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Sample records for plasmas confines par

  1. Tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, T. Kenneth

    1978-11-14

    Apparatus and method for confining a plasma in a center mirror cell by use of two end mirror cells as positively charged end stoppers to minimize leakage of positive particles from the ends of the center mirror cell.

  2. Alternative approaches to plasma confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper discusses 20 plasma confinement schemes each representing an alternative to the tokamak fusion reactor. Attention is given to: (1) tokamak-like devices (TORMAC, Topolotron, and the Extrap concept), (2) stellarator-like devices (Torsatron and twisted-coil stellarators), (3) mirror machines (Astron and reversed-field devices, the 2XII B experiment, laser-heated solenoids, the LITE experiment, the Kaktus-Surmac concept), (4) bumpy tori (hot electron bumpy torus, toroidal minimum-B configurations), (5) electrostatically assisted confinement (electrostatically stuffed cusps and mirrors, electrostatically assisted toroidal confinement), (6) the Migma concept, and (7) wall-confined plasmas. The plasma parameters of the devices are presented and the advantages and disadvantages of each are listed.

  3. Special topics in plasma confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. B.; Newton, S. L.

    2015-10-01

    > These notes are based on lectures given by one of us (J.B.T.) at the University of Texas in Austin in 1991. Part I concerns some basic features of plasma confinement by magnetic fields as an introduction to an account of plasma relaxation in Part II. Part III discusses confinement by magnetic mirrors, especially minimum- systems. It also includes a general discussion of adiabatic invariants and of the principle of maximal ordering in perturbation theory. Part IV is devoted to the analysis of perturbations in toroidal plasmas and the stability of ballooning modes.

  4. CONFINEMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Koenig, H.R.

    1963-05-01

    The confinement of a high temperature plasma in a stellarator in which the magnetic confinement has tended to shift the plasma from the center of the curved, U-shaped end loops is described. Magnetic means are provided for counteracting this tendency of the plasma to be shifted away from the center of the end loops, and in one embodiment this magnetic means is a longitudinally extending magnetic field such as is provided by two sets of parallel conductors bent to follow the U-shaped curvature of the end loops and energized oppositely on the inside and outside of this curvature. (AEC)

  5. Alternative approaches to plasma confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The potential applications of fusion reactors, the desirable properties of reactors intended for various applications, and the limitations of the Tokamak concept are discussed. The principles and characteristics of 20 distinct alternative confinement concepts are described, each of which may be an alternative to the Tokamak. The devices are classed as Tokamak-like, stellarator-like, mirror machines, bumpy tori, electrostatically assisted, migma concept, and wall-confined plasma.

  6. CORRELATIONS IN CONFINED QUANTUM PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    DUFTY J W

    2012-01-11

    This is the final report for the project 'Correlations in Confined Quantum Plasmas', NSF-DOE Partnership Grant DE FG02 07ER54946, 8/1/2007 - 7/30/2010. The research was performed in collaboration with a group at Christian Albrechts University (CAU), Kiel, Germany. That collaboration, almost 15 years old, was formalized during the past four years under this NSF-DOE Partnership Grant to support graduate students at the two institutions and to facilitate frequent exchange visits. The research was focused on exploring the frontiers of charged particle physics evolving from new experimental access to unusual states associated with confinement. Particular attention was paid to combined effects of quantum mechanics and confinement. A suite of analytical and numerical tools tailored to the specific inquiry has been developed and employed

  7. Plasma confinement. [Physics for magnetic geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, A.H.

    1985-03-01

    The physics of plasma confinement by a magnetic field is developed from the basic properties of plasmas through the theory of equilibrium, stability, and transport in toroidal and open-ended configurations. The close relationship between the theory of plasma confinement and Hamiltonian mechanics is emphasized, and the modern view of macroscopic instabilities as three-dimensional equilibria is given.

  8. PLASMA HEATING AND CONFINING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Bratenahl, Al.; Kunkel, W.B.

    1962-02-13

    ABS> A device is designed for generating, heating, and containing a very pure electrical plasma. Plasma purity is maintained by preventing the hot plasma from contacting insulators, which are a principal source of impurities in prior constructions. An insulator is disposed at each end of a pair of long coaxial cylinders forming an annular chamber therebetween. High voltage is applied between the cylinders and an axial magnetic field is created therethrough. At a middle position on the inner cylinder, a fastopening valve releases a quantity of gas into the chamber, and before the gas can diffuse to the distant insulators, a discharge occurs between the cylinders and plasma is formed in the central region of the chamber away from the insulators. (AEC)

  9. MHD Stability of Centrifugally Confined Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Min

    2003-10-01

    Centrifugally confined plasmas utilize centrifugal forces from plasma rotation to augment magnetic confinement, as an alternative approach to fusion. One magnetic geometry is mirror-type, with rotation about the axis induced from a central, biased core conductor. The outward centrifugal forces from the rotation have a component along the field lines, thus confining ions to the center. The immediate concern, of course, is that the system could be flute unstable to the interchange. The antidote here is that the radial shear in the rotation could stabilize the flute. Our 2D simulations show, first, that plasma pressure is highly peaked at the center away from the mirror end coils. Next, 3D simulations show unequivocally that velocity shear is providing the stability. Further study indicates that the flute stability is sensitive to the density profile. A favorable density profile could be achieved by judiciously placing the particle source, also necessary for a steady state centrifuge. As flows approach the Alfven speed, electromagnetic modes could be involved. The latter is motivated by the question of whether magnetorotational instability, thought to be an angular momentum transporter in accretion disks, could be found in centrifugal plasmas, since all the ingredients are there. We show that the MRI as understood should be stable; however, a related astrophysical instability, the Parker instability, could arise. The Parker instability results in plasma accumulating in regions of bent field lines, further accentuating the bending.

  10. Neoclassical transport in enhanced confinement toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.

    1996-11-01

    It has recently been reported that ion thermal transport levels in enhanced confinement tokamak plasmas have been observed to fall below the irreducible minimum level predicted by standard neoclassical theory. This apparent contradiction is resolved in the present analysis by relaxing the basic neoclassical assumption that the ions orbital excursions are much smaller than the local toroidal minor radius and the equilibrium scale lengths of the system.

  11. Stellarator approach to fusion plasma confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The stellarator is a toroidal fusion plasma confinement device with nested magnetic flux surfaces. The required twist of the field lines is produced by external helical coils rather than by plasma current, as in a tokamak. Stellarator devices are attractive fusion reactor candidates precisely because they offer the prospect of steady-state operation without plasma current. In the last few years the excellent results achieved with currentless stellarator plasmas of modest minor radius (10 to 20 cm) at Kyoto University (Japan) and the Max Planck Institute (West Germany) have made the stellarator second only to the tokamak in its progress toward fusion breakeven, with temperatures T/sub e/, T/sub i/ approx. 1 KeV, Lawson products n tau approx. 2 to 5 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/.s, and volume-averaged beta values approx. = 2%. The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF), now under construction at Oak Ridge Natioal Laboratory (ORNL) and scheduled to operate in 1986, represents a significant advance in stellarator research, with a plasma major radius of 2.1 m, an average minor radius of 0.3 m, and a magnetic field of 2 T for 5 s or 1 T at steady state. ATF replaces the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at ORNL and will use the ISX-B heating and diagnostic system.

  12. Confinement Studies in High Temperature Spheromak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D N; Mclean, H S; Wood, R D; Casper, T A; Cohen, B I; Hooper, E B; LoDestro, L L; Pearlstein, L D; Romero-Talamas, C

    2006-10-23

    Recent results from the SSPX spheromak experiment demonstrate the potential for obtaining good energy confinement (Te > 350eV and radial electron thermal diffusivity comparable to tokamak L-mode values) in a completely self-organized toroidal plasma. A strong decrease in thermal conductivity with temperature is observed and at the highest temperatures, transport is well below that expected from the Rechester-Rosenbluth model. Addition of a new capacitor bank has produced 60% higher magnetic fields and almost tripled the pulse length to 11ms. For plasmas with T{sub e} > 300eV, it becomes feasible to use modest (1.8MW) neutral beam injection (NBI) heating to significantly change the power balance in the core plasma, making it an effective tool for improving transport analysis. We are now developing detailed designs for adding NBI to SSPX and have developed a new module for the CORSICA transport code to compute the correct fast-ion orbits in SSPX so that we can simulate the effect of adding NBI; initial results predict that such heating can raise the electron temperature and total plasma pressure in the core by a factor of two.

  13. Theoretical studies on plasma heating and confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    Three principal topics are covered in this final report: Stabilization of low frequency modes of an axisymmetric compact torus plasma confinement system, such as, spheromaks and FRC'S, by a population of large orbit axis encircling energetic ions. Employing an extension of the energy principle' which utilizes a Vlasov description for the energetic 'ion component, it has been demonstrated that short wavelength MHD type modes are stabilized while the long wavelength tilt and precessional modes are marginally stable. The deformation of the equilibrium configuration by the energetic ions results in the stabilization of the tilt mode for spheromaks. Formation of Ion Rings and their coalescence with spheromaks. A two dimensional electromagnetic PIC codes has been developed for the study of ion ring formation and its propagation, deformation and slowing down in a cold plasma. It has been shown that a ring moving at a speed less than the Alfven velocity can merge with a stationary spheromak. Anomalous transport from drift waves in a Tokomak. The Direct Interaction Approximation in used to obtain incremental transport coefficients for particles and heat for drift waves in a Tokomak. It is shown that the transport matrix does not obey Onsager's principle.

  14. Properties of radio-frequency heated argon confined uranium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon confined, steady state, rf-heated plasma within a fused silica peripheral wall test chamber. Exploratory tests conducted using an 80 kW rf facility and different test chamber flow configurations permitted selection of the configuration demonstrating the best confinement characteristics and minimum uranium compound wall coating. The overall test results demonstrated applicable flow schemes and associated diagnostic techniques were developed for the fluid mechanical confinement and characterization of uranium within an rf plasma discharge when pure UF6 is injected for long test times into an argon-confined, high-temperature, high-pressure, rf-heated plasma.

  15. Comments on experimental results of energy confinement of tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.K.

    1989-04-01

    The results of energy-confinement experiments on steady-state tokamak plasmas are examined. For plasmas with auxiliary heating, an analysis based on the heat diffusion equation is used to define heat confinement time (the incremental energy confinement time). For ohmically sustained plasmas, experiments show that the onset of the saturation regime of energy confinement, marfeing, detachment, and disruption are marked by distinct values of the parameter /bar n//sub e///bar j/. The confinement results of the two types of experiments can be described by a single surface in 3-dimensional space spanned by the plasma energy, the heating power, and the plasma density: the incremental energy confinement time /tau//sub inc/ = ..delta..W/..delta..P is the correct concept for describing results of heat confinement in a heating experiment; the commonly used energy confinement time defined by /tau//sub E/ = W/P is not. A further examination shows that the change of edge parameters, as characterized by the change of the effective collision frequency ..nu../sub e/*, governs the change of confinement properties. The totality of the results of tokamak experiments on energy confinement appears to support a hypothesis that energy transport is determined by the preservation of the pressure gradient scale length. 70 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Long ion plasma confinement times with a 'rotating wall'

    SciTech Connect

    Anderegg, F.; Huang, X.-P.; Driscoll, C. F.; Severn, G. D.; Sarid, E.

    1995-04-15

    Static field errors in a Penning-Malmberg trap exert a drag on confined non-neutral plasmas, causing radial expansion and loss. We suppress this transport by applying an electrostatic wall asymmetry rotating faster than the plasma. This results in inward radial transport and plasma compression. The experiments are performed on a magnesium ion plasma in a magnetic field of 4 Tesla, with in situ Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) measurement of density and temperature profiles. Confinement of ions for up to 10 days is routinely observed.

  17. Stellarator approach to toroidal plasma confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.L.

    1981-12-01

    An overview is presented of the development and current status of the stellarator approach to controlled thermonuclear confinement. Recent experimental, theoretical, and systems developments have made this concept a viable option for the evolution of the toroidal confinement program. Some experimental study of specific problems associated with departure from two-dimensional symmetry must be undertaken before the full advantages and opportunities of steady-state, net-current-free operation can be realized.

  18. Physical investigation of a quad confinement plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Aaron; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Christopher; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Quad magnetic confinement plasma sources are novel magnetized DC discharges suitable for applications in a broad range of fields, particularly space propulsion, plasma etching and deposition. These sources contain a square discharge channel with magnetic cusps at the four lateral walls, enhancing plasma confinement and electron residence time inside the device. The magnetic field topology is manipulated using four independent electromagnets on each edge of the channel, tuning the properties of the generated plasma. We characterize the plasma ejected from the quad confinement sources using a combination of traditional electrostatic probes and non-intrusive laser-based diagnostics. Measurements show a strong ion acceleration layer located 8 cm downstream of the exit plane, beyond the extent of the magnetic field. The ion velocity field is investigated with different magnetic configurations, demonstrating how ion trajectories may be manipulated. C.Y. acknowledges support from the DOE NSSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  19. Achieving Long Confinement in a Toroidal Electron Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Marler, J. P.; Smoniewski, J.; Ha Bao; Stoneking, M. R.

    2009-03-30

    We observe the m = 1 diocotron mode in a partial toroidal trap, and use it as the primary diagnostic for observing the plasma confinement. The frequency of the m = 1 mode, which is approximately proportional to the trapped charge, decays on a three second timescale. The confinement time exceeds, by at least an order of magnitude, the confinement observed in all other toroidal traps for non-neutral plasmas and approaches the theoretical limit set by magnetic pumping transport. Numerical simulations that include toroidal effects are employed to accurately extract plasma charge, equilibrium position and m = 1 mode amplitude from the experimental data. Future work will include attempts to withdraw the electron source in order to study confinement in a full torus.

  20. Plasma networking in magnetically confined plasmas and diagnostics of nonlocal heat transport in tokamak filamentary plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, A. B.; Rantsev-Kartinov, V. A.

    1999-02-01

    The method of multilevel dynamical contrasting is applied to analyzing available data from tokamak plasmas. The results illustrate a possibility of extending the concept of the plasma percolating networks in dense Z pinches (and other inertially confined plasmas) to the case of magnetically confined plasmas. This extension suggests a necessity to append the conventional picture of the nonfilamentary plasma (which is nearly a fluid described by conventional magnetohydrodynamics) with a "network" component which is formed by the strongest long-living filaments of electric current and penetrate the "fluid" component. Signs of networking are found in visible light and soft x-ray images, and magnetic probing data. A diagnostic algorithm is formulated for identifying the role of plasma networking in observed phenomena of nonlocal (non-diffusive) heat transport in a tokamak.

  1. Confinement and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R. J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Synakowski, E.

    1994-03-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has performed initial high-power experiments with the plasma fueled by deuterium and tritium to nominally equal densities. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas, the energy stored in the electron and ions increased by ~20%. These increases indicate improvements in confinement associated with the use of tritium and possibly heating of electrons by α-particles.

  2. Theory for plasma confinement and momentum transport in snakes

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.

    2005-07-15

    A theory for plasma confinement in snakes is developed based on the consequences of the momentum transport resulting from the symmetry-breaking-induced plasma viscosity in the vicinity of an m=1 magnetic island. Here, m is the poloidal mode number of the island. The symmetry-breaking mechanism is the distortion of the magnetic surface associated with the magnetic island embedded in the equilibrium magnetic field. It is demonstrated that a combination of the turbulence suppression and the effects of the orbit squeezing could be responsible for the observed improved plasma confinement in snakes.

  3. Transport processes in magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J.D.

    1991-12-01

    Intensified studies of plasma transport in toroidal plasmas over the past three to five years have progressed through increased understanding in some areas and changed perceptions about the most important issues in other areas. Recent developments are reviewed for six selected topics: edge fluctuations and transport; L-H mode transition; core fluctuations; modern plasma turbulence theory; transient transport; and global scaling. Some of the developments that are highlighted include: the role of a strongly sheared poloidal flow in edge plasma turbulence, transport and the L-H transition; change of focus from {kappa}{perpendicular}{rho}s {approximately} 1 to {kappa}{perpendicular}{rho}s {much lt} 1 fluctuations in tokamak plasmas; modern Direct-Interaction-Approximation plasma turbulence and hybrid fluid/kinetic theoretical models; and transient transport experiments that are raising fundamental questions about our conceptions of local transport processes in tokamaks. 104 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Transport processes in magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J.D.

    1991-12-01

    Intensified studies of plasma transport in toroidal plasmas over the past three to five years have progressed through increased understanding in some areas and changed perceptions about the most important issues in other areas. Recent developments are reviewed for six selected topics: edge fluctuations and transport; L-H mode transition; core fluctuations; modern plasma turbulence theory; transient transport; and global scaling. Some of the developments that are highlighted include: the role of a strongly sheared poloidal flow in edge plasma turbulence, transport and the L-H transition; change of focus from {kappa}{perpendicular}{rho}s {approximately} 1 to {kappa}{perpendicular}{rho}s {much_lt} 1 fluctuations in tokamak plasmas; modern Direct-Interaction-Approximation plasma turbulence and hybrid fluid/kinetic theoretical models; and transient transport experiments that are raising fundamental questions about our conceptions of local transport processes in tokamaks. 104 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Charge exchange cooling in the tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Logan, B. Grant

    1978-01-01

    Method and apparatus for cooling a plasma of warm charged species confined in the center mirror cell of the tandem mirror apparatus by injecting cold neutral species of the plasma into at least one mirroring region of the center mirror cell, the cooling due to the loss of warm charged species through charge exchange with the cold neutral species with resulting diffusion of the warm neutral species out of the plasma.

  6. Laboratory-scale uranium RF plasma confinement experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted using 80 kW and 1.2 MW RF induction heater facilities to aid in developing the technology necessary for designing a self-critical fissioning uranium plasma core reactor. Pure uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into argon-confined, steady-state, RF-heated plasmas in different uranium plasma confinement tests to investigate the characteristics of plamas core nuclear reactors. The objectives were: (1) to confine as high a density of uranium vapor as possible within the plasma while simultaneously minimizing the uranium compound wall deposition; (2) to develop and test materials and handling techniques suitable for use with high-temperature, high-pressure gaseous UF6; and (3) to develop complementary diagnostic instrumentation and measurement techniques to characterize the uranium plasma and residue deposited on the test chamber components. In all tests, the plasma was a fluid-mechanically-confined vortex-type contained within a fused-silica cylindrical test chamber. The test chamber peripheral wall was 5.7 cm ID by 10 cm long.

  7. Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2016-07-05

    An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions ions are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  8. Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2006-04-11

    An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  9. Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2006-10-31

    An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  10. Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2013-06-11

    An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions ions are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  11. Space charge neutralization in inertial electrostatic confinement plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Evstatiev, E. G.; Nebel, R. A.; Chacon, L.; Park, J.; Lapenta, G.

    2007-04-15

    A major issue for electron injected inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) devices is space charge neutralization. A new formalism is developed that will allow this neutralization to occur for both oscillating and steady-state IEC plasmas. Results indicate that there are limits on the amount of compression that can be achieved by oscillating plasmas while simultaneously maintaining space charge neutralization and parabolic background potential. For steady-state plasmas, there are no such limits and space charge neutralization can be achieved even when the plasma becomes quasineutral.

  12. Passive Spectroscopic Diagnostics for Magnetically-confined Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, B. C.; Biter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hillis, D. L.; Hogan, J. T.

    2007-07-18

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities and hydrogen isotopes plays an important role in the study of magnetically-confined fusion plasmas, both in determining the effects of impurities on plasma behavior and in measurements of plasma parameters such as electron and ion temperatures and densities, particle transport, and particle influx rates. This paper reviews spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma radiation that are excited by collisional processes in the plasma, which are termed 'passive' spectroscopic diagnostics to distinguish them from 'active' spectroscopic diagnostics involving injected particle and laser beams. A brief overview of the ionization balance in hot plasmas and the relevant line and continuum radiation excitation mechanisms is given. Instrumentation in the soft X-ray, vacuum ultraviolet, ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions of the spectrum is described and examples of measurements are given. Paths for further development of these measurements and issues for their implementation in a burning plasma environment are discussed.

  13. Theoretical model of fishbone oscillations in magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Porcelli, F.

    1986-11-03

    The onset of electromagnetic oscillations that are observed in magnetically confined plasmas where beams of fast neutrals are injected is associated with the excitation of a mode with poloidal wave number m/sup 0/ = 1 and phase velocity equal to the core-ion diamagnetic velocity. The resonant interaction of the mode with the beam ions is viewed as a form of dissipation that allows the release of the mode excitation energy, related to the gradient of the plasma pressure.

  14. Magnetic plasma confinement for laser ion source.

    PubMed

    Okamura, M; Adeyemi, A; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Kondo, K; Dabrowski, R

    2010-02-01

    A laser ion source (LIS) can easily provide a high current beam. However, it has been difficult to obtain a longer beam pulse while keeping a high current. On occasion, longer beam pulses are required by certain applications. For example, more than 10 micros of beam pulse is required for injecting highly charged beams to a large sized synchrotron. To extend beam pulse width, a solenoid field was applied at the drift space of the LIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The solenoid field suppressed the diverging angle of the expanding plasma and the beam pulse was widened. Also, it was observed that the plasma state was conserved after passing through a few hundred gauss of the 480 mm length solenoid field.

  15. Plasma confinement apparatus using solenoidal and mirror coils

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, T. Kenneth; Condit, William C.

    1979-01-01

    A plasma confinement apparatus, wherein multiple magnetic mirror cells are linked by magnetic field lines inside of a solenoid with the mirroring regions for adjacent magnetic mirror cells each formed by a separate mirror coil inside of the solenoid. The magnetic mirror cells may be field reversed.

  16. Spatially Confined Propagation of Intense Ultraviolet Radiation in Plasmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaomei

    X-ray amplification requires a high energy deposition rate in a high aspect-ratio volume. High power lasers for x-ray laser pumping have become available with the development of the short pulse and high intensity laser technology capable of producing pulses with a peak power as high as 10^{12} watts. Short pulses of high intensity x-ray have been observed in laser -plasma interactions, which encurages many scientists actively pursuing the goal of constructing practical x-ray lasers. Our approach has concentrated on producing high aspect ratio x-ray amplifying medium by spatially confined propagation of high power laser pulse in plasmas. A high intensity laser beam induces nonlinear refractive index changes in plasma. In the case of subpicosecond ultrahigh power laser-plasma interaction, the dominant mechanisms responsible for the refractive index change in plasmas are: (1) the relativistic free electron mass increase due to the increase of electron oscillation velocity in the intense electromagnetic field of the laser pulses; and (2) displacement of free electrons out of the high intensity region of the laser beam by ponderomotive force. Both of the above effects lead to a refractive index change of the plasma, which in turn has a positive lensing effect on the beam. If the focusing effect is strong enough to overcome diffraction the beam will stay in a spatially confined mode of propagation. This confined propagation provides an effective method of concentrating energy. The field intensity associated with the confined propagation is so high that the highly excited medium with high aspect ratio suitable for x-ray amplification can be achieved. In this research we have successfully demonstrated spatially confined propagation of 500 GW subpicosecond laser pulse in laser induced plasma. The measured diameter of the propagation is less than 2 μm and the aspect ratio of the confined propagation is over 1000. The filed intensity associated with the propagation is

  17. Device for plasma confinement and heating by high currents and nonclassical plasma transport properties

    DOEpatents

    Coppi, B.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1973-12-11

    A toroidal plasma containment device having means for inducing high total plasma currents and current densities and at the same time emhanced plasma heating, strong magnetic confinement, high energy density containment, magnetic modulation, microwaveinduced heating, and diagnostic accessibility is described. (Official Gazette)

  18. Negative specific heat of a magnetically self-confined plasma torus

    PubMed Central

    Kiessling, Michael K.-H.; Neukirch, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that the thermodynamic maximum-entropy principle predicts negative specific heat for a stationary, magnetically self-confined current-carrying plasma torus. Implications for the magnetic self-confinement of fusion plasma are considered. PMID:12576553

  19. Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) Fusion using Helicon Injected Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George; Ahern, Drew; Bowman, Jaerd

    2016-10-01

    The use of an external plasma source with the IEC has the advantage that the background pressure in the IEC chamber can be low. This then enables a deep potential well formation for ion confinement. Also unit efficiency is increase due to minimization of ion losses through charge exchange. This technique is under study experimentally for use in a plasma jet propulsion unit and as an IEC type neutron source. Current work has studied the effect of locating the IEC grids off-center in the vacuum chamber, near the plasma entrance from the Helicon. With double grids, the relative potentials employed are also key factors in device performance. Electron emitters are added for space charge neutralization in the case of plasma jet propulsion. Plasma simulations are used to supplement the experiments. Specifically, the electric field and the magnetic field effects on energetic ion trajectories are examined for varying configurations. Funding by NASA, Air Force Research Lab and NPL Associates.

  20. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma.

    PubMed

    Reale, Fabio

    Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered and, therefore, topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones, which provide information on stellar loops) are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses the classification, populations, and the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the loop stranded structure. The section continues with the thermal properties and diagnostics of the loop plasma, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics, hot and cool flows, and waves are illustrated. In the modeling section, some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are divided into those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. More specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC) and impulsive (DC) heating. Large-scale models including atmosphere boxes and the magnetic field are also discussed. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar coronal loops is followed by highlights and open questions.

  1. Implicit Methods for the Magnetohydrodynamic Description of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jardin, S C

    2010-09-28

    Implicit algorithms are essential for predicting the slow growth and saturation of global instabilities in today’s magnetically confined fusion plasma experiments. Present day algorithms for obtaining implicit solutions to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations for highly magnetized plasma have their roots in algorithms used in the 1960s and 1970s. However, today’s computers and modern linear and non-linear solver techniques make practical much more comprehensive implicit algorithms than were previously possible. Combining these advanced implicit algorithms with highly accurate spatial representations of the vector fields describing the plasma flow and magnetic fields and with improved methods of calculating anisotropic thermal conduction now makes possible simulations of fusion experiments using realistic values of plasma parameters and actual configuration geometry.

  2. Confinement of Plasma along Shaped Open Magnetic Fields from the Centrifugal Force of Supersonic Plasma Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Teodorescu, C.; Young, W. C.; Swan, G. W. S.; Ellis, R. F.; Hassam, A. B.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.

    2010-08-20

    Interferometric density measurements in plasmas rotating in shaped, open magnetic fields demonstrate strong confinement of plasma parallel to the magnetic field, with density drops of more than a factor of 10. Taken together with spectroscopic measurements of supersonic ExB rotation of sonic Mach 2, these measurements are in agreement with ideal MHD theory which predicts large parallel pressure drops balanced by centrifugal forces in supersonically rotating plasmas.

  3. Self-confined particle pairs in complex plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisina, I. I.; Lisin, E. A.; Vaulina, O. S.; Petrov, O. F.

    2017-01-01

    The liquid-crystal type of phase transition in complex plasmas has been observed repeatedly. However, more studies need to be done on the liquid-vapor transition in complex plasmas. In this paper, the phenomenon of coupling (condensation) of particles into self-confined particle pairs in an anisotropic plasma medium with ion flow is considered analytically and numerically using the Langevin molecular dynamics method. We obtain the stability conditions of the pair (bound) state depending on the interaction parameters and particle kinetic energy. It was shown that the breakup of the particle pair is very sensitive to the ratio of particle charges; for example, it is determined by the influence of the upper particle on the ion flow around the lower one. We also show that a self-confined pair of particles exists even if their total kinetic energy is much greater than the potential well depth for the pair state. This phenomenon occurs due to velocity correlation of particles, which arises with the nonreciprocity of interparticle interaction.

  4. Self-confined particle pairs in complex plasmas.

    PubMed

    Lisina, I I; Lisin, E A; Vaulina, O S; Petrov, O F

    2017-01-01

    The liquid-crystal type of phase transition in complex plasmas has been observed repeatedly. However, more studies need to be done on the liquid-vapor transition in complex plasmas. In this paper, the phenomenon of coupling (condensation) of particles into self-confined particle pairs in an anisotropic plasma medium with ion flow is considered analytically and numerically using the Langevin molecular dynamics method. We obtain the stability conditions of the pair (bound) state depending on the interaction parameters and particle kinetic energy. It was shown that the breakup of the particle pair is very sensitive to the ratio of particle charges; for example, it is determined by the influence of the upper particle on the ion flow around the lower one. We also show that a self-confined pair of particles exists even if their total kinetic energy is much greater than the potential well depth for the pair state. This phenomenon occurs due to velocity correlation of particles, which arises with the nonreciprocity of interparticle interaction.

  5. Antiproton powered propulsion with magnetically confined plasma engines

    SciTech Connect

    Lapointe, M.R.

    1989-08-01

    Matter-antimatter annihilation releases more energy per unit mass than any other method of energy production, making it an attractive energy source for spacecraft propulsion. In the magnetically confined plasma engine, antiproton beams are injected axially into a pulsed magnetic mirror system, where they annihilate with an initially neutral hydrogen gas. The resulting charged annihilation products transfer energy to the hydrogen propellant, which is then exhausted through one end of the pulsed mirror system to provide thrust. The calculated energy transfer efficiencies for a low number density (10(14)/cu cm) hydrogen propellant are insufficient to warrant operating the engine in this mode. Efficiencies are improved using moderate propellant number densities (10(16)/cu cm), but the energy transferred to the plasma in a realistic magnetic mirror system is generally limited to less than 2 percent of the initial proton-antiproton annihilation energy. The energy transfer efficiencies are highest for high number density (10(18)/cu cm) propellants, but plasma temperatures are reduced by excessive radiation losses. Low to moderate thrust over a wide range of specific impulse can be generated with moderate propellant number densities, while higher thrust but lower specific impulse may be generated using high propellant number densities. Significant mass will be required to shield the superconducting magnet coils from the high energy gamma radiation emitted by neutral pion decay. The mass of such a radiation shield may dominate the total engine mass, and could severely diminish the performance of antiproton powered engines which utilize magnetic confinement. The problem is compounded in the antiproton powered plasma engine, where lower energy plasma bremsstrahlung radiation may cause shield surface ablation and degradation.

  6. Antiproton powered propulsion with magnetically confined plasma engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.

    1989-01-01

    Matter-antimatter annihilation releases more energy per unit mass than any other method of energy production, making it an attractive energy source for spacecraft propulsion. In the magnetically confined plasma engine, antiproton beams are injected axially into a pulsed magnetic mirror system, where they annihilate with an initially neutral hydrogen gas. The resulting charged annihilation products transfer energy to the hydrogen propellant, which is then exhausted through one end of the pulsed mirror system to provide thrust. The calculated energy transfer efficiencies for a low number density (10(14)/cu cm) hydrogen propellant are insufficient to warrant operating the engine in this mode. Efficiencies are improved using moderate propellant number densities (10(16)/cu cm), but the energy transferred to the plasma in a realistic magnetic mirror system is generally limited to less than 2 percent of the initial proton-antiproton annihilation energy. The energy transfer efficiencies are highest for high number density (10(18)/cu cm) propellants, but plasma temperatures are reduced by excessive radiation losses. Low to moderate thrust over a wide range of specific impulse can be generated with moderate propellant number densities, while higher thrust but lower specific impulse may be generated using high propellant number densities. Significant mass will be required to shield the superconducting magnet coils from the high energy gamma radiation emitted by neutral pion decay. The mass of such a radiation shield may dominate the total engine mass, and could severely diminish the performance of antiproton powered engines which utilize magnetic confinement. The problem is compounded in the antiproton powered plasma engine, where lower energy plasma bremsstrahlung radiation may cause shield surface ablation and degradation.

  7. Formation of High-Beta Plasma and Stable Confinement of Toroidal Electron Plasma in RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Haruhiko

    2010-11-01

    The Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device is a laboratory magnetosphere generated by a levitated superconducting magnet. The goals of RT-1 are to realize stable formation of ultra high-beta plasma suitable for burning advanced fusion fuels, and confinement of toroidal non-neutral plasmas including antimatter particles. RT- 1 has produced high-beta plasma in the magnetospheric configuration. The effects of coil levitation and geomagnetic field compensation [Y. Yano et al., Plasma Fusion Res. 4, 039] resulted drastic improvements of the plasma properties, and a maximum local beta value exceeded 70%. Because plasma is generated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) in the present experiment, the plasma pressure is mainly due to hot electrons, whose bremsstrahlung was observed with an x-ray CCD camera. The pressure profiles have rather steep gradient near the superconducting coil in the strong field region. The decay rates of magnetic probe and interferometer signals have different time constants, suggesting multiple temperature components. The energy confinement time estimated from the input RF power and stored magnetic energy is on the order of 1s, which is comparable to the decay time constant of the density of hot electron component. Pure electron plasma experiments are also conducted in RT-1. Radial profiles of electrostatic potential and electron density showed that the plasma rigidly rotates in the toroidal direction in the stable confinement phase. Long time confinement of toroidal non- neutral plasma for more than 300s and inward particle diffusion to strong field regions, caused by the activation of the diocotron (Kelvin-Helmholtz) instability, have been realized [Z. Yoshida et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 235004].

  8. Measurements of uranium mass confined in high density plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeffler, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    An X-ray absorption method for measuring the amount of uranium confined in high density, rf-heated uranium plasmas is described. A comparison of measured absorption of 8 keV X-rays with absorption calculated using Beer Law indicated that the method could be used to measure uranium densities from 3 times 10 to the 16th power atoms/cu cm to 5 times 10 to the 18th power atoms/cu cm. Tests were conducted to measure the density of uranium in an rf-heated argon plasma with UF6 infection and with the power to maintain the discharge supplied by a 1.2 MW rf induction heater facility. The uranium density was measured as the flow rate through the test chamber was varied. A maximum uranium density of 3.85 times 10 to the 17th power atoms/cu cm was measured.

  9. Strong-coupling effects in a plasma of confining gluons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Su, Nan; Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2016-12-01

    The plasma consisting of confining gluons resulting from the Gribov quantization of the SU(3) Yang-Mills theory is studied using non-equilibrium fluid dynamical framework. Exploiting the Bjorken symmetry and using linear response theory a general analytic expressions for the bulk, ζ, and shear, η, viscosity coefficients are derived. It is found that the considered system exhibits a number of properties similar to the strongly-coupled theories, where the conformality is explicitly broken. In particular, it is shown that, in the large temperature limit, ζ / η ratio, scales linearly with the difference 1 / 3 - cs2, where cs is the speed of sound. Results obtained from the analysis are in line with the interpretation of the quark-gluon plasma as an almost perfect fluid.

  10. Laser beam propagation through inertial confinement fusion hohlraum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D. H.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N. B.; Dixit, S.; Neumayer, P.; Moody, J. D.; Pollock, B. B.; Ross, J. S.; Suter, L.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2007-05-15

    A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes have been performed in plasmas that are created to emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. The plasma emulator is produced in a gas-filled hohlraum; a blue 351-nm laser beam propagates along the axis of the hohlraum interacting with a high-temperature (T{sub e}=3.5 keV), dense (n{sub e}=5x10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}), long-scale length (L{approx}2 mm) plasma. Experiments at these conditions have demonstrated that the interaction beam produces less than 1% total backscatter resulting in transmission greater than 90% for laser intensities less than I<2x10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}. The bulk plasma conditions have been independently characterized using Thomson scattering where the peak electron temperatures are shown to scale with the hohlraum heater beam energy in the range from 2 keV to 3.5 keV. This feature has allowed us to determine the thresholds for both backscattering and filamentation instabilities; the former measured with absolutely calibrated full aperture backscatter and near backscatter diagnostics and the latter with a transmitted beam diagnostics. Comparing the experimental results with detailed gain calculations for the onset of significant laser scattering processes shows a stimulated Brillouin scattering threshold (R=10%) for a linear gain of 15; these high temperature, low density experiments produce plasma conditions comparable to those along the outer beams in ignition hohlraum designs. By increasing the gas fill density (n{sub e}=10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}) in these targets, the inner beam ignition hohlraum conditions are accessed. In this case, stimulated Raman scattering dominates the backscattering processes and we show that scattering is small for gains less than 20 which can be achieved through proper choice of the laser beam intensity.

  11. Plasma confinement regimes and collective modes characterizing them

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Zhou, T.

    2012-10-15

    A unified theory is presented for the modes that are excited at the edge of the plasma column and are important signatures of the advanced confinement regimes into which magnetically confined plasmas can be driven. In particular, the so-called EDA H-Regime, the Elmy H-Regime, and the I-Regime are considered. The modes that are identified theoretically have characteristics that are consistent with or have anticipated those of the modes observed experimentally for each of the investigated regimes. The phase velocities, the produced transport processes, the frequencies, the wavelengths, and the consistency with the direction of spontaneous rotation are the factors considered for comparison with the relevant experiments. The quasi-coherent mode [I. Cziegler, Ph.D. dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2011] that is present in the EDA H-Regime has a phase velocity in the direction of the ion diamagnetic velocity in the plasma reference frame. Consequently, this is identified as a ballooning mode near finite Larmor radius marginal stability involving the effects of transverse ion viscosity and other dissipative effects. In this regime, impurities are driven outward by the combined effects of the local temperature gradients of the impurities and their thermal conductivity, while in the Elmy H-Regime impurities are driven toward the center of the plasma column. In the I-Regimes, the excited 'Heavy Particle' modes [B. Coppi and T. Zhou, Phys. Plasmas 19, 012302 (2012); Phys. Lett. A 375, 2916 (2011)] are not of the ballooning kind and are shown to expel the impurities toward the plasma edge in the presence of significant fluctuations. These modes can have a finite frequency of oscillation with a phase velocity in the direction of the electron diamagnetic velocity or they can be nearly purely growing, explaining why there are I-Regimes where fluctuations are not observed. Instead, the modes considered for the Elmy H-Regime are of the ballooning

  12. Control of Internal Transport Barriers in Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panta, Soma; Newman, David; Sanchez, Raul; Terry, Paul

    2016-10-01

    In magnetic confinement fusion devices the best performance often involves some sort of transport barriers to reduce the energy and particle flow from core to edge. Those barriers create gradients in the temperature and density profiles. If gradients in the profiles are too steep that can lead to instabilities and the system collapses. Control of these barriers is therefore an important challenge for fusion devices (burning plasmas). In this work we focus on the dynamics of internal transport barriers. Using a simple 7 field transport model, extensively used for barrier dynamics and control studies, we explore the use of RF heating to control the local gradients and therefore the growth rates and shearing rates for barrier initiation and control in self-heated fusion plasmas. Ion channel barriers can be formed in self-heated plasmas with some NBI heating but electron channel barriers are very sensitive. They can be formed in self-heated plasmas with additional auxiliary heating i.e. NBI and radio-frequency(RF). Using RF heating on both electrons and ions at proper locations, electron channel barriers along with ion channel barriers can be formed and removed demonstrating a control technique. Investigating the role of pellet injection in controlling the barriers is our next goal. Work supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER54741.

  13. Hot Electron Instability in a Dipole Confined Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesner, J.; Mauel, M. E.

    2005-10-01

    In plasma containing energetic electrons, two interacting collective modes, an MHD-like mode and a hot electron interchange (HEI) modeootnotetextN. A. Krall, Phys. Fluids, 9, 820 (1966)., may be present. The linear stability of interchange modes in a z-pinch at arbitrary beta, including a bulk and hot electron species was recently studiedootnotetextN. Krasheninnikova, P. J. Catto, Phys. Plasmas, 12, 32101 (2005).. Using the dispersion relation derived in this reference we show that when necessary conditions are satisfied the two modes may be present or absent in a closed-field line magnetic confinement geometry such as a hard core z-pinch or a dipole. The HEI instability and the MHD-like centrifugally-driven mode have been studied previouslyootnotetextB. Levitt, et al., Phys. Plasmas, 9, 2507 (2002), and 12, 055703 (2005)., including a comparison between the measured mode structure and the predictions of a global low-beta simulation. The radial eigenmode is seen to effect the saturation level of the mode. In the Levitated Dipole Experimenthttp://psfcwww2.psfc.mit.edu/ldx/ electron cyclotron resonance heating produces high beta plasmas containing hot electrons, and instability observations will be discussed and compared with theoretical predictions.

  14. Laser Beam Propagation through Inertial Confinement Fusion Hohlraum Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; Meezan, N B; DIxit, S; Neumayer, P; Moody, J D; Pollock, B B; Ross, J S; Glenzer, S H

    2006-10-26

    A study of the relevant laser-plasma interaction processes has been performed in long-scale length plasmas that emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Experiments in this high-temperature (T{sub e} = 3.5 keV), dense (n{sub e} = 0.5 - 1 x 10{sup -3}) hohlraum plasma have demonstrated that blue 351-nm laser beams produce less than 1% total backscatter resulting in transmission greater than 90% for ignition relevant laser intensities (I < 2 x 10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}). The bulk plasma conditions have been independently characterized using Thomson scattering where the peak electron temperatures are shown to scale with the hohlraum heater beam energy in the range from 2 keV to 3.5 keV. This feature has allowed us to determine the thresholds for both backscattering and filamentation instabilities; the former measured with absolutely calibrated full aperture backscatter and near backscatter diagnostics and the latter with a transmitted beam diagnostics. Comparing the experimental results with detailed gain calculations for the onset of significant laser scattering processes shows that these results are relevant for the outer beams in ignition hohlraum experiments corresponding to a gain threshold for stimulated Brillouin scattering of 15. By increasing the gas fill density in these experiments further accesses inner beam ignition hohlraum conditions. In this case, stimulated Raman scattering dominates the backscattering processes. They show that scattering is small for gains smaller than 20, which can be achieved through proper choice of the laser beam intensity.

  15. Antiproton powered propulsion with magnetically confined plasma engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.

    1989-01-01

    The reaction of the matter-antimatter annihilation, with its specific energy being over 250 times the specific energy released in nuclear fusion, is considered as an energy source for spacecraft propulsion. A concept of a magnetically confined pulsed plasma engine is described. In this concept, antiproton beams are injected axially into a pulsed magnetic mirror system, where they annihilate with an initially neutral hydrogen gas; the resulting charge annihilation products transfer energy to the hydrogen propellant, which is then exhausted through one end of the pulsed mirror system to provide thrust. Numerical simulations were developed to calculate the annihilation rate of antiprotons in hydrogen and to follow the resulting ion, muon, and electron/positron number density evolutions.

  16. Antiproton powered propulsion with magnetically confined plasma engines

    SciTech Connect

    Lapointe, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    The reaction of the matter-antimatter annihilation, with its specific energy being over 250 times the specific energy released in nuclear fusion, is considered as an energy source for spacecraft propulsion. A concept of a magnetically confined pulsed plasma engine is described. In this concept, antiproton beams are injected axially into a pulsed magnetic mirror system, where they annihilate with an initially neutral hydrogen gas; the resulting charge annihilation products transfer energy to the hydrogen propellant, which is then exhausted through one end of the pulsed mirror system to provide thrust. Numerical simulations were developed to calculate the annihilation rate of antiprotons in hydrogen and to follow the resulting ion, muon, and electron/positron number density evolutions. 22 refs.

  17. Alpha Heating and Burning Plasmas in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.

    2016-05-01

    Assessing the degree to which fusion alpha particles contribute to the fusion yield is essential to understanding the onset of the thermal runaway process of thermonuclear ignition. It is shown that in inertial confinement fusion, the yield enhancement due to alpha particle heating (before ignition occurs) depends on the generalized Lawson parameter that can be inferred from experimental observables. A universal curve valid for arbitrary laser-fusion targets shows the yield amplification due to alpha heating for a given value of the Lawson parameter. The same theory is used to determine the onset of the burning plasma regime when the alpha heating exceeds the compression work. This result can be used to assess the performance of current ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility.

  18. Plasma transport coefficients for nonsymmetric toroidal confinement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshman, S.P.; Shaing, K.C.; van Rij, W.I.; Beasley, C.O. Jr.; Crume, E.C. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    A variational principle is developed for computing accurate values of local plasma transport coefficients in nonsymmetric toroidal confinement configurations. Numerical solutions of the linearized drift Fokker-Planck equation are used to obtain the thermodynamic fluxes as functions of collision frequenty and the radial electric field. Effects resulting from the variation of the longitudinal adiabatic invariant J along an orbit (due to particle transitions from helically trapped to toroidally trapped orbits) are treated. The velocity-space distribution resulting from trapped, circulating, and transition particle orbits is well represented by a Legendre polynomial expansion in the pitch angle coordinate. The computational effort is significantly reduced from that required with Monte Carlo methods through use of an efficient treatment of the disparity between the time scales of collisionless and collisional particle dynamics. Numerical computations for a stellarator configuration are presented. 24 refs. 9 figs.

  19. Laser-plasma interactions relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, K. B.

    1998-11-01

    Research into laser-driven inertial confinement fusion is now entering a critical juncture with the construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Many of the remaining unanswered questions concerning NIF involve interactions between lasers and plasmas. With the eventual goal of fusion power in mind, laser-plasma interactions relevant to laser fusion schemes is an important topic in need of further research. This work experimentally addresses some potential shortcuts and pitfalls on the road to laser-driven fusion power. Current plans on NIF have 192 laser beams directed into a small cylindrical cavity which will contain the fusion fuel; to accomplish this the beams must cross in the entrance holes, and this intersection will be in the presence of outward-flowing plasma. To investigate the physics involved, interactions of crossing laser beams in flowing plasmas are investigated with experiments on the Nova laser facility at LLNL. It was found that in a flowing plasma, energy is transferred between two crossing laser beams, and this may have deleterious consequences for energy balance and ignition in NIF. Possible solutions to this problem are presented. A recently-proposed alternative to standard laser-driven fusion, the ''fast ignitor'' concept, is also experimentally addressed in this dissertation. Many of the laser-plasma interactions necessary for the success of the fast ignitor have not previously been explored at the relevant laser intensities. Specifically, the transfer of high-intensity laser energy to electrons at solid-target interfaces is addressed. 20-30% conversion efficiencies into forward-propagated electrons were measured, along with an average electron energy that varied with the type of target material. The directionality of the electrons was also measured, revealing an apparent beaming of the highest energy electrons. This work was extended to various intensities and pulse lengths and a

  20. Two particle system in spherically confined plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munjal, Dipti; Sen, K. D.; Prasad, Vinod

    2017-03-01

    Energy eigenvalues of Harmonium atom are reported for the first time under spherically confined Debye and spherically confined exponentially cosine screened coulomb potential. Energy of different states of Harmonium is analyzed as a function of confinement radius and Debye screening length. Comparison of radial matrix elements of Harmonium atom under spherically confined Debye and spherically confined exponentially cosine screened coulomb potential is done. Interesting results are obtained.

  1. Plasma confinement calculations for TIBER-II: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, E.

    1987-10-14

    This paper compares the empirically based TIBER II design parameters against the reactor parameters of a tokamak based on a theoretical model of heat transport. The motivation behind this project is the following. The present TIBER-II design is based on an empirical scaling of confinement time tau/sub E/ known as Kaye-Goldston scaling. This empirical scaling is based on data from tokamak plasmas whose temperatures did not exceed a few keV, while the TIBER-II requires electron temperatures of 25 keV. The question, then, is whether the Kaye Goldston scaling is valid at temperatures above the range of empirical data. For this we must turn to theory. If a theoretical transport model is available that shows favorable correlation with the Kaye-Goldston scaling in the range of a few keV, then this scaling could be extrapolated to the 25 keV range required for TIBER-II. The project is divided into two parts. Part one of the project concerns the development of a transport model from plasma theory that has empirical support. Part two of the project consists of applying the transport model to the TIBER-II design. 8 refs., 3 tabs.

  2. Transmission Grating Imaging Spectrometer for Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagojevic, B.; Stutman, D.; Vero, R.; Finkenthal, M.; Moos, H. W.

    2001-10-01

    The Johns Hopkins Plasma Spectroscopy Group is developing a transmission grating (TG) based imaging spectrometer for the soft and ultrasoft X-ray (USXR) ranges. The spectrometer will be integrated into a multi-purpose impurity diagnostic package for Magnetically Confined Fusion experiments, which will provide time and space resolved information about radiation losses, Zeff profiles and particle transport. The package will also include 2-D filtered USXR diode arrays and atomic physics and impurity transport computational capability. The spectrometer has a very simple layout, consisting of two collimating and space resolving slits, a TG and a 2-D imaging detector. As detector we are developing phosphor (P45) coated fiber optic plates with CCD and intensified CCD image readout. The performance of a test 5000 l/mm, 2:1 bar to open area ratio TG has been evaluated in the laboratory using a K-alpha Manson source and the emission from a Penning Discharge. The incident and diffracted photon flux was recorded in the 10-300 Å range with a gas flow proportional counter. The measurements show that spectral resolution and efficiency agree well with the predicted values. A device optimized for spectral resolution and higher order suppression will be tested on the CDX-U and NSTX tokamak at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Work supported by DoE grant No. DE-FG02-86ER52314ATDoE

  3. Heavy ion plasma confinement in an RF quadrupole trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schermann, J.; Major, F. G.

    1971-01-01

    The confinement of an electron free plasma in a pure quadrupole RF electric trap was considered. The ultimate goal was to produce a large density of mercury ions, in order to realize a trapped ion frequency standard using the hyperfine resonance of 199 Hg(+) at 40.7 GHz. An attempt was made to obtain an iodine plasma consisting of equal numbers of positive and negative ions of atomic iodine, the positive iodine ions, being susceptible to charge-exchange with mercury atoms, will produce the desired mercury ions. The experiment showed that the photoproduction of ions pairs in iodine using the necessary UV radiation occurs with a small cross-section, making it difficult to demonstrate the feasibility of space charge neutralization in a quadrupole trap. For this reason it was considered expedient to choose thallium iodide, which has a more favorable absorption spectrum (in the region of 2000 to 2100 A). The results indicate that, although the ionic recombination is a serious limiting factor, a considerable improvement can be obtained in practice for the density of trapped ions, with a considerable advantage in lifetimes for spectroscopic purposes. The ion pair formation by photoionization is briefly reviewed.

  4. Mirror-field confined compact plasma source using permanent magnet for plasma processings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Tetsuya; Sato, Kei-ichiro; Yabuta, Yuki; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2016-12-01

    A mirror-field confined compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source using permanent magnets was developed, aiming for the realization of high-quality plasma processings where high-density reactive species are supplied to a substrate with minimizing the ion bombardment damages. The ECR position was located between a microwave transmissive window and a quartz limiter, and plasmas were transported from the ECR position to a midplane of the magnetic mirror field through the quartz limiter. Thus, a radius of core plasma could be determined by the limiter, which was 15 mm in this study. Plasma parameters were investigated by the Langmuir probe measurement. High-density plasma larger than 1011 cm-3 could be produced by applying 5.85-GHz microwave power of 10 W or more. For the outside region of the core plasma where a wafer for plasma processings will be set at, the ion current density was decreased dramatically with distance from the core plasma and became smaller by approximately two orders of magnitude that in the core plasma region for the radial position of 40 mm, suggesting the realization of reduction in ion bombardment damages.

  5. Mirror-field confined compact plasma source using permanent magnet for plasma processings.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tetsuya; Sato, Kei-Ichiro; Yabuta, Yuki; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2016-12-01

    A mirror-field confined compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source using permanent magnets was developed, aiming for the realization of high-quality plasma processings where high-density reactive species are supplied to a substrate with minimizing the ion bombardment damages. The ECR position was located between a microwave transmissive window and a quartz limiter, and plasmas were transported from the ECR position to a midplane of the magnetic mirror field through the quartz limiter. Thus, a radius of core plasma could be determined by the limiter, which was 15 mm in this study. Plasma parameters were investigated by the Langmuir probe measurement. High-density plasma larger than 10(11) cm(-3) could be produced by applying 5.85-GHz microwave power of 10 W or more. For the outside region of the core plasma where a wafer for plasma processings will be set at, the ion current density was decreased dramatically with distance from the core plasma and became smaller by approximately two orders of magnitude that in the core plasma region for the radial position of 40 mm, suggesting the realization of reduction in ion bombardment damages.

  6. Experimental investigation of discharge plasma magnetic confinement in the NSTASR ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Anita; Fitzgerald, Dennis; Owens, Al

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic confinement studies were performed on the state-of-the-art NSTAR ion thruster. The goal of the experimental studies was determine the dependence of plasma confinement and plasma uniformity on the strength and shape of the imposed ring-cusp magnetic field.

  7. Role of Plasma Elongation on Turbulent Transport in Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Angelino, P.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Bottino, A.

    2009-05-15

    The theoretical study of plasma turbulence is of central importance to fusion research. Experimental evidence indicates that the confinement time results mainly from the turbulent transport of energy, the magnitude of which depends on the turbulent state resulting from nonlinear saturation mechanisms, in particular, the self-generation of coherent macroscopic structures and large scale flows. Plasma geometry has a strong impact on the structure and magnitude of these flows and also modifies the mode linear growth rates. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations in realistic tokamak magnetohydrodynamic equilibria show how plasma shape can control the turbulent transport. Results are best described in terms of an effective temperature gradient. With increasing plasma elongation, the nonlinear critical effective gradient is not modified while the stiffness of transport is decreasing.

  8. Improvement of confinement times of lithium ion and electron plasmas in BX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Himura, H.; Noichi, T.; Nakata, S.; Kawai, S.; Sanpei, A.

    2015-06-29

    Confinements of both electron (e{sup −}) and Lithium ion (Li{sup +}) plasmas in the BX-U machine are improved experimentally. For the e{sup −} plasma, the longest confinement time so far has been ∼ 10 s, which is much longer than the classical electron-electron collision time: τ{sub ee} ∼ 0.6 s. On the other hand, for the Li{sup +} plasma, the longest confinement time has been about 0.5 s, which is still much shorter than the classical ion-ion collision time.

  9. System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Bers, Abraham

    1981-01-01

    A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave RF energy is injected into said plasma to estalish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected RF energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected RF energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range .DELTA.. The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width .DELTA. in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated inthe plasma.

  10. System and method for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    1981-01-01

    A system for generating steady state confining current for a toroidal plasma fusion reactor providing steady-state generation of the thermonuclear power. A dense, hot toroidal plasma is initially prepared with a confining magnetic field with toroidal and poloidal components. Continuous wave RF energy is injected into said plasma to establish a spectrum of traveling waves in the plasma, where the traveling waves have momentum components substantially either all parallel, or all anti-parallel to the confining magnetic field. The injected RF energy is phased to couple to said traveling waves with both a phase velocity component and a wave momentum component in the direction of the plasma traveling wave components. The injected RF energy has a predetermined spectrum selected so that said traveling waves couple to plasma electrons having velocities in a predetermined range .DELTA.. The velocities in the range are substantially greater than the thermal electron velocity of the plasma. In addition, the range is sufficiently broad to produce a raised plateau having width .DELTA. in the plasma electron velocity distribution so that the plateau electrons provide steady-state current to generate a poloidal magnetic field component sufficient for confining the plasma. In steady state operation of the fusion reactor, the fusion power density in the plasma exceeds the power dissipated in the plasma.

  11. Observation of Centrifugally Driven Interchange Instabilities in a Plasma Confined by a Magnetic Dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, B.; Maslovsky, D.; Mauel, M.E.

    2005-05-06

    Centrifugally driven interchange instabilities are observed in a laboratory plasma confined by a dipole magnetic field. The instabilities appear when an equatorial mesh is biased to drive a radial current that causes rapid axisymmetric plasma rotation. The observed instabilities are quasicoherent in the laboratory frame of reference; they have global radial mode structures and low azimuthal mode numbers, and they are modified by the presence of energetic, magnetically confined electrons. Results from a self-consistent nonlinear simulation reproduce the measured mode structures.

  12. Persistence of atomic spectral line on laser-induced Cu plasma with spatial confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Anmin; Sui, Laizhi; Li, Suyu; Liu, Dunli; Wang, Xiaowei; Jiang, Yuanfei; Huang, Xuri; Jin, Mingxing

    2016-11-01

    This paper carries out the spatial confinement effect on laser-induced Cu breakdown spectroscopy in a cylindrical cavity via a nanosecond pulsed Q-switch Nd:YAG laser operating at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The temporal evolution of the laser-induced plasma spectroscopy is used to investigate the characteristics of spectral persistence. The atomic spectral persistence in plasma generated from Cu with spatial confinement is experimentally demonstrated, where the results indicate that the diameter of the confinement cavity plays a very important role in the persistence of an excited neutral Cu emission line, while the depth of the confinement cavity is almost independent of Cu (I) line persistence. As the diameter of the confinement cavity increases, the persistence of the Cu (I) line in the plasma grows longer under a certain limit. The likely reason for this phenomenon is that under spatial confinement, the reflected shockwave compresses the plasma and leads to an increase in the plasma temperature and density at a certain delay time, which causes further excitation of atomic population to higher excited levels. Finally, the collision rate between particles in the plasma plume is increased.

  13. Studies of plasma confinement in linear and RACETRACK mirror configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Kuthi, A.; Wong, A.Y.

    1986-06-30

    This report discusses research on the following magnetic mirror configurations: Racetrack; ECRH generated plasmas; RF generated plasmas; potential structures; surface multipole fields, and lamex; hot electron physics; axial loss processes; and RF induced effects.

  14. Effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausik, S. S.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K.

    2013-05-01

    The effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma has been studied in a dusty plasma experimental setup by applying electrostatic field to each channel of a multicusp magnetic cage. Argon plasma is produced by hot cathode discharge method at a pressure of 5×10-4 millibars and is confined by a full line cusped magnetic field confinement system. Silver dust grains are produced by gas-evaporation technique and move upward in the form of a collimated dust beam due to differential pressure maintained between the dust and plasma chambers. The charged grains in the beam after coming out from the plasma column enter into the diagnostic chamber and are deflected by a dc field applied across a pair of deflector plates at different confining potentials. Both from the amount of deflection and the floating potential, the number of charges collected by the dust grains is calculated. Furthermore, the collimated dust beam strikes the Faraday cup, which is placed above the deflector plates, and the current (˜pA) so produced is measured by an electrometer at different confining potentials. The experimental results demonstrate the significant effect of confining wall potential on charging of dust grains.

  15. Effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kausik, S. S.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K.

    2013-05-15

    The effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma has been studied in a dusty plasma experimental setup by applying electrostatic field to each channel of a multicusp magnetic cage. Argon plasma is produced by hot cathode discharge method at a pressure of 5×10{sup −4} millibars and is confined by a full line cusped magnetic field confinement system. Silver dust grains are produced by gas-evaporation technique and move upward in the form of a collimated dust beam due to differential pressure maintained between the dust and plasma chambers. The charged grains in the beam after coming out from the plasma column enter into the diagnostic chamber and are deflected by a dc field applied across a pair of deflector plates at different confining potentials. Both from the amount of deflection and the floating potential, the number of charges collected by the dust grains is calculated. Furthermore, the collimated dust beam strikes the Faraday cup, which is placed above the deflector plates, and the current (∼pA) so produced is measured by an electrometer at different confining potentials. The experimental results demonstrate the significant effect of confining wall potential on charging of dust grains.

  16. Ion confinement and transport in a toroidal plasma with externally imposed radial electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.; Krawczonek, W. M.; Powers, E. J.; Kim, Y. C.; Hong, H. Y.

    1979-01-01

    Strong electric fields were imposed along the minor radius of the toroidal plasma by biasing it with electrodes maintained at kilovolt potentials. Coherent, low-frequency disturbances characteristic of various magnetohydrodynamic instabilities were absent in the high-density, well-confined regime. High, direct-current radial electric fields with magnitudes up to 135 volts per centimeter penetrated inward to at least one-half the plasma radius. When the electric field pointed radially toward, the ion transport was inward against a strong local density gradient; and the plasma density and confinement time were significantly enhanced. The radial transport along the electric field appeared to be consistent with fluctuation-induced transport. With negative electrode polarity the particle confinement was consistent with a balance of two processes: a radial infusion of ions, in those sectors of the plasma not containing electrodes, that resulted from the radially inward fields; and ion losses to the electrodes, each of the which acted as a sink and drew ions out of the plasma. A simple model of particle confinement was proposed in which the particle confinement time is proportional to the plasma volume. The scaling predicted by this model was consistent with experimental measurements.

  17. Quantifying Fusion Born Ion Populations in Magnetically Confined Plasmas using Ion Cyclotron Emission

    DOE PAGES

    Carbajal, L.; Warwick Univ., Coventry; Dendy, R. O.; ...

    2017-03-07

    Ion cyclotron emission (ICE) offers unique promise as a diagnostic of the fusion born alpha-particle population in magnetically confined plasmas. Pioneering observations from JET and TFTR found that ICE intensity P ICE scales approximately linearly with the measured neutron flux from fusion reactions, and with the inferred concentration, n /n i , of fusion-born alpha-particles confined within the plasma. We present fully nonlinear self-consistent kinetic simulations that reproduce this scaling for the first time. This resolves a longstanding question in the physics of fusion alpha particle confinement and stability in MCF plasmas. It confirms the MCI as the likely emissionmore » mechanism and greatly strengthens the basis for diagnostic exploitation of ICE in future burning plasmas.« less

  18. MAGNETIC END CLOSURES FOR PLASMA CONFINING AND HEATING DEVICES

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1963-08-20

    More effective magnetic closure field regions for various open-ended containment magnetic fields used in fusion reactor devices are provided by several spaced, coaxially-aligned solenoids utilized to produce a series of nodal field regions of uniform or, preferably, of incrementally increasing intensity separated by lower intensity regions outwardly from the ends of said containment zone. Plasma sources may also be provided to inject plasma into said lower intensity areas to increase plasma density therein. Plasma may then be transported, by plasma diffusion mechanisms provided by the nodal fields, into the containment field. With correlated plasma densities and nodal field spacings approximating the mean free partl cle collision path length in the zones between the nodal fields, optimum closure effectiveness is obtained. (AEC)

  19. APPARATUS FOR MINIMIZING ENERGY LOSSES FROM MAGNETICALLY CONFINED VOLUMES OF HOT PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1961-10-01

    An apparatus is described for controlling electron temperature in plasma confined in a Pyrotron magnetic containment field. Basically the device comprises means for directing low temperature electrons to the plasma in controlled quantities to maintain a predetermined optimum equilibrium electron temperature whereat minimum losses of plasma ions due to ambipolar effects and energy damping of the ions due to dynamical friction with the electrons occur. (AEC)

  20. Alpha heating and burning plasmas in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Spears, B. K.; Nora, R.; Bose, A.; Howard, J.; Woo, K. M.; Edwards, M. J.; Sanz, J.

