    The arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway converts L-arginine into L-ornithine and yields 1 mol of ATP per mol of L-arginine consumed. The L-arginine/L-ornithine exchanger in the pathway takes up L-arginine and excretes L-ornithine from the cytoplasm. Analysis of the genomes of 1281 bacterial species revealed the presence of 124 arc gene clusters encoding the pathway. About half of the clusters contained the gene encoding the well-studied L-arginine/L-ornithine exchanger ArcD, while the other half contained a gene, termed here arcE, encoding a membrane protein that is not a homolog of ArcD. The arcE gene product of Streptococcus pneumoniae was shown to take up L-arginine and L-ornithine with affinities of 0.6 and 1 μmol/L, respectively, and to catalyze metabolic energy-independent, electroneutral exchange. ArcE of S. pneumoniae could replace ArcD in the ADI pathway of Lactococcus lactis and provided the cells with a growth advantage. In contrast to ArcD, ArcE catalyzed translocation of the pathway intermediate L-citrulline with high efficiency. A short version of the ADI pathway is proposed for L-citrulline catabolism and the presence of the evolutionary unrelated arcD and arcE genes in different organisms is discussed in the context of the evolution of the ADI pathway.

  2. Arc of opportunity.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Adam Vai

    2011-07-01

    Born in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, the author had a 20 year career in diplomacy, political affairs, and development policy analysis at the Pacific Islands Forum, the United Nations in New York; the Prime Minister's Department in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and in the Foreign Ministry of PNG. He has also been involved in theatre for over a decade in PNG, and participated in a three-month program at the Eugene O'Neill Theatre Center in Connecticut, USA. He is currently the Business Development Manager at the Torres Strait Regional Authority (Commonwealth) on Thursday Island. Since 1975 the Australian government's overseas development policy has supported various sectoral programs in its neighbouring countries, in particular Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. The "creative" field has not been prominent in this strategy. While natural resources and the sports sectors have gained much greater attention, in terms of being viable international commercial enterprises, the arts, have remained stagnant. In this paper the need for joint programs genuinely supporting "wellbeing" and promoting social enterprise throughout the "arc of opportunity" is described to harness Melanesian creativity to compete successfully in world-markets, starting with penetration of the largest economy at its door-step: Australia.

  3. Percussive arc welding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hollar, Jr., Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    A percussive arc welding apparatus includes a generally cylindrical actuator body having front and rear end portions and defining an internal recess. The front end of the body includes an opening. A solenoid assembly is provided in the rear end portion in the internal recess of the body, and an actuator shaft assembly is provided in the front end portion in the internal recess of the actuator body. The actuator shaft assembly includes a generally cylindrical actuator block having first and second end portions, and an actuator shaft having a front end extending through the opening in the actuator body, and the rear end connected to the first end portion of the actuator block. The second end portion of the actuator block is in operational engagement with the solenoid shaft by a non-rigid connection to reduce the adverse rebound effects of the actuator shaft. A generally transversely extending pin is rigidly secured to the rear end of the shaft. One end of the pin is received in a slot in the nose housing sleeve to prevent rotation of the actuator shaft during operation of the apparatus.

  4. PC-based arc ignition and arc length control system for gas tungsten arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y. ); Cook, G.E.; Barnett, R.J.; Springfield, J.F. . School of Engineering)

    1992-10-01

    In this paper, a PC-based digital control system for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is presented. This system controls the arc ignition process, the arc length, and the process of welding termination. A DT2818 made by Data Translation is used for interface and A/D and D/A conversions. The digital I/O ports of the DT2818 are used for control of wirefeed, shield gas, cooling water, welding power supply, etc. The DT2818 is housed in a PC. The welding signals and status are displayed on the screen for in-process monitoring. A user can control the welding process by the keyboard.

  5. Heat transfer in GTA welding arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huft, Nathan J.

    Heat transfer characteristics of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) arcs with arc currents of 50 to 125 A and arc lengths of 3 to 11 mm were measured experimentally through wet calorimetry. The data collected were used to calculate how much heat reported to the cathode and anode and how much was lost from the arc column. A Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) macro was written to further analyze the data and account for Joule heating within the electrodes and radiation and convection losses from the arc, providing a detailed account of how heat was generated and dissipated within the system. These values were then used to calculate arc efficiencies, arc column voltages, and anode and cathode fall voltages. Trends were noted for variances in the arc column voltage, power dissipated from the arc column, and the total power dissipated by the system with changing arc length. Trends for variances in the anode and cathode fall voltages, total power dissipated, Joule heating within the torches and electrodes with changing arc current were also noted. In addition, the power distribution between the anode and cathode for each combination of arc length and arc current was examined. Keywords: Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, GTAW, anode fall, cathode fall, heat transfer, wet calorimetry

  6. Dosimetric and delivery characterizations of full-arc and half-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy for maxillary cancer.

    PubMed

    Miura, Hideharu; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Tanooka, Masao; Doi, Hiroshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Takada, Yasuhiro; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Hirota, Shozo

    2012-09-01

    We compared the efficiency and accuracy of full-arc and half-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery for maxillary cancer. Plans for gantry rotation angles of 360° and 180° (full-arc and half-arc VMAT) were created for six maxillary cancer cases with the Monaco treatment planning system, and delivered using an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. Full-arc and half-arc VMAT were compared with regard to homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), mean dose to normal brain, total monitor units (MU), delivery times, root mean square (r.m.s.) gantry accelerations (°/s(2)), and r.m.s. gantry angle errors (°). The half-arc VMAT plans achieved comparable HI and CI to the full-arc plans. Mean doses to the normal brain and brainstem with the half-arc VMAT plans were on average 16% and 17% lower than those with the full-arc VMAT plans. For other organs at risk (OARs), no significant DVH differences were observed between plans. Half-arc VMAT resulted in 11% less total MU and 20% shorter delivery time than the full-arc VMAT, while r.m.s. gantry acceleration and r.m.s. gantry angle error during half-arc VMAT delivery were 30% and 23% less than those during full-arc VMAT delivery, respectively. Furthermore, the half-arc VMAT plans were comparable with the full-arc plans regarding dose homogeneity and conformity in maxillary cancer, and provided a statistical decrease in mean dose to OAR, total MU, delivery time and gantry angle error. Half-arc VMAT plans may be a suitable treatment option in radiotherapy for maxillary cancer.

  7. High pressure neon arc lamp

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2003-07-15

    A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

  8. Clines Arc through Multivariate Morphospace.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Brian K; Berner, Daniel; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2017-04-01

    Evolutionary biologists typically represent clines as spatial gradients in a univariate character (or a principal-component axis) whose mean changes as a function of location along a transect spanning an environmental gradient or ecotone. This univariate approach may obscure the multivariate nature of phenotypic evolution across a landscape. Clines might instead be plotted as a series of vectors in multidimensional morphospace, connecting sequential geographic sites. We present a model showing that clines may trace nonlinear paths that arc through morphospace rather than elongating along a single major trajectory. Arcing clines arise because different characters diverge at different rates or locations along a geographic transect. We empirically confirm that some clines arc through morphospace, using morphological data from threespine stickleback sampled along eight independent transects from lakes down their respective outlet streams. In all eight clines, successive vectors of lake-stream divergence fluctuate in direction and magnitude in trait space, rather than pointing along a single phenotypic axis. Most clines exhibit surprisingly irregular directions of divergence as one moves downstream, although a few clines exhibit more directional arcs through morphospace. Our results highlight the multivariate complexity of clines that cannot be captured with the traditional graphical framework. We discuss hypotheses regarding the causes, and implications, of such arcing multivariate clines.

  9. Welding arc length control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a welding arc length control system. The system includes, in its broadest aspects, a power source for providing welding current, a power amplification system, a motorized welding torch assembly connected to the power amplification system, a computer, and current pick up means. The computer is connected to the power amplification system for storing and processing arc weld current parameters and non-linear voltage-ampere characteristics. The current pick up means is connected to the power source and to the welding torch assembly for providing weld current data to the computer. Thus, the desired arc length is maintained as the welding current is varied during operation, maintaining consistent weld penetration.

  10. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Plasma Arc Cutting. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    This welding curriculum guide treats two topics in detail: the care of tungsten electrodes and the entire concept of contamination control and the hafnium electrode and its importance in dual-air cutting systems that use compressed shop air for plasma arc cutting activities. The guide contains three units of instruction that cover the following…

  11. Unzipping of the volcano arc, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, R.J.; Smoot, N.C.; Rubin, M.

    1984-01-01

    A working hypothesis for the recent evolution of the southern Volcano Arc, Japan, is presented which calls upon a northward-progressing sundering of the arc in response to a northward-propagating back-arc basin extensional regime. This model appears to explain several localized and recent changes in the tectonic and magrnatic evolution of the Volcano Arc. Most important among these changes is the unusual composition of Iwo Jima volcanic rocks. This contrasts with normal arc tholeiites typical of the rest of the Izu-Volcano-Mariana and other primitive arcs in having alkaline tendencies, high concentrations of light REE and other incompatible elements, and relatively high silica contents. In spite of such fractionated characteristics, these lavas appear to be very early manifestations of a new volcanic and tectonic cycle in the southern Volcano Arc. These alkaline characteristics and indications of strong regional uplift are consistent with the recent development of an early stage of inter-arc basin rifting in the southern Volcano Arc. New bathymetric data are presented in support of this model which indicate: 1. (1) structural elements of the Mariana Trough extend north to the southern Volcano Arc. 2. (2) both the Mariana Trough and frontal arc shoal rapidly northwards as the Volcano Arc is approached. 3. (3) rugged bathymetry associated with the rifted Mariana Trough is replaced just south of Iwo Jima by the development of a huge dome (50-75 km diameter) centered around Iwo Jima. Such uplifted domes are the immediate precursors of rifts in other environments, and it appears that a similar situation may now exist in the southern Volcano Arc. The present distribution of unrifted Volcano Arc to the north and rifted Mariana Arc to the south is interpreted not as a stable tectonic configuration but as representing a tectonic "snapshot" of an arc in the process of being rifted to form a back-arc basin. ?? 1984.

  12. Total Marrow Irradiation With RapidArc Volumetric Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Aydogan, Bulent; Yeginer, Mete; Kavak, Gulbin O.; Fan, John; Radosevich, James A.; Gwe-Ya, Kim

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To develop a volumetric arc therapy (VMAT)-total marrow irradiation (TMI) technique for patients with hematologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: VMAT planning was performed for 6 patients using RapidArc technology. The planning target volume consisted of all the bones in the body from the head to the mid-femur, excluding the extremities, except for the humerus, plus a 3.0-mm margin. The organs at risk included the lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, bowels, brain, eyes, and oral cavity. The VMAT-TMI technique consisted of three plans: the head and neck, the chest, and the pelvis, each with three 330{sup o} arcs. The plans were prescribed to ensure, at a minimum, 95% planning target volume dose coverage with the prescription dose (percentage of volume receiving dose of {>=}12 Gy was 95%). The treatments were delivered and verified using MapCheck and ion chamber measurements. Results: The VMAT-TMI technique reported in the present study provided comparable dose distributions with respect to the fixed gantry linear accelerator intensity-modulated TMI. RapidArc planning was less subjective and easier, and, most importantly, the delivery was more efficient. RapidArc reduced the treatment delivery time to approximately 18 min from 45 min with the fixed gantry linear accelerator intensity-modulated TMI. When the prescription dose coverage was reduced to 85% from 95% and the mandible and maxillary structures were not included in the planning target volume as reported in a tomotherapy study, a considerable organ at risk dose reduction of 4.2-51% was observed. The average median dose for the lungs and lenses was reduced to 5.6 Gy from 7.2 Gy and 2.4 Gy from 4.5 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The RapidArc VMAT technique improved the treatment planning, dose conformality, and, most importantly, treatment delivery efficiency. The results from our study suggest that the RapidArc VMAT technology can be expected to facilitate the clinical transition of TMI.

  13. Arc-textured high emittance radiator surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    High emittance radiator surfaces are produced by arc-texturing. This process produces such a surface on a metal by scanning it with a low voltage electric arc from a carbon electrode in an inert environment.

  14. Warm storage for arc magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboni, Mélanie; Boehnke, Patrick; Schmitt, Axel K.; Harrison, T. Mark; Shane, Phil; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie; Baumgartner, Lukas

    2016-12-01

    Felsic magmatic systems represent the vast majority of volcanic activity that poses a threat to human life. The tempo and magnitude of these eruptions depends on the physical conditions under which magmas are retained within the crust. Recently the case has been made that volcanic reservoirs are rarely molten and only capable of eruption for durations as brief as 1,000 years following magma recharge. If the “cold storage” model is generally applicable, then geophysical detection of melt beneath volcanoes is likely a sign of imminent eruption. However, some arc volcanic centers have been active for tens of thousands of years and show evidence for the continual presence of melt. To address this seeming paradox, zircon geochronology and geochemistry from both the frozen lava and the cogenetic enclaves they host from the Soufrière Volcanic Center (SVC), a long-lived volcanic complex in the Lesser Antilles arc, were integrated to track the preeruptive thermal and chemical history of the magma reservoir. Our results show that the SVC reservoir was likely eruptible for periods of several tens of thousands of years or more with punctuated eruptions during these periods. These conclusions are consistent with results from other arc volcanic reservoirs and suggest that arc magmas are generally stored warm. Thus, the presence of intracrustal melt alone is insufficient as an indicator of imminent eruption, but instead represents the normal state of magma storage underneath dormant volcanoes.

  15. Metal vapor arc ion plating

    DOEpatents

    Bertram, L.A.; Fisher, R.W.; Mattox, D.M.; Zanner, F.J.

    1986-09-09

    A method and apparatus for ion plating are described. The apparatus uses more negative than a first electrode voltage in a vacuum arc remelt system to attract low energy ions from the anode electrode to the article to be plated. 2 figs.

  16. Warm storage for arc magmas.

    PubMed

    Barboni, Mélanie; Boehnke, Patrick; Schmitt, Axel K; Harrison, T Mark; Shane, Phil; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie; Baumgartner, Lukas

    2016-12-06

    Felsic magmatic systems represent the vast majority of volcanic activity that poses a threat to human life. The tempo and magnitude of these eruptions depends on the physical conditions under which magmas are retained within the crust. Recently the case has been made that volcanic reservoirs are rarely molten and only capable of eruption for durations as brief as 1,000 years following magma recharge. If the "cold storage" model is generally applicable, then geophysical detection of melt beneath volcanoes is likely a sign of imminent eruption. However, some arc volcanic centers have been active for tens of thousands of years and show evidence for the continual presence of melt. To address this seeming paradox, zircon geochronology and geochemistry from both the frozen lava and the cogenetic enclaves they host from the Soufrière Volcanic Center (SVC), a long-lived volcanic complex in the Lesser Antilles arc, were integrated to track the preeruptive thermal and chemical history of the magma reservoir. Our results show that the SVC reservoir was likely eruptible for periods of several tens of thousands of years or more with punctuated eruptions during these periods. These conclusions are consistent with results from other arc volcanic reservoirs and suggest that arc magmas are generally stored warm. Thus, the presence of intracrustal melt alone is insufficient as an indicator of imminent eruption, but instead represents the normal state of magma storage underneath dormant volcanoes.

  17. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  18. STRUVE arc and EUPOS® stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasmane, Ieva; Kaminskis, Janis; Balodis, Janis; Haritonova, Diana

    2013-04-01

    The Struve Geodetic Arc was developed in Years 1816 to 1855, 200 years ago. Historic information on the points of the Struve Geodetic Arc are included in the UNESCO World Heritage list in 2005. Nevertheless, the sites of many points are still not identified nor included in the data bases nowadays. Originally STRUVE arc consisted of 258 main triangles with 265 triangulation points. Currently 34 of the original station points are identified and included in the in the UNESCO World Heritage list. identified original measurement points of the Meridian Arc are located in Sweden (7 points), Norway (15), Finland (83), Russia (1), Estonia (22), Latvia (16), Lithuania (18), Belorussia (28), Ukraine (59) and Moldova (27). In Year 2002 was initiated another large coverage project - European Position Determination System "EUPOS®". Currently there are about 400 continuously operating GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) stations covering EU countries Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Romania and East European countries Ukraine and Moldavia. EUPOS® network is a ground based GNSS augmentation system widely used for geodesy, land surveying, geophysics and navigation. It gives the opportunity for fast and accurate position determination never available before. It is an honorable task to use the EUPOS® system for research of the Struve triangulation former sites. Projects with Struve arc can popularize geodesy, geo-information and its meaning in nowadays GIS and GNSS systems. Struve Arc and its points is unique cooperation cross-border object which deserve special attention because of their natural beauty and historical value for mankind. GNSS in geodesy discovers a powerful tool for the verification and validation of the height values of geodetic leveling benchmarks established historically almost 200 years ago. The differential GNSS and RTK methods appear very useful to identify vertical displacement of landscape by means of

  19. Laboratory experiments on arc deflection and instability

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.; Karasik, M.

    2000-03-21

    This article describes experiments on arc deflection instability carried out during the past few years at the Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The approach has been that of plasma physicists interested in arcs, but they believe these results may be useful to engineers who are responsible for controlling arc behavior in large electric steel furnaces.

  20. Magnification Bias in Gravitational Arc Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Caminha, G. B.; Estrada, J.; Makler, M.

    2013-08-29

    The statistics of gravitational arcs in galaxy clusters is a powerful probe of cluster structure and may provide complementary cosmological constraints. Despite recent progresses, discrepancies still remain among modelling and observations of arc abundance, specially regarding the redshift distribution of strong lensing clusters. Besides, fast "semi-analytic" methods still have to incorporate the success obtained with simulations. In this paper we discuss the contribution of the magnification in gravitational arc statistics. Although lensing conserves surface brightness, the magnification increases the signal-to-noise ratio of the arcs, enhancing their detectability. We present an approach to include this and other observational effects in semi-analytic calculations for arc statistics. The cross section for arc formation ({\\sigma}) is computed through a semi-analytic method based on the ratio of the eigenvalues of the magnification tensor. Using this approach we obtained the scaling of {\\sigma} with respect to the magnification, and other parameters, allowing for a fast computation of the cross section. We apply this method to evaluate the expected number of arcs per cluster using an elliptical Navarro--Frenk--White matter distribution. Our results show that the magnification has a strong effect on the arc abundance, enhancing the fraction of arcs, moving the peak of the arc fraction to higher redshifts, and softening its decrease at high redshifts. We argue that the effect of magnification should be included in arc statistics modelling and that it could help to reconcile arcs statistics predictions with the observational data.

  1. Making Conductive Polymers By Arc Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daech, Alfred F.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental technique for fabrication of electrically conductive polymeric filaments based on arc tracking, in which electrical arc creates conductive carbon track in material that initially was insulator. Electrically conductive polymeric structures made by arc tracking aligned along wire on which formed. Alignment particularly suited to high conductivity and desirable in materials intended for testing as candidate superconductors.

  2. Arc-starting aid for GTA welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiffen, E. L.

    1977-01-01

    Three-in-one handtool combining arc-gap gage, electrode tip sander, and electrode projection gate, effectively improves initiation on gas tungsten arc (GTA), automatic skate-welding machines. Device effects ease in polishing electrode tips and setting exactly initial arc gap before each weld pass.

  3. Thermal analysis of an arc heater electrode with a rotating arc foot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Shepard, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    A smoothly rotating arc foot and an arc foot that jumps between multiple sticking points were analyzed using analytic formulations and numerical solution procedures. For each case the temperature distribution for a copper electrode was obtained for the plausible range of operating conditions. It is shown that the smoothly rotating arc foot is an extremely safe mode of operation, whereas the jumping arc foot produces excessively high electrode surface temperatures which are not greatly alleviated by increasing the average rotational frequency of the arc foot. It is suggested to eliminate arc-foot rotation and rely on the distribution of fixed electrodes with stationary arc attachment to avoid electrode failure at high current.

  4. ION PRODUCING MECHANISM (ARC EXTERNAL TO BLOCK)

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W.H.

    1958-09-01

    This patent pentains to an ion producing mechanism employed in a calutron which has the decided advantage of an increased amount of ionization effectuated by the arc, and a substantially uniform arc in poiat of time, i arc location and along the arc length. The unique features of the disclosed ion source lie in the specific structural arrangement of the source block, gas ionizing passage, filament shield and filament whereby the arc is established both within the ionizing passage and immediately outside the exit of the ionizing passage at the block face.

  5. A mechanism that triggers double arcing during plasma arc cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemchinsky, Valerian

    2009-10-01

    Double arcing (DA) is a phenomenon when a transferred arc, flowing inside an electrically insulated nozzle, breaks into two separate arcs: one that connects the cathode and the nozzle and another that connects the nozzle and a work-piece. It is a commonly accepted opinion that the reason for DA is high voltage drop in the plasma inside the nozzle. However, the specific mechanism that triggers the DA development is not clear. In this paper, we propose such a mechanism. Dielectric films deposited inside the nozzle's orifice play the key role in this mechanism. These films are charged by ion current from plasma. A strong electric field is created inside the film and at the boundary of the film and clean metal of the nozzle. This gives rise to a thermo-field electron emission from the clean metal that borders the film. Emitted electrons are accelerated at the voltage drop between the nozzle and plasma. These electrons produce extra ions, which in turn move back to the film and additionally charge it. This sequence of events leads to explosive instability if the voltage drop inside the nozzle is high enough. Experiments to check the proposed mechanism are suggested.

  6. Filters for cathodic arc plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Brown, Ian G.

    2002-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  7. The SOAR Gravitational Arc Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makler, M.; Furlanetto, C.; Santiago, B. X.; Caminha, G. B.; Cypriano, E.; Cibirka, N.; Pereira, M. E. S.; Bom, C. R. D.; Lima, M. P.; Brandt, C. H.; Neto, A. F.; Estrada, J.; Lin, H.; Hao, J.; McKay, T. M.; da Costa, L. N.; Maia, M. A. G.

    2014-10-01

    We present the first results of the SOAR Gravitational Arc Survey (SOGRAS). The survey imaged 47 clusters in two redshift intervals centered at z=0.27 and z=0.55, targeting the richest clusters in each interval. Images were obtained in the g', r' and i' bands with a median seeing of 0.83, 0.76 and 0.71 arcsec, respectively, in these filters. Most of the survey clusters are located within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe-82 region and all of them are in the SDSS footprint. We present the first results of the survey, including the 6 best strong lensing systems, photometric and morphometric catalogs of the galaxy sample, and cross matches of the clusters and galaxies with complementary samples (spectroscopic redshifts, photometry in several bands, X-ray and Sunyaev Zel'dovich clusters, etc.), exploiting the synergy with other surveys in Stripe-82. We apply several methods to characterize the gravitational arc candidates, including the Mediatrix method (Bom et al. 2012) and ArcFitting (Furlanetto et al. 2012), and for the subtraction of galaxy cluster light. Finally, we apply strong lensing inversion techniques to the best systems, providing constraints on their mass distribution. The analyses of a spectral follow-up with Gemini and the derived dynamical masses are presented in a poster submitted to this same meeting (Cibirka et al.). Deeper follow-up images with Gemini strengthen the case for the strong lensing nature of the candidates found in this survey.

  8. Review of switching arcs and plasma chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benenson, D. M.; Gilmour, A. S., Jr.; Dollinger, R. E.; Nagamatsu, H. T.; Pfender, E.; Warder, R. C., Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Physical processes in switching arcs are considered in such applications as circuit interruption (in high pressure, high voltage gas blast circuit breakers and vacuum arc interrupters), fault current limiting (principally through vacuum arc devices), and pulse power systems (using vacuum arcs). The physics of arc heaters, associated with processes in the anode region, are described. Analytical models of (1) the current zero region and interrupter performance of gas blast interrupters and (2) the heat transfer mechanisms in the anode region of arc heaters, are discussed. Selected diagnostic techniques are presented. Applications of plasma chemistry involving the high pressure, equilibrium (thermal) plasma are noted. Low pressure (nonequilibrium) plasma processing is described through mechanisms associated with coating, deposition, and etching applications.

  9. ARC length control for plasma welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A control system to be used with a plasma arc welding apparatus is disclosed. The plasma arc welding apparatus includes a plasma arc power supply, a contactor, and an electrode assembly for moving the electrode relative to a work piece. The electrode assembly is raised or lowered by a drive motor. The present apparatus includes a plasma arc adapter connected across the power supply to measure the voltage across the plasma arc. The plasma arc adapter forms a dc output signal input to a differential amplifier. A second input is defined by an adjustable resistor connected to a dc voltage supply to permit operator control. The differential amplifier forms an output difference signal provided to an adder circuit. The adder circuit then connects with a power amplifier which forms the driving signal for the motor. In addition, the motor connects to a tachometor which forms a feedback signal delivered to the adder to provide damping, therby avoiding servo loop overshoot.

  10. Plasma arc torch with coaxial wire feed

    DOEpatents

    Hooper, Frederick M

    2002-01-01

    A plasma arc welding apparatus having a coaxial wire feed. The apparatus includes a plasma arc welding torch, a wire guide disposed coaxially inside of the plasma arc welding torch, and a hollow non-consumable electrode. The coaxial wire guide feeds non-electrified filler wire through the tip of the hollow non-consumable electrode during plasma arc welding. Non-electrified filler wires as small as 0.010 inches can be used. This invention allows precision control of the positioning and feeding of the filler wire during plasma arc welding. Since the non-electrified filler wire is fed coaxially through the center of the plasma arc torch's electrode and nozzle, the wire is automatically aimed at the optimum point in the weld zone. Therefore, there is no need for additional equipment to position and feed the filler wire from the side before or during welding.

  11. Water in Aleutian Arc Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, T.; Zimmer, M. M.; Hauri, E. H.

    2011-12-01

    In the past decade, baseline data have been obtained on pre-eruptive water contents for several volcanic arcs worldwide. One surprising observation is that parental magmas contain ~ 4 wt% H2O on average at each arc worldwide [1]. Within each arc, the variation from volcano to volcano is from 2 to 6 w% H2O, with few exceptions. The similar averages at different arcs are unexpected given the order of magnitude variations in the concentration of other slab tracers. H2O is clearly different from other tracers, however, being both a major driver of melting in the mantle and a major control of buoyancy and viscosity in the crust. Some process, such as mantle melting or crustal storage, apparently modulates the water content of mafic magmas at arcs. Mantle melting may deliver a fairly uniform product to the Moho, if the wet melt process includes a negative feedback. On the other hand, magmas with variable water content may be generated in the mantle, but a crustal filter may lead to magma degassing up to a common mid-to-upper crustal storage region. Testing between these two end-member scenarios is critical to our understanding of subduction dehydration, global water budgets, magmatic plumbing systems, melt generation and eruptive potential. The Alaska-Aleutian arc is a prime location to explore this fundamental problem in the subduction water cycle, because active volcanoes vary more than elsewhere in the world in parental H2O contents (based on least-degassed, mafic melt inclusions hosted primarily in olivine). For example, Shishaldin volcano taps magma with among the lowest H2O contents globally (~ 2 wt%) and records low pressure crystal fractionation [2], consistent with a shallow magma system (< 1 km bsl). At the other extreme, Augustine volcano is fed by a mafic parent that contains among the highest H2O globally (~ 7 wt%), and has evolved by deep crystal fractionation [2], consistent with a deep magma system (~ 14 km bsl). Do these magmas stall at different depths

  12. Nomenclature of SLC Arc beamline components

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, J.; Weng, W.T.

    1986-04-10

    This note defines I and C formal names for beamline components in the Arc as specified in the TRANSPORT decks ARCN FINAL and ARCS FINAL of June 5, 1985. The formal name consists of three fields: the primary name, the zone and the unit number. The general principles and guidelines are explained in Reference 1. The rationale and the final resolutions of the naming conventions for the Arc are explained.

  13. Overvoltage protector using varistor initiated arc

    DOEpatents

    Brainard, John P.

    1982-01-01

    Coaxial conductors are protected against electrical overvoltage by at least one element of non-electroded varistor material that adjoins each other varistor element and conductor with which it contacts. With this construction, overvoltage current initiated through the varistor material arcs at the point contacts between varistor elements and, as the current increases, the arcs increase until they become a continuous arc between conductors, bypassing the varistor material.

  14. Magnetic-cusp, cathodic-arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    1995-01-01

    A magnetic-cusp for a cathodic-arc source wherein the arc is confined to the desired cathode surface, provides a current path for electrons from the cathode to the anode, and utilizes electric and magnetic fields to guide ions from the cathode to a point of use, such as substrates to be coated. The magnetic-cusp insures arc stability by an easy magnetic path from anode to cathode, while the straight-through arrangement leads to high ion transmission.

  15. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  16. Plasma arc melting of zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Tubesing, P.K.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Dunn, P.S.

    1997-12-31

    Zirconium, like some other refractory metals, has an undesirable sensitivity to interstitials such as oxygen. Traditionally, zirconium is processed by electron beam melting to maintain minimum interstitial contamination. Electron beam melted zirconium, however, does not respond positively to mechanical processing due to its large grain size. The authors undertook a study to determine if plasma arc melting (PAM) technology could be utilized to maintain low interstitial concentrations and improve the response of zirconium to subsequent mechanical processing. The PAM process enabled them to control and maintain low interstitial levels of oxygen and carbon, produce a more favorable grain structure, and with supplementary off-gassing, improve the response to mechanical forming.

  17. The Abundance of Large Arcs From CLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bingxiao; Postman, Marc; Meneghetti, Massimo; Coe, Dan A.; Clash Team

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an automated arc-finding algorithm to perform a rigorous comparison of the observed and simulated abundance of large lensed background galaxies (a.k.a arcs). We use images from the CLASH program to derive our observed arc abundance. Simulated CLASH images are created by performing ray tracing through mock clusters generated by the N-body simulation calibrated tool -- MOKA, and N-body/hydrodynamic simulations -- MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH X-ray selected sample. We derive a lensing efficiency of 15 ± 3 arcs per cluster for the X-ray selected CLASH sample and 4 ± 2 arcs per cluster for the simulated sample. The marginally significant difference (3.0 σ) between the results for the observations and the simulations can be explained by the systematically smaller area with magnification larger than 3 (by a factor of ˜4) in both MOKA and MUSIC mass models relative to those derived from the CLASH data. Accounting for this difference brings the observed and simulated arc statistics into full agreement. We find that the source redshift distribution does not have big impact on the arc abundance but the arc abundance is very sensitive to the concentration of the dark matter halos. Our results suggest that the solution to the "arc statistics problem" lies primarily in matching the cluster dark matter distribution.

  18. Atmospheric spreading of protons in auroral arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iglesias, G. E.; Vondrak, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    A model is developed to calculate the effect of atmospheric spreading on the flux and angular distribution of protons in homogeneous auroral arcs. An expression is derived that indicates the angular distribution in the atmosphere as a function of distance from arc center, neutral scale height, arc width, and initial angular distribution. The results of the model agree favorably with those based on Monte-Carlo calculations. From these results the enhancement factors needed to compute the original proton current above the atmosphere are obtained. A technique is indicated for determining the incident angular distribution from rocket-based measurements of the arc width and angular distribution.

  19. Automatic Control Of Length Of Welding Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F.

    1991-01-01

    Nonlinear relationships among current, voltage, and length stored in electronic memory. Conceptual microprocessor-based control subsystem maintains constant length of welding arc in gas/tungsten arc-welding system, even when welding current varied. Uses feedback of current and voltage from welding arc. Directs motor to set position of torch according to previously measured relationships among current, voltage, and length of arc. Signal paths marked "calibration" or "welding" used during those processes only. Other signal paths used during both processes. Control subsystem added to existing manual or automatic welding system equipped with automatic voltage control.

  20. Metals purification by improved vacuum arc remelting

    DOEpatents

    Zanner, Frank J.; Williamson, Rodney L.; Smith, Mark F.

    1994-12-13

    The invention relates to improved apparatuses and methods for remelting metal alloys in furnaces, particularly consumable electrode vacuum arc furnaces. Excited reactive gas is injected into a stationary furnace arc zone, thus accelerating the reduction reactions which purify the metal being melted. Additionally, a cooled condensation surface is disposed within the furnace to reduce the partial pressure of water in the furnace, which also fosters the reduction reactions which result in a purer produced ingot. Methods and means are provided for maintaining the stationary arc zone, thereby reducing the opportunity for contaminants evaporated from the arc zone to be reintroduced into the produced ingot.

  1. Helium and Carbon Systematics of the Sangihe Arc, Indonesia: Tracing Volatile Sources in an Arc-Arc Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, L. A.; Hilton, D. R.; Fischer, T. P.; Hartono, U.

    2002-12-01

    The Sangihe and Halmahera arcs in northeastern Indonesia are presently colliding, forming the world's only extant example of an arc-arc collision. We report the first helium and carbon isotopic and relative abundance data from the Sangihe Arc volcanoes as a means to trace magma origins in this complicated tectonic region. Gas chemistry and N-isotopes from the same localities are reported in a companion paper (Clor et al, this volume). There is a distinct regional pattern in He and CO2 variations along the north-south strike of the Sangihe Arc. The two northernmost volcanoes (Awu and Karangetang) have 3He/4He <= 6.4RA (where RA = air 3He/4He), CO2/3He >= 30x109, and δ13C >= -2.0‰ . In contrast, the southern volcanoes along the arc (Ruang, Lokon, Mahawu) have 3He/4He >= 7.0RA, CO2/3He < 7x109 and δ13C < -3.0‰ . The southern volcanoes, therefore, sample volatiles more typical of island arc volcanoes. Resolving the CO2 into component structures (mantle-derived, plus slab-derived organic and limestone CO2 - following the approach of Sano and Marty, Chem. Geol., 1995), the northern volcanoes contain higher than average slab-derived limestone contributions. For example, limestone-derived CO2 makes up > 90% of the total CO2 at Karangetang and ~98% at Awu. These values compare with an average limestone contribution of ~65% in the southern Sangihe arc and ~73% in other arcs worldwide. We are investigating possible reasons for the enhanced limestone contributions in the northern Sangihe arc. The sedimentary mélange wedge is thickest in the north (up to 15km) - where the arcs initially collided. The greater availability of sediment may result in a greater input of subducted sediment, thereby providing enhanced dilution of mantle wedge C inputs. Alternatively, subducted sediments may be more carbonate-rich in the northern segment of the arc. This may reflect obduction of shallow, organic-bearing sediments onto the over-riding plate, leaving only pelagic carbonates to

  2. Unstable behavior of anodic arc discharge for synthesis of nanomaterials

    DOE PAGES

    Gershman, Sophia; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2016-07-27

    A short carbon arc operating with a high ablation rate of the graphite anode exhibits a combined motion of the arc and the arc attachment to the anode. A characteristic time scale of this motion is in a 10-3 sec range. The arc exhibits a negative differential resistance before the arc motion occurs. Thermal processes in the arc plasma region interacting with the ablating anode are considered as possible causes of this unstable arc behavior. It is also hypothesized that the arc motion could potentially cause mixing of the various nanoparticles synthesized in the arc in the high ablation regime.

  3. Unstable behavior of anodic arc discharge for synthesis of nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Gershman, Sophia; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2016-07-27

    A short carbon arc operating with a high ablation rate of the graphite anode exhibits a combined motion of the arc and the arc attachment to the anode. A characteristic time scale of this motion is in a 10-3 sec range. The arc exhibits a negative differential resistance before the arc motion occurs. Thermal processes in the arc plasma region interacting with the ablating anode are considered as possible causes of this unstable arc behavior. It is also hypothesized that the arc motion could potentially cause mixing of the various nanoparticles synthesized in the arc in the high ablation regime.

  4. Quantum Oscillations from Fermi Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereg-Barnea, Tamar; Refael, Gil; Franz, Marcel; Weber, Heidi; Seradjeh, Babak

    2009-03-01

    Recent experiments[1] in a variety of High Tc superconductors revel 1/B oscillations in the vortex-liquid state. The period of oscillations in underdoped samples is short and can be translated, via the Onsager relation to an area in k-space which makes up a few percents of the Brillouin zone. Quantum oscillations are usually thought of as arising from closed orbits in momentum space along the Fermi surface and are used to measure the Fermi vector. Thus, the observation of quantum oscillations in the cuprates seems to be at odds with the observation of Fermi arcs in ARPES experiments[2] due to their fragmented Fermi surface topology. In this talk we show that quantum oscillations can arise from a partially gapped Fermi surface. We adopt a phenomenological model of arcs which terminate at a regime with a superconducting gap of d-wave symmetry to describe the pseudo gap phase. Without invoking any additional order, quantization of energy is found well below the gap maximum. Semiclassically the quantization condition arises from closed orbits in real-space. When translated to momentum space, the area enclosed by the orbits is much smaller than that of the full Fermi surface. [1]N. Doiron-Leyaraud et al. nature 447, 565 (2007) [2]Kanigel et al. Nature Physics 2 447 (2006)

  5. Non-equilibrium modelling of transferred arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidar, J.

    1999-02-01

    A two-temperature, variable-density, arc model has been developed for description of high-current free-burning arcs, including departures from thermodynamic and chemical equilibrium in the plasma. The treatment includes the arc, the anode and the cathode and considers the separate energy balance of the electrons and the heavy particles, together with the continuity equations for these species throughout the plasma. The output includes a two-dimensional distribution for the temperatures and densities both of the electrons and of the heavy particles, plasma velocity, current density and electrical potential throughout the arc. For a 200 A arc in pure argon at 1 atm, we calculate large differences between the temperatures of the electrons and the heavy particles in the plasma region near the cathode tip, together with large departures from local chemical plasma equilibrium. In the main body of the arc at high plasma temperatures, we predict minor differences between the temperatures of the electrons and the heavy particles, which are inconsistent with recent measurements using laser-scattering techniques showing differences of up to several thousand degrees. However, we find that, for the region in front of the cathode tip, the ground-state level of the neutral atoms is overpopulated relative to the corresponding populations under conditions of LTE, in agreement with experimental observations. These departures from LTE are caused by the injection of a large mass flow of cold gas into the arc core due to arc constriction at the tip of the cathode.

  6. Risk assessment of metal vapor arcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Monika C. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for assessing metal vapor arcing risk for a component is provided. The method comprises acquiring a current variable value associated with an operation of the component; comparing the current variable value with a threshold value for the variable; evaluating compared variable data to determine the metal vapor arcing risk in the component; and generating a risk assessment status for the component.

  7. Preventing Arc Welding From Damaging Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, Noel; Mareen, D.

    1988-01-01

    Shielding technique developed to protect sensitive electronic equipment from damage due to electromagnetic disturbances produced by arc welding. Established acceptable alternative in instances in which electronic equipment cannot be removed prior to arc welding. Guidelines established for open, unshielded welds. Procedure applicable to robotics or computer-aided manufacturing.

  8. Feature extraction of arc tracking phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attia, John Okyere

    1995-01-01

    This document outlines arc tracking signals -- both the data acquisition and signal processing. The objective is to obtain the salient features of the arc tracking phenomenon. As part of the signal processing, the power spectral density is obtained and used in a MATLAB program.

  9. Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S.; Korzekwa, Deniece R.

    1999-01-01

    Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

  10. Steady rotation of the Cascade arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, Ray E.; McCaffrey, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Displacement of the Miocene Cascade volcanic arc (northwestern North America) from the active arc is in the same sense and at nearly the same rate as the present clockwise block motions calculated from GPS velocities in a North American reference frame. Migration of the ancestral arc over the past 16 m.y. can be explained by clockwise rotation of upper-plate blocks at 1.0°/m.y. over a linear melting source moving westward 1–4.5 km/m.y. due to slab rollback. Block motion and slab rollback are in opposite directions in the northern arc, but both are westerly in the southern extensional arc, where rollback may be enhanced by proximity to the edge of the Juan de Fuca slab. Similarities between post–16 Ma arc migration, paleomagnetic rotation, and modern GPS block motions indicate that the secular block motions from decadal GPS can be used to calculate long-term strain rates and earthquake hazards. Northwest-directed Basin and Range extension of 140 km is predicted behind the southern arc since 16 Ma, and 70 km of shortening is predicted in the northern arc. The GPS rotation poles overlie a high-velocity slab of the Siletzia terrane dangling into the mantle beneath Idaho (United States), which may provide an anchor for the rotations.

  11. Orbital evolution of Neptune's ring arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliatti-Winter, Silvia; Madeira, Gustavo

    2016-10-01

    Voyager 2 spacecraft sent several images of the Neptune's ring system in 1989. These images show a set of arcs (Courage, Liberté, Egalité and Fraternité), previously detected by stellar occultation in 1984, embedded in the tenuous Adams ring. In order to maintain the confinement of the arcs against the spreading, Renner et al. (2015) proposeda model which the Adams ring has a collection of small coorbital satellites placed in specific positions. These coorbitals would be responsible for maintaining the arcs particles. In this work we analyse the orbital evolution of the particles coorbital to the satellites by adding the effects of the solar radiation force. Our numerical results show that due to this dissipative effect the smallest particles, 1μm in size, leave the arc in less than 10years. Larger particles leave the arc, but can stay confined between the coorbital satellites. De Pater et al. (2005) suggested that a small moonlet embedded in the arc Fraternité can be the source of the arcs and even theAdams ring through an erosion mechanism. Our preliminary results showed that a moonlet up to 200m in radius can stay in the arc without causing any significant variation in the eccentricities of the coorbitals and the particles.

  12. Carbon arc ignition improved by simple auxiliary circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    High voltage, low current pulse in series with arc power supply efficiently ignites a carbon arc. The easily and economically produced circuit is useful with arc burners and searchlights and with plasma jets.

  13. Crustal thickening drives arc front migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, Leif; Lee, Cin-Ty; Manga, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The location of volcanic arcs, relative to the trench evolves over time. Arc front migration has been observed in relic (Sierra Nevada, Andes) as well as active (Cascades) arcs, sometimes with cycles of retreat and return of the front towards the trench over millions of years. Other arcs, particularly where back-arc extension dominates, migrate more slowly, if at all. Coupled with arc migration there are systematic changes in the geochemistry of magmas such as the ratio of trace elements La/Yb and 87Sr/86Sr isotopes (e.g., Haschke et al., 2002). The position of active volcanic arcs relative to the trench is controlled by the location where melt is generated in the mantle wedge, in turn controlled by the geometry of subduction, and the processes that focus rising melt. Arc front migration is commonly attributed to variation in dip angle of the downgoing slab, delamination of overthickened crust, or to subduction erosion. Here we present an alternative hypothesis. Assuming mantle wedge melting is a largely temperature-dependant process, the maximum isotherm in the wedge sets arc front location. Isotherm location depends on slab angle, subduction velocity and wedge thermal diffusivity (England and Katz, 2010). It also depends on crustal thickness, which evolves as melt is transferred from the wedge to the crust. Arc front migration can thus occur purely through magmatic thickening of crust and lithosphere. Thickening rate is determined by the mantle melt flux into the crust, modulated by tectonics and surface erosion. It is not steady in time, as crustal thickening progressively truncates the mantle melt column and eventually shuts it off. Thus slab angle need not change, and in the absence of other contribution processes front location and crustal thickness have long-time steady state values. We develop a quantitative model for arc front migration that is consistent with published arc front data, and explains why arc fronts do not move when there is extension, such

  14. Gliding arc triggered microwave plasma arc at atmospheric pressure for coal gasification application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vishal; Visani, A.; Patil, C.; Patel, B. K.; Sharma, P. K.; John, P. I.; Nema, S. K.

    2014-08-01

    Plasma torch is device that efficiently converts electrical energy in to thermal energy for various high temperature applications. The conventional plasma torch comprises of consumable electrodes namely anode and cathode electrodes. The replacement of these electrodes is a complex process owing to its cooling and process shut down requirements. However, microwave plasma arc is electrode-less plasma arc system that is an alternative method to conventional arc technology for generating plasma arc. In this technique, microwave power is efficiently coupled to generate plasma arc by using the property of polar molecule to absorb microwave power. The absorption of microwave power is in form of losses due to intermolecular friction and high collisions between the molecules. This is an efficient method because all microwave power can be absorbed by plasma arc. The main feature of microwave plasma arc is its large uniform high temperature column which is not possible with conventional arc discharge methods. Such type of plasma discharge is very useful in applications where sufficient residence time for treat materials is required. Microwave arc does not require any consumable electrodes and hence, it can be operated continuously that makes it very useful for hazardous effluent treatment applications. Further, microwave cannot ionize neutral particles at atmospheric pressure and hence, a gliding arc is initiated between two thin electrodes in the cavity by applying very low power high voltage (3kV) AC source. In this report, the method for generating microwave arc of 1kW power using commercial microwave oven is elaborated.

  15. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1985-08-05

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

  16. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1987-11-17

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile. 2 figs.

  17. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1987-01-01

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

  18. 'European approach' to arc flash risk.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2011-11-01

    DuPont claims that electrical arc, and the resulting "arc flash", are among the deadliest, least understood hazards of electricity", and can potentially occur in many industrial and other applications, including hospital plant rooms. Technical and engineering personnel from DuPont Engineering Technology, DuPont Personal Protection, and external independent experts, have thus collaborated to develop "a European approach to electrical arc risk assessment". The resulting free online resource, the DuPont Arc-Guide, sets out key steps to minimise serious arc flash incident risk, and details a range of optional, paid-for tailored risk assessment services, and an accompanying secure web portal, offering more in-depth guidance on this important, but apparently often overlooked, issue. HEJ editor Jonathan Baillie reports.

  19. An advanced arc track resistant airframe wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, J.

    1995-01-01

    Tensolite, a custom cable manufacturer specializing in high temperature materials as the dielectric medium, develops an advance arc track resistant airframe wire called Tufflite 2000. Tufflite 2000 has the following advantages over the other traditional wires: lighter weight and smaller in diameter; excellent wet and dry arc track resistance; superior dynamic cut-through performance even at elevated temperatures; flight proven performance on Boeing 737 and 757 airplanes; and true 260 C performance by utilizing Nickel plated copper conductors. This paper reports the different tests performed on Tufflite 2000: accelerated aging, arc resistance (wet and dry), dynamic cut through, humidity resistance, wire-to-wire abrasion, flammability, smoke, weight, notch sensitivity, flexibility, and markability. It particularly focuses on the BSI (British Standards Institute) dry arc resistance test and BSI wet arc tracking.

  20. Arc burst pattern analysis fault detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, B. Don (Inventor); Aucoin, B. Michael (Inventor); Benner, Carl L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for detecting an arcing fault on a power line carrying a load current. Parameters indicative of power flow and possible fault events on the line, such as voltage and load current, are monitored and analyzed for an arc burst pattern exhibited by arcing faults in a power system. These arcing faults are detected by identifying bursts of each half-cycle of the fundamental current. Bursts occurring at or near a voltage peak indicate arcing on that phase. Once a faulted phase line is identified, a comparison of the current and voltage reveals whether the fault is located in a downstream direction of power flow toward customers, or upstream toward a generation station. If the fault is located downstream, the line is de-energized, and if located upstream, the line may remain energized to prevent unnecessary power outages.

  1. Numerical simulation of ac plasma arc thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Han-Ming; Carey, G. F.; Oakes, M. E.

    1994-05-01

    A mathematical model and approximate analysis for the energy distribution of an ac plasma arc with a moving boundary is developed. A simplified electrical conductivity function is assumed so that the dynamic behavior of the arc may be determined, independent of the gas type. The model leads to a reduced set of non-linear partial differential equations which governs the quasi-steady ac arc. This system is solved numerically and it is found that convection plays an important role, not only in the temperature distribution, but also in arc disruptions. Moreover, disruptions are found to be influenced by convection only for a limited frequency range. The results of the present studies are applicable to the frequnecy range of 10-10(exp 2) Hz which includes most industry ac arc frequencies.

  2. Numerical Simulation of AC Plasma Arc Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Han-Ming; Carey, G. F.; Oakes, M. E.

    1994-05-01

    A mathematical model and approximate analysis for the energy distribution of an ac plasma arc with a moving boundary is developed. A simplified electrical conductivity function is assumed so that the dynamic behavior of the arc may be determined, independent of the gas type. The model leads to a reduced set of non-linear partial differential equations which governs the quasi-steady ac arc. This system is solved numerically and it is found that convection plays an important role, not only in the temperature distribution, but also in arc disruptions. Moreover, disruptions are found to be influenced by convection only for a limited frequency range. The results of the present studies are applicable to the frequency range of 10-102 Hz which includes most industry ac arc frequencies.

  3. The Ophiolite - Oceanic Fore-Arc Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M. K.; Pearce, J. A.; Stern, R. J.; Ishizuka, O.; Petronotis, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    Miyashiro (1973, EPSL) put forward the hypothesis that many ophiolites are generated in subduction zone settings. More recently, ophiolitic sequences including MORB-like basalts underlying boninites or other subduction-related rock types have been linked to near-trench spreading during subduction infancy (e.g., Stern and Bloomer, 1992, GSA Bull.; Shervais, 2001, G-cubed; Stern et al., 2012, Lithos.). These contentions were given strong support by the results of Shinkai 6500 diving in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) fore-arc (e.g., Reagan et al., 2010, G-cubed; Ishizuka et al., 2011, EPSL; Reagan et al., 2013, EPSL). Based on widely spaced dives and grab sampling at disbursed dive stops, these studies concluded that the most abundant and most submerged volcanic rocks in the IBM fore-arc are MORB-like basalts (fore-arc basalts or FAB), and that these basalts appear to be part of a crustal sequence of gabbro, dolerite, FAB, boninite, and normal arc lavas overlying depleted peridotite. This ophiolitic sequence was further postulated to make up most or all of the IBM fore-arc from Guam to Japan, with similar magmatic ages (52 Ma FAB to 45 Ma arc) north to south, reflecting a western-Pacific wide subduction initiation event. At the time of this writing, IODP Expedition 352 is about to set sail, with a principal goal of drilling the entire volcanic sequence in the Bonin fore-arc. This drilling will define the compositional gradients through the volcanic sequence associated with subduction initiation and arc infancy, and test the hypothesized oceanic fore-arc - ophiolite genetic relationship. A primary goal of this expedition is to illustrate how mantle compositions and melting processes evolved during decompression melting of asthenosphere during subduction initiation to later flux melting of depleted mantle. These insights will provide important empirical constraints for geodynamic models of subduction initiation and early arc development.

  4. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  5. Zircon Recycling in Arc Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J.; Barth, A.; Matzel, J.; Wooden, J.; Burgess, S.

    2008-12-01

    Recycling of zircon has been well established in arc intrusions and arc volcanoes, but a better understanding of where and how zircons are recycled can help illuminate how arc magma systems are constructed. To that end, we are conducting age, trace element (including Ti-in-zircon temperatures; TzrnTi) and isotopic studies of zircons from the Late Cretaceous (95-85 Ma) Tuolumne Intrusive Suite (TIS) in the Sierra Nevada Batholith (CA). Within the TIS zircons inherited from ancient basement sources and/or distinctly older host rocks are uncommon, but recycled zircon antecrysts from earlier periods of TIS-related magmatism are common and conspicuous in the inner and two most voluminous units of the TIS, the Half Dome and Cathedral Peak Granodiorites. All TIS units have low bulk Zr ([Zr]<150 ppm) and thus low calculated zircon saturation temperatures (Tzrnsat). Within the Half Dome and Cathedral Peak, TzrnTi values are predominantly at or below average Tzrnsat, and there is no apparent correlation between age and TzrnTi. At temperatures appropriate for granodiorite/tonalite melt generation (at or above biotite dehydration; >825°C), [Zr] in the TIS is a factor of 2 to 3 lower than saturation values. Low [Zr] in TIS rocks might be attributed to a very limited supply of zircon in the source, by disequilibrium melting and rapid melt extraction [1], by melting reactions involving formation of other phases that can incorporate appreciable Zr [2], or by removal of zircon at an earlier stage of magma evolution. Based on a preliminary compilation of literature data, low [Zr] is common to Late Cretaceous N.A. Cordilleran granodioritic/tonalitic intrusions (typically <200 ppm and frequently 100-150 ppm for individual large intrusions or intrusive suites). We infer from this that [Zr] in anatectic melts is probably not limited by zircon supply and is primarily controlled by melting parameters. Comparison of the data from TIS with one of these intrusions, the smaller but otherwise

  6. Theoretical analysis of ARC constriction

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenescu, M.L.; Brooks, A.W.; Smith, T.M.