    2015-06-01

    Estimating the level of alpha heating and determining the onset of the burning plasma regime is essential to finding the path towards thermonuclear ignition. In a burning plasma, the alpha heating exceeds the external input energy to the plasma. Using a simple model of the implosion, it is shown that a general relation can be derived, connecting the burning plasma regime to the yield enhancement due to alpha heating and to experimentally measurable parameters such as the Lawson ignition parameter. A general alpha-heating curve is found, independent of the target and suitable to assess the performance of all laser fusion experiments whether direct or indirect drive. The onset of the burning plasma regime inside the hot spot of current implosions on the National Ignition Facility requires a fusion yield of about 50 kJ.

  1. Non-axisymmetric magnetic fields and toroidal plasma confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2015-02-01

    The physics of non-axisymmetry is a far more important topic in the theory of toroidal fusion plasmas than might be expected. (1) Even a small toroidal asymmetry in the magnetic field strength, δ ≡ ∂ln B/∂φ ˜ 10-4, can cause an unacceptable degradation in performance. (2) Nevertheless, asymmetries—even large asymmetries δ ˜ 1—can give beneficial plasma control and circumvent issues, such as magnetic-configuration maintenance and plasma disruptions, that make axisymmetric fusion devices problematic. Viewed from prospectives that are adequate for designing and studying axisymmetric plasmas, the physics of non-axisymmetric plasmas appears dauntingly difficult. Remarkably, Maxwell's equations provide such strong constraints on the physics of toroidal fusion plasmas that even a black-box model of a plasma answers many important questions. Kinetic theory and non-equilibrium thermodynamics provide further, but more nuanced, constraints. This paper is organized so these constraints can be used as a basis for the innovations and for the extrapolations that are required to go from existing experiments to fusion systems. Outlines are given of a number of calculations that would be of great importance to ITER and to the overall fusion program and that could be carried out now with limited resources.

  2. Observation of Confined Current Ribbon in JET Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Solano, E. R.; Barrera, L.; Luna, E. de la; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Lomas, P. J.; Alper, B.; Andrew, Y.; Arnoux, G.; Boboc, A.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Brix, M.; Gerasimov, S.; Giroud, C.; Howell, D.; Korotkov, A.; Saarelma, S.; Sirinelli, A.; Pinches, S. D.; Zabeo, L.

    2010-05-07

    We report the identification of a localized current structure inside the JET plasma. It is a field-aligned closed helical ribbon, carrying current in the same direction as the background current profile (cocurrent), rotating toroidally with the ion velocity (corotating). It appears to be located at a flat spot in the plasma pressure profile, at the top of the pedestal. The structure appears spontaneously in low density, high rotation plasmas, and can last up to 1.4 s, a time comparable to a local resistive time. It considerably delays the appearance of the first edge localized mode.

  3. Formation of a field reversed configuration for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2007-02-20

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  4. Formation of a field reversed configuration for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2006-02-07

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  5. Magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma with tuning of electrostatic field

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2006-10-10

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  6. Magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma with tuning of electrostatic field

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2006-03-21

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  7. Formation of a field reversed configuration for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2003-12-16

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  8. Magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma with tuning of electrostatic field

    DOEpatents

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl; Qerushi, Artan; Tahsiri, Hooshang

    2008-10-21

    A system and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  9. Computational Support for Alternative Confinement Concepts Basic Plasma Science

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton D. Schnack

    2002-12-09

    This is the final report for contract DE-FG03-99ER54528, ''Computational Support for Alternative Confinement Concepts''. Progress was made in the following areas of investigation: (1) Extensive studies of the confinement properties of conventional Reversed-field Pinch (RFP) configurations (i.e., without current profile control) were performed in collaboration with the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm, Sweden. These studies were carried out using the full 3-dimensional, finite-{beta}, resistive MHD model in the DEBS code, including ohmic heating and anisotropic heat conduction, and thus for the first time included the self-consistent effects of the dynamo magnetic fluctuations on the confinement properties of the RFP. By using multi-variant regression analysis of these results, scaling laws for various properties characterizing the conventional RFP were obtained. In particular, it was found that the, for constant ratio of I/N (where I is the current and N = na{sup 2} is the line density), and over a range of Lundquist numbers S that approaches 10{sup 6}, the fluctuations scale as {delta}B/B {approx} S{sup -0.14}, the temperature scales as T {approx} I{sup 0.56}, the poloidal beta scales as {beta}{sub {theta}} {approx} I{sup -0.4}, and the energy confinement time scales as {tau}{sub E} {approx} I{sup 0.34}. The degradation of poloidal beta with current is a result of the weak scaling of the fluctuation level with the Lundquist number, and leads to the unfavorable scaling laws for temperature and energy confinement time. These results compare reasonably well with experimental data, and emphasize the need for external control of the dynamo fluctuations in the RFP. (2) Studies of feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes in the RFP were performed with the DEBS code in collaboration with the CNR/RFX group in Padua, Italy. The ideal growth rates are ''passively'' reduced by the presence of a resistive wall within the radius for perfectly conducting

  10. Study of intermittent small-scale turbulence in Wendelstein 7-AS plasmas during controlled confinement transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Basse, N.P.; Zoletnik, S.; Michelsen, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    Confinement transitions in the Wendelstein 7-AS stellarator [H. Renner et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 31, 1579 (1989)] can be induced by varying either the internal plasma current or the external magnetic field. In this paper we report on experiments where closely matched confinement states (good and bad) were constructed using the latter method. Analysis using the former scheme has been reported upon previously [S. Zoletnik et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 44, 1581 (2002)]. The electron temperature, along with the major spectral characteristics of magnetic and small-scale electron density fluctuations, changes dramatically at the transition from good to bad confinement. The fluctuation power is intermittent, and core bursts traveling in the electron diamagnetic drift (DD) direction are correlated between the bottom and top of the plasma, especially during degraded confinement. A corresponding top-bottom correlation for the edge ion DD direction turbulence feature was not found. Strong correlations are observed both between the two density fluctuation signals and between magnetic and density fluctuations in bad compared to good confinement. The correlation time of the bursts is of order 100 {mu}s, similar to the lifetime observed during edge localized modes.

  11. Study of intermittent small-scale turbulence in Wendelstein 7-AS plasmas during controlled confinement transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basse, N. P.; Zoletnik, S.; Michelsen, P. K.; W7-As Team

    2005-01-01

    Confinement transitions in the Wendelstein 7-AS stellarator [H. Renner et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 31, 1579 (1989)] can be induced by varying either the internal plasma current or the external magnetic field. In this paper we report on experiments where closely matched confinement states (good and bad) were constructed using the latter method. Analysis using the former scheme has been reported upon previously [S. Zoletnik et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 44, 1581 (2002)]. The electron temperature, along with the major spectral characteristics of magnetic and small-scale electron density fluctuations, changes dramatically at the transition from good to bad confinement. The fluctuation power is intermittent, and core bursts traveling in the electron diamagnetic drift (DD) direction are correlated between the bottom and top of the plasma, especially during degraded confinement. A corresponding top-bottom correlation for the edge ion DD direction turbulence feature was not found. Strong correlations are observed both between the two density fluctuation signals and between magnetic and density fluctuations in bad compared to good confinement. The correlation time of the bursts is of order 100μs, similar to the lifetime observed during edge localized modes.

  12. Turbulence and atomic physics in magnetically confined plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marandet, Y.; Bufferand, H.; Ciraolo, G.; Nace, N.; Serre, E.; Tamain, P.; Valentinuzzi, M.

    2017-03-01

    An overview of issues related to the interplay between atomic process and turbulence in the peripheral regions of magnetically confined fusion devices is presented. Both atomic processes and turbulence play key roles for fusion, but have most of the time been treated separately. The effects of fluctuations on the time averaged ionization balance, on the transport of neutral particles (atoms and molecules) are discussed, using stochastic models to generate fluctuations with statistically relevant properties. Then applications to optical diagnostics of turbulence, namely gas puff imaging and beam emission spectroscopy are discussed.

  13. Formation of high-{beta} plasma and stable confinement of toroidal electron plasma in Ring Trap 1

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, H.; Yoshida, Z.; Morikawa, J.; Furukawa, M.; Yano, Y.; Kawai, Y.; Kobayashi, M.; Vogel, G.; Mikami, H.

    2011-05-15

    Formation of high-{beta} electron cyclotron resonance heating plasma and stable confinement of pure electron plasma have been realized in the Ring Trap 1 device, a magnetospheric configuration generated by a levitated dipole field magnet. The effects of coil levitation resulted in drastic improvements of the confinement properties, and the maximum local {beta} value has exceeded 70%. Hot electrons are major component of electron populations, and its particle confinement time is 0.5 s. Plasma has a peaked density profile in strong field region [H. Saitoh et al., 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference EXC/9-4Rb (2010)]. In pure electron plasma experiment, inward particle diffusion is realized, and electrons are stably trapped for more than 300 s. When the plasma is in turbulent state during beam injection, plasma flow has a shear, which activates the diocotron (Kelvin-Helmholtz) instability. The canonical angular momentum of the particle is not conserved in this phase, realizing the radial diffusion of charged particles across closed magnetic surfaces. [Z. Yoshida et al., Phys Rev. Lett. 104, 235004 (2010); H. Saitoh et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 112111 (2010).].

  14. Confinement Time Exceeding One Second for a Toroidal Electron Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Marler, J. P.; Stoneking, M. R.

    2008-04-18

    Nearly steady-state electron plasmas are trapped in a toroidal magnetic field for the first time. We report the first results from a new toroidal electron plasma experiment, the Lawrence Non-neutral Torus II, in which electron densities on the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3} are trapped in a 270 deg. toroidal arc (670 G toroidal magnetic field) by application of trapping potentials to segments of a conducting shell. The total charge inferred from measurements of the frequency of the m=1 diocotron mode is observed to decay on a 3 s time scale, a time scale that approaches the predicted limit due to magnetic pumping transport. Three seconds represents {approx_equal}10{sup 5} periods of the lowest frequency plasma mode, indicating that nearly steady-state conditions are achieved.

  15. Observation of the hot electron interchange instability in a high beta dipolar confined plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Eugenio Enrique

    In this thesis the first study of the high beta, hot electron interchange (HEI) instability in a laboratory, dipolar confined plasma is presented. The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) is a new research facility that explores the confinement and stability of plasma created within the dipole field produced by a strong superconducting magnet. In initial experiments long-pulse, quasi-steady state microwave discharges lasting more than 10 sec have been produced with equilibria having peak beta values of 20%. Creation of high-pressure, high beta plasma is possible only when intense HEI instabilities are stabilized by sufficiently high background plasma density. LDX plasma exist within one of three regimes characterized by its response to heating and fueling. The observed HEI instability depends on the regime and can take one of three forms: as quasiperiodic bursts during the low density, low beta plasma regime, as local high beta relaxation events in the high beta plasma regime, and as global, intense energy relaxation bursts, both in the high beta and afterglow plasma regimes. Measurements of the HEI instability are made using high-impedance, floating potential probes and fast Mirnov coils. Analysis of these signals reveals the extent of the transport during high beta plasmas. During intense high beta HEI instabilities, fluctuations at the edge significantly exceed the magnitude of the equilibrium field generated by the high beta electrons and energetic electron confinement ends in under 100 musec. For heated plasmas, one of the consequences of the observed high beta transport is the presence of hysteresis in the neutral gas fueling required to stabilize and maintain the high beta plasma. Finally, a nonlinear, self-consistent numerical simulation of the growth and saturation of the HEI instability has been adapted for LDX and compared to experimental observations.

  16. [Analysis of Cr in soil by LIBS based on conical spatial confinement of plasma].

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong-Zeng; Yao, Ming-Yin; Chen, Tian-Bing; Li, Wen-Bing; Zheng, Mei-Lan; Xu, Xue-Hong; Tu, Jian-Ping; Liu, Mu-Hua

    2013-11-01

    The present study is to improve the sensitivity of detection and reduce the limit of detection in detecting heavy metal of soil by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The Cr element of national standard soil was regarded as the research object. In the experiment, a conical cavity with small diameter end of 20 mm and large diameter end of 45 mm respectively was installed below the focusing lens near the experiment sample to mainly confine the signal transmitted by plasma and to some extent to confine the plasma itself in the LIBS setup. In detecting Cr I 425.44 nm, the beast delay time gained from experiment is 1.3 micros, and the relative standard deviation is below 10%. Compared with the setup of non-spatial confinement, the spectral intensity of Cr in the soil sample was enhanced more than 7%. Calibration curve was established in the Cr concentration range from 60 to 400 microg x g(-1). Under the condition of spatial confinement, the liner regression coefficient and the limit of detection were 0.997 71 and 18.85 microg x g(-1) respectively, however, the regression coefficient and the limit of detection were 0.991 22 and 36.99 microg x g(-1) without spatial confinement. So, this shows that conical spatial confinement can/improve the sensitivity of detection and enhance the spectral intensity. And it is a good auxiliary function in detecting Cr in the soil by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  17. Convective plasma stability consistent with MHD equilibrium in magnetic confinement systems with a decreasing field

    SciTech Connect

    Tsventoukh, M. M.

    2010-10-15

    A study is made of the convective (interchange, or flute) plasma stability consistent with equilibrium in magnetic confinement systems with a magnetic field decreasing outward and large curvature of magnetic field lines. Algorithms are developed which calculate convective plasma stability from the Kruskal-Oberman kinetic criterion and in which the convective stability is iteratively consistent with MHD equilibrium for a given pressure and a given type of anisotropy in actual magnetic geometry. Vacuum and equilibrium convectively stable configurations in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field are calculated. It is shown that, in convectively stable equilibrium, the possibility of achieving high plasma pressures in the central region is restricted either by the expansion of the separatrix (when there are large regions of a weak magnetic field) or by the filamentation of the gradient plasma current (when there are small regions of a weak magnetic field, in which case the pressure drops mainly near the separatrix). It is found that, from the standpoint of equilibrium and of the onset of nonpotential ballooning modes, a kinetic description of convective stability yields better plasma confinement parameters in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field than a simpler MHD model and makes it possible to substantially improve the confinement parameters for a given type of anisotropy. For the Magnetor experimental compact device, the maximum central pressure consistent with equilibrium and stability is calculated to be as high as {beta} {approx} 30%. It is shown that, for the anisotropy of the distribution function that is typical of a background ECR plasma, the limiting pressure gradient is about two times steeper than that for an isotropic plasma. From a practical point of view, the possibility is demonstrated of achieving better confinement parameters of a hot collisionless plasma in systems with a decreasing, highly curved magnetic field

  18. Impeding hohlraum plasma stagnation in inertial-confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Frenje, J A; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Zylstra, A B; Petrasso, R D; Amendt, P A; Landen, O L; Mackinnon, A J; Town, R P J; Wilks, S C; Betti, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Soures, J M; Hund, J; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A

    2012-01-13

    This Letter reports the first time-gated proton radiography of the spatial structure and temporal evolution of how the fill gas compresses the wall blowoff, inhibits plasma jet formation, and impedes plasma stagnation in the hohlraum interior. The potential roles of spontaneously generated electric and magnetic fields in the hohlraum dynamics and capsule implosion are discussed. It is shown that interpenetration of the two materials could result from the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability occurring as the lighter, decelerating ionized fill gas pushes against the heavier, expanding gold wall blowoff. This experiment showed new observations of the effects of the fill gas on x-ray driven implosions, and an improved understanding of these results could impact the ongoing ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility.

  19. Electron Plasma Confinement in a Partially Toroidal Trap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-24

    2002 American Institute of Physics 0-7354-0050-4/02/$19.00 671 plane superimposed on the cross - field drifts can close the drift orbits. In the tokamak...equipotential contours. Because the plasma is nonneutral, the drift results in a current, J, which when crossed into the magnetic field , B, balances the...equilibrium momentum equation is evident, J x B = Vp. In MHD theory the diamagnetic current crossed into the magnetic field balances the pressure gradient

  20. On the magnetized disruption of inertially-confined plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, Mario; Kuranz, Carolyn; Rasmus, Alexander; Klein, Sallee; MacDonald, Michael; Trantham, Matt; Fein, Jeff; Belancourt, Patrick; Young, Rachel; Keiter, Paul; Drake, R. Paul; Pollock, Brad; Park, Jaebum; Hazi, Andrew; Williams, Jackson; Chen, Hui

    2016-10-01

    The creation and disruption of inertially-collimated plasma flows is investigated through experiment, simulation, and analytical modeling. Laser-generated plasma-jets are shown to be disrupted by an applied 5T B-field along the jet axis. An analytical model of the system describes the disruption mechanism through the competing effects of B-field advection and diffusion. These results indicate that for Rem 10-100, the ratio of inertial to magnetic pressures plays an important role in determining whether a jet is formed, but at high enough Rem , axial B-field amplification prevents inertial collimation altogether. This work is funded by the U.S. DOE, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in HED Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0001840 and in collaboration with LLNL under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Support for this work was provided by NASA, under contract NAS8-03060, through Einstein Postdoctoral Fellowship Grant Number PF3-140111. Software used in this work was developed in part by the DOE NNSA ASC- and DOE Office of Science ASCR-supported Flash Center.

  1. Improved confinement in JET high β plasmas with an ITER-like wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challis, C. D.; Garcia, J.; Beurskens, M.; Buratti, P.; Delabie, E.; Drewelow, P.; Frassinetti, L.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N.; Hobirk, J.; Joffrin, E.; Keeling, D.; King, D. B.; Maggi, C. F.; Mailloux, J.; Marchetto, C.; McDonald, D.; Nunes, I.; Pucella, G.; Saarelma, S.; Simpson, J.; Contributors, JET

    2015-05-01

    The replacement of the JET carbon wall (C-wall) by a Be/W ITER-like wall (ILW) has affected the plasma energy confinement. To investigate this, experiments have been performed with both the C-wall and ILW to vary the heating power over a wide range for plasmas with different shapes. It was found that the power degradation of thermal energy confinement was weak with the ILW; much weaker than the IPB98(y,2) scaling and resulting in an increase in normalized confinement from H98 ˜ 0.9 at βN ˜ 1.5 to H98 ˜ 1.2-1.3 at βN ˜ 2.5 - 3.0 as the power was increased (where H98 = τE/τIPB98(y,2) and βN = βTBT/aIP in % T/mMA). This reproduces the general trend in JET of higher normalized confinement in the so-called ‘hybrid’ domain, where normalized β is typically above 2.5, compared with ‘baseline’ ELMy H-mode plasmas with βN ˜ 1.5 - 2.0. This weak power degradation of confinement, which was also seen with the C-wall experiments at low triangularity, is due to both increased edge pedestal pressure and core pressure peaking at high power. By contrast, the high triangularity C-wall plasmas exhibited elevated H98 over a wide power range with strong, IPB98(y,2)-like, power degradation. This strong power degradation of confinement appears to be linked to an increase in the source of neutral particles from the wall as the power increased, an effect that was not reproduced with the ILW. The reason for the loss of improved confinement domain at low power with the ILW is yet to be clarified, but contributing factors may include changes in the rate of gas injection, wall recycling, plasma composition and radiation. The results presented in this paper show that the choice of wall materials can strongly affect plasma performance, even changing confinement scalings that are relied upon for extrapolation to future devices.

  2. Initial confinement studies of ohmically heated plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimion, P.C.; Bell, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Bretz, N.; Cecchi, J.L.; Coonrod, J.; Davis, S.; Dylla, H.F.; Fonck, R.; Furth, H.P.

    1984-06-01

    Initial operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has concentrated upon confinement studies of ohmically heated hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. Total energy confinement times (tau/sub E/) are 0.1 to 0.2 s for a line-average density range (anti n/sub e/) of 1 to 2.5 x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/ with electron temperatures of T/sub e/(o) approx. 1.2 to 2.2 keV, ion temperatures of T/sub i/(o) approx. 0.9 to 1.5 keV, and Z/sub eff/ approx. 3. A comparison of PLT, PDX, and TFTR plasma confinement supports a dimension-cubed scaling law.

  3. Energy Confinement Recovery in Low Collisionality ITER Shape Plasmas with Applied Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, L.; Grierson, B.; Logan, N.; Nazikian, R.

    2016-10-01

    Application of RMPs to low collisionality (ν*e < 0.4) ITER shape plasmas on DIII-D leads to a rapid reduction in stored energy due to density pumpout that is sometimes followed by a gradual recovery in the plasma stored energy. Understanding this confinement recovery is essential to optimize the confinement of RMP plasmas in present and future devices such as ITER. Transport modeling using TRANSP+TGLF indicates that the core a/LTi is stiff in these plasmas while the ion temperature gradient is much less stiff in the pedestal region. The reduction in the edge density during pumpout leads to an increase in the core ion temperature predicted by TGLF based on experimental data. This is correlated to the increase in the normalized ion heat flux. Transport stiffness in the core combined with an increase in the edge a/LTi results in an increase of the plasma stored energy, consistent with experimental observations. For plasmas where the edge density is controlled using deuterium gas puffs, the effect of the RMP on ion thermal confinement is significantly reduced. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  4. Electromagnetic Confined Plasma Target for Interaction Studies with Intense Laser Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zielbauer, B; Ursescu, U; Trotsenko, S; Spillmann, U; Schuch, R; Stohlker, T; Kuhl, T; Borneis, S; Schenkel, T; McDonald, J; Schneider, D

    2006-08-09

    The paper describes a novel application of an electron beam ion trap as a plasma target facility for intense laser-plasma interaction studies. The low density plasma target ({approx}10{sup 13}/cm{sup 3}) is confined in a mobile cryogenic electromagnetic charged particle trap, with the magnetic confinement field of 1-3T maintained by a superconducting magnet. Ion plasmas for a large variety of ion species and charge states are produced and maintained within the magnetic field and the space charge of an energetic electron beam in the ''Electron Beam Ion Trap'' (EBIT) geometry. Intense laser beams (optical lasers, x-ray lasers and upcoming ''X-Ray Free Electron Lasers'' (XFEL)) provide strong time varying electromagnetic fields (>10{sup 12} V/cm in femto- to nano-sec pulses) for interactions with electromagnetically confined neutral/non-neutral plasmas. The experiments are aimed to gain understanding of the effects of intense photon fields on ionization/excitation processes, the ionization balance, as well as photon polarization effects. First experimental scenarios and tests with an intense laser that utilize the ion plasma target are outlined.

  5. Production and study of high-beta plasma confined by a superconducting dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, D.T.; Hansen, A.; Mauel, M.E.; Ortiz, E.; Boxer, A.C.; Ellsworth, J.; Karim, I.; Kesner, J.; Mahar, S.; Roach, A.

    2006-05-15

    The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) [J. Kesner et al., in Fusion Energy 1998, 1165 (1999)] is a new research facility that is exploring the confinement and stability of plasma created within the dipole field produced by a strong superconducting magnet. Unlike other configurations in which stability depends on curvature and magnetic shear, magnetohydrodynamic stability of a dipole derives from plasma compressibility. Theoretically, the dipole magnetic geometry can stabilize a centrally peaked plasma pressure that exceeds the local magnetic pressure ({beta}>1), and the absence of magnetic shear allows particle and energy confinement to decouple. In initial experiments, long-pulse, quasi-steady-state microwave discharges lasting more than 10 s have been produced that are consistent with equilibria having peak beta values of 20%. Detailed measurements have been made of discharge evolution, plasma dynamics and instability, and the roles of gas fueling, microwave power deposition profiles, and plasma boundary shape. In these initial experiments, the high-field superconducting floating coil was supported by three thin supports. The plasma is created by multifrequency electron cyclotron resonance heating at 2.45 and 6.4 GHz, and a population of energetic electrons, with mean energies above 50 keV, dominates the plasma pressure. Creation of high-pressure, high-beta plasma is possible only when intense hot electron interchange instabilities are stabilized by sufficiently high background plasma density. A dramatic transition from a low-density, low-beta regime to a more quiescent, high-beta regime is observed when the plasma fueling rate and confinement time become sufficiently large.

  6. Inward transport of a toroidally confined plasma subject to strong radial electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.; Krawczonek, W. M.; Powers, E. J.; Hong, J.; Kim, Y. H.

    1977-01-01

    Digitally implemented spectral analysis techniques were used to investigate the frequency-dependent fluctuation-induced particle transport across a toroidal magnetic field. When the electric field pointed radially inward, the transport was inward and a significant enhancement of the plasma density and confinement time resulted.

  7. Fusion Plasma Theory: Task 1, Magnetic confinement Fusion Plasma Theory. Annual progress report, November 16, 1992--November 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J.D.

    1993-10-01

    The research performed under this grant during the current year has concentrated on few tokamak plasma confinement issues: applications of our new Chapman-Enskog-like approach for developing hybrid fluid/kinetic descriptions of tokamak plasmas; multi-faceted studies as part of our development of a new interacting island paradigm for the tokamak equilibrium`` and transport; investigations of the resolution power of BES and ECE diagnostics for measuring core plasma fluctuations; and studies of net transport in the presence of fluctuating surfaces. Recent progress and publications in these areas, and in the management of the NERSC node and the fusion theory workstations are summarized briefly in this report.

  8. Density distribution of a rotating plasma in Tornado magnetic confinement systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V.M.; Pakhomov, A.B.; Rusakov, A.I.

    1984-12-01

    The density distribution of a rotating plasma in a Tornado magnetic confinement system is calculated under the assumption that the plasma rotates at constant angular velocity throughout the region bounded by the separatrix. The component of the centrifugal inertial force parallel to the magnetic force lines is shown to pinch the plasma toward the equatorial plane of the system. The density distribution depends on the ratio v/T of the plasma drift velocity and temperature. The experimentally measured density distribution can be used to determine v/T and thus to analyze the rotating plasma. If v is known for the rotating plasma then T can be calculated from v, and vice versa.

  9. Study of plasma confinement in ELMO Bumpy Torus with a heavy-ion beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    Plasma confinement in ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) is generally strongly dependent on an ambipolar electric field. Spatially resolved measurements of the resulting electric space potential phi/sub sp/ have been made in a single plasma cross section by the heavy-ion beam probe. This diagnostic injects a 4-60-keV beam of (usually) Cs/sup +/ ions into the plasma. Measurement of the energy of Cs/sup 2 +/ secondary ions leaving the plasma gives a continuous monitor of the local space potential. In addition, the total detected Cs/sup 2 +/ ion current is proportional to the product of the local electron density and the ionization rate, which, in turn, is a function of the electron temperature. This signal, nf(T/sub e/), is sensitive to all three electron distributions found in EBT - those of the cold surface plasma, the warm core plasma, and the hot electron ring.

  10. Stability of magnetohydrodynamic Dean Flow as applied to centrifugally confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hassam, A.B.

    1999-10-01

    Dean Flow is the azimuthal flow of fluid between static concentric cylinders. In a magnetized plasma, there may also be radial stratification of the pressure. The ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability of such a flow in the presence of a strong axial magnetic field and an added radial gravitational force is examined. It is shown that both the Kelvin{endash}Helmholtz instability and pressure-gradient-driven interchanges can be stabilized if the flow is driven by a unidirectional external force and if the plasma annulus is sufficiently thin (large aspect ratio). These results find application in schemes using centrifugal confinement of plasma for fusion. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Hot-electron plasma formation and confinement in the tandem mirror experiment-upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Ress, D.B.

    1988-06-01

    The tandem mirror experiment-upgrade (TMX-U) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the first experiment to investigate the thermal-barrier tandem-mirror concept. One attractive feature of the tandem magnetic mirror as a commercial power reactor is that the fusion reactions occur in an easily accessible center-cell. On the other hand, complicated end-cells are necessary to provide magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and improved particle confinement of the center-cell plasma. In these end-cells, enhanced confinement is achieved with a particular axial potential profile that is formed with electron-cyclotron range-of-frequency heating (ECRF heating, ECRH). By modifying the loss rates of electrons at spatially distinct locations within the end-cells, the ECRH can tailor the plasma potential profile in the desired fashion. Specifically, the thermal-barrier concept requires generation of a population of energetic electrons near the midplane of each end-cell. To be effective, the transverse (to the magnetic field) spatial structure of the hot-electron plasma must be fairly uniform. In this dissertation we characterize the spatial structure of the ECRH-generated plasma, and determine how the structure builds up in time. Furthermore, the plasma should efficiently absorb the ECRF power, and a large fraction of the electrons must be well confined near the end-cell midplane. Therefore, we also examine in detail the ECRH power balance, determining how the ECRF power is absorbed by the plasma, and the processes through which that power is confined and lost. 43 refs., 69 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Nonlinear competition of turbulent structures and improved confinement in magnetized cylindrical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, M.; Kasuya, N.; Itoh, K.; Yagi, M.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2014-11-01

    Nonlinear competition of turbulent structures and their roles in transport are investigated by using three-dimensional simulation code of resistive drift wave turbulence in magnetized cylindrical plasmas. Selective formation of zonal flows and streamers has been obtained by controlling the strength of damping of the zonal flow. In addition, there is an energy path from the drift waves to a flute type structure, which is linearly stable, and it becomes effective just below the stability boundary of the zonal flow. The flute structure directly induces transport effectively, and affects the drift waves and the zonal flow. A large amplitude zonal flow is formed selectively even with existence of the flute structure. The property of the particle confinement is investigated by changing the particle source intensity, which controls the strength of driving of the drift waves. The characteristic of the particle confinement changes according to turbulent states, and an improved confinement regime is obtained in the zonal flow dominant state. Study on cylindrical plasmas reveals the fundamental mechanism of improved confinement in the magnetized plasma with influence of turbulent structural formation.

  13. Particle Confinement Properties of Lower Hybrid Current Drive Plasma on the HL-1 Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xuru; Yuan, Chengjie; Qian, Shangjie; Ding, Xuantong; Yuan, Bin; Yang, Guang; Diao, Guangyue

    1994-03-01

    The particle confinement property of LHCD (lower hybrid current drive) plasma on the HL-1 tokamak is mainly affected by the line-averaged density of electrons (ne). With ne < 2.0 × 1013 cm-3, the particle confinement time (τp) is improved with the suppression of Hα(Dα) fluctuation at the edge, and tends to increase with the power PLH. The peak of τp appears near the critical density (1.0×1013 cm-3). These results are not influenced by the current drive directions.

  14. Plasma confinement experiments in the TMX tandem mirror. Paper IAEA-CN-38/F-1

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T.C.; Anderson, C.A.; Casper, T.A.

    1980-05-22

    Results from the new Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) are described. Tandem-mirror density and potential profiles are produced using end-plug neutral-beam injection and central-cell gas-fueling. TMX parameters are near those predicted theoretically. The end-plug electron temperature is higher than in the comparably sized single-mirror 2XIIB. Axial confinement of the finite-beta central-cell plasma is improved by the end plugs by as much as a factor of 9. In TMX, end-plug microinstability limits central-cell confinement in agreement with theory.

  15. Improved confinement region without large magnetohydrodynamic activity in TPE-RX reversed-field pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime; Koguchi, Haruhisa

    2014-11-01

    We found that spontaneous improved confinement was brought about depending on the operating region in the Toroidal Pinch Experiment-Reversed eXperiment (TPE-RX) reversed-field pinch plasma [Y. Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 421 (1999)]. Gradual decay of the toroidal magnetic field at plasma surface Btw reversal makes it possible to realize a prolonged discharge, and the poloidal beta value and energy confinement time increase in the latter half of the discharge, where reversal and pinch parameters become shallow and low, respectively. In the latter half of the discharge, the plasma current and volume-averaged toroidal magnetic field increase again, the electron density slowly decays, the electron temperature and soft X-ray radiation intensity increase, and the magnetic fluctuations are markedly reduced. In this period of improved confinement, the value of (-Btw)/Bpw, where Bpw is the poloidal magnetic field at the plasma surface, stays almost constant, which indicates that the dynamo action occurs without large magnetohydrodynamic activities.

  16. Improved confinement region without large magnetohydrodynamic activity in TPE-RX reversed-field pinch plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime; Koguchi, Haruhisa

    2014-11-15

    We found that spontaneous improved confinement was brought about depending on the operating region in the Toroidal Pinch Experiment-Reversed eXperiment (TPE-RX) reversed-field pinch plasma [Y. Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 421 (1999)]. Gradual decay of the toroidal magnetic field at plasma surface B{sub tw} reversal makes it possible to realize a prolonged discharge, and the poloidal beta value and energy confinement time increase in the latter half of the discharge, where reversal and pinch parameters become shallow and low, respectively. In the latter half of the discharge, the plasma current and volume-averaged toroidal magnetic field 〈B{sub t}〉 increase again, the electron density slowly decays, the electron temperature and soft X-ray radiation intensity increase, and the magnetic fluctuations are markedly reduced. In this period of improved confinement, the value of (〈B{sub t}〉-B{sub tw})/B{sub pw}, where B{sub pw} is the poloidal magnetic field at the plasma surface, stays almost constant, which indicates that the dynamo action occurs without large magnetohydrodynamic activities.

  17. Evidence for density-gradient-driven trapped-electron modes in improved confinement RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, James; Chapman, Brett; Sarff, John; Terry, Paul; Williams, Zach; Ding, Weixing; Brower, David; Parke, Eli

    2015-11-01

    Density fluctuations in the large-density-gradient region of improved-confinement MST RFP plasmas exhibit features characteristic of the trapped-electron-mode (TEM), strong evidence that drift wave turbulence emerges in RFP plasmas when magnetic transport is reduced. In standard RFP plasmas, core transport is governed by magnetic stochasticity stemming from current-driven tearing modes. Using inductive control, these tearing modes are reduced, improving confinement. The improved confinement is associated with substantial increases in the density and temperature gradients, and we present evidence for the onset of drift wave instability. Density fluctuations are measured with a multi-chord, laser-based interferometer. These fluctuations have wavenumbers kϕ *ρs <0.14, frequencies characteristic of drift waves (>50 kHz), and are clearly distinct from residual global tearing modes. Their amplitudes increase with the local density gradient, and require a critical density gradient. Gyrokinetic analysis provides supporting evidence of microinstability in these plasmas, in which the density-gradient-driven TEM is most unstable. The experimental threshold gradient is close to the predicted critical gradient for linear stability. Work supported by DOE.

  18. New Steady-State Quiescent High-Confinement Plasma in an Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J. S.; Sun, Z.; Guo, H. Y.; Li, J. G.; Wan, B. N.; Wang, H. Q.; Ding, S. Y.; Xu, G. S.; Liang, Y. F.; Mansfield, D. K.; Maingi, R.; Zou, X. L.; Wang, L.; Ren, J.; Zuo, G. Z.; Zhang, L.; Duan, Y. M.; Shi, T. H.; Hu, L. Q.; East Team

    2015-02-01

    A critical challenge facing the basic long-pulse high-confinement operation scenario (H mode) for ITER is to control a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability, known as the edge localized mode (ELM), which leads to cyclical high peak heat and particle fluxes at the plasma facing components. A breakthrough is made in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak in achieving a new steady-state H mode without the presence of ELMs for a duration exceeding hundreds of energy confinement times, by using a novel technique of continuous real-time injection of a lithium (Li) aerosol into the edge plasma. The steady-state ELM-free H mode is accompanied by a strong edge coherent MHD mode (ECM) at a frequency of 35-40 kHz with a poloidal wavelength of 10.2 cm in the ion diamagnetic drift direction, providing continuous heat and particle exhaust, thus preventing the transient heat deposition on plasma facing components and impurity accumulation in the confined plasma. It is truly remarkable that Li injection appears to promote the growth of the ECM, owing to the increase in Li concentration and hence collisionality at the edge, as predicted by GYRO simulations. This new steady-state ELM-free H -mode regime, enabled by real-time Li injection, may open a new avenue for next-step fusion development.

  19. Confinement effects of magnetic field on two-dimensional hydrogen atom in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2015-05-15

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence and in the absence of an external magnetic field within two-dimensional formalism using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms when considering different sets of the parameters in the potential. The plasma screening effects in the weak and strong magnetic field regimes as well as the confinement effects of magnetic field on the two-dimensional hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the corresponding equations. It is found that applying a uniform magnetic field on the hydrogen atom embedded in a plasma leads to change in the profile of the total interaction potential. Thus, confinement effects of magnetic field on hydrogen atom embedded in Debye and quantum plasmas modeled by a MGECSC potential lead to shift bound state energies. This effect would be important to isolate the plasma from the external environment in the experimental applications of plasma physics.

  20. Curling probe measurement of large-volume pulsed plasma confined by surface magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Anil; Sakakibara, Wataru; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Keiji; Sugai, Hideo; Chubu University Team; DOWA Thermotech Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Curling probe (CP) has recently been developed which enables the local electron density measurement even in plasma for non-conducting film CVD. The electron density is obtained from a shift of resonance frequency of spiral antenna in discharge ON and OFF monitored by a network analyzer (NWA). In case of a pulsed glow discharge, synchronization of discharge pulse with frequency sweep of NWA must be established. In this paper, we report time and space-resolved CP measurement of electron density in a large volume plasma (80 cm diameter, 110 cm length) confined by surface magnetic field (multipole cusp field ~0.03 T). For plasma-aided modification of metal surface, the plasma is produced by 1 kV glow discharge at pulse frequency of 0.3 - 25 kHz with various duty ratio in gas (Ar, N2, C2H2) at pressure ~ 1 Pa. A radially movable CP revealed a remarkable effect of surface magnetic confinement: detach of plasma from the vessel wall and a fairly uniform plasma in the central region. In afterglow phase, the electron density was observed to decrease much faster in C2H2 discharge than in Ar discharge.

  1. Confinement effects of magnetic field on two-dimensional hydrogen atom in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence and in the absence of an external magnetic field within two-dimensional formalism using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms when considering different sets of the parameters in the potential. The plasma screening effects in the weak and strong magnetic field regimes as well as the confinement effects of magnetic field on the two-dimensional hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the corresponding equations. It is found that applying a uniform magnetic field on the hydrogen atom embedded in a plasma leads to change in the profile of the total interaction potential. Thus, confinement effects of magnetic field on hydrogen atom embedded in Debye and quantum plasmas modeled by a MGECSC potential lead to shift bound state energies. This effect would be important to isolate the plasma from the external environment in the experimental applications of plasma physics.

  2. Confinement studies of reversed field pinch plasma on TPE-1RM20

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Yasuyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Maejima, Yoshiki; Shimada, Toshio; Hirota, Isao

    1995-04-01

    Confinement properties of a reversed field pinch (RFP), TPE-1RM20, are intensively presented. Plasma current, I{sub p}, dependencies of confinement properties are particularly shown in comparison with the forerunner machine, TPE-1RM15. The results without any active density controls are presented in this paper. It is shown that both machines have almost the same, relatively high, I/N values (<= 12 x 10{sup -14} Am) and the poloidal beta, {Beta}{sub p} (= 0.1) and they do not change very much with I{sub p}, where N is the column density. The energy confinement time, {tau}{sub E}, linearly increases with I{sub p} and the behavior of the resistive part of the loop voltage has an important role to the I{sub p} dependence of {tau}{sub E}. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Robustness of predator-prey models for confinement regime transitions in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2013-04-15

    Energy transport and confinement in tokamak fusion plasmas is usually determined by the coupled nonlinear interactions of small-scale drift turbulence and larger scale coherent nonlinear structures, such as zonal flows, together with free energy sources such as temperature gradients. Zero-dimensional models, designed to embody plausible physical narratives for these interactions, can help to identify the origin of enhanced energy confinement and of transitions between confinement regimes. A prime zero-dimensional paradigm is predator-prey or Lotka-Volterra. Here, we extend a successful three-variable (temperature gradient; microturbulence level; one class of coherent structure) model in this genre [M. A. Malkov and P. H. Diamond, Phys. Plasmas 16, 012504 (2009)], by adding a fourth variable representing a second class of coherent structure. This requires a fourth coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equation. We investigate the degree of invariance of the phenomenology generated by the model of Malkov and Diamond, given this additional physics. We study and compare the long-time behaviour of the three-equation and four-equation systems, their evolution towards the final state, and their attractive fixed points and limit cycles. We explore the sensitivity of paths to attractors. It is found that, for example, an attractive fixed point of the three-equation system can become a limit cycle of the four-equation system. Addressing these questions which we together refer to as 'robustness' for convenience is particularly important for models which, as here, generate sharp transitions in the values of system variables which may replicate some key features of confinement transitions. Our results help to establish the robustness of the zero-dimensional model approach to capturing observed confinement phenomenology in tokamak fusion plasmas.

  4. Plasma sweeper to control the coupling of RF power to a magnetically confined plasma

    DOEpatents

    Motley, Robert W.; Glanz, James

    1985-01-01

    A device for coupling RF power (a plasma sweeper) from a phased waveguide array for introducing RF power to a plasma having a magnetic field associated therewith comprises at least one electrode positioned near the plasma and near the phased waveguide array; and a potential source coupled to the electrode for generating a static electric field at the electrode directed into the plasma and having a component substantially perpendicular to the plasma magnetic field such that a non-zero vector cross-product of the electric and magnetic fields exerts a force on the plasma causing the plasma to drift.

  5. Dipole configuration for confinement of positrons and electron-positron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenson, E. V.; Saitoh, H.; Horn-Stanja, J.; Hergenhahn, U.; Paschkowski, N.; Sunn Pedersen, T.; Stoneking, M. R.; Dickmann, M.; Singer, M.; Vohburger, S.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Schweikhard, L.; Danielson, J. R.; Surko, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    Laboratory creation and confinement of electron-positron plasmas, which are expected to exhibit atypical plasma physics characteristics, would enable tests of many theory and simulation predictions (e.g., the stabilization of anomalous transport mechanisms). This is the goal of APEX/PAX (A Positron-Electron eXperiment/Positron Accumulation eXperiment). Following demonstration of efficient (38%) E ×B injection and subsequent confinement (τ = 3-5 ms) of cold positrons in a dipole magnetic field, the system is undergoing upgrades from a supported permanent magnet to a supported HTSC (high-temperature superconductor) coil, then to a levitated HTSC coil suitable for the simultaneous confinement of electrons and positrons. This contribution will report on the design and testing of the new systems and subsystems (e.g., for cooling, excitation, and levitation) and, if available, on results of upcoming experiments using a ``rotating wall'' to generate inward particle flux deeper into the confinement region. on behalf of the APEX/PAX team and collaborators.

  6. Plasma confinement to enhance the momentum coupling coefficient in ablative laser micro-propulsion: a novel approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Muhammad Raza; Jamil, Yasir; Qaiser Zakaria, M.; Hussain, Tousif; Ahmad, Riaz

    2015-07-01

    We introduce for the first time the novel idea of manipulating the momentum coupling coefficient using plasma confinement and shock wave reflection from the cavity walls. The plasma was confined using cylindrical geometries of various cavity aspect ratios to manipulate the momentum coupling coefficient (C m ). The Nd: YAG laser (532 nm, 5 ns pulse duration) was focused on the ferrite sample surface to produce plasma in a region surrounded by cylindrical cavity walls. The multiple reflections of the shockwaves from the cavity walls confined the laser-induced plasma to the central region of the cavity that subsequently resulted in a significant enhancement of the momentum coupling coefficient values. The plasma shielding effect has also been observed for particular values of laser fluencies and cavity aspect ratios. Compared with the direct ablation, the confined ablation provides an effective way to obtain high C m values.

  7. Divertor plasma conditions and neutral dynamics in horizontal and vertical divertor configurations in JET-ILW low confinement mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groth, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Belo, P.; Brix, M.; Calabro, G.; Chankin, A.; Clever, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Corrigan, G.; Drewelow, P.; Guillemaut, C.; Harting, D.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Järvinen, A.; Kruezi, U.; Lawson, K. D.; Lehnen, M.; Maggi, C. F.; Marchetto, C.; Marsen, S.; Maviglia, F.; Meigs, A. G.; Moulton, D.; Silva, C.; Stamp, M. F.; Wiesen, S.

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of the plasma conditions at the low field side target plate in JET ITER-like wall ohmic and low confinement mode plasmas show minor differences in divertor plasma configurations with horizontally and vertically inclined targets. Both the reduction of the electron temperature in the vicinity of the strike points and the rollover of the ion current to the plates follow the same functional dependence on the density at the low field side midplane. Configurations with vertically inclined target plates, however, produce twice as high sub-divertor pressures for the same upstream density. Simulations with the EDGE2D-EIRENE code package predict significantly lower plasma temperatures at the low field side target in vertical than in horizontal target configurations. Including cross-field drifts and imposing a pumping by-pass leak at the low-field side plate can still not recover the experimental observations.

  8. Thermal Phenomena in Gas Confinement Dielectric Tube of the VASIMR Helicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berisford, Dan; Bengtson, R.; Raja, L.; Squire, J.; Cassidy, L.; Chauncery, J.; McCaskill, G.

    2007-11-01

    A quartz dielectric tube provides gas confinement in the helicon discharge of the VASIMR (Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket) experiment. Despite highly aligned magnetic field lines to confine the plasma in the discharge, significant thermal heating of the dielectric tube occurs. We perform infrared camera imaging studies of heating of the tube with varying operational parameters of the experiment. Results show decreased heating of the tube as the plasma becomes more highly magnetized and less collisional. The data follows a trend that is well represented by a Bohm transport of ions perpendicular to the magnetic field lines suggesting that ion impact on the tube rather than radiation is the primary heating mechanism. Highly localized heating is also observed directly under the antenna in regions where the coils lie closest to the tube surface. This phenomenon is attributed to capacitive coupling effects that accelerate ions under the antenna coils, increasing the local energy flux to the tube surface.

  9. Density-Gradient-Driven trapped-electron-modes in improved-confinement RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, James

    2016-10-01

    Short wavelength density fluctuations in improved-confinement MST plasmas exhibit multiple features characteristic of the trapped-electron-mode (TEM), strong evidence that drift wave turbulence emerges in RFP plasmas when transport associated with MHD tearing is reduced. Core transport in the RFP is normally governed by magnetic stochasticity stemming from long wavelength tearing modes that arise from current profile peaking. Using inductive control, the tearing modes are reduced and global confinement is increased to values expected for a comparable tokamak plasma. The improved confinement is associated with a large increase in the pressure gradient that can destabilize drift waves. The measured density fluctuations have frequencies >50 kHz, wavenumbers k_phi*rho_s<0.14, and propagate in the electron drift direction. Their spectral emergence coincides with a sharp decrease in fluctuations associated with global tearing modes. Their amplitude increases with the local density gradient, and they exhibit a density-gradient threshold at R/L_n 15, higher than in tokamak plasmas by R/a. the GENE code, modified for RFP equilibria, predicts the onset of microinstability for these strong-gradient plasma conditions. The density-gradient-driven TEM is the dominant instability in the region where the measured density fluctuations are largest, and the experimental threshold-gradient is close to the predicted critical gradient for linear stability. While nonlinear analysis shows a large Dimits shift associated with predicted strong zonal flows, the inclusion of residual magnetic fluctuations causes a collapse of the zonal flows and an increase in the predicted transport to a level close to the experimentally measured heat flux. Similar circumstances could occur in the edge region of tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied for the control of ELMs. Work supported by US DOE.

  10. New Scalings of Energy Confinement Time of RFP Plasmas and the Extrapolation to Reactor Relevant Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    Data bases of reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma have been gradually accumulated by recent experiments of several RFP devices. New confinement scalings τX(X=RFPs1)E=0.024Aa2IP/P1/2heat, τX(X=RFPs2)E=0.04s(IN)Aa2I1.25P/P1/2heat which are consistent to the recent data are presented, where units are in [s], [m], [MA] and [MW] respectively and s(IN) is a correction function of IN≡IP/πa2‹ne›20). From the standpoint of new scalings, dependences among parameters of possible RFP reactors are analyzed to find the conditions for RFP reactors. Hs1 Hs2 are defined by the ratios of necessary energy confinement time for RFP reactors for burning against τX(X=RFPs1) and τX(X=RFPs2) respectively. When confinement time follows τX(X=RFPs1)E scaling, confinement enhancement factor of at least Hs1=23 is necessary for RFP reactors to be realistic. When confinement time follows τX(X=RFPs2)E scaling, data points in IP-a space of RFP reactors are within the region of target.

  11. A low energy positron accumulator for the plasma confinement in a compact magnetic mirror trap

    SciTech Connect

    Higaki, Hiroyuki Kaga, Chikato; Nagayasu, Katsushi; Okamoto, Hiromi; Nagata, Yugo; Kanai, Yasuyuki; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2015-06-29

    A low energy positron accumulator was constructed at RIKEN for the purpose of confining an electron-positron plasma. The use of 5 mCi {sup 22}Na RI source with a standard solid Ne moderator and N{sub 2} buffer gas cooling resulted in a low energy positron yield of ∼ 3 × 10{sup 5} e+/s. So far, 2 × 10{sup 6} positrons have been accumulated in 120s.

  12. A Scaling Law of Plasma Confining Potential Formation with Electron Cyclotron Heating Powers in GAMMA 10

    SciTech Connect

    Numakura, T.; Cho, T.; Kohagura, J.; Hirata, M.; Fukai, T.; Yoshida, M.; Minami, R.; Kiminami, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Imai, T.; Miyoshi, S.

    2005-01-15

    Scaling laws of potential formation and associated effects are theoretically and experimentally investigated in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. In GAMMA 10, the main tandem-mirror operations from 1979 to 2003 are characterized in terms of (i) a high-potential mode having kV-order plasma-confining potentials, and (ii) a hot-ion mode yielding fusion neutrons with 10-20 keV bulk-ion temperatures. In this paper, the externally controllable parameter scaling including electron cyclotron heating (ECH) powers for potential formation covering over these two representative operational modes is investigated; that is, the construction of 'the central-cell plasma-confining potentials' {phi}{sub c} formation scaling with plug ECH is studied on the basis of the electron energy-balance equation and Cohen's strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH) theory for investigating the formation physics of plasma confining potentials.It is found that our proposed scaling formulae are in good agreement with the experimental data in the two representative operational modes of the high-potential and hot-ion modes in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror.This scaling shows a favorable increase in confining potentials with installing more powerful ECH sources by the use of ECH powers over the present 250 kW. On the basis of the scaling prediction, we also report the design of a newly developed 500 kW gyrotron for an application to investigate the validity of the above described {phi}{sub c} formation scaling with plug ECH aiming at achieving higher plasma parameters.

  13. Effect of stress during handling, seawater acclimation, confinement, and induced spawning on plasma ion levels and somatolactin-expressing cells in mature female Liza ramada.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Noha A; Hashem, Amal M; Ibrahim, Amal A E; Mousa, Mostafa A

    2012-08-01

    The present experiments were designed to determine the effect of different stress factors; handling, seawater acclimation, confinement, and induced spawning on plasma cortisol, hydro mineral balance as well as changes in size, number and integrated intensity of somatolactin (SL)-expressing cells in Liza ramada mature females confined to fresh water ponds. The plasma levels of cortisol, PO(4)(3-), Na(+), and K(+) were higher, while Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) were lower than controls during transportation without anesthesia. By using clove oil (5 mg L(-1)) as an anesthetic during transportation, the plasma cortisol, PO(4) (3-), Na(+), and K(+) were similar to controls, while Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) were higher. During seawater acclimation, the plasma cortisol and minerals were significantly higher except Na(+) which was lower than controls. In addition, during induction of spawning, the plasma levels of cortisol, PO(4)(3-), Na(+), K(+), and Mg(2+) were significantly higher than controls. The SL-producing cells are located in the pars intermedia (PI) bordering the neurohypophysis. The stress affected the number, size, and immunostaining of SL-expressing cells. During seawater acclimation, the size and the integrated intensity of SL immunoreactivity were lower, but the number of these cells was higher than controls. Furthermore, the number, size, and the integrated intensity of SL immunoreactivity were significantly lower than controls during handling and after spawning, which was opposite to confinement. The response of SL-expressing cells in PI in parallel with changes in cortisol and hydro mineral balance induced by stress support the possible role of SL in the adaptive response of fish to stress.

  14. Neutron yield and Lawson criterion for plasma with inertial electrostatic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu; Kurilenkov, Yu K.

    2016-11-01

    The physics of plasma formation is discussed in the systems with inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) during the convergent to the axis of cylindrical geometry of the ion flow accelerated periodically in the field of virtual cathode, which is formed by the injected electrons. The ranges of plasma parameters and the resulting neutron yield are determined for different modes of ion flux formation. The requirements are formulated to the technical parameters of the system with IEC to create both a powerful neutron source with a rate of generation exceeding 1010-1012 particles/s and to achieve a positive energy output (analogue of Lawson criterion).

  15. A table top experiment to study plasma confined by a dipole magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Sudeep; Baitha, Anuj Ram

    2016-10-01

    There has been a long quest to understand charged particle generation, confinement and underlying complex processes in a plasma confined by a dipole magnet. Our earth's magnetosphere is an example of such a naturally occurring system. A few laboratory experiments have been designed for such investigations, such as the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) at MIT, the Terella experiment at Columbia university, and the Ring Trap-1 (RT-1) experiment at the University of Tokyo. However, these are large scale experiments, where the dipole magnetic field is created with superconducting coils, thereby, necessitating power supplies and stringent cryogenic requirements. We report a table top experiment to investigate important physical processes in a dipole plasma. A strong cylindrical permanent magnet, is employed to create the dipole field inside a vacuum chamber. The magnet is suspended and cooled by circulating chilled water. The plasma is heated by electromagnetic waves of 2.45 GHz and a second frequency in the range 6 - 11 GHz. Some of the initial results of measurements and numerical simulation of magnetic field, visual observations of the first plasma, and spatial measurements of plasma parameters will be presented.

  16. Stable confinement of electron plasma and initial results on positron injection in RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, H.; Yoshida, Z.; Morikawa, J.; Yano, Y.; Kasaoka, N.; Sakamoto, W.; Nogami, T.

    2013-03-01

    The Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device is a dipole field configuration generated by a levitated superconducting magnet. It offers very interesting opportunities for research on the fundamental properties on non-neutral plasmas, such as self-organization of charged particles in the strongly positive and negative charged particles on magnetic surfaces. When strong positron sources will be available in the future, the dipole field configuration will be potentially applicable to the formation of an electron-positron plasma. We have realized stable, long trap of toroidal pure electron plasma in RT-1; Magnetic levitation of the superconducting magnet resulted in more than 300s of confinement for electron plasma of ˜ 1011 m-3. Aiming for the confinement of positrons as a next step, we started a positron injection experiment. For the formation of positron plasma in the closed magnetic surfaces, one of the key issues to be solved is the efficient injection method of positron across closed magnetic surfaces. In contrast to linear configurations, toroidal configurations have the advantage that they are capable of trapping high energy positrons in the dipole field configuration and consider the possibility of direct trapping of positrons emitted from a 22Na source.

  17. Ion flux enhancements and oscillations in spatially confined laser produced aluminum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. C. Fallon, C.; Hayden, P.; Yeates, P.; Costello, J. T.; Mujawar, M.

    2014-09-15

    Ion signals from laser produced plasmas (LPPs) generated inside aluminum rectangular cavities at a fixed depth d = 2 mm and varying width, x = 1.0, 1.6, and 2.75 mm were obtained by spatially varying the position of a negatively biased Langmuir probe. Damped oscillatory features superimposed on Maxwellian distributed ion signals were observed. Depending on the distance of the probe from the target surface, three to twelve fold enhancements in peak ion density were observed via confinement of the LPP, generated within rectangular cavities of varying width which constrained the plasma plume to near one dimensional expansion in the vertical plane. The effects of lateral spatial confinement on the expansion velocity of the LPP plume front, the temperature, density and expansion velocity of ions, enhancement of ion flux, and ion energy distribution were recorded. The periodic behavior of ion signals was analyzed and found to be related to the electron plasma frequency and electron-ion collision frequency. The effects of confinement and enhancement of various ion parameters and expansion velocities of the LPP ion plume are explained on the basis of shock wave theory.

  18. Two-fluid modeling of magnetic nozzle and FRC confined plasmas with the NIMROD code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarditi, Alfonso

    2000-10-01

    MHD and two-fluid simulations with the NIMROD code [1] for studying plasma detachment in a magnetic nozzle and field reversed configuration (FRC) confined plasmas are reported. A new version of the code is used, featuring an improved finite element formulation that provides better spatial accuracy for a given grid resolution [2]. The code is also upgraded by adding the density equation, removing this way the assumption of incompressible plasma, and a provision for “open end” boundary conditions. The simulations of the plasma in a magnetic nozzle are performed in cylindrical geometry with an asymmetric magnetic mirror field along the axis, modeling the VASIMR (Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket) experiment [3]. The goals are to assess critical problems like exhaust plasma detachment, the temperature spatial dependence in the plasma plume and the magnetic nozzle parameter optimization. The possible application of a FRC as a source for plasma propulsion is considered: FRC runs are first addressing the two-fluid stability against tilt modes [4]. Simulations are also tailored to model the integration of the FRC with a magnetic nozzle. [1] A. H. Glasser, et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion , 41, A74 (1999). [2] C. R. Sovinec, Int. Sherwood Fusion Theory Conf., Los Angeles, CA (USA), March 2000. [3] F. R. Chang Diaz, Trans. Fus. Tech., 35, 87 (1999). [4] Ishida, et al., Phys. Fluids, 31, 3024 (1988).

  19. Measurement of RF electric field in high- β plasma using a Pockels detector in magnetosphere plasma confinement device RT-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushiake, Toshiki; Nishiura, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Yano, Y.; Kawazura, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, Atsushi

    2015-11-01

    The magnetosphere plasma confinement device RT-1 generates a dipole magnetic field that can confine high- β plasma by using a levitated superconducting coil. So far it is reported that high temperature electrons (up to 50keV) exist and that the local electron βe value exceeds more than 100%. However, the ion β value βi remains low in the present high- β state. To realize a high-βi state, we have started Ion Cyclotron Heating (ICH) experiments. For efficient ICH in a dipole topology, it is important to measure RF electric fields and characterize the propagation of RF waves in plasmas. On this viewpoint, we started direct measurement of local RF electric fields in RT-1 with a Pockels sensor system. A non-linear optical crystal in the Pockels sensor produces birefringence in an ambient electric field. The refractive index change of the birefringence is proportional to the applied electric field strength, which can be used to measure local electric fields. RF electric field distribution radiated from an ICH antenna was measured inside RT-1 in air, and was compared with numerical results calculated by TASK code. Results on the measurement of electric field distribution in high- β plasma and evaluation of the absorbed RF power into ions will be reported. Supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 23224014.

  20. Spectroscopic Studies of Atomic and Molecular Processes in the Edge Region of Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, J. D.; Brezinsek, S.; Mertens, Ph.; Unterberg, B.

    2006-12-01

    Edge plasma studies are of vital importance for understanding plasma-wall interactions in magnetically confined fusion devices. These interactions determine the transport of neutrals into the plasma, and the properties of the plasma discharge. This presentation deals with optical spectroscopic studies of the plasma boundary, and their role in elucidating the prevailing physical conditions. Recorded spectra are of four types: emission spectra of ions and atoms, produced by electron impact excitation and by charge-exchange recombination, atomic spectra arising from electron impact-induced molecular dissociation and ionisation, visible spectra of molecular hydrogen and its isotopic combinations, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra. The atomic spectra are strongly influenced by the confining magnetic field (Zeeman and Paschen-Back effects), which produces characteristic features useful for species identification, temperature determination by Doppler broadening, and studies of chemical and physical sputtering. Detailed analysis of the Zeeman components in both optical and LIF spectra shows that atomic hydrogen is produced in various velocity classes, some related to the relevant molecular Franck-Condon energies. The latter reflect the dominant electron collision processes responsible for production of atoms from molecules. This assignment has been verified by gas-puffing experiments through special test limiters. The higher-energy flanks of hydrogen line profiles probably also show the influence of charge-exchange reactions with molecular ions accelerated in the plasma sheath ('scrape-off layer') separating limiter surfaces from the edge plasma, in analogy to acceleration in the cathode-fall region of gas discharges. While electron collisions play a vital role in generating the spectra, ion collisions with excited atomic radiators act through re-distribution of population among the atomic fine-structure sublevels, and momentum transfer to the atomic nuclei via

  1. Application of spatially resolved high resolution crystal spectrometry to inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Pablant, N. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Schneider, M.; Widmann, K.; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Zhang, L.

    2012-10-15

    High resolution ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}{approx} 10 000) 1D imaging x-ray spectroscopy using a spherically bent crystal and a 2D hybrid pixel array detector is used world wide for Doppler measurements of ion-temperature and plasma flow-velocity profiles in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. Meter sized plasmas are diagnosed with cm spatial resolution and 10 ms time resolution. This concept can also be used as a diagnostic of small sources, such as inertial confinement fusion plasmas and targets on x-ray light source beam lines, with spatial resolution of micrometers, as demonstrated by laboratory experiments using a 250-{mu}m {sup 55}Fe source, and by ray-tracing calculations. Throughput calculations agree with measurements, and predict detector counts in the range 10{sup -8}-10{sup -6} times source x-rays, depending on crystal reflectivity and spectrometer geometry. Results of the lab demonstrations, application of the technique to the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and predictions of performance on NIF will be presented.