    1980-12-01

    The physics of the thermionic converter is governed by strong electrode-plasma interactions (emissions surface scattering, charge exchange) and weak interactions (diffusion, radiation) at the maximum interelectrode plasma radius. The physical processes are thus mostly convective in thin sheaths in front of the electrodes and mostly diffusive and radiative in the plasma bulk. The physical boundaries are open boundaries to particle transfer (electrons emitted or absorbed by the electrodes, all particles diffusing through some maximum plasma radius) and to convective, conductive and radiative heat transfer. In a first approximation the thermionic converter may be described by a one-dimensional classical transport theory. The two-dimensional effects may be significant as a result of the sheath sensitivity to radial plasma variations and of the strong sheath-plasma coupling. The current-voltage characteristic of the converter is thus the result of an integrated current density over the collector area for which the boundary conditions at each r determine the regime (ignited/unignited) of the local current density. A current redistribution strongly weighted at small radii (arc constriction) limits the converter performance and opens questions on constriction reduction possibilities. The questions addressed are the followng: (1) what are the main contributors to the loss of current at high voltage in the thermionic converter; and (2) is arc constriction observable theoretically and what are the conditions of its occurrence. The resulting theoretical problem is formulated and results are given. The converter electrical current is estimated directly from the electron and ion particle fluxes based on the spatial distribution of the electron/ion density n, temperatures T/sub e/, T/sub i/, electrical voltage V and on the knowledge of the transport coefficients. (WHK)

  7. Analysis of arc emission spectra of stainless steel electric arc furnace slag affected by fluctuating arc voltage.

    PubMed

    Aula, Matti; Mäkinen, Ari; Fabritius, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Control of chromium oxidation in the electric arc furnace (EAF) is a significant problem in stainless steel production due to variations of the chemical compositions in the EAF charge. One potential method to control chromium oxidation is to analyze the emission spectrum of the electric arc in order to find indicators of rising chromium content in slag. The purpose of this study was to determine if slag composition can be gained by utilizing electric arc emission spectra in the laboratory environment, despite electric arc voltage fluctuations and varying slag composition. The purpose of inducing voltage fluctuation was to simulate changes in the industrial EAF process. The slag samples were obtained from Outokumpu Stainless Oy Tornio Works, and three different arc currents were used. The correlation analysis showed that the emission spectra offer numerous peak ratios with high correlations to the X-ray fluorescence-measured slag CrO(x)/FeO(x) and MnO/SiO2 ratios. These ratios are useful in determining if the reduction agents have been depleted in the EAF. The results suggest that analysis of laboratory-scale electric arc emission spectra is suitable for indicating the high CrO(x) or MnO content of the slag despite the arc fluctuations. Reliable analysis of other slag components was not successful.

  8. Propagation of back-arc extension into the arc lithosphere in the southern New Hebrides volcanic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriat, M.; Collot, J.; Danyushevsky, L.; Fabre, M.; Meffre, S.; Falloon, T.; Rouillard, P.; Pelletier, B.; Roach, M.; Fournier, M.

    2015-09-01

    New geophysical data acquired during three expeditions of the R/V Southern Surveyor in the southern part of the North Fiji Basin allow us to characterize the deformation of the upper plate at the southern termination of the New Hebrides subduction zone, where it bends eastward along the Hunter Ridge. Unlike the northern end of the Tonga subduction zone, on the other side of the North Fiji Basin, the 90° bend does not correspond to the transition from a subduction zone to a transform fault, but it is due to the progressive retreat of the New Hebrides trench. The subduction trench retreat is accommodated in the upper plate by the migration toward the southwest of the New Hebrides arc and toward the south of the Hunter Ridge, so that the direction of convergence remains everywhere orthogonal to the trench. In the back-arc domain, the active deformation is characterized by propagation of the back-arc spreading ridge into the Hunter volcanic arc. The N-S spreading axis propagates southward and penetrates in the arc, where it connects to a sinistral strike-slip zone via an oblique rift. The collision of the Loyalty Ridge with the New Hebrides arc, less than two million years ago, likely initiated this deformation pattern and the fragmentation of the upper plate. In this particular geodynamic setting, with an oceanic lithosphere subducting beneath a highly sheared volcanic arc, a wide range of primitive subduction-related magmas has been produced including adakites, island arc tholeiites, back-arc basin basalts, and medium-K subduction-related lavas.

  9. Arc statistics with realistic cluster potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelmann, Matthias; Steinmetz, Matthias; Weiss, Achim

    1995-07-01

    We construct a sample of numerical models for clusters of galaxies and employ these to investigate their capability of imaging background sources into long arcs. The clusters are simulated within the CDM cosmogonic scheme in an Einstein-de Sitter universe. Emphasis is laid on the statistics of the arcs formed, and optical depths for arc formation are determined. We also compare the results to predictions based on simplified, radially symmetric cluster models. We find that the capability of the numerically modeled clusters to produce long arcs is increased by a factor of <~50 compared to a sample of softened isothermal spheres with the same observable parameters (core radii and velocity dispersions), and that they are comparably efficient as singular isothermal spheres with the same velocity dispersion. This largely enhanced capability to produce large arcs of the numerical cluster models can be understood in terms of substructure and intrinsic asymmetry, which enhance the tidal field (shear) of the clusters compared to the radially symmetric cases. We also find that the intrinsic ellipticity of the background sources has a noticeable influence on arc statistics; the optical depth for arcs with a length-to-width ratio of >~10 is significantly larger for elliptical than for circular background sources.

  10. Crustal recycling and the aleutian arc

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, R.W.; Kay, S.M. )

    1988-06-01

    Two types of crustal recycling transfer continental crust back into its mantle source. The first of these, upper crustal recycling, involves elements that have been fractionated by the hydrosphere-sediment system, and are subducted as a part of the oceanic crust. The subduction process (S-process) then fractionates these elements, and those not removed at shallow tectonic levels and as excess components of arc magmas are returned to the mantle. Newly determined trace element composition of Pacific oceanic sedimants are variable and mixing is necessary during the S-process, if sediment is to provide excess element in the ratios observed in Aleutian arc magmas. Only a small fraction of the total sediment subducted at the Aleutian trench is required to furnish the excess elements in Aleutian arc magmas. Ba and {sub 10}Be data indicate that this small fraction includes a contribution from the youngest subducted sediment. The second type of recycling, lower crustal recycling, involves crystal cumulates of both arc and oceanic crustal origin, and residues from crustal melting within arc crust. Unlike the silicic sediments, recycled lower crust is mafic to ultramafic in composition. Trace element analyses of xenoliths representing Aleutian arc lower crust are presented. Recycling by delamination of lower crust and attached mantle lithosphere may occur following basalt eclogite phase transformations that are facilitated by terrane suturing events that weld oceanic island arcs to the continents. The relative importance of upper and lower crustal recycling exerts a primary control on continental crustal composition.

  11. Masking, persistence, and transfer in rotating arcs.

    PubMed

    Geremek, Adam; Stürzel, Frank; da Pos, Osvaldo; Spillmann, Lothar

    2002-10-01

    We demonstrate that the apparent length of a thin white arc on a black disk, rotating concentrically at 2.5 rps, varies with angular length and exposure duration. While short arcs (9-18 degrees ) gradually expand, long arcs (36-72 degrees ) first undergo a brief contraction, before they also expand. On average, perceived elongation asymptotes after 15 s equivalent to visual persistencies ranging from 68 to 170 ms. Using bi- and tri-colored arcs, we find that the apparent increase in length derives from the rear end of the rotating stimulus, while the initial shrinkage derives from contraction of the middle. After 15 s of adaptation, perceived length of the arc decays to actual stimulus length within an average of 6 s and, upon re-exposure of the arc, reaches its former value after only 5 s (priming). When the rotating arc is presented first to one eye and then to the other, apparent elongation transfers partially (46%), suggesting a contribution by the binocular cells in the visual cortex. A partial transfer (26%) also occurs from clockwise to counterclockwise rotation. When tested interocularly, the directional transfer is more pronounced (47%) and equals the interocular transfer under equidirectional conditions, suggesting that the directional transfer (cw versus ccw) might derive from non-directional cortical units. Whereas the initial contraction may be attributable to backward masking, the observed elongation likely reflects a cumulative build-up of after-discharge in cortical neurons over time.

  12. Initial development of the Banda Volcanic Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Hartono, H.M.S. )

    1990-06-01

    The initial development of the Banda Volcanic Arc can be determined by obtaining absolute ages of granites or volcanics, stratigraphy of the Eocene Metan Volcanics of Timor as the oldest formation containing Banda Volcanic Arc extrusives, and tectonic analysis. Banda Arc volcanism is the result of subduction of oceanic crust under the volcanic arc. The time of initial subduction is related to initial seafloor spreading between Australia and Antarctica, which is identical to geomagnetic polarity time 34 (82 mybp). Therefore, 82 mybp can be used as one of the criteria to determine the birth of the Banda Volcanic Arc. With present available time data for determining the birth of the Banda Volcanic Arc, the minimum age coincides with the age of the Metan Volcanics (Eocene, 39-56 mybp) and the maximum age coincides with initial seafloor spreading between Australia and Antarctica (82 mybp). This time span is too long. With the assumption that it needs some time to develop from transcurrent faulting to subduction and volcanism, it is proposed that the initial development of Banda Arc volcanism was during early Tertiary.

  13. Acoustic characteristics of electric arc furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherednichenko, V. S.; Bikeev, R. A.; Cherednichenko, A. V.; Ognev, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model is constructed to describe the appearance and development of the noise characteristics of superpower electric arc furnaces. The noise formation is shown to be related to the pulsation of the axial plasma flows in arc discharges because of the electrodynamic pressure oscillations caused by the interaction of the self-magnetic field with the current passing in an arc. The pressure in the arc axis changes at a frequency of 100 Hz at the maximum operating pressure of 66 kPa for an arc current of 80 kA. The main ac arc sound frequencies are multiples of 100 Hz, which is supported in the practice of operation of electric arc furnaces. The sound intensity in the furnace laboratory reaches 160 dB and is decreased to 115-120 dB in the working furnace area due to shielding by the furnace jacket, the molten metal, and the molten slag. The appropriateness of increasing the hermetic sealing of electric furnaces and creating furnaces operating at low currents and high transformer voltages is corroborated.

  14. Towards a theory for Neptune's arc rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldreich, P.; Tremaine, S.; Borderies, N.

    1986-08-01

    It is proposed that the incomplete rings of Neptune consist of a number of short arcs centered on the corotation resonances of a single satellite. The satellite must have a radius of the order of 100 km or more and move on an inclined orbit. Corotation resonances are located at potential maxima. Thus, mechanical energy dissipated by interparticle collisions must be continually replenished to prevent the arcs from spreading. It is shown that each corotation resonance is associated with a nearby Lindblad resonance, which excites the ring particles' orbital eccentricity, thus supplying the energy required to maintain the arc. The ultimate energy reservoir is the satellite's orbital energy. Therefore, interaction with the arcs damps the satellite's orbital inclination. The self-gravity of the arcs limits their contraction and enforces a relation between arc length and mass. The estimated arc masses are so small, of the order of 10 to the 16th g, that the satellite's orbital inclination suffers negligible decay over the age of the solar system. The inferred surface mass densities are comparable to those found in the major rings of Saturn and Uranus.

  15. Towards a theory for Neptune's arc rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldreich, P.; Tremaine, S.; Borderies, N.

    1986-01-01

    It is proposed that the incomplete rings of Neptune consist of a number of short arcs centered on the corotation resonances of a single satellite. The satellite must have a radius of the order of 100 km or more and move on an inclined orbit. Corotation resonances are located at potential maxima. Thus, mechanical energy dissipated by interparticle collisions must be continually replenished to prevent the arcs from spreading. It is shown that each corotation resonance is associated with a nearby Lindblad resonance, which excites the ring particles' orbital eccentricity, thus supplying the energy required to maintain the arc. The ultimate energy reservoir is the satellite's orbital energy. Therefore, interaction with the arcs damps the satellite's orbital inclination. The self-gravity of the arcs limits their contraction and enforces a relation between arc length and mass. The estimated arc masses are so small, of the order of 10 to the 16th g, that the satellite's orbital inclination suffers negligible decay over the age of the solar system. The inferred surface mass densities are comparable to those found in the major rings of Saturn and Uranus.

  16. Reconstruction of Late Cretaceous Magmatic Arcs in the Northern Andes: Single Versus Multiple Arc Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, A.; Jaramillo, J. S.; Leon, S.; Hincapie, S.; Mejia, D.; Patino, A. M.; Vanegas, J.; Zapata, S.; Valencia, V.; Jimenez, G.; Monsalve, G.

    2014-12-01

    Although magmatic rocks are major tracers of the geological evolution of convergent margins, pre-collisional events such as subduction erosion, collisional thrusting or late collisional strike slip segmentation may difficult the recognizing of multiple arc systems and therefore the existence of paleogeographic scenarios with multiple subduction systems. New field, U-Pb geochronology and whole rock geochemistry constraints from the northwestern segment of the Central Cordillera in the states of Antioquia and Caldas (Colombia) are used to understand the nature of the Late Cretaceous arc magmatism and evaluate the existence of single or multiple Pacific and Caribbean arc systems in the growth of the Northwestern Andes. The new results integrated with additional field and published information is used to suggest the existence of at least three different magmatic arcs. (1) An Eastern Continental arc built within a well defined Permian to Triassic continental crust that record a protracted 90-70 Ma magmatic evolution, (2) a 90-80 arc formed within attenuated continental crust and associated oceanic crust, (3) 90-88 Ma arc formed over a Late Cretaceous plateau crust. The eastern arcs were formed as part of double eastern vergent subduction system, where the most outboard arc represent a fringing arc formed over detached fragments of continental crust, whereas the easternmost continental arc growth by the closure an subduction of and older and broad Triassic to Early Jurassic back-arc ocean. Its closure also end up in ophiolite emplacement. The third allochtonous oceanic arc was formed over the Caribbean plateau crust and was accreted to the continental margin in the Late Cretaceous. Ongoing paleomagnetic, deformational, gravimetric and basin analysis will be integrate to test this model and understand the complex Late Cretaceous tectonic evolution of the Northern Andes.

  17. A simple prescription for simulating and characterizing gravitational arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlanetto, C.; Santiago, B. X.; Makler, M.; de Bom, C.; Brandt, C. H.; Neto, A. F.; Ferreira, P. C.; da Costa, L. N.; Maia, M. A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Simple models of gravitational arcs are crucial for simulating large samples of these objects with full control of the input parameters. These models also provide approximate and automated estimates of the shape and structure of the arcs, which are necessary for detecting and characterizing these objects on massive wide-area imaging surveys. We here present and explore the ArcEllipse, a simple prescription for creating objects with a shape similar to gravitational arcs. We also present PaintArcs, which is a code that couples this geometrical form with a brightness distribution and adds the resulting object to images. Finally, we introduce ArcFitting, which is a tool that fits ArcEllipses to images of real gravitational arcs. We validate this fitting technique using simulated arcs and apply it to CFHTLS and HST images of tangential arcs around clusters of galaxies. Our simple ArcEllipse model for the arc, associated to a Sérsic profile for the source, recovers the total signal in real images typically within 10%-30%. The ArcEllipse+Sérsic models also automatically recover visual estimates of length-to-width ratios of real arcs. Residual maps between data and model images reveal the incidence of arc substructure. They may thus be used as a diagnostic for arcs formed by the merging of multiple images. The incidence of these substructures is the main factor that prevents ArcEllipse models from accurately describing real lensed systems.

  18. Modeling Multi-Arc Spraying Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.

    2016-06-01

    The use of plasma as energy source in thermal spraying enables among others the processing of feed stock materials with very high melting temperatures as coating materials. New generation multi-arc plasma spraying systems are widely spread and promise several advantages in comparison to the conventional single-arc systems. Numerical modeling of multi-arc plasma spraying offers the possibility to increase the understanding about this process. This study focuses on the numerical modeling of three-cathode spraying systems, introducing the recent activities in this field and discussing the numerical aspects which influence the prediction power of the models.

  19. Metal vapor arc switch electromagnetic accelerator technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mongeau, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    A multielectrode device housed in an insulator vacuum vessel, the metal vapor vacuum switch has high power capability and can hold off voltages up to the 100 kilovolt level. Such switches can be electronically triggered and can interrupt or commutate at a zero current crossing. The physics of arc initiation, arc conduction, and interruption are examined, including material considerations; inefficiencies; arc modes; magnetic field effects; passive and forced extinction; and voltage recovery. Heating, electrode lifetime, device configuration, and external circuit configuration are discussed. The metal vapor vacuum switch is compared with SCRs, GTOs, spark gaps, ignitrons, and mechanical breakers.

  20. Magnetic-cusp, cathodic-arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1995-11-21

    A magnetic-cusp for a cathodic-arc source wherein the arc is confined to the desired cathode surface, provides a current path for electrons from the cathode to the anode, and utilizes electric and magnetic fields to guide ions from the cathode to a point of use, such as substrates to be coated. The magnetic-cusp insures arc stability by an easy magnetic path from anode to cathode, while the straight-through arrangement leads to high ion transmission. 3 figs.

  1. Linear volcanic segments in the Sunda Arc, Indonesia: Implications for arc lithosphere control upon volcano distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, C. G.; Pacey, A.; McCaffrey, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    The overall curvature of many subduction zones is immediately apparent and the term island arc betrays the common assumption that subduction zone magmatism occurs in curved zones. This assumption can be expressed by approximating island arcs as segments of small circles on the surface of a sphere. Such treatments predict that the location of arc volcanoes is related to their vertical separation from the slab (in fact, the depth to seismicity in the slab) and require that the primary control on the locus of magmatism lies either within the subducted slab or the mantle wedge that separates the subducted and overriding lithospheric plates. The concept of curved arcs ignores longstanding observations that magmatism in many subduction systems occurs as segments of linearly arranged volcanic centres. Further evidence for this distribution comes from the close relationship between magmatism and large scale, arc-parallel fabrics in some arcs. Similarly, exposures of deep arc crust or mantle often reveal elongation of magmatic intrusions sub-parallel to the inferred trend of the arc. The Sunda Arc forms the Indonesian islands from Sumatra to Alor and provides an important test for models of volcano distribution for several reasons. First, Sunda has hosted abundant historic volcanic activity. Second, with the notable exception of Krakatau, every volcano in the arc is subaerial from base to cone and, therefore, can be readily identified where there is a suitable extent of local mapping that can be used to ground-truth satellite imagery. Third, there are significant changes in the stress regime along the length of the arc, allowing the influence of the upper plate to be evaluated by comparison of different arc segments. Finally, much of the Sunda Arc has proved difficult to accommodate in models that try to relate volcano distribution to the depth to the subducted slab. We apply an objective line-fitting protocol; the Hough Transform, to explore the distribution of volcanoes

  2. Arc - arc collisional tectonics within the Central Mobile Belt of the Newfoundland Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorevski, A.; Rogers, N.; van Staal, C. R.; McNicoll, V. J.; Valverde-Vaquero, P.

    2007-12-01

    The Central Mobile Belt of Newfoundland Appalachians records the Ordovician arc - arc collision between the peri-Laurentian Red Indian Lake Arc of the Annieopsquotch accretionary tract (c. 480-460 Ma), and the peri- Gondwanan Victoria - Popelogan Arc (c. 473-453 Ma), which marks the closure of the Cambro-Ordovician Iapetus Ocean. Although the arc systems are in part coeval, they are distinguishable by the preservation of distinct structural histories and stratigraphies, unique basement characteristics as demonstrated by lead isotopic values of volcanic massive sulphide deposits and faunal differences. A modern analogue of such an arc - arc collision is observed in the Molucca and Solomon seas of the southwest Pacific. From such modern analogues it is evident that the Victoria - Popelogan Arc occupied a lower-plate setting during collision. This tectonic setting is demonstrated by subsidence of the Victoria - Popelogan Arc similar to the collision induced subsidence that is developed on the Australian active margin and Halmahera arcs of the Southwest Pacific. The timing of Victoria - Popelogan Arc subsidence is constrained by three age dates that form the last vestiges of arc volcanism (457 ± 2; 456.8 ± 3.1; 457 ± 3.6 Ma). These volcanic rocks are immediately overlain by Caradocian black shale of the Point Leamington Formation that marks the base of the Badger Group and the initiation of a successor basin. Caradocian black shale is noticeably absent from the top of the Red Indian Lake Arc with this time interval instead represented by a sub-Silurian unconformity, formed in response to collisional uplift. Emergence of the peri- Laurentian margin is demonstrated by detritus from it preserved in the Badger Group, which as it stratigraphically overlies the peri-Gondwanan Victoria - Popelogan Arc, requires that Iapetus was closed by this time. Following this collision, subduction stepped back into the outboard Tetagouche - Exploits back-arc basin. Whereas correlative

  3. Investigation of arc length versus flange thickness while using an arc voltage controller

    SciTech Connect

    Daumeyer, G.J.

    1994-11-01

    An arc voltage controller (AVC) for gas tungsten arc welding will change arc length when flange thickness changes while all other variables, including AVC setting, are held constant. A procedure for calibrating an LVDT (linear variable displacement transducer) used for electrode assembly motion monitoring was proven for laboratory setups and special investigations. A partial characterization on the deadband and sensitivity control settings of the Cyclomatic AVC was completed.

  4. Lifespans of Cascade Arc volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    Compiled argon ages reveal inception, eruptive episodes, ages, and durations of Cascade stratovolcanoes and their ancestral predecessors. Geologic mapping and geochronology show that most Cascade volcanoes grew episodically on multiple scales with periods of elevated behavior lasting hundreds of years to ca. 100 kyr. Notable examples include the paleomag-constrained, few-hundred-year-long building of the entire 15-20 km3 Shastina edifice at Mt. Shasta, the 100 kyr-long episode that produced half of Mt. Rainier's output, and the 30 kyr-long episode responsible for all of South and Middle Sister. Despite significant differences in timing and rates of construction, total durations of active and ancestral volcanoes at discrete central-vent locations are similar. Glacier Peak, Mt. Rainier, Mt. Adams, Mt. Hood, and Mt. Mazama all have inception ages of 400-600 ka. Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Jefferson, Newberry Volcano, Mt. Shasta and Lassen Domefield have more recent inception ages of 200-300 ka. Only the Sisters cluster and Mt. Baker have established eruptive histories spanning less than 50 kyr. Ancestral volcanoes centered 5-20 km from active stratocones appear to have similar total durations (200-600 kyr), but are less well exposed and dated. The underlying mechanisms governing volcano lifecycles are cryptic, presumably involving tectonic and plumbing changes and perhaps circulation cycles in the mantle wedge, but are remarkably consistent along the arc.

  5. Stretched arc discharge in produced water.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y I; Wright, K C; Kim, H S; Cho, D J; Rabinovich, A; Fridman, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of stretching an arc discharge in produced water to increase the volume of produced water treated by plasma. Produced water is the wastewater generated by hydraulic fracturing of shale during the production phase in shale-oil or shale-gas exploration. The electric conductivity of produced water is in the range of 50-200 mS/cm, which provides both a challenge and opportunity for the application of plasmas. Stretching of an arc discharge in produced water was accomplished using a ground electrode and two high-voltage electrodes: one positioned close to the ground electrode and the other positioned farther away from the ground. The benefit of stretching the arc is that the contact between the arc and water is significantly increased, resulting in more efficient plasma treatment in both performance and energy cost.

  6. Arc tracks on nanostructured surfaces after microbreakdowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, D.; Bulgadaryan, D.; Hwangbo, D.; Kajita, S.; Kolodko, D.; Kurnaev, V.; Ohno, N.

    2016-09-01

    Studying of initial steps of unipolar arc ignition process is important for reduction of probability of arcing between the plasma and the wall in thermonuclear devices. Tungsten nano-fuzz surface formed by helium plasma irradiation at high fluences and temperatures is a perfect material for arc ignition. Snowflake-like craters were detected on the fuzzy surfaces after short micro-breakdowns. Such sort of craters have not been observed before on any other metallic surfaces. These specific traces are formed due to unique properties of the fuzz structure. The nano-fuzz could be easily melted and vaporized by micro-breakdown current, due to its porosity and bad thermal conductivity, and formation of low conducting metallic vapour under the cathode spot causes discharge movement to the nearest place. Thus, even low current arc can easily move and leave traces, which could be easily observed by a secondary electron microscope.

  7. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  8. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  9. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  10. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  11. Arc voltage measurements of the hyperbaric MIG process

    SciTech Connect

    Huismann, G.; Hoffmeister, H.

    1996-12-01

    As a vital part of the MIG process, the arc controls the stability of the process, the melting of the filler wire and the base material. In order to control and describe the arc behavior, it is necessary to know the voltage- current- arc length relations, or the arc characteristics. Knowledge of arc characteristics is necessary for control of the MIG process and further automation of welding systems, in particular, at hyperbaric welding. In literature, information on arc characteristics for hyperbaric open arc pulsed process is not available so far. Therefore, in the present work, arc characteristics were measured for a pressure range of 1 to 16 bar. In measuring arc voltages and arc lengths of MIG arcs, specific problems are encountered as compared to TIG arcs where the distance between the electrode and work piece can be taken as the arc length and the ohmic voltage drop in the tungsten electrode is low. The movement of the electrode in the MIG process and the deformation of the molten wire end together with weld pool fluctuations are providing a complex system. For determining the arc characteristics certain simplifications are thus required which have been applied in this work. This paper presents a new concept on measuring arc lengths and voltages in the open MIG arc.

  12. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  13. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Busby, Cathy; Azor, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  14. Arc distribution during the vacuum arc remelting of Ti-6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect

    Woodside, Charles Rigel; King, Paul E.; Nordlund, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Currently, the temporal distribution of electric arcs across the ingot during vacuum arc remelting (VAR) is not a known or monitored process parameter. Previous studies indicate that the distribution of arcs can be neither diffuse nor axisymmetric about the center of the furnace. Correct accounting for the heat flux, electric current flux, and mass flux into the ingot is critical to achieving realistic solidification models of the VAR process. The National Energy Technology Laboratory has developed an arc position measurement system capable of locating arcs and determining the arc distribution within an industrial VAR furnace. The system is based on noninvasive magnetic field measurements and a VAR specific form of the Biot–Savart law. The system was installed on a coaxial industrial VAR furnace at ATI Albany Operations in Albany, OR. This article reports on the different arc distributions observed during production of Ti-6Al-4V. It is shown that several characteristic arc distribution modes can develop. This behavior is not apparent in the existing signals used to control the furnace, indicating the measurement system is providing new information. It is also shown that the different arc distribution modes observed may impact local solidification times, particularly at the side wall.

  15. Sensitivity of collapsed arc QA method for delivery errors in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Tony; Xing, Aitang; Vial, Philp; Thwaites, David; Holloway, Lois; Arumugam, Sankar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the sensitivity of an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) to detecting introduced Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT) treatment errors was studied using the Collapsed Arc method. Two clinical Head and Neck (H&N) and Prostate treatment plans had gantry dependent dose and MLC errors introduced to the plans. These plans were then delivered to an Elekta Synergy Linear Accelerator EPID and compared to the original treatment planning system Collapsed Arc dose matrix. With the Collapsed Arc technique the EPID was able to detect MLC errors down to 2mm and dose errors of down to 3% depending on the treatment plan complexity and gamma tolerance used.

  16. Arc Distribution During the Vacuum Arc Remelting of Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodside, C. Rigel; King, Paul E.; Nordlund, Chris

    2013-02-01

    Currently, the temporal distribution of electric arcs across the ingot during vacuum arc remelting (VAR) is not a known or monitored process parameter. Previous studies indicate that the distribution of arcs can be neither diffuse nor axisymmetric about the center of the furnace. Correct accounting for the heat flux, electric current flux, and mass flux into the ingot is critical to achieving realistic solidification models of the VAR process. The National Energy Technology Laboratory has developed an arc position measurement system capable of locating arcs and determining the arc distribution within an industrial VAR furnace. The system is based on noninvasive magnetic field measurements and a VAR specific form of the Biot-Savart law. The system was installed on a coaxial industrial VAR furnace at ATI Albany Operations in Albany, OR. This article reports on the different arc distributions observed during production of Ti-6Al-4V. It is shown that several characteristic arc distribution modes can develop. This behavior is not apparent in the existing signals used to control the furnace, indicating the measurement system is providing new information. It is also shown that the different arc distribution modes observed may impact local solidification times, particularly at the side wall.

  17. Aligning Plasma-Arc Welding Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeff; Fairley, Mike

    1989-01-01

    Tool aids in alignment of oscillator probe on variable-polarity plasma-arc welding torch. Probe magnetically pulls arc from side to side as it moves along joint. Tensile strength of joint depends on alignment of weld bead and on alignment of probe. Operator installs new tool on front of torch body, levels it with built-in bubble glass, inserts probe in slot on tool, and locks probe in place. Procedure faster and easier and resulting alignment more accurate and repeatable.

  18. Metal Vapor Arcing Risk Assessment Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Monika C.; Leidecker, Henning W.

    2010-01-01

    The Tin Whisker Metal Vapor Arcing Risk Assessment Tool has been designed to evaluate the risk of metal vapor arcing and to help facilitate a decision toward a researched risk disposition. Users can evaluate a system without having to open up the hardware. This process allows for investigating components at risk rather than spending time and money analyzing every component. The tool points to a risk level and provides direction for appropriate action and documentation.

  19. Visualization of Gas Tungsten Arc Weld Pools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    flow visualization of Gas Tungsten Arc weld pools for HY-80 steel is presented using a pulsed laser light source and a conventional night~vision...visualization of Gas Tungsten Arc weld pools for HY-80 steel is presented using a pulsed laser light source and a conventional night-vision image-intensifier...effects of electromagnetic stirring on GTA welds in austenitic stainless steel . Changes in shape and solidification structure of welds observed

  20. Arc spot welding technique for underwater use

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, H.; Ide, Y.; Ogawa, Y.

    1995-12-31

    An arc spot welding equipment with special local cavity shroud was developed for underwater salvaging activity. Arc spot welding for lapped plates is an effective method to recover defects. This method in surface is so simple to use widely in the field of railways and chemical plants manufacturing. But there is some problems on the reliability of joint strength and bead shapes. A special arc spot nozzle to improve welding quality was developed. A small outlet of air jet at the bottom of the nozzle was created to maintain the swirl flow of shielding gas and certain rejection of excessive molten metal. This nozzle covers the welding part completely, then it also works as a local cavity shroud under water. This paper describes the design and function of the nozzle for CO{sub 2} arc spot welding system. A programmable controller manages the welding sequence of shielding gas flow, air jet flow, and arcing time. This welding gun is operated manually, but the operation is only to press the gun on the weld point. After that welding will proceed automatically, and arcing time is about three seconds. Whole time for welding which includes pre and post gas flow time is less than ten seconds for surface use, it is required some more additional pre drying process of welding point for underwater use to guarantee the high quality welding results. Fundamental analysis of welding conditions and the effects of air jet were considered.

  1. Ion source with improved primary arc collimation

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1985-01-01

    An improved negative ion source is provided in which a self-biasing, molybdenum collimator is used to define the primary electron stream arc discharge from a filament operated at a negative potential. The collimator is located between the anode and the filament. It is electrically connected to the anode by means of an appropriate size resistor such that the collimator is biased at essentially the filament voltage during operation. Initially, the full arc voltage appears across the filament to collimator until the arc discharge strikes. Then the collimator biases itself to essentially filament potential due to current flow through the resistor thus defining the primary electron stream without intercepting any appreciable arc power. The collimator aperture is slightly smaller than the anode aperture to shield the anode from the arc power, thereby preventing the exposure of the anode to the full arc power which, in the past, has caused overheating and erosion of the anode collimator during extended time pulsed-beam operation of the source. With the self-biasing collimator of this invention, the ion source may be operated from short pulse periods to steady-state without destroying the anode.

  2. Dynamics of a discrete auroral arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruening, K.; Goertz, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    Porcupine Flight 4 data were used to determine the field-aligned currents associated with a southward moving discrete auroral arc in the postmidnight sector. Three different methods were used for determining the field-aligned current which should give identical results if the arcs are quasi-stationary and no parallel electric field exists between the payload and the dynamo region of the ionosphere. As long as the rocket is above the arc, the three methods agree. The integral of precipitating electron flux, the local magnetic field perturbations, and the divergence of the horizontal Pedersen current all indicate an upward current of 5 + or - 3 microamperes/sq m. Immediately north of the arc a strong downward current of about 10-20 microamperes/sq m is detected. The magnitude, however, is not well known because the rocket's velocity relative to the arc cannot be clearly established. Further north of the southward moving arc, the two methods that can be applied (magnetic field perturbations and divergence of the horizontal Pedersen current) yield contradictory results not only about the magnitude of the current but also about the direction of the current. It is suggested that this discrepancy is due to time-dependent electric field.

  3. Dynamics of a discrete auroral arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruening, K.; Goertz, C. K.

    1986-06-01

    Porcupine Flight 4 data were used to determine the field-aligned currents associated with a southward moving discrete auroral arc in the postmidnight sector. Three different methods were used for determining the field-aligned current which should give identical results if the arcs are quasi-stationary and no parallel electric field exists between the payload and the dynamo region of the ionosphere. As long as the rocket is above the arc, the three methods agree. The integral of precipitating electron flux, the local magnetic field perturbations, and the divergence of the horizontal Pedersen current all indicate an upward current of 5 + or - 3 microamperes/sq m. Immediately north of the arc a strong downward current of about 10-20 microamperes/sq m is detected. The magnitude, however, is not well known because the rocket's velocity relative to the arc cannot be clearly established. Further north of the southward moving arc, the two methods that can be applied (magnetic field perturbations and divergence of the horizontal Pedersen current) yield contradictory results not only about the magnitude of the current but also about the direction of the current. It is suggested that this discrepancy is due to time-dependent electric field.

  4. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism.

    PubMed

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-28

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ(26)Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ(26)Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  5. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  6. Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOEpatents

    Buhrmaster, Carol L.; Clark, Denis E.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspenion of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

  7. Method for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOEpatents

    Buhrmaster, C.L.; Clark, D.E.; Smartt, H.B.

    1990-11-13

    Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites are disclosed. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite. 1 fig.

  8. Method for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOEpatents

    Buhrmaster, Carol L.; Clark, Denis E.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1990-01-01

    Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment wiht the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

  9. THE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION OF GIANT ARCS IN THE SLOAN GIANT ARCS SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, Matthew B.; Gladders, Michael D.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Sharon, Keren; Dahle, Haakon

    2011-01-20

    We measure the redshift distribution of a sample of 28 giant arcs discovered as a part of the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey. Gemini/GMOS-North spectroscopy provides precise redshifts for 24 arcs, and 'redshift desert' constrains for the remaining 4 arcs. This is a direct measurement of the redshift distribution of a uniformly selected sample of bright giant arcs, which is an observable that can be used to inform efforts to predict giant arc statistics. Our primary giant arc sample has a median redshift z = 1.821 and nearly two-thirds of the arcs, 64%, are sources at z {approx}> 1.4, indicating that the population of background sources that are strongly lensed into bright giant arcs resides primarily at high redshift. We also analyze the distribution of redshifts for 19 secondary strongly lensed background sources that are not visually apparent in Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging, but were identified in deeper follow-up imaging of the lensing cluster fields. Our redshift sample for the secondary sources is not spectroscopically complete, but combining it with our primary giant arc sample suggests that a large fraction of all background galaxies that are strongly lensed by foreground clusters reside at z {approx}> 1.4. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests indicate that our well-selected, spectroscopically complete primary giant arc redshift sample can be reproduced with a model distribution that is constructed from a combination of results from studies of strong-lensing clusters in numerical simulations and observational constraints on the galaxy luminosity function.

  10. Crustal thickening drives arc front migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, L.; Lee, C.; Manga, M.

    2012-12-01

    The position of active volcanism relative to the trench in arcs depends on melt focusing processes within the mantle wedge and the geometric parameters of subduction. Arc front migration has been observed in relic (Sierra Nevada, Andes) as well as active (Cascades) arcs, sometimes with cycles of retreat and return of the front towards the trench over millions of years. Other arcs, particularly where backarc extension dominates, exhibit a more stationary front in time relative to the trench. In addition, crustal indices of magmatism as measured by the ratio of trace elements La/Yb or isotopes 87}Sr/{86Sr covary with arc front migration (e.g., Haschke et al., 2002). Arc front migration is commonly attributed to variation in dip angle of the downgoing slab, delamination of overthickened crust, or to subduction erosion. Here we present an alternative hypothesis. Assuming mantle wedge melting is a largely temperature-dependant process, the maximum isotherm in the wedge sets arc front location. Isotherm location depends on slab angle, subduction velocity and wedge thermal diffusivity (England and Katz, 2010). It also depends on crustal thickness, which evolves as melt is transferred from the wedge to the crust. Arc front migration can thus occur purely through magmatic thickening of crust. Thickening proceeds through intrusive as well as extrusive volcanism, modulated by tectonics and surface erosion. Migration rate is set by the mantle melt flux into the crust, which decreases as thickening occurs. Thus slab angle need not change, and in the absence of other contribution processes front location and crustal thickness have long-time steady state values. We develop an analytic model of this process that produces migration rates consistent with published data and explains arc fronts that do not move (dominated by extension, such as in the case of intra-oceanic arcs). We present new geochemical and age data from the Peninsular Ranges Batholith that are also consistent with

  11. arcControlTower: the System for Atlas Production and Analysis on ARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipčič, Andrej; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    PanDA, the Atlas management and distribution system for production and analysis jobs on EGEE and OSG clusters, is based on pilot jobs to increase the throughput and stability of the job execution on grid. The ARC middleware uses a specific approach which tightly connects the job requirements with cluster capabilities like resource usage, software availability and caching of input files. The pilot concept renders the ARC features useless. The arcControlTower is the job submission system which merges the pilot benefits and ARC advantages. It takes the pilot payload from the panda server and submits the jobs to the Nordugrid ARC clusters as regular jobs, with all the job resources known in advance. All the pilot communication with the PanDA server is done by the arcControlTower, so it plays the role of a pilot factory and the pilot itself. There are several advantages to this approach: no grid middleware is needed on the worker nodes, the fair-share between the production and user jobs is tuned with the arcControlTower load parameters, the jobs can be controlled by ARC client tools. The system could be extended to other submission systems using central distribution.

  12. Heat flow and arc efficiency at high pressures in argon and helium tungsten arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Katsaounis, A. )

    1993-09-01

    For control of welding underwater robotic systems, the arc characteristics and the heat quotation in cathode, arc column and anode (weld) were measured in GTAW with argon and helium shielding gas using the calorimetric method. The measurements were performed mainly in a pressure chamber. The pressure, the current and the arc length were varied from 0.1-6.0 MPa, 50-300 A and 2-11 mm, respectively. It was observed that the welding voltage is strongly dependent on system pressure for both shielding gases and an explicit minimum voltage/current was obtained for the argon arc characteristics at approximately 100 A. Furthermore, the field strength and the heat emission from the arc column increased exponentially with the pressure. A simple relation was developed to predict heat emission from the arc column and, consequently, for the arc efficiency. In addition, a calculation model for engineering use was derived based on the Ellenbaas-Heller equation to calculate the-heat flux from the arc to the weld (for both gases).

  13. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius.

  14. GUI for studying the parameters influence of the electric arc model for a three-phase electric arc furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiormez, L.; Prostean, O.; Panoiu, M.; Panoiu, C.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis regarding the modeling of the behavior for a three-phase electric arc furnace installation. Therefore, a block diagram is implemented in Simulink that represents the modeling of the entire electric arc furnace installation. This block diagram contains also the modeling of the electric arc which is the element that makes the electric arc furnace behaving as a nonlinear load. The values for the model parameters of the electric arc furnace installation are like the ones from the real installation taken into consideration. Other model parameters are the electric arc model ones. In order to study the influence of the parameters of the electric arc models, it is developed a Matlab program that contains the graphical user interfaces. These interfaces make connection with the models of the electric arc implemented in Simulink. The interfaces allow the user to modify parameters for each of the electric arc model. Current and voltage of the electric arc are the variables taken into account to study the influence of the parameters on the electric arc models. Waveforms for voltage and current of the electric arc are illustrated when a parameter of the model is modified in order to analyze the importance of this parameter on the electric arc model. Also, for each of the models is presented the voltage-current characteristic of the electric arc because this characteristic gives information about the behavior of the electric arc furnace installation.

  15. The Composition of Water-Rich Components in the Sources of Back Arc and Arc Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, K. A.; Hauri, E. H.

    2007-12-01

    Arc and back-arc basin basalts are distinguished by geochemical signatures that are a complex function of the composition of crustal inputs form the subducting plate and the internal "factory" processes that extract materials from the slab and distribute them across the mantle wedge. Here, we use a global data set of basaltic melts from back arcs and arcs to examine relationships between four elements thought to be primary constituents of slab- derived materials: H2O, Na2O, K2O, and Cl. We use the methods of Kelley et al. (2006), coupled with recent constraints on mantle/melt DH2O and DCl (Hauri et al., 2006) to constrain concentrations of these elements in the mantle source, which compare directly with compositional models of the mantle and the slab-derived component beneath the Mariana trough (Stolper & Newman, 1994). The Mariana trough samples define linear trends in Na2O/H2O (1), K2O/H2O (0.2), and Cl/H2O (0.03) consistent with mixing between these two components. Four other back-arc basins (Sumisu, Central Lau, Manus, and E. Scotia) also fall along this trend in Na2O/H2O and K2O/H2O, suggesting that slab additions to most back-arc mantle sources have common major element characteristics. The Valu Fa Ridge segment of the southern Lau basin, however, trends away from other back arcs towards lower Na2O/H2O (0.1) and K2O/H2O (0.08). Such lower ratios are generally characteristic of arc sources in the Marianas and other arcs (e.g., Na2O/H2O=0.5-0.05), but also appear to be distinct for specific arc volcanoes. In back arcs, Cl may also be affected by late-stage magmatic assimilation of seawater, which drives up Cl/H2O and obscures primary trends, although some central Lau basin samples do point towards a mixing array coincident with the Mariana trough. Mariana arc sources have higher H2O and Cl concentrations than the Mariana trough, and indicate overall lower, but volcano-specific, Cl/H2O (0.02-0.01). In terms of these major-element constituents, arc volcanoes

  16. Research of Arc Chamber Optimization Techniques Based on Flow Field and Arc Joint Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jianying; Guo, Yujing; Zhang, Hao

    2016-03-01

    The preliminary design of an arc chamber in the 550 kV SF6 circuit breaker was proposed in accordance with the technical requirements and design experience. The structural optimization was carried out according to the no-load flow field simulation results and verified by no-load pressure measurement. Based on load simulation results such as temperature field variation at the arc area and the tendency of post arc current under different recovery voltage, the second optimal design was completed and its correctness was certificated by a breaking test. Results demonstrate that the interrupting capacity of an arc chamber can be evaluated by the comparison of the gas medium recovery speed and post arc current growth rate.

  17. Earthquake location in island arcs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engdahl, E.R.; Dewey, J.W.; Fujita, K.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive data set of selected teleseismic P-wave arrivals and local-network P- and S-wave arrivals from large earthquakes occurring at all depths within a small section of the central Aleutians is used to examine the general problem of earthquake location in island arcs. Reference hypocenters for this special data set are determined for shallow earthquakes from local-network data and for deep earthquakes from combined local and teleseismic data by joint inversion for structure and location. The high-velocity lithospheric slab beneath the central Aleutians may displace hypocenters that are located using spherically symmetric Earth models; the amount of displacement depends on the position of the earthquakes with respect to the slab and on whether local or teleseismic data are used to locate the earthquakes. Hypocenters for trench and intermediate-depth events appear to be minimally biased by the effects of slab structure on rays to teleseismic stations. However, locations of intermediate-depth events based on only local data are systematically displaced southwards, the magnitude of the displacement being proportional to depth. Shallow-focus events along the main thrust zone, although well located using only local-network data, are severely shifted northwards and deeper, with displacements as large as 50 km, by slab effects on teleseismic travel times. Hypocenters determined by a method that utilizes seismic ray tracing through a three-dimensional velocity model of the subduction zone, derived by thermal modeling, are compared to results obtained by the method of joint hypocenter determination (JHD) that formally assumes a laterally homogeneous velocity model over the source region and treats all raypath anomalies as constant station corrections to the travel-time curve. The ray-tracing method has the theoretical advantage that it accounts for variations in travel-time anomalies within a group of events distributed over a sizable region of a dipping, high

  18. Critical Length Criterion and the Arc Chain Model for Calculating the Arcing Time of the Secondary Arc Related to AC Transmission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Haoxi; Li, Qingmin; Xing, Jinyuan; Li, Jinsong; Chen, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    The prompt extinction of the secondary arc is critical to the single-phase reclosing of AC transmission lines, including half-wavelength power transmission lines. In this paper, a low-voltage physical experimental platform was established and the motion process of the secondary arc was recorded by a high-speed camera. It was found that the arcing time of the secondary arc rendered a close relationship with its arc length. Through the input and output power energy analysis of the secondary arc, a new critical length criterion for the arcing time was proposed. The arc chain model was then adopted to calculate the arcing time with both the traditional and the proposed critical length criteria, and the simulation results were compared with the experimental data. The study showed that the arcing time calculated from the new critical length criterion gave more accurate results, which can provide a reliable criterion in term of arcing time for modeling and simulation of the secondary arc related with power transmission lines. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51277061 and 51420105011)

  19. Back-arc basin basalt systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Brian; Martinez, Fernando

    2003-05-01

    The Mariana, east Scotia, Lau, and Manus back-arc basins (BABs) have spreading rates that vary from slow (<50 mm/yr) to fast (>100 mm/yr) and extension axes located from 10 to 400 km behind their island arcs. Axial lava compositions from these BABs indicate melting of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)-like sources in proportion to the amount added of previously depleted, water-rich, arc-like components. The arc-like end-members are characterized by low Na, Ti and Fe, and by high H 2O and Ba/La; the MORB-like end-members have the opposite traits. Comparisons between basins show that the least hydrous compositions follow global MORB systematics and an inverse correlation between Na8 and Fe8. This is interpreted as a positive correlation between the average degree and pressure of mantle melting that reflects regional variations in mantle potential temperatures (Lau/Manus hotter than Mariana/Scotia). This interpretation accords with numerical model predictions that faster subduction-induced advection will maintain a hotter mantle wedge. The primary compositional trends within each BAB (a positive correlation between Fe8, Na8 and Ti8, and their inverse correlation with H 2O(8) and Ba/La) are controlled by variations in water content, melt extraction, and enrichments imposed by slab and mantle wedge processes. Systematic axial depth (as a proxy for crustal production) variations with distance from the island arc indicate that compositional controls on melting dominate over spreading rate. Hydrous fluxing enhances decompression melting, allowing depleted mantle sources just behind the island arc to melt extensively, producing shallow spreading axes. Flow of enriched mantle components around the ends of slabs may augment this process in transform-bounded back-arcs such as the east Scotia Basin. The re-circulation (by mantle wedge corner flow) to the spreading axes of mantle previously depleted by both arc and spreading melt extraction can explain the greater depths and thinner

  20. The geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Paleoproterozoic Green Mountain arc: A composite(?), bimodal, oceanic, fringing arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, D.S.; Barnes, C.G.; Premo, W.R.; Snoke, A.W.

    2011-01-01

    The inferred subduction affinity of the ~1780-Ma Green Mountain arc, a dominantly bimodal igneous terrane (together with immature marine and volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks) accreted to the southern margin of the Wyoming province, is integral to arc-accretion models of the Paleoproterozoic growth of southern Laurentia. Conversely, the dominantly bimodal nature of many putative arc-related igneous suites throughout southern Laurentia, including the Green Mountain arc, has also been used to support models of growth by extension of pre-existing crust. We report new geochemical and isotopic data from ~1780-Ma gabbroic and granodioritic to tonalitic rocks of the Big Creek Gneiss, interpreted as consanguineous with previously studied metavolcanic rocks of the Green Mountain Formation.The ~1780-Ma Big Creek Gneiss mafic rocks show clear geochemical signatures of a subduction origin and provide no supporting evidence for extensional tectonism. The ~1780-Ma Big Creek Gneiss felsic rocks are attributed to partial melting of mafic and/or mixed lower-crustal material. The bimodal nature of the suite results from the combination of arc basalts and felsic crustal melts. The lack of andesite is consistent with the observed tholeiitic differentiation trend of the mafic magmas. The lower e{open}Nd(1780Ma) values for the felsic rocks vs. the mafic rocks suggest that the unexposed lower crust of the arc may be older than the arc and that Trans-Hudson- or Penokean-aged rocks possibly form the substratum of the arc. Our results reinforce previous interpretations that arc-related magmatism played a key role in the Paleoproterozoic crustal growth of southern Laurentia, but also support the possibility of unexposed older crust as basement to the arcs. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Physics of arcing, and implications to sputter deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2005-03-15

    Arc and glow discharges are defined based on their cathode processes. Arcs are characterized by collective electron emission, which can be stationary with hot cathodes (thermionic arcs), or non-stationary with cold cathodes (cathodic arcs). A brief review on cathodic arc properties serves as the starting point to better understand arcing phenomena in sputtering. Although arcing occurs in both metal and reactive sputtering, it is more of an issue in the reactive case. Arcing occurs if sufficiently high field strength leads to thermal runaway of an electron emission site. The role of insulating layers and surface potential adjustment through current leakage is highlighted. In the situation of magnetron sputtering with ''racetrack'', the need for a model with two spatial dimensions is shown. In many cases, arcing is initiated by breakdown of dielectric layers and inclusions. It is most efficiently prevented if formation and excessive charge-up of dielectric layers and inclusions can be avoided.

  2. Fluid simulation of carbon arc plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Kentaro; Raitses, Yevgeny; Kaganovich, Igor

    2016-09-01

    An arc discharge using graphite electrodes is known to produce carbon nanomaterials, e.g. nanotubes and fullerenes. In order to understand where and how such nanomaterials are synthesized, the plasma properties inside the arc discharge must be characterized. The mechanism of the carbon arc plasma is as follows. Carbon particles evaporate from the graphite anode, which is mainly heated by the electrons. Carbon atoms and ions condensate and form a deposit on the cathode, from which the electrons are thermionically emitted. A one-dimensional fluid model is developed to study the characteristics of the carbon arc plasma in atmospheric pressures. Sheath models for the anode and cathode are coupled to the fluid simulation to obtain the material temperature and sheath potential. In the model, thermal nonequilibrium is assumed and atomic carbon, dimer, and trimer are considered. A typical operating condition of a carbon arc plasma is discharge voltage of 20 V, discharge current of 60 A, the electron radius of 6 to 12 mm, and background pressure of 500 Torr. Transition from low to high ablation mode is obtained from the simulations with a smaller electrode radius and with a larger discharge current, which agrees with experimental observations. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  3. Ion source with improved primary arc collimation

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1983-12-16

    An improved negative ion source is provided in which a self-biasing, molybdenum collimator is used to define the primary electron stream arc discharge from a filament operated at a negative potential. The collimator is located between the anode and the filament. It is electrically connected to the anode by means of an appropriate size resistor such that the collimator is biased at essentially the filament voltage during operation. Initially, the full arc voltage appears across the filament to collimator until the arc discharge strikes. Then the collimator biases itself to essentially filament potential due to current flow through the resistor thus defining the primary electron stream without intercepting any appreciable arc power. The collimator aperture is slightly smaller than the anode aperture to shield the anode from the arc power which, in the past, has caused overheating and erosion of the anode collimator during extended time pulsed-beam operation of the source. With the self-biasing collimator of this invention, the ion source may be operated from short pulse periods to steady-state without destroying the anode.