  2. Plasma confinement by magnetic field with convex-concave field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsventoukh, Mikhail M.; Krashevskaya, Galina V.; Prishvitsyn, Alexander S.

    2015-06-01

    It has been found that plasma confinement by the magnetic field of alternating-sign curvature with convex-concave field lines results in a strong stabilizing action against convective (flute-interchange) perturbations. For simple combinations of axisymmetric mirrors and cusps the calculations according to the kinetic stability criterion give strongly, centrally peaked stable plasma pressure profiles instead of shallow ones. For the experimental research of this effect, a compact magnetic confinement device has been modified by adding of the external current coil to fulfil the field-line curvature requirements. The critical convectively-stable plasma pressure profiles calculation in this experimental geometry and the probe measurements of the spatial plasma distribution in the new magnetic configuration of alternating-sign curvature have been performed. The experimental results give some support for a conclusion that there is an increase in the ion saturation current at the region near the minimum of the specific volume min ∫dl/B. This region corresponds to the average minimum in the second adiabatic invariant, and the kinetic description predicts the stable pressure profile peaking here due to reduction of charge separation by particle drift in alternating-sign curvature.

  3. Microwave remote plasma enhanced-atomic layer deposition system with multicusp confinement chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Dechana, A.; Thamboon, P.; Boonyawan, D.

    2014-10-15

    A microwave remote Plasma Enhanced-Atomic Layer Deposition system with multicusp confinement chamber is established at the Plasma and Beam Physics research facilities, Chiang Mai, Thailand. The system produces highly-reactive plasma species in order to enhance the deposition process of thin films. The addition of the multicusp magnetic fields further improves the plasma density and uniformity in the reaction chamber. Thus, the system is more favorable to temperature-sensitive substrates when heating becomes unwanted. Furthermore, the remote-plasma feature, which is generated via microwave power source, offers tunability of the plasma properties separately from the process. As a result, the system provides high flexibility in choice of materials and design experiments, particularly for low-temperature applications. Performance evaluations of the system were carried on coating experiments of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers onto a silicon wafer. The plasma characteristics in the chamber will be described. The resulted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films—analyzed by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry in channeling mode and by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy techniques—will be discussed.

  4. Microwave remote plasma enhanced-atomic layer deposition system with multicusp confinement chamber.

    PubMed

    Dechana, A; Thamboon, P; Boonyawan, D

    2014-10-01

    A microwave remote Plasma Enhanced-Atomic Layer Deposition system with multicusp confinement chamber is established at the Plasma and Beam Physics research facilities, Chiang Mai, Thailand. The system produces highly-reactive plasma species in order to enhance the deposition process of thin films. The addition of the multicusp magnetic fields further improves the plasma density and uniformity in the reaction chamber. Thus, the system is more favorable to temperature-sensitive substrates when heating becomes unwanted. Furthermore, the remote-plasma feature, which is generated via microwave power source, offers tunability of the plasma properties separately from the process. As a result, the system provides high flexibility in choice of materials and design experiments, particularly for low-temperature applications. Performance evaluations of the system were carried on coating experiments of Al2O3 layers onto a silicon wafer. The plasma characteristics in the chamber will be described. The resulted Al2O3 films-analyzed by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry in channeling mode and by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy techniques-will be discussed.

  5. Angle of Observation Influence on Emission Signal from Spatially Confined Laser-Induced Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jiri; Cabalín, Luisa Maria; Laserna, J Javier

    2017-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of the angle of observation on the emission signal from copper plasmas. Plasma plumes have been generated inside a home-made chamber consisting of two parallel glass windows spaced by 2.5 mm. This chamber allows observing plasma plumes from different collection angles throughout their perimeter, spanning from 20° to 80° with respect to the surface of the Cu target. In order to minimize the observed volume of the plasma, measurements were made from the closest distance possible through a metallic hollow tube. Single-pulse and collinear double-pulse excitation schemes with a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 5 ns) have been investigated. The results have shown that the selection of the best angle to collect light from the plasma is related to the excitation mode. On the other hand, the shot-to-shot signal variability has been found to depend on the shape of plasma plumes. In single-pulse excitation, a good correlation between the observed laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emission (from spatially confined plumes) and their integrated signal of plasma image has been ascertained. However, this fact was less evident in double-pulse LIBS, which could be due to a different mechanism involved in the ablation process.

  6. Confinement effects of shock waves on laser-induced plasma from a graphite target

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Feiling; Liang, Peipei; Yang, Xu; Cai, Hua; Wu, Jiada; Xu, Ning; Ying, Zhifeng; Sun, Jian

    2015-06-15

    The spatial confinement effects of shock waves on the laser-induced plasma (LIP) from a graphite target in air were studied by probe beam deflection (PBD) measurements and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). A clear relationship between the confinement of the LIP by the shock wave and the effects on the LIP emission was observed, and the underlying mechanisms are discussed. PBD monitoring revealed that the laser-ablation induced shock wave could be well analogized to the shock wave generated by a point explosion and would be reflected by a block. OES measurements indicated that the optical emission of the LIP exhibited significant variations with the block placement. A first enhancement and then a fast decay of CN molecular emission as well as a suppression of carbon atomic emission were observed in the presence of the block. The results revealed that the reflected shock wave spatially confined the expansion of the LIP and compressed the LIP after encountering it, pushing back the species of the LIP and changing the density of the LIP species including luminous carbon atoms and CN molecules. It is suggested that the change of the LIP emission is attributed to the density variation of the LIP species due to the compression of the LIP and the reactions occurring in the plasma.

  7. Observation of energetic electron confinement in a largely stochastic reversed-field pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, D. J.; Chapman, B. E.; O'Connell, R.; Almagri, A. F.; Burke, D. R.; Forest, C. B.; Goetz, J. A.; Kaufman, M. C.; Bonomo, F.; Franz, P.; Gobbin, M.; Piovesan, P.

    2010-01-01

    Runaway electrons with energies >100 keV are observed with the appearance of an m =1 magnetic island in the core of otherwise stochastic Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] reversed-field-pinch plasmas. The island is associated with the innermost resonant tearing mode, which is usually the largest in the m =1 spectrum. The island appears over a range of mode spectra, from those with a weakly dominant mode to those, referred to as quasi single helicity, with a strongly dominant mode. In a stochastic field, the rate of electron loss increases with electron parallel velocity. Hence, high-energy electrons imply a region of reduced stochasticity. The global energy confinement time is about the same as in plasmas without high-energy electrons or an island in the core. Hence, the region of reduced stochasticity must be localized. Within a numerical reconstruction of the magnetic field topology, high-energy electrons are substantially better confined inside the island, relative to the external region. Therefore, it is deduced that the island provides a region of reduced stochasticity and that the high-energy electrons are generated and well confined within this region.

  8. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited).

    PubMed

    Delgado-Aparicio, L F; Maddox, J; Pablant, N; Hill, K; Bitter, M; Rice, J E; Granetz, R; Hubbard, A; Irby, J; Greenwald, M; Marmar, E; Tritz, K; Stutman, D; Stratton, B; Efthimion, P

    2016-11-01

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metal contributions. This technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.

  9. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    DOE PAGES

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; ...

    2016-11-14

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metalmore » contributions. As a result, this technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.« less

  10. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; Hill, K.; Bitter, M.; Rice, J. E.; Granetz, R.; Hubbard, A.; Irby, J.; Greenwald, M.; Marmar, E.; Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Stratton, B.; Efthimion, P.

    2016-11-01

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metal contributions. This technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.

  11. Application of RF Power to Plasma Flow Drive in Fusion Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, D.B.; Berry, L.A.; Carter, M.D.; Jaeger, E.F.

    1999-09-13

    Wave induced flows can produce radially sheared velocity profiles that can in turn stabilize drift wave turbulence and improve plasma confinement. A second-order kinetic theory is developed in one-dimensional slab geometry to treat radio frequency (RF)-driven plasma flows. The Vlasov equation is solved to second order in the RF electric field. Moments of the second-order distribution function give time-averaged expressions for the heating rate, the wave kinetic flux, and the RF force exerted on the plasma. On the collisional or transport time scale, the RF force in the poloidal direction is balanced by neoclassical viscosity, and the force in the radial direction is balanced direction by ambipolar electric fields. Comparison is made with previous theories which have relied on incompressible fluid approximations. Very substantial differences are seen in situations involving the Ion Bernstein Wave, a compressional wave.

  12. Multi-energy SXR cameras for magnetically confined fusion plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; Hill, K.; Bitter, M.; Rice, J. E.; Granetz, R.; Hubbard, A.; Irby, J.; Greenwald, M.; Marmar, E.; Tritz, K.; Stutman, D.; Stratton, B.; Efthimion, P.

    2016-11-14

    A compact multi-energy soft x-ray camera has been developed for time, energy and space-resolved measurements of the soft-x-ray emissivity in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. Multi-energy soft x-ray imaging provides a unique opportunity for measuring, simultaneously, a variety of important plasma properties (Te, nZ, ΔZeff, and ne,fast). The electron temperature can be obtained by modeling the slope of the continuum radiation from ratios of the available brightness and inverted radial emissivity profiles over multiple energy ranges. Impurity density measurements are also possible using the line-emission from medium- to high-Z impurities to separate the background as well as transient levels of metal contributions. As a result, this technique should be explored also as a burning plasma diagnostic in-view of its simplicity and robustness.

  13. SCR-1: Design and Construction of a Small Modular Stellarator for Magnetic Confinement of Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barillas, L.; Vargas, V. I.; Alpizar, A.; Asenjo, J.; Carranza, J. M.; Cerdas, F.; Gutiérrez, R.; Monge, J. I.; Mora, J.; Morera, J.; Peraza, H.; Queral, V.; Rojas, C.; Rozen, D.; Saenz, F.; Sánchez, G.; Sandoval, M.; Trimiño, H.; Umaña, J.; Villegas, L. F.

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes briefly the design and construction of a small modular stellarator for magnetic confinement of plasma, called Stellarator of Costa Rica 1, or SCR-1; developed by the Plasma Physics Group of the Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica, PlasmaTEC. The SCR-1 is based on the small Spanish stellarator UST_1, created by the engineer Vicente Queral. The SCR-1 will employ stainless steel torus-shaped vacuum vessel with a major radius of 460.33 mm and a cross section radius of 110.25mm. A typical SCR-1 plasma will have an average radius 42.2 mm and a volume of 8 liters (0.01 m3), and an aspect ratio of 5.7. The magnetic resonant field will be 0.0878 T, and a period of 2 (m=2) with a rotational transform of 0.3. The magnetic field will be provided by 12 modular coils, with 8 turns each, with an electrical current of 8704 A per coil (1088 A per turn of each coil). This current will be fed by a bank of cell batteries. The plasma will be heated by ECRH with magnetrons of a total power of 5kW, in the first harmonic at 2.45GHz. The expected electron temperature and density are 15 eV and 1017 m-3 respectively with an estimated confinement time of 7.30 x 10-4 ms. The initial diagnostics on the SCR-1 will consist of a Langmuir probe, a heterodyne microwave interferometer, and a field mapping system. The first plasma of the SCR-1 is expected at the end of 2011.

  14. Erratum: Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices (2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 123001)

    DOE PAGES

    Evans, T. E.

    2016-03-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δmore » $$b_⊥^{ext}$$ ≈ $$10^{-4}$$ → $$10^{-3}$$ T). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes. At the same time the theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design [A. Loarte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 033007]. This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.« less

  15. Cholesterol modulates CFTR confinement in the plasma membrane of primary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abu-Arish, Asmahan; Pandzic, Elvis; Goepp, Julie; Matthes, Elizabeth; Hanrahan, John W; Wiseman, Paul W

    2015-07-07

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a plasma-membrane anion channel that, when mutated, causes the disease cystic fibrosis. Although CFTR has been detected in a detergent-resistant membrane fraction prepared from airway epithelial cells, suggesting that it may partition into cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts), its compartmentalization has not been demonstrated in intact cells and the influence of microdomains on CFTR lateral mobility is unknown. We used live-cell imaging, spatial image correlation spectroscopy, and k-space image correlation spectroscopy to examine the aggregation state of CFTR and its dynamics both within and outside microdomains in the plasma membrane of primary human bronchial epithelial cells. These studies were also performed during treatments that augment or deplete membrane cholesterol. We found two populations of CFTR molecules that were distinguishable based on their dynamics at the cell surface. One population showed confinement and had slow dynamics that were highly cholesterol dependent. The other, more abundant population was less confined and diffused more rapidly. Treatments that deplete the membrane of cholesterol caused the confined fraction and average number of CFTR molecules per cluster to decrease. Elevating cholesterol had the opposite effect, increasing channel aggregation and the fraction of channels displaying confinement, consistent with CFTR recruitment into cholesterol-rich microdomains with dimensions below the optical resolution limit. Viral infection caused the nanoscale microdomains to fuse into large platforms and reduced CFTR mobility. To our knowledge, these results provide the first biophysical evidence for multiple CFTR populations and have implications for regulation of their surface expression and channel function.

  16. Investigation of physical processes limiting plasma density in high confinement mode discharges on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maingi, R.; Mahdavi, M. A.; Jernigan, T. C.; La Haye, R. J.; Hyatt, A. W.; Baylor, L. R.; Whyte, D. G.; Wade, M. R.; Petrie, T. W.; Cuthbertson, J. W.; Leonard, A. W.; Murakami, M.; Snider, R. T.; Stambaugh, R. D.; Watkins, J. G.; West, W. P.; Wood, R. D.

    1997-05-01

    A series of experiments was conducted on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)] to investigate the physical processes which limit density in high confinement mode (H-mode) discharges. The typical H-mode to low confinement mode (L-mode) transition limit at high density near the empirical Greenwald density limit [M. Greenwald et al., Nucl. Fusion 28, 2199 (1988)] was avoided by divertor pumping, which reduced divertor neutral pressure and prevented formation of a high density, intense radiation zone (MARFE) near the X-point. It was determined that the density decay time after pellet injection was independent of density relative to the Greenwald limit and increased nonlinearly with the plasma current. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity in pellet-fueled plasmas was observed at all power levels, and often caused unacceptable confinement degradation, except when the neutral beam injected (NBI) power was ⩽3 MW. Formation of MARFEs on closed field lines was avoided with low safety factor (q) operation but was observed at high q, qualitatively consistent with theory. By using pellet fueling and optimizing discharge parameters to avoid each of these limits, an operational space was accessed in which density ˜1.5×Greenwald limit was achieved for 600 ms, and good H-mode confinement was maintained for 300 ms of the density flat-top. More significantly, the density was successfully increased to the limit where a central radiative collapse was observed, the most fundamental density limit in tokamaks.

  17. Excitation of the centrifugally driven interchange instability in a plasma confined by a magnetic dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, B.; Maslovsky, D.; Mauel, M.E.; Waksman, J.

    2005-05-15

    The centrifugally driven electrostatic interchange instability is excited for the first time in a laboratory magnetoplasma. The plasma is confined by a dipole magnetic field, and the instability is excited when an equatorial mesh is biased to induce a radial current that creates rapid axisymmetric plasma rotation. The observed instabilities appear quasicoherent in the lab frame of reference; they have global radial mode structures and low azimuthal mode numbers, and they are modified by the presence of energetic, magnetically confined electrons. The mode structure is measured using a multiprobe correlation technique as well as a novel 96-point polar imaging diagnostic which measures particle flux along field lines that map to the pole. Interchange instabilities caused by hot electron pressure are simultaneously observed at the hot electron drift frequency. Adjusting the hot electron fraction {alpha} modifies the stability as well as the structures of the centrifugally driven modes. In the presence of larger fractions of energetic electrons, m=1 is observed to be the dominant mode. For faster rotating plasmas containing fewer energetic electrons, m=2 dominates. Results from a self-consistent nonlinear simulation reproduce the measured mode structures in both regimes. The low azimuthal mode numbers seen in the experiment and simulation can also be interpreted with a local, linear dispersion relation of the electrostatic interchange instability. Drift resonant hot electrons give the instability a real frequency, inducing stabilizing ion polarization currents that preferentially suppress high-m modes.

  18. Confinement bifurcation initiated by plasma current profile and toroidal electric field perturbations in the TUMAN-3M tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askinazi, L. G.; Bulanin, V. V.; Kornev, V. A.; Krikunov, S. V.; Lebedev, S. V.; Tukachinsky, A. S.; Vildjunas, M. I.; Zhubr, N. A.

    2011-03-01

    The results of the experimental study of confinement mode bifurcation performed on the TUMAN-3M tokamak are reported. As a trigger of confinement mode switching, plasma current ramp-up/-down or magnetic compression/decompression is used. It is found that the possibility and direction of confinement mode switching are correlated not with plasma current profile perturbation (peaking or broadening) but with the sign of toroidal electric field perturbation. A model connecting confinement bifurcation and toroidal electric field perturbation through the perturbation of the radial electric field is used to describe the phenomena observed in all eight scenarios investigated. This model ascribes the radial electric field generation to the non-compensated Ware drift of banana electrons at the TUMAN-3M peripheral plasma, where \

  19. Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T. E.

    2015-11-13

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δ$b_⊥^{ext}$ ≈ $10^{-4}$ → $10^{-3}$ T). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes. At the same time the theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design [A. Loarte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 033007]. This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.

  20. Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices

    DOE PAGES

    Evans, T. E.

    2015-11-13

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δmore » $$b_⊥^{ext}$$ ≈ $$10^{-4}$$ → $$10^{-3}$$ T). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes. At the same time the theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design [A. Loarte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 033007]. This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.« less

  1. Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δ b\\bot\\text{ext}≈ {{10}-4}\\to {{10}-3}~\\text{T} ). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes (ELMs). At the same time, theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design (Loarte et al 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 033007). This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.

  2. Une alternative au cobalt pour la synthese de nanotubes de carbone monoparoi par plasma inductif thermique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, Jean-Francois

    Les nanotubes de carbone de type monoparoi (C-SWNT) sont une classe recente de nanomateriaux qui ont fait leur apparition en 1991. L'interet qu'on leur accorde provient des nombreuses proprietes d'avant-plan qu'ils possedent. Leur resistance mecanique serait des plus rigide, tout comme ils peuvent conduire l'electricite et la chaleur d'une maniere inegalee. Non moins, les C-SWNT promettent de devenir une nouvelle classe de plateforme moleculaire, en servant de site d'attache pour des groupements reactifs. Les promesses de ce type particulier de nanomateriau sont nombreuses, la question aujourd'hui est de comment les realiser. La technologie de synthese par plasma inductif thermique se situe avantageusement pour la qualite de ses produits, sa productivite et les faibles couts d'operation. Par contre, des recherches recentes ont permis de mettre en lumiere des risques d'expositions reliees a l'utilisation du cobalt, comme catalyseur de synthese; son elimination ou bien son remplacement est devenu une preoccupation importante. Quatre recettes alternatives ont ete mises a l'essai afin de trouver une alternative plus securitaire a la recette de base; un melange catalytique ternaire, compose de nickel, de cobalt et d'oxyde d'yttrium. La premiere consiste essentiellement a remplacer la proportion massique de cobalt par du nickel, qui etait deja present dans la recette de base. Les trois options suivantes contiennent de nouveaux catalyseurs, en remplacement au Co, qui sont apparus dans plusieurs recherches scientifiques au courant des dernieres annees: le dioxyde de zircone (ZrO2), dioxyde de manganese (MnO2) et le molybdene (Mo). La methode utilisee consiste a vaporiser la matiere premiere, sous forme solide, dans un reacteur plasma a haute frequence (3 MHz) a paroi refroidi. Apres le passage dans le plasma, le systeme traverse une section dite de "croissance", isolee thermiquement a l'aide de graphite, afin de maintenir une certaine plage de temperature favorable a la

  3. Basic physics of Alfven instabilities driven by energetic particles in toroidally confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W. W.

    2008-05-15

    Superthermal energetic particles (EP) often drive shear Alfven waves unstable in magnetically confined plasmas. These instabilities constitute a fascinating nonlinear system where fluid and kinetic nonlinearities can appear on an equal footing. In addition to basic science, Alfven instabilities are of practical importance, as the expulsion of energetic particles can damage the walls of a confinement device. Because of rapid dispersion, shear Alfven waves that are part of the continuous spectrum are rarely destabilized. However, because the index of refraction is periodic in toroidally confined plasmas, gaps appear in the continuous spectrum. At spatial locations where the radial group velocity vanishes, weakly damped discrete modes appear in these gaps. These eigenmodes are of two types. One type is associated with frequency crossings of counterpropagating waves; the toroidal Alfven eigenmode is a prominent example. The second type is associated with an extremum of the continuous spectrum; the reversed shear Alfven eigenmode is an example of this type. In addition to these normal modes of the background plasma, when the energetic particle pressure is very large, energetic particle modes that adopt the frequency of the energetic particle population occur. Alfven instabilities of all three types occur in every toroidal magnetic confinement device with an intense energetic particle population. The energetic particles are most conveniently described by their constants of motion. Resonances occur between the orbital frequencies of the energetic particles and the wave phase velocity. If the wave resonance with the energetic particle population occurs where the gradient with respect to a constant of motion is inverted, the particles transfer energy to the wave, promoting instability. In a tokamak, the spatial gradient drive associated with inversion of the toroidal canonical angular momentum P{sub {zeta}} is most important. Once a mode is driven unstable, a wide variety

  4. Apparatus and method for removing particle species from fusion-plasma-confinement devices

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, G.W.

    1981-10-26

    In a mirror fusion plasma confinement apparatus, method and apparatus are provided for selectively removing (pumping) trapped low energy (thermal) particle species from the end cell region, without removing the still useful high energy particle species, and without requiring large power input to accomplish the pumping. Perturbation magnets are placed in the thermal barrier region of the end cell region at the turning point characteristic of trapped thermal particles, thus deflecting the thermal particles from their closed trajectory, causing them to drift sufficiently to exit the thermal barrier.

  5. Flute instability in a plasma confined by perfectly reflecting end walls

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, D.; Pozzoli, R.; Ryutov, D. )

    1993-11-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic stability of a low-pressure plasma confined along the magnetic field by the end walls that are perfectly reflecting the impinging particles is considered. It is shown that, if the magnetic field lines do not intersect the walls along the normal, a fast instability can develop. An explicit expression for the growth rate has been derived, and an analogy with the usual flute instability has been traced. The instability can play some role in the scrape-off layers of tokamaks with poloidal limiter.

  6. Magnetic field generation in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Dimonte, Guy; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2012-04-20

    Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) in inertial confinement fusion implosions are expected to generate magnetic fields. A Hall-MHD model is used to study the field generation by 2D single-mode and multimode RTI in a stratified two-fluid plasma. Self-generated magnetic fields are predicted and these fields grow as the RTI progresses via the ∇n(e)×∇T(e) term in the generalized Ohm's law. Scaling studies are performed to determine the growth of the self-generated magnetic field as a function of density, acceleration, Atwood number, and perturbation wavelength.

  7. Measurement of high-frequency, small scale density fluctuations in improved confinement RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, J. R.; Chapman, B. E.; Sarff, J. S.; Carmody, D.; Terry, P. W.; den Hartog, D. J.; Morton, L. A.; Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; MST Team

    2014-10-01

    In standard MST RFP plasmas, core transport is governed by magnetic fluctuations associated with global tearing modes. Using pulsed parallel current drive, tearing is significantly reduced and smaller-scale fluctuations are likely important to electron particle and heat transport for these improved confinement plasmas. On MST, an 11-chord FIR laser-based interferometry diagnostic, with ~ 8 cm chord spacing, is used to measure electron density fluctuations with wavenumbers k < 1-2 cm-1. An upgrade underway will allow resolution up to k ~ 15 cm-1. A fast magnetic coil array is employed for magnetic fluctuations. High-frequency (>50 kHz) small-scale (n > 15) density and magnetic fluctuations have been observed in the edge plasma, where density and temperature gradients are largest. These fluctuations are distinct from tearing and have amplitudes that correlate with the density gradient and electron beta. The MST is well suited to explore beta scaling given the large dynamic range (9-26%) found in the device. Correlation of the measured density fluctuations with plasma parameters in high beta plasmas will serve to identify the drive and contribute to validation of gyrokinetic codes. Work supported by DOE and NSF.

  8. A model for particle confinement in a toroidal plasma subject to strong radial electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    A toroidal plasma is confined and heated by the simultaneous application of strong d.c. magnetic fields and electric fields. Strong radial electric fields (about 1 kilovolt per centimeter) are imposed by biasing the plasma with up to 12 negative electrode rings which surround its minor circumference. The plasma containment is consistent with a balance of two processes: a radial infusion of ions in those sectors not containing electrode rings, resulting from the radially inward electric fields; and ion losses to the electrode rings, each of which acts as a sink and draws ions out the plasma in the manner of a Langmuir probe in the ion saturation regime. The highest density on axis which has been observed so far in this steady-state plasma is 6.2 x 10 to the 12th power particles per cubic centimeter, for which the particle containment time is 2.5 milliseconds. The deuterium ion kinetic temperature for these conditions was in the range of 360 to 520 eV.

  9. A model for particle confinement in a toroidal plasma subject to strong radial electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The approach adopted in the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus experiment is to confine and heat a toroidal plasma by the simultaneous application of strong dc magnetic fields and electric fields. Strong radial electric fields (about 1 kV/cm) are imposed by biasing the plasma with up to 12 negative electrode rings which surround its minor circumference. The plasma containment is consistent with a balance of two processes: a radial infusion of ions in those sectors not containing electrode rings, resulting from the radially inward electric fields; and ion losses to the electrode rings, each of which acts as a sink and draws ions out the plasma in the manner of a Langmuir probe in the ion saturation regime. The highest density on axis which has been observed so far in this steady-state plasma is 6.2 trillion particles per cu cm, for which the particle containment time is 2.5 msec. The deuterium ion kinetic temperature for these conditions was in the range of 360 to 520 eV.

  10. Stable anisotropic plasma confinement in magnetic configurations with convex-concave field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsventoukh, M. M.

    2014-02-01

    It is shown that a combination of the convex and the concave part of a field line provides a strong stabilizing action against convective (flute-interchange) plasma instability (Tsventoukh 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 112002). This results in internal peaking of the stable plasma pressure profile that is calculated from the collisionless kinetic stability criterion for any magnetic confinement system with combination of mirrors and cusps. Connection of the convex and concave field line parts results in a reduction of the space charge that drives the unstable E × B motion, as there is an opposite direction of the particle drift in a non-uniform field at convex and concave field lines. The pressure peaking arises at the minimum of the second adiabatic invariant J that takes place at the ‘middle’ of a tandem mirror-cusp transverse cross-section. The position of the minimum in J varies with the particle pitch angle that results in a shift of the peaking position depending on plasma anisotropy. This allows one to improve a stable peaked pressure profile at a convex-concave field by changing the plasma anisotropy over the trap cross-section. Examples of such anisotropic distribution functions are found that give an additional substantial enhancement in the maximal central pressure. Furthermore, the shape of new calculated stable profiles has a wide central plasma layer instead of a narrow peak.

  11. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vold, E. L.; Joglekar, A. S.; Ortega, M. I.; Moll, R.; Fenn, D.; Molvig, K.

    2015-11-01

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  12. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, E. L.; Molvig, K.; Joglekar, A. S.; Ortega, M. I.; Moll, R.; Fenn, D.

    2015-11-15

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  13. Ion distribution in the hot spot of an inertial confinement fusion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xianzhu; Guo, Zehua; Berk, Herb

    2012-10-01

    Maximizing the fusion gain of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for inertial fusion energy (IFE) applications leads to the standard scenario of central hot spot ignition followed by propagating burn wave through the cold/dense assembled fuel. The fact that the hot spot is surrounded by cold but dense fuel layer introduces subtle plasma physics which requires a kinetic description. Here we perform Fokker-Planck calculations and kinetic PIC simulations for an ICF plasma initially in pressure balance but having large temperature gradient over a narrow transition layer. The loss of the fast ion tail from the hot spot, which is important for fusion reactivity, is quantified by Fokker-Planck models. The role of electron energy transport and the ambipolar electric field is investigated via kinetic simulations and the fluid moment models. The net effect on both hot spot ion temperature and the ion tail distribution, and hence the fusion reactivity, is elucidated.

  14. Optimization of confinement in a toroidal plasma subject to strong radial electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary report on the identification and optimization of independent variables which affect the ion density and confinement time in a bumpy torus plasma is presented. The independent variables include the polarity, position, and number of the midplane electrode rings, the method of gas injection, and the polarity and strength of a weak vertical magnetic field. Some characteristic data taken under condition when most of the independent variables were optimized are presented. The highest value of the electron number density on the plasma axis is 3.2 x 10 to the 12th power/cc, the highest ion heating efficiency is 47 percent, and the longest particle containment time is 2.0 milliseconds.

  15. SXR-XUV Diagnostics for Edge and Core of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stutman, Dan

    2014-09-10

    The present report summarizes the results obtained during a one-year extension of DoE grant “SXR-XUV Diagnostics for Edge and Core of Magnetically Confined Plasmas”, at Johns Hopkins University, aimed at completing the development of a new type of magnetic fusion plasma diagnostic, the XUV Transmission Grating Imaging Radiometer (TGIR). The TGIR enables simultaneous spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of the XUV/VUV radiated power from impurities in fusion plasmas, with high speed. The instrument was successfully developed and qualified in the laboratory and in experiments on a tokamak. Its future applications will be diagnostic of the impurity content and transport in the divertor and edge of advanced magnetic fusion experiments, such as NSTX Upgrade.

  16. Plasma kinetic effects on interfacial mix in settings relevant to inertial confinement fusion and laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Bergen, B.; Bowers, K. J.; Vold, E. L.; Molvig, K.; Fernández, J. C.; Bang, W.; Bradley, P. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Hamilton, C. E.; Palaniyappan, S.; Santiago Cordoba, M. A.; Hegelich, B. M.; Dyer, G.; Roycroft, R.

    2015-11-01

    Mixing of high-Z/low-Z interfaces in dense plasma media is a problem of importance for understanding mix in inertial confinement fusion experiments and recent experiments at the LANL Trident facility. In this presentation, we apply the VPIC particle-in-cell code with a binary collision model to explore kinetic effects of the atomic mixing. Comparisons are made to published analytic theory and hybrid modeling results and conditions are identified under which plasma kinetic behavior may lead to anomalously rapid atomic mixing. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Funding provided by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  17. Plasma confinement characteristics and runaway instability in the Proto-Cleo Torsatron

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, J.N.

    1982-01-01

    The role of the internal separatrix in plasma confinement and the properties of a runaway-modified discharge were studied in the Proto-Cleo torsatron. Two-dimensional profiles of plasma current and density revealed peaking of these quantities off the midplane and allowed for comparisons to analytical and numerical calculations. An investigation of the poloidal distribution of particles in the divertor region concluded that the flux peaks at the apices of the external separatrix, in agreement with numerical calculations. Experimental estimates of the magnitude of runaway current and the relaxation time of a runaway instability were found to be in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions. Electron temperature increases on the order of 50% were observed due to the instability.

  18. Distinct turbulence sources and confinement features in the spherical tokamak plasma regime

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S.; Ren, Y.; ...

    2015-10-30

    New turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in the spherical tokamak (ST) regime are identified through nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. The drift wave Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) mode characterized by intrinsic mode asymmetry is shown to drive significant ion thermal transport in strongly rotating national spherical torus experiment (NSTX) L-modes. The long wavelength, quasi-coherent dissipative trapped electron mode (TEM) is destabilized in NSTX H-modes despite the presence of strong E x B shear, providing a robust turbulence source dominant over collisionless TEM. Dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM)-driven transport in the NSTX parametric regime is shown to increase with electron collision frequency, offeringmore » one possible source for the confinement scaling observed in experiments. There exists a turbulence-free regime in the collision-induced collisionless trapped electron mode to DTEM transition for ST plasmas. In conclusion, this predicts a natural access to a minimum transport state in the low collisionality regime that future advanced STs may cover.« less

  19. Distinct turbulence sources and confinement features in the spherical tokamak plasma regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S.; Ren, Y.; Kaye, S.; Chen, J.; Startsev, E.; Lu, Z.

    2015-10-30

    New turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in the spherical tokamak (ST) regime are identified through nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. The drift wave Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) mode characterized by intrinsic mode asymmetry is shown to drive significant ion thermal transport in strongly rotating national spherical torus experiment (NSTX) L-modes. The long wavelength, quasi-coherent dissipative trapped electron mode (TEM) is destabilized in NSTX H-modes despite the presence of strong E x B shear, providing a robust turbulence source dominant over collisionless TEM. Dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM)-driven transport in the NSTX parametric regime is shown to increase with electron collision frequency, offering one possible source for the confinement scaling observed in experiments. There exists a turbulence-free regime in the collision-induced collisionless trapped electron mode to DTEM transition for ST plasmas. In conclusion, this predicts a natural access to a minimum transport state in the low collisionality regime that future advanced STs may cover.

  20. Measurement of high-frequency density fluctuations in improved confinement RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, J. R.; Chapman, B. E.; Anderson, J. K.; Sarff, J. S.; Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2013-10-01

    In standard RFP plasmas, transport is dominated by global magnetic tearing modes. For improved-confinement plasmas using inductive current profile control (PPCD), smaller-scale fluctuations at higher frequencies (>50 kHz) may become more important as the global tearing modes are significantly reduced. In particular, drift-wave-like instabilities are theoretically unstable to the higher temperature and density gradients achieved during PPCD discharges. On the MST, an eleven chord Far-Infrared (FIR) laser-based diagnostic system with ~ 8 cm spacing is used to measure electron density fluctuations by interferometry and far-forward collective scattering. The existing diagnostic measures line-integrated density fluctuations within the divergence of the probe beam covering a wavenumber range k-< 1.3 cm-1, corresponding to k-ρs < 1.3 (ρs is the ion-sound Larmor radius). Experimentally, in PPCD plasmas, global tearing modes are reduced while high frequency coherent modes (50 < f < 140 kHz) emerge among broadband fluctuations. Correlations of these modes with sources of free energy, such as temperature and density gradients, will be investigated. Additionally, effects of increased plasma flow from a 1MW tangential NBI on high frequency density fluctuations will also be explored. Work Supported by U.S.D.O.E.

  1. Removal of volatile organic compounds in the confined space using atmospheric pressure discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.; Toyoura, T.; Matsui, M.; Kishimoto, T.

    2013-10-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are regulated as hazardous pollutants. Thus, the control of VOCs in the atmosphere is one of the most important environmental problems. Removal of VOCs has been generally carried out by conventional methods such as absorption, adsorption and incineration. There are some researches on development of removal system using atmospheric pressure discharge plasmas. In this study, the plasma process is applied to removal of VOCs in the confined space such as an underwater vehicle because of low operating temperature and compact system. A copper wire is helically wound outside a glass tube, and a tungsten rod is inserted inside the glass tube. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma is produced inside the glass tube by a high-voltage bipolar power supply for the removal of VOC. The DBD plasma decomposed hexane with the initial concentration of 30 ppm diluted by nitrogen, air and humid air. As the result, the removal efficiency of hexane diluted by nitrogen, air and humid air was 15%, 45% and 80%, respectively. Thus, it is considered that O and OH radicals are effective for removal of hexane. Optimization of the electrodes and the applied voltage waveforms for the enhancement of removal efficiency and the reduction of second products such as ozone will be investigated.

  2. The influence of electrode biasing on plasma confinement in the J-TEXT tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yue; Chen, Z. P.; Zhu, T. Z.; Yu, Q.; Zhuang, G.; Nan, J. Y.; Ke, X.; Liu, H.; the J-TEXT Team

    2014-01-01

    The influence of both positive and negative bias on global and plasma-edge parameters has been comparatively studied with a newly designed electrode biasing system in the J-TEXT tokamak. Compared to the 0 V bias case, the global particle confinement of plasma is enhanced under bias with both polarities, with the increments of the central line-averaged density and the soft x-ray emission, as well as the reduction of the edge Hα radiation level. The suppression of plasma-edge fluctuations and turbulent particle transport are obviously observed under bias, in different degrees with different polarities. The potential fluctuation amplitude is observed to be increased at the vicinity of the limiter under positive bias, with the existence of a peaked low-frequency mode characterized as high coherence and near-zero cross-phase poloidally in the edge region, which is not found in the negative bias case. The poloidal correlation length of turbulence is greatly enhanced under bias with both polarities; it shows a positive correlation with the amplitude of the poloidal phase velocity, which is mainly driven by the local Jr × B torque at the plasma edge under bias. The characteristic parameters of intermittent events (i.e. blobs), including amplitude, radial velocity, related particle flux and radial size, decreased dramatically under bias in the edge region.

  3. Optimization of confinement in a toroidal plasma subject to strong radial electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The toroidal ring of plasma contained in the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus facility may be biased to positive or negative potentials approaching 50 kV by applying dc voltages of the respective polarity to 12 or fewer midplane electrode rings. The radial electric fields, which are responsible for raising the ions to high energies by E x B/B-squared drift, then point out of or into the plasma. A preliminary report is given on the identification and optimization of independent variables which affect the ion density and confinement time in the Bumpy Torus plasma. The independent variables include the polarity, position, and number of the midplane electrode rings, the method of gas injection, and the polarity and strength of a weak vertical magnetic field. Some characteristic data taken under conditions where most of the independent variables were optimized are presented. The highest value of the electron number density on the plasma axis is 3.2 trillion per cu cm, the highest ion heating efficiency is 47%, and the longest particle containment time is 2.0 msec.

  4. MAGNETICALLY CONFINED INTERSTELLAR HOT PLASMA IN THE NUCLEAR BULGE OF OUR GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Shogo; Kwon, Jungmi; Tamura, Motohide; Yasui, Kazuki; Nagata, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Tatsuhito; Uchiyama, Hideki; Schödel, Rainer; Hatano, Hirofumi; Sato, Shuji; Sugitani, Koji; Suenaga, Takuya

    2013-06-01

    The origin of the Galactic center diffuse X-ray emission (GCDX) is still under intense investigation. In particular, the interpretation of the hot (kT ≈ 7 keV) component of the GCDX, characterized by the strong Fe 6.7 keV line emission, has been contentious. If the hot component originates from a truly diffuse interstellar plasma, not a collection of unresolved point sources, such plasma cannot be gravitationally bound, and its regeneration would require a huge amount of energy. Here, we show that the spatial distribution of the GCDX does not correlate with the number density distribution of an old stellar population traced by near-infrared light, strongly suggesting a significant contribution of the diffuse interstellar plasma. Contributions of the old stellar population to the GCDX are implied to be ∼50% and ∼20% in the nuclear stellar disk (NSD) and nuclear star cluster, respectively. For the NSD, a scale height of 0.°32 ± 0.°02 is obtained for the first time from the stellar number density profiles. We also show the results of the extended near-infrared polarimetric observations in the central 3° × 2° region of our Galaxy, and confirm that the GCDX region is permeated by a large scale, toroidal magnetic field (MF) as previously claimed. Together with observed MF strengths close to energy equipartition, the hot plasma could be magnetically confined, reducing the amount of energy required to sustain it.

  5. The potential role of electric fields and plasma barodiffusion on the inertial confinement fusion databasea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Peter; Wilks, S. C.; Bellei, C.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2011-05-01

    The generation of strong, self-generated electric fields (GV/m) in direct-drive, inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) capsules has been reported [Rygg et al., Science 319, 1223 (2008); Li et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 225001 (2008)]. A candidate explanation for the origin of these fields based on charge separation across a plasma shock front was recently proposed [Amendt et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 51 124048 (2009)]. The question arises whether such electric fields in imploding capsules can have observable consequences on target performance. Two well-known anomalies come to mind: (1) an observed ≈2× greater-than-expected deficit of neutrons in an equimolar D3He fuel mixture compared with hydrodynamically equivalent D [Rygg et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 052702 (2006)] and DT [Herrmann et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056312 (2009)] fuels, and (2) a similar shortfall of neutrons when trace amounts of argon are mixed with D in indirect-drive implosions [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)]. A new mechanism based on barodiffusion (or pressure gradient-driven diffusion) in a plasma is proposed that incorporates the presence of shock-generated electric fields to explain the reported anomalies. For implosions performed at the Omega laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], the (low Mach number) return shock has an appreciable scale length over which the lighter D ions can diffuse away from fuel center. The depletion of D fuel is estimated and found to lead to a corresponding reduction in neutrons, consistent with the anomalies observed in experiments for both argon-doped D fuels and D3He equimolar mixtures. The reverse diffusional flux of the heavier ions toward fuel center also increases the pressure from a concomitant increase in electron number density, resulting in lower stagnation pressures and larger imploded cores in agreement with gated, self-emission, x-ray imaging data.

  6. Confinement time of electron plasma approaching magnetic pumping transport limit in small aspect ratio C-shaped torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachhvani, Lavkesh; Pahari, Sambaran; Goswami, Rajiv; Bajpai, Manu; Yeole, Yogesh; Chattopadhyay, P. K.

    2016-06-01

    A long confinement time of electron plasma, approaching magnetic pumping transport limit, has been observed in SMARTEX-C (a small aspect ratio partial torus with R o / a ˜ 1.59 ). Investigations of the growth rate reveal that they are governed by instabilities like resistive wall destabilization, ion driven instabilities, and electron-neutral collisions. Successful confinement of electron plasmas exceeding > 1 × 10 5 poloidal E → × B → rotations lasting for nearly 2.1 ± 0.1 s is achieved by suppressing these instabilities. The confinement time has been estimated in two ways: (a) from the frequency scaling of the linear diocotron mode launched from sections of the wall that are also used as capacitive probes and (b) by dumping the plasma onto a charge collector at different hold times.

  7. Effects of acute temperature change, confinement and housing on plasma corticosterone in water snakes, Nerodia sipedon (Colubridae: Natricinae).

    PubMed

    Sykes, Kyle Lea; Klukowski, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    Body temperature affects many aspects of reptilian behavior and physiology, but its effect on hormonal secretion has been little studied, especially in snakes. Major objectives of this study were to determine if acute changes in body temperature during confinement influenced plasma corticosterone levels and if initial body temperatures upon capture in the field were related to baseline corticosterone levels in water snakes (Nerodia sipedon). Water snakes were bled upon capture in the field and after one hour of confinement in a cooled, control, or heated incubator. Since little is known about the potential metabolic changes in response to stress in reptiles, plasma triglyceride levels were also measured. Upon completion of the field study, snakes were housed for 5-8 days without food to determine the effect of chronic stress on both corticosterone and triglyceride levels. Plasma corticosterone concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) and plasma triglycerides were determined enzymatically. In the field, experimental alterations of body temperature during confinement had no effect on corticosterone levels. Similarly, there was no correlation between initial body temperature and baseline plasma corticosterone concentrations. However, post-confinement corticosterone levels were approximately three-times greater in females than males. Plasma triglyceride levels were not affected by temperature treatment, confinement, or sex. Compared to field values, both baseline and post-confinement corticosterone levels were elevated after the chronic stress of short-term laboratory housing but triglyceride levels decreased. Overall, these results indicate that sex but not body temperature has a major influence on the adrenocortical stress response in Nerodia sipedon.

  8. Fast Three Dimensional Reconstruction of Magnetohydrodynamic Equilibria in Plasma Confinement Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seal, S. K.; Cianciosa, M. R.; Hirshman, S. P.; Wingen, A.; Wilcox, R. S.; Unterberg, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    High-fidelity reconstruction of plasma equilibria in confinement devices like stellarators and tokamaks with external three dimensional (3D) fields is computationally very expensive and routinely requires days, even weeks, to complete using serial approaches. Here, we present the performance results of coupling the 3D plasma reconstruction code, V3FIT, with PARVMEC, the recently developed parallel version of VMEC. We present the parallel design of this coupled software along with a scalability analysis to identify its performance bottlenecks. Dependence of its scalability limits on model parameters is derived. These analyses are supported by scaling studies on over 6,000 processor cores of a Cray XC30 supercomputer. PARVMEC, which dominates the total runtime of the reconstruction procedure, is shown to deliver speedup improvements of over one to two orders of magnitude, depending on whether the equilibrium computations are carried out in a free or fixed boundary mode. The overall speedup of the coupled reconstruction code is shown to deliver over 40X improvement enabling fusion scientists to carry out high-fidelity 3D plasma reconstruction analyses in only a few hours instead of in days/weeks for the first time. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  9. Measurements Of Stellar And Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis Reactions Using Inertially-Confined Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, Alex; Herrmann, Hans; Gatu Johnson, Maria; Kim, Yongho; Frenje, Johan; Hale, Gerry; Li, Chikang; Rubery, Mike; Paris, Mark; Bacher, Andy; Brune, Carl; Forrest, Chad; Glebov, Vladimir; Janezic, Roger; McNabb, Dennis; Nikroo, Abbas; Pino, Jesse; Sangster, Craig; Seguin, Fredrick; Sio, Hong; Stoeckl, Christian; Petrasso, Richard

    2016-09-01

    The 3He+ 3He, T+3He, and p+D reactions directly relevant to either Stellar or Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) have been studied at the OMEGA laser facility using inertially-confined plasmas, created using shock-driven `exploding pusher' implosions. These plasmas better mimic astrophysical systems than cold-target accelerator experiments. A new measured S-factor for the T(3He, γ)6Li reaction rules out an anomalously-high 6Li production during the Big Bang as an explanation to the high observed values in metal poor first generation stars. Our value is also inconsistent with values used in previous BBN calculations. Proton spectra from the 3He+3He and T+3He reactions are used to constrain nuclear R-matrix modeling, and recent experiments have probed the p+D reaction for the first time in a plasma. This work was partially supported by the LDRD program at LANL, US DOE, NLUF, LLE, and GA.

  10. Progress in theory and simulation of ion cyclotron emission from magnetic confinement fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendy, Richard; Chapman, Ben; Chapman, Sandra; Cook, James; Reman, Bernard; McClements, Ken; Carbajal, Leopoldo

    2016-10-01

    Suprathermal ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is detected from all large tokamak and stellarator plasmas. Its frequency spectrum has narrow peaks at sequential cyclotron harmonics of the energetic ion population (fusion-born or neutral beam-injected) at the outer edge of the plasma. ICE was the first collective radiative instability driven by confined fusion-born ions observed in deuterium-tritium plasmas in JET and TFTR, and the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability is the most likely emission mechanism. Contemporary ICE measurements are taken at very high sampling rates from the LHD stellarator and from the conventional aspect ratio KSTAR tokamak. A correspondingly advanced modelling capability for the ICE emission mechanism has been developed using 1D3V PIC and hybrid-PIC codes, supplemented by analytical theory. These kinetic codes simulate the self-consistent full orbit dynamics of energetic and thermal ions, together with the electric and magnetic fields and the electrons. We report recent progress in theory and simulation that addresses: the scaling of ICE intensity with energetic particle density; the transition between super-Alfvénic and sub-Alfvénic regimes for the collectively radiating particles; and the rapid time evolution that is seen for some ICE measurements. This work was supported in part by the RCUK Energy Programme [Grant Number EP/I501045] and by Euratom.

  11. Particle and momentum confinement in tokamak plasmas with unbalanced neutral beam injection and strong rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    There is a self-consistent theory of the effects of neutral beam injection on impurity transport in tokamak plasmas. The theory predicts that co-injection drives impurities outward and that counter-injection enhances the normally inward flow of impurities. The theory was applied to carry out a detailed analysis of the large experimental database from the PLT and the ISX-B tokamaks. The theory was found to generally model the experimental data quite well. It is, therefore, concluded that neutral beam co-injection can drive impurities outward to achieve clean central plasmas and a cool radiating edge. Theoretical predictions for future thermonuclear reactors such as INTOR, TIBER II, and ITER indicated that neutral beam driven flow reversal might be an effective impurity control method if the rate of beam momentum deposited per plasma ion is adequate. The external momentum drag, which is a pivotal concept in impurity flow reversal theory, is correctly predicted by the gyroviscous theory of momentum confinement. The theory was applied to analyze experimental data from the PLT and the PDX tokamaks with exact experimental conditions. The theory was found to be in excellent agreement with experiment over a wide range of parameters. It is, therefore, possible to formulate the impurity transport theory from first principles, without resort to empiricism.

  12. Scaling of Microcavity Plasmas Toward 1 µm. Science and Engineering of Spatially-Confined, Low Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Eden, J. G.

    2012-03-07

    The DOE has provided, by means of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), $146,400 in funding for the purchase of scientific equipment. Specifically, these funds have enabled the purchase of two scientific cameras that have already been applied to the research in microcavity plasmas at the University of Illinois (Urbana). The first camera system that was purchased with these funds is a gated ICCD system that allows events as short as 5 ns in time to be captured. It is difficult to express the impact that this equipment has already had on our research. Despite having arrived just 6 - 7 months ago, this camera system has already been used by five graduate students and several undergraduates to capture phenomena that we simply could not see in the past. As an example, the low temperature plasma confined to a spiral structure we fabricate in the Al/Al₂O₃ materials system appears, on long time scales such as those we see with our eyes, to be spatially uniform. However, when captured with the new camera system, the plasma actually is formed initially at the center of the spiral and then moves radially (literally, "jumping" over channels as it goes) at a velocity of a few km/sec. This is an exciting result and I should add that the camera shows that plasma standing waves are produced in some of the structures as well. We do not currently understand all of the phenomena we are witnessing but it is obvious that this new system has quite literally opened new areas of plasma research and application. The second system purchased under this ARRA grant is an infrared system that is far more sensitive than anything our laboratory (or the University of Illinois, for that matter) has had previously. Although fewer experiments have been completed to date with this second camera, it is already clear that it is, indeed, extremely sensitive and it is slated for several experiments in the near future in which we will be measuring the infrared spectra of several arrays of

  13. Insulin regulates Glut4 confinement in plasma membrane clusters in adipose cells.

    PubMed

    Lizunov, Vladimir A; Stenkula, Karin; Troy, Aaron; Cushman, Samuel W; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-stimulated delivery of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) to the plasma membrane (PM) is the hallmark of glucose metabolism. In this study we examined insulin's effects on GLUT4 organization in PM of adipose cells by direct microscopic observation of single monomers tagged with photoswitchable fluorescent protein. In the basal state, after exocytotic delivery only a fraction of GLUT4 is dispersed into the PM as monomers, while most of the GLUT4 stays at the site of fusion and forms elongated clusters (60-240 nm). GLUT4 monomers outside clusters diffuse freely and do not aggregate with other monomers. In contrast, GLUT4 molecule collision with an existing cluster can lead to immediate confinement and association with that cluster. Insulin has three effects: it shifts the fraction of dispersed GLUT4 upon delivery, it augments the dissociation of GLUT4 monomers from clusters ∼3-fold and it decreases the rate of endocytic uptake. All together these three effects of insulin shift most of the PM GLUT4 from clustered to dispersed states. GLUT4 confinement in clusters represents a novel kinetic mechanism for insulin regulation of glucose homeostasis.

  14. Inertially confined fusion plasmas dominated by alpha-particle self-heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O.; Kritcher, A. L.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Albert, F.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Church, J. A.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Hamza, A.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H.; Hohenberger, M.; Hoover, D.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G.; Kozioziemski, B.; Grim, G.; Field, J. E.; Frenje, J.; Izumi, N.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Khan, S. F.; Knauer, J.; Kohut, T.; Landen, O.; Merrill, F.; Michel, P.; Moore, A.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Rygg, R. R.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Shaughnessy, D.; Strozzi, D.; Town, R. P. J.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C.; Yeamans, C.

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-particle self-heating, the process of deuterium-tritium fusion reaction products depositing their kinetic energy locally within a fusion reaction region and thus increasing the temperature in the reacting region, is essential for achieving ignition in a fusion system. Here, we report new inertial confinement fusion experiments where the alpha-particle heating of the plasma is dominant with the fusion yield produced exceeding the fusion yield from the work done on the fuel (pressure times volume change) by a factor of two or more. These experiments have achieved the highest yield (26 +/- 0.5 kJ) and stagnation pressures (≍220 +/- 40 Gbar) of any facility-based inertial confinement fusion experiments, although they are still short of the pressures required for ignition on the National Ignition Facility (~300-400 Gbar). These experiments put us in a new part of parameter space that has not been extensively studied so far because it lies between the no-alpha-particle-deposition regime and ignition.

  15. Customizing electron confinement in plasma-assembled Si/AlN nanodots for solar cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S. Y.; Xu, S.; Arulsamy, A. Das; Xu, M.; Cvelbar, U.; Mozetic, M.; Ostrikov, K.

    2009-12-15

    Size-uniform Si nanodots (NDs) are synthesized on an AlN buffer layer at low Si(111) substrate temperatures using inductively coupled plasma-assisted magnetron sputtering deposition. High-resolution electron microscopy reveals that the sizes of the Si NDs range from 9 to 30 nm. Room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra indicate that the energy peak shifts from 738 to 778 nm with increasing the ND size. In this system, the quantum confinement effect is fairly strong even for relatively large (up to 25 nm in diameter) NDs, which is promising for the development of the next-generation all-Si tandem solar cells capable of effectively capturing sunlight photons with the energies between 1.7 (infrared: large NDs) and 3.4 eV (ultraviolet: small NDs). The strength of the resulting electron confinement in the Si/AlN ND system is evaluated and justified by analyzing the measured PL spectra using the ionization energy theory approximation.

  16. Mean and oscillating plasma flows and turbulence interactions across the L-H confinement transition.

    PubMed

    Conway, G D; Angioni, C; Ryter, F; Sauter, P; Vicente, J

    2011-02-11

    A complex interaction between turbulence driven E × B zonal flow oscillations, i.e., geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs), the turbulence, and mean equilibrium flows is observed during the low to high (L-H) plasma confinement mode transition in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. Below the L-H threshold at low densities a limit-cycle oscillation forms with competition between the turbulence level and the GAM flow shearing. At higher densities the cycle is diminished, while in the H mode the cycle duration becomes too short to sustain the GAM, which is replaced by large amplitude broadband flow perturbations. Initially GAM amplitude increases as the H-mode transition is approached, but is then suppressed in the H mode by enhanced mean flow shear.

  17. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-03-03

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters.

  18. Mean and Oscillating Plasma Flows and Turbulence Interactions across the L-H Confinement Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, G. D.; Angioni, C.; Ryter, F.; Sauter, P.; Vicente, J.

    2011-02-11

    A complex interaction between turbulence driven ExB zonal flow oscillations, i.e., geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs), the turbulence, and mean equilibrium flows is observed during the low to high (L-H) plasma confinement mode transition in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. Below the L-H threshold at low densities a limit-cycle oscillation forms with competition between the turbulence level and the GAM flow shearing. At higher densities the cycle is diminished, while in the H mode the cycle duration becomes too short to sustain the GAM, which is replaced by large amplitude broadband flow perturbations. Initially GAM amplitude increases as the H-mode transition is approached, but is then suppressed in the H mode by enhanced mean flow shear.

  19. Compact Intense Neutron Generators Based on Inertial Electrostatic Confinement of D-D Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, K.; Inoue, K.; Kajiwara, T.; Nakamatsu, R.

    2015-10-01

    A neutron generator based on inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) of fusion plasmas is being developed for a non-destructive inspection system of special nuclear materials hidden in sea containers. The new IEC device is equipped with a multistage feedthrough which was designed aiming at both capability of a high bias voltage and enhancement of ion recirculation by modification of electric fields in the IEC device. Experimental comparison was made with a conventional single-stage IEC device developed in an earlier work. As the results, both the increase in the applied voltage and the modified field symmetry by the new multistage scheme showed significant enhancement in the neutron output. As a consequence, neutron output per input discharge current was enhanced drastically by a factor of ~30 in total. Also, the first pulsing experiments of the newly developed IEC neutron generator showed pulsed neutron output with a rapid pulse fall-off of ~ 1 μsec successfully.

  20. Probing Leader Cells in Endothelial Collective Migration by Plasma Lithography Geometric Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yongliang; Jamilpour, Nima; Yao, Baoyin; Dean, Zachary S.; Riahi, Reza; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-03-01

    When blood vessels are injured, leader cells emerge in the endothelium to heal the wound and restore the vasculature integrity. The characteristics of leader cells during endothelial collective migration under diverse physiological conditions, however, are poorly understood. Here we investigate the regulation and function of endothelial leader cells by plasma lithography geometric confinement generated. Endothelial leader cells display an aggressive phenotype, connect to follower cells via peripheral actin cables and discontinuous adherens junctions, and lead migrating clusters near the leading edge. Time-lapse microscopy, immunostaining, and particle image velocimetry reveal that the density of leader cells and the speed of migrating clusters are tightly regulated in a wide range of geometric patterns. By challenging the cells with converging, diverging and competing patterns, we show that the density of leader cells correlates with the size and coherence of the migrating clusters. Collectively, our data provide evidence that leader cells control endothelial collective migration by regualting the migrating clusters.

  1. Stability properties and fast ion confinement of hybrid tokamak plasma configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, J. P.; Brunetti, D.; Pfefferle, D.; Faustin, J. M. P.; Cooper, W. A.; Kleiner, A.; Lanthaler, S.; Patten, H. W.; Raghunathan, M.

    2015-11-01

    In hybrid scenarios with flat q just above unity, extremely fast growing tearing modes are born from toroidal sidebands of the near resonant ideal internal kink mode. New scalings of the growth rate with the magnetic Reynolds number arise from two fluid effects and sheared toroidal flow. Non-linear saturated 1/1 dominant modes obtained from initial value stability calculation agree with the amplitude of the 1/1 component of a 3D VMEC equilibrium calculation. Viable and realistic equilibrium representation of such internal kink modes allow fast ion studies to be accurately established. Calculations of MAST neutral beam ion distributions using the VENUS-LEVIS code show very good agreement of observed impaired core fast ion confinement when long lived modes occur. The 3D ICRH code SCENIC also enables the establishment of minority RF distributions in hybrid plasmas susceptible to saturated near resonant internal kink modes.

  2. Confinement and structure of electrostatically coupled dust clouds in a direct current plasma-sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunomura, S.; Ohno, N.; Takamura, S.

    1998-10-01

    Mechanisms for the confinement and the internal structure of an electrostatically coupled dust cloud formed in a dc glow discharge have been investigated from a comparative viewpoint between experimental observations and a simple model. Two kinds of dust clouds with different internal structures are clearly observed, depending on the dispersion of the size distribution of dust particles. The dust cloud can be trapped only in the plasma-sheath boundary area, corresponding to the potential minimum region determined by gravitational and electrostatic forces in the cathode sheath. No dust particles were found deep inside of the sheath, which is consistent with the analysis because the dust particles may be charged positively due to an extreme reduction of the electron density. The internal structure of the electrostatically coupled dust cloud was found to be arranged so that the total potential energy, including the repulsive Coulomb interaction among negative dust particles, may become minimal.

  3. Observation of quasi-periodic frequency sweeping in electron cyclotron emission of nonequilibrium mirror-confined plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, M. E.; Shalashov, A. G.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Golubev, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    Chirping frequency patterns have been observed in the electron cyclotron emission from strongly nonequilibrium plasma confined in a table-top mirror magnetic trap. Such patterns are typical for the formation of nonlinear phase-space structures in a proximity of the wave-particle resonances of a kinetically unstable plasma, also known as the “holes and clumps” mechanism. Our data provides the first experimental evidence for the acting of this mechanism in the electron cyclotron frequency domain.

  4. Transport and confinement in the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, R. J.; Ahn, J. W.; Antar, G. Y.; Appel, L. C.; Applegate, D.; Brickley, C.; Bunting, C.; Carolan, P. G.; Challis, C. D.; Conway, N. J.; Counsell, G. F.; Dendy, R. O.; Dudson, B.; Field, A. R.; Kirk, A.; Lloyd, B.; Meyer, H. F.; Morris, A. W.; Patel, A.; Roach, C. M.; Rohzansky, V.; Sykes, A.; Taylor, D.; Tournianski, M. R.; Valovi, M.; Wilson, H. R.; Axon, K. B.; Buttery, R. J.; Ciric, D.; Cunningham, G.; Dowling, J.; Dunstan, M. R.; Gee, S. J.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Helander, P.; Keeling, D. L.; Knight, P. J.; Lott, F.; Loughlin, M. J.; Manhood, S. J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G. J.; Price, M. N.; Stammers, K.; Storrs, J.; Walsh, M. J.; MAST, the; NBI Team

    2003-12-01

    A combination of recently installed state-of-the-art imaging and profile diagnostics, together with established plasma simulation codes, are providing for the first time on Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) the tools required for studying confinement and transport, from the core through to the plasma edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL). The H-mode edge transport barrier is now routinely turned on and off using a combination of poloidally localized fuelling and fine balancing of the X-points. Theory, supported by experiment, indicates that the edge radial electric field and toroidal flow velocity (thought to play an important role in H-mode access) are largest if gas fuelling is concentrated at the inboard side. H-mode plasmas show predominantly type III ELM characteristics, with confinement HH factor (w.r.t. scaling law IPB98[y, 2]) around ~1.0. Combining MAST H-mode data with the International Tokamak Physics Activities (ITPA) analyses, results in an L H power threshold scaling proportional to plasma surface area (rather than PLH ~ R2). In addition, MAST favours an inverse aspect ratio scaling PLH ~ egr0.5. Similarly, the introduction of type III ELMing H-mode data to the pedestal energy regression analysis introduces a scaling Wped ~ egr-2.13 and modifies the exponents on R, BT and kgr. Preliminary TRANSP simulations indicate that ion and electron thermal diffusivities in ELMing H-mode approach the ion-neoclassical level in the half-radius region of the plasma with momentum diffusivity a few times lower. Linear flux-tube ITG and ETG microstability calculations using GS2 offer explanations for the near-neoclassical ion diffusivity and significantly anomalous electron diffusivity seen on MAST. To complement the baseline quasi-steady-state H-mode, newly developed advanced regimes are being explored. In particular, 'broad' internal transport barriers (ITBs) have been formed using techniques developed at conventional aspect ratio. Electron and ion energy diffusivities

  5. Curling probe measurement of a large-volume pulsed plasma with surface magnetic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, A.; Tashiro, H.; Sakakibara, W.; Nakamura, K.; Sugai, H.