  4. Electric Arc and Electrochemical Surface Texturing Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Snyder, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    Surface texturing of conductive materials can readily be accomplished by means of a moving electric arc which produces a plasma from the environmental gases as well as from the vaporized substrate and arc electrode materials. As the arc is forced to move across the substrate surface, a condensate from the plasma re-deposits an extremely rough surface which is intimately mixed and attached to the substrate material. The arc textured surfaces produce greatly enhanced thermal emittance and hold potential for use as high temperature radiator surfaces in space, as well as in systems which use radiative heat dissipation such as computer assisted tomography (CAT) scan systems. Electrochemical texturing of titanium alloys can be accomplished by using sodium chloride solutions along with ultrasonic agitation to produce a random distribution of craters on the surface. The crater size and density can be controlled to produce surface craters appropriately sized for direct bone in-growth of orthopaedic implants. Electric arc texturing and electrochemical texturing techniques, surface properties and potential applications will be presented.

  5. Emissions of chromium (VI) from arc welding.

    PubMed

    Heung, William; Yun, Myoung-Jin; Chang, Daniel P Y; Green, Peter G; Halm, Chris

    2007-02-01

    The presence of Cr in the +6 oxidation state (Cr[VI]) is still observed in ambient air samples in California despite steps taken to reduce emissions from plating operations. One known source of emission of Cr(VI) is welding, especially with high Cr-content materials, such as stainless steels. An experimental effort was undertaken to expand and update Cr(VI) emission factors by conducting tests on four types of arc-welding operations: gas-metal arc welding (GMAW), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), fluxcore arc welding, and pulsed GMAW. Standard American Welding Society hood results were compared with a total enclosure method that permitted isokinetic sampling for particle size-cut measurement, as well as total collection of the aerosol. The fraction of Cr(VI) emitted per unit mass of Cr electrode consumed was determined. Consistent with AP-42 data, initial results indicate that a significant fraction of the total Cr in the aerosol is in the +6 oxidation state. The fraction of Cr(VI) and total aerosol mass produced by the different arc welding methods varies with the type of welding process used. Self-shielded electrodes that do not use a shield gas, for example, SMAW, produce greater amounts of Cr(VI) per unit mass of electrode consumed. The formation of Cr(VI) from standard electrode wires used for welding mild steel was below the method detection limit after eliminating an artifact in the analytical method used.

  6. Welding torch with arc light reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A welding torch arc light reflector is disclosed for welding torches having optical viewing systems. A schematic of a welding torch having an internal coaxial viewing system consisting of a lens which focuses the field of view of the weld scene of the workpiece onto the end of the fiberoptic bundle is provided. The transmitted image of the fiberoptic bundle is provided to a camera lens which focuses it onto a TV sensor array for transmission. To improve the parity of the image of the monitoring system, an arc light reflector is shown fitted to the end of the torch housing or gas cup. The arc light reflector has an internal conical section portion which is polished to serve as a mirror which reflects the bright arc light back onto the darker areas of the weld area and thereby provides a more detailed image for the monitoring system. The novelty of the invention lies in the use of an arc light reflector on welding torches having optical viewing systems.

  7. Welding torch with arc light reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.

    1986-12-01

    A welding torch arc light reflector is disclosed for welding torches having optical viewing systems. A schematic of a welding torch having an internal coaxial viewing system consisting of a lens which focuses the field of view of the weld scene of the workpiece onto the end of the fiberoptic bundle is provided. The transmitted image of the fiberoptic bundle is provided to a camera lens which focuses it onto a TV sensor array for transmission. To improve the parity of the image of the monitoring system, an arc light reflector is shown fitted to the end of the torch housing or gas cup. The arc light reflector has an internal conical section portion which is polished to serve as a mirror which reflects the bright arc light back onto the darker areas of the weld area and thereby provides a more detailed image for the monitoring system. The novelty of the invention lies in the use of an arc light reflector on welding torches having optical viewing systems.

  8. Channel model for AC electric arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, H. L.

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the results from calculations of free-burning AC electric arcs in argon. In order to calculate the arc current and arc voltage, the external electric circuit must be taken into consideration. The external circuit is modeled by an equivalent circuit consisting of an ideal AC voltage source, a loss resistance, and an inductance. The qualitative behavior of the current-voltage characteristic is in agreement with observed characteristics, but experimental data are necessary in order to check whether the calculated power loss is reasonable. Non-symmetry was modeled by introducing different anode and cathode falls in the two half periods. An attempt at taking into account different cathode current densities in the two half periods, depending on whether the electrode or silicon melt is cathode, did not give satisfactory results. Thermionic emission was assumed in both half periods, but this may not be the right mechanism when the silicon melt is cathode. The time delay of the AC arc compared to the DC case is modeled by a time constant. It was shown that this preset time constant must be in agreement with the mean 'mechanical' relaxation time in the arc in order to fulfill the energy balance. By updating the time constant until this is achieved, the time constant is eliminated as a parameter that must be chosen a priori.

  9. Arc Conductance and Flow Velocity Affected by Transient Recovery Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Reo; Ishikawa, Yuya; Ono, Seisui; Sato, Ken; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the stable supply of electric power is indispensable. The GCB (Gas Circuit Breaker) can prevent the spread of the fault current. However, it should have the reliability more. Therefore the GCB has been researched for performance improvement of the arc interruption of abnormal fault current without the fail. Therefore, it is important to prevent the breakdown such as the re-ignition and thermal re-ignition of arc after the arc interruption. It is necessary to reduce the arc conductance in order to prevent the re-ignition of arc. The arc conductance is derived from the temperature distribution and the volume of the arc. The temperature distribution of the arc is formed by convection. In this research, the arc conductance and flow velocity affected by transient recovery voltage are elucidated. The flow rate and temperature distribution of the arc is calculated with changing transient recovery voltage. In addition, the arc conductance is calculated in order to know the extinguish arc ability. As a result, when the transient recovery voltage increases, the probability of re-ignition increases. Therefore, the arc temperature and the arc conductance were increased.

  10. EDITORIAL Metal vapour in atmospheric-pressure arcs Metal vapour in atmospheric-pressure arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Anthony B.

    2010-11-01

    Metal vapour has a significant, and in some cases dominant, influence in many applications of atmospheric-pressure plasmas, including arc welding, circuit interruption and mineral processing. While the influence of metal vapour has long been recognized, it is only recently that diagnostic and computational tools have been sufficiently well-developed to allow this influence to be more thoroughly examined and understood. Some unexpected findings have resulted: for example, that the presence of metal vapour in gas-metal arc welding leads to local minima in the temperature and current density in the centre of the arc. It has become clear that the presence of metal vapour, as well as having intrinsic scientific interest, plays an important role in determining the values of critical parameters in industrial applications, such as the weld penetration in arc welding and the extinction time in circuit breakers. In gas-tungsten arc welding, metal vapour concentrations are formed by evaporation of the weld pool, and are relatively low, typically at most a few per cent. Moreover, the convective flow of the plasma near the weld pool tends to direct the metal vapour plume radially outwards. In gas-metal arc welding, in contrast, metal vapour concentrations can reach over 50%. In this case, the metal vapour is produced mainly by evaporation of the wire electrode, and the strong downwards convective flow below the electrode concentrates the metal vapour in the central region of the arc. The very different metal concentrations and distributions in the two welding processes mean that the metal vapour has markedly different influences on the arc. In gas-tungsten arc welding, the current density distribution is broadened near the weld pool by the influence of the metal vapour on the electrical conductivity of the plasma, and the arc voltage is decreased. In contrast, in gas-metal arc welding, the arc centre is cooled by increased radiative emission and the arc voltage is increased. In

  11. Plasma arc heated secondary combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Haun, R.; Paulson, B.; Schlienger, M.; Goerz, D.; Kerns, J.; Vernazza, J.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes a secondary combustion chamber (SCC) for hazardous waste treatment systems that uses a plasma arc torch as the heat source. Developed under a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Retech, Inc. and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the unit is intended primarily to handle the off-gas from a Plasma Arc Centrifugal Treatment (PACT) system. ft is designed to heat the effluent gas which may contain volatile organic compounds, and maintain the gas temperature above 1000 C for two seconds or more. The benefits of using a plasma arc gas heater are described in comparison to a conventional fossil fuel heated SCC. Thermal design considerations are discussed. Analysis and experimental results are presented to show the effectiveness in destroying hazardous compounds and reducing the total volume of gaseous emissions.

  12. Understanding the Evolution of the Scotia Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Andrés.; Dalziel, Ian; Leat, Philip T.

    2013-07-01

    An international 3-day meeting in which participants discussed geodynamic and multidisciplinary topics related to the evolution of the Scotia Arc was held at the Andalucía Institute of Earth Sciences (Spanish Research Council (CSIC)/University of Granada (UGR)) in Granada, Spain. The Scotia Arc encompasses southern South America, the Antarctic Peninsula, and the intervening part of the Southern Ocean including the South Georgia and South Orkney crustal blocks and the volcanically active South Sandwich Arc. It is a region of critical importance because of its role as a developing ocean gateway during Eocene-Miocene times and because of its impact on global ocean circulation, with possible importance for Paleogene-Neogene paleoenvironmental change, early phases of development of Antarctic ice sheets, gene flow, and resulting biodiversity.

  13. APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Noland, R.A.; Stone, C.C.

    1960-05-10

    An apparatus and method are given for forming a welding arc which is rotated by a magnetic field very rapidly about an annular electrode so that a weld is produced simultaneously over all points of an annular or closed path. This invention inhibits outgassing from the jacket of a fuel slug which is being welded by adjusting the pressure throughout the welding cycle to establish a balance between the gas pressure within the jacket and that of the atmosphere surrounding the jacket. Furthermore, an improved control of the magnetic field producing rotation of the welding arc is disclosed whereby this rotation is prevented from splashing about the metal being welded as the welding arc makes it molten.

  14. Nonlinear identification of the total baroreflex arc.

    PubMed

    Moslehpour, Mohsen; Kawada, Toru; Sunagawa, Kenji; Sugimachi, Masaru; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2015-12-15

    The total baroreflex arc [the open-loop system relating carotid sinus pressure (CSP) to arterial pressure (AP)] is known to exhibit nonlinear behaviors. However, few studies have quantitatively characterized its nonlinear dynamics. The aim of this study was to develop a nonlinear model of the sympathetically mediated total arc without assuming any model form. Normal rats were studied under anesthesia. The vagal and aortic depressor nerves were sectioned, the carotid sinus regions were isolated and attached to a servo-controlled piston pump, and the AP and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) were measured. CSP was perturbed using a Gaussian white noise signal. A second-order Volterra model was developed by applying nonparametric identification to the measurements. The second-order kernel was mainly diagonal, but the diagonal differed in shape from the first-order kernel. Hence, a reduced second-order model was similarly developed comprising a linear dynamic system in parallel with a squaring system in cascade with a slower linear dynamic system. This "Uryson" model predicted AP changes 12% better (P < 0.01) than a linear model in response to new Gaussian white noise CSP. The model also predicted nonlinear behaviors, including thresholding and mean responses to CSP changes about the mean. Models of the neural arc (the system relating CSP to SNA) and peripheral arc (the system relating SNA to AP) were likewise developed and tested. However, these models of subsystems of the total arc showed approximately linear behaviors. In conclusion, the validated nonlinear model of the total arc revealed that the system takes on an Uryson structure.

  15. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from −0.25 to −0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (−0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid−mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration. PMID:27303032

  16. Nonlinear identification of the total baroreflex arc

    PubMed Central

    Moslehpour, Mohsen; Kawada, Toru; Sunagawa, Kenji; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    The total baroreflex arc [the open-loop system relating carotid sinus pressure (CSP) to arterial pressure (AP)] is known to exhibit nonlinear behaviors. However, few studies have quantitatively characterized its nonlinear dynamics. The aim of this study was to develop a nonlinear model of the sympathetically mediated total arc without assuming any model form. Normal rats were studied under anesthesia. The vagal and aortic depressor nerves were sectioned, the carotid sinus regions were isolated and attached to a servo-controlled piston pump, and the AP and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) were measured. CSP was perturbed using a Gaussian white noise signal. A second-order Volterra model was developed by applying nonparametric identification to the measurements. The second-order kernel was mainly diagonal, but the diagonal differed in shape from the first-order kernel. Hence, a reduced second-order model was similarly developed comprising a linear dynamic system in parallel with a squaring system in cascade with a slower linear dynamic system. This “Uryson” model predicted AP changes 12% better (P < 0.01) than a linear model in response to new Gaussian white noise CSP. The model also predicted nonlinear behaviors, including thresholding and mean responses to CSP changes about the mean. Models of the neural arc (the system relating CSP to SNA) and peripheral arc (the system relating SNA to AP) were likewise developed and tested. However, these models of subsystems of the total arc showed approximately linear behaviors. In conclusion, the validated nonlinear model of the total arc revealed that the system takes on an Uryson structure. PMID:26354845

  17. Gravitational effects on the weld pool shape and microstructural evolution during gas tungsten arc and laser beam welding of 304 stainless steel and Al-4 wt% Cu alloy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Namhyun; Singh, Jogender; Kulkarni, Anil K

    2004-11-01

    Effects of gravitational acceleration were investigated on the weld pool shape and microstructural evolution for 304 stainless steel and Al-4wt% Cu alloy. Effects of welding heat source were investigated by using laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). As the gravitational level was increased from low gravity (LG approximately 1.2 g) to high gravity (HG approximately 1.8 g) using a NASA KC-135 aircraft, the weld pool shape for 304 stainless steel was influenced considerably during GTAW. However, insignificant change in the microstructure and solute distribution was observed at gravitational levels between LG and HG. The GTAW on Al-4 wt% Cu alloy was used to investigate the effect of gravitational orientation on the weld solidification behavior. Gravitational orientation was manipulated by varying the welding direction with respect to gravity vector; that is, by welding upward opposing gravity ( ||-U) and downward with gravity ( ||-D) on a vertical weld piece and welding perpendicular to gravity (perpendicular) on a horizontal weld piece. Under the same welding conditions, a larger primary dendrite spacing in the ||-U weld was observed near the weld pool surface and the fusion boundary than in the case of perpendicular or ||-D welds. The ||-D weld exhibited different solidification morphology and abnormal S shape of solidification rate curve during its growth. For 304 stainless steel GTAW, significant effects of gravitational orientation were observed on the weld pool shape that was associated with weld surface morphology and convection flow. However, the weld pool shape for LBW was mostly constant with respect to the gravitational orientation.

  18. Axial Presentations of Regular Arcs on Mn

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Marston

    1972-01-01

    THEOREM 1. Let Mn be a Riemannian manifold of class Cm, m > 0. On Mn let g be a simple compact, sensed, regular arc whose local coordinates are functions of class Cm of the algebraic arc length s, measured along g from a prescribed point of g. There then exists a presentation (F: U, X) [unk] [unk]Mn such that g [unk] X, and each point p(s) of g is represented in the euclidean domain U by coordinates (x1,...,xn) = (s,0,...,0). PMID:16592036

  19. Grain refinement control in TIG arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.; Whiffen, E. L. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A method for controlling grain size and weld puddle agitation in a tungsten electrode inert gas welding system to produce fine, even grain size and distribution is disclosed. In the method the frequency of dc welding voltage pulses supplied to the welding electrode is varied over a preselected frequency range and the arc gas voltage is monitored. At some frequency in the preselected range the arc gas voltage will pass through a maximum. By maintaining the operating frequency of the system at this value, maximum weld puddle agitation and fine grain structure are produced.

  20. Arc-driven rail accelerator research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Pradosh K.

    1987-01-01

    Arc-driven rail accelerator research is analyzed by considering wall ablation and viscous drag in the plasma. Plasma characteristics are evaluated through a simple fluid-mechanical analysis considering only wall ablation. By equating the energy dissipated in the plasma with the radiation heat loss, the average properties of the plasma are determined as a function of time and rate of ablation. Locations of two simultaneously accelerating arcs were determined by optical and magnetic probes and fron streak camera photographs. All three measurements provide consistent results.

  1. Ion source based on the cathodic arc

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, D.M.; Falabella, S.

    1994-02-01

    A cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated, is described. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the dual purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles. 3 figures.

  2. Ion source based on the cathodic arc

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, David M.; Falabella, Steven

    1994-01-01

    A cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the dual purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles.

  3. Plasma distribution of cathodic ARC deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Raoux, S.; Krishnan, K.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G.

    1996-08-01

    The plasma distribution using a cathodic arc plasma source with and without magnetic macroparticle filter has been determined by depositing on a transparent plastic substrate and measuring the film absorption. It was found that the width of the distribution depends on the arc current, and it also depends on the cathode material which leads to a spatial separation of the elements when an alloy cathode is used. By applying a magnetic multicusp field near the exit of the magnetic filter, it was possible to modify the plasma distribution and obtain a flat plasma profile with a constant and homogeneous elemental distribution.

  4. Geochemical differences between along-arc and across-arc volcanics in west-central Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geilert, Sonja; Freundt, Armin; Wörner, Gerhard; Kutterolf, Steffen

    2012-04-01

    The La Paz Centro - Malpaisillo Lineament (LPML) in west-central Nicaragua is a north-south striking, 20 km long chain of maars and cinder cones, which intersects the northwest-southeast striking main volcanic front. A tectonic control of LPML volcanism is likely but only evident for the Malpaisillo fissure at the northern end of the LPML. Previous work demonstrated geochemical variations implying changes in mantle-source composition (i.e., added slab components) along the Central American Volcanic Arc at spatial scales of some 10's of kilometers. Our study of the LPML shows that minor but systematic changes also occur across the arc within 20 km distance. Variations in trace element ratios such as Zr/Nb, Ba/Th, Ba/La, Th/Zr, U/La and La/Yb along the LPML, i.e. across the volcanic front indicate little change in the degree of partial melting but an increase particularly in the hemipelagic sediment component in the mantle source from the fore arc towards the arc front, followed by a decrease behind the arc. Interestingly, the slab component is most prominent just in front of the arc. About 60 km southeast of the LPML, the Nejapa-Miraflores volcanic and tectonic lineament, which marks a 20 km north-south offset in the arc, differs substantially from the LPML. There is a wide scatter in incompatible trace element ratios indicating a heterogeneous mantle source at small spatial scales (c. 1 km). This mantle heterogeneity may represent vertical rather than across-arc variations and is probably related to the arc offset, because in the absence of such offset at the LPML mantle source conditions vary much less but more systematically.

  5. The effect of plasma on solar cell array arc characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Tyree, E.

    1984-01-01

    The influence from the ambient plasma on the arc characteristics of a negatively biased solar cell array was investigated. The arc characteristics examined were the peak current during an arc, the decay time as the arc terminates, and the charge lost during the arc. These arc characteristics were examined in a nitrogen plasma with charge densities ranging from 15,000 to 45,000 cu cm. Background gas pressures ranged from 8x1,000,000 to 6x100,000 torr. Over these ranges of parameters no significant effect on the arc characteristics were seen. Arc characteristics were also examined for three gas species: helium, nitrogen and argon. The helium arcs have higher peak currents and shorter decay times than nitrogen and argon arcs. There are slight differences in the arc characteristics between nitrogen and argon. These differences may be caused by the differences in mass of the respective species. Also, evidence is presented for an electron emission mechanism appearing as a precursor to solar array arcs. Occassionally the plasma generator could be turned off, and currents could still be detected in the vacuum system. When these currents are presented, arcs may occur.

  6. Influence of a transverse magnetic field on arc root movements in a dc plasma torch: Diamagnetic effect of arc column

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Keun Su

    2009-03-23

    The effect of a transverse magnetic field on the anodic arc root movement inside a dc plasma torch has been investigated. The arc voltage fluctuation, which represents the degree of the arc instability, was reduced to 28.6% of the original value and the high frequency components in the voltage signal also decreased in their magnitudes. The inherent arc instability in a dc thermal plasma torch seems to be suppressed by a diamagnetic effect of the arc column. Furthermore, the measured voltage wave forms indicated that the arc root attachment mode would be controllable by a transverse magnetic field.

  7. Characterization of Submerged-Arc and Gas-Metal-Arc Weldments in HY-100 Steel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    RD-R14i 939 CHARACTERIZATION OF SUBMERGED-ARC AND GAS-METAL-ARC / WELDMENTS IN HY-IBB STEEL (U) NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA R E THERRIEN DEC...100 Steel 6. PIERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUM11ER I.7. AUTHOW) 11. CONTRACT OR GRANT NuMMER(.) Alfred E. Therrien _O P O R ME E E T R J C .T S’ .~ S...weld toughness in submerged arc welded (SAW) 4- HY-100 steel weldments precludes this process from large 4. scale HY-100 shipbuilding production

  8. DEVICE AND METHOD FOR PRODUCING A HIGH INTENSITY ARC DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-01-01

    A device is described for producing an energetic d-c carbon arc discharge between widely spaced electrodes with arc currents in excess of 100 amperes in a magnetic field of about 3000 gauss and witnin an evacuated enclo sure at a pressure of about 10/sup -5/ mm Hg. No defining electrodes are used in the device, thus essentially eliminating the problems of shorting which heretofore limited the amount of current that could be produced in an arc discharge. The energetic carbon arc discharge is sustained by the potential across the electrodes and by carbon ions and electrons released from the electrodes during arc operation. A large part of the potential drop of the arc occurs along the arc and many energetic electrons reach the anode because the arc pressure is relatively low, and few collisions occur. The carbon discharge is also an efficient ion pump.

  9. Automated Variable-Polarity Plasma-Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numes, A. C., Jr.; Bayless, E. O., Jr.; Jones, S. C., III; Munafo, P.; Munafo, A.; Biddle, A.; Wilson, W.

    1984-01-01

    Variable-polarity plasma-arc methods produces better welds at lower cost than gas-shielded tungsten-arc welding in assemblies. Weld porosity very low and costs of joint preparation, depeaking, inspection, and weld repair minimized.

  10. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    DOE PAGES

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; ...

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scatteringmore » creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.« less

  11. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scattering creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.

  12. Cheaper Custom Shielding Cups For Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.

    1992-01-01

    New way of making special-purpose shielding cups for gas/tungsten arc welding from hobby ceramic greatly reduces cost. Pattern machined in plastic. Plaster-of-paris mold made, and liquid ceramic poured into mold. Cost 90 percent less than cup machined from lava rock.

  13. Neural-Network Modeling Of Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Kristinn; Barnett, Robert J.; Springfield, James F.; Cook, George E.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Bjorgvinsson, Jon B.

    1994-01-01

    Artificial neural networks considered for use in monitoring and controlling gas/tungsten arc-welding processes. Relatively simple network, using 4 welding equipment parameters as inputs, estimates 2 critical weld-bead paramaters within 5 percent. Advantage is computational efficiency.

  14. CW arc-lamp-pumped alexandrite lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Samelson, H.; Walling, J.C.; Wernikowski, T.; Harter, D.J.

    1988-06-01

    The performance characteristics of arc-lamp- (Xe and Hg) pumped, CW alexandrite lasers are described in detail. The modes of operation considered are free running, tuned, and repetitively Q-switched. The experimental arrangement and apparatus are also outlined. The experimental results are discussed in terms of a steady-state model, and the areas of agreement and difficulty are pointed out.

  15. F-Layer Polar Cap Arcs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    the electric fields. The particles may also be accelerated; they typically have a * higher range of energies than that of their solar ,.-.., wind ...spread F masking in the ionogram indicates the presence of structured irregularities in the arcs. Irregularities also cause dmplitude scintillation. and

  16. Remote electrical arc suppression by laser filamentation.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Elise; Mongin, Denis; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2015-11-02

    We investigate the interaction of narrow plasma channels formed in the filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses, with a DC high voltage. The laser filaments prevent electrical arcs by triggering corona that neutralize the high-voltage electrodes. This phenomenon, that relies on the electric field modulation and free electron release around the filament, opens new prospects to lightning and over-voltage mitigation.

  17. Signal Analysis of Gas Tungsten Arc Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagar, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding is a process in which the input parameters such as current, voltage and travel speed, can be easily controlled and/or monitored. However, weld quality is not solely a function of these parameters. An adaptive method of observing weld quality is desired to improve weld quality assurance. The use of dynamic electrical properties of the welding arc as a weld quality monitor was studied. The electrical properties of the arc are characterized by the current voltage transfer function. The hardware and software necessary to collect the data at a maximum rate of 45 kHz and to allow the off-line processing of this data are tested. The optimum input current waveform is determined. Bead-on-plate welds to observe such characteristics of the weld as the fundamental frequency of the puddle are studied. Future work is planned to observe changes of the arc response with changes in joint geometry, base metal chemistry, and shielding gas composition are discussed.

  18. Gas tungsten arc welder with electrode grinder

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Brown, William F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  19. Arc tracking of cables for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, D.; Frontzek, F. R.; Hanson, J.; Reher, H. J.; Judd, M. D.; Bryant, D.

    1995-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to develop a new test method that is suitable for the assessment of the resistance of aerospace cables to arc tracking for different specific environmental and network conditions of spacecrafts. This paper reports the purpose, test conditions, test specimen, test procedure, and test acceptance criteria of seven different (200-250 mm long) cables.

  20. Evaluation of the clinical usefulness of modulated arc treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Kyu; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Yeon Sil; Choi, Byung Ock; Kang, Young-Nam; Nam, Sang Hee; Park, Hyeong Wook; Kim, Shin Wook; Shin, Hun Joo; Lee, Jae Choon; Kim, Ji Na; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Jin Young

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical usefulness of modulated arc (mARC) treatment techniques. The mARC treatment plans for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were made in order to verify the clinical usefulness of mARC. A pre-study was conducted to find the best plan condition for mARC treatment, and the usefulness of the mARC treatment plan was evaluated by comparing it with other Arc treatment plans such as tomotherapy and RapidArc plans. In the case of mARC, the optimal condition for the mARC plan was determined by comparing the dosimetric performance of the mARC plans developed by using various parameters, which included the photon energy (6 MV, 10 MV), the optimization point angle (6°- 10°intervals), and the total number of segments (36 - 59 segments). The best dosimetric performance of mARC was observed at a 10 MV photon energy, a point angle 6 degrees, and 59 segments. The treatment plans for the three different techniques were compared by using the following parameters: the conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), the target coverage, the dose to the OARs, the number of monitor units (MU), the beam on time, and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). As a result, the three different treatment techniques showed similar target coverages. The mARC plan had the lowest V20 (volume of lung receiving > 20 Gy) and MU per fraction compared with both the RapidArc and the tomotherapy plans. The mARC plan reduced the beam on time as well. Therefore, the results of this study provide satisfactory evidence that the mARC technique can be considered as a useful clinical technique for radiation treatment.

  1. Uranium ARC Fission Reactor for Space Power and Propulsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    thruster or MHD accelerator/generator. Uranium arc technology is being developed for use in space nuclear thermal and electric propulsion reactors. In...specific impulse propulsion or ultrahigh temperature power conversion. Fission events in the nuclear arc plasma provide for additional dissociation and...I Technical Objectives 3 2. URANIUM ARC FISSION REACTOR CONCEPT AND NUCLEAR -AUGMENTED THRUSTER CONCEPT 4 2.1 Physics Basis 4 2.2 Uranium Arc

  2. The Tertiary Arc Chain in the Western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honza, E.

    1991-02-01

    The arcs bordering the Pacific Plate on the Western and Southwestern Pacific rim are reconstructed since their initiation in the Eocene and Oligocene. They occur in a zone forming an arc chain from the Western Pacific tropics to the eastern margin of Australia. They are the Bonin, Mariana, Yap, Palau, Halmahera, North New Guinea-West Melanesia, Solomon, Vanuatu, and Tonga-Kermadec Arcs, designated here the Tertiary Arc Chain. They are associated with the formation and consumption of backarc basins. Reversals of arc polarity and episodic subduction has occurred in some of them. The Tertiary Arc Chain is characterized by four major stages in its evolution which can be seen characteristically in some of the arcs. The first stage is the occurrence of the arc chain from the middle Eocene to earliest Oligocene. The second stage is the formation of the backarc basins from the early to late Oligocene. The third stage is the occurrence of double arcs on the inner side of the arc chain in the early to middle Miocene and the fourth stage is the reversal of arc polarities due to collisions since the late Miocene. The backarc basins associated with the arcs of the Tertiary Arc Chain have fixed limits of duration in their evolution. The backarc basins initially form 15 million years after the initiation of the volcanic arc. Several to 10 million years after the initial opening, backarc spreading terminates. Approximately 20 million years after the cessation of the backarc spreading, a second phase of opening occurs in the backarc region. In the case of arc collision, reversal of the arc polarity occurs if there is oceanic crust on the backarc side, and opening of a backarc basin occurs within several million years. These occurrences and durations have a variation of ca. 3-5 million years.

  3. H2O and CO2 in magmas from the Mariana arc and back arc systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Sally; Stolper, Edward; Stern, Robert

    2000-05-01

    We examined the H2O and CO2 contents of glasses from lavas and xenoliths from the Mariana arc system, an intraoceanic convergent margin in the western Pacific, which contains an active volcanic arc, an actively spreading back arc basin, and active behind-the-arc cross-chain volcanoes. Samples include (1) glass rims from Mariana arc, Mariana trough, and cross-chain submarine lavas; (2) glass inclusions in arc and trough phenocrysts; and (3) glass inclusions from a gabbro + anorthosite xenolith from Agrigan (Mariana arc). Glass rims of submarine arc lavas contain 0.3-1.9 wt % H2O, and CO2 is below detection limits. Where they could be compared, glass inclusions in arc phenocrysts contain more H2O than their host glasses; most arc glasses and phenocryst inclusions contain no detectable CO2, with the exception of those from a North Hiyoshi shoshonite, which contains 400-600 ppm. The glass inclusions from the Agrigan xenolith contain 4-6% H2O, and CO2 is below the detection limit. Glasses from the cross-chain lavas are similar to those from the arc: H2O contents are 1.4-1.7 wt %, and CO2 is below detection limits. Volatile contents in Mariana trough lava glass rims are variable: 0.2-2.8 wt % H2O and 0-300 ppm CO2. Glass inclusions from trough phenocrysts have water contents similar to the host glass, but they can contain up to 875 ppm CO2. Volatile contents of melt inclusions from trough and arc lavas and from the xenolith imply minimum depths of crystallization of ~1-8 km. H2O and CO2 contents of Mariana trough glasses are negatively correlated, indicating saturation of the erupting magma with a CO2-H2O vapor at the pressure of eruption (~400 bars for these samples), with the vapor ranging from nearly pure CO2 at the CO2-rich end of the glass array to nearly pure H2O at the H2O-rich end. Degassing of these magmas on ascent and eruption leads to significant loss of CO2 (thereby masking preeruptive CO2 contents) but minimal disturbance of preeruptive H2O contents. For

  4. Load-Point Compliance for the Arc Bend-Arc Support Fracture Toughness Specimen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    co TECHNICAL REPORT ARCCB-TR-900 11(N LOAD-POINT COMPLIANCE FOR THE ARC BEND-ARC SUPPORT FRACTURE TOUGHNESS SPECIMEN FRANCIS I. BARATTA JOSEPH A...ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(@) 1. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(@) Francis I. Baratta , Joseph A. Kapp, and David S. Saunders (See Reverse) 9. PERFORMING...CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGEhan Date Entered) 7. AUTHORS (CONT’D) Francis I. Baratta U.S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory Watertown, MA 02172

  5. The arc arises: The links between volcanic output, arc evolution and melt composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandl, Philipp A.; Hamada, Morihisa; Arculus, Richard J.; Johnson, Kyle; Marsaglia, Kathleen M.; Savov, Ivan P.; Ishizuka, Osamu; Li, He

    2017-03-01

    Subduction initiation is a key process for global plate tectonics. Individual lithologies developed during subduction initiation and arc inception have been identified in the trench wall of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) island arc but a continuous record of this process has not previously been described. Here, we present results from International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 351 that drilled a single site west of the Kyushu-Palau Ridge (KPR), a chain of extinct stratovolcanoes that represents the proto-IBM island arc, active for ∼25 Ma following subduction initiation. Site U1438 recovered 150 m of oceanic igneous basement and ∼1450 m of overlying sediments. The lower 1300 m of these sediments comprise volcaniclastic gravity-flow deposits shed from the evolving KPR arc front. We separated fresh magmatic minerals from Site U1438 sediments, and analyzed 304 glass (formerly melt) inclusions, hosted by clinopyroxene and plagioclase. Compositions of glass inclusions preserve a temporal magmatic record of the juvenile island arc, complementary to the predominant mid-Miocene to recent activity determined from tephra layers recovered by drilling in the IBM forearc. The glass inclusions record the progressive transition of melt compositions dominated by an early 'calc-alkalic', high-Mg andesitic stage to a younger tholeiitic stage over a time period of 11 Ma. High-precision trace element analytical data record a simultaneously increasing influence of a deep subduction component (e.g., increase in Th vs. Nb, light rare earth element enrichment) and a more fertile mantle source (reflected in increased high field strength element abundances). This compositional change is accompanied by increased deposition rates of volcaniclastic sediments reflecting magmatic output and maturity of the arc. We conclude the 'calc-alkalic' stage of arc evolution may endure as long as mantle wedge sources are not mostly advected away from the zones of arc magma generation, or the rate of

  6. Electric-arc synthesis of soot with high content of higher fullerenes in parallel arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutlov, A. E.; Nekrasov, V. M.; Sergeev, A. G.; Bubnov, V. P.; Kareev, I. E.

    2016-12-01

    Soot with a relatively high content of higher fullerenes (C76, C78, C80, C82, C84, C86, etc.) is synthesized in a parallel arc upon evaporation of pure carbon electrodes. The content of higher fullerenes in soot extract amounts to 13.8 wt % when two electrodes are simultaneously burnt in electric-arc reactor. Such a content is comparable with the content obtained upon evaporation of composite graphite electrodes with potassium carbonate impurity.

  7. Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerwaard, Frank J. Meijer, Otto W.M.; Hoorn, Elles A.P. van der; Verbakel, Wilko; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (RapidArc [RA]), a novel approach allowing for rapid treatment delivery, for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma (VS). Methods and Materials: The RA plans were generated for a small (0.5 cm{sup 3}), intermediate (2.8 cm{sup 3}), and large (14.8 cm{sup 3}) VS. The prescription dose was 12.5 Gy to the encompassing 80% isodose. The RA plans were compared with conventional radiosurgery plans using both a single dynamic conformal arc (1DCA) and five noncoplanar dynamic conformal arcs (5DCA). Conformity indices (CI) and dose-volume histograms of critical organs were compared. The RA plan for the medium-sized VS was measured in a phantom using Gafchromic EBT films and compared with calculated dose distributions. Results: The RA planning was completed within 30 min in all cases, and calculated treatment delivery time (after patient setup) was 5 min vs. 20 min for 5DCA. A superior CI was achieved with RA, with a substantial decrease in low-dose irradiation of the normal brain achieved relative to 5DCA plans. Maximum doses to critical organs were similar for RA and 5DCA but were higher for 1DCA. Film measurements showed the differences between calculated and measured doses to be smaller than 1.5% in the high-dose area and smaller than 3% in the low-dose area. Conclusion: The RA plans consistently achieved a higher CI and decrease in areas of low-dose irradiation. This, together with shorter treatment delivery times, has led to RA replacing our conventional five-arc radiosurgery technique for VS.

  8. Radiation of long and high power arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressault, Y.; Bauchire, J. M.; Hong, D.; Rabat, H.; Riquel, G.; Sanchez, F.; Gleizes, A.

    2015-10-01

    The operators working on electrical installations of low, medium and high voltages can be accidentally exposed to short-circuit arcs ranging from a few kA to several tens of kA. To protect them from radiation, according to the exposure limits, we need to characterize the radiation emitted by the powerful arc. Therefore, we have developed a general experimental and numerical study in order to estimate the spectral irradiance received at a given distance from the arc. The experimental part was based on a very long arc (up to 2 m) with high ac current (between 4 and 40 kA rms, duration 100 ms) using 3 kinds of metallic contacts (copper, steel and aluminium). We measured the irradiance received 10m from the axis of the arc, and integrated on 4 spectral intervals corresponding to the UV, visible, IRA  +  B and IRC. The theoretical part consisted of calculating the radiance of isothermal plasmas in mixtures of air and metal vapour, integrated over the same spectral intervals as defined in the experiments. The comparison between the theoretical and experimental results has allowed the defining of three isothermal radiation sources whose combination leads to a spectral irradiation equivalent to the experimental one. Then the calculation allowed the deduction of the spectral description of the irradiance over all the wavelength range, between 200 nm and 20 μm. The final results indicate that the influence of metal is important in the visible and UVA ranges whereas the IR radiation is due to the air plasma and surrounding hot gas and fumes.

  9. The Plio Quaternary Ambon arc, Eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honthaas, Christian; Maury, René C.; Priadi, Bambang; Bellon, Hervé; Cotten, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    Plio-Quaternary lavas and granites have been collected from Ambon, Seram, Kelang, Haruku, Saparua, Ambelau and Banda Api islands, Eastern Indonesia. They include low-K calc-alkaline basalts, andesites, dacites and rhyolites and high-K calc-alkaline andesites, dacites, rhyolites and granites. All these rocks present the usual chemical characteristics of island-arc magmas. The high-K suite of Ambon is mostly represented by cordierite-bearing dacites (known as ambonites) and granites. Low-K and high-K magmas were emplaced in neighbouring islands or even in the same island (Ambon), often concomitantly, during two magmatic pulses at 5-3.2 Ma and 2.3-1 Ma, respectively. We propose that the low-K suite results from the evolution of basaltic magmas derived from mantle melting above the Western Irian Jaya plate which subducts along the Seram trough. Intermediate and acidic rocks of the high-K suite (e.g. ambonites) are thought to derive from low-K mafic magmas through massive assimilation of the Seram-Ambon continental crust, as originally proposed by Van Bemmelen in 1949. The timing of magmatic events and the geochemical features of the studied lavas are clearly different from those of the southern part of the Banda arc, in which the low-K suite is lacking. In agreement with earlier seismic evidence for two different slabs subducting beneath the Seram-Ambon continental block and beneath the southern Banda arc (from Wetar to Manuk), respectively, we propose to recognise a new Plio-Quaternary island arc, i.e. the Ambon arc, extending west-east from Ambelau to the Banda Archipelago active low-K volcanoes through Kelang, southwestern Seram, Ambon, Haruku and Saparua.

  10. Interaction of Komatiitic Liquids With Archean Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerrich, R.

    2006-12-01

    New, and compilations of, high precision data for 3.0 to 2.7 Ga komatiites of the Superior province show positive normalized anomalies of Nb relative to Th-La, and Nb/Th>8. These features are present in Al- undepleted (AUK) and Al-depleted komatiites(ADK) screened for minimal alteration and absence of crustal contamination. AUK possess positive Zr(Hf)/Sm anomalies, whereas ADK counterparts have negative anomalies. For AUK, positive (Nb,Zr)/REE anomalies are interpreted as oceanic lithosphere processed through a dehydration-dominated subduction zone and recycled into the mantle source of plumes. For ADK, HFSE/REE anomalies may reflect recycled oceanic lithosphere processed through a melt(TTG)-dominated subduction zone, melting of a plume with residual majorite garnet at >400 km, or some combination. Both AUK and ADK are associated with anhydrous intraplate plume-related magmas, based on field associations and Ti/V. A new compositional type of Neoarchean intraoceanic low-K (Ce) tholeiitic arc basalt has been identified. These are characterized by a spectrum of negative to positive (Nb,Ta,Zr,Hf)/REE anomalies, but systematic negative Ti/REE anomalies, where Nb antivaries with Zr/Nb, and Ni>300ppm. This type differs from low-K arc tholeiites of Archean and Phanerozoic age variably associated with andesites, dacites, rhyolites, and characterized by systematic negative anomalies of (Nb,Ta,P,Ti)/REE, with Ni<250ppm. The new type tholeiites are consistent with a model of earlier komatiitic liquids that stalled in, and fertilized, upper mantle. As an arc migrated through composite upper mantle, hydrous melting generated a basalt compositional spectrum from subdued AUK-like to classic arc-like HFSE/REE anomalies. Alternatively, contemporaneous AUK liquids leaked through a slab into the sub-arc mantle wedge, hybridizing with wedge peridotite melts.

  11. Theory of the arc discharge in air blast breakers

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, H.F.

    1980-08-01

    The complete set of equations obtaining in the arc's length element are given. The arc length is determined when the external circuit equations are closed by an expression for the arc inductance as a function of the radius and length, in addition to our relationships for the radius and voltage gradients.

  12. Unstable Behavior of Anodic Arc Discharge for Synthesis of Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Sophia; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2016-09-01

    Fast imaging and electrical current measurements reveal unstable behavior of the carbon arc discharge for synthesis of nanomaterials. The arc column and the arc attachment region to the anode move in a somewhat sporadic way with a characteristic time in a 10-3 sec range. The arc exhibits a negative differential resistance before the arc motion occurs. A physical mechanism is proposed based on the thermal processes in the arc plasma region interacting with the ablating anode which leads to the shift of the arc to a new anode region. According to the transient heat transfer analysis, the time needed to heat a new anode region is also in a 10-3 sec range. For a 0.6 cm diameter anode used in our experiments, this time yields a frequency of about 200-300 Hz, comparable to the measured frequency of the arc motion. The voltage and current measurements show oscillations with a similar characteristic frequency. The thermal model is indirectly supported by the measured negative differential resistance of the arc discharge during arc oscillations. The observed unstable behavior of the arc may be responsible for the mixing of the flow of nanoparticles during the synthesis of nanoparticles leading to poor selectivity typical for the arc synthesis. The work was supported by US DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  13. Arc-Jet Power Supply And Starting Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, Robert P.

    1988-01-01

    Power efficiency high, current regulated, and starting automatic. New circuit for starting arc jets and controlling them in steady operation capable of high power efficiency and constructed in lightweight form. Feedback control system keeps arc-jet current nearly constant, once arc struck by starting pulse. Circuit made of commercially available components. Design capable of high power efficiency.

  14. 29 CFR 1926.351 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arc welding and cutting. 1926.351 Section 1926.351 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Welding and Cutting § 1926.351 Arc welding and... for arc welding and cutting, and are of a capacity capable of safely handling the maximum...

  15. Dry and wet arc track propagation resistance testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Rex

    1995-01-01

    The wet arc-propagation resistance test for wire insulation provides an assessment of the ability of an insulation to prevent damage in an electrical environment. Results of an arc-propagation test may vary slightly due to the method of arc initiation; therefore a standard test method must be selected to evaluate the general arc-propagation resistance characteristics of an insulation. This test method initiates an arc by dripping salt water over pre-damaged wires which creates a conductive path between the wires. The power supply, test current, circuit resistances, and other variables are optimized for testing 20 guage wires. The use of other wire sizes may require modifications to the test variables. The dry arc-propagation resistance test for wire insulation also provides an assessment of the ability of an insulation to prevent damage in an electrical arc environment. In service, electrical arcs may originate form a variety of factors including insulation deterioration, faulty installation, and chafing. Here too, a standard test method must be selected to evaluate the general arc-propagation resistance characteristics of an insulation. This test method initiates an arc with a vibrating blade. The test also evaluates the ability of the insulation to prevent further arc-propagation when the electrical arc is re-energized.

  16. The investigation of carbon nitride films prepared at various arc currents by vacuum cathode arc method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhimin; Xia, Lifang

    2002-08-01

    The carbon nitride films have been prepared in the arc currents range of 20-60 A at the Ar/N2 atmosphere of 50/400 sccm by the vacuum cathode arc deposition method. The properties of the films were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoindentation. The N concentration showed a maximum of 35 at% at 20 A and decreased gradually with the arc currents. The films below 40 A consisted of linear polymeric-like component and sp2 graphitic cluster. With the increasing of the arc current from 20 to 40 A, the ID/IG rose and the photoluminescence (PL) fell gradually, which resulted from the development of the sp2 graphitic phase and the decrease of the polymeric-like phase. As a result, the CC bonds increased and sp3CN and sp2CN decreased. Above 40 A, with the increasing of arc currents, ID/IG fell and the PL increased gradually, which reflected the decreasing of sp2 graphitic phase and the modification of C and N atoms in sp2 cluster. The CC bonds and sp3CN fell and the sp2CN rose. The nanohardness of films showed increasing tendency with the arc currents. The variation of the relative ratio and the average energy of N-containing species and C-containing species at the atmosphere would be responsible for the change in the properties of films.

  17. Numerical investigation of the double-arcing phenomenon in a cutting arc torch

    SciTech Connect

    Mancinelli, B. R.; Minotti, F. O.; Kelly, H.; Prevosto, L.

    2014-07-14

    A numerical investigation of the double-arcing phenomenon in a cutting arc torch is reported. The dynamics of the double-arcing were simulated by using a two-dimensional model of the gas breakdown development in the space-charge layer contiguous to the nozzle of a cutting arc torch operated with oxygen. The kinetic scheme includes ionization of heavy particles by electron impact, electron attachment, electron detachment, electron–ion recombination, and ion–ion recombination. Complementary measurements during double-arcing phenomena were also conducted. A marked rise of the nozzle voltage was found. The numerical results showed that the dynamics of a cathode spot at the exit of the nozzle inner surface play a key role in the raising of the nozzle voltage, which in turn allows more electrons to return to the wall at the nozzle inlet. The return flow of electrons thus closes the current loop of the double-arcing. The increase in the (floating) nozzle voltage is due to the fact that the increased electron emission at the spot is mainly compensated by the displacement current (the ions do not play a relevant role due to its low-mobility) until that the stationary state is achieved and the electron return flow fully-compensates the electron emission at the spot. A fairly good agreement was found between the model and the experiment for a spot emission current growth rate of the order of 7 × 10{sup 4} A/s.

  18. Heat flow in the Lesser Antilles island arc and adjacent back arc Grenada basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manga, Michael; Hornbach, Matthew J.; Le Friant, Anne; Ishizuka, Osamu; Stroncik, Nicole; Adachi, Tatsuya; Aljahdali, Mohammed; Boudon, Georges; Breitkreuz, Christoph; Fraass, Andrew; Fujinawa, Akihiko; Hatfield, Robert; Jutzeler, Martin; Kataoka, Kyoko; Lafuerza, Sara; Maeno, Fukashi; Martinez-Colon, Michael; McCanta, Molly; Morgan, Sally; Palmer, Martin R.; Saito, Takeshi; Slagle, Angela; Stinton, Adam J.; Subramanyam, K. S. V.; Tamura, Yoshihiko; Talling, Peter J.; Villemant, Benoit; Wall-Palmer, Deborah; Wang, Fei

    2012-08-01

    Using temperature gradients measured in 10 holes at 6 sites, we generate the first high fidelity heat flow measurements from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program drill holes across the northern and central Lesser Antilles arc and back arc Grenada basin. The implied heat flow, after correcting for bathymetry and sedimentation effects, ranges from about 0.1 W/m2 on the crest of the arc, midway between the volcanic islands of Montserrat and Guadeloupe, to <0.07 W/m2 at distances >15 km from the crest in the back arc direction. Combined with previous measurements, we find that the magnitude and spatial pattern of heat flow are similar to those at continental arcs. The heat flow in the Grenada basin to the west of the active arc is 0.06 W/m2, a factor of 2 lower than that found in the previous and most recent study. There is no thermal evidence for significant shallow fluid advection at any of these sites. Present-day volcanism is confined to the region with the highest heat flow.

  19. Heat flow in the Lesser Antilles island arc and adjacent back arc Grenada basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manga, M.; Hornbach, M. J.; Le Friant, A.; Ishizuka, O.; Stroncik, N.

    2012-12-01

    Using temperature gradients measured in 10 holes at 6 sites, we generate the first high fidelity heat flow measurements from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program drill holes across the northern and central Lesser Antilles arc and back arc Grenada basin. The implied heat flow, after correcting for bathymetry and sedimentation effects, ranges from about 0.1 W/m2 on the crest of the arc, midway between the volcanic islands of Montserrat and Guadeloupe, to < 0.07 W/m2 at distances > 15 km from the crest in the back arc direction. Combined with previous measurements, we find that the magnitude and spatial pattern of heat flow are similar to those at continental arcs. The heat flow in the Grenada basin to the west of the active arc is 0.06 W/m2, a factor of 2 lower than that found in the previous and most recent study. There is no thermal evidence for significant shallow fluid advection at any of these sites. Present day volcanism is confined to the region with the highest heat flow.

  20. Heat flow in the Lesser Antilles island arc and adjacent back arc Grenada basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manga, Michael; Hornbach, Matt; Le Friant, Anne; Ishizuka, Osamu

    2014-05-01

    Using temperature gradients measured in 10 holes at 6 sites, we generate the first high fidelity heat flow measurements from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program drill holes across the northern and central Lesser Antilles arc and back arc Grenada basin. The implied heat flow, after correcting for bathymetry and sedimentation effects, ranges from about 0.1 W/m2 on the crest of the arc, midway between the volcanic islands of Montserrat and Guadeloupe, to < 0.07 W/m2 at distances > 15 km from the crest in the back arc direction. Combined with previous measurements, we find that the magnitude and spatial pattern of heat flow are similar to those at continental arcs. The heat flow in the Grenada basin to the west of the active arc is 0.06 W/m2, a factor of 2 lower than that found in the previous and most recent study. There is no thermal evidence for significant shallow fluid advection at any of these sites. Present day volcanism is confined to the region with the highest heat flow.

  1. Oceanic, island arc, and back-arc remnants into eastern Kamchatka accretionary complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorchuk, A.V.; Vishnevskaya, V.S.; Izvekov, I.N. )

    1990-06-01

    The Kamchatsky Mts. accretionary complex in the Eastern Kamchatka orogenic belt was studied for identification of the oceanic and suprasubduction components into accretionary wedges. That complex is divided into two tectonic units. The Lower unit is formed sedimentary and tectonic melanges containing arc-related components (Late Senonian volcaniclastics and boninitic gabbro) and oceanic fragments (Fe-Ti-tholeiites, ocean island basalts, and pelagic sediments of Valanginian to Turonian age). The Upper unit consists of ductile deformed oceanic cumulates from troctolites to Fe-Ti-gabbro, 151 to 172 Ma, which are intruded MORB-like diabases with suprasubduction characteristics, 122 to 141 Ma, and are overlain by basalts similar to latter. The Lower and Upper units are separated by a SW-dipping thrust, which is related by an ophiolitoclastic olistostrome of Late Campanian to Early Maestrichtian age. Both units are covered by Paleocene authoclastic deposits. They are all thrusted over the early Neogene island arc complex, 16 to 20 Ma. The Lower unit of the Kamchatsky Mys accretionary complex was originated in a shear zone between a Late Cretaceous island arc and an Early Cretaceous oceanic plate. The Upper unit represents a Jurassic oceanic remnant that formed a basement of Early Cretaceous back-arc or fore-arc basin. Both units were superposed in the latest Cretaceous. The Kamchatsky Mys accretionary complex was emplaced into the Eastern Kamchatka orogenic belt during late Neogene by collision of the early Neogene island arc.

  2. NASA GRC and MSFC Space-Plasma Arc Testing Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Vayner, Boris V.; Galofaro, Joel T,; Hillard, G. Barry; Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2005-01-01

    Tests of arcing and current collection in simulated space plasma conditions have been performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, for over 30 years and at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, for almost as long. During this period, proper test conditions for accurate and meaningful space simulation have been worked out, comparisons with actual space performance in spaceflight tests and with real operational satellites have been made, and NASA has achieved our own internal standards for test protocols. It is the purpose of this paper to communicate the test conditions, test procedures, and types of analysis used at NASA GRC and MSFC to the space environmental testing community at large, to help with international space-plasma arcing-testing standardization. To be discussed are: 1.Neutral pressures, neutral gases, and vacuum chamber sizes. 2. Electron and ion densities, plasma uniformity, sample sizes, and Debuy lengths. 3. Biasing samples versus self-generated voltages. Floating samples versus grounded. 4. Power supplies and current limits. Isolation of samples from power supplies during arcs. 5. Arc circuits. Capacitance during biased arc-threshold tests. Capacitance during sustained arcing and damage tests. Arc detection. Prevention sustained discharges during testing. 6. Real array or structure samples versus idealized samples. 7. Validity of LEO tests for GEO samples. 8. Extracting arc threshold information from arc rate versus voltage tests. 9. Snapover and current collection at positive sample bias. Glows at positive bias. Kapon (R) pyrolisis. 10. Trigger arc thresholds. Sustained arc thresholds. Paschen discharge during sustained arcing. 11. Testing for Paschen discharge threshold. Testing for dielectric breakdown thresholds. Testing for tether arcing. 12. Testing in very dense plasmas (ie thruster plumes). 13. Arc mitigation strategies. Charging mitigation strategies. Models. 14. Analysis of test results

  3. NOTE: Monte Carlo simulation of RapidArc radiotherapy delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, K.; Townson, R.; Zavgorodni, S.

    2008-10-01

    RapidArc radiotherapy technology from Varian Medical Systems is one of the most complex delivery systems currently available, and achieves an entire intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment in a single gantry rotation about the patient. Three dynamic parameters can be continuously varied to create IMRT dose distributions—the speed of rotation, beam shaping aperture and delivery dose rate. Modeling of RapidArc technology was incorporated within the existing Vancouver Island Monte Carlo (VIMC) system (Zavgorodni et al 2007 Radiother. Oncol. 84 S49, 2008 Proc. 16th Int. Conf. on Medical Physics). This process was named VIMC-Arc and has become an efficient framework for the verification of RapidArc treatment plans. VIMC-Arc is a fully automated system that constructs the Monte Carlo (MC) beam and patient models from a standard RapidArc DICOM dataset, simulates radiation transport, collects the resulting dose and converts the dose into DICOM format for import back into the treatment planning system (TPS). VIMC-Arc accommodates multiple arc IMRT deliveries and models gantry rotation as a series of segments with dynamic MLC motion within each segment. Several verification RapidArc plans were generated by the Eclipse TPS on a water-equivalent cylindrical phantom and re-calculated using VIMC-Arc. This includes one 'typical' RapidArc plan, one plan for dual arc treatment and one plan with 'avoidance' sectors. One RapidArc plan was also calculated on a DICOM patient CT dataset. Statistical uncertainty of MC simulations was kept within 1%. VIMC-Arc produced dose distributions that matched very closely to those calculated by the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) that is used in Eclipse. All plans also demonstrated better than 1% agreement of the dose at the isocenter. This demonstrates the capabilities of our new MC system to model all dosimetric features required for RapidArc dose calculations.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of RapidArc radiotherapy delivery.

    PubMed

    Bush, K; Townson, R; Zavgorodni, S

    2008-10-07

    RapidArc radiotherapy technology from Varian Medical Systems is one of the most complex delivery systems currently available, and achieves an entire intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment in a single gantry rotation about the patient. Three dynamic parameters can be continuously varied to create IMRT dose distributions-the speed of rotation, beam shaping aperture and delivery dose rate. Modeling of RapidArc technology was incorporated within the existing Vancouver Island Monte Carlo (VIMC) system (Zavgorodni et al 2007 Radiother. Oncol. 84 S49, 2008 Proc. 16th Int. Conf. on Medical Physics). This process was named VIMC-Arc and has become an efficient framework for the verification of RapidArc treatment plans. VIMC-Arc is a fully automated system that constructs the Monte Carlo (MC) beam and patient models from a standard RapidArc DICOM dataset, simulates radiation transport, collects the resulting dose and converts the dose into DICOM format for import back into the treatment planning system (TPS). VIMC-Arc accommodates multiple arc IMRT deliveries and models gantry rotation as a series of segments with dynamic MLC motion within each segment. Several verification RapidArc plans were generated by the Eclipse TPS on a water-equivalent cylindrical phantom and re-calculated using VIMC-Arc. This includes one 'typical' RapidArc plan, one plan for dual arc treatment and one plan with 'avoidance' sectors. One RapidArc plan was also calculated on a DICOM patient CT dataset. Statistical uncertainty of MC simulations was kept within 1%. VIMC-Arc produced dose distributions that matched very closely to those calculated by the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) that is used in Eclipse. All plans also demonstrated better than 1% agreement of the dose at the isocenter. This demonstrates the capabilities of our new MC system to model all dosimetric features required for RapidArc dose calculations.

  5. Shielded Metal Arc Welding and Carbon Arc Cutting--Air. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Eddie; Knapp, John

    This document contains the teacher and student texts and student workbook for a secondary-level course in shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and carbon arc cutting that consists of units on the following topics: SMAW safety; SMAW equipment, applications, and techniques; hardfacing; and carbon arc cutting--air. The teacher edition includes the…

  6. Driven Motion and Instability of an Atmospheric Pressure Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Max Karasik

    1999-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure arcs are used extensively in applications such as welding and metallurgy. However, comparatively little is known of the physics of such arcs in external magnetic fields and the mechanisms of the instabilities present. In order to address questions of equilibrium and stability of such arcs, an experimental arc furnace is constructed and operated in air with graphite cathode and steel anode at currents 100-250 A. The arc is diagnosed with a gated intensified camera and a collimated photodiode array, as well as fast voltage and current probes.

  7. Tangential electric fields in a drifting auroral arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau, A. W.; Whalen, B. A.; Creutzberg, F.

    1981-04-01

    Rocket-borne ion convection velocity and ground-based optical measurements in an early evening, equatorward drifting, NW-SE oriented auroral arc are reported. Measurements indicate a detailed correspondence between the normal component of the ion convection velocity (the component normal to the auroral arc) and the drift motion of the auroral arc. The two velocities were identical on a time scale of minutes, and correlated strongly with each other in smaller-scale temporal variations. The correspondence implies a near-zero tangential electric field in an auroral arc, in the frame of reference of the arc. The observations have serious consequences for several auroral theories.

  8. Effects of arcing due to spacecraft charging on spacecraft survival

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, A.; Sanders, N. L.; Ellen, J. M., Jr.; Inouye, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    A quantitative assessment of the hazard associated with spacecraft charging and arcing on spacecraft systems is presented. A literature survey on arc discharge thresholds and characteristics was done and gaps in the data and requirements for additional experiments were identified. Calculations of coupling of arc discharges into typical spacecraft systems were made and the susceptibility of typical spacecraft to disruption by arc discharges was investigated. Design guidelines and recommended practices to reduce or eliminate the threat of malfunction and failures due to spacecraft charging/arcing were summarized.

  9. Integrated primary flight display: the sky arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voulgaris, Theodore J.; Metalis, Sam A.; Mobley, R. S.

    1995-05-01

    Flight instrument interpretability has been a key piloting issue because it is directly related to operator performance and inversely related to operator error. To improve interpretability we have developed the Sky Arc, a new symbology initially developed for attitude control, particularly for a helmet-mounted display. It consists of an integrated set of graphic symbols which vary in a continuous, analog fashion with changing flight parameters. The Sky Arc currently integrates, pitch, roll, heading, air speed, and terrain avoidance. The display can be integrated into a head down display, a head up display, or a helmet mounted display. In this preliminary study the usability of the Sky Arc as an attitude indicator was compared to a conventional head-up display pitch ladder symbology. The test involved six test subject pilots and a medium-fidelity simulator. The pilots were asked to fully recover from a series of unusual attitude conditions that were presented on the simulator. The time taken to recover and the correctness of the recovery procedure served as the objective evaluation measures. A Likert-type rating scale and open-ended subject matter expert opinions served as the subjective measures of evaluation. To examine whether there was a relationship between usability of the attitude indicator and difficulty of the unusual attitude, the workload levels involved in performing the unusual attitude recoveries were grouped into three levels, low, medium, and high. At each workload level there were four conditions, for a total of 12 different conditions. Each pilot was asked to recovery twice from each condition, for a total of 24 unusual attitude recovery trials. The test trials were counterbalanced and displayed in a prearranged order. No differences due to difficulty of the unusual attitude were detected. Overall, the study revealed that the Sky Arc led to generally faster recoveries than did the standard display, as well as higher subjective preference ratings

  10. Cloud Arcs in the Western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Small cumulus clouds in this natural-color view from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer have formed a distinctive series of quasi-circular arcs. Clues regarding the formation of these arcs can be found by noting that larger clouds exist in the interior of each arc.

    The interior clouds are thicker and likely to be more convectively active than the other clouds, causing much of the air near the centers of the arcs to rise. This air spreads out horizontally in all directions as it rises and continues to spread out as it begins to sink back to the surface. This pushes any existing small cumulus clouds away from the central region of convection.

    As the air sinks, it also warms, preventing other small clouds from forming, so that the regions just inside the arcs are kept clear. At the arcs, the horizontal flow of sinking air is now quite weak and on meeting the undisturbed air it can rise again slightly -- possibly assisting in the formation of new small cumulus clouds. Although examples of the continuity of air, in which every rising air motion must be compensated by a sinking motion elsewhere, are very common, the degree of organization exhibited here is relatively rare, as the wind field at different altitudes usually disrupts such patterns. The degree of self organization of this cloud image, whereby three or four such circular events form a quasi-periodic pattern, probably also requires a relatively uncommon combination of wind, temperature and humidity conditions for it to occur.

    The image was acquired by MISR's nadir camera on March 11, 2002, and is centered west of the Marshall Islands. Enewetak Atoll is discernible through thin cloud as the turquoise band near the right-hand edge of the image.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously from pole to pole, and views almost the entire globe every 9 days. This image is a portion of the data acquired during Terra orbit 11863, and covers an area of about 380

  11. Series and parallel arc-fault circuit interrupter tests.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Fresquez, Armando J.; Gudgel, Bob; Meares, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    While the 2011 National Electrical Codeª (NEC) only requires series arc-fault protection, some arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) manufacturers are designing products to detect and mitigate both series and parallel arc-faults. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has extensively investigated the electrical differences of series and parallel arc-faults and has offered possible classification and mitigation solutions. As part of this effort, Sandia National Laboratories has collaborated with MidNite Solar to create and test a 24-string combiner box with an AFCI which detects, differentiates, and de-energizes series and parallel arc-faults. In the case of the MidNite AFCI prototype, series arc-faults are mitigated by opening the PV strings, whereas parallel arc-faults are mitigated by shorting the array. A range of different experimental series and parallel arc-fault tests with the MidNite combiner box were performed at the Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) at SNL in Albuquerque, NM. In all the tests, the prototype de-energized the arc-faults in the time period required by the arc-fault circuit interrupt testing standard, UL 1699B. The experimental tests confirm series and parallel arc-faults can be successfully mitigated with a combiner box-integrated solution.

  12. Characteristic of a triple-cathode vacuum arc plasma source.

    PubMed

    Xiang, W; Li, M; Chen, L

    2012-02-01

    In order to generate a better ion beam, a triple-cathode vacuum arc plasma source has been developed. Three plasma generators in the vacuum arc plasma source are equally located on a circle. Each generator initiated by means of a high-voltage breakdown between the cathode and the anode could be operated separately or simultaneously. The arc plasma expands from the cathode spot region in vacuum. In order to study the behaviors of expanding plasma plume generated in the vacuum arc plasma source, a Langmuir probe array is employed to measure the saturated ion current of the vacuum arc plasma source. The time-dependence profiles of the saturated current density of the triple vacuum arc plasma source operated separately and simultaneously are given. Furthermore, the plasma characteristic of this vacuum arc plasma source is also presented in the paper.

  13. Comparison of Arc Tracking Tests in Various Aerospace Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Hammoud, Ahmad; McCall, David

    1996-01-01

    Momentary short-circuit arcs between a polyimide insulated wire with defective insulation and another conductor may cause pyrolization of the insulation resulting in a conductive path capable of sustaining the arc. These sustained arcs may propagate along the wires or to neighboring wires leading to complete failure of the wire bundle. Wire insulation susceptibility to arc tracking may be dependent on its environment. Because all wire insulation types tested to date arc track, a test procedure has been developed to compare different insulation types with respect to their arc tracking susceptibility. This test procedure is presented along with a comparison of arc tracking in the following three environments: (1) Air at atmospheric pressure and 1 gravitational(g) force; (2) Vacuum (2.67 x 10(exp -3) Pa) and 1g, and (3) Air at atmospheric pressure and microgravity (less than 0.04g).

  14. Electric arc discharge damage to ion thruster grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, D. D.; Nakanishi, S.; Finke, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Arcs representative of those occurring between the grids of a mercury ion thruster were simulated. Parameters affecting an arc and the resulting damage were studied. The parameters investigated were arc energy, arc duration, and grid geometry. Arc attenuation techniques were also investigated. Potentially serious damage occurred at all energy levels representative of actual thruster operating conditions. Of the grids tested, the lowest open-area configuration sustained the least damage for given conditions. At a fixed energy level a long duration discharge caused greater damage than a short discharge. Attenuation of arc current using various impedances proved to be effective in reducing arc damage. Faults were also deliberately caused using chips of sputtered materials formed during the operation of an actual thruster. These faults were cleared with no serious grid damage resulting using the principles and methods developed in this study.

  15. SAR arcs we have seen: Evidence for variability in stable auroral red arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, Michael; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Wroten, Joei

    2016-01-01

    Since 1987, an all-sky airglow imaging system has operated from a site at the Millstone Hill/Haystack Observatory in Westford, MA. During the ~2.5 solar cycles from 1987 to 2014, many studies using all-sky images, in conjunction with incoherent scatter radar and satellite data, described subauroral, ionospheric disturbances observed during individual geomagnetic storms. The most prominent storm time optical feature from a subauroral site is a stable auroral red (SAR) arc. The standard use of a SAR arc's position is to locate the ionospheric footprint of the narrow plasmapause-ring current interaction region where heat conduction from the inner magnetosphere excites emission within the F layer trough. When mapped from an emission altitude of 400 km to the geomagnetic equatorial plane, SAR arcs from Millstone Hill give the location of the plasmapause at radial distances between 2 to 4.5 Earth radii. A total of 314 SAR arcs have been observed during the 27 years of imaging at Millstone Hill. We find no single morphology for all SAR arcs, but rather patterns that occasionally depart from stability in space and time. We have classified these into five categories: longevity, multiplicity, zonal structure, latitudinal inhomogeneity, and tilt with respect to geomagnetic coordinates. In each case, the implications for the inner magnetosphere sources that drive SAR arcs are explored. While individual SAR arc variability characteristics have been noted in previous studies, here we describe for the first time all five types from the same site—an aspect not yet addressed in either magnetosphere or ionosphere modeling studies.

  16. Common arc method for diffraction pattern orientation.

    PubMed

    Bortel, Gábor; Tegze, Miklós

    2011-11-01

    Very short pulses of X-ray free-electron lasers opened the way to obtaining diffraction signal from single particles beyond the radiation dose limit. For three-dimensional structure reconstruction many patterns are recorded in the object's unknown orientation. A method is described for the orientation of continuous diffraction patterns of non-periodic objects, utilizing intensity correlations in the curved intersections of the corresponding Ewald spheres, and hence named the common arc orientation method. The present implementation of the algorithm optionally takes into account Friedel's law, handles missing data and is capable of determining the point group of symmetric objects. Its performance is demonstrated on simulated diffraction data sets and verification of the results indicates a high orientation accuracy even at low signal levels. The common arc method fills a gap in the wide palette of orientation methods.

  17. Catalyst and doping methods for arc graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyunjin; Oh, InSeoup; Kang, JungHo; Park, Sungchan; Ku, Boncheol; Park, Min; Kwak, Soonjong; Khanra, Partha; Lee, Joong Hee; Jong Kim, Myung

    2014-11-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene synthesis with ˜g scale has been accomplished using the arc discharge method. The defects formed in the synthesis process were reduced by adding various metal catalysts, among which Bi2O3 was found to be the most effective. Adding dopants to the starting materials increased the electrical conductivity of the graphene product, and the doping concentration in graphene was tuned by adjusting the amount of nitrogen dopants. A step-wise technique to fabricate graphene thin films was developed, including dispersion, separation, and filtering processes. The arc graphene can also find its potential application in supercapacitors, taking advantage of its large surface area and improved conductivity by doping.

  18. High velocity pulsed wire-arc spray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas (Inventor); Massey, Dennis W. (Inventor); Kincaid, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Wire arc spraying using repetitively pulsed, high temperature gas jets, usually referred to as plasma jets, and generated by capillary discharges, substantially increases the velocity of atomized and entrained molten droplets. The quality of coatings produced is improved by increasing the velocity with which coating particles impact the coated surface. The effectiveness of wire-arc spraying is improved by replacing the usual atomizing air stream with a rapidly pulsed high velocity plasma jet. Pulsed power provides higher coating particle velocities leading to improved coatings. 50 micron aluminum droplets with velocities of 1500 m/s are produced. Pulsed plasma jet spraying provides the means to coat the insides of pipes, tubes, and engine block cylinders with very high velocity droplet impact.

  19. The Singing Arc:. the Oldest Memristor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginoux, Jean-Marc; Rossetto, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    On April 30th 2008, the journal Nature announced that the missing circuit element, postulated thirty-seven years before by Professor Leon O. Chua has been found. Thus, after the capacitor, the resistor and the inductor, the existence of a fourth fundamental element of electronic circuits called "memristor" was established. In order to point out the importance of such a discovery, the aim of this article is first to propose an overview of the manner with which the three others have been invented during the past centuries. Then, a comparison between the main properties of the singing arc, i.e. a forerunner device of the triode used in Wireless Telegraphy, and that of the memristor will enable to state that the singing arc could be considered as the oldest memristor.

  20. Hybrid Arc Cell Studies: Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Berg J. S.

    2012-09-28

    I report on the status, at the end of FY12, of the studies of an arc cell for a hybrid synchrotron accelerating from 375 GeV/c to 750 GeV/c in momentum. Garren produced a complete lattice that gives a good outline of the structure of a hybrid synchrotron lattice. It is, however, lacking in some details: it does not maintain a constant time of flight, it lacks chromaticity correction, its cell structure is not ideal for removing aberrations from chromaticity correction, and it probably needs more space between magnets. I have begun studying cell structures for the arc cells to optimize the lattice performance and cost. I present some preliminary results for two magnets per half cell. I then discuss difficulties encountered, some preliminary attempts at resolving them, and the future plans for this work.

  1. Electrical Safety and Arc Flash Protections

    SciTech Connect

    R. Camp

    2008-03-04

    Over the past four years, the Electrical Safety Program at PPPL has evolved in addressing changing regulatory requirements and lessons learned from accident events, particularly in regards to arc flash hazards and implementing NFPA 70E requirements. This presentation will discuss PPPL's approaches to the areas of electrical hazards evaluation, both shock and arc flash; engineered solutions for hazards mitigation such as remote racking of medium voltage breakers, operational changes for hazards avoidance, targeted personnel training and hazard appropriate personal protective equipment. Practical solutions for nominal voltage identification and zero voltage checks for lockout/tagout will also be covered. Finally, we will review the value of a comprehensive electrical drawing program, employee attitudes expressed as a personal safety work ethic, integrated safety management, and sustained management support for continuous safety improvement.

  2. Filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.

    1999-01-01

    A filtered cathodic arc deposition method and apparatus for the production of highly dense, wear resistant coatings which are free from macro particles. The filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus includes a cross shaped vacuum chamber which houses a cathode target having an evaporable surface comprised of the coating material, means for generating a stream of plasma, means for generating a transverse magnetic field, and a macro particle deflector. The transverse magnetic field bends the generated stream of plasma in the direction of a substrate. Macro particles are effectively filtered from the stream of plasma by traveling, unaffected by the transverse magnetic field, along the initial path of the plasma stream to a macro particle deflector. The macro particle deflector has a preformed surface which deflects macro particles away from the substrate.

  3. Shepherding model for Neptune's arc ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    A model to explain the confinement of the recently discovered incomplete arc ring around Neptune is developed. The ring may be azimuthally confined near a triangular (Trojan) point of an undiscovered satellite of Neptune. Radial diffusion of the ring particles can be prevented by shepherding torques of another moon. Two satellites with diameters of 100-200 km would be sufficient to confine the ring; such moons would be too small to have been photographed from earth.

  4. Mixing gasdynamic laser with nonequilibrium arc excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, G. G.; Kovshechnikov, V. B.; Rutberg, F. G.

    2016-05-01

    A mixing gasdynamic laser with nonuniform arc excitation is investigated using a model setup. Tentative analysis of the results indicates the appropriateness of using plasmatrons to improve the efficiency of mixing gasdynamic lasers by making carbon dioxide molecules vibrationally more nonuniform. In addition, a plasmatron serves as a preionization source both for a fast-flow gas-discharge laser and for a gasdynamic laser with combined pumping.

  5. Delivery quality assurance with ArcCHECK

    SciTech Connect

    Neilson, Christopher; Klein, Michael; Barnett, Rob; Yartsev, Slav

    2013-04-01

    Radiation therapy requires delivery quality assurance (DQA) to ensure that treatment is accurate and closely follows the plan. We report our experience with the ArcCHECK phantom and investigate its potential optimization for the DQA process. One-hundred seventy DQA plans from 84 patients were studied. Plans were classified into 2 groups: those with the target situated on the diodes of the ArcCHECK (D plans) and those with the target situated at the center (C plans). Gamma pass rates for 8 target sites were examined. The parameters used to analyze the data included 3%/3 mm with the Van Dyk percent difference criteria (VD) on, 3%/3 mm with the VD off, 2%/2 mm with the VD on, and x/3 mm with the VD on and the percentage dosimetric agreement “x” for diode plans adjusted. D plans typically displayed maximum planned dose (MPD) on the cylindrical surface containing ArcCHECK diodes than center plans, resulting in inflated gamma pass rates. When this was taken into account by adjusting the percentage dosimetric agreement, C plans outperformed D plans by an average of 3.5%. ArcCHECK can streamline the DQA process, consuming less time and resources than radiographic films. It is unnecessary to generate 2 DQA plans for each patient; a single center plan will suffice. Six of 8 target sites consistently displayed pass rates well within our acceptance criteria; the lesser performance of head and neck and spinal sites can be attributed to marginally lower doses and increased high gradient of plans.

  6. The Arc Cloud Complex. A Case Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    evaporationally-driven downdrafts. At the surface, The citations on the following pages follow the style of The Jounal gf the Atmospheric Sciences. 2...categories shown in Fig. 4. The wind direction behind the gust front is indicated by the arrows. A Type 2 pattern has a clear-cut, arc-shaped leading edge...500, 700, and 850 mb) from the NWS were reanalyzed by hand in order to seek indications -of the mesoscale features aloft which may have been

  7. Surface breakdown igniter for mercury arc devices

    DOEpatents

    Bayless, John R.

    1977-01-01

    Surface breakdown igniter comprises a semiconductor of medium resistivity which has the arc device cathode as one electrode and has an igniter anode electrode so that when voltage is applied between the electrodes a spark is generated when electrical breakdown occurs over the surface of the semiconductor. The geometry of the igniter anode and cathode electrodes causes the igniter discharge to be forced away from the semiconductor surface.

  8. HPF Implementation of ARC3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Yan, Jerry

    1999-01-01

    We present an HPF (High Performance Fortran) implementation of ARC3D code along with the profiling and performance data on SGI Origin 2000. Advantages and limitations of HPF as a parallel programming language for CFD applications are discussed. For achieving good performance results we used the data distributions optimized for implementation of implicit and explicit operators of the solver and boundary conditions. We compare the results with MPI and directive based implementations.

  9. Multi-colour detection of gravitational arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maturi, Matteo; Mizera, Sebastian; Seidel, Gregor

    2014-07-01

    Strong gravitational lensing provides fundamental insights into the understanding of the dark matter distribution in massive galaxies, galaxy clusters, and the background cosmology. Despite their importance, few gravitational arcs have been discovered so far. The urge for more complete, large samples and unbiased methods of selecting candidates increases. Several methods for the automatic detection of arcs have been proposed in the literature, but large amounts of spurious detections retrieved by these methods force observers to visually inspect thousands of candidates per square degree to clean the samples. This approach is largely subjective and requires a huge amount of checking by eye, especially considering the actual and upcoming wide-field surveys, which will cover thousands of square degrees. In this paper we study the statistical properties of the colours of gravitational arcs detected in the 37 deg2 of the CFHTLS-Archive-Research Survey (CARS). Most of them lie in a relatively small region of the (g' - r', r' - i') colour-colour diagram. To explain this property, we provide a model that includes the lensing optical depth expected in a ΛCDM cosmology that, in combination with the sources' redshift distribution of a given survey, in our case CARS, peaks for sources at redshift z ~ 1. By furthermore modelling the colours derived from the spectral energy distribution of the galaxies that dominate the population at that redshift, the model reproduces the observed colours well. By taking advantage of the colour selection suggested by both data and model, we automatically detected 24 objects out of 90 detected by eye checking. Compared with the single-band arcfinder, this multi-band filtering returns a sample complete to 83% and a contamination reduced by a factor of ~6.5. New gravitational arc candidates are also proposed.

  10. Effect of cathode model on arc attachment for short high-intensity arc on a refractory cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javidi Shirvan, Alireza; Choquet, Isabelle; Nilsson, Håkan

    2016-12-01

    Various models coupling the refractory cathode, the cathode sheath and the arc at atmospheric pressure exist. They assume a homogeneous cathode with a uniform physical state, and differ by the cathode layer and the plasma arc model. However even the most advanced of these models still fail in predicting the extent of the arc attachment when applied to short high-intensity arcs such as gas tungsten arcs. Cathodes operating in these conditions present a non-uniform physical state. A model taking into account the first level of this non-homogeneity is proposed based on physical criteria. Calculations are done for 5 mm argon arcs with a thoriated tungsten cathode. The results obtained show that radiative heating and cooling of the cathode surface are of the same order. They also show that cathode inhomogeneity has a significant effect on the arc attachment, the arc temperature and pressure. When changing the arc current (100 A, 200 A) the proposed model allows predicting trends observed experimentally that cannot be captured by the homogeneous cathode model unless restricting a priori the size of the arc attachment. The cathode physics is thus an important element to include to obtain a comprehensive and predictive arc model.

  11. Optical diagnostics of a gliding arc.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z W; Zhu, J J; Li, Z S; Aldén, M; Leipold, F; Salewski, M; Kusano, Y

    2013-03-11

    Dynamic processes in a gliding arc plasma generated between two diverging electrodes in ambient air driven by 31.25 kHz AC voltage were investigated using spatially and temporally resolved optical techniques. The life cycles of the gliding arc were tracked in fast movies using a high-speed camera with framing rates of tens to hundreds of kHz, showing details of ignition, motion, pulsation, short-cutting, and extinction of the plasma column. The ignition of a new discharge occurs before the extinction of the previous discharge. The developed, moving plasma column often short-cuts its current path triggered by Townsend breakdown between the two legs of the gliding arc. The emission from the plasma column is shown to pulsate at a frequency of 62.5 kHz, i.e., twice the frequency of the AC power supply. Optical emission spectra of the plasma radiation show the presence of excited N2, NO and OH radicals generated in the plasma and the dependence of their relative intensities on both the distance relative to the electrodes and the phase of the driving AC power. Planar laser-induced fluorescence of the ground-state OH radicals shows high intensity outside the plasma column rather than in the center suggesting that ground-state OH is not formed in the plasma column but in its vicinity.

  12. Arc melter demonstration baseline test results

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Anderson, G.L.; Oden, L.L.; O`Connor, W.K.; Turner, P.C.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the test results and evaluation for the Phase 1 (baseline) arc melter vitrification test series conducted for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration program (BWID). Phase 1 tests were conducted on surrogate mixtures of as-incinerated wastes and soil. Some buried wastes, soils, and stored wastes at the INEL and other DOE sites, are contaminated with transuranic (TRU) radionuclides and hazardous organics and metals. The high temperature environment in an electric arc furnace may be used to process these wastes to produce materials suitable for final disposal. An electric arc furnace system can treat heterogeneous wastes and contaminated soils by (a) dissolving and retaining TRU elements and selected toxic metals as oxides in the slag phase, (b) destroying organic materials by dissociation, pyrolyzation, and combustion, and (c) capturing separated volatilized metals in the offgas system for further treatment. Structural metals in the waste may be melted and tapped separately for recycle or disposal, or these metals may be oxidized and dissolved into the slag. The molten slag, after cooling, will provide a glass/ceramic final waste form that is homogeneous, highly nonleachable, and extremely durable. These features make this waste form suitable for immobilization of TRU radionuclides and toxic metals for geologic timeframes. Further, the volume of contaminated wastes and soils will be substantially reduced in the process.

  13. Finite element analysis of arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, E.

    1980-01-01

    Analytical models of the gas tungsten-arc welding process into finite element computer programs provides a valuable tool for determining the welding thermal cycle, weld bead shape, and penetration characteristics, as well as for evaluating the stresses and distortions generated as a result of the temperature transients. The analysis procedures are applicable to planar or axisymmetric welds with arbitrary cross-sectional geometries, under quasistationary conditions. The method used for determining temperatures features an iteration procedure to accurately account for the latent heat absorbed during melting and liberated during solidification of the weld. By simulating the heat input from the arc to the workpiece by a normal distribution function, temperature transients, weld bead dimensions, and cooling rates are evaluated as functions of both the magnitude and distribution of heat input, weldment geometry, and weld speed (or duration of heating for stationary arcs). Modeling of the welding thermal cycle is a prerequisite to analytical treatments of metallurgical changes in weld metal and heat-affected zone material, residual stresses and distortions, and weld defects. A quasistationary formulation for moving welds enables temperatures to be calculated using a two-dimensional heat conduction computer program. The present limitation of high welding speed can, however, be relaxed without altering the two-dimensional framework of the procedure.

  14. Modify surfaces with ions and arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, B.A. . Lewis Research Center)

    1993-12-01

    Ions, arcs, and atomic-oxygen techniques have been developed at NASA to texture metals, polymers, and biomaterials for a range of medical and industrial applications. NASA originally conducted research in the field of electron bombardment because the technology involves generation of high-velocity ions, which have the potential to produce much higher propellant exhaust velocities for spacecraft than chemical propulsion. As a consequence, considerable data were collected about the effects of ion beams on a wide range of materials. Based on this information, researchers designed specialized surface modification techniques such as ion beam sputter texturing, etching, and simultaneous deposition and etching. Arc-texturing technology was developed as a result of research on high-thermal-emittance radiators. In this process, an electric arc is formed between a carbon or silicon-carbide electrode and a moving metal surface, resulting in durable, microscopically rough surfaces that emit heat more efficiently than coated materials. Atomic-oxygen texturing is a by-product of studies about the effects of atomic oxygen on the surfaces of spacecraft. The purpose of the original research was to find coatings that could withstand atomic-oxygen attack, but it evolved into deliberate bombardment of polymeric materials to increase thermal emittance or reduce co-efficient of friction.

  15. Plasma magmavication of soils by nontransferred arc

    SciTech Connect

    Mayne, P.W.; Burns, S.E.; Circeo, L.J.

    2000-05-01

    Electrical plasma arcs create very high temperatures (T > 4,000 C) that can be specifically directed for the in-place melting of soils. This overview presents a summary of the basic features and capabilities of plasma torches having a nontransferred type of arc for the in situ vitrification of soils. Laboratory chamber experiments using 100 kW and 240 kW plasma systems and full-scale field trials using a 1 MW portable system have successfully melted a variety of soil types, including sands, silts, and clays. Within five minutes' exposure to the arc, a core region of magma forms within the soil matrix that expands radially outward and upward as the torch is pulled out vertically. Several days afterwards, the molten zone cools to form an artificial igneous rock similar to obsidian, basalt, or granite. The size of the vitrified mass is proportional to the electrical power demand. The plasma torch has a configuration similar to a flamethrower and will therefore be amenable to placement down boreholes for purposes of in situ ground modification and subsurface remediation.

  16. Geothermal resource potential of Cascade volcanic arc

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, G.R.

    1987-08-01

    The central and southern cascade volcanic arc has the following features that suggest a high potential for geothermal resources: (1) extensive Quaternary volcanism with some silicic to intermediate volcanoes, (2) hundreds of square kilometers with regional background heat flow in excess of 100 mW/m/sup 2/, (3) shallow (4-9 km) calculated depth to Curie point in the same areas that have heat flow in excess of 100 mW/m/sup 2/, (4) a thick pile of volcanic rock with moderate to low thermal conductivity, (5) hot springs with minimum reservoir temperatures of 174/sup 0/-186/sup 0/C (from the anhydrite geothermometer of Mariner, 1985), and (6) fault zones for fracture permeability. These features are the result of interactions between the North American plate (NAP), the Pacific plate (PP), and the subducted Gorda, Juan de Fuca, and Explorer plates (GJEP). Interactions between the NAP and the PP produce north-south compression and east-west extension, causing extensive development of north-south normal faults and partial melting episodes in upper mantle. Northeast-southwest convergence between the NAP and the GJEP produce subduction-related magmas and crustal deformation from northeast-southwest compression. NAP-GJEP interactions dominate in the northern part of the arc, whereas NAP-PP and NAP-GJEP interactions have combined in the central and southern part of the arc to produce rates of magmatism and heat flow higher than in the north.

  17. Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vivekanandan, Nagarajan; Sriram, Padmanaban; Syam Kumar, S.A.; Bhuvaneswari, Narayanan; Saranya, Kamalakannan

    2012-04-01

    A treatment planning study was performed to evaluate the performance of volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc (RA) against 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques for esophageal cancer. Computed tomgraphy scans of 10 patients were included in the study. 3D-CRT, 4-field IMRT, and single-arc and double-arc RA plans were generated with the aim to spare organs at risk (OAR) and healthy tissue while enforcing highly conformal target coverage. The planning objective was to deliver 54 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in 30 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on target conformity and dose-volume histograms of organs at risk (lung, spinal cord, and heart). The monitor unit (MU) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated to measure the treatment efficiency. The IMRT plan improves target conformity and spares OAR when compared with 3D-CRT. Target conformity improved with RA plans compared with IMRT. The mean lung dose was similar in all techniques. However, RA plans showed a reduction in the volume of the lung irradiated at V{sub 20Gy} and V{sub 30Gy} dose levels (range, 4.62-17.98%) compared with IMRT plans. The mean dose and D{sub 35%} of heart for the RA plans were better than the IMRT by 0.5-5.8%. Mean V{sub 10Gy} and integral dose to healthy tissue were almost similar in all techniques. But RA plans resulted in a reduced low-level dose bath (15-20 Gy) in the range of 14-16% compared with IMRT plans. The average MU needed to deliver the prescribed dose by RA technique was reduced by 20-25% compared with IMRT technique. The preliminary study on RA for esophageal cancers showed improvements in sparing OAR and healthy tissue with reduced beam-on time, whereas only double-arc RA offered improved target coverage compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT plans.

  18. Characteristics of Atmospheric Pressure Rotating Gliding Arc Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Fengsen; Tu, Xin; Bo, Zheng; Cen, Kefa; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a novel direct current (DC) atmospheric pressure rotating gliding arc (RGA) plasma reactor has been developed for plasma-assisted chemical reactions. The influence of the gas composition and the gas flow rate on the arc dynamic behaviour and the formation of reactive species in the N2 and air gliding arc plasmas has been investigated by means of electrical signals, high speed photography, and optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics. Compared to conventional gliding arc reactors with knife-shaped electrodes which generally require a high flow rate (e.g., 10-20 L/min) to maintain a long arc length and reasonable plasma discharge zone, in this RGA system, a lower gas flow rate (e.g., 2 L/min) can also generate a larger effective plasma reaction zone with a longer arc length for chemical reactions. Two different motion patterns can be clearly observed in the N2 and air RGA plasmas. The time-resolved arc voltage signals show that three different arc dynamic modes, the arc restrike mode, takeover mode, and combined modes, can be clearly identified in the RGA plasmas. The occurrence of different motion and arc dynamic modes is strongly dependent on the composition of the working gas and gas flow rate. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51576174), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120101110099) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. 2015FZA4011)

  19. Arc Jet Facility Test Condition Predictions Using the ADSI Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant; Prabhu, Dinesh; Terrazas-Salinas, Imelda

    2015-01-01

    The Aerothermal Design Space Interpolation (ADSI) tool is used to interpolate databases of previously computed computational fluid dynamic solutions for test articles in a NASA Ames arc jet facility. The arc jet databases are generated using an Navier-Stokes flow solver using previously determined best practices. The arc jet mass flow rates and arc currents used to discretize the database are chosen to span the operating conditions possible in the arc jet, and are based on previous arc jet experimental conditions where possible. The ADSI code is a database interpolation, manipulation, and examination tool that can be used to estimate the stagnation point pressure and heating rate for user-specified values of arc jet mass flow rate and arc current. The interpolation is performed in the other direction (predicting mass flow and current to achieve a desired stagnation point pressure and heating rate). ADSI is also used to generate 2-D response surfaces of stagnation point pressure and heating rate as a function of mass flow rate and arc current (or vice versa). Arc jet test data is used to assess the predictive capability of the ADSI code.

  20. Numerical modeling of volcanic arc development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, T.; Gorczyk, W.; Nikolaeva, K.

    2007-05-01

    We have created a new coupled geochemical-petrological-thermomechanical numerical model of subduction associated with volcanic arc development. The model includes spontaneous slab bending, subducted crust dehydration, aqueous fluid transport, mantle wedge melting and melt extraction resulting in crustal growth. Two major volcanic arc settings are modeled so far: active continental margins, and intraoceanic subduction. In case of Pacific-type continental margin two fundamentally different regimes of melt productivity are observed in numerical experiments which are in line with natural observations: (1) During continuous convergence with coupled plates highest amounts of melts are formed immediately after the initiation of subduction and then decrease rapidly with time due to the steepening of the slab inclination angle precluding formation of partially molten mantle wedge plumes; (2) During subduction associated with slab delamination and trench retreat resulting in the formation of a pronounced back arc basin with a spreading center in the middle melt production increases with time due to shallowing/stabilization of slab inclination associated with upward asthenospheric mantle flow toward the extension region facilitating propagation of hydrous partially molten plumes from the slab. In case of spontaneous nucleation of retreating oceanic subduction two scenarios of tecono-magmatic evolution are distinguished: (1) decay and, ultimately, the cessation of subduction and related magmatic activity, (2) increase in subduction rate (to up to ~12 cm/yr) and stabilization of subduction and magmatic arc growth. In the first case the duration of subduction correlates positively with the intensity of melt extraction: the period of continued subduction increases from 15,4 Myrs to 47,6 Myrs with the increase of melt extraction threshold from 1% to 9%. In scenario (1) the magmatic arc crust includes large amounts of rocks formed by melting of subducted crust atop the thermally

  1. Unraveling the diversity in arc volcanic eruption styles: Examples from the Aleutian volcanic arc, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Jessica F.

    2016-11-01

    The magmatic systems feeding arc volcanoes are complex, leading to a rich diversity in eruptive products and eruption styles. This review focuses on examples from the Aleutian subduction zone, encompassed within the state of Alaska, USA because it exhibits a rich diversity in arc structure and tectonics, sediment and volatile influx feeding primary magma generation, crustal magma differentiation processes, with the resulting outcome the production of a complete range in eruption styles from its diverse volcanic centers. Recent and ongoing investigations along the arc reveal controls on magma production that result in diversity of eruptive products, from crystal-rich intermediate andesites to phenocryst-poor, melt-rich silicic and mafic magmas and a spectrum in between. Thus, deep to shallow crustal "processing" of arc magmas likely greatly influences the physical and chemical character of the magmas as they accumulate in the shallow crust, the flow physics of the magmas as they rise in the conduit, and eruption style through differences in degassing kinetics of the bubbly magmas. The broad spectrum of resulting eruption styles thus depends on the bulk magma composition, melt phase composition, and the bubble and crystal content (phenocrysts and/or microlites) of the magma. Those fundamental magma characteristics are in turn largely determined by the crustal differentiation pathway traversed by the magma as a function of tectonic location in the arc, and/or the water content and composition of the primary magmas. The physical and chemical character of the magma, set by the arc differentiation pathway, as it ascends towards eruption determines the kinetic efficiency of degassing versus the increasing internal gas bubble overpressure. The balance between degassing rate and the rate at which gas bubble overpressure builds then determines the conditions of fragmentation, and ultimately eruption intensity.

  2. Back-arc with frontal-arc component origin of Triassic Karmutsen basalt, British Columbia, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, F.; Sutherland, Brown A.; Budahn, J.R.; Plafker, G.

    1989-01-01

    The largely basaltic, ???4.5-6.2-km-thick, Middle to Upper Triassic Karmutsen Formation is a prominent part of the Wrangellian sequence. Twelve analyses of major and minor elements of representative samples of pillowed and massive basalt flows and sills from Queen Charlotte and Vancouver Islands are ferrotholeiites that show a range of 10.2-3.8% MgO (as normalized, H2O- and CO2-free) and related increases in TiO2 (1.0-2.5%), Zr (43-147 ppm) and Nb (5-16 ppm). Other elemental abundances are not related simply to MgO: distinct groupings are evident in Al2O3, Na2O and Cr, but considerable scatter is present in FeO* (FeO + 0.9Fe2O3) and CaO. Some of the variation is attributed to alteration during low-rank metamorphism or by seawater - including variation of Ba, Rb, Sr and Cu, but high-field-strength elements (Sc, Ti, Y, Zr and Nb) as well as Cr, Ni, Cu and rare-earth elements (REE's) were relatively immobile. REE's show chondrite-normalized patterns ranging from light-REE depleted to moderately light-REE enriched. On eleven discriminant plots these analyses fall largely into or across fields of within-plate basalt (WIP), normal or enriched mid-ocean-ridge tholeiite (MORB) and island-arc tholeiite (IAT). Karmutsen basalts are chemically identical to the stratigraphically equivalent Nikolai Greenstone of southern Alaska and Yukon Territory. These data and the fact that the Karmutsen rests on Sicker Group island-arc rocks of Paleozoic age suggest to us that: 1. (1) the basal arc, after minor carbonate-shale deposition, underwent near-axial back-arc rifting (as, e.g., the Mariana arc rifted at different times); 2. (2) the Karmutsen basalts were erupted along this rift or basin as "arc-rift" tholeiitite; and 3. (3) after subsequent deposition of carbonates and other rocks, and Jurassic magmatism, a large fragment of this basalt-sediment-covered island arc was accreted to North America as Wrangellia. The major- and minor-elemental abundances of Karmutsen basalt is modeled

  3. Optical arc sensor using energy harvesting power source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyoo Nam; Rho, Hee Hyuk

    2016-06-01

    Wireless sensors without external power supply gained considerable attention due to convenience both in installation and operation. Optical arc detecting sensor equipping with self sustaining power supply using energy harvesting method was investigated. Continuous energy harvesting method was attempted using thermoelectric generator to supply standby power in micro ampere scale and operating power in mA scale. Peltier module with heat-sink was used for high efficiency electricity generator. Optical arc detecting sensor with hybrid filter showed insensitivity to fluorescent and incandescent lamps under simulated distribution panel condition. Signal processing using integrating function showed selective arc discharge detection capability to different arc energy levels, with a resolution below 17J energy difference, unaffected by bursting arc waveform. The sensor showed possibility for application to arc discharge detecting sensor in power distribution panel. Also experiment with proposed continuous energy harvesting method using thermoelectric power showed possibility as a self sustainable power source of remote sensor.

  4. Arc Flash Boundary Calculations Using Computer Software Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, M.D.

    2005-01-07

    Arc Flash Protection boundary calculations have become easier to perform with the availability of personal computer software. These programs incorporate arc flash protection boundary formulas for different voltage and current levels, calculate the bolted fault current at each bus, and use built in time-current coordination curves to determine the clearing time of protective devices in the system. Results of the arc flash protection boundary calculations can be presented in several different forms--as an annotation to the one-line diagram, as a table of arc flash protection boundary distances, and as printed placards to be attached to the appropriate equipment. Basic arc flash protection boundary principles are presented in this paper along with several helpful suggestions for performing arc flash protection boundary calculations.

  5. Computational Modeling of Arc-Slag Interaction in DC Furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Quinn G.

    2017-02-01

    The plasma arc is central to the operation of the direct-current arc furnace, a unit operation commonly used in high-temperature processing of both primary ores and recycled metals. The arc is a high-velocity, high-temperature jet of ionized gas created and sustained by interactions among the thermal, momentum, and electromagnetic fields resulting from the passage of electric current. In addition to being the primary source of thermal energy, the arc jet also couples mechanically with the bath of molten process material within the furnace, causing substantial splashing and stirring in the region in which it impinges. The arc's interaction with the molten bath inside the furnace is studied through use of a multiphase, multiphysics computational magnetohydrodynamic model developed in the OpenFOAM® framework. Results from the computational solver are compared with empirical correlations that account for arc-slag interaction effects.

  6. Regulation of p53 tetramerization and nuclear export by ARC

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Roger S.-Y.; Nam, Young-Jae; Ostreicher, Marc Jason; Metzl, Mark D.; Whelan, Russell S.; Peng, Chang-Fu; Ashton, Anthony W.; Fu, Weimin; Mani, Kartik; Chin, Suet-Feung; Provenzano, Elena; Ellis, Ian; Figg, Nichola; Pinder, Sarah; Bennett, Martin R.; Caldas, Carlos; Kitsis, Richard N.

    2007-01-01

    Inactivation of the transcription factor p53 is central to carcinogenesis. Yet only approximately one-half of cancers have p53 loss-of-function mutations. Here, we demonstrate a mechanism for p53 inactivation by apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC), a protein induced in multiple cancer cells. The direct binding in the nucleus of ARC to the p53 tetramerization domain inhibits p53 tetramerization. This exposes a nuclear export signal in p53, triggering Crm1-dependent relocation of p53 to the cytoplasm. Knockdown of endogenous ARC in breast cancer cells results in spontaneous tetramerization of endogenous p53, accumulation of p53 in the nucleus, and activation of endogenous p53 target genes. In primary human breast cancers with nuclear ARC, p53 is almost always WT. Conversely, nearly all breast cancers with mutant p53 lack nuclear ARC. We conclude that nuclear ARC is induced in cancer cells and negatively regulates p53. PMID:18087040

  7. Computational Modeling of Arc-Slag Interaction in DC Furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Quinn G.

    2016-11-01

    The plasma arc is central to the operation of the direct-current arc furnace, a unit operation commonly used in high-temperature processing of both primary ores and recycled metals. The arc is a high-velocity, high-temperature jet of ionized gas created and sustained by interactions among the thermal, momentum, and electromagnetic fields resulting from the passage of electric current. In addition to being the primary source of thermal energy, the arc jet also couples mechanically with the bath of molten process material within the furnace, causing substantial splashing and stirring in the region in which it impinges. The arc's interaction with the molten bath inside the furnace is studied through use of a multiphase, multiphysics computational magnetohydrodynamic model developed in the OpenFOAM® framework. Results from the computational solver are compared with empirical correlations that account for arc-slag interaction effects.

  8. The Detection and Statistics of Giant Arcs behind CLASH Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bingxiao; Postman, Marc; Meneghetti, Massimo; Seitz, Stella; Zitrin, Adi; Merten, Julian; Maoz, Dani; Frye, Brenda; Umetsu, Keiichi; Zheng, Wei; Bradley, Larry; Vega, Jesus; Koekemoer, Anton

    2016-02-01

    We developed an algorithm to find and characterize gravitationally lensed galaxies (arcs) to perform a comparison of the observed and simulated arc abundance. Observations are from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Simulated CLASH images are created using the MOKA package and also clusters selected from the high-resolution, hydrodynamical simulations, MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH sample. The algorithm's arc elongation accuracy, completeness, and false positive rate are determined and used to compute an estimate of the true arc abundance. We derive a lensing efficiency of 4 ± 1 arcs (with length ≥6″ and length-to-width ratio ≥7) per cluster for the X-ray-selected CLASH sample, 4 ± 1 arcs per cluster for the MOKA-simulated sample, and 3 ± 1 arcs per cluster for the MUSIC-simulated sample. The observed and simulated arc statistics are in full agreement. We measure the photometric redshifts of all detected arcs and find a median redshift zs = 1.9 with 33% of the detected arcs having zs > 3. We find that the arc abundance does not depend strongly on the source redshift distribution but is sensitive to the mass distribution of the dark matter halos (e.g., the c-M relation). Our results show that consistency between the observed and simulated distributions of lensed arc sizes and axial ratios can be achieved by using cluster-lensing simulations that are carefully matched to the selection criteria used in the observations.

  9. Occultation detection of a Neptunian ring-like arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Brahic, A.; Sicardy, B.; Roques, F.; Elicer, L.-R.; Vilas, F.

    1986-01-01

    The apparent closest approach of the star SAO186001 to Neptune was observed photoelectrically on July 22, 1984 at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. A 32-percent signal drop, lasting about 1.2 s, was probably caused by a partially transparent arc of material at a distance of 67,000 km from Neptune. Neptune's arc(s) do not vary smoothly with azimuth, unlike the rings of other Jovian planets.

  10. Liquid-Arc/Spark-Excitation Atomic-Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlagen, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    Constituents of solutions identified in situ. Liquid-arc/spark-excitation atomic-emission spectroscopy (LAES) is experimental variant of atomic-emission spectroscopy in which electric arc or spark established in liquid and spectrum of light from arc or spark analyzed to identify chemical elements in liquid. Observations encourage development of LAES equipment for online monitoring of process streams in such industries as metal plating, electronics, and steel, and for online monitoring of streams affecting environment.

  11. Physics of arcing, and implications to sputter deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2003-12-15

    Arcing is a well-known, unwanted discharge regime observed on the surface of sputtering targets. The discharge voltage breaks down to less than 50 V while the current jumps to elevated levels. Arcing is unwanted because it prevents uniform deposition and creates particulates. The issue of arcing has been dealt with by target surface conditioning and by using modern power supplies that have arc suppression incorporated. With increasing quality requirements in terms of uniformity of coatings, and absence of particulates, especially for electrochromic and other advanced coatings applications, the issue of arcing warrants a closer examination with the goal to find other, physics-based, and hopefully better approaches of arcing prevention. From a physics point of view, the onset of arcing is nothing else than the transition of the discharge to a cathodic arc mode, which is characterized by the ignition of non-stationary arc spots. Arc spots operate by a sequence of microexplosions, enabling explosive electron emission, as opposed to secondary electron emission. Arc spots and their fragments have a size distribution in the micrometer and sub-micrometer range, and a characteristic time distribution that has components shorter than microseconds. Understanding the ignition conditions of arc spots are of central physical interest. Spot ignition is associated with electric field enhancement, which can be of geometric nature (roughness,particles), or chemical nature (e.g. oxide formation) and related local accumulation of surface charge. Therefore, it is clear that these issues are of particular concern when operating with high-density plasmas, such as in high-power pulsed sputtering, and when using reactive sputter gases.

  12. Analysis of optical perturbations of the SLC arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.; Sands, M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper establishes the analytical framework in solving optical pertubations in a transport line in general and the SLC Arc specifically. The Formulation presented here is applicable to any transport system in a straightforward way. The equations of motion of a perturbed betatron function and dispersion function are presented. Sources of field errors for the SLC Arc system are discussed. Magnitudes of pertubations to the optical functions for the SLC Arc are estimated. (JDH)

  13. THE DETECTION AND STATISTICS OF GIANT ARCS BEHIND CLASH CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Bingxiao; Zheng, Wei; Postman, Marc; Bradley, Larry; Meneghetti, Massimo; Koekemoer, Anton; Seitz, Stella; Zitrin, Adi; Merten, Julian; Maoz, Dani; Frye, Brenda; Vega, Jesus

    2016-02-01

    We developed an algorithm to find and characterize gravitationally lensed galaxies (arcs) to perform a comparison of the observed and simulated arc abundance. Observations are from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Simulated CLASH images are created using the MOKA package and also clusters selected from the high-resolution, hydrodynamical simulations, MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH sample. The algorithm's arc elongation accuracy, completeness, and false positive rate are determined and used to compute an estimate of the true arc abundance. We derive a lensing efficiency of 4 ± 1 arcs (with length ≥6″ and length-to-width ratio ≥7) per cluster for the X-ray-selected CLASH sample, 4 ± 1 arcs per cluster for the MOKA-simulated sample, and 3 ± 1 arcs per cluster for the MUSIC-simulated sample. The observed and simulated arc statistics are in full agreement. We measure the photometric redshifts of all detected arcs and find a median redshift z{sub s} = 1.9 with 33% of the detected arcs having z{sub s} > 3. We find that the arc abundance does not depend strongly on the source redshift distribution but is sensitive to the mass distribution of the dark matter halos (e.g., the c–M relation). Our results show that consistency between the observed and simulated distributions of lensed arc sizes and axial ratios can be achieved by using cluster-lensing simulations that are carefully matched to the selection criteria used in the observations.