    2016-12-01

    A curling probe (CP) based on microwave resonance is applied to the measurement of electron density in a pulsed DC glow discharge under surface magnetic confinement (SMC) provided by a number of permanent magnets on a chamber wall. Owing to the SMC effects, a 1 m scale large-volume plasma is generated by a relatively low voltage (~1 kV) at low pressure (~1 Pa) in various gases (Ar, CH4, and C2H2). Temporal variation of the electron density is measured for pulse frequency f  =  0.5-25 kHz for various discharge-on times (T ON) with a high resolution time (~0.2 µs), using the on-point mode. In general, the electron density starts to increase at time t  =  0 after turn-on of the discharge voltage, reaches peak density at t  =  T ON, and then decreases after turn-off. The peak electron density is observed to increase with the pulse frequency f for constant T ON owing to the residual plasma. This dependence is successfully formulated using a semi-empirical model. The spatio-temporal evolution of the cathode sheath in the pulsed discharge is revealed by a 1 m long movable CP. The measured thickness of the high-voltage cathode fall in a steady state coincides with the value of the so-called Child-Langmuir sheath.

  6. Theoretical studies on plasma heating and confinement. Final report, May 4, 1984--May 13, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    Three principal topics are covered in this final report: Stabilization of low frequency modes of an axisymmetric compact torus plasma confinement system, such as, spheromaks and FRC`S, by a population of large orbit axis encircling energetic ions. Employing an extension of the `energy principle` which utilizes a Vlasov description for the energetic `ion component, it has been demonstrated that short wavelength MHD type modes are stabilized while the long wavelength tilt and precessional modes are marginally stable. The deformation of the equilibrium configuration by the energetic ions results in the stabilization of the tilt mode for spheromaks. Formation of Ion Rings and their coalescence with spheromaks. A two dimensional electromagnetic PIC codes has been developed for the study of ion ring formation and its propagation, deformation and slowing down in a cold plasma. It has been shown that a ring moving at a speed less than the Alfven velocity can merge with a stationary spheromak. Anomalous transport from drift waves in a Tokomak. The Direct Interaction Approximation in used to obtain incremental transport coefficients for particles and heat for drift waves in a Tokomak. It is shown that the transport matrix does not obey Onsager`s principle.

  7. Dynamic Fracture of Borosilicate Glass with Plasma Confinement geometry in Pure Water by Laser-induced Shock Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Fumikazu; Kishimura, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Takanori

    2013-06-01

    In order to characterize dynamic fracture of borosilicate glass, we performed laser-shock-experiments of both an aluminum-ablator mounted glass and a glass with plasma confinement geometry in pure water by Q-switched Nd3+:YAG laser. The incident beam with 440 mJ were focused onto the target approximately 300 μm in diameter. The dynamic fracture of the glass targets is observed with high-speed digital framing-camera photography. For the aluminum-ablator mounted glass, propagation of the shock wave in water was observed, and the shock-wave velocity is obtained to be 1.65 +/- 0.02 km/s using image processing. Shock-pressure applied the target is estimated to be 180 MPa by Hugoniot relation. For the glass with plasma confinement geometry, generation of the micro-fragments from the rear side of the target was observed. This result indicates that shock-induced fragmentation by laser irradiation is enhanced by the plasma confinement effect. The soft-recovered fragments are separated according the size with PET mesh having deferent mesh size. As a result, the glass with plasma confinement geometry generated smaller fragment than the aluminum-ablator mounted glass.

  8. Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in spherical tokamak regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S.; Ren, Y.; Kaye, S.; Chen, J.; Startsev, E.; Lu, Z.; Li, Z. Q.

    2015-10-15

    Highly distinct features of spherical tokamaks (ST), such as National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) and NSTX-U, result in a different fusion plasma regime with unique physics properties compared to conventional tokamaks. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations critical for addressing turbulence and transport physics in the ST regime have led to new insights. The drift wave Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability characterized by intrinsic mode asymmetry is identified in strongly rotating NSTX L-mode plasmas. While the strong E x B shear associated with the rotation leads to a reduction in KH/ion temperature gradient turbulence, the remaining fluctuations can produce a significant ion thermal transport that is comparable to the experimental level in the outer core region (with no "transport shortfall"). The other new, important turbulence source identified in NSTX is the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM), which is believed to play little role in conventional tokamak regime. Due to the high fraction of trapped electrons, long wavelength DTEMs peaking around kθρs ~ 0.1 are destabilized in NSTX collisionality regime by electron density and temperature gradients achieved there. Surprisingly, the E x B shear stabilization effect on DTEM is remarkably weak, which makes it a major turbulence source in the ST regime dominant over collisionless TEM (CTEM). The latter, on the other hand, is subject to strong collisional and E x B shear suppression in NSTX. DTEM is shown to produce significant particle, energy and toroidal momentum transport, in agreement with experimental levels in NSTX H-modes. Furthermore, DTEM-driven transport in NSTX parametric regime is found to increase with electron collision frequency, providing one possible source for the scaling of confinement time observed in NSTX H-modes. Most interestingly, the existence of a turbulence-free regime in the collision-induced CTEM to DTEM transition, corresponding to a minimum plasma

  9. Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in spherical tokamak regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S.; Ren, Y.; Kaye, S.; Chen, J.; Startsev, E.; Lu, Z.; Li, Z. Q.

    2015-10-01

    Highly distinct features of spherical tokamaks (ST), such as National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) and NSTX-U, result in a different fusion plasma regime with unique physics properties compared to conventional tokamaks. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations critical for addressing turbulence and transport physics in the ST regime have led to new insights. The drift wave Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability characterized by intrinsic mode asymmetry is identified in strongly rotating NSTX L-mode plasmas. While the strong E ×B shear associated with the rotation leads to a reduction in KH/ion temperature gradient turbulence, the remaining fluctuations can produce a significant ion thermal transport that is comparable to the experimental level in the outer core region (with no "transport shortfall"). The other new, important turbulence source identified in NSTX is the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM), which is believed to play little role in conventional tokamak regime. Due to the high fraction of trapped electrons, long wavelength DTEMs peaking around kθρs˜0.1 are destabilized in NSTX collisionality regime by electron density and temperature gradients achieved there. Surprisingly, the E ×B shear stabilization effect on DTEM is remarkably weak, which makes it a major turbulence source in the ST regime dominant over collisionless TEM (CTEM). The latter, on the other hand, is subject to strong collisional and E ×B shear suppression in NSTX. DTEM is shown to produce significant particle, energy and toroidal momentum transport, in agreement with experimental levels in NSTX H-modes. Moreover, DTEM-driven transport in NSTX parametric regime is found to increase with electron collision frequency, providing one possible source for the scaling of confinement time observed in NSTX H-modes. Most interestingly, the existence of a turbulence-free regime in the collision-induced CTEM to DTEM transition, corresponding to a minimum plasma transport in advanced ST

  10. Particle modelling of magnetically confined oxygen plasma in low pressure radio frequency discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Benyoucef, Djilali; Yousfi, Mohammed

    2015-01-15

    The main objective of this paper is the modelling and simulation of a radio frequency (RF) discharge in oxygen at low pressure and at room temperature, including the effect of crossed electric and magnetic fields for generation and confinement of oxygen plasma. The particle model takes into account one axial dimension along the electric field axis and three velocity components during the Monte Carlo treatment of the collisions between charged particles and background gas. The simulation by this developed code allows us not only to determine the electrodynamics characteristics of the RF discharge, but also to obtain kinetics and energetic description of reactive oxygen plasma at low pressure. These information are very important for the control of the deep reactive-ion etching technology of the silicon to manufacture capacitors with high density and for the deposition thick insulating films or thick metal to manufacture micro-coils. The simulation conditions are as follows: RF peak voltage of 200 V, frequency of 13.56 MHz, crossed magnetic field varying from 0 to 50 Gauss, and oxygen pressure of 13.8 Pa. In the presence of magnetic field, the results show an increase of the plasma density, a decrease of the electron mean energy, and also a reduction of the ratio between electron density and positive ion density. Finally in order to validate, the results are successfully compared with measurements already carried out in the literature. The conditions of comparison are from 100 to 300 V of the peak voltage at 13.56 MHz under a pressure of 13.8 Pa and a gap distance of 2.5 cm.

  11. Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in spherical tokamak regime

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, W. X.; Ethier, S.; Ren, Y.; ...

    2015-10-15

    Highly distinct features of spherical tokamaks (ST), such as National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) and NSTX-U, result in a different fusion plasma regime with unique physics properties compared to conventional tokamaks. Nonlinear global gyrokinetic simulations critical for addressing turbulence and transport physics in the ST regime have led to new insights. The drift wave Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability characterized by intrinsic mode asymmetry is identified in strongly rotating NSTX L-mode plasmas. While the strong E x B shear associated with the rotation leads to a reduction in KH/ion temperature gradient turbulence, the remaining fluctuations can produce a significant ion thermal transportmore » that is comparable to the experimental level in the outer core region (with no "transport shortfall"). The other new, important turbulence source identified in NSTX is the dissipative trapped electron mode (DTEM), which is believed to play little role in conventional tokamak regime. Due to the high fraction of trapped electrons, long wavelength DTEMs peaking around kθρs ~ 0.1 are destabilized in NSTX collisionality regime by electron density and temperature gradients achieved there. Surprisingly, the E x B shear stabilization effect on DTEM is remarkably weak, which makes it a major turbulence source in the ST regime dominant over collisionless TEM (CTEM). The latter, on the other hand, is subject to strong collisional and E x B shear suppression in NSTX. DTEM is shown to produce significant particle, energy and toroidal momentum transport, in agreement with experimental levels in NSTX H-modes. Furthermore, DTEM-driven transport in NSTX parametric regime is found to increase with electron collision frequency, providing one possible source for the scaling of confinement time observed in NSTX H-modes. Most interestingly, the existence of a turbulence-free regime in the collision-induced CTEM to DTEM transition, corresponding to a minimum plasma transport in

  12. Laboratory study of pulsed regimes of electron cyclotron instabilities in a mirror-confined plasma for astrophysical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viktorov, Mikhail; Golubev, Sergey; Mansfeld, Dmitry; Izotov, Ivan; Gospodchikov, Egor; Shalashov, Alexander; Demekhov, Andrei

    2014-05-01

    We discuss the use of a mirror-confined plasma of the electron cyclotron resonance discharge for modeling of burst processes in the inner magnetosphere of the Earth associated with the implementation of the plasma cyclotron maser. Heating under the electron cyclotron resonance conditions allows to create two component plasma which is typical for the inner magnetosphere of the Earth. One of the most interesting electron cyclotron resonance manifestations is the generation of bursts of electromagnetic radiation that are related to the explosive growth of cyclotron instabilities of the magnetoactive plasma confined in magnetic traps of various kinds and that are accompanied by particle precipitations from the trap. We investigate several regimes of cyclotron maser which are realized in dense and rarefied plasma, in the presence and absence of a permanent powerful gyrotron microwave radiation as a source of nonequilibrium particles in the plasma. Using the new technique for detection of microwave radiation we studied the dynamical spectrum and the intensity of stimulated electromagnetic radiation from the plasma in a wide frequency band covering all types of cyclotron instabilities. Also possible applications for astrophysical plasma are discussed.

  13. Genome-wide protein QTL mapping identifies human plasma kallikrein as a post-translational regulator of serum uPAR levels.

    PubMed

    Portelli, Michael A; Siedlinski, Mateusz; Stewart, Ceri E; Postma, Dirkje S; Nieuwenhuis, Maartje A; Vonk, Judith M; Nurnberg, Peter; Altmuller, Janine; Moffatt, Miriam F; Wardlaw, Andrew J; Parker, Stuart G; Connolly, Martin J; Koppelman, Gerard H; Sayers, Ian

    2014-02-01

    The soluble cleaved urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (scuPAR) is a circulating protein detected in multiple diseases, including various cancers, cardiovascular disease, and kidney disease, where elevated levels of scuPAR have been associated with worsening prognosis and increased disease aggressiveness. We aimed to identify novel genetic and biomolecular mechanisms regulating scuPAR levels. Elevated serum scuPAR levels were identified in asthma (n=514) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; n=219) cohorts when compared to controls (n=96). In these cohorts, a genome-wide association study of serum scuPAR levels identified a human plasma kallikrein gene (KLKB1) promoter polymorphism (rs4253238) associated with serum scuPAR levels in a control/asthma population (P=1.17 × 10(-7)), which was also observed in a COPD population (combined P=5.04 × 10(-12)). Using a fluorescent assay, we demonstrated that serum KLKB1 enzymatic activity was driven by rs4253238 and is inverse to scuPAR levels. Biochemical analysis identified that KLKB1 cleaves scuPAR and negates scuPAR's effects on primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) in vitro. Chymotrypsin was used as a proproteolytic control, while basal HBECs were used as a control to define scuPAR-driven effects. In summary, we reveal a novel post-translational regulatory mechanism for scuPAR using a hypothesis-free approach with implications for multiple human diseases.

  14. The Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX): Centrifugal Confinement and Velocity Shear Stabilization of Plasmas in Shaped Open Magnetic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hassam, Adil; Ellis, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    The Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX) Project has investigated the concepts of centrifugal plasma confinement and stabilization of instabilities by velocity shear. The basic requirement is supersonic plasma rotation about a shaped, open magnetic field. Overall, the MCX Project attained three primary goals that were set out at the start of the project. First, supersonic rotation at Mach number upto 2.5 was obtained. Second, turbulence from flute interchange modes was found considerably reduced from conventional. Third, plasma pressure was contained along the field, as evidenced by density drops of x10 from the center to the mirror throats.

  15. Influence of the radial profile of the electric potential on the confinement of a high-{beta} two-component plasma in a gas-dynamic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatkina, E. I.; Bagryansky, P. A.; Solomakhin, A. L.

    2008-04-15

    One of the most important problems to be studied in the gas-dynamic trap (GDT) facility is the investigation of MHD stability and cross-field transport in a plasma with a relatively high value of {beta} = {pi}p/B{sup 2}. Recent experiments demonstrated that the radial electric field produced in the plasma by using radial limiters and coaxial end plasma collectors improves plasma stability in axisymmetric magnetic mirror systems without applying special MHD stabilizers. The experimental data presented in this work show that stable plasma confinement can be achieved by producing a radial potential drop across a narrow region near the plasma boundary. Creating radial electric fields of strength 15-40 V/cm causes a shear plasma flow, thereby substantially increasing the plasma confinement time. When all the radial electrodes were grounded, the confinement was unstable and the plasma confinement time was much shorter than the characteristic time of plasma outflow through the magnetic mirrors. Measurements of cross-field plasma fluxes with the use of a specially designed combined probe show that, in confinement modes with differential plasma rotation, transverse particle losses are negligibly small as compared to longitudinal ones and thus can be ignored. It is also shown that, when the GDT plasma is in electric contact with the radial limiters and end collectors, the growth rate of interchange instability decreases considerably; such a contact, however, does not ensure complete MHD stability when the electrodes are at the same potential.

  16. Plasma-deposited beryllium carbide coatings for application to inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Wu-Sheng

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is an alternative energy source for the future energy needs in the next century. The materials of the microsphere which confines the D-T fuel inside require high energy transparency (low atomic number, Z), smooth surface, and permeability to Hsb2. Plasma-deposited Be polymer composite coatings with over 50 atomic % of Be and low O content (<5 atomic %) would meet these requirements. Several films with a Be to C atomic ratio of close to 2 to 1 which corresponds to Besb2C with a surface roughness < 100 A and acceptable permeability to Hsb2 were prepared. The coatings were prepared in a rf-induced cylindrical plasma reactor. Diethylberyllium (DEB) was introduced into the reactor as the precursor. Hsb2 was used as the co-reactant for the purpose of reducing internal/compressional stress of the coatings. These coatings were made at substrate temperatures in the range of ambient temperature to 325sp°C with various Hsb2 to DEB flow rate ratios. These coatings have been characterized by AES, XRD, XPS, SEM, AFM, FTIR, electrical resistivity, and TGA. Permeability to Hsb2 through ˜1 mum and ˜5 mum films was also measured. This is the first successful attempt to prepare Besb2C at 250sp°C by PECVD at low pressure as compare to prepare bulk Besb2C at over 1500sp°C by sintering process in a vacuum furnace (<10sp{-4} mmHg). It has been found that the Be content decreases along the distance from the DEB inlet. It has also been confirmed that Besb2C is the dominant phase in these coatings. The Besb2C in these films is resistant to hydrolysis and/or oxidation to dry and moist air in the temperature range of 30sp°C to 250sp°C. It was found that internal/compressional stress is somewhat reduced by introducing Hsb2 into the reactor as a co-reacting gas.

  17. Local Physics Basis of Confinement Degradation in JET ELMy H-Mode Plasmas and Implications for Tokamak Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Alper, B.; Borba, D.; Cordey, J.G.; Ernst, D.R.; Gowers, C.

    2001-02-02

    First results of gyrokinetic analysis of JET [Joint European Torus] ELMy [Edge Localized Modes] H-mode [high-confinement modes] plasmas are presented. ELMy H-mode plasmas form the basis of conservative performance predictions for tokamak reactors of the size of ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor]. Relatively high performance for long duration has been achieved and the scaling appears to be favorable. It will be necessary to sustain low Z(subscript eff) and high density for high fusion yield. This paper studies the degradation in confinement and increase in the anomalous heat transport observed in two JET plasmas: one with an intense gas puff and the other with a spontaneous transition between Type I to III ELMs at the heating power threshold. Linear gyrokinetic analysis gives the growth rate, gamma(subscript lin) of the fastest growing modes. The flow-shearing rate omega(subscript ExB) and gamma(subscript lin) are large near the top of the pedestal. Their ratio decreases approximately when the confinement degrades and the transport increases. This suggests that tokamak reactors may require intense toroidal or poloidal torque input to maintain sufficiently high |gamma(subscript ExB)|/gamma(subscript lin) near the top of the pedestal for high confinement.

  18. The mitigating effect of magnetic fields on Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2013-05-15

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at interfaces of disparate mass densities have long been known to generate magnetic fields during inertial confinement fusion implosions. An externally applied magnetic field can also be efficiently amplified by RT instabilities. The focus here is on magnetic field generation and amplification at the gas-ice interface which is RT unstable during the deceleration phase of the implosion. RT instabilities lead to undesirable mix of hot and cold plasmas which enhances thermal energy loss and tends to produce a more massive warm-spot instead of a hot-spot. Two mechanisms are shown here to mitigate the thermal energy loss from the hot-spot. The first mechanism is the reduction of electron thermal conductivity with interface-aligned magnetic fields. This can occur through self-generated magnetic fields via the Biermann battery effect as well as through externally applied magnetic fields that undergo an exponential growth via the stretch-and-fold magnetohydrodynamic dynamo. Self-generated magnetic fields during RT evolution can result in a factor of 2−10 decrease in the electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface, while externally applied magnetic fields that are compressed to 6–1000 T at the onset of deceleration (corresponding to pre-implosion external fields of 0.06–10 T) could result in a factor of 2–500 reduction in electron thermal conductivity at the gas-ice interface. The second mechanism to mitigate thermal energy loss from the hot-spot is to decrease the interface mixing area between the hot and cold plasmas. This is achieved through large external magnetic fields of 1000 T at the onset of deceleration which damp short-wavelength RT modes and long-wavelength Kelvin-Helmholtz modes thus significantly slowing the RT growth and reducing mix.

  19. The field line map approach for simulations of magnetically confined plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegmeir, Andreas; Coster, David; Maj, Omar; Hallatschek, Klaus; Lackner, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Predictions of plasma parameters in the edge and scrape-off layer of tokamaks is difficult since most modern tokamaks have a divertor and the associated separatrix causes the usually employed field/flux-aligned coordinates to become singular on the separatrix/X-point. The presented field line map approach avoids such problems as it is based on a cylindrical grid: standard finite-difference methods can be used for the discretisation of perpendicular (w.r.t. magnetic field) operators, and the characteristic flute mode property (k∥ ≪k⊥) of structures is exploited computationally via a field line following discretisation of parallel operators which leads to grid sparsification in the toroidal direction. This paper is devoted to the discretisation of the parallel diffusion operator (the approach taken is very similar to the flux-coordinate independent (FCI) approach which has already been adopted to a hyperbolic problem (Ottaviani, 2011; Hariri, 2013)). Based on the support operator method, schemes are derived which maintain the self-adjointness property of the parallel diffusion operator on the discrete level. These methods have very low numerical perpendicular diffusion compared to a naive discretisation which is a critical issue since magnetically confined plasmas exhibit a very strong anisotropy. Two different versions of the discrete parallel diffusion operator are derived: the first is based on interpolation where the order of interpolation and therefore the numerical diffusion is adjustable; the second is based on integration and is advantageous in cases where the field line map is strongly distorted. The schemes are implemented in the new code GRILLIX, and extensive benchmarks and numerous examples are presented which show the validity of the approach in general and GRILLIX in particular.

  20. Mechanism for magnetic field generation and growth in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2012-08-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions are expected to generate magnetic fields at the gas-ice interface and at the ice-ablator interface. The focus here is on the gas-ice interface where the temperature gradient is the largest. A Hall-MHD model is used to study the magnetic field generation and growth for 2-D single-mode and multimode RTI in a stratified two-fluid plasma, the two fluids being ions and electrons. Self-generated magnetic fields are observed and these fields grow as the RTI progresses via the ∇ne×∇Te term in the generalized Ohm's law. Srinivasan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] present results of the magnetic field generation and growth, and some scaling studies in 2-dimensions. The results presented here study the mechanism behind the magnetic field generation and growth, which is related to fluid vorticity generation by RTI. The magnetic field wraps around the bubbles and spikes and concentrates in flux bundles at the perturbed gas-ice interface where fluid vorticity is large. Additionally, the results of Srinivasan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] are described in greater detail. Additional scaling studies are performed to determine the growth of the self-generated magnetic field as a function of density, acceleration, perturbation wavelength, Atwood number, and ion mass.

  1. Mechanism for magnetic field generation and growth in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang Xianzhu

    2012-08-15

    Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions are expected to generate magnetic fields at the gas-ice interface and at the ice-ablator interface. The focus here is on the gas-ice interface where the temperature gradient is the largest. A Hall-MHD model is used to study the magnetic field generation and growth for 2-D single-mode and multimode RTI in a stratified two-fluid plasma, the two fluids being ions and electrons. Self-generated magnetic fields are observed and these fields grow as the RTI progresses via the {nabla}n{sub e} Multiplication-Sign {nabla}T{sub e} term in the generalized Ohm's law. Srinivasan et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] present results of the magnetic field generation and growth, and some scaling studies in 2-dimensions. The results presented here study the mechanism behind the magnetic field generation and growth, which is related to fluid vorticity generation by RTI. The magnetic field wraps around the bubbles and spikes and concentrates in flux bundles at the perturbed gas-ice interface where fluid vorticity is large. Additionally, the results of Srinivasan et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] are described in greater detail. Additional scaling studies are performed to determine the growth of the self-generated magnetic field as a function of density, acceleration, perturbation wavelength, Atwood number, and ion mass.

  2. APPARATUS FOR TRAPPING ENERGETIC CHARGED PARTICLES AND CONFINING THE RESULTING PLASMA

    DOEpatents

    Gibson, G.; Jordan, W.C.; Lauer, E.J.

    1963-04-01

    The present invention relates to a plasma-confining device and a particle injector therefor, the device utilizing a generally toroidal configuration with magnetic fields specifically tailored to the associated injector. The device minimizes the effects of particle end losses and particle drift to the walls with a relatively simple configuration. More particularly, the magnetic field configuration is created by a continuous array of circular, mirror field coils, disposed side-by- side, in particularly spaced relation, to form an endless, toroidal loop. The resulting magnetic field created therein has the appearance of a bumpy'' torus, from which is derived the name Bumpy Torus.'' One of the aforementioned coils is split transverse to its axis, and injection of particles is accomplished along a plane between the halves of such modified coil. The guiding center of the particles follows a constant magnetic field in the plane for a particular distance within the torus, to move therefrom onto a precessional surface which does not intersect the point of injection. (AEC)

  3. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, Erik Lehman; Joglekar, Archis S.; Ortega, Mario I.; Moll, Ryan; Fenn, Daniel; Molvig, Kim

    2015-11-20

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion(ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. In this paper, we have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasmaviscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasmaviscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasmaviscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Finally, plasmaviscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.

  4. Plasma viscosity with mass transport in spherical inertial confinement fusion implosion simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Vold, Erik Lehman; Joglekar, Archis S.; Ortega, Mario I.; ...

    2015-11-20

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion(ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. In this paper, we have implemented a Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasmaviscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasmaviscosity andmore » to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasmaviscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Finally, plasmaviscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and also modifies the flux-limiting needed for electron thermal conduction.« less

  5. Genome-wide protein QTL mapping identifies human plasma kallikrein as a post-translational regulator of serum uPAR levels

    PubMed Central

    Portelli, Michael A.; Siedlinski, Mateusz; Stewart, Ceri E.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Nieuwenhuis, Maartje A.; Vonk, Judith M.; Nurnberg, Peter; Altmuller, Janine; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Wardlaw, Andrew J.; Parker, Stuart G.; Connolly, Martin J.; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Sayers, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The soluble cleaved urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (scuPAR) is a circulating protein detected in multiple diseases, including various cancers, cardiovascular disease, and kidney disease, where elevated levels of scuPAR have been associated with worsening prognosis and increased disease aggressiveness. We aimed to identify novel genetic and biomolecular mechanisms regulating scuPAR levels. Elevated serum scuPAR levels were identified in asthma (n=514) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; n=219) cohorts when compared to controls (n=96). In these cohorts, a genome-wide association study of serum scuPAR levels identified a human plasma kallikrein gene (KLKB1) promoter polymorphism (rs4253238) associated with serum scuPAR levels in a control/asthma population (P=1.17×10−7), which was also observed in a COPD population (combined P=5.04×10−12). Using a fluorescent assay, we demonstrated that serum KLKB1 enzymatic activity was driven by rs4253238 and is inverse to scuPAR levels. Biochemical analysis identified that KLKB1 cleaves scuPAR and negates scuPAR's effects on primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) in vitro. Chymotrypsin was used as a proproteolytic control, while basal HBECs were used as a control to define scuPAR-driven effects. In summary, we reveal a novel post-translational regulatory mechanism for scuPAR using a hypothesis-free approach with implications for multiple human diseases.—Portelli, M. A., Siedlinski, M., Stewart, C. E., Postma, D. S., Nieuwenhuis, M. A., Vonk, J. M., Nurnberg, P., Altmuller, J., Moffatt, M. F., Wardlaw, A. J., Parker, S. G., Connolly, M. J., Koppelman, G. H., Sayers, I. Genome-wide protein QTL mapping identifies human plasma kallikrein as a post-translational regulator of serum uPAR levels. PMID:24249636

  6. Comparison of non-neutral electron plasma confinement in harmonic and rectangular potentials in a very dense regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, T.; Mohri, A.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2013-01-15

    Confinement of high density electron plasmas in a strong uniform magnetic field was experimentally studied in a multi-ring trap (MRT). The trap was housed inside a bore tube and surrounded by a superconducting solenoid. A 5 T magnetic field was used to provide radial confinement while an electrostatic harmonic or rectangular potential well was used for axial confinement. For trapped electrons of N = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} in a harmonic potential well (HPW) with the trap length of L{sub T} = 320 mm, the plasma lifetime was about 10{sup 4} s and it became much longer at lower N = 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9}. Such long holding times were achieved without application of rotating electric fields. Contrastingly, in a rectangular potential well (RPW), the plasma of N = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} under the same trap length expanded to cover the whole Faraday Cup within 200 s, where its radial expansion rate was {eta} = 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} mm/s, which was 20 times faster than HPW. The lifetime for RPW became shorter with increasing L{sub T} and scaled as 1/[L{sub T}]{sup 2}. This scaling found for high density plasmas is similar to the obtained one with different Penning-Malmberg traps at UC San Diego (USCD).

  7. A spectral line survey from 17.5-250 nm of plasmas created in a magnetic confinement device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Zurro, B.; Hollmann, E. M.; Hernández Sánchez, J.; TJ-II Team1, the

    2016-11-01

    Spectral emission lines continue to be a powerful tool for studying astrophysical, process, laser-produced, and magnetically confined plasmas, among others. Hence, numerous spectroscopy-based plasma diagnostics, from the x-ray to the infrared, make use of the relative intensity, width, displacement in wavelength, or temporal evolution of such emission lines emitted by the atoms and ions present in such plasmas. In this work, a spectral line survey, from 17.5-250 nm, is presented for electron cyclotron resonance heated (ECRH) and neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas created and maintained in the TJ-II stellarator, a medium-sized magnetically confined plasma device. In these plasmas, for which hydrogen, deuterium or helium have been used as the working gas, central electron temperatures and densities up to 1 keV and 5 × 1019 m-3, respectively, are achieved. This work is a compilation of the identified spectral emission lines emitted by the working gas as well by the intrinsic and injected impurity ions in the above wavelength range. For this, spectra were recorded, over the past fifteen years of TJ-II operation, using a 1 m focal length normal incidence spectrometer equipped with a charge-coupled detector at its output focal plane. In total, almost 400 spectral emission lines from eighteen different elements have been identified using a number of atomic line emission databases.

  8. First-principles thermal conductivity of warm-dense deuterium plasmas for inertial confinement fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Boehly, T. R.; Kress, J. D.; Goncharov, V. N.; Skupsky, S.

    2014-04-01

    Thermal conductivity (κ) of both the ablator materials and deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel plays an important role in understanding and designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. The extensively used Spitzer model for thermal conduction in ideal plasmas breaks down for high-density, low-temperature shells that are compressed by shocks and spherical convergence in imploding targets. A variety of thermal-conductivity models have been proposed for ICF hydrodynamic simulations of such coupled and degenerate plasmas. The accuracy of these κ models for DT plasmas has recently been tested against first-principles calculations using the quantum molecular-dynamics (QMD) method; although mainly for high densities (ρ > 100 g/cm3), large discrepancies in κ have been identified for the peak-compression conditions in ICF. To cover the wide range of density-temperature conditions undergone by ICF imploding fuel shells, we have performed QMD calculations of κ for a variety of deuterium densities of ρ = 1.0 to 673.518 g/cm3, at temperatures varying from T = 5 × 103 K to T = 8 × 106 K. The resulting κQMD of deuterium is fitted with a polynomial function of the coupling and degeneracy parameters Γ and θ, which can then be used in hydrodynamic simulation codes. Compared with the "hybrid" Spitzer-Lee-More model currently adopted in our hydrocode lilac, the hydrosimulations using the fitted κQMD have shown up to ˜20% variations in predicting target performance for different ICF implosions on OMEGA and direct-drive-ignition designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The lower the adiabat of an imploding shell, the more variations in predicting target performance using κQMD. Moreover, the use of κQMD also modifies the shock conditions and the density-temperature profiles of the imploding shell at early implosion stage, which predominantly affects the final target performance. This is in contrast to the previous speculation that κQMD changes mainly the

  9. First-principles thermal conductivity of warm-dense deuterium plasmas for inertial confinement fusion applications.

    PubMed

    Hu, S X; Collins, L A; Boehly, T R; Kress, J D; Goncharov, V N; Skupsky, S

    2014-04-01

    Thermal conductivity (κ) of both the ablator materials and deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel plays an important role in understanding and designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. The extensively used Spitzer model for thermal conduction in ideal plasmas breaks down for high-density, low-temperature shells that are compressed by shocks and spherical convergence in imploding targets. A variety of thermal-conductivity models have been proposed for ICF hydrodynamic simulations of such coupled and degenerate plasmas. The accuracy of these κ models for DT plasmas has recently been tested against first-principles calculations using the quantum molecular-dynamics (QMD) method; although mainly for high densities (ρ > 100 g/cm3), large discrepancies in κ have been identified for the peak-compression conditions in ICF. To cover the wide range of density-temperature conditions undergone by ICF imploding fuel shells, we have performed QMD calculations of κ for a variety of deuterium densities of ρ = 1.0 to 673.518 g/cm3, at temperatures varying from T = 5 × 103 K to T = 8 × 106 K. The resulting κQMD of deuterium is fitted with a polynomial function of the coupling and degeneracy parameters Γ and θ, which can then be used in hydrodynamic simulation codes. Compared with the "hybrid" Spitzer-Lee-More model currently adopted in our hydrocode lilac, the hydrosimulations using the fitted κQMD have shown up to ∼20% variations in predicting target performance for different ICF implosions on OMEGA and direct-drive-ignition designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The lower the adiabat of an imploding shell, the more variations in predicting target performance using κQMD. Moreover, the use of κQMD also modifies the shock conditions and the density-temperature profiles of the imploding shell at early implosion stage, which predominantly affects the final target performance. This is in contrast to the previous speculation that κQMD changes mainly the

  10. Radio Frequency (RF) Trap for Confinement of Antimatter Plasmas Using Rotating Wall Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III; Pearson, J. Boise

    2004-01-01

    Perturbations associated with a rotating wall electric field enable the confinement of ions for periods approaching weeks. This steady state confinement is a result of a radio frequency manipulation of the ions. Using state-of-the-art techniques it is shown that radio frequency energy can produce useable manipulation of the ion cloud (matter or antimatter) for use in containment experiments. The current research focuses on the improvement of confinement systems capable of containing and transporting antimatter.

  11. Improved confinement in high-density H-modes via modification of the plasma boundary with lower hybrid wavesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, J. L.; Reinke, M. L.; Hughes, J. W.; LaBombard, B.; Theiler, C.; Wallace, G. M.; Baek, S. G.; Brunner, D.; Churchill, R. M.; Edlund, E.; Ennever, P.; Faust, I.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Irby, J.; Lin, Y.; Parker, R. R.; Rice, J. E.; Shiraiwa, S.; Walk, J. R.; Wukitch, S. J.; Xu, P.

    2015-05-01

    Injecting Lower Hybrid Range of Frequency (LHRF) waves into Alcator C-Mod's high-density H-mode plasmas has led to enhanced global energy confinement by increasing pedestal temperature and pressure gradients, decreasing the separatrix density, modifying the pedestal radial electric field and rotation, and decreasing edge turbulence. These experiments indicate that edge LHRF can be used as an actuator to increase energy confinement via modification of boundary quantities. H98-factor increases of up to ˜35% (e.g., H98 from 0.75 to 1.0) are seen when moderate amounts of LH power (PLH/Ptot ˜ 0.15) are applied to H-modes of densities n ¯ e ˜ 3 × 1020 m-3, corresponding to values ˜0.5 of the Greenwald density. However, the magnitude of the improvement is reduced if the confinement quality of the target H-mode plasma is already good (i.e., H98target ˜ 1). Ray-tracing modeling and accessibility calculations for the LH waves indicate that they do not penetrate to the core. The LHRF power appears to be deposited in plasma boundary region, with a large fraction of the injected power increment appearing promptly on the outer divertor target. There is no evidence that the LH waves are driving current in these plasmas. The LHRF-actuated improvements are well correlated with suppressed pedestal density fluctuations in the 100-300 kHz range. There is also a correlation between the improved confinement and a drop in separatrix density, a correlation that is consistent with previous H-mode results with no LHRF.

  12. Characterization of magnetically confined low-pressure plasmas produced by an electromagnetic field in argon-acetylene mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdessi, G. Al; Margot, J.; Clergereaux, R.

    2016-10-01

    Dust particles formation was investigated in magnetically confined low-pressure plasma produced in argon-acetylene mixtures. The plasma characteristics were measured in order to identify the species involved in the dust particles formation. Their dependence on the operating conditions including magnetic field intensity, acetylene fraction in the gas mixture and operating pressure was examined. In contrast with noble gases, in the presence of acetylene, the electron temperature increases with the magnetic field intensity, indicating additional charged particles losses in the plasma. Indeed, in these conditions, larger hydrocarbon ions are produced leading to the formation of dust particles in the plasma volume. The observed dependence of positive ion mass distribution and density and relative negative ion density on the operating parameters suggests that the dust particles are formed through different pathways, where negative and positive ions are both involved in the nucleation.

  13. Feasibility of alpha particle measurement in a magnetically confined plasma by CO/sub 2/ laser Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, R.K.; Vander Sluis, K.L.; Hutchinson, D.P.

    1987-08-01

    Fusion-product alpha particles will dominate the behavior of the next generation of ignited D-T fusion reactors. Advanced diagnostics will be required to characterize the energy deposition of these fast alpha particles in the magnetically confined plasma. For small-angle coherent Thomson scattering of a CO/sub 2/ laser beam from such a plasma, a resonance in the scattered power occurs near 90/sup 0/ with respect to the magnetic field direction. This spatial concentration permits a simplified detection of the scattered laser power from the plasma using a heterodyne system. The signal produced by the presence of fusion-product alpha particles in an ignited plasma is calculated to be well above the noise level, which results from statistical variations of the background signal produced by scattering from free electrons. 7 refs.

  14. Dynamics of the electron thermal diffusivity at improved energy confinement during lower hybrid plasma heating in the FT-2 tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouprienko, D. V.; Altukhov, A. B.; Gurchenko, A. D.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Kantor, M. Yu.; Lashkul, S. I.; Esipov, L. A.

    2010-05-01

    The dynamics of electron heat transport at improved energy confinement during lower hybrid plasma heating in the FT-2 tokamak was studied experimentally. Evolution of the profiles of the electron temperature and density was thoroughly investigated under conditions of fast variation in the plasma parameters. The energy balance in the electron channel is calculated with the help of the ASTRA code by using the measured plasma parameters. Correlation is revealed between the dynamics of electron heat transport and the behavior of small-scale drift turbulence measured using the enhanced scattering correlation diagnostics. The suppression of heat transfer and turbulence agrees well with the increase in the shear of poloidal plasma rotation calculated from experimental data in the neoclassical approximation.

  15. BX-U linear trap for one-way production and confinement of Li+ and e- plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himura, Haruhiko

    2016-03-01

    A modified version of the Penning-Malmberg trap was developed wherein both positive and negative harmonic potential wells were created by using multi-ring electrodes. The sequence of particle injection, particle trapping, and plasma extraction from the potential wells was controlled by a set of switching circuits. All the guns launching charged particles were collected together in one side of the linear trap. Nevertheless, pure electron (e-) and lithium-ion (Li+) plasmas were not only separately produced on the machine axis but also confined simultaneously. Preliminary data show that for B ≈ 0.13 T the e- plasma lasted for 15 s and the Li+ plasma lasted for ~ 4 s.

  16. Wave excitation by nonlinear coupling among shear Alfvén waves in a mirror-confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ikezoe, R. Ichimura, M.; Okada, T.; Hirata, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sumida, S.; Jang, S.; Takeyama, K.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Wang, X.

    2015-09-15

    A shear Alfvén wave at slightly below the ion-cyclotron frequency overcomes the ion-cyclotron damping and grows because of the strong anisotropy of the ion temperature in the magnetic mirror configuration, and is called the Alfvén ion-cyclotron (AIC) wave. Density fluctuations caused by the AIC waves and the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves used for ion heating have been detected using a reflectometer in a wide radial region of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror plasma. Various wave-wave couplings are clearly observed in the density fluctuations in the interior of the plasma, but these couplings are not so clear in the magnetic fluctuations at the plasma edge when measured using a pick-up coil. A radial dependence of the nonlinearity is found, particularly in waves with the difference frequencies of the AIC waves; bispectral analysis shows that such wave-wave coupling is significant near the core, but is not so evident at the periphery. In contrast, nonlinear coupling with the low-frequency background turbulence is quite distinct at the periphery. Nonlinear coupling associated with the AIC waves may play a significant role in the beta- and anisotropy-limits of a mirror-confined plasma through decay of the ICRF heating power and degradation of the plasma confinement by nonlinearly generated waves.

  17. Wave excitation by nonlinear coupling among shear Alfvén waves in a mirror-confined plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikezoe, R.; Ichimura, M.; Okada, T.; Hirata, M.; Yokoyama, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sumida, S.; Jang, S.; Takeyama, K.; Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J.; Shima, Y.; Wang, X.

    2015-09-01

    A shear Alfvén wave at slightly below the ion-cyclotron frequency overcomes the ion-cyclotron damping and grows because of the strong anisotropy of the ion temperature in the magnetic mirror configuration, and is called the Alfvén ion-cyclotron (AIC) wave. Density fluctuations caused by the AIC waves and the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves used for ion heating have been detected using a reflectometer in a wide radial region of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror plasma. Various wave-wave couplings are clearly observed in the density fluctuations in the interior of the plasma, but these couplings are not so clear in the magnetic fluctuations at the plasma edge when measured using a pick-up coil. A radial dependence of the nonlinearity is found, particularly in waves with the difference frequencies of the AIC waves; bispectral analysis shows that such wave-wave coupling is significant near the core, but is not so evident at the periphery. In contrast, nonlinear coupling with the low-frequency background turbulence is quite distinct at the periphery. Nonlinear coupling associated with the AIC waves may play a significant role in the beta- and anisotropy-limits of a mirror-confined plasma through decay of the ICRF heating power and degradation of the plasma confinement by nonlinearly generated waves.

  18. Generating end plug potentials in tandem mirror plasma confinement by heating thermal particles so as to escape low density end stoppering plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, D.E.; Logan, B.G.

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for raising the potential of a magnetic mirror cell by pumping charged particles of the opposite sign of the potential desired out of the mirror cell through excitation, with the pumping being done by an externally imposed field at the bounce frequence of the above charged particles. These pumped simple mirror cells then provide end stoppering for a center mirror cell for the tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus. For the substantially complete pumping case, the end plugs of a tandem mirror can be up to two orders of magnitude lower in density for confining a given center mirror cell plasma than in the case of end plugs without pumping. As a result the decrease in recirculating power required to keep the system going, the technical state of the art required, and the capital cost are all greatly lowered.

  19. Generating end plug potentials in tandem mirror plasma confinement by heating thermal particles so as to escape low density end stoppering plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, David E.; Logan, B. Grant

    1981-01-01

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for raising the potential of a magnetic mirror cell by pumping charged particles of the opposite sign of the potential desired out of the mirror cell through excitation, with the pumping being done by an externally imposed field at the bounce frequency of the above charged particles. These pumped simple mirror cells then provide end stoppering for a center mirror cell for the tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus. For the substantially complete pumping case, the end plugs of a tandem mirror can be up to two orders of magnitude lower in density for confining a given center mirror cell plasma than in the case of end plugs without pumping. As a result the decrease in recirculating power required to keep the system going, the technological state of the art required, and the capital cost are all greatly lowered.

  20. Equilibrium drives of the low and high field side n = 2 plasma response and impact on global confinement

    DOE PAGES

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Logan, N. C.; Haskey, S. R.; ...

    2016-03-31

    The nature of the multi-modal n=2 plasma response and its impact on global confinement is studied as a function of the axisymmetric equilibrium pressure, edge safety factor, collisionality, and L-versus H-mode conditions. Varying the relative phase (ΔΦUL) between upper and lower in-vessel coils demonstrates that different n=2 poloidal spectra preferentially excite different plasma responses. These different plasma response modes are preferentially detected on the tokamak high-field side (HFS) or low-field side (LFS) midplanes, have different radial extents, couple differently to the resonant surfaces, and have variable impacts on edge stability and global confinement. In all equilibrium conditions studied, the observedmore » confinement degradation shares the same ΔΦUL dependence as the coupling to the resonant surfaces given by both ideal (IPEC) and resistive (MARS-F) MHD computation. Varying the edge safety factor shifts the equilibrium field-line pitch and thus the ΔΦUL dependence of both the global confinement and the n=2 magnetic response. As edge safety factor is varied, modeling finds that the HFS response (but not the LFS response), the resonant surface coupling, and the edge displacements near the X-point all share the same ΔΦUL dependence. The LFS response magnitude is strongly sensitive to the core pressure and is insensitive to the collisionality and edge safety factor. This indicates that the LFS measurements are primarily sensitive to a pressure-driven kink-ballooning mode that couples to the core plasma. MHD modeling accurately reproduces these (and indeed all) LFS experimental trends and supports this interpretation. In contrast to the LFS, the HFS magnetic response and correlated global confinement impact is unchanged with plasma pressure, but is strongly reduced in high collisionality conditions in both H- and L-mode. This experimentally suggests the bootstrap current drives the HFS response through the kink-peeling mode drive, though

  1. Local Regulation of Interchange Turbulence in a Dipole-Confined Plasma Torus using Current-Collection Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, T. Maximillian

    2014-10-01

    Turbulence in a dipole-confined plasma is dominated by interchange fluctuations with complex dynamics and short coherence. We report the first laboratory demonstration of the regulation of interchange turbulence in a plasma torus confined by an axisymmetric dipole magnet using active feedback. Feedback is performed by varying the bias to an electrode in proportion to the electric potential measured at other locations. The phase and amplitude of the bias to the electrode is adjusted with a linear circuit, forming a relatively broad-band current-collection feedback system. Changing the gain and phase of collection results in modification of turbulent fluctuations, observed as amplification or suppression of turbulent spectrum. Significantly, power can be either extracted from or injected into the turbulence. When the gain and phase are adjusted to suppress turbulence, the external circuit becomes a controlled load extracting power from the plasma. This is analogous to the regulation of magnetospheric convection by ionospheric currents. When the gain and phase of the external circuit is adjusted to amplify turbulence, the direction of power flow from the electrode reverses, enhancing the fluctuations. Although we observe significant changes to the intensity and spectrum of plasma fluctuations, these changes appear only on those magnetic field lines within a region near the current collector equal in size to the turbulent correlation length and shifted in the direction of the electron magnetic drift. We conclude that the effects of this feedback on turbulence in a dipole plasma torus is localized. The clear influence of current-collection feedback on interchange turbulence suggests the possibility of global regulation of turbulent motion using multiple sensor and electrode pairs as well as the ability to perform controlled tests of bounce-averaged gyrokinetic theory of turbulence in the geometry of a dipole plasma torus. Supported by NSF-DOE Partnership for Plasma

  2. Local Physics Basis of Confinement Degradation in JET ELMy H-Mode Plasmas and Implications for Tokamak Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny

    2000-11-15

    ELMy H-mode plasmas form the basis of conservative performance predictions for tokalmak reactors of the size of ITER. Relatively high performace for long durations has been achieved and the scaling is favorable. It will be necessary to sustain low Zeff and high density for high fusion yield. This paper studies the degradation in confinement and increase in the anomalous heat transport observed in two JET plasmas: one in which the degradation occurs with an intense gas puff, and the other with a spontaneous transition at the heating power threshold from Type I to III ELMs. Linear gryokinetic analysis gives the growth rate, glin of the fastest growing mode. Our results indicate that the flow-shearing rate wExB and glin are large near the top of the pedestal. Their ratio decreases approximately when the confinement degrades and the transport increases. This suggests that tokamak reactors may require intense toroidal or poloidal torque input to maintain sufficiently high *wExB*/glin near the top of the pedestal for high confinement.

  3. Refraction-Enhanced X-ray Radiography for Inertial Confinement Fusion and Laser-Produced Plasma Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Kozioziemski, B J; Izumi, N; Dewald, E L; Salmonson, J D; Hammel, B A

    2008-08-26

    We explore various laser-produced plasma and inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) applications of phase-contrast x-ray radiography, and we show how the main features of these enhancements can be considered from a geometrical optics perspective as refraction enhancements. This perspective simplifies the analysis, and often permits simple analytical formulae to be derived that predict the enhancements. We explore a raytrace approach to various material interface applications, and we explore a more general example of refractive bending of x-rays by an implosion plasma. We find that refraction-enhanced x-ray radiography of implosions may provide a means to quantify density differences across shock fronts as well as density variations caused by local heating due to high-Z dopants. We also point out that refractive bending by implosions plasmas can blur fine radiograph features, and can also provide misleading contrast information in area-backlit pinhole imaging experiments unless its effects are taken into consideration.

  4. Experimental studies of high-confinement mode plasma response to non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations in ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Suttrop, Wolfgang; Kirk, A.; Nazikian, R.; Leuthold, N.; Strumberger, E.; Willensdorfer, M.; Cavedon, M.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Fietz, S.; Fuchs, J. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; McDermott, R. M.; Orain, F.; Ryan, D. A.; Viezzer, E.

    2016-11-22

    Here, the interaction of externally applied small non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MP) with tokamak high-confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas is reviewed and illustrated by recent experiments in ASDEX Upgrade. The plasma response to the vacuum MP field is amplified by stable ideal kink modes with low toroidal mode number n driven by the H-mode edge pressure gradient (and associated bootstrap current) which is experimentally evidenced by an observable shift of the poloidal mode number m away from field alignment (m = qn, with q being the safety factor) at the response maximum. A torque scan experiment demonstrates the importance of the perpendicular electron flow for shielding of the resonant magnetic perturbation, as expected from a two-fluid MHD picture. Two significant effects of MP occur in H-mode plasmas at low pedestal collisionality, $\

  5. Experimental studies of high-confinement mode plasma response to non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations in ASDEX Upgrade

    DOE PAGES

    Suttrop, Wolfgang; Kirk, A.; Nazikian, R.; ...

    2016-11-22

    Here, the interaction of externally applied small non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MP) with tokamak high-confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas is reviewed and illustrated by recent experiments in ASDEX Upgrade. The plasma response to the vacuum MP field is amplified by stable ideal kink modes with low toroidal mode number n driven by the H-mode edge pressure gradient (and associated bootstrap current) which is experimentally evidenced by an observable shift of the poloidal mode number m away from field alignment (m = qn, with q being the safety factor) at the response maximum. A torque scan experiment demonstrates the importance of the perpendicular electron flow for shielding of the resonant magnetic perturbation, as expected from a two-fluid MHD picture. Two significant effects of MP occur in H-mode plasmas at low pedestal collisionality,more » $$\

  6. GPUbased, Microsecond Latency, HectoChannel MIMO Feedback Control of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Nikolaus

    Feedback control has become a crucial tool in the research on magnetic confinement of plasmas for achieving controlled nuclear fusion. This thesis presents a novel plasma feedback control system that, for the first time, employs a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) for microsecond-latency, real-time control computations. This novel application area for GPU computing is opened up by a new system architecture that is optimized for low-latency computations on less than kilobyte sized data samples as they occur in typical plasma control algorithms. In contrast to traditional GPU computing approaches that target complex, high-throughput computations with massive amounts of data, the architecture presented in this thesis uses the GPU as the primary processing unit rather than as an auxiliary of the CPU, and data is transferred from A-D/D-A converters directly into GPU memory using peer-to-peer PCI Express transfers. The described design has been implemented in a new, GPU-based control system for the High-Beta Tokamak - Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device. The system is built from commodity hardware and uses an NVIDIA GeForce GPU and D-TACQ A-D/D-A converters providing a total of 96 input and 64 output channels. The system is able to run with sampling periods down to 4 μs and latencies down to 8 μs. The GPU provides a total processing power of 1.5 x 1012 floating point operations per second. To illustrate the performance and versatility of both the general architecture and concrete implementation, a new control algorithm has been developed. The algorithm is designed for the control of multiple rotating magnetic perturbations in situations where the plasma equilibrium is not known exactly and features an adaptive system model: instead of requiring the rotation frequencies and growth rates embedded in the system model to be set a priori, the adaptive algorithm derives these parameters from the evolution of the perturbation amplitudes themselves. This results in non-linear control

  7. Self-organized criticality and the dynamics of near-marginal turbulent transport in magnetically confined fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, R.; Newman, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    The high plasma temperatures expected at reactor conditions in magnetic confinement fusion toroidal devices suggest that near-marginal operation could be a reality in future devices and reactors. By near-marginal it is meant that the plasma profiles might wander around the local critical thresholds for the onset of instabilities. Self-organized criticality (SOC) was suggested in the mid 1990s as a more proper paradigm to describe the dynamics of tokamak plasma transport in near-marginal conditions. It advocated that, near marginality, the evolution of mean profiles and fluctuations should be considered simultaneously, in contrast to the more common view of a large separation of scales existing between them. Otherwise, intrinsic features of near-marginal transport would be missed, that are of importance to understand the properties of energy confinement. In the intervening 20 years, the relevance of the idea of SOC for near-marginal transport in fusion plasmas has transitioned from an initial excessive hype to the much more realistic standing of today, which we will attempt to examine critically in this review paper. First, the main theoretical ideas behind SOC will be described. Secondly, how they might relate to the dynamics of near-marginal transport in real magnetically confined plasmas will be discussed. Next, we will review what has been learnt about SOC from various numerical studies and what it has meant for the way in which we do numerical simulation of fusion plasmas today. Then, we will discuss the experimental evidence available from the several experiments that have looked for SOC dynamics in fusion plasmas. Finally, we will conclude by identifying the various problems that still remain open to investigation in this area. Special attention will be given to the discussion of frequent misconceptions and ongoing controversies. The review also contains a description of ongoing efforts that seek effective transport models better suited than traditional

  8. Par1b Induces Asymmetric Inheritance of Plasma Membrane Domains via LGN-Dependent Mitotic Spindle Orientation in Proliferating Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Slim, Christiaan L.; Lázaro-Diéguez, Francisco; Bijlard, Marjolein; Toussaint, Mathilda J. M.; de Bruin, Alain; Du, Quansheng; Müsch, Anne; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    2013-01-01

    The development and maintenance of polarized epithelial tissue requires a tightly controlled orientation of mitotic cell division relative to the apical polarity axis. Hepatocytes display a unique polarized architecture. We demonstrate that mitotic hepatocytes asymmetrically segregate their apical plasma membrane domain to the nascent daughter cells. The non-polarized nascent daughter cell can form a de novo apical domain with its new neighbor. This asymmetric segregation of apical domains is facilitated by a geometrically distinct “apicolateral” subdomain of the lateral surface present in hepatocytes. The polarity protein partitioning-defective 1/microtubule-affinity regulating kinase 2 (Par1b/MARK2) translates this positional landmark to cortical polarity by promoting the apicolateral accumulation of Leu-Gly-Asn repeat-enriched protein (LGN) and the capture of nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA)–positive astral microtubules to orientate the mitotic spindle. Proliferating hepatocytes thus display an asymmetric inheritance of their apical domains via a mechanism that involves Par1b and LGN, which we postulate serves the unique tissue architecture of the developing liver parenchyma. PMID:24358023

  9. Plasma equilibrium and confinement in a tokamak with nearly zero central current density in JT-60U.

    PubMed

    Fujita, T; Oikawa, T; Suzuki, T; Ide, S; Sakamoto, Y; Koide, Y; Hatae, T; Naito, O; Isayama, A; Hayashi, N; Shirai, H

    2001-12-10

    A high confinement equilibrium with nearly zero toroidal current in the central region (a "current hole") has been observed for the first time to persist stably for several seconds in the JT-60U tokamak. This observation indicates the possibility of stable tokamak operation without central toroidal current; the central current has previously been believed to be necessary in tokamaks. The radius of the current hole extended up to 40% of the plasma minor radius. It was observed that the current hole was formed by the increase of the off-axis noninductive current.

  10. Quasi-analytical method for solving nonlinear differential equations for turbulent self-confined magneto-plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurier, M.; Hayd, A.; Kaeppeler, H. J.

    1986-09-01

    The mathematical procedures employed in REDUCE/FORTRAN, a hybrid code developed by Hearn (1969 and 1973) and Hayd and Meinke (1980) to compute the dynamics of confined plasmas with simple magnetic-field configurations (Hayd et al., 1982; Kaeppeler, 1982; Kaeppeler et al., 1983) are explained. In REDUCE/FORTRAN, the dispersion relation is derived analytically, Fourier-transformed, and solved numerically, and the solution is then fitted to an analytical formula for further manipulation (including back-transformation). The procedure is demonstrated by solving the Burgers equation with a delta function for the initial conditions, and numerical results are presented in tables and graphs.

  11. Contribution a l'etude de l'inactivation de micro-organismes par plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhacene-Boudam, Mustafa-Karim

    The present work is a deepening of some specific research aspects concerning medical device sterilization by ionized gases, that were initiated almost ten years ago and pursued since then by the "Sterilization team" of the Groupe de physique des plasmas. Initially, the thesis was directed at spore inactivation by atmospheric-pressure plasmas with the intent of showing that it was possible to reach sterility mainly by the action of UV photons, therefore minimizing damage to materials (in contrast to using chemically reactive species from the plasma) and, at the same time, achieving a greater control of the process through its better understanding. We actually succeeded in demonstrating the possibility of spore inactivation based on the dominant action of UV photons issued from an atmospheric-pressure plasma. However, the low inactivation efficiency and the practical difficulty of the atmospheric-pressure plasma used made us turn to low-pressure post-discharge sterilization systems. To comply with this new goal, we first characterized, essentially through emission spectroscopy, the flowing afterglow of a N2-O2 low-pressure discharge, concentrating on the properties and effects of the early and late post-discharges as far as sterilization is concerned. We demonstrated that the early afterglow is responsible for heavy damage to processed polymers but that it is possible to reduce its influence provided a minimum percentage of O2 is added in the N2-O2 mixture and also by moving away the plasma source from the sterilization chamber entrance. We then studied the combined effects, on the kinetics of spore inactivation, of the species (UV photons, radicals) issued from the plasma and of the heating of the petri dish, using B. atrophaeus spores as reference microorganisms. We clearly proved the existence of synergy between UV photons and heating in inactivating spores, provided UV photons and heating act simultaneously. Whatever the O2% in the mixture, and thus the UV

  12. Reference distribution functions for magnetically confined plasmas from the minimum entropy production theorem and the MaxEnt principle, subject to the scale-invariant restrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnino, Giorgio; Cardinali, Alessandro; Steinbrecher, Gyorgy; Peeters, Philippe; Sonnino, Alberto; Nardone, Pasquale

    2013-12-01

    We derive the expression of the reference distribution function for magnetically confined plasmas far from the thermodynamic equilibrium. The local equilibrium state is fixed by imposing the minimum entropy production theorem and the maximum entropy (MaxEnt) principle, subject to scale invariance restrictions. After a short time, the plasma reaches a state close to the local equilibrium. This state is referred to as the reference state. The aim of this Letter is to determine the reference distribution function (RDF) when the local equilibrium state is defined by the above mentioned principles. We prove that the RDF is the stationary solution of a generic family of stochastic processes corresponding to an universal Landau-type equation with white parametric noise. As an example of application, we consider a simple, fully ionized, magnetically confined plasmas, with auxiliary Ohmic heating. The free parameters are linked to the transport coefficients of the magnetically confined plasmas, by the kinetic theory.

  13. Laser-Plasma Interaction Near the Quarter-Critical Density in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximov, A. V.; Wen, H.; Myatt, J. F.; Short, R. W.; Ren, C.

    2016-10-01

    The laser-plasma interaction (LPI) near the quarter-critical density in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas strongly influences the coupling of laser energy to the target and the generation of fast electrons capable of preheating the target fuel. The full modeling of LPI near the quarter-critical density includes the interplay between two-plasmon decay and stimulated Raman scattering instabilities as well as ion-acoustic perturbations. The results of the kinetic particle-in-cell simulations are in agreement with the simulation results from the fluid-type code. The fast-electron flux and the ω/2 half-omega light spectra are calculated for the parameters relevant to direct-drive ICF experiments on the OMEGA Laser System and at the National Ignition Facility. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  14. Population inversion and gain measurements for soft x-ray-laser development in a magnetically confined plasma column

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, S.; Skinner, C.H.; Voorhees, D.; Milchberg, H.; Keane, C.; Semet, A.

    1983-06-01

    We present population inversion and gain measurements from an experimental investigation of possibilities to obtain high gain and lasing action in the soft x-ray region. Our approach to soft x-ray-laser development is based on rapid plasma cooling after the laser pulse by radiation losses, leading to fast recombination and collisional cascade into upper excited levels of CVI, for example, while the lower excited levels depopulate rapidly by radiative transitions, thus creating population inversions and gain. A approx. = 0.5 kJ CO/sub 2/ laser was focused onto a target of solid carbon or teflon; or CO/sub 2/, O/sub 2/, Ne gas, and the resulting plasma confined in a 50 to 90 kG magnetic field. Spectroscopic diagnostics with absolute intensity calibration were used to measure level populations.

  15. Self-consistent dynamics of impurities in magnetically confined plasmas: turbulence intermittency and non-diffusive transport

    SciTech Connect

    Futatani, S.; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Garbet, X; Benkadda, S.; Dubuit, N.

    2012-01-01

    Self-consistent turbulent transport of high concentration impurities in magnetically confined fusion plasmas is studied using a three-dimensional nonlinear fluid global turbulence model which includes ion temperature gradient (ITG) and trapped electron mode (TEM) instabilities. It is shown that the impurity concentration can have a dramatic feedback in the turbulence and, as a result, it can significantly change the transport properties of the plasma. High concentration impurities can trigger strong intermittency, that manifests in non-Gaussian heavy tails of the pdfs of E B and the ion-temperature flux fluctuations. At the heart of this self-consistent coupling is the existence of inward propagating ion temperature fronts with a sharp gradient at the leading edge that give rise to instabilities and avalanche-like bursty transport. Numerical evidence of time non-locality in the turbulent transport of high concentration impurities is also presented.