  14. A New Survey for Giant Arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Hennawi, Joseph F.; Gladders, Michael D.; Oguri, Masamune; Dalal, Neal; Koester, Benjamin; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Strauss, Michael A.; Inada, Naohisa; Kayo, Issha; Lin, Huan; Lampeitl, Hubert; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2006-11-15

    We report on the first results of an imaging survey to detect strong gravitational lensing targeting the richest clusters selected from the photometric data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with follow-up deep imaging observations from the Wisconsin Indiana Yale NOAO (WIYN) 3.5m telescope and the University of Hawaii 88-inch telescope (UH88). The clusters are selected from an area of 8000 deg{sup 2} using the Red Cluster Sequence technique and span the redshift range 0.1 {approx}< z {approx}< 0.6, corresponding to a comoving cosmological volume of {approx} 2Gpc{sup 3}. Our imaging survey thus targets a volume more than an order of magnitude larger than any previous search. A total of 240 clusters were imaged of which 141 had sub-arcsecond image quality. Our survey has uncovered 16 new lensing clusters with definite giant arcs, an additional 12 systems for which the lensing interpretation is very likely, and 9 possible lenses which contain shorter arclets or candidate arcs which are less certain and will require further observations to confirm their lensing origin. The number of new cluster lenses detected in this survey is likely > 30. Among these new systems are several of the most dramatic examples of strong gravitational lensing ever discovered with multiple bright arcs at large angular separation. These will likely become 'poster-child' gravitational lenses similar to Abell 1689 and CL0024+1654. The new lenses discovered in this survey will enable future systematic studies of the statistics of strong lensing and its implications for cosmology and our structure formation paradigm.

  15. Hazards from High Intensity Lamps and Arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    The principal occupational health problem generally associated with high intensity arc lamps results from exposure of the eye and skin to ultraviolet radiation. Occasionally, the chorioretinal burns are of concern. The eye is generally more susceptible than the skin to injury from high intensity optical radiation sources whether ultraviolet, visible or infrared. Recent developments in technology have shown that some high intensity optical radiation sources which have output parameters greatly different from those encountered in the natural environment present a serious chorioretinal burn hazard.

  16. Arc Heater Capability Upgrade at AEDC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    pressure flow for expansion through a hypersonic nozzle into a subatmospheric test cell to provide flows at Mach numbers ranging from 3.4 to 7.0. The...H2 arc-heated wind tunnel specifications. Facility type Subatmospheric free-jet exhaust Max. run time Up to 30 min Nozzle Mach number 3.4–7.0 Nozzle...ground simulation testing of thermal protection systems, antenna transmission windows, hypersonic leading edges, and missile fore- bodies and nose tips

  17. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, Herschel B.; Einerson, Carolyn J.; Watkins, Arthur D.

    1989-01-01

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections.

  18. Plasma Arc Welding: How it Works

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur

    2004-01-01

    The physical principles of PAW from basic arcs to keyholing to variable polarity are outlined. A very brief account of the physics of PAW with an eye to the needs of a welder is presented. Understanding is usually (but not always) superior to handbooks and is required (unless dumb luck intervenes) for innovation. And, in any case, all welders by nature desire to know. A bit of history of the rise and fall of the Variable Polarity (VP) PA process in fabrication of the Space Shuttle External Tank is included.

  19. Sensing the gas metal arc welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, N. M.; Johnson, J. A.; Smartt, H. B.; Watkins, A. D.; Larsen, E. D.; Taylor, P. L.; Waddoups, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    Control of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) requires real-time sensing of the process. Three sensing techniques for GMAW are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These are (1) noncontacting ultrasonic sensing using a laser/EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) to detect defects in the solidified weld on a pass-by-pass basis, (2) integrated optical sensing using a CCD camera and a laser stripe to obtain cooling rate and weld bead geometry information, and (3) monitoring fluctuations in digitized welding voltage data to detect the mode of metal droplet transfer and assure that the desired mass input is achieved.

  20. The ATLAS ARC backend to HPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug, S.; Hostettler, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Weber, M.

    2015-12-01

    The current distributed computing resources used for simulating and processing collision data collected by ATLAS and the other LHC experiments are largely based on dedicated x86 Linux clusters. Access to resources, job control and software provisioning mechanisms are quite different from the common concept of self-contained HPC applications run by particular users on specific HPC systems. We report on the development and the usage in ATLAS of a SSH backend to the Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) middleware to enable HPC compliant access and on the corresponding software provisioning mechanisms.

  1. Sensing the gas metal arc welding process

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, N.M.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.; Watkins, A.D.; Larsen, E.D.; Taylor, P.L. ); Waddoups, M.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Control of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) requires real-time sensing of the process. Three sensing techniques for GMAW are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These are (1) noncontacting ultrasonic sensing using a laser/EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) to detect defects in the solidified weld on a pass-bypass basis, (2) integrated optical sensing using a CCD camera and a laser stripe to obtain cooling rate and weld bead geometry information, and (3) monitoring fluctuations in digitized welding voltage data to detect the mode of metal droplet transfer and assure that the desired mass input is achieved.

  2. Sensing the gas metal arc welding process

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, N.M.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.; Watkins, A.D.; Larsen, E.D.; Taylor, P.L.; Waddoups, M.A.

    1992-10-01

    Control of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) requires real-time sensing of the process. Three sensing techniques for GMAW are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These are (1) noncontacting ultrasonic sensing using a laser/EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) to detect defects in the solidified weld on a pass-bypass basis, (2) integrated optical sensing using a CCD camera and a laser stripe to obtain cooling rate and weld bead geometry information, and (3) monitoring fluctuations in digitized welding voltage data to detect the mode of metal droplet transfer and assure that the desired mass input is achieved.

  3. ArcView Coal Evaluation User's Guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watson, William

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the ArcView Coal Evaluation (ACE) is to estimate the amount and location of coal available to be mined by various coal mining technologies, based on the geologic coverages developed in the National Coal Resource Assessment (NCRA) which are the starting coverages used in the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) evaluation of coal resources. The ACE Users Guide provides many examples of how to apply technical limits based upon mining technology. The methods, which are iterative for any given mining technology, should transfer directly by mining technology to other coal beds.

  4. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, H.B.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.

    1987-08-10

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Partial Arc Curvilinear Direct Drive Servomotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiuhong (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A partial arc servomotor assembly having a curvilinear U-channel with two parallel rare earth permanent magnet plates facing each other and a pivoted ironless three phase coil armature winding moves between the plates. An encoder read head is fixed to a mounting plate above the coil armature winding and a curvilinear encoder scale is curved to be co-axis with the curvilinear U-channel permanent magnet track formed by the permanent magnet plates. Driven by a set of miniaturized power electronics devices closely looped with a positioning feedback encoder, the angular position and velocity of the pivoted payload is programmable and precisely controlled.

  6. RESEARCH ON ELECTRIC ARC REDUCTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CARBON DIOXIDE , REDUCTION(CHEMISTRY), ELECTRIC ARCS, CHEMICAL REACTIONS, HEAT OF REACTION, GAS FLOW, OXYGEN, CARBON COMPOUNDS, MONOXIDES, ELECTRODES, LABORATORY EQUIPMENT, HIGH TEMPERATURE, PLASMAS(PHYSICS), ENERGY.

  7. Arcing in LEO - Does the Whole Array Discharge?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Vayner, Boris V.; Galofaro, Joel T.; Hillard, G. Barry

    2005-01-01

    The conventional wisdom about solar array arcing in LEO is that only the parts the solar array that are swept over by the arc-generated plasma front are discharged in the initial arc. This limits the amount of energy that can be discharged. Recent work done at the NASA Glenn Research Center has shown that this idea is mistaken. In fact, the capacitance of the entire solar array may be discharged, which for large arrays leads to very large and possibly debilitating arcs, even if no sustained arc occurs. We present the laboratory work that conclusively demonstrates this fact by using a grounded plate that prevents the arc-plasma front from reaching certain array strings. Finally, we discuss the dependence of arc strength and arc pulse width on the capacitance that is discharged, and provide a physical mechanism for discharge of the entire array, even when parts of the array are not accessible to the arc-plasma front. Mitigation techniques are also presented.

  8. Arcing in LEO: Does the Whole Array Discharge?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Vayner, Boris V.; Galofaro, Joel T.; Hillard, G. Barry

    2005-01-01

    The conventional wisdom about solar array arcing in LEO is that only the parts of the solar array that are swept over by the arc-generated plasma front are discharged in the initial arc. This limits the amount of energy that can be discharged. Recent work done at the NASA Glenn Research Center has shown that this idea is mistaken. In fact, the capacitance of the entire solar array may be discharged, which for large arrays leads to very large and possibly debilitating arcs, even if no sustained arc occurs. We present the laboratory work that conclusively demonstrates this fact by using a grounded plate that prevents the arc-plasma front from reaching certain array strings. Finally, we discuss the dependence of arc strength and arc pulse width on the capacitance that is discharged, and provide a physical mechanism for discharge of the entire array, even when parts of the array are not accessible to the arc-plasma front. Mitigation techniques are also presented.

  9. Triad3A Regulates Synaptic Strength by Ubiquitination of Arc

    PubMed Central

    Mabb, Angela M.; Je, H. Shawn; Wall, Mark J.; Robinson, Camenzind G.; Larsen, Rylan S.; Qiang, Yuan; Corrêa, Sonia A.L.; Ehlers, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Activity-dependent gene transcription and protein synthesis underlie many forms of learning-related synaptic plasticity. At excitatory glutamatergic synapses, the immediate early gene product Arc/Arg3.1 couples synaptic activity to postsynaptic endocytosis of AMPA-type glutamate receptors. Although the mechanisms for Arc induction have been described, little is known regarding the molecular machinery that terminates Arc function. Here we demonstrate that the RING domain ubiquitin ligase Triad3A/RNF216 ubiquitinates Arc, resulting in its rapid proteasomal degradation. Triad3A associates with Arc, localizes to clathrin-coated pits, and is associated with endocytic sites in dendrites and spines. In the absence of Triad3A, Arc accumulates, leading to the loss of surface AMPA receptors. Furthermore, loss of Triad3A mimics and occludes Arc-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity. Thus, degradation of Arc by clathrin-localized Triad3A regulates the availability of synaptic AMPA receptors and temporally tunes Arc-mediated plasticity at glutamatergic synapses. PMID:24945773

  10. Domain Analysis of ArcS, the Hybrid Sensor Kinase of the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Arc Two-Component System, Reveals Functional Differentiation of Its Two Receiver Domains

    PubMed Central

    Bubendorfer, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    In all species of the genus Shewanella, the redox-sensing Arc two-component system consists of the response regulator ArcA, the sensor kinase ArcS, and the separate phosphotransfer protein HptA. Compared to its counterpart ArcB in Escherichia coli, ArcS has a significantly different domain structure. Resequencing and reannotation revealed that in the N-terminal part, ArcS possesses a periplasmic CaChe-sensing domain bracketed by two transmembrane domains and, moreover, that ArcS has two cytoplasmic PAS-sensing domains and two receiver domains, compared to a single one of each in ArcB. Here, we used a combination of in vitro phosphotransfer studies on purified proteins and phenotypic in vivo mutant analysis to determine the roles of the different domains in ArcS function. The analysis revealed that phosphotransfer occurs from and toward the response regulator ArcA and involves mainly the C-terminal RecII domain. However, RecI also can receive a phosphate from HptA. In addition, the PAS-II domain, located upstream of the histidine kinase domain, is crucial for function. The results support a model in which phosphorylation of RecI stimulates histidine kinase activity of ArcS in order to maintain an appropriate level of phosphorylated ArcA according to environmental conditions. In addition, the study reveals some fundamental mechanistic differences between ArcS/HptA and ArcB with respect to signal perception and phosphotransfer despite functional conservation of the Arc system in Shewanella and E. coli. PMID:23161031

  11. Community Structure Comparisons of Hydrothermal Vent Microbial Mats Along the Mariana Arc and Back-arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, K. W.; Fullerton, H.; Moyer, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal vents along the Mariana Arc and back-arc represent a hotspot of microbial diversity that has not yet been fully recognized. The Mariana Arc and back-arc contain hydrothermal vents with varied vent effluent chemistry and temperature, which translates to diverse community composition. We have focused on iron-rich sites where the dominant primary producers are iron oxidizing bacteria. Because microbes from these environments have proven elusive in culturing efforts, we performed culture independent analysis among different microbial communities found at these hydrothermal vents. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and Illumina sequencing of small subunit ribosomal gene amplicons were used to characterize community members and identify samples for shotgun metagenomics. Used in combination, these methods will better elucidate the composition and characteristics of the bacterial communities at these hydrothermal vent systems. The overarching goal of this study is to evaluate and compare taxonomic and metabolic diversity among different communities of microbial mats. We compared communities collected on a fine scale to analyze the bacterial community based on gross mat morphology, geography, and nearby vent effluent chemistry. Taxa richness and evenness are compared with rarefaction curves to visualize diversity. As well as providing a survey of diversity this study also presents a juxtaposition of three methods in which ribosomal small subunit diversity is compared with T-RFLP, next generation amplicon sequencing, and metagenomic shotgun sequencing.

  12. A Detailed Geochemical Study of Island Arc Crust: The Talkeetna Arc Section, South-central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, A. R.; Debari, S. M.; Kelemen, P. B.; Clift, P. D.; Blusztajn, J.

    2002-12-01

    The Talkeetna arc section in south-central Alaska is recognized as the exposed upper mantle and crust of an accreted, Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic island arc. Detailed geochemical studies of layered gabbronorite from the middle and lower crust of this arc and a diverse suite of volcanic and plutonic rocks from the middle and upper crust provide crucial data for understanding arc magma evolution. We also present new data on parental magma compositions for the arc. The deepest level of the arc section consists of residual mantle and ultramafic cumulates adjacent to garnet gabbro and basal gabbronorite interlayered with pyroxenite. The middle crust is primarily layered gabbronorite, ranging from anorthosite to pyroxenite in composition, and is the most widespread plutonic lithology. The upper mid crust is a heterogenous assemblage of dioritic to tonalitic rocks mixed with gabbro and intruded by abundant mafic dikes and chilled pillows. The upper crust of the arc is comprised of volcanic rocks of the Talkeetna Formation ranging from basalt to rhyolite. Most of these volcanic rocks have evolved compositions (<5% MgO, Mg# <60) and overlap the composition of intermediate to felsic plutonic rocks (<3.5% MgO, Mg# <45). However, several chilled mafic rocks and one basalt have primitive characteristics (>8% MgO, Mg# >60). Ion microprobe analyses of clinopyroxene in mid-crustal layered gabbronorites have parallel REE patterns with positive-sloping LREE segments (La/Sm(N)=0.05-0.17; mean 0.11) and flat HREE segments (5-25xchondrite; mean 10xchondrite). Liquids in REE equilibrium with the clinopyroxene in these gabbronorite cumulates were calculated in order to constrain parental magmas. These calculated liquids(La/Sm(N)=0.77-1.83; mean 1.26) all fall within the range of dike and volcanic rock(La/Sm(N)=0.78-2.12; mean 1.23) compositions. However, three lavas out of the 44 we have analyzed show strong HREE depletion, which is not observed in any of the liquid compositions

  13. Spiral Bevel and Circular Arc Helical Gears: Tooth Contact Analysis and the Effect of Misalignment on Circular Arc Helical Gears.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    AD-AI59 738 SPIRAL BEVEL AND CIRCULAR ARC HELICAL BEARS: TOOTH Loll CONTACT ANALYSIS AND T..(U) NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION...STANDARDS -1963A -_L177- 7 7 71 7 -777 , AD-A 158 738 NASA USAAVSCOM Technical Memorandum 87013 Technical Report 85-C-6 Spiral Bevel and Circular Arc Helical ...this paper cover the generation of (1) spiral bevel gears with almost zero kinematic errors, and (2) helical gears with circular arc teeth

  14. Physical constraints by different arc extension regimes. Intraoceanic arc-trench system: an approach with numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baitsch Ghirardello, Bettina; Gerya, Taras; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2010-05-01

    Since most of the modern intraoceanic collision zones have an extension, it is important to understand how and where the extensions are created and what the decisive factors are. Why is there no extension in certain subductions zones? Why can basins with a thin crust be observed, while in other places the crust spreads and a new magmatic arc is produced? What is the involvement of slab fluids and melt production in the mantle wedge for the extension process? In order to answer these questions we performed systematic numerical experiments with a 2D coupled petrological-thermo-mechanical numerical model of an intra-oceanic subduction process. Over time, part of our numerical models developed a spontaneous slab retreat associated with following flattening of the slab angle, and therefore an extension of the overriding plate and formation of a new spreading center. Our results indicate that weakening effects from subduction related melts play a major role in defining where the extension is localized: in the for-arc, the back-arc or within an arc. According to the general trend the stronger the weakening is, the more the extension shifts toward the back-arc direction. The intensity of the forearc weakening by slab derived fluids also plays a notable role: if such weakening is insufficient two plates are strongly coupled which results in a compressive subduction without the overriding plate extension. If we compare the different extension types in our models with observations in nature, we observe a good agreement. For example in nature, intra-arc extension may split initially homogeneous arc in two distinct parts such as the active Mariana arc and the inactive West Mariana Ridge and create thin oceanic crust in the middle like the Mariana Trough, similar to our experiments. In this way observations based on seismic images of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc crust and mantle structure can be simulated with our model. For example, the first arc with no back-arc rifting (Kyushu

  15. Sensors control gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Siewert, T.A.; Madigan, R.B.; Quinn, T.P.

    1997-04-01

    The response time of a trained welder from the time a weld problem is identified to the time action is taken is about one second--especially after a long, uneventful period of welding. This is acceptable for manual welding because it is close to the time it takes for the weld pool to solidify. If human response time were any slower, manual welding would not be possible. However, human response time is too slow to respond to some weld events, such as melting of the contact tube in gas metal arc welding (GMAW), and only automated intelligent control systems can react fast enough to correct or avoid these problems. Control systems incorporate welding knowledge that enables intelligent decisions to be made about weld quality and, ultimately, to keep welding parameters in the range where only high-quality welds are produced. This article discusses the correlation of electrical signals with contact-tube wear, changes in shielding gas, changes in arc length, and other weld process data.

  16. Cathodic ARC surface cleaning prior to brazing

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, V. R.; Hollis, K. J.; Castro, R. G.; Smith, F. M.; Javernick, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    Surface cleanliness is one the critical process variables in vacuum furnace brazing operations. For a large number of metallic components, cleaning is usually accomplished either by water-based alkali cleaning, but may also involve acid etching or solvent cleaning / rinsing. Nickel plating may also be necessary to ensure proper wetting. All of these cleaning or plating technologies have associated waste disposal issues, and this article explores an alternative cleaning process that generates minimal waste. Cathodic arc, or reserve polarity, is well known for welding of materials with tenacious oxide layers such as aluminum alloys. In this work the reverse polarity effect is used to clean austenitic stainless steel substrates prior to brazing with Ag-28%Cu. This cleaning process is compared to acid pickling and is shown to produce similar wetting behavior as measured by dynamic contact angle experiments. Additionally, dynamic contact angle measurements with water drops are conducted to show that cathodic arc cleaning can remove organic contaminants as well. The process does have its limitations however, and alloys with high titanium and aluminum content such as nickel-based superalloys may still require plating to ensure adequate wetting.

  17. Vacuum arc deposited DLC based coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, Othon R.; Delplancke-Ogletree, Marie-Paule

    2002-05-01

    The great interest in the use of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films as a coating material is justified by the superior wear resistance and hardness, chemical inertness, and very low friction coefficients of these coatings. Vacuum arc deposition is well suited to prepare superhard films with high sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} ratios. However, the high level of internal stresses originating during growth prevents the deposition of thick films, and their hardness makes it difficult for DLC layers to comply with substrate deformations. In order to overcome these limitations, different approaches are possible. Multilayer structures are one means to maintain the surface mechanical properties of the DLC while relieving the internal stresses. Another possibility is to dope the DLC films in order to reduce the internal stress and to stabilize the desirable sp{sup 3} bonds to higher temperatures. At higher doses of dopants, the formation of nanocrystals is possible and the properties of the coatings change drastically. All these approaches were investigated on films prepared by cathodic arc and a synthesis of the results is presented here.

  18. Tracing magma sources in an arc-arc collision zone: Helium and carbon isotope and relative abundance systematics of the Sangihe Arc, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Lillie A.; Hilton, David R.; Fischer, Tobias P.; Hartono, Udi

    2004-04-01

    The Sangihe Arc is presently colliding with the Halmahera Arc in northeastern Indonesia, forming the world's only extant example of an arc-arc collision zone. We report the first helium and carbon isotopic and relative abundance data from the Sangihe Arc volcanoes as a means to trace magma origins in this complicated tectonic region. Results of this study define a north-south trend in 3He/4He, CO2/3He, and δ13C, suggesting that there are variations in primary magma source characteristics along the strike of the arc. The northernmost volcanoes (Awu and Karangetang) have higher CO2/3He and δ13C (up to 179 × 109 and -0.4‰, respectively) and lower 3He/4He (˜5.4 RA) than the southernmost volcanoes (Ruang, Lokon, and Mahawu). Resolving the arc CO2 into component structures (mantle-derived, plus slab-derived organic and carbonate CO2), the northern volcanoes contain an unusually high (>90%) contribution of CO2 derived from isotopically heavy carbonate associated with the subducting slab (sediment and altered oceanic basement). Furthermore, the overall slab contribution (CO2 of carbonate and organic origin) relative to carbon of mantle wedge origin is significantly enhanced in the northern segment of the arc. These observations may be caused by greater volumes of sediment subduction in the northern arc, along-strike variability in subducted sediment composition, or enhanced slab-derived fluid/melt production resulting from the superheating of the slab as collision progresses southward.

  19. Development of circuit model for arcing on solar panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Bhoomi K.; Deshpande, S. P.; Mukherjee, S.; Gupta, S. B.; Ranjan, M.; Rane, R.; Vaghela, N.; Acharya, V.; Sudhakar, M.; Sankaran, M.; Suresh, E. P.

    2010-02-01

    The increased requirements of payload capacity of the satellites have resulted in much higher power requirements of the satellites. In order to minimize the energy loss during power transmission due to cable loss, use of high voltage solar panels becomes necessary. When a satellite encounters space plasma it floats negatively with respect to the surrounding space plasma environment. At high voltage, charging and discharging on solar panels causes the power system breakdown. Once a solar panel surface is charged and potential difference between surface insulator and conductor exceeds certain value, electrostatic discharge (ESD) may occur. This ESD may trigger a secondary arc that can destroy the solar panel circuit. ESD is also called as primary or minor arc and secondary is called major arc. The energy of minor arc is supplied by the charge stored in the coverglass of solar array and is a pulse of typically several 100 ns to several 100 μs duration. The damage caused by minor arc is less compared to major arcs, but it is observed that the minor arc is cause of major arc. Therefore it is important to develop an understanding of minor arc and mitigation techniques. In this paper we present a linear circuit analysis for minor arcs on solar panels. To study arcing event, a ground experimental facility to simulate space plasma environment has been developed at Facilitation Centre for Industrial Plasma Technologies (Institute for Plasma Research) in collaboration with Indian Space Research Organization's ISRO Satellite Technology Centre (ISAC). A linear circuit model has been developed to explain the experimental results by representing the coverglass, solar cell interconnect and wiring by an LCR circuit and the primary arc by an equivalent LR circuit. The aim of the circuit analysis is to predict the arc current which flows through the arc plasma. It is established from the model that the current depends on various parameters like potential difference between insulator

  20. Modeling of thermal plasma arc technology FY 1994 report

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkes, G.L.; Nguyen, H.D.; Paik, S.; McKellar, M.G.

    1995-03-01

    The thermal plasma arc process is under consideration to thermally treat hazardous and radioactive waste. A computer model for the thermal plasma arc technology was designed as a tool to aid in the development and use of the plasma arc-Joule beating process. The value of this computer model is to: (a) aid in understanding the plasma arc-Joule beating process as applied to buried waste or exhumed buried waste, (b) help design melter geometry and electrode configuration, (c) calculate the process capability of vitrifying waste (i.e., tons/hour), (d) develop efficient plasma and melter operating conditions to optimize the process and/or reduce safety hazards, (e) calculate chemical reactions during treatment of waste to track chemical composition of off-gas products, and composition of final vitrified waste form and (f) help compare the designs of different plasma-arc facilities. A steady-state model of a two-dimensional axisymmetric transferred plasma arc has been developed and validated. A parametric analysis was performed that studied the effects of arc length, plasma gas composition, and input power on the temperatures and velocity profiles of the slag and plasma gas. A two-dimensional transient thermo-fluid model of the US Bureau of Mines plasma arc melter has been developed. This model includes the growth of a slag pool. The thermo-fluid model is used to predict the temperature and pressure fields within a plasma arc furnace. An analysis was performed to determine the effects of a molten metal pool on the temperature, velocity, and voltage fields within the slag. A robust and accurate model for the chemical equilibrium calculations has been selected to determine chemical composition of final waste form and off-gas based on the temperatures and pressures within the plasma-arc furnace. A chemical database has been selected. The database is based on the materials to be processed in the plasma arc furnaces.

  1. Arc Deflection Length Affected by Transverse Rotating Magnetic Field with Lateral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiino, Toru; Ishii, Yoko; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru; High Current Energy Laboratory (HiCEL) Team

    2016-10-01

    Gas metal arc welding using shielding gas is often used in the welding industry. However, the arc deflection affected by lateral gas is problem because of inappropriate heat transfer. Shielding gas is used in order to prevent the instability affected by the arc deflection. However, the shielding gas causes turbulence, then blowhole of weld defect occurs because the arc affected by the instability is contaminated by the air. Thus, the magnetic field is applied to the arc in order to stabilize the arc using low amount of shielding gas. The method of applying the transverse rotating magnetic field (RMF) to the arc is one of the methods to prevent the arc instability. The RMF drives the arc because of electromagnetic force. The driven arc is considered to be prevented to arc deflection of lateral gas because the arc is restrained by the magnetic field because of the driven arc. In addition, it is assume the RMF prevented to the arc deflection of lateral gas from the multiple directions. In this paper, the arc deflection length affected by the RMF with lateral gas was elucidated in order to know the effect of the RMF for arc stabilization. Specifically, the arc deflection length affected by the magnetic frequency and the magnetic flux density is measured by high speed video camera. As a result, the arc deflection length decreases with increasing magnetic frequency, and the arc deflection length increases with increasing the magnetic flux density.

  2. A sustained-arc ignition system for internal combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, A. G.

    1977-01-01

    A sustained-arc ignition system was developed for internal combustion engines. It produces a very-long-duration ignition pulse with an energy in the order of 100 millijoules. The ignition pulse waveform can be controlled to predetermined actual ignition requirements. The design of the sustained-arc ignition system is presented in the report.

  3. 29 CFR 1910.254 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or the Safety Standard for Transformer-Type Arc-Welding Machines, ANSI C33.2—1956, Underwriters... conditions. (i) Standard machines for arc welding service shall be designed and constructed to carry their... service conditions may exist, and in such circumstances machines shall be especially designed to...

  4. Applying the ARCS Motivation Model in Technological and Vocational Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Hung-Chang; Wang, Ya-huei

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the incorporation of Keller's ARCS (Attention, Relevance, Confidence, and Satisfaction) motivation model into traditional classroom instruction-learning process. Viewing that technological and vocational students have low confidence and motivation in learning, the authors applied the ARCS motivation model not only in the…

  5. What makes an electric welding arc perform its required function

    SciTech Connect

    Correy, T.B.

    1982-09-01

    The physics of direct current and alternating current welding arcs, the heat transfer of direct current welding arcs, the characteristics of dc welding and ac welding power supplies and recommendations for the procurement and maintenance of precision power supplies are discussed. (LCL)

  6. Artificially modulated hard coatings produced with a vacuum arc evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsygankov, P. A.; Parada Becerra, F. F.; Dugar-Zhabon, V. D.; Plata, A.; V-Niño, E. D.

    2016-02-01

    The experimental set for artificially modulated structures production through an advanced vacuum arc evaporator with a magnetically-driven cathode spots on the cathode surface is described. The main features of vacuum arc as a vapor source with time-modulated compositions are discussed. The characteristics of the obtained multilayer coatings with artificially modulated Ti/TiB structures are presented.

  7. Variable-Polarity Plasma Arc Welding Of Alloy 2219

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Report presents results of study of variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding of aluminum alloy 2219. Consists of two parts: Examination of effects of microsegregation and transient weld stress on macrosegregation in weld pool and, electrical characterization of straight- and reverse-polarity portions of arc cycle.

  8. 29 CFR 1910.254 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or the Safety Standard for Transformer-Type Arc-Welding Machines, ANSI C33.2—1956, Underwriters... subpart S of this part. (ii) On all types of arc welding machines, control apparatus shall be enclosed... shall be in accordance with the requirements of subpart S of this part. (2) Grounding. (i) The frame...

  9. 29 CFR 1910.254 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... or the Safety Standard for Transformer-Type Arc-Welding Machines, ANSI C33.2—1956, Underwriters... subpart S of this part. (ii) On all types of arc welding machines, control apparatus shall be enclosed... shall be in accordance with the requirements of subpart S of this part. (2) Grounding. (i) The frame...

  10. Durable cathodes for high-power inert-gas arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.; Gettleman, C. C.; Goldman, G. C.; Hall, J. H.; Pollack, J. L.

    1971-01-01

    Cathode design minimizes evaporation of electrode material which may deposit on associated optical surfaces. It also results in stable operation and precise positioning of arc relative to optical collector. Innovation applies to high power light sources and to arcs used in industrial furnaces.

  11. Anode heat transfer in a constricted tube arc.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukens, L. A.; Incropera, F. P.

    1971-01-01

    The complex energy exchange mechanisms occurring on the most severely heated component of an arc constrictor, the anode, have been investigated. Measurements performed to determine the anode heat flux for a cascade, atmospheric argon arc of the Maecker type are described. The results are used to check the validity of an existing anode heat transfer model.

  12. [Fatal electric arc accidents due to high voltage].

    PubMed

    Strauch, Hansjürg; Wirth, Ingo

    2004-01-01

    The frequency of electric arc accidents has been successfully reduced owing to preventive measures taken by the professional association. However, the risk of accidents has continued to exist in private setting. Three fatal electric arc accidents caused by high voltage are reported with reference to the autopsy findings.

  13. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. Welding Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in gas tungsten arc welding. The module has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles involved in gas tungsten arc welding, supplies, and applications are covered. The materials included…

  14. TILTING ELECTRIC ARC FURNACE USED TO MELT BRONZE IN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TILTING ELECTRIC ARC FURNACE USED TO MELT BRONZE IN THE BRASS FOUNDRY BY MEANS OF AN ARC CREATED BETWEEN TWO HORIZONTAL ELECTRODES. WHEN MELTED, THE FURNACE TILTS, FILLING MOBILE LADLES FROM THE SPOUT. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Brass Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  15. The loss of material from the cathode of metal arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seeliger, R.; Wulfhekel, H.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of arc length, cathode thickness, current strength, gas pressure and the chemical nature of the cathode material and filling gases upon the material loss from Cu, Fe, and Ag cathodes in arcs. The results show that the analysis of the phenomenon is complex and the energy balance is difficult to formulate.

  16. Using the ARCS Model To Design Multimedia College Engineering Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shellnut, Bonnie; Savage, Timothy; Knowlton, Allie

    This paper describes how a Wayne State University (Michigan) multimedia design team is applying Keller's ARCS (Attention, Relevance, Confidence, and Satisfaction) Model of Motivational Design to the entire process of design, development, and evaluation of multimedia courseware. The ARCS Model has been applied to the prototype module and is being…

  17. Arc Jet Testing of Thermal Protection Materials: 3 Case Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Conley, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Arc jet testing is used to simulate entry to test thermal protection materials. This paper discusses the usefulness of arc jet testing for 3 cases. Case 1 is MSL and PICA, Case 2 is Advanced TUFROC, and Case 3 is conformable ablators.

  18. Petrographic and Geochemical Investigation of Andesitic Arc Volcanism: Mount Kerinci, Sunda Arc, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, M.; Saunders, K.; Troll, V. R.; Jolis, E.; Muir, D. D.; Deegan, F. M.; Budd, D. A.; Astbury, R.; Bromiley, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Present knowledge of the chain of dominantly andesitic volcanoes, which span the Sumatran portion of the Sunda Arc is extremely limited. Previous studies have focused on Toba and Krakatau, although over 13 further volcanic edifices are known. Several recent explosive eruptions in Sumatra such as that of Mt. Sinabung, 2014, have highlighted the potential hazard that these volcanoes pose to the local and regional communities. Mount Kerinci, is one of the most active of the volcanoes in this region, yet little is known about the petrogenesis of the magma by which it is fed. Kerinci is located approximately mid-way between Toba in the North and Krakatau in the south. Along arc variations are observed in the major, minor and trace elements of whole rock analyses. However, bulk rock approaches produce an average chemical composition for a sample, potentially masking important chemical signatures. In-situ micro-analytical analysis of individual components of samples such as melt inclusions, crystals and groundmass provides chemical signatures of individual components allowing the evolution of volcanic centres to be deciphered in considerably more detail. Examination of whole rock chemistry indicates its location may be key to unravelling the petrogenesis of the arc as significant chemical changes occur between Kerinci and Kaba, 250 km to the south. Kerinci samples are dominantly porphyritic with large crystals of plagioclase, pyroxene and Fe-Ti oxides, rare olivine crystals are observed. Plagioclase and pyroxene crystals are chemically zoned and host melt inclusions. Multiple plagioclase populations are observed. A combination of in-situ micro-analysis techniques will be used to characterise the chemical composition of melt inclusions and crystals. These data can be used along with extant geothermobarometric models to help determine the magma source, storage conditions and composition of the evolving melt. Integration of the findings from this study with existing data for

  19. Geologic framework of the Aleutian arc, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallier, Tracy L.; Scholl, David W.; Fisher, Michael A.; Bruns, Terry R.; Wilson, Frederic H.; von Huene, Roland E.; Stevenson, Andrew J.

    1994-01-01

    The Aleutian arc is the arcuate arrangement of mountain ranges and flanking submerged margins that forms the northern rim of the Pacific Basin from the Kamchatka Peninsula (Russia) eastward more than 3,000 km to Cooke Inlet (Fig. 1). It consists of two very different segments that meet near Unimak Pass: the Aleutian Ridge segment to the west and the Alaska Peninsula-the Kodiak Island segment to the east. The Aleutian Ridge segment is a massive, mostly submerged cordillera that includes both the islands and the submerged pedestal from which they protrude. The Alaska Peninsula-Kodiak Island segment is composed of the Alaska Peninsula, its adjacent islands, and their continental and insular margins. The Bering Sea margin north of the Alaska Peninsula consists mostly of a wide continental shelf, some of which is underlain by rocks correlative with those on the Alaska Peninsula.There is no pre-Eocene record in rocks of the Aleutian Ridge segment, whereas rare fragments of Paleozoic rocks and extensive outcrops of Mesozoic rocks occur on the Alaska Peninsula. Since the late Eocene, and possibly since the early Eocene, the two segments have evolved somewhat similarly. Major plutonic and volcanic episodes, however, are not synchronous. Furthermore, uplift of the Alaska Peninsula-Kodiak Island segment in late Cenozoic time was more extensive than uplift of the Aleutian Ridge segment. It is probable that tectonic regimes along the Aleutian arc varied during the Tertiary in response to such factors as the directions and rates of convergence, to bathymetry and age of the subducting Pacific Plate, and to the volume of sediment in the Aleutian Trench.The Pacific and North American lithospheric plates converge along the inner wall of the Aleutian trench at about 85 to 90 mm/yr. Convergence is nearly at right angles along the Alaska Peninsula, but because of the arcuate shape of the Aleutian Ridge relative to the location of the plates' poles of rotation, the angle of convergence

  20. Miniature Arcs for Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    Although many methods are available for producing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), the conventional carbon arc process remains the most popular due to its simplicity and large production rate. In the carbon arc, SWNTs are catalytically synthesized by rapidly evaporating a graphite anode impregnated with NiN metal catalyst from which the nanotubes grow in an inert atmosphere. However, high temperatures inside the carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection, and it is hypothesized that the non-uniform environment created by this flow has a large effect on the growth and morphology of the SWNTs. To study the effect of buoyancy on the arc process, a miniature carbon arc apparatus was developed to synthesize SWNTs in a microgravity environment substantially free from these strong convective flows. The reactor was operated for either 2.2 or 5 seconds during free-fall in the drop towers at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Two apparatus designs differing mainly in their production rate and power capacity were investigated. The first consisted of a miniaturized carbon arc employing a 1 mm diameter graphite anode and powered by a 0.54 F capacitor bank charged to 65 V. The second, larger apparatus employed a 4 mm diameter anode and was powered by a portable battery pack capable of providing in excess of 300 amps at 30 volts to the arc for the duration of a 5 second drop. Initial results indicated that transient heating is a very large effect in the short-duration drop tower carbon arcs, and thermal equilibrium of the arc plasma, buffer gas, and apparatus was not attained during the short microgravity periods. In addition, removal of the buoyant convection by the microgravity now allowed clear observation of large jets of evaporated carbon vapor streaming from the anode and mixing with the inert buffer gas. The initial mixing of these jets with the cold buffer gas combined with the thermal transient made it difficult to establish a uniform high temperature

  1. The confinement of Neptune's ring arcs by the moon Galatea.

    PubMed

    Namouni, Faith; Porco, Carolyn

    2002-05-02

    Neptune has five narrow ring arcs, spanning about 40 degrees in longitude, which are apparently confined against the rapid azimuthal and radial spreading that normally results from inter-particle collisions. A gravitational resonance based on the vertical motion of the nearby neptunian moon Galatea was proposed to explain the trapping of the ring particles into a sequence of arcs. But recent observations have indicated that the arcs are away from the resonance, leaving their stability again unexplained. Here we report that a resonance based on Galatea's eccentricity is responsible for the angular confinement of the arcs. The mass of the arcs affects the precession of Galatea's eccentric orbit, which will enable a mass estimate from future observations of Galatea's eccentricity.

  2. A stable auroral red (SAR) arc with multiple emission features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, Michael; Finan, Robert; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Wroten, Joei; Martinis, Carlos; Casillas, Marcus

    2016-10-01

    Stable auroral red (SAR) arcs offer subvisible evidence for storm time linkages between the inner magnetosphere and the midlatitude ionosphere. A SAR arc's defining characteristics are horizon-to-horizon east-west extent, a few degrees of latitude in meridional extent, emission only at the oxygen 6300Å line, and minimal brightness changes during a night—effects readily provided by steady heat conduction from the ring current-plasmapause interaction region. Here we describe a typical SAR arc (brightness 300 rayleighs) with several superimposed patches of emission in two oxygen lines (with a 6300Å/5577Å ratio of 40). We find no evidence for highly localized heating effects but rather evidence from GPS satellites supporting low-energy electron precipitation as the SAR arc modulating mechanism. Seven brightness peaks with average longitude spacing of 4° define a new spatial pattern for SAR arc studies.

  3. Luminosity variations in several parallel auroral arcs before auroral breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safargaleev, V.; Lyatsky, W.; Tagirov, V.

    1997-08-01

    Variation of the luminosity in two parallel auroral arcs before auroral breakup has been studied by using digitised TV-data with high temporal and spatial resolution. The intervals when a new arc appears near already existing one were chosen for analysis. It is shown, for all cases, that the appearance of a new arc is accompanied by fading or disappearance of another arc. We have named these events out-of-phase events, OP. Another type of luminosity variation is characterised by almost simultaneous enhancement of intensity in the both arcs (in-phase event, IP). The characteristic time of IP events is 10-20 s, whereas OP events last about one minute. Sometimes out-of-phase events begin as IP events. The possible mechanisms for OP and IP events are discussed.

  4. Evaluation of pyrolysis and arc tracking on candidate wire insulation designs for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Hrovat, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    The ability of wire insulation materials and constructions to resist arc tracking was determined and the damage caused by initial arcing and restrike events was assessed. Results of arc tracking tests on various insulation constructions are presented in view-graph format. Arc tracking tests conducted on Champlain, Filotex, and Teledyne Thermatics indicate the Filotex is least likely to arc track. Arc tracking occurs more readily in air than it does in vacuum.

  5. Young upper crustal chemical composition of the orogenic Japan Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togashi, Shigeko; Imai, Noboru; Okuyama-Kusunose, Yasuko; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Okai, Takashi; Koma, Takeshi; Murata, Yasuaki

    2000-11-01

    A new geochemical estimate of the young (mainly Paleozoic age to present) upper crust of the Japan Arc shows a dacitic composition in contrast to the idea that andesite is predominant in active orogenic arcs. Temporal changes in composition are not significant from the Paleozoic age to the present for the Japan Arc. The major element composition is similar to previous models of old cratonic upper crusts. The coincidence in the major elements between young and old crusts indicates that essential mechanisms during crust formation have not changed from the Archean era to the present. In trace element compositions the average young upper crust of the Japan Arc has higher Sb and As concentrations and lower concentrations of alkaline, light rare earth, and high field strength elements with respect to previous models of continental upper crusts. The large degree of constancy of trace element composition in marine sedimentary rocks is in contrast to the large variety in igneous rocks. However, the averages for both accretionary and nonaccretionary sedimentary rocks are almost identical to the average for the igneous rocks of the Japan Arc, with the exceptions of high Sb and As concentrations in unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks. The compositional homogeneity among different types of rocks on an arc scale implies that recycling processes mechanically mix the arc-derived igneous materials to homogenize the chemical composition during erosion, transportation, sedimentation, accretion, and uplifting. Since the contribution of oceanic crust to the composition of arc crust is small, the recycling processes have not changed the bulk upper crustal composition of the active continental margin except increase the Sb and As from sediments. Instead, the influx of differentiated acidic rocks from depth is essential to characterize the orogenic crust formation of the young Japan Arc. The characteristically low incompatible element content of the Japanese upper arc crust appears

  6. Optimal partial-arcs in VMAT treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Wala, Jeremiah; Salari, Ehsan; Chen, Wei; Craft, David

    2012-09-21

    We present a method for improving the delivery efficiency of VMAT by extending the recently published VMAT treatment planning algorithm vmerge to automatically generate optimal partial-arc plans. A high-quality initial plan is created by solving a convex multicriteria optimization problem using 180 equi-spaced beams. This initial plan is used to form a set of dose constraints, and a set of partial-arc plans is created by searching the space of all possible partial-arc plans that satisfy these constraints. For each partial-arc, an iterative fluence map merging and sequencing algorithm (vmerge) is used to improve the delivery efficiency. Merging continues as long as the dose quality is maintained above a user-defined threshold. The final plan is selected as the partial-arc with the lowest treatment time. The complete algorithm is called pmerge. Partial-arc plans are created using pmerge for a lung, liver and prostate case, with final treatment times of 127, 245 and 147 . Treatment times using full arcs with vmerge are 211, 357 and 178 s. The mean doses to the critical structures for the vmerge and pmerge plans are kept within 5% of those in the initial plan, and the target volume covered by the prescription isodose is maintained above 98% for the pmerge and vmerge plans. Additionally, we find that the angular distribution of fluence in the initial plans is predictive of the start and end angles of the optimal partial-arc. We conclude that VMAT delivery efficiency can be improved by employing partial-arcs without compromising dose quality, and that partial-arcs are most applicable to cases with non-centralized targets.

  7. Optimal partial-arcs in VMAT treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wala, Jeremiah; Salari, Ehsan; Chen, Wei; Craft, David

    2012-09-01

    We present a method for improving the delivery efficiency of VMAT by extending the recently published VMAT treatment planning algorithm vmerge to automatically generate optimal partial-arc plans. A high-quality initial plan is created by solving a convex multicriteria optimization problem using 180 equi-spaced beams. This initial plan is used to form a set of dose constraints, and a set of partial-arc plans is created by searching the space of all possible partial-arc plans that satisfy these constraints. For each partial-arc, an iterative fluence map merging and sequencing algorithm (vmerge) is used to improve the delivery efficiency. Merging continues as long as the dose quality is maintained above a user-defined threshold. The final plan is selected as the partial-arc with the lowest treatment time. The complete algorithm is called pmerge. Partial-arc plans are created using pmerge for a lung, liver and prostate case, with final treatment times of 127, 245 and 147 s. Treatment times using full arcs with vmerge are 211, 357 and 178 s. The mean doses to the critical structures for the vmerge and pmerge plans are kept within 5% of those in the initial plan, and the target volume covered by the prescription isodose is maintained above 98% for the pmerge and vmerge plans. Additionally, we find that the angular distribution of fluence in the initial plans is predictive of the start and end angles of the optimal partial-arc. We conclude that VMAT delivery efficiency can be improved by employing partial-arcs without compromising dose quality, and that partial-arcs are most applicable to cases with non-centralized targets.

  8. Thermocapillary and arc phenomena in stainless steel welding

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, S.W.; Olson, D.L.; Burgardt, P.

    1999-02-01

    This investigation characterized the effects of power level and Gaussian heat source size on thermocapillary-induced weld shape and estimated the relative influence of various possible arc phenomena in determining weld shape. Welds made with the CTAW process were compared with similar ones made with a conduction-mode EBW process and the differences were related to arc effects. Evidence of thermocapillary flow was readily apparent in both the GTA welds and the conduction-mode EB welds and was qualitatively similar in both. The similarity between the results obtained with the two processes serves to demonstrate that thermocapillary convection is the dominant factor in heat-to-heat weld shape variability. However, a similar one-to-one correspondence between welds produced with the two processes does not exist. Especially at high power, the EB welds showed stronger thermocapillary convection than the GTA welds. One important arc factor that limits thermocapillary flow in ar welds appears to be an increase in arc size with arc length and arc current. A non-Gaussian arc power distribution in GTAW seems to be most important in limiting the fluid flow. Apparently, the arc power distribution is more nearly rectangular in shape for an argon gas arc. At higher currents, above 200 A, plasma shear force may also be an important contributor to weld shape development. The conduction-mode EB welds demonstrate that thermocapillary flow reversal probably does not occur in welds made with a simple Gaussian heat source. The complex shape behavior is likely a result of an arc effect such as plasma shear.

  9. NASA GRC and MSFC Space-Plasma Arc Testing Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Vayner, Boris V.; Galofaro, Joel T.; Hillard, G. Barry; Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2007-01-01

    Tests of arcing and current collection in simulated space plasma conditions have been performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, for over 30 years and at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, for almost as long. During this period, proper test conditions for accurate and meaningful space simulation have been worked out, comparisons with actual space performance in spaceflight tests and with real operational satellites have been made, and NASA has achieved our own internal standards for test protocols. It is the purpose of this paper to communicate the test conditions, test procedures, and types of analysis used at NASA GRC and MSFC to the space environmental testing community at large, to help with international space-plasma arcing-testing standardization. Discussed herein are neutral gas conditions, plasma densities and uniformity, vacuum chamber sizes, sample sizes and Debye lengths, biasing samples versus self-generated voltages, floating samples versus grounded samples, test electrical conditions, arc detection, preventing sustained discharges during testing, real samples versus idealized samples, validity of LEO tests for GEO samples, extracting arc threshold information from arc rate versus voltage tests, snapover, current collection, and glows at positive sample bias, Kapton pyrolysis, thresholds for trigger arcs, sustained arcs, dielectric breakdown and Paschen discharge, tether arcing and testing in very dense plasmas (i.e. thruster plumes), arc mitigation strategies, charging mitigation strategies, models, and analysis of test results. Finally, the necessity of testing will be emphasized, not to the exclusion of modeling, but as part of a complete strategy for determining when and if arcs will occur, and preventing them from occurring in space.

  10. Signal analysis of voltage noise in welding arcs. [gas tungsten arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elis, E.; Eagar, T. W.

    1982-01-01

    Gas tungsten arc welds were made on low alloy steel plates to which intentional defects (discontinuities) were imposed. Disruption of shielding gas, welding over surface films, and tack welds produce changes in what is otherwise a relatively uniform voltage signal. The arc voltage was 15 volts + or - 2 volts with 300 mV ripple noise from the power supply. Changes in this steady noise voltage varied from 50 mV to less than one millivolt depending on the severity and the type of change experienced. In some instances the changes were easily detected by analysis of the signal in real time, while in other cases the signal had to transformed to the frequency domain in order to detect the changes. Discontinuities as small as 1.5 mm in length were detected. The ultimate sensitivity and reproducibility of the technique is still being investigated.

  11. Airborne Advanced Reconfigurable Computer System (ARCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjurman, B. E.; Jenkins, G. M.; Masreliez, C. J.; Mcclellan, K. L.; Templeman, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    A digital computer subsystem fault-tolerant concept was defined, and the potential benefits and costs of such a subsystem were assessed when used as the central element of a new transport's flight control system. The derived advanced reconfigurable computer system (ARCS) is a triple-redundant computer subsystem that automatically reconfigures, under multiple fault conditions, from triplex to duplex to simplex operation, with redundancy recovery if the fault condition is transient. The study included criteria development covering factors at the aircraft's operation level that would influence the design of a fault-tolerant system for commercial airline use. A new reliability analysis tool was developed for evaluating redundant, fault-tolerant system availability and survivability; and a stringent digital system software design methodology was used to achieve design/implementation visibility.

  12. Arc instability in shallow water wet welding

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, J.H.; Graham, S.R.B.

    1993-12-31

    A series of wet welding trials, undertaken at Cranfield as part of a larger program, examined the relative stability of the process across a range of shallow water depths. The effect of welder skill, and the use of computer based data logging equipment, was also evaluated. By means of the data logging system, it was confirmed that welding carried out at a depth of 6 meters was markedly more stable than similar welds at 1.5 and 3 meters. Objective effects of welder skill were also noted, most markedly the ability of the skilled welder to operate at lower arc voltages and travel speeds. The use of the computer based data logging and analysis system was of great assistance in the program, and the use of similar equipment is highly recommended.

  13. Hydrogen mitigation in submerged arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimowicz, Steven

    With the role of hydrogen in weld metal well understood in its relation to cold cracking, there has been a push to produce welds with lower and lower diffusible hydrogen contents. The push for lower diffusible hydrogen contents has placed pressure on consumables manufactures to create consumables that can achieve the requirements for lower diffusible hydrogen content. Currently EM12K flux is produced so that it can achieve below 4 ml of diffusible hydrogen for every 100g of weld metal deposited (ml/100g) for submerged arc welding (SAW). The recent trend for industry is to preferentially achieve diffusible hydrogen contents below 3 ml/100g. Making it necessary to find a way to modify the flux to achieve a lower diffusible hydrogen content for the welds it produces. To achieve this goal a two phase plan was developed. The first phase was to characterize the entire welding system for hydrogen. Since the goal of the project is hydrogen mitigation, any amount of hydrogen that could be reduced is helpful and therefore must first be discovered. Sources of hydrogen may be found by analyzing the welding wire and base metal, as well as breaking the flux down into its components and production steps. The wire was analyzed for total hydrogen content as was the base metal. The flux and its components were analyzed using differential thermal analysis-simultaneous thermal analysis (DTA-STA) and later vacuum degassing for moisture content. The analysis of the wire showed that the copper coating on the wire was the largest contributor of hydrogen. There was lubricant present on the wire surface as well, but it did not contribute as much as the copper coating. It was found that a simple low temperature baking of the wire was enough to remove the lubricant and coating moisture. The base metal was found to have a similar total hydrogen content to that of the wire. The breakdown of the flux and production process for moisture content analysis revealed that the production process

  14. Sensor control of robot arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sias, F. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A basic problem in the application of robots for welding which is how to guide a torch along a weld seam using sensory information was studied. Improvement of the quality and consistency of certain Gas Tungsten Arc welds on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) that are too complex geometrically for conventional automation and therefore are done by hand was examined. The particular problems associated with space shuttle main egnine (SSME) manufacturing and weld-seam tracking with an emphasis on computer vision methods were analyzed. Special interface software for the MINC computr are developed which will allow it to be used both as a test system to check out the robot interface software and later as a development tool for further investigation of sensory systems to be incorporated in welding procedures.