  16. Transient Shock Formation of Pulsed Electrothermal Plasma Discharge Confined in an Extended Bore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoungjin; Kwak, Ho Sang; Park, Joong-Youn

    An electrothermal gun possesses a great potential to be an efficient source of pulsed plasma discharge for nanomaterials production or thermal plasma spray coatings. A plasma discharge by intense pulsed power is numerically studied utilizing time-dependent gas dynamics equations which are solved by FCT (flux-corrected transport) algorithm in two-dimensional domain of the interior capillary bore region and the external region of extended bore. Plasma conditions at the bore exit, mass ablation of polycarbonate bore wall, and degree of ionization are determined at different levels of transient arc current profile. As a way to controlling the plasma discharge, the extended bore at the capillary exit is considered and the flow pattern of pulsed plasma discharge in the extended bore exhibit complex shock structure from slightly to highly underexpanded jet depending on the level of arc current profiles. Flow instability of oscillating Mach disk is found at higher level of arc current profile cases.

  17. Erratum: Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices (2015 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 57 123001)

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, T. E.

    2016-03-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δ$b_⊥^{ext}$ ≈ $10^{-4}$ → $10^{-3}$ T). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes. At the same time the theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design [A. Loarte, et al., Nucl. Fusion 54 (2014) 033007]. This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.

  18. Resonance between heat-carrying electrons and Langmuir waves in inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rozmus, W.; Chapman, T.; Berger, R. L.; Brantov, A.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Winjum, B. J.; Brunner, S.; Tableman, A.; Tzoufras, M.; Glenzer, S.

    2016-01-15

    In ignition scale hot plasmas, temperature gradients and thermal transport modify electron distributions in a velocity range resonant with Langmuir waves typical of those produced by stimulated Raman scattering. We examine the resultant changes to the Landau damping experienced by these Langmuir waves and the levels of thermal plasma fluctuations. The form factor and Thomson scattering cross-section in such plasmas display unique characteristics of the background conditions. A theoretical model and high-order Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations are used in our analysis. An experiment to measure changes in thermal plasma fluctuation levels due to a thermal gradient is proposed.

  19. Resonance between heat-carrying electrons and Langmuir waves in inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozmus, W.; Chapman, T.; Brantov, A.; Winjum, B. J.; Berger, R. L.; Brunner, S.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Tableman, A.; Tzoufras, M.; Glenzer, S.

    2016-01-01

    In ignition scale hot plasmas, temperature gradients and thermal transport modify electron distributions in a velocity range resonant with Langmuir waves typical of those produced by stimulated Raman scattering. We examine the resultant changes to the Landau damping experienced by these Langmuir waves and the levels of thermal plasma fluctuations. The form factor and Thomson scattering cross-section in such plasmas display unique characteristics of the background conditions. A theoretical model and high-order Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations are used in our analysis. An experiment to measure changes in thermal plasma fluctuation levels due to a thermal gradient is proposed.

  20. Experimental studies of high-confinement mode plasma response to non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suttrop, W.; Kirk, A.; Nazikian, R.; Leuthold, N.; Strumberger, E.; Willensdorfer, M.; Cavedon, M.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Fietz, S.; Fuchs, J. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; McDermott, R. M.; Orain, F.; Ryan, D. A.; Viezzer, E.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team; The DIII-D Team; The Eurofusion MST1 Team

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of externally applied small non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations (MP) with tokamak high-confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas is reviewed and illustrated by recent experiments in ASDEX Upgrade. The plasma response to the vacuum MP field is amplified by stable ideal kink modes with low toroidal mode number n driven by the H-mode edge pressure gradient (and associated bootstrap current) which is experimentally evidenced by an observable shift of the poloidal mode number m away from field alignment (m  =  qn, with q being the safety factor) at the response maximum. A torque scan experiment demonstrates the importance of the perpendicular electron flow for shielding of the resonant magnetic perturbation, as expected from a two-fluid MHD picture. Two significant effects of MP occur in H-mode plasmas at low pedestal collisionality, ν \\text{ped}\\ast≤slant 0.4 : (a) a reduction of the global plasma density by up to 61 % and (b) a reduction of the energy loss associated with edge localised modes (ELMs) by a factor of up to 9. A comprehensive database of ELM mitigation pulses at low {ν\\ast} in ASDEX Upgrade shows that the degree of ELM mitigation correlates with the reduction of pedestal pressure which in turn is limited and defined by the onset of ELMs, i. e. a modification of the ELM stability limit by the magnetic perturbation.

  1. Amelioration de l'aerodynamisme des ailes d'avion par actionnement plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demers, Francis

    The paper will present experimental and numerical investigation of improved aerodynamics performance of a 2D extruded airfoil by plasma actuation. The aim of the research is to develop three promising flow control concepts using solid-state electro-fluidic (plasma) actuators to achieve reduced drag as well as lift control at take-off/landing. Aerodynamic plasma actuators are solid-state devices that convert electricity directly into flow acceleration through partial air ionization. The most common plasma actuator, the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) actuator, essentially consists of two offset electrodes separated by a dielectric across which a high-voltage low-amperage AC input is applied. The ions in the air created by the high electric field between the two electrodes are accelerated by this field and transfer their momentum to the inert air particles through collisions, resulting in an acceleration of a very thin layer of air adjacent to the surface. This thin, simple, high bandwidth actuator is easy to integrate and thus offer the most practical yet solution for widespread use of flow control to revolutionize aircraft aerodynamics. The three flow control concepts studied involve placing the actuator on the suction surface of a wing to delay boundary layer transition and thus reduced viscous drag and to control boundary layer separation to control lift at take-off and landing without the need for slats, flaps and spoilers. While these concepts had been previously explored, they were only tested empirically at small-scale and very low-speed due to limitations in plasma actuator strength. The current research aimed to test these concepts at higher speeds (up to 30 m/s) using more recent DBD actuators with higher actuator strength and perform more detailed measurements so that these data can be used to validate CFD codes that can be used for assessing the concept at realistic aircraft scales and flight conditions. Wind tunnel experiments were carried out on a

  2. Son of IXION: A Steady State Centrifugally Confined Plasma for Fusion*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassam, Adil

    1996-11-01

    A magnetic confinement scheme in which the inertial, u.grad(u), forces effect parallel confinement is proposed. The basic geometry is mirror-like as far as the poloidal field goes or, more simply, multipole (FM-1) type. The rotation is toroidal in this geometry. A supersonic rotation can effect complete parallel confinement, with the usual magnetic mirror force rendered irrelevant. The rotation shear, in addition, aids in the suppression of the flute mode. This suppression is not complete which indicates the addition of a toroidal field, at maximum of the order of the poloidal field. We show that at rotation in excess of Mach 3, the parallel particle and heat losses can be minimized to below the Lawson breakeven point. The crossfield transport can be expected to be better than tokamaks on account of the large velocity shear. Other advantages of the scheme are that it is steady state and disruption free. An exploratory experiment that tests equilibrium, parallel detachment, and MHD stability is proposed. The concept resembles earlier (Geneva, 1958) experiments on "homopolar generators" and a mirror configuration called IXION. Ixion, Greek mythological king, was forever strapped to a rotating, flaming wheel. *Work supported by DOE

  3. Excitation of Ion Acoustic Waves in Confined Plasmas with Untrapped Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schamis, Hanna; Dow, Ansel; Carlsson, Johan; Kaganovich, Igor; Khrabrov, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Various plasma propulsion devices exhibit strong electron emission from the walls either as a result of secondary processes or due to thermionic emission. To understand the electron kinetics in plasmas with strong emission, we have performed simulations using a reduced model with the LSP particle-in-cell code. This model aims to show the instability generated by the electron emission, in the form of ion acoustic waves near the sheath. It also aims to show the instability produced by untrapped electrons that propagate across the plasma, similarly to a beam, and can drive ion acoustic waves in the plasma bulk. This work was made possible by funding from the Department of Energy for the Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No.DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  4. Nonequilibrium-Plasma-Synthesized ZnO Nanocrystals with Plasmon Resonance Tunable via Al Doping and Quantum Confinement.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Benjamin L; Ganguly, Shreyashi; Held, Jacob T; Kramer, Nicolaas J; Mkhoyan, K Andre; Aydil, Eray S; Kortshagen, Uwe R

    2015-12-09

    Metal oxide semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) tunable within the infrared (IR) region of the electromagnetic spectrum by vacancy or impurity doping. Although a variety of these NCs have been produced using colloidal synthesis methods, incorporation and activation of dopants in the liquid phase has often been challenging. Herein, using Al-doped ZnO (AZO) NCs as an example, we demonstrate the potential of nonthermal plasma synthesis as an alternative strategy for the production of doped metal oxide NCs. Exploiting unique, thoroughly nonequilibrium synthesis conditions, we obtain NCs in which dopants are not segregated to the NC surfaces and local doping levels are high near the NC centers. Thus, we achieve overall doping levels as high as 2 × 10(20) cm(-3) in NCs with diameters ranging from 12.6 to 3.6 nm, and for the first time experimentally demonstrate a clear quantum confinement blue shift of the LSPR energy in vacancy- and impurity-doped semiconductor NCs. We propose that doping of central cores and heavy doping of small NCs are achievable via nonthermal plasma synthesis, because chemical potential differences between dopant and host atoms-which hinder dopant incorporation in colloidal synthesis-are irrelevant when NC nucleation and growth proceed via irreversible interactions among highly reactive gas-phase ions and radicals and ligand-free NC surfaces. We explore how the distinctive nucleation and growth kinetics occurring in the plasma influences dopant distribution and activation, defect structure, and impurity phase formation.

  5. Extreme ultraviolet emission and confinement of tin plasmas in the presence of a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava E-mail: aroy@barc.gov.in; Murtaza Hassan, Syed; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hassanein, Ahmed; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas

    2014-05-15

    We investigated the role of a guiding magnetic field on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and ion emission from a laser produced Sn plasma for various laser pulse duration and intensity. For producing plasmas, planar slabs of pure Sn were irradiated with 1064 nm, Nd:YAG laser pulses with varying pulse duration (5–15 ns) and intensity. A magnetic trap was fabricated with the use of two neodymium permanent magnets which provided a magnetic field strength ∼0.5 T along the plume expansion direction. Our results indicate that the EUV conversion efficiency do not depend significantly on applied axial magnetic field. Faraday Cup ion analysis of Sn plasma show that the ion flux reduces by a factor of ∼5 with the application of an axial magnetic field. It was found that the plasma plume expand in the lateral direction with peak velocity measured to be ∼1.2 cm/μs and reduced to ∼0.75 cm/μs with the application of an axial magnetic field. The plume expansion features recorded using fast photography in the presence and absence of 0.5 T axial magnetic field are simulated using particle-in-cell code. Our simulation results qualitatively predict the plasma behavior.

  6. Étude comparative des techniques d'analyse par fluorescence X à dispersion d'énergie (ED-XRF) et à dispersion de longueur d'onde (WD-XRF), et par spectrométrie d'émission atomique à source plasma couplée par induction (ICP-AES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, A.; Benyaïch, F.; Bounakhla, M.; Bilal, E.; Moutte, J.; Gruffat, J. J.; Zahry, F.

    2004-11-01

    Dans ce travail, nous présentons une étude comparative des techniques d'analyse par fluorescence X à dispersion d'énergie (ED-XRF) et à dispersion de longueur d'onde (WD-XRF), et par spectrométrie d'émission atomique à source plasma couplée par induction (ICP-AES). Les résultats de la calibration des spectromètres à dispersion d'énergie, à excitation par sources radioactives (55Fe, 109Cd et 241Am) et à excitation secondaire (cible secondaire Mo et Cu) du Centre National pour l'Energie, les Sciences et les Techniques Nucléaires (CNESTEN, Rabat, Maroc) sur des échantillons étalons de références de l'Agence International de l'Energie Atomique (AIEA) et du Community Bureau of Référence (BCR) ont été comparés aux résultats d'analyse des mêmes échantillons étalons par la spectrométrie X à dispersion de longueur d'onde (WD-XRF) et par spectrométrie d'émission atomique à source plasma couplé par induction (ICP-AES) au département GENERIC du centre SPIN à l'Ecole des Mines de Saint-Etienne (France). Les trois techniques d'analyse utilisées donnent des résultats comparables pour le dosage des éléments majeurs, alors que pour les traces on note des déviations importantes à cause des effets de matrice qui sont difficiles à corriger dans le cas de la fluorescence X.

  7. Experimental study on dipole motion of an ion plasma confined in a linear Paul trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, K.; Okano, T.; Moriya, K.; Fukushima, K.; Higaki, H.; Okamoto, H.

    2015-11-01

    The compact non-neutral plasma trap systems named "S-POD" have been developed at Hiroshima University as an experimental simulator of beam dynamics. S-POD is based either on a linear Paul trap or on a Penning trap and can approximately reproduce the collective motion of a relativistic charged-particle beam observed in the center-of-mass frame. We here employ the Paul trap system to investigate the behavior of an ion plasma near a dipole resonance. A simple method is proposed to calibrate the data of secular frequency measurements by using the dipole instability condition. We also show that the transverse density profile of an ion plasma in the trap can be estimated from the time evolution of ion losses caused by the resonance.

  8. Turbulent fluctuations during pellet injection into a dipole confined plasma torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, D. T.; Mauel, M. E.; Roberts, T. M.; Kesner, J.; Woskov, P. P.

    2017-01-01

    We report measurements of the turbulent evolution of the plasma density profile following the fast injection of lithium pellets into the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) [Boxer et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 207 (2010)]. As the pellet passes through the plasma, it provides a significant internal particle source and allows investigation of density profile evolution, turbulent relaxation, and turbulent fluctuations. The total electron number within the dipole plasma torus increases by more than a factor of three, and the central density increases by more than a factor of five. During these large changes in density, the shape of the density profile is nearly "stationary" such that the gradient of the particle number within tubes of equal magnetic flux vanishes. In comparison to the usual case, when the particle source is neutral gas at the plasma edge, the internal source from the pellet causes the toroidal phase velocity of the fluctuations to reverse and changes the average particle flux at the plasma edge. An edge particle source creates an inward turbulent pinch, but an internal particle source increases the outward turbulent particle flux. Statistical properties of the turbulence are measured by multiple microwave interferometers and by an array of probes at the edge. The spatial structures of the largest amplitude modes have long radial and toroidal wavelengths. Estimates of the local and toroidally averaged turbulent particle flux show intermittency and a non-Gaussian probability distribution function. The measured fluctuations, both before and during pellet injection, have frequency and wavenumber dispersion consistent with theoretical expectations for interchange and entropy modes excited within a dipole plasma torus having warm electrons and cool ions.

  9. Effect of different tritium fractions on some plasma parameters in deuterium-tritium magnetic confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevalli, S. M.; Mohsenpour, T.; Dashtban, N.

    2016-09-01

    Nearly all reactor projects have considered deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion. The cross section of D-T reaction is larger than those of other fusion reactions, thus it is considered to be a more favorable reaction. The mix of fuel can vary. In this work, a comparison between the effects of different mixture of D-T fuel on the plasma parameters is made. A time dependence calculation of the fusion process is performed using the zero-dimensional model based on a coupled set of particle and energy balance equations in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). The time evolution of plasma parameters is also analyzed numerically.

  10. Steady-shear-enhanced microdiffusion with multiple time scales of confined, mesoscopic, two-dimensional dusty-plasma liquids.

    PubMed

    Io, Chong-Wai; I, Lin

    2009-09-01

    We experimentally investigate the multitime scale diffusion and the spatiotemporal behaviors of the degrees of enhancement for the longitudinal and the transverse diffusions in a confined mesoscopic quasi-two-dimensional dusty-plasma liquid sheared by two parallel counterpropagating laser beams. The steady external drive directly enhances the longitudinal cooperative hopping, associated with the shear bands that have high shear rate near boundaries. It drastically excites the slow hopping modes to high fluctuation level in the outer band region, accompanied by the enhanced superdiffusion. Through cascaded many-body interaction, the excitation flows from the outer region toward the center region, from the longitudinal modes to the transverse mode, and from the slow hopping modes to the fast caging modes, which are in better contact with the thermal bath. It causes the weaker enhancement of fluctuation level, and diffusion for the center region and the fast modes. The boundary confinement further breaks the system symmetry and enhances anisotropy. It has much stronger effect on the suppression of the transverse hopping modes than the longitudinal hopping mode. The degrees of enhancement of the fluctuations by the shear stress are highly anisotropic for the large amplitude slow modes, especially in the outer region but are more isotropic in the inner band.

  11. Density-Modulation-Induced Absolute Laser-Plasma-Instabilities in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Yan, Rui; Ren, Chuang

    2016-10-01

    Fluid simulations show that when a static sinusoidal density modulation is superimposed on a linear density profile, convective instabilities can become absolutely unstable. This conversion can occur for two-plasmon-decay and stimulated Raman scattering instabilities under realistic direct-drive inertial confinement fusion conditions and can affect hot-electron generation and laser-energy deposition. Analysis of the three-wave model shows that a sufficiently large change of the density gradient in a linear density profile can turn convective instabilities into absolute ones. An analytical expression is given for the threshold of the gradient change, which depends only on the convective gain. This work was supported by DOE under Grant No. DE-SC0012316; by NSF under Grant No. PHY-1314734; and by Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The research used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center.

  12. Demonstration of Ion Kinetic Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions and Investigation of Magnetic Reconnection Using Laser-Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    Shock-driven laser inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions have demonstrated the presence of ion kinetic effects in ICF implosions and also have been used as a proton source to probe the strongly driven reconnection of MG magnetic fields in laser-generated plasmas. Ion kinetic effects arise during the shock-convergence phase of ICF implosions when the mean free path for ion-ion collisions (λii) approaches the size of the hot-fuel region (Rfuel) and may impact hot-spot formation and the possibility of ignition. To isolate and study ion kinetic effects, the ratio of N - K =λii /Rfuel was varied in D3He-filled, shock-driven implosions at the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility, from hydrodynamic-like conditions (NK 0.01) to strongly kinetic conditions (NK 10). A strong trend of decreasing fusion yields relative to the predictions of hydrodynamic models is observed as NK increases from 0.1 to 10. Hydrodynamics simulations that include basic models of the kinetic effects that are likely to be present in these experiments-namely, ion diffusion and Knudsen-layer reduction of the fusion reactivity-are better able to capture the experimental results. This type of implosion has also been used as a source of monoenergetic 15-MeV protons to image magnetic fields driven to reconnect in laser-produced plasmas at conditions similar to those encountered at the Earth's magnetopause. These experiments demonstrate that for both symmetric and asymmetric magnetic-reconnection configurations, when plasma flows are much stronger than the nominal Alfvén speed, the rate of magnetic-flux annihilation is determined by the flow velocity and is largely insensitive to initial plasma conditions. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Grant Number DENA0001857.

  13. High Confinement and High Density with Stationary Plasma Energy and Strong Edge Radiation Cooling in Textor-94

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messiaen, A. M.

    1996-11-01

    A new discharge regime has been observed on the pumped limiter tokamak TEXTOR-94 in the presence of strong radiation cooling and for different scenarii of additional hearing. The radiated power fraction (up to 90%) is feedback controlled by the amount of Ne seeded in the edge. This regime meets many of the necessary conditions for a future fusion reactor. Energy confinement increases with increasing densities (reminiscent of the Z-mode obtained at ISX-B) and as good as ELM-free H-mode confinement (enhancement factor verus ITERH93-P up to 1.2) is obtained at high densities (up to 1.2 times the Greenwald limit) with peaked density profiles showing a peaking factor of about 2 and central density values around 10^14cm-3. In experiments where the energy content of the discharges is kept constant with an energy feedback loop acting on the amount of ICRH power, stable and stationary discharges are obtained for intervals of more than 5s, i.e. 100 times the energy confinement time or about equal to the skin resistive time, even with the cylindrical q_α as low as 2.8 β-values up to the β-limits of TEXTOR-94 are achieved (i.e. β n ≈ 2 of and β p ≈ 1.5) and the figure of merit for ignition margin f_Hqa in these discharges can be as high as 0.7. No detrimental effects of the seeded impurity on the reactivity of the plasma are observed. He removal in these discharges has also been investigated. [1] Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas-Laboratorium voor Plasmafysica, Association "EURATOM-Belgian State", Ecole Royale Militaire-Koninklijke Militaire School, Brussels, Belgium [2] Institut für Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich, GmbH, Association "EURATOM-KFA", Jülich, Germany [3] Fusion Energy Research Program, Mechanical Engineering Division, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, USA [4] FOM Institüt voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen, Associatie "FOM-EURATOM", Nieuwegein, The Netherlands [*] Researcher at NFSR, Belgium itemize

  14. Kinetic instabilities in a mirror-confined plasma sustained by high-power microwave radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalashov, A. G.; Viktorov, M. E.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Golubev, S. V.

    2017-03-01

    This paper summarizes the studies of plasma kinetic instabilities in the electron cyclotron frequency range carried out over the last decade at the Institute of Applied Physics in Nizhny Novgorod. We investigate the nonequilibrium plasma created and sustained by high-power microwave radiation of a gyrotron under the electron cyclotron resonance condition. Resonant plasma heating results in the formation of at least two electron components, one of which, more dense and cold, determines the dispersion properties of the high-frequency waves, and the other, a small group of energetic electrons with a highly anisotropic velocity distribution, is responsible for the excitation of unstable waves. Dynamic spectra and the intensity of stimulated electromagnetic emission are studied with high temporal resolution. Interpretation of observed data is based on the cyclotron maser paradigm; in this context, a laboratory modeling of non-stationary wave-particle interaction processes has much in common with similar processes occurring in the magnetosphere of Earth, planets, and solar coronal loops.

  15. Non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Avijit; Ray, Debasis

    2015-03-01

    The non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by the bound valence electron in the ground state 3s of atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas is investigated theoretically. The incident photon energy is assumed to be much smaller than the 3s-3p excitation energy. The alkali atom sodium is first formulated as an effective one-electron problem in which the attractive interaction between the valence electron and the atomic ion core is simulated by a spherically symmetric model potential. The Shukla-Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential model is then used to mimic the effective two-body (valence-core) interaction within quantum plasmas. Non-relativistic calculations performed within the electric dipole approximation indicate that the non-resonant elastic photon scattering cross-section undergoes a dramatic growth by several orders of magnitude as the quantum wave number increases. A qualitative explanation of this phenomenon is presented. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, a similar growth is observed at larger values of the quantum wave number. Our computed relevant atomic data are in very good agreement with the experimental as well as the previous theoretical data for the zero-screening (free atom) case, and with the very limited, accurate theoretical results available for the case of exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction, without the cosine screening term.

  16. Population inversion and gain measurements for X-ray laser development in magnetically confined plasma column in fiscal year 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suckewer, S.

    1985-03-01

    This report covers X-ray laser development in magnetically confined plasmas, as well as in expanding recombining plasma columns using time resolved soft X-ray monochromators. Experiments with both solid and gas targets resulted in gain measurements for hydrogen-like Carbon(6+) (CVI) ions and population inversion measurements for lithium-like Neon(8+) (NeVIII) ions. Our most recent results, involving carbon disc targets in a 90 k Gauss field with a 300 Joule carbon dioxide laser pulse, in which a one-pass gain of kl 6.5 (enhancement of stimulated emission over spontaneous emission about 100) was obtained for CVI 182A are presented. Results of a gain kl = 3.0 (k approx. 7.5/cm) for thick carbon fiber targets are also presented. Population inversions of NeVIII ions as a function of initial gas pressure are also discussed, as well as an overview of the instrumentation, experimental setup, and target configurations used.

  17. Non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Avijit Ray, Debasis

    2015-03-15

    The non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by the bound valence electron in the ground state 3s of atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas is investigated theoretically. The incident photon energy is assumed to be much smaller than the 3s-3p excitation energy. The alkali atom sodium is first formulated as an effective one-electron problem in which the attractive interaction between the valence electron and the atomic ion core is simulated by a spherically symmetric model potential. The Shukla-Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential model is then used to mimic the effective two-body (valence-core) interaction within quantum plasmas. Non-relativistic calculations performed within the electric dipole approximation indicate that the non-resonant elastic photon scattering cross-section undergoes a dramatic growth by several orders of magnitude as the quantum wave number increases. A qualitative explanation of this phenomenon is presented. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, a similar growth is observed at larger values of the quantum wave number. Our computed relevant atomic data are in very good agreement with the experimental as well as the previous theoretical data for the zero-screening (free atom) case, and with the very limited, accurate theoretical results available for the case of exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction, without the cosine screening term.

  18. Generality of Deterministic Chaos, Exponential Spectra, and Lorentzian Pulses in Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, J. E.; Morales, G. J.

    2011-10-01

    The dynamics of transport at the edge of magnetized plasmas is deterministic chaos. The connection is made by a previous survey [M. A. Pedrosa , Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 3621 (1999)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.82.3621] of measurements of fluctuations that is shown to exhibit power spectra with exponential frequency dependence over a broad range, which is the signature of deterministic chaos. The exponential character arises from Lorentzian pulses. The results suggest that the generalization to complex times used in studies of deterministic chaos is a representation of Lorentzian pulses emerging from the chaotic dynamics.

  19. Inertia driven radial breathing and nonlinear relaxation in cylindrically confined pure electron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2014-02-15

    The dynamics of cylindrically trapped electron plasma has been investigated using a newly developed 2D Electrostatic PIC code that uses unapproximated, mass-included equations of motion for simulation. Exhaustive simulations, covering the entire range of Brillouin ratio, were performed for uniformly filled circular profiles in rigid rotor equilibrium. The same profiles were then loaded away from equilibrium with an initial value of rigid rotation frequency different from that required for radial force balance. Both these sets of simulations were performed for an initial zero-temperature or cold load of the plasma with no spread in either angular velocity or radial velocity. The evolution of the off-equilibrium initial conditions to a steady state involve radial breathing of the profile that scales in amplitude and algebraic growth with Brillouin fraction. For higher Brillouin fractions, the growth of the breathing mode is followed by complex dynamics of spontaneous hollow density structures, excitation of poloidal modes, leading to a monotonically falling density profile.

  20. Inertia driven radial breathing and nonlinear relaxation in cylindrically confined pure electron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2015-06-29

    The dynamics of cylindrically trapped electron plasma has been investigated using a newly developed 2D Electrostatic PIC code that uses unapproximated, mass-included equations of motion for simulation. Exhaustive simulations, covering the entire range of Brillouin ratio, were performed for uniformly filled circular profiles in rigid rotor equilibrium. The same profiles were then loaded away from equilibrium with an initial value of rigid rotation frequency different from that required for radial force balance. Both these sets of simulations were performed for an initial zero-temperature or cold load of the plasma with no spread in either angular velocity or radial velocity. The evolution of the off-equilibrium initial conditions to a steady state involve radial breathing of the profile that scales in amplitude and algebraic growth with Brillouin fraction. For higher Brillouin fractions, the growth of the breathing mode is followed by complex dynamics of spontaneous hollow density structures, excitation of poloidal modes, leading to a monotonically falling density profile.

  1. Abrupt onset of tongue deformation and phase space response of ions in magnetically-confined plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Itoh, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Akiyama, T.; Moon, C.; Tsuchiya, H.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-01-01

    An abrupt onset of the new tongue-shaped deformation of magnetic surface in magnetized plasmas, which was conjectured in since the 1960s but has not been observed, is experimentally identified just before an abrupt onset of a large-scale collapse event. Two novel properties of the event are identified. First, the transition of symmetry of perturbation (rather than a growth of linearly unstable MHD modes) was found to be a key for the onset of abrupt collapse, i.e., the transition of symmetry gives a new route to the collapse from stable state. Second, as a phase-space response of ions, the distortion from Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of epithermal ions was observed for the first time. PMID:27796370

  2. Abrupt onset of tongue deformation and phase space response of ions in magnetically-confined plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Itoh, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Akiyama, T.; Moon, C.; Tsuchiya, H.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-10-01

    An abrupt onset of the new tongue-shaped deformation of magnetic surface in magnetized plasmas, which was conjectured in since the 1960s but has not been observed, is experimentally identified just before an abrupt onset of a large-scale collapse event. Two novel properties of the event are identified. First, the transition of symmetry of perturbation (rather than a growth of linearly unstable MHD modes) was found to be a key for the onset of abrupt collapse, i.e., the transition of symmetry gives a new route to the collapse from stable state. Second, as a phase-space response of ions, the distortion from Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of epithermal ions was observed for the first time.

  3. Sheared Rotation Effects on Kinetic Stability in Enhanced Confinement Tokamak Plasmas, and Nonlinear Dynamics of Fluctuations and Flows in Axisymmetric Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, M.A.; Chance, M.S.; Hahm, T.S.; Lin, Z.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1997-11-01

    Sheared rotation dynamics are widely believed to have signficant influence on experimentally observed confinement transitions in advanced operating modes in major tokamak experiments, such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [D.J. Grove and D.M. Meade, Nuclear Fusion 25, 1167 (1985)], with reversed magnetic shear regions in the plasma interior. The high-n toroidal drift modes destabilized by the combined effects of ion temperature gradients and trapped particles in toroidal geometry can be strongly affected by radially sheared toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. In previous work with the FULL linear microinstability code, a simplified rotation model including only toroidal rotation was employed, and results were obtained. Here, a more complete rotation model, that includes contributions from toroidal and poloidal rotation and the ion pressure gradient to the total radial electric field, is used for a proper self-consistent treatment of this key problem. Relevant advanced operating mode cases for TFTR are presented. In addition, the complementary problem of the dynamics of fluctuation-driven E x B flow is investigated by an integrated program of gyrokinetic simulation in annulus geometry and gyrofluid simulation in flux tube geometry.

  4. Sheared Rotation Effects on Kinetic Stability in Enhanced Confinement Tokamak Plasmas, and Nonlinear Dynamics of Fluctuations and Flows in Axisymmetric Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rewoldt, G.; Beer, M.A.; Chance, M.S.; Hahm, T.S.; Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.

    1997-12-01

    Sheared rotation dynamics are widely believed to have significant influence on experimentally observed confinement transitions in advanced operating modes in major tokamak experiments, such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with reversed magnetic shear regions in the plasma interior. The high-n toroidal drift modes destabilized by the combined effects of ion temperature gradients and trapped particles in toroidal geometry can be strongly affected by radially sheared toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. In previous work with the FULL linear microinstability code, a simplified rotation model including only toroidal rotation was employed, and results were obtained. Here, a more complete rotation model, that includes contributions from toroidal and poloidal rotation and the ion pressure gradient to the total radial electric field, is used for a proper self-consistent treatment of this key problem. Relevant advanced operating mode cases for TFTR are presented. In addition, the complementary problem of the dynamics of fluctuation-driven E x B flow is investigated by an integrated program of gyrokinetic simulation in annulus geometry and gyrofluid simulation in flux tube geometry.

  5. Thermo-statistical study of evaporation effects in a non neutral plasma under an imperfect magnetic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordenes-Huanca, C.; Velazquez, L.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental studies of non-neutral plasmas in magnetic traps undergo, in some degree of affectation, the incidence of evaporation. For example, the existence of a finite threshold energy {{\\varepsilon}c} for the escaping of plasma constituents can be favored by the external electrostatic forces near the grounded conducting walls of a cylindrical Penning trap. In contrast, the conventional statistical mechanics description of these situations is performed assuming the existence of a rigorous thermodynamic equilibrium (Dubin and O’Neil 1999 Rev. Mod. Phys. 71 87), dismissing thus the existence of evaporation effects. We propose in this work a two-dimensional toy model that describes the incidence of evaporation on thermo-statistics of a pure non-neutral plasma (a system composed of a single charge species like an infinitely long electron column). Considering the existing connections between the macroscopic descriptions of pure non-neutral plasmas and astrophysical systems, the treatment of evaporation along a quasi-stationary regime is developed here in analogy to some astrophysical models proposed in the literature. We start from a regularized microcanonical description that only considers those microscopic configurations where particles are trapped inside a confinement region of radius R c , which is implemented introducing a truncation of their velocity spectrum. These arguments lead us to a statistical procedure to predict the quasi-stationary particles distribution n≤ft(\\mathbf{r}\\right) similar to the maximum entropy approach. According to our analysis, the influence of evaporation for a non-zero temperature T crucially depends on the saturation parameter δ ={{r}\\text{B}}/{{R}c} , whose admissible values are located in the interval 0<δ <1 , with r B being the radius of Billouin steady state that appears in the limit T\\to 0 . The theoretical profiles predicted from this model are then compared to the metastable radial density distribution reported by

  6. A self-organized criticality model for ion temperature gradient mode driven turbulence in confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Isliker, H.; Pisokas, Th.; Vlahos, L.; Strintzi, D.

    2010-08-15

    A new self-organized criticality (SOC) model is introduced in the form of a cellular automaton (CA) for ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode driven turbulence in fusion plasmas. Main characteristics of the model are that it is constructed in terms of the actual physical variable, the ion temperature, and that the temporal evolution of the CA, which necessarily is in the form of rules, mimics actual physical processes as they are considered to be active in the system, i.e., a heating process and a local diffusive process that sets on if a threshold in the normalized ITG R/L{sub T} is exceeded. The model reaches the SOC state and yields ion temperature profiles of exponential shape, which exhibit very high stiffness, in that they basically are independent of the loading pattern applied. This implies that there is anomalous heat transport present in the system, despite the fact that diffusion at the local level is imposed to be of a normal kind. The distributions of the heat fluxes in the system and of the heat out-fluxes are of power-law shape. The basic properties of the model are in good qualitative agreement with experimental results.

  7. Gaussian beams for a linearized cold plasma confined in a torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinali, A.; Dobrokhotov, S. Yu.; Klevin, A.; Tirozzi, B.

    2016-04-01

    We consider a system of linear pde describing a cold plasma in a toroidal region in three-dimensional space. This system simulates the passage of a laser beam through the TOKAMAK, it consists of 9 equations for the electric field and the velocities of electrons and ions in a given magnetic field. Asymptotic solutions describing high-frequency Gaussian beams are constructed using the theory of Maslov complex germ in a fairly effective form. The solutions of the system are localized in the neighborhood of the beam passing through the toroidal domain (the camera). The equations for a ray take into account the density of particles in the camera and don't ``feel'' the presence of the magnetic field because of the high frequency of the Gaussian beam; the dependence on the magnetic field is contained in the amplitude of the electric field. Before the TOKAMAK camera the amplitude of the Gaussian beam is the same as in free space, but after the camera the amplitude vector rotates under the influence of the magnetic field. The formula for the angle of rotation is given explicitly. An analytical-numerical algorithm based on the asymptotic solutions is used to analyze the parameters of the magnetic field in the TOKAMAK.

  8. LDRD final report on confinement of cluster fusion plasmas with magnetic fields.

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, Jeffrey W.; Kellogg, Jeffrey W.; Headley, Daniel Ignacio; Stoltzfus, Brian Scott; Waugh, Caleb J.; Lewis, Sean M.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Wisher, Matthew; Struve, Kenneth William; Savage, Mark Edward; Quevedo, Hernan J.; Bengtson, Roger

    2011-11-01

    Two versions of a current driver for single-turn, single-use 1-cm diameter magnetic field coils have been built and tested at the Sandia National Laboratories for use with cluster fusion experiments at the University of Texas in Austin. These coils are used to provide axial magnetic fields to slow radial loss of electrons from laser-produced deuterium plasmas. Typical peak field strength achievable for the two-capacitor system is 50 T, and 200 T for the ten-capacitor system. Current rise time for both systems is about 1.7 {mu}s, with peak current of 500 kA and 2 MA, respectively. Because the coil must be brought to the laser, the driver needs to be portable and drive currents in vacuum. The drivers are complete but laser-plasma experiments are still in progress. Therefore, in this report, we focus on system design, initial tests, and performance characteristics of the two-capacitor and ten-capacitors systems. The questions of whether a 200 T magnetic field can retard the breakup of a cluster-fusion plasma, and whether this field can enhance neutron production have not yet been answered. However, tools have been developed that will enable producing the magnetic fields needed to answer these questions. These are a two-capacitor, 400-kA system that was delivered to the University of Texas in 2010, and a 2-MA ten-capacitor system delivered this year. The first system allowed initial testing, and the second system will be able to produce the 200 T magnetic fields needed for cluster fusion experiments with a petawatt laser. The prototype 400-kA magnetic field driver system was designed and built to test the design concept for the system, and to verify that a portable driver system could be built that delivers current to a magnetic field coil in vacuum. This system was built copying a design from a fixed-facility, high-field machine at LANL, but made to be portable and to use a Z-machine-like vacuum insulator and vacuum transmission line. This system was sent to the

  9. Confined diffusion of transmembrane proteins and lipids induced by the same actin meshwork lining the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Takahiro K; Iwasawa, Kokoro; Kalay, Ziya; Tsunoyama, Taka A; Watanabe, Yusuke; Umemura, Yasuhiro M; Murakoshi, Hideji; Suzuki, Kenichi G N; Nemoto, Yuri L; Morone, Nobuhiro; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2016-04-01

    The mechanisms by which the diffusion rate in the plasma membrane (PM) is regulated remain unresolved, despite their importance in spatially regulating the reaction rates in the PM. Proposed models include entrapment in nanoscale noncontiguous domains found in PtK2 cells, slow diffusion due to crowding, and actin-induced compartmentalization. Here, by applying single-particle tracking at high time resolutions, mainly to the PtK2-cell PM, we found confined diffusion plus hop movements (termed "hop diffusion") for both a nonraft phospholipid and a transmembrane protein, transferrin receptor, and equal compartment sizes for these two molecules in all five of the cell lines used here (actual sizes were cell dependent), even after treatment with actin-modulating drugs. The cross-section size and the cytoplasmic domain size both affected the hop frequency. Electron tomography identified the actin-based membrane skeleton (MSK) located within 8.8 nm from the PM cytoplasmic surface of PtK2 cells and demonstrated that the MSK mesh size was the same as the compartment size for PM molecular diffusion. The extracellular matrix and extracellular domains of membrane proteins were not involved in hop diffusion. These results support a model of anchored TM-protein pickets lining actin-based MSK as a major mechanism for regulating diffusion.

  10. Confined diffusion of transmembrane proteins and lipids induced by the same actin meshwork lining the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Takahiro K.; Iwasawa, Kokoro; Kalay, Ziya; Tsunoyama, Taka A.; Watanabe, Yusuke; Umemura, Yasuhiro M.; Murakoshi, Hideji; Suzuki, Kenichi G. N.; Nemoto, Yuri L.; Morone, Nobuhiro; Kusumi, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which the diffusion rate in the plasma membrane (PM) is regulated remain unresolved, despite their importance in spatially regulating the reaction rates in the PM. Proposed models include entrapment in nanoscale noncontiguous domains found in PtK2 cells, slow diffusion due to crowding, and actin-induced compartmentalization. Here, by applying single-particle tracking at high time resolutions, mainly to the PtK2-cell PM, we found confined diffusion plus hop movements (termed “hop diffusion”) for both a nonraft phospholipid and a transmembrane protein, transferrin receptor, and equal compartment sizes for these two molecules in all five of the cell lines used here (actual sizes were cell dependent), even after treatment with actin-modulating drugs. The cross-section size and the cytoplasmic domain size both affected the hop frequency. Electron tomography identified the actin-based membrane skeleton (MSK) located within 8.8 nm from the PM cytoplasmic surface of PtK2 cells and demonstrated that the MSK mesh size was the same as the compartment size for PM molecular diffusion. The extracellular matrix and extracellular domains of membrane proteins were not involved in hop diffusion. These results support a model of anchored TM-protein pickets lining actin-based MSK as a major mechanism for regulating diffusion. PMID:26864625

  11. Measurement of high-frequency density fluctuations using far-forward collective scattering and interferometric techniques in improved-confinement RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, James; Chapman, Brett; Sarff, John; Ding, Weixing; Brower, David; Lin, Liang

    2012-10-01

    In standard RFP plasmas, transport is governed by magnetic fluctuations associated with global tearing modes. For improved-confinement plasmas using inductive current profile control (PPCD), smaller-scale fluctuations at higher frequencies might become important for transport, especially drift-wave-like instabilities which may be theoretically unstable for the larger temperature gradients achieved. On the MST-RFP, an 11-chord laser-based diagnostic with ˜8 cm chord spacing is and frequency 694 GHz used to measure electron density fluctuations both interferometrically and by far-forward collective scattering. The existing diagnostic configuration measures the line-integrated fluctuations within the divergence of the probe beam covering a wavenumber range k<1.3 cm-1, corresponding to kρs <1.3 (ρs is the ion-sound Larmor radius). Of particular interest is comparing fluctuations in standard and PPCD plasmas. Relative to standard plasmas, tearing mode and higher frequency broadband fluctuations (up to 600 kHz) are suppressed with PPCD. This suppression in PPCD plasmas corresponds to the improved confinement. A diagnostic upgrade, in progress, will improve sensitivity and cover shorter wavelengths. Work supported by U.S.D.O.E.

  12. Improved confinement in ELM-suppressed high-density H-modes at the ITER field via modification of the plasma boundary with Lower Hybrid RF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, J. L.

    2014-10-01

    Injecting Lower Hybrid (LH) power into Alcator C-Mod's high-density H-mode plasmas has enhanced global confinement by increasing pedestal temperature gradients, modifying edge rotation, and decreasing edge and SOL turbulence. These new experiments indicate that edge LHRF can be used as a tool to increase confinement via direct modification of boundary quantities. Ray-tracing modeling and accessibility calculations for the LH waves indicate that the LH waves do not penetrate to regions inside the top of the pedestal and are not driving current in these plasmas; instead the LH power modifies the boundary conditions. When moderate amounts of LH power (PLH/Ptot = 20%) are applied to high-density EDA H-modes (neo = 3.5×1020 m-3) , we observe the following effects: edge/SOL fluctuation power decreases by roughly an order of magnitude; pedestal temperature gradients are increased; global energy confinement time and H-factor increase by 30-40% (H98 from 0.7 to 1.0); co-current core and pedestal rotation velocities increase; power to the (outer) divertor target increases promptly with an increment that is roughly 1/2 of the injected LH power, qualitatively consistent with the inaccessibility of the LH waves; and the central frequency of the edge-localized Quasi-Coherent Mode down-shifts and becomes much more coherent. These H-mode confinement improvements brought about by the edge LHRF are the result of changes in the pedestal (e.g. changes in rotation/shear and increased pedestal temperature gradients), with no substantial change in peaking of core density or temperature profiles. There is not perfect correlation with edge turbulence suppression, indicating that the turbulence decrease may be a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for the pedestal and confinement improvements. Supported by US DoE Awards DE-FC02-99ER54512 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  13. Equilibrium drives of the low and high field side n  =  2 plasma response and impact on global confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Logan, N. C.; Haskey, S. R.; Nazikian, R.; Strait, E. J.; Chen, X.; Ferraro, N. M.; King, J. D.; Lyons, B. C.; Park, J.-K.

    2016-05-01

    The nature of the multi-modal n  =  2 plasma response and its impact on global confinement is studied as a function of the axisymmetric equilibrium pressure, edge safety factor, collisionality, and L-versus H-mode conditions. Varying the relative phase (Δ {φ\\text{UL}} ) between upper and lower in-vessel coils demonstrates that different n  =  2 poloidal spectra preferentially excite different plasma responses. These different plasma response modes are preferentially detected on the tokamak high-field side (HFS) or low-field side (LFS) midplanes, have different radial extents, couple differently to the resonant surfaces, and have variable impacts on edge stability and global confinement. In all equilibrium conditions studied, the observed confinement degradation shares the same Δ {φ\\text{UL}} dependence as the coupling to the resonant surfaces given by both ideal (IPEC) and resistive (MARS-F) MHD computation. Varying the edge safety factor shifts the equilibrium field-line pitch and thus the Δ {φ\\text{UL}} dependence of both the global confinement and the n  =  2 magnetic response. As edge safety factor is varied, modeling finds that the HFS response (but not the LFS response), the resonant surface coupling, and the edge displacements near the X-point all share the same Δ {φ\\text{UL}} dependence. The LFS response magnitude is strongly sensitive to the core pressure and is insensitive to the collisionality and edge safety factor. This indicates that the LFS measurements are primarily sensitive to a pressure-driven kink-ballooning mode that couples to the core plasma. MHD modeling accurately reproduces these (and indeed all) LFS experimental trends and supports this interpretation. In contrast to the LFS, the HFS magnetic response and correlated global confinement impact is unchanged with plasma pressure, but is strongly reduced in high collisionality conditions in both H- and L-mode. This experimentally suggests the bootstrap

  14. Equilibrium drives of the low and high field side n = 2 plasma response and impact on global confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Logan, N. C.; Haskey, S. R.; Nazikian, R.; Strait, E. J.; Chen, X.; Ferraro, N. M.; King, J. D.; Lyons, B. C.; Park, J. -K.

    2016-03-31

    The nature of the multi-modal n=2 plasma response and its impact on global confinement is studied as a function of the axisymmetric equilibrium pressure, edge safety factor, collisionality, and L-versus H-mode conditions. Varying the relative phase (ΔΦUL) between upper and lower in-vessel coils demonstrates that different n=2 poloidal spectra preferentially excite different plasma responses. These different plasma response modes are preferentially detected on the tokamak high-field side (HFS) or low-field side (LFS) midplanes, have different radial extents, couple differently to the resonant surfaces, and have variable impacts on edge stability and global confinement. In all equilibrium conditions studied, the observed confinement degradation shares the same ΔΦUL dependence as the coupling to the resonant surfaces given by both ideal (IPEC) and resistive (MARS-F) MHD computation. Varying the edge safety factor shifts the equilibrium field-line pitch and thus the ΔΦUL dependence of both the global confinement and the n=2 magnetic response. As edge safety factor is varied, modeling finds that the HFS response (but not the LFS response), the resonant surface coupling, and the edge displacements near the X-point all share the same ΔΦUL dependence. The LFS response magnitude is strongly sensitive to the core pressure and is insensitive to the collisionality and edge safety factor. This indicates that the LFS measurements are primarily sensitive to a pressure-driven kink-ballooning mode that couples to the core plasma. MHD modeling accurately reproduces these (and indeed all) LFS experimental trends and supports this interpretation. In contrast to the LFS, the HFS magnetic response and correlated global confinement impact is unchanged with plasma pressure, but is strongly reduced in high collisionality conditions in both H- and L-mode. This experimentally suggests the bootstrap current drives the HFS response through

  15. Global and pedestal confinement and pedestal structure in dimensionless collisionality scans of low-triangularity H-mode plasmas in JET-ILW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassinetti, L.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Saarelma, S.; Boom, J. E.; Delabie, E.; Flanagan, J.; Kempenaars, M.; Giroud, C.; Lomas, P.; Meneses, L.; Maggi, C. S.; Menmuir, S.; Nunes, I.; Rimini, F.; Stefanikova, E.; Urano, H.; Verdoolaege, G.; Contributors, JET

    2017-01-01

    A dimensionless collisionality scan in low-triangularity plasmas in the Joint European Torus with the ITER-like wall (JET-ILW) has been performed. The increase of the normalized energy confinement (defined as the ratio between thermal energy confinement and Bohm confinement time) with decreasing collisionality is observed. Moreover, at low collisionality, a confinement factor H98, comparable to JET-C, is achieved. At high collisionality, the low normalized confinement is related to a degraded pedestal stability and a reduction in the density-profile peaking. The increase of normalized energy confinement is due to both an increase in the pedestal and in the core regions. The improvement in the pedestal is related to the increase of the stability. The improvement in the core is driven by (i) the core temperature increase via the temperature-profile stiffness and by (ii) the density-peaking increase driven by the low collisionality. Pedestal stability analysis performed with the ELITE (edge-localized instabilities in tokamak equilibria) code has a reasonable qualitative agreement with the experimental results. An improvement of the pedestal stability with decreasing collisionality is observed. The improvement is ascribed to the reduction of the pedestal width, the increase of the bootstrap current and the reduction of the relative shift between the positions of the pedestal density and pedestal temperature. The EPED1 model predictions for the pedestal pressure height are qualitatively well correlated with the experimental results. Quantitatively, EPED1 overestimates the experimental pressure by 15-35%. In terms of the pedestal width, a correct agreement (within 10-15%) between the EPED1 and the experimental width is found at low collisionality. The experimental pedestal width increases with collisionality. Nonetheless, an extrapolation to low-collisionality values suggests that the width predictions from the KBM constraint are reasonable for ITER.

  16. Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Interactive and High Heat Flux Components: Volume 5, Technical assessment of critical issues in the steady state operation of fusion confinement devices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Critical issues for the steady state operation of plasma confinement devices exist in both the physics and technology fields of fusion research. Due to the wide range and number of these issues, this technical assessment has focused on the crucial issues associated with the plasma physics and the plasma interactive components. The document provides information on the problem areas that affect the design and operation of a steady state ETR or ITER type confinement device. It discusses both tokamaks and alternative concepts, and provides a survey of existing and planned confinement machines and laboratory facilities that can address the identified issues. A universal definition of steady state operation is difficult to obtain. From a physics point of view, steady state is generally achieved when the time derivatives approach zero and the operation time greatly exceeds the characteristic time constants of the device. Steady state operation for materials depends on whether thermal stress, creep, fatigue, radiation damage, or power removal are being discussed. For erosion issues, the fluence and availability of the machine for continuous operation are important, assuming that transient events such as disruptions do not limit the component lifetimes. The panel suggests, in general terms, that steady state requires plasma operation from 100 to 1000 seconds and an availability of more than a few percent, which is similar to the expectations for an ETR type device. The assessment of critical issues for steady state operation is divided into four sections: physics issues; technology issues; issues in alternative concepts; and devices and laboratory facilities that can address these problems.

  17. Studies of plasma confinement in linear and RACETRACK mirror configurations. Progress report, January 1--October 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Kuthi, A.; Wong, A.Y.

    1986-06-30

    This report discusses research on the following magnetic mirror configurations: Racetrack; ECRH generated plasmas; RF generated plasmas; potential structures; surface multipole fields, and lamex; hot electron physics; axial loss processes; and RF induced effects.

  18. The effect of the driving frequency on the confinement of beam electrons and plasma density in low-pressure capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, S.; Trieschmann, J.; Schulze, J.; Schuengel, E.; Brinkmann, R. P.; Derzsi, A.; Korolov, I.; Donkó, Z.; Mussenbrock, T.

    2015-04-01

    The effect of changing the driving frequency on the plasma density and the electron dynamics in a capacitive radio-frequency argon plasma operated at low pressures of a few Pa is investigated by particle-in-cell/Monte-Carlo collision simulations and analytical modeling. In contrast to previous assumptions, the plasma density does not follow a quadratic dependence on the driving frequency in this non-local collisionless regime. Instead, a step-like increase at a distinct driving frequency is observed. Based on an analytical power balance model, in combination with a detailed analysis of the electron kinetics, the density jump is found to be caused by an electron heating mode transition from the classical α-mode into a low-density resonant heating mode characterized by the generation of two energetic electron beams at each electrode per sheath expansion phase. These electron beams propagate through the bulk without collisions and interact with the opposing sheath. In the low-density mode, the second beam is found to hit the opposing sheath during its collapse. Consequently, a large number of energetic electrons is lost at the electrodes resulting in a poor confinement of beam electrons in contrast to the classical α-mode observed at higher driving frequencies. Based on the analytical model this modulated confinement quality and the related modulation of the energy lost per electron lost at the electrodes is demonstrated to cause the step-like change of the plasma density. The effects of a variation of the electrode gap, the neutral gas pressure, the electron sticking and secondary electron emission coefficients of the electrodes on this step-like increase of the plasma density are analyzed based on the simulation results.

  19. Analyses par diffraction de rayons X sur des revêtements barrières thermiques réalisés par un procédé hybride plasma-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antou, G.; Hlawka, F.; Montavon, G.; Bach, M.; Cornet, A.; Coddet, C.

    2004-11-01

    Les revêtements barrières thermiques (BTs) constitués de zircone yttriée partiellement stabilisée (ZrO{2} + 7% en masse d'Y{2}O{3}) et d'une sous-couche métallique (MCrAlY où M représente une combinaison de nickel et de cobalt) sont extrêmement utilisés afin d'améliorer les performances des composants des parties chaudes des turbines à gaz. La projection plasma sous atmosphère ambiante et l'irradiation laser in situ (au moyen d'un laser à diodes) sont associés ici afin de modifier les caractéristiques structurales des BTs. Les phases présentes au sein de la BT ont un rôle important. Des analyses par diffraction de rayons X ont été menées pour étudier les changements de phase possibles après traitement laser. Aucun changement de phase n'a été remarqué : la phase tétragonale métastable (t') demeure la phase prépondérante aussi bien pour les dépôts projetés que les dépôts post-traités au laser et refondus in situ. La formation de cette phase semble être liée à la solidification et au refroidissement rapide découlant de la projection plasma ainsi que de la refusion laser. Ce résultat est prometteur, car :

  20. On the spatial structure of solitary radial electric field at the plasma edge in toroidal confinement devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Kamiya, K.; Kasuya, N.

    2015-07-01

    The solitary radial electric field in the edge of toroidal plasma is studied based on the electric field bifurcation model. Results are applied to tokamak and helical plasmas, and the dependence of the electric field structure on the plasma parameters and geometrical factors is analyzed. The order of magnitude estimate for tokamak plasma is not far from experimental observations. It is shown that, in helical plasmas, the height of electric field structure is reduced substantially owing to the ripple particle transport, while the width is influenced less. The implications of the results for the limit of achievable gradient in the H-mode pedestal are also discussed.

  1. Toroidal current profile control during low confinement mode plasma discharges in DIII-D via first-principles-driven model-based robust control synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Justin E.; Boyer, Mark D.; Shi, Wenyu; Schuster, Eugenio; Luce, Tim C.; Ferron, John R.; Walker, Michael L.; Humphreys, David A.; Penaflor, Ben G.; Johnson, Robert D.

    2012-12-01

    In order for ITER to be capable of operating in advanced tokamak operating regimes, characterized by a high fusion gain, good plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability and a non-inductively driven plasma current, for extended periods of time, several challenging plasma control problems still need to be solved. Setting up a suitable toroidal current density profile in the tokamak is key for one possible advanced operating scenario characterized by non-inductive sustainment of the plasma current. At the DIII-D tokamak, the goal is to create the desired current profile during the ramp-up and early flat-top phases of the plasma discharge and then actively maintain this target profile for the remainder of the discharge. The evolution in time of the toroidal current profile in tokamaks is related to the evolution of the poloidal magnetic flux profile, which is modelled in normalized cylindrical coordinates using a first-principles, nonlinear, dynamic partial differential equation (PDE) referred to as the magnetic diffusion equation. The magnetic diffusion equation is combined with empirical correlations developed from physical observations and experimental data from DIII-D for the electron temperature, the plasma resistivity and the non-inductive current drive to develop a simplified, control-oriented, nonlinear, dynamic PDE model of the poloidal flux profile evolution valid for low confinement mode discharges. In this work, we synthesize a robust feedback controller to reject disturbances and track a desired reference trajectory of the poloidal magnetic flux gradient profile by employing the control-oriented model of the system. A singular value decomposition of the static gain matrix of the plant model is utilized to identify the most relevant control channels and is combined with the dynamic response of system around a given operating trajectory to design the feedback controller. A general framework for real-time feedforward + feedback control of magnetic and

  2. Effect of the laser wavelength: A long story of laser-plasma interaction physics for Inertial Confinement Fusion Teller Medal Lecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, Christine

    2016-10-01

    Laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) relies on the use of high-energy laser beams to compress and ignite a the1monuclear fuel with the ultimate goal of producing energy. Fusion is the holy grail of energy sources-combining abundant fuel with no greenhouse gas emissions, minimal waste products and a scale that can meet mankind's long-term energy demands. The quality and the efficiency of the coupling of the laser beams with the target are an essential step towards the success of laser fusion. A long-te1m program on laser-plasma interaction physics has been pursued to understand the propagation and the coupling of laser pulses in plasmas for a wide range of parameters.

  3. High confinement and high density with stationary plasma energy and strong edge radiation cooling in the upgraded Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR-94)

    SciTech Connect

    Messiaen, A.M.; Ongena, J.; Unterberg, B.; Boedo, J.; Fuchs, G.; Jaspers, R.; Konen, L.; Koslowski, H.R.; Mank, G.; Rapp, J.; Samm, U.; Vandenplas, P.E.; Van Oost, G.; Van Wassenhove, G.; Waidmann, G.; Weynants, R.R.; Wolf, G.H.; Bertschinger, G.; Bonheure, G.; Brix, M.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Finken, K.H.; Giesen, B.; Hillis, D.; Hutteman, P.; Koch, R.; Kramer-Flecken, A.; Lyssoivan, A.; Mertens, P.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Sauer, M.; Schweer, B.; Schwelberger, J.; Telesca, G.; Tokar, M.Z.; Uhlemann, R.; Vervier, M.; Winter, J. ||||

    1997-05-01

    An overview of the results obtained so far for the radiative I-mode regime on the upgraded Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR-94) [{ital Proceedings of the 16th IEEE Symposium on Fusion Engineering} (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Piscataway, NJ, 1995), Vol. 1, p. 470] is given. This regime is obtained under quasistationary conditions with edge neon seeding in a pumped limiter tokamak with circular cross section. It combines high confinement and high {beta} (up to a normalized beta, {beta}{sub n}=2) with low edge q values (down to q{sub a}=2.8) and high density even above the Greenwald limit together with dominant edge radiative heat exhaust, and therefore shows promise for the future of fusion research. Bulk and edge properties of these discharges are described, and a detailed account is given of the energy and particle confinement and their scaling. Energy confinement scales linearly with density as for the nonsaturated Ohmic Neo-Alcator scaling, but the usual degradation with total power remains. No deleterious effects of the neon seeding on fusion reactivity and plasma stability have been observed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Modelisation numerique d'un actionneur plasma de type decharge a barriere dielectrique par la methode de derive-diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Jacques

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator is a proposed device for active for control in order to improve the performances of aircraft and turbomachines. Essentially, these actuators are made of two electrodes separated by a layer of dielectric material and convert electricity directly into flow. Because of the high costs associated with experiences in realistic operating conditions, there is a need to develop a robust numerical model that can predict the plasma body force and the effects of various parameters on it. Indeed, this plasma body force can be affected by atmospheric conditions (temperature, pressure, and humidity), velocity of the neutral flow, applied voltage (amplitude, frequency, and waveform), and by the actuator geometry. In that respect, the purpose of this thesis is to implement a plasma model for DBD actuator that has the potential to consider the effects of these various parameters. In DBD actuator modelling, two types of approach are commonly proposed, low-order modelling (or phenomenological) and high-order modelling (or scientific). However a critical analysis, presented in this thesis, showed that phenomenological models are not robust enough to predict the plasma body force without artificial calibration for each specific case. Moreover, there are based on erroneous assumptions. Hence, the selected approach to model the plasma body force is a scientific drift-diffusion model with four chemical species (electrons, positive ions, negative ions, and neutrals). This model was chosen because it gives consistent numerical results comparatively with experimental data. Moreover, this model has great potential to include the effect of temperature, pressure, and humidity on the plasma body force and requires only a reasonable computational time. This model was independently implemented in C++ programming language and validated with several test cases. This model was later used to simulate the effect of the plasma body force on the laminar

  5. New technique for the direct analysis of food powders confined in a small hole using transversely excited atmospheric CO(2) laser-induced gas plasma.

    PubMed

    Khumaeni, Ali; Ramli, Muliadi; Deguchi, Yoji; Lee, Yong Inn; Idris, Nasrullah; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Lie, Tjung Jie; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2008-12-01

    Taking advantage of the differences between the interactions of transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO(2) lasers with metal and with organic powder, a new technique for the direct analysis of food powder samples has been developed. In this technique, the powder samples were placed into a small hole with a diameter of 2 mm and a depth of 3 mm and covered by a metal mesh. The TEA CO(2) laser (1500 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on the powder sample surfaces, passing through the metal mesh, at atmospheric pressure in nitrogen gas. It is hypothesized that the small hole functions to confine the powder particles and suppresses the blowing-off of sample, while the metal mesh works as the source of electrons to initiate the strong gas breakdown plasma. The confined powder particles are then ablated by laser irradiation and the ablated particles move into the strong gas breakdown plasma region to be atomized and excited; this method cannot be applied for the case of Nd:YAG lasers because in such case the metal mesh itself was ablated by the laser irradiation. A quantitative analysis of a milk powder sample containing different concentrations of Ca was successfully demonstrated, resulting in a good linear calibration curve with high precision.