  15. Hydrothermal treatment of electric arc furnace dust.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing-Sheng; Wang, Yuh-Ruey; Chang, Tien-Chin

    2011-06-15

    In this study, ZnO crystals were fabricated from electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) after alkaline leaching, purification and hydrothermal treatment. The effects of temperature, duration, pH, and solid/liquid ratio on ZnO crystal morphology and size were investigated. Results show a high reaction temperature capable of accelerating the dissolution of ZnO precursor, expediting the growth of 1D ZnO, and increasing the L/D ratio in the temperature range of 100-200°C. ZnO crystals with high purity can also be obtained, using the one-step hydrothermal treatment with a baffle that depends on the different solubility of zincite and franklinite in the hydrothermal conditions.

  16. Small-scale auroral Arc deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, J. S.; Sydora, R. D.; Tajima, T.; Hallinan, T.; Lee, L. C.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1983-10-01

    An auroral arc undergoes various types of deformations, such as curls, folds and spirals. In this paper the formation mechanism of folds is examined by a plasma simulation method. It is suggested that folds, as well as curls, can arise from electrostatic shear-induced instabilities. The differences between the two forms are controlled by the presence of ambient ions that must be present to shield the electric field of the precipitating electron charge sheet. It is shown that curls form when the ion sheath thickness is large in comparison with the electron sheet. Folds form when the ion sheath is thin and lags slightly behind the electron guiding centers, setting up an additional electric field that controls the late stages of instability growth.

  17. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Plasma Arc Cutting. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Eddie; Knapp, John

    This packet of instructional materials for a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and plasma arc cutting course is comprised of a teacher edition, student edition, and student workbook. The teacher edition consists of introductory pages and teacher pages. Introductory pages include training and competency profile, state duty/task crosswalk,…

  18. The modelling of an SF6 arc in a supersonic nozzle: II. Current zero behaviour of the nozzle arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Liu, J.; Yan, J. D.; Fang, M. T. C.

    2016-08-01

    The present work (part II) forms the second part of an investigation into the behaviour of SF6 nozzle arc. It is concerned with the aerodynamic and electrical behaviour of a transient nozzle arc under a current ramp specified by a rate of current decay (di/dt) before current zero and a voltage ramp (dV/dt) after current zero. The five flow models used in part I [1] for cold gas flow and DC nozzle arcs have been applied to study the transient arc at three stagnation pressures (P 0) and two values of di/dt for the current ramp, representing a wide range of arcing conditions. An analysis of the physical mechanisms encompassed in each flow model is given with an emphasis on the adequacy of a particular model in describing the rapidly varying arc around current zero. The critical rate of rise of recovery voltage (RRRV) is found computationally and compared with test results of Benenson et al [2]. For transient nozzle arcs, the RRRV is proportional to the square of P 0, rather than to the square root of P 0 for DC nozzle arcs. The physical mechanisms responsible for the strong dependence of RRRV on P 0 have been investigated. The relative merits of the flow models employed are discussed.

  19. 3D cartography of the Alpine Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vouillamoz, N.; Sue, C.; Champagnac, J. D.; Calcagno, P.

    2012-04-01

    We present a 3D cartography of the alpine arc, a highly non-cylindrical mountain belt, built using the 3D GeoModeller of the BRGM (French geological survey). The model allows to handle the large-scale 3D structure of seventeen major crustal units of the belt (from the lower crust to the sedimentary cover nappes), and two main discontinuities (the Insubric line and the Crustal Penninic Front). It provides a unique document to better understand their structural relationships and to produce new sections. The study area comprises the western alpine arc, from the Jura to the Northwest, up to the Bergell granite intrusion and the Lepontine Dome to the East, and is limited to the South by the Ligurian basin. The model is limited vertically 10 km above sea level at the top, and the moho interface at the bottom. We discarded the structural relationships between the Alps sensus stricto and the surrounding geodynamic systems such as the Rhine graben or the connection with the Apennines. The 3D-model is based on the global integration of various data such as the DEM of the Alps, the moho isobaths, the simplified geological and tectonic maps of the belt, the crustal cross-sections ECORS-CROP and NFP-20, and complementary cross-sections specifically built to precise local complexities. The database has first been integrated in a GIS-project to prepare their implementation in the GeoModeller, by homogenizing the different spatial referencing systems. The global model is finally interpolated from all these data, using the potential field method. The final document is a new tri-dimentional cartography that would be used as input for further alpine studies.

  20. Lithospheric buckling and intra-arc stresses: A mechanism for arc segmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Kerri L.

    1989-01-01

    Comparison of segment development of a number of arcs has shown that consistent relationships between segmentation, volcanism and variable stresses exists. Researchers successfully modeled these relationships using the conceptual model of lithospheric buckling of Yamaoka et al. (1986; 1987). Lithosphere buckling (deformation) provides the needed mechanism to explain segmentation phenomenon; offsets in volcanic fronts, distribution of calderas within segments, variable segment stresses and the chemical diversity seen between segment boundary and segment interior magmas.

  1. Leaf position error during conformal dynamic arc and intensity modulated arc treatments.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, C R; Spencer, K M; Alhakeem, R; Oliver, A L

    2001-01-01

    Conformal dynamic arc (CD-ARC) and intensity modulated arc treatments (IMAT) are both treatment modalities where the multileaf collimator (MLC) can change leaf position dynamically during gantry rotation. These treatment techniques can be used to generate complex isodose distributions, similar to those used in fix-gantry intensity modulation. However, a beam-hold delay cannot be used during CD-ARC or IMAT treatments to reduce spatial error. Consequently, a certain amount of leaf position error will have to be accepted in order to make the treatment deliverable. Measurements of leaf position accuracy were taken with leaf velocities ranging from 0.3 to 3.0 cm/s. The average and maximum leaf position errors were measured, and a least-squares linear regression analysis was performed on the measured data to determine the MLC velocity error coefficient. The average position errors range from 0.03 to 0.21 cm, with the largest deviations occurring at the maximum achievable leaf velocity (3.0 cm/s). The measured MLC velocity error coefficient was 0.0674 s for a collimator rotation of 0 degrees and 0.0681 s for a collimator rotation of 90 degrees. The distribution in leaf position error between the 0 degrees and 90 degrees collimator rotations was within statistical uncertainty. A simple formula was developed based on these results for estimating the velocity-dependent dosimetric error. Using this technique, a dosimetric error index for plan evaluation can be calculated from the treatment time and the dynamic MLC leaf controller file.

  2. Sedimentation rate curves as a key to understand the evolution of arc and backarc basin -Arc type and Basin type-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, K.; Matsuoka, H.

    2003-12-01

    The deepsea cores recovered from about 50 drilling sites in the Philippine Sea, equally distributed in marginal basins, remnant arcs, present arcs and other tectonic settings, during the DSDP/IPOD/ODP offer significant geotectonic information. Sediment accumulation rates, lithologic changes and frequency of tephras were examined in the light of the recent advanced nannofossil biostratigraphy of the sediment on these cores. Sediment accumulation rate curves of these drill sites were classified into two major types, A and B types, respectively. A type has rapid accumulation rates just above the arc basement and then shows a decreasing pattern. In contrast, B type has rather constant accumulation rate throughout the cores. Sediments from the rapid sediment accumulation rates imply volcanogenic debris flow and volcaniclastic turbidite sequences derived which were derived from arcs that represent an activity of magmatic arc consisting of tholeiitic and calc-alkalic volcanic rocks. On the contrary, sediments from the low sediment accumulation rates imply mostly biogenic materials instead of volcaniclastic materials. This may mean the termination of intense arc volcanism. Frequency of volcanic ash layers deduced from these cores has maxima just after the rapid sediment accumulation stage of A type curves. As for the remnant arcs such as the Kyushu-Palau and the Daito Ridge, tephra maxima exist at both late Eocene to early Oligocene time and the present arc such as the Izu-Bonin Arc, there are two major maxima at Eocene-Oligocene and Pliocene-Pleistocene time, respectively. Explosive volcanism may take place when oceanic arc develops as shallow as the pressure compensation level (PCL). If this is the case, we may draw the volcanic history of oceanic island arc. At the incipient stage of arc evolution the style of volcanism is quiet resultant formation of pillow lavas and hyaloclastite. On the contrary, the intense volcanism takes place with formation of marine tephra

  3. Cycling of sulfur in subduction zones: The geochemistry of sulfur in the Mariana Island Arc and back-arc trough

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alt, J.C.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Jackson, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The sulfur contents and sulfur isotopic compositions of 24 glassy submarine volcanics from the Mariana Island Arc and back-arc Mariana Trough were determined in order to investigate the hypothesis that subducted seawater sulfur (??34S = 21???) is recycled through arc volcanism. Our results for sulfur are similar to those for subaerial arc volcanics: Mariana Arc glasses are enriched in 34S (??34S = up to 10.3???, mean = 3.8???) and depleted in S (20-290 ppm, mean = 100 ppm) relative to MORB (850 ppm S, ??34S = 0.1 ?? 0.5???). The back-arc trough basalts contain 200-930 ppm S and have ??34S values of 1.1 ?? 0.5???, which overlap those for the arc and MORB. The low sulfur contents of the arc and some of the trough glasses are attributed to (1) early loss of small amounts of sulfur through separation of immiscible sulfide and (2) later vapor-melt equilibrium control of sulfur contents and loss of sulfur in a vapor phase from sulfide-undersaturated melts near the minimum in sulfur solubility at f{hook}O2 ??? NNO (nickel-nickel oxide). Although these processes removed sulfur from the melts their effects on the sulfur isotopic compositions of the melts were minimal. Positive trends of ??34S with 87Sr 86Sr, LILE and LREE contents of the arc volcanics are consistent with a metasomatic seawater sulfur component in the depleted sub-arc mantle source. The lack of a 34S-rich slab signature in the trough lavas may be attributed to equilibration of metasomatic fluid with mantle material along the longer pathway from the slab to the source of the trough volcanics. Sulfur is likely to have been transported into the mantle wedge by metasomatic fluid derived from subducted sediments and pore fluids. Gases extracted from vesicles in arc and back-arc samples are predominantly H2O, with minor CO2 and traces of H2S and SO2. CO2 in the arc and back-arc rocks has ??13C values of -2.1 to -13.1???, similar to MORB. These data suggest that degassing of CO2 could explain the slightly lower

  4. ArcGeomorphometry: A toolbox for geomorphometric characterisation of DEMs in the ArcGIS environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigol-Sanchez, Juan P.; Stuart, Neil; Pulido-Bosch, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    A software tool is described for the extraction of geomorphometric land surface variables and features from Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). The ArcGeomorphometry Toolbox consists of a series of Python/Numpy processing functions, presented through an easy-to-use graphical menu for the widely used ArcGIS package. Although many GIS provide some operations for analysing DEMs, the methods are often only partially implemented and can be difficult to find and used effectively. Since the results of automated characterisation of landscapes from DEMs are influenced by the extent being considered, the resolution of the source DEM and the size of the kernel (analysis window) used for processing, we have developed a tool to allow GIS users to flexibly apply several multi-scale analysis methods to parameterise and classify a DEM into discrete land surface units. Users can control the threshold values for land surface classifications. The size of the processing kernel can be used to identify land surface features across a range of landscape scales. The pattern of land surface units from each attempt at classification is displayed immediately and can then be processed in the GIS alongside additional data that can assist with a visual assessment and comparison of a series of results. The functionality of the ArcGeomorphometry toolbox is described using an example DEM.

  5. Carboniferous rifted arcs leading to an archipelago of multiple arcs in the Beishan-Tianshan orogenic collages (NW China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhonghua; Xiao, Wenjiao; Windley, Brian F.; Zhang, Ji'en; Zhang, Zhiyong; Song, Dongfang

    2016-12-01

    The Beishan and East Tianshan Orogenic Collages in the southernmost Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) record the final stages of evolution of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. These collages and their constituent arcs have an important significance for resolving current controversies regarding their tectonic setting and age, consequent accretionary history of the southern CAOB, and the closure time of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. In this paper, we present our work on the southern Mazongshan arc and the northern Hongyanjing Basin in the Beishan Orogenic Collage (BOC), and our comparison with the Bogda arc and associated basins in the East Tianshan Orogenic Collage. Field relationships indicate that the Pochengshan fault defines the boundary between the arc and basin in the BOC. Volcanic rocks including basalts and rhyolites in the Mazongshan arc have bimodal calc-alkaline characteristics, an enrichment in large ion lithophile elements such as Rb, Ba, and Pb and depletion in high field-strength elements (e.g., Nb and Ta), which were probably developed in a subduction-related tectonic setting. We suggest that these bimodal calc-alkaline volcanic rocks formed in rifted arcs instead of post-orogenic rifts with mantle plume inputs. By making detailed geochemical comparisons between the Mazongshan arc and the Bogda arc to the west, we further propose that they are similar and both formed in arc rifts, and helped generate a Carboniferous archipelago of multiple arcs in the southern Paleo-Asian Ocean. These data and ideas enable us to postulate a new model for the tectonic evolution of the southern CAOB.

  6. The geochemistry of the Neogene Halmahera Arc, eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forde, Emily Jane

    The Halmahera arc is a north-south linear intraoceanic arc cutting across the islands of Halmahera and Bacan in NE Indonesia. The arc is the result of the eastward subduction of the Molucca Sea Plate, accommodating the westward movement of the Pacific and Philippine Sea Plates (PSP) against the Eurasian margin. To the south of the Halmahera arc is a major left-lateral strike-slip fault system: the Sorong Fault Zone (SFZ), which separates the northward movement of Australia from the westward movement of the PSP. This plate boundary has been stable throughout the Neogene to the present day, and has been responsible for the transfer of continental fragments from the Australian margin into the southern Molucca Sea region. K/Ar dating has revealed the migration of volcanism along the length of the Halmahera arc from south to north. The oldest volcanics (ca. 11 Ma) are from Obi, the southernmost island in the region, where volcanism is now extinct. Moving north into Bacan, ages range from 7 Ma to the Quaternary, whereas in central Halmahera they range from 6 - 2 Ma. The present-day arc currently lies to the west of central Halmahera and stretches up the north-west arm of the island. On the basis of spatial, temporal and geochemical variations a possible seven Neogene volcanic centres can be distinguished along the length of the arc. Major element, trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb-O isotopic analyses reveal a wide diversity in geochemical characteristics between the centres. This is due to heterogeneity within the arc mantle wedge, the type of arc crust through which the volcanics were erupted and variations in contribution to the mantle wedge from a subducted component. Volcanic rocks from Obi, central Halmahera and north Bacan display geochemical characteristics typical of intraoceanic arc lavas. The lack of a continental component within these centres enables a greater understanding of the variety of processes and source components affecting arc magmatism in this region

  7. Replicability and 40-year predictive power of childhood ARC types.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Benjamin P; Goldberg, Lewis R

    2011-09-01

    We examined 3 questions surrounding the undercontrolled, overcontrolled, and resilient-or Asendorpf-Robins-Caspi (ARC)-personality types originally identified by Block (1971). In analyses of the teacher personality assessments of over 2,000 children in 1st through 6th grade in 1959-1967 and follow-up data on general and cardiovascular health outcomes in over 1,100 adults recontacted 40 years later, we found bootstrapped internal replication clustering suggesting that Big Five scores were best characterized by a tripartite cluster structure corresponding to the ARC types. This cluster structure was fuzzy rather than discrete, indicating that ARC constructs are best represented as gradients of similarity to 3 prototype Big Five profiles; ARC types and degrees of ARC prototypicality showed associations with multiple health outcomes 40 years later. ARC constructs were more parsimonious but, depending on the outcome, comparable or slightly worse classifiers than the dimensional Big Five traits. Forty-year incident cases of heart disease could be correctly identified with 67% accuracy by childhood personality information alone and stroke incidence with over 70% accuracy. Findings support the theoretical validity of ARC constructs, their treatment as continua of prototypicality rather than discrete categories, and the need for further understanding the robust predictive power of childhood personality for midlife health.

  8. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Treatment Planning for Superficial Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Zacarias, Albert S.; Brown, Mellonie F.; Mills, Michael D.

    2010-10-01

    The physician's planning objective is often a uniform dose distribution throughout the planning target volume (PTV), including superficial PTVs on or near the surface of a patient's body. Varian's Eclipse treatment planning system uses a progressive resolution optimizer (PRO), version 8.2.23, for RapidArc dynamic multileaf collimator volumetric modulated arc therapy planning. Because the PRO is a fast optimizer, optimization convergence errors (OCEs) produce dose nonuniformity in the superficial area of the PTV. We present a postsurgical cranial case demonstrating the recursive method our clinic uses to produce RapidArc treatment plans. The initial RapidArc treatment plan generated using one 360{sup o} arc resulted in substantial dose nonuniformity in the superficial section of the PTV. We demonstrate the use of multiple arcs to produce improved dose uniformity in this region. We also compare the results of this superficial dose compensation method to the results of a recursive method of dose correction that we developed in-house to correct optimization convergence errors in static intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment plans. The results show that up to 4 arcs may be necessary to provide uniform dose to the surface of the PTV with the current version of the PRO.

  9. Interruption Phenomenon in Intermediate-Frequency Vacuum Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yuan; Wu, Jianwen

    2016-03-01

    In the condition of the 3 mm gap, experiments for 360 Hz intermediate-frequency vacuum arc are carried out in interrupters with the diameters being 41 mm and with the contact materials being CuCr50 and Cu-W-WC alloy respectively. The results indicate that the contacts material is closely related to the breaking capacity of the vacuum interrupters and characteristics of an intermediate-frequency vacuum arc. For contacts with the same diameter, the breaking capacity of CuCr50 is better than that of Cu-W-WC. When the current fails to be interrupted, the arcs overflow the gap and present irregular performances in the first half wave. Consequently a voltage spike appears. More macroscopic metal droplets can be seen in the arc column between CuCr50 contacts because of the lower melting point. It is observed that the droplet emission is much more severe during arc reignition than that in the first half wave. It is much more conspicuous that the high frequency arc voltage noises appear in Cu-W-WC contacts when the vacuum arcs reignite, for higher temperature and stronger electronic emission ability of Cu-W-WC contacts. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51377007), Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20131102130006), and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China

  10. Arcing in space structures in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upschulte, B. L.; Marinelli, W. J.; Weyl, G.; Carleton, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes results of an experimental and theoretical program to investigate arcing of structures containing dielectric and conducting materials when they are biased negatively with respect to a plasma. An argon ion source generated Ar(+) ions of directed energy 20 to 40 eV and density approximately 10(exp 7) cm(exp -3) that impinged upon samples containing a dielectric material on top of a negatively biased Kovar plate. Arcing events were studied for bias voltages between -300 and -1000V with respect to the ion beam. The samples were Dow Corning 93-500 adhesive on Kovar, fused silica cover slips bonded on Kovar, and silicon solar cells mounted on Kovar. Measurements of discharge current, Kovar plate voltage, and radiation from the arc versus time were carried out. Microsecond duration exposure images and optical spectra in the 0.24 to 0.40 micron band were also acquired during arcing events. Arcing events were found to be associated with exposed adhesive and means were found to eliminate arcing altogether. The charging of a silica cover plate and the fields around the plate were calculated using a particle-in-cell code. Models were developed to explain the ignition of the arc and the physical processes occurring during the discharge.

  11. New Caledonia a classic example of an arc continent collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitchison, J.

    2011-12-01

    The SW Pacific island of New Caledonia presents a classic example of an arc-continent collision. This event occurred in the Late Eocene when elements of an intra-oceanic island arc system, the Loyalty-D'Entrecasteaux arc, which stretched SSE from near Papua New Guinea east of New Caledonia to offshore New Zealand, collided with micro-continental fragments that had rifted off eastern Gondwana (Australia) in the late Cretaceous. Intervening Late Cretaceous to Paleogene oceanic crust of the South Loyalty Basin was eliminated through eastward subduction beneath this west-facing intra-oceanic island arc. As with many arc-continent collisions elsewhere collision was accompanied by ophiolite emplacement. The erosional remnants of which are extensive in New Caledonia. Collision led to subduction flip, followed by extensive rollback in front of the newly established east-facing Vitiaz arc. Post-collisional magmatism occurred after slab break-off and is represented by small-scale granitoid intrusions. Additional important features of New Caledonia include the presence of a regionally extensive UHP metamorphic terrain consisting of blueschists and eclogites that formed during the subduction process and were rapidly exhumed as a result of the collision Not only was collision and associated orogeny short-lived this collision system has not been overprinted by any major subsequent collision. New Caledonia thus provides an exceptional location for the study of processes related to arc-continent collision in general.

  12. Replicability and 40-Year Predictive Power of Childhood ARC Types

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Benjamin P.; Goldberg, Lewis R.

    2011-01-01

    We examined three questions surrounding the Undercontrolled, Overcontrolled, and Resilient--or Asendorpf-Robins-Caspi (ARC)--personality types originally identified by Block (1971). In analyses of the teacher personality assessments of over 2,000 children in 1st through 6th grade in 1959-1967, and follow-up data on general and cardiovascular health outcomes in over 1,100 adults recontacted 40 years later, we found: (1) Bootstrapped internal replication clustering suggested that Big Five scores were best characterized by a tripartite cluster structure corresponding to the ARC types; (2) this cluster structure was fuzzy, rather than discrete, indicating that ARC constructs are best represented as gradients of similarity to three prototype Big Five profiles; and (3) ARC types and degrees of ARC prototypicality showed associations with multiple health outcomes 40 years later. ARC constructs were more parsimonious, but neither better nor more consistent predictors than the dimensional Big Five traits. Forty-year incident cases of heart disease could be correctly identified with 68% accuracy by personality information alone, a figure approaching the 12-year accuracy of a leading medical cardiovascular risk model. Findings support the theoretical validity of ARC constructs, their treatment as continua of prototypicality rather than discrete categories, and the need for further understanding the robust predictive power of childhood personality traits for mid-life health. PMID:21744975

  13. Petrology and tectonics of Phanerozoic continent formation: From island arcs to accretion and continental arc magmatism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, C.-T.A.; Morton, D.M.; Kistler, R.W.; Baird, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    Mesozoic continental arcs in the North American Cordillera were examined here to establish a baseline model for Phanerozoic continent formation. We combine new trace-element data on lower crustal xenoliths from the Mesozoic Sierra Nevada Batholith with an extensive grid-based geochemical map of the Peninsular Ranges Batholith, the southern equivalent of the Sierras. Collectively, these observations give a three-dimensional view of the crust, which permits the petrogenesis and tectonics of Phanerozoic crust formation to be linked in space and time. Subduction of the Farallon plate beneath North America during the Triassic to early Cretaceous was characterized by trench retreat and slab rollback because old and cold oceanic lithosphere was being subducted. This generated an extensional subduction zone, which created fringing island arcs just off the Paleozoic continental margin. However, as the age of the Farallon plate at the time of subduction decreased, the extensional environment waned, allowing the fringing island arc to accrete onto the continental margin. With continued subduction, a continental arc was born and a progressively more compressional environment developed as the age of subducting slab continued to young. Refinement into a felsic crust occurred after accretion, that is, during the continental arc stage, wherein a thickened crustal and lithospheric column permitted a longer differentiation column. New basaltic arc magmas underplate and intrude the accreted terrane, suture, and former continental margin. Interaction of these basaltic magmas with pre-existing crust and lithospheric mantle created garnet pyroxenitic mafic cumulates by fractional crystallization at depth as well as gabbroic and garnet pyroxenitic restites at shallower levels by melting of pre-existing lower crust. The complementary felsic plutons formed by these deep-seated differentiation processes rose into the upper crust, stitching together the accreted terrane, suture and former

  14. Auroral arc and oval electrodynamics in the Harang region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marghitu, O.; Karlsson, T.; Klecker, B.; Haerendel, G.; McFadden, J.

    2009-03-01

    Auroral arcs are typically described in terms of an upward field-aligned current (FAC) sheet above the arc, connected by ionospheric Pedersen current to a downward FAC sheet near the arc. On the basis of data measured by the FAST spacecraft, conjugate with ground optical observations, we present first a wide and stable winter evening arc, where this standard model does not apply. The arc is observed in the Harang region during the growth phase of a modest substorm, poleward of the convection reversal (CR) boundary. Although the magnetic field data suggest the typical configuration, the two FAC sheets appear to be decoupled near the satellite footprint: the upward FAC is fed by the westward electrojet (WEJ), while the downward FAC feeds the eastward electrojet (EEJ). The examination of the arc by the newly developed ALADYN technique confirms this peculiar current topology. For comparison, we apply ALADYN also to a second evening arc, located within the Harang region equatorward from the CR. The arc is confirmed to have the standard configuration, consistent with a former study, but substantial FAC-EJ coupling is inferred in the auroral oval both poleward and equatorward of the arc. A key element for the topology of the current closure is the westward component of the electric field, which influences the relative location of the CR with respect to the large-scale FAC reversal (FR) boundary. As proved by tests on synthetic data, a westward component of the electric field pushes the CR toward the FR, preventing thus the standard FAC closure, while the conductance and FAC pattern shape the CR profile. Since a westward electric field is often measured in the Harang region, the FAC-EJ coupling is expected to be an essential ingredient there. This has important implications for the current closure in the equatorial magnetosphere and for the auroral current circuit in the WEJ region, closely related to the substorm process.

  15. Arc Energy Estimations: Applications in Lightning-Induced Concrete Spall

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, L K; Ong, M M

    2008-06-03

    After lightning contacts a building, the possibility of a physical break in its conductive path to ground may exist. Given such a break, an electric field may develop across the gap until it exceeds the breakdown strength of the non-conducting, or dielectric, material. Breakdown subsequently occurs and energy is dissipated during the development of an arc channel. If the dielectric is concrete, a concern exists that the energy available for arc formation may be capable of launching pieces of spall into sensitive equipment. This paper discusses the mechanisms of energy dissipation in arc formation and quantifies the energy available for concrete spall.

  16. Degradation of Verapamil hydrochloride in water by gliding arc discharge.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Syam; Maslani, Alan; Izdebski, Tomasz; Horakova, Marta; Klementova, Sarka; Spatenka, Petr

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the influence of gliding arc plasma discharge on the degradation of Verapamil hydrochloride in water. The plasma discharge was characterized by means of optical emission spectroscopy. Spectra of various atomic and molecular species were observed. Aqueous solution of Verapamil hydrochloride was exposed to gliding arc discharge operated in continuous discharge at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The identification of Verapamil, the degradation mechanisms of Verapamil and its transformation products were performed using liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Experimental results indicate that the atmospheric pressure gliding arc plasma treatment has noticeable effects on Verapamil with satisfactory degradation efficiency. Plausible mechanisms of the degradation were discussed.

  17. Electrode erosion in arc discharges at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed in an effort to measure and increase lifetime of electrodes in an arcjet thruster. The electrode erosion of various anode and cathode materials was measured after tests in an atmospheric pressure nitrogen arc discharge at powers less than 1 kW. A free-burning arc configuration and a constricted arc configuration were used to test the materials. Lanthanum hexaboride and thoriated tungsten had low cathode erosion rates while thoriated tungsten and pure tungsten had the lowest anode erosion rates of the materials tested. Anode cooling, reverse gas flow, and external magnetic fields were all found to reduce electrode mass loss.

  18. Electrode erosion in arc discharges at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed in an effort to measure and increase lifetime of electrodes in an arcjet thruster. The electrode erosion of various anode and cathode materials was measured after tests in an atmospheric pressure nitrogen arc discharge at powers less than 1 kW. A free-burning arc configuration and a constricted arc configuration were used to test the materials. Lanthanum hexboride and thoriated tungsten had low cathode erosion rates while thoriated tungsten and pure tungsten had the lowest anode erosion rates of the materials tested. Anode cooling, reverse gas flow, an external magnetic fields were all found to reduce electrode mass loss.

  19. Numerical simulation of carbon arc discharge for nanoparticle synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundrapu, M.; Keidar, M.

    2012-07-01

    Arc discharge with catalyst-filled carbon anode in helium background was used for the synthesis of carbon nanoparticles. In this paper, we present the results of numerical simulation of carbon arc discharges with arc current varying from 10 A to 100 A in a background gas pressure of 68 kPa. Anode sublimation rate and current voltage characteristics are compared with experiments. Distribution of temperature and species density, which is important for the estimation of the growth of nanoparticles, is obtained. The probable location of nanoparticle growth region is identified based on the temperature range for the formation of catalyst clusters.

  20. Feedback between neutral winds and auroral arc electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.; Walterscheid, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The feedback between neutral atmospheric winds and the electrodynamics of a stable, discrete auroral arc is analyzed. The ionospheric current continuity equation and the equation for neutral gas acceleration by ion drag are solved simultaneously, as a function of time. The results show that, in general, the electric field in the ionosphere adjusts to neutral wind acceleration so as to keep auroral field-aligned currents and electron acceleration approximately independent of time. It is thus concluded that the neutral winds that develop as a result of the electrodynamical forcing associated with an arc do not significantly affect the intensity of the arc.

  1. Basalts erupted along the Tongan fore arc during subduction initiation: Evidence from geochronology of dredged rocks from the Tonga fore arc and trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meffre, Sebastian; Falloon, Trevor J.; Crawford, Tony J.; Hoernle, Kaj; Hauff, Folkmar; Duncan, Robert A.; Bloomer, Sherman H.; Wright, Dawn J.

    2012-12-01

    A wide variety of different rock types were dredged from the Tonga fore arc and trench between 8000 and 3000 m water depths by the 1996 Boomerang voyage. 40Ar-39Ar whole rock and U-Pb zircon dating suggest that these fore arc rocks were erupted episodically from the Cretaceous to the Pliocene (102 to 2 Ma). The geochemistry suggests that MOR-type basalts and dolerites were erupted in the Cretaceous, that island arc tholeiites were erupted in the Eocene and that back arc basin and island arc tholeiite and boninite were erupted episodically after this time. The ages generally become younger northward suggesting that fore arc crust was created in the south at around 48-52 Ma and was extended northward between 35 and 28 Ma, between 9 and 15 Ma and continuing to the present-day. The episodic formation of the fore arc crust suggested by this data is very different to existing models for fore arc formation based on the Bonin-Marianas arc. The Bonin-Marianas based models postulate that the basaltic fore arc rocks were created between 52 and 49 Ma at the beginning of subduction above a rapidly foundering west-dipping slab. Instead a model where the 52 Ma basalts that are presently in a fore arc position were created in the arc-back arc transition behind the 57-35 Ma Loyalty-Three Kings arc and placed into a fore arc setting after arc reversal following the start of collision with New Caledonia is proposed for the oldest rocks in Tonga. This is followed by growth of the fore arc northward with continued eruption of back arc and boninitic magmas after that time.

  2. Arc reattachment driven by a turbulent boundary layer: implications for the sweeping of lightning arcs along aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra-Garcia, C.; Nguyen, N. C.; Peraire, J.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.

    2016-09-01

    A lightning channel attached to an aircraft in flight will be swept along the aircraft’s surface in response to the relative velocity between the arc’s root (attached to a moving electrode) and the bulk of the arc, which is stationary with respect to the air. During this process, the reattachment of the arc to new locations often occurs. The detailed description of this swept stroke is still at an early stage of research, and it entails the interaction between an electrical arc and the flow boundary layer. In this paper we examine the implications of the structure of the boundary layer for the arc sweeping and reattachment process by considering different velocity profiles, both for laminar and turbulent flow, as well as a high fidelity description, using large eddy simulation, of transitional flow over an airfoil. It is found that the local velocity fluctuations in a turbulent flow may be important contributors to the reattachment of the arc, through a combination of an increased potential drop along the arc and local approaches of the arc to the surface. Specific flow features, such as the presence of a laminar recirculation bubble, can also contribute to the possibility of reattachment.

  3. The volcanoes of an oceanic arc from origin to destruction: A case from the northern Luzon Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yu-Ming; Song, Sheng-Rong

    2013-09-01

    Volcanoes were created, grew, uplifted, became dormant or extinct, and were accreted as part of continents during continuous arc-continent collision. Volcanic rocks in Eastern Taiwan's Coastal Range (CR) are part of the northern Luzon Arc, an oceanic island arc produced by the subduction of the South China Sea Plate beneath the Philippine Sea Plate. Igneous rocks are characterized by intrusive bodies, lava and pyroclastic flows, and volcaniclastic rocks with minor tephra deposits. Based on volcanic facies associations, Sr-Nd isotopic geochemistry, and the geography of the region, four volcanoes were identified in the CR: Yuemei, Chimei, Chengkuangao, and Tuluanshan. Near-vent facies associations show different degrees of erosion in the volcanic edifices for Chimei, Chengkuangao, and Tuluanshan. Yuemei lacks near-vent rocks, implying that Yuemei's main volcanic body may have been subducted at the Ryukyu Trench with the northward motion of the Philippine Sea Plate. These data suggest a hypothesis for the evolution of volcanism and geomorphology during arc growth and ensuing arc-continent collision in the northern Luzon Arc, which suggests that these volcanoes were formed from the seafloor, emerging as islands during arc volcanism. They then became dormant or extinct during collision, and finally, were uplifted and accreted by additional collision. The oldest volcano, Yuemei, may have already been subducted into the Ryukyu Trench.

  4. Massive edifice failure at Aleutian arc volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, M.L.; White, S.M.; Scholl, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    Along the 450-km-long stretch of the Aleutian volcanic arc from Great Sitkin to Kiska Islands, edifice failure and submarine debris-avalanche deposition have occurred at seven of ten Quaternary volcanic centers. Reconnaissance geologic studies have identified subaerial evidence for large-scale prehistoric collapse events at five of the centers (Great Sitkin, Kanaga, Tanaga, Gareloi, and Segula). Side-scan sonar data collected in the 1980s by GLORIA surveys reveal a hummocky seafloor fabric north of several islands, notably Great Sitkin, Kanaga, Bobrof, Gareloi, Segula, and Kiska, suggestive of landslide debris. Simrad EM300 multibeam sonar data, acquired in 2005, show that these areas consist of discrete large blocks strewn across the seafloor, supporting the landslide interpretation from the GLORIA data. A debris-avalanche deposit north of Kiska Island (177.6?? E, 52.1?? N) was fully mapped by EM300 multibeam revealing a hummocky surface that extends 40??km from the north flank of the volcano and covers an area of ??? 380??km2. A 24-channel seismic reflection profile across the longitudinal axis of the deposit reveals a several hundred-meter-thick chaotic unit that appears to have incised into well-bedded sediment, with only a few tens of meters of surface relief. Edifice failures include thin-skinned, narrow, Stromboli-style collapse as well as Bezymianny-style collapse accompanied by an explosive eruption, but many of the events appear to have been deep-seated, removing much of an edifice and depositing huge amounts of debris on the sea floor. Based on the absence of large pyroclastic sheets on the islands, this latter type of collapse was not accompanied by large eruptions, and may have been driven by gravity failure instead of magmatic injection. Young volcanoes in the central and western portions of the arc (177?? E to 175?? W) are located atop the northern edge of the ??? 4000-m-high Aleutian ridge. The position of the Quaternary stratocones relative to the

  5. Optimal planning strategy among various arc arrangements for prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy technique

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sang Won; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, In Ah; Eom, Keun Yong; Song, Changhoon; Lee, Jeong Woo; Kim, Jin Young

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine the optimal strategy among various arc arrangements in prostate plans of stereotactic body radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy (SBRT-VMAT). Patients and methods To investigate how arc arrangements affect dosimetric and biological metrics, SBRT-VMAT plans for eighteen patients were generated with arrangements of single-full arc (1FA), single-partial arc (1PA), double-full arc (2FA), and double-partial arc (2PA). All plans were calculated by the Acuros XB calculation algorithm. Dosimetric and radiobiological metrics for target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were evaluated from dosevolume histograms. Results All plans were highly conformal (CI<1.05, CN=0.91) and homogeneous (HI=0.09-0.12) for target volumes. For OARs, there was no difference in the bladder dose, while there was a significant difference in the rectum and both femoral head doses. Plans using 1PA and 2PA showed a strong reduction to the mean rectum dose compared to plans using 1FA and 2FA. Contrastively, the D2% and mean dose in both femoral heads were always lower in plans using 1FA and 2FA. The average tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability were comparable in plans using all arc arrangements. Conclusions The use of 1PA had a more effective delivery time and produced equivalent target coverage with better rectal sparing, although all plans using four arc arrangements showed generally similar for dosimetric and biological metrics. However, the D2% and mean dose in femoral heads increased slightly and remained within the tolerance. Therefore, this study suggests that the use of 1PA is an attractive choice for delivering prostate SBRT-VMAT. PMID:28265240

  6. Transient Response of Arc Temperature and Iron Vapor Concentration Affected by Current Frequency with Iron Vapor in Pulsed Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Tatsuro; Maeda, Yoshifumi; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-10-01

    TIG arc welding is chemically a joining technology with melting the metallic material and it can be high quality. However, this welding should not be used in high current to prevent cathode melting. Thus, the heat transfer is poor. Therefore, the deep penetration cannot be obtained and the weld defect sometimes occurs. The pulsed arc welding has been used for the improvement of this defect. The pulsed arc welding can control the heat flux to anode. The convention and driving force in the weld pool are caused by the arc. Therefore, it is important to grasp the distribution of arc temperature. The metal vapor generate from the anode in welding. In addition, the pulsed current increased or decreased periodically. Therefore, the arc is affected by such as a current value and current frequency, the current rate of increment and the metal vapor. In this paper, the transient response of arc temperature and the iron vapor concentration affected by the current frequency with iron vapor in pulsed arc was elucidated by the EMTF (ElectroMagnetic Thermal Fluid) simulation. As a result, the arc temperature and the iron vapor were transient response as the current frequency increase. Thus, the temperature and the electrical conductivity decreased. Therefore, the electrical field increased in order to maintain the current continuity. The current density and electromagnetic force increased at the axial center. In addition, the electronic flow component of the heat flux increased at the axial center because the current density increased. However, the heat conduction component of the heat flux decreased.

  7. The generation of high Sr/Y plutons following Late Jurassic arc-arc collision, Blue Mountains province, NE Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Joshua J.; Johnson, Kenneth; Miranda, Elena A.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2011-09-01

    High Sr/Y plutons (Sr/Y > 40) occupy large areas in ancient and modern orogenic belts, yet considerable controversy exists regarding mechanisms of their generation, the tectonic settings in which they form, and their relationship to contractional deformation through time. In the Blue Mountains province (NE Oregon), a suite of Late Jurassic (148-145 Ma), high Sr/Y plutons intrude Middle Jurassic (162-157 Ma), low Sr/Y (< 40) arc-related lavas and plutons in the Dixie Butte area immediately after widespread Late Jurassic arc-arc collision (159-154 Ma). Early, pre- to syn-kinematic low Sr/Y lavas and plutons (162-157 Ma) have flat to slightly enriched light rare earth element (REE) abundances, low Sr (< 400 ppm) and Sr/Y values (< 40), and strongly positive initial epsilon Hf values (+ 10.1 to + 12.3: 2σ weighted average). Ce/Y values from basalts and gabbros yield a maximum crustal thickness of ~ 23 km. These geochemical and isotopic features suggest derivation from a depleted-mantle source and/or shallow-level (≪ 40 km) melting of pre-existing island arc crust with little to no evolved crustal input. In contrast, post-kinematic high Sr/Y plutons (148-145 Ma) are more compositionally restricted (tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite) and display depleted heavy REE abundances, an absence of Eu anomalies, elevated Sr (> 600 ppm) and Sr/Y values (> 40), and positive initial epsilon Hf values (+ 10.5 to + 7.8: 2σ weighted average). These geochemical and isotopic results are consistent with geochemical models suggesting derivation from partial melting of island arc crust in the presence of a plagioclase-poor to absent, clinopyroxene + hornblende + garnet-bearing source (depths > 35-40 km). We propose that the transition from low Sr/Y to high Sr/Y magmatism resulted from orogenic thickening of island arc crust in the Dixie Butte area during Late Jurassic arc-arc collision between the Olds Ferry and Wallowa island arcs at 159-154 Ma. This fundamental change in crustal

  8. Submarine Arc Volcanism in the Southern Mariana Arc: Results of Recent ROV studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, A. R.; Tamura, Y.; Stern, R. J.; Embley, R. W.; Hein, J. R.; Jordan, E.; Ribeiro, J. M.; Sica, N.; Kohut, E. J.; Whattam, S. A.; Hirahara, Y.; Senda, R.; Nunokawa, A.

    2009-12-01

    The submarine Diamante cross-arc volcanoes (~16°N) and the Sarigan-Zealandia Bank Multi-Volcano Complex (SZBMVC; ~16°45’N), north and south, respectively, of Anatahan Island in the southern Mariana Arc, were studied during several dives in June 2009 using the ROV Hyper-Dolphin, cruise NT09-08 (R/V Natsushima); neither has been studied in detail before. The data collected provide a new perspective on how the subduction factory operates to complement previous studies on other cross-arc volcanic chains in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc. The Diamante complex consists of three major edifices, two cones (West and Central Diamante) and a more complex caldera-like edifice at the volcanic front (East Diamante). West and Central Diamante are basaltic volcanoes but East Diamante has a more complex history. Our studies indicate initial construction of a basaltic volcano. Magmatic evolution led to a violent caldera-forming and quieter dome-building events. Post-caldera quiescence allowed a carbonate platform to grow, now preserved on the eastern caldera wall. Felsic magma or hot rock provides a heat source for an active hydrothermal field associated with felsic domes in the caldera, which NOAA investigators discovered in 2004. A new type of hydrothermal deposit was discovered in the hydrothermal field, consisting of large sulfide-sulfate mounds topped by bulbous constructions of low-temperature Fe and Mn oxides. Vents on the mounds were observed to emit shimmering water. The SZBMVC consists of six closely spaced edifices whose loci are aligned along two parallel trends, one along the volcanic front (Zealandia Bank, Sarigan and South Sarigan), and one about 15 km west towards the rear-arc (Northwest Zealandia, West Zealandia and West Sarigan). Zealandia Bank dives revealed that, as with East Diamante, initial activity was basaltic and became more evolved with time. The western half of Zealandia Bank is dominated by felsic lavas centered on a small (~2 km diameter) caldera and

  9. Vitrification of electric arc furnace dusts.

    PubMed

    Pelino, M; Karamanov, A; Pisciella, P; Crisucci, S; Zonetti, D

    2002-01-01

    Electric arc furnace baghouse dust (EAFD), a waste by-product of the steelmaking process, contains the elements that are volatilized from the charge during the melting (Cr, Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd). The results of leaching tests show that the concentration of these elements exceeds the regulatory limits. Consequently, EAFD cannot be disposed of in ordinary landfill sites without stabilization of the heavy metals. In this work, the vitrification of EAFD, from both carbon and stainless steel productions, were studied. The vitrification process was selected as the inertizing process because it permits the immobilization of the hazardous elements in the glass network and represents an environmentally acceptable method for the stabilization of this waste. Classes of various compositions were obtained by mixing EAFD with glass cullet and sand. The EAFD and the glass products were characterized by DTA, TG, X-ray analysis and by the TCLP test. The results show that the stability of the product is influenced by the glass structure, which mainly depends on the Si/O ratio. Secondary crystallization heat-treatment were carried out on some samples. The results highlighted the formation of spinel phases, which reduced the chemical durability in acid media. The possibility to recover Zn from carbon steel production EAFD was investigated and about 60-70% of metal recovery was obtained. The resulting glass show higher chemical stability than glasses obtained without metal recovery.

  10. Orbit determination using dual crossing arc altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Born, G. H.; Tapley, B. D.; Santee, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the position of an altimetric satellite is required for the altimeter range data to be effective in measuring ocean topography. This study addresses the use of high-precision altimeter data from NASA's TOPEX Mission in reducing the radial component of the orbit of the U.S. Navy's N-ROSS satellite. Simulated altimeter crossing arc residuals between the TOPEX and N-ROSS orbits are minimized using both geometric and dynamic techniques in an effort to reduce the N-ROSS radial error to a level comparable to that of TOPEX. Tracking of N-ROSS by the Navy's NAVSPASUR system is simulated, and crossover residuals are created from the TOPEX and N-ROSS orbits. A simple geometric fit is shown to reduce the radial component of the NAVSPASUR N-ROSS orbit error from 350 m RMS to below 10 m RMS. In comparison, the dynamic approach of estimating the initial conditions of the N-ROSS orbit using a twentieth degree and order gravity field and a combined data set of tracking and altimeter crossover data yields a 6 m RMS residual error. Sub-meter accuracy can be attained by geometrically fitting these residuals to remove long wavelength orbit error.

  11. Robotic Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffery, Waris S.

    1993-01-01

    The need for automated plasma welding was identified in the early stages of the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) because it requires approximately 1.3 miles of welding for assembly. As a result of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process's ability to make virtually defect-free welds in aluminum, it was chosen to fulfill the welding needs. Space Station Freedom will be constructed of 2219 aluminum utilizing the computer controlled VPPAW process. The 'Node Radial Docking Port', with it's saddle shaped weld path, has a constantly changing surface angle over 360 deg of the 282 inch weld. The automated robotic VPPAW process requires eight-axes of motion (six-axes of robot and two-axes of positioner movement). The robot control system is programmed to maintain Torch Center Point (TCP) orientation perpendicular to the part while the part positioner is tilted and rotated to maintain the vertical up orientation as required by the VPPAW process. The combined speed of the robot and the positioner are integrated to maintain a constant speed between the part and the torch. A laser-based vision sensor system has also been integrated to track the seam and map the surface of the profile during welding.

  12. Robotic Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffery, Waris S.

    1993-02-01

    The need for automated plasma welding was identified in the early stages of the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) because it requires approximately 1.3 miles of welding for assembly. As a result of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process's ability to make virtually defect-free welds in aluminum, it was chosen to fulfill the welding needs. Space Station Freedom will be constructed of 2219 aluminum utilizing the computer controlled VPPAW process. The 'Node Radial Docking Port', with it's saddle shaped weld path, has a constantly changing surface angle over 360 deg of the 282 inch weld. The automated robotic VPPAW process requires eight-axes of motion (six-axes of robot and two-axes of positioner movement). The robot control system is programmed to maintain Torch Center Point (TCP) orientation perpendicular to the part while the part positioner is tilted and rotated to maintain the vertical up orientation as required by the VPPAW process. The combined speed of the robot and the positioner are integrated to maintain a constant speed between the part and the torch. A laser-based vision sensor system has also been integrated to track the seam and map the surface of the profile during welding.

  13. Lightning Induced Arcing an LDRD Report

    SciTech Connect

    JORGENSON,ROY E.; WARNE,LARRY K.; KUNHARDT,ERICH E.

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a science-based understanding of the early-time behavior of electric surface arcing in air at atmospheric pressure. As a first step towards accomplishing this, we used a kinetic approach to model an electron swarm as it evolved in a neutral gas under the influence of an applied electric field. A computer code was written in which pseudo-particles, each representing some number of electrons, were accelerated by an electric field. The electric field due to the charged particles was calculated efficiently using a tree algorithm. Collision of the electrons with the background gas led to the creation of new particles through the processes of ionization and photoionization. These processes were accounted for using measured cross-section data and Monte Carlo methods. A dielectric half-space was modeled by imaging the charges in its surface. Secondary electron emission from the surface, resulting in surface charging, was also calculated. Simulation results show the characteristics of a streamer in three dimensions. A numerical instability was encountered before the streamer matured to form branching.

  14. Vaccum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Krotz, P. D.; Todd, D. T.; Liaw, Y. K.

    1995-01-01

    This two year program will investigate Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. VGTAW appears to offer a significant improvement in weldability because of the clean environment and lower heat input needed. The overall objective of the program is to develop the VGTAW technology and implement it into a manufacturing environment that will result in lower cost, better quality and higher reliability aerospace components for the space shuttle and other NASA space systems. Phase 1 of this program was aimed at demonstrating the process's ability to weld normally difficult-to-weld materials. Phase 2 will focus on further evaluation, a hardware demonstration and a plan to implement VGTAW technology into a manufacturing environment. During Phase 1, the following tasks were performed: (1) Task 11000 Facility Modification - an existing vacuum chamber was modified and adapted to a GTAW power supply; (2) Task 12000 Materials Selection - four difficult-to-weld materials typically used in the construction of aerospace hardware were chosen for study; (3) Task 13000 VGTAW Experiments - welding experiments were conducted under vacuum using the hollow tungsten electrode and evaluation. As a result of this effort, two materials, NARloy Z and Incoloy 903, were downselected for further characterization in Phase 2; and (4) Task 13100 Aluminum-Lithium Weld Studies - this task was added to the original work statement to investigate the effects of vacuum welding and weld pool vibration on aluminum-lithium alloys.

  15. Continental crust generated in oceanic arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, Esteban; Hayes, Jorden L.; Hoernle, Kaj; Kelemen, Peter; Everson, Erik; Holbrook, W. Steven; Hauff, Folkmar; van den Bogaard, Paul; Vance, Eric A.; Chu, Shuyu; Calvert, Andrew J.; Carr, Michael J.; Yogodzinski, Gene M.

    2015-04-01

    Thin oceanic crust is formed by decompression melting of the upper mantle at mid-ocean ridges, but the origin of the thick and buoyant continental crust is enigmatic. Juvenile continental crust may form from magmas erupted above intra-oceanic subduction zones, where oceanic lithosphere subducts beneath other oceanic lithosphere. However, it is unclear why the subduction of dominantly basaltic oceanic crust would result in the formation of andesitic continental crust at the surface. Here we use geochemical and geophysical data to reconstruct the evolution of the Central American land bridge, which formed above an intra-oceanic subduction system over the past 70 Myr. We find that the geochemical signature of erupted lavas evolved from basaltic to andesitic about 10 Myr ago--coincident with the onset of subduction of more oceanic crust that originally formed above the Galápagos mantle plume. We also find that seismic P-waves travel through the crust at velocities intermediate between those typically observed for oceanic and continental crust. We develop a continentality index to quantitatively correlate geochemical composition with the average P-wave velocity of arc crust globally. We conclude that although the formation and evolution of continents may involve many processes, melting enriched oceanic crust within a subduction zone--a process probably more common in the Archaean--can produce juvenile continental crust.

  16. Statistics of arcs in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergmann, Anton G.; Petrosian, Vahe

    1993-01-01

    Samples of gravitational lens events in clusters show many large arcs compared to arclets, relative to what can be obtained by idealized singular lens models. We describe the probability of image magnification for point sources and for simple but more realistic gravitational lensing models that include a finite core size and an ellipticity. In addition, we explore the changes in the probability distribution of image magnifications, distortions, and angular extents for sources of different sizes as the parameters of the lenses are varied. A finite core in spherically symmetric lens models introduces a discontinuity in the probability distribution at which the relative number of highly magnified images is increased. In elliptical lenses, this discontinuity and its effect are replaced by a continuous increase in the probability of obtaining high-magnification images relative to singular spherically symmetric models. We also find that the finite size of the source causes a further increase in the expected number of images just below the maximum possible magnification.

  17. Generalized arc consistency for global cardinality constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Regin, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    A global cardinality constraint (gcc) is specified in terms of a set of variables X = (x{sub 1},..., x{sub p}) which take their values in a subset of V = (v{sub 1},...,v{sub d}). It constrains the number of times a value v{sub i} {epsilon} V is assigned to a variable in X to be in an interval [l{sub i}, c{sub i}]. Cardinality constraints have proved very useful in many real-life problems, such as scheduling, timetabling, or resource allocation. A gcc is more general than a constraint of difference, which requires each interval to be. In this paper, we present an efficient way of implementing generalized arc consistency for a gcc. The algorithm we propose is based on a new theorem of flow theory. Its space complexity is O({vert_bar}X{vert_bar} {times} {vert_bar}V{vert_bar}) and its time complexity is O({vert_bar}X{vert_bar}{sup 2} {times} {vert_bar}V{vert_bar}). We also show how this algorithm can efficiently be combined with other filtering techniques.

  18. Magmatic control along a strike-slip volcanic arc: The central Aeolian arc (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruch, J.; Vezzoli, L.; De Rosa, R.; Di Lorenzo, R.; Acocella, V.