  6. Amelioration de l'adhesion de revetements organiques deposes par plasma froid sur polymeres pour applications biomedicales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbai, Marouan

    Plasma surface modification is commonly used in biomedical field, for example to enhance cell adhesion and growth surrounding the stent covers without affecting its bulk properties. Plasma polymer (PP) deposition used to create thin films rich in functional groups, e.g. primary amines, known to enhance the cellular response and allow grafting of biomolecules especially on stent grafts. Thin film adhesion to stent polymeric cover should be considered especially as they will evolve in a biological environment. The aim of this project is to evaluate the adhesion of PP on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polyethyleneterephthalate (PET). Thereafter, an ammonia plasma treatment on PTFE is performed prior to deposition of PP to optimize the PP/PTFE adhesion. PP studied here (referred to as "LP") is prepared from a mixture of ethylene (C2H4) and ammonia (NH3). It is deposited on two supports, PET and PTFE. The interfacial adhesion between the LP coating and the substrate was evaluated by "Peel-test 180 °" according to ASTM F1842. Staining of the surface after peel test followed by an image analysis was performed to determine the percentage of removed coating. Adhesion optimization is done by varying operating plasma parameters such as power, pressure and pretreatment time. Chemical analyses and wettability of LP and pretreated surfaces in dry and wet conditions are characterized by XPS and contact angle measurements, respectively. The adhesion of LP/PET was excellent in a dry environment (<1%), but lower under wet conditions (4+/-6% and 44+/-7% as minimum and maximum values at 5min and 60min of immersion in deionized water, respectively). However, 56% to 75% of the LP is removed from virgin PTFE in a dry and wet environment, respectively; percentages can be substantially reduced by plasma pretreatment (0% and 8+/-3% in air and 30min in deionized water). Almost no delamination was observed with NH3 plasma pretreatment at 15s, 100 mTorr and 50W. N2 plasma pretreatment

  7. Electron Density and Two-Channel Neutron Emission Measurements in Steady-State Spherical Inertial-Electrostatically Confined Plasmas, with Review of the 1-D Kinetic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.; Hrbud, Ivana

    2004-01-01

    Electron density measurements have been made in steady-state plasmas in a spherical inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) discharge using microwave interferometry. Plasma cores interior to two cathodes, having diameters of 15 and 23 cm, respectively, were probed over a transverse range of 10 cm with a spatial resolution of about 1.4 cm for buffer gas pressures from 0.2 to 6 Pa in argon and deuterium. The transverse profiles are generally flat, in some cases with eccentric symmetric minima, and give mean densities of from approx. = 0.4 to 7x 10(exp 10)/cu cm, the density generally increasing with the neutral gas pressure. Numerical solutions of the 1-D Poisson equation for EC plasmas are reviewed and energy distribution functions are identified which give flat transverse profiles. These functions are used with the plasma approximation to obtain solutions which also give densities consistent with the measurements, and a double potential well solution is obtained which has minima qualitatively similar to those observed. Explicit consideration is given to the compatibility of the solutions interior and exterior to the cathode, and to grid transparency. Deuterium fusion neutron emission rates were also measured and found to be isotropic, to within the measurement error, over two simultaneous directions. Anisotropy was observed in residual emissions during operation with non-fusing hydrogen-1. The deuterium rates are consistent with predictions from the model.

  8. Electron Density and Two-Channel Neutron Emission Measurements in Steady-State Spherical Inertial-Electrostatically Confined Plasmas, with Review of the One-Dimensional Kinetic Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris C.; Hrbud, Ivana

    2004-01-01

    Electron density measurements have been made in steady-state plasmas in a spherical inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) discharge using microwave interferometry. Plasma cores interior to two cathodes, having diameters of 15 and 23 cm, respectively, were probed over a transverse range of 10 cm with a spatial resolution of about 1.4 cm for buffer gas pressures from 0.2 to 6 Pa in argon and deuterium. The transverse profiles are generally flat, in some cases with eccentric symmetric minima, and give mean densities of from approx. = 0.4 to 7 x 10(exp 10)/cu cm, the density generally increasing with the neutral gas pressure. Numerical solutions of the one-dimensional Poisson equation for IEC plasmas are reviewed and energy distribution functions are identified which give flat transverse profiles. These functions are used with the plasma approximation to obtain solutions which also give densities consistent with the measurements, and a double potential well solution is obtained which has minima qualitatively similar to those observed. Explicit consideration is given to the compatibility of the solutions interior and exterior to the cathode, and to grid transparency. Deuterium fusion neutron emission rates were also measured and found to be isotropic, to within the measurement error, over two simultaneous directions. Anisotropy was observed in residual emissions during operation with nonfusing hydrogen- 1. The deuterium rates are consistent with predictions from the model.

  9. Population Inversion and Gain Measurements for Soft X-Ray Laser Development in a Magnetically Confined Plasma Column.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY ’* Princeton, Now Jersey 08544 A 17’-F LA- *,% -f - UNCLASSIFIED_ q[CfL 7 YT CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE REPORT... Laboratory Building 41C’ Princeton, NJ 0854-4 Bolling AFB DC Z0332-6448S $a NAME OF F:,.NCING SPONSDRNO So~ OFFICE SYMBOL 9 PROCLREMEN7 NS. RMENT OE%7 9...Skinner and D. Voorhees Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory , Princeton, New Jersey 08544 ABSTRACT We present studies of magnetically

  10. Fusion, magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-08-06

    An overview is presented of the principles of magnetic confinement of plasmas for the purpose of achieving controlled fusion conditions. Sec. 1 discusses the different nuclear fusion reactions which can be exploited in prospective fusion reactors and explains why special technologies need to be developed for the supply of tritium or {sup 3}He, the probable fuels. In Sec. 2 the Lawson condition, a criterion that is a measure of the quality of confinement relative to achieving fusion conditions, is explained. In Sec. 3 fluid equations are used to describe plasma confinement. Specific confinement configurations are considered. In Sec. 4 the orbits of particle sin magneti and electric fields are discussed. In Sec. 5 stability considerations are discussed. It is noted that confinement systems usually need to satisfy stability constraints imposed by ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The paper culminates with a summary of experimental progress in magnetic confinement. Present experiments in tokamaks have reached the point that the conditions necessary to achieve fusion are being satisfied.

  11. Mapping the electromagnetic field confinement in the gap of germanium nanoantennas with plasma wavelength of 4.5 micrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calandrini, Eugenio; Venanzi, Tommaso; Appugliese, Felice; Badioli, Michela; Giliberti, Valeria; Baldassarre, Leonetta; Biagioni, Paolo; De Angelis, Francesco; Klesse, Wolfgang M.; Scappucci, Giordano; Ortolani, Michele

    2016-09-01

    We study plasmonic nanoantennas for molecular sensing in the mid-infrared made of heavily doped germanium, epitaxially grown with a bottom-up doping process and featuring free carrier density in excess of 1020 cm-3. The dielectric function of the 250 nm thick germanium film is determined, and bow-tie antennas are designed, fabricated, and embedded in a polymer. By using a near-field photoexpansion mapping technique at λ = 5.8 μm, we demonstrate the existence in the antenna gap of an electromagnetic energy density hotspot of diameter below 100 nm and confinement volume 105 times smaller than λ3.

  12. A novel technique for single-shot energy-resolved 2D x-ray imaging of plasmas relevant for the inertial confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Labate, L; Köster, P; Levato, T; Gizzi, L A

    2012-10-01

    A novel x-ray diagnostic of laser-fusion plasmas is described, allowing 2D monochromatic images of hot, dense plasmas to be obtained in any x-ray photon energy range, over a large domain, on a single-shot basis. The device (named energy-encoded pinhole camera) is based upon the use of an array of many pinholes coupled to a large area CCD camera operating in the single-photon mode. The available x-ray spectral domain is only limited by the quantum efficiency of scientific-grade x-ray CCD cameras, thus extending from a few keV up to a few tens of keV. Spectral 2D images of the emitting plasma can be obtained at any x-ray photon energy provided that a sufficient number of photons had been collected at the desired energy. Results from recent inertial confinement fusion related experiments will be reported in order to detail the new diagnostic.

  13. Lower-hybrid breakdown of gas in the field of a current-carrying loop in a plasma-filled magnetic confinement system

    SciTech Connect

    Golubyatnikov, G.Y.; Egorov, S.V.; Eremin, B.G.

    1995-02-01

    Experiments have been carried out on the breakdown dynamics and the formation of an ionized region in the field of a current-carrying loop in a large magnetic confinement system filled with background plasma. The loop radiates in the lower-hybrid frequency range. Breakdown is observed to generate a strong local perturbation of plasma: {Delta}N/N{approx_equal} 10{sup 2}, {Delta}T{sub e}/T{sub e} {approx_equal} 50. The perturbed region has a transverse dimension roughly equal to the antenna diameter. Along the direction of the magnetic field, this region is localized between the magnetic mirrors. The density begins to increase throughout the volume of this magnetic tube at the instant at which the field arises at the antenna. Analysis of experimental data leads to the conclusion that the primary cause of the fast ionization along the magnetic force tube is the excitation of an intense beam of lower-hybrid plasma waves. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Injection of electrons with predominantly perpendicular energy into an area of toroidal field ripple in a tokamak plasma to improve plasma confinement

    DOEpatents

    Ono, Masayuki; Furth, Harold

    1993-01-01

    An electron injection scheme for controlling transport in a tokamak plasma. Electrons with predominantly perpendicular energy are injected into a ripple field region created by a group of localized poloidal field bending magnets. The trapped electrons then grad-B drift vertically toward the plasma interior until they are detrapped, charging the plasma negative. Calculations indicate that the highly perpendicular velocity electrons can remain stable against kinetic instabilities in the regime of interest for tokamak experiments. The penetration distance can be controlled by controlling the "ripple mirror ratio", the energy of the injected electrons, and their v.sub..perp. /v.sub.51 ratio. In this scheme, the poloidal torque due to the injected radial current is taken by the magnets and not by the plasma. Injection is accomplished by the flat cathode containing an ECH cavity to pump electrons to high v.sub..perp..

  15. An experimental investigation of stimulated Brillouin scattering in laser-produced plasmas relevant to inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Keith Stanley

    1993-02-11

    Despite the apparent simplicity of controlled fusion, there are many phenomena which have prevented its achievement. One phenomenon is laser-plasma instabilities. An investigation of one such instability, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), is reported here. SBS is a parametric process whereby an electromagnetic wave (the parent wave) decays into another electromagnetic wave and an ion acoustic wave (the daughter waves). SBS impedes controlled fusion since it can scatter much or all of the incident laser light, resulting in poor drive symmetry and inefficient laser-plasma coupling. It is widely believed that SBS becomes convectively unstable--that is, it grows as it traverses the plasma. Though it has yet to be definitively tested, convective theory is often invoked to explain experimental observations, even when one or more of the theory`s assumptions are violated. In contrast, the experiments reported here not only obeyed the assumptions of the theory, but were also conducted in plasmas with peak densities well below quarter-critical density. This prevented other competing or coexisting phenomena from occurring, thereby providing clearly interpretable results. These are the first SBS experiments that were designed to be both a clear test of linear convective theory and pertinent to controlled fusion research. A crucial part of this series of experiments was the development of a new instrument, the Multiple Angle Time Resolving Spectrometer (MATRS). MATRS has the unique capability of both spectrally and temporally resolving absolute levels of scattered light at many angles simultaneously, and is the first of its kind used in laser-plasma experiments. A detailed comparison of the theoretical predictions and the experimental observations is made.

  16. Magnetic reconnection in plasma under inertial confinement fusion conditions driven by heat flux effects in Ohm's law.

    PubMed

    Joglekar, A S; Thomas, A G R; Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A

    2014-03-14

    In the interaction of high-power laser beams with solid density plasma there are a number of mechanisms that generate strong magnetic fields. Such fields subsequently inhibit or redirect electron flows, but can themselves be advected by heat fluxes, resulting in complex interplay between thermal transport and magnetic fields. We show that for heating by multiple laser spots reconnection of magnetic field lines can occur, mediated by these heat fluxes, using a fully implicit 2D Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code. Under such conditions, the reconnection rate is dictated by heat flows rather than Alfvènic flows. We find that this mechanism is only relevant in a high β plasma. However, the Hall parameter ωcτei can be large so that thermal transport is strongly modified by these magnetic fields, which can impact longer time scale temperature homogeneity and ion dynamics in the system.

  17. Proton Radiography of Spontaneous Fields, Plasma Flows and Dynamics in X-Ray Driven Inertial-Confinement Fusion Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Rosenberg, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Landen, O. L.; Town, R. P. J.; Betti, R.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Back, C. A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2010-11-01

    Backlighting of x-ray-driven implosions in empty hohlraums with mono-energetic protons on the OMEGA laser facility has allowed a number of important phenomena to be observed. Several critical parameters were determined, including plasma flow, three types of spontaneous electric fields and megaGauss magnetic fields. These results provide insight into important issues in indirect-drive ICF. Even though the cavity is effectively a Faraday cage, the strong, local fields inside the hohlraum can affect laser-plasma instabilities, electron distributions and implosion symmetry. They are of fundamental scientific importance for a range of new experiments at the frontiers of high-energy-density physics. Future experiments designed to characterize the field formation and evolution in low-Z gas fill hohlraums will be discussed.

  18. Approaching to the ideal condition of plasma confinement by applying external resonant fields in IR-T1 tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkani, Sakineh; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Lafouti, Mansoureh

    2015-06-01

    For understanding the effect of resonant helical magnetic field (RHF) and bias on the edge plasma turbulent transport, the radial and poloidal electric field (Er, EP ), poloidal and toroidal magnetic field (BP, Br ) were detected by the Langmuir probe, magnetic probe and diamagnetic loop. The poloidal, toroidal and radial velocity (VP, Vr, Vt ) can be determined from the electric and magnetic field. In the present work, we have investigated the effect of the magnitude of bias (V bias = 200v, V bias = 320v) on Er, EP, BP, Bt, VP, Vr, Vt . Moreover, we applied RHF with L = 2, L = 3 and L = 2 and 3 and investigate the effect of the helical windings radius on above parameters. Also, the experiment was repeated by applying the positive biasing potentials and RHF's simultaneously. The results show that by applying bias to the plasma at t = 15 msec at r/a = 0.9, Er , BP and Bt increase while EP decreases. The best modification occurs at V bias = 200v. By applying RHF to the plasma, both the electric and magnetic field vary. Er reaches the highest in the presence of RHF with L = 3. The same results are obtained for BP, Bt, VP and Vt . While the inverse results are obtained for EP and Vr . Finally, RHF and bias are applied simultaneously to the plasma. With applied bias with V bias = 200v and RHF with L = 2 and 3, we reach to the ideal circumstance. The same results obtain in the situation with V bias = 320v and RHF with L = 2 and 3.

  19. Neutron Time-of-Flight Measurements of Charged-Particle Energy Loss in Inertial Confinement Fusion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayre, Daniel; Cerjan, Charlie; Berzak Hopkins, Laura; Caggiano, Joseph; Divol, Laurent; Eckart, Mark; Graziani, Frank; Grim, Gary; Hartouni, Ed; Hatarik, Robert; Le Pape, Sebastien; MacKinnon, Andrew; Schneider, Dieter; Sepke, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Neutron time-of-flight measurements of inflight T (d , n) α reactions created during an implosion of a deuterium gas target have been performed at the National Ignition Facility, with order of magnitude improvements in statistics and resolution over past experiments. In the implosion, energetic tritons emitted by thermonuclear fusion within the deuterium plasma produced over 1011 inflight T (d , n) α reactions. The yield and particle spectrum of inflight reactions are sensitive to the triton's energy loss in the plasma, which, in this implosion, consisted of multi-keV temperatures and number densities above 1024 cm-3. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the implosion were adjusted to match the yield and broadening of the D (d , n) 3 He neutron peak. These same simulations give reasonable agreement with the measured T (d , n) α yield and neutron spectrum, and this provides a strong consistency check of the simulated plasma conditions and energy loss model. This research was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Development of diagnostic and manipulation systems for space-charge dominated electron beams and confined electron plasmas in ELTRAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romé, M.; Cavaliere, F.; Cavenago, M.; Ikram, M.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.; Pozzoli, R.

    2013-03-01

    Modifications have been implemented in the Penning-Malmberg device ELTRAP aimed at performing studies on the dynamics of space-charge dominated nanosecond electron bunches traveling along the magnetic field. In particular, a Thomson backscattering apparatus has been developed where an infrared (IR) laser pulse collides with the bunched electron beam. The frequency-shifted backscattered radiation, acquired by means of a photomultiplier (PMT), can be exploited to evaluate information on energy, energy spread and density of the bunch. The achievable sensitivity of the diagnostics has been estimated, and valuable information on the main parameters affecting the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio has been obtained [B. Paroli, F. Cavaliere, M. Cavenago, F. De Luca, M. Ikram, G. Maero, C. Marini, R. Pozzoli, and M. Romé, JINST 7, P01008 (2012)]. A series of upgrades are under way, aimed at increasing the S/N ratio through the use of a new laser for the electron source, the insertion of a stray light shield, and the optimization of the detection electronics. Moreover, electromagnetic simulations relevant to the design and implementation of a microwave heating system are presented. The generation of an electron plasma in ELTRAP by means of a low-power radio frequency (RF) drive in the MHz range applied on one of the trap electrodes and under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions has previously been demonstrated [B. Paroli, F. De Luca, G. Maero, F. Pozzoli, and M. Romé, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 19, 045013 (2010)]. The new heating system will allow the extension of the RF studies to the GHz range and in particular the production of a more energetic electron plasma via cyclotron resonant excitation.

  1. Isoelectronic x-ray spectroscopy to determine electron temperatures in long-scale-length inertial-confinement-fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, T. D.; Back, C. A.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kauffman, R. L.; Keane, C. J.; Klem, D. E.; Lasinski, B. F.; MacGowan, B. J.; Powers, L. V.; Suter, L. J.; Turner, R. E.; Failor, B. H.; Hsing, W. W.

    1996-05-01

    We have successfully employed isoelectronic line ratios to measure the electron temperature in gas-filled Hohlraum targets and gas bags shot with the Nova laser. These targets produce millimeter-scale-length plasmas with electron density Ne~1021 cm-3 and electron temperature Te~3 keV. The Hohlraum targets can also produce radiation temperature exceeding 200 eV. Isoelectronic line ratios are well suited to this measurement because they are relatively insensitive to radiation field effects in Hohlraum targets, opacity, transients, and variations in electron density compared to conventional line ratios. We survey the properties of isoelectronic line ratios formed from ratios of n-to-1 resonance transitions in heliumlike Cr to the same transitions in Ti and compare with conventional ratios of n-to-1 transitions in hydrogenlike Ti to the corresponding transitions in heliumlike Ti, concentrating on plasma parameter ranges of interest to the Nova experiments. We also consider the same ratios using K and Cl. Atomic kinetics are treated using collisional-radiative models and experimental data are analyzed with the aid of radiation-hydrodynamics calculations. When we apply isoelectronic techniques to the Nova experimental data, we find that the targets have electron temperatures of at least 3 keV.

  2. The mitigating effect of self-generated magnetic field on Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana

    2012-10-01

    It has long been expected that Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) in ICF can generate magnetic fields at the gas-ice interface and at the ice-ablator interface during the deceleration phase of target implosion. The focus here is on the gas-ice interface where the temperature gradient is the largest. Nonlinear evolution of RTI leads to undesirable mixing of hot and cold plasmas and enhances target energy loss. RTI is also expected to generate magnetic fields via the Biermann battery effect, which is related to fluid vorticity generation by RTI. The magnetic field wraps around the bubbles and spikes and concentrates in flux bundles at the perturbed gas-ice interface where fluid vorticity is large. The generated magnetic field can then be further amplified via the MHD dynamo effect. While the planar 2-D simulations only generate out-of-plane magnetic fields, 3-D simulations will result in further amplification of the complex magnetic field structures via the MHD dynamo. This is studied by including a seed in-plane magnetic field in 2-D and examining the resulting magnetic field structure and magnitude. The self-generated out-of-plane magnetic fields depend on ICF parameters via the scaling law, mi√A g/λ where mi is the ion mass, A is the Atwood number, g is the acceleration, and λ is the wavelength. These magnetic fields grow to magnitudes of 10^2-10^3 T for ICF relevant parameter regimes. While this is dynamically insignificant due to the plasma pressure far exceeding the magnetic pressure, it can significantly reduce perpendicular electron thermal conductivity by a factor of 2-10. Such a reduction in thermal conductivity perpendicular to the magnetic field contributes to lowering of radial energy transport in the implosion target.

  3. High-level ciprofloxacin resistance from point mutations in gyrA and parC confined to global hospital-adapted clonal lineage CC17 of Enterococcus faecium.

    PubMed

    Leavis, Helen L; Willems, Rob J L; Top, Janetta; Bonten, Marc J M

    2006-03-01

    To substantiate a common genetic background of ciprofloxacin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, 32 ciprofloxacin-resistant (Cip(r)) and 31 ciprofloxacin-susceptible (Cip(s)) isolates from outbreaks, clinical infections, surveillances, and animals from 10 different countries were genotyped by multilocus sequence typing. Additionally, susceptibilities to ampicillin and vancomycin and the presence of esp were determined and the quinolone resistance-determining regions of parC, gyrA, parB, and gyrE were sequenced. High-level Cip(r) (MIC > or = 64 microg/ml) due to point mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region was unique to a distinct hospital-adapted genetic complex in E. faecium, previously designated CC17. Low-level Cip(r) (MIC = 4 microg/ml) in non-CC17 strains is not attributable to point mutations in any subunit of the topoisomerase genes, and the mechanism of resistance remains unclear. Acquisition of mutations in parC and gyrA, leading to high-level Cip(r), is, in addition to ampicillin resistance and the presence of a putative pathogenicity island, another cumulative step in hospital adaptation of CC17.

  4. Simulations of Enhanced Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorland, W.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Liu, Q. P.; Jones, C. S.; Beer, M. A.; Hammett, G. W.

    1996-11-01

    Most existing tokamaks routinely achieve enhanced confinement regimes. Designs for new, larger tokamaks therefore are typically predicated upon reliable enhanced confinement performance. However, most enhanced confinement regimes rely (to some degree) upon sheared E×B flows to stabilize the turbulence that otherwise limits the confinement. For example, the pedestal H-mode transport barrier is typically attributed to shear stabilization [Biglari, Diamond and Terry, Phys. Fl. B, 2 1 (1990)]. Unfortunately, it is easily shown that sheared E×B stabilization of microinstabilities such as the ITG mode does not scale favorably with machine size. Here, using nonlinear gyrofluid simulations in general geometry, we attempt to quantify the confinement enhancement that can be expected from velocity shear stabilization for conventional reactor plasmas. We also consider other microinstability stabilization mechanisms(See related presentations by Beer, Kotschenreuther, Manickam, and Ramos, this conference.) (strong density peaking, Shafranov shift stabilization, dots) and unconventional reactor configurations.^2 Experimental datasets from JET, DIII-D, C-Mod and TFTR are analyzed, and ITER operation is considered.

  5. Nanocrystalline-Si-dot multi-layers fabrication by chemical vapor deposition with H-plasma surface treatment and evaluation of structure and quantum confinement effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kosemura, Daisuke Mizukami, Yuki; Takei, Munehisa; Numasawa, Yohichiroh; Ogura, Atsushi; Ohshita, Yoshio

    2014-01-15

    100-nm-thick nanocrystalline silicon (nano-Si)-dot multi-layers on a Si substrate were fabricated by the sequential repetition of H-plasma surface treatment, chemical vapor deposition, and surface oxidation, for over 120 times. The diameter of the nano-Si dots was 5–6 nm, as confirmed by both the transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The annealing process was important to improve the crystallinity of the nano-Si dot. We investigated quantum confinement effects by Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Based on the experimental results, we simulated the Raman spectrum using a phenomenological model. Consequently, the strain induced in the nano-Si dots was estimated by comparing the experimental and simulated results. Taking the estimated strain value into consideration, the band gap modulation was measured, and the diameter of the nano-Si dots was calculated to be 5.6 nm by using PL. The relaxation of the q ∼ 0 selection rule model for the nano-Si dots is believed to be important to explain both the phenomena of peak broadening on the low-wavenumber side observed in Raman spectra and the blue shift observed in PL measurements.

  6. Sheared magnetofluids and Bernoulli confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quevado, H. J.; Bengtson, Roger; Mahajan, S. M.; Valanju, P. M.

    2001-10-01

    New magnetofluid states that differ qualitatively from those accessible to either neutral fluids or to conventional MHD plasmas have been predited theoretically. They are predicted to appear if plasmas with strong velocity shear flows (with large initial values of both magnetic and magnetofluid helicity) are created and allowed to relax. The dynamic invariance of these two helicities will force the plasma to self-organize and relax to a long-lived quasi equilibrium state away from thermal equilibrium. The investigation of these states bears critically upon basic plasma confinement and heating issues in both natural and laboratory plasmas. We have built a magnetic mirror device designed to create and investigate these theoretically predicted pressure-confining magnetofluid states. The primary experimental challenge is to create an initial plasma (with significant flows and currents) which is relatively isolated from walls and embedded in a modest magnetic external field. Our machine has a central bias rod to create a radial electric field for generating fast plasma flow, a large mirror ratio for good centrifugal confinement, and magnetic, Langmuir, and Mach probes to measure the evolution of plasma rotation profiles and fluctuations. Initial results will be presented demonstrating plasma rotation.

  7. Boundary condition for toroidal plasma flow imposed at the separatrix in high confinement JT-60U plasmas with edge localized modes and the physics process in pedestal structure formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiya, K.; Honda, M.; Urano, H.; Yoshida, M.; Kamada, Y.; Itoh, K.

    2014-12-15

    Modulation charge eXchange recombination spectroscopy measurements with high spatial and temporal resolution have made the evaluation of the toroidal plasma flow of fully stripped carbon impurity ions (V{sub ϕ}{sup C6+}) in the JT-60U tokamak peripheral region (including, in particular, the separatrix) possible with a better signal-to-noise ratio. By comparing co- and counter-neutral beam injection discharges experimentally, we have identified the boundary condition of V{sub ϕ}{sup C6+} and radial electric field shear (∇E{sub r}) imposed at the separatrix in high confinement (H-mode) plasmas with edge localized modes (ELMs). The V{sub ϕ}{sup C6+} value at the separatrix is not fixed at zero but varies with the momentum input direction. On the other hand, the ∇E{sub r} value is nearly zero (or very weakly positive) at the separatrix. Furthermore, the edge localized mode perturbation does not appear to affect both V{sub ϕ}{sup C6+} and ∇E{sub r} values at the separatrix as strongly as that in the pedestal region. The above experimental findings based on the precise edge measurements have been used to validate a theoretical model and develop a new empirical model. A better understanding of the physical process in the edge transport barrier (ETB) formation due to the sheared E{sub r} formation is also discussed.

  8. Multi-field/-scale interactions of turbulence with neoclassical tearing modes and impact on plasma confinement in the DIII-D tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardoczi, L.

    2016-10-01

    We present the first localized measurements of ITG scale temperature and density fluctuations and TEM scale density fluctuations modified by an m=2, n=1 magnetic island. These islands are formed by a Neoclassical Tearing Mode (NTM) deep in the core plasma at the q=2 surface. NTMs are important as they often degrade confinement and lead to disruption. This is the first experimental confirmation of a long-standing theory prediction of decreased local small-scale turbulence levels across large-scale magnetic islands. Our measurements capture a mean reduction of turbulence inside (and enhancement just outside) the island region during island evolution. Additionally, in the island saturated state, the fluctuations at the O-point are observed to be reduced compared to the X-point. These measurements allow the determination of the turbulence length scale at the island separatrix that is predicted to affect NTM stability. A novel, non-perturbative measurement technique finds reduced cross-field electron thermal diffusivity (by 1-2 orders of magnitude) at the O-point, consistent with the local turbulence reduction. Initial comparisons to the GENE non-linear gyrokinetic code are promising with GENE predicting the observed turbulence reduction inside the island and increase just outside the island and replicating the observed scaling with island size. These results allow the validation of gyrokinetic simulations modeling the interaction of multi-scale phenomena as well as have potential implications for improved NTM control. Supported by USDOE under DE-FG02-08ER54984, DE-FG02-08ER54999 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  9. Conception et caracterisation d'un magnetoplasma produit par une onde de surface pour la pulverisation d'echantillons solides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masse, Louis Philippe

    puissance. Une etude des caracteristiques du plasma seul a revele que le champ magnetique confine si bien le plasma que le maximum de densite electronique se trouve hors axe, plus exactement a la position radiale correspondant au rayon du cylindre dielectrique servant a former l'interface dielectrique-plasma dans la zone source du reacteur. Ce phenomene indique une tres nette superiorite du coefficient de diffusion axial par rapport au coefficient de diffusion radial. Notre reacteur a un potentiel interessant pour l'analyse elementaire de materiaux solides puisque le taux de pulverisation y est eleve et que les especes pulverisees sont aisement excitees et ionisees par le plasma.

  10. Visualization of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    1999-12-10

    With the rapid developments in experimental and theoretical fusion energy research towards more geometric details, visualization plays an increasingly important role. In this paper we will give an overview of how visualization can be used to compare and contrast some different configurations for future fusion reactors. Specifically we will focus on the stellarator and tokamak concepts. In order to gain understanding of the underlying fundamental differences and similarities these two competing concepts are compared and contrasted by visualizing some key attributes.

  11. Protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1 and PAR4 differentially regulate factor V expression from human platelets.

    PubMed

    Duvernay, Matthew; Young, Summer; Gailani, David; Schoenecker, Jonathan; Hamm, Heidi E; Hamm, Heidi

    2013-04-01

    With the recent interest of protease-activated receptors (PAR) 1 and PAR4 as possible targets for the treatment of thrombotic disorders, we compared the efficacy of protease-activated receptor (PAR)1 and PAR4 in the generation of procoagulant phenotypes on platelet membranes. PAR4-activating peptide (AP)-stimulated platelets promoted thrombin generation in plasma up to 5 minutes earlier than PAR1-AP-stimulated platelets. PAR4-AP-mediated factor V (FV) association with the platelet surface was 1.6-fold greater than for PAR1-AP. Moreover, PAR4 stimulation resulted in a 3-fold greater release of microparticles, compared with PAR1 stimulation. More robust FV secretion and microparticle generation with PAR4-AP was attributable to stronger and more sustained phosphorylation of myosin light chain at serine 19 and threonine 18. Inhibition of Rho-kinase reduced PAR4-AP-mediated FV secretion and microparticle generation to PAR1-AP-mediated levels. Thrombin generation assays measuring prothrombinase complex activity demonstrated 1.5-fold higher peak thrombin levels on PAR4-AP-stimulated platelets, compared with PAR1-AP-stimulated platelets. Rho-kinase inhibition reduced PAR4-AP-mediated peak thrombin generation by 25% but had no significant effect on PAR1-AP-mediated thrombin generation. In conclusion, stimulation of PAR4 on platelets leads to faster and more robust thrombin generation, compared with PAR1 stimulation. The greater procoagulant potential is related to more efficient FV release from intracellular stores and microparticle production driven by stronger and more sustained myosin light chain phosphorylation. These data have implications about the role of PAR4 during hemostasis and are clinically relevant in light of recent efforts to develop PAR antagonists to treat thrombotic disorders.

  12. System and method of operating toroidal magnetic confinement devices

    DOEpatents

    Chance, M.S.; Jardin, S.C.; Stix, T.H.; Grimm, R.C.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.

    1984-08-30

    This invention pertains to methods and arrangements for attaining high beta values in plasma confinement devices. More specifically, this invention pertains to methods for accessing the second stability region of operation in toroidal magnetic confinement devices.

  13. Elaboration d'un simulateur de gravure par plasma de haute densite base sur une approche cellulaire pour l'etude de profils dans divers materiaux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saussac, Jerome

    Sub-micrometer and nanometer-size device manufacturing requires perfect control of fabrication processing, in particular plasma etching. The fabrication of such devices is complex and the requirements in terms of quality and geometry of the etching profiles impose to use the best adapted operating conditions. Simulation of space and time-etching profile evolution that is proposed in this thesis addresses these issues. The simulator yields a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that occur during plasma etching of features in various materials. It enables to test the influence of plasma parameters on the profile shape and thus to determine the optimal operating conditions. The development of the simulator is based on the fundamental concepts in plasma etching. From thorough review of the various numerical approaches available to simulate etching profile evolution, we have developed a stable and flexible algorithm that enables to emphasize the importance of some key-parameters for the realization of etching profiles by high-density and low-pressure plasma. The capabilities of this algorithm were tested on the study of Si sputtering in an argon plasma and of ion-assisted chemical etching of SiO2/Si in a chlorine plasma. From comparisons between simulated and experimental profiles, we have shown the importance of some parameters, like the nature of the gas, the plasma pressure, the initial shape of the mask, the mask/material selectivity, the neutral/ion flux ratio, etc. We also linked these parameters to the formation of defects in the profile, for exemple mask facetting, sidewall bowing and microtrenching. Finally, we have shown that redeposition of sputtered atoms compete with electric surface charging to explain V-shape profiles observed on Pt sputtered in argon plasmas. Keywords. plasma, etching, profile, simulation, silicon, platinum, redeposition, microtrenching

  14. The history of research into improved confinement regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing the pressure by additional heating of magnetically confined plasmas had the consequence that turbulent processes became more violent and plasma confinement degraded. Since this experience from the early 1980ies, fusion research was dominated by the search for confinement regimes with improved properties. It was a gratifying experience that toroidally confined plasmas are able to self-organise in such a way that turbulence diminishes, resulting in a confinement with good prospects to reach the objectives of fusion R&D. The understanding of improved confinement regimes revolutionized the understanding of turbulent transport in high-temperature plasmas. In this paper the story of research into improved confinement regimes will be narrated starting with 1980.

  15. Etude de la preparation de poudres et de depots a partir de suspension par plasma inductif: Le cas de l'hydroxyapatite phosphocalcique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouyer, Etienne

    The work presented in this thesis has been directed to the study and the development of a new thermal spray process now known as the "SPS" (Suspension Plasma Spraying), in which the raw material to be treated is initially a liquid suspension. The SPS process is employed either for the preparation of thick coating or to the production of spherical and dense powders. The principle of SPS is the axial injection of a suspension into the plasma core by gas atomization. The atomization droplets are successively dried, melted and accelerated in the plasma plume. Finally, melt droplets strike a substrate and solidify to build the coating (deposition route) or are solidified in-flight and are then collected from within the reactor (powder route). The SPS process is best achieved with the use of r.f. thermal plasma technology and has been applied to the complex shape forming of ceramic materials: e.g. hydroxyapatite (HA), Ca10(PO4)6(OH) 2. HA, which is a bioceramic used in various biomedical applications such as bone substitute. The original chemical synthesis of the HA is a key step for the control of physical and chemical properties of the HA suspension which in turn are fundamental to the success of the entire SPS process. HA decomposes at elevated temperatures. With proper control of the plasma spraying parameters (i.e. the nature of the plasma gas and its composition, plasma power level, pressure, etc), the in-flight plasma decomposition can be minimized. Moreover it is possible to control the coating texture, its crystallinity and adhesion strength while maintaining high deposition rates (>150 mum/min). The morphology of powders prepared by the SPS technique and the size of resultant powders depends strongly on the atomization parameters of the spray suspension in the plasma. Water promotes the stabilization of HA during the plasma treatment and therefore helps to limit its in-flight decomposition. The SPS process is a potentially powerful technology providing in

  16. During the Long Way to Mars: Effects of 520 Days of Confinement (Mars500) on the Assessment of Affective Stimuli and Stage Alteration in Mood and Plasma Hormone Levels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Jing, Xiaolu; Lv, Ke; Wu, Bin; Bai, Yanqiang; Luo, Yuejia; Chen, Shanguang; Li, Yinghui

    2014-01-01

    For future interplanetary manned spaceflight, mental issues, as well as physiological problems, must inevitably be considered and solved. Mars500 is a high-fidelity ground simulation experiment that involved 520 days of confined isolation for six multinational crewmembers. This experiment provided a good opportunity to perform psycho-physiological and psycho-social researches on such missions. To investigate emotional responses and psychological adaptation over long-term confinement, the International Affective Pictures System (IAPS) was selected as the visual emotional stimuli in this study. Additional data collected and analyzed included the Profile of Mood States (POMS) questionnaire and the levels of four types of plasma hormones: cortisol, 5-hydroxy tryptamine, dopamine, and norepinephrine. The results demonstrated an obvious bias on valence rating for unpleasant stimuli with time (p<0.05), and the correlation between psychological and biochemical data was identified (p<0.05). Overall, we concluded that the confined crew tended to assign positive ratings to negative pictures with time, which might be driven by a defensive system. There was a stage-changing pattern of psychological adaptation of the Mars500 crew, which is similar to the third-quarter phenomenon. PMID:24695321

  17. During the long way to Mars: effects of 520 days of confinement (Mars500) on the assessment of affective stimuli and stage alteration in mood and plasma hormone levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Jing, Xiaolu; Lv, Ke; Wu, Bin; Bai, Yanqiang; Luo, Yuejia; Chen, Shanguang; Li, Yinghui

    2014-01-01

    For future interplanetary manned spaceflight, mental issues, as well as physiological problems, must inevitably be considered and solved. Mars500 is a high-fidelity ground simulation experiment that involved 520 days of confined isolation for six multinational crewmembers. This experiment provided a good opportunity to perform psycho-physiological and psycho-social researches on such missions. To investigate emotional responses and psychological adaptation over long-term confinement, the International Affective Pictures System (IAPS) was selected as the visual emotional stimuli in this study. Additional data collected and analyzed included the Profile of Mood States (POMS) questionnaire and the levels of four types of plasma hormones: cortisol, 5-hydroxy tryptamine, dopamine, and norepinephrine. The results demonstrated an obvious bias on valence rating for unpleasant stimuli with time (p<0.05), and the correlation between psychological and biochemical data was identified (p<0.05). Overall, we concluded that the confined crew tended to assign positive ratings to negative pictures with time, which might be driven by a defensive system. There was a stage-changing pattern of psychological adaptation of the Mars500 crew, which is similar to the third-quarter phenomenon.

  18. Confinement and the safety factor profile

    SciTech Connect

    Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M.; Scott, S.D.

    1995-12-01

    The conjecture that the safety factor profile, q(r), controls the improvement in tokamak plasmas from poor confinement in the Low (L-) mode regime to improved confinement in the supershot regime has been tested in two experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). First, helium was puffed into the beam-heated phase of a supershot discharge which induced a degradation from supershot to L-mode confinement in about 100 msec, far less than the current relaxation time. The q and shear profiles measured by a motional Stark effect polarimeter showed little change during the confinement degradation. Second, rapid current ramps in supershot plasmas altered the q profile, but were observed not to change significantly the energy confinement. Thus, enhanced confinement in supershot plasmas is not due to a particular q profile which has enhanced stability or transport properties. The discharges making a continuous transition between supershot and L-mode confinement were also used to test the critical-electron-temperature-gradient transport model. It was found that this model could not reproduce the large changes in electron and ion temperature caused by the change in confinement.

  19. Confinement studies in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Arunasalam, V.; Bell, J.D.; Bell, M.G.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Boody, F.; Boyd, D.; Bretz, N.; Bush, C.E.

    1985-06-01

    The paper describes the present (end of February 1985) status of the plasma confinement studies in the TFTR tokamak with emphasis on those with neutral beam injection (NBI). Recent improvements in the device capabilities have substantially extended operating parameters: B/sub T/ increased to 4.0 T, I/sub p/ to 2.0 MA, injection power (P/sub b/) to 5 MW with H/sup 0/ or D/sup 0/ beams anti n/sub e/ to 5 x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/, and Z/sub eff/ reduced to 1.4. With ohmic heating (OH) alone, the previously established scaling for gross energy confinement time (tau/sub E/ = anti n/sub e/q) has been confirmed at higher I/sub p/ and B/sub T/, and the maximum tau/sub E/ of 0.4 sec has been achieved. With NBI at P/sub b/ substantially (by factor >2) higher than P/sub OH/, excellent power and particle accountability have been established. This suggests that the less-than-expected increase in stored energy with NBI is not due to problems of power delivery, but due to problems of confinement deterioration. tau/sub E/ is observed to scale approximately as I/sub p/ P/sub b//sup -0.5/ (independent of anti n/sub e/), consistent with previous L-mode scalings. With NBI we have achieved the maximum tau/sub E/ of 0.2 sec and the maximum T/sub i/(o) of 4.4 keV in the normal operating regime, and even higher T/sub i/(o) in the energetic-ion regime with low-n/sub e/ and low-I/sub p/ operation.

  20. The Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. A proposal submitted to the Department of Energy in response to Program Notice 95-10: Innovations in toroidal magnetic confinement systems

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-12

    The Fusion Research Center (FRC) at the University Texas will operate the tokamak TEXT-U and its associated systems for experimental research in basic plasma physics. While the tokamak is not innovative, the research program, diagnostics and planned experiments are. The fusion community will reap the benefits of the success in completing the upgrades (auxiliary heating, divertor, diagnostics, wall conditioning), developing diverted discharges in both double and single null configurations, exploring improved confinement regimes including a limiter H-mode, and developing unique, critical turbulence diagnostics. With these new regimes, the authors are poised to perform the sort of turbulence and transport studies for which the TEXT group has distinguished itself and for which the upgrade was intended. TEXT-U is also a facility for collaborators to perform innovative experiments and develop diagnostics before transferring them to larger machines. The general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The emphasis of the proposed research is to provide well-documented plasmas which will be used to suggest and evaluate theories, to explore control techniques, to develop advanced diagnostics and analysis techniques, and to extend current drive techniques. Up to 1 MW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) will be used not only for heating but as a localized, perturbative tool. Areas of proposed research are: (1) core turbulence and transport; (2) edge turbulence and transport; (3) turbulence analysis; (4) improved confinement; (5) ECH physics; (6) Alfven wave current drive; and (7) diagnostic development.

  1. Electrons Confined with an Axially Symmetric Magnetic Mirror Field

    SciTech Connect

    Higaki, H.; Ito, K.; Kira, K.; Okamoto, H.

    2008-08-08

    Low energy non-neutral electron plasmas were confined with an axially symmetric magnetic mirror field and an electrostatic potential to investigate the basic confinement properties of a simple magnetic mirror trap. As expected the confinement time became longer as a function of the mirror ratio. The axial electrostatic oscillations of a confined electron plasma were also observed. Obtained results suggested an improved scheme to accumulate low energy charged particles with the use of a magnetic mirror field, which would enable the investigation of electron-positron plasmas.

  2. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic interchanges in low density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yimin; Goel, Deepak; Hassam, A.B.

    2005-03-01

    The ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations are usually derived under the assumption V{sub A}<plasmas wherein V{sub A} can be comparable to or greater than c. This involves relaxation of the usual charge quasineutrality assumption and the inclusion of electromagnetic momentum on par with plasma momentum. The extended system is applied to interchange instabilities in 'line-tied' slab geometry as well as to centrifugally confined plasmas. It is found that interchange growth rates are reduced by a factor of 1+V{sub A}{sup 2}/c{sup 2}, corresponding to a larger effective mass resulting from the extra electromagnetic momentum. Line tying is unaffected.

  3. Final Report DOE Grant No. DE-FG03-01ER54617 Computer Modeling of Microturbulence and Macrostability Properties of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jean-Noel Leboeuf

    2004-03-04

    OAK-B135 We have made significant progress during the past grant period in several key areas of the UCLA and national Fusion Theory Program. This impressive body of work includes both fundamental and applied contributions to MHD and turbulence in DIII-D and Electric Tokamak plasmas, and also to Z-pinches, particularly with respect to the effect of flows on these phenomena. We have successfully carried out interpretive and predictive global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell calculations of DIII-D discharges. We have cemented our participation in the gyrokinetic PIC effort of the SciDAC Plasma Microturbulence Project through working membership in the Summit Gyrokinetic PIC Team. We have continued to teach advanced courses at UCLA pertaining to computational plasma physics and to foster interaction with students and junior researchers. We have in fact graduated 2 Ph. D. students during the past grant period. The research carried out during that time has resulted in many publications in the premier plasma physics and fusion energy sciences journals and in several invited oral communications at major conferences such as Sherwood, Transport Task Force (TTF), the annual meetings of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society, of the European Physical Society, and the 2002 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, FEC 2002. Many of these have been authored and co-authored with experimentalists at DIII-D.

  4. Laser driven instabilities in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.L.

    1990-06-04

    Parametric instabilities excited by an intense electromagnetic wave in a plasma is a fundamental topic relevant to many applications. These applications include laser fusion, heating of magnetically-confined plasmas, ionospheric modification, and even particle acceleration for high energy physics. In laser fusion, these instabilities have proven to play an essential role in the choice of laser wavelength. Characterization and control of the instabilities is an ongoing priority in laser plasma experiments. Recent progress and some important trends will be discussed. 8 figs.

  5. A Particle X-ray Temporal Diagnostic (PXTD) for studies of kinetic, multi-ion effects, and ion-electron equilibration rates in Inertial Confinement Fusion plasmas at OMEGA (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sio, H.; Frenje, J. A.; Katz, J.; Stoeckl, C.; Weiner, D.; Bedzyk, M.; Glebov, V.; Sorce, C.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sangster, T. C.; Regan, S. P.; Kwan, T.; Le, A.; Simakov, A. N.; Taitano, W. T.; Chacòn, L.; Keenan, B.; Shah, R.; Sutcliffe, G.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2016-11-01

    A Particle X-ray Temporal Diagnostic (PXTD) has been implemented on OMEGA for simultaneous time-resolved measurements of several nuclear products as well as the x-ray continuum produced in High Energy Density Plasmas and Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. The PXTD removes systematic timing uncertainties typically introduced by using multiple instruments, and it has been used to measure DD, DT, D3He, and T3He reaction histories and the emission history of the x-ray core continuum with relative timing uncertainties within ±10-20 ps. This enables, for the first time, accurate and simultaneous measurements of the x-ray emission histories, nuclear reaction histories, their time differences, and measurements of Ti(t) and Te(t) from which an assessment of multiple-ion-fluid effects, kinetic effects during the shock-burn phase, and ion-electron equilibration rates can be made.

  6. A Particle X-ray Temporal Diagnostic (PXTD) for studies of kinetic, multi-ion effects, and ion-electron equilibration rates in Inertial Confinement Fusion plasmas at OMEGA (invited)

    DOE PAGES

    Sio, H.; Frenje, J. A.; Katz, J.; ...

    2016-09-14

    Here, a Particle X-ray Temporal Diagnostic (PXTD) has been implemented on OMEGA for simultaneous time-resolved measurements of several nuclear products as well as the x-ray continuum produced in High Energy Density Plasmas and Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. The PXTD removes systematic timing uncertainties typically introduced by using multiple instruments, and it has been used to measure DD, DT, D3He, and T3He reaction histories and the emission history of the x-ray core continuum with relative timing uncertainties within ±10-20 ps. This enables, for the first time, accurate and simultaneous measurements of the x-ray emission histories, nuclear reaction histories, their time differences,more » and measurements of Ti(t) and Te(t) from which an assessment of multiple-ion-fluid effects, kinetic effects during the shock-burn phase, and ion-electron equilibration rates can be made.« less

  7. A Particle X-ray Temporal Diagnostic (PXTD) for studies of kinetic, multi-ion effects, and ion-electron equilibration rates in Inertial Confinement Fusion plasmas at OMEGA (invited).

    PubMed

    Sio, H; Frenje, J A; Katz, J; Stoeckl, C; Weiner, D; Bedzyk, M; Glebov, V; Sorce, C; Gatu Johnson, M; Rinderknecht, H G; Zylstra, A B; Sangster, T C; Regan, S P; Kwan, T; Le, A; Simakov, A N; Taitano, W T; Chacòn, L; Keenan, B; Shah, R; Sutcliffe, G; Petrasso, R D

    2016-11-01

    A Particle X-ray Temporal Diagnostic (PXTD) has been implemented on OMEGA for simultaneous time-resolved measurements of several nuclear products as well as the x-ray continuum produced in High Energy Density Plasmas and Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. The PXTD removes systematic timing uncertainties typically introduced by using multiple instruments, and it has been used to measure DD, DT, D(3)He, and T(3)He reaction histories and the emission history of the x-ray core continuum with relative timing uncertainties within ±10-20 ps. This enables, for the first time, accurate and simultaneous measurements of the x-ray emission histories, nuclear reaction histories, their time differences, and measurements of Ti(t) and Te(t) from which an assessment of multiple-ion-fluid effects, kinetic effects during the shock-burn phase, and ion-electron equilibration rates can be made.

  8. Development of a tunable Fabry-Perot etalon-based near-infrared interference spectrometer for measurement of the HeI 2{sup 3}S-2{sup 3}P spectral line shape in magnetically confined torus plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ogane, S.; Shikama, T. Hasuo, M.; Zushi, H.

    2015-10-15

    In magnetically confined torus plasmas, the local emission intensity, temperature, and flow velocity of atoms in the inboard and outboard scrape-off layers can be separately measured by a passive emission spectroscopy assisted by observation of the Zeeman splitting in their spectral line shape. To utilize this technique, a near-infrared interference spectrometer optimized for the observation of the helium 2{sup 3}S–2{sup 3}P transition spectral line (wavelength 1083 nm) has been developed. The applicability of the technique to actual torus devices is elucidated by calculating the spectral line shapes expected to be observed in LHD and QUEST (Q-shu University Experiment with Steady State Spherical Tokamak). In addition, the Zeeman effect on the spectral line shape is measured using a glow-discharge tube installed in a superconducting magnet.

  9. Development of a tunable Fabry-Perot etalon-based near-infrared interference spectrometer for measurement of the HeI 23S-23P spectral line shape in magnetically confined torus plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogane, S.; Shikama, T.; Zushi, H.; Hasuo, M.

    2015-10-01

    In magnetically confined torus plasmas, the local emission intensity, temperature, and flow velocity of atoms in the inboard and outboard scrape-off layers can be separately measured by a passive emission spectroscopy assisted by observation of the Zeeman splitting in their spectral line shape. To utilize this technique, a near-infrared interference spectrometer optimized for the observation of the helium 23S-23P transition spectral line (wavelength 1083 nm) has been developed. The applicability of the technique to actual torus devices is elucidated by calculating the spectral line shapes expected to be observed in LHD and QUEST (Q-shu University Experiment with Steady State Spherical Tokamak). In addition, the Zeeman effect on the spectral line shape is measured using a glow-discharge tube installed in a superconducting magnet.

  10. Investigations of the radial propagation of blob-like structure in a non-confined electron cyclotron resonance heated plasma on Q-shu University Experiment with a Steady-State Spherical Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, R.; Liu, H. Q.; Ishiguro, M.; Ikeda, T.; Hanada, K.; Zushi, H.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Nishino, N.; Collaboration: QUEST Group

    2011-09-15

    A study of radial propagation and electric fields induced by charge separation in blob-like structures has been performed in a non-confined cylindrical electron cyclotron resonance heating plasma on Q-shu University Experiment with a Steady-State Spherical Tokamak using a fast-speed camera and a Langmuir probe. The radial propagation of the blob-like structures is found to be driven by E x B drift. Moreover, these blob-like structures were found to have been accelerated, and the property of the measured radial velocities agrees with the previously proposed model [C. Theiler et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 065001 (2009)]. Although the dependence of the radial velocity on the connection length of the magnetic field appeared to be different, a plausible explanation based on enhanced short-circuiting of the current path can be proposed.

  11. The Physics Basis of ITER Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, F.

    2009-02-19

    ITER will be the first fusion reactor and the 50 year old dream of fusion scientists will become reality. The quality of magnetic confinement will decide about the success of ITER, directly in the form of the confinement time and indirectly because it decides about the plasma parameters and the fluxes, which cross the separatrix and have to be handled externally by technical means. This lecture portrays some of the basic principles which govern plasma confinement, uses dimensionless scaling to set the limits for the predictions for ITER, an approach which also shows the limitations of the predictions, and describes briefly the major characteristics and physics behind the H-mode--the preferred confinement regime of ITER.

  12. Spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, X. K.; Sun, J.; Ling, H.; Lu, Y. F.

    2007-08-20

    The spatial confinement effects in laser-induced breakdown of aluminum (Al) targets in air have been investigated both by optical emission spectroscopy and fast photography. A KrF excimer laser was used to produce plasmas from Al targets in air. Al atomic emission lines show an obvious enhancement in the emission intensity when a pair of Al-plate walls were placed to spatially confine the plasma plumes. Images of the Al plasma plumes showed that the plasma plumes evolved into a torus shape and were compressed in the Al walls. The mechanism for the confinement effects was discussed using shock wave theory.

  13. Confinement and Transport in a Laboratory Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Ethan; Clark, Michael; Cooper, Christopher; Endrizzi, Douglass; Wallace, John; Weisberg, David; Forest, Cary

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of density, temperature, diamagnetic currents, and ion flows throughout a dipole magnetosphere immersed in a homogeneous plasma are presented. A 1-D ambipolar diffusion transport model developed for multi-cusp confinement systems is adapted for a dipole magnetosphere geometry and compared to measurements. In addition, differential azimuthal flow is imposed on the magnetosphere through electrically driven flow at the boundary of the machine. Modifications to the transport and confinement due to differential rotation are presented as well.

  14. Improved confinement in JET hybrid discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobirk, J.; Imbeaux, F.; Crisanti, F.; Buratti, P.; Challis, C. D.; Joffrin, E.; Alper, B.; Andrew, Y.; Beaumont, P.; Beurskens, M.; Boboc, A.; Botrugno, A.; Brix, M.; Calabro', G.; Coffey, I.; Conroy, S.; Ford, O.; Frigione, D.; Garcia, J.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N. C.; Howell, D.; Jenkins, I.; Keeling, D.; Kempenaars, M.; Leggate, H.; Lotte, P.; de la Luna, E.; Maddison, G. P.; Mantica, P.; Mazzotta, C.; McDonald, D. C.; Meigs, A.; Nunes, I.; Rachlew, E.; Rimini, F.; Schneider, M.; Sips, A. C. C.; Stober, J. K.; Studholme, W.; Tala, T.; Tsalas, M.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; de Vries, P. C.; EFDA contributors, JET

    2012-09-01

    A new technique has been developed to produce plasmas with improved confinement relative to the H98,y2 scaling law (ITER Physics Expert Groups on Confinement and Transport and Confinement Modelling and Database ITER Physics Basics Editors and ITER EDA 1999 Nucl. Fusion 39 2175) on the JET tokamak. In the mid-size tokamaks ASDEX upgrade and DIII-D heating during the current formation is used to produce a flat q-profile with a minimum close to 1. On JET this technique leads to q-profiles with similar minimum q but opposite to the other tokamaks not to an improved confinement state. By changing the method utilizing a faster current ramp with temporary higher current than in the flattop (current overshoot) plasmas with improved confinement (H98,y2 = 1.35) and good stability (βN ≈ 3) have been produced and extended to many confinement times only limited by technical constraints. The increase in H98,y2-factor is stronger with more heating power as can be seen in a power scan. The q-profile development during the high power phase in JET is reproduced by current diffusion calculated by TRANSP and CRONOS. Therefore the modifications produced by the current overshoot disappear quickly from the edge but the confinement improvement lasts longer, in some cases up to the end of the heating phase.

  15. Nonlocal Heat Transport by Longitudinal/Transverse EM Waves in Magnetically Confined Plasmas and Modelling of the Observed Nonlocal Phenomena in a Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukushkin, A. B.

    1996-11-01

    The nonlocal transport approach is formulated, based on anomalous cross-field energy transport (ACFET) by the longitudinal/tranverse EM waves of the mean free path of the order and much larger than plasma characteristic size and, correspondingly, on integral equation in space variables. Self-consistency of this approach is shown in interpreting those observed phenomena of nonlocality whose interpretation in "local", diffusion-like approaches gives instant jumps of thermal diffusivities in a large part of plasma volume. The modelling is carried out of the initial stage of recently observed phenomena of fast nonlocal energy transport: (i) net inward flux of energy during off-axis heating (vs. ECRH experiments on D-III-D); (ii) prompt rise of temperature in the core in "cold pulse" experiments (fast cooling of the periphery) on TEXT and TFTR; (iii) fast "volumetric" response of energy transport to plasma edge behavior during L-H transitions (in JET and JT-60U). The results suggest (a) universal and transparent physical explanation of the mechanism of nonlocal inward energy flux, which is lost in diffusion-like approaches, and (b) necessity to append existing numerical codes with nonlocal transport term, an integral in space variables.

  16. Confinement and heating of high beta plasmas with emphasis on compact toroids: Task 2, Stellarator and heliac research: Annual report, October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Ribe, F.L.

    1986-12-31

    Progress over the past year has enabled us to complete the comprehensive experimental investigation of the equilibrium and stability of the linear heliac and the linear l = 1 stellarator configration. In the case of the heliac work, we discoverd axisymmetric hot plasma near the axial conductor (''hardcore'') in amounts which are comparable to the helically symmetric hot plasma centered on the magnetic axis. From this result came the motivation for an extended investigation which concentrates on the details of high-beta heliac formation. Important first results of the formation study have been obtained. In the case of the stellarator work, we have observed the flute-like m = 1 instability foe a specific set of experimental parameters and, for a different set, we have observed the mode stabilized by the combined effects of a finite ion Larmor radius and a nearby conducting wall. The single-discharge CV ion-temperature diagnostic system has been debugged and has yielded a heliac temperature measurement of (90 +- 10)eV. The plasma density diagnostic system based on cross-tube interferometry has been modified from its previous design for use with the somewhat wrinkly helical discharge tube.

  17. Étude par diffraction des rayons X de la nitruration plasma d'un acier 304L Influence sur l'oxydation à 1000 ^{circ}C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marot, L.; Buscail, H.; Straboni, A.; Riffard, F.; Caudron, E.; Cueff, R.

    2002-07-01

    This work presents the influence of various nitridation parameters on the 304L steel oxidation at 1000 ^{circ}C, in air under atmospheric pressure. Nitridation temperatures were ranging between 300 ^{circ}C and 430 ^{circ}C with exposure times lasting from 2 to 8 hours. At 300 and 430 ^{circ}C, the nitridation treatment leads to the solid solution surface formation γ-N without any nitride formation. After oxidation at 1000 ^{circ}C of blank specimens, X ray diffraction reveals the FeCr2O4 spinel formation. This oxide does not act as a good diffusion barrier. With nitrogen treated specimens, the higher the nitridation temperature is and the longer the exposure time is, better is the oxidation behaviour at 1000 ^{circ}C. We then observe that the Cr{1,3}Fe{0,7}O3 oxide is more present in the oxide sale from the very beginning of the oxidation test which is correlated to a final lower mass gain. Cette étude porte sur l'influence des paramètres de nitruration plasma sur l'oxydation de l'acier 304L à 1000 ^{circ}C, sous air, à la pression atmosphérique. Les températures employées lors de la nitruration ont été de 300 ^{circ}C et 430 ^{circ}C pour des durées de nitruration variant entre 2 et 8 heures. A 300 et 430 ^{circ}C, la nitruration conduit à la formation d'une solution solide γ-N en surface sans provoquer la formation de nitrures. Après oxydation à 1000 ^{circ}C du 304L non nitruré, la diffraction des rayons X révèle la formation d'une couche de type spinelle FeCr2O4 qui ne semble pas jouer le rôle de barrière de diffusion. Pour les échantillons préalablement nitrurés, plus la température de nitruration est élevée et plus la durée du traitement est longue, meilleur est le comportement en oxydation. Nous observons alors l'oxyde Cr{1,3}Fe{0,7}O3 en proportion importante dès le début de l'oxydation et une prise de masse finale plus faible.

  18. Observations of the vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray brightness profiles of Fe, Ni, and Ge in magnetically confined fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    May, M J; Finkenthal, M; Moos, H W; Fournier, K B; Goldstein, W H; Mattioli, M; Pacella, D; Mazzitelli, G; Leigheb, M; Gabellieri, L

    2001-09-01

    The spatial brightness profiles of emission lines for the K-like through He-like ionization states of Fe, Ge, and Ni have been measured during a set of experiments in which Fe and Ge were introduced into FTU tokamak plasmas by using the laser blowoff technique. Nickel was an intrinsic impurity observed during these experiments that was sputtered from the inconel limiter. The brightness profiles were measured by spatially scanable, photometrically calibrated vaccum ultraviolet and x-ray spectrometers that covered the 1 to 1700 A region. Simulations of these profiles and the time evolution of the laser blowoffs were performed with the MIST transport code using several sets of atomic physics compilations [ADPAK (originally in MIST), Arnaud and Raymond (AR92), Arnaud and Rothenflug (AR85), Mazzotta et al., and Mattioli (an extension to Mazzotta)]. The goal was to determine which set of available rates could best simulate the measured spatial brightness profiles and the charge state balance in the plasma. The Mazzotta et al. (for Fe and Ni), the Mattioli (for Ge), and the AR92 (for Fe only) rates adequately simulated the He-, Li-, Be-, Na-, Mg-like ionization states. The F- to B-like charge states could not be simulated by these compilations unless the relevant dielectronic rates were multiplied by a factor of 2. The ADPAK rates could not adequately predict any of the charge states of Fe, Ge, or Ni.

  19. Inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, L.; Condouris, R.; Kotowski, M.; Murphy, P.W.

    1992-01-01

    This issue of the ICF Quarterly contains seven articles that describe recent progress in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's ICF program. The Department of Energy recently initiated an effort to design a 1--2 MJ glass laser, the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF). These articles span various aspects of a program which is aimed at moving forward toward such a facility by continuing to use the Nova laser to gain understanding of NIF-relevant target physics, by developing concepts for an NIF laser driver, and by envisioning a variety of applications for larger ICF facilities. This report discusses research on the following topics: Stimulated Rotational Raman Scattering in Nitrogen; A Maxwell Equation Solver in LASNEX for the Simulation of Moderately Intense Ultrashort Pulse Experiments; Measurements of Radial Heat-Wave Propagation in Laser-Produced Plasmas; Laser-Seeded Modulation Growth on Directly Driven Foils; Stimulated Raman Scattering in Large-Aperture, High-Fluence Frequency-Conversion Crystals; Fission Product Hazard Reduction Using Inertial Fusion Energy; Use of Inertial Confinement Fusion for Nuclear Weapons Effects Simulations.

  20. Liquid injection plasma deposition method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kong, P.C.; Watkins, A.D.

    1999-05-25

    A liquid injection plasma torch deposition apparatus for depositing material onto a surface of a substrate may comprise a plasma torch for producing a jet of plasma from an outlet nozzle. A plasma confinement tube having an inlet end and an outlet end and a central bore therethrough is aligned with the outlet nozzle of the plasma torch so that the plasma jet is directed into the inlet end of the plasma confinement tube and emerges from the outlet end of the plasma confinement tube. The plasma confinement tube also includes an injection port transverse to the central bore. A liquid injection device connected to the injection port of the plasma confinement tube injects a liquid reactant mixture containing the material to be deposited onto the surface of the substrate through the injection port and into the central bore of the plasma confinement tube. 8 figs.