    2016-02-01

    The regional stress field in volcanic areas may be overprinted by that produced by magmatic activity, promoting volcanism and faulting. In particular, in strike-slip settings, the definition of the relationships between the regional stress field and magmatic activity remains elusive. To better understand these relationships, we collected stratigraphic, volcanic, and structural field data along the strike-slip central Aeolian arc (Italy): here the islands of Lipari and Vulcano separate the extensional portion of the arc (to the east) from the contractional one (to the west). We collected >500 measurements of faults, extension fractures, and dikes at 40 sites. Most structures are NNE-SSW to NNW-SSE oriented, eastward dipping, and show almost pure dip-slip motion, consistent with an E-W extension direction, with minor dextral and sinistral shear. Our data highlight six eruptive periods during the last 55 ka, which allow considering both islands as a single magmatic system, in which tectonic and magmatic activities steadily migrated eastward and currently focus on a 10 km long × 2 km wide active segment. Faulting appears to mostly occur in temporal and spatial relation with magmatic events, supporting that most of the observable deformation derives from transient magmatic activity (shorter term, days to months), rather than from steady longer-term regional tectonics (102-104 years). More in general, the central Aeolian case shows how magmatic activity may affect the structure and evolution of volcanic arcs, overprinting any strike-slip motion with magma-induced extension at the surface.

  19. Continent-arc collision in the Banda Arc imaged by ambient noise tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porritt, Robert W.; Miller, Meghan S.; O'Driscoll, Leland J.; Harris, Cooper W.; Roosmawati, Nova; Teofilo da Costa, Luis

    2016-09-01

    The tectonic configuration of the Banda region in southeast Asia captures the spatial transition from subduction of Indian Ocean lithosphere to subduction and collision of the Australian continental lithosphere beneath the Banda Arc. An ongoing broadband seismic deployment funded by NSF is aimed at better understanding the mantle and lithospheric structure in the region and the relationship of the arc-continent collision to orogenesis. Here, we present results from ambient noise tomography in the region utilizing this temporary deployment of 30 broadband instruments and 39 permanent stations in Indonesia, Timor Leste, and Australia. We measure dispersion curves for over 21,000 inter-station paths resulting in good recovery of the velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath the Savu Sea, Timor Leste, and the Nusa Tenggara Timur (NTT) region of Indonesia. The resulting three dimensional model indicates up to ∼25% variation in shear velocity throughout the plate boundary region; first-order velocity anomalies are associated with the subducting oceanic lithosphere, subducted Australian continental lithosphere, obducted oceanic sediments forming the core of the island of Timor, and high velocity anomalies in the Savu Sea and Sumba. The structure in Sumba and the Savu Sea is consistent with an uplifting forearc sliver. Beneath the island of Timor, we confirm earlier inferences of pervasive crustal duplexing from surface mapping, and establish a link to underlying structural features in the lowermost crust and uppermost mantle that drive upper crustal shortening. Finally, our images of the volcanic arc under Flores, Wetar, and Alor show high velocity structures of the Banda Terrane, but also a clear low velocity anomaly at the transition between subduction of oceanic and continental lithosphere. Given that the footprint of the Banda Terrane has previously been poorly defined, this model provides important constraints on tectonic reconstructions that

  20. Measurement of total ion current from vacuum arc plasmasources

    SciTech Connect

    Oks, Efim M.; Savkin, Konstantin P.; Yushkov, Georgiu Yu.; Nikolaev, Alexey G.; Anders, A.; Brown, Ian G.

    2005-07-01

    The total ion current generated by a vacuum arc plasma source was measured. The discharge system investigated allowed ion collection from the arc plasma streaming through a hemispherical mesh anode with geometric transparency of 72 percent. A range of different cathode materials was investigated, and the arc current was varied over the range 50-500 A. We find that the normalized ion current (Iion/Iarc) depends on the cathode material, with values in the range from 5 percent to 19 percent and generally greater for elements of low cohesive energy. The application of a strong axial magnetic field in the cathode and arc region leads to increased normalized ion current, but only by virtue of enhanced ion charge states formed in a strong magnetic field.

  1. 29 CFR 1915.56 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... shall be bonded, and periodic inspections shall be conducted to ensure that no condition of electrolysis... objects. (2) Hot electrode holders shall not be dipped in water, since to do so may expose the arc...

  2. 29 CFR 1915.56 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... shall be bonded, and periodic inspections shall be conducted to ensure that no condition of electrolysis... objects. (2) Hot electrode holders shall not be dipped in water, since to do so may expose the arc...

  3. 29 CFR 1915.56 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shall be bonded, and periodic inspections shall be conducted to ensure that no condition of electrolysis... objects. (2) Hot electrode holders shall not be dipped in water, since to do so may expose the arc...

  4. Vibration response and harmonic wave propagation of ultrasonic arc drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithmaitrie, Pruittikorn; DeHaven, J. G.; Higuchi, K.; Tzou, H. S.

    2007-02-01

    A piezoelectric curvilinear arc driver designed for an ultrasonic curvilinear motor is evaluated in this study. A design of piezoelectric curvilinear arc driver is proposed and its governing equations, vibration behaviour and wave propagation are investigated. Then, analysis of forced vibration response or driving characteristics to harmonic excitations in the modal domain is conducted. Finite element modelling and analysis of the arc driver are also discussed. Analytical results of free vibration characteristics are compared favourably with the finite element results. Harmonic analyses of the three finite element models reveal changes of dynamic behaviours of three models and also imply operating frequencies with a significant travelling wave component. Parametric study of mathematical and finite element simulation results suggests that stable travelling waves can be generated to drive a rotor on the proposed curvilinear arc motor system.

  5. Closed circuit TV system automatically guides welding arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephans, D. L.; Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Closed circuit television /CCTV/ system automatically guides a welding torch to position the welding arc accurately along weld seams. Digital counting and logic techniques incorporated in the control circuitry, ensure performance reliability.

  6. A Note on the Teaching of Arc Elasticity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seldon, James R.

    1986-01-01

    Maintains that the Aba P. Lerner alternative for calculating arc elasticity is superior to the commonly used mean prices and quantities method typically used in intermediate microeconomics courses. (JDH)

  7. The layered structure of the carbon arc discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekselman, Vladislav; Stratton, Brentley; Raitses, Yevgeny; LaboratoryPlasma Nanosynthesis Team

    2016-10-01

    The arc discharge with a consumed anode is commonly used for synthesis of nanomaterials such as fullerenes, nanotubes and, more recently, graphene. The role of the arc plasma in nanosynthesis processes, including ablation of the graphite anode, nucleation and growth of nanostructures remains unclear. Our recent fast frame camera measurements revealed arc oscillations associated with the ablation processes at the anode. More sophisticated measurements using optical emission spectroscopy and spectrally resolved fast framing imaging revealed the complex, layered structure of plasma species distribution, which is dynamically changing. The results of this research include time- and space- resolved distributions of plasma species, plasma electron density and temperature. The obtained experimental data suggest a strong correlation between arc plasma parameters and nanosynthesis processes. This work was supported by US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  8. High powered arc electrodes. [producing solar simulator radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. H.; Gettelman, C. C.; Pollack, J. L.; Goldman, G. C.; Decker, A. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Nonconsumable metal electric arc electrodes are described capable of being operated in a variety of gases at various pressures, current, and powers. The cathode has a circular annulus tip to spread the emission area for improved cooling.

  9. Characteristics of a stable auroral red arc event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Cravens, T. E.; Nagy, A. F.; Chandler, M. O.; Brace, L. H.; Maynard, N. C.; Slater, D. W.; Emery, B. A.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with an analysis of the measurements of the stable auroral red (SAR) arc of October 23, 1981, using data from orbit 1192 of Dynamics Explorer (DE) 2, during which a magnetic coincidence occurred with the DE-1 spacecraft near the red arc field line, and for which simultaneous ground-based intensity measurements from Richland, WA were available. The altitude of the DE-2 satellite was approximately 850 km during arc passage in the Northern Hemisphere and approximately 395 km during the conjugate hemisphere passage. The DE-1 satellite was at an altitude of approximately 6000 km during the magnetic coincidence with DE-2 in the Northern Hemisphere. The described observations and calculations reconfirm a previous understanding that the actual excitation of the O(1D) state responsible for the 6300 A emission of red arcs is caused by hot ionospheric thermal electrons.

  10. A Compact Gas/Tungsten-Arc Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgen, Gene E.

    1991-01-01

    Compact gas/tungsten-arc welding torch delivers 100-A current, yet used in confined spaces inaccessible to even smallest commercially available torch. Despite its extremely small size, torch contains all usual components and delivers high current.

  11. Use NASA GES DISC Data in ArcGIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Wenli; Pham, Long B.; Kempler, Steve

    2015-01-01

    This presentation describes GIS relevant data at NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC), GES DISC Services and Support for GIS Users, and use cases of GES DISC data in ArcGIS.

  12. Method for defect free keyhole plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwig, Dennis D. (Inventor); Hunt, James F. (Inventor); Ryan, Patrick M. (Inventor); Fisher, Walter J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A plasma arc welding process for welding metal of increased thickness with one pass includes operating the plasma arc welding apparatus at a selected plasma gas flow rate, travel speed and arc current, to form a weld having a penetration ratio to weld height to weld width, and maintaining the penetration ratio at less than 0.74. Parameters for the plasma gas flow rate, travel speed and arc current are adjusted to a steady state condition during a start up period and maintained during the steady state condition to complete a weld. During a terminal stopping period, the travel speed is stopped and instantaneously replaced by filler wire which adds material to fill the keyhole that had been formed by the welding process. Parameters are subsequently adjusted during the stopping period to terminate the weld in a sound manner.

  13. ARC EMCS Experiments (Seedling Growth-2) Experiment Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heathcote, David; Steele, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Presentation of the status of the ARC ISS (International Space Station) Experiment, Seedling Growth-2 to the Payload Operations Investigator Working Group meeting at MSFC, Huntsville AL. The experiment employs the European Modular Cultivation System (ECMS).

  14. Chatanika radar measurements of the electrical properties of auroral arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vondrak, R. R.

    Ionospheric parameters measured in the presence of auroral arcs by the incoherent scatter Chatanika radar are used to define properties of the arcs. The radar broadcasts at 3-5 MW with a range resolution of 4.5 km along the radar line-of-sight, and has yielded auroral measurements on the variation of electron density, Hall and Pederson conductivity, horizontal electric fields, electrojet currents, precipitating electron energy flux, and the Joule heating rate. Elevation-scan techniques have been utilized to study the latitude and altitude variation of the ionospheric plasma parameters, and fixed-position scans allow determination of ionization conditions, including the electric fields and the acceleration of precipitating auroral electrons. Arcs in the diffuse aurora have been found to be local conductivity enhancements, while discrete arcs correspond to the boundary plasma sheet and have an asymmetric electric field pattern reduced on the northward side.

  15. Fore-arc migration in Cascadia and its neotectonic significance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    Neogene deformation, paleomagnetic rotations, and sparse geodetic data suggest the Cascadia fore arc is migrating northward along the coast and breaking up into large rotating blocks. Deformation occurs mostly around the margins of a large, relatively aseismic Oregon coastal block composed of thick, accreted seamount crust. This 400 km long block is moving slowly clockwise with respect to North America about a Euler pole in eastern Washington, thus increasing convergence rates along its leading edge near Cape Blanco, and creating an extensional volcanic arc on its trailing edge. Northward movement of the block breaks western Washington into smaller, seismically active blocks and compresses them against the Canadian Coast Mountains restraining bend. Arc-parallel transport of fore-arc blocks is calculated to be up to 9 mm/yr, sufficient to produce damaging earthquakes in a broad deformation zone along block margins.

  16. INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, WITH PLASMA ARC BURNING MACHINE (GALT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, WITH PLASMA ARC BURNING MACHINE (GALT INDUSTRIES) WHICH CUTS STEEL SHAPES AND OPERATOR PHILIP WILLOUBY. - O'Neal Steel, Incorporated, Fabrication Shop, 744 Forty-first Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  17. Simple filtered repetitively pulsed vacuum arc plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekh, Yu.; Zhirkov, I. S.; Delplancke-Ogletree, M. P.

    2010-02-01

    A very simple design of cathodic filtered vacuum arc plasma source is proposed. The source without filter has only four components and none of them require precise machining. The source operates in a repetitively pulsed regime, and for laboratory experiments it can be used without water cooling. Despite the simple construction, the source provides high ion current at the filter outlet reaching 2.5% of 400 A arc current, revealing stable operation in a wide pressure range from high vacuum to oxygen pressure up to more than 10-2 mbar. There is no need in complicated power supply system for this plasma source, only one power supply can be used to ignite the arc, to provide the current for the arc itself, to generate the magnetic field in the filter, and provide its positive electric biasing without any additional high power resistance.

  18. New Ages on Old Arc Rocks, Preliminary Results From the Southern IBM Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohler, D.; Reagan, M.; Heizler, M.; Hickey-Vargas, R.

    2001-12-01

    The first results of our reevaluation of the geochemistry and geochronology of Eocene to Miocene volcanic rocks from the southern Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc include preliminary 40Ar/39Ar ages on rocks from Guam, and DSDP sites 447, 448, 458, 459B. Our new 40Ar/39Ar age of 44 Ma on a boninite series basalt from the Facpi formation, supports earlier work by Meijer et al. (1983, AGU Mono. 27, p349) who obtained a 44 Ma K-Ar age on a similar basalt from the same area in western Guam. Our 40Ar/39Ar age of 20 Ma age on a tholeiite dike in the southern portion of the Facpi formation is in the range of K-Ar ages in Cosca et al. (1998 Is. Arc 7 p.579) and Meijer et al. (1983) of 36 Ma to 16 Ma for the Facpi. These ages are younger than the Late Middle Eocene age assigned to the Facpi, and indicates either that a previously unrecognized unit of tholeiitic arc volcanics exists in southern Guam, or that zeolite facies metamorphism reset the ages. If the former is true, then this unit has ages within the gap in arc volcanism previously postulated for the late Oligocene and early Miocene on Guam. Our preliminary results on DSDP cores when combined with 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar dates from Cosca et al. (1998,), and older K-Ar ages from Meijer et al. (1983) suggest that tholeiitic to boninitic volcanism occurred at site 458 and perhaps 459 to east of Guam at about 50 Ma. Similarly, Cosca et al. (1998), showed that volcanism along the Palau-Kyushu ridge dates back to about 50 Ma. Thus, magmatism appears to have occurred around 5 Ma later on Guam than to the east and west, which is consistent with a center of Eocene forearc spreading near Guam. A single preliminary 40Ar/39Ar age of 20 Ma for a relatively intact diabase at site 447 and dates reported in Fujioka et al., (1999, Geology 27, p.1135) and Hickey-Vargas (1998 JGR 103, p. 20963) presents the possibility that volcanism continued in the West Philippine Basin into the early Miocene.

  19. DUAL HEATED ION SOURCE STRUCTURE HAVING ARC SHIFTING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, E.O.

    1959-04-14

    An ion source is presented for calutrons, particularly an electrode arrangement for the ion generator of a calutron ion source. The ion source arc chamber is heated and an exit opening with thermally conductive plates defines the margins of the opening. These plates are electrically insulated from the body of the ion source and are connected to a suitable source of voltage to serve as electrodes for shaping the ion beam egressing from the arc chamber.

  20. Inert-Gas Diffuser For Plasma Or Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Spencer, Carl N.; Hosking, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    Inert-gas diffuser provides protective gas cover for weld bead as it cools. Follows welding torch, maintaining continuous flow of argon over newly formed joint and prevents it from oxidizing. Helps to ensure welds of consistently high quality. Devised for plasma arc keyhole welding of plates of 0.25-in. or greater thickness, also used in tungsten/inert-gas and other plasma or arc welding processes.

  1. Spacelab Life Sciences-2 ARC payload - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, P. D., Jr.; Dalton, B.; Hogan, R.; Leon, H.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of microgravity on the anatomy and physiology of rodent and primate systems will be investigated on the Spacelab Life Sciences 2 (SLS-2) mission. Here, the payload being developed at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) is described and illustrated with drawings. The ARC payload will build upon the success of previous missions. Experiments includes asssessment of rodent cardiovascular and vestibular system responses, primate thermoregulation and metabolic responses.

  2. Nonequilibrium flow calculations for the hydrogen constricted arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. K.; Incropera, F. P.

    1973-01-01

    A nonequilibrium flow model has been formulated and solved numerically for conditions in an atomic hydrogen cascade arc. Solutions show that although thermal nonequilibrium effects are minor, the departure from chemical equilibrium is significant. Comparisons with results obtained from an equilibrium flow model reveal the deficiencies associated with such a model and parametric calculations reveal the effect of current, pressure, and radius on arc behavior.

  3. Barrier island arcs along abandoned Mississippi River deltas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Penland, S.; Suter, J.R.; Boyd, Ron

    1985-01-01

    Generation of transgressive barrier island arcs along the Mississippi River delta plain and preservation of barrier shoreline facies in their retreat paths on the inner shelf is controlled by: (1) shoreface translation; (2) age of the transgression; and (3) the thickness of the barrier island arc sediment package. Barrier island arcs experience an average relative sea level rise of 0.50-1.00 cm yr-1 and shoreface retreat rates range from 5-15 m yr-1. Young barrier island arc sediment packages (Isles Dernieres) are thin and have experienced limited landward retreat of the shoreface. Older barrier island arcs (Chandeleur Islands) are thicker and have experienced significant landward movement of the shoreface because of the greater time available for retreat. If the transgressed barrier shoreline sediment package lies above the advancing ravinement surface, the entire sequence is truncated. A thin reworked sand sheet marks the shoreface retreat path. The base of the transgressive sediment package can lie below the ravinement surface in older barrier shorelines. In this setting, the superstructure of the barrier shoreline is truncated, leaving the basal portion of the transgressive sequence preserved on the inner shelf. A variety of transgressive stratigraphic sequences from sand sheets to truncated barrier islands to sand-filled tidal inlet scars have been identified by high resolution seismic profiling across the shoreface retreat paths of Mississippi delta barrier island arcs. One of these examples, the Isles Dernieres, represents a recently detached barrier island arc in the early stages of transgression. An older example, the Chandeleur Islands, represents a barrier island arc experiencing long-term shoreface retreat. This paper describes the stratigraphic character and preserved transgressive facies for the Isles Dernieres and Chandeleur Islands. ?? 1985.

  4. Systematic variation in the depths of slabs beneath arc volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    England, P.; Engdahl, R.; Thatcher, W.

    2004-01-01

    The depths to the tops of the zones of intermediate-depth seismicity beneath arc volcanoes are determined using the hypocentral locations of Engdahl et al. These depths are constant, to within a few kilometres, within individual arc segments, but differ by tens of kilometres from one arc segment to another. The range in depths is from 65 km to 130 km, inconsistent with the common belief that the volcanoes directly overlie the places where the slabs reach a critical depth that is roughly constant for all arcs. The depth to the top of the intermediate-depth seismicity beneath volcanoes correlates neither with age of the descending ocean floor nor with the thermal parameter of the slab. This depth does, however, exhibit an inverse correlation with the descent speed of the subducting plate, which is the controlling factor both for the thermal structure of the wedge of mantle above the slab and for the temperature at the top of the slab. We interpret this result as indicating that the location of arc volcanoes is controlled by a process that depends critically upon the temperature at the top of the slab, or in the wedge of mantle, immediately below the volcanic arc.

  5. Birth of a Neotethyan intra-oceanic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitchison, J.; Gibbons, A.; Müller, R.; Whittaker, J.

    2012-12-01

    How, when and why intra-oceanic island arcs are initiated is a topic of long-standing debate. On-land geological evidence along the Yarlung Tsangpo/Indus suture zone provides strong evidence for the former existence of at least one such arc within Neotethys. This is increasingly accepted and numerous recent diagrammatic reconstructions of Neotethys now depict such an arc. Notably, the arc portrayed in these cartoons is typically shown to be located close to, and orientated parallel with, the assumed location of the southern margin of Eurasia. Nevertheless, how this arc was initiated and why it formed where it is shown are not particularly well constrained by any published geological evidence. In examining existing geodynamic models and from our own University of Sydney paleogeographic reconstruction work using GPlates we have noticed the presence of a major ocean-crossing feature, possibly a fracture zone, that trends approximately North-South from the western margin of India to the Eurasian margin. We will present a new model that directly relates mid-Cretaceous Neotethyan ophiolite genesis to this structure. This interpretation accords with the most recent concepts developed to explain the inception of intra-oceanic island arcs and ophiolite generation. Moreover, it is consistent with the development of metamorphic soles as well as ophiolite emplacement onto passive continental margins

  6. Lidar arc scan uncertainty reduction through scanning geometry optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Barthelmie, Rebecca J.; Pryor, Sara C.; Brown, Gareth.

    2016-04-01

    Doppler lidars are frequently operated in a mode referred to as arc scans, wherein the lidar beam scans across a sector with a fixed elevation angle and the resulting measurements are used to derive an estimate of the n minute horizontal mean wind velocity (speed and direction). Previous studies have shown that the uncertainty in the measured wind speed originates from turbulent wind fluctuations and depends on the scan geometry (the arc span and the arc orientation). This paper is designed to provide guidance on optimal scan geometries for two key applications in the wind energy industry: wind turbine power performance analysis and annual energy production prediction. We present a quantitative analysis of the retrieved wind speed uncertainty derived using a theoretical model with the assumption of isotropic and frozen turbulence, and observations from three sites that are onshore with flat terrain, onshore with complex terrain and offshore, respectively. The results from both the theoretical model and observations show that the uncertainty is scaled with the turbulence intensity such that the relative standard error on the 10 min mean wind speed is about 30 % of the turbulence intensity. The uncertainty in both retrieved wind speeds and derived wind energy production estimates can be reduced by aligning lidar beams with the dominant wind direction, increasing the arc span and lowering the number of beams per arc scan. Large arc spans should be used at sites with high turbulence intensity and/or large wind direction variation.

  7. Setup for Visual Observation of Carbon-Nanotube Arc Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2004-01-01

    A simple optical setup has been devised to enable safe viewing of the arc and measurement of the interelectrode gap in a process in which carbon nanotubes are produced in an arc between a catalyst-filled carbon anode and a graphite cathode. This setup can be used for visually guided manual positioning of the anode to maintain the interelectrode gap at a desired constant value, possibly as a low-technology alternative to the automatic position/voltage control described in Automatic Control of Arc Process for Making Carbon Nanotubes (MSC-23134), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 3 (March 2004), page 51. The optical setup consists mainly of lenses for projecting an image of the arc onto a wall, plus a calibrated grid that is mounted on the wall so that one can measure the superimposed image of the arc. To facilitate determination of the end point of the process, the anode is notched, by use of a file, at the end of the filled portion that is meant to be consumed in the process. As the anode is consumed and the notch comes into view in the scene projected onto the wall, the process operator switches off the arc current.

  8. The global relevance of the Scotia Arc: An introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Andrés; Dalziel, Ian W. D.; Leat, Philip T.

    2015-02-01

    The Scotia Arc, situated between South America and Antarctica, is one of the Earth's most important ocean gateways and former land bridges. Understanding its structure and development is critical for the knowledge of tectonic, paleoenvironmental and biological processes in the southern oceans and Antarctica. It extends from the Drake Passage in the west, where the Shackleton Fracture Zone forms a prominent, but discontinuous, bathymetric ridge between the southern South American continent and the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula to the active intra-oceanic volcanic arc forming the South Sandwich Island in the east. The tectonic arc comprises the NSR to the north and to the south the South Scotia Ridge, both transcurrent plate margins that respectively include the South Georgia and South Orkney microcontinents. The Scotia and Sandwich tectonic plates form the major basin within these margins. As the basins opened, formation of first shallow sea ways and then deep ocean connections controlled the initiation and development of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, which is widely thought to have been important in providing the climatic conditions for formation of the polar ice-sheets. The evolution of the Scotia Arc is therefore of global palaeoclimatic significance. The Scotia Arc has been the focus of increasing international research interest. Many recent studies have stressed the links and interactions between the solid Earth, oceanographic, paleoenvironmental and biological processes in the area. This special issue presents new works that summarize significant recent research results and synthesize the current state of knowledge for the Scotia Arc.

  9. Intensity-modulated arc therapy: principles, technologies and clinical implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Cedric X.; Tang, Grace

    2011-03-01

    Intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) was proposed by Yu (1995 Phys. Med. Biol. 40 1435-49) as an alternative to tomotherapy. Over more than a decade, much progress has been made. The advantages and limitations of the IMAT technique have also been better understood. In recent years, single-arc forms of IMAT have emerged and become commercially adopted. The leading example is the volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), a single-arc form of IMAT that delivers apertures of varying weights with a single-arc rotation that uses dose-rate variation of the treatment machine. With commercial implementation of VMAT, wide clinical adoption has quickly taken root. However, there remains a lack of general understanding for the planning of such arc treatments, as well as what delivery limitations and compromises are made. Commercial promotion and competition add further confusion for the end users. It is therefore necessary to provide a summary of this technology and some guidelines on its clinical implementation. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of the works from the radiotherapy community that led to wide clinical adoption, and point out the issues that still remain, providing some perspective on its further developments. Because there has been vast experience in IMRT using multiple intensity-modulated fields, comparisons between IMAT and IMRT are also made in the review within the areas of planning, delivery and quality assurance.

  10. Structure of propagating arc in a magneto-hydrodynamic rail plasma actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Miles D.; Choi, Young-Joon; Sirohi, Jayant; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-01-01

    The spatio-temporal evolution of a magnetically driven arc in a rail plasma flow actuator has been characterized with high-speed imaging, electrical measurements, and spectroscopy. The arc draws a peak current of ~1 kA. High-speed framing cameras were used to observe the complex arc propagation phenomenon. In particular, the anode and cathode roots were observed to have different modes of transit, which resulted in distinct types of electrode degradation on the anode and cathode surfaces. Observations of the arc electrical properties and induced magnetic fields are used to explain the transit mechanism of the arc. Emission spectroscopy revealed the arc temperature and species composition as a function of transit distance of the arc. The results obtained offer significant insights into the electromagnetic properties of the arc-rail system as well as arc-surface interaction phenomena in a propagating arc.

  11. Introduction to resuscitation of the newborn infant. ARC and NZRC Guideline 2010.

    PubMed

    2011-08-01

    • Introduction to Resuscitation of the Newborn Infant. ARC and NZRC Guideline 2010 • Planning for Neonatal Resuscitation and Identification of the Newborn Infant at Risk. ARC and NZRC Guideline 2010 • Assessment of the Newborn Infant. ARC and NZRC Guideline 2010 • Airway Management and Mask Ventilation of the Newborn Infant. ARC and NZRC Guideline 2010 • Tracheal Intubation and Ventilation of the Newborn Infant. ARC and NZRC Guideline 2010 • Chest Compressions during Resuscitation of the Newborn Infant. ARC and NZRC Guideline 2010 • Medication or Fluids for the Resuscitation of the Newborn Infant. ARC and NZRC Guideline 2010 • The Resuscitation of the Newborn Infant in Special Circumstances. ARC and NZRC Guideline 2010 • After the Resuscitation of a Newborn Infant. ARC and NZRC Guideline 2010 • Ethical Issues in Resuscitation of the Newborn Infant. ARC and NZRC Guideline 2010.

  12. Rear-arc vs. arc-front volcanoes in the Katmai reach of the Alaska Peninsula: A critical appraisal of across-arc compositional variation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hildreth, W.; Fierstein, J.; Siems, D.F.; Budahn, J.R.; Ruiz, J.

    2004-01-01

    Physical and compositional data and K-Ar ages are reported for 14 rear-arc volcanoes that lic 11-22 km behind the narrowly linear volcanic front defined by the Mount Katmai-to-Devils Desk chain on the Alaska Peninsula. One is a 30-km3 stratocone (Mount Griggs; 51-63% SiO2) active intermittently from 292 ka to Holocene. The others are monogenetic cones, domes, lava flows, plugs, and maars, of which 12 were previously unnamed and unstudied; they include seven basalts (48-52% SiO2), four mafic andesites (53-55% SiO2), and three andesite-dacite units. Six erupted in the interval 500-88 ka, one historically in 1977, and five in the interval 3-2 Ma. No migration of the volcanic front is discernible since the late Miocene, so even the older units erupted well behind the front. Discussion explores the significance of the volcanic front and the processes that influence compositional overlaps and differences among mafic products of the rear-arc volcanoes and of the several arc-front edifices nearby. The latter have together erupted a magma volume of about 200 km3, at least four times that of all rear-arc products combined. Correlation of Sr-isotope ratios with indices of fractionation indicates crustal contributions in volcanic-front magmas (0.7033-0.7038), but lack of such trends among the rear-arc units (0.70298-0.70356) suggests weaker and less systematic crustal influence. Slab contributions and mantle partial-melt fractions both appear to decline behind the front, but neither trend is crisp and unambiguous. No intraplate mantle contribution is recognized nor is any systematic across-arc difference in intrinsic mantle-wedge source fertility discerned. Both rear-arc and arc-front basalts apparently issued from fluxing of typically fertile NMORB-source mantle beneath the Peninsular terrane, which docked here in the Mesozoic. ?? Springer-Verlag 2004.

  13. Along-arc Variations in Subduction Inputs and Mantle Source in Cascadia: Insights from Basaltic Arc Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E. R.; Walowski, K. J.; Wallace, P. J.; DeBari, S. M.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2015-12-01

    The Cascade arc spans ~1300 km from northern California into southern British Columbia, and basaltic magmas have erupted throughout the arc. The compositions of arc basalts are particularly useful in discerning mantle origins and inputs to the magmatic system, as basalts have undergone less differentiation en route to the surface. This presentation will draw on both existing datasets and new research to summarize our knowledge of Cascades arc basalt geochemistry and explore along-arc variability in mantle compositions and subduction recycling (oceanic crust and sediment). Cascades basalts are highly variable in composition; at least five types of primitive basalts erupt in the arc, with calc-alkaline basalts (CAB) and low-K tholeiites (LKT, also called high-alumina olivine tholeiites) being the most common. Such variability has been suggested to correlate with mantle heterogeneities and/or mantle melting processes, with CAB originating from fluid-fluxing of the mantle and LKT representing decompression melts (e.g., Leeman et al., 1990; Schmidt et al., 2008). However, recent work has suggested that, at least in some localities, CAB and LKT magmas could originate from a common mantle source (Mullen et al., 2014). A compilation of published primitive (>7 wt% MgO) basaltic magma compositions illustrates potential mantle heterogeneity along the arc, as well as variations in subduction recycling. Increases in melt H2O contents, radiogenic isotopes, oxygen isotopes, and LILE from north to south along the arc commonly suggest an increase in the amount of subduction component added to the mantle beneath the southern Cascades. The origin of the subduction component (crust vs. sediment) appears variable as well. With recent work on the seafloor sediments offshore of the north Cascades (Carpentier et al., 2010, 2013, 2014), researchers have been able to model the contributions of subducted sediment and crust to the north Cascades arc magmas and have suggested that sediment

  14. Reinvestigation of the charge density distribution in arc discharge fusion system

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Lin Horng; Yee, Lee Kim; Nan, Phua Yeong; Thung, Yong Yun; Khok, Yong Thian; Rahman, Faidz Abd

    2015-04-24

    A continual arc discharge system has been setup and the light intensity of arc discharge has been profiled. The mathematical model of local energy density distribution in arc discharge fusion has been simulated which is in good qualitative agreement with light intensity profile of arc discharge in the experiments. Eventually, the local energy density distribution of arc discharge system is able to be precisely manipulated to act as heat source in the fabrication of fused fiber devices.

  15. The Molucca Sea revisited: Evolution of an arc-arc collision

    SciTech Connect

    Milsom, J. )

    1991-03-01

    The Molucca Sea is the site of the collision between the opposed Sangihe and Halmahera arcs and is floored by the coalesced accretionary wedges to the two subduction zones. In the north, the sea is bounded by the southern islands of the Philippine Archipelago, while in the south it abuts on the Sula Spur Continental Fragment. Free air and Bouguer anomaly values in its central part are among the lowest recorded offshore anywhere on the globe and provide severe constraints on structural and evolutionary models for the area. Further constraints are provided by the patterns of regional seismicity, which show earthquakes to be virtually confined to the two Benioff zones. Recently obtained geological data from the Halmahera Arc, together with results from the 1988 cruise of the RRS Charles Darwin and reflection seismic data from the southern part of the sea allow refinements to be made to previous interpretations. An understanding of the area is of importance from an exploration point of view because the Mesozoic sediments of the Sula Spur, which are believed to have been laid down at the margin of Gondwanaland, are generally considered to have hydrocarbon potential.

  16. Scalability of Localized Arc Filament Plasma Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2008-01-01

    Temporal flow control of a jet has been widely studied in the past to enhance jet mixing or reduce jet noise. Most of this research, however, has been done using small diameter low Reynolds number jets that often have little resemblance to the much larger jets common in real world applications because the flow actuators available lacked either the power or bandwidth to sufficiently impact these larger higher energy jets. The Localized Arc Filament Plasma Actuators (LAFPA), developed at the Ohio State University (OSU), have demonstrated the ability to impact a small high speed jet in experiments conducted at OSU and the power to perturb a larger high Reynolds number jet in experiments conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center. However, the response measured in the large-scale experiments was significantly reduced for the same number of actuators compared to the jet response found in the small-scale experiments. A computational study has been initiated to simulate the LAFPA system with additional actuators on a large-scale jet to determine the number of actuators required to achieve the same desired response for a given jet diameter. Central to this computational study is a model for the LAFPA that both accurately represents the physics of the actuator and can be implemented into a computational fluid dynamics solver. One possible model, based on pressure waves created by the rapid localized heating that occurs at the actuator, is investigated using simplified axisymmetric simulations. The results of these simulations will be used to determine the validity of the model before more realistic and time consuming three-dimensional simulations are conducted to ultimately determine the scalability of the LAFPA system.

  17. Structural ceramics containing electric arc furnace dust.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, V N; Papandreou, A; Kanellopoulou, D; Stournaras, C J

    2013-11-15

    In the present work the stabilization of electric arc furnace dust EAFD waste in structural clay ceramics was investigated. EAFD was collected over eleven production days. The collected waste was characterized for its chemical composition by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. By powder XRD the crystal structure was studied while the fineness of the material was determined by a laser particle size analyzer. The environmental characterization was carried out by testing the dust according to EN12457 standard. Zn, Pb and Cd were leaching from the sample in significant amounts. The objective of this study is to investigate the stabilization properties of EAFD/clay ceramic structures and the potential of EAFD utilization into structural ceramics production (blocks). Mixtures of clay with 2.5% and 5% EAFD content were studied by TG/DTA, XRD, SEM, EN12457 standard leaching and mechanical properties as a function of firing temperature at 850, 900 and 950 °C. All laboratory facilities maintained 20 ± 1 °C. Consequently, a pilot-scale experiment was conducted with an addition of 2.5% and 5% EAFD to the extrusion mixture for the production of blocks. During blocks manufacturing, the firing step reached 950 °C in a tunnel kiln. Laboratory heating/cooling gradients were similar to pilot scale production firing. The as produced blocks were then subjected to quality control tests, i.e. dimensions according to EN772-17, water absorbance according to EN772-6, and compressive strength according to EN772-1 standard, in laboratory facilities certified under EN17025. The data obtained showed that the incorporation of EAFD resulted in an increase of mechanical strength. Moreover, leaching tests performed according to the Europeans standards on the EAFD-block samples showed that the quantities of heavy metals leached from crushed blocks were within the regulatory limits. Thus the EAFD-blocks can be regarded as material of no environmental concern.

  18. Anhydrite solubility in differentiated arc magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masotta, M.; Keppler, H.

    2015-06-01

    The solubility of anhydrite in differentiated arc magmas was experimentally studied at 200 MPa and 800-1000 °C over a range of oxygen fugacities, from 0.5 log units above the Ni-NiO buffer to the hematite-magnetite buffer. Anhydrite is stable only at oxidizing conditions (fO2 ⩾ Re-ReO2), whereas sulfides only form under reducing conditions. The solubility of anhydrite in the melt ultimately regulates the amount of sulfur available to partition between melt and fluid phase during the eruption. At oxidizing conditions, the solubility product of anhydrite increases with temperature, nbo/t and melt water content. We provide a new calibration of the anhydrite solubility product (KSP = XCaO * XSO3), which reproduces all available experimental data with greatly improved accuracy: In this equation, the molar fractions XCaO and XSO3 in the melt as well as the number of non-bridging oxygen atoms per tetrahedron (nbo/t) are calculated on an anhydrous basis (H2O refers to the melt water content, T is temperature in Kelvin). We apply our model to estimate the sulfur yield of some recent volcanic eruptions and we show that the sulfur yield of the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo dacite eruption was unusually large, because only a small fraction of the sulfur was locked up in anhydrite. In general, high sulfur yields are expected when anhydrite solubility in the melt is high, i.e. for somewhat depolymerized melts. For rhyolitic systems, most of the available sulfur will be locked up in anhydrite, so that even very large eruptions may only have a small effect on global surface temperatures. Our model therefore allows improved predictions of the environmental impact of explosive volcanic eruptions.

  19. Back-arc spreading of the northern Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands arc clarified by GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Takuya

    2011-11-01

    We examined GPS data in the northwestern Pacific region, which includes the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin)-Mariana (IBM) arc and the Japan arc. GPS velocity vectors on the Izu Islands, including Hachijo-jima and Aoga-shima, show systematic eastward movement deviating from that predicted by the rigid rotation of the Philippine Sea plate; this deviation supports the active back-arc spreading model suggested by previous geological studies. The results of a statistical F-test analysis with 99% confidence level showed that the forearc of the Izu Islands arc has an independent motion with respect to the rigid part of the Philippine Sea plate. We developed a kinematic block-fault model to estimate both rigid rotations of crustal blocks and elastic deformation due to locked faults on the block boundaries. The model suggests that the back-arc opening rate along the Izu back-arc rift zone ranges from 2 mm/yr at its southern end to 9 mm/yr near Miyake-jima, its northern end. It also predicts 23-28 mm/yr of relative motion along the Sagami Trough in the direction of ~ N25°W, where the Izu forearc subducts beneath central Japan. The orientation of this motion is supported by slip vectors of recent medium-size earthquakes, repeated slow-slip events, and the 1923 M = 7.9 Kanto earthquake.

  20. Risk of radiogenic second cancers following volumetric modulated arc therapy and proton arc therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rechner, Laura A; Howell, Rebecca M; Zhang, Rui; Etzel, Carol; Lee, Andrew K; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2012-11-07

    Prostate cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy are at an increased risk to develop a radiogenic second cancer. Proton therapy has been shown to reduce the predicted risk of second cancer when compared to intensity modulated radiotherapy. However, it is unknown if this is also true for the rotational therapies proton arc therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The objective of this study was to compare the predicted risk of cancer following proton arc therapy and VMAT for prostate cancer. Proton arc therapy and VMAT plans were created for three patients. Various risk models were combined with the dosimetric data (therapeutic and stray dose) to predict the excess relative risk (ERR) of cancer in the bladder and rectum. Ratios of ERR values (RRR) from proton arc therapy and VMAT were calculated. RRR values ranged from 0.74 to 0.99, and all RRR values were shown to be statistically less than 1, except for the value calculated with the linear-non-threshold risk model. We conclude that the predicted risk of cancer in the bladder or rectum following proton arc therapy for prostate cancer is either less than or approximately equal to the risk following VMAT, depending on which risk model is applied.

  1. Risk of radiogenic second cancers following volumetric modulated arc therapy and proton arc therapy for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechner, Laura A.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Zhang, Rui; Etzel, Carol; Lee, Andrew K.; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2012-11-01

    Prostate cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy are at an increased risk to develop a radiogenic second cancer. Proton therapy has been shown to reduce the predicted risk of second cancer when compared to intensity modulated radiotherapy. However, it is unknown if this is also true for the rotational therapies proton arc therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The objective of this study was to compare the predicted risk of cancer following proton arc therapy and VMAT for prostate cancer. Proton arc therapy and VMAT plans were created for three patients. Various risk models were combined with the dosimetric data (therapeutic and stray dose) to predict the excess relative risk (ERR) of cancer in the bladder and rectum. Ratios of ERR values (RRR) from proton arc therapy and VMAT were calculated. RRR values ranged from 0.74 to 0.99, and all RRR values were shown to be statistically less than 1, except for the value calculated with the linear-non-threshold risk model. We conclude that the predicted risk of cancer in the bladder or rectum following proton arc therapy for prostate cancer is either less than or approximately equal to the risk following VMAT, depending on which risk model is applied.

  2. Sustained arc temperature: better marker for phase transformation of carbon black to multiwalled carbon nanotubes in arc discharge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Neha; Sharma, N. N.

    2016-10-01

    The present study investigates the role of temperature in the formation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes from carbon black using arc discharge technique. Carbon black has been used as precursor to synthesize carbon nanotubes in argon atmosphere. The arc current has been varied from 25 to 40 A in order to study the morphological changes in carbon black as it gets converted to multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). We observed formation of MWCNTs at an arc current of 25 A; however the recorded temperature data suggested correlation of sustained arc temperature with the nanotube formation rather than the magnitude of current in its absoluteness. Interesting to note is that reported current magnitude in published literature are very high (>40 A) for conversion of carbon black but the present investigation shows that it is possible to convert the carbon black to MWCNTs even at lower current values in case the arc temperature is stabilized and sustained for longer period. Detailed investigations suggested that a sustained stable critical temperature of 1400 °C-1600 °C is essential for the growth of nanotubes and an unstable arc causing temperature fluctuation from critical temperature value yields very low or no MWCNTs.

  3. Dust in the arcs of Methone and Anthe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kai-Lung; Seiß, Martin; Hedman, M. M.; Spahn, Frank

    2017-03-01

    Methone and Anthe are two tiny moons (with diameter < 3 km) in the inner part of Saturn's E ring. Both moons are embedded in arcs of dust particles. To understand the amount of micron-sized dust in these arcs and their spatial distributions, we model the source, dynamical evolution, and sinks of the dust in the arc. We assume hypervelocity impacts of micrometeoroids on the moons produces these dust (Hedman et al., 2009), via the so called impact-ejecta process (Krivov et al., 2003; Spahn et al., 2006). After ejecting and escaping from the moons, these micron-sized particles are subject to several perturbing forces, including gravitational perturbation from Mimas, oblateness of Saturn, Lorentz force, solar radiation pressure, and plasma drag. Particles can be either confined in the arcs due to corotational resonance with Mimas, like their source moons (Cooper et al., 2008; El Moutamid et al., 2014; Hedman et al., 2009; Spitale et al., 2006), or pushed outward by plasma drag. Particle sinks are recollisions with the source moon, collisions with other moons, or migration out of the zone of interest. The erosion of particles due to plasma sputtering is also considered (Johnson et al., 2008), although its timescale is much larger than other sinks. Our simulation results show that ejecta from both moons can form maximal number densities between 10-4 and 10-3m-3 . In comparison with the observations of Anthe arc, the peak value in simulations is about an order of magnitude smaller. Plausible explanations for the difference include millimeter-sized particles as additional source and the uncertainties of impactor flux Fimp and the yields Y. The longitudinal extension of the Methone/Anthe arc in our simulation is 10.8°/15°, consistent with observations and theory (Hedman et al., 2009). Our results also show the lifetime distributions of particles and the heliotropic behavior of dust introduced by solar radiation pressure (Hedman et al., 2010a). The lifetimes of arc

  4. Instability of a Short Anodic Arc Used for Synthesis of Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Sophia; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2016-10-01

    The short anodic arc discharge is used for the synthesis of nanomaterials and had been presumed stable. We report the results of electrical and fast imaging measurements that reveal a combined motion of the arc column and the arc attachment region to the anode when the arc is operated with a high ablation rate. The arc exhibits a negative differential resistance before the arc motion occurs. The observed arc motion correlates with the arc voltage and current oscillations. The characteristic time of these instabilities is in a 10-3 sec range. Thermal processes in the arc plasma region interacting with the ablating anode are considered as possible causes of this unstable arc behavior. The measured negative differential resistance of the arc during the oscillations indirectly supports the thermal model. Our model suggests that the injection of the ablating material into the plasma locally reduces the energy flux to the surface and leads to the arc shifting to the adjacent position. The observed arc motion can potentially cause the mixing of the various nanoparticles synthesized in the arc in the high ablation regime leading to the poor selectivity characteristic of the arc synthesis of nanomaterials. US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  5. Ground Water Data Management Using the ArcObjects Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, N. L.; Gallup, D.

    2003-12-01

    The principal advantage of utilizing GIS technology for regional ground water modeling is that it allows the model development to occur on the conceptual model level. The principal model features can be defined using points, arcs, and polygons. For example, production and observation wells can be input as points. Rivers, drains, and head-dependent boundary conditions can be defined using arcs. Lakes, recharge zones, seepage faces, and hydraulic conductivity zones can be represented using polygons. Once the conceptual model has been defined, the model can be discretized to the model grid. The feature objects are intersected with the model grid to determine which cells coincide with each model feature. The cell-by-cell model input can then be automatically extracted from the feature object data. This conceptual model approach has numerous advantages: 1. Model development much is more efficient since the tedious discretization process can be automated. 2. Since the conceptual model is defined independent of the model grid, the modeler can quickly test various grid resolutions. 3. Existing GIS data can be integrated into a modeling project with minimal effort. When building a GIS-based ground water modeling tool, one of two approaches is typically used: 1) the tools be built entirely within an existing GIS such as ArcGIS, or 2) the tools can be built in a stand-alone program that imports data provided by a GIS. There are several advantages/disadvantages to each of these methods. We have chosen to build our system in a stand-alone program called the Groundwater Modeling System (GMS). The Map Module in GMS provides an interface for building conceptual models and converting conceptual models to a variety of models including MODFLOW & MT3DMS. One important component of a GIS-based modeling system is the capability to import GIS data. Traditionally, we have used the "shapefile" format for importing and exporting GIS data. The shapefile format is a fairly simple file format

  6. Electrical and hydrodynamic characterization of a high current pulsed arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa Martins, R.; Chemartin, L.; Zaepffel, C.; Lalande, Ph; Soufiani, A.

    2016-05-01

    High current pulsed arcs are of significant industrial interest and, aiming to reduce time and cost, there is progressively more and more need for computation tools that describe and predict the behaviour of these arcs. These simulation codes need inputs and validations by experimental databases, but accurate data is missing for this category of electric discharges. The principal lack of understanding is with respect to the transient phase of the current, which can reach thousands of amperes in a few microseconds. In this paper, we present the work realized on an experimental setup that simulates in the laboratory an arc column subjected to five levels of high pulsed current, ranging from 10 kA to 100 kA, with the last one corresponding to the standard lightning current waveform used in aircraft certification processes. This device was instrumented by high speed video cameras to assess the characteristic sizes of the arc channel and to characterize the shock wave generated by the arc expansion. The arc channel radius was measured over time during the axisymmetric phase and reached 3.2 cm. The position and velocity of the shock wave was determined during the first 140 μs. The background-oriented schlieren method was used to study the shock wave and a model for the light deflection inside the shock wave was developed. The mass density profile of the shock wave was estimated and showed good agreement with Rankine-Hugoniot relations at the wave front. Electrical measurements were also used to estimate the time-dependent resistance and conductivity of the arc for times lasting up to 50 μs.

  7. A Carbon Arc Apparatus For Production Of Nanotubes In Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    Although many methods are available for production of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), the conventional carbon arc process remains the most popular due to its simplicity and large production rate. However, high temperatures inside the carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection, and it is hypothesized that the non-uniform environment created by this flow will have large effects on the growth and morphology of SWNTs produced by the arc process. Indeed, using normal gravity experiments, Marin et al. have demonstrated that changes in the buoyant convection plume produced by altering the arc electrode orientation can be used to change the diameter distribution of the SWNTs produced; an effect they attribute to changes in the temperature of the local nanotube growth environment. While these experiments present convincing evidence that buoyant convection has a strong effect on nanotube growth, normal gravity experiments are severely limited in scope. The ideal way to study the effect of buoyancy on SWNT production is to remove it completely. Toward this goal, a microgravity carbon arc reactor has been designed for use in the NASA Glenn 2.2 and 5 second drop towers. Although simple in principle, conventional carbon arc machines, which generally employ large reaction chambers and require heavy duty welding power supplies capable of supplying kilowatts of power, are not suitable for microgravity experiments. Here we describe a miniature carbon arc machine for SWNT production that fits into a conventional drop rig for use on the NASA Glenn 2.2 and 5 second drop towers, but that has a performance (production rate) that is better than most large ground-based machines.

  8. Electrode voltage fall and total voltage of a transient arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valensi, F.; Ratovoson, L.; Razafinimanana, M.; Masquère, M.; Freton, P.; Gleizes, A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with an experimental study of the components of a transient arc total voltage with duration of a few tens of ms and a current peak close to 1000 A. The cathode tip is made of graphite whereas the flat anode is made either of copper or of graphite; the electrodes gap is a few mm. The analysis of the electrical parameters is supported and validated by fast imaging and by two models: the first one is a 2D physical model of the arc allowing to calculate both the plasma temperature field and the arc voltage; the second model is able to estimate the transient heating of the graphite electrode. The main aim of the study was to detect the possible change of the cathode voltage fall (CVF) during the first instants of the arc. Indeed it is expected that during the first ms the graphite cathode is rather cool and the main mechanism of the electron emission should be the field effect emission, whereas after several tens of ms the cathode is strongly heated and thermionic emission should be predominant. We have observed some change in the apparent CVF but we have shown that this apparent change can be attributed to the variation of the solid cathode resistance. On the other hand, the possible change of CVF corresponding to the transition between a ‘cold’ and a ‘hot’ cathode should be weak and could not be characterized considering our measurement uncertainty of about 2 V. The arc column voltage (ACV) was estimated by subtracting the electrode voltage fall from the total arc voltage. The experimental transient evolution of the ACV is in very good agreement with the theoretical variation predicted by the model, showing the good ability of the model to study this kind of transient arc.

  9. Teleseismic detection in the Aleutian Island Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermann, R. E.

    1983-06-01

    Recently it has become apparent that teleseismic detection has decreased substantially in many regions of the world. The major decrease was related to the closure of the VELA arrays in the United States during the late 1960's. This detection decrease has been recognized in South and Central America, Mexico, the Kuriles, the Caribbean, Tonga, and the New Hebrides. In this paper the effect of the closure of these arrays on the reporting of events in the Aleutian Island Arc is examined. In the Aleutians, the detection history is complicated by the short-term installation of a local network on and near Amchitka Island during the early 1970's. The temporal coincidence of the installation of this network and the closure of the VELA arrays delayed the detection decrease in the central Aleutians until the Amchitka network was closed in early 1973. Reporting in the eastern Aleutians was unaffected by the installation of the Amchitka network. In that region the detection decreased between 1968 and 1970, the time of the closure of the VELA arrays. New techniques have been developed which make it possible to determine the effect of station installation or closure on the reporting in some regions. These techniques rely on plots which show the distribution of an observed seismicity rate change in the magnitude domain. These plots make it possible to recognize probable detection changes and to determine quantitatively magnitude cutoffs which avoid these changes. The magnitude level at which these cutoffs are made is termed the minimum magnitude of homogeneity (mmin h). The reporting of events with mb≤4.6 in the Aleutians decreased substantially during the mid-1970's, so mmin h in this region is 4.7. This is different from the magnitude of completeness (mmin c) which is mb = 5.0±0.1. If one is interested in examining seismicity rates for changes which may be precursors to earthquakes, then awareness of detection-related changes and magnitude cutoffs which avoid these changes

  10. Sub Moho boundary beneath island arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iidaka, T.; Igarashi, T.; Lee, C.; Iwasaki, T.; Niu, F.

    2008-12-01

    reflective to seismic waves as compared to the continental ones which are relatively transparent. Locations of the observed sub-Moho appear to correlate well with the active volcanic front, suggesting that the sub-Moho might be formed as the result of arc magmatism.

  11. Single arc volumetric modulated arc therapy for complex brain gliomas: is there an advantage as compared to intensity modulated radiotherapy or by adding a partial arc?