  1. Liquid injection plasma deposition method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kong, Peter C.; Watkins, Arthur D.

    1999-01-01

    A liquid injection plasma torch deposition apparatus for depositing material onto a surface of a substrate may comprise a plasma torch for producing a jet of plasma from an outlet nozzle. A plasma confinement tube having an inlet end and an outlet end and a central bore therethrough is aligned with the outlet nozzle of the plasma torch so that the plasma jet is directed into the inlet end of the plasma confinement tube and emerges from the outlet end of the plasma confinement tube. The plasma confinement tube also includes an injection port transverse to the central bore. A liquid injection device connected to the injection port of the plasma confinement tube injects a liquid reactant mixture containing the material to be deposited onto the surface of the substrate through the injection port and into the central bore of the plasma confinement tube.

  2. Numerical Study of Velocity Shear Stabilization of 3D and Theoretical Considerations for Centrifugally Confined Plasmas and Other Interchange-Limited Fusion Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Hassam, Adil

    2015-09-21

    We studied the feasibility of resonantly driving GAMs in tokamaks. A numerical simulation was carried out and showed the essential features and limitations. It was shown further that GAMs can damp by phase-mixing, from temperature gradients, or nonlinear detuning, thus broadening the resonance. Experimental implications of this were quantified. Theoretical support was provided for the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment, funded in a separate grant by DOE. Plasma diamagnetism from supersonic rotation was established. A theoretical model was built to match the data. Additional support to the experiment in terms of numerical simulation of the interchange turbulence was provided. Spectra from residual turbulence on account of velocity shear suppression were obtained and compared favorably to experiment. A new drift wave, driven solely by the thermal force, was identified.

  3. Color Confinement from Fluctuating Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    QCD possesses a compact gauge group, and this implies a non-trivial topological structure of the vacuum. In this contribution to the Gribov-85 Memorial volume, we first discuss the origin of Gribov copies and their interpretation in terms of fluctuating topology in the QCD vacuum. We then describe the recent work with E. Levin that links the confinement of gluons and color screening to the fluctuating topology, and discuss implications for spin physics, high energy scattering, and the physics of quark-gluon plasma.

  4. Color confinement from fluctuating topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E.

    2016-10-01

    QCD possesses a compact gauge group, and this implies a non-trivial topological structure of the vacuum. In this contribution to the Gribov-85 Memorial volume, we first discuss the origin of Gribov copies and their interpretation in terms of fluctuating topology in the QCD vacuum. We then describe the recent work with E. Levin that links the confinement of gluons and color screening to the fluctuating topology, and discuss implications for spin physics, high energy scattering, and the physics of quark-gluon plasma.

  5. Progress in toroidal confinement and fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1987-10-01

    During the past 30 years, the characteristic T/sub i/n tau/sub E/-value of toroidal-confinement experiments has advanced by more than seven orders of magnitude. Part of this advance has been due to an increase of gross machine parameters. Most of this advance has been due to an increase of gross machine parameters. Most of the advance is associated with improvements in the ''quality of plasma confinement.'' The combined evidence of spherator and tokamak research clarifies the role of magnetic-field geometry in determining confinement and points to the importance of shielding out plasma edge effects. A true physical understanding of anomalous transport remains to be achieved. 39 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Continuous emission of keV x-rays from low-pressure, low-field, low-power-RF plasma columns and significance to mirror confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandovitz, P.; Swanson, C.; Glasser, A.; Cohen, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    We report on observations of a continuous stream of 0.8-6.0 keV x-rays emitted from cool (bulk Te 4 eV), tenuous (ne 1010 cm-3), 4-cm-diameter hydrogen or argon plasma columns generated in an axisymmetric, high-mirror-ratio, tandem mirror machine heated in one end cell by an external RF (27 MHz) antenna operating at low power, 20-600 W. The continuous emission of x-rays is evidence of the steady production of energetic electrons. The source appears to be ion-induced secondary electron emission from a floating carbon cup in the vacuum system about 2 cm from the RF antenna. The cup is charged to a high negative potential, perhaps by other secondary electrons emitted from the self-biased Pyrex vessel under the antenna. X-ray emission in the central cell increases as the mirror ratio increases, an effect we attribute to increased trapping of passing particles due to non-adiabatic scattering at the midplane of the central cell. This work was supported, in part, by DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  7. Fast ion JET diagnostics: confinement and losses

    SciTech Connect

    Kiptily, V. G.; Pinches, S. D.; Sharapov, S. E.; Syme, D. B.; Cecconello, M.; Darrow, D.; Hill, K.; Goloborod'ko, V.; Yavorskij, V.; Johnson, T.; Murari, A.; Reich, M.; Gorini, G.; Zoita, V.

    2008-03-12

    A study of magnetically confined fast ions in tokamaks plays an important role in burning plasma research. To reach ignition and steady burning of a reactor plasma an adequate confinement of energetic ions produced by NBI heating, accelerated with ICRF and born in fusion reactions is essential to provide efficient heating of the bulk plasma. Thus, investigation of the fast ion behaviour is an immediate task for present-day large machines, such as JET, in order to understand the main mechanisms of slowing down, redistribution and losses, and to develop optimal plasma scenarios. Today's JET has an enhanced suite of fast ion diagnostics both of confined and lost ions that enable to significantly contribute to this important area of research. Fast ion populations of p, d, t, {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He, made with ICRF, NBI, and fusion reactions have been investigated in experiments on JET with sophisticated diagnostics in conventional and shear-reversed plasmas, exploring a wide range of effects. This paper will introduce to the JET fast-ion diagnostic techniques and will give an overview of recent observations. A synergy of the unique diagnostic set was utilised in JET, and studies of the response of fast ions to MHD modes (e.g. tornado modes, sawtooth crashes), fast {sup 3}He-ions behaviour in shear-reversed plasmas are impressive examples of that. Some results on fast ion losses in JET experiments with various levels of the toroidal field ripple will be demonstrated.

  8. THE MEASURES PAR PROJECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouin, R. J.; Franz, B.

    2009-12-01

    The solar energy available for photosynthesis, known as PAR, controls the growth of phytoplankton and, therefore, regulates the composition and evolution of marine ecosystems. Knowing the spatial and temporal distribution of PAR over the oceans is critical to understanding biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nutrients, and oxygen, and to address important climate and global change issues such as the fate of anthropogenic atmospheric carbon dioxide. In view of this, a 12-year time series of PAR at the ocean surface, starting in September 1997, is being produced by the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group from SeaWiFS, MODIS-Terra, and MODIS-Aqua data. The product covers the global oceans, with a spatial resolution of about 9.3x9.3 km (equal area grid) and a temporal resolution of one day. PAR is computed as the difference between the 400-700 nm solar flux incident on the top of the atmosphere (known) and reflected back to space by the atmosphere and surface (derived from satellite radiance), taking into account atmospheric absorption (modeled). Knowledge of pixel composition is not required, eliminating the need for cloud screening and arbitrary assumptions about sub-pixel cloudiness. Combining data from satellite sensors with different equatorial crossing times accounts for the diurnal variability of clouds and, therefore, increases accuracy on a daily time scale. The processing system, including routine check of accuracy and control of quality, is designed to operate during the entire lifetime of SeaWiFS and MODIS, and to accommodate future sensors with ocean-color capabilities. Maps of daily, weekly, and monthly PAR obtained from individual sensors are presented, as well as merged products. Accuracy is quantified in comparisons with other satellite estimates, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalysis product, and in-situ measurements from fixed buoys and platforms. The good statistical performance makes the satellite PAR product suitable for large

  9. A Particle X-ray Temporal Diagnostic (PXTD) for studies of kinetic, multi-ion effects, and ion-electron equilibration rates in Inertial Confinement Fusion plasmas at OMEGA (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Sio, H.; Frenje, J. A.; Katz, J.; Stoeckl, C.; Weiner, D.; Bedzyk, M.; Glebov, V.; Sorce, C.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sangster, T. C.; Regan, S. P.; Kwan, T.; Le, A.; Simakov, A. N.; Taitano, W. T.; Chacòn, L.; Keenan, B.; Shah, R.; Sutcliffe, G.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2016-09-14

    Here, a Particle X-ray Temporal Diagnostic (PXTD) has been implemented on OMEGA for simultaneous time-resolved measurements of several nuclear products as well as the x-ray continuum produced in High Energy Density Plasmas and Inertial Confinement Fusion implosions. The PXTD removes systematic timing uncertainties typically introduced by using multiple instruments, and it has been used to measure DD, DT, D3He, and T3He reaction histories and the emission history of the x-ray core continuum with relative timing uncertainties within ±10-20 ps. This enables, for the first time, accurate and simultaneous measurements of the x-ray emission histories, nuclear reaction histories, their time differences, and measurements of Ti(t) and Te(t) from which an assessment of multiple-ion-fluid effects, kinetic effects during the shock-burn phase, and ion-electron equilibration rates can be made.

  10. PLASMA ENERGIZATION

    DOEpatents

    Furth, H.P.; Chambers, E.S.

    1962-03-01

    BS>A method is given for ion cyclotron resonance heatthg of a magnetically confined plasma by an applied radio-frequency field. In accordance with the invention, the radiofrequency energy is transferred to the plasma without the usual attendent self-shielding effect of plasma polarlzatlon, whereby the energy transfer is accomplished with superior efficiency. More explicitly, the invention includes means for applying a radio-frequency electric field radially to an end of a plasma column confined in a magnetic mirror field configuration. The radio-frequency field propagates hydromagnetic waves axially through the column with the waves diminishing in an intermediate region of the column at ion cyclotron resonance with the fleld frequency. In such region the wave energy is converted by viscous damping to rotational energy of the plasma ions. (AEC)

  11. Nonlocal Transport Phenomena and Various Structure Formations in Plasmas 4.Classical Nonlocal Phenomena in Magnetic Confinement Plasmas 4.2Nonlocal Transport Related to Dynamics Perpendicular to the Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Masao; Nakajima, Noriyoshi

    Neoclassical transport is studied including the effect of finite orbit widths for tokamak plasmas subject to regular flux surfaces. Nonlocal transport for the plasma near the magnetic axis is considered by the Lagrangian method. All types of particle orbits, that are complicated and different from those of usual banana and passing particles, are taken into account. Neoclassical radial electric fields are calculated by a δf MonteCarlo particle simulation. Only when the effect of finite orbit widths is rigorously taken into account, the determination of the radial electric field is possible. The diffusion process in perturbed electromagnetic field is revisited, in order to consider the effects of non-local particle orbits on the transport.

  12. Confinement Aquaculture. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaplaine School District, AR.

    The Delaplaine Agriculture Department Confinement Project, begun in June 1988, conducted a confinement aquaculture program by comparing the growth of channel catfish raised in cages in a pond to channel catfish raised in cages in the Black River, Arkansas. The study developed technology that would decrease costs in the domestication of fish, using…

  13. Indoor Confined Feedlots.

    PubMed

    Grooms, Daniel L; Kroll, Lee Anne K

    2015-07-01

    Indoor confined feedlots offer advantages that make them desirable in northern climates where high rainfall and snowfall occur. These facilities increase the risk of certain health risks, including lameness and tail injuries. Closed confinement can also facilitate the rapid spread of infectious disease. Veterinarians can help to manage these health risks by implementing management practices to reduce their occurrence.

  14. suPAR and Team Nephrology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) accounts for nearly 10 % of patients who require renal replacement therapy. Elevated circulating levels of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) have been identified as a biomarker to discriminate primary FSGS from other glomerulopathies. Subsequent reports have questioned the diagnostic utility of this test. In a study in BMC Medicine, Huang et al. demonstrate that urinary soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) excretion assists in distinguishing primary FSGS from other glomerular diseases, and that high plasma suPAR concentrations are not directly linked to a decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). This observation suggests that further investigation of suPAR is warranted in patients with FSGS. It should be interpreted in light of a recent report that B7-1 is expressed in the podocytes of a subset of patients with FSGS, and that blocking this molecule may represent the first successful targeted intervention for this disease. These advances highlight the rapid pace of scientific progress in the field of nephrology. Nephrologists should work together, share resources, and expedite the design of protocols to evaluate these novel biomarkers in a comprehensive and scientifically valid manner. Please see related article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/12/81. PMID:24885021

  15. La pelade par plaques

    PubMed Central

    Spano, Frank; Donovan, Jeff C.

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Présenter aux médecins de famille des renseignements de base pour faire comprendre l’épidémiologie, la pathogenèse, l’histologie et l’approche clinique au diagnostic de la pelade par plaques. Sources des données Une recension a été effectuée dans PubMed pour trouver des articles pertinents concernant la pathogenèse, le diagnostic et le pronostic de la pelade par plaques. Message principal La pelade par plaques est une forme de perte pileuse auto-immune dont la prévalence durant une vie est d’environ 2 %. Des antécédents personnels ou familiaux de troubles auto-immuns concomitants, comme le vitiligo ou une maladie de la thyroïde, peuvent être observés dans un petit sous-groupe de patients. Le diagnostic peut souvent être posé de manière clinique en se fondant sur la perte de cheveux non cicatricielle et circulaire caractéristique, accompagnée de cheveux en « point d’exclamation » en périphérie chez ceux dont le problème en est aux premiers stades. Le diagnostic des cas plus complexes ou des présentations inhabituelles peut être facilité par une biopsie et un examen histologique. Le pronostic varie largement et de mauvais résultats sont associés à une apparition à un âge précoce, une perte importante, la variante ophiasis, des changements aux ongles, des antécédents familiaux ou des troubles auto-immuns concomitants. Conclusion La pelade par plaques est une forme auto-immune de perte de cheveux périodiquement observée en soins primaires. Les médecins de famille sont bien placés pour identifier la pelade par plaques, déterminer la gravité de la maladie et poser le diagnostic différentiel approprié. De plus, ils sont en mesure de renseigner leurs patients à propos de l’évolution clinique de la maladie ainsi que du pronostic général selon le sous-type de patients.

  16. Elastic membranes in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua; Miksis, Michael; Davis, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and DNA, have finer internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically ``confined'' by another object. We study the shape stability of elastic membranes in a ``confining'' box and introduce repulsive van der Waals forces to prevent the membrane from intersecting the wall. We aim to define the parameter space associated with mitochondria-like deformations. We compare the confined to `unconfined' solutions and show how the structure and stability of the membrane shapes changes with the system parameters.

  17. Results from deuterium-tritium tokamak confinement experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R.J.

    1997-02-01

    Recent scientific and technical progress in magnetic fusion experiments has resulted in the achievement of plasma parameters (density and temperature) which enabled the production of significant bursts of fusion power from deuterium-tritium fuels and the first studies of the physics of burning plasmas. The key scientific issues in the reacting plasma core are plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability, and the confinement and loss of energetic fusion products from the reacting fuel ions. Progress in the development of regimes of operation which have both good confinement and are MHD stable have enabled a broad study of burning plasma physics issues. A review of the technical and scientific results from the deuterium-tritium experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is given with particular emphasis on alpha-particle physics issues.

  18. Initial results on positron confinement in a magnetospheric configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitoh, Haruhiko; Yoshida, Zensho; Yano, Yoshihisa; Morikawa, Junji

    2011-10-01

    Creation of positron-electron plasma in a laboratory is an interesting and challenging subject, which may open many scientific applications. Although single-component plasma is stably confined in linear traps, for example Penning-Malmberg trap, it is not straightforward to simultaneously confine electrons and positrons as plasma. Toroidal geometries have advantages for solving this problem. For this purpose, studies on toroidal non-neutral plasma have been conducted in the levitated magnetospheric configuration, RT-1. Stable confinement and self-organization of toroidal non-neutral plasma was realized in RT-1; rigid-rotating pure electron plasma is confined for more than 300s [Z. Yoshida et al., PRL 104, 235004 (2010)]. As the initial step toward the formation of magnetospheric antimatter plasmas, we installed a 1MBq Na-22 radiation source in RT-1. Annihilation gamma-rays were observed by a NaI(TI) scintillator detector, for the estimation of basic injection and confinement properties of positrons in the magnetospheric configuration. Numerical analysis of positron orbits in RT-1 and the initial experimental results will be presented. Work funded by MEXT of Japan (23224014, 23654201).

  19. Fueling of magnetic-confinement devices

    SciTech Connect

    Milora, S.L.

    1981-01-01

    A general overview of the fueling of magnetic confinement devices is presented, with particular emphasis on recent experimental results. Various practical fueling mechanisms are considered, such as cold gas inlet (or plasma edge fueling), neutral beam injection, and injection of high speed cryogenic hydrogen pellets. The central role played by charged particle transport and recycle of plasma particles from material surfaces in contact with the plasma is discussed briefly. The various aspects of hydrogen pellet injection are treated in detail, including applications to the production of high purity startup plasmas for stellarators and other devices, refueling of tokamak plasmas, pellet ablation theory, and the technology and performance characteristics of low and high speed pellet injectors.

  20. Nonideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and toroidal magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-05-01

    The marked divergence of experimentally observed plasma instability phenomena from the predictions of ideal magnetohydrodynamics led in the early 1960s to the formulations of finite-resistivity stability theory. Beginning in the 1970s, advanced plasma diagnostics have served to establish a detailed correspondence between the predictions of the finite-resistivity theory and experimental plasma behavior - particularly in the case of the resistive kink mode and the tokamak plasma. Nonlinear resistive-kink phenomena have been found to govern the transport of magnetic flux and plasma energy in the reversed-field pinch. The other predicted finite-resistivity instability modes have been more difficult to identify directly and their implications for toroidal magnetic confinement are still unresolved.

  1. Polymer Crystallization under Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floudas, George

    Recent efforts indicated that polymer crystallization under confinement can be substantially different from the bulk. This can have important technological applications for the design of polymeric nanofibers with tunable mechanical strength, processability and optical clarity. However, the question of how, why and when polymers crystallize under confinement is not fully answered. Important studies of polymer crystallization confined to droplets and within the spherical nanodomains of block copolymers emphasized the interplay between heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation. Herein we report on recent studies1-5 of polymer crystallization under hard confinement provided by model self-ordered AAO nanopores. Important open questions here are on the type of nucleation (homogeneous vs. heterogeneous), the size of critical nucleus, the crystal orientation and the possibility to control the overall crystallinity. Providing answers to these questions is of technological relevance for the understanding of nanocomposites containing semicrystalline polymers. In collaboration with Y. Suzuki, H. Duran, M. Steinhart, H.-J. Butt.

  2. Confinement and the Pomeron

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.R.

    1989-09-25

    The importance of confinement for obtaining a unitary high-energy limit for QCD is discussed. Minijets'' are argued to build up non-unitary behavior{endash}when k{sub T} {gt} {Lambda} is imposed. For minijets to mix with low k{sub T} Pomeron Field Theory describing confinement, and give consistent asymptotic behavior, new quarks'' must enter the theory above the minijet transverse momentum scale. The Critical Pomeron is the resulting high-energy limit. 22 refs.

  3. La pelade par plaques

    PubMed Central

    Spano, Frank; Donovan, Jeff C.

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Présenter aux médecins de famille des renseignements de base pour faire comprendre les schémas thérapeutiques et les résultats des traitements pour la pelade par plaques, de même que les aider à identifier les patients pour qui une demande de consultation en dermatologie pourrait s’imposer. Sources des données Une recension a été effectuée dans PubMed pour trouver des articles pertinents concernant le traitement de la pelade par plaques. Message principal La pelade par plaques est une forme auto-immune de perte pileuse qui touche à la fois les enfants et les adultes. Même s’il n’y a pas de mortalité associée à la maladie, la morbidité découlant des effets psychologiques de la perte des cheveux peut être dévastatrice. Lorsque la pelade par plaques et le sous-type de la maladie sont identifiés, un schéma thérapeutique approprié peut être amorcé pour aider à arrêter la chute des cheveux et possiblement faire commencer la repousse. Les traitements de première intention sont la triamcinolone intralésionnelle avec des corticostéroïdes topiques ou du minoxidil ou les 2. Les médecins de famille peuvent prescrire ces traitements en toute sécurité et amorcer ces thérapies. Les cas plus avancés ou réfractaires pourraient avoir besoin de diphénylcyclopropénone topique ou d’anthraline topique. On peut traiter la perte de cils avec des analogues de la prostaglandine. Les personnes ayant subi une perte de cheveux abondante peuvent recourir à des options de camouflage ou à des prothèses capillaires. Il est important de surveiller les troubles psychiatriques en raison des effets psychologiques profonds de la perte de cheveux. Conclusion Les médecins de famille verront de nombreux patients qui perdent leurs cheveux. La reconnaissance de la pelade par plaques et la compréhension du processus pathologique sous-jacent permettent d’amorcer un schéma thérapeutique approprié. Les cas plus graves ou r

  4. One Dimensional Analysis of Inertially Confined Plasmas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    Sedov, L.I. Similarity and Dimensional Methods in Mechanics. New York: Academic Press, 1959. 26. Spitzer , Lyman , Jr . Physics of Fully Ionized Gases...Based on Maxwellian velocity distributions for both ions and electrons and defining t from the relation given by Spitzer (Ref 26:135), dt T...this coeffi- cient is given by Spitzer (Ttef 26:144), T (18) Heat flow caused by a temperature gradient results in a current, however, and this

  5. High-Energy Electron Confinement in a Magnetic Cusp Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeyoung; Krall, Nicholas A.; Sieck, Paul E.; Offermann, Dustin T.; Skillicorn, Michael; Sanchez, Andrew; Davis, Kevin; Alderson, Eric; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    We report experimental results validating the concept that plasma confinement is enhanced in a magnetic cusp configuration when β (plasma pressure/magnetic field pressure) is of order unity. This enhancement is required for a fusion power reactor based on cusp confinement to be feasible. The magnetic cusp configuration possesses a critical advantage: the plasma is stable to large scale perturbations. However, early work indicated that plasma loss rates in a reactor based on a cusp configuration were too large for net power production. Grad and others theorized that at high β a sharp boundary would form between the plasma and the magnetic field, leading to substantially smaller loss rates. While not able to confirm the details of Grad's work, the current experiment does validate, for the first time, the conjecture that confinement is substantially improved at high β . This represents critical progress toward an understanding of the plasma dynamics in a high-β cusp system. We hope that these results will stimulate a renewed interest in the cusp configuration as a fusion confinement candidate. In addition, the enhanced high-energy electron confinement resolves a key impediment to progress of the Polywell fusion concept, which combines a high-β cusp configuration with electrostatic fusion for a compact, power-producing nuclear fusion reactor.

  6. Confinement scaling and ignition in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, F.W.; Sun, Y.C.

    1985-10-01

    A drift wave turbulence model is used to compute the scaling and magnitude of central electron temperature and confinement time of tokamak plasmas. The results are in accord with experiment. Application to ignition experiments shows that high density (1 to 2) . 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/, high field, B/sub T/ > 10 T, but low temperature T approx. 6 keV constitute the optimum path to ignition.

  7. Statistical Mechanics of Confined Quantum Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannur, Vishnu M.; Udayanandan, K. M.

    We develop statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of Bose and Fermi systems in relativistic harmonic oscillator (RHO) confining potential, which is applicable in quark gluon plasma (QGP), astrophysics, Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) etc. Detailed study of QGP system is carried out and compared with lattice results. Furthermore, as an application, our equation of state (EoS) of QGP is used to study compact stars like quark star.

  8. Confined Brownian ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malgaretti, Paolo; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Rubi, J. Miguel

    2013-05-01

    We analyze the dynamics of Brownian ratchets in a confined environment. The motion of the particles is described by a Fick-Jakobs kinetic equation in which the presence of boundaries is modeled by means of an entropic potential. The cases of a flashing ratchet, a two-state model, and a ratchet under the influence of a temperature gradient are analyzed in detail. We show the emergence of a strong cooperativity between the inherent rectification of the ratchet mechanism and the entropic bias of the fluctuations caused by spatial confinement. Net particle transport may take place in situations where none of those mechanisms leads to rectification when acting individually. The combined rectification mechanisms may lead to bidirectional transport and to new routes to segregation phenomena. Confined Brownian ratchets could be used to control transport in mesostructures and to engineer new and more efficient devices for transport at the nanoscale.

  9. Central cell confinement in MFTF-B

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, R.A.

    1981-05-05

    The point code TANDEM has been used to survey the range of plasma parameters which can be attained in MFTF-B. The code solves for the electron and ion densities and temperatures in the central cell, yin-yang, barrier, and A-cell regions as well as the plasma potential in each region. In these studies, the A-cell sloshing ion beams were fixed while the neutral beams in the yin-yang and central cell, the gas feed in the central cell, and the applied ECRH power ..beta.., central cell ion density and temperature, and the confining potential are discussed.

  10. Normal modes of confined cold ionic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P.; Dubin, D.H.

    1995-08-01

    The normal modes of a cloud of confined ions forming a strongly-correlated plasma were investigated. The results of molecular-dynamics simulations were compared to predictions of a cold fluid mode. Mode frequencies are observed to shift slightly compared to the cold fluid predictions, and the modes are also observed to damp in time. Simulations also reveal a set of torsional oscillations which have no counterpart in cold fluid theory. The frequency shift, damping, and torsional effects are compared to a model that treats trapped plasmas as a visco-elastic spheroid. It may be possible to measure high-frequency bulk and shear moduli of a strongly-correlated plasma from mode excitation experiments on trapped non-neutral plasmas. An example of the results of the calculation is presented.

  11. Laboratory Dipole Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesner, Jay

    2011-10-01

    Modern laboratory studies of plasma confined by a strong dipole magnet originated twenty years ago when it was learned that planetary magnetospheres have centrally-peaked plasma pressure profiles that form naturally when solar wind drives plasma circulation and heating. Unlike other internal rings devices, like spherators and octupoles, the magnetic flux tubes of the dipole field expand rapidly with radius. Unlike plasma confinement devices that obtain stability from magnetic shear and average good curvature, like tokamaks and levitrons, the dipole-confined plasma obtains stability from plasma compressibility. These two geometric characteristics of the dipole field have profound consequences: (i) plasma can be stable with local beta exceeding unity, (ii) fluctuations can drive either heat or particles inward to create stationary profiles that are strongly peaked, and (iii) the confinement of particles and energy can decouple. During the past decade, several laboratory dipole experiments and modeling efforts have lead to new understanding of interchange, centrifugal and entropy modes, nonlinear gyrokinetics, and plasma transport. Two devices, the LDX experiment at MIT and RT-1 at the University of Tokyo, operate with levitated superconducting dipole magnets. With a levitated dipole, not only is very high-beta plasma confined in steady state but, also, levitation produces high-temperature at low input power and demonstrates that toroidal magnetic confinement of plasma does not require a toroidal field. Modeling has explained many of the processes operative in these experiments, including the observation of a strong inward particle pinch. Turbulent low-frequency fluctuations in dipole confined plasma cause adiabatic transport and form a fundamental linkage between the radial variation of flux-tube volume and the centrally peaked density and pressure profiles. In collaboration with M.E. Mauel and D.T. Garnier; supported by DoE FG02-98ER54458.

  12. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Gow, J.D.; Wilcox, J.M.

    1961-12-26

    A device is designed for producing and confining highenergy plasma from which neutrons are generated in copious quantities. A rotating sheath of electrons is established in a radial electric field and axial magnetic field produced within the device. The electron sheath serves as a strong ionizing medium to gas introdueed thereto and also functions as an extremely effective heating mechanism to the resulting plasma. In addition, improved confinement of the plasma is obtained by ring magnetic mirror fields produced at the ends of the device. Such ring mirror fields are defined by the magnetic field lines at the ends of the device diverging radially outward from the axis of the device and thereafter converging at spatial annular surfaces disposed concentrically thereabout. (AFC)

  13. Brulures par Diluant

    PubMed Central

    Benbrahim, A.; Jerrah, H.; Diouri, M.; Bahechar, N.; Boukind, E.H.

    2009-01-01

    Summary La flamme de diluant est une cause non rare de brûlure dans le contexte marocain. Nous avons jugé intéressant de faire une étude épidémiologique sur la brûlure par flamme de diluant (BFD) au centre national des brûlés (CNB) du CHU Ibn-Rochd de Casablanca. Ce travail a été réalisé sur une période de 10 mois (septembre 2007/juin 2008). Le but du travail est de montrer les caractéristiques de ce type de brûlures pour les prévenir et ce par l'information sur le diluant, produit causant ces brûlures, et ses différents dangers, la brûlure notamment. Durant cette période, nous avons colligé 17 cas de BFD sur un total de 356 patients admis au CNB pour brûlures aiguës toute étiologie confondue. La moyenne d'age des patients concernés est de 32 ans. Ils sont presque tous de sexe masculin (16 hommes/1 femme) et ont des antécédents de toxicomanie et/ou de délinquance. Tous nos patients sont de bas niveau socio-économique et habitent dans des bidonvilles pour la plupart. La brûlure est souvent secondaire à une agression dans la rue (92% des cas). Concernant les caractéristiques de la brûlure, la surface cutanée brûlée moyenne est de 23%; elle est souvent profonde et siège surtout au niveau des membres supérieurs et du tronc. PMID:21991179

  14. Field reversed configuration confinement enhancement through edge biasing and neutral beam injection.

    PubMed

    Tuszewski, M; Smirnov, A; Thompson, M C; Korepanov, S; Akhmetov, T; Ivanov, A; Voskoboynikov, R; Schmitz, L; Barnes, D; Binderbauer, M W; Brown, R; Bui, D Q; Clary, R; Conroy, K D; Deng, B H; Dettrick, S A; Douglass, J D; Garate, E; Glass, F J; Gota, H; Guo, H Y; Gupta, D; Gupta, S; Kinley, J S; Knapp, K; Longman, A; Hollins, M; Li, X L; Luo, Y; Mendoza, R; Mok, Y; Necas, A; Primavera, S; Ruskov, E; Schroeder, J H; Sevier, L; Sibley, A; Song, Y; Sun, X; Trask, E; Van Drie, A D; Walters, J K; Wyman, M D

    2012-06-22

    Field reversed configurations (FRCs) with high confinement are obtained in the C-2 device by combining plasma gun edge biasing and neutral beam injection. The plasma gun creates an inward radial electric field that counters the usual FRC spin-up. The n = 2 rotational instability is stabilized without applying quadrupole magnetic fields. The FRCs are nearly axisymmetric, which enables fast ion confinement. The plasma gun also produces E × B shear in the FRC edge layer, which may explain the observed improved particle transport. The FRC confinement times are improved by factors 2 to 4, and the plasma lifetimes are extended from 1 to up to 4 ms.

  15. Totally confined explosive welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The undesirable by-products of explosive welding are confined and the association noise is reduced by the use of a simple enclosure into which the explosive is placed and in which the explosion occurs. An infrangible enclosure is removably attached to one of the members to be bonded at the point directly opposite the bond area. An explosive is completely confined within the enclosure at a point in close proximity to the member to be bonded and a detonating means is attached to the explosive. The balance of the enclosure, not occupied by explosive, is filled with a shaped material which directs the explosive pressure toward the bond area. A detonator adaptor controls the expansion of the enclosure by the explosive force so that the enclosure at no point experiences a discontinuity in expansion which causes rupture. The use of the technique is practical in the restricted area of a space station.

  16. Confinement and water quality-induced stress in largemouth bass

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, G.J.; Tomasso, J.R.; Simco, B.A.; Davis, K.B.

    1984-11-01

    Plasma values of corticosteroids, glucose, chloride, and osmolality were determined in largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides under various environmental conditions. No differences were observed in quiescent fish due to sex, size, time of day, or the types of holding facilities tested (tanks, raceways, ponds). Differences were observed in plasma glucose, chloride, and osmolality values among fish acclimated to 10, 16, and 23 C. Abrupt temperature changes caused elevations in plasma corticosteroid and glucose concentrations and reduced plasma chloride and osmolality. Confinement in a net, for up to 48 hours, caused elevated glucose and corticosteroids and reduced chloride and osmolality values. After 48 hours of confinement, fish required up to 14 days to recover normal plasma characters. Generally, short-term exposure to poor water quality (high concentrations of CO/sub 2/ and NH/sub 3/, and low concentrations of dissolved oxygen) altered plasma corticosteroids and glucose but had little effect on plasma chloride or osmolality. Net confinement plus poor water quality caused additional stress. Plasma glucose and corticosteroid values were good indicators of stress during application of acute stressors whereas chloride and osmolality were useful indicators of long-term stress and patterns of recovery after stressors were removed.

  17. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  18. Energy confinement in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Sugihara, M.; Singer, C.

    1986-08-01

    A straightforward generalization is made of the ohmic heating energy confinement scalings of Pfeiffer and Waltz and Blackwell et. al. The resulting model is systematically calibrated to published data from limiter tokamaks with ohmic, electron cyclotron, and neutral beam heating. With considerably fewer explicitly adjustable free parameters, this model appears to give a better fit to the available data for limiter discharges than the combined ohmic/auxiliary heating model of Goldston.

  19. Classical confined particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horzela, Andrzej; Kapuscik, Edward

    1993-01-01

    An alternative picture of classical many body mechanics is proposed. In this picture particles possess individual kinematics but are deprived from individual dynamics. Dynamics exists only for the many particle system as a whole. The theory is complete and allows to determine the trajectories of each particle. It is proposed to use our picture as a classical prototype for a realistic theory of confined particles.

  20. Impurity confinement and transport in high confinement regimes without edge localized modes on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Grierson, B. A. Nazikian, R. M.; Solomon, W. M.; Burrell, K. H.; Garofalo, A. M.; Belli, E. A.; Staebler, G. M.; Evans, T. E.; Smith, S. P.; Chrobak, C.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; McKee, G. R.; Orlov, D. M.; Chrystal, C.

    2015-05-15

    Impurity transport in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] is investigated in stationary high confinement (H-mode) regimes without edge localized modes (ELMs). In plasmas maintained by resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP), ELM-suppression, and QH-mode, the confinement time of fluorine (Z = 9) is equivalent to that in ELMing discharges with 40 Hz ELMs. For selected discharges with impurity injection, the impurity particle confinement time compared to the energy confinement time is in the range of τ{sub p}/τ{sub e}≈2−3. In QH-mode operation, the impurity confinement time is shown to be smaller for intense, coherent magnetic, and density fluctuations of the edge harmonic oscillation than weaker fluctuations. Transport coefficients are derived from the time evolution of the impurity density profile and compared to neoclassical and turbulent transport models NEO and TGLF. Neoclassical transport of fluorine is found to be small compared to the experimental values. In the ELMing and RMP ELM-suppressed plasma, the impurity transport is affected by the presence of tearing modes. For radii larger than the mode radius, the TGLF diffusion coefficient is smaller than the experimental value by a factor of 2–3, while the convective velocity is within error estimates. Low levels of diffusion are observed for radii smaller than the tearing mode radius. In the QH-mode plasma investigated, the TGLF diffusion coefficient is higher inside of ρ=0.4 and lower outside of 0.4 than the experiment, and the TGLF convective velocity is more negative by a factor of approximately 1.7.

  1. The Par3 polarity protein is an exocyst receptor essential for mammary cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Syed Mukhtar; Macara, Ian G.

    2017-01-01

    The exocyst is an essential component of the secretory pathway required for delivery of basolateral proteins to the plasma membranes of epithelial cells. Delivery occurs adjacent to tight junctions (TJ), suggesting that it recognizes a receptor at this location. However, no such receptor has been identified. The Par3 polarity protein associates with TJs but has no known function in membrane traffic. We now show that, unexpectedly, Par3 is essential for mammary cell survival. Par3 silencing causes apoptosis, triggered by phosphoinositide trisphosphate depletion and decreased Akt phosphorylation, resulting from failure of the exocyst to deliver basolateral proteins to the cortex. A small region of PAR3 binds directly to Exo70 and is sufficient for exocyst docking, membrane-protein delivery and cell survival. PAR3 lacking this domain can associate with the cortex but cannot support exocyst function. We conclude that Par3 is the long-sought exocyst receptor required for targeted membrane-protein delivery. PMID:28358000

  2. Beam ion confinement on NSTX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Hao, G. Z.; Podesta, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.

    2016-10-01

    A second and more tangential neutral beam line is a major upgrade component of the National Spherical Torus Experiment - Upgrade (NSTX-U) with the purpose of improving neutral beam current drive efficiency and providing more flexibility in current/pressure profile control. Good beam ion confinement is essential to achieve the anticipated improvements in performance. In the planned beam ion confinement experiment, various short and long (relative to fast ion slowing-down time) neutral beam (NB) pulses from six neutral beam sources will be injected into center-stack limited L-mode plasmas to characterize the beam ion confinement and distribution function produced by the new and the existing NBI lines. The neutron rate decay after the turn-off of short NB pulses will be used to estimate the beam ion confinement time and to investigate its dependence on NB source/geometry, injection energy, and plasma current. The tangential and vertical Fast-Ion D-Alpha (FIDA) diagnostics and multi-view Solid State Neutral Particle Analyzer (SSNPA) arrays will be used to measure beam ion slowing-down distribution function and spatial profile during the injection of relatively long NB pulses. Beam ion prompt losses will be monitored with a scintillator Fast Lost Ion Probe (sFLIP) diagnostic. The experimental data and comparisons with classical predictions from NUBEAM modeling will be presented. Work supported by U.S. DOE DE-AC0209CH11466, DE-FG02-06ER54867, and DE-FG03-02ER54681.

  3. Density dependence of reactor performance with thermal confinement scalings

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D.P.

    1992-03-01

    Energy confinement scalings for the thermal component of the plasma published thus far have a different dependence on plasma density and input power than do scalings for the total plasma energy. With such thermal scalings, reactor performance (measured by Q, the ratio of the fusion power to the sum of the ohmic and auxiliary input powers) worsens with increasing density. This dependence is the opposite of that found using scalings based on the total plasma energy, indicating that reactor operation concepts may need to be altered if this density dependence is confirmed in future research.

  4. Par Pond vegetation status 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Riley, R.S.

    1996-12-01

    The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the newly emergent, shoreline aquatic plant communities of Par Pond began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level. These surveys continued in July, September, and late October, 1995, and into the early spring and late summer of 1996. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown, Par Pond aquatic plant communities continue to become re-established. Emergent beds of maidencane, lotus, waterlily, watershield, and Pontederia are extensive and well developed. Measures of percent cover, width of beds, and estimates of area of coverage with satellite data indicate regrowth within two years of from 40 to 60% of levels prior to the draw down. Cattail occurrence continued to increase during the summer of 1996, especially in the former warm arm of Par Pond, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the draw down still have not formed. Lotus has invaded and occupies many of the areas formerly dominated by cattail beds. To track the continued development of macrophytes in Par Pond, future surveys through the summer and early fall of 1997, along with the evaluation of satellite data to map the extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned.

  5. Quark confinement dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.J.; Olsson, M.G.; Veseli, S.; Williams, K. |

    1997-05-01

    Starting from Buchm{umlt u}ller{close_quote}s observation that a chromoelectric flux tube meson will exhibit only the Thomas-type spin-orbit interaction, we show that a model built upon the related assumption that a quark feels only a constant radial chromoelectric field in its rest frame implies a complete relativistic effective Hamiltonian that can be written explicitly in terms of quark canonical variables. The model yields linear Regge trajectories and exhibits some similarities to scalar confinement, but with the advantage of being more closely linked to QCD. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Confinement Vessel Dynamic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R. Robert Stevens; Stephen P. Rojas

    1999-08-01

    A series of hydrodynamic and structural analyses of a spherical confinement vessel has been performed. The analyses used a hydrodynamic code to estimate the dynamic blast pressures at the vessel's internal surfaces caused by the detonation of a mass of high explosive, then used those blast pressures as applied loads in an explicit finite element model to simulate the vessel's structural response. Numerous load cases were considered. Particular attention was paid to the bolted port connections and the O-ring pressure seals. The analysis methods and results are discussed, and comparisons to experimental results are made.

  7. Confinement Contains Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Roberts, Craig D.; Shrock, Robert; Tandy, Peter C.

    2012-03-12

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its connection to the generation of hadron masses has historically been viewed as a vacuum phenomenon. We argue that confinement makes such a position untenable. If quark-hadron duality is a reality in QCD, then condensates, those quantities that have commonly been viewed as constant empirical mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons; i.e., they are a property of hadrons themselves and expressed, e.g., in their Bethe-Salpeter or light-front wave functions. We explain that this paradigm is consistent with empirical evidence, and incidentally expose misconceptions in a recent Comment.

  8. Quark Confinement and Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    't Hooft, Gerardus

    QCD was proposed as a theory for the strong interactions long before we had any idea as to how it could be that its fundamental constituents, the quarks, are never seen as physical particles. Massless gluons also do not exist as free particles. How can this be explained? The first indication that this question had to be considered in connection with the topological structure of a gauge theory came when Nielsen and Olesen observed the occurrence of stable magnetic vortex structures [1] in the Abelian Higgs model. Expanding on such ideas, the magnetic monopole solution was found [2]. Other roundabout attempts to understand confinement involve instantons. Today, we have better interpretations of these topological structures, including a general picture of the way they do lead to unbound potentials confining quarks. It is clear that these unbound potentials can be ascribed to a string-like structure of the vortices formed by the QCD field lines. Can string theory be used to analyze QCD? Many researchers think so. The leading expert on this is Sacha Polyakov. In his instructive account he adds how he experienced the course of events in Gauge Theory, emphasizing the fact that quite a few discoveries often ascribed to researchers from the West, actually were made independently by scientists from the Soviet Union…

  9. Diamagnetism of rotating plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Young, W. C.; Hassam, A. B.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Ellis, R. F.; Teodorescu, C.

    2011-11-15

    Diamagnetism and magnetic measurements of a supersonically rotating plasma in a shaped magnetic field demonstrate confinement of plasma pressure along the magnetic field resulting from centrifugal force. The Grad-Shafranov equation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic force balance, including supersonic rotation, is solved to confirm that the predicted angular velocity is in agreement with spectroscopic measurements of the Doppler shifts.

  10. Plasma engineering for MARS

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, G.A.; Baldwin, D.E.; Barr, W.L.

    1983-03-24

    The two-year Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) has resulted in the conceptual design of a commercial, electricity-producing fusion reactor based on tandem mirror confinement. The physics basis for the MARS reactor was developed through work in two highly coupled areas of plasma engineering: magnetics and plasma performance.

  11. Plasma control and utilization

    DOEpatents

    Ensley, Donald L.

    1976-12-28

    A plasma is confined and heated by a microwave field resonant in a cavity excited in a combination of the TE and TM modes while responding to the resonant frequency of the cavity as the plasma dimensions change to maintain operation at resonance. The microwave field is elliptically or circularly polarized as to prevent the electromagnetic confining field from going to zero. A high Q chamber having superconductive walls is employed to minimize wall losses while providing for extraction of thermonuclear energy produced by fusion of nuclei in the plasma.

  12. Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, July--September 1994. Volume 4, Number 4

    SciTech Connect

    Honea, E.

    1994-09-01

    The ICF Quarterly continues with six articles in this issue describing recent developments in the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The topics include plasma characterization, production of millimeter scale-length plasmas for studying laser-plasma instabilities, hohlraum physics, three-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling, crystal growth, and laser-beam smoothing.

  13. Amoeboid motion in confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Thiébaud, M.; Hu, W.-F.; Farutin, A.; Rafaï, S.; Lai, M.-C.; Peyla, P.; Misbah, C.

    2015-11-01

    Many eukaryotic cells undergo frequent shape changes (described as amoeboid motion) that enable them to move forward. We investigate the effect of confinement on a minimal model of amoeboid swimmer. A complex picture emerges: (i) The swimmer's nature (i.e., either pusher or puller) can be modified by confinement, thus suggesting that this is not an intrinsic property of the swimmer. This swimming nature transition stems from intricate internal degrees of freedom of membrane deformation. (ii) The swimming speed might increase with increasing confinement before decreasing again for stronger confinements. (iii) A straight amoeoboid swimmer's trajectory in the channel can become unstable, and ample lateral excursions of the swimmer prevail. This happens for both pusher- and puller-type swimmers. For weak confinement, these excursions are symmetric, while they become asymmetric at stronger confinement, whereby the swimmer is located closer to one of the two walls. In this study, we combine numerical and theoretical analyses.

  14. Amoeboid motion in confined geometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Thiébaud, M; Hu, W-F; Farutin, A; Rafaï, S; Lai, M-C; Peyla, P; Misbah, C

    2015-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cells undergo frequent shape changes (described as amoeboid motion) that enable them to move forward. We investigate the effect of confinement on a minimal model of amoeboid swimmer. A complex picture emerges: (i) The swimmer's nature (i.e., either pusher or puller) can be modified by confinement, thus suggesting that this is not an intrinsic property of the swimmer. This swimming nature transition stems from intricate internal degrees of freedom of membrane deformation. (ii) The swimming speed might increase with increasing confinement before decreasing again for stronger confinements. (iii) A straight amoeoboid swimmer's trajectory in the channel can become unstable, and ample lateral excursions of the swimmer prevail. This happens for both pusher- and puller-type swimmers. For weak confinement, these excursions are symmetric, while they become asymmetric at stronger confinement, whereby the swimmer is located closer to one of the two walls. In this study, we combine numerical and theoretical analyses.

  15. Immune responses in humans after 60 days of confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, D. A.; Peres, C.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Tkackzuk, J.; Arquier, M.; Mauco, G.; Ohayon, E.

    1995-01-01

    A confinement experiment in a normobaric diving chamber was undertaken to better understand the effect of confinement and isolation on human psychology and physiology. Pre- and postconfinement blood samples were obtained from four test subjects and control donors to analyze immune responses. No modification in the levels of CD2+, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD19+, and CD56+ cells was observed after confinement. Mitogen-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation and interleukin-2 receptor expression were not altered significantly. Whole blood interferon-alpha and gamma-induction and plasma cortisol levels were also unchanged, as was natural killer cell activity. These data suggest that in humans, no specific components of the immune response are affected by a 2-month isolation and confinement of a small group.

  16. The role of collisions and scattering in differential confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochs, Ian; Fisch, Nathaniel; Gueroult, Renaud; Zweben, Stewart

    2016-10-01

    Much of plasma physics is concerned with the overall confinement of all species present. However, in certain applications, it is desirable to confine some species while allowing others to escape, or to have different species escape to different regions. In this study, we examine one class of differential confinement system, the plasma mass filter, and evaluate the regimes of feasible operation given realistic confounding effects such as collisions with neutrals and ions, turbulence, and radiative losses. In schemes that rely on Larmor motion, we find that the low-temperature requirement imposed by line radiation necessitates a large ( 1 T) magnetic field at the densities required for high throughput, since the Coulomb collision frequency scales as T - 3 / 2. There are, however, a variety of ways that may be contemplated to achieve separation effects.

  17. Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) Fusion for Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadler, Jon

    1999-01-01

    An Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device was assembled at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Propulsion Research Center (PRC) to study the possibility of using EEC technology for deep space propulsion and power. Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement is capable of containing a nuclear fusion plasma in a series of virtual potential wells. These wells would substantially increase plasma confinement, possibly leading towards a high-gain, breakthrough fusion device. A one-foot in diameter IEC vessel was borrowed from the Fusion Studies Laboratory at the University of Illinois@Urbana-Champaign for the summer. This device was used in initial parameterization studies in order to design a larger, actively cooled device for permanent use at the PRC.

  18. Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) Fusion For Space Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadler, Jon

    1999-01-01

    An Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device was assembled at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Propulsion Research Center (PRC) to study the possibility of using IEC technology for deep space propulsion and power. Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement is capable of containing a nuclear fusion plasma in a series of virtual potential wells. These wells would substantially increase plasma confinement, possibly leading towards a high-gain, breakthrough fusion device. A one-foot in diameter IEC vessel was borrowed from the Fusion Studies Laboratory at the University of Illinois @ Urbana-Champaign for the summer. This device was used in initial parameterization studies in order to design a larger, actively cooled device for permanent use at the PRC.

  19. Home versus hospital confinement

    PubMed Central

    Barry, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    The case for hospital rather than home delivery has been powerfully argued, especially in and since the Report of the Peel Committee. Nevertheless, evidence of comparison with other countries, notably the Netherlands, suggests the choice is not necessarily simple. Some general practitioner units are now reporting perinatal mortality rates which are consistently lower than those of specialist units, and recent statistical analyses suggest that the presence of more high risk cases in consultant units does not explain this. The only big controlled home-versus-hospital trial did not lead to a significantly lower perinatal mortality rate in the hospital group. The onus of proof now seems to lie with those who advocate 100 per cent hospital confinement. PMID:7373581

  20. High-temperature plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Furth, H.P.

    1988-03-01

    Both magnetic and inertial confinement research are entering the plasma parameter range of fusion reactor interest. This paper reviews the individual and common technical problems of these two approaches to the generation of thermonuclear plasmas, and describes some related applications of high-temperature plasma physics.

  1. Coronal electron confinement by double layers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2013-12-01

    In observations of flare-heated electrons in the solar corona, a longstanding problem is the unexplained prolonged lifetime of the electrons compared to their transit time across the source. This suggests confinement. Recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, which explored the transport of pre-accelerated hot electrons through ambient cold plasma, showed that the formation of a highly localized electrostatic potential drop, in the form of a double layer (DL), significantly inhibited the transport of hot electrons. The effectiveness of confinement by a DL is linked to the strength of the DL as defined by its potential drop. In this work, we investigate the scaling of the DL strength with the hot electron temperature by PIC simulations and find a linear scaling. We demonstrate that the strength is limited by the formation of parallel shocks. Based on this, we analytically determine the maximum DL strength, and also find a linear scaling with the hot electron temperature. The DL strength obtained from the analytic calculation is comparable to that from the simulations. At the maximum strength, the DL is capable of confining a significant fraction of hot electrons in the source.

  2. High beta and confinement studies on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, G.A.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Iacono, R.; Mauel, M.E.; Sabbagh, S.A. ); Kesner, J. )

    1992-01-01

    A new regime of high poloidal beta operation in TFTR was developed in the course of the first two years of this project (9/25/89 to 9/24/91). Our proposal to continue this successful collaboration between Columbia University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for a three year period (9/25/91 to 9/24/94) to continue to investigate improved confinement and tokamak performance in high poloidal beta plasmas in TFTR through the DT phase of operation was approved by the DOE and this is a report of our progress during the first 9 month budget period of the three year grant (9/25/91 to 6/24/92). During the approved three year project period we plan to (1) extend and apply the low current, high QDD discharges to the operation of TFTR using Deuterium and Tritium plasma; (2) continue the analysis and plan experiments on high poloidal beta phenomena in TFTR including: stability properties, enhanced global confinement, local transport, bootstrap current, and divertor formation; (3) plan and carry out experiments on TFTR which attempt to elevate the central q to values > 2 where entry to the second stability regime is predicted to occur; and (4) collaborate on high beta experiments using bean-shaped plasmas with a stabilizing conducting shell in PBX-M. In the seven month period covered by this report we have made progress in each of these four areas through the submission of 4 TFTR Experimental Proposals and the partial execution of 3 of these using a total of 4.5 run days during the August 1991 to February 1992 run.

  3. Exploration of locomotion in the ParA/ParB system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Lavisha; Emberly, Eldon

    2015-03-01

    In many bacteria the ParA/ParB system is responsible for actively segregating DNA during replication. ParB precessively moves by hydrolyzing DNA bound ParA-ATP forming a depleted ParA region in its wake. Recent in-vitro experiments have shown that a ParB covered bead can traverse a ParA bound DNA substrate. It has been suggested that the formation of a gradient in ParA leads to diffusion-ratchet like motion of the ParB bead but its origin and potential consequences requires investigation. We have developed a deterministic model for the in-vitro ParA/ParB system and show that any amount of spatial noise in ParA can lead to the spontaneous formation of its gradient. The velocity of the bead is independent of this noise but depends on the scale over which ParA exerts a force on the bead and the scale over which ParB hydrolyzes ParA from the substrate. There is a particular ratio of these scales at which the velocity is a maximum. We also explore the effects of cooperative vs independent rebinding of ParA to the substrate. Our model shows how the driving force for ParB originates and highlights necessary conditions for directed motion in the in-vitro system that may provide insight into the in-vivo behaviour of the ParA/ParB system.

  4. Tgermonuclear Ignition in Inertial Confinement Fusion and Comparison with Magnetic Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Betti, R.; Chang, P.Y.; Spears, B.K.; Anderson, K.S.; Edwards, J.; Fatenejad, M.; Lindl, J.D.; McCrory, R.L.; Nora, R.; Shvarts, D.

    2010-04-23

    The physics of thermonuclear ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is presented in the familiar frame of a Lawson-type criterion. The product of the plasma pressure and confinement time Ptau for ICF is cast in terms of measurable parameters and its value is estimated for cryogenic implosions. An overall ignition parameter chi including pressure, confinement time, and temperature is derived to complement the product Ptau. A metric for performance assessment should include both chi and Ptau. The ignition parameter and the product Ptau are compared between inertial and magnetic-confinement fusion. It is found that cryogenic implosions on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have achieved Ptau ~ 1.5 atm s comparable to large tokamaks such as the Joint European Torus [P. H. Rebut and B. E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)] where Ptau ~ 1 atm s. Since OMEGA implosions are relatively cold (T ~ 2 keV), their overall ignition parameter chi ~ 0.02–0.03 is ~5X lower than in JET (chi ~ 0.13), where the average temperature is about 10 keV.

  5. Hot electron confinement in a microwave heated spindle cusp

    SciTech Connect

    Prelas, M.A.

    1991-08-01

    The Plasma Research Laboratory at the University of Missouri-Columbia was established with awards from the McDonnel Douglas Foundation, ARMCO, Union Electric, Black and Vetch, Kansas City Power and Light, the National Science Foundation, and DOE. The Plasma Research Lab's major effort is the Missouri Magnetic Mirror (MMM or M{sup 3}) Project. The technical goals of MMM have been (1) Diagnostic Development, (2) Plasma Physics in the Cusp geometry, (3) plasma-wall interactions, (4) impurity effects in a steady-state plasma, and (5) Development of Diagnostics for use in harsh plasma processing environments. The other major goal of MMM has remained providing a facility for hands-on training in experimental plasma physics. The major experimental facility of MMM is the MMM Modified Experiment (M4X). Other research efforts in the Plasma Research Laboratory include small efforts in cold fusion, toroidal magnetic confinement, and inertial confinement and a potentially major effort in direct conversion of nuclear energy.

  6. Hot electron confinement in a microwave heated spindle cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prelas, M. A.

    1991-08-01

    The Plasma Research Laboratory at the University of Missouri-Columbia was established with awards from the McDonnell Douglas Foundation, ARMCO, Union Electric, Black and Vetch, Kansas City Power and Light, the National Science Foundation, and DOE. The Plasma Research Lab's major effort is the Missouri Magnetic Mirror (MMM or M(exp 3)) Project. The technical goals of MMM have been (1) Diagnostic Development, (2) Plasma Physics in the Cusp geometry, (3) plasma-wall interactions, (4) impurity effects in a steady-state plasma, and (5) Development of Diagnostics for use in harsh plasma processing environments. The other major goal of MMM has remained providing a facility for hands-on training in experimental plasma physics. The major experimental facility of MMM is the MMM Modified Experiment (M4X). Other research efforts in the Plasma Research Laboratory include small efforts in cold fusion, toroidal magnetic confinement, and inertial confinement and a potentially major effort in direct conversion of nuclear energy.

  7. Participation of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in neutrophil transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Pliyev, Boris K; Antonova, Olga A; Menshikov, Mikhail

    2011-05-01

    The mechanisms underlying migration of neutrophils across endothelium are not completely understood. The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) plays a key role in neutrophil adhesion and migration. In the present study, we addressed whether uPAR regulates neutrophil transendothelial migration. We first showed that siRNA-mediated knockdown of uPAR in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) did not affect neutrophil migration across HUVEC monolayers indicating that endothelial uPAR does not regulate neutrophil transmigration. In contrast, the transmigration was significantly inhibited by Fab' fragment of anti-uPAR monoclonal antibody and proteolytically inactive urokinase (uPA), whereas inhibition of proteolytical activity of endogenous uPA (with amiloride or plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) did not affect the transmigration. Both the anti-uPAR Fab' fragment and proteolytically inactive uPA did not exert significant effects upon the transmigration conducted in the presence of F(ab')(2) fragment of blocking antibody to integrin Mac-1 indicating that uPAR regulates Mac-1-dependent transmigration. Mac-1-dependent, but not Mac-1-independent, transmigration was significantly reduced in the presence of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine and d-mannose, the saccharides that disrupt uPAR/Mac-1 association, but was unaffected in the presence of control saccharides (d-sorbitol and sucrose). We conclude that physical association of uPAR with Mac-1 mediates the regulatory effect of uPAR over the transmigration. Finally, we provide evidence that the functional cooperation between uPAR and Mac-1 is essential at both adhesion and diapedesis steps of neutrophil migration across endothelium. Thus, uPAR expressed on neutrophil plasma membrane regulates transendothelial migration independently of uPA proteolytical activity and acting as a cofactor for integrin Mac-1.

  8. High confinement dissipative divertor operation on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, J. A.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Pitcher, C. S.; Terry, J. L.; Boswell, C.; Gangadhara, S.; Pappas, D.; Weaver, J.; Welch, B.; Boivin, R. L.; Bonoli, P.; Fiore, C.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A.; Hutchinson, I.; Irby, J.; Marmar, E.; Mossessian, D.; Porkolab, M.; Rice, J.; Rowan, W. L.; Schilling, G.; Snipes, J.; Takase, Y.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.

    1999-05-01

    Alcator C-Mod [I. H. Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] has operated a High-confinement-mode (H-mode) plasma together with a dissipative divertor and low core Zeff. The initially attached plasma is characterized by steady-state enhancement factor, HITER89P [P. N. Yushmanov et al., Nucl. Fusion 30, 1999 (1990)], of 1.9, central Zeff of 1.1, and a radiative fraction of ˜50%. Feedback control of a nitrogen gas puff is used to increase radiative losses in both the core/edge and divertor plasmas in almost equal amounts. Simultaneously, the core plasma maintains HITER89P of 1.6 and Zeff of 1.4 in this nearly 100% radiative state. The power and particle flux to the divertor plates have been reduced to very low levels while the core plasma is relatively unchanged by the dissipative nature of the divertor.

  9. Multipolar ECR plasma characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Ciubotariu, C.I.; Golovanivsky, K.S.; Bacal, M.

    1995-12-31

    There has been considerable interest in the development of intense negative ion sources for use in high-energy neutral beam heating and diagnostics systems for nuclear fusion plasmas. As it was shown by one of the authors overdense ECR plasmas seem to be an appropriate medium to produce H-ions at high rate. Overdense plasmas are a result of the microwave({mu}wave) power absorption in ECR plasma heating and magnetic field confinement. Our aim is to characterize the hydrogen plasma produced in a 2.45 GHz multipolar negative ion ECR source (ECRIN).

  10. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Brathenahl, A.; Furth, H.P.

    1962-04-10

    A device for producing a confined high temperature plasma is described. In the device the concave inner surface of an outer annular electrode is disposed concentrically about and facing the convex outer face of an inner annular electrode across which electrodes a high potential is applied to produce an electric field there between. Means is provided to create a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field and a gas is supplied at reduced pressure in the area therebetween. Upon application of the high potential, the gas between the electrodes is ionized, heated, and under the influence of the electric and magnetic fields there is produced a rotating annular plasma disk. The ionized plasma has high dielectric constant properties. The device is useful as a fast discharge rate capacitor, in controlled thermonuclear research, and other high temperature gas applications. (AEC)

  11. Confined helium on Lagrange meshes.

    PubMed

    Baye, D; Dohet-Eraly, J

    2015-12-21

    The Lagrange-mesh method has the simplicity of a calculation on a mesh and can have the accuracy of a variational method. It is applied to the study of a confined helium atom. Two types of confinement are considered. Soft confinements by potentials are studied in perimetric coordinates. Hard confinement in impenetrable spherical cavities is studied in a system of rescaled perimetric coordinates varying in [0,1] intervals. Energies and mean values of the distances between electrons and between an electron and the helium nucleus are calculated. A high accuracy of 11 to 15 significant figures is obtained with small computing times. Pressures acting on the confined atom are also computed. For sphere radii smaller than 1, their relative accuracies are better than 10(-10). For larger radii up to 10, they progressively decrease to 10(-3), still improving the best literature results.

  12. Confined Selective Withdrawal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelio, Alvaro; Campo-Cortes, Francisco; Gordillo, Jose Manuel

    2014-11-01

    It is well known that the controlled production of monodisperse simple and composite emulsions possesses uncountable applications in medicine, pharmacy, materials science and industry. Here we present both experiments and slender-body theory regarding the generation of simple emulsions using a configuration that we have called Confined Selective Withdrawal, since it is an improved configuration of the classical Selective Withdrawal. We consider two different situations, namely, the cases when the outer flow Reynolds number is high and low, respectively. Several geometrical configurations and a wide range of viscosity ratios are analyzed so that the physics behind the phenomenon can be fully understood. In addition, we present both experiments and theory regarding the generation of composite emulsions. This phenomenon is only feasible when the outer flow Reynolds number is low enough. In this case, we propose a more complex theory which requires the simultaneous resolution of two interfaces in order to predict the shape of the jet and the sizes of the drops formed. The excellent agreement between our slender-body approximation and the experimental evidence fully validates our theories.