    PubMed

    Davidson, M T M; Masucci, G L; Follwell, M; Blake, S J; Xu, W; Moseley, D J; Sanghera, P; Wong, C S; Perry, J; Tsao, M; Sahgal, A

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) offers advantages over intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for complex brain gliomas and evaluate the role of an additional partial arc. Twelve patients with glioma involving critical organs at risk (OAR) were selected [six low grade brainstem glioma (BG) and six glioblastoma (GB) cases]. BGs were prescribed 54 Gy/30 fractions (frx), and GB treated to 50 Gy/30 frx to a lower dose PTV (PTV50) with a simultaneous integrated boost delivering a total dose of 60 Gy/30 frx to a higher dose PTV (PTV60). VMAT was planned with a single arc (VMAT1) and with an additional coplanar partial arc spanning 90° (VMAT2). We observed VMATI improving the PTV equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for BG cases (p=0.027), improving the V95 for the PTV50 in GB cases (p=0.026) and resulting in more conformal GB plans (p=0.008) as compare to IMRT. However, for the GB PTV60, IMRT achieved favorable V95 over VMAT1 and VMAT2 (0.0046 and 0.008, respectively). The GB total integral dose (ID) was significantly lower with VMAT1 and VMAT2 (p=0.049 and p=0.006, respectively). Both VMAT1 and VMAT2 reduced the ID, however, only at the 5 Gy threshold for BG cases (p=0.011 and 0.005, respectively). VMAT achieved a lower spinal cord maximum dose and EUD for BG cases and higher optic nerve doses, otherwise no significant differences were observed. VMAT1 yielded the fastest treatment times and least MU. We conclude that VMAT offers faster treatment delivery for complex brain tumors while maintaining similar dosimetric qualities to IMRT. Selective dosimetric advantages in terms of spinal cord sparing and lowering the ID are observed favoring the use of an additional coplanar partial arc.

  12. Electrical Evaluation Of Welding Machines Based On The Arc Properties. Application To SMAW, GMAW And GTAW Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, V.; Martínez, A.; Manjabacas, M. C.; Coello, J.; Calatayud, A.

    2009-11-01

    In this work, a methodology to obtain the electrical behavior of arc welding equipments is presented. The method is based on the electrical arc fundamentals and it is applied to Shielding Metal Arc Welding and to Gas Metal Arc Welding processes. For the first one, different arc points are achieved by practicing several arc lengths. For MIG process, different arc lengths are made by changing the feel wire velocity. Arc current and voltage are measured for the different arc length in both cases. Finally, a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding equipment has been used to obtain the electrical arc characteristics as a function of arc length. Different considerations about the thermal and electrical principles related to the arc behavior have been made.

  13. Arc Inception Mechanism on a Solar Array Immersed in a Low-Density Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vayner, B.; Galofaro, J.; Ferguson, D.

    2001-01-01

    In this report, results are presented of an experimental and theoretical study of arc phenomena and snapover for two samples of solar arrays immersed in argon plasma. The effects of arcing and snapover are investigated. I-V curves are measured, and arc and snapover inception voltages and arc rates are determined within the wide range of plasma parameters. A considerable increase in arc rate due to absorption of molecules from atmospheric air has been confirmed. It is shown that increasing gas pressure causes increasing ion current collection and, consequently, arc rate even though the effect of conditioning also takes place. Arc sites have been determined by employing a video-camera. It is confirmed that keeping sample under high vacuum for a long time results in shifting arc threshold voltage well below -300 V. The results obtained seem to be important for the understanding of arc inception mechanism.

  14. Self-consistent radiation-based simulation of electric arcs: II. Application to gas circuit breakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordanidis, A. A.; Franck, C. M.

    2008-07-01

    An accurate and robust method for radiative heat transfer simulation for arc applications was presented in the previous paper (part I). In this paper a self-consistent mathematical model based on computational fluid dynamics and a rigorous radiative heat transfer model is described. The model is applied to simulate switching arcs in high voltage gas circuit breakers. The accuracy of the model is proven by comparison with experimental data for all arc modes. The ablation-controlled arc model is used to simulate high current PTFE arcs burning in cylindrical tubes. Model accuracy for the lower current arcs is evaluated using experimental data on the axially blown SF6 arc in steady state and arc resistance measurements close to current zero. The complete switching process with the arc going through all three phases is also simulated and compared with the experimental data from an industrial circuit breaker switching test.

  15. Bulk Enthalpy Calculations in the Arc Jet Facility at NASA ARC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Corinna S.; Prabhu, Dinesh; Terrazas-Salinas, Imelda; Mach, Jeffrey J.

    2011-01-01

    The Arc Jet Facilities at NASA Ames Research Center generate test streams with enthalpies ranging from 5 MJ/kg to 25 MJ/kg. The present work describes a rigorous method, based on equilibrium thermodynamics, for calculating the bulk enthalpy of the flow produced in two of these facilities. The motivation for this work is to determine a dimensionally-correct formula for calculating the bulk enthalpy that is at least as accurate as the conventional formulas that are currently used. Unlike previous methods, the new method accounts for the amount of argon that is present in the flow. Comparisons are made with bulk enthalpies computed from an energy balance method. An analysis of primary facility operating parameters and their associated uncertainties is presented in order to further validate the enthalpy calculations reported herein.

  16. Sensitivity analysis of physics and planning SmartArc parameters for single and partial arc VMAT planning.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; Yan, Di; Tyagi, Neelam

    2012-11-08

    We investigate the sensitivity of various physics and planning SmartArc parameters to generate single and partial arc VMAT plans with equivalent or better plan quality as IMRT. Patients previously treated with step-and-shoot IMRT for several treatment sites were replanned using SmartArc. These treatment sites included head and neck, prostate, lung, and spine. Effect of various physics and planning SmartArc parameters, such as continuous vs. binned dose rate, dynamic leaf gap, leaf speed, maximum delivery time, number of arcs, and control point spacing, were investigated for Elekta Axesse and Synergy linacs. Absolute dose distribution was measured by using the ArcCHECK 3D cylindrical diode array. For all cases investigated, plan metrics such as conformity indices and dose homogeneity indices increased, while plan QA decreased with increasing leaf speed. Leaf speed had a significant impact on the segment size for low dose per fractionation cases. Constraining leaf motion to a lower speed not only avoids tiny large leaf travel and low-dose rate value, but also achieves better PTV coverage (defined as the volume receiving prescription dose) with less total MUs. Maximum delivery time, the number of arcs, and the spacing of control points all had similar effects as the leaf motion constraint on dose rate and segment size. The maximum delivery time had a significant effect on the optimization, acting as a hard constraint. Increasing the control point spacing from 2 to 6 degrees increased the PTV coverage, but reduced the absolute dose gamma passing rate. Plans generated using continuous and binned dose rate modes did not show any difference in the quality and the delivery for the Elekta machines. Dosimetric analysis with a 3D cylindrical QA phantom resulted in 93.6%-99.3% of detectors with a gamma index (3%/2 mm) < 1 for all cases.

  17. Instability Analysis of Formation of Multiple Arc Anode Attachments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang; Heberlein, Joachim

    2007-10-01

    To understand the origin of the multiple arc-anode attachments and the origin of the restrike behavior in the anode region of high intensity arcs, linear stability analyses of a non-uniform singly-ionized argon plasma and of the arc-anode interface are performed. The short characteristic times of such anode phenomena allow significant simplification and linearization of the governing equations, from which dispersion relations of the plasma are obtained. According to the calculations, we propose that the electron overheating instability and the anode evaporation-ionization instability are responsible for the formation of these anode phenomena. The electron overheating instability, which generates an electron temperature run-away situation, is excited by small-amplitude fluctuations in the plasma with specific combination of current flow, electric field, electron temperature and electron density. The vaporation-ionization instability, which leads to current run-away in a small area, is encouraged by large electric fields accelerating electrons towards the anode. The regions of these instabilities are identified with our experimental measurements. The results show that the multiple arc-anode attachments form in the fringes of the arc, and that the restrike behavior starts from flow instabilities, which bring high electron temperature cloud to the anode surface. Observations to the anode surface confirm the analysis results.

  18. Solar cell arcing: The role of outgassing and contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marinelli, W. J.; Green, B. D.; Upschulte, B. L.; Weyl, G.; Hastings, D.; Aifer, E.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of outgassing, venting, and thruster firing events on spacecraft system performance has been a long standing issue. Recent laboratory measurements on negatively biased high voltage solar cells at Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) suggest that some currently designed and certainly future space power systems must address/re-evaluate this issue. Our observations show that exposing these cells to moderate levels (10 exp -3 torr-min) of H2O vapor enhances the arcing frequency, while heating to 85 C to remove water vapor significantly reduces the arc frequency. The interaction of the adhesive used to attach the cover glass to the solar cell with ambient water vapor is the key factor in determining arcing rates. Elimination of adhesive exposed to the environmental plasma reduces the arc frequency more than two orders of magnitude, and eliminates any sensitivity to H2O exposure. The adhesive may also become a source of spacecraft contamination. Macroscopic amounts were observed to blow off some arc events, and (we assume) electrostatically precipitate at other negatively biased locations. Data, analysis, and potential impact for future space platforms are discussed.

  19. Fine-scale transient arcs seen in a shock aurora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoba, T.; Ebihara, Y.; Kadokura, A.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2014-08-01

    We report, for the first time, fine-scale transient arcs that emerged successively within the initial 1-2 min evolutionary interval of a postnoon shock aurora on 14 July 2012. Data were acquired from ~2 Hz temporal resolution imaging of dayside aurora with a white light all-sky camera (ASC) at South Pole Station (magnetic latitude = -74.3°, magnetic local time = UT -3.5 h). Just after 1809:50 UT at which the initial response to an interplanetary (IP) shock was detected in the postnoon geosynchronous magnetic field, the ASC observed three successive transient arcs of which the locations shifted equatorward with an abrupt jump by ~0.2° in latitude. All of the transient arcs occurred in a closed field line region, ~1.0°-1.5° equatorward of the polar cap or open/closed field line boundary inferred from the intensity ratio of I630.0/I557.7 but just poleward of the shock-induced proton and diffuse-type electron aurorae. Each of the transient arcs had a latitudinal width of ~0.1° and a short lifetime of ~20-30 s. Although the obvious mechanism has still remained unclear, possible interpretations of the fine-scale transient arc features are discussed in terms of a local process of each of the magnetospheric origin (mode conversion) and ionospheric origin (feedback interaction) that may be induced by IP shock.

  20. More About Arc-Welding Process for Making Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeanette M.; Leidecker, Henning

    2005-01-01

    High-quality batches of carbon nanotubes are produced at relatively low cost in a modified atmospheric-pressure electric-arc welding process that does not include the use of metal catalysts. What would normally be a welding rod and a weldment are replaced by an amorphous carbon anode rod and a wider, hollow graphite cathode rod. Both electrodes are water-cooled. The cathode is immersed in ice water to about 0.5 cm from the surface. The system is shielded from air by flowing helium during arcing. As the anode is consumed during arcing at 20 to 25 A, it is lowered to maintain it at an approximately constant distance above the cathode. The process causes carbon nanotubes to form on the lowest 5 cm of the anode. The arcing process is continued until the anode has been lowered to a specified height. The nanotube-containing material is then harvested. The additional information contained in the instant report consists mostly of illustrations of carbon nanotubes and a schematic diagram of the arc-welding setup, as modified for the production of carbon nanotubes.

  1. The mammalian molybdenum enzymes of mARC.

    PubMed

    Ott, Gudrun; Havemeyer, Antje; Clement, Bernd

    2015-03-01

    The "mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component" (mARC) is the most recently discovered molybdenum-containing enzyme in mammals. All mammalian genomes studied to date contain two mARC genes: MARC1 and MARC2. The proteins encoded by these genes are mARC-1 and mARC-2 and represent the simplest form of eukaryotic molybdenum enzymes, only binding the molybdenum cofactor. In the presence of NADH, mARC proteins exert N-reductive activity together with the two electron transport proteins cytochrome b5 type B and NADH cytochrome b5 reductase. This enzyme system is capable of reducing a great variety of N-hydroxylated substrates. It plays a decisive role in the activation of prodrugs containing an amidoxime structure, and in detoxification pathways, e.g., of N-hydroxylated purine and pyrimidine bases. It belongs to a group of drug metabolism enzymes, in particular as a counterpart of P450 formed N-oxygenated metabolites. Its physiological relevance, on the other hand, is largely unknown. The aim of this article is to summarize our current knowledge of these proteins with a special focus on the mammalian enzymes and their N-reductive activity.

  2. Robotic arc welding is off and running at Caterpillar

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, B.

    2000-04-01

    Many experts have long regarded Caterpillar Inc., Peoria, Ill, as not only the largest but perhaps the wisest user of arc welding technology in the world. So it is no surprise Caterpillar was in on the ground floor when robots were first introduced to arc welding. In the early years, which started almost 20 years ago, there were growing pains. There was a huge amount of research into robotic arc welding at the Caterpillar Manufacturing Development Center in East Peoria, Ill., and developments in advanced robotic systems continue today at the Tech Center in Mossville, Ill. The original spadework has paid off to the extent the company now has several hundred robots in operation throughout its plants worldwide specifically engaged in arc welding. Why all this effort? What was the goal? Howard Ludewig, project manager, welding engineering, answered both questions quickly and to the point: Quality, productivity and environmental impact. There was a time not too many years ago when welders wielding semiautomatic guns performed most of the welding operations in a typical Caterpillar manufacturing plant. Most of the welds were made with flux-cored wire. Today, most of the welders have become robot operators or have moved to other jobs. Robotic arc welding systems now make the welds the welders produced in the past. Nowadays, the welds are made mostly by solid, not flux-cored, wire. Things are quiet. The plant area is clean.

  3. Graphite electrode arc melter demonstration Phase 2 test results

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Anderson, G.L.; O`Connor, W.K.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.

    1996-06-01

    Several U.S. Department of Energy organizations and the U.S. Bureau of Mines have been collaboratively conducting mixed waste treatment process demonstration testing on the near full-scale graphite electrode submerged arc melter system at the Bureau`s Albany (Oregon) Research Center. An initial test series successfully demonstrated arc melter capability for treating surrogate incinerator ash of buried mixed wastes with soil. The conceptual treatment process for that test series assumed that buried waste would be retrieved and incinerated, and that the incinerator ash would be vitrified in an arc melter. This report presents results from a recently completed second series of tests, undertaken to determine the ability of the arc melter system to stably process a wide range of {open_quotes}as-received{close_quotes} heterogeneous solid mixed wastes containing high levels of organics, representative of the wastes buried and stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Phase 2 demonstration test results indicate that an arc melter system is capable of directly processing these wastes and could enable elimination of an up-front incineration step in the conceptual treatment process.

  4. Dynamic Resource Allocation with the arcControlTower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipčič, A.; Cameron, D.; Nilsen, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Distributed computing resources available for high-energy physics research are becoming less dedicated to one type of workflow and researchers workloads are increasingly exploiting modern computing technologies such as parallelism. The current pilot job management model used by many experiments relies on static dedicated resources and cannot easily adapt to these changes. The model used for ATLAS in Nordic countries and some other places enables a flexible job management system based on dynamic resources allocation. Rather than a fixed set of resources managed centrally, the model allows resources to be requested on the fly. The ARC Computing Element (ARC-CE) and ARC Control Tower (aCT) are the key components of the model. The aCT requests jobs from the ATLAS job management system (PanDA) and submits a fully-formed job description to ARC-CEs. ARC-CE can then dynamically request the required resources from the underlying batch system. In this paper we describe the architecture of the model and the experience of running many millions of ATLAS jobs on it.

  5. Spectroscopic and video observations of fullerene production arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Lorents, D.C.; Stalder, K.R.; Keegan, D.M.; Ruoff, R.S.; Malhotra, R.M.

    1993-12-01

    Spatially resolved spectroscopic studies of a carbon arc operating under fullerene production conditions have been made across the visible wavelength range using an imaging Optical Multichannel Analyzer. C{sub 2} Swan bands are observed to be the major visible emissions although strong CI and CII as well as He I atomic lines are also observed. Video and photographic studies of the arc characteristics show the Swan-band emissions to be concentrated most intensely near the anode but also to appear strongly in regions well outside the electrode gap region. Vibrational and rotational temperatures of these bands provide information on the temperatures in various regions of the arc. The characteristic spatial structure of the arcs observed in the Swan-band light suggests that they are excited by electrons whose trajectories are controlled by the local electric and magnetic fields. The arc exhibits complex and interesting temporal behavior that has been observed with a video camera using short exposure times. Video film taken through a Swan-band filter clearly shows the dominant spatial features of the C{sub 2} emissions.

  6. Explorations of Mariana Arc Volcanoes Reveal New Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, R. W.; Baker, E. T.; Chadwick, W. W., Jr.; Lupton, J. E.; Resing, J. A.; Massoth, G. J.; Nakamura, K.

    2004-01-01

    Some 20,000 km of volcanic arcs, roughly one-third the length of the global mid-ocean ridge (MOR) system, rim the western Pacific Ocean. Compared to 25 years of hydrothermal investigations along MORs, exploration of similar activity on the estimated ~600 submarine arc volcanoes is only beginning [Ishibashi and Urabe, 1995; De Ronde et al., 2003]. To help alleviate this under-sampling, the R/V T. G. Thompson was used in early 2003 (9 February to 5 March) to conduct the first complete survey of hydrothermal activity along 1200 km of the Mariana intra-oceanic volcanic arc. This region includes both the Territory of Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. The expedition mapped over 50 submarine volcanoes with stunning new clarity (Figures 1 and 2) and found active hydrothermal discharge at 12 sites, including the southern back-arc site. This includes eight new sites along the arc (West Rota, Northwest Rota, E. Diamante, Zealandia Bank, Maug Caldera, Ahyi, Daikoku, and Northwest Eifuku) and four sites of previously known hydrothermal activity (Seamount X, Esmeralda, Kasuga 2, and Nikko) (Figures 1 and 2). The mapping also fortuitously provided a ``before'' image of the submarine flanks of Anatahan Island, which had its first historical eruption on 10 May 2003 (Figures 1 and 3).

  7. Late Cenozoic fault kinematics and basin development, Calabrian arc, Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, S.D.; Turco, E.

    1988-08-01

    Current views for explaining the present structure of the Calabrian arc emphasize bending or buckling of an initially straight zone by rigid indentation. Although bending has played an important role, bending itself cannot explain all structural features now seen in the arc for the following reasons: (1) across-arc extension is inconsistent with buckling, (2) north-south compression predicted by a bending mechanism to occur in the internal part of a curved mountain belt is not present in the Calabrian arc, and (3) lateral shear occurs throughout the arc, not just along the northern and southern boundaries. The model presented here is based on lateral bending of mantle and lower crust (demonstrated by variation in extension in the Tyrrhenian basin) and semibrittle faulting and block rotation in the upper crust. These two styles of deformation are confined to the upper plate of the Calabrian subduction system. This deformation is considered to have been active from the beginning of extension in the Tyrrhenian basin (late Tortonian) and is still active today (based on Holocene seismicity). Block rotations are a consequence of lateral heterogeneous shear during extension. Therefore, some of the observed rotation of paleo-magnetic declinations may have occurred in areas undergoing extension and not just during thrusting. Inversion of sedimentary basins by block rotation is predicted by the model. The model will be a useful aid in interpreting reflection seismic data and exploring and developing offshore and onshore sedimentary basins in southern Italy.

  8. The ultimate arc: Differential displacement, oroclinal bending, and vertical axis rotation in the External Betic-Rif arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J. P.; Allerton, S.; Kirker, A.; Mandeville, C.; Mayfield, A.; Platzman, E. S.; Rimi, A.

    2003-06-01

    The External Betic-Rif arc, which lies between the converging African and Iberian plates, is one of the tightest orogenic arcs on Earth. It is a thin-skinned fold and thrust belt formed in Miocene time around the periphery of the Alborán Domain, an older contractional orogen that underwent extensional collapse coevally with the formation of the thrust belt. Restoration of four sections across the thrust belt, together with kinematic and paleomagnetic analysis, allows a reconstruction of the prethrusting geometry of the Alborán Domain, and the identification of the following processes that contributed to the formation of the arc: (1) The Alborán Domain moved some 250 km westward relative to Iberia and Africa during the Miocene. This initiated the two limbs of the arc on its NW and SW margins, closing to the WSW in the region of Cherafat in northern Morocco. The overall convergence direction on the Iberian side of the arc was between 310° and 295°, and on the African side it was between 235° and 215°. The difference in convergence direction between the two sectors was primarily a result of the relative motion between Africa and Iberia. (2) Extensional collapse of the Alborán Domain during the Miocene modified the geometry of the western end of the arc: the Internal Rif rotated anticlockwise to form the present north trending sector of the arc, and additional components of displacement produced by extension were transferred into the external thrust belt along a series of strike-slip faults and shear zones. These allowed the limbs of the arc to rotate and extend, tightening the arc, and creating variations in the amounts and directions of shortening around the arc. The Betic sector of the arc rotated clockwise by 25° during this process, and the southern Rif rotated anticlockwise by ˜55°. (3) Oblique convergence on the two limbs of the arc, dextral in the Betics and sinistral in the southern Rif, resulted in strongly noncoaxial deformation. This had three

  9. Water content in arc basaltic magma in the Northeast Japan and Izu arcs: an estimate from Ca/Na partitioning between plagioclase and melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushioda, Masashi; Takahashi, Eiichi; Hamada, Morihisa; Suzuki, Toshihiro

    2014-12-01

    The variation in water content of arc basaltic magmas in the Northeast Japan arc and the Izu arc was estimated using a simple plagioclase phenocryst hygrometer. In order to construct a plagioclase phenocryst hygrometer optimized for arc basalt magmas, we have conducted high-pressure melting experiments of relatively primitive basalt from the Miyakejima volcano, a frontal-arc volcano in the Izu arc. As a result of the experiments, we found that the Ca/Na partition coefficient between plagioclase and hydrous basaltic melt increases linearly with an increase in H2O content in the melts. We then selected from literature geochemical data sets of relatively primitive basaltic rocks with no evidence of magma mixing and the most frequent Ca-rich plagioclase phenocrysts from 15 basaltic arc volcanoes including both frontal-arc and rear-arc volcanoes. In the 15 volcanoes studied, plagioclase phenocrysts of high anorthite content (An > 90) were commonly observed, whereas plagioclase phenocrysts in rear arc volcanoes usually had a lower anorthite content (90 > An > 80). In all volcanoes studied, the estimated H2O content of basaltic magma was at least 3 wt.% H2O or higher. The magmas of volcanoes located on the volcanic front have about 5 wt.% H2O in magma whereas those from the rear-arc side are slightly lower in H2O content.

  10. Water content in arc basaltic magma in the Northeast Japan and Izu arcs: an estimate from Ca/Na partitioning between plagioclase and melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushioda, M.; Takahashi, E.; Hamada, M.; Suzuki, T.

    2015-12-01

    The variation in water content of arc basaltic magmas in the Northeast Japan arc and the Izu arc was estimatedusing a simple plagioclase phenocryst hygrometer. In order to construct a plagioclase phenocryst hygrometeroptimized for arc basalt magmas, we have conducted hydrous melting experiments of relatively primitive basaltfrom the Miyakejima volcano, a frontal-arc volcano in the Izu arc. As a result of the experiments, we found that theCa/Na partition coefficient between plagioclase and hydrous basaltic melt increases linearly with an increase in H2Ocontent in the melts. We then compiled published geochemical data sets of relatively primitive basaltic rocks with no evidence of magma mixing and the most frequent Ca-rich plagioclase phenocrysts from 15 basaltic arc volcanoesincluding both frontal-arc and rear-arc volcanoes. In the 15 volcanoes studied, plagioclase phenocrysts of high anorthitecontent (An > 90) were commonly observed, whereas plagioclase phenocrysts in rear arc volcanoes usually had a loweranorthite content (90 > An > 80). In all volcanoes studied, the estimated H2O content of basaltic magma was at least3 wt.% H2O or higher. The magmas of volcanoes located on the volcanic front have about 5 wt.% H2O in magmawhereas those from the rear-arc side are slightly lower in H2O content.

  11. Feasibility of the partial-single arc technique in RapidArc planning for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Rana, Suresh; Cheng, Chihyao

    2013-10-01

    The volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique, in the form of RapidArc, is widely used to treat prostate cancer. The full-single arc (f-SA) technique in RapidArc planning for prostate cancer treatment provides efficient treatment, but it also delivers a higher radiation dose to the rectum. This study aimed to compare the dosimetric results from the new partial-single arc (p-SA) technique with those from the f-SA technique in RapidArc planning for prostate cancer treatment. In this study, 10 patients with low-risk prostate cancer were selected. For each patient, two sets of RapidArc plans (f-SA and p-SA) were created in the Eclipse treatment planning system. The f-SA plan was created using one full arc, and the p-SA plan was created using planning parameters identical to those of the f-SA plan but with anterior and posterior avoidance sectors. Various dosimetric parameters of the f-SA and p-SA plans were evaluated and compared for the same target coverage and identical plan optimization parameters. The f-SA and p-SA plans showed an average difference of ±1% for the doses to the planning target volume (PTV), and there were no clear differences in dose homogeneity or plan conformity. In comparison to the f-SA technique, the p-SA technique reduced the doses to the rectum by approximately 6.1% to 21.2%, to the bladder by approximately 10.3% to 29.5%, and to the penile bulb by approximately 2.2%. In contrast, the dose to the femoral heads, the integral dose, and the number of monitor units were higher in the p-SA plans by approximately 34.4%, 7.7%, and 9.2%, respectively. In conclusion, it is feasible to use the p-SA technique for RapidArc planning for prostate cancer treatment. For the same PTV coverage and identical plan optimization parameters, the p-SA technique is better in sparing the rectum and bladder without compromising plan conformity or target homogeneity when compared to the f-SA technique.

  12. A theoretical analysis of vacuum arc thruster performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Sekerak, Mike; Ziemer, John K.; Schein, Jochen; Qi, Niansheng; Binder, Robert; Anders, Andre

    2001-01-01

    In vacuum arc discharges the current is conducted through vapor evaporated from the cathode surface. In these devices very dense, highly ionized plasmas can be created from any metallic or conducting solid used as the cathode. This paper describes theoretical models of performance for several thruster configurations which use vacuum arc plasma sources. This analysis suggests that thrusters using vacuum arc sources can be operated efficiently with a range of propellant options that gives great flexibility in specific impulse. In addition, the efficiency of plasma production in these devices appears to be largely independent of scale because the metal vapor is ionized within a few microns of the cathode electron emission sites, so this approach is well-suited for micropropulsion.

  13. Purging means and method for Xenon arc lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    High pressure Xenon short-arc lamp with two reservoirs which are selectively connectable to the lamp's envelope is described. One reservoir contains an absorbent which will absorb both Xenon and contaminant gases such as CO2 and O2. The absorbent temperature is controlled to evacuate the envelope of both the Xenon and the contaminant gases. The temperature of the absorbent is then raised to desorb only clean Xenon while retaining the contaminant gases, thereby clearing the envelope of the contaminant gases. The second reservoir contains a gas whose specific purpose is, to remove the objectional metal film which deposits gradually on the interior surface of the lamp envelope during normal arc operation. The origin of the film is metal transferred from the cathode of the arc lamp by sputtering or other gas transfer processes.

  14. PNNL 331 Building Arc Flash Team Investigation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Deichman, Mark L.; Drewrey, John C.; Hodges, Hurtis; Madson, Vernon J.; Minton, Allen L.; Montgomery, Daniel M.; Olson, Marvin E.; Rojas, Pedro H.; Sanan, Sanjay K.; Sharp, Reed D.; Sparks, Bobby R.; Swearingen, Gary L.

    2006-06-06

    On Friday, April 21, 2006, a PNNL electrician was performing repair of an electrical system for the 331 Building chilled water pump (CHWP) No.2, when an electrical arc flash occurred inside a 480V combination motor starter. The electrician was taken to the on-site medical provider for evaluation and was released for return to work without restriction. The electrician was not shocked, but did receive a minor, superficial (first degree) burn on the left wrist. This report, the result of a thorough review by the 331 Building Arc Flash Assessment Team, provides an in-depth look at the steps leading up to the arc-flash and recommendations and opportunities for improvement.

  15. Investigation of Transferred-Arc Cleaning for Thin Film Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Hollis, K.; Castro, R.G.; Bartram, B.

    1998-03-17

    Transferred-arc cleaning is being investigated as a precision cleaning method for thin films on electrically conducting substrates as well as the traditional cleaning and roughening pretreatment for LPPS. Transferred-arc cleaning of copper substrates has been studied to identify the effect of processing conditions on cleaning and roughening characteristics. A Box-Behnken response surface design experiment varying the chamber pressure, substrate standoff distance, and torch current while observing the transferred arc voltage, voltage fluctuation, current, emitted light, and surface cleanliness was performed. The result of the analysis show the effect of the various independent variables on the measured responses. Distinct stages in the cleaning process are identified by their sample cleanliness, voltage level, voltage fluctuation, emitted light, and erosion rate.

  16. Arcing in Leo and Geo Simulated Environments: Comparative Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vayner, Boris V.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Galofaro, Joel TY.

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive tests of two solar array samples in simulated Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) environments have demonstrated that the arc inception voltage was 2-3 times lower in the LEO plasma than in the GEO vacuum. Arc current pulse wave forms are also essentially different in these environments. Moreover, the wide variations of pulse forms do not allow introducing the definition of a "standard arc wave form" even in GEO conditions. Visual inspection of the samples after testing in a GEO environment revealed considerable damage on coverglass surfaces and interconnects. These harmful consequences can be explained by the discharge energy being one order of magnitude higher in vacuum than in background plasma. The tests also revealed a potential danger of powerful electrostatic discharges that could be initiated on the solar array surface of a satellite in GEO during the ignition of an arcjet thruster.

  17. Hot, shallow mantle melting under the Cascades volcanic arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elkins Tanton, Linda T.; Grove, Timothy L.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie

    2001-01-01

    Melting occurs at progressively greater depths and higher temperatures from west to east across the Cascades volcanic arc in northern California, as demonstrated by compositional variations observed in high-alumina olivine tholeiites. The lavas studied erupted from seven vents defining a 75-km-long, east-west transect across the arc, from near Mount Shasta to east of Medicine Lake volcano. The increase in melting depth across the arc parallels modeled isotherms in the mantle wedge and does not parallel the inferred dip of the slab. The depth of mantle melting at which the high-alumina olivine tholeiites were created is ∼36 km at the western end of the transect and 66 km at the eastern end. The very high temperatures of dry melting so close to the crust indicate a transitory condition of the mantle.

  18. Dirac node arcs in PtSn4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yun; Wang, Lin-Lin; Mun, Eundeok; Johnson, D. D.; Mou, Daixiang; Huang, Lunan; Lee, Yongbin; Bud'Ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Kaminski, Adam

    2016-07-01

    In topological quantum materials the conduction and valence bands are connected at points or along lines in the momentum space. A number of studies have demonstrated that several materials are indeed Dirac/Weyl semimetals. However, there is still no experimental confirmation of materials with line nodes, in which the Dirac nodes form closed loops in the momentum space. Here we report the discovery of a novel topological structure--Dirac node arcs--in the ultrahigh magnetoresistive material PtSn4 using laser-based angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy data and density functional theory calculations. Unlike the closed loops of line nodes, the Dirac node arc structure arises owing to the surface states and resembles the Dirac dispersion in graphene that is extended along a short line in the momentum space. We propose that this reported Dirac node arc structure is a novel topological state that provides an exciting platform for studying the exotic properties of Dirac fermions.

  19. Diffuse vacuum arc with cerium oxide hot cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirov, R. Kh; Vorona, N. A.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Liziakin, G. D.; Polistchook, V. P.; Samoylov, I. S.; Smirnov, V. P.; Usmanov, R. A.; Yartsev, I. M.; Ivanov, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    Diffuse vacuum arc with hot cathode is one of the perspective plasma sources for the development of spent nuclear fuel plasma reprocessing technology. Experimental data is known for such type of discharges on metal cathodes. In this work discharge with cerium dioxide hot cathode was studied. Cerium dioxide properties are similar to uranium dioxide. Its feature as dielectric is that it becomes conductive in oxygen-free atmosphere. Vacuum arc was studied at following parameters: cathode temperatures were between 2.0 and 2.2 kK, discharge currents was between 30 and 65 A and voltages was in range from 15 to 25 V. Power flows from plasma to cathode were estimated in achieved regimes. Analysis of generated plasma component composition was made by radiation spectrum diagnostics. These results were compared with calculations of equilibrium gaseous phase above solid sample of cerium dioxide in close to experimental conditions. Cerium dioxide vacuum evaporation rate and evaporation rate in arc were measured.

  20. A temperature controller board for the ARC controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulloch, Simon

    2016-07-01

    A high-performance temperature controller board has been produced for the ARC Generation-3 CCD controller. It contains two 9W temperature servo loops and four temperature input channels and is fully programmable via the ARC API and OWL data acquisition program. PI-loop control is implemented in an on-board micro. Both diode and RTD sensors can be used. Control and telemetry data is sent via the ARC backplane although a USB-2 interface is also available. Further functionality includes hardware timers and high current drivers for external shutters and calibration LEDs, an LCD display, a parallel i/o port, a pressure sensor interface and an uncommitted analogue telemetry input.

  1. Multipoint Observations of Oval-aligned Transpolar Arc Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumnock, J. A.; Le, G.; Zhang, Y.; Slavin, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    We analyze changes in field-aligned currents associated with auroral oval-aligned transpolar arc formation during quiet times on time scales of a few minutes. This is accomplished using observations from the highly accurate multipoint magnetic field measurements provided by the Space Technology 5 mission which consists of three micro-satellites in low Earth orbit. Simultaneous measurements of precipitating particles are provided by three DMSP satellites. We analyze field-aligned currents associated with the dusk oval. For the first time we observe the field-aligned currents associated with the formation of an oval-aligned transpolar arc poleward of the auroral oval which in one case are large compared with the field-aligned currents associated with the auroral oval measured 10 minutes earlier. These events clearly illustrate the dynamic nature of oval-aligned arc formation.

  2. Hot, shallow mantle melting under the Cascades volcanic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins Tanton, Linda T.; Grove, Timothy L.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie

    2001-07-01

    Melting occurs at progressively greater depths and higher temperatures from west to east across the Cascades volcanic arc in northern California, as demonstrated by compositional variations observed in high-alumina olivine tholeiites. The lavas studied erupted from seven vents defining a 75-km-long, east-west transect across the arc, from near Mount Shasta to east of Medicine Lake volcano. The increase in melting depth across the arc parallels modeled isotherms in the mantle wedge and does not parallel the inferred dip of the slab. The depth of mantle melting at which the high-alumina olivine tholeiites were created is ˜36 km at the western end of the transect and 66 km at the eastern end. The very high temperatures of dry melting so close to the crust indicate a transitory condition of the mantle.

  3. Plasma arc welding repair of space flight hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David S.

    1993-01-01

    A technique to weld repair the main combustion chamber of Space Shuttle Main Engines has been developed. The technique uses the plasma arc welding process and active cooling to seal cracks and pinholes in the hot-gas wall of the main combustion chamber liner. The liner hot-gas wall is made of NARloy-Z, a copper alloy previously thought to be unweldable using conventional arc welding processes. The process must provide extensive heat input to melt the high conductivity NARloy-Z while protecting the delicate structure of the surrounding material. The higher energy density of the plasma arc process provides the necessary heat input while active water cooling protects the surrounding structure. The welding process is precisely controlled using a computerized robotic welding system.

  4. Plasma arc welding repair of space flight hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David S.

    1993-01-01

    Repair and refurbishment of flight and test hardware can extend the useful life of very expensive components. A technique to weld repair the main combustion chamber of space shuttle main engines has been developed. The technique uses the plasma arc welding process and active cooling to seal cracks and pinholes in the hot-gas wall of the main combustion chamber liner. The liner hot-gas wall is made of NARloyZ, a copper alloy previously thought to be unweldable using conventional arc welding processes. The process must provide extensive heat input to melt the high conductivity NARloyZ while protecting the delicate structure of the surrounding material. The higher energy density of the plasma arc process provides the necessary heat input while active water cooling protects the surrounding structure. The welding process is precisely controlled using a computerized robotic welding system.

  5. Darwin : The Third DOE ARM TWP ARCS Site /

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, William E.; Jones, L. A.; Baldwin, T.; Nitschke, K.

    2002-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program began operations in its Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale in October 1996 when the first Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station (ARCS) began collecting data on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Two years later, in November 1998, a second ARCS began operations on the island of Nauru in the Central Pacific. Now a third ARCS has begun collecting data in Darwin, Australia. The Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites are operated through collaborative agreements with the PNG National Weather Service, The Nauru Department of Industry and Economic Development (IED), and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's (BOM) Special Services Unit (SSU) respectively. All ARM TWP activities in the region are coordinated with the South Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) based in Apia, Samoa. The Darwin ARM site and its role in the ARM TWP Program are discussed.

  6. High-bandwidth continuous-flow arc furnace

    DOEpatents

    Hardt, D.E.; Lee, S.G.

    1996-08-06

    A high-bandwidth continuous-flow arc furnace for stream welding applications includes a metal mass contained in a crucible having an orifice. A power source charges an electrode for generating an arc between the electrode and the mass. The arc heats the metal mass to a molten state. A pressurized gas source propels the molten metal mass through the crucible orifice in a continuous stream. As the metal is ejected, a metal feeder replenishes the molten metal bath. A control system regulates the electrode current, shielding gas pressure, and metal source to provide a continuous flow of molten metal at the crucible orifice. Independent control over the electrode current and shield gas pressure decouples the metal flow temperature and the molten metal flow rate, improving control over resultant weld characteristics. 4 figs.

  7. High-bandwidth continuous-flow arc furnace

    DOEpatents

    Hardt, David E.; Lee, Steven G.

    1996-01-01

    A high-bandwidth continuous-flow arc furnace for stream welding applications includes a metal mass contained in a crucible having an orifice. A power source charges an electrode for generating an arc between the electrode and the mass. The arc heats the metal mass to a molten state. A pressurized gas source propels the molten metal mass through the crucible orifice in a continuous stream. As the metal is ejected, a metal feeder replenishes the molten metal bath. A control system regulates the electrode current, shielding gas pressure, and metal source to provide a continuous flow of molten metal at the crucible orifice. Independent control over the electrode current and shield gas pressure decouples the metal flow temperature and the molten metal flow rate, improving control over resultant weld characteristics.

  8. Note: Triggering behavior of a vacuum arc plasma source.

    PubMed

    Lan, C H; Long, J D; Zheng, L; Dong, P; Yang, Z; Li, J; Wang, T; He, J L

    2016-08-01

    Axial symmetry of discharge is very important for application of vacuum arc plasma. It is discovered that the triggering method is a significant factor that would influence the symmetry of arc discharge at the final stable stage. Using high-speed multiframe photography, the transition processes from cathode-trigger discharge to cathode-anode discharge were observed. It is shown that the performances of the two triggering methods investigated are quite different. Arc discharge triggered by independent electric source can be stabilized at the center of anode grid, but it is difficult to achieve such good symmetry through resistance triggering. It is also found that the triggering process is highly correlated to the behavior of emitted electrons.

  9. Discovery of a Weyl fermion semimetal and topological Fermi arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Su-Yang; Belopolski, Ilya; Alidoust, Nasser; Neupane, Madhab; Bian, Guang; Zhang, Chenglong; Sankar, Raman; Chang, Guoqing; Yuan, Zhujun; Lee, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shin-Ming; Zheng, Hao; Ma, Jie; Sanchez, Daniel S.; Wang, BaoKai; Bansil, Arun; Chou, Fangcheng; Shibayev, Pavel P.; Lin, Hsin; Jia, Shuang; Hasan, M. Zahid

    2015-08-01

    A Weyl semimetal is a new state of matter that hosts Weyl fermions as emergent quasiparticles and admits a topological classification that protects Fermi arc surface states on the boundary of a bulk sample. This unusual electronic structure has deep analogies with particle physics and leads to unique topological properties. We report the experimental discovery of a Weyl semimetal, tantalum arsenide (TaAs). Using photoemission spectroscopy, we directly observe Fermi arcs on the surface, as well as the Weyl fermion cones and Weyl nodes in the bulk of TaAs single crystals. We find that Fermi arcs terminate on the Weyl fermion nodes, consistent with their topological character. Our work opens the field for the experimental study of Weyl fermions in physics and materials science.

  10. Non-arcing commutation in explosive opening switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, John P.; Newman, Duane; Ford, Richard; Klug, Reja

    1993-01-01

    Explosively actuated opening switches can develop high impedance without arcing. We examine the commutation performance of the repetitively actuated pyrotechnic (RAP) switch in the USAF Armament Technology Battery Power System (ATBPS). The ATBPS stores over 10 MJ at up to 2.5 MA in an inductor. The RAP switch is used to commutate the current into a railgun load. The RAP switch develops several hundred volts before it completely opens and arcs. We have developed an analytic description of the nonarcing opening powers; it is primarily resistive, with current diffusion plays a central role. Experimental results which validate the theoretical model are also presented. The effect can be exploited to achieve higher nonarcing impedance, thereby reducing the destructive effects of arcs on the opening switch.

  11. Provenance of the Walash-Naopurdan back-arc-arc clastic sequences in the Iraqi Zagros Suture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sarmad A.; Sleabi, Rajaa S.; Talabani, Mohammad J. A.; Jones, Brian G.

    2017-01-01

    Marine clastic rocks occurring in the Walash and Naopurdan Groups in the Hasanbag and Qalander areas, Kurdistan region, Iraqi Zagros Suture Zone, are lithic arenites with high proportions of volcanic rock fragments. Geochemical classification of the Eocene Walash and Oligocene Naopurdan clastic rocks indicates that they were mainly derived from associated sub-alkaline basalt and andesitic basalt in back-arc and island arc tectonic settings. Major and trace element geochemical data reveal that the Naopurdan samples are chemically less mature than the Walash samples and both were subjected to moderate weathering. The seaway in the southern Neotethys Ocean was shallow during both Eocene and Oligocene permitting mixing of sediment from the volcanic arcs with sediment derived from the Arabian continental margin. The Walash and Naopurdan clastic rocks enhance an earlier tectonic model of the Zagros Suture Zone with their deposition occurring during the Eocene Walash calc-alkaline back-arc magmatism and Early Oligocene Naopurdan island arc magmatism in the final stages of intra-oceanic subduction before the Miocene closure and obduction of the Neotethys basin.

  12. Lidar arc scan uncertainty reduction through scanning geometry optimization

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Hui; Barthelmie, Rebecca J.; Pryor, Sara C.; ...

    2016-04-13

    Doppler lidars are frequently operated in a mode referred to as arc scans, wherein the lidar beam scans across a sector with a fixed elevation angle and the resulting measurements are used to derive an estimate of the n minute horizontal mean wind velocity (speed and direction). Previous studies have shown that the uncertainty in the measured wind speed originates from turbulent wind fluctuations and depends on the scan geometry (the arc span and the arc orientation). This paper is designed to provide guidance on optimal scan geometries for two key applications in the wind energy industry: wind turbine power performance analysis and annualmore » energy production prediction. We present a quantitative analysis of the retrieved wind speed uncertainty derived using a theoretical model with the assumption of isotropic and frozen turbulence, and observations from three sites that are onshore with flat terrain, onshore with complex terrain and offshore, respectively. The results from both the theoretical model and observations show that the uncertainty is scaled with the turbulence intensity such that the relative standard error on the 10 min mean wind speed is about 30 % of the turbulence intensity. The uncertainty in both retrieved wind speeds and derived wind energy production estimates can be reduced by aligning lidar beams with the dominant wind direction, increasing the arc span and lowering the number of beams per arc scan. Large arc spans should be used at sites with high turbulence intensity and/or large wind direction variation.« less

  13. Hf isotope and concentration systematics of the Mariana arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollstrup, D. L.; Gill, J. B.

    2004-12-01

    Negative Hf concentration anomalies are common but little-discussed geochemical features of island arcs. Because both light rare earth elements (LREE) and Hf may be mobile even in `fluid-dominated' island arcs, it is important to relate their isotopic and elemental ratios to models of slab-mantle mixing. We report new Hf isotope and trace element data for K-rich submarine basalts from the Kasuga seamounts located 10-20 km behind the volcanic front of the southern Northern Seamount Province (NSP) of the Mariana arc. These data, when combined with published data for other Mariana samples, span the full range from low-K tholeiites to high-K shoshonites. Rear-arc Kasuga seamounts seamounts of the NSP have lower 143Nd/144Nd and 176Hf/177Hf ratios than arc-front volcanoes of the Mariana Central Island Province (CIP). Within the CIP, Hf concentration anomalies correlate positively with 176Hf/177Hf ratios. Radiogenic Hf and little or no concentration anomalies characterize samples from fluid-dominated volcanoes (Guguan and Maug), whereas samples from sediment-melt dominated volcanoes (Anatahan and Sarigan) have less radiogenic Hf and larger concentration anomalies. Samples from the Kasuga and Hiyoshi seamounts have even larger negative concentration anomalies and less radiogenic Hf, although the two are not always correlated. These data are consistent with mixing between a depleted mantle and a partial melt of subducted sediment that is saturated with trace accessory phases including zircon, rutile, and monazite. A more volcaniclastic source is needed for the NSP than the CIP. Implications of these findings are three-fold. Partial melts of subducting sediment affect the HFSE and REE budgets of even fluid-dominated island arcs. Slab temperatures must be high enough for a peraluminous melt to be present, even where old, cold slabs are subducting. Refractory accessory phases have the potential to become exotic "nuggets" in the convecting mantle, potentially controlling the

  14. Flow bursts, breakup arc, and substorm current wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Energy liberated by the reconnection process in the near-Earth tail is transported via flow bursts toward the dipolar magnetosphere during substorms. The breakup arc is a manifestation of the arrival of the bursts under flow braking and energy deposition. Its structure and behavior is analyzed on the basis of five striking spatial, temporal, and energetic properties, qualitatively and in part also quantitatively. A key element is the formation of stop layers. They are thin layers, of the width of an ion gyro radius, in which the magnetic field makes a transition from tail to near-dipolar magnetosphere configurations and in which the kinetic energy of fast flows is converted into electromagnetic energy of kinetic Alfvén waves. The flows arise from the relaxation of the strong magnetic shear stresses in the leading part of the flow bursts. The bright narrow arcs of less than 10 km width inside the broad poleward expanding breakup arc, Alfvénic in nature and visually characterized by erratic short-lived rays, are seen as traces of the stop layers. The gaps between two narrow and highly structured arcs are filled with more diffuse emissions. They are attributed to the relaxation of the less strained magnetic field of the flow bursts. Eastward flows along the arcs are linked to the shrinking gaps between two successive arcs and the entry of auroral streamers into the dipolar magnetosphere in the midnight sector. Flow braking in the stop layers forms multiple pairs of narrow balanced currents and cannot be behind the formation of the substorm current wedge. Instead, its origin is attributed to the force exerted by the dipolarized magnetic field of the flow bursts on the high-beta plasma, after the high magnetic shears have relaxed and the fast flows and stop layer process have subsided, in other words, to the "dying flow bursts."

  15. Propagation of back-arc extension in the arc of the southern New Hebrides Subduction Zone (South West Pacific) and possible relation to subduction initiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, M.; Patriat, M.; Collot, J.; Danyushevsky, L. V.; Meffre, S.; Falloon, T.; Rouillard, P.; Pelletier, B.; Roach, M. J.; Fournier, M.

    2015-12-01

    Geophysical data acquired during three expeditions of the R/V Southern Surveyor allows us to characterize the deformation of the upper plate at the southern termination of the New Hebrides subduction zone where it bends 90° eastward along the Hunter Ridge. As shown by GPS measurements and earthquake slip vectors systematically orthogonal to the trench, this 90° bend does not mark a transition from subduction to strike slip as usually observed at subduction termination. Here the convergence direction remains continuously orthogonal to the trench notwithstanding its bend. Multibeam bathymetric data acquired in the North Fiji Basin reveals active deformation and fragmentation of the upper plate. It shows the southward propagation of a N-S back-arc spreading ridge into the pre-existing volcanic arc, and the connection of the southern end of the spreading axis with an oblique active rift in the active arc. Ultimately the active arc lithosphere is sheared as spreading progressively supersedes rifting. Consequently to such incursion of back-arc basin extension into the arc, peeled off and drifted pieces of arc crust are progressively isolated into the back-arc basin. Another consequence is that the New Hebrides arc is split in two distinct microplates, which move independently relative to the lower plate, and thereby define two different subduction systems. We suggest arc fragmentation could be a consequence of the incipient collision of the Loyalty Ridge with the New Hebrides Arc. We further speculate that this kinematic change could have resulted, less than two million year ago, in the initiation of a new subduction orthogonal to the New Hebrides Subduction possibly along the paleo STEP fault. In this geodynamic setting, with an oceanic lithosphere subducting beneath a sheared volcanic arc, a particularly wide range of primitive subduction-related magmas have been produced including adakites, island arc tholeiites, back-arc basin basalts, and medium-K subduction

  16. Multitasking the code ARC3D. [for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, John T.; Hsiung, Christopher C.

    1986-01-01

    The CRAY multitasking system was developed in order to utilize all four processors and sharply reduce the wall clock run time. This paper describes the techniques used to modify the computational fluid dynamics code ARC3D for this run and analyzes the achieved speedup. The ARC3D code solves either the Euler or thin-layer N-S equations using an implicit approximate factorization scheme. Results indicate that multitask processing can be used to achieve wall clock speedup factors of over three times, depending on the nature of the program code being used. Multitasking appears to be particularly advantageous for large-memory problems running on multiple CPU computers.

  17. Unique variable polarity plasma arc welding for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Plasma Arc Torch in 1955 and subsequent to the work at Boeing in the 1960's, significant improvements crucial to success have been made in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Process at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Several very important advantages to this process are given, and the genesis of PA welding, the genesis of VPPA welding, special equiment requirements, weld property development, results with other aluminum alloys, and the eventual successful VPPA transition to production operations are discussed.

  18. Multi-cathode metal vapor arc ion source

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Ian G.; MacGill, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. One embodiment of the appaatus utilizes a multi-cathode arrangement for interaction with the anode.

  19. Graphite electrode DC arc furnace. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-05-01

    The Graphite Electrode DC Arc Furnace (DC Arc) is a high-temperature thermal process, which has been adapted from a commercial technology, for the treatment of mixed waste. A DC Arc Furnace heats waste to a temperature such that the waste is converted into a molten form that cools into a stable glassy and/or crystalline waste form. Hazardous organics are destroyed through combustion or pyrolysis during the process and the majority of the hazardous metals and radioactive components are incorporated in the molten phase. The DC Arc Furnace chamber temperature is approximately 593--704 C and melt temperatures are as high as 1,500 C. The DC Arc system has an air pollution control system (APCS) to remove particulate and volatiles from the offgas. The advantage of the DC Arc is that it is a single, high-temperature thermal process that minimizes the need for multiple treatment systems and for extensive sorting/segregating of large volumes of waste. The DC Arc has the potential to treat a wide range of wastes, minimize the need for sorting, reduce the final waste volumes, produce a leach resistant waste form, and destroy organic contaminants. Although the DC arc plasma furnace exhibits great promise for treating the types of mixed waste that are commonly present at many DOE sites, several data and technology deficiencies were identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) regarding this thermal waste processing technique. The technology deficiencies that have been addressed by the current studies include: establishing the partitioning behavior of radionuclides, surrogates, and hazardous metals among the product streams (metal, slag, and offgas) as a function of operating parameters, including melt temperature, plenum atmosphere, organic loading, chloride concentration, and particle size; demonstrating the efficacy of waste product removal systems for slag and metal phases; determining component durability through test runs of extended duration, evaluating the effect of

  20. Geologic implications of great interplate earthquakes along the Aleutian arc

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, H.F.; Scholl, D.W.

    1993-12-01

    We present new marine geophysical observations and synthesize previous geologic interpretations of the Aleutian arc to show that the epicenters of these great thrust-type earthquakes coincide with upper plate segments of the arc characterized by a coherent forearc structural fabric. We propose that variations in upper plate structural strength and mobility affect the mechanical properties of the interplate thrust zone and need to be considered in localizing interplate asperities. Forearc tectonic segmentaion associated with the partitioning of strike-slip and thrust motions may exert long-term controls on the rates of seismic moment release.