  13. Effect of internal magnetic structure on energetic ion confinement in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.W.; Kaita, R.; Levinton, F.; Asakura, N.; Bell, R.; Chance, M.; Duperrex, P.; Gammel, G.; Hatcher, R.; Holland, A.; Kaye, S.; Kessel, C.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Pomphrey, N.; Powell, E.; Sauthoff, N.; Sesnic, S.; Takahashi, H.; White, R. )

    1993-08-16

    For the tokamak magnetic confinement concept, theory has predicted a distinct relationship between the plasma shape, the internal magnetic structure, and the presence or absence of fast ion losses in the presence of plasma instabilities. We have, for the first time, carried out measurements of the magnetic safety factor profile, [ital q]([ital r]), in plasmas unstable to a specific instability, the so-called fishbone'' mode. The experimental equilibria reconstructed from these data have been used to demonstrate that when the plasma is unstable to fishbones, the fast ion confinement properties depend strongly on the radius of the magnetic surface where [ital q]([ital r])=1.

  14. Axisymmetric Tandem Mirrors: Stabilization and Confinement Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R F; Fowler, T K; Bulmer, R; Byers, J; Hua, D; Tung, L

    2004-07-15

    The 'Kinetic Stabilizer' has been proposed as a means of MHD stabilizing an axisymmetric tandem mirror system. The K-S concept is based on theoretical studies by Ryutov, confirmed experimentally in the Gas Dynamic Trap experiment in Novosibirsk. In the K-S beams of ions are directed into the end of an 'expander' region outside the outer mirror of a tandem mirror. These ions, slowed, stagnated, and reflected as they move up the magnetic gradient, produce a low-density stabilizing plasma. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory we have been conducting theoretical and computational studies of the K-S Tandem Mirror. These studies have employed a low-beta code written especially to analyze the beam injection/stabilization process, and a new code SYMTRAN (by Hua and Fowler) that solves the coupled radial and axial particle and energy transport in a K-S TM. Also, a 'legacy' MHD stability code, FLORA, has been upgraded and employed to benchmark the injection/stabilization code and to extend its results to high beta values. The FLORA code studies so far have confirmed the effectiveness of the K-S in stabilizing high-beta (40%) plasmas with stabilizer plasmas the peak pressures of which are several orders of magnitude smaller than those of the confined plasma. Also the SYMTRAN code has shown D-T plasma ignition from alpha particle energy deposition in T-M regimes with strong end plugging. Our studies have confirmed the viability of the K-S-T-M concept with respect to MHD stability and radial and axial confinement. We are continuing these studies in order to optimize the parameters and to examine means for the stabilization of possible residual instability modes, such as drift modes and 'trapped-particle' modes. These modes may in principle be controlled by tailoring the stabilizer plasma distribution and/or the radial potential distribution. In the paper the results to date of our studies are summarized and projected to scope out possible fusion-power versions of the K

  15. Runaway electrons and magnetic island confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2016-08-19

    The breakup of magnetic surfaces is a central feature of ITER planning for the avoidance of damage due to runaway electrons. Rapid thermal quenches, which lead to large accelerating voltages, are thought to be due to magnetic surface breakup. Impurity injection to avoid and to mitigate both halo and runaway electron currents utilizes massive gas injection or shattered pellets. The actual deposition is away from the plasma center, and the breakup of magnetic surfaces is thought to spread the effects of the impurities across the plasma cross section. The breakup of magnetic surfaces would prevent runaway electrons from reaching relativistic energies were it not for the persistence of non-intercepting flux tubes. These are tubes of magnetic field lines that do not intercept the walls. In simulations and in magnetic field models, non-intercepting flux tubes are found to persist near the magnetic axis and in the cores of magnetic islands even when a large scale magnetic surface breakup occurs. As long as a few magnetic surfaces reform before all of the non-intercepting flux tubes dissipate, energetic electrons confined and accelerated in these flux tubes can serve as the seed electrons for a transfer of the overall plasma current from thermal to relativistic carriers. The acceleration of electrons is particularly strong because of the sudden changes in the poloidal flux that naturally occur in a rapid magnetic relaxation. Furthermore, the physics of magnetic islands as non-intercepting flux tubes is studied. Expressions are derived for (1) the size of islands required to confine energetic runaway electrons, (2) the accelerating electric field in an island, (3) the increase or reduction in the size of an island by the runaway electron current, (4) the approximate magnitude of the runaway current in an island, and (5) the time scale for the evolution of an island.

  16. Runaway electrons and magnetic island confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2016-08-01

    The breakup of magnetic surfaces is a central feature of ITER planning for the avoidance of damage due to runaway electrons. Rapid thermal quenches, which lead to large accelerating voltages, are thought to be due to magnetic surface breakup. Impurity injection to avoid and to mitigate both halo and runaway electron currents utilizes massive gas injection or shattered pellets. The actual deposition is away from the plasma center, and the breakup of magnetic surfaces is thought to spread the effects of the impurities across the plasma cross section. The breakup of magnetic surfaces would prevent runaway electrons from reaching relativistic energies were it not for the persistence of non-intercepting flux tubes. These are tubes of magnetic field lines that do not intercept the walls. In simulations and in magnetic field models, non-intercepting flux tubes are found to persist near the magnetic axis and in the cores of magnetic islands even when a large scale magnetic surface breakup occurs. As long as a few magnetic surfaces reform before all of the non-intercepting flux tubes dissipate, energetic electrons confined and accelerated in these flux tubes can serve as the seed electrons for a transfer of the overall plasma current from thermal to relativistic carriers. The acceleration of electrons is particularly strong because of the sudden changes in the poloidal flux that naturally occur in a rapid magnetic relaxation. The physics of magnetic islands as non-intercepting flux tubes is studied. Expressions are derived for (1) the size of islands required to confine energetic runaway electrons, (2) the accelerating electric field in an island, (3) the increase or reduction in the size of an island by the runaway electron current, (4) the approximate magnitude of the runaway current in an island, and (5) the time scale for the evolution of an island.

  17. Runaway electrons and magnetic island confinement

    DOE PAGES

    Boozer, Allen H.

    2016-08-19

    The breakup of magnetic surfaces is a central feature of ITER planning for the avoidance of damage due to runaway electrons. Rapid thermal quenches, which lead to large accelerating voltages, are thought to be due to magnetic surface breakup. Impurity injection to avoid and to mitigate both halo and runaway electron currents utilizes massive gas injection or shattered pellets. The actual deposition is away from the plasma center, and the breakup of magnetic surfaces is thought to spread the effects of the impurities across the plasma cross section. The breakup of magnetic surfaces would prevent runaway electrons from reaching relativisticmore » energies were it not for the persistence of non-intercepting flux tubes. These are tubes of magnetic field lines that do not intercept the walls. In simulations and in magnetic field models, non-intercepting flux tubes are found to persist near the magnetic axis and in the cores of magnetic islands even when a large scale magnetic surface breakup occurs. As long as a few magnetic surfaces reform before all of the non-intercepting flux tubes dissipate, energetic electrons confined and accelerated in these flux tubes can serve as the seed electrons for a transfer of the overall plasma current from thermal to relativistic carriers. The acceleration of electrons is particularly strong because of the sudden changes in the poloidal flux that naturally occur in a rapid magnetic relaxation. Furthermore, the physics of magnetic islands as non-intercepting flux tubes is studied. Expressions are derived for (1) the size of islands required to confine energetic runaway electrons, (2) the accelerating electric field in an island, (3) the increase or reduction in the size of an island by the runaway electron current, (4) the approximate magnitude of the runaway current in an island, and (5) the time scale for the evolution of an island.« less

  18. Smoky Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2006-10-01

    The mesosphere contains nanometer-sized smoke particles that have formed in the vapor trails of meteors and that are thought to be the condensation nuclei for noctilucent clouds. Laboratory dusty plasmas often have the dust particles in a layer at the lower sheath boundary. We examine the possibility of creating in a double-plasma device a smoky plasma in which the particles would be sufficiently small to fill the plasma nearly uniformly while being sufficiently large to exhibit multiple charge states that would distinguish the smoky plasma from one containing heavy negative ions. For example, nanometer sized atomic clusters of Ag (4 nm radius, 10,000 atoms) can be generated in an oven with an inert gas that carries the particles into the plasma chamber. These particles will become charged negatively with about 8 electrons and will then be electrostatically contained by the presheath electric field The confining electric force will also be greater than the ion drag force that could otherwise create a void in the smoke particle density distribution. This plasma would make possible, for example, experiments on the coupling of electrostatic waves to fluid turbulence by the neutral drag force. An acoustic wave propagating in smoky plasma will exert different drag forces on electrons, ions, and smoke particles thus creating a charge-separation electric field that can be measured by potential probes. This coupling may be the origin of electrostatic fluctuations seen by rocket-borne electric field probes in the mesosphere. Supported by the NSF/DOE Plasma Science Initiative.

  19. Psychopathological effects of solitary confinement.

    PubMed

    Grassian, S

    1983-11-01

    Psychopathological reactions to solitary confinement were extensively described by nineteenth-century German clinicians. In the United States there have been several legal challenges to the use of solitary confinement, based on allegations that it may have serious psychiatric consequences. The recent medical literature on this subject has been scarce. The author describes psychiatric symptoms that appeared in 14 inmates exposed to periods of increased social isolation and sensory restriction in solitary confinement and asserts that these symptoms form a major, clinically distinguishable psychiatric syndrome.

  20. Spatial confinement of muonium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaw, K. S.; Antognini, A.; Prokscha, T.; Kirch, K.; Liszkay, L.; Salman, Z.; Crivelli, P.

    2016-08-01

    We report the achievement of spatial confinement of muonium atoms (the bound state of a positive muon and an electron). Muonium emitted into a vacuum from mesoporous silica reflects between two SiO2 confining surfaces separated by 1 mm. From the data, one can extract that the reflection probability on the confining surfaces kept at 100 K is about 90% and the reflection process is well described by a cosine law. This technique enables new experiments with this exotic atomic system and is a very important step towards a measurement of the 1 S -2 S transition frequency using continuous-wave laser spectroscopy.

  1. Enhanced coupling of optical energy during liquid-confined metal ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Welch, Ashley J.

    2015-10-21

    Liquid-confined laser ablation was investigated with various metals of indium, aluminum, and nickel. Ablation threshold and rate were characterized in terms of surface deformation, transient acoustic responses, and plasma emissions. The surface condition affected the degree of ablation dynamics due to variations in reflectance. The liquid confinement yielded up to an order of larger ablation crater along with stronger acoustic transients than dry ablation. Enhanced ablation performance resulted possibly from effective coupling of optical energy at the interface during explosive vaporization, plasma confinement, and cavitation. The deposition of a liquid layer can induce more efficient ablation for laser metal processing.

  2. A double-layer based model of ion confinement in electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Mascali, D. Neri, L.; Celona, L.; Castro, G.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Torrisi, G.; Sorbello, G.

    2014-02-15

    The paper proposes a new model of ion confinement in ECRIS, which can be easily generalized to any magnetic configuration characterized by closed magnetic surfaces. Traditionally, ion confinement in B-min configurations is ascribed to a negative potential dip due to superhot electrons, adiabatically confined by the magneto-static field. However, kinetic simulations including RF heating affected by cavity modes structures indicate that high energy electrons populate just a thin slab overlapping the ECR layer, while their density drops down of more than one order of magnitude outside. Ions, instead, diffuse across the electron layer due to their high collisionality. This is the proper physical condition to establish a double-layer (DL) configuration which self-consistently originates a potential barrier; this “barrier” confines the ions inside the plasma core surrounded by the ECR surface. The paper will describe a simplified ion confinement model based on plasma density non-homogeneity and DL formation.

  3. Par Pond Fish, Water, and Sediment Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, M.H.; Wike, L.D.

    1996-06-01

    The objectives of this report are to describe the Par Pond fish community and the impact of the drawdown and refill on the community, describe contaminant levels in Par Pond fish, sediments, and water and indicate how contaminant concentrations and distributions were affected by the drawdown and refill, and predict possible effects of future water level fluctuations in Par Pond.

  4. Directed and persistent movement arises from mechanochemistry of the ParA/ParB system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Longhua; Vecchiarelli, Anthony G.; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi; Neuman, Keir C.; Liu, Jian

    The segregation of DNA prior to cell division is essential for faithful genetic inheritance. In many bacteria, segregation of the low-copy-number plasmids involves an active partition system composed of ParA ATPase and its stimulator protein ParB. Recent experiments suggest that ParA/ParB system motility is driven by a diffusion-ratchet mechanism in which ParB-coated plasmid both creates and follows a ParA gradient on the nucleoid surface. However, the detailed mechanism of ParA/ParB-mediated directed and persistent movement remains unknown. We develop a theoretical model describing ParA/ParB-mediated motility. We show that the ParA/ParB system can work as a Brownian ratchet, which effectively couples the ATPase-dependent cycling of ParA-nucleoid affinity to the motion of the ParB bound cargo. Paradoxically, the resulting processive motion relies on quenching diffusive plasmid motion through a large number of transient ParA/ParB-mediated tethers to the nucleoid surface. Our work sheds light on a new emergent phenomenon in which non-motor proteins work collectively via mechanochemical coupling to propel cargos -- an ingenious solution shaped by evolution to cope with the lack of processive motor proteins in bacteria.

  5. Assessing confinement in coastal lagoons.

    PubMed

    Canu, Donata Melaku; Solidoro, Cosimo; Umgiesser, Georg; Cucco, Andrea; Ferrarin, Christian

    2012-11-01

    Measures of transport scale in aquatic systems can contribute to the formulation of definitions of indicators of the system's ecological properties. This paper addresses confinement, a specific transport scale proposed by biological scientists as a parameter that can capture and synthesize the principal properties that determine the spatial structure of biological communities in transitional environments. Currently, there is no direct experimental measure of confinement. In this study, a methodology based on the accumulation rate within a lagoon of a passive tracer of marine origin is proposed, the influences of different factors in the calculation of confinement are analyzed, and general recommendations are derived. In particular, we analyze the spatial and the temporal variability of confinement and its sensitivity to the seasonal variability of climatic forcing, the inputs from rivers and the parameterization of the tidal exchanges. The Lagoon of Venice is used as a case study.

  6. Solvent cavitation under solvophobic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashbaugh, Henry S.

    2013-08-01

    The stability of liquids under solvophobic confinement can tip in favor of the vapor phase, nucleating a liquid-to-vapor phase transition that induces attractive forces between confining surfaces. In the case of water adjacent to hydrophobic surfaces, experimental and theoretical evidence support confinement-mediated evaporation stabilization of biomolecular and colloidal assemblies. The macroscopic thermodynamic theory of cavitation under confinement establishes the connection between the size of the confining surfaces, interfacial free energies, and bulk solvent pressure with the critical evaporation separation and interfacial forces. While molecular simulations have confirmed the broad theoretical trends, a quantitative comparison based on independent measurements of the interfacial free energies and liquid-vapor coexistence properties has, to the best of our knowledge, not yet been performed. To overcome the challenges of simulating a large number of systems to validate scaling predictions for a three-dimensional fluid, we simulate both the forces and liquid-vapor coexistence properties of a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid confined between solvophobic plates over a range of plate sizes and reservoir pressures. Our simulations quantitatively agree with theoretical predictions for solvent-mediated forces and critical evaporation separations once the length dependence of the solvation free energy of an individual confining plate is taken into account. The effective solid-liquid line tension length dependence results from molecular scale correlations for solvating microscopic plates and asymptotically decays to the macroscopic value for plates longer than 150 solvent diameters. The success of the macroscopic thermodynamic theory at describing two-dimensional liquids suggests application to surfactant monolayers to experimentally confirm confinement-mediated cavitation.

  7. Magnetic-confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ongena, J.; Koch, R.; Wolf, R.; Zohm, H.

    2016-05-01

    Our modern society requires environmentally friendly solutions for energy production. Energy can be released not only from the fission of heavy nuclei but also from the fusion of light nuclei. Nuclear fusion is an important option for a clean and safe solution for our long-term energy needs. The extremely high temperatures required for the fusion reaction are routinely realized in several magnetic-fusion machines. Since the early 1990s, up to 16 MW of fusion power has been released in pulses of a few seconds, corresponding to a power multiplication close to break-even. Our understanding of the very complex behaviour of a magnetized plasma at temperatures between 150 and 200 million °C surrounded by cold walls has also advanced substantially. This steady progress has resulted in the construction of ITER, a fusion device with a planned fusion power output of 500 MW in pulses of 400 s. ITER should provide answers to remaining important questions on the integration of physics and technology, through a full-size demonstration of a tenfold power multiplication, and on nuclear safety aspects. Here we review the basic physics underlying magnetic fusion: past achievements, present efforts and the prospects for future production of electrical energy. We also discuss questions related to the safety, waste management and decommissioning of a future fusion power plant.

  8. A Review of Quantum Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerade, Jean-Patrick

    2009-12-01

    A succinct history of the Confined Atom problem is presented. The hydrogen atom confined to the centre of an impenetrable sphere counts amongst the exactly soluble problems of physics, alongside much more noted exact solutions such as Black Body Radiation and the free Hydrogen atom in absence of any radiation field. It shares with them the disadvantage of being an idealisation, while at the same time encapsulating in a simple way particular aspects of physical reality. The problem was first formulated by Sommerfeld and Welker [1]—henceforth cited as SW—in connection with the behaviour of atoms at very high pressures, and the solution was published on the occasion of Pauli's 60th birthday celebration. At the time, it seemed that there was not much other connection with physical reality beyond a few simple aspects connected to the properties of atoms in solids, for which more appropriate models were soon developed. Thus, confined atoms attracted little attention until the advent of the metallofullerene, which provided the first example of a confined atom with properties quite closely related to those originally considered by SW. Since then, the problem has received much more attention, and many more new features of quantum confinement, quantum compression, the quantum Faraday cage, electronic reorganisation, cavity resonances, etc have been described, which are relevant to real systems. Also, a number of other situations have been uncovered experimentally to which quantum confinement is relevant. Thus, studies of the confined atom are now more numerous, and have been extended both in terms of the models used and the systems to which they can be applied. Connections to thermodynamics are explored through the properties of a confined two-level atom adapted from Einstein's celebrated model, and issues of dynamical screening of electromagnetic radiation by the confining shell are discussed in connection with the Faraday cage produced by a confining conducting shell

  9. A Review of Quantum Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Connerade, Jean-Patrick

    2009-12-03

    A succinct history of the Confined Atom problem is presented. The hydrogen atom confined to the centre of an impenetrable sphere counts amongst the exactly soluble problems of physics, alongside much more noted exact solutions such as Black Body Radiation and the free Hydrogen atom in absence of any radiation field. It shares with them the disadvantage of being an idealisation, while at the same time encapsulating in a simple way particular aspects of physical reality. The problem was first formulated by Sommerfeld and Welker - henceforth cited as SW - in connection with the behaviour of atoms at very high pressures, and the solution was published on the occasion of Pauli's 60th birthday celebration. At the time, it seemed that there was not much other connection with physical reality beyond a few simple aspects connected to the properties of atoms in solids, for which more appropriate models were soon developed. Thus, confined atoms attracted little attention until the advent of the metallofullerene, which provided the first example of a confined atom with properties quite closely related to those originally considered by SW. Since then, the problem has received much more attention, and many more new features of quantum confinement, quantum compression, the quantum Faraday cage, electronic reorganisation, cavity resonances, etc have been described, which are relevant to real systems. Also, a number of other situations have been uncovered experimentally to which quantum confinement is relevant. Thus, studies of the confined atom are now more numerous, and have been extended both in terms of the models used and the systems to which they can be applied. Connections to thermodynamics are explored through the properties of a confined two-level atom adapted from Einstein's celebrated model, and issues of dynamical screening of electromagnetic radiation by the confining shell are discussed in connection with the Faraday cage produced by a confining conducting shell. The

  10. suPAR: The Molecular Crystal Ball

    PubMed Central

    Thunø, Maria; Macho, Betina; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    soluble urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (suPAR) levels reflect inflammation and elevated suPAR levels are found in several infectious diseases and cancer. suPAR exists in three forms; suPARI-III, suPARII-III and suPARI which show different properties due to structural differences. Studies suggest that full-length suPAR is a regulator of uPAR/uPA by acting as uPA-scavenger, whereas the cleaved suPARII-III act as a chemotactic agent promoting the immune response via the SRSRY sequence in the linker-region. This review focus on the various suPAR fragments and their involvement in inflammation and pathogenic processes. We focus on the molecular mechanisms of the suPAR fragments and the link to the inflammatory process, as this could lead to medical applications in infectious and pathological conditions. PMID:19893210

  11. PREFACE: Water in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovere, Mauro

    2004-11-01

    The study of water confined in complex systems in solid or gel phases and/or in contact with macromolecules is relevant to many important processes ranging from industrial applications such as catalysis and soil chemistry, to biological processes such as protein folding or ionic transport in membranes. Thermodynamics, phase behaviour and the molecular mobility of water have been observed to change upon confinement depending on the properties of the substrate. In particular, polar substrates perturb the hydrogen bond network of water, inducing large changes in the properties upon freezing. Understanding how the connected random hydrogen bond network of bulk water is modified when water is confined in small cavities inside a substrate material is very important for studies of stability and the enzymatic activity of proteins, oil recovery or heterogeneous catalysis, where water-substrate interactions play a fundamental role. The modifications of the short-range order in the liquid depend on the nature of the water-substrate interaction, hydrophilic or hydrophobic, as well as on its spatial range and on the geometry of the substrate. Despite extensive study, both experimentally and by computer simulation, there remain a number of open problems. In the many experimental studies of confined water, those performed on water in Vycor are of particular interest for computer simulation and theoretical studies since Vycor is a porous silica glass characterized by a quite sharp distribution of pore sizes and a strong capability to absorb water. It can be considered as a good candidate for studying the general behaviour of water in hydrophilic nanopores. But there there have been a number of studies of water confined in more complex substrates, where the interpretation of experiments and computer simulation is more difficult, such as in zeolites or in aerogels or in contact with membranes. Of the many problems to consider we can mention the study of supercooled water. It is

  12. Potential Ecological Effects of Contaminants in the Exposed Par Pond Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, M.H.; Wike, L.D.

    1996-08-01

    Sediment and small mammal samples were collected from the exposed sediments of Par Pond in early 1995, shortly before the reservoir was refilled after a 4-year drawdown. Sampling was confined to elevations between 58 and 61 meters (190 and 200 feet) above mean sea level, which includes the sediments likely to be exposed if the Par Pond water level is permitted to fluctuate naturally. Both soil and small mammal samples were analyzed for a number of radionuclides and metals. Some of the soil samples were also analyzed for organic contaminants. The objective of the study was to determine if contaminant levels in the Par Pond sediments were high enough to cause deleterious ecological effects.

  13. Impurity confinement and transport in high confinement regimes without edge localized modes on DIII-D [Impurity confinement and transport in high confinement regimes without ELMs on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Grierson, Brian A.; Burrell, Keith H.; Nazikian, Raffi M.; Solomon, Wayne M.; Garofalo, Andrea M.; Belli, Emily A.; Staebler, Gary M.; Fenstermacher, Max E.; McKee, George R.; Evans, Todd E.; Orlov, D. M.; Smith, S. P.; Chrobak, C.; Chrystal, C.

    2015-04-17

    Here, impurity transport in the DIII-D tokamak is investigated in stationary high confinement (H-mode) regimes without edge localized modes (ELMs). In plasmas maintained by resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) ELM-suppression and QH-mode the confinement time of fluorine (Z=9) is equivalent to that in ELMing discharges with 40 Hz ELMs. For selected discharges with impurity injection the impurity particle confinement time compared to the energy confinement time is in the range of τpe ≈ 2 $-$ 3. In QH-mode operation the impurity confinement time is shown to be smaller for intense, coherent magnetic and density fluctuations of the edge harmonic oscillation than weaker fluctuations. Transport coefficients are derived from the time evolution of the impurity density profile and compared to neoclassical and turbulent transport models NEO and TGLF. Neoclassical transport of fluorine is found to be small compared to the experimental values. In the ELMing and RMP ELM-suppressed plasma the impurity transport is affected by the presence of tearing modes. For radii larger than the mode radius the TGLF diffusion coefficient is smaller than the experimental value by a factor of 2-3, while the convective velocity is within error estimates. Low levels of diffusion are observed for radii smaller than the tearing mode radius. In the QH-mode plasma investigated, the TGLF diffusion coefficient higher inside of ρ = 0.4 and lower outside of 0.4 than the experiment, and the TGLF convective velocity is more negative by a factor of approximately 1.7.

  14. Impurity confinement and transport in high confinement regimes without edge localized modes on DIII-D [Impurity confinement and transport in high confinement regimes without ELMs on DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Grierson, Brian A.; Burrell, Keith H.; Nazikian, Raffi M.; ...

    2015-04-17

    Here, impurity transport in the DIII-D tokamak is investigated in stationary high confinement (H-mode) regimes without edge localized modes (ELMs). In plasmas maintained by resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) ELM-suppression and QH-mode the confinement time of fluorine (Z=9) is equivalent to that in ELMing discharges with 40 Hz ELMs. For selected discharges with impurity injection the impurity particle confinement time compared to the energy confinement time is in the range of τp/τe ≈ 2 $-$ 3. In QH-mode operation the impurity confinement time is shown to be smaller for intense, coherent magnetic and density fluctuations of the edge harmonic oscillation thanmore » weaker fluctuations. Transport coefficients are derived from the time evolution of the impurity density profile and compared to neoclassical and turbulent transport models NEO and TGLF. Neoclassical transport of fluorine is found to be small compared to the experimental values. In the ELMing and RMP ELM-suppressed plasma the impurity transport is affected by the presence of tearing modes. For radii larger than the mode radius the TGLF diffusion coefficient is smaller than the experimental value by a factor of 2-3, while the convective velocity is within error estimates. Low levels of diffusion are observed for radii smaller than the tearing mode radius. In the QH-mode plasma investigated, the TGLF diffusion coefficient higher inside of ρ = 0.4 and lower outside of 0.4 than the experiment, and the TGLF convective velocity is more negative by a factor of approximately 1.7.« less

  15. Confinement and power balance in the S-1 spheromak

    SciTech Connect

    Levinton, F.M.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Mayo, R.M.; Janos, A.C.; Ono, Y.; Ueda, Y.; Yamada, M.

    1989-07-01

    The confinement and scaling features of the S-1 spheromak have been investigated using magnetic, spectroscopic, and Thomson scattering data in conjunction with numerical modeling. Results from the multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic shows that the central beta remains constant (/beta//sub to/ /approximately/ 5%) as the plasma current density increases from 0.68--2.1 MA/m/sup 2/. The density is observed to increase slowly over this range, while the central electron temperature increases much more rapidly. Analysis of the global plasma parameters shows a decrease in the volume average beta and energy confinement as the total current is increased. The power balance has been modeled numerically with a 0-D non-equilibrium time-dependent coronal model and is consistent with the experimental observations. 20 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Scaling of energy confinement time in the Globus-M spherical tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurskiev, G. S.; Gusev, V. K.; Sakharov, N. V.; Bakharev, N. N.; Iblyaminova, A. D.; Shchegolev, P. B.; Avdeeva, G. F.; Kiselev, E. O.; Minaev, V. B.; Mukhin, E. E.; Patrov, M. I.; Petrov, Yu V.; Telnova, A. Yu; Tolstyakov, S. Yu

    2017-04-01

    The paper is devoted to an energy confinement study at the Globus-M spherical tokamak (ST). Experiments were performed in single null divertor configuration with elongation as high as 1.8–1.9 for variable plasma current and fixed toroidal magnetic field. The confinement time (τ E) dependence on density for ohmic-heated (OH) deuterium plasma is presented. It was found that τ E rises linearly with plasma current in H-mode with pure ohmic heating. Pronounced electron and ion heating was achieved in discharges with neutral beam injection at a moderate density level. The dependence of τ E on absorbed power was weak.

  17. Semiflexible chains in confined spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Greg; Thirumalai, D.

    2009-01-01

    We develop an analytical method for studying the properties of a noninteracting wormlike chain (WLC) in confined geometries. The mean-field-like theory replaces the rigid constraints of confinement with average constraints, thus allowing us to develop a tractable method for treating a WLC wrapped on the surface of a sphere, and fully encapsulated within it. The efficacy of the theory is established by reproducing the exact correlation functions for a WLC confined to the surface of a sphere. In addition, the coefficients in the free energy are exactly calculated. We also describe the behavior of a surface-confined chain under external tension that is relevant for single molecule experiments on histone-DNA complexes. The force-extension curves display spatial oscillations, and the extension of the chain, whose maximum value is bounded by the sphere diameter, scales as f-1 at large forces, in contrast to the unconfined chain that approaches the contour length as f-1/2 . A WLC encapsulated in a sphere, that is relevant for the study of the viral encapsulation of DNA, can also be treated using the mean-field approach. The predictions of the theory for various correlation functions are in excellent agreement with Langevin simulations. We find that strongly confined chains are highly structured by examining the correlations using a local winding axis. The predicted pressure of the system is in excellent agreement with simulations but, as is known, is significantly lower than the pressures seen for DNA packaged in viral capsids.

  18. Issues in tokamak/stellarator transport and confinement enhancement mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, F.W.

    1990-08-01

    At present, the mechanism for anomalous energy transport in low-{beta} toroidal plasmas -- tokamaks and stellarators -- remains unclear, although transport by turbulent E {times} B velocities associated with nonlinear, fine-scale microinstabilities is a leading candidate. This article discusses basic theoretical concepts of various transport and confinement enhancement mechanisms as well as experimental ramifications which would enable one to distinguish among them and hence identify a dominant transport mechanism. While many of the predictions of fine-scale turbulence are born out by experiment, notable contradictions exist. Projections of ignition margin rest both on the scaling properties of the confinement mechanism and on the criteria for entering enhanced confinement regimes. At present, the greatest uncertainties lie with the basis for scaling confinement enhancement criteria. A series of questions, to be answered by new experimental/theoretical work, is posed to resolve these outstanding contradictions (or refute the fine-scale turbulence model) and to establish confinement enhancement criteria. 73 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Density Limits in Toroidal Magnetic Confinement Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2001-10-01

    The density limit represents one of the fundamental operating boundaries for magnetic confinement devices - one with practical importance to the goal of fusion power. With fusion reactivity maximized at a plasma temperature on the order of 10 keV and a reaction rate scaling as n^2, an optimum density can be calculated which is not guaranteed to be achievable in any given device. Unlike operational limits for plasma current or pressure, the density limit cannot be explained by magneto-hydrodynamics alone. There is general agreement that the proximate cause for the disruptive limit in the tokamak is cooling of the plasma edge and subsequent current profile shrinkage. The edge cooling may be dominated by atomic physics processes or as suggested in recent experiments, by anomalous transport. A similar picture is emerging for the reversed field pinch (RFP), while the limit in stellarators is apparently due to loss of thermal equilibrium from radiation. Empirical scaling laws in which the maximum plasma density is proportional to the average current density have been fairly successful in predicting the limit for subsequent experiments. Surprisingly, the density limits found in tokamaks and RFPs are virtually identical. Currentless stellarators reach similar density limits, though the expression needs to be recast in terms of the rotational transform. While scaling laws have done a reasonable job in describing data from many recent experiments, they can only give hints at the underlying physics. Understanding the mechanism for the density limit is crucial for extrapolating machine performance into untested regimes and so far, a completely satisfactory theory has not emerged. It seems likely that robust, reliable predictions will only come from the development of a first-principles theory backed up by detailed experimental observations. The extensive work already accomplished and reviewed here should provide a solid basis for such development.

  20. Inertial Confinement Fusion Research at LOS Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batha, S. H.; Albright, B. J.; Alexander, D. J.; Barnes, Cris W.; Bradley, P. A.; Cobble, J. A.; Cooley, J. C.; Cooley, J. H.; Day, R. D.; DeFriend, K. A.; Delamater, N. D.; Dodd, E. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Fernandez, J. C.; Flippo, K. A.; Grim, G. P.; Goldman, S. R.; Greenfield, S. R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hoffman, N. M.; Holmes, R. L.; Johnson, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Lanier, N. E.; Loomis, E.; Lopez, F. E.; Luo, S.; Mack, J. M.; Magelssen, G. R.; Montgomery, D. S.; Nobile, A.; Oertel, J. A.; Reardon, P.; Rose, H. A.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitt, M. J.; Seifter, A.; Shimada, T.; Swift, D. C.; Tierney, T. E.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Wilke, M. D.; Wilson, D. C.; Workman, J.; Yin, L.

    2009-07-01

    Inertial confinement fusion research at Los Alamos National Laboratory is focused on high-leverage areas of thermonuclear ignition to which LANL can apply its historic strengths and that are complementary to high-energy-density-physics topics. Using the Trident and Omega laser facilities, experiments are pursued in laser-plasma instabilities, symmetry, Be technologies, neutron and fusion-product diagnostics, and defect hydrodynamics.

  1. System and method of operating toroidal magnetic confinement devices

    DOEpatents

    Chance, Morrell S.; Jardin, Stephen C.; Stix, Thomas H.; Grimm, deceased, Ray C.; Manickam, Janardhan; Okabayashi, Michio

    1987-01-01

    For toroidal magnetic confinement devices the second region of stability against ballooning modes can be accessed with controlled operation. Under certain modes of operation, the first and second stability regions may be joined together. Accessing the second region of stability is accomplished by forming a bean-shaped plasma and increasing the indentation until a critical value of indentation is reached. A pusher coil, located at the inner-major-radius side of the device, is engaged to form a bean-shaped poloidal cross-section in the plasma.

  2. Multibeam Stimulated Raman Scattering in Inertial Confinement Fusion Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, P.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Milovich, J. L.; Hohenberger, M.; Jones, O. S.; Hopkins, L. Berzak; Berger, R. L.; Kruer, W. L.; Moody, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering from multiple laser beams arranged in a cone sharing a common daughter wave is investigated for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions in a inhomogeneous plasma. It is found that the shared electron plasma wave (EPW) process, where the lasers collectively drive the same EPW, can lead to an absolute instability when the electron density reaches a matching condition dependent on the cone angle of the laser beams. This mechanism could explain recent experimental observations of hot electrons at early times in ICF experiments, at densities well below quarter critical when two plasmon decay is not expected to occur.

  3. Multibeam Stimulated Raman Scattering in Inertial Confinement Fusion Conditions.

    PubMed

    Michel, P; Divol, L; Dewald, E L; Milovich, J L; Hohenberger, M; Jones, O S; Hopkins, L Berzak; Berger, R L; Kruer, W L; Moody, J D

    2015-07-31

    Stimulated Raman scattering from multiple laser beams arranged in a cone sharing a common daughter wave is investigated for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions in a inhomogeneous plasma. It is found that the shared electron plasma wave (EPW) process, where the lasers collectively drive the same EPW, can lead to an absolute instability when the electron density reaches a matching condition dependent on the cone angle of the laser beams. This mechanism could explain recent experimental observations of hot electrons at early times in ICF experiments, at densities well below quarter critical when two plasmon decay is not expected to occur.

  4. Nanoscopic Cellular Imaging: Confinement Broadens Understanding.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephen A; Ponjavic, Aleks; Siv, Chanrith; Lee, Steven F; Biteen, Julie S

    2016-09-27

    In recent years, single-molecule fluorescence imaging has been reconciling a fundamental mismatch between optical microscopy and subcellular biophysics. However, the next step in nanoscale imaging in living cells can be accessed only by optical excitation confinement geometries. Here, we review three methods of confinement that can enable nanoscale imaging in living cells: excitation confinement by laser illumination with beam shaping; physical confinement by micron-scale geometries in bacterial cells; and nanoscale confinement by nanophotonics.

  5. Radiation reaction in fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Hazeltine, R D; Mahajan, S M

    2004-10-01

    The effects of a radiation reaction on thermal electrons in a magnetically confined plasma, with parameters typical of planned burning plasma experiments, are studied. A fully relativistic kinetic equation that includes the radiation reaction is derived. The associated rate of phase-space contraction is computed and the relative importance of the radiation reaction in phase space is estimated. A consideration of the moments of the radiation reaction force show that its effects are typically small in reactor-grade confined plasmas, but not necessarily insignificant.

  6. Acoustic confinement in superlattice cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sanchez, Daniel; Déleglise, Samuel; Thomas, Jean-Louis; Atkinson, Paola; Lagoin, Camille; Perrin, Bernard

    2016-09-01

    The large coupling rate between the acoustic and optical fields confined in GaAs/AlAs superlattice cavities makes them appealing systems for cavity optomechanics. We have developed a mathematical model based on the scattering matrix that allows the acoustic guided modes to be predicted in nano and micropillar superlattice cavities. We demonstrate here that the reflection at the surface boundary considerably modifies the acoustic quality factor and leads to significant confinement at the micropillar center. Our mathematical model also predicts unprecedented acoustic Fano resonances on nanopillars featuring small mode volumes and very high mechanical quality factors, making them attractive systems for optomechanical applications.

  7. Étude des modifications structurales de l'eau confinée dans le gel de silice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouzri, A.; Dorbez-Sridi, R.; Oumezzine, M.

    2004-11-01

    Les modifications structurales de l'eau confinée dans le gel de silice en poudre en fonction du taux d'hydratation sont étudiées par calorimétrie différentielle à balayage et par diffusion des rayons X. L'analyse thermique par DSC a permis de montrer que pour les faibles taux d'hydratation (≤ 50%) l'eau est complètement confinée dans les pores alors que pour les forts taux d'hydratation (>50%) l'eau se trouve aussi bien dans les pores qu'autour des grains de la silice. L'apparition de la glace cubique lors du refroidissement de l'eau confinée dans le gel de silice prouve que l'interaction eau-silice ne peut être négligée lors de la détermination du signal de l'eau. L'extraction du signal, diffusé uniquement par l'eau confinée, à partir des intensités diffusées par le gel de silice à deux taux d'hydratation distincts, révèle dans les fonctions de corrélation de paire un pic à 3.7Å qui ne peut être attribué qu'à une corrélation oxygène-oxygène inexistante dans l'eau massique et résultant de la déformation du réseau tétraédrique des molécules d'eau sous l'effet du confinement et de la proximité d'une surface.

  8. Computations in Plasma Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Bruce I.; Killeen, John

    1983-01-01

    Discusses contributions of computers to research in magnetic and inertial-confinement fusion, charged-particle-beam propogation, and space sciences. Considers use in design/control of laboratory and spacecraft experiments and in data acquisition; and reviews major plasma computational methods and some of the important physics problems they…

  9. Building solids inside nano-space: from confined amorphous through confined solvate to confined 'metastable' polymorph.

    PubMed

    Nartowski, K P; Tedder, J; Braun, D E; Fábián, L; Khimyak, Y Z

    2015-10-14

    The nanocrystallisation of complex molecules inside mesoporous hosts and control over the resulting structure is a significant challenge. To date the largest organic molecule crystallised inside the nano-pores is a known pharmaceutical intermediate - ROY (259.3 g mol(-1)). In this work we demonstrate smart manipulation of the phase of a larger confined pharmaceutical - indomethacin (IMC, 357.8 g mol(-1)), a substance with known conformational flexibility and complex polymorphic behaviour. We show the detailed structural analysis and the control of solid state transformations of encapsulated molecules inside the pores of mesoscopic cellular foam (MCF, pore size ca. 29 nm) and controlled pore glass (CPG, pore size ca. 55 nm). Starting from confined amorphous IMC we drive crystallisation into a confined methanol solvate, which upon vacuum drying leads to the stabilised rare form V of IMC inside the MCF host. In contrast to the pure form, encapsulated form V does not transform into a more stable polymorph upon heating. The size of the constraining pores and the drug concentration within the pores determine whether the amorphous state of the drug is stabilised or it recrystallises into confined nanocrystals. The work presents, in a critical manner, an application of complementary techniques (DSC, PXRD, solid-state NMR, N2 adsorption) to confirm unambiguously the phase transitions under confinement and offers a comprehensive strategy towards the formation and control of nano-crystalline encapsulated organic solids.

  10. Plasma Control in Symmetric Mirror Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W.; Rowan, W. L.; Alvarado, Igor; Fu, X. R.; Beklemishev, A. D.

    2014-10-01

    Plasma confinement in the symmetric rotating mirror plasma at the Budker Institute shows enhanced confinement with high electron temperatures with end plates biasing. Improved confinement is achieved by biasing end plate cells in the expansion tanks so as to achieve an inward pointing radial electric field. The negative potential well produces vortex plasma rotation similar to that in the negative potential well of Ohmic heated tokamaks. This plasma state has similarity with the lower turbulence level regimes documented in the Helimak where negative biasing of the end plates produces an inward radial electric field. To understand this vortex confinement we carry out 3D simulations with nonlinear partial differential equations for the electric potential and density in plasmas with an axially localized region of unfavorable and favorable magnetic curvature. The simulations show that the plasma density rapidly adjusts to be higher in the region of favorable curvature regions and remains relatively well confined while rapidly rotating. The results support the concept of using plasma-biasing electrodes in large expander tanks to achieve enhanced mirror plasma confinement. Supported by US-DoE grant to UT, LANL and the Budker Institute for Nuclear Physics.

  11. Confinement and lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M

    1980-06-01

    The motivation for formulating gauge theories on a lattice to study non-perturbative phenomena is reviewed, and recent progress supporting the compatibility of asymptotic freedom and quark confinement in the standard SU(3) Yang-Mills theory of the strong interaction is discussed.

  12. Permit-Required Confined Spaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Permit-Required Confined Spaces U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA 3138 1998 (Revised) Report Documentation...Department of Labor Occupational Safety & Health Administration 200 Constitution Avenue Washington, DC 20210 Performing Organization Report Number OSHA 3138...determine compliance responsibili- ties, which are set forth in OSHA standards themselves and the Occupational Safety and Health Act. Moreover, because

  13. Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) review

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, D.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Novick, B.; Panofsky, W.; Rosenbluth, M.; Treiman, S.; York, H.

    1996-03-01

    During its 1996 winter study JASON reviewed the DOE Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. This included the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and proposed studies. The result of the review was to comment on the role of the ICF program in support of the DOE Science Based Stockpile Stewardship program.

  14. Dynamical conductivity of confined water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemov, V. G.

    2017-01-01

    The electrodynamic response of water confined in nanoporous MCM-41 is measured in the frequency range 1 MHz-3 THz at room temperature. The results are analyzed in the context of a recently proposed ionic model of water. We found an increase in dc-conductivity of confined water by 3 orders of magnitude (3.3 · 10-3 Ω-1 · m-1) compared to bulk water (5.5 · 10-6 Ω-1 · m-1). This is attributed to the increase of H3O+ and OH- ion mobility, due to a decrease of the effective potential amplitude by walls of the confining environment. We found that the absorption in the microwave frequency range is much smaller in the medium with confined water than in the bulk water, and the quadratic dependence of the conductivity (σ) on frequency (ω) becomes less steep and tends to σ ~ ω. The results are of fundamental importance and can be used for understanding of the proton transport in systems with water in the nanoconfined state.

  15. Monomer–dimer dynamics and distribution of GPI-anchored uPAR are determined by cell surface protein assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Caiolfa, Valeria R.; Zamai, Moreno; Malengo, Gabriele; Andolfo, Annapaola; Madsen, Chris D.; Sutin, Jason; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Blasi, Francesco; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2007-01-01

    To search for functional links between glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) protein monomer–oligomer exchange and membrane dynamics and confinement, we studied urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) receptor (uPAR), a GPI receptor involved in the regulation of cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Using a functionally active fluorescent protein–uPAR in live cells, we analyzed the effect that extracellular matrix proteins and uPAR ligands have on uPAR dynamics and dimerization at the cell membrane. Vitronectin directs the recruitment of dimers and slows down the diffusion of the receptors at the basal membrane. The commitment to uPA–plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1–mediated endocytosis and recycling modifies uPAR diffusion and induces an exchange between uPAR monomers and dimers. This exchange is fully reversible. The data demonstrate that cell surface protein assemblies are important in regulating the dynamics and localization of uPAR at the cell membrane and the exchange of monomers and dimers. These results also provide a strong rationale for dynamic studies of GPI-anchored molecules in live cells at steady state and in the absence of cross-linker/clustering agents. PMID:18056417

  16. Microscopie en champ proche par réflexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spajer, M.; Courjon, D.; Sarayeddine, K.; Jalocha, A.; Vigoureux, J.-M.

    1991-01-01

    This communication presents two techniques for high resolution surface analysis. In the first one, the illumination beam is totally reflected under the object surface, which must be transparent. The evanescent wave confined on the surface is frustrated locally by a dielectric probe of nanometric dimension which scans the objetc. A horizontal resolution of 10 nm and a vertical one of 1 nm have been obtained. In the second one, more adapted to metallic objects, the surface is illuminated by the near-field of the stylus, in which the reflected beam is Partially launched. First results dealing with the characterization of the dielectric stylus are presented. Cette communication présente deux techniques permettant l'analyse de surface haute résolution. Dans la première, le faisceau d'éclairage est réfléchi totalement sous la surface de l'objet, nécessairement transparent. L'onde évanescente qui l'accompagne est frustrée localement par une pointe diélectrique de dimension nanométrique balayant la surface. Une résolution de 10 nm horizontalement et de 1nm verticalement a été obtenue. Dans la seconde, qui permet d'étudier un objet opaque, celui-ci est éclairé par le champ proche émis par la pointe, dans laquelle le faisceau réfléchi est partiellement réinjecté. Les premiers résultats concernant la caractérisation de la pointe sont présentés.

  17. PAR for the Course: A Congruent Pedagogical Approach for a PAR Methods Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Joyce D.; Hicks, Maria; Kalman, Rowenn; Miller, Jason

    2005-01-01

    In the past two years, three graduate students and a senior faculty member have co-taught a participatory action research (PAR) course to undergraduate and graduate students. In this article the co-teachers advocate a set of pedagogical principles and practices in a PAR-oriented classroom that establishes congruency with community PAR projects in…

  18. New results on structure of low beta confinement Polywell cusps simulated by comsol multiphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavipour, B.; Salar Elahi, A.

    The Inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) is one of the ways for fusion approaches. It is one of the various methods which can be used to confine hot fusion plasma. The advantage of IEC is that the IEC experiments could be done in smaller size facilities than ITER or NIF, costing less money and moving forward faster. In IEC fusion, we need to trap adequate electrons to confine the desired ion density which is needed for a fusion reactor. Polywell is a device which uses the magnetic cusp system and traps the required amount of electrons for fusion reactions. The purpose of this device is to create a virtual cathode in order to achieve nuclear fusion using inertial electrostatic confinement (Miley and Krupakar Murali, 2014). In this paper, we have simulated the low beta Polywell. Then, we examined the effects of coil spacing, coils current, electron injection energy on confinement time.

  19. Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report, January--March 1995. Volume 5, No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The ICF quarterly report is published by the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics included this quarter include: the role of the National Ignition Facility in the development of Inertial Confinement Fusion, laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums, evolution of solid-state induction modulators for a heavy-ion recirculator, the National Ignition Facility project, and terminal-level relaxation in Nd-doped laser material.

  20. Par Pond vegetation status Summer 1995 -- Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Riley, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the newly emergent, shoreline aquatic plant communities of Par Pond began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level. These surveys continued in July, September, and late October, 1995. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown, Par Pond aquatic plant communities are becoming re-established. Emergent beds of maidencane, lotus, waterlily, and watershield are extensive and well developed. Cattail occurrence continued to increase during the summer, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the drawdown have not formed. Estimates from SPOT HRV, remote sensing satellite data indicated that as much as 120 hectares of emergent wetlands vegetation may have been present along the Par Pond shoreline by early October, 1995. To track the continued development of macrophytes in Par Pond, future surveys throughout 1996 and 1997, along with the continued evaluation of satellite data to map the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned.

  1. Simultaneous confinement of low-energy electrons and positrons in a compact magnetic mirror trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higaki, H.; Kaga, C.; Fukushima, K.; Okamoto, H.; Nagata, Y.; Kanai, Y.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2017-02-01

    More than 107 electrons and 105 positrons with energy less than a few eV were confined simultaneously for the first time in a compact magnetic mirror trap with plugging potentials. The exponential decay time constant of the confined positrons exceeded 70 ms at the beginning of the simultaneous confinement. Particle simulations in the early stages of the mixing process were also conducted. The results obtained in the experiments and simulations suggested that an improved setup would make it possible to investigate the unexplored field of low-energy electron–positron plasmas experimentally.

  2. Magnetic confinement experiment -- 1: Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Goldston, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    This report reviews presentations made at the 15th IAEA Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion on experimental tokamak physics, particularly on advances in core plasma physics, divertor and edge physics, heating and current drive, and tokamak concept optimization.

  3. Self-organized confinement by magnetic dipole: recent results from RT-1 and theoretical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Z.; Saitoh, H.; Yano, Y.; Mikami, H.; Kasaoka, N.; Sakamoto, W.; Morikawa, J.; Furukawa, M.; Mahajan, S. M.

    2013-01-01

    Inhomogeneous magnetic field gives rise to interesting properties of plasmas which are degenerate in homogeneous (or zero) magnetic fields. Magnetospheric plasmas, as observed commonly in the Universe, are the most simple, natural realization of strongly inhomogeneous structures created spontaneously in the vicinity of magnetic dipoles. The RT-1 device produces a ‘laboratory magnetosphere’ by which stable confinement (particle and energy confinement times ˜0.5 s) of high-β (local electron β ˜ 0.7 electron temperature ≳10 keV) plasma is achieved. By producing a pure-electron plasma, we obtain clear-cut evidence of inward (or up-hill) diffusion of particles. A statistical mechanical model reveals the ‘distortion’ of phase space, induced by the inhomogeneity of the ambient magnetic field, on which the plasma relaxes into an equilibrium with inhomogeneous density while it maximizes the entropy.

  4. Sensitization of TRPA1 by PAR2 contributes to the sensation of inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yi; Wang, Shenglan; Tominaga, Makoto; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Fukuoka, Tetsuo; Higashi, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Kimiko; Obata, Koichi; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Noguchi, Koichi

    2007-07-01

    Proinflammatory agents trypsin and mast cell tryptase cleave and activate PAR2, which is expressed on sensory nerves to cause neurogenic inflammation. Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) is an excitatory ion channel on primary sensory nerves of pain pathway. Here, we show that a functional interaction of PAR2 and TRPA1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons could contribute to the sensation of inflammatory pain. Frequent colocalization of TRPA1 with PAR2 was found in rat DRG neurons. PAR2 activation increased the TRPA1 currents evoked by its agonists in HEK293 cells transfected with TRPA1, as well as DRG neurons. Application of phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitors or phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) suppressed this potentiation. Decrease of plasma membrane PIP(2) levels through antibody sequestration or PLC-mediated hydrolysis mimicked the potentiating effects of PAR2 activation at the cellular level. Thus, the increased TRPA1 sensitivity may have been due to activation of PLC, which releases the inhibition of TRPA1 from plasma membrane PIP(2). These results identify for the first time to our knowledge a sensitization mechanism of TRPA1 and a novel mechanism through which trypsin or tryptase released in response to tissue inflammation might trigger the sensation of pain by TRPA1 activation.

  5. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems.

  6. Theory of rheology in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerov, Artem A.; Krüger, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    The viscosity of fluids is generally understood in terms of kinetic mechanisms, i.e., particle collisions, or thermodynamic ones as imposed through structural distortions upon, e.g., applying shear. Often the latter are more relevant, which allows a simpler theoretical description, and, e.g., (damped) Brownian particles can be considered good fluid model systems. We formulate a general theoretical approach for rheology in confinement, based on microscopic equations of motion and classical density functional theory. Specifically, we discuss the viscosity for the case of two parallel walls in relative motion as a function of the wall-to-wall distance, analyzing its relation to the slip length found for a single wall. The previously observed [A. A. Aerov and M. Krüger, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 094701 (2014)., 10.1063/1.4866450] deficiency of inhomogeneous (unphysical) stresses under naive application of shear in confinement is healed when hydrodynamic interactions are included.

  7. Theory of rheology in confinement.

    PubMed

    Aerov, Artem A; Krüger, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    The viscosity of fluids is generally understood in terms of kinetic mechanisms, i.e., particle collisions, or thermodynamic ones as imposed through structural distortions upon, e.g., applying shear. Often the latter are more relevant, which allows a simpler theoretical description, and, e.g., (damped) Brownian particles can be considered good fluid model systems. We formulate a general theoretical approach for rheology in confinement, based on microscopic equations of motion and classical density functional theory. Specifically, we discuss the viscosity for the case of two parallel walls in relative motion as a function of the wall-to-wall distance, analyzing its relation to the slip length found for a single wall. The previously observed [A. A. Aerov and M. Krüger, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 094701 (2014).] deficiency of inhomogeneous (unphysical) stresses under naive application of shear in confinement is healed when hydrodynamic interactions are included.

  8. Confined aquifers as viral reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Renee J; Jeffries, Thomas C; Roudnew, Ben; Seymour, Justin R; Fitch, Alison J; Simons, Keryn L; Speck, Peter G; Newton, Kelly; Brown, Melissa H; Mitchell, James G

    2013-10-01

    Knowledge about viral diversity and abundance in deep groundwater reserves is limited. We found that the viral community inhabiting a deep confined aquifer in South Australia was more similar to reclaimed water communities than to the viral communities in the overlying unconfined aquifer community. This similarity was driven by high relative occurrence of the single-stranded DNA viral groups Circoviridae, Geminiviridae and Microviridae, which include many known plant and animal pathogens. These groups were present in a 1500-year-old water situated 80 m below the surface, which suggests the potential for long-term survival and spread of potentially pathogenic viruses in deep, confined groundwater. Obtaining a broader understanding of potentially pathogenic viral communities within aquifers is particularly important given the ability of viruses to spread within groundwater ecosystems.

  9. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-05

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems.

  10. Reentry confined to the atrioventricular node: electrophysiologic and anatomic findings.

    PubMed

    Sheinman, M M; Gonzalez, R; Thomas, A; Ullyot, D; Bharati, S; Lev, M

    1982-05-01

    A patient with recurrent disabling, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia refractory to drug treatment underwent electrophysiologic studies. The paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia was found to be due to atrioventricular (A-V) nodal reentry. The patient died shortly after surgical His bundle section and detailed anatomic studies were performed. These showed fatty infiltration of the approaches to the sinoatrial node, atrial preferential pathways, and A-V node and common bundle. The A-V node was mechanically damaged and the common His bundle was completely severed. These abnormalities were clearly delineated and there was no evidence of an atrio-His bundle bypass tract to an accessory A-V node. Specifically, the central fibrous body and pars membranacea were defined and no atrial muscular fibers pierced these structures to joint the A-V bundle. It is concluded that paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia due to A-V nodal reentry can be confined to the A-V node.

  11. The Plasma Physics of Processing Discharges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-28

    Karachevtsev, Ref. 6, Chapter 12 82 52. H. Furth, J Killeen, and M Rosenbluth, Physics Fluids, 6, 459, (1963) 53. W. Manheimer and C. Lashmore - Davies, MHD and Microinstabilities in Confined Plasmas, Adam Hilger, (1989) 83

  12. Ion beam inertial confinement target

    DOEpatents

    Bangerter, Roger O.; Meeker, Donald J.

    1985-01-01

    A target for implosion by ion beams composed of a spherical shell of frozen DT surrounded by a low-density, low-Z pusher shell seeded with high-Z material, and a high-density tamper shell. The target has various applications in the inertial confinement technology. For certain applications, if desired, a low-density absorber shell may be positioned intermediate the pusher and tamper shells.

  13. Inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1981-11-16

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques have been devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

  14. Interfacial electrofluidics in confined systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Biao; Groenewold, Jan; Zhou, Min; Hayes, Robert A.; Zhou, Guofu (G. F.)

    2016-05-01

    Electrofluidics is a versatile principle that can be used for high speed actuation of liquid interfaces. In most of the applications, the fundamental mechanism of electro-capillary instability plays a crucial role, yet it’s potential richness in confined fluidic layers has not been well addressed. Electrofluidic displays which are comprised of thin pixelated colored films in a range of architectures are excellent systems for studying such phenomena. In this study we show theoretically and experimentally that confinement leads to the generation of a cascade of voltage dependent modes as a result of the electro-capillary instability. In the course of reconciling theory with our experimental data we have observed a number of previously unreported phenomena such as a significant induction time (several milliseconds) prior to film rupture as well as a rupture location not corresponding to the minimum electric field strength in the case of the standard convex water/oil interface used in working devices. These findings are broadly applicable to a wide range of switchable electrofluidic applications and devices having confined liquid films.

  15. Interfacial electrofluidics in confined systems

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Biao; Groenewold, Jan; Zhou, Min; Hayes, Robert A.; Zhou, Guofu (G.F.)

    2016-01-01

    Electrofluidics is a versatile principle that can be used for high speed actuation of liquid interfaces. In most of the applications, the fundamental mechanism of electro-capillary instability plays a crucial role, yet it’s potential richness in confined fluidic layers has not been well addressed. Electrofluidic displays which are comprised of thin pixelated colored films in a range of architectures are excellent systems for studying such phenomena. In this study we show theoretically and experimentally that confinement leads to the generation of a cascade of voltage dependent modes as a result of the electro-capillary instability. In the course of reconciling theory with our experimental data we have observed a number of previously unreported phenomena such as a significant induction time (several milliseconds) prior to film rupture as well as a rupture location not corresponding to the minimum electric field strength in the case of the standard convex water/oil interface used in working devices. These findings are broadly applicable to a wide range of switchable electrofluidic applications and devices having confined liquid films. PMID:27221211

  16. Holographic confinement in inhomogeneous backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marolf, Donald; Wien, Jason

    2016-08-01

    As noted by Witten, compactifying a d-dimensional holographic CFT on an S 1 gives a class of ( d - 1)-dimensional confining theories with gravity duals. The proto-typical bulk solution dual to the ground state is a double Wick rotation of the AdS d+1 Schwarzschild black hole known as the AdS soliton. We generalize such examples by allowing slow variations in the size of the S 1, and thus in the confinement scale. Coefficients governing the second order response of the system are computed for 3 ≤ d ≤ 8 using a derivative expansion closely related to the fluid-gravity correspondence. The primary physical results are that i) gauge-theory flux tubes tend to align orthogonal to gradients and along the eigenvector of the Hessian with the lowest eigenvalue, ii) flux tubes aligned orthogonal to gradients are attracted to gradients for d ≤ 6 but repelled by gradients for d ≥ 7, iii) flux tubes are repelled by regions where the second derivative along the tube is large and positive but are attracted to regions where the eigenvalues of the Hessian are large and positive in directions orthogonal to the tube, and iv) for d > 3, inhomogeneities act to raise the total energy of the confining vacuum above its zeroth order value.

  17. Nanoparticle Order through Entropic Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ren; Lee, Bongjoon; Stafford, Christopher; Douglas, Jack; Bockstaller, Michael; Karim, Alamgir

    As has been addressed in colloidal science, visual order transitions can be achieved with entropy contributions alone. Herein, entropy-driven ordering of nanoparticle (NP) structures is generated where entropy increase and visual order are achieved simultaneously. We study an ``athermal'' NP-polymer blends where NPs are densely grafted with polymer brush of the same chemical composition as the polymer matrix. Visual order of the NPs is induced by geometrically confining the thin film blends with meso-scale topographic patterns. When the residual layer thickness of the patterned blend films approaches the nanoparticle dimension, exclusive segregation of NPs to less confining imprinted mesa region occurs. This preferential segregation of NPs, defined by partition coefficient K = 0, is attributed to purely entropic penalty, where K denotes the particle density ratio at highly confined residual layer to that at mesa region. We further demonstrate K is fully tunable and even invertible with increasing matrix chain dimension. The associated entropic free energy change (ΔF = - ln K) is calculated to explain NP segregation preference. Accordingly, variation of residual layer thickness and polymer matrix molecule size can both affect NP distribution among patterned thick and thin regions.

  18. Transitions Out of High-Confinement Mode to Lower Confinement Regimes in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldon, David

    A high-resolution edge Thomson Scattering (TS) system was developed and installed on the DIII-D tokamak, and was then used to study the back transition from High Confinement (H-mode) to Low Confinement (L-mode) in DIII-D. The transient event seen to initiate some back transition sequences is superficially similar to a large type-I ELM, which is described by the linear ideal MHD theory of peeling-ballooning modes. Detailed edge pedestal profile evolution studies during the back transition show that the plasma does not exceed this linear stability limit during the back transition, indicating that the transient is not a type-I ELM event. The E x B shearing rate oE x B and turbulence decorrelation rate oT were then compared before the H-L sequence. The results show that the back transition sequence begins while oE x B is still well above oT, indicating that the sequences observed in these experiments are not triggered by the collapse of the E x B shear layer. Further investigation is made to characterize a coherent density fluctuation whose behavior is linked to back transition sequences. Strategies for avoiding the transient are tested and a reliable method for producing a "soft'' back transition is identified. Such cases are compared to the class of "hard'' transitions in which the pedestal pressure gradient rapidly relaxes.

  19. Production of field-reversed mirror plasma with a coaxial plasma gun

    DOEpatents

    Hartman, Charles W.; Shearer, James W.

    1982-01-01

    The use of a coaxial plasma gun to produce a plasma ring which is directed into a magnetic field so as to form a field-reversed plasma confined in a magnetic mirror. Plasma thus produced may be used as a target for subsequent neutral beam injection or other similarly produced and projected plasma rings or for direct fusion energy release in a pulsed mode.

  20. Production of field-reversed mirror plasma with a coaxial plasma gun

    DOEpatents

    Hartman, C.W.; Shearer, J.W.

    The use of a coaxial plasma gun to produce a plasma ring which is directed into a magnetic field so as to form a field-reversed plasma confined in a magnetic mirror. Plasma thus produced may be used as a target for subsequent neutral beam injection or other similarly produced and projected plasma rings or for direct fusion energy release in a pulsed mode.